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  1. Type I vs type II spiral ganglion neurons exhibit differential survival and neuritogenesis during cochlear development

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    Housley Gary D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms that consolidate neural circuitry are a major focus of neuroscience. In the mammalian cochlea, the refinement of spiral ganglion neuron (SGN innervation to the inner hair cells (by type I SGNs and the outer hair cells (by type II SGNs is accompanied by a 25% loss of SGNs. Results We investigated the segregation of neuronal loss in the mouse cochlea using β-tubulin and peripherin antisera to immunolabel all SGNs and selectively type II SGNs, respectively, and discovered that it is the type II SGN population that is predominately lost within the first postnatal week. Developmental neuronal loss has been attributed to the decline in neurotrophin expression by the target hair cells during this period, so we next examined survival of SGN sub-populations using tissue culture of the mid apex-mid turn region of neonatal mouse cochleae. In organotypic culture for 48 hours from postnatal day 1, endogenous trophic support from the organ of Corti proved sufficient to maintain all type II SGNs; however, a large proportion of type I SGNs were lost. Culture of the spiral ganglion as an explant, with removal of the organ of Corti, led to loss of the majority of both SGN sub-types. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF added as a supplement to the media rescued a significant proportion of the SGNs, particularly the type II SGNs, which also showed increased neuritogenesis. The known decline in BDNF production by the rodent sensory epithelium after birth is therefore a likely mediator of type II neuron apoptosis. Conclusion Our study thus indicates that BDNF supply from the organ of Corti supports consolidation of type II innervation in the neonatal mouse cochlea. In contrast, type I SGNs likely rely on additional sources for trophic support.

  2. The Black Hole Mass - Pitch Angle Relation of Type I AGN In Spiral Galaxies

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    Schilling, Amanda; Jones, Logan; Hughes, John A.; Barrows, R. Scott; Kennefick, Julia D.

    2017-01-01

    A relationship between the mass of supermassive black holes, M, at the center of galaxies and the pitch angle, P, a measure of tightness of spiral arms, was recently reported by Berrier, et al. (2013 ApJ 769, 132) for late type galaxies. The relationship, established for a local sample, shows that spiral galaxies with tighter pitch angles host higher mass black holes. In this work, we explore the M-P relation for a sample of 50 low to moderate redshift (0.04spiral galaxies that host Type 1 Active Galactic Nuclei, AGN. These objects were selected from the SDSS quasar catalog and various studies involving HST imaging. Broad Hβ, Hα, and MgII and narrow [OIII]λ5007 emission lines were used with established mass scaling relations to estimate black-hole mass. Pitch angles were measured using a 2DFFT technique (Davis, et al., 2012 ApJS 199, 33). We find that the M-P relation for the higher redshift, AGN sample differs from that of the local sample and discuss the possibility of AGN feedback by looking at a proposed Fundamental Plane for late-type galaxies - a correlation between bulge mass, disk mass, and spiral-arm pitch angle (Davis, et al. 2015, ApJ 802, L13).

  3. The origin of type I profiles in cluster lenticulars: an interplay between ram pressure stripping and tidally induced spiral migration

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    Clarke, Adam J.; Debattista, Victor P.; Roškar, Rok; Quinn, Tom

    2017-02-01

    Using N-body + smooth particle hydrodynamics simulations of galaxies falling into a cluster, we study the evolution of their radial density profiles. When evolved in isolation, galaxies develop a type II (down-bending) profile. In the cluster, the evolution of the profile depends on the minimum cluster-centric radius the galaxy reaches, which controls the degree of ram pressure stripping. If the galaxy falls to ˜50 per cent of the virial radius, then the profile remains type II, but if the galaxy reaches down to ˜20 per cent of the virial radius, the break weakens and the profile becomes more type I like. The velocity dispersions are only slightly increased in the cluster simulations compared with the isolated galaxy; random motion therefore cannot be responsible for redistributing material sufficiently to cause the change in the profile type. Instead, we find that the joint action of radial migration driven by tidally induced spirals and the outside-in quenching of star formation due to ram pressure stripping alters the density profile. As a result, this model predicts a flattening of the age profiles amongst cluster lenticulars with type I profiles, which can be observationally tested.

  4. Anti-diabetic activity of Zingiber officinale in streptozotocin-induced type I diabetic rats.

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    Akhani, Sanjay P; Vishwakarma, Santosh L; Goyal, Ramesh K

    2004-01-01

    The fresh and dried rhizome of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (commonly known as ginger) is widely used in traditional medicine. We have studied the effect of the juice of Z. officinale (4 mL kg(-1), p.o. daily) for 6 weeks on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type I diabetic rats with particular reference to the involvement of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) receptors in glycaemic control. In normoglycaemic rats, 5-HT (1mg kg(-1), i.p.) produced hyperglycaemia and hypoinsulinaemia, which was significantly prevented by the juice of Z. officinale. STZ-diabetes produced a significant increase in fasting glucose levels that was associated with a significant decrease in serum insulin levels. Treatment with Z. officinale produced a significant increase in insulin levels and a decrease in fasting glucose levels in diabetic rats. In an oral glucose tolerance test, treatment with Z. officinale was found to decrease significantly the area under the curve of glucose and to increase the area under the curve of insulin in STZ-diabetic rats. Treatment with Z. officinale also caused a decrease in serum cholesterol, serum triglyceride and blood pressure in diabetic rats. Our data suggest a potential antidiabetic activity of the juice of Z. officinale in type I diabetic rats, possibly involving 5-HT receptors.

  5. Therapeutic efficacy of differentiated versus undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells in experimental type I diabetes in rat

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    M.A. Wassef

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Selective MSCs differentiation protocol into pancreatic beta cells was conducted in the present study using exendin-4 and TGF-beta. Differentiated and undifferentiated MSCs were assessed in experimental type I diabetes in rats. Ninety female white albino rats were included in the study and divided equally (n=15/group into 6 groups: healthy control, healthy control rats received acellular tissue culture medium, diabetic rats, diabetic rats received acellular tissue culture medium, diabetic rats received undifferentiated MSCs and diabetic rats received differentiated MSCs. Therapeutic efficacy of undifferentiated versus differentiated MSCs was evaluated via assessment of quantitative gene expressions of insulin1, insulin 2, Smad-2, Smad-3, PDX-1, PAX-4, neuroD. Blood glucose and insulin hormone levels were also assessed. Results showed that quantitative gene expressions of all studied genes showed significant decrease in diabetic rat groups. Use of undifferentiated and differentiated MSCs led to a significant elevation of expression levels of all genes with more superior effect with differentiated MSCs except smad-2 gene. As regards insulin hormone levels, use of either undifferentiated or differentiated MSCs led to a significant elevation of its levels with more therapeutic effect with differentiated MSCs. Blood glucose levels were significantly decreased with both undifferentiated and differentiated MSCs in comparison to diabetic groups but its levels were normalized 2 months after injection of differentiated MSCs. In conclusion, use of undifferentiated or differentiated MSCs exhibited significant therapeutic potentials in experimental type I diabetes in rats with more significant therapeutic effect with the use of differentiated MSCs.

  6. Cleistanthus collinus induces type I distal renal tubular acidosis and type II respiratory failure in rats

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    Maneksh Delinda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose : A water decoction of the poisonous shrub Cleistanthus collinus is used for suicidal purposes. The mortality rate is 28%. The clinical profile includes distal renal tubular acidosis (DRTA and respiratory failure. The mechanism of toxicity is unclear. Objectives : To demonstrate features of C. collinus toxicity in a rat model and to identify its mechanism(s of action. Materials and Methods : Rats were anesthetized and the carotid artery was cannulated. Electrocardiogram and respiratory movements were recorded. Either aqueous extract of C. collinus or control solution was administered intraperitoneally. Serial measurements of blood gases, electrolytes and urinary pH were made. Isolated brush border and basolateral membranes from rat kidney were incubated with C. collinus extract and reduction in ATPase activity was assessed. Venous blood samples from human volunteers and rats were incubated with an acetone extract of C. collinus and plasma potassium was estimated as an assay for sodium-potassium pump activity. Results : The mortality was 100% in tests and 17% in controls. Terminal event in test animals was respiratory arrest. Controls had metabolic acidosis, respiratory compensation , acidic urine and hyperkalemia. Test animals showed respiratory acidosis, alkaline urine and low blood potassium as compared to controls. C. collinus extract inhibited ATPase activity in rat kidney. Plasma K + did not increase in human blood incubated with C. collinus extract. Conclusions and Implications : Active principles of C. collinus inhibit proton pumps in the renal brush border, resulting in type I DRTA in rats. There is no inhibition of sodium-potassium pump activity. Test animals develop respiratory acidosis, and the immediate cause of death is respiratory arrest.

  7. The origin of type-I profiles in cluster lenticulars: An interplay between ram pressure stripping and tidally-induced spiral migration

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, Adam J; Roškar, Rok; Quinn, and Tom

    2016-01-01

    Using $N$-body+SPH simulations of galaxies falling into a cluster, we study the evolution of their radial density profiles. When evolved in isolation, galaxies develop a type~II (down-bending) profile. In the cluster, the evolution of the profile depends on the minimum cluster-centric radius the galaxy reaches, which controls the degree of ram pressure stripping. If the galaxy falls to $\\sim 50\\%$ of the virial radius, then the profile remains type~II, but if the galaxy reaches down to $\\sim 20\\%$ of the virial radius the break weakens and the profile becomes more type~I like. The velocity dispersions are only slightly increased in the cluster simulations compared with the isolated galaxy; random motion therefore cannot be responsible for redistributing material sufficiently to cause the change in the profile type. Instead we find that the joint action of radial migration driven by tidally-induced spirals and the outside-in quenching of star formation due to ram pressure stripping alters the density profile. ...

  8. Pregnancy Differentially Regulates the Collagens Types I and III in Left Ventricle from Rat Heart

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    Limon-Miranda, Sarai; Salazar-Enriquez, Diana G.; Muñiz, Jesus; Ramirez-Archila, Mario V.; Sanchez-Pastor, Enrique A.; Andrade, Felipa; Soñanez-Organis, Jose G.; Moran-Palacio, Edgar F.; Virgen-Ortiz, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    The pathologic cardiac remodeling has been widely documented; however, the physiological cardiac remodeling induced by pregnancy and its reversion in postpartum are poorly understood. In the present study we investigated the changes in collagen I (Col I) and collagen III (Col III) mRNA and protein levels in left ventricle from rat heart during pregnancy and postpartum. Col I and Col III mRNA expression in left ventricle samples during pregnancy and postpartum were analyzed by using quantitative PCR. Data obtained from gene expression show that Col I and Col III in left ventricle are upregulated during pregnancy with reversion in postpartum. In contrast to gene expression, the protein expression evaluated by western blot showed that Col I is downregulated and Col III is upregulated in left ventricle during pregnancy. In conclusion, the pregnancy differentially regulates collagens types I and III in heart; this finding could be an important molecular mechanism that regulates the ventricular stiffness in response to blood volume overload present during pregnancy which is reversed in postpartum. PMID:25147829

  9. Pregnancy Differentially Regulates the Collagens Types I and III in Left Ventricle from Rat Heart

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    Sarai Limon-Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathologic cardiac remodeling has been widely documented; however, the physiological cardiac remodeling induced by pregnancy and its reversion in postpartum are poorly understood. In the present study we investigated the changes in collagen I (Col I and collagen III (Col III mRNA and protein levels in left ventricle from rat heart during pregnancy and postpartum. Col I and Col III mRNA expression in left ventricle samples during pregnancy and postpartum were analyzed by using quantitative PCR. Data obtained from gene expression show that Col I and Col III in left ventricle are upregulated during pregnancy with reversion in postpartum. In contrast to gene expression, the protein expression evaluated by western blot showed that Col I is downregulated and Col III is upregulated in left ventricle during pregnancy. In conclusion, the pregnancy differentially regulates collagens types I and III in heart; this finding could be an important molecular mechanism that regulates the ventricular stiffness in response to blood volume overload present during pregnancy which is reversed in postpartum.

  10. The inhibitory effect of Gynostemma pentaphyllum on MCP-1 and type I procollagen expression in rat hepatic stellate cells.

