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Sample records for rate dependent deformation

  1. Localization in inelastic rate dependent shearing deformations

    KAUST Repository

    Katsaounis, Theodoros

    2016-09-04

    Metals deformed at high strain rates can exhibit failure through formation of shear bands, a phenomenon often attributed to Hadamard instability and localization of the strain into an emerging coherent structure. We verify formation of shear bands for a nonlinear model exhibiting strain softening and strain rate sensitivity. The effects of strain softening and strain rate sensitivity are first assessed by linearized analysis, indicating that the combined effect leads to Turing instability. For the nonlinear model a class of self-similar solutions is constructed, that depicts a coherent localizing structure and the formation of a shear band. This solution is associated to a heteroclinic orbit of a dynamical system. The orbit is constructed numerically and yields explicit shear localizing solutions. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  2. Rate Dependent Deformation and Strength Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    A research program is being undertaken to develop rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composite materials. In previous work in this program, strain-rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations used to analyze polymers have been implemented into a mechanics of materials based composite micromechanics method. In the current work, modifications to the micromechanics model have been implemented to improve the calculation of the effective inelastic strain. Additionally, modifications to the polymer constitutive model are discussed in which pressure dependence is incorporated into the equations in order to improve the calculation of constituent and composite shear stresses. The Hashin failure criterion is implemented into the analysis method to allow for the calculation of ply level failure stresses. The deformation response and failure stresses for two representative uniaxial polymer matrix composites, IM7/977-2 and AS4-PEEK, are predicted for varying strain rates and fiber orientations. The predicted results compare favorably to experimentally obtained values.

  3. Rate-dependent deformation of rocks in the brittle regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, P.; Brantut, N.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.

    2013-12-01

    Rate-dependent brittle deformation of rocks, a phenomenon relevant for long-term interseismic phases of deformation, is poorly understood quantitatively. Rate-dependence can arise from chemically-activated, subcritical crack growth, which is known to occur in the presence of aqueous fluids. Here we attempt to establish quantitative links between this small scale process and its macroscopic manifestations. We performed a series of brittle deformation experiments in porous sandstones, in creep (constant stress) and constant strain rate conditions, in order to investigate the relationship between their short- and long-term mechanical behaviors. Elastic wave velocities measurements indicate that the amount of microcracking follows the amount of inelastic strain in a trend which does not depend upon the timescale involved. The comparison of stress-strain curves between constant strain rate and creep tests allows us to define a stress difference between the two, which can be viewed as a difference in energy release rate. We empirically show that the creep strain rates are proportional to an exponential function of this stress difference. We then establish a general method to estimate empirical micromechanical functions relating the applied stresses to mode I stress intensity factors at microcrack tips, and we determine the relationship between creep strain rates and stress intensity factors in our sandstone creep experiments. We finally provide an estimate of the sub-critical crack growth law parameters, and find that they match -within the experimental errors and approximations of the method- the typical values observed in independent single crack tests. Our approach provides a comprehensive and unifying explanation for the origin and the macroscopic manifestation of time-dependent brittle deformation in brittle rocks.

  4. Nonlinearity and Strain-Rate Dependence in the Deformation Response of Polymer Matrix Composites Modeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2000-01-01

    There has been no accurate procedure for modeling the high-speed impact of composite materials, but such an analytical capability will be required in designing reliable lightweight engine-containment systems. The majority of the models in use assume a linear elastic material response that does not vary with strain rate. However, for containment systems, polymer matrix composites incorporating ductile polymers are likely to be used. For such a material, the deformation response is likely to be nonlinear and to vary with strain rate. An analytical model has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field that incorporates both of these features. A set of constitutive equations that was originally developed to analyze the viscoplastic deformation of metals (Ramaswamy-Stouffer equations) was modified to simulate the nonlinear, rate-dependent deformation of polymers. Specifically, the effects of hydrostatic stresses on the inelastic response, which can be significant in polymers, were accounted for by a modification of the definition of the effective stress. The constitutive equations were then incorporated into a composite micromechanics model based on the mechanics of materials theory. This theory predicts the deformation response of a composite material from the properties and behavior of the individual constituents. In this manner, the nonlinear, rate-dependent deformation response of a polymer matrix composite can be predicted.

  5. The instantaneous rate dependence in low temperature laboratory rock friction and rock deformation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.; Kronenberg, A.K.; Reinen, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    Earthquake occurrence probabilities that account for stress transfer and time-dependent failure depend on the product of the effective normal stress and a lab-derived dimensionless coefficient a. This coefficient describes the instantaneous dependence of fault strength on deformation rate, and determines the duration of precursory slip. Although an instantaneous rate dependence is observed for fracture, friction, crack growth, and low temperature plasticity in laboratory experiments, the physical origin of this effect during earthquake faulting is obscure. We examine this rate dependence in laboratory experiments on different rock types using a normalization scheme modified from one proposed by Tullis and Weeks [1987]. We compare the instantaneous rate dependence in rock friction with rate dependence measurements from higher temperature dislocation glide experiments. The same normalization scheme is used to compare rate dependence in friction to rock fracture and to low-temperature crack growth tests. For particular weak phyllosilicate minerals, the instantaneous friction rate dependence is consistent with dislocation glide. In intact rock failure tests, for each rock type considered, the instantaneous rate dependence is the same size as for friction, suggesting a common physical origin. During subcritical crack growth in strong quartzofeldspathic and carbonate rock where glide is not possible, the instantaneous rate dependence measured during failure or creep tests at high stress has long been thought to be due to crack growth; however, direct comparison between crack growth and friction tests shows poor agreement. The crack growth rate dependence appears to be higher than the rate dependence of friction and fracture by a factor of two to three for all rock types considered. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Biomolecular Origin of The Rate-Dependent Deformation of Prismatic Enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, J; Hsiung, L

    2006-07-05

    Penetration deformation of columnar prismatic enamel was investigated using instrumented nanoindentation testing, carried out at three constant strain rates (0.05 s{sup -1}, 0.005 s{sup -1}, and 0.0005 s{sup -1}). Enamel demonstrated better resistance to penetration deformation and greater elastic modulus values were measured at higher strain rates. The origin of the rate-dependent deformation was rationalized to be the shear deformation of nanoscale protein matrix surrounding each hydroxyapatite crystal rods. And the shear modulus of protein matrix was shown to depend on strain rate in a format: G{sub p} = 0.213 + 0.021 ln {dot {var_epsilon}}. Most biological composites compromise reinforcement mineral components and an organic matrix. They are generally partitioned into multi-level to form hierarchical structures that have supreme resistance to crack growth [1]. The molecular mechanistic origin of toughness is associated with the 'sacrificial chains' between the individual sub-domains in a protein molecule [2]. As the protein molecule is stretched, these 'sacrificial chains' break to protect its backbone and dissipate energy [3]. Such fresh insights are providing new momentum toward updating our understanding of biological materials [4]. Prismatic enamel in teeth is one such material. Prismatic microstructure is frequently observed in the surface layers of many biological materials, as exemplified in mollusk shells [5] and teeth [6]. It is a naturally optimized microstructure to bear impact loading and penetration deformation. In teeth, the columnar prismatic enamel provides mechanical and chemical protection for the relatively soft dentin layer. Its mechanical behavior and reliability are extremely important to ensure normal tooth function and human health. Since enamel generally contains up to 95% hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals and less than 5% protein matrix, it is commonly believed to be a weak and brittle material with little resistance to

  7. Strain rate dependent deformation and failure behavior of laser welded DP780 steel joint under dynamic tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang, E-mail: liuyang@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Ministry of Education, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Dong, Danyang, E-mail: dongdanyang@mail.neu.edu.cn [College of Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Wang, Lei, E-mail: wanglei@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Ministry of Education, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Chu, Xi, E-mail: chuxi.ok@163.com [College of Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Wang, Pengfei, E-mail: wpf1963871400@163.com [College of Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Jin, Mengmeng, E-mail: 24401878@163.com [College of Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2015-03-11

    Laser welded DP steel joints are used widely in the automotive industry for weight reduction. Understanding the deformation and fracture behavior of the base metal (BM) and its welded joint (WJ), especially at high strain rates, is critical for the design of vehicle structures. This paper is concerned with the effects of strain rate on the tensile properties, deformation and fracture behavior of the laser welded DP780 steel joint. Quasi-static and dynamic tensile tests were performed on the WJ and BM of the DP780 steel using an electromechanical universal testing machine and a high-speed tensile testing machine over a wide range of strain rate (0.0001–1142 s{sup −1}). The microstructure change and microhardness distribution of the DP780 steel after laser welding were examined. Digital image correlation (DIC) and high-speed photography were employed for the strain measurement of the DP780 WJ during dynamic tensile tests. The DP780 WJ is a heterogeneous structure with hardening in fusion zone (FZ) and inner heat-affected zone (HAZ), and softening in outer HAZ. The DP780 BM and WJ exhibit positive strain rate dependence on the YS and UTS, which is smaller at lower strain rates and becomes larger with increasing strain rate, while ductility in terms of total elongation (TE) tends to increase under dynamic loading. Laser welding leads to an overall reduction in the ductility of the DP780 steel. However, the WJ exhibits a similar changing trend of the ductility to that of the BM with respect to the strain rate over the whole strain rate range. As for the DP780 WJ, the distance of tensile failure location from the weld centerline decreases with increasing strain rate. The typical ductile failure characteristics of the DP780 BM and WJ do not change with increasing strain rate. DIC measurements reveal that the strain localization starts even before the maximum load is attained in the DP780 WJ and gradual transition from uniform strains to severely localized strains

  8. Associative Flow Rule Used to Include Hydrostatic Stress Effects in Analysis of Strain-Rate-Dependent Deformation of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2004-01-01

    designing reliable composite engine cases that are lighter than the metal cases in current use. The types of polymer matrix composites that are likely to be used in such an application have a deformation response that is nonlinear and that varies with strain rate. The nonlinearity and the strain-rate dependence of the composite response are due primarily to the matrix constituent. Therefore, in developing material models to be used in the design of impact-resistant composite engine cases, the deformation of the polymer matrix must be correctly analyzed. However, unlike in metals, the nonlinear response of polymers depends on the hydrostatic stresses, which must be accounted for within an analytical model. By applying micromechanics techniques along with given fiber properties, one can also determine the effects of the hydrostatic stresses in the polymer on the overall composite deformation response. First efforts to account for the hydrostatic stress effects in the composite deformation applied purely empirical methods that relied on composite-level data. In later efforts, to allow polymer properties to be characterized solely on the basis of polymer data, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center developed equations to model the polymers that were based on a non-associative flow rule, and efforts to use these equations to simulate the deformation of representative polymer materials were reasonably successful. However, these equations were found to have difficulty in correctly analyzing the multiaxial stress states found in the polymer matrix constituent of a composite material. To correct these difficulties, and to allow for the accurate simulation of the nonlinear strain-rate-dependent deformation analysis of polymer matrix composites, in the efforts reported here Glenn researchers reformulated the polymer constitutive equations from basic principles using the concept of an associative flow rule. These revised equations were characterized and validated in an

  9. Strain Rate Dependent Deformation and Strength Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite Utilizing a Micromechanics Approach. Degree awarded by Cincinnati Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    1999-01-01

    Potential gas turbine applications will expose polymer matrix composites to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under extreme conditions. Specifically, analytical methods designed for these applications must have the capability of properly capturing the strain rate sensitivities and nonlinearities that are present in the material response. The Ramaswamy-Stouffer constitutive equations, originally developed to analyze the viscoplastic deformation of metals, have been modified to simulate the nonlinear deformation response of ductile, crystalline polymers. The constitutive model is characterized and correlated for two representative ductile polymers. Fiberite 977-2 and PEEK, and the computed results correlate well with experimental values. The polymer constitutive equations are implemented in a mechanics of materials based composite micromechanics model to predict the nonlinear, rate dependent deformation response of a composite ply. Uniform stress and uniform strain assumptions are applied to compute the effective stresses of a composite unit cell from the applied strains. The micromechanics equations are successfully verified for two polymer matrix composites. IM7/977-2 and AS4/PEEK. The ultimate strength of a composite ply is predicted with the Hashin failure criteria that were implemented in the composite micromechanics model. The failure stresses of the two composite material systems are accurately predicted for a variety of fiber orientations and strain rates. The composite deformation model is implemented in LS-DYNA, a commercially available transient dynamic explicit finite element code. The matrix constitutive equations are converted into an incremental form, and the model is implemented into LS-DYNA through the use of a user defined material subroutine. The deformation response of a bulk polymer and a polymer matrix composite are predicted by finite element analyses. The results

  10. Experimental Identification and Simulation of Time and/or Rate Dependent Reversible and Irreversible Deformation Regions for both a Titanium and Nickel Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Sellers, Cory

    2013-01-01

    In this paper time and/or rate dependent deformation regions are experimentally mapped out as a function of temperature. It is clearly demonstrated that the concept of a threshold stress (a stress that delineate reversible and irreversible behavior) is valid and necessary at elevated temperatures and corresponds to the classical yield stress at lower temperatures. Also the infinitely slow modulus, (Es) i.e. the elastic modulus of the material if it was loaded at an infinitely slow strain rate, and the "dynamic modulus", modulus, Ed, which represents the modulus of the material if it is loaded at an infinitely fast rate are used to delineate rate dependent from rate independent regions. As demonstrated at elevated temperatures there is a significant difference between the two modulus values, thus indicating both significant time-dependence and rate dependence. In the case of the nickel-based super alloy, ME3, this behavior is also shown to be grain size specific. Consequently, at higher temperatures viscoelastic behavior exist below k (i.e., the threshold stress) and at stresses above k the behavior is viscoplastic. Finally a multi-mechanism, stress partitioned viscoelastic model, capable of being consistently coupled to a viscoplastic model is characterized over the full temperature range investigated for Ti-6-4 and ME3.

  11. Constitutive model with time-dependent deformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette

    1998-01-01

    are common in time as well as size. This problem is adressed by means of a new constitutive model for soils. It is able to describe the behavior of soils at different deformation rates. The model defines time-dependent and stress-related deformations separately. They are related to each other and they occur......In many geological and Engineering problems it is necessary to transform information from one scale to another. Data collected at laboratory scale are often used to evaluate field problems on a much larger scale. This is certainly true for geological problems where extreme scale differences...... simultanelously. The model is based on concepts from elasticity and viscoplasticity theories. In addition to Hooke's law for the elastic behavior, the framework for the viscoplastic behavior consists, in the general case (two-dimensional or three-dimensional), of a yield surface, an associated flow rule...

  12. High strain rate deformation of layered nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Veysset, David; Singer, Jonathan P.; Retsch, Markus; Saini, Gagan; Pezeril, Thomas; Nelson, Keith A.; Thomas, Edwin L.

    2012-11-01

    Insight into the mechanical behaviour of nanomaterials under the extreme condition of very high deformation rates and to very large strains is needed to provide improved understanding for the development of new protective materials. Applications include protection against bullets for body armour, micrometeorites for satellites, and high-speed particle impact for jet engine turbine blades. Here we use a microscopic ballistic test to report the responses of periodic glassy-rubbery layered block-copolymer nanostructures to impact from hypervelocity micron-sized silica spheres. Entire deformation fields are experimentally visualized at an exceptionally high resolution (below 10 nm) and we discover how the microstructure dissipates the impact energy via layer kinking, layer compression, extreme chain conformational flattening, domain fragmentation and segmental mixing to form a liquid phase. Orientation-dependent experiments show that the dissipation can be enhanced by 30% by proper orientation of the layers.

  13. Strain Rate Dependent Deformation of a Polymer Matrix Composite with Different Microstructures Subjected to Off-Axis Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate the comprehensive influence of three microstructure parameters (fiber cross-section shape, fiber volume fraction, and fiber off-axis orientation and strain rate on the macroscopic property of a polymer matrix composite. During the analysis, AS4 fibers are considered as elastic solids, while the surrounding PEEK resin matrix exhibiting rate sensitivities are described using the modified Ramaswamy-Stouffer viscoplastic state variable model. The micromechanical method based on generalized model of cells has been used to analyze the representative volume element of composites. An acceptable agreement is observed between the model predictions and experimental results found in the literature. The research results show that the stress-strain curves are sensitive to the strain rate and the microstructure parameters play an important role in the behavior of polymer matrix.

  14. Recent deformation rates on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Robert E.

    1994-11-01

    Constraints on the recent geological evolution of Venus may be provided by quantitative estimates of the rates of the principal resurfacing processes, volcanism and tectonism. This paper focuses on the latter, using impact craters as strain indicators. The total postimpact tectonic strain lies in the range 0.5-6.5%, which defines a recent mean strain rate of 10-18-10-17/s when divided by the mean surface age. Interpretation of the cratering record as one of pure production requires a decline in resurfacing rates at about 500 Ma (catastrophic resurfacing model). If distributed tectonic resurfacing contributed strongly before that time, as suggested by the widespread occurrence of tessera as inliers, the mean global strain rate must have been at least approximately 10-15/s, which is also typical of terrestrial active margins. Numerical calculations of the response of the lithosphere to inferred mantle convective forces were performed to test the hypothesis that a decrease in surface strain rate by at least two orders of magnitude could be caused by a steady decline in heat flow over the last billion years. Parameterized convection models predict that the mean global thermal gradient decreases by only about 5 K/km over this time; even with the exponential dependence of viscosity upon temperature, the surface strain rate drops by little more than one order of magnitude. Strongly unsteady cooling and very low thermal gradients today are necessary to satisfy the catastrophic model. An alternative, uniformitarian resurfacing hypothesis holds that Venus is resurfaced in quasi-random 'patches' several hundred kilometers in size that occur in response to changing mantle convection patterns.

  15. Spreading rate dependent seafloor deformation in response to India-Eurasia collision: results of a hydrosweep survey in the Central Indian Ocean basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; George, P.; Ranade, G.

    ; spreading rate dependence; effect of plate collision; stress regime; CIOB 1. Introduction The Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) is the largest basin in the Indian Ocean, and covers an area of about 7 million km2 (Fig. la). This basin is underlain... from the central part of the CIOB (Kamesh Raju and Ramprasad, 1989; Mukhopadhyay and Khadge, 1992, 1994; Kodagali et al., 1992) call for a thorough analysis of the effect of the stress regime (Weissel et al., 1980; Zoback et al., 1989...

  16. View-Dependent Streamline Deformation and Exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Xin; Edwards, John; Chen, Chun-Ming; Shen, Han-Wei; Johnson, Chris R.; Wong, Pak Chung

    2016-07-01

    Occlusion presents a major challenge in visualizing 3D flow and tensor fields using streamlines. Displaying too many streamlines creates a dense visualization filled with occluded structures, but displaying too few streams risks losing important features. We propose a new streamline exploration approach by visually manipulating the cluttered streamlines by pulling visible layers apart and revealing the hidden structures underneath. This paper presents a customized view-dependent deformation algorithm and an interactive visualization tool to minimize visual cluttering for visualizing 3D vector and tensor fields. The algorithm is able to maintain the overall integrity of the fields and expose previously hidden structures. Our system supports both mouse and direct-touch interactions to manipulate the viewing perspectives and visualize the streamlines in depth. By using a lens metaphor of different shapes to select the transition zone of the targeted area interactively, the users can move their focus and examine the vector or tensor field freely.

  17. Microstructural Analysis of Orientation-Dependent Recovery and Recrystallization in a Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Deformed by Compression at a High Strain Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Zhang, Yubin; Mishin, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the microstructure and texture during annealing of a modified ferritic/martensitic 9Cr-1Mo steel compressed by dynamic plastic deformation (DPD) to a strain of 2.3 has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. It is found...

  18. Transient deformation from daily GPS displacement time series: postseismic deformation, ETS and evolving strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Y.; Fang, P.; Moore, A. W.; Kedar, S.; Liu, Z.; Owen, S. E.; Glasscoe, M. T.

    2016-12-01

    underlying physical mechanisms. (3) We present evolving strain dilatation and shear rates based on the SESES velocities for regional subnetworks as a metric for assigning earthquake probabilities and detection of possible time-dependent deformation related to underlying physical processes.

  19. Microstructural Analysis of Orientation-Dependent Recovery and Recrystallization in a Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Deformed by Compression at a High Strain Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Zhang, Yubin; Mishin, Oleg V.; Tao, Nairong; Pantleon, Wolfgang; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2016-09-01

    The evolution of the microstructure and texture during annealing of a modified ferritic/martensitic 9Cr-1Mo steel compressed by dynamic plastic deformation (DPD) to a strain of 2.3 has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. It is found that the duplex + fiber texture formed by DPD is transformed during annealing to a dominant fiber texture, and that crystallites of the component have an advantage during both nucleation and growth. Detailed characterization of the microstructural morphology, and estimation of the stored energies in - and -oriented regions in deformed and annealed samples, as well as investigations of the growth of recrystallizing grains, are used to analyze the annealing behavior. It is concluded that recrystallization in the given material occurs by a combination of oriented nucleation and oriented growth.

  20. Time dependent deformation of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery-Brown, Emily Kvietka Desmarais

    to a decollement structure 8 km under the south flank, and the locations of the microearthquakes suggest that both occur on the same structure. In 2007, Episode 56 of the Pu'u 'O'o-Kupianaha eruption occurred. This episode was exciting both because it was the largest intrusion in the last decade, and because it occurred concurrently with a flank slow-slip event. The intrusion started on Father's day (June 17th), 2007 with increased seismicity and abrupt tilts at the summit and rift zones. Quasi-static models of the total deformation determined from GPS, tilt, and InSAR indicate that the intrusion occurred on two en echelon dike segments in the upper East Rift Zone along with deformation consistent with slow-slip in the same areas of previous events. The ˜ 2 m maximum opening occurred on the eastern segment near Makaopui crater. Unlike previous intrusions in 1997, 1999, and 2000, the dike model was not sufficient to explain deformation on the western flank. Additionally, a coastal tiltmeter installed in anticipation of a slow-slip event recorded tilts consistent with those observed during the 2005 slow-slip event. These observations led to the conclusion that a concurrent slow-slip event occurred. Geodetic models indicate a similar amount of decollement slip occurred as in previous slow-slip events. Sub-daily GPS positions were used to study the spatio-temporal distribution of the dike intrusion. The time-dependent intrusion model shows that the intrusion began on the western en echelon segment before jumping to the eastern segment, which accumulated the majority of the 2 m of opening. Sub-daily GPS positions limit the number of stations available since there are very few continuous stations north of the East Rift Zone, where coverage is critical for separating the intrusion from the slow-slip. However, an ENVISAT interferogram at 08:22 on June 18, 2007 provides additional spatial coverage of deformation up to that point. Combining this image with the GPS and tilt

  1. Twinning in copper deformed at high strain rates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Cronje; R E Kroon; W D Roos; J H Neethling

    2013-02-01

    Copper samples having varying microstructures were deformed at high strain rates using a split-Hopkinson pressure bar. Transmission electron microscopy results show deformation twins present in samples that were both annealed and strained, whereas samples that were annealed and left unstrained, as well as samples that were unannealed and strained, are devoid of these twins. These deformation twins occurred at deformation conditions less extreme than previously predicted.

  2. Temperature Dependent Cyclic Deformation Mechanisms in Haynes 188 Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Castelli, Michael G.; Allen, Gorden P.; Ellis, John R.

    1995-01-01

    The cyclic deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-base superalloy, Haynes 188, has been investigated over a range of temperatures between 25 and 1000 C under isothermal and in-phase thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) conditions. Constant mechanical strain rates (epsilon-dot) of 10(exp -3)/s and 10(exp -4)/s were examined with a fully reversed strain range of 0.8%. Particular attention was given to the effects of dynamic strain aging (DSA) on the stress-strain response and low cycle fatigue life. A correlation between cyclic deformation behavior and microstructural substructure was made through detailed transmission electron microscopy. Although DSA was found to occur over a wide temperature range between approximately 300 and 750 C the microstructural characteristics and the deformation mechanisms responsible for DSA varied considerably and were dependent upon temperature. In general, the operation of DSA processes led to a maximum of the cyclic stress amplitude at 650 C and was accompanied by pronounced planar slip, relatively high dislocation density, and the generation of stacking faults. DSA was evidenced through a combination of phenomena, including serrated yielding, an inverse dependence of the maximum cyclic hardening with epsilon-dot, and an instantaneous inverse epsilon-dot sensitivity verified by specialized epsilon-dot -change tests. The TMF cyclic hardening behavior of the alloy appeared to be dictated by the substructural changes occuring at the maximum temperature in the TMF cycle.

  3. Viscoelastic Response of the Titanium Alloy Ti-6-4: Experimental Identification of Time- and Rate-Dependent Reversible and Irreversible Deformation Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    In support of an effort on damage prognosis, the viscoelastic behavior of Ti-6Al-4V (Ti-6-4) was investigated. This report documents the experimental characterization of this titanium alloy. Various uniaxial tests were conducted to low load levels over the temperature range of 20 to 538 C to define tensile, creep, and relaxation behavior. A range of strain rates (6x10(exp -7) to 0.001/s) were used to document rate effects. All tests were designed to include an unloading portion, followed by a hold time at temperature to allow recovery to occur either at zero stress or strain. The titanium alloy was found to exhibit viscoelastic behavior below the "yield" point and over the entire range of temperatures (although at lower temperatures the magnitude is extremely small). These experimental data will be used for future characterization of a viscoelastic model.

  4. Particle-Dependent Deformations of Lorentz Symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Amelino-Camelia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available I report results suggesting that it is possible to introduce laws of relativistic kinematics endowing different types of particles with suitably different deformed-Lorentz-symmetry properties. I also consider some possible applications of these results, among which I highlight those relevant for addressing a long-standing challenge in the description of composite particles, such as atoms, within quantum-gravity-inspired scenarios with Planck-scale deformations of Lorentz symmetry. Some of the new elements here introduced in the formulation of relativistic kinematics appear to also provide the starting point for the development of a correspondingly novel mathematical formulation of spacetime-symmetry algebras.

  5. Computational procedures for finite deformation rate-independent plasticity and viscoplasticity based on overstress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Said Taha Khalil

    2000-10-01

    This thesis is dedicated to developing the computational procedures required in implementing the finite element method for finite deformation, rate-independent plasticity and finite deformation viscoplasticity theory based on overstress. The classical rate-independent, von Mises plasticity is formulated using both hypoelastic-plastic model and hyperelastic-plastic model. In the hypoelastic-plastic model, a relationship between an objective rate of Kirchhoff stress, based on a new recently proposed logarithmic spin [13], and the elastic part of rate of deformation tensor is postulated. In the hyperelastic-plastic model, the deformation gradient is decomposed into elastic and plastic deformations, a relationship between Kirchhoff stress and the logarithm of the elastic left stretch tensor is used. Numerical procedures for the integration of both models are developed. The isotropic, viscoplasticity theory based on overstress consisting of a flow law and two tensor valued and one scalar valued stress-like state variables is extended to finite deformation. To this end the Cauchy stress rate and the rates of the two tensor-valued state variables are interpreted as Eulerian tensors. The rate of deformation is equal to the sum of the elastic (the rate form of Hooke's law) and the inelastic rate of deformation, which depends on the overstress. The model does not contain a strain like quantity. Two integration schemes are considered: (i) a one step time integration scheme based on the forward gradient approximation and (ii) unconditionally stable implicit integration scheme based on backward Euler. The finite deformation, anisotropic, viscoplasticity theory based on overstress is formulated. A hypoelastic relation between the Lagrangian, rotated, logarithmic Cauchy stress rate and the rotated rate of deformation is used. The deformation induced anisotropy is modeled using a compliance tensor that allowed to grow according to Armstrong-Frederick law for fourth order tensors

  6. Dependence of Deformation Twinning on Grain Orientation and Texture Evolution of High Manganese TWIP Steels at Different Deformation Temperatures%Dependence of Deformation Twinning on Grain Orientation and Texture Evolution of High Manganese TWIP Steels at Different Deformation Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Xiu-hui; YANG Ping; LU Fa-yun; MENG Li

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical properties, microstructure and texture evolution were studied in two tensile-deformed high manganese TWIP steels at different temperatures. Special attention was paid to the effects of deformation tempera- ture and grain orientation on twinning behavior. The results showed that, at --70 ℃ and at room temperature, both twins and hexagonal martensite were found in a lower manganese steel of 26Mn. With deformation temperature ris- ing, twins became less and they disappeared at 500 ℃. Strong 〈111〉 texture appeared at 300 ℃, while it weakened at 500 ℃ due to the low strain rate and higher stacking fault energy. EBSD measurement revealed the dependence of deformation twinning on grain orientation at all test temperatures.

  7. A time-dependent measuring system for welding deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡志鹏; 赵海燕; 鹿安理; 史清宇; 施光凯

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the establishment and application of a time-dependent measuring system for welding deformation are presented which is established with high quality sensors shielded from strong welding interference. By using this system, vertical and horizontal displacements of the high temperature area are surveyed at the same time. And this system is also used for monitoring and controlling the deformation of real welded structures.

  8. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 1; Matrix Constitutive Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this first paper of a two part report, background information is presented, along with the constitutive equations which will be used to model the rate dependent nonlinear deformation response of the polymer matrix. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive models which were originally developed to model the viscoplastic deformation of metals have been adapted to model the nonlinear viscoelastic deformation of polymers. The modified equations were correlated by analyzing the tensile/ compressive response of both 977-2 toughened epoxy matrix and PEEK thermoplastic matrix over a variety of strain rates. For the cases examined, the modified constitutive equations appear to do an adequate job of modeling the polymer deformation response. A second follow-up paper will describe the implementation of the polymer deformation model into a composite micromechanical model, to allow for the modeling of the nonlinear, rate dependent deformation response of polymer matrix composites.

  9. Dynamic tensile behaviour and deformational mechanism of C5191 phosphor bronze under high strain rates deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Dao-chun [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Taizhou Vocational & Technical College, Taizhou 318000 (China); Chen, Ming-he, E-mail: meemhchen@nuaa.edu.cn [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Lei; Cheng, Hu [College of Mechanical Engineering, Taizhou University, Taizhou 318000 (China)

    2016-01-01

    High speed stamping process is used to high strength and high electrical conductivity phosphor bronze with extremely high strain rates more than 10{sup 3} s{sup −1}. This study on the dynamic tensile behaviour and deformational mechanism is to optimise the high speed stamping processes and improve geometrical precision in finished products. Thus, the tensile properties and deformation behaviour of C5191 phosphor bronze under quasi-static tensile condition at a strain rate of 0.001 s{sup −1} by electronic universal testing machine, and dynamic tensile condition at strain rate of 500, 1000 and 1500 s{sup −1} by split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB) apparatus were studied. The effects of strain rate and the deformation mechanism were investigated by means of SEM and TEM. The results showed that the yield strength and tensile strength of C5191 phosphor bronze under high strain rates deformation increased by 32.77% and 11.07% respectively compared with quasi-static condition, the strain hardening index increases from 0.075 to 0.251, and the strength of the material strain rates sensitivity index change from 0.005 to 0.022, which presented a clear sensitive to strain rates. Therefore, it is claimed that the dominant deformation mechanism was changed by the dislocation motion under different strain rates, and the ability of plastic deformation of C5191 phosphor bronze increased due to the number of movable dislocations increased significantly, started multi-line slip, and the soft effect of adiabatic temperature rise at the strain rate ranging from 500 to 1500 s{sup −1}.

  10. Orientation dependence of the deformation microstructure in compressed aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, G.M.; Godfrey, A.; Hong, Chuanshi

    2012-01-01

    The orientation dependence of the deformation microstructure has been investigated in aluminum compressed to 20% reduction. The dislocation boundaries formed can be classified, as for tension, into one of three types: dislocation cells (Type 2), and extended planar boundaries near (Type 1...

  11. Strain Rate Dependent Modeling of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    A research program is in progress to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations have been developed to model the polymer matrix, and have been incorporated into a micromechanics approach to analyze polymer matrix composites. The Hashin failure criterion has been implemented within the micromechanics results to predict ply failure strengths. The deformation model has been implemented within LS-DYNA, a commercially available transient dynamic finite element code. The deformation response and ply failure stresses for the representative polymer matrix composite AS4/PEEK have been predicted for a variety of fiber orientations and strain rates. The predicted results compare favorably to experimentally obtained values.

  12. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 2; Composite Micromechanical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this second paper of a two part report, a three-dimensional composite micromechanical model is described which allows for the analysis of the rate dependent, nonlinear deformation response of a polymer matrix composite. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations utilized to model the deformation response of a polymer are implemented within the micromechanics method. The deformation response of two representative laminated carbon fiber reinforced composite materials with varying fiber orientation has been predicted using the described technique. The predicted results compare favorably to both experimental values and the response predicted by the Generalized Method of Cells, a well-established micromechanics analysis method.

  13. Analytical Modeling of the High Strain Rate Deformation of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Gilat, Amos

    2003-01-01

    The results presented here are part of an ongoing research program to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. State variable constitutive equations originally developed for metals have been modified in order to model the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymeric matrix materials. To account for the effects of hydrostatic stresses, which are significant in polymers, the classical 5 plasticity theory definitions of effective stress and effective plastic strain are modified by applying variations of the Drucker-Prager yield criterion. To verify the revised formulation, the shear and tensile deformation of a representative toughened epoxy is analyzed across a wide range of strain rates (from quasi-static to high strain rates) and the results are compared to experimentally obtained values. For the analyzed polymers, both the tensile and shear stress-strain curves computed using the analytical model correlate well with values obtained through experimental tests. The polymer constitutive equations are implemented within a strength of materials based micromechanics method to predict the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymer matrix composites. In the micromechanics, the unit cell is divided up into a number of independently analyzed slices, and laminate theory is then applied to obtain the effective deformation of the unit cell. The composite mechanics are verified by analyzing the deformation of a representative polymer matrix composite (composed using the representative polymer analyzed for the correlation of the polymer constitutive equations) for several fiber orientation angles across a variety of strain rates. The computed values compare favorably to experimentally obtained results.

  14. The Microstructure Evolution of Dual-Phase Pipeline Steel with Plastic Deformation at Different Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, L. K.; Xu, T.; Zhang, J. M.; Wang, H. T.; Tong, M. X.; Zhu, R. H.; Zhou, G. S.

    2017-07-01

    Tensile properties of the high-deformability dual-phase ferrite-bainite X70 pipeline steel have been investigated at room temperature under the strain rates of 2.5 × 10-5, 1.25 × 10-4, 2.5 × 10-3, and 1.25 × 10-2 s-1. The microstructures at different amount of plastic deformation were examined by using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Generally, the ductility of typical body-centered cubic steels is reduced when its stain rate increases. However, we observed a different ductility dependence on strain rates in the dual-phase X70 pipeline steel. The uniform elongation (UEL%) and elongation to fracture (EL%) at the strain rate of 2.5 × 10-3 s-1 increase about 54 and 74%, respectively, compared to those at 2.5 × 10-5 s-1. The UEL% and EL% reach to their maximum at the strain rate of 2.5 × 10-3 s-1. This phenomenon was explained by the observed grain structures and dislocation configurations. Whether or not the ductility can be enhanced with increasing strain rates depends on the competition between the homogenization of plastic deformation among the microconstituents (ultra-fine ferrite grains, relatively coarse ferrite grains as well as bainite) and the progress of cracks formed as a consequence of localized inconsistent plastic deformation.

  15. Effect of the cooling rate on plastic deformability of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The present work found the plastic deformability of Zr65Cu17.5Ni10Al7.5 BMG dependent on the cooling rate during the formation from the molten state alloy. The deformation behavior in the compression test of φ 2 mm Zr65Cu17.5Ni10Al7.5 BMGs as-cast or lathed from different sizes as-cast samples was characterized, and they exhibited different plastic strains. The compressive plastic strain increases with the decreasing diameter of the as-cast specimens, i.e. with increasing the cooling rate. It is suggested that free volume content in the BMGs, which is related to the cooling rate during the rapid solidification, could play an important role in the deformation process of the BMGs.

  16. Various aspects of the Deformation Dependent Mass model of nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Petrellis, D; Minkov, N

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a variant of the Bohr Hamiltonian was proposed where the mass term is allowed to depend on the beta variable of nuclear deformation. Analytic solutions of this modified Hamiltonian have been obtained using the Davidson and the Kratzer potentials, by employing techniques from supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Apart from the new set of analytic solutions, the newly introduced Deformation-Dependent Mass (DDM) model offered a remedy to the problematic behaviour of the moment of inertia in the Bohr Hamiltonian, where it appears to increase proportionally to the square of beta. In the DDM model the moments of inertia increase at a much lower rate, in agreement with experimental data. The current work presents an application of the DDM-model suitable for the description of nuclei at the point of shape/phase transitions between vibrational and gamma-unstable or prolate deformed nuclei and is based on a method that was successfully applied before in the context of critical point symmetries.

  17. Low rate of Sinabung deformation inferred by GPS measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriswati, Estu; Kuncoro, Henri; Meilano, Irwan

    2015-04-01

    A series of Sinabung volcano eruption occurred on August 27, 2010 for the first time after dormain probably several hundred years, continued until September 7, 2010. Ash plumes from the new eruption at Sinabung volcano reached at least 8 km above sea level. In September 15th, 2013, a new phase of Sinabung volcano eruption forces peoples surrounding the volcano to evacuate homes. The eruption is still continuing, ash plume are reaching 10 kilometer above summit. The eruptions also generate pyroclastic flows and lahars. A month before the eruption, seismicity of Sinabung volcano increased especially increased on number of deep volcanic earthquakes. GPS have been installed in 4 stations in the slope of Sinabung volcano in the distance of 2 - 8 km from summit. GPS data is recorded continuously and analyzed automatically to obtain the baseline between two points in Sinabung network. In this paper, GAMIT/GLOBK software is using to get the coordinates and baseline solutions precisely. Time-series show some periods of increased volcanic activity with low rate of deformation since August 2012. Rapid deformation occur after June 2013, the horizontal displacement is ranged 8 - 11.3 mm in the period of 2013 June - October. After first eruption on September 15 the inflation still continuing. Linear strain at a triangulation of GPS stations in the slope of Sinabung volcano during the period show an inflation in summit area.Long period of deformation measurement show inflation due to magmatic process beneath summit. Since no other significant precursor to the eruption, the information is important for early warning especially for volcanic activity with low rate deformation like Sinabung volcano.

  18. Size-dependent deformation behavior of nanocrystalline graphene sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhi [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Huang, Yuhong [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062, Shaanxi (China); Ma, Fei, E-mail: mafei@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Sun, Yunjin [Faculty of Food Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Agriculture, Beijing Key Laboratory of Agricultural Product Detection and Control of Spoilage Organisms and Pesticide Residue, Beijing Laboratory of Food Quality and Safety, Beijing 102206 (China); Xu, Kewei, E-mail: kwxu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Department of Physics and Opt-electronic Engineering, Xi’an University of Arts and Science, Xi’an 710065, Shaanxi (China); Chu, Paul K., E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • MD simulation is conducted to study the deformation of nanocrystalline graphene. • Unexpectedly, the elastic modulus decreases with the grain size considerably. • But the fracture stress and strain are nearly insensitive to the grain size. • A composite model with grain domains and GBs as two components is suggested. - Abstract: Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is conducted to study the deformation behavior of nanocrystalline graphene sheets. It is found that the graphene sheets have almost constant fracture stress and strain, but decreased elastic modulus with grain size. The results are different from the size-dependent strength observed in nanocrystalline metals. Structurally, the grain boundaries (GBs) become a principal component in two-dimensional materials with nano-grains and the bond length in GBs tends to be homogeneously distributed. This is almost the same for all the samples. Hence, the fracture stress and strain are almost size independent. As a low-elastic-modulus component, the GBs increase with reducing grain size and the elastic modulus decreases accordingly. A composite model is proposed to elucidate the deformation behavior.

  19. Spatiotemporal evolution of fault slip-rates in deforming continents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perouse, E.; Wernicke, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    The present study is a compilation of neotectonic data offering an unprecedented view into spatial and temporal patterns of seismic strain release in diffusely deforming crust, at timescales of 1 kyr to 1 Myr. We compiled paleoseismologic and Quaternary geology data from 159 published studies, for some 167 faults across the Great basin region (Western US), an archetype for diffuse deformation of the continental crust. Our database is accessible online through an interactive GIS interface and an Excel file. Results from the database indicate a mean vertical displacement for earthquakes on Basin and Range normal faults of 2 m. The distribution of earthquake recurrence intervals is far more scattered, with a mode value of 1-3 kyr and a mean value of ~11 kyr. A significant fraction of recurrence intervals (24%) are >10 kyr, and about half that (12%) are >20 kyr. Displacement per event and recurrence interval seems not clearly correlated. Finally, in 2/3 of the measurements, the difference in vertical displacement with a previous event on the same fault is concentrated along the edges of the province (Wasatch front, central Nevada seismic belt), the central part of the Great Basin being almost inactive. However, the deformation is evenly distributed in the overall region when considering a 150 ka time window, with homogeneous finite displacement rates of ~0.2-0.3 mm/yr on the faults. Spatial paleoearthquakes kinematics is not random: we can distinguish "local clusters" (episode of events on a single fault) from "regional clusters" (episode of events, distributed on several faults, each with a single event). We thus propose a general model where any given fault alternates between: (1) fast transient displacement rate episodes (1-2 mm/yr), lasting ~20-50 kyr, associated to "local clusters"; (2) slow transient displacement rate episode (0.05-0.1 mm/yr), lasting up to 400 kyr, associated to "regional clusters". More speculatively, we comment on possible "local clusters

  20. Performance of the experimental resins and dental nanocomposites at varying deformation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Shortall, Adrian

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the bi-axial flexural strength of experimental unfilled resins and resin-based composites at varying deformation rates following 1-week dry, 1-week wet, and 13-week wet storage regimes. A total of 270 disc-shaped specimens (12 mm diameter, 1 mm thickness) of either unfilled resins or experimental resin-based composites comprising of three groups (n = 90) were fabricated. Three groups of each unfilled resin and resin-based composites (n = 90) were stored for 1 week under dry conditions, and at 1 and 13 weeks under wet conditions (37 ± 1°C) before testing. The bi-axial flexural strength of each unfilled resin and resin-based composites group was determined at a 0.1, 1, and 10 mm/min deformation rate (n = 30). The unfilled resins revealed a deformation rate dependence following all storage regimes; however, the addition of fillers in the unfilled resins modified such reliance following the 1-week dry and 13-week wet storage regimes. In contrast, a lower bi-axial flexural strength of the 1-week wet resin-based composites specimens at a 0.1 mm/min deformation rate was identified. A lower bi-axial flexural strength of the 1-week wet resin-based composites specimens at a low deformation rate suggests that premature failure of resin-based composites restorations might occur in patients with parafunctional habits, such as bruxism. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Material deformation dynamics at ultrahigh pressures and strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, B. A.; Park, H. S.; Maddox, B. R.; May, M. J.; Pollaine, S. M.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Rudd, R. E.; Hawreliak, J. A.; Perry, T. S.; Comley, A. J.; Wark, J. S.; Meyers, M. A.

    2010-11-01

    Solid-state dynamics experiments at extreme pressures, up to 10 Mbar, and strain rates (1.e6 -1.e8 1/s) are being developed for the NIF laser. The experimental methods are being developed on the Omega laser facility. VISAR measurements establish the ramped, high-pressure conditions. Recovery experiments offer a look at the residual microstructure. Dynamic diffraction measurements allow phase, shear stress (strength), and possibly twin volume fraction and dislocation density to be inferred. Constitutive models for material strength at these conditions by comparing 2D simulations with experiments measuring the Rayleigh-Taylor instability evolution in solid-state samples of vanadium and tantalum. The material deformation likely falls into the phonon drag regime. We estimate of the (microscopic) phonon drag coefficient, by relating to the (macroscopic) effective lattice viscosity.

  2. 1993-2011 Time dependent deformation of Eyjafjallajokull volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, T.; Feigl, K.; Pedersen, R.; Sigmundsson, F.

    2011-12-01

    We analyze synthetic aperture radar data acquired by ERS-1, ERS-2, Envisat, TerraSAR-X and ALOS satellites between 1993 and 2011 to characterize the deformation associated with activity at Eyjafjallajokull. The volcano had shown intermittent unrest for 18 years before erupting in 2010. An effusive lava eruption occurred from 20th March to 12th April and was followed by an explosive summit eruption from 14th April to 22nd May, disrupting air traffic. Satellite radar interferometry (InSAR) captured intrusive events in 1994 and 1999 when several decimeters of deformation occurred on the volcanic edifice. By inverting the geodetic data, Pedersen et al. [2004; 2006] inferred that sills between depths of 5-7 km had increased in volume by approximately 10-17 and 21-31 million cubic meters during each of two intrusive events in 1994 and 1999, respectively. In this study, we extend the time series analysis to the pre-eruptive, co-eruptive, and post-eruptive deformation associated with the 2010 eruptions. To describe the pre-eruptive deformation over several months, Sigmundsson et al. [2010] estimate the total volume increase in two sills and a dike to be 49-71 million cubic meters. During the effusive eruption, no significant deformation was observed in the interferograms. During the explosive eruption, deflation was observed, that continued at a low rate after the eruption ceased. To estimate source parameters, we use the General Inversion of Phase Technique [GIPhT; Feigl and Thurber, 2009] that analyzes the gradient of phase without the need for unwrapping. To quantify the misfit between the observed and modeled values of the phase gradient, the objective function calculates the cost as the absolute value of their difference, averaged over all sampled pixels. To minimize the objective function we use a simulated annealing algorithm. For computational efficiency, we approximate the fitting function using Taylor series. Calculation of derivatives requires evaluating the

  3. β+/EC decay rates of deformed neutron-deficient nuclei in the deformed QRPA with realistic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Ni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The weak-decay (β+ and EC rates of neutron-deficient Kr, Sr, Zr, and Mo isotopes are investigated within the deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation with realistic nucleon–nucleon interactions. The particle–particle and particle–hole channels of residual interactions are handled in large single-particle model spaces, based on the Brückner G-matrix with charge-dependent Bonn nucleon–nucleon forces. Contributions from allowed Gamow–Teller and Fermi transitions as well as first-forbidden transitions are calculated. The calculated half-lives show good agreement with the experimental data over a wide range of magnitude, from 10−2 to 107 s. Moreover, predictions of β-decay half-lives are made for some extremely proton-rich isotopes, which could be useful for future experiments.

  4. Effects of Adiabatic Heating on the High Strain Rate Deformation of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorini, Chris; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2017-01-01

    Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are increasingly being used in aerospace structures that are expected to experience complex dynamic loading conditions throughout their lifetime. As such, a detailed understanding of the high strain rate behavior of the constituents, particularly the strain rate, temperature, and pressure dependent polymer matrix, is paramount. In this paper, preliminary efforts in modeling experimentally observed temperature rises due to plastic deformation in PMCs subjected to dynamic loading are presented. To this end, an existing isothermal viscoplastic polymer constitutive formulation is extended to model adiabatic conditions by incorporating temperature dependent elastic properties and modifying the components of the inelastic strain rate tensor to explicitly depend on temperature. It is demonstrated that the modified polymer constitutive model is capable of capturing strain rate and temperature dependent yield as well as thermal softening associated with the conversion of plastic work to heat at high rates of strain. The modified constitutive model is then embedded within a strength of materials based micromechanics framework to investigate the manifestation of matrix thermal softening, due to the conversion of plastic work to heat, on the high strain rate response of a T700Epon 862 (T700E862) unidirectional composite. Adiabatic model predictions for high strain rate composite longitudinal tensile, transverse tensile, and in-plane shear loading are presented. Results show a substantial deviation from isothermal conditions; significant thermal softening is observed for matrix dominated deformation modes (transverse tension and in-plane shear), highlighting the importance of accounting for the conversion of plastic work to heat in the polymer matrix in the high strain rate analysis of PMC structures.

  5. High-rate Plastic Deformation of Nanocrystalline Tantalum to Large Strains: Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, R E

    2009-02-05

    Recent advances in the ability to generate extremes of pressure and temperature in dynamic experiments and to probe the response of materials has motivated the need for special materials optimized for those conditions as well as a need for a much deeper understanding of the behavior of materials subjected to high pressure and/or temperature. Of particular importance is the understanding of rate effects at the extremely high rates encountered in those experiments, especially with the next generation of laser drives such as at the National Ignition Facility. Here we use large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the high-rate deformation of nanocrystalline tantalum to investigate the processes associated with plastic deformation for strains up to 100%. We use initial atomic configurations that were produced through simulations of solidification in the work of Streitz et al [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, (2006) 225701]. These 3D polycrystalline systems have typical grain sizes of 10-20 nm. We also study a rapidly quenched liquid (amorphous solid) tantalum. We apply a constant volume (isochoric), constant temperature (isothermal) shear deformation over a range of strain rates, and compute the resulting stress-strain curves to large strains for both uniaxial and biaxial compression. We study the rate dependence and identify plastic deformation mechanisms. The identification of the mechanisms is facilitated through a novel technique that computes the local grain orientation, returning it as a quaternion for each atom. This analysis technique is robust and fast, and has been used to compute the orientations on the fly during our parallel MD simulations on supercomputers. We find both dislocation and twinning processes are important, and they interact in the weak strain hardening in these extremely fine-grained microstructures.

  6. Deformation-dependent enzyme mechanokinetic cleavage of type I collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Karla E-K; Bourne, Jonathan W; Torzilli, Peter A

    2009-05-01

    Collagen is a key structural protein in the extracellular matrix of many tissues. It provides biological tissues with tensile mechanical strength and is enzymatically cleaved by a class of matrix metalloproteinases known as collagenases. Collagen enzymatic kinetics has been well characterized in solubilized, gel, and reconstituted forms. However, limited information exists on enzyme degradation of structurally intact collagen fibers and, more importantly, on the effect of mechanical deformation on collagen cleavage. We studied the degradation of native rat tail tendon fibers by collagenase after the fibers were mechanically elongated to strains of epsilon=1-10%. After the fibers were elongated and the stress was allowed to relax, the fiber was immersed in Clostridium histolyticum collagenase and the decrease in stress (sigma) was monitored as a means of calculating the rate of enzyme cleavage of the fiber. An enzyme mechanokinetic (EMK) relaxation function T(E)(epsilon) in s(-1) was calculated from the linear stress-time response during fiber cleavage, where T(E)(epsilon) corresponds to the zero order Michaelis-Menten enzyme-substrate kinetic response. The EMK relaxation function T(E)(epsilon) was found to decrease with applied strain at a rate of approximately 9% per percent strain, with complete inhibition of collagen cleavage predicted to occur at a strain of approximately 11%. However, comparison of the EMK response (T(E) versus epsilon) to collagen's stress-strain response (sigma versus epsilon) suggested the possibility of three different EMK responses: (1) constant T(E)(epsilon) within the toe region (epsiloncollagen triple helix may be by a conformational change in the triple helix since the decrease in T(E)(epsilon) appeared concomitant with stretching of the collagen molecule.

  7. PLASTIC DEFORMATION BEHAVIOR OF ELECTROFORMED COPPER LINER OF SHAPED CHARGE AT DIFFERENT STRAIN RATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Y.Gao; Q.Sun

    2003-01-01

    The paper deals with different plastic deformation behavior of electroformed copper liner of shaped charge,depormed at high strain rate(about 1×107s-1) and normal strain rate (4×10-4s-1).The crystallographic orientation distribution of grains in recovered slugs which had undergone high-strain-rate plastic deformation during ex-plosive detonation was investigated by electron backscattering Kikuchi pattern tech-nique.Cellualar structures formed by tangled disocations and sub-grain boundaries consisting of dislocation arrays were detected in the recovered slugs.Some twins and slip dislocations were observed in specimen deformed at normal strain rate.It was found that dynamic recovery and recrystallization take place during high-strain-rate deformation due to the temperature rising,whereas the conventional slip mechanism operates during deformation at normal strain rate.

  8. Heart rate dependency of JT interval sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatkova, Katerina; Johannesen, Lars; Vicente, Jose; Malik, Marek

    2017-08-09

    Little experience exists with the heart rate correction of J-Tpeak and Tpeak-Tend intervals. In a population of 176 female and 176 male healthy subjects aged 32.3±9.8 and 33.1±8.4years, respectively, curve-linear and linear relationship to heart rate was investigated for different sections of the JT interval defined by the proportions of the area under the vector magnitude of the reconstructed 3D vectorcardiographic loop. The duration of the JT sub-section between approximately just before the T peak and almost the T end was found heart rate independent. Most of the JT heart rate dependency relates to the beginning of the interval. The duration of the terminal T wave tail is only weakly heart rate dependent. The Tpeak-Tend is only minimally heart rate dependent and in studies not showing substantial heart rate changes does not need to be heart rate corrected. For any correction formula that has linear additive properties, heart rate correction of JT and JTpeak intervals is practically the same as of the QT interval. However, this does not apply to the formulas in the form of Int/RR(a) since they do not have linear additive properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Exploration of mechanisms underlying the strain-rate-dependent mechanical property of single chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Trung Dung; Gu, YuanTong, E-mail: yuantong.gu@qut.edu.au [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2014-05-05

    Based on the characterization by Atomic Force Microscopy, we report that the mechanical property of single chondrocytes has dependency on the strain-rates. By comparing the mechanical deformation responses and the Young's moduli of living and fixed chondrocytes at four different strain-rates, we explore the deformation mechanisms underlying this dependency property. We found that the strain-rate-dependent mechanical property of living cells is governed by both of the cellular cytoskeleton and the intracellular fluid when the fixed chondrocytes are mainly governed by their intracellular fluid, which is called the consolidation-dependent deformation behavior. Finally, we report that the porohyperelastic constitutive material model which can capture the consolidation-dependent behavior of both living and fixed chondrocytes is a potential candidature to study living cell biomechanics.

  10. PLASTIC DEFORMATION BEHAVIOR OF ELECTROFORMED COPPER LINER OF SHAPED CHARGE AT DIFFERENT STRAIN RATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Y. Gao; W.H. Tian; A.L. Fan; Q. Sun

    2003-01-01

    The paper deals with different plastic deformation behavior of electroformed copperliner of shaped charge, deformed at high strain rate (about 1×107 s-1) and normalstrain rate (4×10-4 s-1). The crystallographic orientation distribution of grains inrecovered slugs which had undergone high-strain-rate plastic deformation during ex-plosive detonation was investigated by electron backscattering Kikuchi pattern tech-nique. Cellular structures formed by tangled dislocations and sub-grain boundariesconsisting of dislocation arrays were detected in the recovered slugs. Some twins andslip dislocations were observed in specimen deformed at normal strain rate. It wasfound that dynamic recovery and recrystallization take place during high-strain-ratedeformation due to the temperature rising, whereas the conventional slip mechanismoperates during deformation at normal strain rate.

  11. Decay rates of spherical and deformed proton emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C. N.; Esbensen, H.

    1999-11-23

    Using Green's function techniques, the authors derive expressions for the width of a proton decaying state in spherical and deformed nuclei. The authors show that the proton decay widths calculated by the exact expressions of Maglione et al. are equivalent to the distorted wave expressions of Bugrov et al., and that of {angstrom} berg et al. in the spherical case.

  12. Stress and temperature dependence of the avalanche dynamics during creep deformation of metallic glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Gómez, Carlos; Samwer, Konrad

    2016-09-22

    The understanding of the mesoscopic origin of plasticity in metallic glasses remains still an open issue. At the microscopic level, Shear Transformation Zones (STZ), composed by dozens of atoms, have been identified as the basic unit of the deformation process. Macroscopically, metallic glasses perform either homogeneous or inhomogeneous flow depending on the experimental conditions. However, the emergence of macroscopic behavior resulting from STZ interactions is still an open issue and is of great interest. In the current work we present an approach to analyze the different interaction mechanisms of STZ's by studying the statistics of the avalanches produced by a metallic glass during tensile creep deformation. We identified a crossover between different regimes of avalanches, and we analyzed the dependence of such crossover on the experimental conditions, namely stress and temperature. We interpret such crossover as a transition from 3D random STZ activity to localized 2D nano-shear bands. The experimental time at which the crossover takes place seems to depend on the overall strain and strain rate in the sample.

  13. Temperature Dependence of Atomic Decay Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-Jun; CHENG Ze

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the decay rate of an atom in a two-dimensional optical microcavity in which there exists a Bose-Einstein condensation of photons. It is found that below the critical temperature Tc, the atomic decay rate depends on the absolute temperature T. Especially, at absolute zero temperature almost all photons are in the condensate state, and the atom can be approximately treated as if it is in vacuum.%We investigate the decay rate of an atom in a two-dimensional optical microcavity in which there exists a BoseEinstein condensation of photons.It is found that below the critical temperature To,the atomic decay rate depends on the absolute temperature T.Especially,at absolute zero temperature almost all photons are in the condensate state,and the atom can be approximately treated as if it is in vacuum.

  14. Size-dependent deformation mechanisms in hollow silicon nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Even inherently brittle hollow silicon nanoparticles (NPs can withstand larger strain to failure than solid NPs. However, the influence of wall thickness on the mechanical behavior of hollow Si NPs is not fully understood. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the compressive behavior of hollow Si NPs. Three distinct failure mechanisms of hollow NPs are uncovered, and their strength and deformability are analyzed quantitatively. For extra-thick-walled NPs, dislocations will nucleate below the contact area and cut through the particles till failure. For mid-thick-walled NPs, however, dislocations will emit from the inner surface and slip towards the outer surface. For thin-walled NPs, elastic buckling is the cause of failure. Compared to solid NPs, hollow NPs with wall thickness being around half of its outer radius can achieve significant improvement in both strength and deformability.

  15. Time-dependent deformation at elevated temperatures in basalt from El Hierro, Stromboli and Teide volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, P. M.; Fahrner, D.; Harnett, C. E.; Fazio, M.

    2014-12-01

    Time dependent deformation describes the process whereby brittle materials deform at a stress level below their short-term material strength (Ss), but over an extended time frame. Although generally well understood in engineering (where it is known as static fatigue or "creep"), knowledge of how rocks creep and fail has wide ramifications in areas as diverse as mine tunnel supports and the long term stability of critically loaded rock slopes. A particular hazard relates to the instability of volcano flanks. A large number of flank collapses are known such as Stromboli (Aeolian islands), Teide, and El Hierro (Canary Islands). Collapses on volcanic islands are especially complex as they necessarily involve the combination of active tectonics, heat, and fluids. Not only does the volcanic system generate stresses that reach close to the failure strength of the rocks involved, but when combined with active pore fluid the process of stress corrosion allows the rock mass to deform and creep at stresses far lower than Ss. Despite the obvious geological hazard that edifice failure poses, the phenomenon of creep in volcanic rocks at elevated temperatures has yet to be thoroughly investigated in a well controlled laboratory setting. We present new data using rocks taken from Stromboli, El Heirro and Teide volcanoes in order to better understand the interplay between the fundamental rock mechanics of these basalts and the effects of elevated temperature fluids (activating stress corrosion mechanisms). Experiments were conducted over short (30-60 minute) and long (8-10 hour) time scales. For this, we use the method of Heap et al., (2011) to impose a constant stress (creep) domain deformation monitored via non-contact axial displacement transducers. This is achieved via a conventional triaxial cell to impose shallow conditions of pressure (<25 MPa) and temperature (<200 °C), and equipped with a 3D laboratory seismicity array (known as acoustic emission, AE) to monitor the micro

  16. Progression of spinal deformity in wheelchair-dependent patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who are not treated with steroids: coronal plane (scoliosis) and sagittal plane (kyphosis, lordosis) deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, F; Zurakowski, D; Bui, T; Darras, B T

    2014-01-01

    We determined the frequency, rate and extent of development of scoliosis (coronal plane deformity) in wheelchair-dependent patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) who were not receiving steroid treatment. We also assessed kyphosis and lordosis (sagittal plane deformity). The extent of scoliosis was assessed on sitting anteroposterior (AP) spinal radiographs in 88 consecutive non-ambulatory patients with DMD. Radiographs were studied from the time the patients became wheelchair-dependent until the time of spinal fusion, or the latest assessment if surgery was not undertaken. Progression was estimated using a longitudinal mixed-model regression analysis to handle repeated measurements. Scoliosis ≥ 10° occurred in 85 of 88 patients (97%), ≥ 20° in 78 of 88 (89%) and ≥ 30° in 66 of 88 patients (75%). The fitted longitudinal model revealed that time in a wheelchair was a highly significant predictor of the magnitude of the curve, independent of the age of the patient (p lordosis (16 (27%) abnormal and seven (11%) normal). This study provides a baseline to assess the effects of steroids and other forms of treatment on the natural history of scoliosis in patients with DMD, and an approach to assessing spinal deformity in the coronal and sagittal planes in wheelchair-dependent patients with other neuromuscular disorders.

  17. Deformation of superplastic alloys at relatively low strain rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grivas, D.

    1978-02-01

    The superplastic and sub-superplastic creep properties of Pb-Sn eutectic and Al-Zn eutectoid alloys were studied. Various thermomechanical treatments we tested to check the possibilities of whether the subsuperplastic deformation mechanism is affected by these treatments. All thermomechanical histories were found to reveal the same stress exponent, which is believed to be indicative of the predominant mechanism. The mechanical data in the low stress region lead us to suggest that dislocation glide is the predominant mechanism in this region. At higher stresses extensive grain boundary sliding takes place and the dislocation movement is directed to relieve the stress concentration developed by the grain movement.

  18. Effect of deformation temperature and strain rate on semi-solid deformation behavior of spray-formed Al-70 %Si alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Di; YANG Bin; ZHANG Ji-shan; ZHANG Yong-an; XIONG Bai-qing

    2005-01-01

    Spray-formed Al-70%Si(mass fraction) alloys were deformed by compression in the semi-solid state.The effects of the deformation temperature, strain rate and the microstructure were studied. Two strain rates(1 s-1and 0.1 s-1) and six deformation temperatures (600 ℃, 720 ℃ , 780 ℃, 900 ℃, 1 000 ℃ and 1 100 ℃) were chosen. The stress-strain curve exhibits a peak at low strain and then decreases to a plateau before it starts to increase again as the strain increases. The stress required for deformation at lower strain rate and at higher deformation temperatures is less than those at higher strain rate and at lower deformation temperatures. Four mechanisms of semisolid deformation can be used to explain the different behaviors of the stress-strain curves under different conditions.

  19. Deformation and Shear Band Development in an Ultrahigh Carbon Steel During High Strain Rate Deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D R; Syn, C K; Sherby, O D

    2004-07-06

    The mechanical response of a pearlitic UHCS-1.3C steel deformed at approximately 4000 s{sup -1} to large strains ({var_epsilon} = -0.9) has been studied. Failure, at both the macroscopic and the microscopic levels has been evaluated, and the ability of the material to absorb energy in compression has been examined. Failure occurred by the development of a shear band. However before failure, extensive buckling of the carbide plates was observed and the UHCS-1.3C material exhibited significant potential for compressive ductility and energy absorption due to the distributed buckling of these plates. Strain localization during adiabatic shear band development resulted in the formation of austenite. Subsequent cooling produced a divorced-eutectoid transformation with associated deformation, which resulted in a microstructure consisting of 50 to 100 nm sized grains. The stress-strain behavior within the shear band has also been determined. The results are used to critically evaluate the maximum shear stress criterion of shear band development. New criteria for the development of shear bands are developed based on a strain energy concept.

  20. Time-Dependent Flexural Deformation Beneath the Emperor Seamounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, P.; Watts, A. B.; Kim, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Hawaii-Emperor seamount chain stretches over 6000 km from the Big Island of Hawaii to the subduction cusp off Kamchatka and represents a near-continuous record of hotspot volcanism since the Late Cretaceous. The load of these seamounts and islands has caused the underlying lithosphere to deform, developing a flexural flanking moat that is now largely filled with volcanoclastic sediments. Because the age differences between the seafloor and the seamounts vary by an order of magnitude or more along the chain, the Hawaii-Emperor chain and surrounding area is considered a natural laboratory for lithospheric flexure and has been studied extensively in order to infer the rheology of the oceanic lithosphere. While most investigations have focused on the Hawaiian Islands and proximal seamounts (where data sets are more complete, including seismic reflection and refraction, swath bathymetry and even mapping and dating of drowned reef terraces), far fewer studies have examined the flexural deformation beneath the remote Emperor chain. Preliminary analysis of satellite altimetry data shows the flexural moats to be associated with very large negative gravity anomalies relative to the magnitudes of the positive anomalies over the loads, suggesting considerable viscous or viscoelastic relaxation since the loads were emplaced 50-80 Myr ago. In our study, we will attempt to model the Emperor seamount chain load as a superposition of individual elliptical Gaussian seamounts with separate loading histories. We use Optimal Robust Separation (ORS) techniques to extract the seamount load from the regional background bathymetry and partition the residual load into a set of individual volcanoes. The crustal age grid and available seamount dates are used to construct a temporal loading model and evaluate the flexural response of the lithosphere beneath the Emperor seamounts. We explore a variety of rheological models and loading scenarios that are compatible with the inferred load

  1. Influence of cooling rate on cracking and plastic deformation during impact and indentation of borosilicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehnder, Christoffer; Bruns, Sebastian; Peltzer, Jan-Niklas; Durst, Karsten; Korte-Kerzel, Sandra; Möncke, Doris

    2017-03-01

    The influence of a changing glass topology on local mechanical properties was studied in a multi-technique nanomechanical approach. The glass response against sharp contacts can result in structural densification, plastic flow or crack initiation. Using instrumented indentation testing, the mechanical response was studied in different strain rate regimes for a sodium-boro-silicate glass (NBS) exhibiting altering structures due to varying processing conditions. Comparison with data from former studies as well as with literature data on other glass structures helped to elucidate the role of the borate and silicate sub-networks and to understand the overall mechanical properties of the mixed glass systems. A peculiarity of some of the NBS glasses tested in this study is the fact that the connectivity of the borate and silicate entities depends on the sample’s thermal history. While the influence on macroscopic material properties such as E and H is minor, the onset of cracking indeed is influenced by those structural changes within the glass. Rapidly quenched glass shows an improved crack resistance, which is even more pronounced at high strain rates. Studies on various processing conditions further indicate that this transition is closely related to the cooling rate around Tg. The strain rate dependence of cracking is discussed in terms of the occurrence of shear deformation and densification.