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    Chen, Ming-Ho; Wang, Qwa-Fun; Chen, Lih-Geeng; Shee, Jia-Jen; Chen, Jung-Chou; Chen, Ke-Yu; Chen, Shu-Hsin; Su, Jyan-Gwo J; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2009-10-29

    Gynostemma pentaphyllum is a popular folk medicine that has been used for treatment of hepatitis in Asia. Our previous study demonstrates that Gynostemma pentaphyllum n-butanol extract inhibits the onset and improves the recovery of CCl(4)-induced liver fibrogenesis in rats and inhibits PDGF-induced rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) proliferation. In this study, the effect of Gynostemma pentaphyllum extract on cytokines and type I procollagen expression was analyzed. Rat HSCs were treated with PDGF, Gynostemma pentaphyllum n-butanol extract, RP-18-Gyp fraction, rapamycin or vehicle. Rat cytokine antibody array chip or ELISA kit was used for cytokines detection. Intracellular protein expression was detected by Western blotting, mRNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR. RP-18-Gyp fraction is the more purified gypenosides fraction from Gynostemma pentaphyllum n-butanol extract. In cell proliferation, the inhibitory effect of 200 microg/ml RP-18-Gyp fraction is similar to 500 microg/ml Gynostemma pentaphyllum n-butanol extract. Furthermore, both of them have the ability of decreasing monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) mRNA expression and protein release and inhibiting type I procollagen protein expression. Both of Gynostemma pentaphyllum n-butanol extract and its more purified RP-18-Gyp fraction have the biological activities in the inhibition of cell proliferation, MCP-1 release and type I procollagen expression in rat HSCs. These data could provide the evidence to support for the traditional use of Gynostemma pentaphyllum in hepatitis.

  11. Effects of immobilization and whole-body vibration on rat serum Type I collagen turnover

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    Gürhan Dönmez

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Although 1 week of WBV had a positive effect on type I collagen turnover in controls, it is not an efficient method for repairing tissue damage in the early stage following immobilization.

  12. Evaluation of anti-diabetic activity of Glucova Active Tablet on Type I and Type II diabetic model in rats

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    Hardik Soni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glucova Active Tablet is a proprietary Ayurvedic formulation with ingredients reported for anti-hyperglycemic, anti-hyperlipidemic activity and antioxidant properties. Objective: Evaluation of anti-diabetic activity of Glucova Active Tablet on Type I and Type II diabetic model in rats. Materials and Methods: Experimental Type I diabetes was induced in 24 albino rats with intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg. Type II diabetes was induced in 18 albino rats by intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (35 mg/kg along with high fat diet. The rats were divided in 5 groups for Type I model and 4 groups for Type II model. Normal control group was kept common for both experimental models. Glucova Active Tablet (108 mg/kg treatment was provided for 28 days twice daily orally. Fasting blood glucose level, serum lipid profile and liver anti-oxidant parameters like superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione was carried out in both experimental models. Pancreas histopathology was also done. Statistical analysis were done by ′analysis of variance′ test followed by post hoc Tukey′s test, with significant level of P < 0.05.Results and Discussion: Glucova Active Tablet showed significant effect on fasting blood glucose level. It also showed significant alteration in lipid profile and antioxidant parameters. Histopathology study revealed restoration of beta cells in pancreas in Glucova Active Tablet treated group. Conclusion: Finding of this study concludes that Glucova Active Tablet has shown promising anti-diabetic activity in Type I and Type II diabetic rats. It was also found showing good anti-hyperlipidemic activity and anti-oxidant property.

  13. Evaluation of anti-diabetic activity of Glucova Active Tablet on Type I and Type II diabetic model in rats

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    Soni, Hardik; Patel, Sejal; Patel, Ghanshyam; Paranjape, Archana

    2014-01-01

    Background: Glucova Active Tablet is a proprietary Ayurvedic formulation with ingredients reported for anti-hyperglycemic, anti-hyperlipidemic activity and antioxidant properties. Objective: Evaluation of anti-diabetic activity of Glucova Active Tablet on Type I and Type II diabetic model in rats. Materials and Methods: Experimental Type I diabetes was induced in 24 albino rats with intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Type II diabetes was induced in 18 albino rats by intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (35 mg/kg) along with high fat diet. The rats were divided in 5 groups for Type I model and 4 groups for Type II model. Normal control group was kept common for both experimental models. Glucova Active Tablet (108 mg/kg) treatment was provided for 28 days twice daily orally. Fasting blood glucose level, serum lipid profile and liver anti-oxidant parameters like superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione was carried out in both experimental models. Pancreas histopathology was also done. Statistical analysis were done by ‘analysis of variance’ test followed by post hoc Tukey's test, with significant level of P < 0.05. Results and Discussion: Glucova Active Tablet showed significant effect on fasting blood glucose level. It also showed significant alteration in lipid profile and antioxidant parameters. Histopathology study revealed restoration of beta cells in pancreas in Glucova Active Tablet treated group. Conclusion: Finding of this study concludes that Glucova Active Tablet has shown promising anti-diabetic activity in Type I and Type II diabetic rats. It was also found showing good anti-hyperlipidemic activity and anti-oxidant property. PMID:24948860

  14. DISTRIBUTION OF COLLAGENS TYPE-I, TYPE-III AND TYPE-V IN THE PANCREAS OF RAT, DOG, PIG AND MAN

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    VANDEIJNEN, JHM; VANSUYLICHEM, PTR; WOLTERS, GHJ; VANSCHILFGAARDE, R

    1994-01-01

    The presence of collagens type I, type III and type V was determined immunohistochemically in pancreatic tissue of rat, pig, dog and man. The reaction to anti-collagen type I is weak (pig, dog) or moderate (rat, man) in the peri-insular region and in the lobar, lobular and acinar septa, whereas the

  15. Late appearance of a type I alveolar epithelial cell marker during fetal rat lung development.

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    Danto, S I; Zabski, S M; Crandall, E D

    1994-10-01

    Recent studies in fetal lung using immunological and molecular probes have revealed type I and type II cell phenotypic markers in primordial lung epithelial cells prior to the morphogenesis of these cell types. We have recently developed monoclonal antibodies specific for adult type I cells. To evaluate further the temporal appearance of the type I cell phenotype during alveolar epithelial cell ontogeny, we analyzed fetal lung development using one of our monoclonal antibodies (mAb VIII B2). The epitope recognized by mAb VIII B2 first appears in the canalicular stage of fetal lung development, at approx. embryonic day 19 (E19), in occasional, faintly stained tubules. Staining with this type I cell probe becomes more intense and more widespread with increasing gestational age, during which time the pattern of staining changes. Initially, all cells of the distal epithelial tubules are uniformly labelled along their apical and basolateral surfaces. As morphological differentiation of the alveolar epithelium proceeds, type I cell immunoreactivity appears to become restricted to the apical surface of the primitive type I cells in a pattern approaching that seen in the mature lung. We concurrently analyzed developing fetal lung with an antiserum to surfactant apoprotein-A (alpha-SP-A). Consistent with the findings of others, labeling of SP-A was first detectable in scattered cuboidal cells at E18. Careful examination of the double-labeled specimens suggested that some cells were reactive with both the VIII B2 and SP-A antibodies, particularly at E20. Confocal microscopic analysis of such sections from E20 lung confirmed this impression. Three populations of cells were detected: cells labeled only with alpha-SP-A, cells labeled only with mAb VIII B2, and a smaller subset of cells labeled by both.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. ZK91587: a novel synthetic antimineralocorticoid displays high affinity for corticosterone (type I) receptors in the rat hippocampus

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    Sutanto, W.; de Kloet, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    In vitro cytosol binding assays have shown the properties of binding of a novel steroid, ZK91587 (15..beta.., 16..beta..b-methylene-mexrenone) in the brain of rats. Scatchard and Woolf analyses of the binding data reveal the binding of (/sup 3/H) ZK91587 to the total hippocampal coritcosteroid receptor sites with high affinity, and low capacity. When 100-fold excess RU28362 was included simultaneously with (/sup 3/H) ZK91587, the labelled steroid binds with the same affinity and capacity. Relative binding affinities (RBA) of various steroids for the Type I or Type II corticosteroid receptor in these animals are: Type I: ZK91587 = corticosterone (B) > cortisol (F); Type II: B > F >>> ZK91587. In the binding kinetic study, ZK91587 has a high association rate of binding in the rat. The steroid dissociates following a one slope pattern, indicating, the present data demonstrate that in the rat hippocampus, ZK91587 binds specifically to the Type I (corticosterone-preferring/mineralocorticoid-like receptor.

  17. EVALUATION OF THE EXTRACTS OF LEUCAS ASPERA ON BIOCHEMICAL PROFILES IN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF DIABETES MELLITUS (TYPE- I IN RATS

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    T.Tukaram

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of Leucas aspera leaves on experimental diabetes mellitus (type I in rats in terms of alterations in biochemical profiles. Thirty rats were randomly divided into six groups of 5 rats in each. Group-I were fed on basal diet without any treatment, group-II induced diabetic models (type-I (Alloxan monohydrate dissolved in sterile normal saline (150 mg/kgBW, ip, group-III, IV, V and VI were induced diabetics and treated with extract of Leucas aspera (30,100,150 and 300mg/kg BW respectively, PO twice daily in the morning and evening post prandially for thirty days respectively. The blood samples were collected on day 0, 10, 20 and 30 and were used for the analysis of biochemical profiles.The blood glucose (mg% were consistently increased significantly (P<0.01 in groups II,III, IV V and VI till day 20 while in groups V and VI there was a significant (P<0.01 decline in the values on day 30. There was found to have profound effect in lowering the blood glucose levels in dose dependent manner. The study revealed that experimental diabetes mellitus (type-I induced patho-biochemical changes were ameliorated more effectively by ethanolic extract of Leucas aspera in dose dependent manner.

  18. OXIDATIVE AND HYDROLYTIC METABOLISM OF TYPE I PYRETHROIDS IN RAT HEPATIC MICROSOMES

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    Pyrethroids are a class of neurotoxic insecticides used in a variety of agricultural and household activities. Increased potential for human exposure to pyrethroids has prompted pharmacokinetic research. To that end, our lab has determined the in vitro clearance of the Type I p...

  19. Collagen type I coating stimulates bone regeneration and osteointegration of titanium implants in the osteopenic rat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sartori, Maria; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Parrilli, Annapaola; Ferrari, Andrea; Aldini, Nicolò Nicoli; Morra, Marco; Cassinelli, Clara; Bollati, Daniele; Fini, Milena

    2015-01-01

    ...) on bone regeneration and osteointegration in a healthy and osteopenic rat animal model.TiColl screws were implanted into the femoral condyles of healthy and osteopenic rats and compared with acid-etched titanium (Ti) screws...

  20. A novel rat tail collagen type-I gel for the cultivation of human articular chondrocytes in low cell density.

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    Muller-Rath, R; Gavénis, K; Andereya, S; Mumme, T; Schmidt-Rohlfing, B; Schneider, U

    2007-12-01

    Collagen type-I matrix systems have gained growing importance as a cartilage repair device. However, most of the established matrix systems use collagen type-I of bovine origin seeded in high cell densities. Here we present a novel collagen type-I gel system made of rat tail collagen for the cultivation of human chondrocytes in low cell densities. Rat tail collagen type-I gel (CaReS, Arthro Kinetics, Esslingen, Germany) was seeded with human passage 2 chondrocytes in different cell densities to evaluate the optimal cell number. In vitro, the proliferation factor of low density cultures was more than threefold higher compared with high density cultures. After 6 weeks of in vitro cultivation, freshly prepared chondrocytes with an initial cell density of 2x10(5) cells/mL showed a proliferation factor of 33. A cell density of 2x10(5) cells/mL was chosen for in vitro and in vivo cultivation using the common nude mouse model as an in vivo system. Chondrocytes stayed viable as a Live/Dead fluorescence assay and TUNEL staining revealed. During in vitro cultivation, passage 0 cells partly dedifferentiated morphologically. In vivo, passage 0 cells maintained the chondrocyte phenotype and demonstrated an increased synthesis of collagen type-II protein and gene expression compared to passage 2 cells. Passage 2 cells did not redifferentiate in vivo. Cultivating a cell-seeded collagen gel of bovine origin as a control (AtelocollagenTM, Koken, Tokyo, Japan) did not lead to superior results with regard to cell morphology, col-II protein production and col-II gene expression. With the CaReS collagen gel system the best quality of repair tissue was obtained by seeding freshly isolated chondrocytes.

  1. Ammonium accumulation and cell death in a rat 3D brain cell model of glutaric aciduria type I.

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    Paris Jafari

    Full Text Available Glutaric aciduria type I (glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency is an inborn error of metabolism that usually manifests in infancy by an acute encephalopathic crisis and often results in permanent motor handicap. Biochemical hallmarks of this disease are elevated levels of glutarate and 3-hydroxyglutarate in blood and urine. The neuropathology of this disease is still poorly understood, as low lysine diet and carnitine supplementation do not always prevent brain damage, even in early-treated patients. We used a 3D in vitro model of rat organotypic brain cell cultures in aggregates to mimic glutaric aciduria type I by repeated administration of 1 mM glutarate or 3-hydroxyglutarate at two time points representing different developmental stages. Both metabolites were deleterious for the developing brain cells, with 3-hydroxyglutarate being the most toxic metabolite in our model. Astrocytes were the cells most strongly affected by metabolite exposure. In culture medium, we observed an up to 11-fold increase of ammonium in the culture medium with a concomitant decrease of glutamine. We further observed an increase in lactate and a concomitant decrease in glucose. Exposure to 3-hydroxyglutarate led to a significantly increased cell death rate. Thus, we propose a three step model for brain damage in glutaric aciduria type I: (i 3-OHGA causes the death of astrocytes, (ii deficiency of the astrocytic enzyme glutamine synthetase leads to intracerebral ammonium accumulation, and (iii high ammonium triggers secondary death of other brain cells. These unexpected findings need to be further investigated and verified in vivo. They suggest that intracerebral ammonium accumulation might be an important target for the development of more effective treatment strategies to prevent brain damage in patients with glutaric aciduria type I.

  2. Insulin Modulates Liver Function in a Type I Diabetes Rat Model

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    Eduardo L. Nolasco

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Several studies have been performed to unravel the association between diabetes and increased susceptibility to infection. This study aimed to investigate the effect of insulin on the local environment after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP in rats. Methods: Diabetic (alloxan, 42 mg/kg i.v., 10 days and non-diabetic (control male Wistar rats were subjected to a two-puncture CLP procedure and 6 h later, the following analyses were performed: (a total and differential cell counts in peritoneal lavage (PeL and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluids; (b quantification of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC-1 and CINC-2 in the PeL and BAL fluids by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA; (c total leukocyte count using a veterinary hematology analyzer and differential leukocyte counts on stained slides; (d biochemical parameters (urea, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP by colorimetric analyses; and (e lung, kidney, and liver morphological analyses (hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results: Relative to controls, non-diabetic and diabetic CLP rats exhibited an increased in the concentration of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, CINC-1, and CINC-2 and total and neutrophil in the PeL fluid. Treatment of these animals with neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin (NPH, 1IU and 4IU, respectively, s.c., 2 hours before CLP procedure, induced an increase on these cells in the PeL fluid but it did not change cytokine levels. The levels of ALT, AST, ALP, and urea were higher in diabetic CLP rats than in non-diabetic CLP rats. ALP levels were higher in diabetic sham rats than in non-diabetic sham rats. Treatment of diabetic rats with insulin completely restored ALT, AST, and ALP levels. Conclusion: These results together suggest that insulin attenuates liver dysfunction during early two-puncture CLP-induced peritoneal

  3. Osteogenicity of titanium implants coated with calcium phosphate or collagen type-I in osteoporotic rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alghamdi, H.S.A.; Bosco, R.; Beucken, J.J. van den; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    This study hypothesized that modification of titanium implant surface, e.g. by the deposition of inorganic/organic coatings, can significantly improve the implant-bone response compared in osteoporotic vs. healthy conditions. After osteoporosis was induced in 15 female Wistar rats by ovariectomy

  4. Regional alterations of type I collagen in rat tibia induced by skeletal unloading

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    Shiiba, Masashi; Arnaud, Sara B.; Tanzawa, Hideki; Kitamura, Eiji; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal unloading induces loss of mineral density in weight-bearing bones that leads to inferior bone mechanical strength. This appears to be caused by a failure of bone formation; however, its mechanisms still are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize collagen, the predominant matrix protein in bone, in various regions of tibia of rats that were subjected to skeletal unloading by 4 weeks tail suspension. Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (4 months old) were divided into tail suspension and ambulatory controls (eight rats each). After the tail suspension, tibias from each animal were collected and divided into five regions and collagen was analyzed. The collagen cross-linking and the extent of lysine (Lys) hydroxylation in unloaded bones were significantly altered in proximal epiphysis, diaphysis, and, in particular, proximal metaphysis but not in distal regions. The pool of immature/nonmineralized collagen measured by its extractability with a chaotropic solvent was significantly increased in proximal metaphysis. These results suggest that skeletal unloading induced an accumulation of post-translationally altered nonmineralized collagen and that these changes are bone region specific. These alterations might be caused by impaired osteoblastic function/differentiation resulting in a mineralization defect.

  5. Upregulation of PPARbeta/delta is associated with structural and functional changes in the type I diabetes rat diaphragm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadège Salvi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus is associated with alterations in peripheral striated muscles and cardiomyopathy. We examined diaphragmatic function and fiber composition and identified the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR alpha and beta/delta as a factor involved in diaphragm muscle plasticity in response to type I diabetes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Streptozotocin-treated rats were studied after 8 weeks and compared with their controls. Diaphragmatic strips were stimulated in vitro and mechanical and energetic variables were measured, cross bridge kinetics assessed, and the effects of fatigue and hypoxia evaluated. Morphometry, myosin heavy chain isoforms, PPAR alpha and beta/delta gene and protein expression were also assessed. Diabetes induced a decrease in maximum velocity of shortening (-14%, P<0.05 associated with a decrease in myosin ATPase activity (-49%, P<0.05, and an increase in force (+20%, P<0.05 associated with an increase in the number of cross bridges (+14%, P<0.05. These modifications were in agreement with a shift towards slow myosin heavy chain fibers and were associated with an upregulation of PPARbeta/delta (+314% increase in gene and +190% increase in protein expression, P<0.05. In addition, greater resistances to fatigue and hypoxia were observed in diabetic rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Type I diabetes induced complex mechanical and energetic changes in the rat diaphragm and was associated with an up-regulation of PPARbeta/delta that could improve resistance to fatigue and hypoxia and favour the shift towards slow myosin heavy chain isoforms.

  6. An extract from date seeds stimulates endogenous insulin secretion in streptozotocin-induced type I diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed F. El Fouhil

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The efficacy of an extract from date seeds has been tested successfully on the glycemic control of type I diabetes mellitus in rats. A suggestion that date seed extract could stimulate certain cells to differentiate into insulin-secreting cells has been proposed. In order to investigate such a possibility, this study was conducted to measure C-peptide levels in the serum of type 1 diabetic rats treated with date seed extract. Methods: Two hundred rats were divided into 4 groups. Group I served as the control. Group II was given daily ingestions of 10 ml of date seed extract. Groups III and IV were made diabetic by streptozotocin injection and were given daily subcutaneous injections of 3 IU/day of insulin for 8 weeks. Group IV received, in addition, daily ingestions of 10 ml of seed extract. At the end of experiment, blood samples were collected from each rat, and blood glucose and serum Cpeptide levels were measured. Results: No significant differences in the means of blood glucose and serum C-peptide levels were observed between groups I (control group and II (date seed extract-treated control group. Group IV (date seed extract-insulin-treated diabetic group showed a statistically significant reduction in the mean blood glucose level compared to Group III (insulin-treated diabetic group. The mean serum C-peptide level was significantly higher in group IV compared to group III. Conclusion: Biochemical results suggested an increase in endogenous insulin secretion in the case of type 1 diabetic rats treated with date seed extract, which might be the cause of its hypoglycemic effect.

  7. Preparation of ready-to-use, storable and reconstituted type I collagen from rat tail tendon for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Navneeta; Habermehl, Jason; Coté, Marie-France; Doillon, Charles J; Mantovani, Diego

    2006-01-01

    Collagen is a widely investigated extracellular matrix material with extensive potentials in the field of tissue engineering. This protocol describes a method to prepare reconstituted collagen that can be ready-to-use, storable and suitable for further in vitro and in vivo investigations. Type I collagen was extracted from rat tail tendons and processed in acetic acid solution to obtain sterile soluble collagen. At first, crude collagen was dissolved in acetic acid, then frozen at -20 degrees C and lyophilized to obtain a sponge, which could be stored at -80 degrees C. Lyophilized collagen was then dispersed in acetic acid to obtain a sterile solution of collagen at targeted concentrations. The whole low-cost process from the extraction to the final sterile solution takes around 2-3 weeks. The collagen solution, once neutralized, has the potential to be used to produce gels or scaffolds, to deposit thin films on supports and to develop drug delivery systems.

  8. A Novel Angiotensin Type I Receptor Antagonist, Fimasartan, Prevents Doxorubicin-induced Cardiotoxicity in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sung-A; Lim, Byung-Kwan; Lee, You Jung; Hong, Mi-Kyung; Choi, Jin-Oh; Jeon, Eun-Seok

    2015-05-01

    Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have organ-protective effects in heart failure and may be also effective in doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy (DOX-CMP); however, the efficacy of ARBs on the prevention of DOX-CMP have not been investigated. We performed a preclinical experiment to evaluate the preventive effect of a novel ARB, fimasartan, in DOX-CMP. All animals underwent echocardiography and were randomly assigned into three groups: treated daily with vehicle (DOX-only group, n=22), 5 mg/kg of fimasartan (Low-fima group, n=22), and 10 mg/kg of fimasartan (High-fima group, n=19). DOX was injected once a week for six weeks. Echocardiography and hemodynamic assessment was performed at the 8th week using a miniaturized conductance catheter. Survival rate of the High-fima group was greater (100%) than that of the Low-fima (75%) and DOX-only groups (50%). Echocardiography showed preserved left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction in the High-fima group, but not in the DOX-only group (P=0.002). LV dimensions increased in the DOX-only group; however, remodeling was attenuated in the Low-fima and High-fima groups. Hemodynamic assessment showed higher dP/dt in the High-fima group compared with the DOX-only group. A novel ARB, fimasartan, may prevent DOX-CMP and improve survival rate in a dose-dependent manner in a rat model of DOX-CMP and could be a treatment option for the prevention of DOX-CMP.

  9. Evidence for effects on thermoregulation after acute oral exposure to type I and type II pyrethroids in infant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardullas, Ulises; Sosa-Holt, Carla Solange; Pato, Alejandro Martín; Nemirovsky, Sergio Iván; Wolansky, Marcelo Javier

    2015-01-01

    Most pyrethroid (PYR) insecticides may be classified either as type-I compounds, which produce whole body tremors and hyperthermia, or type-II compounds, which produce salivation, choreoathetosis, and hypothermia (i.e., producing T and CS neurobehavioral syndromes, respectively). This classification is based on clinical observations in adult rats and mice after intracerebroventricular or intravascular administration of highly effective acute (bolus) doses. PYR neurotoxicity in infant animals is not characterized as much as in adult animals. Endpoints informing on vital determinants of mammal's maturation, such as body temperature may help recognizing age-related differences in susceptibility to PYRs. In this work, body temperature (Tb) was monitored at 30-min intervals after acute oral exposure to T-syndrome PYR bifenthrin (BIF), CS-syndrome PYR cypermethrin (CYPM), and a BIF–CYPM mixture in weanling rats by using a subcutaneous temperature monitoring system. In both single-compound assays, a time- and dose-related decline of Tb was the most evident impact on thermoregulation observed starting at ~2–3 h after dosing.Moreover, 15–18 mg/kg BIF induced a mild increase in Tb before the hypothermic action was apparent. The lowest effective dose for temperature perturbation was 15mg/kg for BIF and 10mg/kg for CYPM, and moderate neurobehavioral alterations were evident at 12 and 10mg/kg, respectively. When low effective doses of BIF and CYPM were co-administered mild behavioral effects and a transient increase in Tb (p=0.02) were observed at 1–2 h, and no Tb decline was apparent afterwards compared to control animals. Noteworthy, the hypothermic action of BIF in infant rats was quite different from the hyperthermia consistently reported in studies using mature animals. Our results suggest that body temperature monitoring may be useful as a complementary assessment to reveal qualitative age-specific pesticide effects in rats.

  10. Collagen type I Density on dental pulp inflamation of sprague-dawley rats following the application of trigona sp propolis from south sulawesi province,Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Ardo Sabir, Dr.drg. M.Kes

    2015-01-01

    The Result show That there is no significants difference of the collagen fibers density among 4 time periods of each group and among 5 groups of each time periods. The aim was to analyse the collagen type I density as the result of trigona sp propolis application in the dental pulp inflamation of sprague-dawley rats.