  2. Shape-dependent global deformation modes of large protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloshevsky, Gennady V.; Hassanein, Ahmed; Jordan, Peter C.

    2010-05-01

    Conformational changes are central to the functioning of pore-forming proteins that open and close their molecular gates in response to external stimuli such as pH, ionic strength, membrane voltage or ligand binding. Normal mode analysis (NMA) is used to identify and characterize the slowest motions in the gA, KcsA, ClC-ec1, LacY and LeuT Aa proteins at the onset of gating. Global deformation modes of the essentially cylindrical gA, KcsA, LacY and LeuT Aa biomolecules are reminiscent of global twisting, transverse and longitudinal motions in a homogeneous elastic rod. The ClC-ec1 protein executes a splaying motion in the plane perpendicular to the lipid bilayer. These global collective deformations are determined by protein shape. New methods, all-atom Monte Carlo Normal Mode Following and its simplification using a rotation-translation of protein blocks (RTB), are described and applied to gain insight into the nature of gating transitions in gA and KcsA. These studies demonstrate the severe limitations of standard NMA in characterizing the structural rearrangements associated with gating transitions. Comparison of all-atom and RTB transition pathways in gA clearly illustrates the impact of the rigid protein block approximation and the need to include all degrees of freedom and their relaxation in computational studies of protein gating. The effects of atomic level structure, pH, hydrogen bonding and charged residues on the large-scale conformational changes associated with gating transitions are discussed.

  3. Effects of deformation temperature and rate on compressive deformation behaviour of Y 112 die cast aluminum alloy in semi-solid state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ming-bo; HU Hong-jun; TANG Li-wen; DAI Bing

    2006-01-01

    The semi-solid compression deformation behaviour of Y112 die casting aluminum alloy with nondendritic structure obtained under the semi-solid isothermal treatment condition of 570 ℃ and 120 min, was investigated by means of Gleeble-1500 thermal-mechanical simulator. The results show that, when the strain is lower than 0.8, along with the compression strain increasing,the compression stress firstly increases rapidly, then decreases gradually. Under the condition of different deformation temperatures and deformation rates, the maximium compression stress is obtained simultaneously when the strain is 0.07 approximately.Furthermore, when the deformation rate keeps a constant, the compression stress decreases along with the deformation temperature increasing, and when the deformation temperature keeps a constant, the compression stress increases along with the deformation rate increasing.

  4. Effect of Strain Rate on Deformation Behavior of AlCoCrFeNi High-Entropy Alloy by Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, L.; Jiao, Z. M.; Yuan, G. Z.; Ma, S. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Yang, H. J.; Zhang, Y.; Qiao, J. W.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, nanoindentation tests with continuous stiffness measurement technique were measured to investigate the deformation behavior of a high-entropy alloy AlCoCrFeNi under different indentation strain rates at room temperature. Results suggest that the creep behavior exhibits remarkable strain rate dependence. In-situ scanning images showed a conspicuous pileup around the indents, indicating that an extremely localized plastic deformation occurred during the nanoindentation. Under different strain rates, elastic modulus basically remains unchanged, while the hardness decreases with increasing indentation depth due to the indentation size effect. Furthermore, the modulus and hardness of AlCoCrFeNi HEAs are greater than that of the Al x CoCrFeNi ( x = 0.3,0.5) at the strain rate of 0.2 s-1 due to its higher negative enthalpy of mixing related to the atomic binding force, and the solid solution strengthening induced by the lattice distortion, respectively.

  5. Bertram Hopkinson's pioneering work and the dislocation mechanics of high rate deformations and mechanically induced detonations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Ronald W

    2014-05-13

    Bertram Hopkinson was prescient in writing of the importance of better measuring, albeit better understanding, the nature of high rate deformation of materials in general and, in particular, of the importance of heat in initiating detonation of explosives. This report deals with these subjects in terms of post-Hopkinson crystal dislocation mechanics applied to high rate deformations, including impact tests, Hopkinson pressure bar results, Zerilli-Armstrong-type constitutive relations, shock-induced deformations, isentropic compression experiments, mechanical initiation of explosive crystals and shear banding in metals.

  6. Microstructural Characteristics of High Rate Plastic Deformation in Elektron (trademark) WE43 Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Microstructural Characteristics of High Rate Plastic Deformation in Elektron ™ WE43 Magnesium Alloy by Joseph Hamilton, Sarah T. Brennan...Ground, MD 21005-5069 ARL-RP-363 April 2012 Microstructural Characteristics of High Rate Plastic Deformation in Elektron ™ WE43 Magnesium...Alloy Joseph Hamilton, Sara T. Brennan, and Yongho Sohn University of Central Florida Bruce Davis and Rick DeLorme Magnesium Elektron North

  7. The effect of heat developed during high strain rate deformation on the constitutive modeling of amorphous polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Keivan H.; Zamani, Jamal; Guedes, Rui M.; Ferreira, Fernando J.

    2016-02-01

    An adiabatic constitutive model is proposed for large strain deformation of polycarbonate (PC) at high strain rates. When the strain rate is sufficiently high such that the heat generated does not have time to transfer to the surroundings, temperature of material rises. The high strain rate deformation behavior of polymers is significantly affected by temperature-dependent constants and thermal softening. Based on the isothermal model which first was introduced by Mulliken and Boyce et al. (Int. J. Solids Struct. 43:1331-1356, 2006), an adiabatic model is proposed to predict the yield and post-yield behavior of glassy polymers at high strain rates. When calculating the heat generated and the temperature changes during the step by step simulation of the deformation, temperature-dependent elastic constants are incorporated to the constitutive equations. Moreover, better prediction of softening phenomena is achieved by the new definition for softening parameters of the proposed model. The constitutive model has been implemented numerically into a commercial finite element code through a user material subroutine (VUMAT). The experimental results, obtained using a split Hopkinson pressure bar, are supported by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and Decompose/Shift/Reconstruct (DSR) method. Comparison of adiabatic model predictions with experimental data demonstrates the ability of the model to capture the characteristic features of stress-strain curve of the material at very high strain rates.

  8. Half-Lives of Proton Emitters With a Deformed Density-Dependent Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Yi-Bin; REN Zhong-Zhou; NI Dong-Dong; SHENG Zong-Qiang

    2010-01-01

    @@ Half-lives of proton radioactivity are investigated with a deformed density-dependent model. The single folding potential which is dependent on deformation and orientation is employed to calculate the proton decay width through the deformed potential barrier. In addition, the spectroscopic factor is taken into account in the calcu-lation, which is obtained in the relativistic mean field theory with NL3. The calculated results of semi-spherical nuclei are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data, and the results of well-deformed nuclei are also satisfactory. Moreover, a formula for the spherical proton emission half-life based on the Gamow quantum tunneling theory is presented.

  9. Coupled-Channels Study of α-DECAY Rates for Deformed Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Dongdong; Ren, Zhongzhou

    The generalized density-dependent cluster model is devoted to calculate α-decay half-lives of spherical and deformed nuclei. The multi-channel cluster model is developed to describe the α-decay fine structure in heavy deformed nuclei, including half-lives and branching ratios. After a brief review of these two models, special cases of the α-decay fine structure are presented. Calculations are separately performed using the coupled-channels and WKB approaches.

  10. Unusual distance dependences of electron transfer rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss-Petermann, Martin; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-07-28

    Usually the rates for electron transfer (kET) decrease with increasing donor-acceptor distance, but Marcus theory predicts a regime in which kET is expected to increase when the transfer distance gets longer. Until recently, experimental evidence for such counter-intuitive behavior had been very limited, and consequently this effect is much less well-known than the Gaussian free energy dependence of electron transfer rates leading to the so-called inverted driving-force effect. This article presents the theoretical concepts that lead to the prediction of electron transfer rate maxima at large donor-acceptor distances, and it discusses conditions that are expected to favor experimental observations of such behavior. It continues with a consideration of specific recent examples in which electron transfer rates were observed to increase with increasing donor-acceptor distance, and it closes with a discussion of the importance of this effect in the context of light-to-chemical energy conversion.

  11. Possible Time Dependent Deformation over Socorro Magma Body from GPS and InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havazli, E.; Wdowinski, S.; Amelug, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Socorro Magma Body (SMB) is one of the largest, currently active magma intrusions in the Earth's continental crust. The area of Socorro is a segment of the Rio Grande Rift that display a broad seismic anomaly and ground deformation. The seismic reflector is imaged at 19 km depth coinciding with the occurrence of numerous small earthquake swarms. Broad crustal uplift was also observed above this reflector and led to the hypothesis of the presence of a large mid-crustal sill-like magma body. Previous geodetic studies over the area reveal ground deformation at the rate of 2-3 mm/yr from 1992 to 2006. The magma body was modeled as a penny-shaped crack of 21 km radius at 19 km depth based on InSAR results [Finnegan et. al., 2009]. In this study we expand the uplift measurement period over the SMB to two decades by using additional InSAR and GPS observations. We extended the InSAR observation record by analyzing 27 Envisat scenes acquired during the years 2006-2010. Continuous GPS observation acquired by the SC01 station since 2001 and three more recent Plate Boundary Observatory stations, which were installed between 2005 and 2011, provide high temporal record of uplift over the past decade and a half. We analyzed the InSAR data using ROI_PAC software package and calculated the temporal evolution of the vertical displacement using time series analysis. Preliminary results of 2006-2010 Envisat data show no significant deformation above the 1-2 mm noise level, which disagree with the previous ERS-1/2 results; 2-3 mm/yr during 1992-2006. This disagreement suggests a time dependent uplift of the SMB, which is also supported by GPS observations. The average uplift rate of the SC01 station is 0.9±0.02 mm/yr for 2001-2015 and 0.6±0.08 mm/yr for 2006-2010. Furthermore the SC01 time series exhibits episodic uplift events. The observed time dependent uplift suggests that magma supply in the middle crust may also occur episodically, as in shallow magmatic systems.

  12. Dynamic recrystallization of electroformed copper liners of shaped charges in high—strain—rate plastic deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WenhuaiTian; QiSun; 等

    2002-01-01

    The microstructures in the electroformed copper liners of shaped charges after high-strain-rate plastic deformation were in vestigated by transmission microscopy(TEM).Meanwhile,the orientation distribution of the grains in the recovered slug was examined by the electron backscattering Kikuchi pattern(EBSP) technique.EBSP analysis illustrated that unlike the as-formed electroformed copper liners of shaped charges the grain orientations in the recovered slug are distributed along randomly all the directions after undergoing heavily strain deformation at high-strain rate.Optical microscopy shows a typical recrystallization structure,and TEM examination reveals dislocation cells existed in the thin foil specimen.These results indicate that dynamic recovery and recrystallization occur during this plastic deformation process,and the associated deformation temperature is considered to be higher than 0.6 times the melting point of copper.

  13. Dynamic recrystallization of electroformed copper liners of shaped charges in high-strain-rate plastic deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The microstructures in the electroformed copper liners of shaped charges after high-strain-rate plastic deformation were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Meanwhile, the orientation distribution of the grains in the recovered slug was examined by the electron backscattering Kikuchi pattern (EBSP) technique. EBSP analysis illustrated that unlike the as-formed electroformed copper linersof shaped charges the grain orientations in the recovered slug are distributed along randomly all the directions after undergoing heavily strain deformation at high-strain rate. Optical microscopy shows a typical recrystallization structure, and TEM examination reveals dislocation cells existed in the thin foil specimen. These results indicate that dynamic recovery and recrystallization occur during this plastic deformation process, and the associated deformation temperature is considered to be higher than 0.6 times the melting point of copper.

  14. Time-dependent deformation behavior of polyvinylidene fluoride binder: Implications on the mechanics of composite electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santimetaneedol, Arnuparp; Tripuraneni, Rajasekhar; Chester, Shawn A.; Nadimpalli, Siva P. V.

    2016-11-01

    The majority of existing battery models that simulate composite electrode behavior assume the binder as a linear elastic material due to lack of a thorough understanding of time-dependent mechanical behavior of binders. Here, thin films of polyvinylidene fluoride binder, prepared according to commercial battery manufacturing method, are subjected to standard monotonic, load-unload, and relaxation tests to characterize the time-dependent mechanical behavior. The strain in the binder samples is measured with the digital image correlation technique to eliminate experimental errors. The experimental data showed that for (charging/discharging) time scales of practical importance, polyvinylidene fluoride behaves more like an elastic-viscoplastic material as opposed to a visco-elastic material; based on this observation, a simple elastic-viscoplastic model, calibrated against the data is adopted to represent the deformation behavior of binder in a Si-based composite electrode; the lithiation/delithiation process of this composite was simulated at different C rates and the stress/strain behavior was monitored. It is observed that the linear elastic assumption of the binder leads to inaccurate results and the time-dependent constitutive behavior of the binder not only leads to accurate prediction of the mechanics but is an essential step towards developing advanced multi-physics models for simulating the degradation behavior of batteries.

  15. Examples of deformation-dependent flow simulations of conjunctive use with MF-OWHM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R. T.; Traum, J.; Boyce, S. E.; Schmid, W.; Hughes, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    The dependency of surface- and groundwater flows and aquifer hydraulic properties on deformation induced by changes in aquifer head is not accounted for in the standard version of MODFLOW. A new USGS integrated hydrologic model, MODFLOW-OWHM, incorporates this dependency by linking subsidence and mesh deformation with changes in aquifer transmissivity and storage coefficient, and with flows that also depend on aquifer characteristics and land-surface geometry. This new deformation-dependent approach is being used for the further development of the integrated Central Valley hydrologic model (CVHM) in California. Preliminary results from this application and from hypothetical test cases of similar systems show that changes in canal flows, stream seepage, and evapotranspiration from groundwater (ETgw) are sensitive to deformation. Deformation feedback has been shown to also have an indirect effect on conjunctive surface- and groundwater use components with increased stream seepage and streamflows influencing surface-water deliveries and return flows. In the Central Valley model, land subsidence may significantly degrade the ability of the major canals to deliver surface water from the Delta to the San Joaquin and Tulare basins. Subsidence can also affect irrigation demand and ETgw, which, along with altered surface-water supplies, causes a feedback response resulting in changed estimates of groundwater pumping for irrigation. This modeling feature also may improve the impact assessment of dewatering-induced land subsidence/uplift (following irrigation pumping or coal-seam gas extraction) on surface receptors, inter-basin transfers, and surface infrastructure integrity.

  16. Nonrigid registration with tissue-dependent filtering of the deformation field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staring, Marius; Klein, Stefan; Pluim, Josien P W [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA, Room Q0S.459, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2007-12-07

    In present-day medical practice it is often necessary to nonrigidly align image data. Current registration algorithms do not generally take the characteristics of tissue into account. Consequently, rigid tissue, such as bone, can be deformed elastically, growth of tumours may be concealed, and contrast-enhanced structures may be reduced in volume. We propose a method to locally adapt the deformation field at structures that must be kept rigid, using a tissue-dependent filtering technique. This adaptive filtering of the deformation field results in locally linear transformations without scaling or shearing. The degree of filtering is related to tissue stiffness: more filtering is applied at stiff tissue locations, less at parts of the image containing nonrigid tissue. The tissue-dependent filter is incorporated in a commonly used registration algorithm, using mutual information as a similarity measure and cubic B-splines to model the deformation field. The new registration algorithm is compared with this popular method. Evaluation of the proposed tissue-dependent filtering is performed on 3D computed tomography (CT) data of the thorax and on 2D digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images. The results show that tissue-dependent filtering of the deformation field leads to improved registration results: tumour volumes and vessel widths are preserved rather than affected.

  17. The rate sensitivity and plastic deformation of nanocrystalline tantalum films at nanoscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yongli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nanoindentation creep and loading rate change tests were employed to examine the rate sensitivity (m and hardness of nanocrystalline tetragonal Ta films. Experimental results suggested that the m increased with the decrease of feature scale, such as grain size and indent depth. The magnitude of m is much less than the corresponding grain boundary (GB sliding deformation with m of 0.5. Hardness softening behavior was observed for smaller grain size, which supports the GB sliding mechanism. The rate-controlling deformation was interpreted by the GB-mediated processes involving atomic diffusion and the generation of dislocation at GB.

  18. Implementation of an Associative Flow Rule Including Hydrostatic Stress Effects Into the High Strain Rate Deformation Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Gilat, Amos

    2003-01-01

    A previously developed analytical formulation has been modified in order to more accurately account for the effects of hydrostatic stresses on the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymer matrix composites. State variable constitutive equations originally developed for metals have been modified in order to model the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymeric materials. To account for the effects of hydrostatic stresses, which are significant in polymers, the classical J2 plasticity theory definitions of effective stress and effective inelastic strain, along with the equations used to compute the components of the inelastic strain rate tensor, are appropriately modified. To verify the revised formulation, the shear and tensile deformation of two representative polymers are computed across a wide range of strain rates. Results computed using the developed constitutive equations correlate well with experimental data. The polymer constitutive equations are implemented within a strength of materials based micromechanics method to predict the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymer matrix composites. The composite mechanics are verified by analyzing the deformation of a representative polymer matrix composite for several fiber orientation angles across a variety of strain rates. The computed values compare well to experimentally obtained results.

  19. Time-Dependent Deformation Modelling for a Chopped-Glass Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, W

    2001-08-24

    Time-dependent deformation behavior of a polymeric composite with chopped-glass-fiber reinforcement was investigated for automotive applications, The material under stress was exposed to representative automobile service environments. Results show that environment has substantial effects on time-dependent deformation behavior of the material. The data were analyzed and experimentally-based models developed for the time-dependent deformation behavior as a basis for automotive structural durability design criteria.

  20. Emergence of Coherent Localized Structures in Shear Deformations of Temperature Dependent Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaounis, Theodoros; Olivier, Julien; Tzavaras, Athanasios E.

    2016-12-01

    Shear localization occurs in various instances of material instability in solid mechanics and is typically associated with Hadamard-instability for an underlying model. While Hadamard instability indicates the catastrophic growth of oscillations around a mean state, it does not by itself explain the formation of coherent structures typically observed in localization. The latter is a nonlinear effect and its analysis is the main objective of this article. We consider a model that captures the main mechanisms observed in high strain-rate deformation of metals, and describes shear motions of temperature dependent non-Newtonian fluids. For a special dependence of the viscosity on the temperature, we carry out a linearized stability analysis around a base state of uniform shearing solutions, and quantitatively assess the effects of the various mechanisms affecting the problem: thermal softening, momentum diffusion and thermal diffusion. Then, we turn to the nonlinear model, and construct localized states—in the form of similarity solutions—that emerge as coherent structures in the localization process. This justifies a scenario for localization that is proposed on the basis of asymptotic analysis in uc(Katsaounis) and uc(Tzavaras) (SIAM J Appl Math 69:1618-1643, 2009).

  1. Emergence of coherent localized structures in shear deformations of temperature dependent fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Katsaounis, Theodoros

    2016-11-25

    Shear localization occurs in various instances of material instability in solid mechanics and is typically associated with Hadamard-instability for an underlying model. While Hadamard instability indicates the catastrophic growth of oscillations around a mean state, it does not by itself explain the formation of coherent structures typically observed in localization. The latter is a nonlinear effect and its analysis is the main objective of this article. We consider a model that captures the main mechanisms observed in high strain-rate deformation of metals, and describes shear motions of temperature dependent non-Newtonian fluids. For a special dependence of the viscosity on the temperature, we carry out a linearized stability analysis around a base state of uniform shearing solutions, and quantitatively assess the effects of the various mechanisms affecting the problem: thermal softening, momentum diffusion and thermal diffusion. Then, we turn to the nonlinear model, and construct localized states - in the form of similarity solutions - that emerge as coherent structures in the localization process. This justifies a scenario for localization that is proposed on the basis of asymptotic analysis in \\\\cite{KT}.

  2. Effects of strain rate and confining pressure on the deformation and failure of shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.M. (Schlumberger Cambridge Research (GB)); Sheppard, M.C. (Anadrill/Schlumberger (US)); Houwen, O.H. (Sedco Forex (FR))

    1991-06-01

    Previous work on shale mechanical properties has focused on the slow deformation rates appropriate to wellbore deformation. Deformation of shale under a drill bit occurs at a very high rate, and the failure properties of the rock under these conditions are crucial in determining bit performance and in extracting lithology and pore-pressure information from drilling parameters. Triaxial tests were performed on two nonswelling shales under a wide range of strain rates and confining and pore pressures. At low strain rates, when fluid is relatively free to move within the shale, shale deformation and failure are governed by effective stress or pressure (i.e., total confining pressure minus pore pressure), as is the case for ordinary rock. If the pore pressure in the shale is high, increasing the strain rate beyond about 0.1%/sec causes large increases in the strength and ductility of the shale. Total pressure begins to influence the strength. At high stain rates, the influence of effective pressure decreases, except when it is very low (i.e., when pore pressure is very high); ductility then rises rapidly. This behavior is opposite that expected in ordinary rocks. This paper briefly discusses the reasons for these phenomena and their impact on wellbore and drilling problems.

  3. CHARADE: A characteristic code for calculating rate-dependent shock-wave response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.N.; Tonks, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    In this report we apply spatially one-dimensional methods and simple shock-tracking techniques to the solution of rate-dependent material response under flat-plate-impact conditions. This method of solution eliminates potential confusion of material dissipation with artificial dissipative effects inherent in finite-difference codes, and thus lends itself to accurate calculation of elastic-plastic deformation, shock-to-detonation transition in solid explosives, and shock-induced structural phase transformation. Equations are presented for rate-dependent thermoelastic-plastic deformation for (100) planar shock-wave propagation in materials of cubic symmetry (or higher). Specific numerical calculations are presented for polycrystalline copper using the mechanical threshold stress model of Follansbee and Kocks with transition to dislocation drag. A listing of the CHARADE (for characteristic rate dependence) code and sample input deck are given. 26 refs., 11 figs.

  4. Suppression of dislocations at high strain rate deformation in a twinning-induced plasticity steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Z.Y. [Shenzhen Institute of Research and Innovation, The University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Huang, W., E-mail: whuang@szu.edu.cn [Department of Civil Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen (China); Huang, M.X., E-mail: mxhuang@hku.hk [Shenzhen Institute of Research and Innovation, The University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-03-25

    The increase of strain rate generally enhances dislocation evolution in face-centred cubic (FCC) metals. However, by synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments, the present work demonstrates for the first time that a higher strain rate leads to a lower dislocation density in a twinning-induced plasticity steel with an FCC structure. This unexpected suppression of dislocation evolution has been attributed to the temperature increase due to dissipative heating at high strain rate deformation.

  5. Piezoelectric and deformation potential effects of strain-dependent luminescence in semiconductor quantum well structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Aihua; Peng, Mingzeng; Willatzen, Morten;

    2017-01-01

    , in the framework of the 6 × 6 k·p Hamiltonian for the valence states, to directly assess the interplay between the spin-orbit coupling and the strain-induced deformation potential for the interband momentum-matrix element. We numerically addressed problems of both the infinite and IQWs with piezoelectric fields...... to elucidate the effects of the piezoelectric potential and the deformation potential on the strain-dependent luminescence. The experimentally measured photoluminescence variatio½n as a function of pressure can be qualitatively explained by the theoretical results....

  6. Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the quadrupole deformation in sd-shell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P A Ganai; J A Sheikh; I Maqbool; R P Singh

    2009-11-01

    Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the quadrupole deformation is studied in the middle of the sd-shell for 28Si and 27Si isotopes using the spherical shell model approach. The shell model calculations have been performed using the standard universal sd-shell (USD) interaction and the canonical partition function constructed from the calculated eigensolutions. It is shown that the extracted average quadrupole moments show a transitional behaviour as a function of temperature and the infered transitional temperature is shown to vary with angular momentum. The quadrupole deformation of the individual eigenstate is also analysed.

  7. Discrete dislocation plasticity analysis of loading rate-dependent static friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H.; Deshpande, V. S.; Van der Giessen, E.

    2016-08-01

    From a microscopic point of view, the frictional force associated with the relative sliding of rough surfaces originates from deformation of the material in contact, by adhesion in the contact interface or both. We know that plastic deformation at the size scale of micrometres is not only dependent on the size of the contact, but also on the rate of deformation. Moreover, depending on its physical origin, adhesion can also be size and rate dependent, albeit different from plasticity. We present a two-dimensional model that incorporates both discrete dislocation plasticity inside a face-centred cubic crystal and adhesion in the interface to understand the rate dependence of friction caused by micrometre-size asperities. The friction strength is the outcome of the competition between adhesion and discrete dislocation plasticity. As a function of contact size, the friction strength contains two plateaus: at small contact length (≲0.6 μ m), the onset of sliding is fully controlled by adhesion while for large contact length (≳10 μ m), the friction strength approaches the size-independent plastic shear yield strength. The transition regime at intermediate contact size is a result of partial de-cohesion and size-dependent dislocation plasticity, and is determined by dislocation properties, interfacial properties as well as by the loading rate.

  8. Interaction of heat production, strain rate and stress power in a plastically deforming body under tensile test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglietti, A.

    1982-01-01

    At high strain rates the heat produced by plastic deformation can give rise to a rate dependent response even if the material has rate independent constitutive equations. This effect has to be evaluated when interpreting a material test, or else it could erroneously be ascribed to viscosity. A general thermodynamic theory of tensile testing of elastic-plastic materials is given in this paper; it is valid for large strain at finite strain rates. It enables discovery of the parameters governing the thermodynamic strain rate effect, provides a method for proper interpretation of the results of the tests of dynamic plasticity, and suggests a way of planning experiments in order to detect the real contribution of viscosity.

  9. Interaction of heat production, strain rate and stress power in a plastically deforming body under tensile test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglietti, A.

    1982-01-01

    At high strain rates the heat produced by plastic deformation can give rise to a rate dependent response even if the material has rate independent constitutive equations. This effect has to be evaluated when interpreting a material test, or else it could erroneously be ascribed to viscosity. A general thermodynamic theory of tensile testing of elastic-plastic materials is given in this paper; it is valid for large strain at finite strain rates. It enables discovery of the parameters governing the thermodynamic strain rate effect, provides a method for proper interpretation of the results of the tests of dynamic plasticity, and suggests a way of planning experiments in order to detect the real contribution of viscosity.

  10. Time-dependent q-deformed bi-coherent states for generalized uncertainty relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouba, Laure

    2015-07-01

    We consider the time-dependent bi-coherent states that are essentially the Gazeau-Klauder coherent states for the two dimensional noncommutative harmonic oscillator. Starting from some q-deformations of the oscillator algebra for which the entire deformed Fock space can be constructed explicitly, we define the q-deformed bi-coherent states. We verify the generalized Heisenberg's uncertainty relations projected onto these states. For the initial value in time, the states are shown to satisfy a generalized version of Heisenberg's uncertainty relations. For the initial value in time and for the parameter of noncommutativity θ = 0, the inequalities are saturated for the simultaneous measurement of the position-momentum observables. When the time evolves, the uncertainty products are different from their values at the initial time and do not always respect the generalized uncertainty relations.

  11. A Rate-Dependent Crystal Plasticity Analysis of Orientation Stability in Biaxial Tension of Magnesium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donghong Zhang; Saiyi Li

    2011-01-01

    The development of texture during plastic deformation plays an important role in determining the stretch formability of magnesium alloy sheets. In this study, the orientation stability during equibiaxial tension of magnesium was analyzed based on three dimensional lattice rotations calculated by using a rate-dependent crystal plasticity model and assuming five different combinations of slip modes. The results show that no orientations can satisfy the stability criteria with both zero rotation velocity and convergent orientation flow in all dimensions. However, relatively stable orientations with zero rotation velocity and an overall convergence are found. They are featured by characteristic alignments of specific crystallographic directions in the macroscopic axis of contraction, depending on the slip modes involved in the deformation. It is also shown that the orientation stability varies significantly with the deviation of deformation mode from equibiaxial tension. The simulation results are briefly discussed in comparison with pre-existing experiments.

  12. Modelling plastic deformation of metals over a wide range of strain rates using irreversible thermodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, M.; Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J.; Bouaziz, O.; Van der Zwaag, S.

    2009-01-01

    Based on the theory of irreversible thermodynamics, the present work proposes a dislocation-based model to describe the plastic deformation of FCC metals over wide ranges of strain rates. The stress-strain behaviour and the evolution of the average dislocation density are derived. It is found that t

  13. Elastic stresses and plastic deformations in 'Santa Clara' tomato fruits caused by package dependent compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEREIRA ADRIANA VARGAS

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the fruit compression behavior aiming to develop new tomato packages. Deformations caused by compression forces were observed inside packages and in individual 'Santa Clara' tomato fruit. The forces applied by a transparent acrylic lever to the fruit surface caused pericarp deformation and the flattened area was proportional to the force magnitude. The deformation was associated to the reduction in the gas volume (Vg, caused by expulsion of the air from the loculus cavity and reduction in the intercellular air volume of the pericarp. As ripening advanced, smaller fractions of the Vg reduced by the compressive force were restored after the stress was relieved. The lack of complete Vg restoration was an indication of permanent plastic deformations of the stressed cells. Vg regeneration (elastic recovery was larger in green fruits than in the red ones. The ratio between the applied force and the flattened area (flattening pressure, which depends on cell turgidity, decreased during ripening. Fruit movements associated with its depth in the container were observed during storage in a transparent glass container (495 x 355 x 220 mm. The downward movement of the fruits was larger in the top layers because these movements seem to be driven by a summation of the deformation of many fruits in all layers.

  14. On rate-dependent dissipation effects in electro-elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, Prashant; Steinmann, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the mathematical modelling of large strain electro-viscoelastic deformations in electro-active polymers. Energy dissipation is assumed to occur due to mechanical viscoelasticity of the polymer as well as due to time-dependent effective polarisation of the material. Additive decomposition of the electric field $\\mathbb{E} = \\mathbb{E}_e + \\mathbb{E}_v$ and multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient $\\mathbf{F} = \\mathbf{F}_e \\mathbf{F}_v$ are proposed to model the internal dissipation mechanisms. The theory is illustrated with some numerical examples in the end.

  15. Surveying of the deformed terraces and crust shortening rate in the northwestern Tarim Basin: Comment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ The paper of Shen et al., entitled "Surveying of the deformed terraces and crust shortening rate in the northwest Tarim Basin", was published in Chinese Science Bulletin (Vol. 46, No. 12)[1]. Shen et al. found the deformation of Late Pleistocene to Holocene terraces of the Boguzi River across the Artushi Anticline in the northwest Tarim Basin close to the Pamir, and made level survey and differential GPS measurement, which is of great importance to geodynamics for research on the coupling of Tianshan Mountains uplifting and Tarim Basin depression. But their understanding to the deformation mechanics of terraces and the calculation methods of crustal shortening are open to discussion. Therefore, we discuss it with Shen Jun et al.

  16. Flow rate-pressure drop relation for deformable shallow microfluidic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christov, Ivan C.; Cognet, Vincent; Stone, Howard A.

    2013-11-01

    Laminar flow in devices fabricated from PDMS causes deformation of the passage geometry, which affects the flow rate-pressure drop relation. Having an accurate flow rate-pressure drop relation for deformable microchannels is of importance given that the flow rate for a given pressure drop can be as much as 500% of the flow rate predicted by Poiseuille's law for a rigid channel. proposed a successful model of the latter phenomenon by heuristically coupling linear elasticity with the lubrication approximation for Stokes flow. However, their model contains a fitting parameter that must be found for each channel shape by performing an experiment. We present a perturbative derivation of the flow rate-pressure drop relation in a shallow deformable microchannel using Kirchoff-Love theory of isotropic quasi-static plate bending and Stokes' equations under a ``double lubrication'' approximation (i.e., the ratio of the channel's height to its width and of the channel's width to its length are both assumed small). Our result contains no free parameters and confirms Gervais et al.'s observation that the flow rate is a quartic polynomial of the pressure drop. ICC was supported by NSF Grant DMS-1104047 and the U.S. DOE through the LANL/LDRD Program; HAS was supported by NSF Grant CBET-1132835.

  17. Effect of temperature on segmental mobility is reduced, but not eliminated during constant strain rate deformation of poly(methyl methacrylate) glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Kelly; Bending, Benjamin; Ricci, Josh; Ediger, M. D.

    2015-03-01

    Deformation of polymer glasses is typically nonlinear and not understood at a molecular level. During deformation, segmental motion in polymer glasses can be accelerated by over a factor of 1000. While temperature has a big impact on the segmental motion of polymer glasses in the absence of deformation, some workers suggest that segmental mobility in polymer glasses undergoing deformation should be independent of temperature. We have measured segmental mobility in poly(methyl methacrylate) glasses during constant strain rate deformation at four different temperatures using a probe reorientation method. We find that during deformation, the dependence of segmental mobility on temperature is significantly reduced, though not eliminated. This is in qualitative agreement with the work of Chen and Schweizer. We also find that the KWW β parameter increases during deformation, indicating a narrower distribution of segmental relaxation times. At a given strain rate, this increase of the KWW β parameter is larger at lower temperature. We thank the National Science Foundation (DMR-1404614) for support of this research.

  18. Modelling plastic deformation of metals over a wide range of strain rates using irreversible thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Mingxin; Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, Pedro E J; Zwaag, Sybrand van der [Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS, Delft (Netherlands); Bouaziz, Olivier, E-mail: mingxin.huang@arcelormittal.com [ArcelorMittal Maizieres, Research and Development, Voie Romaine-BP30320, 57283 Maizieres-les-Metz Cedex (France)

    2009-07-15

    Based on the theory of irreversible thermodynamics, the present work proposes a dislocation-based model to describe the plastic deformation of FCC metals over wide ranges of strain rates. The stress-strain behaviour and the evolution of the average dislocation density are derived. It is found that there is a transitional strain rate ({approx} 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}) over which the phonon drag effects appear, resulting in a significant increase in the flow stress and the average dislocation density. The model is applied to pure Cu deformed at room temperature and at strain rates ranging from 10{sup -5} to 10{sup 6} s{sup -1} showing good agreement with experimental results.

  19. Competitive effects of nuclear deformation and density dependence of $\\Lambda\\!N$ interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Isaka, M; Rijken, T h A

    2016-01-01

    Competitive effects of nuclear deformation and density dependence of $\\Lambda\\!N$-interaction in $\\Lambda$ binding energies $B_\\Lambda$ of hypernuclei are studied systematically on the basis of the baryon-baryon interaction model ESC including many-body effects. By using the $\\Lambda\\!N$ G-matrix interaction derived from ESC, we perform microscopic calculations of $B_\\Lambda$ in $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei within the framework of the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics under the averaged-density approximation. The calculated values of $B_\\Lambda$ reproduce experimental data within a few hundred keV in the wide mass regions from 9 to 51. It is found that competitive effects of nuclear deformation and density dependence of $\\Lambda\\!N$-interaction work decisively for fine tuning of $B_\\Lambda$ values.

  20. Deformation character of the aluminum alloy AA 6063 depending on the homogenization state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelesoglu, Erguen [Yildiz Technical Univ. (Turkey). Research and Development Centre for Industrial Cooperation; Erarslan, Yaman [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Yildiz Technical Univ. (Turkey); Oezer, Goekhan [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Yildiz Technical Univ. (Turkey); Yildiz Technical Univ. (TR). Balkan Centre of Advanced Casting Technologies (BCACT)

    2009-07-01

    In the work for this contribution, homogenization heat treatment was evaluated with respect to its effect on deformation ability of AA6063 aluminum alloy which is a widely used extrusion alloy. The samples machined from extrusion billets were homogenized at 540 C, 560 C and 580 C for a time period of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 h. The homogenization state of the samples was assessed via microstructure examination. The hardness of the samples was determined using Brinell hardness method. Tensile test was carried out in order to evaluate the deformation ability. Tensile strength and elongation at rupture were compared depending on the homogenization state of the alloy. Depending on the homogenization grade, the elongation at rupture was increased, and samples showed a gradual shift from brittle fracture to ductile fracture. (orig.)

  1. Relation of ongoing deformation rates to the subduction zone process in southern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauber, Jeanne; McClusky, Simon; King, Robert

    1997-11-01

    The rate and orientation of ongoing strain associated with subduction of the Pacific plate and the accretion of the Yakutat terrane to southern Alaska has been estimated at 13 sites from Global Positioning System measurements made in June 1993 and 1995. Along the Gulf of Alaska coast near Cape Yakataga, the average rate of deformation, relative to Fairbanks, was ≈38 mm/yr at N32°W. Further inland, above the region where the dip of the downgoing Pacific plate changes from about 10° to >30°, the deformation rate was ≈12mm/yr at N26°W. In the Sourdough/Paxson area, the deformation rate drops to 2-5 mm/yr and suggests a low short-term deformation rate across the Denali fault. Elastic straining of the overriding plate due to back-slip on a main thrust zone with an average dip of about 10° can account for the overall rate and distribution of short-term compressional strain across south central Alaska. Above the transitional region between unstable and stable sliding we suggest that strain associated with ≈15 mm/yr of right-lateral strike-slip occurs also. If the strain accumulated since the two 1899 earthquakes (both MW=8.1) from the offshore Pamplona fault zone to south of the Border Ranges fault (down-dip width ≈100 km) was seismically released on a single fault it would correspond to a M=8.1 earthquake.

  2. Specimen- and grain-size dependence of compression deformation behavior in nanocrystalline copper

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Norihiko L.; Kashioka, Daisuke; Hirato, Tetsuji; Inui, Haruyuki

    2014-01-01

    The compression deformation behavior of electrodeposited nanocrystalline copper pillars with average grain sizes (d) of 360, 100, and 34 nm has been investigated as a function of specimen size (D). The yield stress for nanocrystalline pillars with d = 360 and 100 nm does not depend on specimen size, exhibiting essentially the bulk yield stress until the specimen size is reduced down to the critical values ((D/d)∗ = 35 and 85), below which the yield stress decreases with the decrease in specim...

  3. Over Decades to Centuries, Interseismic Coupling and Deformation Rates along Subduction Zones Are Not Steady

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzner, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    It has long been assumed that once the postseismic phase of the earthquake cycle is complete, years to decades after a large earthquake, deformation and strain accumulation during the interseismic phase of the seismic cycle are uniform. Although postseismic transients have been widely documented and result from a variety of processes, they are commonly observed to decay to a "background" deformation rate. The belief was that, subsequently, this "background" interseismic strain rate (or pattern of interseismic deformation) remained steady over most of the seismic cycle [Savage and Thatcher, 1992, JGR]. More recently, researchers discovered processes and phenomena previously unappreciated along subduction zones, including slow slip events at a range of timescales, abrupt changes in the width of the locked region, and changes over time in plate coupling. Yet our understanding of the range of behavior during the interseismic period along a subduction zone is generally limited by the brevity of modern geodetic networks, which may be at most two or three decades old. Taking advantage of high-resolution paleogeodetic data from coral microatolls in Sumatra, I show that it is the rule, not the exception, that interseismic rates vary over the course of a seismic cycle, and from one seismic cycle to the next. Although interseismic vertical deformation rates (uplift or subsidence) may be linear for decades to a century, the rate at any site may shift abruptly to a new rate and remain fixed at the new rate for decades more. The coupling pattern before one great earthquake may be dramatically different from the pattern leading up to a similar, co-located earthquake. Some sections of a megathrust may be nearly uncoupled for a century or more, yet appear fully coupled at other times and sustain large displacements during an ensuing earthquake. In general, the coral records suggest that our observations and understanding of fault behavior between earthquakes are still far from

  4. An Experimental Study on Rate-sensitive Tensile Deformation Behaviour of Fe-based Shape Memory Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwamoto Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it is attempted to apply high manganese steel including Fe-based shape memory alloy to vibration dampers. Especially, the alloy indicates a special characteristic as a well-known shape memory effect. By coupling between this effect and its plastic deformation, it can be considered that its deformation behaviour at higher deformation rate becomes quite complicated and still unclear. In this study, tensile tests of Fe-based shape memory alloy at different rate of deformation are conducted by using two different testing apparatuses such as the conventional material testing machine and impact testing machine based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique. In the tests, temperature rise is captured during the quasi-static deformation. After the quasi-static test, the recovery strain due to shape memory effect is measured by heating up the deformed specimens to Af temperature. Finally, the rate sensitivity of the alloy is discussed including the recovery strain.

  5. Strain rate and temperature dependent mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanjgaokar, Nikhil J.

    Nanocrystalline metal films are candidate materials for microelectronics and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS). The long term mechanical stability of metal films requires quantitative understanding of their thermo-mechanical behavior in the large range of operating strain rates and temperatures. This dissertation research studied (a) the role of thermally activated processes based on the strain rate and temperature dependent mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline Au thin films, and (b) deformation processes at nominally elastic loads that lead to creep strain over a moderate temperature range that is relevant to MEMS applications. The rate dependent mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline Au thin films was first investigated at room temperature ~ 25 °C and at strain rates between 10-6 to 20 s-1. The use of digital image correlation (DIC) facilitated repeatable and accurate measurements of fullfield strain from free-standing nanocrystalline Au thin films. The experimental stress-strain curves were used to calculate activation volumes for two film thicknesses (0.85 mum, and 1.75 mum), which were 4.5b3 and 8.1b3, at strain rates smaller than 10-4 s-1 and 12.5b3 and 14.6b3 at strain rates higher than 10-4 s-1. The reduced activation volume and increased strain rate sensitivity at slow strain rates were attributed to grain boundary (GB) diffusional processes that result in creep strain. The room temperature strain rate results were augmented with microscale strain rate experiments at temperatures up to 110 °C. Two methods for heating free-standing microscale thin film specimens, namely uniform heating using a custom-built microheater and resistive (Joule) heating, were evaluated using a combination of full-field strain measurements by optical microscopy and full-field temperature measurements by infrared (IR) thermal imaging. It was shown for the first time that the Joule specimen heating method results in large underestimation of the inelastic material properties

  6. Temperature dependence of dynamic deformation in FCC metals, aluminum and invar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Laura; Swift, D. C.; Austin, R. A.; Florando, J. N.; Hawreliak, J.; Lazicki, A.; Saculla, M. D.; Eakins, D.; Bernier, J. V.; Kumar, M.

    2017-01-01

    Laser-driven shock experiments were performed on fcc metals, aluminum and invar, at a range of initial temperatures from approximately 120-800 K to explore the effect of initial temperature on dynamic strength properties at strain rates reaching up to 107 s-1. In aluminum, velocimetry data demonstrated an increase of peak stress of the elastic wave, σE, with initial temperature. Alternatively, for invar, σE exhibits little-to-no decrease over the same initial temperature range. Aluminum's unusual deformation behavior is found to primarily be due to anharmonic vibrational effects. Differences in the magnetic structure of aluminum and invar can account for discrepancies in high rate deformation behavior.

  7. Development of wide-range constitutive equations for calculations of high-rate deformation of metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preston D.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For development of models of strength and compressibility of metals in wide range of pressures (up to several megabar and strain rates ~ 1÷108 s−1, the method of dynamic tests is used. Since direct measurement of strength is impossible under complicated intensive high-rate loading, a formal model is created at first, and then it is updated basing on comparison with many experiments, which are sensitive to shear strength. Elastic-plastic, viscous-elastic-plastic and relaxation integral models became nowadays most commonly used. The basic unsolved problems in simulation of high-rate deformation of metals are mentioned in the paper.

  8. A fault-based model for crustal deformation, fault slip-rates and off-fault strain rate in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yuehua; Shen, Zheng-Kang

    2016-01-01

    We invert Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity data to estimate fault slip rates in California using a fault‐based crustal deformation model with geologic constraints. The model assumes buried elastic dislocations across the region using Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast Version 3 (UCERF3) fault geometries. New GPS velocity and geologic slip‐rate data were compiled by the UCERF3 deformation working group. The result of least‐squares inversion shows that the San Andreas fault slips at 19–22  mm/yr along Santa Cruz to the North Coast, 25–28  mm/yr along the central California creeping segment to the Carrizo Plain, 20–22  mm/yr along the Mojave, and 20–24  mm/yr along the Coachella to the Imperial Valley. Modeled slip rates are 7–16  mm/yr lower than the preferred geologic rates from the central California creeping section to the San Bernardino North section. For the Bartlett Springs section, fault slip rates of 7–9  mm/yr fall within the geologic bounds but are twice the preferred geologic rates. For the central and eastern Garlock, inverted slip rates of 7.5 and 4.9  mm/yr, respectively, match closely with the geologic rates. For the western Garlock, however, our result suggests a low slip rate of 1.7  mm/yr. Along the eastern California shear zone and southern Walker Lane, our model shows a cumulative slip rate of 6.2–6.9  mm/yr across its east–west transects, which is ∼1  mm/yr increase of the geologic estimates. For the off‐coast faults of central California, from Hosgri to San Gregorio, fault slips are modeled at 1–5  mm/yr, similar to the lower geologic bounds. For the off‐fault deformation, the total moment rate amounts to 0.88×1019  N·m/yr, with fast straining regions found around the Mendocino triple junction, Transverse Ranges and Garlock fault zones, Landers and Brawley seismic zones, and farther south. The overall California moment rate is 2.76×1019

  9. Effect of strain rates on deformation behaviors of an in situ Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Chu, M. Y.; Wang, Y. S.; Yang, H. J.; Qiao, J. W.

    2016-06-01

    Quasi-static and dynamic deformation behaviors of an in situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composite: Ti56Zr18V10Cu4Be12 were investigated. Upon quasi-static compression, the composite exhibits distinguished work hardening, accompanied by the ultimate strength of 1290 MPa and the plasticity of 20 %. The improved plasticity is attributed to the multiplication of shear bands within the glass matrix and pileups of dislocations within the dendrites. Upon dynamic compression, the stable plastic flow prevails and the yielding stress increases with the strain rate. The macroscopic plasticity decreases considerably, since the shear bands cannot be effectively hindered by dendrites with deteriorated toughness. The dendrite-dominated mechanism results in the positive strain-rate sensitivity, and the Cowper-Symonds model is employed to depict the strain-rate dependency of yielding strength.

  10. Surface deformation versus eruption rates of the two Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruptions; implications for the magma plumbing system and origin of melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, R.; Sigmundsson, F.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Arnadottir, T.; Hoskuldsson, A.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Magnusson, E.

    2010-12-01

    Repeated geodetic measurements reveal how active volcanoes deform at the surface, and data inversion facilitates inferences about the related volume changes of underlying deformation sources. During an eruption, drainage from a shallow magma chamber can lead to direct correlation between magma flow rate and deformation rates, as observed previously in Iceland. In the simplest case, a constant scale factor relates magma flow rates, deformation rates on the surface, and inferred volume contraction of subsurface sources. The scale factor will depend on magma source geometry, compressibility of residing magma and rheological properties of the crustal rocks. During the two eruptions of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland, in 2010 an entirely different behaviour was observed. This behaviour may be related to the rather unique plumbing system of this particular Icelandic volcano, which appears to have no shallow magma chamber. For the initial flank eruption, where olivine basalt were erupted during a period of about 3 weeks, the average eruption rate was comparable to the inferred flow rate during formation of a pre-eruptive network of intrusions. Detailed GPS and InSAR measurements have revealed a model for the subsurface magma plumbing system active prior to and during the events with multiple sills around 5 km depth. Such intrusions have occurred intermittently in this particular volcano for the past 18 years. During the subsequent explosive trachy-andesitic summit eruption, the relation between deformation rate and magma flow rate is more complex. A large discrepancy exists between the inferred erupted volume and the computed volume change based on the associated surface deformation. When recalculated to dense rock equivalent, the inferred volume change responsible for the main deformation is about one order of magnitude smaller than the sum of mapped erupted volumes. Furthermore, the spatial pattern of the deformation is complex, and not directly related to the

  11. Hardness and phase analysis of IN 718 deformed at high strain rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renhof, L; Guder, S; Werner, E

    2004-06-01

    Specimens of the nickel base alloy IN 718 deformed at high strain rate (approximately 10 s(-1)), as realized in a screw press, have higher strength than parts forged conventionally in a hydraulic press. Microstructure analyses in light and transmission electron microscopes reveal the precipitation of very small Ni(3)Nb particles (gamma"-phase) to be the reason for the increased hardness. Several processing routes are discussed and analyzed in relation to the TTT-diagram of IN 718.

  12. RBC-NOS-dependent S-nitrosylation of cytoskeletal proteins improves RBC deformability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke Grau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Red blood cells (RBC possess a nitric oxide synthase (RBC-NOS whose activation depends on the PI3-kinase/Akt kinase pathway. RBC-NOS-produced NO exhibits important biological functions like maintaining RBC deformability. Until now, the cellular target structure for NO, to exert its influence on RBC deformability, remains unknown. In the present study we analyzed the modification of RBC-NOS activity by pharmacological treatments, the resulting influence on RBC deformability and provide first evidence for possible target proteins of RBC-NOS-produced NO in the RBC cytoskeletal scaffold. METHODS/FINDINGS: Blood from fifteen male subjects was incubated with the NOS substrate L-arginine to directly stimulate enzyme activity. Direct inhibition of enzyme activity was induced by L-N5-(1-Iminoethyl-ornithin (L-NIO. Indirect stimulation and inhibition of RBC-NOS were achieved by applying insulin and wortmannin, respectively, substances known to affect PI3-kinase/Akt kinase pathway. The NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP and the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO were additionally applied as NO positive and negative controls, respectively. Immunohistochemical staining was used to determine phosphorylation and thus activation of RBC-NOS. As a marker for NO synthesis nitrite was measured in plasma and RBCs using chemiluminescence detection. S-nitrosylation of erythrocyte proteins was determined by biotin switch assay and modified proteins were identified using LC-MS. RBC deformability was determined by ektacytometry. The data reveal that activated RBC-NOS leads to increased NO production, S-nitrosylation of RBC proteins and RBC deformability, whereas RBC-NOS inhibition resulted in contrary effects. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study first-time provides strong evidence that RBC-NOS-produced NO modifies RBC deformability through direct S-nitrosylation of cytoskeleton proteins, most likely α- and

  13. Deformation T-Cup: a new multi-anvil apparatus for controlled strain-rate deformation experiments at pressures above 18 GPa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Simon A; Weidner, Donald J; McCormack, Richard J; Whitaker, Matthew L; Bailey, Edward; Li, Li; Vaughan, Michael T; Dobson, David P

    2014-08-01

    A new multi-anvil deformation apparatus, based on the widely used 6-8 split-cylinder, geometry, has been developed which is capable of deformation experiments at pressures in excess of 18 GPa at room temperature. In 6-8 (Kawai-type) devices eight cubic anvils are used to compress the sample assembly. In our new apparatus two of the eight cubes which sit along the split-cylinder axis have been replaced by hexagonal cross section anvils. Combining these anvils hexagonal-anvils with secondary differential actuators incorporated into the load frame, for the first time, enables the 6-8 multi-anvil apparatus to be used for controlled strain-rate deformation experiments to high strains. Testing of the design, both with and without synchrotron-X-rays, has demonstrated the Deformation T-Cup (DT-Cup) is capable of deforming 1-2 mm long samples to over 55% strain at high temperatures and pressures. To date the apparatus has been calibrated to, and deformed at, 18.8 GPa and deformation experiments performed in conjunction with synchrotron X-rays at confining pressures up to 10 GPa at 800 °C .

  14. Deformation T-Cup: A new multi-anvil apparatus for controlled strain-rate deformation experiments at pressures above 18 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Simon A.; Weidner, Donald J.; McCormack, Richard J.; Whitaker, Matthew L.; Bailey, Edward; Li, Li; Vaughan, Michael T.; Dobson, David P.

    2014-08-01

    A new multi-anvil deformation apparatus, based on the widely used 6-8 split-cylinder, geometry, has been developed which is capable of deformation experiments at pressures in excess of 18 GPa at room temperature. In 6-8 (Kawai-type) devices eight cubic anvils are used to compress the sample assembly. In our new apparatus two of the eight cubes which sit along the split-cylinder axis have been replaced by hexagonal cross section anvils. Combining these anvils hexagonal-anvils with secondary differential actuators incorporated into the load frame, for the first time, enables the 6-8 multi-anvil apparatus to be used for controlled strain-rate deformation experiments to high strains. Testing of the design, both with and without synchrotron-X-rays, has demonstrated the Deformation T-Cup (DT-Cup) is capable of deforming 1-2 mm long samples to over 55% strain at high temperatures and pressures. To date the apparatus has been calibrated to, and deformed at, 18.8 GPa and deformation experiments performed in conjunction with synchrotron X-rays at confining pressures up to 10 GPa at 800 °C .

  15. DEFORMATION RATE CHANGES OF TECTONIC BELTS ALONG BOUNDARIES OF YUNNAN SICHAUN BLOCK AND RELATION TO GROUPED STRONG EARTHQUAKES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChengWanzheng; YangYongling

    2003-01-01

    Deformation measurements such as short-range leveling, short-baseline, continuous cross-fault strain measurement are carried out at different intervals from 1982 to 2001. All these measurement sites are built across the boundary tectonic belts of Yunnan-Sichuan block. On the basis of these deformation data, the annual deformation rates at all sites are calculated and their change curves with time are plotted respectively. With these calculated results, we analyze the vertical and horizontal movements of tectonic belts of Yunnan-Sichuan block, and the relationship to grouped strong earthquakes occurred in the block are discussed as well. These results show that the tectonic activities in the western and southeastern Yunnan are intensive. Along some eastern boundary belts: from Qujiang, Xiaojiang fault belts in the south of Yunnan to Xianshuihe fault belts in northwestern Sichuan, present annual rate of horizontal deformation decreases. Along Xianshuihe, Xiaojiang and Longmenshan fault belts the rates of vertical deformation change are small, but the vertical deformation change rates along Anninghe and Zemuhe faul tbelts are comparatively large. The comprehensive analysis shows that grouped strong earthquakes will occur probably when the deformation rate changes sharply. Thus we think that sharp changes of deformation rates may be one of the seismic precursors.

  16. DEFORMATION RATE CHANGES OF TECTONIC BELTS ALONG BOUNDARIES OF YUNNAN SICHAUN BLOCK AND RELATION TO GROUPED STRONG EARTHQUAKES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Wanzheng; Yang Yongling

    2003-01-01

    Deformation measurements such as short-range leveling, short-baseline, continuous cross-fault strain measurement are carried out at different intervals from 1982 to 2001. All these measurement sites are built across the boundary tectonic belts of Yunnan-Sichuan block. On the basis of these deformation data, the annual deformation rates at all sites are calculated and their change curves with time are plotted respectively. With these calculated results, we analyze the vertical and horizontal movements of tectonic belts of Yunnan-Sichuan block, and the relationship to grouped strong earthquakes occurred in the block are discussed as well. These results show that the tectonic activities in the western and southeastern Yunnan are intensive. Along some eastern boundary belts: from Qujiang, Xiaojiang fault belts in the south of Yunnan to Xianshuihe fault belts in northwestern Sichuan, present annual rate of horizontal deformation decreases. Along Xianshuihe, Xiaojiang and Longmenshan fault belts the rates of vertical deformation change are small, but the vertical deformation change rates along Anninghe and Zemuhe fault belts are comparatively large. The comprehensive analysis shows that grouped strong earthquakes will occur probably when the deformation rate changes sharply. Thus we think that sharp changes of deformation rates may be one of the seismic precursors.

  17. Revealing Hidden Deformation Sources in New Zealand: a Novel Inversion of GPS Data for Non-Prescriptive Physics-Based Surface Forces and High-Precision Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, L. L.; Haines, A. J.; Wallace, L. M.; Williams, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Monitoring strain accumulation in active deformation zones is vital for studying and preparing for earthquake hazards. New Zealand straddles the complicated boundary between the obliquely converging Australian and Pacific plates. The motion is accommodated largely along the Alpine Fault in the south, through the Marlborough fault system and onto the Hikurangi trench in the north. In addition, a significant component of the motion is distributed on smaller, poorly characterized faults. Dimitrova et al. (2012) showed that the vertical derivatives of horizontal stress (VDoHS) rates are a substantially higher resolution expression of subsurface sources of ongoing deformation than the GPS velocities or GPS derived strain rates. We expand this method to solve the horizontal force balance equations for the VDoHS in 2-D to obtain the highest possible resolution picture of the surface deformation pattern in New Zealand. We invert GPS data from campaign GPS observations spanning from 1995 to 2012 for the VDoHS that best fit the GPS velocities, without prescribing sources or zones of deformation, while fully accounting for the physics of the problem. Using the VDoHS rates we identify (1) areas of deformation due to well-known active faults, (2) areas of poorly characterized deformation, e.g. deformation along faults without slip rate information mapped from palaeo-seismicity, (3) areas of previously unknown deformation, potentially on hidden faults, and (4) areas undergoing post-seismic deformation. The VDoHS are integrated to produce the highest resolution to-date maps of strain rates. We identify an area of extensional areal strain between the Alpine fault and the Main Divide of the central Southern Alps indicating possible gravitational collapse of the Southern Alps. Relationships between the VDoHS and strain rates allow us to calculate the variation in fault slip rate and locking depth for the identified faults, and we show selected results for the Alpine Fault and the

  18. Surgical technique, fusion rates, and planovalgus foot deformity correction with naviculocuneiform fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajis, Adam; Geary, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    Arthrodesis of the naviculocuneiform (NC) joints is not a common procedure, as it is perceived by many to be less reliable or less predictable than arthrodesis of proximal or distal joints in the medial column. There is a subset of patients with planovalgus feet, cavovarus feet, and degenerative arthritis who also have an apex of deformity at the NC joints in whom fusion is indicated. The surgical technique, fusion rates, and deformity correction data for NC fusion in planovalgus feet are evaluated in this report. Twenty-eight patients (33 feet) who underwent surgery between October 2008 and November 2012 were identified who had NC fusion as their only arthrodesis procedure. Medical records and radiographs were reviewed, and time to union was calculated. Twenty patients from that group underwent NC fusion for symptomatic planovalgus feet, and their preoperative and last postoperative weight-bearing radiographs were reviewed and compared for deformity correction. All patients were operated on by the senior author or a senior foot and ankle trainee during fellowship using the same surgical technique, and all patients followed a standardized postoperative rehabilitation protocol. Mean time to union for all 33 NC fusions was 21.7 ± 2 weeks (mean ± SEM). One patient underwent revision for nonunion, resulting in an arthrodesis rate of 97%. For NC fusions in those with planovalgus feet, an improvement in mean lateral talus-first metatarsal angle (Meary's line) from 12.3 ± 1.3 degrees to 5.2 ± 1.2 degrees (P treatment for their condition. NC fusion was a safe and predictable procedure for any of its indications, with a fusion rate similar to that of other joints in the foot albeit with a longer time to union. For patients with symptomatic and flexible planovalgus feet, NC fusion resulted in deformity correction in multiple planes and good symptomatic relief. Level IV, retrospective case series.

  19. Nucleation mechanisms of dynamic recrystallization in Inconel 625 superalloy deformed with different strain rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The effects of strain rates on the hot working characteristics and nucleation mechanisms of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) were studied by optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. Hot compression tests were conducted using a Gleeble-1500 simulator at a true strain of 0.7 in the temperature range of 1000 to 1150 °C and strain rate range of 0.01 to 10.00 s-1. It is found that the size and volume fraction of the DRX grains in hot-deformed Inconel 625 superalloy firstly decreas...

  20. DEPENDENCE OF GRAIN SIZE OF AUSTENITE STEEL OF RAILWAY WHEEL FROM PARAMETERS OF HOT DEFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Vakulenko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The estimation of heat temperature influence and degree of hot reduction of carbon steel on the size of grain аustenite at making of railway wheels. Methodology. The material for research was carbon steel, mark 60 with carbon content of 0,55 and 0,65 %, selected from the fragments of railway wheels. The size of grain аustenite depending on a temperature (from 800 to 1 150 ºC and degrees of hot deformation (10−50 % was determined. The size of grain was determined under a light microscope with the use of quantitative metallography methods. Findings. The use of cooling in the process of hot reduction of the railway wheel will allow dispergating the structure of аustenite on large distances from the surface of the rim. The reason for this is that the volumes of metal after cooling have an increased strength and will be exposed in less degree to the plastic deformation. To compare the cooling layers near-by with the surface of rim, they are more warmed-up in internal volumes of metal. In the conditions of continuity of plastic deformation distribution, having a high temperature, they will be exposed to the reduction on the large total degree of deformation. In consequence of the resulted decisions more even austenitic structure must be formed on the section of rim of railway wheel. To obtain the effect of disperse grain of аustenite at making of the whole-rolled railway wheels it is necessary to decrease the heat temperature of billet under rolling or increase the degree of reduction on the lasts stages of shape-generating deformation. The pause by duration of 1,5 min. after reduction of 20 % at a temperature 950 ºC is sufficiently for processes completion of dynamic and static recrystalization of аustenite carbon steel of the railway wheel. Originality. Increase of plastic deformation degree, especially in the central volumes of rim is accompanied by the decrease of heterogeneity of austenitic structure on his section. The

  1. Point canonical transformation versus deformed shape invariance for position-dependent mass Schrodinger equation

    CERN Document Server

    Quesne, C

    2008-01-01

    On using the known equivalence between the presence of a position-dependent mass (PDM) in the Schr\\"odinger equation and a deformation of the canonical commutation relations, a method based on deformed shape invariance has recently been devised for generating pairs of potential and PDM for which the Schr\\"odinger equation is exactly solvable. This approach has provided the bound-state energy spectrum, as well as the ground-state and the first few excited-state wavefunctions. The general wavefunctions have however remained unknown in explicit form because for their determination one would need the solutions of a rather tricky differential-difference equation. Here we show that solving this equation may be avoided by combining the deformed shape invariance technique with the point canonical transformation method in a novel way. It consists in employing our previous knowledge of the PDM problem energy spectrum to construct a constant-mass Schr\\"odinger equation with similar characteristics and in deducing the PD...

  2. Establishing time-dependent model of deformation modulus caused by bedrock excavation rebound by inverse analysis method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Rock rebound relaxation deformation,or even rock burst,caused by the excavation of dam base and abutment or high rock slope affects their stability and results in the fall of mechanical properties of the rock.So an inverse analysis method was proposed in this paper to establish the time-dependent model of deformation modulus caused by excavation rebound.The basic principle is based on the combination of observed data of the excavation rebound deformation of dam abutment or rock slope,and the calculated rebound deformation by FEM under ground stress at the corresponding time in the excavation process.The norm of the residuals of observed data and calculated data are taken as the objective function.Accordingly,the time-dependent model of bedrock deformation modulus can be established.The method displays its significance in the design of excavation,construction and operation management of dam base and high slope.

  3. Time-dependent q-deformed coherent states for generalized uncertainty relations

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Sanjib; Gouba, Laure; Castro, Paulo G

    2012-01-01

    We investigate properties of generalized time-dependent q-deformed coherent states for a noncommutative harmonic oscillator. The states are shown to satisfy a generalized version of Heisenberg's uncertainty relations. For the initial value in time the states are demonstrated to be squeezed, i.e. the inequalities are saturated, whereas when time evolves the uncertainty product oscillates away from this value albeit still respecting the relations. For the canonical variables on a noncommutative space we verify explicitly that Ehrenfest's theorem hold at all times. We conjecture that the model exhibits revival times to infinite order. Explicit sample computations for the fractional revival times and superrevival times are presented.