  11. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent serum assays (ELISAs) for rat and human N-terminal pro-peptide of collagen type I (PINP) - Assessment of corresponding epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeming, Diana Julie; Larsen, D.V.; Zhang, C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The present study describes two newly developed N-terminal pro-peptides of collagen type I (PINP) competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the assessment of corresponding PINP epitopes in the rat- and human species. Methods: Monoclonal antibodies were raised against...

  12. The type I interleukin-1 receptor mediates fever in the rat as shown by interleukin-1 receptor subtype selective ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowsky, D; Chai, Z; Bristulf, J; Simoncsits, A; Bartfai, T

    1995-12-01

    The interleukin-1 (IL-1) system possesses two distinct receptors (type I and type II) which, together with the accessory protein, mediate a multitude of responses to IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta, including fever. So far, no receptor subtype-specific ligands have been described. Since both types of IL-1 receptors occur in the thermoregulatory areas it was unclear which IL-1 receptor type mediates fever. We report here that for a series of deletion mutants of human recombinant IL-1 beta (hrIL-1 beta), the affinity of these ligands for the type I IL-1 receptor correlates with their efficacy to evoke the fever response (hrIL-1 beta > des-SND52-54 > des-QGE48-50 > des-I56). Thus, the results suggest that agonist occupancy of the type I IL-1 receptor is essential for IL-1 beta-mediated fever.

  13. Pyrazinamide potential effects on male rats DNA fragmentation, bone type I collagen amino acid composition, reproductive capability and posterity antenatal and postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, Larysa B; Shayakhmetova, Ganna M; Byshovets, Taisiya F; Kovalenko, Valentina M

    2012-01-01

    Current therapeutic regimens with first-line antitubercular agents are associated with a high rate of adverse effects which can lead to therapeutic failure. Understanding the nature and the severity of these effects is important for treatment optimization. The aim of present study was to investigate pyrazinamide potential effects on male rats DNA fragmentation, amino acid composition of bone type I collagen, reproductive capability and their posterity antenatal and postnatal development. Wistar albino male rats (160-200 g b.w.) were divided into three groups: I--received pyrazinamide per os at a dose of 1000 mg/kg b.w./day, II--at a dose of 2000 mg/kg b.w./day, in both groups it was given for 60 days; III--control. After 60 days of the experiment, rats of the experimental (groups I and II) and control groups were mated with intact virgin females. The amino acids contents of male rat bone type I collagens were determined using amino acid analyzer, epididymis and testis DNA fragmentation--electrophoretically; posterity antenatal development indices and postnatal development--by standard procedures. The study of pyrazinamide effects (administered in different doses) on males bone type I collagen amino acid contents and testis DNA fragmentation demonstrated the presence of dose-dependent pyrazinamide-mediated quantitative and qualitative changes in male rat reproductive organs DNA and extracellular matrix proteins in comparison with control. Changes in nucleic acids and proteins structure were accompanied by alterations in processes of fertilization (with intact females), embryogenesis and by lowering of posterity survival.

  14. Low-level light-emitting diode therapy increases mRNA expressions of IL-10 and type I and III collagens on Achilles tendinitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Murilo; de Souza, Renato Aparecido; Pires, Viviane Araújo; Santos, Ana Paula; Aimbire, Flávio; Silva, José Antônio; Albertini, Regiane; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of low-level light-emitting diode (LED) therapy (880 ± 10 nm) on interleukin (IL)-10 and type I and III collagen in an experimental model of Achilles tendinitis. Thirty male Wistar rats were separated into six groups (n = 5), three groups in the experimental period of 7 days, control group, tendinitis-induced group, and LED therapy group, and three groups in the experimental period of 14 days, tendinitis group, LED therapy group, and LED group with the therapy starting at the 7th day after tendinitis induction (LEDT delay). Tendinitis was induced in the right Achilles tendon using an intratendinous injection of 100 μL of collagenase. The LED parameters were: optical power of 22 mW, spot area size of 0.5 cm(2), and irradiation time of 170 s, corresponding to 7.5 J/cm(2) of energy density. The therapy was initiated 12 h after the tendinitis induction, with a 48-h interval between irradiations. The IL-10 and type I and III collagen mRNA expression were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction at the 7th and 14th days after tendinitis induction. The results showed that LED irradiation increased IL-10 (p < 0.001) in treated group on 7-day experimental period and increased type I and III collagen mRNA expression in both treated groups of 7- and 14-day experimental periods (p < 0.05), except by type I collagen mRNA expression in LEDT delay group. LED (880 nm) was effective in increasing mRNA expression of IL-10 and type I and III collagen. Therefore, LED therapy may have potentially therapeutic effects on Achilles tendon injuries.

  15. Photobiomodulation therapy on collagen type I and III, vascular endothelial growth factor, and metalloproteinase in experimentally induced tendinopathy in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Anna Cristina de Farias; Albertini, Regiane; Serra, Andrey Jorge; da Silva, Evela Aparecida Pereira; de Oliveira, Vanessa Lima Cavalcante; Silva, Luciana Miatto; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) on collagen type I and III, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in experimentally induced tendinopathy in female aged rats. Tendinopathy was induced by the Achilles tendoncollagenase peritendinous. Forty-two Wistar rats (Norvegicus albinus) were used; groups consisted of 36 aged animals (18 months old; mean body weight, 517.7 ± 27.54 g) and 6 adult animals (12 weeks old; mean body weight, 266± 19.30 g). The animals were divided into three groups: control, aged tendinopathy, and aged tendinopathy PBMT; the aged groups were subdivided based on time to euthanasia: 7, 14, and 21 days. PBMT involved a gallium-arsenide-aluminum laser (Theralaser, DMC®) with active medium operating at wavelength 830 ± 10 nm, 50 mW power, 0.028 cm(2) laser beam, 107 J/cm(2) energy density, 1.8 W/cm(2) power density, and an energy of 3 J per point. The laser was applied by direct contact with the left Achilles tendon during 60 s per point at a frequency of three times per week, until the euthanasia date (7, 14, and 21 days). VEGF, MMP-3, and MMP-9 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, and collagen type I and III by Sirius red. PBMT increased the deposition of collagen type I and III in a gradual manner, with significant differences relative to the group aged tendonitis (p tendinopathy (p < 0.001). PBMT, therefore, increased the production of collagen type I and III, downregulated the expression of MMP-3 and MMP-9, and upregulated that of VEGF, with age and age-induced hormonal deficiency.

  16. Neurotoxicity of Quinolinic Acid to Spiral Ganglion Cells in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖红俊; 杨琛; 何圆圆; 郑娜

    2010-01-01

    Our study investigated the neurotoxicity of quinolinic acid(QA) to spiral ganglion cells(SGCs),observed the protective effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate(NMDA) receptor antagonist MK-801 and magnesium ions on the QA-induced injury to SGCs,and analyzed the role of QA in otitis media with effusion(OME)-induced sensorineural hearing loss(SNHL).After culture in vitro for 72 h,SGCs were exposed to different media and divided into 4 groups:the blank control group,the QA injury group,the MK-801 treatment group,and th...

  17. Pirfenidone inhibits proliferation, arrests the cell cycle, and downregulates heat shock protein-47 and collagen type I in rat hepatic stellate cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xian-Hong; Jiang, Tian-Peng; Zhang, Shuai; Song, Jie; Li, Xing; Yang, Jian-Yong; Zhou, Shi

    2015-07-01

    Pirfenidone (esbiret) is an established anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory drug used to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. In the present study, the dose-dependent effects of pirfenidone on the cell cycle, proliferation and expression of heat shock protein (HSP)-47 and collagen type I in a cultured rat hepatic stellate cell line (HSC-T6) were investigated. Following pirfenidone treatment, cell proliferation was determined using the cell counting kit-8 assay and the cell cycle was measured using flow cytometry. HSP-47 expression was estimated using western blot analysis and collagen type I mRNA was assessed using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Pirfenidone induced significant dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation in HSC-T6 cells. Cell viability was unaffected by treatment with pirfenidone (0, 10 or 100 µM) for 24 and 72 h. However, after 24 h, HSC-T6 cells exhibited dose-dependent decreases in HSP-47 protein and collagen I mRNA levels. In conclusion, pirfenidone inhibited HSC-T6 cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle and reduced the expression of HSP-47 and collagen type I, indicating that pirfenidone may be a promising drug in the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  18. Effect of Resistance Training on Plasma Nitric Oxide and Asymmetric Dimethylarginine Concentrations in Type I Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Parivash Shekarchizadeh; Gharakhanlou, Reza; Karimian, Jahangir; Khazaei, Majid; Feizi, Awat; Safarzade, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) has a predominant role in progression of some cardiovascular diseases, including diabetes. It interferes with L-arginine in production of nitric oxide (NO) by inhibition of NO synthase. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of resistance training on plasma NO and ADMA concentrations in type 1 diabetic male rats. Methods: Thirty-six male wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: (1) control; (2) diabetic; (3) diabetic trained, and (4) control trained (n = 9 each). In the trained groups, the animals undertook one training session per day, 3 days/week, for 4 weeks. At the end of experiment, blood samples were taken and the concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, lipid profile, NO and ADMA concentrations were determined. Results: plasma ADMA concentration showed a significant increase in diabetic rats compare to control group (0.73 ± 0.07 vs. 0.62 ± 0.04 μmol/l; P < 0.05). The plasma ADMA level in the trained diabetic and control were lower than the sedentary groups, although it was not statistically significant. Plasma NO concentration in diabetic group was lower than control (P < 0.05). Resistance training significantly increased plasma NO concentration in diabetic animals (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Elevated ADMA level in diabetic animals can normalize during resistance exercise. Reduced ADMA level and increased NO level following resistance training might improve cardiovascular risk in diabetic subjects. PMID:23717776

  19. Selective C1 Lesioning Slightly Decreases Angiotensin II type I Receptor Expression in the Rat Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla (RVLM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, Erick A.; Stedenfeld, Kristen A.; Sved, Alan F.; Speth, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular homeostasis is regulated in large part by the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in mammals. Projections from the RVLM to the intermediolateral column of the thoracolumbar spinal cord innervate preganglionic neurons of the sympathetic nervous system causing elevation of blood pressure and heart rate. A large proportion, but not all, of the neurons in the RVLM contain the enzymes necessary for the production of epinephrine and are identified as the C1 cell group. Angiotensin II (Ang II) activates the RVLM acting upon AT1 receptors. To assess the proportion of AT1 receptors that are located on C1 neurons in the rat RVLM this study employed an antibody to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase conjugated to saporin, to selectively destroy C1 neurons in the RVLM. Expression of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons in the RVLM was reduced by 57 % in the toxin injected RVLM compared to the contralateral RVLM. In contrast, densitometric analysis of autoradiographic images of 125I-sarcosine1, isoleucine8 Ang II binding to AT1 receptors of the injected side RVLM revealed a small (10%) reduction in AT1 receptor expression compared to the contralateral RVLM. These results suggest that the majority of AT1 receptors in the rat RVLM are located on non-C1 neurons or glia. PMID:26138553

  20. Continuous inhibition of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I in adipose tissue leads to tachyphylaxis in humans and rats but not in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morentin Gutierrez, P; Gyte, A; deSchoolmeester, J; Ceuppens, P; Swales, J; Stacey, C; Eriksson, J W; Sjöstrand, M; Nilsson, C; Leighton, B

    2015-10-01

    11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I (11β-HSD1), a target for Type 2 diabetes mellitus, converts inactive glucocorticoids into bioactive forms, increasing tissue concentrations. We have compared the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationship of target inhibition after acute and repeat administration of inhibitors of 11β-HSD1 activity in human, rat and mouse adipose tissue (AT). Studies included abdominally obese human volunteers, rats and mice. Two specific 11β-HSD1 inhibitors (AZD8329 and COMPOUND-20) were administered as single oral doses or repeat daily doses for 7-9 days. 11β-HSD1 activity in AT was measured ex vivo by conversion of (3) H-cortisone to (3) H-cortisol. In human and rat AT, inhibition of 11β-HSD1 activity was lost after repeat dosing of AZD8329, compared with acute administration. Similarly, in rat AT, there was loss of inhibition of 11β-HSD1 activity after repeat dosing with COMPOUND-20 with continuous drug cover, but effects were substantially reduced if a 'drug holiday' period was maintained daily. Inhibition of 11β-HSD1 activity was not lost in mouse AT after continuous cover with COMPOUND-20 for 7 days. Human and rat AT, but not mouse AT, exhibited tachyphylaxis for inhibition of 11β-HSD1 activity after repeat dosing. Translation of observed efficacy in murine disease models to human for 11β-HSD1 inhibitors may be misleading. Investigators of the effects of 11β-HSD1 inhibitors should confirm that desired levels of enzyme inhibition in AT can be maintained over time after repeat dosing and not rely on results following a single dose. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Non-competitive metabotropic glutamate 1 receptor antagonists block activity of slowly adapting type I mechanoreceptor units in the rat sinus hair follicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahusac, P M B; Mavulati, S C