  4. Engineering of surface microstructure transformations using high rate severe plastic deformation in machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolghasem, Sepideh

    Engineering surface structures especially at the nanometer length-scales can enable fundamentally new multifunctional property combinations, including tunable physical, mechanical, electrochemical and biological responses. Emerging manufacturing paradigms involving Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD), for manipulating final microstructure of the surfaces are unfortunately limited by poorly elucidated process-structure-performance linkages, which are characterized by three central variables of plasticity: strain, strain-rate and temperature that determine the resulting Ultrafine Grained (UFG) microstructure. The challenge of UFG surface engineering, design and manufacturing can be overcome if and only if the mappings between the central variables and the final microstructure are delineated. The objective of the proposed document is to first envision a phase-space, whose axes are parameterized in terms of the central variables of SPD. Then, each point can correspond to a unique microstructure, characterized by its location on this map. If the parametrization and the population of the datasets are accurately defined, then the mapping is bijective where: i) realizing microstructure designs can be reduced to simply one of tuning process parameters falling within the map s desired subspaces. And, inversely, ii) microstructure prediction is directly possible by merely relating the measured/calculated thermomechanics at each point in the deformation zone to the corresponding spot on the maps. However, the analytic approach to establish this map first requires extensive datasets, where the microstructures are accurately measured for a known set of strain, strain-rate and temperature of applied SPD. Although such datasets do not exist, even after the empirical data is accumulated, there is a lack of formalized statistical outlines in relating microstructural characteristic to the process parameters in order to build the mapping framework. Addressing these gaps has led to this

  5. A numerical and experimental study of temperature effects on deformation behavior of carbon steels at high strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouya, M.; Winter, S.; Fritsch, S.; F-X Wagner, M.

    2017-03-01

    Both in research and in the light of industrial applications, there is a growing interest in methods to characterize the mechanical behavior of materials at high strain rates. This is particularly true for steels (the most important structural materials), where often the strain rate-dependent material behavior also needs to be characterized in a wide temperature range. In this study, we use the Finite Element Method (FEM), first, to model the compressive deformation behavior of carbon steels under quasi-static loading conditions. The results are then compared to experimental data (for a simple C75 steel) at room temperature, and up to testing temperatures of 1000 °C. Second, an explicit FEM model that captures wave propagation phenomena during dynamic loading is developed to closely reflect the complex loading conditions in a Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) – an experimental setup that allows loading of compression samples with strain rates up to 104 s-1 The dynamic simulations provide a useful basis for an accurate analysis of dynamically measured experimental data, which considers reflected elastic waves. By combining numerical and experimental investigations, we derive material parameters that capture the strain rate- and temperature-dependent behavior of the C75 steel from room temperature to 1000 °C, and from quasi-static to dynamic loading.

  6. Strain Rate Dependant Material Model for Orthotropic Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignjevic, Rade

    2016-08-01

    In manufacturing processes anisotropic metals are often exposed to the loading with high strain rates in the range from 102 s-1 to 106 s-1 (e.g. stamping, cold spraying and explosive forming). These types of loading often involve generation and propagation of shock waves within the material. The material behaviour under such a complex loading needs to be accurately modelled, in order to optimise the manufacturing process and achieve appropriate properties of the manufactured component. The presented research is related to development and validation of a thermodynamically consistent physically based constitutive model for metals under high rate loading. The model is capable of modelling damage, failure and formation and propagation of shock waves in anisotropic metals. The model has two main parts: the strength part which defines the material response to shear deformation and an equation of state (EOS) which defines the material response to isotropic volumetric deformation [1]. The constitutive model was implemented into the transient nonlinear finite element code DYNA3D [2] and our in house SPH code. Limited model validation was performed by simulating a number of high velocity material characterisation and validation impact tests. The new damage model was developed in the framework of configurational continuum mechanics and irreversible thermodynamics with internal state variables. The use of the multiplicative decomposition of deformation gradient makes the model applicable to arbitrary plastic and damage deformations. To account for the physical mechanisms of failure, the concept of thermally activated damage initially proposed by Tuller and Bucher [3], Klepaczko [4] was adopted as the basis for the new damage evolution model. This makes the proposed damage/failure model compatible with the Mechanical Threshold Strength (MTS) model Follansbee and Kocks [5], 1988; Chen and Gray [6] which was used to control evolution of flow stress during plastic deformation. In

  7. Modelling deformation rates in the western Gulf of Corinth: rheological constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianetti, S.; Tinti, E.; Giunchi, C.; Cocco, M.

    2008-08-01

    The Gulf of Corinth is one of the most active extensional regions in the Mediterranean area characterized by a high rate of seismicity. However, there are still open questions concerning the role and the geometry of the numerous active faults bordering the basin, as well as the mechanisms governing the seismicity. In this paper, we use a 2-D plane strain finite element analysis to constrain the upper crust rheology by modelling the available deformation data (GPS and geomorphology). We consider a SSW-NNE cross-section of the rift cutting the main active normal faults (Aigion, West Eliki and Off-Shore faults). The models run for 650 Kyr assuming an elasto-viscoplastic rheology and 1.3 cmyr-1 horizontal extension as boundary condition (resulting from GPS data). We model the horizontal and vertical deformation rates and the accumulation of plastic strain at depth, and we compare them with GPS data, with long term uplift rates inferred from geomorphology and with the distribution of seismicity, respectively. Our modelling results demonstrate that dislocation on high-angle normal faults in a plastic crustal layer plays a key role in explaining the extremely localized strain within the Gulf of Corinth. Conversely, the contribution of structures such as the antithetic Trizonia fault or the buried hypothetical subhorizontal discontinuity are not necessary to model observed data.

  8. The Effect of Horizontal Advection of Topography and Time Dependent Crustal Deformation on Tsunami Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, S.; Beroza, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Initial conditions used in tsunami modeling are commonly simplified due to lack of observations, poor understanding of the mechanics of tsunami generation, and limitations on computational power and processing time. First, since the time-varying deformation of the seafloor has a negligible effect far from the source, often, only the static, or the residual deformation is used to excite the tsunami model. However, when the earthquake occurs close to the coast, the dynamic displacement of the seafloor might have a significant effect on coastal wave height and arrival time. Second, it is common to use only the vertical component of the seafloor displacement, while neglecting the horizontal co-seismic displacements in the absence of landslides. While this assumption is valid for a flat or shallowly-dipping seafloor, it has been shown that in certain conditions, such as the combination of a shallow-dipping thrust fault with relatively steep topography, the contribution of the horizontal displacement is significant and might help explain discrepancies in wave height predictions. In this study we are using the abundant observations recorded during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake and tsunami to study the effects of time-varying deformation and the contribution of horizontal seafloor displacement on tsunami generation. We use SPECFEM3D, a spectral element numerical code, to solve the elasto-dynamic problem including wave propagation and the residual static deformation, to determine the time-dependent seafloor deformation. To simulate the earthquake we use a kinematic rupture model, in which the fault slip (magnitude and direction) is determined at each point in space and time for the assumed fault geometry. In order to test the contribution of topography we run the simulation with and without the surface topography and compare the results. In addition, we compare our results to real observations, where they are available, to validate of our model. Finally, our next step will

  9. Time-dependent solution for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed visco-elastic bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyang; van der Wal, Wouter; Vermeersen, Bert

    2017-04-01

    Many icy satellites or planets contain features which suggest a (past) reorientation of the body, such as the tiger stripes on Enceladus and the heart-shaped Sputnik Planum on Pluto. Most of these icy bodies are tidally locked and this creates a large tidal bulge which is about three times of its centrifugal (equatorial) bulge. To study the reorientation of such rotating tidally deformed body is complicated and most previous studies apply the so-called fluid limit method. The fluid limit approach ignores the viscous response of the body and assumes that it immediately reaches its fluid limit when simulating the reorientation due to a changing load. As a result, this method can only simulate cases when the change in the load is much slower than the dominant viscous modes of the body. For other kinds of load, for instance, a Heaviside load due to an impact which creates an instant relocation of mass, it does not give us a prediction of how the reorientation is accomplished (e.g. How fast? Along which path?). We establish a new method which can give an accurate time-dependent solution for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed bodies. Our method can be applied both semi-analytically or numerically (with finite element method) to include features such as lateral heterogeneity or non-linear material. We also present an extension of our method to simulate the e ffect of a fossil bulge. With our method, we show that reorientation of a tidally deformed body driven by a positive mass anomaly near the poles has a preference for rotating around the tidal axis instead of towards it, contrary to predictions in previous studies. References Hu, H., W. van der Wal and L.L.A. Vermeersen (2017). A numerical method for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed visco-elastic bodies. Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, doi:10.1002/2016JE005114, 2016JE005114. Matsuyama, I. and Nimmo, F. (2007). Rotational stability of tidally deformed planetary bodies. Journal of Geophysical

  10. Influence of the tempurature and rate conditions of deformation on the mechanical properties of 15Kh5M steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muckhin, V.N.; Nikulina, O.A.; Teplova, N.I.; Vatnik, L.E.

    1986-10-01

    This paper studies the influence of temperature and rate conditions of deformation of 15Kh5M steel on its mechanical properties for the purpose of determination of the sensitivity of the steel to deform rate, features of the change in uniform and concentrated plasticity, and the deformation capacity in long operating times, since 15Kh steel is widely used for production of the tubular coils of furnances of catalytic reformers of gasolines, which operate at temperatures up to 873 K and a pressure up to 6 MPa in a dangerously explosive medium.

  11. Slip rates on San Francisco Bay area faults from anelastic deformation of the continental lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eric L.; Andrews, D. J.

    2000-11-01

    Long-term slip rates on major faults in the San Francisco Bay area are predicted by modeling the anelastic deformation of the continental lithosphere in response to regional relative plate motion. The model developed by Bird and Kong [1994] is used to simulate lithospheric deformation according to a Coulomb frictional rheology of the upper crust and a dislocation creep rheology at depth. The focus of this study is the long-term motion of faults in a region extending from the creeping section of the San Andreas fault to the south up to the latitude of Cape Mendocino to the north. Boundary conditions are specified by the relative motion between the Pacific plate and the Sierra Nevada-Great Valley microplate [Argus and Gordon, 2000]. Rheologic-frictional parameters are specified as independent variables, and prediction errors are calculated with respect to geologic estimates of slip rates and maximum compressive stress directions. The model that best explains the region-wide observations is one in which the coefficient of friction on all of the major faults is less than 0.15, with the coefficient of friction for the San Andreas fault being approximately 0.09, consistent with previous inferences of San Andreas fault friction. Prediction error increases with lower fault friction on the San Andreas, indicating a lower bound of μSAF > 0.08. Discrepancies with respect to previous slip rate estimates include a higher than expected slip rate along the peninsula segment of the San Andreas fault and a slightly lower than expected slip rate along the San Gregorio fault.

  12. Time-Dependent Deformation at Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Field (Nevada) Measured With Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar and Modeled with Multiple Working Hypotheses of Coupled Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigl, K. L.; Ali, S. T.; Akerley, J.; Baluyut, E.; Cardiff, M. A.; Davatzes, N. C.; Foxall, W.; Fratta, D.; Kreemer, C.; Mellors, R. J.; Lopeman, J.; Spielman, P.; Wang, H. F.

    2015-12-01

    To measure time-dependent deformation at the Brady Hot Springs geothermal field in western Nevada, we analyze interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data acquired between 2004 and 2014 by five satellite missions, including: ERS-2, Envisat, ALOS, TerraSAR-X, and TanDEM-X. The resulting maps of deformation show an elliptical subsiding area that is ~4 km by ~1.5 km. Its long axis coincides with the strike of the dominant normal-fault system at Brady. Within this bowl of subsidence, the interference pattern shows several smaller features with length scales of the order of ~1 km. This signature occurs consistently in all of the well-correlated interferometric pairs spanning several months. Results from inverse modeling suggest that the deformation is a result of volumetric contraction in shallow units, no deeper than 600 m, that are probably associated with damaged regions where faults interact via thermal (T), hydrological (H), mechanical (M), and chemical (C) processes. Such damaged zones are expected to extend downward along steeply dipping fault planes, providing high-permeability conduits to the production wells. Using time series analysis, we test the hypothesis that geothermal production drives the observed deformation. We find a good correlation between the observed deformation rate and the rate of production in the shallow wells. We explore first-order models to calculate the time-dependent deformation fields produced by coupled processes, including: thermal contraction of rock (T-M coupling), decline in pore pressure (H-M coupling), and dissolution of minerals over time (H-C-M coupling). These processes are related to the heterogeneity of hydro-geological and material properties at the site. This work is part of a project entitled "Poroelastic Tomography by Adjoint Inverse Modeling of Data from Seismology, Geodesy, and Hydrology" (PoroTomo) http://geoscience.wisc.edu/feigl/porotomo.

  13. Deformation Rates From Climate Cycles in Marine Synorogenic Turbidites, Jaca Basin, Spanish Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasio, D. J.; Kodama, K. P.; Pares, J. M.; Hinnov, L. A.

    2007-12-01

    Synsedimentary structures provide a link between depositional and deformational processes in orogenic belts. Marine growth strata offer great promise in determining precise long-term deformation rates such as uplift, shortening, fault-slip, and folding rates. Magnetostratigraphy and cyclostratigraphy of the Eocene Arguis Fm., a delta slope deposit and the overlying delta plain Belsue-Atares Fm. monitors the varying pace of deformation at Pico del Aguila, a transverse decollement fold in the south Pyrenean foothills. Anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) data show hierarchical cyclicity at all predicted Milankovitch frequencies. ARM is a proxy for fine-grained detrital magnetite concentration. The age distorting effects of pre-lithification compaction on bed thickness and on the rock and paleomagnetic data series were removed using empirical calibration of anisotropy of anhysteretic remanence magnetization to volume loss from laboratory compaction experiments. The decompacted ARM depth domain was converted to time using an improved magnetostratigraphy within the growth section. Tuning filtered ARM data series to the precession index according to the LA2004 orbital model refined the magnetostratigraphic time scale. The precession-tuned growth strata mapped with precision GPS record variable folding rates at 100skyr timescales for 7 Myr and55° of limb tilt. Folding rates accelerate twice to ~30°/Myr and are punctuated by more gradual decelerations to 0-3°/Myr. Submarine folding rates at Pico del Aguila are attributed to episodic thrusting in the fold core along a roof ramp fault and along the basal decollement. Formation-scale deposition in the Paleogene wedge-top basin responded to tectonic forcing, however, clastic facies patterns in the prodeltaic and slope environments reflect regional uplift controlling sediment supply, sea level variations controlling delta front position and climate forcing (e.g. monsoon strength and frequency, pedogenesis) of runoff

  14. Deformation and failure of OFHC copper under high strain rate shear compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Andrew; Testa, Gabriel; Bonora, Nicola; Iannitti, Gianluca; Persechino, Italo; Colliander, Magnus Hörnqvist

    2017-01-01

    Hat-shaped specimen geometries were developed to generate high strain, high-strain-rates deformation under prescribed conditions. These geometries offer also the possibility to investigate the occurrence of ductile rupture under low or negative stress triaxiality, where most failure models fail. In this work, three tophat geometries were designed, by means of extensive numerical simulation, to obtain desired stress triaxiality values within the shear region that develops across the ligament. Material failure was simulated using the Continuum Damage Model (CDM) formulation with a unilateral condition for damage accumulation and validated by comparing with quasi-static and high strain rate compression tests results on OFHC copper. Preliminary results seem to indicate that ductile tearing initiates at the specimen corner location where positive stress triaxiality occurs because of local rotation and eventually propagates along the ligament.

  15. On the response of Escherichia coli to high rates of deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzmaurice, B. C.; Painter, J. D.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Wood, D. C.; Hazael, R.; McMillan, P. F.

    2017-01-01

    While a large body of work exists on the low strain-rate loading of biological systems such as bacteria, there is a paucity of information on the response of such organisms at high rates of deformation. Here, the response of a readily accessible strain of bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli), has been examined under shock loading conditions. Although previous studies have shown greatly reduced growth in shock conditions up to several GPa, relationships between loading conditions and bacterial response have yet to be fully elucidated. Initial results of a more rigorous investigation into the 1D shock loading response of E. coli are presented here, expectantly leading to a more comprehensive view of its behaviour when exposed to high pressures. Comparison has been drawn to provide insight into the importance of the nature of the loading regime to the survival of these biological systems.

  16. GNSS seismometer: Seismic phase recognition of real-time high-rate GNSS deformation waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Zhaosheng; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Gang; Jia, Zhige; Wang, Dijin; Zhou, Yu; Lin, Mu

    2016-12-01

    High-rate global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) can potentially be used as seismometers to capture short-period instantaneous dynamic deformation waves from earthquakes. However, the performance and seismic phase recognition of the GNSS seismometer in the real-time mode, which plays an important role in GNSS seismology, are still uncertain. By comparing the results of accuracy and precision of the real-time solution using a shake table test, we found real-time solutions to be consistent with post-processing solutions and independent of sampling rate. In addition, we analyzed the time series of real-time solutions for shake table tests and recent large earthquakes. The results demonstrated that high-rate GNSS have the ability to retrieve most types of seismic waves, including P-, S-, Love, and Rayleigh waves. The main factor limiting its performance in recording seismic phases is the widely used 1-Hz sampling rate. The noise floor also makes recognition of some weak seismic phases difficult. We concluded that the propagation velocities and path of seismic waves, macro characteristics of the high-rate GNSS array, spatial traces of seismic phases, and incorporation of seismographs are all useful in helping to retrieve seismic phases from the high-rate GNSS time series.

  17. Metastable vacuum decay and θ dependence in gauge theory. Deformed QCD as a toy model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Bhoonah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a number of different ingredients related to the θ dependence, metastable excited vacuum states and other related subjects using a simplified version of QCD, the so-called “deformed QCD”. This model is a weakly coupled gauge theory, which, however, preserves all the relevant essential elements allowing us to study hard and nontrivial features which are known to be present in real strongly coupled QCD. Our main focus in this work is to test the ideas related to the metastable vacuum states (which are known to be present in strongly coupled QCD in large N limit in a theoretically controllable manner using the “deformed QCD” as a toy model. We explicitly show how the metastable states emerge in the system, why their lifetime is large, and why these metastable states must be present in the system for the self-consistency of the entire picture of the QCD vacuum. We also speculate on possible relevance of the metastable vacuum states in explanation of the violation of local P and CP symmetries in heavy ion collisions.

  18. Effect of microstructure on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xing; Shi, Zhijun; Lau, Andrew; Liu, Changqin; Yang, Guang; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2016-05-01

    This study is focused on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose (BC) hydrogel that can be strain-rate insensitive, hardening, softening, or strain-rate insensitive in various ranges of strain rate. BC hydrogel consists of randomly distributed nanofibres and a large content of free water; thanks to its ideal biocompatibility, it is suitable for biomedical applications. Motivated by its potential applications in complex loading conditions of body environment, its time-dependent behaviour was studied by means of in-aqua uniaxial tension tests at constant temperature of 37 °C at various strain rates ranging from 0.000 1s(-1) to 0.3s(-1). Experimental results reflect anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour that was not documented before. Micro-morphological observations allowed identification of deformation mechanisms at low and high strain rates in relation to microstructural changes. Unlike strain-rate softening behaviours in other materials, reorientation of nanofibres and kinematics of free-water flow dominate the softening behaviour of BC hydrogel at high strain rates.

  19. Effects of strain rate on the hot deformation behavior and dynamic recrystallization in China low activation martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yuanyuan [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Chen, Xizhang, E-mail: kernel.chen@gmail.com [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Madigan, Bruce [Montana Tech, Butte, MT (United States); Cao, Hongyan [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Konovalov, Sergey [Center for Collective Use Material Science, Siberian State Industrial University, Novokuznetsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Average grain sizes of 1.8 μm are observed at strain rate of 10 s{sup −1}. • Peak stress value increased, but strain decreased with increasing of strain rate. • A catenuliform recrystallized occurred at a strain rate of 5 s{sup −1}. • DRX effect improved with increasing of deformation amounts. - Abstract: To investigate the effects of strain rate on dynamic recrystallization (DRX) behavior on China low activation martensitic steel, hot uniaxial compression tests with strain rates ranging from 0.1 s{sup −1} to 10 s{sup −1} and deformations amounts of 40% and 70% where conducted. The true stress–true strain curves were analyzed for the occurrence of DRX under the different strain rates and compressive deformation amounts. The steel microstructures were examined and linked to the observed stress-strain diagrams to study DRX. Results show that DRX was responsible for refining the grain structure over a wide range of strain rates under 70% deformation. However, significant DRX occurred only at the relatively low strain rate of 0.1 s{sup −1} under 40% deformation. The original elongated microstructure of the rolled plate from which the specimens were taken was replaced by dynamic recrystallization grains. At 70% deformation, the average grain size was 4.2 μm at a strain rate of 0.1 s{sup −1}, 2.5 μm at a strain rate of 5 s{sup −1}, 1.8 μm at a strain rate of 10 s{sup −1}. In conclusion, with increasing strain rate, the recrystallized grain size decreased and the peak stress increased.

  20. Prospective Multicenter Assessment of Early Complication Rates Associated With Adult Cervical Deformity Surgery in 78 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justin S; Ramchandran, Subaraman; Lafage, Virginie; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Ailon, Tamir; Klineberg, Eric; Protopsaltis, Themistocles; Schwab, Frank J; OʼBrien, Michael; Hostin, Richard; Gupta, Munish; Mundis, Gregory; Hart, Robert; Kim, Han Jo; Passias, Peter G; Scheer, Justin K; Deviren, Vedat; Burton, Douglas C; Eastlack, Robert; Bess, Shay; Albert, Todd J; Riew, K Daniel; Ames, Christopher P

    2016-09-01

    Few reports have focused on treatment of adult cervical deformity (ACD). To present early complication rates associated with ACD surgery. A prospective multicenter database of consecutive operative ACD patients was reviewed for early (≤30 days from surgery) complications. Enrollment required at least 1 of the following: cervical kyphosis >10 degrees, cervical scoliosis >10 degrees, C2-7 sagittal vertical axis >4 cm, or chin-brow vertical angle >25 degrees. Seventy-eight patients underwent surgical treatment for ACD (mean age, 60.8 years). Surgical approaches included anterior-only (14%), posterior-only (49%), anterior-posterior (35%), and posterior-anterior-posterior (3%). Mean numbers of fused anterior and posterior vertebral levels were 4.7 and 9.4, respectively. A total of 52 early complications were reported, including 26 minor and 26 major. Twenty-two (28.2%) patients had at least 1 minor complication, and 19 (24.4%) had at least 1 major complication. Overall, 34 (43.6%) patients had at least 1 complication. The most common complications included dysphagia (11.5%), deep wound infection (6.4%), new C5 motor deficit (6.4%), and respiratory failure (5.1%). One (1.3%) mortality occurred. Early complication rates differed significantly by surgical approach: anterior-only (27.3%), posterior-only (68.4%), and anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior-posterior (79.3%) (P = .007). This report provides benchmark rates for overall and specific ACD surgery complications. Although the surgical approach(es) used were likely driven by the type and complexity of deformity, there were significantly higher complication rates associated with combined and posterior-only approaches compared with anterior-only approaches. These findings may prove useful in treatment planning, patient counseling, and ongoing efforts to improve safety of care. 3CO, 3-column osteotomiesACD, adult cervical deformityEBL, estimated blood lossISSG, International Spine Study groupSVA, sagittal vertical axis.

  1. Temperature dependence of the deformation behavior of 316 stainless steel after low temperature neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel-Robertson, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile behavior of 316 stainless steel have been investigated. A single heat of solution annealed 316 was irradiated to 7 and 18 dpa at 60, 200, 330, and 400{degrees}C. The tensile properties as a function of dose and as a function of temperature were examined. Large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, strain to necking, and strain hardening capacity were seen in this irradiation experiment. The magnitudes of the changes are dependent on both irradiation temperature and neutron dose. Irradiation can more than triple the yield strength over the unirradiated value and decrease the strain to necking (STN) to less than 0.5% under certain conditions. A maximum increase in yield strength and a minimum in the STN occur after irradiation at 330{degrees}C but the failure mode remains ductile.

  2. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock: deformation-induced fission

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, P M; Rios, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus, and the daughter products. Purpose: To explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe fast fission processes beyond the fission barrier, using the nuclide $^{240}$Pu as an example. Methods: Time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations based on the Skyrme interaction are used to calculate non-adiabatic fission paths, beginning from static constrained Hartree-Fock calculations. The properties of the dynamic states are interpreted in terms of the nature of their collective motion. Fission product properties are compared to data. Results: Parent nuclei constrained to begin dynamic evolution with a deformation less than the fission barrier exhibit giant-resonance-type behaviour. Those beginning just beyond the ...

  3. Constraining age and rate of deformation in the northern Bolivian Andes from cross sections, cooling ages, and thermokinematic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, N.; Ehlers, T. A.; Rak, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    A critical component in assessing the viability of proposed plate tectonic or geodynamic processes in regions of convergence is the expected or predicted age and rate of deformation in the overriding plate. Commonly, age of deformation is inferred through geochronology of foreland basin and wedge-top sedimentary rocks and bedrock thermochronometer cooling signals. In Bolivia the original pulse of deformation of the fold-thrust belt is argue to be as young as 38-25 Ma based on the age of synorogenic strata or as old as 65-45 Ma due to proposed foreland basin rocks deposited in the Bolivian Altiplano. The large discrepancies in proposed age, rate and magnitude of deformation through the Bolivian Andes limit our ability to relate age and rate of shortening to internal geodynamic or external plate tectonic processes. We evaluate permissible ranges in age of initiation and rate of deformation through a forward kinematic model of the northern Bolivian fold-thrust belt. Each step of deformation accounts for isostatic loading from thrust faults and subsequent erosional of structural highs. The kinematic model predicts an evolution of flexural basins into which synorogenic sediments are deposited allowing us to fully integrate age of exhumation and deposition to age and magnitude of deformation. By assigning an age to each deformation step, we create a range of velocity vectors that are input into the thermokinematic model Pecube, which predicts thermochronometer cooling histories based on kinematics, topography, thermal parameters and shortening rates. We match the pattern of predicted ages with the across strike pattern of measured zircon fission track, apatite fission track and apatite (U-Th)/ He cooling ages. The sensitivity of modeled thermochronologic data to the age at which deformation initiates indicate that northern Bolivian EC started deforming at 50 Ma and may have begun as early as 55 Ma. The acceptable velocity envelope for the modeled section permits either a

  4. Optimal False Discovery Rate Control for Dependent Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jichun; Cai, T. Tony; Maris, John; Li, Hongzhe

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of optimal false discovery rate control when the test statistics are dependent. An optimal joint oracle procedure, which minimizes the false non-discovery rate subject to a constraint on the false discovery rate is developed. A data-driven marginal plug-in procedure is then proposed to approximate the optimal joint procedure for multivariate normal data. It is shown that the marginal procedure is asymptotically optimal for multivariate normal data with a short-range dependent covariance structure. Numerical results show that the marginal procedure controls false discovery rate and leads to a smaller false non-discovery rate than several commonly used p-value based false discovery rate controlling methods. The procedure is illustrated by an application to a genome-wide association study of neuroblastoma and it identifies a few more genetic variants that are potentially associated with neuroblastoma than several p-value-based false discovery rate controlling procedures. PMID:23378870

  5. A novel multitemporal insar model for joint estimation of deformation rates and orbital errors

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lei

    2014-06-01

    Orbital errors, characterized typically as longwavelength artifacts, commonly exist in interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imagery as a result of inaccurate determination of the sensor state vector. Orbital errors degrade the precision of multitemporal InSAR products (i.e., ground deformation). Although research on orbital error reduction has been ongoing for nearly two decades and several algorithms for reducing the effect of the errors are already in existence, the errors cannot always be corrected efficiently and reliably. We propose a novel model that is able to jointly estimate deformation rates and orbital errors based on the different spatialoral characteristics of the two types of signals. The proposed model is able to isolate a long-wavelength ground motion signal from the orbital error even when the two types of signals exhibit similar spatial patterns. The proposed algorithm is efficient and requires no ground control points. In addition, the method is built upon wrapped phases of interferograms, eliminating the need of phase unwrapping. The performance of the proposed model is validated using both simulated and real data sets. The demo codes of the proposed model are also provided for reference. © 2013 IEEE.

  6. Strain rate dependence in plasticized and un-plasticized PVC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siviour C.R.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and analytical investigation has been made into the mechanical behaviour of two poly (vinyl chloride (PVC polymers – an un-plasticized PVC and a diisononyl phthalate (DINP-plasticized PVC. Measurements of the compressive stress-strain behaviour of the PVCs at strain rates ranging from 10−3 to 103s−1 and temperatures from − 60 to 100∘C are presented. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis was also performed in order to understand the material transitions observed in compression testing as the strain rate is increased. This investigation develops a better understanding of the interplay between the temperature dependence and rate dependence of polymers, with a focus on locating the temperature and rate-dependent material transitions that occur during high rate testing.

  7. Strain rate dependence in plasticized and un-plasticized PVC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, M. J.; Siviour, C. R.

    2012-08-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation has been made into the mechanical behaviour of two poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) polymers - an un-plasticized PVC and a diisononyl phthalate (DINP)-plasticized PVC. Measurements of the compressive stress-strain behaviour of the PVCs at strain rates ranging from 10-3 to 103s-1 and temperatures from - 60 to 100∘C are presented. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis was also performed in order to understand the material transitions observed in compression testing as the strain rate is increased. This investigation develops a better understanding of the interplay between the temperature dependence and rate dependence of polymers, with a focus on locating the temperature and rate-dependent material transitions that occur during high rate testing.

  8. Rate dependence of swelling in lithium-ion cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, KY; Siegel, JB; Secondo, L; Kim, SU; Samad, NA; Qin, JW; Anderson, D; Garikipati, K; Knobloch, A; Epureanu, BI; Monroe, CW; Stefanopoulou, A

    2014-12-01

    Swelling of a commercial 5 Ah lithium-ion cell with a nickel/manganese/cobalt-oxide cathode is investigated as a function of the charge state and the charge/discharge rate. In combination with sensitive displacement measurements, knowledge of the electrode configuration within this prismatic cell's interior allows macroscopic deformations of the casing to be correlated to electrochemical and mechanical transformations in individual anode/separator/cathode layers. Thermal expansion and interior charge state are both found to cause significant swelling. At low rates, where thermal expansion is negligible, the electrode sandwich dilates by as much as 1.5% as the charge state swings from 0% to 100% because of lithium-ion intercalation. At high rates a comparably large residual swelling was observed at the end of discharge. Thermal expansion caused by joule heating at high discharge rate results in battery swelling. The changes in displacement with respect to capacity at low rate correlate well with the potential changes known to accompany phase transitions in the electrode materials. Although the potential response changes minimally with the C-rate, the extent of swelling varies significantly, suggesting that measurements of swelling may provide a sensitive gauge for characterizing dynamic operating states. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Temperature, Fractional Deformation, and Cooling Rate on the Structure and Properties of Steel 09GNB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodzhaspirov, G. E.; Sulyagin, R. V.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of temperature, divisibility of deformation, and cooling rate in high-temperature thermomechanical treatment (HTTMT) on the structure and mechanical properties of low-alloy steel 09GNB is studied. The steel is used as a high-strength material for the production of offshore structures, strips, and other welded articles. The study is performed using the method of experimental design where the parameters are fractional deformation (number of passes in rolling), final temperature of the deformation, and rate of post-deformation cooling. The results of the experiments are used to construct regression equations describing the qualitative and quantitative effect of the parameters of HTTMT on the mechanical properties of the steel. Microstructure and fracture surfaces of the steel are analyzed.

  10. Effect of suction-dependent soil deformability on landslide susceptibility maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarraga, Jose J.; Buscarnera, Giuseppe; Frattini, Paolo; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2016-04-01

    This contribution presents a physically-based, spatially-distributed model for shallow landslides promoted by rainfall infiltration. The model features a set of Factor of Safety values aimed to capture different failure mechanisms, namely frictional slips with limited mobility and flowslide events associated with the liquefaction of the considered soils. Indices of failure associated with these two modes of instability have been derived from unsaturated soil stability principles. In particular, the propensity to wetting-induced collapse of unsaturated soils is quantified through the introduction of a rigid-plastic model with suction-dependent yielding and strength properties. The model is combined with an analytical approach (TRIGRS) to track the spatio-temporal evolution of soil suction in slopes subjected to transient infiltration. The model has been tested to reply the triggering of shallow landslides in pyroclastic deposits in Sarno (1998, Campania Region, Southern Italy). It is shown that suction-dependent mechanical properties, such as soil deformability, have important effects on the predicted landslide susceptibility scenarios, resulting on computed unstable zones that may encompass a wide range of slope inclinations, saturation levels, and depths. Such preliminary results suggest that the proposed methodology offers an alternative mechanistic interpretation to the variability in behavior of rainfall-induced landslides. Differently to standard methods the explanation to this variability is based on suction-dependent soil behavior characteristics.

  11. Implementation of Improved Transverse Shear Calculations and Higher Order Laminate Theory Into Strain Rate Dependent Analyses of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin-Fa; Kim, Soo; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed to investigate the nonlinear and strain rate dependent deformation response of polymer matrix composite laminated plates under high strain rate impact loadings. A recently developed strength of materials based micromechanics model, incorporating a set of nonlinear, strain rate dependent constitutive equations for the polymer matrix, is extended to account for the transverse shear effects during impact. Four different assumptions of transverse shear deformation are investigated in order to improve the developed strain rate dependent micromechanics model. The validities of these assumptions are investigated using numerical and theoretical approaches. A method to determine through the thickness strain and transverse Poisson's ratio of the composite is developed. The revised micromechanics model is then implemented into a higher order laminated plate theory which is modified to include the effects of inelastic strains. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate the mechanical response of composite plates under high strain rate loadings. Results show the transverse shear stresses cannot be neglected in the impact problem. A significant level of strain rate dependency and material nonlinearity is found in the deformation response of representative composite specimens.

  12. Continuum modeling of rate-dependent granular flows in SPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Ryan C.; Andrade, José E.

    2016-09-01

    We discuss a constitutive law for modeling rate-dependent granular flows that has been implemented in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). We model granular materials using a viscoplastic constitutive law that produces a Drucker-Prager-like yield condition in the limit of vanishing flow. A friction law for non-steady flows, incorporating rate-dependence and dilation, is derived and implemented within the constitutive law. We compare our SPH simulations with experimental data, demonstrating that they can capture both steady and non-steady dynamic flow behavior, notably including transient column collapse profiles. This technique may therefore be attractive for modeling the time-dependent evolution of natural and industrial flows.

  13. Continuum modeling of rate-dependent granular flows in SPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Ryan C.; Andrade, José E.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss a constitutive law for modeling rate-dependent granular flows that has been implemented in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). We model granular materials using a viscoplastic constitutive law that produces a Drucker-Prager-like yield condition in the limit of vanishing flow. A friction law for non-steady flows, incorporating rate-dependence and dilation, is derived and implemented within the constitutive law. We compare our SPH simulations with experimental data, demonstrating that they can capture both steady and non-steady dynamic flow behavior, notably including transient column collapse profiles. This technique may therefore be attractive for modeling the time-dependent evolution of natural and industrial flows.

  14. A Computational Investigation on Bending Deformation Behavior at Various Deflection Rates for Enhancement of Absorbable Energy in TRIP Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hang Thi; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    Transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel might have a high energy-absorption characteristic because it could possibly consume impact energy by not only plastic deformation but also strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during deformation. Therefore, TRIP steel is considered to be suitable for automotive structures from the viewpoint of safety. Bending deformation due to buckling is one of the major collapse modes of automotive structures. Thus, an investigation on the bending deformation behavior and energy-absorption characteristic in TRIP steel at high deformation rate is indispensable to clarify the mechanism of better performance. Some past studies have focused on the improvement of mechanical properties by means of SIMT; however, the mechanism through which the energy-absorption characteristic in steel can be improved is still unclear. In this study, the three-point bending deformation behavior of a beam specimen made of type-304 austenitic stainless steel, a kind of TRIP steel, is investigated at various deflection rates by experiments and finite-element simulations based on a constitutive model proposed by one of the authors. After confirming the validity of the computation, the rate-sensitivity of energy absorption from the viewpoint of hardening behavior is examined and the improvement of the energy-absorption characteristic in TRIP steel including its mechanism is discussed.

  15. Comparison of microstructures in electroformed and spin-formed copper liners of shaped charge undergone high-strain-rate deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The as-formed and post-deformed microstructures in both electroformed and spin-formed copper liners of shaped charge were studied by optical microscopy(OM), electron backscattering Kikuchi patterns(EBSP) technique and transmission electron microscopy(TEM). The deformation was carried out at an ultra-high strain rate. OM analysis shows that the initial grains of the electroformed copper liner are finer than those of the spin-formed copper liners. Meanwhile, EBSP analysis reveals that the fiber texture exists in the electroformed copper liners, whereas there is no texture observed in the spin-formed copper liners before deformation. Having undergone high-strain-rate deformation the grains in the recovered slugs, which are transformed from both the electroformed and spin-formed copper liners, all become small. TEM observations of the above two kinds of post-deformed specimens show the existence of cellular structures characterized by tangled dislocations and subgrain boundaries consisting of dislocation arrays. These experimental results indicate that dynamic recovery and recrystallization play an important role in the high-strain-rate deformation process.

  16. Rate dependent constitutive behavior of dielectric elastomers and applications in legged robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, William; Miles, Paul; Gao, Wei; Clark, Jonathan; Mashayekhi, Somayeh; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    2017-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers exhibit novel electromechanical coupling that has been exploited in many adaptive structure applications. Whereas the quasi-static, one-dimensional constitutive behavior can often be accurately quantified by hyperelastic functions and linear dielectric relations, accurate predictions of electromechanical, rate-dependent deformation during multiaxial loading is non-trivial. In this paper, an overview of multiaxial electromechanical membrane finite element modeling is formulated. Viscoelastic constitutive relations are extended to include fractional order. It is shown that fractional order viscoelastic constitutive relations are superior to conventional integer order models. This knowledge is critical for transition to control of legged robotic structures that exhibit advanced mobility.

  17. Long-range dependence in interest rates and monetary policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajueiro, Daniel O.; Tabak, Benjamin M.

    2008-01-01

    This Letter studies the dynamics of Brazilian interest rates for short-term maturities. The Letter employs developed techniques in the econophysics literature and tests for long-range dependence in the term structure of these interest rates for the last decade. Empirical results suggest that the degree of long-range dependence has changed over time due to changes in monetary policy, specially in the short-end of the term structure of interest rates. Therefore, we show that it is possible to identify monetary arrangements using these techniques from econophysics.

  18. Long-range dependence in Interest Rates and Monetary Policy

    CERN Document Server

    Cajueiro, D O; Cajueiro, Daniel O.; Tabak, Benjamin M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies the dynamics of Brazilian interest rates for short-term maturities. The paper employs developed techniques in the econophysics literature and tests for long-range dependence in the term structure of these interest rates for the last decade. Empirical results suggest that the degree of long-range dependence has changed over time due to changes in monetary policy, specially in the short-end of the term structure of interest rates. Therefore, we show that it is possible to identify monetary arrangements using these techniques from econophysics.

  19. Mechanical properties and constitutive relations for tantalum and tantalum alloys under high-rate deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.R.; Gray, G.T. III; Bingert, S.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

    1996-05-01

    Tantalum and its alloys have received increased interest as a model bcc metal and for defense-related applications. The stress-strain behavior of several tantalums, possessing varied compositions and manufacturing histories, and tantalum alloyed with tungsten, was investigated as a function of temperature from {minus}196 C to 1,000 C, and strain rate from 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1} to 8,000 s{sup {minus}1}. The yield stress for all the Ta-materials was found to be sensitive to the test temperature, the impurity and solute contents; however, the strain hardening remained very similar for various ``pure`` tantalums but increased with alloying. Powder-metallurgy (P/M) tantalum with various levels of oxygen content produced via different processing paths was also investigated. Similar mechanical properties compared to conventionally processed tantalums were achieved in the P/M Ta. This data suggests that the frequently observed inhomogeneities in the mechanical behavior of tantalum inherited from conventional processes can be overcome. Constitutive relations based upon the Johnson-Cook, the Zerilli-Armstrong, and the Mechanical Threshold Stress models were evaluated for all the Ta-based materials. Parameters were also fit for these models to a tantalum-bar material. Flow stresses of a Ta bar stock subjected to a large-strain deformation of {var_epsilon} = 1.85 via multiple upset forging were obtained. The capabilities and limitations of each model for large-strain applications are examined. The deformation mechanisms controlling high-rate plasticity in tantalum are revisited.

  20. The universality of enzymatic rate-temperature dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Mikael; Wieczorek, Grzegorz; Rosenne, Shaked; Tawfik, Dan S

    2014-01-01

    Organismal adaptation to extreme temperatures yields enzymes with distinct configurational stabilities, including thermophilic and psychrophilic enzymes, which are adapted to high and low temperatures, respectively. These enzymes are widely assumed to also have unique rate-temperature dependencies. Thermophilic enzymes, for example, are considered optimal at high temperatures and effectively inactive at low temperatures due to excess rigidity. Surveying published data, we find that thermophilic, mesophilic, and psychrophilic enzymes exhibit indistinguishable rate-temperature dependencies. Furthermore, given the nonenzymatic rate-temperature dependency, all enzymes, regardless of their operation temperatures, become >10-fold less powerful catalysts per 25 °C temperature increase. Among other factors, this loss of rate acceleration may be ascribed to thermally induced vibrations compromising the active-site catalytic configuration, suggesting that many enzymes are in fact insufficiently rigid.

  1. Miocene to present deformation rates in the Yakima Fold Province and implications for earthquake hazards in central Washington State, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staisch, Lydia; Sherrod, Brian; Kelsey, Harvey; Blakely, Richard; Möller, Andreas; Styron, Richard

    2017-04-01

    The Yakima fold province (YFP), located in the Cascadia backarc of central Washington, is a region of active distributed deformation that accommodates NNE-SSW shortening. Geodetic data show modern strain accumulation of 2 mm/yr across this large-scale fold province. Deformation rates on individual structures, however, are difficult to assess from GPS data given low strain rates and the relatively short time period of geodetic observation. Geomorphic and geologic records, on the other hand, span sufficient time to investigate deformation rates on the folds. Resolving fault geometries and slip rates of the YFP is imperative to seismic hazard assessment for nearby infrastructure, including a large nuclear waste facility and hydroelectric dams along the Columbia and Yakima Rivers. We present new results on the timing and magnitude of deformation across several Yakima folds, including the Manastash Ridge, Umtanum Ridge, and Saddle Mountains anticlines. We constructed several line-balanced cross sections across the folds to calculated the magnitude of total shortening since Miocene time. To further constrain our structural models, we include forward-modeling of magnetic and gravity anomaly data. We estimate total shortening between 1.0 and 2.4 km across individual folds, decreasing eastward, consistent with geodetically and geologically measured clockwise rotation. Importantly, we find that thrust faults reactivate and invert normal faults in the basement, and do not appear to sole into a common décollement at shallow to mid-crustal depth. We constrain spatial and temporal variability in deformation rates along the Saddle Mountains, Manastash Ridge and Umtanum Ridge anticlines using geomorphic and stratigraphic markers of topographic evolution. From stratigraphy and geochronology of growth strata along the Saddle Mountains we find that the rate of deformation has increased up to six-fold since late Miocene time. To constrain deformation rates along other Yakima folds

  2. A microstructure- and surface energy-dependent third-order shear deformation beam model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X.-L.; Zhang, G. Y.

    2015-08-01

    A new non-classical third-order shear deformation model is developed for Reddy-Levinson beams using a variational formulation based on Hamilton's principle. A modified couple stress theory and a surface elasticity theory are employed. The equations of motion and complete boundary conditions for the beam are obtained simultaneously. The new model contains a material length scale parameter to account for the microstructure effect and three surface elastic constants to describe the surface energy effect. Also, Poisson's effect is incorporated in the new beam model. The current non-classical model recovers the classical elasticity-based third-order shear deformation beam model as a special case when the microstructure, surface energy and Poisson's effects are all suppressed. In addition, the newly developed beam model includes the models considering the microstructure dependence or the surface energy effect alone as limiting cases and reduces to two existing models for Bernoulli-Euler and Timoshenko beams incorporating the microstructure and surface energy effects. To illustrate the new model, the static bending and free vibration problems of a simply supported beam loaded by a concentrated force are analytically solved by directly applying the general formulas derived. For the static bending problem, the numerical results reveal that both the deflection and rotation of the simply supported beam predicted by the current model are smaller than those predicted by the classical model. Also, it is observed that the differences in the deflection and rotation predicted by the two beam models are very large when the beam thickness is sufficiently small, but they are diminishing with the increase in the beam thickness. For the free vibration problem, it is found that the natural frequency predicted by the new model is higher than that predicted by the classical beam model, and the difference is significant for very thin beams. These predicted trends of the size effect at the

  3. Chemically tuned linear energy transfer dependent quenching in a deformable, radiochromic 3D dosimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høye, Ellen Marie; Skyt, Peter Sandegaard; Balling, Peter

    2017-01-01

    the observed quenching in proton beams. The dependency of dose response on linear energy transfer, as calculated through Monte Carlo simulations of the dosimeter, was investigated in 60 MeV proton beams. We found that the amount of quenching varied with the chemical composition: peak-to-plateau ratios (1cm...... chemical compositions of the dosimeter showed dose-rate dependency; however this was not dependent on the linear energy transfer. Track-structure theory was used to explain the observed quenching effects. In conclusion, this study shows that the silicone-based dosimeter has potential for use in measuring 3...

  4. DNA deformability changes of single base pair mutants within CDE binding sites in S. Cerevisiae centromere DNA correlate with measured chromosomal loss rates and CDE binding site symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Kenneth A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The centromeres in yeast (S. cerevisiae are organized by short DNA sequences (125 bp on each chromosome consisting of 2 conserved elements: CDEI and CDEIII spaced by a CDEII region. CDEI and CDEIII are critical sequence specific protein binding sites necessary for correct centromere formation and following assembly with proteins, are positioned near each other on a specialized nucleosome. Hegemann et al. BioEssays 1993, 15: 451–460 reported single base DNA mutants within the critical CDEI and CDEIII binding sites on the centromere of chromosome 6 and quantitated centromere loss of function, which they measured as loss rates for the different chromosome 6 mutants during cell division. Olson et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1998, 95: 11163–11168 reported the use of protein-DNA crystallography data to produce a DNA dinucleotide protein deformability energetic scale (PD-scale that describes local DNA deformability by sequence specific binding proteins. We have used the PD-scale to investigate the DNA sequence dependence of the yeast chromosome 6 mutants' loss rate data. Each single base mutant changes 2 PD-scale values at that changed base position relative to the wild type. In this study, we have utilized these mutants to demonstrate a correlation between the change in DNA deformability of the CDEI and CDEIII core sites and the overall experimentally measured chromosome loss rates of the chromosome 6 mutants. Results In the CDE I and CDEIII core binding regions an increase in the magnitude of change in deformability of chromosome 6 single base mutants with respect to the wild type correlates to an increase in the measured chromosome loss rate. These correlations were found to be significant relative to 105 Monte Carlo randomizations of the dinucleotide PD-scale applied to the same calculation. A net loss of deformability also tends to increase the loss rate. Binding site position specific, 4 data-point correlations were also

  5. Attaining the rate-independent limit of a rate-dependent strain gradient plasticity theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Naaman, Salim Abdallah; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    The existence of characteristic strain rates in rate-dependent material models, corresponding to rate-independent model behavior, is studied within a back stress based rate-dependent higher order strain gradient crystal plasticity model. Such characteristic rates have recently been observed...... for steady-state processes, and the present study aims to demonstrate that the observations in fact unearth a more widespread phenomenon. In this work, two newly proposed back stress formulations are adopted to account for the strain gradient effects in the single slip simple shear case, and characteristic...

  6. Evaluation of Dynamic Deformation Behaviors in Metallic Materials under High Strain-Rates Using Taylor Bar Impact Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Kyung Oh; Shin, Hyung Seop [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To ensure the reliability and safety of various mechanical systems in accordance with their high-speed usage, it is necessary to evaluate the dynamic deformation behavior of structural materials under impact load. However, it is not easy to understand the dynamic deformation behavior of the structural materials using experimental methods in the high strain-rate range exceeding 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. In this study, the Taylor bar impact test was conducted to investigate the dynamic deformation behavior of metallic materials in the high strain-rate region, using a high-speed photography system. Numerical analysis of the Taylor bar impact test was performed using AUTODYN S/W. The results of the analysis were compared with the experimental results, and the material behavior in the high strain-rate region was discussed.

  7. The dependence of homogeneous nucleation rate on supersaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girshick, Steven L

    2014-07-14

    The claim that classical nucleation theory (CNT) correctly predicts the dependence on supersaturation of the steady-state rate of homogeneous nucleation is reexamined in light of recent experimental studies of nucleation of a range of substances, including water, argon, nitrogen, and several 1-alcohols. Based on these studies (which include, for water, a compilation of nine different studies), it is concluded that the dependence of nucleation rate on supersaturation is not correctly predicted by CNT. It is shown that CNT's incorrect prediction of the supersaturation dependence of nucleation rate is due to its incorrect prediction of the Gibbs free energy change associated with formation of small clusters from the monomer vapor, evaluated at the substance's equilibrium vapor pressure, even though that free energy change is itself a function only of temperature.

  8. TRP 9904 - Constitutive Behavior of High Strength Multiphase Sheel Steel Under High Strain Rate Deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Matlock; John Speer

    2005-03-31

    The focus of the research project was to systematically assess the strain rate dependence of strengthening mechanisms in new advanced high strength sheet steels. Data were obtained on specially designed and produced Duel Phase and TRIP steels and compared to the properties of automotive steels currently in use.

  9. Strain rate dependency of laser sintered polyamide 12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook J.E.T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parts processed by Additive Manufacturing can now be found across a wide range of applications, such as those in the aerospace and automotive industry in which the mechanical response must be optimised. Many of these applications are subjected to high rate or impact loading, yet it is believed that there is no prior research on the strain rate dependence in these materials. This research investigates the effect of strain rate and laser energy density on laser sintered polyamide 12. In the study presented here, parts produced using four different laser sintered energy densities were exposed to uniaxial compression tests at strain rates ranging from 10−3 to 10+3 s−1 at room temperature, and the dependence on these parameters is presented.

  10. Size-dependent ion-beam-induced anisotropic plastic deformation at the nanoscale by nonhydrostatic capillary stresses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dillen, T.; van der Giessen, E.; Onck, P. R.; Polman, A.

    2006-01-01

    We develop a phenomenological model for size-dependent anisotropic plastic deformation of colloidal nanoparticles under ion irradiation. We show that, at the nanoscale, nonhydrostatic capillary stresses drive radiation-induced Newtonian viscous flow, counteracting the stress state that initiates the

  11. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Pei, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Background: The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. Purpose: We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and collective mass parameters. Methods: The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures has to incorporate the reflection above barriers. Results: Our results of spontaneous fission rates reasonably agree with other studies and experiments. The temperature dependencies of fission barrier heights and curvatures have been discussed. The temperature dependent behaviors of mass parameters have also been discussed. The thermal fission rates from low to high temperatures with a smooth connection have been given by different approaches. Conclusions: Since the temperature dependencies of fission barrier heights and curvatures, and the mass parameters can vary rapidly for different nuclei, the microscopic descriptions of thermal fission rates are very valuable. Our studies without free parameters provide a consistent picture to study various fissions such as that in fast-neutron reactors, astrophysical environments, and fusion reactions for superheavy nuclei.

  12. Simulations of cardiovascular blood flow accounting for time dependent deformational forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters Randles, Amanda; Melchionna, Simone; Latt, Jonas; Succi, Sauro; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is currently the leading cause of death in the United States, and early detection is critical. Despite advances in imaging technology, 50% of these deaths occur suddenly and with no prior symptoms. The development and progression of coronary diseases such as atherosclerosis has been linked to prolonged areas of low endothelial shear stress (ESS); however, there is currently no way to measure ESS in vivo. We will present a patient specific fluid simulation that applies the Lattice Boltzmann equation to model the blood flow in the coronary arteries whose geometries are derived from computed tomography angiography data. Using large-scale supercomputers up to 294,912 processors, we can model a full heartbeat at the resolution of the red blood cells. We are investigating the time dependent deformational forces exerted on the arterial flows from the movement of the heart. The change in arterial curvature that occurs over a heartbeat has been shown to have significant impact on flow velocity and macroscopic quantities like shear stress. We will discuss a method for accounting for these resulting forces by casting them into a kinetic formalism via a Gauss-Hermite projection and their impact on ESS while maintaining the static geomtry obtained from CTA data.

  13. Experimental study of the electric dipole strength in the even Mo nuclei and its deformation dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Erhard, M; Nair, C; Schwengner, R; Beyer, R; Klug, J; Kosev, K; Wagner, A; Grosse, E

    2010-01-01

    Two methods based on bremsstrahlung were applied to the stable even Mo isotopes for the experimental determination of the photon strength function covering the high excitation energy range above 4 MeV with its increasing level density. Photon scattering was used up to the neutron separation energies Sn and data up to the maximum of the isovector giant resonance(GDR) were obtained by photo-activation. After a proper correction for multi-step processes the observed quasi-continuous spectra of scattered photons show a remarkably good match to the photon strengths derived from nuclear photo effect data obtained previously by neutron detection and corrected in absolute scale using the new activation results. The combined data form an excellent basis to derive a shape dependence of the E1 strength in the even Mo isotopes with increasing deviation from the N = 50 neutron shell, i.e. with the impact of quadrupole deformation and triaxiality. The wide energy coverage of the data allows for a stringent assessment of th...

  14. ELDRS and dose-rate dependence of vertical NPN transistor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yu-Zhan; LU Wu; REN Di-Yuan; WANG Gai-Li; YU Xue-Feng; GUO Qi

    2009-01-01

    The enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity (ELDRS) and dose-rate dependence of vertical NPN transistors are investigated in this article.The results show that the vertical NPN transistors exhibit more degradation at low dose rate,and that this degradation is attributed to the increase on base current.The oxide trapped positive charge near the SiO2-Si interface and interface traps at the interface can contribute to the increase on base current and the two-stage hydrogen mechanism associated with space charge effect can well explain the experimental results.

  15. Velocity of chloroplast avoidance movement is fluence rate dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2004-06-01

    In Arabidopsis leaves, chloroplast movement is fluence rate dependent. At optimal, lower light fluences, chloroplasts accumulate at the cell surface to maximize photosynthetic potential. Under high fluence rates, chloroplasts avoid incident light to escape photodamage. In this paper, we examine the phenomenon of chloroplast avoidance movement in greater detail and demonstrate a proportional relationship between fluence rate and the velocity of chloroplast avoidance. In addition we show that the amount of light-activated phototropin2, the photoreceptor for the avoidance response, likely plays a role in this phenomenon, as heterozygous mutant plants show a reduced avoidance velocity compared to that of homozygous wild type plants.

  16. The RNA chain elongation rate in Escherichia coli depends on the growth rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1994-01-01

    We determined the rates of mRNA and protein chain elongation on the lacZ gene during exponential growth on different carbon sources. The RNA chain elongation rate was calculated from measurements of the time elapsing between induction of lacZ expression and detection of specific hybridization...... with a probe near the 3' end of the mRNA. The elongation rate for the transcripts decreased 40% when the growth rate decreased by a factor of 4, and it always correlated with the rate of translation elongation. A similar growth rate dependency was seen for transcription on the infB gene and on a part...

  17. Long-term and Short-term Vertical Deformation Rates across the Forearc in the Central Mexican Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Herrera, M. T.; Gaidzik, K.; Forman, S. L.; Kostoglodov, V.; Burgmann, R.

    2015-12-01

    Spatial scales of the earthquake cycle, from rapid deformation associated with earthquake rupture to slow deformation associated with interseismic and transient slow-slip behavior, span from fractions of a meter to thousands of kilometers (plate boundaries). Similarly, temporal scales range from seconds during an earthquake rupture to thousands of years of strain accumulation between earthquakes. The complexity of the multiple physical processes operating over this vast range of scales and the limited coverage of observations leads most scientists to focus on a narrow space-time window to isolate just one or a few process. We discuss here preliminary results on the vertical crustal deformation associated with both slow and rapid crustal deformation along a profile across the forearc region of the central Mexican subduction zone on the Guerrero sector, where the Cocos plate underthrusts the North American plate. This sector of the subduction zone is characterized by a particular slab geometry (with zones of rapid bending-unbending of the slab), irregular distributed seismicity, exceptionally large slow slip events (SSE) and non-volcanic tremors (NVT). We used the river network and geomorphic features of the Papagayo River to assess Quaternary crustal deformation. The Papagayo drainage network is strongly controlled by Late Cenozoic tectonic, Holocene and recent earthquake cycle processes. This is particularly true for the southern section of the drainage basin; from the dam in La Venta to the river mouth, where W-E structures commonly offset the course of the main river. River terraces occur along the course of the river at different elevations. We measured the height of a series of terraces and obtained OSL ages on quartz extracts to determine long-term rates of deformation. Finally, we discuss associations of the topography and river characteristics with the Cocos slab geometry, slow earthquakes, crustal deformation, and interseismic deformation.

  18. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    \\item[Background] The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. \\item[Purpose] We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and mass parameters. \\item[Methods] The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures ...

  19. [Bundle-branch block depending on the heart rate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolov, L

    1975-01-01

    Five patients are reported, admitted to the hospital, with diseases predominantly of the cardio-vascular system. During the electrocardiographic examinations bundle branch block was established, depending on heart rate. It fluctuated within the physiological limits from 50 to 90/min. In three of the patients, the bundle branch block appeared with the quickening of the heart rate (tachycardia-depending bundle branch block) and in two of the patients--the bundle branch block appeared during the slowing down of the heart action and disappeared with its quickening (bradicardia-depending bundle branch block). A brief literature review is presented and attention is paid to the possible diagnostic errors and the treatment mode of those patients with cardiac tonic and antiarrhythmic medicaments.

  20. Finite deformation analysis of continuum structures with time dependent anisotropic elastic plastic material behavior (LWBR/AWBA Development Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutula, D.N.

    1980-03-01

    A finite element procedure is presented for finite deformation analysis of continuum structures with time-dependent anisotropic elastic-plastic material behavior. An updated Lagrangian formulation is used to describe the kinematics of deformation. Anisotropic constitutive relations are referred, at each material point, to a set of three mutually orthogonal axes which rotate as a unit with an angular velocity equal to the spin at the point. The time-history of the solution is generated by using a linear incremental procedure with residual force correction, along with an automatic time step control algorithm which chooses time step sizes to control the accuracy and numerical stability of the solution.

  1. A Model for High-Strain-Rate Deformation of Uranium-Niobium Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F.L.Addessio; Q.H.Zuo; T.A.Mason; L.C.Brinson

    2003-05-01

    A thermodynamic approach is used to develop a framework for modeling uranium-niobium alloys under the conditions of high strain rate. Using this framework, a three-dimensional phenomenological model, which includes nonlinear elasticity (equation of state), phase transformation, crystal reorientation, rate-dependent plasticity, and porosity growth is presented. An implicit numerical technique is used to solve the evolution equations for the material state. Comparisons are made between the model and data for low-strain-rate loading and unloading as well as for heating and cooling experiments. Comparisons of the model and data also are made for low- and high-strain-rate uniaxial stress and uniaxial strain experiments. A uranium-6 weight percent niobium alloy is used in the comparisons of model and experiment.

  2. Micromechanical modeling of rate-dependent behavior of Connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, A; Ahmadian, M T; Firozbakhsh, K; Aghdam, M M

    2017-03-07

    In this paper, a constitutive and micromechanical model for prediction of rate-dependent behavior of connective tissues (CTs) is presented. Connective tissues are considered as nonlinear viscoelastic material. The rate-dependent behavior of CTs is incorporated into model using the well-known quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) theory. A planar wavy representative volume element (RVE) is considered based on the tissue microstructure histological evidences. The presented model parameters are identified based on the available experiments in the literature. The presented constitutive model introduced to ABAQUS by means of UMAT subroutine. Results show that, monotonic uniaxial test predictions of the presented model at different strain rates for rat tail tendon (RTT) and human patellar tendon (HPT) are in good agreement with experimental data. Results of incremental stress-relaxation test are also presented to investigate both instantaneous and viscoelastic behavior of connective tissues.

  3. Discrete dislocation plasticity analysis of loading rate-dependent static friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, H.; Deshpande, V. S.; van der Giessen, E.

    2016-01-01

    From a microscopic point of view, the frictional force associated with the relative sliding of rough surfaces originates from deformation of the material in contact, by adhesion in the contact interface or both. We know that plastic deformation at the size scale of micrometres is not only dependent

  4. Strain Rate Dependent Ductile-to-Brittle Transition of Graphite Platelet Reinforced Vinyl Ester Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmananda Pramanik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous research, the fractal dimensions of fractured surfaces of vinyl ester based nanocomposites were estimated applying classical method on 3D digital microscopic images. The fracture energy and fracture toughness were obtained from fractal dimensions. A noteworthy observation, the strain rate dependent ductile-to-brittle transition of vinyl ester based nanocomposites, is reinvestigated in the current study. The candidate materials of xGnP (exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets reinforced and with additional CTBN (Carboxyl Terminated Butadiene Nitrile toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites that are subjected to both quasi-static and high strain rate indirect tensile load using the traditional Brazilian test method. High-strain rate indirect tensile testing is performed with a modified Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB. Pristine vinyl ester shows ductile deformation under quasi-static loading and brittle failure when subjected to high-strain rate loading. This observation reconfirms the previous research findings on strain rate dependent ductile-to-brittle transition of this material system. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Contribution of nanoreinforcement to the tensile properties is reported in this paper.

  5. The accretion rate dependence of burst oscillation amplitude

    CERN Document Server

    Ootes, Laura S; Galloway, Duncan K; Wijnands, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    Neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries exhibit oscillations during thermonuclear bursts, attributed to asymmetric brightness patterns on the burning surfaces. All models that have been proposed to explain the origin of these asymmetries (spreading hotspots, surface waves, and cooling wakes) depend on the accretion rate. By analysis of archival RXTE data of six oscillation sources, we investigate the accretion rate dependence of the amplitude of burst oscillations. This more than doubles the size of the sample analysed previously by Muno et al. (2004), who found indications for a relationship between accretion rate and oscillation amplitudes. We find that burst oscillation signals can be detected at all observed accretion rates. Moreover, oscillations at low accretion rates are found to have relatively small amplitudes ($A_\\text{rms}\\leq0.10$) while oscillations detected in bursts observed at high accretion rates cover a broad spread in amplitudes ($0.05\\leq A_\\text{rms}\\leq0.20$). In this paper we present t...

  6. Fault Scaling Relationships Depend on the Average Geological Slip Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. G.; Biasi, G. P.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2016-12-01

    This study addresses whether knowing the geological slip rates on a fault in addition to the rupture length improves estimates of magnitude (Mw) of continental earthquakes that rupture the surface, based on a database of 80 events that includes 57 strike-slip, 12 reverse, and 11 normal faulting events. Three functional forms are tested to relate rupture length L to magnitude Mw: linear, bilinear, and a shape with constant static stress drop. The slip rate dependence is tested as a perturbation to the estimates of magnitude from rupture length. When the data are subdivided by fault mechanism, magnitude predictions from rupture length are improved for strike-slip faults when slip rate is included, but not for reverse or normal faults. This conclusion is robust, independent of the functional form used to relate L to Mw. Our preferred model is the constant stress drop model, because teleseismic observations of earthquakes favor that result. Because a dependence on slip rate is only significant for strike-slip events, a combined relationship for all rupture mechanisms is not appropriate. The observed effect of slip rate for strike-slip faults implies that the static stress drop, on average, tends to decrease as the fault slip rate increases.

  7. Orientation-dependent recrystallization in an oxide dispersion strengthened steel after dynamic plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Tao, N.R.; Mishin, Oleg V.

    2015-01-01

    dynamic plastic deformation. Different boundary spacings and different stored energy densities for regions belonging to either of the two fibre texture components result in a quite heterogeneous deformation microstructure. Upon annealing, preferential recovery and preferential nucleation...... of recrystallization are found in the 〈111〉- oriented lamellae, which had a higher stored energy density in the as-deformed condition. In the course of recrystallization, the initial duplex fibre texture is replaced by a strong 〈111〉 fibre recrystallization texture....

  8. Global calculations on the microscopic energies and nuclear deformations: Isospin dependence of the spin-orbit coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhe-Ying; Wyss, Ramon; Liu, Hong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The microscopic energies and nuclear deformations of about 1850 even-even nuclei are calculated systematically within the macroscopic-microscopic framework using three Woods-Saxon parameterizations, with different isospin dependences, which were constructed mainly for nuclear spectroscopy calculations. Calculations are performed in the deformation space $(\\beta_2, \\gamma, \\beta_4)$. Both the monopole and doubly stretched quadrupole interactions are considered for the pairing channel. The ground state deformations obtained by the three calculations are quite similar to each other. Large differences are seen mainly in neutron-rich nuclei and in superheavy nuclei. Systematic calculations on the shape-coexisting second minima are also presented. As for the microscopic energies of the ground states, the results are also very close to each other. Only in a few cases the difference is larger than 2 MeV. The total binding energy is estimated by adding the macroscopic energy provided by the usual liquid drop model wit...

  9. The effect of coarse second-phase particles on the rate of grain refinement during severe deformation processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Apps, P.J.; Bowen, Jacob R.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of second-phase particles on the rate of grain refinement during severe deformation processing has been investigated, by comparing the microstructure evolution in an AA8079 aluminium alloy, containing 2.5 vol.% of ~2 μm particles, with that in a high purity, single-phase, Al-0.13% Mg a...

  10. Microstructure and nanohardness distribution in a polycrystalline Zn deformed by high strain rate impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirras, G., E-mail: dirras@univ-paris13.fr [LSPM, CNRS, UPR 3407, Universite Paris 13, 99 avenue Jean Baptiste Clement, 93430 Villetaeuse (France); Ouarem, A. [LSPM, CNRS, UPR 3407, Universite Paris 13, 99 avenue Jean Baptiste Clement, 93430 Villetaeuse (France); Couque, H. [Nexter-Munitions, 7 route de Guerry, 18023 Bourges Cedex (France); Gubicza, J.; Szommer, P. [Department of Materials Physics, Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest, P.O.B. 32, H-1518 (Hungary); Brinza, O. [LSPM, CNRS, UPR 3407, Universite Paris 13, 99 avenue Jean Baptiste Clement, 93430 Villetaeuse (France)

    2011-05-15

    Polycrystalline Zn with an average grain size of about 300 {mu}m was deformed by direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar at a velocity of 29 m/s. An inhomogeneous grain structure was found consisting of a center region having large average grain size of 20 {mu}m surrounded by a fine-grained rim with an average grain size of 6 {mu}m. Transmission electron microscopy investigations showed a significant dislocation density in the large-grained area while in the fine-grained rim the dislocation density was negligible. Most probably, the higher strain yielded recrystallization in the outer ring while in the center only recovery occurred. The hardening effect of dislocations overwhelms the smaller grain size strengthening in the center part resulting in higher nanohardness in this region than in the outer ring. - Graphical Abstract: (a): EBSD micrograph showing the initial microstructure of polycrystalline Zn that was subsequently submitted to high strain rate impact. (b): an inhomogeneous grain size refinement was obtained which consists of a central coarse-grained area, surrounded by a fine-grained recrystallized rim. The black arrow points to the disc center. Research Highlights: {yields} A polycrystalline Zn specimen was submitted to high strain rate impact loading. {yields} Inhomogeneous grain refinement occurred due to strain gradient in impacted sample. {yields} A fine-grained recrystallized rim surrounded the coarse-grained center of specimen. {yields} The coarse-grained center exhibited higher hardness than the fine-grained rim. {yields} The higher hardness of the center was caused by the higher dislocation density.

  11. Dependence between temperature and clearance rate of Balanion comatum Wulff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Rychert

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The dependence between temperature and clearance rate of the ciliate Balanion comatum Wulff 1919 was assessed in the coastal zone of the southern Baltic Sea. Five in situ experiments were carried out with the use of wheat starch as a surrogate of food particles. The clearance rate rose from 1.4 to 7.0 µl cell-1 h-1 with a temperature rise from 8 to 19°C. B. comatum preferred particles of size 1.9-4.4 µm, and the clearance rates calculated for the preferred particles were consistently higher than those measured for the whole range of particles ingested (Wilcoxon's signed rank test, p = 0.04. The exponential dependence between temperature and clearance rates for preferred particles was statistically significant (R2 = 0.86, p = 0.02 and enabled the Q10 coefficient to be calculated. This amounted to 2.9 and lay within the range of typical values. The linear dependence (also drawn for preferred particles demonstrated a higher significance (R2 = 0.91, p = 0.02, indicating the linear dynamics of the process.

  12. Dependence of deformation mechanisms on grain orientations and their changes calculated based on Sachs model in magnesium alloy AZ31

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-ge XIE; Ping YANG; Li MENG

    2008-01-01

    During deformation, the orientation of a grain influences not only the deformation mechanisms (slip or twinning) and the specific selection of activated slip or twinning systems for that grain, but also the kinetics of different types of transformation. Schmid factor analysis was applied to determine the orientation dependency of deformation mechanisms in magnesium alloys AZ31 in this work. The orientation changes after the operation of the specific deformation mechanisms were also calcu-lated based on Sachs model. It was found that different deformation mechanisms proceeded differently according to theoretical predictions. Basal slip occurred when basal planes of grains were tilted toward ND around TD. Prismatic slip dominated when basal planes were approxi-mately perpendicular to TD. Calculation results also indi-cated that the operating of pyramidal slip can not be neglected. {10 12} twinning was favorable when basal planes were approximately normal to RD and { 10 11 } twinning was analyzed to be related to the grains with basal orientations. The operating of slip could greatly suppress the activating of twinning by our Schmid factor analysis. Basal orientations with TD and RD scattering can favor basal slip and tension twinning, respectively, after the operation of compression twinning based on the Schmid factor calculations.

  13. The Influence of Temperature on Time-Dependent Deformation and Failure in Granite: A Mesoscale Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, T.; Zhou, G. L.; Heap, Michael J.; Zhu, W. C.; Chen, C. F.; Baud, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    An understanding of the influence of temperature on brittle creep in granite is important for the management and optimization of granitic nuclear waste repositories and geothermal resources. We propose here a two-dimensional, thermo-mechanical numerical model that describes the time-dependent brittle deformation (brittle creep) of low-porosity granite under different constant temperatures and confining pressures. The mesoscale model accounts for material heterogeneity through a stochastic local failure stress field, and local material degradation using an exponential material softening law. Importantly, the model introduces the concept of a mesoscopic renormalization to capture the co-operative interaction between microcracks in the transition from distributed to localized damage. The mesoscale physico-mechanical parameters for the model were first determined using a trial-and-error method (until the modeled output accurately captured mechanical data from constant strain rate experiments on low-porosity granite at three different confining pressures). The thermo-physical parameters required for the model, such as specific heat capacity, coefficient of linear thermal expansion, and thermal conductivity, were then determined from brittle creep experiments performed on the same low-porosity granite at temperatures of 23, 50, and 90 °C. The good agreement between the modeled output and the experimental data, using a unique set of thermo-physico-mechanical parameters, lends confidence to our numerical approach. Using these parameters, we then explore the influence of temperature, differential stress, confining pressure, and sample homogeneity on brittle creep in low-porosity granite. Our simulations show that increases in temperature and differential stress increase the creep strain rate and therefore reduce time-to-failure, while increases in confining pressure and sample homogeneity decrease creep strain rate and increase time-to-failure. We anticipate that the

  14. ON PLASTIC ANISOTROPY OF CONSTITUTIVE MODEL FOR RATE-DEPENDENT SINGLE CRYSTAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张光; 张克实; 冯露

    2005-01-01

    An algorithm for single crystals was developed and implemented to simulate plastic anisotropy using a rate-dependent slip model. The proposed procedure was a slightly modified form of single crystal constitutive model of Sarma and Zacharia. Modified Euler method, together with Newton-Raphson method was used to integrate this equation which was stable and efficient. The model together with the developed algorithm was used to study three problems. First, plastic anisotropy was examined by simulating the crystal deformation in tension and plane strain compression, respectively. Secondly, the orientation effect of some material parameters in the model and applied strain rate on plastic anisotropy for single crystal also is investigated. Thirdly, the influence of loading direction on the active slip system was discussed.

  15. Alloy-dependent deformation behavior of highly ductile nanocrystalline AuCu thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmiller, Jochen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Spolenak, Ralph [Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Gruber, Patric A., E-mail: patric.gruber@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-02-10

    Nanocrystalline thin films on compliant substrates become increasingly important for the development of flexible electronic devices. In this study, nanocrystalline AuCu thin films on polyimide substrate were tested in tension while using a synchrotron-based in situ testing technique. Analysis of X-ray diffraction profiles allowed identifying the underlying deformation mechanisms. Initially, elastic and microplastic deformation is observed, followed by dislocation-mediated shear band formation, and eventually macroscopic crack formation. Particularly the influence of alloy composition, heat-treatment, and test temperature were investigated. Generally, a highly ductile behavior is observed. However, high Cu concentrations, annealing, and/or large plastic strains lead to localized deformation and hence reduced ductility. On the other hand, enhanced test temperature allows for a delocalized deformation and extended ductility.

  16. Dose rate and SDD dependence of commercially available diode detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Amarjit S; Zhu, Timothy C

    2004-04-01

    The dose-rate dependence of commercially available diode detectors was measured under both high instantaneous dose-rate (pulsed) and low dose rate (continuous, Co-60) radiation. The dose-rate dependence was measured in an acrylic miniphantom at a 5-cm depth in a 10 x 10 cm2 collimator setting, by varying source-to-detector distance (SDD) between at least 80 and 200 cm. The ratio of a normalized diode reading to a normalized ion chamber reading (both at SDD=100 cm) was used to determine diode sensitivity ratio for pulsed and continuous radiation at different SDD. The inverse of the diode sensitivity ratio is defined as the SDD correction factor (SDD CF). The diode sensitivity ratio increased with increasing instantaneous dose rate (or decreasing SDD). The ratio of diode sensitivity, normalized to 4000 cGy/s, varied between 0.988 (1490 cGy/s)-1.023 (38,900 cGy/s) for unirradiated n-type Isorad Gold, 0.981 (1460 cGy/s)-1.026 (39,060 cGy/s) for unirradiated QED Red (n type), 0.972 (1490 cGy/s)-1.068 (38,900 cGy/s) for preirradiated Isorad Red (n type), 0.985 (1490 cGy/s)-1.012 (38,990 cGy/s) for n-type Pt-doped Isorad-3 Gold, 0.995 (1450 cGy/s)-1.020 (21,870 cGy/s) for n-type Veridose Green, 0.978 (1450 cGy/s)-1.066 (21,870 cGy/s) for preirradiated Isorad-p Red, 0.994 (1540 cGy/s)-1.028 (17,870 cGy/s) for p-type preirradiated QED, 0.998 (1450 cGy/s)-1.003 (21,870 cGy/s) for the p-type preirradiated Scanditronix EDP20(3G), and 0.998 (1490 cGy/s)-1.015 (38,880 cGy/s) for Scanditronix EDP10(3G) diodes. The p-type diodes do not always show less dose-rate dependence than the n-type diodes. Preirradiation does not always reduce diode dose-rate dependence. A comparison between the SDD dependence measured at the surface of a full scatter phantom and that in a miniphantom was made. Using a direct adjustment of radiation pulse height, we concluded that the SDD dependence of diode sensitivity can be explained by the instantaneous dose-rate dependence if sufficient buildup is

  17. Energy dependence of deformation parameters in the SC(p,p') SC reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.W.; Glashausser, C.; de Swiniarski, R.; Nanda, S.; Carey, T.A.; Cornelius, W.; Moss, J.M.; McClelland, J.B.; Comfort, J.R.; Escudie, J.

    1986-01-01

    Values of deformation parameters have been extracted from macroscopic coupled-channels analyses of inelastic proton scattering to the first 2 , 3 , and 4 states of SC over the energy range from 200 to 700 MeV. The apparent deformations are almost unchanged over this energy interval; they agree also with nucleon scattering data at much lower energies and at 800 MeV and 1 GeV.

  18. An exploration of plastic deformation dependence of cell viability and adhesion in metallic implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzer, B; Toker, S M; Cingoz, A; Bagci-Onder, T; Gerstein, G; Maier, H J; Canadinc, D

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between cell viability and adhesion behavior, and micro-deformation mechanisms was investigated on austenitic 316L stainless steel samples, which were subjected to different amounts of plastic strains (5%, 15%, 25%, 35% and 60%) to promote a variety in the slip and twin activities in the microstructure. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) revealed that cells most favored the samples with the largest plastic deformation, such that they spread more and formed significant filopodial extensions. Specifically, brain tumor cells seeded on the 35% deformed samples exhibited the best adhesion performance, where a significant slip activity was prevalent, accompanied by considerable slip-twin interactions. Furthermore, maximum viability was exhibited by the cells seeded on the 60% deformed samples, which were particularly designed in a specific geometry that could endure greater strain values. Overall, the current findings open a new venue for the production of metallic implants with enhanced biocompatibility, such that the adhesion and viability of the cells surrounding an implant can be optimized by tailoring the surface relief of the material, which is dictated by the micro-deformation mechanism activities facilitated by plastic deformation imposed by machining.

  19. Shear Rate Dependence of the Pāhoehoe to `A`ā Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soule, A.; Cashman, K.

    2003-12-01

    The surface morphology transition from pāhoehoe-to-`a`ā on basaltic lava flows can be used to interpret the emplacement conditions of solidified flows and predict the behavior of active flows. Investigations of this phenomenon have emphasized either the mechanical properties of the solidified crust (e.g., Kilburn, 1981), or the rheologic properties of the liquid interior (e.g., Peterson and Tilling, 1980). In the latter, the boundary separating pāhoehoe and `a`ā is represented qualitatively by an inverse relationship between apparent viscosity and shear rate. Recent investigations of the rheology dependence of the transition have revealed a critical crystallinity range at which pāhoehoe transforms to `a`ā of φ = 0.18 to 0.35 that can vary between flows. Here, we extend this approach to investigate the shear rate dependence of the pāhoehoe-to-`a`ā transition. We use a suspension of corn syrup and rice to represent lava with crystals. Suspensions of varying particle concentration (φ = 0.15 to 0.40) are sheared in a Couette rheometer over a range of constant shear rates (0.1 to 2.0 s-1). We describe three deformation regimes, clumping, shear zone formation, and fluid failure that produce changes in the suspension microstructure and lead to shear localization. The deformation mechanisms are imaged with digital video and quantified by tracking individual particle paths. In the presence of cooling, these shear localization may be the mechanism by which `a`ā flow surfaces form. We find that the onset of each regime follows the expected inverse relationship between shear rate and suspension viscosity. We expect that the results of these experiments apply to the thermal boundary layer of a flow and thus bridge the distinct approaches taken to investigate this phenomenon. The results of these experiments can contribute to more detailed lava flow modeling and better assessment of flow dynamics from solidified lava flows.

  20. Ataxia rating scales are age-dependent in healthy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsma, Rick; Spits, Anne H; Kuiper, Marieke J; Lunsing, Roelinka J; Burger, Huibert; Kremer, Hubertus P; Sival, Deborah A

    2014-06-01

    To investigate ataxia rating scales in children for reliability and the effect of age and sex. Three independent neuropaediatric observers cross-sectionally scored a set of paediatric ataxia rating scales in a group of 52 healthy children (26 males, 26 females) aged 4 to 16 years (mean age 10y 5mo SD 3y 11mo). The investigated scales involved the commonly applied International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS), the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), the Brief Ataxia Rating Scale (BARS), and PEG-board tests. We investigated the interrelatedness between individual ataxia scales, the influence of age and sex, inter- and intra-observer agreement, and test-retest reliability. Spearman's rank correlations revealed strong correlations between ICARS, SARA BARS, and PEG-board test (all pataxia rating scales are reliable, but should include age-dependent interpretation in children up to 12 years of age. To enable longitudinal interpretation of quantitative ataxia rating scales in children, European paediatric normative values are necessary. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  1. Influence of high temperature pre-deformation on the dissolution rate of delta ferrites in martensitic heat-resistant steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junru; Liu, Jianjun; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Chaolei; Liu, Yazheng

    2017-03-01

    The dissolution process of delta ferrites and the influence of high temperature pre-deformation on the dissolution rate of delta ferrites in martensitic heat-resistant steel 10Cr12Ni3Mo2VN were studied by isothermal heating and thermal simulation experiments. The precipitation temperature of delta ferrites in experimental steel is about 1195 °C. M23C6-type carbides incline to precipitate and coarsen at the boundaries of delta ferrites below 930 °C, and can be rapidly dissolved by heating at 1180 °C. The percentage of delta ferrites gradually decreases with heating time. And a Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation was established to describe the dissolution process of delta ferrites at 1180 °C. High temperature pre-deformation can markedly increase the dissolution rate of delta ferrites. Pre-deformation can largely increase the interface area between delta ferrite and matrix and thus increase the unit-time diffusing quantities of alloying elements between delta ferrites and matrix. In addition, high temperature pre-deformation leads to dynamic recrystallization and increases the number of internal grain boundaries in the delta ferrites. This can also greatly increase the diffusing rate of alloying elements. In these cases, the dissolution of delta ferrites can be promoted.

  2. Medium-dependent control of the bacterial growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Måns; Bremer, Hans; Dennis, Patrick P

    2013-04-01

    By combining results from previous studies of nutritional up-shifts we here re-investigate how bacteria adapt to different nutritional environments by adjusting their macromolecular composition for optimal growth. We demonstrate that, in contrast to a commonly held view the macromolecular composition of bacteria does not depend on the growth rate as an independent variable, but on three factors: (i) the genetic background (i.e. the strain used), (ii) the physiological history of the bacteria used for inoculation of a given growth medium, and (iii) the kind of nutrients in the growth medium. These factors determine the ribosome concentration and the average rate of protein synthesis per ribosome, and thus the growth rate. Immediately after a nutritional up-shift, the average number of ribosomes in the bacterial population increases exponentially with time at a rate which eventually is attained as the final post-shift growth rate of all cell components. After a nutritional up-shift from one minimal medium to another minimal medium of higher nutritional quality, ribosome and RNA polymerase syntheses are co-regulated and immediately increase by the same factor equal to the increase in the final growth rate. However, after an up-shift from a minimal medium to a medium containing all 20 amino acids, RNA polymerase and ribosome syntheses are no longer coregulated; a smaller rate of synthesis of RNA polymerase is compensated by a gradual increase in the fraction of free RNA polymerase, possibly due to a gradual saturation of mRNA promoters. We have also analyzed data from a recent publication, in which it was concluded that the macromolecular composition in terms of RNA/protein and RNA/DNA ratios is solely determined by the effector molecule ppGpp. Our analysis indicates that this is true only in special cases and that, in general, medium adaptation also depends on factors other than ppGpp.

  3. Packet error rate analysis of digital pulse interval modulation in intersatellite optical communication systems with diversified wavefront deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin; Wang, Dayan; Xie, Wanqing

    2015-02-20

    Diversified wavefront deformation is an inevitable phenomenon in intersatellite optical communication systems, which will decrease system performance. In this paper, we investigate the description of wavefront deformation and its influence on the packet error rate (PER) of digital pulse interval modulation (DPIM). With the wavelet method, the diversified wavefront deformation can be described by wavelet parameters: coefficient, dilation, and shift factors, where the coefficient factor represents the depth, dilation factor represents the area, and shift factor is for location. Based on this, the relationship between PER and wavelet parameters is analyzed from a theoretical viewpoint. Numerical results illustrate the validity of theoretical analysis: PER increases with the depth and area and decreases if location gets farther from the center of the optical antenna. In addition to describing diversified deformation, the advantage of the wavelet method over Zernike polynomials in computational complexity is shown via numerical example. This work provides a feasible method for the description along with influence analysis of diversified wavefront deformation from a practical viewpoint and will be helpful for designing optical systems.

  4. Force response of actively deformed polymer microdroplets: dependence on the solid/liquid boundary condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppe, Jonas; McGraw, Joshua D.; Bennewitz, Roland; Jacobs, Karin

    2015-03-01

    In fluid dynamics, the solid/liquid boundary condition can play a major role in the flow behavior of a liquid. For example, in the dewetting of identical polymer films on weak slip or strong slip substrates, large qualitative and quantitative differences are observed. Therefore, when applying an external load to a liquid resting on such substrates, the measured reaction forces and the ensuing flow should also depend on the boundary condition. We present atomic force microscopy measurements in which the reaction force of a cantilever is measured as the tip pierces liquid polymer micron sized droplets and films. These indentations are done on substrates with tuned slip. Accessing the size, depth and rate dependence of the resulting force distance curves, we show an influence of the slip condition on the dissipated energy and adhesion.

  5. Research on forecasting model of sandstone deformation rate during sine wave loading segment under the lag effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    To reduce data variance caused by individual differences of different samples,a new experimental method is proposed by loading and unloading the axial forces with different frequencies and different waves of a certain load amplitude to the same rock sample without damaging it.Lag time segments are defined and fractionized into segments I and Ⅱ.Criterions for seg-mentation,definitions of relevant parameters and empirical analysis are also offered afterwards.In the course of sinusoidal loading,the serious peak value dislocation of the displacement variation rate and the loading rate is defined as peak dislocation.Meanwhile,the definition of the apparent tangent modulus is put forward and the linear relation between it and the vertical force in the frequency of 0.1,0.2,0.5 Hz sinusoidal loading segment is confirmed to be ever-present on the basis of the test data.Then the calculating formula of the deformation rate in non-lag time is deduced.It is thus suggested that the deformation rate should be codetermined by the loading rate df/dt and instant load f(t),which well explains the peak dislocation of the time-variable curve peak value of dl/dt and deformation rate of df/dt.Finally the lag time derivation model is established and by comparing the calculated values with the measured ones,it is demonstrated that the above formula offers a better simulation of the sandstone deformation rate in the sinusoidal loading segment,with the load amplitude being 96 kN and the frequency ranging from 0.1 Hz to 0.5 Hz.

  6. Time-Dependent Behaviors of Granite: Loading-Rate Dependence, Creep, and Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiba, K.; Fukui, K.

    2016-07-01

    To assess the long-term stability of underground structures, it is important to understand the time-dependent behaviors of rocks, such as their loading-rate dependence, creep, and relaxation. However, there have been fewer studies on crystalline rocks than on tuff, mudstone, and rock salt, because the high strength of crystalline rocks makes the detection of their time-dependent behaviors much more difficult. Moreover, studies on the relaxation, temporal change of stress and strain (TCSS) conditions, and relations between various time-dependent behaviors are scarce for not only granites, but also other rocks. In this study, previous reports on the time-dependent behaviors of granites were reviewed and various laboratory tests were conducted using Toki granite. These tests included an alternating-loading-rate test, creep test, relaxation test, and TCSS test. The results showed that the degree of time dependence of Toki granite is similar to other granites, and that the TCSS resembles the stress-relaxation curve and creep-strain curve. A viscoelastic constitutive model, proposed in a previous study, was modified to investigate the relations between the time-dependent behaviors in the pre- and post-peak regions. The modified model reproduced the stress-strain curve, creep, relaxation, and the results of the TCSS test. Based on a comparison of the results of the laboratory tests and numerical simulations, close relations between the time-dependent behaviors were revealed quantitatively.

  7. The temperature-dependence of elementary reaction rates: beyond Arrhenius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ian W M

    2008-04-01

    The rates of chemical reactions and the dependence of their rate constants on temperature are of central importance in chemistry. Advances in the temperature-range and accuracy of kinetic measurements, principally inspired by the need to provide data for models of combustion, atmospheric, and astrophysical chemistry, show up the inadequacy of the venerable Arrhenius equation--at least, over wide ranges of temperature. This critical review will address the question of how to reach an understanding of the factors that control the rates of 'non-Arrhenius' reactions. It makes use of a number of recent kinetic measurements and shows how developments in advanced forms of transition state theory provide satisfactory explanations of complex kinetic behaviour (72 references).

  8. GPS and Geologic Deformation Rates Agree to Within Uncertainties in the Arabia-Africa- Eurasia Zone of Plate Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilinger, R. E.; McClusky, S.

    2008-12-01

    Geodetically-derived motions for Arabia and Nubia relative to Eurasia agree within 1 standard deviation with plate rates estimated from geologic observations (McQuarrie et al., GRL, 2003) for the past 11 Myr for Nubia and greater than 25 Myr for Arabia. Furthermore, fault slip rates derived from an elastic block model constrained by GPS agree within uncertainties (about +/- 15 percent) with geologically determined, long-term slip rates in this complex area of plate interaction. Detailed geomorphological studies of the central North Anatolian fault (NAF) constrained by quantitative dating (Kozaci et a al., Geology, 2007) indicate slip rates that agree within uncertainties, but appear to be systematically lower than geodetic rates. While real rate changes of a few mm/yr cannot be ruled out at present, we note that geodetic inversions for coseismic fault slip on the NAF, and most other faults well constrained by geodetic observations, indicate larger slip at depth than at the surface. If this difference persists throughout the earthquake deformation cycle, it would account for the small difference in geodetic and geologic rates. Extrapolating present-day geodetic motions for Arabia relative to Nubia and Somalia to the time of initiation of Red Sea and Gulf of Aden extension indicates that Arabia separated from Nubia and Somalia simultaneously along the full extent of both rifts at about 25 Myr BP, consistent with independent geologic estimates for the style, and age of initiation of Red Sea extension (Omar and Steckler, 1995, Science). In addition, structural offsets across the Gulf of Suez (GoS) and Gulf of Aqaba (GoA) are consistent with a transfer of strain form the GoS to the GoA at around 12 Ma BP, roughly consistent with the age on initiation of the Dead Sea fault system. We further show that the apparent discrepancy between geodetic deformation of the Aegean (plate-like motion with low internal deformation), and geologic deformation (extensive crustal thinning

  9. Competing effects of nuclear deformation and density dependence of the Λ N interaction in BΛ values of hypernuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaka, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Rijken, Th. A.

    2016-10-01

    Competitive effects of nuclear deformation and density dependence of Λ N interaction in Λ binding energies BΛ of hypernuclei are studied systematically on the basis of the baryon-baryon interaction model ESC (extended soft core) including many-body effects. By using the Λ N G -matrix interaction derived from ESC, we perform microscopic calculations of BΛ in Λ hypernuclei within the framework of the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics under the averaged-density approximation. The calculated values of BΛ reproduce experimental data within a few hundred keV in the wide mass regions from 9 to 51. It is found that competitive effects of nuclear deformation and density dependence of Λ N interaction work decisively for fine-tuning of BΛ values.

  10. On the Temperature Dependence of Enzyme-Catalyzed Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcus, Vickery L; Prentice, Erica J; Hobbs, Joanne K; Mulholland, Adrian J; Van der Kamp, Marc W; Pudney, Christopher R; Parker, Emily J; Schipper, Louis A

    2016-03-29

    One of the critical variables that determine the rate of any reaction is temperature. For biological systems, the effects of temperature are convoluted with myriad (and often opposing) contributions from enzyme catalysis, protein stability, and temperature-dependent regulation, for example. We have coined the phrase "macromolecular rate theory (MMRT)" to describe the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates independent of stability or regulatory processes. Central to MMRT is the observation that enzyme-catalyzed reactions occur with significant values of ΔCp(‡) that are in general negative. That is, the heat capacity (Cp) for the enzyme-substrate complex is generally larger than the Cp for the enzyme-transition state complex. Consistent with a classical description of enzyme catalysis, a negative value for ΔCp(‡) is the result of the enzyme binding relatively weakly to the substrate and very tightly to the transition state. This observation of negative ΔCp(‡) has important implications for the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates. Here, we lay out the fundamentals of MMRT. We present a number of hypotheses that arise directly from MMRT including a theoretical justification for the large size of enzymes and the basis for their optimum temperatures. We rationalize the behavior of psychrophilic enzymes and describe a "psychrophilic trap" which places limits on the evolution of enzymes in low temperature environments. One of the defining characteristics of biology is catalysis of chemical reactions by enzymes, and enzymes drive much of metabolism. Therefore, we also expect to see characteristics of MMRT at the level of cells, whole organisms, and even ecosystems.

  11. Cube texture generation dependence on deformation textures in cold rolled OFE copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Necker, C.T.; Rollett, A.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Doherty, R.D. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The evolution of the {alpha} and {beta} fiber deformation textures in OFE copper for von Mises strains of 1.0 to 4.5 is reported as well as how it affects the generation of cube recrystallization textures. Computational volume fraction analysis of the fibers indicates that the deformation texture evolves evenly along the length of the fibers. Fiber weakening during recrystallization does not occur more selectively in any one component or section of the fiber but occurs relatively evenly across the fiber. Cube grains grow without misorientation preference into the deformed structure. Microtextural analysis of the fully recrystallized samples indicates that the cube component (defined as less than 20{degrees} misorientation from {l_brace}100{r_brace}<001>) not only strengthens with increasing prior strain but also becomes much sharper, more closely aligned with the exact cube position. These results are explained by the evolution of the environment (texture and microstructure) surrounding potential nucleation sites.

  12. The analysis of GPS crustal deformation, seismicity, and strain rate in October 2013 Ruisui, Taiwan Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min-Chien, Tsai; Shui-Beih, Yu; Tzay-Chyn, Shin

    2016-04-01

    The Ruisui earthquake occurred on 31 October 2013 on the Longitudinal Valley (LV) in eastern Taiwan, close to the town of Ruisui. The event was the third Mw ≥ 6 event occurring in Taiwan, during 2013, following the 27 March and 2 June Nantou sequence. The LV, which is considered as an active collision boundary between the Eurasian plate (EU) and the Philippine Sea plate (PSP), is accounting for more than one third of the 82 mm/yr of oblique plate convergence. The LVF is separating two different geological regions: the Coastal Range to the east and the Central Range to the west. The deformation along the LV is mostly accommodated by two large structures: the Longitudinal Valley fault (LVF) and the Central Range fault (CRF). According to the previous research results of geology, GPS, and other geophysical data, the 60° east-dipping LVF, which represents the main active structure of the LV, is characterized by high rates of oblique slip on its southern segment and by primary left-lateral strike-slip on its northern segment. The CRF, dipping 50°-60° westward underneath the eastern flank of the Central Range, is associated with the fast uplift of the Central Range. The Ruisui earthquake is believed to rupture a 30-35-km-long segment of this northeast-southwest trending CRF with a primary thrust mechanism, in agreement with the tectonic stress regime in this region. However, the existence of the CRF has long been debated since its introduction. The earthquake report of the Central Weather Bureau (CWB) of Taiwan indicated an epicenter located at a depth of about 15 km at the position (121.348° E, 23.566° N). Source parameters inferred from GPS data inversion and seismic waveform inversion were reported soon after its occurrence. Both indicate a thrust-fault mechanism with a strike, dip, and rake angles varying from about 200° to 209°, 45° to 59°, and 42° to 50°, respectively, and with a moment magnitude of about 6.2. This shock occurred near a dense

  13. A test case of the deformation rate analysis (DRA) stress measurement method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dight, P.; Hsieh, A. [Australian Centre for Geomechanics, Univ. of WA, Crawley (Australia); Johansson, E. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Hudson, J.A. [Rock Engineering Consultants (United Kingdom); Kemppainen, K.

    2012-01-15

    As part of Posiva's site and ONKALO investigations, the in situ rock stress has been measured by a variety of techniques, including hydraulic fracturing, overcoring, and convergence measurements. All these techniques involve direct measurements in a drillhole or at the rock surface. An alternative method is to test drillhole core in a way that enables estimation of the magnitudes and orientations of the in situ rock stress. The Kaiser Effect (KE) and Deformation Rate Analysis (DRA) are two ways to do this. In the work reported here, a 'blind' DRA test was conducted on core obtained from the POSE (Posiva's Olkiluoto Spalling Experiment) niche in the ONKALO. The term 'blind' means that the two first authors of this report, who conducted the tests at the Australian Centre for Geomechanics, did not know the depths below surface at which the cores had been obtained. The results of this DRA Test Case are presented, together with an explanation of the DRA procedure. Also, additional information that would help in such DRA testing and associated analysis is explained. One of the problems in comparing the DRA results with the known Olkiluoto stress field is that the latter is highly variable across the site, as experienced by the previous in situ stress measurements and as predicted by numerical analysis. The variability is mainly caused by the presence of the large brittle deformation zones which perturb the local stress state. However, this variability reduces with depth and the stress field becomes more stable at the {approx} 350 m at which the drillhole cores were obtained. Another compounding difficulty is that the stress quantity, being a second order tensor, requires six independent components for its specification. In other words, comparison of the DRA results and the known stress field requires comparison of six different quantities. In terms of the major principal stress orientation, the DRA results predict an orientation completely

  14. Effect of methamphetamine dependence on heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Brook L; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William

    2012-05-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an increasing popular and highly addictive stimulant associated with autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction, cardiovascular pathology and neurotoxicity. Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used to assess autonomic function and predict mortality in cardiac disorders and drug intoxication, but has not been characterized in METH use. We recorded HRV in a sample of currently abstinent individuals with a history of METH dependence compared to age- and gender-matched drug-free comparison subjects. HRV was assessed using time domain, frequency domain, and non-linear entropic analyses in 17 previously METH-dependent and 21 drug-free comparison individuals during a 5 minute rest period. The METH-dependent group demonstrated significant reduction in HRV, reduced parasympathetic activity, and diminished heartbeat complexity relative to comparison participants. More recent METH use was associated with increased sympathetic tone. Chronic METH exposure may be associated with decreased HRV, impaired vagal function, and reduction in heart rate complexity as assessed by multiple methods of analysis. We discuss and review evidence that impaired HRV may be related to the cardiotoxic or neurotoxic effects of prolonged METH use.

  15. Local membrane deformations activate Ca2+-dependent K+ and anionic currents in intact human red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Dyrda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanical, rheological and shape properties of red blood cells are determined by their cortical cytoskeleton, evolutionarily optimized to provide the dynamic deformability required for flow through capillaries much narrower than the cell's diameter. The shear stress induced by such flow, as well as the local membrane deformations generated in certain pathological conditions, such as sickle cell anemia, have been shown to increase membrane permeability, based largely on experimentation with red cell suspensions. We attempted here the first measurements of membrane currents activated by a local and controlled membrane deformation in single red blood cells under on-cell patch clamp to define the nature of the stretch-activated currents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The cell-attached configuration of the patch-clamp technique was used to allow recordings of single channel activity in intact red blood cells. Gigaohm seal formation was obtained with and without membrane deformation. Deformation was induced by the application of a negative pressure pulse of 10 mmHg for less than 5 s. Currents were only detected when the membrane was seen domed under negative pressure within the patch-pipette. K(+ and Cl(- currents were strictly dependent on the presence of Ca(2+. The Ca(2+-dependent currents were transient, with typical decay half-times of about 5-10 min, suggesting the spontaneous inactivation of a stretch-activated Ca(2+ permeability (PCa. These results indicate that local membrane deformations can transiently activate a Ca(2+ permeability pathway leading to increased [Ca(2+](i, secondary activation of Ca(2+-sensitive K(+ channels (Gardos channel, IK1, KCa3.1, and hyperpolarization-induced anion currents. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The stretch-activated transient PCa observed here under local membrane deformation is a likely contributor to the Ca(2+-mediated effects observed during the normal aging process of red blood cells, and

  16. A Numerical Modelling Approach for Time-Dependent Deformation of Hot Forming Tools under the Creep-Fatigue Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Reggiani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at predicting the time-dependent deformation of tools used in hot forming applications subjected to the creep-fatigue regime. An excessive accumulated plastic deformation is configured as one of the three main causes of premature failure of tools in these critical applications and it is accumulated cycle by cycle without evident marks leading to noncompliant products. With the aim of predicting this accumulated deformation, a novel procedure was developed, presented, and applied to the extrusion process as an example. A time-hardening primary creep law was used and novel regression equations for the law’s coefficients were developed to account not only for the induced stress-temperature state but also for the dwell-time value, which is determined by the selected set of process parameters and die design. The procedure was validated against experimental data both on a small-scale extrusion die at different stress, temperature, load states, and for different geometries and on an industrial extrusion die which was discarded due to the excessive plastic deformation after 64 cycles. A numerical-experimental good agreement was achieved.

  17. Exercise training improves heart rate variability after methamphetamine dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Brett Andrew; Chudzynski, Joy; Dickerson, Daniel; Mooney, Larissa; Rawson, Richard A; Garfinkel, Alan; Cooper, Christopher B

    2014-06-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects a healthy autonomic nervous system and is increased with physical training. Methamphetamine dependence (MD) causes autonomic dysfunction and diminished HRV. We compared recently abstinent methamphetamine-dependent participants with age-matched, drug-free controls (DF) and also investigated whether HRV can be improved with exercise training in the methamphetamine-dependent participants. In 50 participants (MD = 28; DF = 22), resting heart rate (HR; R-R intervals) was recorded over 5 min while seated using a monitor affixed to a chest strap. Previously reported time domain (SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50) and frequency domain (LFnu, HFnu, LF/HF) parameters of HRV were calculated with customized software. MD were randomized to thrice-weekly exercise training (ME = 14) or equal attention without training (MC = 14) over 8 wk. Groups were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests. Statistical significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Participant characteristics were matched between groups (mean ± SD): age = 33 ± 6 yr; body mass = 82.7 ± 12 kg, body mass index = 26.8 ± 4.1 kg·min. Compared with DF, the MD group had significantly higher resting HR (P increased SDNN (+14.7 ± 2.0 ms, +34%), RMSSD (+19.6 ± 4.2 ms, +63%), pNN50 (+22.6% ± 2.7%, +173%), HFnu (+14.2 ± 1.9, +60%), and decreased HR (-5.2 ± 1.1 bpm, -7%), LFnu (-9.6 ± 1.5, -16%), and LF/HF (-0.7 ± 0.3, -19%). These measures did not change from baseline in the MC group. HRV, based on several conventional indices, was diminished in recently abstinent, methamphetamine-dependent individuals. Moreover, physical training yielded a marked increase in HRV, representing increased vagal modulation or improved autonomic balance.

  18. Friction and scale-dependent deformation processes of large experimental carbonate faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesei, Telemaco; Carpenter, Brett M.; Giorgetti, Carolina; Scuderi, Marco M.; Sagy, Amir; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Collettini, Cristiano

    2017-07-01

    We studied the frictional behaviour and deformation products of large (20 cm × 20 cm bare surfaces) experimental limestone faults. We sheared samples in a direct shear configuration, with an imposed normal force of 40-200 kN and shear velocity of 10 μm/s. The steady-state shearing of these surfaces yielded a coefficient of friction 0.7hold-slide tests, is null (Δμ≤0 upon re-shear). Moreover, sliding of these surfaces is accompanied by dilatation and production of grooves, gouge striations and fault mirrors. These products are entirely analogous to slip surface phenomena found on natural limestone-bearing faults at both the macroscale and at the microscale. We infer that high friction, accompanied by dilatant deformation, and null frictional healing are the macroscopic effect of brittle damage on the sliding surface, constrained by the strength of the rock and by fast healing processes in the gouge. Simultaneously to brittle failure, plastic deformation occurs on the sliding surface and inside the intact rock via nanoparticle formation (mirrors) and twinning at the micron scale. Because of the similarity between experimental and natural structures, we suggest that sliding of carbonate-bearing faults in the uppermost crust could be characterized by high friction, fast healing and strongly dilatant deformation, which would help to explain shallow seismicity frequently documented in carbonatic terrains such as the Northern Apennines of Italy.

  19. Thickness-Dependent Strain Effect on the Deformation of the Graphene-Encapsulated Au Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangli Ye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The strain effect on graphene-encapsulated Au nanoparticles is investigated. A finite-element calculation is performed to simulate the strain distribution and morphology of the monolayer and multilayer graphene-encapsulated Au nanoparticles, respectively. It can be found that the inhomogeneous strain and deformation are enhanced with the increasing shrinkage of the graphene shell. Moreover, the strain distribution and deformation are very sensitive to the layer number of the graphene shell. Especially, the inhomogeneous strain at the interface between the graphene shell and encapsulated Au nanoparticles is strongly tuned by the graphene thickness. For the mono- and bilayer graphene-encapsulated Au nanoparticles, the dramatic shape transformation can be observed. However, with increasing the graphene thickness further, there is hardly deformation for the encapsulated Au nanoparticles. These simulated results indicate that the strain and deformation can be designed by the graphene layer thickness, which provides an opportunity to engineer the structure and morphology of the graphene-encapsulated nanoparticles.

  20. The modelling of time-dependant deformation in wood using chemical kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonfield, P.W.; Mundy, J.; Robson, D.J.; Dinwoodie, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The development of rheological models to predict creep has led to the derivation of quite complex equations that can predict creep reasonably accurately. However, these models are conceptual and are not based on a fundamental under-standing of the actual deformation processes occurring within the ma

  1. Rate dependent rheological stress-strain behavior of porous nanocrystalline materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李慧; 周剑秋

    2008-01-01

    To completely understand the rate-dependent stress-strain behavior of the porous nanocrystalline materials,it is necessary to formulate a constitutive model that can reflect the complicated experimentally observed stress-strain relations of nanocrystalline materials.The nanocrystalline materials consisting grain interior and grain boundary are considered as viscoplastic and porous materials for the reasons that their mechanical deformation is commonly governed by both dislocation glide and diffusion,and pores commonly exist in the nanocrystalline materials.A constitutive law of the unified theory reflecting the stress-strain relations was established and verified by experimental data of bulk nanocrystalline Ni prepared by hydrogen direct current arc plasma evaporation method and hot compression.The effect of the evolution of porosity on stress-strain relations was taken into account to make that the predicted results can keep good agreements with the corresponding experimental results.

  2. Finite element simulation of rate-dependent magneto-active polymer response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, K.; Kiefer, B.; Menzel, A.

    2016-10-01

    This contribution is concerned with the embedding of constitutive relations for magneto-active polymers (MAP) into finite element simulations. To this end, a recently suggested, calibrated, and validated material model for magneto-mechanically coupled and rate-dependent MAP response is briefly summarized in its continuous and algorithmic settings. Moreover, the strongly coupled field equations of finite deformation magneto-mechanics are reviewed. For the purpose of numerical simulation, a finite element model is then established based on the usual steps of weak form representation, discretization and consistent linearization. Two verifying inhomogeneous numerical examples are presented in which a classical ‘plate with a hole’ geometry is equipped with MAP properties and subjected to different types of time-varying mechanical and magnetic loading.

  3. ANALYSIS OF SIMPLE SHEAR ENDOCHRONIC EQUATIONS FOR FINITE PLASTIC DEFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江五贵; 黄明挥

    2005-01-01

    Jaumann rate, generalized Jaumann rate, Fu rate and Wu rate were incorporated into endochronic equations forfinite plastic deformation to analyze simple shear finite deformation. The results show that an oscillatory shear stress and normal stress response to a monotonically increasing shear strain occurs when Jaumann rate objective model is adopted for hypoelastic or endochronic materials. The oscillatory response is dependent on objective rate adopted, independent on elastoplastic models. Normal stress is unequal to zero during simple shear finite deformation.

  4. Surface deformation associated with the 2013 Mw7.7 Balochistan earthquake: Geologic slip rates may significantly underestimate strain release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ryan; Reitman, Nadine; Briggs, Richard; Barnhart, William; Hayes, Gavin

    2015-04-01

    sections with narrow deformation zones in order to capture the full deformation field. Our results imply that hazard analyses based on geologically-determined fault slip rates (e.g., near-field) should consider the significant and heterogeneous mismatch we document between on- and off-fault coseismic deformation.

  5. Scale dependence of rock friction at high work rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Mizoguchi, Kazuo; Takizawa, Shigeru; Xu, Shiqing; Kawakata, Hironori

    2015-12-10

    Determination of the frictional properties of rocks is crucial for an understanding of earthquake mechanics, because most earthquakes are caused by frictional sliding along faults. Prior studies using rotary shear apparatus revealed a marked decrease in frictional strength, which can cause a large stress drop and strong shaking, with increasing slip rate and increasing work rate. (The mechanical work rate per unit area equals the product of the shear stress and the slip rate.) However, those important findings were obtained in experiments using rock specimens with dimensions of only several centimetres, which are much smaller than the dimensions of a natural fault (of the order of 1,000 metres). Here we use a large-scale biaxial friction apparatus with metre-sized rock specimens to investigate scale-dependent rock friction. The experiments show that rock friction in metre-sized rock specimens starts to decrease at a work rate that is one order of magnitude smaller than that in centimetre-sized rock specimens. Mechanical, visual and material observations suggest that slip-evolved stress heterogeneity on the fault accounts for the difference. On the basis of these observations, we propose that stress-concentrated areas exist in which frictional slip produces more wear materials (gouge) than in areas outside, resulting in further stress concentrations at these areas. Shear stress on the fault is primarily sustained by stress-concentrated areas that undergo a high work rate, so those areas should weaken rapidly and cause the macroscopic frictional strength to decrease abruptly. To verify this idea, we conducted numerical simulations assuming that local friction follows the frictional properties observed on centimetre-sized rock specimens. The simulations reproduced the macroscopic frictional properties observed on the metre-sized rock specimens. Given that localized stress concentrations commonly occur naturally, our results suggest that a natural fault may lose its

  6. A Rate-Dependent Viscoelastic Damage Model for Simulation of Solid Propellant Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, E. R.; Nguyen, D. Q.

    2006-07-01

    A viscoelastic deformation and damage model (VED) for solid rocket propellants has been developed based on an extensive set of mechanical properties experiments. Monotonic tensile tests performed at several strain rates showed rate and dilatation effects. During cyclic tensile tests, hysteresis and a rate-dependent shear modulus were observed. A tensile relaxation experiment showed significant stress decay in the sample. Taylor impact tests exhibited large dilatations without significant crack growth. Extensive modifications to a viscoelastic-viscoplastic model (VEP) necessary to capture these experimental results have led to development of the VED model. In particular, plasticity has been eliminated in the model, and the multiple Maxwell viscoelastic formulation has been replaced with a time-dependent shear modulus. Furthermore, the loading and unloading behaviors of the material are modeled independently. To characterize the damage and dilatation behavior, the Tensile Damage and Distention (TDD) model is run in conjunction with VED. The VED model is connected to a single-cell driver as well as to the CTH shock physics code. Simulations of tests show good comparisons with tensile tests and some aspects of the Taylor tests.

  7. Unraveling the tectonic processes behind the contemporary observed deformation rates in southern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, T.; Freed, A.

    2008-12-01

    Southern Alaska forms part of the complex tectonic boundary between the North American and Pacific plates where the interplate boundary transitions from strike-slip to flat and oblique subduction associated with microplate collision to normal subduction. The deformation of this broad plate boundary has been extensively observed by a large array of GPS receivers that illuminate a wide variety of current (1996-2002) deformation characteristics. These include northwestward directed velocities that diminish rapidly across the Denali Fault and a region of southeastward directed velocities near the site of the great 1964 Alaska earthquake. Here we attempt to explain the major trends of the deformation by using a 3-D viscoelastic Lagrangian finite element model that incorporates the complex geometry of the Pacific slab as it subducts beneath North America, the major earthquakes in the region during over the past half century (just prior to the 2002 Denali Fault earthquake), and postseismic relaxation of a mobile lower crust and mantle associated with these events. Results suggest that the deformation field is dominated by convergence of the subducting Pacific plate. However, in order to explain the rapid drop-off in velocities across the Denali Fault, the regions to the south must be substantially weaker mechanically. This would be consistent with distributed brittle behavior throughout these accreted allochthonous terranes, each of which has undergone extensive internal deformation in the past. In addition, on-going viscoelastic relaxation associated with the 1964 earthquake is consistent with southeastward directed velocities in the vicinity of the western Kenai Peninsula. And postseismic relaxation associated with earthquakes in 1949, 1958, and 1972 along the Queen Charlotte - Fairweather fault system explains well the lack of northwestward directed velocities east of the Fairweather fault. The locking depth of the megathrust and the viscoelastic structure also play

  8. Dependence of displacement-length scaling relations for fractures and deformation bands on the volumetric changes across them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, R.A.; Soliva, R.; Fossen, H.; Okubo, C.H.; Reeves, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Displacement-length data from faults, joints, veins, igneous dikes, shear deformation bands, and compaction bands define two groups. The first group, having a power-law scaling relation with a slope of n = 1 and therefore a linear dependence of maximum displacement and discontinuity length (Dmax = ??L), comprises faults and shear (non-compactional or non-dilational) deformation bands. These shearing-mode structures, having shearing strains that predominate over volumetric strains across them, grow under conditions of constant driving stress, with the magnitude of near-tip stress on the same order as the rock's yield strength in shear. The second group, having a power-law scaling relation with a slope of n = 0.5 and therefore a dependence of maximum displacement on the square root of discontinuity length (Dmax = ??L0.5), comprises joints, veins, igneous dikes, cataclastic deformation bands, and compaction bands. These opening- and closing-mode structures grow under conditions of constant fracture toughness, implying significant amplification of near-tip stress within a zone of small-scale yielding at the discontinuity tip. Volumetric changes accommodated by grain fragmentation, and thus control of propagation by the rock's fracture toughness, are associated with scaling of predominantly dilational and compactional structures with an exponent of n = 0.5. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Hybrid colored noise process with space-dependent switching rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Lawley, Sean D.

    2017-07-01

    A fundamental issue in the theory of continuous stochastic process is the interpretation of multiplicative white noise, which is often referred to as the Itô-Stratonovich dilemma. From a physical perspective, this reflects the need to introduce additional constraints in order to specify the nature of the noise, whereas from a mathematical perspective it reflects an ambiguity in the formulation of stochastic differential equations (SDEs). Recently, we have identified a mechanism for obtaining an Itô SDE based on a form of temporal disorder. Motivated by switching processes in molecular biology, we considered a Brownian particle that randomly switches between two distinct conformational states with different diffusivities. In each state, the particle undergoes normal diffusion (additive noise) so there is no ambiguity in the interpretation of the noise. However, if the switching rates depend on position, then in the fast switching limit one obtains Brownian motion with a space-dependent diffusivity of the Itô form. In this paper, we extend our theory to include colored additive noise. We show that the nature of the effective multiplicative noise process obtained by taking both the white-noise limit (κ →0 ) and fast switching limit (ɛ →0 ) depends on the order the two limits are taken. If the white-noise limit is taken first, then we obtain Itô, and if the fast switching limit is taken first, then we obtain Stratonovich. Moreover, the form of the effective diffusion coefficient differs in the two cases. The latter result holds even in the case of space-independent transition rates, where one obtains additive noise processes with different diffusion coefficients. Finally, we show that yet another form of multiplicative noise is obtained in the simultaneous limit ɛ ,κ →0 with ɛ /κ2 fixed.

  10. Late Quaternary uplift rate inferred from marine terraces, Muroto Peninsula, southwest Japan: Forearc deformation in an oblique subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsu'ura, Tabito

    2015-04-01

    Tectonic uplift rates across the Muroto Peninsula, in the southwest Japan forearc (the overriding plate in the southwest Japan oblique subduction zone), were estimated by mapping the elevations of the inner edges of marine terrace surfaces. The uplift rates inferred from marine terraces M1 and M2, which were correlated by tephrochronology with marine isotope stages (MIS) 5e and 5c, respectively, include some vertical offset by local faults but generally decrease northwestward from 1.2-1.6 m ky- 1 on Cape Muroto to 0.3-0.7 m ky- 1 in the Kochi Plain. The vertical deformation of the Muroto Peninsula since MIS 5e and 5c was interpreted as a combination of regional uplift and folding related to the arc-normal offshore Muroto-Misaki fault. A regional uplift rate of 0.46 m ky- 1 was estimated from terraces on the Muroto Peninsula, and the residual deformation of these terraces was attributed to fault-related folding. A mass-balance calculation yielded a shortening rate of 0.71-0.77 m ky- 1 for the Muroto Peninsula, with the Muroto-Misaki fault accounting for 0.60-0.71 m ky- 1, but these rates may be overestimated by as much as 10% given variations of several meters in the elevation difference between the buried shoreline angles and terrace inner edges in the study area. A thrust fault model with flat (5-10° dip) and ramp (60° dip) components is proposed to explain the shortening rate and uplift rate of the Muroto-Misaki fault since MIS 5e. Bedrock deformation also indicates that the northern extension of this fault corresponds to the older Muroto Flexure.

  11. Implementation into earthquake sequence simulations of a rate- and state-dependent friction law incorporating pressure solution creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, H.

    2016-05-01

    Pressure solution creep (PSC) is an important elementary process in rock friction at high temperatures where solubilities of rock-forming minerals are significantly large. It significantly changes the frictional resistance and enhances time-dependent strengthening. A recent microphysical model for PSC-involved friction of clay-quartz mixtures, which can explain a transition between dilatant and non-dilatant deformation (d-nd transition), was modified here and implemented in dynamic earthquake sequence simulations. The original model resulted in essentially a kind of rate- and state-dependent friction (RSF) law, but assumed a constant friction coefficient for clay resulting in zero instantaneous rate dependency in the dilatant regime. In this study, an instantaneous rate dependency for the clay friction coefficient was introduced, consistent with experiments, resulting in a friction law suitable for earthquake sequence simulations. In addition, a term for time-dependent strengthening due to PSC was added which makes the friction law logarithmically rate-weakening in the dilatant regime. The width of the zone in which clasts overlap or, equivalently, the interface porosity involved in PSC plays a role as the state variable. Such a concrete physical meaning of the state variable is a great advantage in future modelling studies incorporating other physical processes such as hydraulic effects. Earthquake sequence simulations with different pore pressure distributions demonstrated that excess pore pressure at depth causes deeper rupture propagation with smaller slip per event and a shorter recurrence interval. The simulated ruptures were arrested a few kilometres below the point of pre-seismic peak stress at the d-nd transition and did not propagate spontaneously into the region of pre-seismic non-dilatant deformation. PSC weakens the fault against slow deformation and thus such a region cannot produce a dynamic stress drop. Dynamic rupture propagation further down to

  12. Engineering estimation of time-dependent deformation characteristics as bending moment relaxation and released unfolding motion of creased paperboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Sh

    2017-02-01

    Paperboards are recognized to be important raw materials for packaging industry due to their advantages such as high strength-to-weight ratio, recyclability. Regarding the development of advanced packaging materials and the requirement of smart formed products, a study of sheet’s response behaviour is necessary for expanding the advanced converting industry. After introducing a couple of past research works concerned crease technologies, a fundamental mechanisms of crease deformation is reviewed using the scoring depth and the folding angle of a paperboard. Since one of important forming characteristics is a time-dependent stress relaxation or time-delayed strain during a fold/unfold process, the author’s experimental approaches for estimating a short term (less than 10 seconds) dynamic deformation behaviour of creased paperboard are discussed.

  13. Strength and Deformation Rate of Plate Boundaries: The Rheological Effects of Grain Size Reduction, Structure, and Serpentinization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesi, L.; Gueydan, F.

    2016-12-01

    Global strain rate maps reveal 1000-fold contrasts between plate interiors, oceanic or continental diffuse plate boundaries and narrow plate boundaries. Here, we show that rheological models based on the concepts of shear zone localization and the evolution of rock structure upon strain can explain these strain rate contrasts. Ductile shear zones constitute a mechanical paradox in the lithosphere. As every plastic deformation mechanism is strain-rate-hardening, ductile rocks are expected to deform at low strain rate and low stress (broad zone of deformation). Localized ductile shear zones require either a localized forcing (locally high stress) or a thermal or structural anomaly in the shear zone; either can be inherited or develop progressively as rocks deform. We previously identified the most effective process at each depth level of the lithosphere. In the upper crust and middle crust, rocks fabric controls localization. Grain size reduction is the most efficient mechanism in the uppermost mantle. This analysis can be generalized to consider a complete lithospheric section. We assume strain rate does not vary with depth and that the depth-integrated strength of the lithospheric does not change over time, as the total force is controlled by external process such as mantle convection and plate and slab buoyancy. Reducing grain size from a coarse value typical of undeformed peridotite to a value in agreement with the stress level (piezometer) while letting that stress vary from depth to depth (the integrated stress remains the same) increases the lithospheric strain rate by about a factor of 1000. This can explain the development of diffuse plate boundaries. The slightly higher strain rate of continental plate boundary may reflect development of a layered rock fabric in the middle crust. Narrow plate boundaries require additional weakening process. The high heat flux near mid-ocean ridge implies a thin lithosphere, which enhances stress (for constant integrated

  14. GPS deformation rates in the Bajo Segura Basin (NE of the Eastern Betic Shear Zone, SE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesús Borque, María; Sánchez-Alzola, Alberto; Estévez, Antonio; García-Tortosa, Francisco J.; Martín-Rojas, Iván; Molina, Sergio; Alfaro, Pedro; Rodríguez-Caderot, Gracia; de Lacy, Clara; García-Armenteros, Juan Antonio; Avilés, Manuel; Herrera, Antonio; Rosa-Cintas, Sergio; Gil, Antonio J.

    2014-05-01

    The Bajo Segura Basin, located in the NE end of the Eastern Betic Shear Zone, is one of the areas with highest seismic activity of the Iberian Peninsula. It is bounded by the Crevillente Fault to the north and the Bajo Segura Fault to the south, and it is characterized by a Late Miocene to Quaternary folded cover. We estimate the present-day deformation of the study area from a GPS network with 11 sites. Observation campaigns were carried out four times (June 1999, September 2001, September 2002 and September 2013). We used the 6.2 version of GIPSY-OASIS software to process GPS data in Precise Point Positioning mode (PPP). In order to obtain the position time series in the whole period of these episodic campaigns, all the GPS observations from 1999 to 2013 campaigns were processed with an identical standard procedure. We compared our velocity field estimation with respect to GEODVEL tectonic model to obtain the residual velocity field of the Bajo Segura Basin. We estimated a ~N-S shortening with deformation rates varying between 0.2 and 0.6 mm/yr. These results are consistent with local geological deformation rates although slightly higher. They also fit well with regional geodetic data estimated for the Western Mediterranean.

  15. Fuzzy economic production quantity model with time dependent demand rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta Kumar Indrajitsingha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this paper, an economic production quantity model is considered under a fuzzy environment. Both the demand cost and holding cost are considered using fuzzy pentagonal numbers. The Signed Distance Method is used to defuzzify the total cost function. Methods: The results obtained by these methods are compared with the help of a numerical example. Sensitivity analysis is also carried out to explore the effect of changes in the values of some of the system parameters. Results and conclusions: The fuzzy EPQ model with time dependent demand rate was presented together with the possible implementation. The behavior of changes in parameters was analyzed. The possible extension of the implementation of this method was presented.

  16. Characterizing heart rate variability by scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Gao, Jianbo; Tung, Wen-wen

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies on heart rate variability (HRV) using chaos theory, fractal scaling analysis, and many other methods, while fruitful in many aspects, have produced much confusion in the literature. Especially the issue of whether normal HRV is chaotic or stochastic remains highly controversial. Here, we employ a new multiscale complexity measure, the scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent (SDLE), to characterize HRV. SDLE has been shown to readily characterize major models of complex time series including deterministic chaos, noisy chaos, stochastic oscillations, random 1/f processes, random Levy processes, and complex time series with multiple scaling behaviors. Here we use SDLE to characterize the relative importance of nonlinear, chaotic, and stochastic dynamics in HRV of healthy, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation subjects. We show that while HRV data of all these three types are mostly stochastic, the stochasticity is different among the three groups.

  17. Potential pitfalls of strain rate imaging: angle dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, P. L.; Greenberg, N. L.; Drinko, J.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Strain Rate Imaging (SRI) is a new echocardiographic technique that allows for the real-time determination of myocardial SR, which may be used for the early and accurate detection of coronary artery disease. We sought to study whether SR is affected by scan line alignment in a computer simulation and an in vivo experiment. Through the computer simulation and the in vivo experiment we generated and validated safe scanning sectors within the ultrasound scan sector and showed that while SRI will be an extremely valuable tool in detecting coronary artery disease there are potential pitfalls for the unwary clinician. Only after accounting for these affects due to angle dependency, can clinicians utilize SRI's potential as a valuable tool in detecting coronary artery disease.

  18. A STELLAR-MASS-DEPENDENT DROP IN PLANET OCCURRENCE RATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulders, Gijs D.; Pascucci, Ilaria [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Apai, Dániel [Department of Astronomy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA. (United States)

    2015-01-10

    The Kepler spacecraft has discovered a large number of planets with up to one-year periods and down to terrestrial sizes. While the majority of the target stars are main-sequence dwarfs of spectral type F, G, and K, Kepler covers stars with effective temperatures as low as 2500 K, which corresponds to M stars. These cooler stars allow characterization of small planets near the habitable zone, yet it is not clear if this population is representative of that around FGK stars. In this paper, we calculate the occurrence of planets around stars of different spectral types as a function of planet radius and distance from the star and show that they are significantly different from each other. We further identify two trends. First, the occurrence of Earth- to Neptune-sized planets (1-4 R {sub ⊕}) is successively higher toward later spectral types at all orbital periods probed by Kepler; planets around M stars occur twice as frequently as around G stars, and thrice as frequently as around F stars. Second, a drop in planet occurrence is evident at all spectral types inward of a ∼10 day orbital period, with a plateau further out. By assigning to each spectral type a median stellar mass, we show that the distance from the star where this drop occurs is stellar mass dependent, and scales with semi-major axis as the cube root of stellar mass. By comparing different mechanisms of planet formation, trapping, and destruction, we find that this scaling best matches the location of the pre-main-sequence co-rotation radius, indicating efficient trapping of migrating planets or planetary building blocks close to the star. These results demonstrate the stellar-mass dependence of the planet population, both in terms of occurrence rate and of orbital distribution. The prominent stellar-mass dependence of the inner boundary of the planet population shows that the formation or migration of planets is sensitive to the stellar parameters.

  19. Interpreting the Dependence of Mutation Rates on Age and Time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyue Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations can originate from the chance misincorporation of nucleotides during DNA replication or from DNA lesions that arise between replication cycles and are not repaired correctly. We introduce a model that relates the source of mutations to their accumulation with cell divisions, providing a framework for understanding how mutation rates depend on sex, age, and cell division rate. We show that the accrual of mutations should track cell divisions not only when mutations are replicative in origin but also when they are non-replicative and repaired efficiently. One implication is that observations from diverse fields that to date have been interpreted as pointing to a replicative origin of most mutations could instead reflect the accumulation of mutations arising from endogenous reactions or exogenous mutagens. We further find that only mutations that arise from inefficiently repaired lesions will accrue according to absolute time; thus, unless life history traits co-vary, the phylogenetic "molecular clock" should not be expected to run steadily across species.

  20. Automatic estimation of pressure-dependent rate coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Joshua W.

    2012-01-01

    A general framework is presented for accurately and efficiently estimating the phenomenological pressure-dependent rate coefficients for reaction networks of arbitrary size and complexity using only high-pressure-limit information. Two aspects of this framework are discussed in detail. First, two methods of estimating the density of states of the species in the network are presented, including a new method based on characteristic functional group frequencies. Second, three methods of simplifying the full master equation model of the network to a single set of phenomenological rates are discussed, including a new method based on the reservoir state and pseudo-steady state approximations. Both sets of methods are evaluated in the context of the chemically-activated reaction of acetyl with oxygen. All three simplifications of the master equation are usually accurate, but each fails in certain situations, which are discussed. The new methods usually provide good accuracy at a computational cost appropriate for automated reaction mechanism generation. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  1. Strain rate dependency of oceanic intraplate earthquake b-values at extremely low strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasajima, Ryohei; Ito, Takeo

    2016-06-01

    We discovered a clear positive dependence of oceanic intraplate earthquake (OCEQ) b-values on the age of the oceanic lithosphere. OCEQ b-values in the youngest (20 Ma) oceanic lithosphere exceed 1.5, which is significantly higher than the average worldwide earthquake b-value (around 1.0). On the other hand, the b-value of intraplate earthquakes in the Ninety East-Sumatra orogen, where oceanic lithosphere has an anomalously higher strain rate compared with normal oceanic lithosphere, is 0.93, which is significantly lower than the OCEQ b-value (about 1.9) with the same age (50-110 Ma). Thus, the variation in b-values relates to the strain rate of the oceanic lithosphere and is not caused by a difference in thermal structure. We revealed a negative strain rate dependency of the b-value at extremely low strain rates (1.5) in oceanic lithosphere >20 Ma old imply that future improvement in seismic observation will capture many smaller magnitude OCEQs, which will provide valuable information on the evolution of the oceanic lithosphere and the driving mechanism of plate tectonics.

  2. Radial deformation of single-walled carbon nanotubes on quartz substrates and the resultant anomalous diameter-dependent reaction selectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Yang; Yu Liu; Daqi Zhang; Xiao Wang; Ruoming Li; Yan Li

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the unique conjugated structure, the chemical-reaction selectivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has attracted great attention. By utilizing the radial deformation of SWNTs caused by the strong interactions with the quartz lattice, we achieve an anomalous diameter-dependent reaction selectivity of quartz lattice-oriented SWNTs in treatment with iodine vapor; this is distinctly different from the widely reported and well accepted higher reaction activity in small-diameter tubes compared to large-diameter tubes. The radial deformation of SWNTs on quartz substrate is verified by detailed Raman spectroscopy and mappings in both G-band and radial breathing mode. Due to the strong interaction between SWNTs and the quartz lattice, large-diameter tubes present a larger degree of radial deformation and more delocalized partial electrons are distributed at certain sidewall sites with high local curvature. It is thus easier for the carbon--carbon bonds at these high-curvature sites on large-diameter tubes to break down during reaction. This anomalous reaction activity offers a novel approach for selective removal of small-band~aD large-diameter tubes.