    2009-10-20

    Previous studies suggested that Group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors play a role in mechanotransduction processes of slowly adapting type I mechanoreceptors. Using an isolated rat sinus hair follicle preparation we tested a range of compounds. Surprisingly, only non-competitive mGlu1 receptor antagonists produced profound and long-lasting depression of mechanically evoked firing. 6-Amino-N-cyclohexyl-N,3-dimethylthiazolo[3,2-alpha]benzimidazole-2-carboxamide hydrochloride (YM-298198) had an IC(50) of 8.7 muM (95% CI 5.7 to 13.2 microM), representing the most potent known blocker of type I mechanoreceptors. The derivative 6-amino-N-cyclohexyl-3-methylthiazolo[3,2-alpha]benzimidazole-2-carboxamide hydrochloride (desmethyl YM-298198) had a comparable potency. Another compound 7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate ethyl ester (CPCCOEt) had a similar depressant effect, although it was less potent with an approximate IC(50) of 100 microM. Between three and seven times the concentration of CPCCOEt and YM-298198 respectively was required to produce similar depressions in slowly adapting type II units. No depression, and some weak excitatory effects, were observed using the following ligands: the competitive mGlu1 receptor antagonist alpha-amino-5-carboxy-3-methyl-2-thiopheneacetic acid (3-MATIDA) (300 microM), the phosphoserine phosphatase inhibitor dl-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (dl-AP3) (2 mM), non-competitive mGlu5 receptor antagonists 3-((2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl)pyridine; (S)-3,5-DHPG, (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (MTEP) (10 microM) and 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP) (100 microM), the mGlu1 receptor agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine ((S)-3,5-DHPG) (500 microM), and the mGlu5 receptor agonist (RS)-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG) (1 mM). The results suggest that the non-competitive mGlu1 receptor antagonists are not acting at conventional mGlu1 receptors but at other binding sites, possibly

  2. Phenotypic differentiation of neonatal rat cochlear spiral ganglion neurons following trypsin dissociation and culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dingjun Zha; Li Qiao; Lianjun Lu; Xue Gao; Tao Xue; Wenjuan Mi; Shunli Liu; Jianhua Qiu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Under laboratory conditions, cochlear spiral ganglion neurons are commonly isolated and cultured by mechanical dissociation. However, these neurons are extremely fragile and survive for only a short time.OBJECTIVE: To establish a trypsin dissociation and culture method for studying neonatal rat cochlear spiral ganglion neurons. DESIGN: A single sample study. SETTING: Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: This study was performed at the central laboratory for Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA from February to May 2006. A total of 40 neonatal Sprague Dawley rats of either gender, aged 2-5 days, were provided by the Laboratory Animal Center of the Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA. Trypsin and neuronal-specific nuclear protein (NeuN) monoclonal antibodies were purchased from Sigma Company, USA. Culture medium was synthesized using Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM)/F12 (Gibco Company, USA) supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (Sigma Company, USA), 100 000 U/L penicillin, and 1 mol/L NaOH. The following protocol was performed in accordance with ethical guidelines for the use and care of animals.METHODS: After anesthesia, rats were sacrificed by neck dislocation. A complete cochlear axis with spiral ganglion tissue was removed. The cochlear axis was rinsed three times in a culture dish with a diameter of 35 mm using Hank's balanced solution. After washings, the tissue was cut into pieces, digested with 0.25% trypsin for about 20 minutes, and incubated in a 37 ℃ water bath. The tissue was centrifuged, then mixed with serum-containing culture medium. Using a transfer pipette, the cell suspension was transferred to polylysine (0.1%)-treated culture dishes with a diameter of 35 mm. The culture dish was incubated at 37 ℃, with a 5% CO2-air environment. Once

  3. High dose of green tea infusion normalized spiral artery density in rats treated with the depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilda, A S; Veri, Nora; Alchalidi, Alchalidi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of green tea (GT) on the spiral artery density and endometrial thickness in female rats treated with the depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA). A total of 24 female rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 6 each): The control group (no treatment), the DMPA-treated group, treated with DMPA and GT doses of 165 mg/kg of body weight/day, and treated with DMPA and GT doses of 330 mg/kg of body weight/day. Spiral artery density and endometrial thickness were subjected to histopathological analysis. Spiral artery density decreased in the DMPA-treated group, despite the insignificant difference (P > 0.05). With regard to the administration of GT at doses of 165 and 330 mg/g of body weight/day, only GT at the high dose was capable of significantly preventing a decrease in spiral artery density (P 0.05). Meanwhile, the administration of DMPA and/or DMPA with GT did not cause significant changes in endometrial thickness relative to the control group (P > 0.05). DMPA induced a decrease in spiral artery density, despite the insignificant differences, and these changes could be normalized by the administration of high doses of GT. Therefore, GT could be a candidate herb to prevent the adverse effects of the contraceptive DMPA.

  4. Interleukin-1 stimulates the expression of type I and type II interleukin-1 receptors in the rat insulinoma cell line Rinm5F; sequencing a rat type II interleukin-1 receptor cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristulf, J; Gatti, S; Malinowsky, D; Bjork, L; Sundgren, A K; Bartfai, T

    1994-01-01

    The insulin secreting rat Rinm5F cells are often used to study the cytotoxic actions of interleukin-1 (IL-1) on pancreatic beta-cells. We demonstrate here that Rinm5F insulinoma cells express both type I and type II interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) mRNAs and gene products. IL-1R agonists, recombinant murine IL-1 alpha (rmIL-1 alpha, 10 ng/ml) and recombinant rat IL-1 beta (rrIL-1 beta, 100 pg/ml or 10 ng/ml) induce the upregulation of mRNA expression for both types of IL-1 receptors (IL-1Rs). This effect of rrIL-1 beta is antagonised by preincubation with recombinant human interleukin 1 receptor antagonist protein (rhIL-1ra, 5 micrograms/ml). Furthermore, this rrIL-1 beta induced upregulation of IL-1R mRNAs is blocked by actinomycin D (7.5 micrograms/ml), whereas cycloheximide (20 micrograms/ml) has no effect. The phorbol ester PMA (20 nM) upregulates the expression of mRNAs both IL-1 receptors, whereas glucose (50 mM) upregulates the expression of the type I IL-1R mRNA only. Pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml) partially blocks the rrIL-1 beta induced expression of mRNA for the type I and, to a lesser extent, the type II IL-1R. Incubation of the cells with rrIL-1 beta also induces a time-dependent expression of c-fos, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNAs. Binding studies with 125I-recombinant human IL-1 beta (125I-rhIL-1 beta) indicate that IL-1R gene products, with the ligand binding characteristics of the type I IL-1R, are constitutively present on Rinm5F cells. Treatment with rrIL-1 beta (6h) increases the number of 125I-rhIL-1 beta binding sites on Rinm5F cells. We have also demonstrated that the number of type II IL-1R binding sites increases after induction with rrIL-1 beta (6h), by indirect immunofluorescence using a monoclonal antibody (ALVA 42) raised against the human type II IL-1R. Furthermore, we have sequenced the type II IL-1R cDNA in the rat insulinoma Rinm5F cells. The comparison of the amino acid

  5. Mucopolysaccharidosis type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wraith, J E; Jones, Simon

    2014-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase a-L-Iduronidase leading to accumulation of the GAGs, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulphate, The disease spectrum includes a disorder with severe involvement and CNS disease Hurler disease (HPS I H) a chronic disease without CNS disease Scheie disease (HPS I S5) and the intermediate Hurler/Scheie disease(HPS I HIS).The urine GAGs pattern. confirmed by Iduronidase enzyme assay is diagnostic. Over 200 mutations exist. Genotype / phenotype correlation is poor but two nonsense mutations results in Hurler disease.The skeletal disease dysostosis multiplex (DM) is seen in severe variants of MPS I. The hypoplastic odontoid putting these patients at high risk of cervical cord damage. MPS IH (Hurler Disease) affected infants develop a spinal 'gibbus' deformity, persistent nasal discharge, middle ear effusions and frequent upper respiratory infection. They have "coarse", facial features, and an enlarged tongue. . Progressive upper airway disease leads to obstructive sleep apnoea. Corneal clouding and cognitive impairment appears, growth ceases. Joint stiffness and contractures limit mobility. Cardiac disease is universal. Death occurs before 10 years. SCHEIE patients are diagnosed as teenagers with hepatomegaly, joint contractures, cardiac valve abnormalities and corneal clouding . Prolonged survival with considerable disability without cognitive impairment is usual. MPS IH/S Hurler/Scheie. is diagnosed by 6.5 years, with variable skeletal and visceral manifestations without cognitive involvement. Joint stiffness, corneal clouding, , umbilical hernia, abnormal facies, hepatomegaly, joint contractures, and cervical myelopathy occur. Patients die in their 20s .Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) the standard treatment of MPS IH for 30 years is unpredictable .When performed before 2 years it can stabilize cognitive impairment. Hepatosplenomegaly, urine GAGs excretion, upper

  6. Antihyperglycemiac action of Diosmin, a citrus flavonoid, is induced through endogenous β-endorphin in type I-like diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chia-Chen; Lin, Mang Hung; Cheng, Juei Tang; Wu, Ming Chang

    2017-02-20

    Diosmin is one of the flavonoids contained in citrus and has been demonstrated to improve glucose metabolism in diabetic disorders. However, the mechanism(s) of diosmin in glucose regulation remain obscure. Therefore, we investigated the potential mechanism(s) for the antihyperglycemic action of diosmin in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ-diabetic rats). Diosmin lowered hyperglycemia in a dose-dependent manner in STZ-diabetic rats. This action was inhibited by naloxone at a dose sufficient to block opioid receptors. Additionally, we determined the changes in plasma β-endorphin-like immunoreactivity (BER) using ELISA. Diosmin also increased BER dose-dependently in the same manner. Repeated treatment of STZ-diabetic rats with diosmin for one week resulted in an increase in the expression of the glucose transporter subtype 4 (GLUT 4) in the soleus muscle and a reduction in the expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in the liver. These effects were also inhibited by naloxone at a dose sufficient to block opioid receptors. Bilateral adrenalectomy in STZ-diabetic rats eliminated the actions of diosmin, including both the reduction in hyperglycemia and the elevation of plasma BER. In conclusion, our results suggest that diosmin may act on the adrenal glands to enhance the secretion of β-endorphin, which can stimulate the opioid receptors to attenuate hepatic gluconeogenesis and increase glucose uptake in soleus muscle, resulting in reduced hyperglycemia in STZ-diabetic rats. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP) is a marker for fibrogenesis in bile duct ligation-induced fibrosis in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veidal, Sanne Skovgård; Vassiliadis, Efstathios; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine

    2010-01-01

    ligation (BDL) in rats. METHODS: BDL was performed on 30 female Sprague-Dawley rats aged 6 months, and sham operations on 30 controls. Animals were killed after 14, 28, or 35 days. The extent of liver fibrosis was evaluated by quantitative histology after Sirus Red staining. Levels of serum PINP...... and osteocalcin (a marker solely for osteoblastic bone formation) were determined using ELISA at baseline and post termination. RESULTS: Collagen formation increased by 30% compared to 3% in sham-operated animals (P

  8. Topical application of Acalypha indica accelerates rat cutaneous wound healing by up-regulating the expression of Type I and III collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshkumar, Moorthy; Ponrasu, Thangavel; Krithika, Rajesh; Iyappan, Kuttalam; Gayathri, Vinaya Subramani; Suguna, Lonchin

    2012-06-26

    Acalypha indica Linn. (Acalypha indica) vernacularly called Kuppaimeni in Tamil, has been used as a folklore medicine since ages for the treatment of wounds by tribal people of Tamil Nadu, Southern India. The present study investigates the biochemical and molecular rationale behind the healing potential of Acalypha indica on dermal wounds in rats. Acalypha indica extract (40 mg/kg body weight) was applied topically once a day on full-thickness excision wounds created on rats. The wound tissue was removed and used for estimation of various biochemical and biophysical analyses and to observe histopathological changes with and with-out extract treatment. The serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) was measured at 12 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h post-wounding using ELISA. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was performed to study the expression pattern of transforming growth factor [TGF-β1], collagen 1 α (I) [Col 1 α (I)] and collagen 3 α (I) [Col 3 α (I)]. Likewise, linear incision wounds were created and treated with the extract and used for tensile strength measurements. Wound healing in control rats was characterized by less inflammatory cell infiltration, lack of granulation tissue formation, deficit of collagen and significant decrease in biomechanical strength of wounds. Acalypha indica treatment mitigated the oxidative stress and decreased lipid peroxidation with concomitant increase in ascorbic acid levels. It also improved cellular proliferation, increased TNF-α levels during early stages of wound healing, up-regulated TGF-β1 and elevated collagen synthesis by markedly increasing the expression of Col 1 α (I) and Col 3 α (I). Increased rates of wound contraction, epithelialization, enhanced shrinkage temperature and high tensile strength were observed in the extract treated rats. Acalypha indica extract was shown to augment the process of dermal wound healing by its ability to increase collagen

  9. Interleukin 1 (IL-1) type I receptors mediate activation of rat hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and interleukin 6 production as shown by receptor type selective deletion mutants of IL-1beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dam, A M; Malinowsky, D; Lenczowski, M J; Bartfai, T; Tilders, F J

    1998-06-01

    The cytokine interleukin 1 (IL-1) plays an important role in the activation of the hypothalamus-pituary-adrenal (HPA)-axis and interleukin 6 (IL-6) production during infection or inflammation. Which of the interleukin-1 receptor types mediates these effects is not known. To investigate this issue a pharmacological approach was chosen by using recently developed IL-1 receptor type selective ligands. Rats were given one of various doses of recombinant human IL-1beta (rhIL-1beta; 1 and 10 microg/kg) and of several IL-1beta mutants (DeltaSND, DeltaQGE and DeltaI; 1, 10 and 100 microg/kg), that differ in their affinities for the IL-1 type I receptor but have similar affinities for the IL-1 type II receptor. One hour after intravenous administration of rhIL-1beta or IL-1beta mutants, plasma levels of ACTH, corticosterone (cort) and IL-6 were measured. Doses of 1 and 10 microg/kg rhIL-1beta markedly elevated plasma levels of ACTH, cort and IL-6. However, 10-100-fold higher doses of IL-1beta mutants DeltaSND and DeltaQGE and at least 100-fold higher doses of DeltaI have to be administered to increase plasma levels of ACTH, cort and IL-6. The potency differences correlate with their respective affinity for the type I receptor but not with that of the IL-1 type II receptor. It is concluded that IL-1beta induced ACTH, cort and IL-6 production is mediated by interleukin 1 type I receptors.

  10. Effects of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, angio- tensin II type I receptor blocker and their combination on postinfarcted ventricular remodeling in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Transforming growth factor (TGF) β1-Smads signal plays an important role in cardiac remodeling following myocardial infarction (MI). In addition, both angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) and angiotensin II type I receptor blocker (ARB) can effectively prevent left ventricular remodeling. The current study focused on whether the combination of ACEI and ARB is more beneficial for preventing ventricular remodeling and whether Smad proteins mediate this beneficial effect.Results VW/BW significantly increased in the placebo groups compared with that in the control group (P<0.01). This increase was limited in ACEI, ARB, and combined groups (P<0.01 compared with placebo group). There was no significant difference among the three actively treated groups. Collagen was increased in placebo group (5.68±0.5)% compared with that in control group (P<0.01). ACEI, ARB and combined treatment attenuated this increase of collagen [(4.3±0.5)%, (3.5±0.5)%, (3.2±0.4)%] in comparison with that in placebo group (P<0.01 respectively). Combined treatment showed more significant effect on collagen deposition. EF and FS significantly decreased, LVDd and E/A significantly increased in placebo group compared with that in control group (P<0.01 respectively). ACEI, ARB and combined treatment ameliorated these indexes (P<0.01 compared with placebo group). The mRNA expression of TGFβ1, Smad 2, and Smad 3 (0.700±0.045, 0.959±0.037 and 0.850±0.051) increased in placebo group compared with that in control group (P<0.01). ACEI, ARB and combined treatment normalized the increase (P<0.01). Furthermore, ARB and combined treatment proved to be more effective in decreasing TGF β1 and Smad mRNA expression than ACEI treatment (P<0.01). The expression of Smad 2 and Smad 3 protein increased in placebo group compared with that in control group (P<0.01). ACEI, ARB and combined treatment normalized the increase (P<0.01). Furthermore, ARB and combined treatment proved to be more

  11. Effects of S100A9 in a rat model of asthma and in isolated tracheal spirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lei-Miao; Li, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Qing-Hua; Xu, Yu-Dong; Wang, Yu; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Wei, Ying; Liu, Yan-Yan; Yang, Yong-Qing

    2010-07-30

    S100A9 is a member of the S100 family of proteins that contain two EF-hand calcium-binding motifs. We previously reported that S100A9 was differentially expressed during the early airway response phase of asthma and can be regulated by acupuncture. To understand the possible role of S100A9 in asthma, the effects of the S100A9 were investigated in a rat model of asthma and in isolated tracheal spirals. The pulmonary function and isometric tension were measured after the administration of purified recombinant S100A9. The results of in vivo experiments showed that S100A9 (0.1microg/kg) significantly decreased the pulmonary resistance and increased the dynamic compliance. The in vitro experimental results showed that S100A9 (100, 200, 400, or 800ng/ml, final concentrations) significantly reduced the isometric tension of isolated tracheal spirals. These results suggest that S100A9 elicits dose-dependent anti-asthmatic effects and may provide further insight into the treatment of asthma.

  12. Direct interaction of Syk and Lyn protein tyrosine kinases in rat basophilic leukemia cells activated via type I Fc epsilon receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoui, M; Dráberová, L; Tolar, P; Dráber, P

    1997-01-01

    Activation of rat mast cells through the receptor with high affinity for IgE (Fc epsilonRI) requires a complex set of interactions involving transmembrane subunits of the Fc epsilonRI and two classes of nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase (PTK). the Src family PTK p53/p56(lyn) (Lyn) and the Syk/ZAP-family PTK p72(syk) (Syk). Early activation events involve increased activity of Lyn and Syk kinases and their translocation into membrane domains containing aggregated Fc epsilonRI, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for these changes have remained largely unclear. To determine the role of Fc epsilonRI subunits in this process, we have analyzed Syk- and Lyn-associated proteins in activated rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells and their variants deficient in the expression of Fc epsilonRI beta or gamma subunits. Sepharose 4B gel chromatography of postnuclear supernatants from Nonidet-P40-solubilized antigen (Ag)- or pervanadate-activated RBL cells revealed extensive changes in the size of complexes formed by Lyn and Syk kinases and other cellular components. A fusion protein containing Src homology 2 (SH2) and SH3 domains of Lyn bound Syk from lysates of nonactivated RBL cells; an increased binding was observed when lysates from Ag- or pervanadate-activated cells were used. A similar amount of Syk was bound when lysates from pervanadate-activated variant cells deficient in the expression of Fc epsilonRI beta or gamma subunits were used, suggesting that Fc epsilonRI does not function as the only intermediate in the formation of the Syk-Lyn complexes. Further experiments have indicated that Syk-Lyn interactions occur in Ag-activated RBL cells under in vivo conditions and that these interactions could involve direct binding of the Lyn SH2 domain with phosphorylated tyrosine of Syk. The physical association of Lyn and Syk during mast-like cell activation supports the recently proposed functional cooperation of these two tyrosine kinases in Fc epsilonRI signaling.

  13. Therapy with methanolic extract of Pterocarpus marsupium Roxb and Ocimum sanctum Linn reverses dyslipidemia and oxidative stress in alloxan induced type I diabetic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prem Kumar; Baxi, Darshee; Banerjee, Sudip; Ramachandran, A V

    2012-07-01

    Methanolic extracts of Pterocarpus marsupium Roxb (P. marsupium) and Ocimum sanctum Linn (O. sanctum) were prepared separately and then administered to both non-diabetic and alloxan induced diabetic adult female Wistar rats as a mixture of both at a dosage of 500mg/kg body weight, and its effect was checked on serum and tissue lipids together with corticosterone, estrogen and progesterone profile. Further, tissue load of metabolites (cholesterol), enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant status together with lipid peroxidation levels and serum markers of hepatic and renal damage were also assessed. Results of the present study strongly support the possibility of this herbal combination in humans to meet the objective of achieving a holistic amelioration and cure of diabetes as, the herbal extract mixture of P. marsupium and O. sanctum has succeeded in not only rectifying dyslipidemia but also in restoring the endogenous antioxidant levels to the pre diabetic status. Herbal preparations are ideal candidates of choice and in this context, the present combination of P. marsupium and O. sanctum provides compelling evidence for a holistic efficacy in amelioration of associated diabetic manifestations/dysregulations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: mucopolysaccharidosis type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions mucopolysaccharidosis type I mucopolysaccharidosis type I Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a condition that affects many ...

  15. Bianchi type I string cosmologies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D N Pant; Sanjay Oli

    2003-03-01

    By making use of Letelier’s form of energy–momentum tensor for a cloud of stringdust we present some classes of solutions of general relativistic field equations which describe cosmological string-dust models in Bianchi type I space-time. Some of the classes of models obey Takabayashi’s equation of state whereas a class of models exhibits inflation in the initial stage. Two of the classes presented here have Kasner’s space-time as past asymptote.

  16. NEUROFIBROMATOSIS TYPE I: CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available : Neurofibromatosis (NF is a term that has been applied to a variety of related syndromes, characterized by neuro ectodermal tumors arising within multiple organs and autosomal-dominant inheritance. Neurofibromatosis type I(NF-1, known as well as Recklinghausen’s disease, we have presented a case report of 10 year old boy with complain of scalp swelling on right postero-lateral aspect of scalp with multiple flat, hypo pigmented macule on back, neck. On radiology work up including MRI there were multiple plexiform neuroibromas, multiple non-neoplastic hamartomatous lesion suggestive of neurofibromatosis type.

  17. Spiral symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hargittai, Istvan

    1992-01-01

    From the tiny twisted biological molecules to the gargantuan curling arms of many galaxies, the physical world contains a startling repetition of spiral patterns. Today, researchers have a keen interest in identifying, measuring, and defining these patterns in scientific terms. Spirals play an important role in the growth processes of many biological forms and organisms. Also, through time, humans have imitated spiral motifs in their art forms, and invented new and unusual spirals which have no counterparts in the natural world. Therefore, one goal of this multiauthored book is to stress the c

  18. Species differences in liver type I iodothyronine deiodinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.H. Schoenmakers (Christian); I.G.A.J. Pigmans (I. G A J); T.J. Visser (Theo)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractThe type I iodothyronine deiodinase (ID-I) of liver is an important enzyme for the conversion of the prohormone thyroxine (T4) to the active thyroid hormone 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine (T3). Because it is an integral membrane protein of low abundance, purification of ID-I from rat liver has

  19. Type I signal peptidases of Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjalsma, Harold; Bolhuis, Albert; Bron, Sierd; Jongbloed, Jan; Meijer, Wilfried J.J.; Noback, Michiel; van Roosmalen, Maarten; Venema, Gerhardus; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Hopsu Havu, VK; Jarvinen, M; Kirschke, H

    1997-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis contains at least three chromosomally-encoded type I signal peptidases (SPases; SipS, SipT, and SipU), which remove signal peptides from secretory proteins. In addition, certain B. subtilis (natto) strains contain plasmid-encoded type I SPases (SipP). The known type I SPases from

  20. Investigation on the optical scan condition for imaging of multi-slice spiral CT liver perfusion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Rong-jie; WANG Jin-e; JIANG Hui-jie; HAO Xue-jia; DONG Xu-peng; HUANG Ya-hua; WEI Lai

    2013-01-01

    contrast agent was 19% or 38%,no pseudo-color map was created.The viscosity increased when the concentration of the contrast agent was 76%; so it is difficult to inject the contrast agent at such a high concentration.Also no pseudo-color map was generated when the injection time was short (1,2-3,and 4-5 seconds)or the injection rate was low (0.3 mi/s).The best perfusion images and perfusion parameters were obtained during 50 seconds scanning.Each rat was given an injection of 57% diatrizoate at 0.5 mi/s via the tail vein using a high-pressure syringe for 6 seconds.The perfusion parameters included hepatic blood flow (HBF),hepatic blood volume (HBV),mean transit time (MTT) of the contrast agent,capillary permeability-surface area product (PS),hepatic arterial index (HAI),hepatic artery perfusion (HAP),and hepatic portal perfusion (HPP).All these parameters reflected the perfusion status of liver parenchyma in normal rats,Three phases of enhancement were modified according to the time-density curves (TDCs) of the perfusion imaging:hepatic arterial phase (7 seconds),hepatic portal venous phase (15 seconds),and a delayed phase (23-31 seconds).On examination by microscopy,the liver tissues were pathologically normal.Conclusions The appropriate protocol with multi-slice spiral CT liver perfusion reflected normal liver hemodynamics in rats.This study laid a solid foundation for further investigation of the physiological characteristics of liver cancer in a rat model,and was an important supplement to and reference for conventional contrast-enhanced CT scans.