  3. Exercise Training Improves Heart Rate Variability after Methamphetamine Dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Brett A.; Chudzynski, Joy; Dickerson, Daniel; Mooney, Larissa; Rawson, Richard A.; Garfinkel, Alan; Cooper, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects a healthy autonomic nervous system and is increased with physical training. Methamphetamine dependence (MD) causes autonomic dysfunction and diminished HRV. We compared recently abstinent MD participants with age-matched, drug free controls (DF) and also investigated whether HRV can be improved with exercise training in the MD participants. Methods In 50 participants (MD=28; DF=22) resting heart rate (R-R intervals) was recorded over 5 min while seated using a monitor affixed to a chest strap. Previously reported time-domain (SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50) and frequency-domain (LFnu, HFnu, LF/HF) parameters of HRV were calculated with customized software. MD were randomized to thrice weekly exercise training (ME=14) or equal attention without training (MC=14) over 8 weeks. Groups were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests. Statistical significance was set at P≤0.05. Results Participant characteristics were matched between groups: age 33±6 years; body mass 82.7±12 kg, BMI 26.8±4.1 kg•min−2, mean±SD. Compared with DF, the MD group had significantly higher resting heart rate (P<0.05), LFnu, and LF/HF (P<0.001) as well as lower SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50 and HFnu (all P<0.001). At randomization, HRV indices were similar between ME and MC groups. However, after training, the ME group significantly (all P<0.001) increased SDNN (+14.7±2.0 ms, +34%), RMSSD (+19.6±4.2 ms, +63%), pNN50 (+22.6±2.7%, +173%), HFnu (+14.2±1.9, +60%) and decreased HR (−5.2±1.1 beats·min−1, −7%), LFnu (−9.6±1.5, −16%) and LF/HF (−0.7±0.3, −19%). These measures did not change from baseline in the MC group. Conclusion HRV, based on several conventional indices, was diminished in recently abstinent, methamphetamine dependent individuals. Moreover, physical training yielded a marked increase of HRV representing increased vagal modulation or improved autonomic balance. PMID:24162556

  4. Model for high rate gas flows in deformable and reactive porous beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, A M

    1985-01-08

    This report presents the development of a one dimensional planar Lagrange hydrodynamic computer model which describes the processes preceding detonation. The model treats gas flow, deflagration, and compaction in a porous bed of reactive material. The early part of deflagration to detonation experiment with porous HMX is simulated. Sensitivity of the simulation calculation to ignition and burn rate parameters is illustrated and discussed. The effects of changing the mean particle size of the porous material are investigated. There is widespread interest in runaway reaction hazards that may be associated with porosity in propellant and explosive materials. Experimentally, such reactions are initiated and observed in long, thick walled hollow tubes, filled with a granular porous bed of reactive material. We will present comparisons with an experiment on porous HMX to illustrate details of the model and to point out what we believe are important features of the observed phenomenon. A geometric finite element cell is devised that allows gas to flow through a compacting matrix. The experimental simulation considers the DDT process from initial squib burn through the onset of general matrix deflagration (convective burning), to the development of a fully dense compaction wave. While this simulation did not calculate turnover to detonation, it did illustrate that the transition occurred as soon as the compaction wave became fully dense. It is shown that deflagration and gas permeation lags compaction at the time of transition. This suggests that the actual transition involves an additional compaction dependent process. 18 references, 20 figures, 3 tables.

  5. Rates and patterns of surface deformation from laser scanning following the South Napa earthquake, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Stephen B.; Lienkaemper, James J.; Pickering, Alexandra J; Avdievitch, Nikita N.

    2015-01-01

    The A.D. 2014 M6.0 South Napa earthquake, despite its moderate magnitude, caused significant damage to the Napa Valley in northern California (USA). Surface rupture occurred along several mapped and unmapped faults. Field observations following the earthquake indicated that the magnitude of postseismic surface slip was likely to approach or exceed the maximum coseismic surface slip and as such presented ongoing hazard to infrastructure. Using a laser scanner, we monitored postseismic deformation in three dimensions through time along 0.5 km of the main surface rupture. A key component of this study is the demonstration of proper alignment of repeat surveys using point cloud–based methods that minimize error imposed by both local survey errors and global navigation satellite system georeferencing errors. Using solid modeling of natural and cultural features, we quantify dextral postseismic displacement at several hundred points near the main fault trace. We also quantify total dextral displacement of initially straight cultural features. Total dextral displacement from both coseismic displacement and the first 2.5 d of postseismic displacement ranges from 0.22 to 0.29 m. This range increased to 0.33–0.42 m at 59 d post-earthquake. Furthermore, we estimate up to 0.15 m of vertical deformation during the first 2.5 d post-earthquake, which then increased by ∼0.02 m at 59 d post-earthquake. This vertical deformation is not expressed as a distinct step or scarp at the fault trace but rather as a broad up-to-the-west zone of increasing elevation change spanning the fault trace over several tens of meters, challenging common notions about fault scarp development in strike-slip systems. Integrating these analyses provides three-dimensional mapping of surface deformation and identifies spatial variability in slip along the main fault trace that we attribute to distributed slip via subtle block rotation. These results indicate the benefits of laser scanner surveys along

  6. Geomorphic analysis in areas of low-rate neotectonic deformation: South Epirus (Greece) as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntokos, Dimitrios; Lykoudi, Evdoxia; Rondoyanni, Theodora

    2016-06-01

    River morphology and the distribution of river deposits reliably reflect the neotectonic activity of a region in relation to rock resistance and climatic changes. Geomorphic indices have been used to identify landscape evolution and active faults, particularly in areas of high-rate tectonic deformation. In areas of low-rate deformation, the influence of neotectonic activity on landscape evolution is less apparent, although it is important. The aim of this study is to examine the region of south Epirus (Greece), a region where the rates of active tectonic processes are low. Because rock resistance is low and the sediment supply is intense in this region, the fault surfaces are either not well preserved or they are covered. For the purposes of this paper, geomorphic analysis (including the drainage basin asymmetry factor, the basin hypsometric curve and integral, the valley floor width-to-height ratio, longitudinal river profiles, the stream-length gradient index normalized by the graded river gradient, and the mountain front sinuosity index) was used to evaluate neotectonic activity and to identify covered, potentially active faults. In places where fault surfaces could be observed, geological mapping and tectonic analysis were applied to determine the fault characteristics. The first result of this work is that important active or potentially active faults extend for a significant distance into the alluvial plains of south Epirus. In this case study, we considered that geomorphic indices constitute a valuable tool for identifying neotectonic activity in regions of low-rate deformation. Furthermore, geomorphic analysis reveals the location of covered fault structures, contributes to evaluating fault capability, and therefore to estimating seismotectonic hazard.

  7. The development of grain-orientation-dependent residual stressess in a cyclically deformed alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Dong; Tian, Hongbo; Stoica, Alexandru D; Wang, Xun-Li; Liaw, Peter K; Richardson, James W

    2003-02-01

    There have been numerous efforts to understand and control the resistance of materials to fracture by repeated or cyclic stresses. The micromechanical behaviours, particularly the distributions of stresses on the scale of grain size during or after mechanical or electrical fatigue, are crucial to a full understanding of the damage mechanisms in these materials. Whether a large microstress develops during cyclic deformation with a small amount of monotonic strain but a large amount of accumulated strain remains an open question. Here, we report a neutron diffraction investigation of the development of intergranular stresses, which vary as a function of grain orientations, in 316 stainless steel during high-cycle fatigue. We found that a large intergranular stress developed before cracks started to appear. With further increase of fatigue cycles, the intergranular stress decreased, while the elastic intragranular stored energy continued to grow. One implication of our findings is that the ratio between the intergranular and intragranular stored energies during various stages of fatigue deformation may validate the damage mechanism and can be used as a fingerprint for monitoring the state of fatigue damage in materials.

  8. Rate- and Temperature-Dependent Material Behavior of a Multilayer Polymer Battery Separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdeev, Ilya; Martinsen, Michael; Francis, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Designing battery packs for safety in automotive applications requires multiscale modeling, as macroscopic deformations due to impact cause the mechanical failure of individual cells on a sub-millimeter level. The separator material plays a critical role in this process, as the thinning or perforating of the separator can lead to thermal runaway and catastrophic failure of an entire battery pack. The electrochemical properties of various polymer separators have been extensively investigated; however, the dependency of mechanical properties of these thin films on various factors, such as high temperature and strain rate, has not been sufficiently characterized. In this study, the macroscopic mechanical properties of a multilayer polymer thin film used as a battery separator are studied experimentally at various temperatures, strain rates, and solvent saturations. Due to the anisotropy of the material, material testing was conducted in two perpendicular directions (machine and transverse directions). Material samples were tested in both dry and saturated conditions at several temperatures, and it was found that temperature and strain rate have a nearly linear effect on the stress experienced by the material. Additionally, saturating the separator material in a common lithium-ion solvent had softened it and had a positive effect on its toughness. The experimental results obtained in this study can be used to develop mathematical constitutive models of the multilayer separator material for subsequent numerical simulations and design.

  9. Style and rate of quaternary deformation of the Hosgri Fault Zone, offshore south-central coastal California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Kathryn L.; Lettis, William R.; McLaren, Marcia; Savage, William U.; Hall, N. Timothy; Keller, Mararget A.

    2004-01-01

    The Hosgri Fault Zone is the southernmost component of a complex system of right-slip faults in south-central coastal California that includes the San Gregorio, Sur, and San Simeon Faults. We have characterized the contemporary style of faulting along the zone on the basis of an integrated analysis of a broad spectrum of data, including shallow high-resolution and deep penetration seismic reflection data; geologic and geomorphic data along the Hosgri and San Simeon Fault Zones and the intervening San Simeon/Hosgri pull-apart basin; the distribution and nature of near-coast seismicity; regional tectonic kinematics; and comparison of the Hosgri Fault Zone with worldwide strike-slip, oblique-slip, and reverse-slip fault zones. These data show that the modern Hosgri Fault Zone is a convergent right-slip (transpressional) fault having a late Quaternary slip rate of 1 to 3 mm/yr. Evidence supporting predominantly strike-slip deformation includes (1) a long, narrow, linear zone of faulting and associated deformation; (2) the presence of asymmetric flower structures; (3) kinematically consistent localized extensional and compressional deformation at releasing and restraining bends or steps, respectively, in the fault zone; (4) changes in the sense and magnitude of vertical separation both along trend of the fault zone and vertically within the fault zone; (5) strike-slip focal mechanisms along the fault trace; (6) a distribution of seismicity that delineates a high-angle fault extending through the seismogenic crust; (7) high ratios of lateral to vertical slip along the fault zone; and (8) the separation by the fault of two tectonic domains (offshore Santa Maria Basin, onshore Los Osos domain) that are undergoing contrasting styles of deformation and orientations of crustal shortening. The convergent component of slip is evidenced by the deformation of the early-late Pliocene unconformity. In characterizing the style of faulting along the Hosgri Fault Zone, we assessed

  10. On Temperature and Strain Rate Dependent Strain Localization Behavior in Ti-6.5Al-3.5Mo-1.5Zr-0.3Si Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Zhang; L.M.Lei; X.L.Jiang; Z.M.Song; X.Huang; G.P.Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Deformation behaviors of Ti-6.5Al-3.5Mo-1.5Zr-O.3Si alloys with α/β lamellar structure were investigated systematically at different temperatures from room temperature to 950 ℃ and different strain rates.Results reveal that when the deformation temperature is higher than a critical temperature of 600 ℃,an evident transition of deformation behavior from localized shear banding to α/β lamella kinking,flow softening and temperature/strain rate-dependent peak flow stress occurred in the alloy.The critical conditions for the occurrence of internal cracking and strain localization behavior associated with temperature and strain rate were determined.

  11. Orientation dependency of shear stress-strain curves in B2-ordered Fe3Al single crystals deformed in tension at room temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑为为; 杨王玥; 孙祖庆

    2002-01-01

    B2-ordered Fe3Al single crystals with various orientations were deformed in tension at room temperature in vacuum. The shape of shear stress-strain curves and work hardening rates were found to be strongly dependent on the orientation. The formation of the five different work hardening stages were considered to be related to the number of operative slip systems, the effect of secondary slip systems and the dissociation of the twofold superdislocation. Stage I is an easy glide stage corresponding to single slip. Stage II, with high hardening rate, often corresponds to the existence of conjugate slip systems. Stage III, with relatively low hardening rate, corresponds to the weaker hardening of secondary slip systems. Stage IV, with the highest hardening rate, is not only related to multiple slip but also the dissociation of twofold superdislocations and the moving of superpartials with an antiphase boundary (APB) trap. Stages V, with a negative hardening rate, may be caused by the cross slip of single dissociated superdislocation. The number of stages and the work hardening rate of the same stage were also found to change significantly, when the tensile orientation lies in different orientation regions.

  12. Nuclear shape phase transition within a conjonction of {\\gamma}-rigid and {\\gamma}-stable collective behaviours in deformation dependent mass formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Chabab, M; Lahbas, A; Oulne, M

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical study of a conjonction of $\\gamma$-rigid and $\\gamma$-stable collective motions in critical point symmetries of the phase transitions from spherical to deformed shapes of nuclei using exactly separable version of the Bohr Hamiltonian with deformation-dependent mass term. The deformation-dependent mass is applied simultaneously to $\\gamma$-rigid and $\\gamma$-stable parts of this famous collective Hamiltonian. Moreover, the $\\beta$ part of the problem is described by means of Davidson potential, while the $\\gamma$-angular part corresponding to axially symmetric shapes is treated by a Harmonic Osillator potential. The energy eigenvalues and normalized eigenfunctions of the problem are obtained in compact forms by making use of the asymptotic iteration method. The combined effect of the deformation-dependent mass and rigidity as well as harmonic oscillator stiffness parameters on the energy spectrum and wave functions is duly investigated. Also, the electric quadrupole tran...

  13. Spatially dependent lattice deformations for dislocations at the edges of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chuncheng; He, Kuang; Robertson, Alex W; Yoon, Euijoon; Lee, Gun-Do; Warner, Jamie H

    2015-01-27

    We show that dislocations located at the edge of graphene cause different lattice deformations to those located in the bulk lattice. When a dislocation is located near an edge, a decrease in the rippling and increase of the in-plane rotation occurs relative to the dislocations in the bulk. The increased in-plane rotation near the edge causes bond rotations at the edge of graphene to reduce the overall strain in the system. Dislocations were highly stable and remained fixed in their position even when located within a few lattice spacings from the edge of graphene. We study this behavior at the atomic level using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. These results show detailed information about the behavior of dislocations in 2D materials and the strain properties that result.

  14. Variability of global left ventricular deformation analysis using vendor dependent and independent two-dimensional speckle-tracking software in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Niels; Ali, Sophia; Olsen, Niels T;

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of myocardial deformation by two-dimensional speckle-tracking is useful for clinical and research purposes. However, differences may exist among different ultrasound machines, software packages, frame rates, and observers....

  15. Deformation nanotwins in coarse-grained aluminum alloy at ambient temperature and low strain rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhu; Li, Ning, E-mail: hslining@mail.hust.edu.cn; Jiang, Huawen; Liu, Lin

    2015-01-05

    In order to reveal the possible occurrence of deformation twins in coarse-grained aluminum/aluminum alloy at normal experimental conditions, a 5A02-O aluminum alloy with coarse grains was compressed quasi-statically to various plastic strains at ambient temperature, followed by high-resolution transmission electron analysis. The results revealed some long streaks produced by the thin plate-like structure with 2 atomic planes thick in the specimen undergoing a large strain, while under a relatively small plastic strain, the striped characteristics disappeared. The fast Fourier transform and theoretical analysis have shown that these long streaks are nanotwins, derived from the overlapping of stacking fault ribbons formed by Shockley partial dislocation on adjacent slip planes, which are triggered by the large plastic strain.

  16. Cryogenic ultrahigh strain rate deformation induced hybrid nanotwinned microstructure for high strength and high ductility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang; Suslov, Sergey; Lin, Dong; Liao, Yiliang; Cheng, Gary J.

    2014-06-01

    Nanocrystalline metallic materials prepared by severe plastic deformation often possess high strength but low ductility due to the low dislocation accumulation capacity of the nanograins. Here, we report a unique process, namely, cryogenic laser shock peening (CLSP), to generate gradient nanotwinned microstructure that leads to high strength while preserving the ductility. It was observed that gradient structure was generated in copper. Near the top surface, nanocrystalline with high dense nanotwins have been observed; with the depth increasing, the fraction of the twin boundaries reduces and more heavily dislocated subgrains are observed. It has been demonstrated that CLSP can significantly improve material strength while preserving the ductility. The mechanism of the formation of gradient microstructure and high dense nanotwins near the surface was discussed. The reason behind the improvement in strength and ductility was investigated.

  17. Modelling time-dependent mechanical behaviour of softwood using deformation kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang; Svensson, Staffan

    2010-01-01

    The time-dependent mechanical behaviour (TDMB) of softwood is relevant, e.g., when wood is used as building material where the mechanical properties must be predicted for decades ahead. The established mathematical models should be able to predict the time-dependent behaviour. However, these models...

  18. Quantifying the rates of Quaternary deformation in the Peruvian Forearc using in situ produced cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S. R.; Farber, D. L.; Audin, L.; Finkel, R. C.; Meriaux, A.

    2005-12-01

    While the canonical view is that active deformation in the Andes is mostly confined to the eastern slopes in the subandean fold and thrust belt, recent studies have highlighted the existence of active deformation in the central Andean forearc (Audin et al, 2003, Hartley et al., 2000, Husson and Sempere, 2003, Farias et al., 2005). The forearc of southern Peru, between ~14.5{o}S-18{o}S, consists of the Moquegua Basin longitudinal depression which is bound by the Cordillera de la Costa in the west and the Precordillera and main Cordillera Occidental to the east. The well-preserved fan deposits of the Moquegua Formation cover vast areas of up to 5 km{2}. Developed on top of the Moquegua Formation are a series of well-preserved pediment surfaces (Tosdal et al., 1984), along which, abrupt changes in topography, visible changes in drainage incision, and the offset of alluvial terraces indicate recent uplift and/or faulting. We use in situ produced {10}Be and {26}Al to calculate the exposure ages of these surfaces thereby establishing bounds on timing and extent of tectonic activity. Near the town of Mirave in the Locumba river valley (17.4{o}S, 70.8{o}W) we have used satellite imagery and field mapping to identify an active right-lateral reverse fault. The fault vertically offsets an active channel as evidenced by a 2 m scarp and an abandoned surface of river deposits on the upthrown side of the fault. Cosmogenic ages of vertically and horizontally offset abandoned surfaces provide an opportunity to establish slip-rates along this fault. Preliminary data yields an estimated minimum vertical slip-rate of ~0.22 - 1.1 mm per yr. However, this is just one of many newly mapped active strike-slip and reverse faults within the forearc region, which together can be used to establish regional rates of forearc deformation. The presence of significant of deformation within the forearc region suggests present models convergence distribution may underestimate the amount slip locked

  19. Rate dependent load-deformation relation for concrete under impact tensile loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerheijm, J.

    2005-01-01

    For the numerical prediction of the response of concrete structures under extreme dynamic loading reliable material data and material models are essential. TNO-Prins Maurits Laboratory and the Delft University of Technology collaborate in the field of impact dynamics and concrete modelling. The aim

  20. Size-Dependent Coherent-Phonon Plasmon Modulation and Deformation Characterization in Gold Bipyramids and Nanojavelins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirschner, Matthew S.; Lethiec, Clotilde M.; Lin, Xiao-Min; Schatz, George C.; Chen, Lin X.; Schaller, Richard D.

    2016-05-18

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) arising from metallic nanoparticles offer an array of prospective applications that range from chemical sensing to biotherapies. Bipyramidal particles exhibit particularly narrow ensemble LSPR resonances that reflect small dispersity of size and shape but until recently were only synthetically accessible over a limited range of sizes with corresponding aspect ratios. Narrow size dispersion offers the opportunity to examine ensemble dynamical phenomena such as coherent phonons that induce periodic oscillations of the LSPR energy. Here, we characterize transient optical behavior of a large range of gold bipyramid sizes, as well as higher aspect ratio nanojavelin ensembles with specific attention to the lowest-order acoustic phonon mode of these nanoparticles. We report coherent phonon-driven oscillations of the LSPR position for particles with resonances spanning 670 to 1330 nm. Nanojavelins were shown to behave similarly to bipyramids but offer the prospect of separate control over LSPR energy and coherent phonon oscillation period. We develop a new methodology for quantitatively measuring mechanical expansion caused by photogenerated coherent phonons. Using this method, we find an elongation of approximately 1% per photon absorbed per unit cell and that particle expansion along the lowest frequency acoustic phonon mode is linearly proportional to excitation fluence for the fluence range studied. These characterizations provide insight regarding means to manipulate phonon period and transient mechanical deformation.

  1. Abstinence Rates Following Behavioral Treatments for Marijuana Dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Kadden, Ronald M.; Litt, Mark D.; Kabela-Cormier, Elise; Petry, Nancy M.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have noted particular difficulty in achieving abstinence among those who are marijuana dependent. The present study employed a dismantling design to determine whether adding contingency management (ContM) to motivational enhancement therapy plus cognitive behavioral therapy (MET+CBT), an intervention used in prior studies of treatment for marijuana dependence, would enhance abstinence outcomes. 240 marijuana dependent participants were recruited via advertisements and assigne...

  2. Temperature-dependent ideal strength and stacking fault energy of fcc Ni: a first-principles study of shear deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, S L; Wang, W Y; Wang, Y; Du, Y; Zhang, J X; Patel, A D; Liu, Z K

    2012-04-18

    Variations of energy, stress, and magnetic moment of fcc Ni as a response to shear deformation and the associated ideal shear strength (τ(IS)), intrinsic (γ(SF)) and unstable (γ(US)) stacking fault energies have been studied in terms of first-principles calculations under both the alias and affine shear regimes within the {111} slip plane along the and directions. It is found that (i) the intrinsic stacking fault energy γ(SF) is nearly independent of the shear deformation regimes used, albeit a slightly smaller value is predicted by pure shear (with relaxation) compared to the one from simple shear (without relaxation); (ii) the minimum ideal shear strength τ(IS) is obtained by pure alias shear of {111}; and (iii) the dissociation of the 1/2[110] dislocation into two partial Shockley dislocations (1/6[211] + 1/6[121]) is observed under pure alias shear of {111}. Based on the quasiharmonic approach from first-principles phonon calculations, the predicted γ(SF) has been extended to finite temperatures. In particular, using a proposed quasistatic approach on the basis of the predicted volume versus temperature relation, the temperature dependence of τ(IS) is also obtained. Both the γ(SF) and the τ(IS) of fcc Ni decrease with increasing temperature. The computed ideal shear strengths as well as the intrinsic and unstable stacking fault energies are in favorable accord with experiments and other predictions in the literature.

  3. DEPENDENCE OF THE SLIDER DEFORMATION AND MACHINING PRECISION ON THE MULTIPURPOSE MACHINE-TOOL COMPLEX OF VM SERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berezhnoy S. B.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the development of high-tech metal-working industry, as well as to the use of unmanned technology. We recommended measures to improve the accuracy and quality of manufacturing of complex and large workpieces weighing up to 100 tons. To date, the technical level of many economy sectors is largely determined by the level of the production means. Based on the engineering development there is an overall automation and mechanization of production and industry processes, construction, agriculture, transport and other industries. We analyzed forms of slide sections, of errors affecting the accuracy of the workpieces manufacturing. We made simulation of the cutting forces and sliders deformations. Solved measures increase manufacturing accuracy based on multi-purpose machine tool systems of VM series. We held the analysis of the dependence of cutting forces, a slider form on its strain in different types of processing. We obtained a graph of cutting force and precision manufacturing. We defined the optimal shape of the slider cross section to increase the rigidity and reduce the slide deformation in metal cutting

  4. Interseismic Coupling, Quaternary Uplift Rates, and Fore arc Deformation Along the Costa Rican Segment of the Middle American Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sak, P. B.; Fisher, D. M.; Gardner, T. W.; La Femina, P.; Marshall, J. S.

    2006-12-01

    Late Quaternary uplift recorded by marine and fluvial terraces is broadly consistent with geodetically constrained measurements of locking across the Costa Rican segment of the Middle American Trench (MAT), implying potential linkages between rough crust subduction and seismogenesis. Fifty nine published and seven unpublished radiocarbon dated marine samples constrain variations in Late Quaternary surface uplift rates across a ~300 km long segment of the Pacific coast of Costa Rica between the central Nicoya Peninsula and the Osa Peninsula. All sixty six samples are analyzed using the most recent (IntCal04) calibration and recent sea level curves to constrain late Quaternary uplift rates. Regions characterized by the fastest (> 6 m k.y.-1) long-term uplift rates map to geodetically defined regions of elevated interseismic locking along the Nicoya and Osa Peninsulas. Kinematic analysis of > 40 mesoscale fault populations from along the Costa Rican fore arc provide additional evidence of long-term patterns of upper plate deformation. Mesoscale fault populations suggest that the fore arc can be subdivided into three domains that correlate to the geometry and morphology of the subducting plate. Across the Nicoya Peninsula, where the crust currently entering the MAT is smooth and the Benioff zone defines a steeply dipping slab, mesoscale fault populations are consistent with margin parallel extension and strike-slip motion. Along the central Pacific coast, steeply dipping northeast striking nodal planes accommodate differential uplift associated with ongoing seamount subduction. Further south, inboard of where the aseismic Cocos ridge is under thrust along a subhorizontal Benioff zone, mesoscale fault populations record active shortening related to an extensive thrust belt. Rates of vertical tectonism across the fore arc provide a first order estimate of elastic strain accumulation within the subjacent seismogenic zone. Permanent deformation and permanent shortening

  5. High-frame-rate deformation imaging in two dimensions using continuous speckle-feature tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Vandborg; Moore, Cooper; Arges, Kristine;

    2016-01-01

    The study describes a novel algorithm for deriving myocardial strain from an entire cardiac cycle using high-frame-rate ultrasound images. Validation of the tracking algorithm was conducted in vitro prior to the application to patient images. High-frame-rate ultrasound images were acquired in vivo...... from 10 patients, and strain curves were derived in six myocardial regions around the left ventricle from the apical four-chamber view. Strain curves derived from high-frame-rate images had a higher frequency content than those derived using conventional methods, reflecting improved temporal sampling....

  6. Temperature dependence of magnetically induced deformation of Ni-Mn-Ga martensite

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Vov, V. A.; Glavatska, N.; Aaltio, I.; Söderberg, O.; Glavatskiy, I.; Hannula, S.-P.

    2008-05-01

    In the present work the contributions of the temperature-dependent (i) crystal lattice parameters (related to the magnetic anisotropy energy), (ii) Young's modulus, (iii) saturation magnetization and (iv) thermal fluctuations of the microstress to the temperature dependence of the magnetic field induced strain (MFIS) in Ni-Mn-Ga martensite are considered in the framework of a statistical model. Both individual and cooperative effects of these factors on the achievable MFIS value and on the characteristic values of the magnetic fields, which trigger and saturate MFIS, are estimated. It is shown that all the factors affect both the achievable MFIS value and characteristic fields under the real experimental conditions, and none of them can be neglected in the quantitative theoretical analysis of the experimental strain-field dependencies obtained for different temperature values. In addition, the influence of specimen shape on the characteristic fields is illustrated for different temperature values. For the available experimental dependencies (i) (iii) and the reasonable set of model parameters the switching magnetic field proved to be equal to 160 kA/m when the temperature was by 15 K below the martensite start temperature and raised to 320 kA/m when the temperature was by 45 K below the martensite start temperature. Obtained results agree with the experimental data reported by O. Heczko and L. Straka, in J. Appl. Phys. 94, 7139 (2003).

  7. A new numerical method to calculate inhomogeneous and time-dependent large deformation of two-dimensional geodynamic flows with application to diapirism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, L.; Schmeling, H.

    2013-08-01

    A key to understand many geodynamic processes is studying the associated large deformation fields. Finite deformation can be measured in the field by using geological strain markers giving the logarithmic strain f = log 10(R), where R is the ellipticity of the strain ellipse. It has been challenging to accurately quantify finite deformation of geodynamic models for inhomogeneous and time-dependent large deformation cases. We present a new formulation invoking a 2-D marker-in-cell approach. Mathematically, one can describe finite deformation by a coordinate transformation to a Lagrangian reference frame. For a known velocity field the deformation gradient tensor, F, can be calculated by integrating the differential equation DtFij = LikFkj, where L is the velocity gradient tensor and Dt the Lagrangian derivative. The tensor F contains all information about the minor and major semi-half axes and orientation of the strain ellipse and the rotation. To integrate the equation centrally in time and space along a particle's path, we use the numerical 2-D finite difference code FDCON in combination with a marker-in-cell approach. For a sufficiently high marker density we can accurately calculate F for any 2-D inhomogeneous and time-dependent creeping flow at any point for a deformation f up to 4. Comparison between the analytical and numerical solution for the finite deformation within a Poiseuille-Couette flow shows an error of less than 2 per cent for a deformation up to f = 1.7. Moreover, we determine the finite deformation and strain partitioning within Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTIs) of different viscosity and layer thickness ratios. These models provide a finite strain complement to the RTI benchmark of van Keken et al. Large finite deformation of up to f = 4 accumulates in RTIs within the stem and near the compositional boundaries. Distinction between different stages of diapirism shows a strong correlation between a maximum occurring deformation of f = 1, 3 and

  8. Preliminary results on the deformation rates of the Malatya Fault (Malatya-Ovacık Fault Zone, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sançar, Taylan; Zabcı, Cengiz; Akçar, Naki; Karabacak, Volkan; Yazıcı, Müge; Akyüz, Hüsnü Serdar; Öztüfekçi Önal, Ayten; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Christl, Marcus; Vockenhuber, Christof

    2016-04-01

    The complex tectonic architecture of the eastern Mediterranean is mainly shaped by the interaction between the Eurasian, African, Arabian plates and smaller Anatolian Scholle. Ongoing post-collisional convergence between Eurasian and Arabian plates causes; (1) the westward motion of the Anatolia and and (2) the formation of four neo-tectonic provinces in Turkey: (a) East Anatolian Province of Shortening (b) North Anatolian Province (c) Central Anatolian "Ova" Province (d) West Anatolian Extensional Province. The Central "Ova" Province, which defines a region between the Aegean extensional regime in the west, the North Anatolian Shear Zone (NASZ) in the north and the East Anatolian Shear Zone (EASZ) in the east, is deformed internally by a series of NW-striking dextral and NE-striking sinistral strike-slip faults. The Malatya-Ovacık Fault Zone (MOFZ) is one the sinistral faults of the "Ova" province, located close to its eastern boundary. In order to understand not only the spatio-temporal behaviour of the MOFZ, but also its role in the internal deformation of the Anatolian Scholle we started to study the southern section, the Malatya Fault (MF), of this strike-slip fault zone in the framework of the TÜBITAK project no. 114Y580. The scope of the study is to calculate (a) the horizontal geologic slip rate, (b) the uplift rate, and (c) the cumulative displacement of the Malatya Fault (MF) that constitute the southwest part of MOFZ. Offset streams between 20-1700 m, pressure ridges, hot springs and small pull-apart basin formations are clear geological and geomorphological evidences for fault geometry along the MF. Among them the ~1700 m offset of the Tohma River (TR) presents unique site to understand deformational characteristics of the MF. Three levels of strath terraces (T1 to T3) identified along the both flanks of the TR by analyses of aerial photos and the field observations. The spatial distribution of these terraces are well-constrained by using the high

  9. Effect of Strain Rate on the Ferrite Grain Refinement in a Low Carbon Nb-Ti Microalloyed Steel during Low Temperature Deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Eghbali; A.Abdollah-zadeh

    2005-01-01

    Grain refinement is one of the effective methods to develop new generation low carbon microalloyed steels possessing excellent combination of mechanical properties. The microstructural evolution and ferrite grain refinement at the de-formation temperature of 865℃, above Ar3, with different strain rates were investigated using single pass isothermal hot compression experiments for a low carbon Nb-Ti microalloyed steel. The physical processes that occurred during deformation were discussed by observing the optical microstructure and analyzing the true stress-true strain responses.At strain rates of 0.001 and 0.01 s-1, there is no evidence of work hardening behavior during hot deformation and strain-induced transformation (SIT) leads to dynamic flow softening in flow curves. Optical microscopy observation shows that ultrafine and equiaxed ferrite with grain sizes of 2μm can be obtained by applying deformation with strain rate of 0.1 s-1 due to SIT just after deformation. Furthermore, increasing the strain rate from 0.001 to 0.1 s-1reduces both the grain size of the equiaxed ferrite and the amount of deformed ferrite.

  10. Ataxia rating scales are age-dependent in healthy children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, Rick; Spits, Anne H.; Kuiper, Marieke J.; Lunsing, Roelinka J.; Burger, Huibert; Kremer, Hubertus P.; Sival, Deborah A.

    AIM: To investigate ataxia rating scales in children for reliability and the effect of age and sex. METHOD: Three independent neuropaediatric observers cross-sectionally scored a set of paediatric ataxia rating scales in a group of 52 healthy children (26 males, 26 females) aged 4 to 16 years (mean

  11. Temperature-dependent rate models of vascular cambium cell mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew B. Dickinson; Edward A. Johnson

    2004-01-01

    We use two rate-process models to describe cell mortality at elevated temperatures as a means of understanding vascular cambium cell death during surface fires. In the models, cell death is caused by irreversible damage to cellular molecules that occurs at rates that increase exponentially with temperature. The models differ in whether cells show cumulative effects of...

  12. Ataxia rating scales are age-dependent in healthy children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, Rick; Spits, Anne H.; Kuiper, Marieke J.; Lunsing, Roelinka J.; Burger, Huibert; Kremer, Hubertus P.; Sival, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate ataxia rating scales in children for reliability and the effect of age and sex. METHOD: Three independent neuropaediatric observers cross-sectionally scored a set of paediatric ataxia rating scales in a group of 52 healthy children (26 males, 26 females) aged 4 to 16 years (mean

  13. Depth-dependent variations in Achilles tendon deformations with age are associated with reduced plantarflexor performance during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Jason R; Thelen, Darryl G

    2015-08-01

    The anatomical arrangement of the Achilles tendon (AT), with distinct fascicle bundles arising from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, may facilitate relatively independent behavior of the triceps surae muscles. A reduced capacity for sliding between adjacent tendon fascicles with age may couple gastrocnemius and soleus muscle behavior, thereby potentially contributing to diminished plantarflexor performance commonly observed in old adults. Nine healthy young (mean age, 23.9 yr) and eight healthy old (69.9 yr) adults walked at three speeds (0.75, 1.00, and 1.25 m/s) on a force-sensing treadmill. We coupled dynamic ultrasound imaging of the free AT with motion capture and inverse dynamic analyses to compute, in part: 1) depth-dependent variations in AT tissue displacements and elongations and 2) net ankle joint kinetics during push-off. The difference in displacements between superficial and deep AT regions, and in their corresponding elongations, did not differ between old and young adults at the slower two walking speeds (P > 0.61). However, old adults walked with 41% smaller depth-dependent variations in free AT displacements and elongations at 1.25 m/s (P = 0.02). These more uniform tendon deformations in old adults most strongly correlated with reduced peak ankle moment (R(2) = 0.40), but also significantly correlated with reduced peak power generation (R(2) = 0.15) and positive ankle work during push-off (R(2) = 0.19) (P > 0.01). Our findings: 1) demonstrate a potential role for nonuniform AT deformations in governing gastrocnemius and soleus muscle-tendon function and 2) allude to altered tendon behavior that may contribute to the age-related reduction in plantarflexor performance during walking.

  14. Extensional deformation of the Guadalquivir Basin: rate of WSW-ward tectonic displacement from Upper Tortonian sedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, Francisco J.; Azañón, Jose Miguel; Rodríguez-Fernández, Jose; María Mateos, Rosa

    2016-04-01

    The Guadalquivir Basin (Upper Tortonian-Quaternary sedimentary infilling) has been considered the foreland basin of the Betic Orogen built up during its collision with the Sudiberian margin. The basin is currently restricted to its westernmost sector, in the Cadiz Gulf, because the Neogene-Quaternary uplift of the Betic Cordillera has produced the emersion of their central and eastern parts. The upper Tortonian chronostratigraphic unit is the oldest one and it was indistinctly deposited on the South Iberian paleomargin and the External units from the Betic Cordillera. However, these rocks are undeformed on the Sudiberian paleomargin while they are deeply affected by brittle deformation on the External Betic Zone. Outcrops of Upper Tortonian sedimentary rocks on External Betic Zone are severely fragmented showing allocthonous characters with regard to those located on the Sudiberian paleomargin. This post- Upper Tortonian deformation is not well known in the External Zones of the Cordillera where the most prominent feature is the ubiquity of a highly deformed tecto-sedimentary unit outcropping at the basement of the Guadalquivir sedimentary infilling. This tecto-sedimentary unit belongs to the Mass Wasting Extensional Complex (Rodríguez-Fernández, 2014) formed during the collision and westward migration of the Internal Zone of the Betic Cordillera (15-8,5 Ma). In the present work, we show an ensemble of tectonic, geophysical and cartographic data in order to characterize the post-Upper Tortonian deformation. For this, seismic reflection profiles have been interpreted with the help of hidrocarbon boreholes to define the thickness of the Upper Tortonian sedimentary sequence. All these data provide an estimation of the geometrical and kinematic characteristics of the extensional faults, direction of movement and rate of displacement of these rocks during Messinian/Pliocene times. References Rodríguez-Fernández, J., Roldan, F. J., J.M. Azañón y Garcia-Cortes, A

  15. Properties of heterogeneous energetic materials under high strain, high strain rate deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing

    Heterogeneous energetic materials have many applications. Their dynamic behavior and microstructural evolution upon plastic deformation have remained not fully understood. The following heterogeneous materials were investigated in the this study: the pure PTFE (usually a mixture of crystalline and amorphous phases), PTFE-Sn, PTFE-Al, PTFE-Al-W, and carbon fibers filled Al alloy. Sample manufacturing processes involving ball milling and Cold Isostatic Pressing were employed. Quasi-static and Hopkinson bar tests were carried out to obtain the compressive strengths of composites. The Conventional Thick-walled Cylinder (TWC) method and newly developed small-scale Hopkinson bar based TWC experiments were conducted to investigate single shear bands and their assembly. Conventional and "soft" drop-weight tests were performed to examine the mechanical properties and the initiation of chemical reactions. Scanning Electron Microscopy was used to detect the details of the microstructures and failure mechanisms of heterogeneous materials. New features in the dynamic behavior of heterogeneous materials were observed. They include the following: (1) Strain softening, instead of thermal softening, is the main mechanism in the initiation of shear bands in explosively driven TWC tests of solid PTFE. (2) Cold isostatically pressed PTFE-Sn samples were more stable with respect to shear localization than solid PTFE. (3) The dynamic collapse of solid PTFE-Al samples with different particle sizes was accomplished with the shear localization bands and cracks. (4) Force chains in the fine W and Al particles were attributed to the high strength of the porous PTFE-Al-W composite containing fine W particles in comparison with composites with coarse W particles. (5) Debonding of metal particles from the PTFE matrix and the fracture of the matrix were identified to be two major mechanisms for the failure of the PTFE-Al-W composites. (6) The formation of PTFE nano-fibers during high strain flow

  16. Comparison between Cooling Rate Dependence of Macroscopic and Microscopic Quantities in Simulated Aluminium Glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chang-Song; ZHU Zhen-Gang

    2000-01-01

    Constant-pressure molecular dynamics simulations and an analysis of the local atomic structures have been performed to study the cooling rate dependence of some macroscopic and microscopic quantities in aluminium glass. Macroscopic quantities, enthalpy and density, see an observable but small dependence on the cooling rate. Icosahedral ordering units exhibit strong cooling rate dependence, which is responsible for the dependence of the enthalpy and the density on the cooling rate; while the almost independence of some microstructural units such as the 1541, 1431 and 1421 pairs of the cooling rate may lead to a small dependence of the enthalpy and the density on the cooling rate.

  17. Dependence of the brittle ductile transition on strain-rate-dependent critical homologous temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Paul M.

    2017-05-01

    Earthquakes mainly occur in crust or mantle that is below a critical temperature for the tectonic strain-rate, \\dot{e}_t, such that stress builds up to the breaking point before it can relax due to creep. Then long-range stress correlation gives rise to power law seismicity including large events. The limiting temperature depends on pressure, which is taken into account by finding a critical homologous temperature THc = T/TM above which earthquakes are rarely observed (where T, TM are temperature and average melting temperature of constituent minerals). We find that THc for ocean plates is ∼0.55. For California earthquakes, it is also close to 0.55. The uppermost mantle layer of oceanic plates of thickness ∼50 km is composed of harzburgite and depleted peridotite from which basalt has been removed to form ocean crust. Thus it has a higher melting temperature than the peridotite of the surrounding mantle, or the lower halves of plates. Thicknesses of seismicity in deep subduction zones, determined from 2-D polynomial fits to a relocated catalogue, are ∼50 km, which suggests that the earthquake channel is confined to this layer. We construct models to find homologous temperatures in slabs, and find that seismicity thicknesses are also, on average, confined to TH ≤ 0.55 ± 0.05. The associated rheology is compared with that obtained from flexure models of ocean lithosphere. The brittle-ductile transition occurs where viscosity drops from high values in the cold cores of slabs to values of 1022-1023 Pa s, that is, where creep strain-rates become comparable to tectonic rates. The cut-off for deep earthquakes is not sharp. However they appear unlikely to occur if homologous temperature is high TH > 0.55. Exceptions to the rule are anomalously deep earthquakes such as those beneath the Iceland and the Hawaiian hotspots, and the Newport Inglewood Fault. These are smaller events with short-range stress correlation, and can be explained if strain-rates are two to

  18. Dependence of Reaction Rate Constants on Density in Supercritical Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGTao; SHENZhongyao

    2002-01-01

    A new method,which correlates rate constants of chemical reactions and density or pressure in supercritical fluids,was developed.Based on the transition state theory and thermodynamic principles, the rate constant can be reasonably correlated with the density of the supercritical fluid,and a correlation equation was obtained. Coupled with the equation of state (EOS) of a supercritical solvent,the effect of pressure on reaction rate constant could be represented.Two typical systems were used to test this method.The result indicates that this method is suitable for dilute supercritical fluid solutions.

  19. Submicroscopic Deformation in Cement Paste and Mortar at High Load Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-15

    Composites: Strain Rate Effects on Fracture, S. Mindess and S. P. Shah, Eds., Materials Research Society Symposia Proceedings, Vol. 64, 1986, pp. 167-180. 3...Strength, and the Compressive Strength of Mortar," Bonding in Cementitious Composites, S. Mindess and S. P. Shah, Eds., Materials Research Society

  20. Continuum remodeling revisited : deformation rate driven functional adaptation using a hypoelastic constitutive law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negus, Charles H; Impelluso, Thomas J

    2007-07-01

    Recent research effort in bone remodeling has been directed toward describing interstitial fluid flow in the lacuno-canalicular system and its potential as a cellular stimulus. Regardless of the precise contents of the mechanotransduction "black box", it seems clear that the fluid flow on which the remodeling is predicated cannot occur under static loading conditions. In an attempt to help continuum remodeling simulations catch up with cellular and subcellular research, this paper presents a simple, strain rate driven remodeling algorithm for density allocation and principal material direction rotations. An explicit finite element code was written and deployed on a supercomputer which discretizes the remodeling process and uses an objective hypoelastic constitutive law to simulate trabecular realignment. Results indicate that a target strain rate for this dynamic approach is |D ( I )| = 1.7% per second which seems reasonable when compared to observed strain rates. Simulations indicate that a morpho-mechanically realistic three-dimensional bone can be synthesized by applying a few dynamic loads at the envelope of common daily physiological rates, even with no static loading component.

  1. Deformation Rates in the Snake River Plain and Adjacent Basin and Range Regions Based on GPS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, S. J.; McCaffrey, R.; King, R. W.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    We estimate horizontal velocities for 405 sites using Global Positioning System (GPS) phase data collected from 1994 to 2010 within the Northern Basin and Range Province, U.S.A. The velocities reveal a slowly-deforming region within the Snake River Plain in Idaho and Owyhee-Oregon Plateau in Oregon separated from the actively extending adjacent Basin and Range regions by shear. Our results show a NE-oriented extensional strain rate of 5.6 ± 0.7 nanostrain/yr in the Centennial Tectonic Belt and an ~E-oriented extensional strain rate of 3.5 ± 0.2 nanostrain/yr in the Great Basin. These extensional rates contrast with the very low strain rate within the 125 km x 650 km region of the Snake River Plain and Owyhee-Oregon Plateau which is not distinguishable from zero (-0.1 ± 0.4 x nanostrain/yr). Inversions of Snake River Plain velocities with dike-opening models indicate that rapid extension by dike intrusion in volcanic rift zones, as previously hypothesized, is not currently occurring. GPS data also disclose that rapid extension in the surrounding regions adjacent to the slowly-deforming region of the Snake River Plain drives shear between them. We estimate right-lateral shear with slip rates of 0.3-1.5 mm/yr along the northwestern boundary adjacent to the Centennial Tectonic Belt and left-lateral oblique extension with slip rates of 0.5-1.5 mm/yr along the southeastern boundary adjacent to the Intermountain Seismic Belt. The fastest lateral shearing evident in the GPS occurs near the Yellowstone Plateau where earthquakes with right-lateral strike-slip focal mechanisms are within a NE-trending zone of seismicity. The regional velocity gradients are best fit by nearby poles of rotation for the Centennial Tectonic Belt, Snake River Plain, Owyhee-Oregon Plateau, and eastern Oregon, indicating that clockwise rotation is not locally driven by Yellowstone hotspot volcanism, but instead by extension to the south across the Wasatch fault possibly due to gravitational

  2. Research on flow stress of spray formed 70Si30Al ahoy under hot compression deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Yanguang; XIONG Baiqing; ZHANG Yong'an; LIU Hongwei; ZHU Baohong; WANG feng

    2006-01-01

    The flow stress of spray formed 70Si30Al alloy was studied by hot compression on a Gleeble-1500 test machine.The experimental results indicated that the flow stress depends on the strain rate and the deformation temperature. The flow stress increases with an increase in strain rate at a given deformation temperature. The flow stress decreases with the deformation temperature increasing at a given strain rate. The relational expression among the flow stress, the strain rate, and the deformation temperature satisfies the Arrhenius equation. The deformation activation energy of 70Si30Al alloy during hot deformation is 866.27 kJ/mol from the Arrhenius equation.

  3. Constitutive Models for Compressive Deformation of AZ80 Magnesium Alloy under Multiple Loading Directions and Strain Rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-qing CHANG; Li-ying ZHANG; Yong-biao YANG; Jing-li REN

    2016-01-01

    Two constitutive models,the modified Johnson-Cook model and the logarithm linear relation model based on empirical approach and data analysis,were presented to illustrate compressive deformation of magnesium alloys AZ80 under multiple loading directions and strain rates.The results of stress-strain curve analysis and sensitivity in-dex analysis suggested that the stress held large fluctuations in loading direction of 90°.Model testing signified that the logarithm linear relation model was more proper than the modified Johnson-Cook model in view of relative mean square error and correlation coefficients.Moreover,numerical simulation building on established models also indica-ted that the logarithm linear model is more precise than the modified Johnson-Cook model.

  4. Mechanical properties and constitutive relations for molybdenum under high-rate deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.R.; Maudlin, P.J.; Gray, G.T. III

    1998-01-01

    Molybdenum and its alloys have received increased interest in recent years for ballistic applications. The stress-strain behavior of several molybdenums possessing various compositions, manufacturing sources, and the degree of pre-straining, were investigated as a function of temperature from 77 to 1,273 K, and strain rate from 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1} to 8,000 s{sup {minus}1}. The yield stress was found to be sensitive to the test temperature and strain rate, however, the strain hardening remained rate-insensitive. The constitutive response of a powder-metallurgy molybdenum was also investigated; similar mechanical properties compared to conventionally wrought processed molybdenums were achieved. Constitutive relations based upon the Johnson-Cook, the Zerilli-Armstrong and the Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) models were evaluated and fit for the various Mo-based materials. The capabilities and limitations of each model for large-strain applications were examined. The differences between the three models are demonstrated using model comparisons to Taylor cylinder validation experiments.

  5. Crustal deformation rates in central and eastern U.S. inferred from GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Weijun; Prescott, William H.

    Analysis of continuous GPS observations between 1996 and 2000 at 62 stations distributed throughout the central and eastern United States suggests that the area is generally stable. Seven of the 62 stations show anomalous velocities, but there is reason to suspect their monument stability. Assuming the remaining 55 stations are stable with respect to interior North America, we have found the North America-ITRF97 Euler vector (-1.88°±1.04°N, 77.67°±0.39°W, 0.201°±0.004° Myr-1) that minimizes the RMS station velocity. Referred to fixed North America, all of these velocities are less than 3.2 mm yr-1. Motion of several stations suggests the Mississippi embayment may be moving southward away from the rest of the continent at a rate of 1.7±0.9 mm yr-1. The motion of the embayment produces a large gradient in velocity which, in turn, implies the highest seismic moment accumulation rate that we found. Although the highest rate is only marginally significant, the fact that it occurs near New Madrid, where earthquake risk is thought to be high, argues that the anomaly may be real. Nevertheless, the identification of the anomaly remains tentative.

  6. Gamow-Teller strength distributions and stellar weak-interaction rates for ^{76}Ge and ^{82}Se using the deformed pn-QRPA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Ishfaq, Mavra

    2016-07-01

    We calculate Gamow-Teller strength distributions for β β-decay nuclei ^{76}Ge and ^{82}Se using the deformed pn-QRPA model. We use a deformed Nilsson basis and consider pairing correlations within the deformed BCS theory. Ground state correlations and two-particle and two-hole mixing states were included in our pn-QRPA model. Our calculated strength distributions were compared with experimental data and previous calculation. The total Gamow-Teller strength and centroid placement calculated in our model compares well with the measured value. We calculate β-decay and positron capture rates on ^{76}Ge and ^{82}Se in supernovae environments and compare them to those obtained from experimental data and previous calculation. Our study shows that positron capture rates command the total weak rates at high stellar temperatures. We also calculate energy rates of β-delayed neutrons and their emission probabilities.

  7. Dependency of deformation twinning on grain orientation in an FCC and a HCP metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ping

    2007-01-01

    Twinning plays important roles in HCP metals and those FCC metals with low stacking fault energy.The structural difierence of two types of metals makes quite different contributions of twinning to plasticity The variety of grain orientation in polycrystalline metals causes the inhomogeneous occurrence of twinning and further distinct transformation kinetics of twinning as strain increases and texture develops.This changes finally the work hardening behavior and mechanical properties.This Paper reveals the dependency of twinning on grain orientation in an FCC TWIP(twinning induced plasticity)steel with high Mn content and in a magnesium alloy using electron-backscatter-difiraction(EBSD) technique,and analyzes the characteristies of twinning in the two types of metals by Schmid factor calculation.In addition,the relation of twinning and shear banding, as well as their influence on properties are discussed.

  8. Dependence of rate constants on vibrational temperatures - An Arrhenius description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, D. I.; Johnson, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    An interpretation of the variation of rate constants with vibrational temperature is proposed which introduces parameters analogous to those of the classical Arrhenius expression. The constancy of vibrational activation energy is studied for the dissociaton of NO, the ion-molecular reaction of O(+) with N2, and the atom exchange reaction of I with H2. It is found that when a Boltzmann distribution for vibrational states is applicable, the variation of the rate constant with the vibrational temperature can be used to define a vibrational activation energy. The method has application to exchange reactions where a vibrational energy threshold exists.

  9. GPS measurements of deformation near the Rio Grande rift: Evidence for variations in the rate of extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, M. H.; Murray, K. D.; Sheehan, A. F.; Nerem, R. S.; van Wijk, J.; Axen, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    We use data from 215 continuous GPS stations, including 26 stations installed in 2006-2007 as part of a collaborative EarthScope experiment, to investigate how deformation is distributed near the Rio Grande rift (RGR) in New Mexico (NM) and Colorado (CO), USA. Our previous analysis, using data from 2006-2010, found nearly uniform 1.2±0.2 nanostrain/yr (nɛ/yr) east-west extensional strain rate along 5 profiles spanning a ~1000 km region (Berglund et al., 2012). We have included data from 1996-2015, and more formally account for correlated noise in the time series, which reduces horizontal velocity uncertainties to ~0.06 mm/yr. Strain rate along the profiles across the RGR increases from 0.55±0.06 nɛ/yr in southern NM to as much as 1.05±0.06 nɛ/yr in southern CO before dropping to ~0 nɛ/yr, within error, in northern CO. In all 5 east-west profiles across the RGR, strain rate is higher along the profiles west of the fault-defined rift zone than it is to the east—an increase to 1.65±0.1 nɛ/yr in southern CO, for example. Results from Euler pole analysis of sites within the Colorado Plateau relative to stable North America are consistent with significant internal deformation within the plateau, and using a subset of sites, we infer an Euler pole located in northern Utah that is roughly consistent with geologically derived estimates of a Miocene clockwise rotation (Chapin and Cather, 1994). A 2-dimensional strain rate field shows little evidence for higher extensional rates directly across the surface faults bounding the RGR, but does suggest a higher concentration along the Jemez lineament, which is a linear series of the youngest volcanic activity in NM located primarily at the SE edge of the Colorado Plateau. Two zones of possible contraction exist north and south of the Jemez lineament, which may reflect uplift from the NE section of the Jemez lineament due to upper mantle buoyancy.

  10. Fault structure and deformation rates at the Lastros-Sfaka Graben, Crete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, J.; Schneiderwind, S.; Pallikarakis, A.; Wiatr, T.; Mechernich, S.; Papanikolaou, I.; Reicherter, K.

    2016-06-01

    The Lastros and Sfaka faults have an antithetic relationship and form a ca. 2 km wide graben within the Ierapetra fault zone in eastern Crete. Both faults have impressive bedrock fault scarps many metres in height which form prominent features within the landscape. t-LiDAR investigations undertaken on the Lastros fault are used to accurately determine vertical displacements along a ca. 1.3 km long scanned segment. Analyses show that previous estimations of post glacial slip rate are too high because there are many areas along strike where the scarp is exhumed by natural erosion and/or anthropogenic activity. In areas not affected by erosion there is mean scarp height of 9.4 m. This leads to a slip rate of 0.69 ± 0.15 mm/a using 15 ± 3 ka for scarp exhumation. Using empirical calculations the expected earthquake magnitudes and displacement per event are discussed based on our observations. Trenching investigations on the Sfaka fault identify different generations of fissure fills. Retrodeformation analyses and 14C dating of the fill material indicate at least four events dating back to 16,055 ± 215 cal BP, with the last event having occurred soon after 6102 ± 113 cal BP. The Lastros fault is likely the controlling fault in the graben, and ruptures on the Lastros fault will sympathetically affect the Sfaka fault, which merges with the Lastros fault at a depth of 2.4 km. The extracted dates from the Sfaka fault fissure fills therefore either represent activity on the Lastros fault, assuming they formed coseismically, or accommodation events. Cross sections show that the finite throw is limited to around 300 m, and the derived slip rate for the Lastros fault therefore indicates that both faults are relatively young having initiated 435 ± 120 ka.

  11. Modeling anisotropic plasticity: Eulerian hydrocode applications of high strain-rate deformation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clancy, S.P.; Burkett, M.W.; Maudlin, P.J.

    1997-05-01

    Previously developed constitutive models and solution algorithms for anisotropic elastoplastic material strength are implemented in the two-dimensional MESA hydrodynamics code. Quadratic yield functions fitted from polycrystal simulations for a metallic hexagonal-close-packed structure are utilized. An associative flow strength formulation incorporating these yield functions is solved using a geometric normal return method. A stretching rod problem is selected to investigate the effects of material anisotropy on a tensile plastic instability (necking). The rod necking rate and topology are compared for MESA simulations performed for both isotropic and anisotropic cases utilizing the Mechanical Threshold Stress flow stress model.

  12. Mechanical deformation model of the western United States instantaneous strain-rate field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, Fred F.; Vergnolle, Mathilde

    2006-10-01

    We present a relationship between the long-term fault slip rates and instantaneous velocities as measured by Global Positioning System (GPS) or other geodetic measurements over a short time span. The main elements are the secularly increasing forces imposed by the bounding Pacific and Juan de Fuca (JdF) plates on the North American plate, viscoelastic relaxation following selected large earthquakes occurring on faults that are locked during their respective interseismic periods, and steady slip along creeping portions of faults in the context of a thin-plate system. In detail, the physical model allows separate treatments of faults with known geometry and slip history, faults with incomplete characterization (i.e. fault geometry but not necessarily slip history is available), creeping faults, and dislocation sources distributed between the faults. We model the western United States strain-rate field, derived from 746 GPS velocity vectors, in order to test the importance of the relaxation from historic events and characterize the tectonic forces imposed by the bounding Pacific and JdF plates. Relaxation following major earthquakes (M γ 8.0) strongly shapes the present strain-rate field over most of the plate boundary zone. Equally important are lateral shear transmitted across the Pacific-North America plate boundary along ~1000 km of the continental shelf, downdip forces distributed along the Cascadia subduction interface, and distributed slip in the lower lithosphere. Post-earthquake relaxation and tectonic forcing, combined with distributed deep slip, constructively interfere near the western margin of the plate boundary zone, producing locally large strain accumulation along the San Andreas fault (SAF) system. However, they destructively interfere further into the plate interior, resulting in smaller and more variable strain accumulation patterns in the eastern part of the plate boundary zone. Much of the right-lateral strain accumulation along the SAF system

  13. Mechanical deformation model of the western United States instantaneous strain-rate field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F.F.; Vergnolle, M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a relationship between the long-term fault slip rates and instantaneous velocities as measured by Global Positioning System (GPS) or other geodetic measurements over a short time span. The main elements are the secularly increasing forces imposed by the bounding Pacific and Juan de Fuca (JdF) plates on the North American plate, viscoelastic relaxation following selected large earthquakes occurring on faults that are locked during their respective interseismic periods, and steady slip along creeping portions of faults in the context of a thin-plate system. In detail, the physical model allows separate treatments of faults with known geometry and slip history, faults with incomplete characterization (i.e. fault geometry but not necessarily slip history is available), creeping faults, and dislocation sources distributed between the faults. We model the western United States strain-rate field, derived from 746 GPS velocity vectors, in order to test the importance of the relaxation from historic events and characterize the tectonic forces imposed by the bounding Pacific and JdF plates. Relaxation following major earthquakes (M ??? 8.0) strongly shapes the present strain-rate field over most of the plate boundary zone. Equally important are lateral shear transmitted across the Pacific-North America plate boundary along ???1000 km of the continental shelf, downdip forces distributed along the Cascadia subduction interface, and distributed slip in the lower lithosphere. Post-earthquake relaxation and tectonic forcing, combined with distributed deep slip, constructively interfere near the western margin of the plate boundary zone, producing locally large strain accumulation along the San Andreas fault (SAF) system. However, they destructively interfere further into the plate interior, resulting in smaller and more variable strain accumulation patterns in the eastern part of the plate boundary zone. Much of the right-lateral strain accumulation along the SAF

  14. Strain rate dependency and fragmentation pattern of expanding warheads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John F MOXNES; Anne K PRYTZ; yvind FRYLAND; Stian SKRIUDALEN; Steinar BRVE; Gard DEGRDSTUEN

    2015-01-01

    For the characterization of the behaviors of a metal material in events like expanding warheads, it is necessary to know its strength and ductility at high strain rates, around 104e105/s. The flyer plate impact testing produces the uniform stress and strain rates but the testing is expensive. The Taylor test is relatively inexpensive but produces non-uniform stress and strain fields, and the results are not so easily inferred for material modeling. In the split-Hopkinson bar (SHB), which may be used in compression, tension and torsion testing, the strain rates never exceeds 103/s. In the present work, we use the expanding ring test where the strain rate is 104e105/s. A streak camera is used to examine the expanding ring velocity, and a water tank is used to collect the fragments. The experimental results are compared with the numerical simulations using the hydrocodes AUTODYN, IMPETUS Afea and a regularized smooth particle (RSPH) software. The number of fragments increases with the increase in the expansion velocity of the rings. The number of fragments is similar to the experimental results. The RSPH software shows much the same results as the AUTODYN where the Lagrangian solver is used for the ring. The IMPETUS Afea solver shows a somewhat different fragmentation characteristic due to the node splitting algorithm that induces pronounced tensile splitting.

  15. Dependence of paracentric inversion rate on tract length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    York, Thomas L; Durrett, Rick; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We develop a Bayesian method based on MCMC for estimating the relative rates of pericentric and paracentric inversions from marker data from two species. The method also allows estimation of the distribution of inversion tract lengths. RESULTS: We apply the method to data from Drosoph...

  16. Dependent interest and transition rates in life insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    For market consistent life insurance liabilities modelled with a multi-state Markov chain, it is of importance to consider the interest and transition rates as stochastic processes, for example in order to consider hedging possibilities of the risks, and for risk measurement. In the literature, t...

  17. Heating rate dependence of anatase to rutile transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Galizia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Commercial titania powders were calcined in order to investigate the influence of the heating history on the thermally stable phase (rutile. Temperatures from 620 to 700 °C and heating rates from 50 to 300 °C/h were used in order to evaluate their influence on the kinetics of transformation and microstructure evolution. The quantitative analysis of anatase-rutile mixtures based on X-ray diffraction intensities was performed. The results were plotted as cumulative transformation rate vs. cumulative coarsening rate in order to address the heating history of the anatase to rutile transformation. As the main result it was found that the amount of anatase transformed into rutile increases with increasing heating rate at fixed soaking time and temperature of calcination. Through linear extrapolation of experimental data obtained from the calcined commercial titania Degussa P25, it was found that 83 nm for the rutile crystallite size is the lowest limit needed for getting 100% of rutile powders. A substantial improvement in the anatase to rutile kinetic transformation was achieved after pressing the starting powders in order to exploit the interface nucleation.

  18. Age-dependent recombination rates in human pedigrees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Hussin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In humans, chromosome-number abnormalities have been associated with altered recombination and increased maternal age. Therefore, age-related effects on recombination are of major importance, especially in relation to the mechanisms involved in human trisomies. Here, we examine the relationship between maternal age and recombination rate in humans. We localized crossovers at high resolution by using over 600,000 markers genotyped in a panel of 69 French-Canadian pedigrees, revealing recombination events in 195 maternal meioses. Overall, we observed the general patterns of variation in fine-scale recombination rates previously reported in humans. However, we make the first observation of a significant decrease in recombination rates with advancing maternal age in humans, likely driven by chromosome-specific effects. The effect appears to be localized in the middle section of chromosomal arms and near subtelomeric regions. We postulate that, for some chromosomes, protection against non-disjunction provided by recombination becomes less efficient with advancing maternal age, which can be partly responsible for the higher rates of aneuploidy in older women. We propose a model that reconciles our findings with reported associations between maternal age and recombination in cases of trisomies.

  19. Strain rate dependency and fragmentation pattern of expanding warheads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Moxnes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available For the characterization of the behaviors of a metal material in events like expanding warheads, it is necessary to know its strength and ductility at high strain rates, around 104–105/s. The flyer plate impact testing produces the uniform stress and strain rates but the testing is expensive. The Taylor test is relatively inexpensive but produces non-uniform stress and strain fields, and the results are not so easily inferred for material modeling. In the split-Hopkinson bar (SHB, which may be used in compression, tension and torsion testing, the strain rates never exceeds 103/s. In the present work, we use the expanding ring test where the strain rate is 104–105/s. A streak camera is used to examine the expanding ring velocity, and a water tank is used to collect the fragments. The experimental results are compared with the numerical simulations using the hydrocodes AUTODYN, IMPETUS Afea and a regularized smooth particle (RSPH software. The number of fragments increases with the increase in the expansion velocity of the rings. The number of fragments is similar to the experimental results. The RSPH software shows much the same results as the AUTODYN where the Lagrangian solver is used for the ring. The IMPETUS Afea solver shows a somewhat different fragmentation characteristic due to the node splitting algorithm that induces pronounced tensile splitting.

  20. Larger rate dependence of late sodium current in cardiac Purkinje cells: A potential link to arrhythmogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Yu, Ying; Hou, Jian-Wen; Zhou, Zhi-Wen; Guo, Kai; Zhang, Peng-Pai; Wang, Zhi-Quan; Yan, Jian-Hua; Sun, Jian; Zhou, Qing; Wang, Yue-Peng; Li, Yi-Gang

    2017-03-01

    Purkinje cells (PCs) have a steeper rate dependence of repolarization and are more susceptible to arrhythmic activity than do ventricular myocytes (VMs). Late sodium current (INaL) is rate dependent and contributes to rate dependence of repolarization. This study sought to test our hypothesis that PCs have a larger rate dependence of INaL, contributing to their steeper rate dependence of repolarization and higher susceptibility to arrhythmic activity, than do VMs. INaL was recorded in isolated rabbit PCs and VMs with the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Action potential was examined using the microelectrode technique. Compared with VMs, PCs exhibited a significantly larger rate dependence of INaL with a larger INaL to basic cycle length (BCL) slope. Moreover, PCs had a larger rate dependence of INaL decay and slower recovery kinetics. Interestingly, the larger rate dependence of INaL matched to a steeper rate dependence of action potential duration (APD) in PCs. The INaL blocker tetrodotoxin significantly blunted, while the INaL enhancer anemone toxin (ATX-II) significantly increased, the rate dependence of INaL and APD in PCs and VMs. In the presence of ATX-II, the rate dependence of INaL in PCs was markedly larger than that in VMs, causing a much steeper rate dependence of APD in PCs. Accordingly, PCs exhibited greater rate-dependent electrical instability and were more prone to ATX-II-induced early afterdepolarizations, which were completely inhibited by the INaL inhibitor ranolazine. PCs have a significantly larger rate dependence of INaL than do VMs because of distinctive INaL decay and recovery kinetics, which contributes to their larger rate adaptation, and simultaneously predisposes them to a higher risk of arrhythmogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. DECAY RATE OF SAINT-VENANT END EFFECTS FOR PLANE DEFORMATIONS OF PIEZOELECTRIC-PIEZOMAGNETIC SANDWICH STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Xue; Jinxi Liu

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the decay of Saint-Venant end effects for plane deformations of piezoelectric (PE)-piezomagnetic (PM) sandwich structures,where a PM layer is located between two PE layers with the same material properties or reversely.The end of the sandwich structure is subjected to a set of self-equilibrated magneto-electro-elastic loads.The upper and lower surfaces of the sandwich structure are mechanically free,electrically open or shorted as well as magnetically open or shorted.Firstly the constitutive equations of PE materials and PM materials for plane strain are given and normalized.Secondly,the simplified state space approach is employed to arrange the constitutive equations into differential equations in a matrix form.Finally,by using the transfer matrix method,the characteristic equations for eigenvalues or decay rates are derived.Based on the obtained characteristic equations,the decay rates for the PE-PM-PE and PM-PE-PM sandwich structures are calculated.The influences of the electromagnetic boundary conditions,material properties of PE layers and volume fraction on the decay rates are discussed in detail.

  2. Simultaneous X-ray diffraction and phase-contrast imaging for investigating material deformation mechanisms during high-rate loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudspeth, M; Sun, T; Parab, N; Guo, Z; Fezzaa, K; Luo, S; Chen, W

    2015-01-01

    Using a high-speed camera and an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), a simultaneous X-ray imaging and diffraction technique has been developed for studying dynamic material behaviors during high-rate tensile loading. A Kolsky tension bar has been used to pull samples at 1000 s(-1) and 5000 s(-1) strain-rates for super-elastic equiatomic NiTi and 1100-O series aluminium, respectively. By altering the ICCD gating time, temporal resolutions of 100 ps and 3.37 µs have been achieved in capturing the diffraction patterns of interest, thus equating to single-pulse and 22-pulse X-ray exposure. Furthermore, the sample through-thickness deformation process has been simultaneously imaged via phase-contrast imaging. It is also shown that adequate signal-to-noise ratios are achieved for the detected white-beam diffraction patterns, thereby allowing sufficient information to perform quantitative data analysis diffraction via in-house software (WBXRD_GUI). Of current interest is the ability to evaluate crystal d-spacing, texture evolution and material phase transitions, all of which will be established from experiments performed at the aforementioned elevated strain-rates.

  3. Postseismic viscoelastic deformation and stress. Part 2: Stress theory and computation; dependence of displacement, strain, and stress on fault parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1979-01-01

    A viscoelastic model for deformation and stress associated with earthquakes is reported. The model consists of a rectangular dislocation (strike slip fault) in a viscoelastic layer (lithosphere) lying over a viscoelastic half space (asthenosphere). The time dependent surface stresses are analyzed. The model predicts that near the fault a significant fraction of the stress that was reduced during the earthquake is recovered by viscoelastic softening of the lithosphere. By contrast, the strain shows very little change near the fault. The model also predicts that the stress changes associated with asthenospheric flow extend over a broader region than those associated with lithospheric relaxation even though the peak value is less. The dependence of the displacements, stresses on fault parameters studied. Peak values of strain and stress drop increase with increasing fault height and decrease with fault depth. Under many circumstances postseismic strains and stresses show an increase with decreasing depth to the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. Values of the strain and stress at distant points from the fault increase with fault area but are relatively insensitive to fault depth.

  4. Influence of the relative deformation rate on tube processing by ultrasonic vibration drawing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan, M.

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available After a brief review of the "friction reversion mechanism" during ultrasonic vibration drawing of tubes (UVD, the paper introduces a method to determine the drawing force based on the theorem of total consumed power, in the case of tube processing. The experiments performed on tubes made from 10TiNiCr180 (AISI321 austenitic stainless steel confirm the superiority of UVD technology regarding the diminution of the drawing force, the increase of the plasticity and the improvement of the safety coefficient, tendencies that are enhanced with the decrease of the relative drawing rate. The best results were obtained for the relative drawing rate of 0.12 for which the drawing force decreased with 33 %, plasticity increased with 9 % and safety coefficient with 22 %, as compared to CT.

    Después de un breve resumen del mecanismo de reversión de la fricción al estirado por vibraciones ultrasonoras (EVU, el trabajo propone un método para calcular la fuerza de estirado en base al teorema de la potencia total consumida, en el caso particular de la elaboración de tubos. Los experimentos realizados con tubos de acero inoxidable austenítico 10TiNiCr180 (AISI321 demuestran la superioridad de la tecnología EVU sobre la tecnología clásica (TC, en lo concerniente a la reducción de la fuerza de estirado, el incremento de la plasticidad y la mejora del coeficiente de seguridad, tendencias que se acentúan al diminuirse la velocidad relativa de estirado. Los mejores resultados se han obtenido en el caso de la velocidad relativa de 0,12, para la cual la fuerza de estirado se redujo, aproximadamente, un 33 %; la plasticidad se incrementó en el 9 %; y el coeficiente de seguridad aumentó un 22 % frente a la TC.

  5. Dependent Types for Multi-Rate Flows in Synchronous Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Blair

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Synchronous programming languages emerged in the 1980s as tools for implementing reactive systems, which interact with events from physical environments and often must do so under strict timing constraints. In this report, we encode inside ATS various real-time primitives in an experimental synchronous language called Prelude, where ATS is a statically typed language with an ML-like functional core that supports both dependent types (of DML-style and linear types. We show that the verification requirements imposed on these primitives can be formally expressed in terms of dependent types in ATS. Moreover, we modify the Prelude compiler to automatically generate ATS code from Prelude source. This modified compiler allows us to solely rely on typechecking in ATS to discharge proof obligations originating from the need to typecheck Prelude code. Whereas ATS is typically used as a general purpose programming language, we hereby demonstrate that it can also be conveniently used to support some forms of advanced static checking in languages equipped with less expressive types.

  6. Topographically induced self-deformation of the nuclei of cells: dependence on cell type and proposed mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Patricia M; Fromigué, Olivia; Marie, Pierre J; Hasirci, Vasif; Reiter, Günter; Anselme, Karine

    2010-03-01

    Osteosarcoma-derived cell lines (SaOs-2, MG63) have recently been shown to deform their nucleus considerably in response to surface topography. Such a deformation had not been described previously. Here we present results on additional cell lines, including cancerous (OHS4, U2OS), immortalized (F/STRO-1(+)A and FHSO6) and healthy cells (HOP). The cancerous cells were found to deform extensively, the immortalized cells showed small deformations, whereas the healthy cells showed deformation only at short incubation times. These results suggest a strong link between the malignant transformation of cells and the state of the cytoskeletal network. We propose mechanisms to explain the deformation in which the cytoskeleton either pushes down on the nucleus during spreading or pulls it down upon adhesion to the pillars.

  7. Rate limit of protein elastic response is tether dependent

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The elastic restoring force of tissues must be able to operate over the very wide range of loading rates experienced by living organisms. It is surprising that even the fastest events involving animal muscle tissues do not surpass a few hundred hertz. We propose that this limit is set in part by the elastic dynamics of tethered proteins extending and relaxing under a changing load. Here we study the elastic dynamics of tethered proteins using a fast force spectrometer with sub-millisecond tim...

  8. Density dependence, whitebark pine, and vital rates of grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Frank T.; Haroldson, Mark A.; Bjornlie, Daniel D; Ebinger, Michael R.; Thompson, Daniel J.; Costello, Cecily M; White, Gary C.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding factors influencing changes in population trajectory is important for effective wildlife management, particularly for populations of conservation concern. Annual population growth of the grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) population in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, USA has slowed from 4.2–7.6% during 1983–2001 to 0.3–2.2% during 2002–2011. Substantial changes in availability of a key food source and bear population density have occurred. Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), the seeds of which are a valuable but variable fall food for grizzly bears, has experienced substantial mortality primarily due to a mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreak that started in the early 2000s. Positive growth rates of grizzly bears have resulted in populations reaching high densities in some areas and have contributed to continued range expansion. We tested research hypotheses to examine if changes in vital rates detected during the past decade were more associated with whitebark pine decline or, alternatively, increasing grizzly bear density. We focused our assessment on known-fate data to estimate survival of cubs-of-the-year (cubs), yearlings, and independent bears (≥2 yrs), and reproductive transition of females from having no offspring to having cubs. We used spatially and temporally explicit indices for grizzly bear density and whitebark pine mortality as individual covariates. Models indicated moderate support for an increase in survival of independent male bears over 1983–2012, whereas independent female survival did not change. Cub survival, yearling survival, and reproductive transition from no offspring to cubs all changed during the 30-year study period, with lower rates evident during the last 10–15 years. Cub survival and reproductive transition were negatively associated with an index of grizzly bear density, indicating greater declines where bear densities were higher. Our analyses did not support a similar relationship for the

  9. Correlated errors in geodetic time series: Implications for time-dependent deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, J.; Johnson, H.

    1997-01-01

    addition, the seasonal noise can be as large as 3 mm in amplitude but typically is less than 0.5 mm. Because of the presence of random-walk noise in these time series, modeling and interpretation of the geodetic data must account for this source of error. By way of example we show that estimating the time-varying strain tensor (a form of spatial averaging) from geodetic data having both random-walk and white noise error components results in seemingly significant variations in the rate of strain accumulation; spatial averaging does reduce the size of both noise components but not their relative influence on the resulting strain accumulation model. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Effect of confining pressure on deformation and failure of rock at higher strain rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xue-bin; PAN Yi-shan

    2005-01-01

    Influence of confining pressure from 0 to 28 MPa, which acts on the two lateral edges of rock specimen in plane strain compression, on the shear failure processes and patterns as well as on the macroscopically mechanical responses were numerically modeled by use of FLAC. A material imperfection with lower strength in comparison with the intact rock, which is close to the lower-left corner of the specimen, was prescribed. In elastic stage, the adopted constitutive relation of rock was linear elastic; in strain-softening stage, a composite Mohr-Coulomb criterion with tension cut-off and a post-peak linear constitutive relation were adopted. The numerical results show that with an increase of confining pressure the peak strength of axial stress-axial strain curve and the corresponding axial strain linearly increase; the residual strength and the stress drop from the peak strength to the residual strength increase; the failure modes of rock transform form the multiple shear bands close to the loading end of the specimen (confining pressure=0~0.1MPa), to the conjugate shear bands (0.5~2.0 MPa), and then to the single shear band (4~28 MPa). Once the tip of the band reaches the loading end of the specimen, the direction of the band changes so that the reflection of the band occurs. At higher confining pressure, the new-formed shear band does not intersect the imperfection, bringing extreme difficulties in prediction of the failure of rock structure, such as rock burst. The present results enhance the understanding of the shear failure processes and patterns of rock specimen in higher confining pressure and higher loading strain rate.

  11. Enzyme surface rigidity tunes the temperature dependence of catalytic rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-07-12

    The structural origin of enzyme adaptation to low temperature, allowing efficient catalysis of chemical reactions even near the freezing point of water, remains a fundamental puzzle in biocatalysis. A remarkable universal fingerprint shared by all cold-active enzymes is a reduction of the activation enthalpy accompanied by a more negative entropy, which alleviates the exponential decrease in chemical reaction rates caused by lowering of the temperature. Herein, we explore the role of protein surface mobility in determining this enthalpy-entropy balance. The effects of modifying surface rigidity in cold- and warm-active trypsins are demonstrated here by calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots and thermodynamic activation parameters for the peptide hydrolysis reaction, using extensive computer simulations. The protein surface flexibility is systematically varied by applying positional restraints, causing the remarkable effect of turning the cold-active trypsin into a variant with mesophilic characteristics without changing the amino acid sequence. Furthermore, we show that just restraining a key surface loop causes the same effect as a point mutation in that loop between the cold- and warm-active trypsin. Importantly, changes in the activation enthalpy-entropy balance of up to 10 kcal/mol are almost perfectly balanced at room temperature, whereas they yield significantly higher rates at low temperatures for the cold-adapted enzyme.

  12. The dependence of cusp ion signatures on the reconnection rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Morley

    Full Text Available The interpretation of structure in cusp ion dispersions is important for helping to understand the temporal and spatial structure of magnetopause reconnection. "Stepped" and "sawtooth" signatures have been shown to be caused by temporal variations in the reconnection rate under the same physical conditions for different satellite trajectories. The present paper shows that even for a single satellite path, a change in the amplitude of any reconnection pulses can alter the observed signature and even turn sawtooth into stepped forms and vice versa. On 20 August 1998, the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP craft F-14 crossed the cusp just to the south of Longyearbyen, returning on the following orbit. The two passes by the DMSP F-14 satellites have very similar trajectories and the open-closed field line boundary (OCB crossings, as estimated from the SSJ/4 precipitating particle data and Polar UVI images, imply a similarly-shaped polar cap, yet the cusp ion dispersion signatures differ substantially. The cusp crossing at 08:54 UT displays a stepped ion dispersion previously considered to be typical of a meridional pass, whereas the crossing at 10:38 UT is a sawtooth form ion dispersion, previously considered typical of a satellite travelling longitudinally with respect to the OCB. It is shown that this change in dispersed ion signature is likely to be due to a change in the amplitude of the pulses in the reconnection rate, causing the stepped signature. Modelling of the low-energy ion cutoff under different conditions has reproduced the forms of signature observed.

    Key words. Ionosphere (particle precipitation Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating, magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers

  13. The Luminosity Dependence of the Galaxy Merger Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Patton, D R

    2008-01-01

    We measure the number of companions per galaxy (Nc) as a function of r-band absolute magnitude for both the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Croton et al. (2006) semi-analytic catalog applied to the Millennium Run simulation. For close pairs with projected separations of 5-20 h^{-1} kpc, velocity differences less than 500 km/s, and luminosity ratios between 1:2 and 2:1, we find good agreement between the observations and simulations, with Nc consistently close to 0.02 over the range -22 < M_r < -18. For larger pair separations, Nc(M_r) instead becomes increasingly steep towards the faint end, implying that luminosity-dependent clustering plays an important role on small scales. Using the simulations to assess and correct for projection effects, we infer that the real-space Nc(M_r) for close pairs peaks at about M*, and declines by at least a factor of two as M_r becomes fainter. Conversely, by measuring the number density of close companions, we estimate that at least 90% of all major mergers occur betw...

  14. Discovery of Spin-Rate-Dependent Asteroid Thermal Inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Alan; Drube, Line

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of the surface thermal inertia of an asteroid can provide insight into surface structure: porous material has a lower thermal inertia than rock. Using WISE/NEOWISE data and our new asteroid thermal-inertia estimator we show that the thermal inertia of main-belt asteroids (MBAs) appears to increase with spin period. Similar behavior is found in the case of thermophysically-modeled thermal inertia values of near-Earth objects (NEOs). We interpret our results in terms of rapidly increasing material density and thermal conductivity with depth, and provide evidence that thermal inertia increases by factors of 10 (MBAs) to 20 (NEOs) within a depth of just 10 cm. On the basis of a picture of depth-dependent thermal inertia our results suggest that, in general, thermal inertia values representative of solid rock are reached some tens of centimeters to meters below the surface in the case of MBAs (the median diameter in our dataset = 24 km). In the case of the much smaller (km-sized) NEOs a thinner porous surface layer is indicated, with large pieces of solid rock possibly existing just a meter or less below the surface. These conclusions are consistent with our understanding from in-situ measurements of the surfaces of the Moon, and a few asteroids, and suggest a very general picture of rapidly changing material properties in the topmost regolith layers of asteroids. Our results have important implications for calculations of the Yarkovsky effect, including its perturbation of the orbits of potentially hazardous objects and those of asteroid family members after the break-up event. Evidence of a rapid increase of thermal inertia with depth is also an important result for studies of the ejecta-enhanced momentum transfer of impacting vehicles ("kinetic impactors") in planetary defense.

  15. Strain-rate dependence for Ni/Al hybrid foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Anne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shock absorption often needs stiff but lightweight materials that exhibit a large kinetic energy absorption capability. Open-cell metal foams are artificial structures, which due to their plateau stress, including a strong hysteresis, can in principle absorb large amounts of energy. However, their plateau stress is too low for many applications. In this study, we use highly novel and promising Ni/Al hybrid foams which consist of standard, open-cell aluminium foams, where nanocrystalline nickel is deposited by electrodeposition as coating on the strut surface. The mechanical behaviour of cellular materials, including their behaviour under higher strain-rates, is governed by their microstructure due to the properties of the strut material, pore/strut geometry and mass distribution over the struts. Micro-inertia effects are strongly related to the microstructure. For a conclusive model, the exact real microstructure is needed. In this study a micro-focus computer tomography (μCT system has been used for the analysis of the microstructure of the foam samples and for the development of a microstructural Finite Element (micro-FE mesh. The microstructural FE models have been used to model the mechanical behaviour of the Ni/Al hybrid foams under dynamic loading conditions. The simulations are validated by quasi-static compression tests and dynamic split Hopkinson pressure bar tests.

  16. Female promiscuity and maternally dependent offspring growth rates in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, Michael; Brooks, Robert C; Lemaître, Jean-François; Gaillard, Jean-Michel

    2014-04-01

    Conflicts between family members are expected to influence the duration and intensity of parental care. In mammals, the majority of this care occurs as resource transfer from mothers to offspring during gestation and lactation. Mating systems can have a strong influence on the severity of familial conflict--where female promiscuity is prevalent, conflict is expected to be higher between family members, causing offspring to demand more resources. If offspring are capable of manipulating their mothers and receive resources in proportion to their demands, resource transfer should increase with elevated promiscuity. We tested this prediction, unexplored across mammals, using a comparative approach. The total durations of gestation and lactation were not related to testes mass, a reliable proxy of female promiscuity across taxa. Offspring growth during gestation, however, and weaning mass, were positively correlated with testes mass, suggesting that offspring gain resources from their mothers at faster rates when familial conflict is greater. During gestation, the relationship between offspring growth and testes mass was also related to placenta morphology, with a stronger relationship between testes mass and growth observed in species with a less invasive placenta. Familial conflict could have a pervasive influence on patterns of parental care in mammals. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  17. Rate limit of protein elastic response is tether dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovich, Ronen; Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Popa, Ionel; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Berne, Bruce J.; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2012-01-01

    The elastic restoring force of tissues must be able to operate over the very wide range of loading rates experienced by living organisms. It is surprising that even the fastest events involving animal muscle tissues do not surpass a few hundred hertz. We propose that this limit is set in part by the elastic dynamics of tethered proteins extending and relaxing under a changing load. Here we study the elastic dynamics of tethered proteins using a fast force spectrometer with sub-millisecond time resolution, combined with Brownian and Molecular Dynamics simulations. We show that the act of tethering a polypeptide to an object, an inseparable part of protein elasticity in vivo and in experimental setups, greatly reduces the attempt frequency with which the protein samples its free energy. Indeed, our data shows that a tethered polypeptide can traverse its free-energy landscape with a surprisingly low effective diffusion coefficient Deff ∼ 1,200 nm2/s. By contrast, our Molecular Dynamics simulations show that diffusion of an isolated protein under force occurs at Deff ∼ 108 nm2/s. This discrepancy is attributed to the drag force caused by the tethering object. From the physiological time scales of tissue elasticity, we calculate that tethered elastic proteins equilibrate in vivo with Deff ∼ 104–106 nm2/s which is two to four orders magnitude smaller than the values measured for untethered proteins in bulk. PMID:22895787

  18. Residence-time dependent cell wall deformation of different Staphylococcus aureus strains on gold measured using surface-enhanced-fluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Jiuyi; Busscher, Henk J.; Swartjes, Jan J. T. M.; Chen, Yun; Harapanahalli, Akshay K.; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C.; Sjollema, Jelmer

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is accompanied by cell wall deformation that may extend to the lipid membrane with an impact on the antimicrobial susceptibility of the organisms. Nanoscale cell wall deformation upon adhesion is difficult to measure, except for Delta pbp4 mutants, deficient in peptido

  19. Projected-deformed wavefunctions with central Jastrow and linear state-dependent correlations for {sup 8}Be and {sup 12}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buenda, E.; Galvez, F.J.; Praena, J. [Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Granada (Spain); Sarsa, A. [International School for Advanced Studies, SISSA, Trieste (Italy)

    2001-11-01

    Trial wavefunctions including angular momentum projection and deformations, with linearized state-dependent and central Jastrow-type correlations are used to study the ground state rotational band of both {sup 8}Be and {sup 12}C nuclei. The competition between deformations, central Jastrow-type correlations and operatorial linear correlations is systematically analysed on different properties such as the energy, the square root mean radii, and transition amplitudes of the rotational band. A study of the one- and two-body spatial ground state densities is also carried out. All the matrix elements have been calculated by performing Monte Carlo simulations. (author)

  20. Reinforcer magnitude and rate dependency: evaluation of resistance-to-change mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkston, Jonathan W; Ginsburg, Brett C; Lamb, Richard J

    2014-10-01

    Under many circumstances, reinforcer magnitude appears to modulate the rate-dependent effects of drugs such that when schedules arrange for relatively larger reinforcer magnitudes rate dependency is attenuated compared with behavior maintained by smaller magnitudes. The current literature on resistance to change suggests that increased reinforcer density strengthens operant behavior, and such strengthening effects appear to extend to the temporal control of behavior. As rate dependency may be understood as a loss of temporal control, the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency may be due to increased resistance to disruption of temporally controlled behavior. In the present experiments, pigeons earned different magnitudes of grain during signaled components of a multiple FI schedule. Three drugs, clonidine, haloperidol, and morphine, were examined. All three decreased overall rates of key pecking; however, only the effects of clonidine were attenuated as reinforcer magnitude increased. An analysis of within-interval performance found rate-dependent effects for clonidine and morphine; however, these effects were not modulated by reinforcer magnitude. In addition, we included prefeeding and extinction conditions, standard tests used to measure resistance to change. In general, rate-decreasing effects of prefeeding and extinction were attenuated by increasing reinforcer magnitudes. Rate-dependent analyses of prefeeding showed rate-dependency following those tests, but in no case were these effects modulated by reinforcer magnitude. The results suggest that a resistance-to-change interpretation of the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency is not viable.

  1. EVALUATION REINFORCER MAGNITUDE AND RATE DEPENDENCY OF RESISTANCE TO CHANGE MECHANIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Ginsburg, Brett C.; Lamb, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    In many circumstances, reinforcer magnitude appears to modulate the rate-dependent effects of drugs, such that when schedules arrange for relatively larger reinforcer magnitude, rate dependency is attenuated compared to behavior maintained by smaller magnitudes. The current literature on resistance to change suggests that increased reinforcer density strengthens operant behavior, and such strengthening effects appear to extend to the temporal control of behavior. As rate dependency may be understood as a loss of temporal control, the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency may be due to increased resistance to disruption of temporally controlled behavior. In the present experiments, pigeons earned different magnitudes of grain during signaled components of a multiple fixed-interval schedule. Three drugs, clonidine, haloperidol, and morphine, were examined: all three decreased overall rates of key pecking; however, only the effects of clonidine were attenuated as reinforcer magnitude increased. An analysis of within-interval performance found rate-dependent effects for clonidine and morphine, but those effects were not modulated by reinforcer magnitude. Additionally, we included prefeeding and extinction conditions, standard tests used to measure resistance to change. In general, rate-decreasing effects of prefeeding and extinction were attenuated by increasing reinforcer magnitudes. Rate-dependent analyses of prefeeding showed rate-dependency following those tests, but in no case were these effects modulated by reinforcer magnitude. The results suggest a resistance-to-change interpretation of the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency is not viable. PMID:25115595

  2. Microstructural characteristics of adiabatic shear localization in a metastable beta titanium alloy deformed at high strain rate and elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Hongyi, E-mail: h.zhan@uq.edu.au [Centre for Advanced Materials Processing and Manufacture, School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Zeng, Weidong [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, School of Materials, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wang, Gui [Centre for Advanced Materials Processing and Manufacture, School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Defence Material Technology Centre, Level 2, 24 Wakefield St, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Kent, Damon [School of Science and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Queensland 4575 (Australia); Dargusch, Matthew [Centre for Advanced Materials Processing and Manufacture, School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Defence Material Technology Centre, Level 2, 24 Wakefield St, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    The microstructural evolution and grain refinement within adiabatic shear bands in the Ti6554 alloy deformed at high strain rates and elevated temperatures have been characterized using transmission electron microscopy. No stress drops were observed in the corresponding stress–strain curve, indicating that the initiation of adiabatic shear bands does not lead to the loss of load capacity for the Ti6554 alloy. The outer region of the shear bands mainly consists of cell structures bounded by dislocation clusters. Equiaxed subgrains in the core area of the shear band can be evolved from the subdivision of cell structures or reconstruction and transverse segmentation of dislocation clusters. It is proposed that dislocation activity dominates the grain refinement process. The rotational recrystallization mechanism may operate as the kinetic requirements for it are fulfilled. The coexistence of different substructures across the shear bands implies that the microstructural evolution inside the shear bands is not homogeneous and different grain refinement mechanisms may operate simultaneously to refine the structure. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The microstructure within the adiabatic shear band was characterized by TEM. • No stress drops were observed in the corresponding stress–strain curve. • Dislocation activity dominated the grain refinement process. • The kinetic requirements for rotational recrystallization mechanism were fulfilled. • Different grain refinement mechanisms operated simultaneously to refine the structure.

  3. Nuclear deformation effects in the cluster radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misicu, S. [Department of Theoretical Physics, NINPE-HH, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Protopopescu, D. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the nuclear deformation on the decay rates of some cluster emission processes. The interaction between the daughter and the cluster is given by a double folding potential including quadrupole and hexadecapole deformed densities of both fragments. The nuclear part of the nucleus-nucleus interaction is density dependent and at small distances a repulsive core in the potential will occur. In the frame of the WKB-approximation the assault frequency of the cluster will depend on the geometric properties of the potential pocket whereas the penetrability will be sensitive to changes in the barrier location. The results obtained in this paper point out that various combinations of cluster and daughter deformations may account for the measured values of the decay rate. The decay rates are however more sensitive to the changes in the daughter deformation due to the large mass asymmetry of the process. (author) 10 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

  4. Nuclear Deformation Effects in the Cluster Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misicu, Serban; Protopopescu, Dan

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the nuclear deformation on the decay rates of some cluster emission processes. The interaction between the daughter and the cluster is given by a double folding potential including quadrupole and hexadecupole deformed densities of both fragments. The nuclear part of the nucleus--nucleus interaction is density dependent and at small distances a repulsive core in the potential will occur. In the frame of the WKB-approximation the assault frequency of the cluster will depend on the geometric properties of the potential pocket whereas the penetrability will be sensitive to changes in the barrier location. The results obtained in this paper point out that various combinations of cluster and daughter deformations may account for the measured values of the decay rate. The decay rates are however more sensitive to the changes in the daughter deformation due to the large mass asymmetry of the process.

  5. The Mechanical Response of M30, JA2 and XM39 Gun Propellants to High-Rate Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    shown using a ballistic code to have almost no effect on gun performance. Propel- lant performance within an established charge depends on the rate of...differen- Vapor Port tial end effects tor propellants of the same Figure 3. DWMPT Temperature type but having different dimensions. The cut Conditioning...SMCAR-LCU-CT ATTN: SMCAR-LCU-CV R. Davitt C. Mandala Picatinny Arsenal, NJ Picatinny Arsenal, N.J 07806-5000 07806-5000 Commander Commander US Army

  6. Properties of Super-Poisson Processes and Super-Random Walks with Spatially Dependent Branching Rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Xia REN

    2008-01-01

    The global supports of super-Poisson processes and super-random walks with a branching mechanism ψ(z)=z2 and constant branching rate are known to be noncompact. It turns out that, for any spatially dependent branching rate, this property remains true. However, the asymptotic extinction property for these two kinds of superprocesses depends on the decay rate of the branching-rate function at infinity.

  7. Exchange-mediated, nonlinear, out-of-plane magnetic field dependence of the ferromagnetic vortex gyrotropic mode frequency driven by core deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Jasper P.; Fangohr, Hans; Kostylev, Mikhail; Metaxas, Peter J.

    2016-12-01

    We have performed micromagnetic simulations of low-amplitude gyrotropic dynamics of magnetic vortices in the presence of spatially uniform out-of-plane magnetic fields. For disks having small lateral dimensions, we observe a frequency drop-off when approaching the disk's out-of-plane saturation field. This nonlinear frequency response is shown to be associated with a vortex core deformation driven by nonuniform demagnetizing fields that act on the shifted core. The deformation results in an increase in the average out-of-plane magnetization of the displaced vortex state (contrasting the effect of gyrofield-driven deformation at low field), which causes the exchange contribution to the vortex stiffness to switch from positive to negative. This generates an enhanced reduction of the core stiffness at high field, leading to a nonlinear field dependence of the gyrotropic mode frequency.

  8. 38 CFR 3.10 - Dependency and indemnity compensation rate for a surviving spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... compensation rate for a surviving spouse. 3.10 Section 3.10 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... General § 3.10 Dependency and indemnity compensation rate for a surviving spouse. (a) General determination of rate. When VA grants a surviving spouse entitlement to DIC, VA will determine the rate of...

  9. Constraints on strain rate and fabric partitioning in ductilely deformed black quartzites (Badajoz-Córdoba Shear Zone, Iberian Massif)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puelles, Pablo; Ábalos, Benito; Fernández-Armas, Sergio

    2013-04-01

    orientations around Y and Z. Quartz [c]-axis orientations close to Y predominate in coarser-grained bands, whereas [c]-axes scatter around Z in fine-grained zones. A relationship between microstructure and crystal orientation can thus be unraveled. In both fabric types the asymmetry of the LPOs with respect to the external XYZ reference unravel non-coaxial deformation components. Microstructural and LPO evidences indicate that two intracrystalline quartz deformation modes have operated in the "Serie Negra" black quartzites in parallel domains interleaved at the mm- to cm scale. Unless one of them took place under higher-temperature conditions ({m} slip in the high-T amphibolite-facies) and is a relic feature, both modes should have operated simultaneously. Thus, high-temperature boundary migration and the dispersed inclusion pattern of small mica and graphite grains constrained the pinning grain boundary microstructures, the {m} intracrystalline slip, and the larger size of some quartz crystals. Simultaneously, a larger concentration of disseminated graphite led to formation of finer-grained quartz aggregates (due to grain growth) deformed by the (0001) intracrystalline slip systems, that dominate lower-T quartz plasticity (under greenschist- to amphibolite-facies conditions). Arguably, this intracrystalline slip system partitioning was initially constrained by primary variations in inclusion concentration. Likely, these induced a domainal variation in the rate of plastic strain accommodation that led to the current banded microstructural and fabric organization.

  10. Deformed General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Deformed special relativity is embedded in deformed general relativity using the methods of canonical relativity and loop quantum gravity. Phase-space dependent deformations of symmetry algebras then appear, which in some regimes can be rewritten as non-linear Poincare algebras with momentum-dependent deformations of commutators between boosts and time translations. In contrast to deformed special relativity, the deformations are derived for generators with an unambiguous physical role, following from the relationship between canonical constraints of gravity with stress-energy components. The original deformation does not appear in momentum space and does not give rise to non-locality issues or problems with macroscopic objects. Contact with deformed special relativity may help to test loop quantum gravity or restrict its quantization ambiguities.

  11. Flight Test Techniques for Quantifying Pitch Rate and Angle of Attack Rate Dependencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.; Murri, Daniel G.

    2017-01-01

    Three different types of maneuvers were designed to separately quantify pitch rate and angle of attack rate contributions to the nondimensional aerodynamic pitching moment coefficient. These maneuvers combined pilot inputs and automatic multisine excitations, and were own with the subscale T-2 and Bat-4 airplanes using the NASA AirSTAR flight test facility. Stability and control derivatives, in particular C(sub mq) and C(sub m alpha(.)) were accurately estimated from the flight test data. These maneuvers can be performed with many types of aircraft, and the results can be used to increase simulation prediction fidelity and facilitate more accurate comparisons with wind tunnel experiments or numerical investigations.

  12. Bound and Scattering State of Position Dependent Mass Klein-Gordon Equation with Hulthen Plus Deformed-Type Hyperbolic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikot, A. N.; Obong, H. P.; Abbey, T. M.; Zare, S.; Ghafourian, M.; Hassanabadi, H.

    2016-09-01

    In this article we use supersymmetry quantum mechanics and factorization methods to study the bound and scattering state of Klein-Gordon equation with deformed Hulthen plus deformed hyperbolical potential for arbitrary state in D-dimensions. The analytic relativistic bound state eigenvalues and the scattering phase factor are found in closed form. We report on the numerical results for the bound state energy in D-dimensions.

  13. Uniqueness of rate-dependency, creep and stress relaxation behaviors for soft clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱启银; 尹振宇; 徐长节; 殷建华; 夏小和

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on the uniqueness of rate-dependency, creep and stress relaxation behaviors for soft clays under one-dimensional condition. An elasto-viscoplastic model is briefly introduced based on the rate-dependency of preconsolidation pressure. By comparing the rate-dependency formulation with the creep based formulation, the relationship between rate-dependency and creep behaviors is firstly described. The rate-dependency based formulation is then extended to derive an analytical solution for the stress relaxation behavior with defining a stress relaxation coefficient. Based on this, the relationship between the rate-dependency coefficient and the stress relaxation coefficient is derived. Therefore, the uniqueness between behaviors of rate-dependency, creep and stress relaxation with their key parameters is obtained. The uniqueness is finally validated by comparing the simulated rate-dependency of preconsolidation pressure, the estimated values of secondary compression coefficient and simulations of stress relaxation tests with test results on both reconstituted Illite and Berthierville clay.

  14. Tectonic geomorphology, deformation history, and slip-rate estimate along the Palos Verdes Fault, offshore Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, D. S.; Conrad, J. E.; Maier, K. L.; Paull, C. K.; McGann, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Palos Verdes Fault (PVF) is one of few active faults in Southern California that crosses the shoreline and can be studied using both terrestrial and subaqueous methodologies. Despite its proximity to metropolitan Los Angeles, the recent activity and earthquake hazards associated with the PVF are poorly constrained. To characterize the near seafloor fault morphology, Late Pleistocene-Holocene slip-rate and tectonic influences on slope sedimentary processes, a grid of high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and chirp sub-bottom profiles were acquired with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute's (MBARI) Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV). The AUV surveys were focused along the continental slope ~25 km south of Long Beach in water depths between 250 and 600 m, where the PVF crosses the slope. AUV multibeam bathymetry data gridded at 2-m resolution and chirp profiles are merged with 25-m resolution ship-based multibeam bathymetry and seismic-reflection profiles. Vibracores collected with the MBARI Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) and ship-based USGS gravity cores provided radiocarbon dates for stratigraphic horizons offset by the PVF. Recent deformation is expressed as a well-defined seafloor lineation and offset Late Pleistocene-Holocene sub-bottom reflections. Curvilinear scarps associated with an upper submarine landslide (~450 m water depth), a buried slump block, and a lower submarine landslide (~525 m water depth) have been right-laterally offset by 55±3, 55±5, and 40±5 meters, respectively. The age of the upper scarp is bracketed between 23-31 kyr BP, which yields an average slip rate across the PVF of 1.6-2.4 mm/yr. However, our best estimate for the age of the upper landslide is ~ 31 kyr BP, which yields a right-lateral slip-rate of 1.8 mm/yr. Vertical growth faulting observed along a subtle transtensional fault-bend suggests that at least two surface ruptures occurred during the Holocene. In summary, these results indicate that the offshore

  15. A generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii model for characterizing the rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis of piezoelectric actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinqiang; Zhang, Xianmin; Wu, Heng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a generalized hysteresis model is developed to describe both rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators. Based on the classical Prandtl-Ishlinskii (P-I) model, the developed model adds a quadratic polynomial and makes other small changes. When it is used to describe rate-independent hysteresis, the parameters of the model are constants, which can be identified by self-adaptive particle swarm optimization. The effectiveness of this rate-independent modified P-I model is demonstrated by comparing simulation results of the developed model and the classic Prandtl-Ishlinskii model. Simulation results suggest that the rate-independent modified P-I model can describe hysteresis more precisely. Compared with the classical P-I model, the rate-independent modified P-I model reduces modeling error by more than 50%. When it is used to describe rate-independent hysteresis, a one-side operator is adopted and the parameters are functions with input frequency. The results of the experiments and simulations have shown that the proposed models can accurately describe both rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators.

  16. Towards the determination of deformation rates - pinch-and-swell structures as a natural and simulated paleo-strain rate gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Max; Poulet, Thomas; Karrech, Ali; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Herwegh, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Layered rocks deformed under viscous deformation conditions frequently show boudinage, a phenomenon that results from differences in effective viscosity between the involved layers. In the case of continuous necking of a mechanically stiffer layer embedded in a weaker matrix, symmetric boudins are interpreted as the result of dominant visco-plastic deformation (Goscombe et al., 2004). However, information on the physical conditions, material properties and deformation processes are yet unknown. Natural samples deformed under low-grade (Trelatively high extensional strains. REFERENCES Austin, N. and Evans, B. (2007). Paleowattmeters: A scaling relation for dynamically recrystallized grain size. Geology, 35. Goscombe, B.D., Passchier, C.W. and Hand, M. (2004). Boudinage classification: End-member boudin types and modified boudin structures, Journal of Structural Geology, 26. Herwegh, M., Poulet, T., Karrech, A. and Regenauer-Lieb, K. (in press). From transient to steady state deformation and grain size: A thermodynamic approach using elasto-visco-plastic numerical modeling. Journal of Geophysical Research. Karrech, A., Regenauer-Lieb, K. and Poulet, T. (2011a). A Damaged visco-plasticity model for pressure and temperature sensitive geomaterials. Journal of Engineering Science 49. Regenauer-Lieb, K. and Yuen, D. (2004). Positive feedback of interacting ductile faults from coupling of equation of state, rheology and thermal-mechanics. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 142. Schmalholz, S.M. and Maeder, X. (2012). Pinch-and-swell structure and shear zones in viscoplastic layers. Journal of Structural Geology, 34.

  17. Prospective multicenter assessment of perioperative and minimum 2-year postoperative complication rates associated with adult spinal deformity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justin S; Klineberg, Eric; Lafage, Virginie; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Schwab, Frank; Lafage, Renaud; Hostin, Richard; Mundis, Gregory M; Errico, Thomas J; Kim, Han Jo; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Hamilton, D Kojo; Scheer, Justin K; Soroceanu, Alex; Kelly, Michael P; Line, Breton; Gupta, Munish; Deviren, Vedat; Hart, Robert; Burton, Douglas C; Bess, Shay; Ames, Christopher P

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Although multiple reports have documented significant benefit from surgical treatment of adult spinal deformity (ASD), these procedures can have high complication rates. Previously reported complications rates associated with ASD surgery are limited by retrospective design, single-surgeon or single-center cohorts, lack of rigorous data on complications, and/or limited follow-up. Accurate definition of complications associated with ASD surgery is important and may serve as a resource for patient counseling and efforts to improve the safety of patient care. The authors conducted a study to prospectively assess the rates of complications associated with ASD surgery with a minimum 2-year follow-up based on a multicenter study design that incorporated standardized data-collection forms, on-site study coordinators, and regular auditing of data to help ensure complete and accurate reporting of complications. In addition, they report age stratification of complication rates and provide a general assessment of factors that may be associated with the occurrence of complications. METHODS As part of a prospective, multicenter ASD database, standardized forms were used to collect data on surgery-related complications. On-site coordinators and central auditing helped ensure complete capture of complication data. Inclusion criteria were age older than 18 years, ASD, and plan for operative treatment. Complications were classified as perioperative (within 6 weeks of surgery) or delayed (between 6 weeks after surgery and time of last follow-up), and as minor or major. The primary focus for analyses was on patients who reached a minimum follow-up of 2 years. RESULTS Of 346 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 291 (84%) had a minimum 2-year follow-up (mean 2.1 years); their mean age was 56.2 years. The vast majority (99%) had treatment including a posterior procedure, 25% had an anterior procedure, and 19% had a 3-column osteotomy. At least 1 revision was required in 82

  18. Dynamics of a Hogg-Huberman Model with Time Dependent Reevaluation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Toshijiro; Kurihara, Tetsuya; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2006-05-01

    The dynamical behavior of the Hogg-Huberman model with time-dependent reevaluation rates is studied. The time dependence of the reevaluation rate that agents using one of resources decide to consider their resource choice is obtained in terms of states of the system. It is seen that the change of fraction of agents using one resource is suppressed to be smaller than that in the case of a fixed reevaluation rate and the chaos control in the system associated with time-dependent reevaluation rates can be performed by the system itself.

  19. Extreme strain rate and temperature dependence of the mechanical properties of nano silicon nitride thin layers in a basal plane under tension: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xuefeng; Wang, Hongjie; Wei, Yin; Wen, Jiangbo; Niu, Min; Jia, Shuhai

    2014-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to clarify the extreme strain rate and temperature dependence of the mechanical behaviors of nano silicon nitride thin layers in a basal plane under tension. It is found that fracture stresses show almost no change with increasing strain rate. However, fracture strains decrease gradually due to the appearance of additional N(2c)-Si bond breaking defects in the deformation process. With increasing loading temperature, there is a noticeable drop in fracture stress and fracture strain. In the low temperature range, roughness phases can be observed owing to a combination of factors such as configuration evolution and energy change.

  20. Seismicity and Deformation of Krafla Volcano, Iceland. Intervals of Low Seismicity Rate during Rapid Inflation Explained By the Kaiser Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimisson, E. R.; Einarsson, P.; Sigmundsson, F.; Brandsdottir, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Krafla central volcano in NE-Iceland produced about 20 dike intrusions during a rifting episode 1975-1984. These intrusions were always preceded by inflation of the caldera. Once a dike started propagating rapid deflation was observed. The first deflation event began in December 1975 with a dike traveling laterally from the magma chamber. Leveling measurements revealed subsidence of 2 m close to the deflation center. In February 1976 a stage of inflation began and at the same time the seismicity rate in the caldera rose in good correlation with the inflation. A small intrusion started propagating in late September 1976 which was accompanied by maximum subsidence of about 14 cm. However in the next 3 inflation and deflation cycles the inflation periods were almost aseismic until the inflation level of previous cycle was exceeded. At that point a sharp increase in the caldera earthquake count was observed. This phenomenon was observed until late April 1977 when a fissure eruption occurred inside the caldera. By inverting leveling data from 87 stations for a Mogi source and regarding the volume change of the source as a measure of stress we suggest that this phenomenon can be explained by the Kaiser effect. The Kaiser effect is well known from rock mechanics where under cyclic loading and unloading rocks, and other materials, induce dramatic increase in acoustic emissions when the load exceeds that of previous cycles. Krafla demonstrated the same effect while the external stress field was not significantly changed during the aforementioned 3 inflation/deflation cycles. This condition was disturbed when eruption occurred inside the caldera. The state of stress in the vicinity of the magma chamber was changed and subsequent inflation periods were not accompanied by significant seismicity. These results indicate that the Kaiser effect is an important part of understanding the relationship between deformation and seismicity in active volcanoes. The importance of

  1. Microstructure- and Strain Rate-Dependent Tensile Behavior of Fiber Laser-Welded DP980 Steel Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qiang; Guo, Wei; Peng, Peng; Li, Minggao; Zhu, Ying; Zou, Guisheng

    2016-02-01

    DP980 steels were butt-welded by fiber laser welding. The microstructures, microhardness distribution, and tensile behavior of the joint were investigated. The results showed that the fusion zone (FZ) consisted of fully martensite with higher hardness compared to the base metal (BM). A softened zone (20 HV0.2 drop) was produced in heat-affected zone due to martensite tempering during the laser welding. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and yield strength (YS) of the laser-welded joint were not degraded compared to BM with the existence of softened zone. The UTS and YS of the welded joint increased with the increase of tensile strain rate. The work hardening exponents of the BM and welded joint showed weak positive strain rate dependence. The deformation of softened zone was restrained by the hardened FZ during loading, resulting in a higher work hardening rate of softened zone than that of BM. The failure of welded joint occurred in the BM instead of softened zone. The fracture surfaces of the joint exhibited typical ductile fracture over strain rate from 0.0001 to 0.1 s-1.

  2. Thermomechanical Modeling of Shape Memory Alloys with Rate Dependency on the Pseudoelastic Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Ho Roh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The loading-rate dependency on the pseudoelastic behaviors of shape memory alloy (SMA wires is experimentally and numerically investigated. The results are analyzed to estimate the parameters for a thermomechanical constitutive model of SMA wire with strain-rate dependency of the hysteresis behavior. An analytical model of SMAs is developed by using nonconstant parameters during various strain rates. Numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate the accuracy of the improved model.

  3. Dynamic behavior and microstructural evolution during moderate to high strain rate hot deformation of a Fe-Ni-Cr alloy (alloy 800H)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu; Di, Hongshuang; Zhang, Jiecen; Yang, Yaohua

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to fundamentally understand the dynamic behavior of alloy 800H at moderate to high strain rate using hot compression tests and propose nucleation mechanism associated with dynamic crystallization (DRX). We firstly investigated the dynamic behavior of alloy 800H with industrial scale strain rates using hot compression tests and adiabatic correction was performed to correct as-measured flow curves. Secondly, a Johnson-Cook model was established by using the corrected data and could give a precise prediction of elevated temperature flow stress for the studied alloy. Finally, the nucleation mechanism of DRX grains at high strain rates was studied. The results showed that the predominant nucleation mechanism for DRX is the formation of "bulge" at parent grain boundary. Additionally, the fragmentation of original grain at low deformation temperatures and the twinning near the bulged regions at high deformation temperatures also accelerate the DRX process.

  4. Geometry- and Length Scale-Dependent Deformation and Recovery on Micro- and Nanopatterned Shape Memory Polymer Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei Li; Low, Hong Yee

    2016-03-01

    Micro- and nanoscale surface textures, when optimally designed, present a unique approach to improve surface functionalities. Coupling surface texture with shape memory polymers may generate reversibly tuneable surface properties. A shape memory polyetherurethane is used to prepare various surface textures including 2 μm- and 200 nm-gratings, 250 nm-pillars and 200 nm-holes. The mechanical deformation via stretching and recovery of the surface texture are investigated as a function of length scales and shapes. Results show the 200 nm-grating exhibiting more deformation than 2 μm-grating. Grating imparts anisotropic and surface area-to-volume effects, causing different degree of deformation between gratings and pillars under the same applied macroscopic strain. Full distribution of stress within the film causes the holes to deform more substantially than the pillars. In the recovery study, unlike a nearly complete recovery for the gratings after 10 transformation cycles, the high contribution of surface energy impedes the recovery of holes and pillars. The surface textures are shown to perform a switchable wetting function. This study provides insights into how geometric features of shape memory surface patterns can be designed to modulate the shape programming and recovery, and how the control of reversibly deformable surface textures can be applied to transfer microdroplets.

  5. An Investigation on the Reliability of Deformation Analysis at Simulated Network Depending on the Precise Point Position Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdag, U. M.; Erdogan, B.; Hekimoglu, S.

    2014-12-01

    Deformation analysis plays an important role for human life safety; hence investigating the reliability of the obtained results from deformation analysis is crucial. The deformation monitoring network is established and the observations are analyzed periodically. The main problem in the deformation analysis is that if there is more than one displaced point in the monitoring network, the analysis methods smear the disturbing effects of the displaced points over all other points which are not displaced. Therefore, only one displaced point can be detected successfully. The Precise Point Positioning (PPP) gives opportunity to prevent smearing effect of the displaced points. In this study, we have simulated a monitoring network that consisting four object points and generated six different scenarios. The displacements were added to the points by using a device that the GPS antenna was easily moved horizontally and the seven hours static GPS measurements were carried out. The measurements were analyzed by using online Automatic Precise Positioning Service (APPS) to obtain the coordinates and covariance matrices. The results of the APPS were used in the deformation analysis. The detected points and true displaced points were compared with each other to obtain reliability of the method. According to the results, the analysis still detect stable points as displaced points. For the next step, we are going to search the reason of the wrong results and deal with acquiring more reliable results.

  6. Constitutive modeling and understanding of the hot compressive deformation of Mg-9.5Zn-2.0Y magnesium alloy with reduced number of strain-dependent constitutive parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woo Jin; Kwak, Tae Yang

    2017-07-01

    The hot compressive flow behavior of the cast Mg-9.5Zn-2.0Y alloy as a function of strain was analyzed, and the degree of dependence of the parameters ( A: material constant, n 2: stress exponent, Q c: activation energy for plastic flow and α: stress multiplier) of the constitutive equation (\\dot ɛ = A{[ {sinh ( {α σ } )} ]^{{n_2}}}\\exp ( {{ - {Q_c}}/{RT}} )) upon the strain was examined in a systematic manner. This is to explore the possibility of representing the hot compressive deformation behavior of metallic alloys in a simple way by using a reduced number of strain-dependent constitutive parameters. The analysis results for several different cases can be interpreted as follows: (1) Q c can be treated as being strain-independent, which is physically sensible; (2) while only the microstructure changes as a function of strain at low flow stresses, as the flow stress increases, the power-law creep deformation and power-law breakdown mechanisms change; (3) the regime where only A is strain dependent expanded to higher strain rates and lower temperatures as the strain increased, suggesting that the number of the strain-dependent parameters decreases as the initial microstructure is refined by dynamic recrystallization, and the microstructure approaches a steady state.

  7. Rate dependency of depth in nanoindentation of polycrystalline NiTi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Q.P.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent increased use of shape memory alloys (SMAs for engineering applications manifests the need of checking the aspect of rate in NiTi. The ability of models and experiments to accurately predict the rate dependency of function–rate relationship is important. This paper concentrates on the rate dependency of depth in nanoindentation of NiTi where different tips have been used. To explain the phenomena, hysteresis damping areas are investigated. The results show decreasing depth at higher rates is due to the amount of latent heat generated from phase transition and relaxation time for heat release.

  8. A QUASI-FLOW CONSTITUTIVE MODEL WITH STRAIN-RATE DEPENDENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Ping; SHEN Guozhe; YANG Guang

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the proposed is a quasi-flow constitutive model with strain-rate sensitivity for elastic plastic large deformation. The model is based on the Quasi-flow Corner theory,and is suitable for the sheet metal forming process simulation with a variable punch machine velocity.Uniaxial tensile tests and deep-drawing tests of a circular blank with square punch are carried out and numerically simulated. The consistency between the experimental and the numerically simulated results shows the validity of the present new constitutive model.

  9. Local membrane deformations activate Ca2+-dependent K+ and anionic currents in intact human red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrda, Agnieszka; Cytlak, Urszula; Ciuraszkiewicz, Anna

    2010-01-01

    by such flow, as well as the local membrane deformations generated in certain pathological conditions, such as sickle cell anemia, have been shown to increase membrane permeability, based largely on experimentation with red cell suspensions. We attempted here the first measurements of membrane currents......-activated transient PCa observed here under local membrane deformation is a likely contributor to the Ca(2+)-mediated effects observed during the normal aging process of red blood cells, and to the increased Ca(2+) content of red cells in certain hereditary anemias such as thalassemia and sickle cell anemia.......BACKGROUND: The mechanical, rheological and shape properties of red blood cells are determined by their cortical cytoskeleton, evolutionarily optimized to provide the dynamic deformability required for flow through capillaries much narrower than the cell's diameter. The shear stress induced...

  10. The effect of time-dependent deformation of viscoelastic hydrogels on myogenic induction and Rac1 activity in mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Andrew R; Frith, Jessica E; Gomez, Guillermo A; Yap, Alpha S; Cooper-White, Justin J

    2014-02-01

    Cell behaviours within tissues are influenced by a broad array of physical and biochemical microenvironmental factors. Whilst 'stiffness' is a recognised physical property of substrates and tissue microenvironments that influences many cellular behaviours, tissues and their extracellular matrices are not purely rigid but 'viscoelastic' materials, composed of both rigid-like (elastic) and dissipative (viscous) elements. This viscoelasticity results in materials displaying increased deformation with time under the imposition of a defined force or stress, a phenomenon referred to as time-dependent deformation or 'creep'. Previously, we compared the behaviour of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on hydrogels tailored to have a constant stiffness, but to display varying levels of creep in response to an applied force. Using polyacrylamide as a model material, we showed that on high-creep hydrogels (HCHs), hMSCs displayed increased proliferation, spread area and differentiation towards multiple lineages, compared to their purely stiff analogue, with a particular propensity for differentiation towards a smooth muscle cell (SMC) lineage. In this present study, we investigate the mechanisms behind this phenomenon and show that hMSCs adhered to HCHs have increased expression of SMC induction factors, including soluble factors, ECM proteins and the cell-cell adhesion molecule, N-Cadherin. Further, we identify a key role for Rac1 signalling in mediating this increased N-Cadherin expression. Using a real-time Rac1-FRET biosensor, we confirm increased Rac1 activation on HCHs, an observation that is further supported functionally by observed increases in motility and lamellipodial protrusion rates of hMSCs. Increased Rac1 activity in hMSCs on HCHs provides underlying mechanisms for enhanced commitment towards a SMC lineage and the compensatory increase in spread area (isotonic tension) after a creep-induced loss of cytoskeletal tension on viscoelastic substrates, in contrast

  11. Strain-rate and temperature dependent material properties of Agar and Gellan Gum used in biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavi, Alessandro; Cuccaro, Rugiada; Troia, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Agar and Gellan Gum are biocompatible polymers extensively used in several fields of tissue engineering research (e.g. tissue replacement, tissue support, tissue mimicking), due to their mechanical behaviour effectively representative of actual biological tissues. Since mechanical properties of artificial tissues are related to biocompatibility and functionality of medical implants and significantly influence adhesion, growth and differentiation of cells in tissue-engineering scaffolds, an accurate characterization of Young׳s modulus and relaxation time processes is needed. In this study, the strain-rate and temperature dependent material properties of Agarose and one among the numerous kind of Gellan Gum commercially available, known as Phytagel(®), have been investigated. Nine hydrogel samples have been realized with different mechanical properties: the first one Agar-based as a reference material, the further eight samples Gellan Gum based in which the effect of dispersed solid particles like kieselguhr and SiC, as enhancing mechanical properties factors, have been investigated as a function of concentration. Stress-strain has been investigated in compression and relaxation time has been evaluated by means of the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts time decay function. Mechanical properties have been measured as a function of temperature between 20 °C and 35 °C and at different strain rates, from ~10(-3)s(-1) and ~10(-2)s(-1) (or deformation rate from ~0.01 mms(-1) to ~0.1 mms(-1)). From experimental data, the combined temperature and strain-rate dependence of hydrogels Young׳s modulus is determined on the basis of a constitutive model. In addition to a dependence of Young׳s modulus on temperature, a remarkable influence of strain-rate has been observed, especially in the sample containing solid particles; in same ranges of temperature and strain-rate, also relaxation time variations have been monitored in order to identify a possible dependence of damping

  12. Nuclear Deformation Effects in the Cluster Radioactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Misicu, S.; Protopopescu, D.(University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, United Kingdom)

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the nuclear deformation on the decay rates of some cluster emission processes. The interaction between the daughter and the cluster is given by a double folding potential including quadrupole and hexadecupole deformed densities of both fragments. The nuclear part of the nucleus-nucleus interaction is density dependent and at small distances a repulsive core in the potential will occur. In the frame of the WKB- approximation the assault frequency of the cluster ...

  13. The Deformation Rate of Smooth Muscle Cells in Vessel Walls After Short-Duration Heating Dilatation in a Porcine Model Ex Vivo and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunio, Mie; Arai, Tsunenori

    2012-09-01

    We have proposed a novel short-duration thermal angioplasty with uniform temperature distribution. Although the dilatation mechanism of our short-duration heating dilatation was reported in our previous study, the influences on smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are not sufficiently understood. We studied the influences on SMCs in terms of shape change and discussed the relationship between the SMCs' shape change and dilatation mechanism ex vivo and in vivo. We found that the SMCs were fixed in the stretched condition after our short-duration heating dilatation both ex vivo and in vivo. The deformation rate of SMCs' shape, measured by the cells' nuclei, was increased with rising balloon maximum temperature (T(balloon)), and the same tendency was observed for the arterial dilatation rate. We hypothesize that the SMCs were fixed in the stretched condition because the arterial dilatation with our short-duration heating dilatation was performed without any plastic deformations of the vessel wall, causing the vessel wall itself to be stretched. We also prospect that the reasons for the positive correlation between the deformation rate of SMCs' shape and T(balloon) are that (i) the area heated over 60 °C was expanded with rising T(balloon), and (ii) the arterial dilatation rate was also increased with rising T(balloon).

  14. Deformation, Phase Transformation and Recrystallization in the Shear Bands Induced by High-Strain Rate Loading in Titanium and Its Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongbo XU; Yilong BAI; M.A.Meyers

    2006-01-01

    α-titanium and its alloys with a dual-phase structure (α+β) were deformed dynamically under strain rate of about 104 s-1. The formation and microstructural evolution of the localized shear bands were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results reveal that both the strain and strain rate should be considered simultaneously as the mechanical conditions for shear band formation, and twinning is an important mode of deformation. Both experimental and calculation show that the materials within the bands underwent a superhigh strain rate (9×105 s-1) deformation, which is two magnitudes of that of average strain rate required for shear band formation; the dislocations inthe bands can be constricted and developed into cell structures; the phase transformation from α to α2 within the bands was observed, and the transformation products (α2) had a certain crystallographic orientation relationship with their parent; the equiaxed grains with an average size of 10μm in diameter observed within the bands are proposed to be the results of recrystallization.

  15. Local membrane deformations activate Ca2+-dependent K+ and anionic currents in intact human red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrda, Agnieszka; Cytlak, Urszula; Ciuraszkiewicz, Anna;

    2010-01-01

    -activated transient PCa observed here under local membrane deformation is a likely contributor to the Ca(2+)-mediated effects observed during the normal aging process of red blood cells, and to the increased Ca(2+) content of red cells in certain hereditary anemias such as thalassemia and sickle cell anemia....

  16. Strain rate dependence of impact properties of sintered 316L stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woei-Shyan; Lin, Chi-Feng; Liu, Tsung-Ju

    2006-12-01

    This paper uses a material testing system (MTS) and a compressive split-Hopkinson bar to investigate the impact behaviour of sintered 316L stainless steel at strain rates ranging from 10 -3 s -1 to 7.5 × 10 3 s -1. It is found that the true stress, the rate of work hardening and the strain rate sensitivity vary significantly as the strain rate increases. The flow behaviour of the sintered 316L stainless steel can be accurately predicted using a constitutive law based on Gurson's yield criterion and the flow rule proposed by Khan, Huang and Liang (KHL). Microstructural observations reveal that the degree of localized grain deformation increases, but the pore density and the grain size decrease, with increasing strain rate. Adiabatic shear bands associated with cracking are developed at strain rates higher than 5.6 × 10 3 s -1. The fracture surfaces exhibit ductile dimples. The depth and density of these dimples decrease with increasing strain rate.

  17. Strain rate dependence of impact properties of sintered 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.-S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: wslee@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Lin, C.-F. [National Center for High-Performance Computing, Hsin-Shi Tainan County 744, Taiwan (China); Liu, T.-J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2006-12-15

    This paper uses a material testing system (MTS) and a compressive split-Hopkinson bar to investigate the impact behaviour of sintered 316L stainless steel at strain rates ranging from 10{sup -3} s{sup -1} to 7.5 x 10{sup 3} s{sup -1}. It is found that the true stress, the rate of work hardening and the strain rate sensitivity vary significantly as the strain rate increases. The flow behaviour of the sintered 316L stainless steel can be accurately predicted using a constitutive law based on Gurson's yield criterion and the flow rule proposed by Khan, Huang and Liang (KHL). Microstructural observations reveal that the degree of localized grain deformation increases, but the pore density and the grain size decrease, with increasing strain rate. Adiabatic shear bands associated with cracking are developed at strain rates higher than 5.6 x 10{sup 3} s{sup -1}. The fracture surfaces exhibit ductile dimples. The depth and density of these dimples decrease with increasing strain rate.

  18. The Single-Vendor-Single-Buyer Integrated Production-Shipment Model with Stock Dependent Demand Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In the integrated production-shipment models for the single-vendor-single-buyer system presented hitherto, thedemand rate of items is treated as a constant. However, many researchers have observed that the presence of morequantities of the same product tends to attract more customers. This suggests that the demand rate should depend on thestock level. This paper presents a single-vendor-single-buyer production-shipment model with the stock dependentdemand rate, based on the demand rate linearly depending upon the stock level at any instant of time.

  19. Displacement rate dependence of irradiation creep as predicted by the production bias model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, C.H.

    1996-04-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the non-swelling component of irradiation creep of austenitic stainless steels is relatively independent of temperature but is sensitive to the displacement rate. An earlier model of Lewthwaite and Mosedale anticipated the sensitivity of displacement rate and attributed it to the flux sensitivity of point defect recombination. The point-defect recombination process does not yield the observed temperature dependence, however, although it does predict an inverse dependence of the creep rate on the square root of the displacement rate that was experimentally observed at relatively low temperatures.

  20. Solvent viscosity dependence of the folding rate of a small protein: distributed computing study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrovic, Bojan; Pande, Vijay

    2003-09-01

    By using distributed computing techniques and a supercluster of more than 20,000 processors we simulated folding of a 20-residue Trp Cage miniprotein in atomistic detail with implicit GB/SA solvent at a variety of solvent viscosities (gamma). This allowed us to analyze the dependence of folding rates on viscosity. In particular, we focused on the low-viscosity regime (values below the viscosity of water). In accordance with Kramers' theory, we observe approximately linear dependence of the folding rate on 1/gamma for values from 1-10(-1)x that of water viscosity. However, for the regime between 10(-4)-10(-1)x that of water viscosity we observe power-law dependence of the form k approximately gamma(-1/5). These results suggest that estimating folding rates from molecular simulations run at low viscosity under the assumption of linear dependence of rate on inverse viscosity may lead to erroneous results.

  1. Neutron Scattering in Hydrogenous Moderators, Studied by Time Dependent Reaction Rate Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, L.G.; Moeller, E.; Purohit, S.N.

    1966-03-15

    The moderation and absorption of a neutron burst in water, poisoned with the non-1/v absorbers cadmium and gadolinium, has been followed on the time scale by multigroup calculations, using scattering kernels for the proton gas and the Nelkin model. The time dependent reaction rate curves for each absorber display clear differences for the two models, and the separation between the curves does not depend much on the absorber concentration. An experimental method for the measurement of infinite medium reaction rate curves in a limited geometry has been investigated. This method makes the measurement of the time dependent reaction rate generally useful for thermalization studies in a small geometry of a liquid hydrogenous moderator, provided that the experiment is coupled to programs for the calculation of scattering kernels and time dependent neutron spectra. Good agreement has been found between the reaction rate curve, measured with cadmium in water, and a calculated curve, where the Haywood kernel has been used.

  2. The effects of quench rate and pre-deformation on precipitation hardening in Al–Mg–Si alloys with different Cu amounts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Takeshi, E-mail: takeshi.saito@ntnu.no [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Marioara, Calin D. [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, N-7465 Trondheim (Norway); Røyset, Jostein [Hydro Aluminum Research and Technology Development, N-6601 Sunndalsøra (Norway); Marthinsen, Knut [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Holmestad, Randi [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2014-07-15

    The effects of quench rate after solution heat treatment in combination with 1% pre-deformation on precipitation hardening in three Al–Mg–Si alloys have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and hardness measurements during an isothermal heat treatment. The alloys contain different Cu amounts (up to 0.1 wt%) and the same amounts of other solute elements. While a Cu amount below 0.01 wt% does not affect precipitation hardening, an addition of 0.1 wt% Cu increases hardness due to the formation of a fine microstructure having a high number density of short precipitates. A double peak hardness evolution was observed during isothermal heat treatment. This effect was most pronounced for alloys with low quench rate, and less pronounced for alloys with 1% pre-deformation and 0.1 wt% Cu addition. The low quench rate also led to wider precipitation free zones. This effect was also less pronounced by 1% pre-deformation and addition of 0.1 wt% Cu.

  3. PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT DEFLAGRATION RATE MEASUREMENTS OF LLM-105 AND TATB BASED EXPLOSIVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glascoe, E A; Tan, N; Koerner, J; Lorenz, K T; Maienschein, J L

    2009-11-10

    The pressure dependent deflagration rates of LLM-105 and TATB based formulations were measured in the LLNL high pressure strand burner. The role of binder amount, explosive type, and thermal damage and their effects on the deflagration rate will be discussed. Two different formulations of LLM-105 and three formulations of TATB were studied and results indicate that binder amount and type play a minor role in the deflagration behavior. This is in sharp contrast to the HMX based formulations which strongly depend on binder amount and type. The effect of preheating these samples was considerably more dramatic. In the case of LLM-105, preheating the sample appears to have little effect on the deflagration rate. In contrast, preheating TATB formulations causes the deflagration rate to accelerate and become erratic. The thermal and mechanical properties of these formulations will be discussed in the context of their pressure and temperature dependent deflagration rates.