  1. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7 identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra

  2. Type I Planetary Migration with MHD Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Laughlin, G; Adams, F; Laughlin, Gregory; Steinacker, Adriane; Adams, Fred

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines how type I planet migration is affected by the presence of turbulent density fluctuations in the circumstellar disk. For type I migration, the planet does not clear a gap in the disk and its secular motion is driven by torques generated by the wakes it creates in the surrounding disk fluid. MHD turbulence creates additional density perturbations that gravitationally interact with the planet and can dominate the torques produced by the migration mechanism itself. This paper shows that conventional type I migration can be readily overwhelmed by turbulent perturbations and hence the usual description of type I migration should be modified in locations where the magnetorotational instability is active. In general, the migrating planet does not follow a smooth inward trned, but rather exhibits a random walk through phase space. Our main conclusion is that MHD turbulence will alter the time scales for type I planet migration and -- because of chaos -- requires the time scales to be described by ...

  3. The spiral

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bibace, Roger; Kharlamov, Nikita

    2013-01-01

    At the core of Heinz Werner’s concept of development is what he called “the genetic principle of spirality:” over the course of ontogenetic development, lower levels, processes, and functions do not disappear, and can even resurface again under specific conditions, normal and pathological. Werner...

  4. Streptozotocin, Type I Diabetes Severity and Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motyl Katherine

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As many as 50% of adults with type I (T1 diabetes exhibit bone loss and are at increased risk for fractures. Therapeutic development to prevent bone loss and/or restore lost bone in T1 diabetic patients requires knowledge of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the bone pathology. Because cell culture models alone cannot fully address the systemic/metabolic complexity of T1 diabetes, animal models are critical. A variety of models exist including spontaneous and pharmacologically induced T1 diabetic rodents. In this paper, we discuss the streptozotocin (STZ-induced T1 diabetic mouse model and examine dose-dependent effects on disease severity and bone. Five daily injections of either 40 or 60 mg/kg STZ induce bone pathologies similar to spontaneously diabetic mouse and rat models and to human T1 diabetic bone pathology. Specifically, bone volume, mineral apposition rate, and osteocalcin serum and tibia messenger RNA levels are decreased. In contrast, bone marrow adiposity and aP2 expression are increased with either dose. However, high-dose STZ caused a more rapid elevation of blood glucose levels and a greater magnitude of change in body mass, fat pad mass, and bone gene expression (osteocalcin, aP2. An increase in cathepsin K and in the ratio of RANKL/OPG was noted in high-dose STZ mice, suggesting the possibility that severe diabetes could increase osteoclast activity, something not seen with lower doses. This may contribute to some of the disparity between existing studies regarding the role of osteoclasts in diabetic bone pathology. Examination of kidney and liver toxicity indicate that the high STZ dose causes some liver inflammation. In summary, the multiple low-dose STZ mouse model exhibits a similar bone phenotype to spontaneous models, has low toxicity, and serves as a useful tool for examining mechanisms of T1 diabetic bone loss.

  5. Streptozotocin, Type I Diabetes Severity and Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motyl Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As many as 50% of adults with type I (T1 diabetes exhibit bone loss and are at increased risk for fractures. Therapeutic development to prevent bone loss and/or restore lost bone in T1 diabetic patients requires knowledge of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the bone pathology. Because cell culture models alone cannot fully address the systemic/metabolic complexity of T1 diabetes, animal models are critical. A variety of models exist including spontaneous and pharmacologically induced T1 diabetic rodents. In this paper, we discuss the streptozotocin (STZ-induced T1 diabetic mouse model and examine dose-dependent effects on disease severity and bone. Five daily injections of either 40 or 60 mg/kg STZ induce bone pathologies similar to spontaneously diabetic mouse and rat models and to human T1 diabetic bone pathology. Specifically, bone volume, mineral apposition rate, and osteocalcin serum and tibia messenger RNA levels are decreased. In contrast, bone marrow adiposity and aP2 expression are increased with either dose. However, high-dose STZ caused a more rapid elevation of blood glucose levels and a greater magnitude of change in body mass, fat pad mass, and bone gene expression (osteocalcin, aP2. An increase in cathepsin K and in the ratio of RANKL/OPG was noted in high-dose STZ mice, suggesting the possibility that severe diabetes could increase osteoclast activity, something not seen with lower doses. This may contribute to some of the disparity between existing studies regarding the role of osteoclasts in diabetic bone pathology. Examination of kidney and liver toxicity indicate that the high STZ dose causes some liver inflammation. In summary, the multiple low-dose STZ mouse model exhibits a similar bone phenotype to spontaneous models, has low toxicity, and serves as a useful tool for examining mechanisms of T1 diabetic bone loss.

  6. Extracellular ATP decreases trophoblast invasion, spiral artery remodeling and immune cells in the mesometrial triangle in pregnant rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaans, F.; Melgert, B. N.; Chiang, C.; Borghuis, T.; Klok, P. A.; de Vos, P.; van Goor, H.; Bakker, W.W.; Faas, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Preeclampsia is characterized by deficient trophoblast invasion and spiral artery remodeling, a process governed by inflammatory cells. High levels of the danger signal extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) have been found in women with preeclampsia and infusion of ATP in pregnant

  7. Immunomodulatory functions of type I interferons

    OpenAIRE

    González-Navajas, José M.; Lee, Jongdae; David, Michael; Raz, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Interferon-α (IFNα) and IFNβ, collectively known as type I IFNs, are the major effector cytokines of the host immune response against viral infections. However, the production of type I IFNs is also induced in response to bacterial ligands of innate immune receptors and/or bacterial infections, indicating a broader physiological role for these cytokines in host defence and homeostasis than was originally assumed. The main focus of this Review is the underappreciated immunomodulatory functions...

  8. Type I restriction enzymes and their relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loenen, Wil A M; Dryden, David T F; Raleigh, Elisabeth A; Wilson, Geoffrey G

    2014-01-01

    Type I restriction enzymes (REases) are large pentameric proteins with separate restriction (R), methylation (M) and DNA sequence-recognition (S) subunits. They were the first REases to be discovered and purified, but unlike the enormously useful Type II REases, they have yet to find a place in the enzymatic toolbox of molecular biologists. Type I enzymes have been difficult to characterize, but this is changing as genome analysis reveals their genes, and methylome analysis reveals their recognition sequences. Several Type I REases have been studied in detail and what has been learned about them invites greater attention. In this article, we discuss aspects of the biochemistry, biology and regulation of Type I REases, and of the mechanisms that bacteriophages and plasmids have evolved to evade them. Type I REases have a remarkable ability to change sequence specificity by domain shuffling and rearrangements. We summarize the classic experiments and observations that led to this discovery, and we discuss how this ability depends on the modular organizations of the enzymes and of their S subunits. Finally, we describe examples of Type II restriction-modification systems that have features in common with Type I enzymes, with emphasis on the varied Type IIG enzymes.

  9. Spiral inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Barenboim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel scenario of primordial inflation in which the inflaton goes through a spiral motion starting from around the top of a symmetry breaking potential. We show that, even though inflation takes place for a field value much smaller than Planck scale, it is possible to obtain relatively large tensor-to-scalar ratio (r∼0.1 without fine tuning. The inflationary observables perfectly match Planck data.

  10. Earth Abundant Element Type I Clathrate Phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Kauzlarich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Earth abundant element clathrate phases are of interest for a number of applications ranging from photovoltaics to thermoelectrics. Silicon-containing type I clathrate is a framework structure with the stoichiometry A8-xSi46 (A = guest atom such as alkali metal that can be tuned by alloying and doping with other elements. The type I clathrate framework can be described as being composed of two types of polyhedral cages made up of tetrahedrally coordinated Si: pentagonal dodecahedra with 20 atoms and tetrakaidecahedra with 24 atoms in the ratio of 2:6. The cation sites, A, are found in the center of each polyhedral cage. This review focuses on the newest discoveries in the group 13-silicon type I clathrate family: A8E8Si38 (A = alkali metal; E = Al, Ga and their properties. Possible approaches to new phases based on earth abundant elements and their potential applications will be discussed.

  11. Spiralling upward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulgasser, Kalman; Witztum, Allan

    2004-09-21

    Thin vertical leaves often manifest twist. Perhaps the most prominent example of this is in Typha sp., but such twist is also apparent in Narcissus, Pancratium and many other genera. Such a blade is often referred to as a "spiral leaf". We will indicate the mechanical advantage afforded to the leaf by this arrangement, i.e. that it permits the leaf to achieve a greater height without losing stability, that is bending over due to its own weight. We quantify this gain and show how by a simple experiment it can be shown that the advantage is indeed utilized in nature. Typha domingensis is offered as an example.

  12. The spiral

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bibace, Roger; Kharlamov, Nikita

    2013-01-01

    ’s work with Bernard Kaplan on symbol formation is a primer on this idea. This paper examines the idea of spirality and develops the notion of dynamic coexistence that can clarify the issue of directionality of development; that is, what is the general trajectory or ground plan that development assumes....... Directionality is discussed in terms of the organism-in-environment unfolding over time as the unit of developmental analysis. Thinking on this issue has proceeded from the nature–nurture debates, to recognition of the interaction of external and internal processes, to transactions between the organism...

  13. Cochlear implant in incomplete partition type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrettini, S; Forli, F; De Vito, A; Bruschini, L; Quaranta, N

    2013-02-01

    In this investigation, we report on 4 patients affected by incomplete partition type I submitted to cochlear implant at our institutions. Preoperative, surgical, mapping and follow-up issues as well as results in cases with this complex malformation are described. The cases reported in the present study confirm that cochlear implantation in patients with incomplete partition type I may be challenging for cochlear implant teams. The results are variable, but in many cases satisfactory, and are mainly related to the surgical placement of the electrode and residual neural nerve fibres. Moreover, in some cases the association of cochlear nerve abnormalities and other disabilities may significantly affect results.

  14. On Type I Singularities in Ricci flow

    CERN Document Server

    Enders, Joerg; Topping, Peter M

    2010-01-01

    We define several notions of singular set for Type I Ricci flows and show that they all coincide. In order to do this, we prove that blow-ups around singular points converge to nontrivial gradient shrinking solitons, thus extending work of Naber. As a by-product we conclude that the volume of a finite-volume singular set vanishes at the singular time. We also define a notion of density for Type I Ricci flows and use it to prove a regularity theorem reminiscent of White's partial regularity result for mean curvature flow.

  15. Geometry of all supersymmetric type I backgrounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gran, Ulf; Papadopoulos, George; Sloane, Peter; Roest, Diederik

    2007-01-01

    We find the geometry of all supersymmetric type I backgrounds by solving the gravitino and dilatino Killing spinor equations, using the spinorial geometry technique, in all cases. The solutions of the gravitino Killing spinor equation are characterized by their isotropy group in Spin(9, 1), while th

  16. Quantum spirals

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, Z

    2016-01-01

    Quantum systems often exhibit fundamental incapability to entertain vortex. The Meissner effect, a complete expulsion of the magnetic field (the electromagnetic vorticity), for instance, is taken to be the defining attribute of the superconducting state. Superfluidity is another, close-parallel example; fluid vorticity can reside only on topological defects with a limited (quantized) amount. Recent developments in the Bose-Einstein condensates produced by particle traps further emphasize this characteristic. We show that the challenge of imparting vorticity to a quantum fluid can be met through a nonlinear mechanism operating in a hot fluid corresponding to a thermally modified Pauli-Schroedinger spinor field. In a simple field-free model, we show that the thermal effect, represented by a nonlinear, non-Hermitian Hamiltonian, in conjunction with spin vorticity, leads to new interesting quantum states; a spiral solution is explicitly worked out.