  4. The Limit Behavior of a Stochastic Logistic Model with Individual Time-Dependent Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilun Shang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a variant of the stochastic logistic model that allows individual variation and time-dependent infection and recovery rates. The model is described as a heterogeneous density dependent Markov chain. We show that the process can be approximated by a deterministic process defined by an integral equation as the population size grows.

  5. A numerical basis for strain-gradient plasticity theory: Rate-independent and rate-dependent formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2014-01-01

    of a single plastic zone is analyzed to illustrate the agreement with earlier published results, whereafter examples of (ii) multiple plastic zone interaction, and (iii) elastic–plastic loading/unloading are presented. Here, the simple shear problem of an infinite slab constrained between rigid plates......–plastic loading/unloading and the interaction of multiple plastic zones, is proposed. The predicted model response is compared to the corresponding rate-dependent version of visco-plastic origin, and coinciding results are obtained in the limit of small strain-rate sensitivity. First, (i) the evolution...

  6. Reliability Assessment of Impact Tensile Testing Apparatus using a Drop-bar Striker for Intermediate Strain-rate Range and Evaluation of Dynamic Deformation Behaviors for a Carbon Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Kyung Oh; Kim, Dae Woong; Shin, Hyung Seop [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of); Park, Lee Ju; Kim, Hyung Won [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Studies on the deformation behavior of materials subjected to impact loads have been carried out in various fields of engineering and industry. The deformation and fracture of members for these machines/structures are known to correspond to the intermediate strain-rate region. Therefore, for the structural design, it is necessary to consider the dynamic deformation behavior in these intermediate strain-rate ranges. However, there have been few reports with useful data about the deformation and fracture behavior at intermediate strain-rate ranges. Because the intermediate strain-rate region is located between quasi-static and high strain-rate regions, it is difficult to obtain the intermediate strain-rate using conventional reasonable test equipment. To solve this problem, in this study, the measurement reliability of the constructed drop-bar impact tensile test apparatus was established and the dynamic behavior at the intermediate strain-rate range of carbon steels was evaluated by utilizing the apparatus.

  7. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-09-07

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  8. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  9. Dependence of Growing High-Quality Gem Diamonds on Growth Rates by Temperature Gradient Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZANG Chuan-Yi; JIA Xiao-Peng; REN Guo-Zhong; WANG Xian-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    @@ Using the temperature gradient method under high pressure and high temperature, we investigate the dependence of growing high-quality gem diamond crystals on the growth rates. It is found that the lower the growth rate of gem diamond crystals, the larger the temperature range of growing high-quality gem diamond crystals, and the easier the control of temperature.

  10. Participation Rates in the Aid to Families with Dependent Children Program: Trends for 1967 through 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Patricia; Michel, Richard C.

    This report examines participation rates in the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program. TRIM2, a microsimulation model that simulated the eligibility and benefit rules of the AFDC program on a state-by-state basis, showed that there had been a dramatic decline after 1981 in the rate at which AFDC families were applying for and…

  11. Geometry dependence of Auger carrier capture rates into cone-shaped self-assembled quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnúsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Bischoff, Svend; Uskov, A.V.;

    2003-01-01

    We calculate carrier capture rates into cone- and truncated-cone-shaped quantum dots mediated by Auger processes. It is demonstrated that the capture rates depend strongly on both dot size and shape. The importance of phonon-mediated versus the Auger-mediated capture processes is discussed....

  12. Effect of Cooling Rate and Deformation on Microstructures and Critical Phase-Transformation Temperature of Boron-Nickel Added HSLA H-Beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao; WANG Zuo-cheng; WANG Xie-bin; WANG Yi-ran; GAO Jun-qing; ZHAO Xiu-ling

    2012-01-01

    Microstructures and critical phase-transformation temperature of boron-nickel added Nb-treated high strength low alloy (HSLA) H-beams cooled at different cooling rate, with different deformation were investigated. Continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram of this new type of steel was obtained by using Gleeble 1500 ther- momechanical simulator. Microstructures and hardness, especially micro-hardness of the experimental steel were in- vestigated by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Rockwell and Vickers hardness tests. Phase analysis was also studied by X~ray diffraction (XRD). The results indicated that with increase of cooling rate, microstructures of continuous cooled specimens gradually transformed from polygonal ferrite and pearlite, grain boundary ferrite and bainite, bainite and martensite to single martensite. The CCT diagram revealed that slow cool- ing was needed to avoid austenite-bainite transformation to ensure toughness of this steel. By plastic deformation of 40%, austenite-ferrite transformation temperature increased by 46℃, due to deformation induced ferrite transfor- mation during continuous cooling, but Rockwell hardness has little change.

  13. Physical mechanisms underlying the strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of kangaroo shoulder cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibbotuwawa, Namal; Oloyede, Adekunle; Li, Tong; Singh, Sanjleena; Senadeera, Wijitha; Gu, YuanTong

    2015-09-01

    Due to anatomical and biomechanical similarities to human shoulder, kangaroo was chosen as a model to study shoulder cartilage. Comprehensive enzymatic degradation and indentation tests were applied on kangaroo shoulder cartilage to study mechanisms underlying its strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior. We report that superficial collagen plays a more significant role than proteoglycans in facilitating strain-rate-dependent behavior of the kangaroo shoulder cartilage. By comparing the mechanical properties of degraded and normal cartilages, it was noted that proteoglycan and collagen degradation significantly compromised strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of the cartilage. Superficial collagen contributed equally to the tissue behavior at all strain-rates. This is different to the studies reported on knee cartilage and confirms the importance of superficial collagen on shoulder cartilage mechanical behavior. A porohyperelastic numerical model also indicated that collagen disruption would lead to faster damage of the shoulder cartilage than when proteoglycans are depleted.

  14. Secular and Time-Dependent Deformation in the Eastern California Shear Zone From a Joint Analysis of the ERS, ENVISAT, and GPS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymofyeyeva, E.; Fialko, Y. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present analysis of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data from the Eastern California Shear Zone. We use ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT data from the descending tracks 399 and 170 spanning a time period between 1992-2010 to derive the mean line-of-sight (LOS) velocity fields, as well as time series of LOS displacements for several points of interest. We use a new method to calculate atmospheric phase screens by iterative stacking of redundant interferograms that share a common acquisition date. The inferred phase screens are subtracted from the data prior to stacking for the mean LOS velocities, or computing time series. We focus on several areas where previous studies have suggested anomalous deformation signals. In particular, we find that subsidence around the Coso geothermal plant (the second largest geothermal production site in the US) is persisting at a nearly constant rate over the period of observations (1992-2010). The average subsidence rate at Coso is about 2 cm/yr. We also observe subsidence around Harper Lake, most likely due to compaction caused by water pumping, at an average rate of 1 cm/yr. The Harper Lake area is covered by both tracks, and we find an excellent agreement between data from each track. The find a localized LOS velocity gradient across the Blackwater Fault of about 1 mm/yr over 3-5 km using data from track 170, consistent with findings of Peltzer et al. (2001) who used data from the same track spanning 8 years between 1992-2000. However, data from the neighboring track 399 do not show a similar LOS velocity pattern, implying that the data precision are of the order of 1 mm/yr, and that the inferred deformation due to the Blackwater fault may be due to residual noise. Finally, we investigate deformation across the Hunter Mountain Fault, where a similar secular deformation anomaly was inferred from InSAR data from track 442, and attributed to interseismic slip rate of 5 mm/yr and an anomalously shallow locking depth of 2 km

  15. High rate and high spatial resolution surface deformation monitoring of the Argentiere glacier from complementary remote sensing and geodetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Lionel; Pham, Ha-Thai; Trouvé, Emmanuel; Vernier, Flavien; Moreau, Luc; Martin, Olivier; Thom, Christian; Briole, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    The Argentière glacier in the French Alps (Mont-Blanc massif) is a 10 km long glacier covering 19 km². Its flow on a large scale has been studied for over a hundred years by glaciologists, but the time and space fluctuations of its flow are still poorly documented. We selected a small area of the glacier, about 1 km upstream of the Lognan serac fall to measure the glacier flow with in-situ GPS measurements combined with time series of ground based pictures and time series of synthetic aperture radar images from the TerreSAR-X satellite. The experiment took place during two months between September and November 2013 with a network of thirteen single-frequency GPS receivers (eleven set up on the glacier and two on the nearby bedrock) deployed in the field with a sampling rate of 30s. Our data processing allows us to estimate epoch by epoch coordinates of each GPS site with a centimetric precision. The main interest of this approach is twofold : the monitoring of the temporal evolution of the flow and the providing of ground control points for the local and satellite remote sensing imagery. The average velocities of the stations is around 15 cm/day with peaks reaching 25cm/day lasting a few hours to one day after rainfalls or cooling periods. We explain these accelerations as the consequence of an increased basal water pressure. The strain tensor analysis shows a good consistency between the main strain axis and the orientation of the cracks on both sides of the glacier. However, available only at eleven points, the GPS data can not in any case give a picture of the overall deformation of the glacier. In order to map the glacier flow as a whole, including crevasse areas or serac falls, two automatic digital cameras were installed during the experiment on the bedrock on the shore of the glacier with acquisitions every three hours during day time. The processing of the stereo pairs produces maps in which the pixels coordinates (and their changes) are estimated with a

  16. Men with Sickle Cell Anemia and Priapism Exhibit Increased Hemolytic Rate, Decreased Red Blood Cell Deformability and Increased Red Blood Cell Aggregate Strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kizzy-Clara Cita

    Full Text Available To investigate the association between priapism in men with sickle cell anemia (SCA and hemorheological and hemolytical parameters.Fifty-eight men with SCA (median age: 38 years were included; 28 who had experienced priapism at least once during their life (priapism group and 30 who never experienced this complication (control group. Twenty-two patients were treated with hydroxycarbamide, 11 in each group. All patients were at steady state at the time of inclusion. Hematological and biochemical parameters were obtained through routine procedures. The Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer was used to measure red blood cell (RBC deformability at 30 Pa (ektacytometry and RBC aggregation properties (laser backscatter versus time. Blood viscosity was measured at a shear rate of 225 s-1 using a cone/plate viscometer. A principal component analysis was performed on 4 hemolytic markers (i.e., lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT, total bilirubin (BIL levels and reticulocyte (RET percentage to calculate a hemolytic index.Compared to the control group, patients with priapism exhibited higher ASAT (p = 0.01, LDH (p = 0.03, RET (p = 0.03 levels and hemolytic indices (p = 0.02. Higher RBC aggregates strength (p = 0.01 and lower RBC deformability (p = 0.005 were observed in patients with priapism compared to controls. After removing the hydroxycarbamide-treated patients, RBC deformability (p = 0.01 and RBC aggregate strength (p = 0.03 were still different between the two groups, and patients with priapism exhibited significantly higher hemolytic indices (p = 0.01 than controls.Our results confirm that priapism in SCA is associated with higher hemolytic rates and show for the first time that this complication is also associated with higher RBC aggregate strength and lower RBC deformability.

  17. Characterization of shock-dependent reaction rates in an aluminum/perfluoropolyether pyrolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dennis; Granier, John; Johnson, Richard; Littrell, Donald

    2017-01-01

    Energetic formulations of perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and aluminum are highly non-ideal. They release energy via a fast self-oxidized combustion wave rather than a true self-sustaining detonation. Unlike high explosives, the reactions are shock dependent and can be overdriven to control energy release rate. Reaction rate experiments show that the velocity can vary from 1.25 to 3 km/s. This paper examines the effect of the initial shock conditions upon the reaction rate of the explosive. The following conditions were varied in a series of reaction rate experiments: the high explosive booster mass and geometry; shock attenuation; confinement; and rate stick diameter and length. Several experiments designed to isolate and quantify these dependencies are described and summarized.

  18. Voltage dependence of rate functions for Na+ channel inactivation within a membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Vaccaro, Samuel R

    2015-01-01

    The inactivation of a Na+ channel occurs when the activation of the charged S4 segment of domain IV, with rate functions $\\alpha_{i}$ and $\\beta_{i}$, is followed by the binding of an intracellular hydrophobic motif which blocks conduction through the ion pore, with rate functions $\\gamma_{i}$ and $\\delta_{i}$. During a voltage clamp of the Na+ channel, the solution of the master equation for inactivation reduces to the relaxation of a rate equation when the binding of the inactivation motif is rate limiting ($\\alpha_{i} \\gg \\gamma_{i}$ and $\\beta_{i} \\gg \\delta_{i}$). The voltage dependence of the derived forward rate function for Na+ channel inactivation has an exponential dependence on the membrane potential for small depolarizations and approaches a constant value for larger depolarizations, whereas the voltage dependence of the backward rate function is exponential, and each rate has a similar form to the Hodgkin-Huxley empirical rate functions for Na+ channel inactivation in the squid axon.

  19. Modeling of Rate-Dependent Hysteresis Using a GPO-Based Adaptive Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Ma, Yaopeng

    2016-02-06

    A novel generalized play operator-based (GPO-based) nonlinear adaptive filter is proposed to model rate-dependent hysteresis nonlinearity for smart actuators. In the proposed filter, the input signal vector consists of the output of a tapped delay line. GPOs with various thresholds are used to construct a nonlinear network and connected with the input signals. The output signal of the filter is composed of a linear combination of signals from the output of GPOs. The least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm is used to adjust the weights of the nonlinear filter. The modeling results of four adaptive filter methods are compared: GPO-based adaptive filter, Volterra filter, backlash filter and linear adaptive filter. Moreover, a phenomenological operator-based model, the rate-dependent generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii (RDGPI) model, is compared to the proposed adaptive filter. The various rate-dependent modeling methods are applied to model the rate-dependent hysteresis of a giant magnetostrictive actuator (GMA). It is shown from the modeling results that the GPO-based adaptive filter can describe the rate-dependent hysteresis nonlinear of the GMA more accurately and effectively.

  20. Multi-item direct behavior ratings: Dependability of two levels of assessment specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Robert J; Briesch, Amy M

    2015-09-01

    Direct Behavior Rating-Multi-Item Scales (DBR-MIS) have been developed as formative measures of behavioral assessment for use in school-based problem-solving models. Initial research has examined the dependability of composite scores generated by summing all items comprising the scales. However, it has been argued that DBR-MIS may offer assessment of 2 levels of behavioral specificity (i.e., item-level, global composite-level). Further, it has been argued that scales can be individualized for each student to improve efficiency without sacrificing technical characteristics. The current study examines the dependability of 5 items comprising a DBR-MIS designed to measure classroom disruptive behavior. A series of generalizability theory and decision studies were conducted to examine the dependability of each item (calls out, noisy, clowns around, talks to classmates and out of seat), as well as a 3-item composite that was individualized for each student. Seven graduate students rated the behavior of 9 middle-school students on each item over 3 occasions. Ratings were based on 10-min video clips of students during mathematics instruction. Separate generalizability and decision studies were conducted for each item and for a 3-item composite that was individualized for each student based on the highest rated items on the first rating occasion. Findings indicate favorable dependability estimates for 3 of the 5 items and exceptional dependability estimates for the individualized composite.

  1. Determination of the strain rate dependent thermal softening behavior of thermoplastic materials for crash simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmann, Christian; Klein, Jan; Schöngart, Maximilian

    2016-03-01

    Thermoplastic materials are increasingly used as a light weight replacement for metal, especially in automotive applications. Typical examples are frontends and bumpers. The loads on these structures are very often impulsive, for example in a crash situation. A high rate of loading causes a high strain rate in the material which has a major impact on the mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials. The stiffness as well as the rigidity of polymers increases to higher strain rates. The increase of the mechanical properties is superimposed at higher rates of loading by another effect which works reducing on stiffness and rigidity, the increase of temperature caused by plastic deformation. The mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials is influenced by temperature opposing to strain rate. The stiffness and rigidity are decreased to higher values of temperature. The effect of thermal softening on thermoplastic materials is investigated at IKV. For this purpose high-speed tensile tests are performed on a blend, consisting of Polybutylenterephthalate (PBT) and Polycarbonate (PC). In preliminary investigations the effects of strain rate on the thermomechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials was studied by different authors. Tensile impact as well as split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests were conducted in combination with high-speed temperature measurement, though, the authors struggled especially with temperature measurement. This paper presents an approach which uses high-speed strain measurement to transpire the link between strain, strain rate and thermal softening as well as the interdependency between strain hardening and thermal softening. The results show a superimposition of strain hardening and thermal softening, which is consistent to preliminary investigations. The advantage of the presented research is that the results can be used to calibrate damage and material models to perform mechanical simulations using Finite Element Analysis.

  2. Evolution of Dislocation Subsystem Components During Plastic Deformation Depending on Parameters of Strengthening Phase with L12 Superstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneyko, O. I.; Kovalevskaya, T. A.; Kulaeva, N. A.; Kolupaeva, S. N.; Shalygina, T. A.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents results of mathematical modelling of plastic deformation in dispersion-hardened materials with FCC crystal system and L12 superstructure particles. Research results show that the size and the distance between particles of the strengthening phase affect the strain hardening and the evolution of the dislocation subsystem of the FCC alloy hardened with coherent L12 superstructure particles. It is found that increased size of ordered particles or decreased distance between them enhances the abnormal growth in the flow stress and the density of the dislocation subsystem components. Investigations show that prismatic dislocation loops predominate in the dislocation subsystem of materials having a nano-dispersion strengthening phase.

  3. The simulated features of heliospheric cosmic-ray modulation with a time-dependent drift model. IV - The role of heliospheric neutral sheet deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, J. A.; Potgieter, M. S.

    1992-01-01

    Previous calculations with a time-dependent drift model revealed the model to be less successful in describing time-dependent modulation during periods of moderate to large solar activity. In this paper, it is argued that a major reason for this is that the previously used wavy heliospheric neutral sheet (HNS) description was based on an idealized HNS not subject to any spatial evolution while propagating radially outward. It is suggested that the deformation and compression of HNS wave peaks will lead to significant increases in the crossfield diffusion across these peaks (short-circuiting). The cosmic rays will effectively experience reduced tilt angles and therefore a reduction in the integrated HNS modulation effect between an observer and the heliospheric boundary. During periods of moderate to large solar activity these HNS deformation processes are progressively more frequent and should lead to a significant reduction in time-dependent modulation as predicted by drift models. Calculations done with radially propagating tilt angles that effectively decrease with radial distance give the expected reduction which improves the general description of modulation from 1987-1988.

  4. Quantifying the size-dependent effect of the residual surface stress on the resonant frequencies of silicon nanowires if finite deformation kinematics are considered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Harold S

    2009-03-18

    There are two major objectives to the present work. The first objective is to demonstrate that, in contrast to predictions from linear surface elastic theory, when nonlinear, finite deformation kinematics are considered, the residual surface stress does impact the resonant frequencies of silicon nanowires. The second objective of this work is to delineate, as a function of nanowire size, the relative contributions of both the residual (strain-independent) and the surface elastic (strain-dependent) parts of the surface stress to the nanowire resonant frequencies. Both goals are accomplished by using the recently developed surface Cauchy-Born model, which accounts for nanoscale surface stresses through a nonlinear, finite deformation continuum mechanics model that leads to the solution of a standard finite element eigenvalue problem for the nanowire resonant frequencies. In addition to demonstrating that the residual surface stress does impact the resonant frequencies of silicon nanowires, we further show that there is a strong size dependence to its effect; in particular, we find that consideration of the residual surface stress alone leads to significant errors in predictions of the nanowire resonant frequency, with an increase in error with decreasing nanowire size. Correspondingly, the strain-dependent part of the surface stress is found to have an increasingly important effect on the resonant frequencies of the nanowires with decreasing nanowire size.

  5. Role of the late sodium current in rate-dependent repolarization of the canine ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Yang, Lin; Yang, Zhao; Zheng, Xiao

    2013-12-31

    Late sodium current I(NaL) is an inward current participating in maintaining the plateau of the action potential. So far its role in the repolarization of canine hearts is not well known. In this paper, by taking advantage of a computer simulation method, we developed a one-dimensional transmural tissue to study the impacts of I(NaL) on rate-dependent repolarization and its ionic basis in the canine ventricle. An OpenMP parallel algorithm was performed on a four-core personal computer to accelerate the simulation. The results demonstrated that action potential durations of midmyocytes showed greater rate dependence than the endo- and epi-myocytes. When the pacing rate was reduced, repolarization of the tissue was prolonged while the transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) was enlarged. The enhancement of I(NaL) further amplified this rate-dependent repolarization and TDR meanwhile increased the risk of arrhythmogenesis. I(NaL) was found highly sensitive to the pacing rate by calculating its kinetics. The study suggested that I(NaL) played an important role in the rate-dependent repolarization of the canine ventricle. Selective blockade of I(NaL) could have clinical benefits, especially for such pathological conditions with enhanced I(NaL) as long QT 3 syndrome and heart failure.

  6. Dependence of Limited Growth Rate of High-Quality Gem Diamond on Growth Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yu; MA Hong-An; LI Shang-Sheng; XIAO Hong-Yu; ZHANG Ya-Fei; HUANG Guo-Feng; MA Li-Qiu; JIA Xiao-Peng

    2007-01-01

    The growth rate of diamond has been investigated for a long time and researchers have been attempting to enhance the growth rate of high-quality gem diamond infinitely. However, it has been found according to previous research results that the quality of diamond is debased with the increase of growth rate. Thus, under specific conditions, the growth rate of high-quality diamond cannot exceed a limited value that is called the limited growth rate of diamond. We synthesize a series of type Ib gem diamonds by temperature gradient method under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) using the as-grown {100} face. The dependence of limited growth rate on growth conditions is studied. The results show that the limited growth rate increases when synthetic temperature decreases, also when growth time is prolonged.

  7. Computational modeling of the dependence of kindling rate on network properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, B.; Niranjan, B. R.; Ullal, G.; Dasgupta, C.

    2006-05-01

    The dependence of the rate of kindling on network properties, such as the number of neurons, number of stored memories, and the number of neurons used to store each memory, is studied through computer simulations of an appropriate neural network model for kindling of focal epilepsy. Simulations are performed for models of both chemical and electrical kindling. Larger and more complex networks are found to take longer time to kindle, as observed in experiments. The nature of the dependence of the kindling rate on network properties is somewhat different between the two types of kindling. A simple analysis of the process of chemical kindling is presented, which provides a semi-quantitative explanation of the behavior observed in our simulations. This analysis also shows that our main conclusions about the dependence of the kindling rate on the size and complexity of the network are independent of some of the assumptions made in our modeling.

  8. Modelling the Dependence Structure of MUR/USD and MUR/INR Exchange Rates using Copula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandna Jowaheer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available American Dollar (USD and Indian Rupee (INR play an important role in Mauritian economy. It is important to model the pattern of dependence in their co-movement with respect to Mauritian Rupee (MUR, as this may indicate the export-import behavior in Mauritius. However, it is known that distributions of exchange rates are usually non-normal and the use of linear correlation as a dependence measure is inappropriate. Moreover it is quite difficult to obtain the joint distribution of such random variables in order to specify the complete covariance matrix to measure their dependence structure. In this paper, we first identify the marginal distributions of the exchange rates of MUR against USD and INR and then select the best fitting copula model for the bivariate series. It is concluded that both the series are asymmetric and fat-tailed following hyperbolic distribution. Their dependence structure is appropriately modeled by t copula.

  9. Infliximab dependency is related to decreased surgical rates in adult Crohn's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, N.; Duricova, D.; Lenicek, M.

    2010-01-01

    last intended infusion: prolonged response (maintenance of complete/partial response), infliximab dependency (relapse requiring repeated infusions to regain complete/partial response or need of infliximab > 12 months to sustain response). Results Forty-seven percent obtained prolonged response, 29...... on maintenance versus on demand regime was 33 and 31%, respectively (P = 0.63). No relevant clinical or genetic predictors were identified. Conclusion The infliximab dependency response seems to be equivalent to the prolonged response in adult CD patients when comparing surgery rates. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol......Background Infliximab dependency in children with Crohn's disease (CD) has recently been described and found to be associated with a decreased surgery rate. Aim To assess infliximab dependency of adult CD patients, evaluate the impact on surgery, and search for possible clinical and genetic...

  10. An implicit algorithm for a rate-dependent ductile failure model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Q. H.; Rice, Jeremy R.

    2008-10-01

    An implicit numerical algorithm has been developed for a rate-dependent model for damage and failure of ductile materials under high-rate dynamic loading [F. L. Addessio and J. N. Johnson, J. Appl. Phys. 74, 1640 (1993)]. Over each time step, the algorithm first implicitly determines the equilibrium state on a Gurson surface, and then calculates the final state by solving viscous relaxation equations, also implicitly. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the key features of the algorithm. Compared to the explicit algorithm used previously, the current algorithm allows significantly larger time steps that can be used in the analysis. As the viscosity of the material vanishes, the results of the rate-dependent model are shown here to converge to that of the corresponding rate-independent model, a result not achieved with the explicit algorithm.

  11. Rate of egg maturation in marine turtles exhibits 'universal temperature dependence'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Sam B; Blount, Jonathan D; Godley, Brendan J; Witt, Matthew J; Broderick, Annette C

    2011-09-01

    1. The metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) predicts that, after correcting for body mass variation among organisms, the rates of most biological processes will vary as a universal function of temperature. However, empirical support for 'universal temperature dependence' (UTD) is currently equivocal and based on studies of a limited number of traits. 2. In many ectothermic animals, the rate at which females produce mature eggs is temperature dependent and may be an important factor in determining the costs of reproduction. 3. We tested whether the rate of egg maturation in marine turtles varies with environmental temperature as predicted by MTE, using the time separating successive clutches of individual females to estimate the rate at which eggs are formed. We also assessed the phenotypic contribution to this rate, by using radio telemetry to make repeated measurements of interclutch intervals for individual green turtles (Chelonia mydas). 4. Rates of egg maturation increased with seasonally increasing water temperatures in radio-tracked green turtles, but were not repeatable for individual females, and did not vary according to maternal body size or reproductive investment (number and size of eggs produced). 5. Using a collated data set from several different populations and species of marine turtles, we then show that a single relationship with water temperature explains most of the variation in egg maturation rates, with a slope that is statistically indistinguishable from the UTD predicted by MTE. However, several alternative statistical models also described the relationship between temperature and egg maturation rates equally parsimoniously. 6. Our results offer novel support for the MTE's predicted UTD of biological rates, although the underlying mechanisms require further study. The strong temperature dependence of egg maturation combined with the apparently weak phenotypic contribution to this rate has interesting behavioural implications in ectothermic

  12. Cooling rate dependence of undercooling of pure Sn single drop by fast scanning calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bin [Shanghai University, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing, Shanghai (China); University of Rostock, Institute of Physics, Rostock (Germany); Gao, Yulai; Zou, Changdong; Zhai, Qijie [Shanghai University, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing, Shanghai (China); Abyzov, A.S. [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, National Science Center, Kharkov (Ukraine); Zhuravlev, E.; Schmelzer, J.W.P.; Schick, C. [University of Rostock, Institute of Physics, Rostock (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    Non-adiabatic fast scanning calorimetry has been developed to in-situ measure the response of single metallic drops to temperature changes in a large range of cooling rate spanning four orders of magnitude. In particular, the effect of cooling rate on the degree of undercooling of one 10 {mu}m Sn-drop is studied. The experimental results show that the undercooling could be increased first significantly with increasing cooling rate going over to a stage of slow increase for high cooling rates, which indicates a shelf-like dependence of undercooling level on cooling rate before and after a ''crossover'' at a cooling rate of about 1000 K/s where two different heterogeneous mechanisms act simultaneously. First theoretical estimates are developed on the specific feature of the heterogeneous nucleation process of the effect analyzed and possible directions of further research are anticipated. (orig.)

  13. Does the Rate of Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection Depend on the Dissipation Mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aunai, Nicolas; Hesse, Michael; Black, Carrie; Evans, Rebekah; Kuznetsova, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The importance of the electron dissipation effect on the reconnection rate is investigated in the general case of asymmetric collisionless magnetic reconnection. Contrary to the standard collisionless reconnection model, it is found that the reconnection rate, and the macroscopic evolution of the reconnecting system, crucially depend on the nature of the dissipation mechanism and that the Hall effect alone is not able to sustain fast reconnection.

  14. The combined effects of reactant kinetics and enzyme stability explain the temperature dependence of metabolic rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, J P; Gibert, J P; Luhring, T M; Bachman, G; Reed, B; Neyer, A; Montooth, K L

    2017-06-01

    A mechanistic understanding of the response of metabolic rate to temperature is essential for understanding thermal ecology and metabolic adaptation. Although the Arrhenius equation has been used to describe the effects of temperature on reaction rates and metabolic traits, it does not adequately describe two aspects of the thermal performance curve (TPC) for metabolic rate-that metabolic rate is a unimodal function of temperature often with maximal values in the biologically relevant temperature range and that activation energies are temperature dependent. We show that the temperature dependence of metabolic rate in ectotherms is well described by an enzyme-assisted Arrhenius (EAAR) model that accounts for the temperature-dependent contribution of enzymes to decreasing the activation energy required for reactions to occur. The model is mechanistically derived using the thermodynamic rules that govern protein stability. We contrast our model with other unimodal functions that also can be used to describe the temperature dependence of metabolic rate to show how the EAAR model provides an important advance over previous work. We fit the EAAR model to metabolic rate data for a variety of taxa to demonstrate the model's utility in describing metabolic rate TPCs while revealing significant differences in thermodynamic properties across species and acclimation temperatures. Our model advances our ability to understand the metabolic and ecological consequences of increases in the mean and variance of temperature associated with global climate change. In addition, the model suggests avenues by which organisms can acclimate and adapt to changing thermal environments. Furthermore, the parameters in the EAAR model generate links between organismal level performance and underlying molecular processes that can be tested for in future work.

  15. Along-strike variation in deformation style inferred from kinematic reconstruction and strain rate analysis: A case study of the Ethiopian Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muluneh, Ameha A.; Cuffaro, Marco; Kidane, Tesfaye

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we combine kinematic reconstruction and seismic strain rate analysis to understand the along-strike variation in strain accommodation in the Ethiopian Rift (ER) evolution. The reconstruction poles close the southern and central ER at 19 and 15 Myr, respectively whereas there is 34 ± 14 km overlap in the northern ER at 11 Myr. Using Kostrov summation, seismic strain rates of 6.81 ×10-9 yr-1 and 0.06 × 10-9 yr-1 are obtained for the south-central and northern ER, respectively. Comparison of the seismic and geodetic strain rates shows that seismic deformation dominates the south and central ER contrary to the northern ER that deforms aseismically. The results obtained indicate that Nubia/Somalia plate reconstructions together with information on the onset of rifting overestimate the kinematics of the northern ER. We argue that magmatic processes play significant role in accommodating the ∼ 2 Myr opening of the rift. Our findings agree well with previous geophysical and geological studies in the Ethiopian Rift.

  16. The contrasting roles of creep and stress relaxation in the time-dependent deformation during in-situ cooling of a nickel-base single crystal superalloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwisawas, Chinnapat; D'Souza, Neil; Collins, David M; Bhowmik, Ayan

    2017-09-11

    Time dependent plastic deformation in a single crystal nickel-base superalloy during cooling from casting relevant temperatures has been studied using a combination of in-situ neutron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and modelling. Visco-plastic deformation during cooling was found to be dependent on the stress and constraints imposed to component contraction during cooling, which mechanistically comprises creep and stress relaxation. Creep results in progressive work hardening with dislocations shearing the γ' precipitates, a high dislocation density in the γ channels and near the γ/γ' interface and precipitate shearing. When macroscopic contraction is restricted, relaxation dominates. This leads to work softening from a decreased dislocation density and the presence of long segment stacking faults in γ phase. Changes in lattice strains occur to a similar magnitude in both the γ and γ' phases during stress relaxation, while in creep there is no clear monotonic trend in lattice strain in the γ phase, but only a marginal increase in the γ' precipitates. Using a visco-plastic law derived from in-situ experiments, the experimentally measured and calculated stresses during cooling show a good agreement when creep predominates. However, when stress relaxation dominates accounting for the decrease in dislocation density during cooling is essential.

  17. New insight into deformation-dependent hydraulic permeability of gels and cartilage, and dynamic behavior of agarose gels in confined compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, W Y; Yao, H; Huang, C Y; Cheung, H S

    2003-04-01

    Equilibrium, creep, and dynamic behaviors of agarose gels (2.0-14.8%) in confined compression were investigated in this study. The hydraulic permeabilities of gels were determined by curve-fitting creep data to the biphasic model (J. Biomech. Eng. 102 (1980) 73) and found to be similar in value to those published in the literature (AIChE J. 42 (1996) 1220). A new relationship between intrinsic permeability and volume fraction of water was found for agarose gel, capable of predicting deformation-dependent permeabilities of bovine articular cartilage and 2% agarose gel published in literature. This relationship is accurate for gels and cartilage over a wide range of permeabilities (four orders of magnitude variation). The dynamic stiffness of the gels increases with gel concentration and loading frequency (0.01-1.0Hz). The increase in dynamic stiffness with loading frequency is less pronounced for gels with higher concentrations. The results of this study provide a new insight into deformation-dependent permeability behavior of agarose gel and cartilage, and are important for understanding biological responses of cells to interstitial fluid flow in gel or in cartilage under dynamic mechanical loading.

  18. Time-Dependent Afterslip of the 2009 Mw 6.3 Dachaidan Earthquake (China and Viscosity beneath the Qaidam Basin Inferred from Postseismic Deformation Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The 28 August 2009 Mw 6.3 Dachaidan (DCD earthquake occurred at the Qaidam Basin’s northern side. To explain its postseismic deformation time series, the method of modeling them with a combination model of afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation is improved to simultaneously assess the time-dependent afterslip and the viscosity. The coseismic slip model in the layered model is first inverted, showing a slip pattern close to that in the elastic half-space. The postseismic deformation time series can be explained by the combination model, with a total root mean square (RMS misfit of 0.37 cm. The preferred time-dependent afterslip mainly occurs at a depth from the surface to about 9.1 km underground and increases with time, indicating that afterslip will continue after 28 July 2010. By 334 days after the main shock, the moment released by the afterslip is 0.91 × 1018 N∙m (Mw 5.94, approximately 24.3% of that released by the coseismic slip. The preferred lower bound of the viscosity beneath the Qaidam Basin’s northern side is 1 × 1019 Pa·s, close to that beneath its southern side. This result also indicates that the viscosity structure beneath the Tibet Plateau may vary laterally.

  19. Numerical Modeling of Subglacial Sediment Deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    incompatible with commonly accepted till rheology models. Variation in pore-water pressure proves to cause reorganization in the internal stress network and leads to slow creeping deformation. The rate of creep is non-linearly dependent on the applied stresses. Granular creep can explain slow glacial...

  20. Hot Deformation Of 6xxx Series Aluminium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrówka-Nowotnik G.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The hot deformation behavior of the 6xxx aluminum alloys was investigated by compression tests in the temperature range 100°C-375°C and strain rate range 10−4s−1 and 4×10−4s−1 using dilatometer DIL 805 BÄHR Thermoanalyse equipped with accessory attachment deformation allows the process to execute thermoplastic in vacuum and inert gas atmosphere. Associated microstructural changes of characteristic states of examined alloys were studied by using the transmission electron microscope (TEM. The results show that the stress level decreases with increasing deformation temperature and deformation rate. And was also found that the activation energy Q strongly depends on both, the temperature and rate of deformation. The results of TEM observation showing that the dynamic flow softening is mainly as the result of dynamic recovery and recrystallization of 6xxx aluminium alloys.

  1. Nuclear Deformation Effects in the Cluster Radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Misicu, S

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the nuclear deformation on the decay rates of some cluster emission processes. The interaction between the daughter and the cluster is given by a double folding potential including quadrupole and hexadecupole deformed densities of both fragments. The nuclear part of the nucleus-nucleus interaction is density dependent and at small distances a repulsive core in the potential will occur. In the frame of the WKB-approximation the assault frequency of the cluster will depend on the geometric properties of the potential pocket whereas the penetrability will be sensitive to changes in the barrier location. The results obtained in this paper point out that various combinations of cluster and daughter deformations may account for the measured values of the decay rate.

  2. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: ELDRS and dose-rate dependence of vertical NPN transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu-Zhan; Lu, Wu; Ren, Di-Yuan; Wang, Gai-Li; Yu, Xue-Feng; Guo, Qi

    2009-01-01

    The enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity (ELDRS) and dose-rate dependence of vertical NPN transistors are investigated in this article. The results show that the vertical NPN transistors exhibit more degradation at low dose rate, and that this degradation is attributed to the increase on base current. The oxide trapped positive charge near the SiO2-Si interface and interface traps at the interface can contribute to the increase on base current and the two-stage hydrogen mechanism associated with space charge effect can well explain the experimental results.

  3. Different Cooling Rate Dependences of Different Microstructure Units in Aluminium Glass by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chang-Song; ZHU Zhen-Gang; XIA Jun-Chao; SUN De-Yan

    2000-01-01

    Constant-pressure molecular dynamics simulation and the pair analysis technique have been performed to study the microstructural evolution of aluminium during rapid solidification. The microstructure characteristics of icosahedral ordering increase with decrease of the cooling rate, whereas the microstructure unit characteristics of hcp crystalline structure decrease. There are two kinds of microstructure units which are similar to those in the fcc crystal containing interstitialcies. These two kinds of microscopic units are nearly independent of the cooling rate. The microscopic structural unit characteristics of fcc crystalline structure do not depend on the cooling rate either. These results may help us understand the microstructure of glass and its stability.

  4. Dependence of calcite growth rate and Sr partitioning on solution stoichiometry: Non-Kossel crystal growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nehrke, G.; Reichart, G.-J.; Van Cappellen, P.; Meile, C.; Bijma, J.

    2007-01-01

    Seeded calcite growth experiments were conducted at fixed pH (10.2) and two degrees of supersaturation (Ω = 5, 16), while varying the Ca2+ to CO3 2- solution ratio over several orders of magnitude. The calcite growth rate and the incorporation of Sr in the growing crystals strongly depended on

  5. CONVERGENCE RATES IN THE STRONG LAWS FOR A CLASS OF DEPENDENT RANDOM FIFLDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CaiGuanghui

    2003-01-01

    By using a Rosenthal type inequality established in this paper,the complete convergence rates in the strong laws for a class of dependent random fields are discussed.And the result obtained extends those for ρ--mixing random fields,ρ*-mixing random fields and negatively associated fields.

  6. Increased transcapillary escape rate of albumin in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1986-01-01

    The transcapillary escape rate, intravascular mass and outflux of albumin were measured in 75 Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. The groups were defined as: group 1: normal urinary albumin excretion, less than 30 mg/24 h (n = 21); group 2: microalbuminuria, 30-300 mg/24 h (n = 36); group...

  7. An electroplating topography model based on layout-dependent variation of copper deposition rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qiang; Chen Lan; Li Zhigang; Ruan Wenbiao

    2011-01-01

    A layout-pattern-dependent electroplating model is developed based on the physical mechanism of the electroplating process.Our proposed electroplating model has an advantage over former ones due to a consideration of the variation of copper deposition rate with different layout parameters during the process.The simulation results compared with silicon data demonstrate the improvement in accuracy.

  8. Level of dependence in patients on haemodialysis in Catalonia and evolution of mortality rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Periz, Lola; Puig-Llobet, Montserrat; Cases-Amenós, Aleix

    2012-01-01

    Age and the comorbidities associated with ESRD impair the functional autonomy of patients on haemodialysis (HD). Our objectives were to assess the level of dependence in patients on HD and their mortality rates after three years of treatment. To do so, we followed the criteria established by the "Ley de Promoción de la Autonomía Personal y Atención a las Personas en situación de dependencia", the Spanish Law of Dependence (LD). We carried out a cross-sectional descriptive study between October 2007 and January 2008. From 3702 patients in 40 dialysis units in Catalonia, 806 were selected as potential dependent individuals according to the criteria of their healthcare providers. Variables studied included: level of dependence according to the LD criteria, age, time on HD, associated pathology, treatment characteristics, family circumstances, and survival from 2009 to 2011. According to the LD, 137 were not dependent, 350 had a grade 1 dependence level, 237 grade 2, and 82 grade 3. In addition, 121 were living in an institution. The mean age was 74.9 ± 18.2 years and the median time on HD was 36 months. The prevalence of common pathologies was: diabetes (35.7%) and cardiovascular disease (29.1%). Musculoskeletal alterations (87%) and neurological disorders (38%) were the main causes of dependence. 64.2% of patients had a catheter as a vascular access. 34.9% of patients survived after three years, and these had a lower level of dependence when compared to those patients who had died, with no statistically significant differences within those three years. According to the LD, the prevalence of dependent patients in Catalonia is substantial (18.07%). These patients have a high mortality rate after three years.

  9. Current crustal deformation of the Taiwan orogen reassessed by cGPS strain-rate estimation and focal mechanism stress inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sean Kuanhsiang; Wu, Yih-Min; Hsu, Ya-Ju; Chan, Yu-Chang

    2017-07-01

    We study internal deformation of the Taiwan orogen, a young arc-continental collision belt, which the spatial heterogeneity remains unclear. We aim to ascertain heterogeneity of the orogenic crust in depth when specifying general mechanisms of the Taiwan orogeny. To reach this goal, we used updated data of continuous GPS (cGPS) and earthquake focal mechanisms to reassess geodetic strain-rate and seismic stress fields of Taiwan, respectively. We updated the both data sets from 1990 to 2015 to provide large amount of constraints on surficial and internal deformation of the crust for a better understanding. We estimated strain-rate tensors by calculating gradient tensors of cGPS station velocities in horizontal 0.1°-spacing grids via Delaunay triangulation. We determined stress tensors within a given horizontal and vertical grid cell of 0.1° and 10 km, respectively, by employing the spatial and temporal stress inversion. To minimize effects of the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake on trends of the strain and stress, we modified observational possible bias of the cGPS velocities after the earthquake and removed the first 15-month focal mechanisms within the fault rupture zone. We also calculated the Anderson fault parameter (Aϕ) based on stress ratios and rake angles to quantitatively describe tectonic regimes of Taiwan. By examining directions of seismic compressive axes and styles of faulting, our results indicate that internal deformation of the crust is presently heterogeneous in the horizontal and vertical spaces. Directions of the compressive axes are fan-shaped oriented between N10°W and N110°W in the western and mid-eastern Taiwan at the depths of 0-20 km and near parallel to orientations of geodetic compressional axes. The orientations agreed with predominantly reverse faulting in the western Taiwan at the same depth range, implying a brittle deformation regime against the Peikang Basement High. Orientations of the compressive axes most rotated counter

  10. The systematic study of the stability of forecasts in the rate- and state-dependent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gaetano, D.; McCloskey, J.; Nalbant, S.

    2012-04-01

    Numerous observations have shown a general spatial correlation between positive Coulomb failure stress changes due to an earthquake and the locations of aftershocks. However this correlation does not give any indication of the rate from which we can infer the magnitude using the Gutenberg-Richter law. Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model can be used to obtain a forecast of the observed aftershock rate for the space and time evolution of seismicity caused by stress changes applied to an infinite population of nucleating patches. The seismicity rate changes on this model depend on eight parameters: the stressing rate, the amplitude of the stress perturbation, the physical constitutive properties of faults, the spatial parameters (location and radii of the cells), the start and duration of each of the temporal windows as well as the background seismicity rate. The background seismicity is obtained from the epidemic type aftershock sequence model. We use the 1992 Landers earthquake as a case study, using the Southern California Earthquake Data Centre (SCEDC) catalogue, to examine if Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model can forecast the aftershock seismicity rate. A systematic study is performed on a range of values on all the parameters to test the forecasting ability of this model. The results obtained suggest variable success in forecasting, when varying the values for the parameters, with the spatial and temporal parameters being the most sensitive. Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model is compared with a well studied null hypothesis, the Omori-Utsu law. This law describes the aftershock rate as a power law in time following the main shock and depends on only three parameters: the aftershock productivity, the elapsed time since the main shock and the constant time shift, all of which can be estimated in the early part of the aftershock sequence and then extrapolated to give a long term rate forecast. All parameters are estimated using maximum

  11. Energy and charge dependence of the rate of electron-ion recombination in cold magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, H.; Schuch, R.; Zong, W.; Justiniano, E.; DeWitt, D.R.; Lebius, H.; Spies, W. [Stockholm Univ., Atomic Physics Dept., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-07-28

    We have measured electron-ion recombination rates for bare ions of D{sup +}, He{sup 2+}, N{sup 7+}, Ne{sup 10+} and Si{sup 14+} in a storage ring. For the multi-charged ions an unexpected energy dependence was found, showing a strong increase of the measured rates over the calculated radiative recombination rate for electron beam detuning energies below the electron beam transverse temperature. The measured enhanced rates increase approximately as Z{sup 2.8} with the charge state Z. A comparison of these rates with theoretical predictions for collisional-radiative recombination in the cold magnetized electron plasma, in particular three-body recombination including radiative de-excitation of electrons in Rydberg levels, is made. (author).

  12. Modeling and Control for Giant Magnetostrictive Actuators with Rate-Dependent Hysteresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate-dependent hysteresis in giant magnetostrictive materials is a major impediment to the application of such material in actuators. In this paper, a relevance vector machine (RVM model is proposed for describing the hysteresis nonlinearity under varying input current. It is possible to construct a unique dynamic model in a given rate range for a rate-dependent hysteresis system using the sinusoidal scanning signals as the training set input signal. Subsequently, a proportional integral derivative (PID control scheme combined with a feedforward compensation is implemented on a giant magnetostrictive actuator (GMA for real-time precise trajectory tracking. Simulations and experiments both verify the effectiveness and the practicality of the proposed modeling and control methods.

  13. Simulation of biochemical reactions with time-dependent rates by the rejection-based algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanh, Vo Hong, E-mail: vo@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research - University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Priami, Corrado, E-mail: priami@cosbi.eu [The Microsoft Research - University of Trento Centre for Computational and Systems Biology, Piazza Manifattura 1, Rovereto 38068 (Italy); Department of Mathematics, University of Trento, Trento (Italy)

    2015-08-07

    We address the problem of simulating biochemical reaction networks with time-dependent rates and propose a new algorithm based on our rejection-based stochastic simulation algorithm (RSSA) [Thanh et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141(13), 134116 (2014)]. The computation for selecting next reaction firings by our time-dependent RSSA (tRSSA) is computationally efficient. Furthermore, the generated trajectory is exact by exploiting the rejection-based mechanism. We benchmark tRSSA on different biological systems with varying forms of reaction rates to demonstrate its applicability and efficiency. We reveal that for nontrivial cases, the selection of reaction firings in existing algorithms introduces approximations because the integration of reaction rates is very computationally demanding and simplifying assumptions are introduced. The selection of the next reaction firing by our approach is easier while preserving the exactness.

  14. Uniaxial Compressive Strength and Fracture Mode of Lake Ice at Moderate Strain Rates Based on a Digital Speckle Correlation Method for Deformation Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jijian Lian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Better understanding of the complex mechanical properties of ice is the foundation to predict the ice fail process and avoid potential ice threats. In the present study, uniaxial compressive strength and fracture mode of natural lake ice are investigated over moderate strain-rate range of 0.4–10 s−1 at −5 °C and −10 °C. The digital speckle correlation method (DSCM is used for deformation measurement through constructing artificial speckle on ice sample surface in advance, and two dynamic load cells are employed to measure the dynamic load for monitoring the equilibrium of two ends’ forces under high-speed loading. The relationships between uniaxial compressive strength and strain-rate, temperature, loading direction, and air porosity are investigated, and the fracture mode of ice at moderate rates is also discussed. The experimental results show that there exists a significant difference between true strain-rate and nominal strain-rate derived from actuator displacement under dynamic loading conditions. Over the employed strain-rate range, the dynamic uniaxial compressive strength of lake ice shows positive strain-rate sensitivity and decreases with increasing temperature. Ice obtains greater strength values when it is with lower air porosity and loaded vertically. The fracture mode of ice seems to be a combination of splitting failure and crushing failure.

  15. Massey products and deformations

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, D; Fuchs, Dmitry; Lang, Lynelle

    1996-01-01

    The classical deformation theory of Lie algebras involves different kinds of Massey products of cohomology classes. Even the condition of extendibility of an infinitesimal deformation to a formal one-parameter deformation of a Lie algebra involves Massey powers of two dimensional cohomology classes which are not powers in the usual definition of Massey products in the cohomology of a differential graded Lie algebra. In the case of deformations with other local bases, one deals with other, more specific Massey products. In the present work a construction of generalized Massey products is given, depending on an arbitrary graded commutative, associative algebra. In terms of these products, the above condition of extendibility is generalized to deformations with arbitrary local bases. Dually, a construction of generalized Massey products on the cohomology of a differential graded commutative associative algebra depends on a nilpotent graded Lie algebra. For example, the classical Massey products correspond to the...

  16. High strain-rate deformation fabrics characterize a kilometers-thick Paleozoic fault zone in the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas, central Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmeyer, Steven J.; Simpson, Carol

    2003-06-01

    High strain rate fabrics that transgress a crustal depth range of ca. 8-22 km occur within a major Paleozoic fault zone along the western margin of the Sierras de Córdoba, central Argentina. The NNW-striking, east-dipping 'Tres Arboles' fault zone extends for at least 250 km and separates two metamorphic terranes that reached peak temperatures in the middle Cambrian and Ordovician, respectively. Exposed fault zone rocks vary from a 16-km-thickness of ultramylonite and mylonite in the southern, deepest exposures to 520 °C. Reaction-enhanced grain size reduction and grain boundary sliding were the predominant deformation mechanisms in these high strain rate rocks. Ultramylonites in the intermediate depth section also contain evidence for grain boundary sliding and diffusional mass transfer, although overprinted by late stage chlorite. In the shallowest exposed section, rocks were deformed at or near to the brittle-ductile transition to produce mylonite, cataclasite, shear bands and pseudotachylyte. The overall structure of the Tres Arboles zone is consistent with existing fault zone models and suggests that below the brittle-ductile transition, strain compatibility may be accommodated through very thick zones of high temperature ultramylonite.

  17. CHARACTERISTIC DIMENSIONLESS NUMBERS IN MULTI-SCALE AND RATE-DEPENDENT PROCESSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yilong Bai; Mengfen Xia; Haiying Wang; Fujiu Ke

    2003-01-01

    Multi-scale modeling of materials properties and chemical processes has drawn great attention from science and engineering. For these multi-scale and rate-dependent processes, how to characterize their trans-scale formulation is a key point. Three questions should be addressed:● How do multi-sizes affect the problems?● How are length scales coupled with time scales?● How to identify emergence of new structure in process and its effect?For this sake, the macroscopic equations of mechanics and the kinetic equations of the microstructural transformations should form a unified set that be solved simultaneously.As a case study of coupling length and time scales, the trans-scale formulation of wave-induced damage evolution due to mesoscopic nucleation and growth is discussed. In this problem, the trans-scaling could be reduced to two independent dimensionless numbers: the imposed Deborah number De*=(ac*)/(LV*) and the intrinsic Deborah number D* = (nN*c*5)/V* , where a, L, c*, V* and nN* are wave speed, sample size, microcrack size, the rate of microcrack growth and the rate of microcrack nucleation density, respectively. Clearly, the dimensionless number De*=(ac*)/(LV*) includes length and time scales on both meso- and macro- levels and governs the progressive process.Whereas, the intrinsic Deborah number D* indicates the characteristic transition of microdamage to macroscopic rupture since D* is related to the criterion of damage localization, which is a precursor of macroscopic rupture. This case study may highlight the scaling in multi-scale and rate-dependent problems.Then, more generally, we compare some historical examples to see how trans-scale formulations were achieved and what are still open now. The comparison of various mechanisms governing the enhancement of meso-size effects reminds us of the importance of analyzing multi-scale and rate-dependent processes case by case.For multi-scale and rate-dependent processes with chemical reactions and

  18. Deformation behavior during nanoindentation in Ce-based bulk metallic glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lingchen; XING Dongmei; ZHANG Taihua; WEI Bingchen; LI Weihuo; WANG Yuren

    2006-01-01

    The deformation behavior and the effect of the loading rate on the plastic deformation in Ce-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) were investigated through nanoindentation tests. The results showed that the loading rate dependence of plastic deformation during nanoindentation measurements in the Ce-based BMGs is quite unique in contrast to that of other BMG alloys. The load-displacement (P-h)curves of Ce60Al15Cu10Ni15 BMG exhibit a homogeneous plastic deformation at low loading rates, and a prominent serrated flow at high strain rates, whereas,the P-h curves of Ce65Al10Cu10Ni10Nb5 exhibit homogenous plastic deformation at all studied loading rates. The room temperature creep behavior could clearly be observed in these two alloys. The mechanism of the unique plastic deformation feature in the Ce-based BMGs was studied.

  19. Bounds on the Rate Dependent Plastic Flow of Tantalum up to 75 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan; Patterson, Reed; Kumar, Mukul

    2013-06-01

    We report improvements in a general thermodynamics-based velocimetry analysis method designed to extract strength and plastic-flow information from shock and ramp compression experiments. The method allows extraction of thermodynamic histories, including deviatoric stress and plastic strain, including nonsteady rate-dependent features. The improved method includes free-surface corrections for pullback waves, reduced noise sensitivity, and application to pressures of 75 GPa and higher. Specifically, we show results for shock waves in tantalum, including bounds on the plastic flow behavior at strain rates exceeding 1e7/s.The deviatoric stress appears to be almost entirely dependent on strain rate, with very little pressure dependence.The deviatoric stress in the post-shock plateau state appears to be very small at higher pressures, calling into question the value of considering strength as a steady- state pressure-dependent quantity. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Rate Dependent Multicontinuum Progressive Failure Analysis of Woven Fabric Composite Structures under Dynamic Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Lua

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine composite materials typically exhibit significant rate dependent response characteristics when subjected to extreme dynamic loading conditions. In this work, a strain-rate dependent continuum damage model is incorporated with multicontinuum technology (MCT to predict damage and failure progression for composite material structures. MCT treats the constituents of a woven fabric composite as separate but linked continua, thereby allowing a designer to extract constituent stress/strain information in a structural analysis. The MCT algorithm and material damage model are numerically implemented with the explicit finite element code LS-DYNA3D via a user-defined material model (umat. The effects of the strain-rate hardening model are demonstrated through both simple single element analyses for woven fabric composites and also structural level impact simulations of a composite panel subjected to various impact conditions. Progressive damage at the constituent level is monitored throughout the loading. The results qualitatively illustrate the value of rate dependent material models for marine composite materials under extreme dynamic loading conditions.

  1. Infliximab dependency is related to decreased surgical rates in adult Crohn's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, N.; Duricova, D.; Lenicek, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Infliximab dependency in children with Crohn's disease (CD) has recently been described and found to be associated with a decreased surgery rate. Aim To assess infliximab dependency of adult CD patients, evaluate the impact on surgery, and search for possible clinical and genetic...... predictors. Methods Two hundred and forty-five CD patients treated with infliximab were included from Danish and Czech Crohn Colitis Database (1999-2006). Infliximab response was assessed as immediate outcome, 1 month after infliximab start: complete, partial, and no response. Three months outcome, after...

  2. Modeling of High-Strain-Rate Deformation, Fracture, and Impact Behavior of Advanced Gas Turbine Engine Materials at Low and Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Nathenson, David; Prakash, Vikas

    2003-01-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides have received considerable attention over the last decade. These alloys are known to have low density, good high temperature strength retention, and good oxidation and corrosion resistance. However, poor ductility and low fracture toughness have been the key limiting factors in the full utilization of these alloys. More recently, Gamma-met PX has been developed by GKSS, Germany. These alloys have been observed to have superior strengths at elevated temperatures and quasi-static deformation rates and good oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures when compared with other gamma titanium aluminides. The present paper discusses results of a study to understand dynamic response of gamma-met PX in uniaxial compression. The experiments were conducted by using a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar between room temperature and 900 C and strain rates of up to 3500 per second. The Gamma met PX alloy showed superior strength when compared to nickel based superalloys and other gamma titanium aluminides at all test temperatures. It also showed strain and strain-rate hardening at all levels of strain rates and temperatures and without yield anomaly up to 900 C. After approximately 600 C, thermal softening is observed at all strain rates with the rate of thermal softening increasing dramatically between 800 and 900 C. However, these flow stress levels are comparatively higher in Gamma met PX than those observed for other TiAl alloys.

  3. Transcapillary escape rate of albumin in hypertensive patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, K; Jensen, T; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1993-01-01

    excretion rate: 30-300 mg/24 h) and normal blood pressure. Group 3--eleven non-diabetic patients with essential hypertension. Group 4--nine Type 1 diabetic patients with hypertension but normal urinary albumin excretion (urinary......Diabetic patients with elevated urinary albumin excretion rate (incipient or clinical nephropathy) also have an increased transcapillary escape rate of albumin. This study was designed to clarify whether this is caused by a general vascular dysfunction or by elevated systemic blood pressure....... The systemic blood pressure and the transcapillary escape rate of albumin were measured in the following groups after 4 weeks without antihypertensive treatment: Group 1--eleven healthy control subjects. Group 2--ten Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with incipient nephropathy (urinary albumin...

  4. Rate of development of predatory insects is dependent on that of their prey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony F. G. Dixon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analyzed data in the literature on the rates of development of parasitoids that parasitize aphids and coccids. The objective was to determine whether their rates of development, as is well documented for ladybirds, are also dependent on that of their prey. The analysis revealed that, like ladybirds, parasitoids that parasitize aphids develop faster than those that parasitize coccids. Parasitoids and ladybird predators show the same pattern in their rates of development: those attacking aphids develop faster than those attacking coccids. This is strong evidence that we are dealing with a general response rather than one specific to ladybirds. It also lends support to the concept that the development rates of these natural enemies are evolutionarily conserved rather than phylogenetically constrained.

  5. Transcription factor control of growth rate dependent genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A three factor design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazio, Alessandro; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Characterization of cellular growth is central to understanding living systems. Here, we applied a three-factor design to study the relationship between specific growth rate and genome-wide gene expression in 36 steady-state chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The three...... factors we considered were specific growth rate, nutrient limitation, and oxygen availability. Results: We identified 268 growth rate dependent genes, independent of nutrient limitation and oxygen availability. The transcriptional response was used to identify key areas in metabolism around which m...... transcription factor target sets, transcription factors that coordinate balanced growth were also identified. Our analysis shows that FhII, Rap1, and Sfp1, regulating protein biosynthesis, have significantly enriched target sets for genes up-regulated with increasing growth rate. Cell cycle regulators...

  6. Extreme mass ratio inspiral rates: dependence on the massive black hole mass

    CERN Document Server

    Hopman, Clovis

    2009-01-01

    We study the rate at which stars spiral into a massive black hole (MBH) due to the emission of gravitational waves (GWs), as a function of the mass M of the MBH. In the context of our model, it is shown analytically that the rate approximately depends on the MBH mass as M^{-1/4}. Numerical simulations confirm this result, and show that for all MBH masses, the event rate is highest for stellar black holes, followed by white dwarfs, and lowest for neutron stars. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is expected to see hundreds of these extreme mass ratio inspirals per year. Since the event rate derived here formally diverges as M->0, the model presented here cannot hold for MBHs of masses that are too low, and we discuss what the limitations of the model are.

  7. A numerical investigation of oxygen concentration dependence on biodegradation rate laws in vapor intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yijun; Shen, Rui; Pennel, Kelly G; Suuberg, Eric M

    2013-12-01

    In subsurface vapor intrusion, aerobic biodegradation has been considered as a major environmental factor that determines the soil gas concentration attenuation factors for contaminants such as petroleum hydrocarbons. The site investigation has shown that oxygen can play an important role in this biodegradation rate, and this paper explores the influence of oxygen concentration on biodegradation reactions included in vapor intrusion (VI) models. Two different three dimensional (3-D) numerical models of vapor intrusion were explored for their sensitivity to the form of the biodegradation rate law. A second order biodegradation rate law, explicitly including oxygen concentration dependence, was introduced into one model. The results indicate that the aerobic/anoxic interface depth is determined by the ratio of contaminant source vapor to atmospheric oxygen concentration, and that the contaminant concentration profile in the aerobic zone was significantly influenced by the choice of rate law.

  8. SEMICONDUCTOR PHYSICS Dose-rate dependence of optically stimulated luminescence signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingqiang, Wei; Zhaoyang, Chen; Yanwei, Fan; Yurun, Sun; Yun, Zhao

    2010-10-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is the luminescence emitted from a semiconductor during its exposure to light. The OSL intensity is a function of the total dose absorbed by the sample. The dose-rate dependence of the OSL signal of the semiconductor CaS doped Ce and Sm was studied by numerical simulation and experiments. Based on a one-trap/one-center model, the whole OSL process was represented by a series of differential equations. The dose-rate properties of the materials were acquired theoretically by solving the equations. Good coherence was achieved between numerical simulation and experiments, both of which showed that the OSL signal was independent of dose rate. This result validates that when using OSL as a dosimetry technique, the dose-rate effect can be neglected.

  9. Sleep Stage Dependence of Invariance Characteristics in Fluctuations of Healthy Human Heart Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togo, Fumiharu; Kiyono, Ken; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2005-08-01

    The outstanding feature of healthy human heart rate is the robust scale invariance in the non-Gaussian probability density function (PDF), which is preserved not only in a quiescent condition, but also in a dynamic state during waking hours [K. Kiyono et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004)]. Together with 1/f like scaling, this characteristic is a strong indication of far-from-equilibrium, critical-like dynamics of heart rate regulation. Our results suggest that healthy human heart rate departs from a critical state-like operation during sleeping hours, at a rate which is heterogeneous with respect to sleep stages annotated according to traditional techniques. We study specific contributions of sleep stages to the relative departure from criticality through the analysis of sleep stage dependence of the root mean square of multiscale local energy and the multiscale PDF. There is a possibility that the involvement of cortical activity may be important for a critical state-like operation.

  10. An accurate analytic representation of the temperature dependence of nonresonant nuclear reaction rate coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2016-12-01

    There has been intense interest for several decades by different research groups to accurately model the temperature dependence of a large number of nuclear reaction rate coefficients for both light and heavy nuclides. The rate coefficient, k(T) , is given by the Maxwellian average of the reactive cross section expressed in terms of the astrophysical factor, S(E) , which for nonresonant reactions is generally written as a power series in the relative energy E. A computationally efficient algorithm for the temperature dependence of nuclear reaction rate coefficients is required for fusion reactor research and for models of nucleosynthesis and stellar evolution. In this paper, an accurate analytical expression for the temperature dependence of nuclear reaction rate coefficients is provided in terms of τ = 3(b / 2) 2/3 or equivalently, T - 1/3 , where b = B /√{kB T }, B is the Gamow factor and kB is the Boltzmann constant. The methodology is appropriate for all nonresonant nuclear reactions for which S(E) can be represented as a power series in E. The explicit expression for the rate coefficient versus temperature is derived with the asymptotic expansions of the moments of w(E) = exp(- E /kB T - B /√{ E }) in terms of τ. The zeroth order moment is the familiar Gaussian approximation to the rate coefficient. Results are reported for the representative reactions D(d, p)T, D(d, n)3He and 7Li(p, α) α and compared with several different fitting procedures reported in the literature.

  11. Integrated rate-dependent and dual pathway AV nodal functions: principles and assessment framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billette, Jacques; Tadros, Rafik

    2014-01-15

    The atrioventricular (AV) node conducts slowly and has a long refractory period. These features sustain the filtering of atrial impulses and hence are often modulated to optimize ventricular rate during supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. The AV node is also the site of a clinically common reentrant arrhythmia. Its function is assessed for a variety of purposes from its responses to a premature protocol (S1S2, test beats introduced at different cycle lengths) repeatedly performed at different basic rates and/or to an incremental pacing protocol (increasingly faster rates). Puzzlingly, resulting data and interpretation differ with protocols as well as with chosen recovery and refractory indexes, and are further complicated by the presence of built-in fast and slow pathways. This problem applies to endocavitary investigations of arrhythmias as well as to many experimental functional studies. This review supports an integrated framework of rate-dependent and dual pathway AV nodal function that can account for these puzzling characteristics. The framework was established from AV nodal responses to S1S2S3 protocols that, compared with standard S1S2 protocols, allow for an orderly quantitative dissociation of the different factors involved in changes in AV nodal conduction and refractory indexes under rate-dependent and dual pathway function. Although largely based on data from experimental studies, the proposed framework may well apply to the human AV node. In conclusion, the rate-dependent and dual pathway properties of the AV node can be integrated within a common functional framework the contribution of which to individual responses can be quantitatively determined with properly designed protocols and analytic tools.

  12. Increased transcapillary escape rate of albumin in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1986-01-01

    The transcapillary escape rate, intravascular mass and outflux of albumin were measured in 75 Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. The groups were defined as: group 1: normal urinary albumin excretion, less than 30 mg/24 h (n = 21); group 2: microalbuminuria, 30-300 mg/24 h (n = 36); group...... vascular leakage of albumin is an early event in the development of diabetic nephropathy, with the leakage of albumin being fully developed in the microalbuminuric patient. In contrast, long-term diabetic patients with normal urinary albumin excretion have a normal transcapillary escape rate of albumin....

  13. New delay-dependent stability of Markovian jump neutral stochastic systems with general unknown transition rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yonggui; Wang, Changhong; Xie, Jing; Karimi, Hamid Reza

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the delay-dependent stability problem for neutral Markovian jump systems with generally unknown transition rates (GUTRs). In this neutral GUTR model, each transition rate is completely unknown or only its estimate value is known. Based on the study of expectations of the stochastic cross-terms containing the ? integral, a new stability criterion is derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities. In the mathematical derivation process, bounding stochastic cross-terms, model transformation and free-weighting matrix are not employed for less conservatism. Finally, an example is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed results.

  14. Rate dependence of the magnetocaloric effect in La-Fe-Si compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasso C.P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic magnetocaloric effect in La(FexCoySi1-x-y13 with x=0.9 and low Co content of y=0.015 was analysed by calorimetric measurements at constant magnetic field and constant temperature as well as magnetisation relaxation measurements. It is shown that the rate dependence of the measurement, which leads to an increased entropy hysteresis with increasing rate of the driving force (temperature or magnetic field, can be mainly attributed to a thermal contact resistance R between sample and thermal bath of the measurement setup.

  15. Periodic review inventory policy for non-instantaneous deteriorating items with time dependent deterioration rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwesha Samanta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies a periodic review inventory model with no shortages and different demand rates during pre- and post- deterioration periods . Deterioration of units start after a fixed time interval, and the deterioration rate is time dependent. The model determines the optimal reorder interval and the optimal order quantity so as to minimize the total cost per unit length of an inventory cycle. An extension of the model to include price discount has been further considered. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the model and a sensitivity analysis is also reported.

  16. On- and off-fault deformation associated with the September 2013 Mw 7.7 Balochistan earthquake: Implications for geologic slip rate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ryan D.; Reitman, Nadine G.; Briggs, Richard W.; Barnhart, William D.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Wilson, Earl

    2015-10-01

    The 24 September 2013 Mw7.7 Balochistan, Pakistan earthquake ruptured a ~ 200 km-long stretch of the Hoshab fault in southern Pakistan and produced the second-largest lateral surface displacement observed for a continental strike-slip earthquake. We remotely measured surface deformation associated with this event using high-resolution (0.5 m) pre- and post-event satellite optical imagery. We document left lateral, near-field, on-fault offsets (10 m from fault) using 309 laterally offset piercing points, such as streams, terrace risers, and roads. Peak near-field displacement is 13.6 + 2.5/- 3.4 m. We characterize off-fault deformation by measuring medium- ( 350 m from fault) displacement using manual (259 measurements) and automated image cross-correlation methods, respectively. Off-fault peak lateral displacement values are ~ 15 m and exceed on-fault displacement magnitudes for ~ 85% of the rupture length. Our observations suggest that for this rupture, coseismic surface displacement typically increases with distance away from the surface trace of the fault; however, nearly 100% of total surface displacement occurs within a few hundred meters of the primary fault trace. Furthermore, off-fault displacement accounts for, on average, 28% of the total displacement but exhibits a highly heterogeneous along-strike pattern. The best agreement between near-field and far-field displacements generally corresponds to the narrowest fault zone widths. Our analysis demonstrates significant and heterogeneous mismatches between on- and off-fault coseismic deformation, and we conclude that this phenomenon should be considered in hazard models based on geologically determined on-fault slip rates.

  17. Strain-Rate Dependency of Strength of Soft Marine Deposits of the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    abstract number: 090612-057 Strain-rate dependency of strength of soft marine deposits of the Gulf of Mexico Andrei Abelev and Philip Valent...from the Gulf of Mexico . The vane test may not always be the most accurate method of describing the undrained shear strength, mainly because it...deposits of the Gulf of Mexico 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  18. Temperature dependence of metabolic rates for microbial growth, maintenance, and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, P Buford; Sowers, Todd

    2004-03-30

    Our work was motivated by discoveries of prokaryotic communities that survive with little nutrient in ice and permafrost, with implications for past or present microbial life in Martian permafrost and Europan ice. We compared the temperature dependence of metabolic rates of microbial communities in permafrost, ice, snow, clouds, oceans, lakes, marine and freshwater sediments, and subsurface aquifer sediments. Metabolic rates per cell fall into three groupings: (i) a rate, microg(T), for growth, measured in the laboratory at in situ temperatures with minimal disturbance of the medium; (ii) a rate, microm(T), sufficient for maintenance of functions but for a nutrient level too low for growth; and (iii) a rate, micros(T), for survival of communities imprisoned in deep glacial ice, subsurface sediment, or ocean sediment, in which they can repair macromolecular damage but are probably largely dormant. The three groups have metabolic rates consistent with a single activation energy of approximately 110 kJ and that scale as microg(T):microm(T):micros(T) approximately 10(6):10(3):1. There is no evidence of a minimum temperature for metabolism. The rate at -40 degrees C in ice corresponds to approximately 10 turnovers of cellular carbon per billion years. Microbes in ice and permafrost have metabolic rates similar to those in water, soil, and sediment at the same temperature. This finding supports the view that, far below the freezing point, liquid water inside ice and permafrost is available for metabolism. The rate micros(T) for repairing molecular damage by means of DNA-repair enzymes and protein-repair enzymes such as methyltransferase is found to be comparable to the rate of spontaneous molecular damage.

  19. Bacteriophage T4 development in Escherichia coli is growth rate dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovitch, Avinoam; Fishov, Itzhak; Hadas, Hilla; Einav, Monica; Zaritsky, Arieh

    2002-05-01

    Three independent parameters (eclipse and latent periods, and rate of ripening during the rise period) are essential and sufficient to describe bacteriophage development in its bacterial host. A general model to describe the classical "one-step growth" experiment [Rabinovitch et al. (1999a) J. Bacteriol.181, 1687-1683] allowed their calculations from experimental results obtained with T4 in Escherichia coli B/r under different growth conditions [Hadas et al. (1997) Microbiology143, 179-185]. It is found that all three parameters could be described by their dependence solely on the culture doubling time tau before infection. Their functional dependence on tau, derived by a best-fit analysis, was used to calculate burst size values. The latter agree well with the experimental results. The dependence of the derived parameters on growth conditions can be used to predict phage development under other experimental manipulations.

  20. Dose-rate dependent effects of ionizing radiation on vascular reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorava, T; Luksha, L; Bulanova, K Ya; Lobanok, L M

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the dose-rate dependent effects of ionising radiation on endothelium- and NO-mediated reactivity of aorta and coronary vessels. Rats were exposed to acute ((137)Cs, 9 x 10(-4) Gy s(-1), 18 min) and chronic ((137)Cs, 2.8 x 10(-7) Gy s(-1), 41 days) radiation in 1 Gy dose. Acute irradiation transiently increased coronary flow in eNOS-activity-dependent manner on day 3 after exposure. In striking contrast, chronic irradiation caused a significant depression of coronary flow even on day 90 after irradiation and abolished the effects of NO-synthase inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10 micromol l(-1)). Furthermore, low intensity radiation strongly diminished the vasodilator properties of NO-donor sodium nitroprusside (5 micromol l(-1)). A similar pattern was observed in aortic rings. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was increased on days 3 and 10 after acute irradiation, but strongly inhibited following chronic exposure for the entire post-radiation period. This was accompanied by a diminished vasodilator response to NO-donor on days 3, 10 and 30 of post-radiation but not on day 90. The data suggest that ionising radiation in 1 Gy induces changes of aortic and coronary vessels reactivity depending on the dose-rate and the interval after exposure.

  1. On the Temperature Dependence of the Rate Constant of the Bimolecular Reaction of two Hydrated Electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Butarbutar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been a longstanding issue in the radiation chemistry of water that, even though H2 is a molecular product, its “escape” yield g(H2 increases with increasing temperature. A main source of H2 is the bimolecular reaction of two hydrated electrons (eaq. The temperature dependence of the rate constant of this reaction (k1, measured under alkaline conditions, reveals that the rate constant drops abruptly above ~150°C. Recently, it has been suggested that this temperature dependence should be regarded as being independent of pH and used in high-temperature modeling of near-neutral water radiolysis. However, when this drop in the eaq self-reaction rate constant is included in low (isolated spurs and high (cylindrical tracks linear energy transfer (LET modeling calculations, g(H2 shows a marked downward discontinuity at ~150°C which is not observed experimentally. The consequences of the presence of this discontinuity in g(H2 for both low and high LET radiation are briefly discussed in this communication. It is concluded that the applicability of the sudden drop in k1 observed at ~150°C in alkaline water to near-neutral water is questionable and that further measurements of the rate constant in pure water are highly desirable.

  2. Deforming tachyon kinks and tachyon potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Afonso, V. I.; Bazeia, D.; Brito, F. A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we investigate deformation of tachyon potentials and tachyon kink solutions. We consider the deformation of a DBI type action with gauge and tachyon fields living on D1-brane and D3-brane world-volume. We deform tachyon potentials to get other consistent tachyon potentials by using properly a deformation function depending on the gauge field components. Resolutions of singular tachyon kinks via deformation and applications of deformed tachyon potentials to scalar cosmology scena...

  3. Flow rate dependency of critical wall shear stress in a radial-flow cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detry, J.G.; Jensen, Bo Boye Busk; Sindic, M.

    2009-01-01

    of a water or ethanol suspension of starch granules on the surfaces. Depending on the substrate and on the suspending liquid, the aggregates differed in size and shape. Aggregate removal was studied at two flow rates. At the lower flow rate (Re-inlet = 955), the values of critical wall shear stress......In the present work, a radial-flow cell was used to study the removal of starch particle aggregates from several solid substrates (glass, stainless steel, polystyrene and PTFE) in order to determine the critical wall shear stress value for each case. The particle aggregates were formed by aspersion...... for the different surfaces suggested that capillary forces were, for all of them, playing an important role in aggregate adhesion since aqueous based aggregates were always more difficult to remove. At the higher flow rate (Re-inlet = 2016) the critical wall shear stress increased as a result of the change...

  4. Strong Dependence of the Inner Edge of the Habitable Zone on Planetary Rotation Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jun; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Abbot, Dorian S

    2014-01-01

    Planetary rotation rate is a key parameter in determining atmospheric circulation and hence the spatial pattern of clouds. Since clouds can exert a dominant control on planetary radiation balance, rotation rate could be critical for determining mean planetary climate. Here we investigate this idea using a three-dimensional general circulation model with a sophisticated cloud scheme. We find that slowly rotating planets (like Venus) can maintain an Earth-like climate at nearly twice the stellar flux as rapidly rotating planets (like Earth). This suggests that many exoplanets previously believed to be too hot may actually be habitable, depending on their rotation rate. The explanation for this behavior is that slowly rotating planets have a weak Coriolis force and long daytime illumination, which promotes strong convergence and convection in the substellar region. This produces a large area of optically thick clouds, which greatly increases the planetary albedo. In contrast, on rapidly rotating planets a much n...

  5. STRONG DEPENDENCE OF THE INNER EDGE OF THE HABITABLE ZONE ON PLANETARY ROTATION RATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jun; Abbot, Dorian S. [Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Boué, Gwenaël; Fabrycky, Daniel C., E-mail: abbot@uchicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    Planetary rotation rate is a key parameter in determining atmospheric circulation and hence the spatial pattern of clouds. Since clouds can exert a dominant control on planetary radiation balance, rotation rate could be critical for determining the mean planetary climate. Here we investigate this idea using a three-dimensional general circulation model with a sophisticated cloud scheme. We find that slowly rotating planets (like Venus) can maintain an Earth-like climate at nearly twice the stellar flux as rapidly rotating planets (like Earth). This suggests that many exoplanets previously believed to be too hot may actually be habitable, depending on their rotation rate. The explanation for this behavior is that slowly rotating planets have a weak Coriolis force and long daytime illumination, which promotes strong convergence and convection in the substellar region. This produces a large area of optically thick clouds, which greatly increases the planetary albedo. In contrast, on rapidly rotating planets a much narrower belt of clouds form in the deep tropics, leading to a relatively low albedo. A particularly striking example of the importance of rotation rate suggested by our simulations is that a planet with modern Earth's atmosphere, in Venus' orbit, and with modern Venus' (slow) rotation rate would be habitable. This would imply that if Venus went through a runaway greenhouse, it had a higher rotation rate at that time.

  6. Controllable deterioration rate for time-dependent demand and time-varying holding cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Vinod Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop an inventory model for non-instantaneous deteriorating items under the consideration of the facts: deterioration rate can be controlled by using the preservation technology (PT during deteriorating period, and holding cost and demand rate both are linear function of time, which was treated as constant in most of the deteriorating inventory models. So in this paper, we developed a deterministic inventory model for non-instantaneous deteriorating items in which both demand rate and holding cost are a linear function of time, deterioration rate is constant, backlogging rate is variable and depend on the length of the next replenishment, shortages are allowed and partially backlogged. The model is solved analytically by minimizing the total cost of the inventory system. The model can be applied to optimizing the total inventory cost of non-instantaneous deteriorating items inventory for the business enterprises, where the preservation technology is used to control the deterioration rate, and demand & holding cost both are a linear function of time.

  7. Strain Rates and Contemporary Deformation in the Snake River Plain and Surrounding Basin and Range From GPS and Seismicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. J. Payne; R. McCaffrey; R. W. King

    2008-08-01

    New horizontal GPS velocities along with earthquakes, faults, and volcanic features are used to assess how strain is accommodated in the Northern Basin and Range Province. We used GPS phase data collected from 1994 to 2007 to estimate horizontal velocities for 132 stations within the Snake River Plain (SRP) and surrounding basin and range. These velocities show regional scale clockwise rotation indicating basal driving forces beyond those associated with the Yellowstone Hotspot. Within the western Centennial Tectonic Belt (CTB), the GPS measurements indicate the basin and range is extending at a rate between 5x10-9/yr and 10x10-9/yr, which is an order of magnitude greater than the strain rate we observe with GPS in the SRP, explaining its low seismicity. Between these two regions is the “Centennial Shear Zone”, a NE-trending zone of right-lateral shear with estimated slip rates that increase northeastward from 0.9±0.3 mm/yr in the SW to 1.7±0.2 mm/yr in NE. We interpret the new GPS velocities to indicate: 1) right-lateral shear may be accommodated by strike-slip earthquakes on NE-trending faults in the Centennial Shear Zone; 2) three basin and range faults (Lost River, Lemhi, and Beaverhead) do not extend into the SRP, but instead terminate at the SRP margin; and 3) extension in the SRP occurs at a much lower rate than the rate of normal faulting in the western CTB.

  8. Strain Rate Dependency of Bronze Metal Matrix Composite Mechanical Properties as a Function of Casting Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lloyd; Joyce, Peter; Radice, Joshua; Gregorian, Dro; Gobble, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Strain rate dependency of mechanical properties of tungsten carbide (WC)-filled bronze castings fabricated by centrifugal and sedimentation-casting techniques are examined, in this study. Both casting techniques are an attempt to produce a functionally graded material with high wear resistance at a chosen surface. Potential applications of such materials include shaft bushings, electrical contact surfaces, and brake rotors. Knowledge of strain rate-dependent mechanical properties is recommended for predicting component response due to dynamic loading or impact events. A brief overview of the casting techniques for the materials considered in this study is followed by an explanation of the test matrix and testing techniques. Hardness testing, density measurement, and determination of the volume fraction of WC particles are performed throughout the castings using both image analysis and optical microscopy. The effects of particle filling on mechanical properties are first evaluated through a microhardness survey of the castings. The volume fraction of WC particles is validated using a thorough density survey and a rule-of-mixtures model. Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) testing of various volume fraction specimens is conducted to determine strain dependence of mechanical properties and to compare the process-property relationships between the two casting techniques. The baseline performances of C95400 bronze are provided for comparison. The results show that the addition of WC particles improves microhardness significantly for the centrifugally cast specimens, and, to a lesser extent, in the sedimentation-cast specimens, largely because the WC particles are more concentrated as a result of the centrifugal-casting process. Both metal matrix composites (MMCs) demonstrate strain rate dependency, with sedimentation casting having a greater, but variable, effects on material response. This difference is attributed to legacy effects from the casting process, namely

  9. Thermo-elastic plane deformations in doubly-connected domains with temperature and pressure which depend of the thermal conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Cimatti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new weak formulation for the plane problem of thermoelastic theory in multiply-connected domains. This permits to avoid the difficulties connected with the Cesaro-Volterra boundary conditions in the related elliptic boundary-value problem. In the second part we consider a nonlinear version of the problem assuming that the thermal conductivity depends not only on the temperature but also on the pressure. Recent studies reveals that this situation can occur in practice. A theorem of existence and uniqueness is proved for this problem.

  10. A new interpretation of deformation rates in the Snake River Plain and adjacent basin and range regions based on GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, S. J.; McCaffrey, R.; King, R. W.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2012-04-01

    Within the Northern Basin and Range Province, USA, we estimate horizontal velocities for 405 sites using Global Positioning System (GPS) phase data collected from 1994 to 2010. The velocities, together with geologic, volcanic, and earthquake data, reveal a slowly deforming region within the Snake River Plain in Idaho and Owyhee-Oregon Plateau in Oregon separated from the actively extending adjacent Basin and Range regions by shear. Our results show a NE-oriented extensional strain rate of 5.6 ± 0.7 × 10-9 yr-1 in the Centennial Tectonic Belt and an ˜E-oriented extensional strain rate of 3.5 ± 0.2 × 10-9 yr-1 in the Great Basin. These extensional rates contrast with the very low strain rate within the 125 km × 650 km region of the Snake River Plain and Owyhee-Oregon Plateau, which is indistinguishable from zero (-0.1 ± 0.4 × 10-9 yr-1). Inversions of the velocities with dyke-opening models indicate that rapid extension by dyke intrusion in volcanic rift zones, as previously hypothesized, is not currently occurring in the Snake River Plain. This slow internal deformation, in contrast to the rapidly extending adjacent Basin and Range regions, indicates shear along the boundaries of the Snake River Plain. We estimate right-lateral shear with slip rates of 0.3-1.4 mm yr-1 along the northwestern boundary adjacent to the Centennial Tectonic Belt and left-lateral oblique extension with slip rates of 0.5-1.5 mm yr-1 along the southeastern boundary adjacent to the Intermountain Seismic Belt. The fastest lateral shearing evident in the GPS occurs near the Yellowstone Plateau where strike-slip focal mechanisms and faults with observed strike-slip components of motion are documented. The regional velocity gradients are best fit by nearby poles of rotation for the Centennial Tectonic Belt, Snake River Plain, Owyhee-Oregon Plateau, and eastern Oregon, indicating that clockwise rotation is not locally driven by Yellowstone hotspot volcanism, but instead by extension to the

  11. Rate-dependence of 'wet' biological adhesives and the function of the pad secretion in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonte, David; Federle, Walter

    2015-11-28

    Many insects use soft adhesive footpads for climbing. The surface contact of these organs is mediated by small volumes of a liquid secretion, which forms thin films in the contact zone. Here, we investigate the role of viscous dissipation by this secretion and the 'bulk' pad cuticle by quantifying the rate-dependence of the adhesive force of individual pads. Adhesion increased with retraction speed, but this effect was independent of the amount of pad secretion present in the contact zone, suggesting that the secretion's viscosity did not play a significant role. Instead, the rate-dependence can be explained by relating the strain energy release rate to the speed of crack propagation, using an established empirical power law. The 'wet' pads' behaviour was akin to that of 'dry' elastomers, with an equilibrium energy release rate close to that of dry van-der-Waals contacts. We suggest that the secretion mainly serves as a 'release layer', minimising viscous dissipation and thereby reducing the time- and 'loading-history'-dependence of the adhesive pads. In contrast to many commercial adhesives which derive much of their strength from viscous dissipation, we show that the major modulator of adhesive strength in 'wet' biological adhesive pads is friction, exhibiting a much larger effect than retraction speed. A comparison between 'wet' and 'dry' biological adhesives, using both results from this study and the literature, revealed a striking lack of differences in attachment performance under varying experimental conditions. Together, these results suggest that 'wet' and 'dry' biological adhesives may be more similar than previously thought.

  12. Multi-scale detection of rate changes in spike trains with weak dependencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Michael; Costa, Kauê M; Roeper, Jochen; Schneider, Gaby

    2017-04-01

    The statistical analysis of neuronal spike trains by models of point processes often relies on the assumption of constant process parameters. However, it is a well-known problem that the parameters of empirical spike trains can be highly variable, such as for example the firing rate. In order to test the null hypothesis of a constant rate and to estimate the change points, a Multiple Filter Test (MFT) and a corresponding algorithm (MFA) have been proposed that can be applied under the assumption of independent inter spike intervals (ISIs). As empirical spike trains often show weak dependencies in the correlation structure of ISIs, we extend the MFT here to point processes associated with short range dependencies. By specifically estimating serial dependencies in the test statistic, we show that the new MFT can be applied to a variety of empirical firing patterns, including positive and negative serial correlations as well as tonic and bursty firing. The new MFT is applied to a data set of empirical spike trains with serial correlations, and simulations show improved performance against methods that assume independence. In case of positive correlations, our new MFT is necessary to reduce the number of false positives, which can be highly enhanced when falsely assuming independence. For the frequent case of negative correlations, the new MFT shows an improved detection probability of change points and thus, also a higher potential of signal extraction from noisy spike trains.

  13. Time and dose-dependent deformation of SiC/SiC composites With off-axis fiber alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henager, C.H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The use of SiC-reinforced composites for fusion reactors or other nuclear applications will not be restricted to 0/90 aligned fiber architecture in all cases. It is important to understand the role of fiber orientation in the strength, toughness, and time-dependent properties for such materials. The use of high-strength ceramic fibers for composites is predicated on optimizing the strength, fracture resistance, and retained strength in aggressive environments, which argues for the best use of fiber strengths, namely on-axis loading for full load transfer to the high-strength fibers. Relatively few researchers have systematically studied the effects of fiber orientation on composite properties, and none have, to the best of our knowledge, performed any time-dependent testing of composites with off-axis fiber orientations. We have performed mechanical property tests on Hi-Nicalon Type-S fiber SiC/SiC composites as a function of fiber orientation. The mechanical testing consisted of 4- point bend strength, 4-point single-edge notched bend fracture toughness, and 4-point bend slow crack growth testing on two composite architectures from ambient to 1600 deg. C (1873 K). The two composite materials that were tested included a {+-}55 deg.-braided-weave composite with Type-S fibers inclined at 55 deg. to the principal composite axes to simulate a tubular-weave architecture and a Type-S 0/90 satin-weave composite as a reference material. A time-dependent fiber-bridging model that accounts for fiber orientation has been developed and its predictions are compared to the strength and crack growth data. The level of agreement suggests that existing models of off-axis bridging fibers are adequate for fusion reactor designs using SiC/SiC composites in off-axis orientations. However, the strength data suggests that off-axis orientations are much weaker than aligned fiber orientations and, thus, care must be taken to ensure that some fraction of

  14. A new interpretation of deformation rates in the Snake River Plain and adjacent basin and range regions based on GPS measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.J. Payne; R. McCaffrey; R.W. King; S.A. Kattenhorn

    2012-04-01

    We evaluate horizontal Global Positioning System (GPS) velocities together with geologic, volcanic, and seismic data to interpret extension, shear, and contraction within the Snake River Plain and the Northern Basin and Range Province, U.S.A. We estimate horizontal surface velocities using GPS data collected at 385 sites from 1994 to 2009 and present an updated velocity field within the Stable North American Reference Frame (SNARF). Our results show an ENE-oriented extensional strain rate of 5.9 {+-} 0.7 x 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1} in the Centennial Tectonic belt and an E-oriented extensional strain rate of 6.2 {+-} 0.3 x 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1} in the Intermountain Seismic belt combined with the northern Great Basin. These extensional strain rates contrast with the regional north-south contraction of -2.6 {+-} 1.1 x 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1} calculated in the Snake River Plain and Owyhee-Oregon Plateau over a 125 x 650 km region. Tests that include dike-opening reveal that rapid extension by dike intrusion in volcanic rift zones does not occur in the Snake River Plain at present. This slow internal deformation in the Snake River Plain is in contrast to the rapidly-extending adjacent Basin and Range provinces and implies shear along boundaries of the Snake River Plain. We estimate right-lateral shear with slip rates of 0.5-1.5 mm/yr along the northwestern boundary adjacent to the Centennial Tectonic belt and left-lateral oblique extension with slip rates of <0.5 to 1.7 mm/yr along the southeastern boundary adjacent to the Intermountain Seismic belt. The fastest lateral shearing occurs near the Yellowstone Plateau where strike-slip focal mechanisms and faults with observed strike-slip components of motion are documented. The regional GPS velocity gradients are best fit by nearby poles of rotation for the Centennial Tectonic belt, Idaho batholith, Snake River Plain, Owyhee-Oregon Plateau, and central Oregon, indicating that clockwise rotation is driven by extension to the

  15. Dependence of X-Ray Burst Models on Nuclear Reaction Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyburt, R. H.; Amthor, A. M.; Heger, A.; Johnson, E.; Keek, L.; Meisel, Z.; Schatz, H.; Smith, K.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray bursts are thermonuclear flashes on the surface of accreting neutron stars, and reliable burst models are needed to interpret observations in terms of properties of the neutron star and the binary system. We investigate the dependence of X-ray burst models on uncertainties in (p, γ), (α, γ), and (α, p) nuclear reaction rates using fully self-consistent burst models that account for the feedbacks between changes in nuclear energy generation and changes in astrophysical conditions. A two-step approach first identified sensitive nuclear reaction rates in a single-zone model with ignition conditions chosen to match calculations with a state-of-the-art 1D multi-zone model based on the Kepler stellar evolution code. All relevant reaction rates on neutron-deficient isotopes up to mass 106 were individually varied by a factor of 100 up and down. Calculations of the 84 changes in reaction rate with the highest impact were then repeated in the 1D multi-zone model. We find a number of uncertain reaction rates that affect predictions of light curves and burst ashes significantly. The results provide insights into the nuclear processes that shape observables from X-ray bursts, and guidance for future nuclear physics work to reduce nuclear uncertainties in X-ray burst models.

  16. Strain-rate Dependence of Elastic Modulus Reveals Silver Nanoparticle Induced Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporizzo, Matthew Alexander; Roco, Charles M; Ferrer, Maria Carme Coll; Grady, Martha E; Parrish, Emmabeth; Eckmann, David M; Composto, Russell John

    Force-displacement measurements are taken at different rates with an atomic force microscope to assess the correlation between cell health and cell viscoelasticity in THP-1 cells that have been treated with a novel drug carrier. A variable indentation-rate viscoelastic analysis, VIVA, is employed to identify the relaxation time of the cells that are known to exhibit a frequency dependent stiffness. The VIVA agrees with a fluorescent viability assay. This indicates that dextran-lysozyme drug carriers are biocompatible and deliver concentrated toxic material (rhodamine or silver nanoparticles) to the cytoplasm of THP-1 cells. By modelling the frequency dependence of the elastic modulus, the VIVA provides three metrics of cytoplasmic viscoelasticity: a low frequency modulus, a high frequency modulus and viscosity. The signature of cytotoxicity by rhodamine or silver exposure is a frequency independent twofold increase in the elastic modulus and cytoplasmic viscosity, while the cytoskeletal relaxation time remains unchanged. This is consistent with the known toxic mechanism of silver nanoparticles, where metabolic stress causes an increase in the rigidity of the cytoplasm. A variable indentation-rate viscoelastic analysis is presented as a straightforward method to promote the self-consistent comparison between cells. This is paramount to the development of early diagnosis and treatment of disease.

  17. Dependence of the width of the glass transition interval on cooling and heating rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Jürn W. P.; Tropin, Timur V.

    2013-01-01

    In a preceding paper [J. W. P. Schmelzer, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 074512 (2012), 10.1063/1.3685510], a general kinetic criterion of glass formation has been advanced allowing one to determine theoretically the dependence of the glass transition temperature on cooling and heating rates (or similarly on the rate of change of any appropriate control parameter determining the transition of a stable or metastable equilibrium system into a frozen-in, non-equilibrium state of the system, a glass). In the present paper, this criterion is employed in order to develop analytical expressions for the dependence of the upper and lower boundaries and of the width of the glass transition interval on the rate of change of the external control parameters. It is shown, in addition, that the width of the glass transition range is strongly correlated with the entropy production at the glass transition temperature. The analytical results are supplemented by numerical computations. Analytical results and numerical computations as well as existing experimental data are shown to be in good agreement.

  18. Notch Fracture Toughness of Glasses: Dependence on Rate, Age, and Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasoya, Manish; Rycroft, Chris H.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the fracture toughness (resistance) of glasses is a fundamental problem of prime theoretical and practical importance. Here we theoretically study its dependence on the loading rate, the age (history) of the glass, and the notch radius ρ . Reduced-dimensionality analysis suggests that the notch fracture toughness results from a competition between the initial, age- and history-dependent, plastic relaxation time scale τ0pl and an effective loading time scale τext(K˙ I,ρ ) , where K˙ I is the tensile stress-intensity-factor rate. The toughness is predicted to scale with √{ρ } independently of ξ ≡τext/τ0pl for ξ ≪1 , to scale as T √{ρ }log (ξ ) for ξ ≫1 (related to thermal activation, where T is the temperature), and to feature a nonmonotonic behavior in the crossover region ξ ˜O (1 ) (related to plastic yielding dynamics). These predictions are verified using 2D computations, providing a unified picture of the notch fracture toughness of glasses. The theory highlights the importance of time-scale competition and far-from-steady-state elasto-viscoplastic dynamics for understanding the toughness and shows that the latter varies quite significantly with the glass age (history) and applied loading rate. Experimental support for bulk metallic glasses is presented, and possible implications for applications are discussed.

  19. Distance dependence of the energy transfer rate from a single semiconductor nanostructure to graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federspiel, François; Froehlicher, Guillaume; Nasilowski, Michel; Pedetti, Silvia; Mahmood, Ather; Doudin, Bernard; Park, Serin; Lee, Jeong-O; Halley, David; Dubertret, Benoît; Gilliot, Pierre; Berciaud, Stéphane

    2015-02-11

    The near-field Coulomb interaction between a nanoemitter and a graphene monolayer results in strong Förster-type resonant energy transfer and subsequent fluorescence quenching. Here, we investigate the distance dependence of the energy transfer rate from individual, (i) zero-dimensional CdSe/CdS nanocrystals and (ii) two-dimensional CdSe/CdS/ZnS nanoplatelets to a graphene monolayer. For increasing distances d, the energy transfer rate from individual nanocrystals to graphene decays as 1/d(4). In contrast, the distance dependence of the energy transfer rate from a two-dimensional nanoplatelet to graphene deviates from a simple power law but is well described by a theoretical model, which considers a thermal distribution of free excitons in a two-dimensional quantum well. Our results show that accurate distance measurements can be performed at the single particle level using graphene-based molecular rulers and that energy transfer allows probing dimensionality effects at the nanoscale.

  20. Inferring kinetic pathways, rates, and force dependence from nonprocessive optical tweezers experiments: a maximum likelihood approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalafut, Bennett; Visscher, Koen

    2008-10-01

    Optical tweezers experiments allow us to probe the role of force and mechanical work in a variety of biochemical processes. However, observable states do not usually correspond in a one-to-one fashion with the internal state of an enzyme or enzyme-substrate complex. Different kinetic pathways yield different distributions for the dwells in the observable states. Furthermore, the dwell-time distribution will be dependent upon force, and upon where in the biochemical pathway force acts. I will present a maximum-likelihood method for identifying rate constants and the locations of force-dependent transitions in transcription initiation by T7 RNA Polymerase. This method is generalizable to systems with more complicated kinetic pathways in which there are two observable states (e.g. bound and unbound) and an irreversible final transition.

  1. Elevated time-dependent strengthening rates observed in San Andreas Fault drilling samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikari, Matt J.; Carpenter, Brett M.; Vogt, Christoph; Kopf, Achim J.

    2016-09-01

    The central San Andreas Fault in California is known as a creeping fault, however recent studies have shown that it may be accumulating a slip deficit and thus its seismogenic potential should be seriously considered. We conducted laboratory friction experiments measuring time-dependent frictional strengthening (healing) on fault zone and wall rock samples recovered during drilling at the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), located near the southern edge of the creeping section and in the direct vicinity of three repeating microearthquake clusters. We find that for hold times of up to 3000 s, frictional healing follows a log-linear dependence on hold time and that the healing rate is very low for a sample of the actively shearing fault core, consistent with previous results. However, considering longer hold times up to ∼350,000 s, the healing rate accelerates such that the data for all samples are better described by a power law relation. In general, samples having a higher content of phyllosilicate minerals exhibit low log-linear healing rates, and the notably clay-rich fault zone sample also exhibits strong power-law healing when longer hold times are included. Our data suggest that weak faults, such as the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault, can accumulate interseismic shear stress more rapidly than expected from previous friction data. Using the power-law dependence of frictional healing on hold time, calculations of recurrence interval and stress drop based on our data accurately match observations of discrete creep events and repeating Mw = 2 earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault.

  2. The role of time-dependent deformation in intergranular crack initiation of alloy 600 steam generator tubing material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, G.S.; Lian, K.

    1998-03-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of two commercial alloy 600 conditions (600LT, 600HT) and controlled- purity Ni-18Cr-9Fe alloys (CDMA, CDTT) were investigated using constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests in primary water (0.01M LiOH+0.01M H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) with 1 bar hydrogen overpressure at 360{degrees}C and 320{degrees}C. Heat treatments produced two types of microstructures in both commercial and controlled-purity alloys: one dominated by grain boundary carbides (600HT and CDTT) and one dominated by intragranular carbides (600LT and CDMA). CERT tests were conducted over a range of strain rates and at two temperatures with interruptions at specific strains to determine the crack depth distributions. Results show that in all samples, IGSCC was the dominant failure mode. For both the commercial alloy and the controlled-purity alloys, the microstructure with grain boundary carbides showed delayed crack initiation and shallower crack depths than did the intragranular carbide microstructure under all experimental conditions. This data indicates that a grain boundary carbide microstructure is more resistant to IGSCC than an intragranular carbide microstructure. Observations support both the film rupture/slip dissolution mechanism and enhanced localized plasticity. The advantage of these results over previous studies is that the different carbide distributions were obtained in the same commercial alloy using different heat treatments, and in the other case, in nearly identical controlled-purity alloys. Therefore, observations of the effects of carbide distribution on IGSCC can more confidently be attributed to the carbide distribution alone rather than other potentially significant differences in microstructure or composition.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Investigations of the Local Structural Characteristics of DNA Oligonucleotides: Studies of Helical Axis Deformations, Conformational Sequence Dependence and Modified Nucleoside Perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louise-May, Shirley

    The present DNA studies investigate the local structure of DNA oligonucleotides in order to characterize helical axis deformations, sequence dependent fine structure and modified nucleoside perturbations of selected oligonucleotide sequences. The molecular dynamics method is used to generate an ensemble of energetically feasible DNA conformations which can then be analyzed for dynamical conformational properties, some of which can be compared to experimentally derived values. A theory and graphical presentation for the analysis of helical deformations of DNA based on the configurational statistics of polymers, called "Persistence Analysis", was designed. The results of the analysis on prototype forms, static crystal structures and two solvated MD simulations of the sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG) indicate that all of the expected features of bending can be sensitively and systematically identified by this approach. Comparison of the relative performance of three molecular dynamics potential functions commonly used for dynamical modeling of biological macromolecules; CHARMm, AMBER and GROMOS was investigated via in vacuo MD simulations on the dodecamer sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG)_2 with respect to the conformational properties of each dynamical model and their ability to support A and B families of DNA. Vacuum molecular dynamics simulations using the CHARMm force field carried out on simple homo- and heteropolymers of DNA led to the conclusion that sequence dependent fine structure appears to be well defined for adenine-thymine rich sequences both at the base pair and base step level whereas much of the the fine structure found in cytosine -guanine rich sequences appears to be context dependent. The local conformational properties of the homopolymer poly (dA) -poly (dT) revealed one dynamical model which was found in general agreement with fiber models currently available. Investigation of the relative structural static and dynamical effect of the misincorporation of

  4. A new methodology to simulate subglacial deformation of water saturated granular material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David Lundbek; Piotrowski, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    or weakening components, depending on the rate of deformation, the material state, clay mineral content, and the hydrological properties of the material. The influence of the fluid phase is negligible when relatively permeable sediment is deformed. However, by reducing the local permeability, fast deformation...... on the hydraulic conductivity at the ice-bed interface. Grain-fluid feedbacks can cause complex material properties that vary over time, and which may be of importance for glacier stick-slip behavior....

  5. Optimal control of an influenza model with seasonal forcing and age-dependent transmission rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeehyun; Kim, Jungeun; Kwon, Hee-Dae

    2013-01-21

    This study considers an optimal intervention strategy for influenza outbreaks. Variations in the SEIAR model are considered to include seasonal forcing and age structure, and control strategies include vaccination, antiviral treatment, and social distancing such as school closures. We formulate an optimal control problem by minimizing the incidence of influenza outbreaks while considering intervention costs. We examine the effects of delays in vaccine production, seasonal forcing, and age-dependent transmission rates on the optimal control and suggest some optimal strategies through numerical simulations.

  6. Numerical Modeling of Friction Stir Welding Process by Using Rate-dependent Constitutive Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwu ZHANG; Zhao ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    Rate-dependent constitutive model was used to simulate the friction stir welding process. The effect of the viscosity coefficient and the process parameters on the material behaviors and the stress distributions around the pin were studied. Results indicate that the stress in front of the pin is larger than that behind the pin. The difference between the radial/circumferential stress in front of the pin and that behind it becomes smaller when the material gets closer to the top surface. This difference increases with increasing the viscosity coefficient and becomes smaller when the welding speed decreases. The variation of the angular velocity does not significantly affect the difference.

  7. Size dependence of multipolar plasmon resonance frequencies and damping rates in simple metal spherical nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Derkachova, A

    2008-01-01

    Multipolar plasmon oscillation frequencies and corresponding damping rates for nanospheres formed of the simplest free-electron metals are studied. The possibility of controlling plasmon features by choosing the size and dielectric properties of the sphere surroundings is discussed. Optical properties of the studied metals are described within the Drude-Sommerfeld model of the dielectric function with effective parameters acounting for the contribution of conduction electrons and of interband transitions. No approximation is made in respect of the size of a particle; plasmon size characteristics are described rigorously. The results of our experiment on sodium nanodroplets [1] are compared with the oscillation frequency size dependence of dipole and quadrupole plasmon.

  8. Modeling of Rate-Dependent Hysteresis Using a GPO-Based Adaptive Filter

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen Zhang; Yaopeng Ma

    2016-01-01

    A novel generalized play operator-based (GPO-based) nonlinear adaptive filter is proposed to model rate-dependent hysteresis nonlinearity for smart actuators. In the proposed filter, the input signal vector consists of the output of a tapped delay line. GPOs with various thresholds are used to construct a nonlinear network and connected with the input signals. The output signal of the filter is composed of a linear combination of signals from the output of GPOs. The least-mean-square (LMS) al...

  9. Generalized Korteweg-de Vries equation induced from position-dependent effective mass quantum models and mass-deformed soliton solution through inverse scattering transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganguly, A., E-mail: gangulyasish@rediffmail.com, E-mail: aganguly@maths.iitkgp.ernet.in; Das, A., E-mail: amiya620@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, IIT Kharagpur, Kharagpur, 721302 West Bengal (India)

    2014-11-15

    We consider one-dimensional stationary position-dependent effective mass quantum model and derive a generalized Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation in (1+1) dimension through Lax pair formulation, one being the effective mass Schrödinger operator and the other being the time-evolution of wave functions. We obtain an infinite number of conserved quantities for the generated nonlinear equation and explicitly show that the new generalized KdV equation is an integrable system. Inverse scattering transform method is applied to obtain general solution of the nonlinear equation, and then N-soliton solution is derived for reflectionless potentials. Finally, a special choice has been made for the variable mass function to get mass-deformed soliton solution. The influence of position and time-dependence of mass and also of the different representations of kinetic energy operator on the nature of such solitons is investigated in detail. The remarkable features of such solitons are demonstrated in several interesting figures and are contrasted with the conventional KdV-soliton associated with constant-mass quantum model.

  10. Planning Horizon for Production Inventory Models with Production Rate Dependent on Demand and Inventory Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses why the selection of a finite planning horizon is preferable to an infinite one for a replenishment policy of production inventory models. In a production inventory model, the production rate is dependent on both the demand rate and the inventory level. When there is an exponentially decreasing demand, the application of an infinite planning horizon model is not suitable. The emphasis of this paper is threefold. First, while pointing out questionable results from a previous study, we propose a corrected infinite planning horizon inventory model for the first replenishment cycle. Second, while investigating the optimal solution for the minimization problem, we found that the infinite planning horizon should not be applied when dealing with an exponentially decreasing demand. Third, we developed a new production inventory model under a finite planning horizon for practitioners. Numerical examples are provided to support our findings.

  11. Dependence of reproductive rate on cell size and temperature in freshwater ciliated protozoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finlay, B.J.

    1977-01-01

    Reproductive rates have been calculated for ten species of ciliated protozoa in defined conditions. Interspecific double log regressions of generation time vs. cell volume have been computed at each of three temperatures (8.5/sup 0/C, 15/sup 0/C, and 20/sup 0/C) indicating a significant dependence of reproductive rate on cell size. Recorded generation times varied from 6.38 h in Vorticella microstoma at 20/sup 0/C to 1004 h in Spirostomum teres at 8.5/sup 0/C. These values correspond to a range in r/sub m/ (day)/sup -1/ of 2.607 to 0.017 and lambda (day)/sup -1/ of 13.554 to 1.017. The relationship between these data and similar published data for marine ciliates is examined and the value of such regressions in ecological studies of the protozoa is discussed.

  12. Rate dependent response and failure of a ductile epoxy and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Eric N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rae, Philip J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stahl, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    An extensive characterization suite has been performed on the response and failure of a ductile epoxy 55A and uniaxial carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite of IM7 fibers in 55A resin from the quasistatic to shock regime. The quasistatic and intermediate strain rate response, including elastic modulus, yield and failure have are characterized by quasistatic, SHPB, and DMA measurements as a function of fiber orientation and temperature. The high strain rate shock effect of fiber orientation in the composite and response of the pure resin are presented for plate impact experiments. It has previously been shown that at lower impact velocities the shock velocity is strongly dependent on fiber orientation but at higher impact velocity the in-plane and through thickness Hugoniots converge. The current results are compared with previous studies of the shock response of carbon fiber composites with more conventional brittle epoxy matrices. The spall response of the composite is measured and compared with quasistatic fracture toughness measurements.

  13. Measuring evaporation rates of laser-trapped droplets by use of fluorescent morphology-dependent resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastel, R; Struthers, A

    2001-05-20

    Morphology-dependent resonances (MDRs) are used to measure accurately the evaporation rates of laser-trapped 1- to 2-mum droplets of ethylene glycol. Droplets containing 3 x 10(-5) M Rhodamine-590 laser dye are optically trapped in a 20-mum hollow fiber by two counterpropagating 150-mW, 800-nm laser beams. A weaker 532-nm laser excites the dye, and fluorescence emission is observed near 560 nm as the droplet evaporates. A complete series of first-order TE and TM MDRs dominates the fluorescent output. MDR mode identification sizes the droplets and provides accurate evaporation rates. We verify the automated MDR mode identification by counting fringes in a videotape of the experiment. The longitudinal spring constant of the trap, measured by analysis of the videotaped motion of droplets perturbed from the trap center, provides independent verification of the laser's intensity within the trap.

  14. Impaired autoregulation of glomerular filtration rate in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Kastrup, Helge; Smidt, U M

    1984-01-01

    The effect of acute lowering of arterial blood pressure upon kidney function in nephropathy was studied in 13 patients with long-term Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes. Ten normal subjects (six normotensive and four hypertensive) and five short-term Type 1 diabetic patients without nephropathy...... micrograms) or saline (0.154 mmol/l). The arterial blood pressure was similar in the diabetic patients with nephropathy (mean 136 +/- 11 divided by 88 +/- mmHg) and in the non-diabetic control subjects (mean 140 +/- 25 divided by 92 +/- 15 mmHg). The clonidine injection induced similar reductions in mean...... excretion declined from 1707 to 938 micrograms/min (p less than 0.01) in the patients with diabetic nephropathy. Our results suggest that an intrinsic vascular (arteriolar) mechanism underlying the normal autoregulation of glomerular filtration rate, i.e. the relative constancy of glomerular filtration rate...

  15. Asymptotics for partly linear regression with dependent samples and ARCH errors: consistency with rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Partly linear regression model is useful in practice, but littleis investigated in the literature to adapt it to the real data which are dependent and conditionally heteroscedastic. In this paper, the estimators of the regression components are constructed via local polynomial fitting and the large sample properties are explored. Under certain mild regularities, the conditions are obtained to ensure that the estimators of the nonparametric component and its derivatives are consistent up to the convergence rates which are optimal in the i.i.d. case, and the estimator of the parametric component is root-n consistent with the same rate as for parametric model. The technique adopted in the proof differs from that used and corrects the errors in the reference by Hamilton and Truong under i.i.d. samples.

  16. The Dose Rate Dependence of the Yield of Trapped Electrons in Crystalline Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Johan Daniel Göran; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1980-01-01

    for the experimental dose rate dependence observed at −10° C. The reaction with the protons has a negative temperature coefficient while the reaction with the OH radicals has an activation energy of about 14 kcal mole−1. The mobility of the proton was estimated to be about 3 × 10−4 cm2 V−1 S−1 at −10°C.......The yield of localized excess electrons in crystalline H2O ice has been studied as a function of the dose rate at various temperatures in the range −10 to −40°C. The G value was found to decrease significantly with increasing dose rate. Thus it appears that the localization of electrons takes place...... in competition with other reactions and we propose a simple model where we assume that the mobile electrons can undergo bimolecular bulk reactions with protons and OH radicals. Rate constants of 3.0 × 1015 M−1 S−1 and 1.4 × 1014 M−1 S−1 for the two reactions were required in the model in order to account...

  17. Dependence of X-Ray Burst Models on Nuclear Reaction Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Cyburt, R H; Heger, A; Johnson, E; Keek, L; Meisel, Z; Schatz, H; Smith, K

    2016-01-01

    X-ray bursts are thermonuclear flashes on the surface of accreting neutron stars and reliable burst models are needed to interpret observations in terms of properties of the neutron star and the binary system. We investigate the dependence of X-ray burst models on uncertainties in (p,$\\gamma$), ($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$), and ($\\alpha$,p) nuclear reaction rates using fully self-consistent burst models that account for the feedbacks between changes in nuclear energy generation and changes in astrophysical conditions. A two-step approach first identified sensitive nuclear reaction rates in a single-zone model with ignition conditions chosen to match calculations with a state-of-the-art 1D multi-zone model based on the {\\Kepler} stellar evolution code. All relevant reaction rates on neutron deficient isotopes up to mass 106 were individually varied by a factor of 100 up and down. Calculations of the 84 highest impact reaction rate changes were then repeated in the 1D multi-zone model. We find a number of uncertain reac...

  18. SU-F-19A-09: Propagation of Organ at Risk Contours for High Dose Rate Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer: A Deformable Image Registration Comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellon, M; Kumarasiri, A; Kim, J; Shah, M; Elshaikh, M; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the performance of two deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for contour propagation and to evaluate the accuracy of DIR for use with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer. Methods: Five patients undergoing HDR ring and tandem brachytherapy were included in this retrospective study. All patients underwent CT simulation and replanning prior to each fraction (3–5 fractions total). CT-to-CT DIR was performed using two commercially available software platforms: SmartAdapt, Varian Medical Systems (Demons) and Velocity AI, Velocity Medical Solutions (B-spline). Fraction 1 contours were deformed and propagated to each subsequent image set and compared to contours manually drawn by an expert clinician. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC), defined as, DSC(A,B)=2(AandB)/(A+B) were calculated to quantify spatial overlap between manual (A) and deformed (B) contours. Additionally, clinician-assigned visual scores were used to describe and compare the performance of each DIR method and ultimately evaluate which was more clinically acceptable. Scoring was based on a 1–5 scale—with 1 meaning, “clinically acceptable with no contour changes” and 5 meaning, “clinically unacceptable”. Results: Statistically significant differences were not observed between the two DIR algorithms. The average DSC for the bladder, rectum and rectosigmoid were 0.82±0.08, 0.67±0.13 and 0.48±0.18, respectively. The poorest contour agreement was observed for the rectosigmoid due to limited soft tissue contrast and drastic anatomical changes, i.e., organ shape/filling. Two clinicians gave nearly equivalent average scores of 2.75±0.91 for SmartAdapt and 2.75±0.94 for Velocity AI—indicating that for a majority of the cases, more than one of the three contours evaluated required major modifications. Conclusion: Limitations of both DIR algorithms resulted in inaccuracies in contour propagation in the pelvic region, thus hampering the

  19. Analysis of the dependence of lattice deformations in Cu sup II -Co sup II hydroxide nitrate solid solutions on their composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotov, N. (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of Applied Mineralogy); Petrov, K. (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of General and Inorganic Chemistry)

    1991-06-01

    The synthesized Cu{sub x}Co{sub 2-x}(OH){sub 3}NO{sub 3} hydroxide nitrate mixed crystals have a monoclinic pseudo-hexagonal lattice. The unit-cell parameters vary non-linearly with composition. In such cases the calculation of the tensor of compositional deformation and the finite Lagrangian strain tensor is a convenient method for the investigation of the structural anisotropy of lattice distortions. The lattice deformation when substituting copper for cobalt can be represented as a two-dimensional shear deformation in the ac plane and a one-dimensional deformation along the b axis. The directions of the largest and smallest deformations are determined by the arrangement of the longest Cu-O bonds in the distorted CuO{sub 6} octahedra. A change in the directions of the principal axes of the tensor of compositional deformation is observed for compositions x=0.8 and x=1.5. (orig.).

  20. Intelligent modeling and control for nonlinear systems with rate-dependent hysteresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO JianQin; DING HaiShan

    2009-01-01

    A new modeling approach for nonlinear systems with rate-dependent hysteresis is proposed. The ap-proach is used for the modeling of the giant magnetostrictive actuator, which has the rate-dependent nonlinear property. The models built are simpler than the existed approaches. Compared with the exper-intent result, the model built can well describe the hysteresis nonlinear of the actuator for Input signals with complex frequency. An adaptive direct inverse control approach is proposed based on the fuzzy tree model and Inverse learning and special learning that are used in neural network broadly. In this approach, the inverse model of the plant is identified to be the initial controller firstly. Then, the inverse model Is connected with the plant in series and the linear parameters of the controller are adjusted using the least mean square algorithm by on-line manner. The direct Inverse control approach based on the fuzzy tree model is applied on the tracing control of the actuator by simulation. The simulation results show the correctness of the approach.

  1. Rate-Dependent Analysis of the Asymptotic Behavior of Channel Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Hassani, S Hamed; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Urbanke, Rudiger

    2011-01-01

    For a binary-input memoryless symmetric channel $W$, we consider the asymptotic behavior of the polarization process in the large block-length regime when transmission takes place over $W$. In particular, we study the asymptotics of the cumulative distribution $\\mathbb{P}(Z_n \\leq z)$, where $\\{Z_n\\}$ is the Bhattacharyya process defined from $W$, and its dependence on the rate of transmission. On the basis of this result, we characterize the asymptotic behavior, as well as its dependence on the rate, of the block error probability of polar codes using the successive cancellation decoder. This refines the original bounds by Ar{\\i}kan and Telatar. Our results apply to general polar codes based on $\\ell \\times \\ell$ kernel matrices. We also provide lower bounds on the block error probability of polar codes using the MAP decoder. The MAP lower bound and the successive cancellation upper bound coincide when $\\ell=2$, but there is a gap for $\\ell>2$.

  2. Basic theories for strain localization analysis of porous media with rate dependent model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hongwu; QIN Jianmin

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyzes the interaction between two kinds of internal length scales when the rate dependent plasticity is introduced to a multiphase material model to study the dynamic strain localization phenomenon of saturated and partially saturated porous media. The stability analysis demonstrates that the enhanced porous media model preserves the well-posedness of the initial value problem for both axial and shear waves because an internal length scale parameter is introduced in the visco-plasticity model. On the other hand, the interaction between the length scale introduced by the rate dependent model and that naturally contained in the governing equations of fully and partially saturated model will take place. A basic method is presented to investigate the internal length scale of the multiphase porous media under the interaction of these two kinds of length scale parameters. Material stability analysis is carried out for a certain permeability from which the results of wave number domain with real wave speed are distinguished. A one dimensional example is given to illustrate the theoretical findings.

  3. Rate dependence of cell-to-cell variations of lithium-ion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fuqiang; Chen, Lufan; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Jianbo; Li, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Lithium-ion cells are commonly used in a multicell configuration in power devices and electric vehicles, making the cell-to-cell variation (CtCV) a key factor to consider in system design and management. Previous studies on CtCV have two major limitations: the number of cells is usually less than one hundred, and the cells are usually commercial cells already subjected to cell-screenings. In this article, we first make a statistical analysis on the CtCV of 5473 fresh cells from an automotive battery manufacturer before the cell-screening process. Secondly, 198 cells are randomly selected from these 5473 cells and the rate dependence of the CtCV is examined, focusing on the correlations of capacity versus weight and capacity versus resistance, corresponding to thermodynamic and kinetic factors, respectively. The rate dependence of these two correlations is explained from a phenomenological model. Finally, eight cells from the 198 cells are further characterized with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method to elucidate the kinetic origins of the CtCV.

  4. Load rate dependence of the mechanical properties of thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotov, Nikolay; Eggeler, Gunther [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Ruhr Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Bartsch, Marion [Institut fuer Werkstoff-Forschung, DLR Koeln, 51147 Koeln (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC), composed of yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) ceramic top coat (TC) and intermetallic NiCoCrAlY bond coat (BC) are commonly used as protective coatings of Ni-based high temperature gas engine components. Nanoindentation techniques are increasingly applied for determining the TBC mechanical properties on a nanometre scale. However, little is known about the load-rate dependence of the mechanical properties, which is important for better understanding of cyclic thermal fatigue experiments. Nanoindentations with different load rates omega were performed on polished cross-sections of TBC, deposited by EB-PVD on IN625 substrates (S), using a XP Nanoindenter (MTS) equipped with Berkovich diamond tip. The Young's modulus (E) of the TC is independent of omega, while E for the BC and the S decreases with omega. The hardness (H) of the TC and the BC increases, while H for the S decreases with omega. From the dependence of H on omega, creep power-law exponents c = 0.24(11) and c = 0.023(6) for the TC and the BC were determined. For all TBC components, a decrease with omega of the power-law exponents n and m, describing the loading and unloading nanoindentation curves, is observed.

  5. Reynolds-number dependence of the dimensionless dissipation rate in homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkmann, Moritz; Berera, Arjun; Goldstraw, Erin E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the behavior of the dimensionless dissipation rate Cɛ for stationary and nonstationary magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the presence of external forces. By combining with previous studies for freely decaying MHD turbulence, we obtain here both the most general model equation for Cɛ applicable to homogeneous MHD turbulence and a comprehensive numerical study of the Reynolds number dependence of the dimensionless total energy dissipation rate at unity magnetic Prandtl number. We carry out a series of medium to high resolution direct numerical simulations of mechanically forced stationary MHD turbulence in order to verify the predictions of the model equation for the stationary case. Furthermore, questions of nonuniversality are discussed in terms of the effect of external forces as well as the level of cross- and magnetic helicity. The measured values of the asymptote Cɛ ,∞ lie between 0.193 ≤Cɛ ,∞≤0.268 for free decay, where the value depends on the initial level of cross- and magnetic helicities. In the stationary case we measure Cɛ ,∞=0.223 .

  6. Biomechanics of ant adhesive pads: frictional forces are rate- and temperature-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federle, Walter; Baumgartner, Werner; Hölldobler, Bert

    2004-01-01

    Tarsal adhesive pads enable insects to hold on to smooth plant surfaces. Using a centrifuge technique, we tested whether a "wet adhesion" model of a thin film of liquid secreted between the pad and the surface can explain adhesive and frictional forces in Asian Weaver ants (Oecophylla smaragdina). When forces are acting parallel to the surface, pads in contact with the surface can slide smoothly. Force per unit pad contact area was strongly dependent on sliding velocity and temperature. Seemingly consistent with the effect of a thin liquid film in the contact zone, (1) frictional force linearly increased with sliding velocity, (2) the increment was greater at lower temperatures and (3) no temperature dependence was detected for low-rate perpendicular detachment forces. However, we observed a strong, temperature-independent static friction that was inconsistent with a fully lubricated contact. Static friction was too large to be explained by the contribution of other (sclerotized) body parts. Moreover, the rate-specific increase of shear stress strongly exceeded predictions derived from estimates of the adhesive liquid film's thickness and viscosity. Both lines of evidence indicate that the adhesive secretion alone is insufficient to explain the observed forces and that direct interaction of the soft pad cuticle with the surface ("rubber friction") is involved.

  7. Rate dependence of cell-to-cell variations of lithium-ion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fuqiang; Chen, Lufan; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Jianbo; Li, Ping

    2016-10-11

    Lithium-ion cells are commonly used in a multicell configuration in power devices and electric vehicles, making the cell-to-cell variation (CtCV) a key factor to consider in system design and management. Previous studies on CtCV have two major limitations: the number of cells is usually less than one hundred, and the cells are usually commercial cells already subjected to cell-screenings. In this article, we first make a statistical analysis on the CtCV of 5473 fresh cells from an automotive battery manufacturer before the cell-screening process. Secondly, 198 cells are randomly selected from these 5473 cells and the rate dependence of the CtCV is examined, focusing on the correlations of capacity versus weight and capacity versus resistance, corresponding to thermodynamic and kinetic factors, respectively. The rate dependence of these two correlations is explained from a phenomenological model. Finally, eight cells from the 198 cells are further characterized with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method to elucidate the kinetic origins of the CtCV.

  8. Energy loss rate in disordered quantum well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, P.; Ashraf, S. S. Z. [Centre of Excellence in Nanomaterials, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India); Hasan, S. T. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, The M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002 (India); Sharma, A. C. [Physics Department, Sibli National College, Azamgarh-276128 (India)

    2014-04-24

    We report the effect of dynamically screened deformation potential on the electron energy loss rate in disordered semiconductor quantum well. Interaction of confined electrons with bulk acoustic phonons has been considered in the deformation coupling. The study concludes that the dynamically screened deformation potential coupling plays a significant role as it substantially affects the power dependency of electron relaxation on temperature and mean free path.

  9. Nonlinear decline-rate dependence and intrinsic variation of typeIa supernova luminosities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lifan; Strovink, Mark; Conley, Alexander; Goldhaber,Gerson; Kowalski, Marek; Perlmutter, Saul; Siegrist, James

    2005-12-14

    Published B and V fluxes from nearby Type Ia supernova are fitted to light-curve templates with 4-6 adjustable parameters. Separately, B magnitudes from the same sample are fitted to a linear dependence on B-V color within a post-maximum time window prescribed by the CMAGIC method. These fits yield two independent SN magnitude estimates B{sub max} and B{sub BV}. Their difference varies systematically with decline rate {Delta}m{sub 15} in a form that is compatible with a bilinear but not a linear dependence; a nonlinear form likely describes the decline-rate dependence of B{sub max} itself. A Hubble fit to the average of B{sub max} and B{sub BV} requires a systematic correction for observed B-V color that can be described by a linear coefficient R = 2.59 {+-} 0.24, well below the coefficient R{sub B} {approx} 4.1 commonly used to characterize the effects of Milky Way dust. At 99.9% confidence the data reject a simple model in which no color correction is required for SNe that are clustered at the blue end of their observed color distribution. After systematic corrections are performed, B{sub max} and B{sub BV} exhibit mutual rms intrinsic variation equal to 0.074 {+-} 0.019 mag, of which at least an equal share likely belongs to B{sub BV}. SN magnitudes measured using maximum-luminosity or cmagic methods show comparable rms deviations of order {approx}0.14 mag from the Hubble line. The same fit also establishes a 95% confidence upper limit of 486 km s{sup -1} on the rms peculiar velocity of nearby SNe relative to the Hubble flow.

  10. Gas Release as a Deformation Signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Radiogenic noble gases are contained in crustal rock at inter and intra granular sites. The gas composition depends on lithology, geologic history, fluid phases, and the aging effect by decay of U, Th, and K. The isotopic signature of noble gases found in rocks is vastly different than that of the atmosphere which is contributed by a variety of sources. When rock is subjected to stress conditions exceeding about half its yield strength, micro-cracks begin to form. As rock deformation progresses a fracture network evolves, releasing trapped noble gases and changing the transport properties to gas migration. Thus, changes in gas emanation and noble gas composition from rocks could be used to infer changes in stress-state and deformation. The purpose of this study has been to evaluate the effect of deformation/strain rate upon noble gas release. Four triaxial experiments were attempted for a strain rate range of %7E10-8 /s (180,000s) to %7E 10-4/s (500s); the three fully successful experiments (at the faster strain rates) imply the following: (1) helium is measurably released for all strain rates during deformation, this release is in amounts 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than that present in the air, and (2) helium gas release increases with decreasing strain rate.

  11. Experience-dependent firing rate remapping generates directional selectivity in hippocampal place cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaneta eNavratilova

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available When rodents engage in irregular foraging in an open field environment, hippocampal principal cells exhibit place-specific firing that is statistically independent of the direction of traverse through the place field. When the path is restricted to a track, however, in-field rates differ substantially in opposite directions. Frequently, the representations of the track in the two directions are essentially orthogonal. We show that this directionally selective firing is not hard-wired, but develops through experience-dependent plasticity. During the rats’ first pass in each direction, place fields were highly directionally symmetric, whereas over subsequent laps, the firing rates in the two directions gradually but substantially diverged. We conclude that, even on a restricted track, place cell firing is initially determined by allocentric position, and only later, the within-field firing rates change in response to differential sensory information or behavioral cues in the two directions. In agreement with previous data, place fields near local cues, such as textures on the track, developed less directionality than place fields on a uniform part of the track, possibly because the local cues reduced the net difference in sensory input at a given point. Directionality also developed in an open environment without physical restriction of the animal’s path, when rats learned to run along a specified path. In this case, directionality developed later than on the running track, only after the rats began to run in a stereotyped manner. Although the average population firing rates exhibited little if any change over laps in either direction, the direction-specific firing rates in a given place field were up- or down-regulated with about equal probability and magnitude, which was independent in the two directions, suggesting some form of competitive mechanism (e.g., LTP/LTD acting coherently on the set of synapses conveying external information to

  12. Methodological and experimental study of the relationship between displacement rate of landslide and GNSS strategy for deformation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordan, Daniele; Piras, Marco; Allasia, Paolo; Dabove, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    The use of GNSS for landslide monitoring is not a novelty. In the field of large slope instabilities, where the phenomena are usually wide and the use of complex monitoring networks is needed, often a continuous monitoring is required. In this case, the installed GNSS solution is composed by a dual frequency receiver, with a solar power and with a radio connection to a ground station, where the measurement sessions of the rovers are collected and processed. The management of the collected data is the most critical aspect because the approach, which is commonly used, assumes a fixed position of the GNSS antenna during the acquisition time window. When the landslide is active, the position shift of the point can be considered insignificant for the low displacement rate, but together with the increase of the velocity, the GNSS time series processing becomes a crucial aspect to obtain reliable and enough accurate measurements. Starting from real case studies as the Italian large slope instabilities of Montaguto (Avellino, Italy) and Mont de La Saxe (Courmayeur, Italy), we focused on the presence of different kinematic domains with dissimilar displacement behaviors and velocities. In particular, the range of velocities registered during the main active periods ranges from several millimeters/day up to several meters/day, so the strategy for the GNSS processing data must be very different. Methodology for data acquisition (continuous or windowed) and its duration, type of receivers and antenna used (single or dual frequency, GPS or GNSS, mass market or geodetic), data processing strategies (i.e. single epoch, kinematic), and eventually GNSS network services are fundamental factors, which may favor one or another solution, according to time, economy and infrastructure readiness in the field. In the greater part of these studies, the choices were made based on the experience of responsible in the similar conditions. Starting from the behavior of real cases previously cited

  13. [Values of the sperm deformity index, acrosome abnormity rate, and sperm DNA fragmentation index of optimized sperm in predicting IVF fertilization failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei-jie; Jin, Fan; Zhou, Li-ming

    2016-02-01

    To i