  17. Spiral tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan Asadiyan, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    Spiral Tectonics (ST) is a new window to global tectonics introduced as alternative model for Plate Tectonics (PT). ST based upon Dahw(rolling) and Tahw(spreading) dynamics. Analogues to electric and magnetic components in the electromagnetic theory we could consider Dahw and Tahw as components of geodynamics, when one component increases the other decreases and vice versa. They are changed to each other during geological history. D-component represents continental crust and T-component represents oceanic crust. D and T are two arm of spiral-cell. T-arm 180 degree lags behind D-arm so named Retard-arm with respect to D or Forward-arm. It seems primary cell injected several billions years ago from Earth's center therefore the Earth's core was built up first then mantel and finally the crust was build up. Crust building initiate from Arabia (Mecca). As the universe extended gravitation wave swirled the earth fractaly along cycloid path from big to small scale. In global scale (order-0) ST collect continents in one side and abandoned Pacific Ocean in the other side. Recent researches also show two mantels upwelling in opposite side of the Earth: one under Africa (tectonic pose) and the other under Pacific Ocean (tectonic tail). In higher order (order-1) ST build up Africa in one side and S.America in the other side therefore left Atlantic Ocean meandered in between. In order-n e.g. Khoor Musa and Bandar-Deylam bay are seen meandered easterly in the Iranian part but Khoor Abdullah and Kuwait bay meandered westerly in the Arabian part, they are distributed symmetrically with respect to axis of Persian Gulf(PG), these two are fractal components of easterly Caspian-wing and westerly Black Sea-wing which split up from Anatoly. Caspian Sea and Black Sea make two legs of Y-like structure, this shape completely fitted with GPS-velocity map which start from PG and split up in the Catastrophic Point(Anatoly). We could consider PG as remnants of Ancient Ocean which spent up

  18. Measurement of Elastic Modulus of Collagen Type I Single Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutov, Pavel; Antipova, Olga; Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    Collagen fibers are the main components of the extra cellular matrix and the primary contributors to the mechanical properties of tissues. Here we report a novel approach to measure the longitudinal component of the elastic moduli of biological fibers under conditions close to those found in vivo and apply it to type I collagen from rat tail tendon. This approach combines optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and exploits Euler-Bernoulli elasticity theory for data analysis. This approach also avoids drying for measurements or visualization, since samples are freshly extracted. Importantly, strains are kept below 0.5%, which appear consistent with the linear elastic regime. We find, surprisingly, that the longitudinal elastic modulus of type I collagen cannot be represented by a single quantity but rather is a distribution that is broader than the uncertainty of our experimental technique. The longitudinal component of the single-fiber elastic modulus is between 100 MPa and 360 MPa for samples extracted from different rats and/or different parts of a single tail. Variations are also observed in the fibril-bundle/fibril diameter with an average of 325±40 nm. Since bending forces depend on the diameter to the fourth power, this variation in diameter is important for estimating the range of elastic moduli. The remaining variations in the modulus may be due to differences in composition of the fibril-bundles, or the extent of the proteoglycans constituting fibril-bundles, or that some single fibrils may be of fibril-bundle size.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: lattice corneal dystrophy type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... corneal dystrophy type I lattice corneal dystrophy type I Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Lattice corneal dystrophy type I is an eye disorder that affects the clear, ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: bare lymphocyte syndrome type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions bare lymphocyte syndrome type I bare lymphocyte syndrome type I Enable Javascript to view ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Bare lymphocyte syndrome type I (BLS I) is an ...

  1. Hereditary angioedema type I: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Peralta, Francisca; Buller Vigueira, Eva; Cabello Pulido, Juana

    2016-01-28

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare disease with great heterogeneity of symptoms such as edema of the skin, gastro-intestinal mucosa and larynx or pharynx. Even though there are three types, the most frequent is type I, which is a result from a deficiency of the complement C1 inhibitor. The severity of its symptoms along with the low prevalence of the disease and the need for appropriate specific treatment make the diagnosis and treatment of the pathology an outstanding subject for the family physician. The present is the case of a male teenager with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency since he was six months old, angioedema on arms and legs since 11 years old and diagnosed with hereditary angioedema type I one year after. The definitive diagnosis of the disease enabled an appropriate treatment which consists in preventing outbreaks that may compromise the patient's life and, if they occur, administration of complement C1 inhibitor.

  2. The Origin of Type I Spicule Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Jess, D B; Christian, D J; Mathioudakis, M; Keys, P H; Keenan, F P

    2011-01-01

    We use images of high spatial and temporal resolution, obtained with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope, to reveal how the generation of transverse waves in Type I spicules is a direct result of longitudinal oscillations occurring in the photosphere. Here we show how pressure oscillations, with periodicities in the range 130 - 440 s, manifest in small-scale photospheric magnetic bright points, and generate kink waves in the Sun's outer atmosphere with transverse velocities approaching the local sound speed. Through comparison of our observations with advanced two-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic simulations, we provide evidence for how magnetoacoustic oscillations, generated at the solar surface, funnel upwards along Type I spicule structures, before undergoing longitudinal-to-transverse mode conversion into waves at twice the initial driving frequency. The resulting kink modes are visible in chromospheric plasma, with periodicities of 65 -220 s, and amplitud...

  3. [Cell therapy for type I diabete].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, I B

    2009-01-01

    Cell therapy is a modern and promising approach to type I diabetes mellitus treatment. Nowadays a wide range of cells is used in laboratory experiments and clinical studies, including allogeneic and xenogeneic cells of Langergance islets, bone marrow cells, haematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and cord blood stem cells. Any type of the cells named could correct the status of the patients to a certain extent. However, full recovery after cell therapy has not been achieved yet.

  4. Canagliflozin use in Type I diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Robert

    2017-04-01

    Peters et al documented the appearance of diabetic ketoacidosis without significant elevation of serum glucose in patients treated with Canagliflozin. They solicited patient reports from their practice and from other colleagues' practices and identified nine patients, mainly with Type I Diabetes. Erondu et al evaluated the Canagliflozin development data base to describe the rate and appearance of ketoacidosis in the study patients. They found that in the research patients with Type 2 Diabetes, the rate of ketoacidosis in Canagliflozin patients was uncommon and similar to the reported rate in Type 2 patients not receiving Canagliflozin. Finally, Henry et al reported on a research program that added Canagliflozin onto insulin therapy in Type I patients, finding that there were only modest improvements in HgBA1 C levels and weight, while this therapy produced increased levels of ketosis and 6% rate of ketoacidosis in Canagliflozin patients. This information strongly suggests that Canagliflozin, and possibly the other SGLT-2 inhibitors, are not proper therapy for patients with Type I Diabetes.

  5. Characterization and development of an inner ear type I fibrocyte cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, M A; Schulte, B A; Hazen-Martin, D J

    1996-09-15

    A method has been developed that allows successful maintenance of secondary cell cultures derived from explants of the cochlear lateral wall of young adult gerbils. The secondary cultures were characterized morphologically with light and transmission electron microscopy and immunocytochemically with protein markers specific to various lateral wall cell types. Structural studies revealed fusiform-shaped cells with a paucity of cytoplasm surrounding the nucleus and slender processes. The cells showed little evidence of intercellular contact even when confluent. The cultures were immunopositive for vimentin, carbonic anhydrase isozyme II, creatine kinase isozyme BB and smooth endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase, but lacked reactivity for cytokeratins and Na,K-ATPase. The results indicate that the cultures are comprised of type I fibrocytes from the spiral ligament. These findings are the first to demonstrate that inner ear spiral ligament cells can be isolated and maintained in secondary culture while retaining many of their in vivo characteristics. Based upon their location and content of ion transport enzymes, type I fibrocytes are thought to be involved in the recycling of potassium from perilymph into the stria vascularis. The establishment of this cell line provides a means to analyze the role of spiral ligament fibrocytes in maintenance of inner ear homeostasis.

  6. Techniques for Type I Collagen Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Jackson, LaTecia Diamond

    Tissue Engineering is a process in which cells, engineering, and material methods are used in amalgamation to improve biological functions. The purpose of tissue engineering is to develop alternative solutions to treat or cure tissues and organs that have been severely altered or damaged by diseases, congenital defects, trauma, or cancer. One of the most common and most promising biological materials for tissue engineering to develop scaffolds is Type I collagen. A major challenge in biomedical research is aligning Type I collagen to mimic biological structures, such as ligaments, tendons, bones, and other hierarchal aligned structures within the human body. The intent of this research is to examine possible techniques for organizing Type I collagen and to assess which of the techniques is effective for potential biological applications. The techniques used in this research to organize collagen are soft lithography with solution-assisted sonication embossing, directional freezing, and direct poling. The final concentration used for both soft lithography with solution-assisted sonication embossing and direct poling was 1 mg/ml, whereas for directional freezing the final concentration varied between 4mg/ml, 2mg/ml, and 1 mg/ml. These techniques were characterized using the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and Helium Ion Microscope (HIM). In this study, we have found that out of the three techniques, the soft lithography and directional freezing techniques have been successful in organizing collagen in a particular pattern, but not alignment. We concluded alignment may be dependent on the pH of collagen and the amount of acetic acid used in collagen solution. However, experiments are still being conducted to optimize all three techniques to align collagen in a unidirectional arrangement.

  7. Type I receptors in parotid, colon, and pituitary are aldosterone selective in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, K.; Funder, J.W. (Prince Henry' s Hospital, Melbourne (Australia))

    1987-10-01

    Previous in vivo studies have demonstrated that type I receptors in the rat kidney are aldosterone selective, whereas those in the hippocampus do not appear to discriminate between aldosterone and corticosterone. The authors have injected mature rats with ({sup 3}H)aldosterone or ({sup 3}H)corticosterone plus 100-fold excess of RU 28362, with or without unlabeled aldosterone or corticosterone, and compared type I receptor occupancy in two classic mineralocorticoid target tissues (parotid and colon) and in the pituitary. Mature rats were killed 10-180 min after tracer administration; ({sup 3}H)aldosterone was well taken up and retained in all tissues, whereas ({sup 3}H)corticosterone was significantly retained only in the pituitary 10 min after tracer administration. To assess a possible role for corticosterone-binding globulin (CBG) in conferring aldosterone specificity on type I receptors, 10-day-old rats (with very low levels of CBG) were similarly injected. In the colon and parotid, ({sup 3}H)aldosterone binding was at least an order of magnitude higher than that of corticosterone; in the pituitary aldosterone binding was approximately three times that of corticosterone. They interpret these data as evidence that in the parotid and colon type I receptors are aldosterone selective by a non-CBG-requiring mechanism, whereas in the pituitary there appear to be both aldosterone-selective and nonselective type I sites.

  8. Magnetic Flux in Toroidal Type I Compactification

    CERN Document Server

    Blumenhagen, R; Körs, B; Lüst, Dieter; Blumenhagen, Ralph; Goerlich, Lars; Kors, Boris; Lust, Dieter

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the compactification of type I strings on a torus with additional background gauge flux on the D9-branes. The solutions to the cancellation of the RR tadpoles display various phenomenologically attractive features: supersymmetry breaking, chiral fermions and the opportunity to reduce the rank of the gauge group as desired. We also point out the equivalence of the concept of various different background fields and noncommutative deformations of the geometry on the individual D9-branes by constructing the relevant boundary states to describe such objects.

  9. Oral neurofibrosarcoma associated with neurofibromatosis type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, B W; Hann, J; Narang, R; Garen, P

    1991-10-01

    One of the most feared complications of neurofibromatosis type I (NF-I) is development of cancer, which is estimated to occur in about 5% of cases. The most common associated malignancy is the neurofibrosarcoma (NFS). HOwever, oral NFS in association with NF-I has rarely been reported. We report two cases of oral NFS arising in patients with NF-I. Both patients died of their tumors. Oral NFS arising in association with NF-I appears to have an extremely poor prognosis, as do these tumors at other sites of the body.

  10. The effect of WIN 55,212-2 suggests a cannabinoid-sensitive component in the early toxicity induced by organic acids accumulating in glutaric acidemia type I and in related disorders of propionate metabolism in rat brain synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colín-González, A L; Paz-Loyola, A L; Serratos, I N; Seminotti, B; Ribeiro, C A J; Leipnitz, G; Souza, D O; Wajner, M; Santamaría, A

    2015-12-01

    Several physiological processes in the CNS are regulated by the endocannabinoid system (ECS). Cannabinoid receptors (CBr) and CBr agonists have been involved in the modulation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) activation. Glutaric (GA), 3-hydroxyglutaric (3-OHGA), methylmalonic (MMA) and propionic (PA) acids are endogenous metabolites produced and accumulated in the brain of children affected by severe organic acidemias (OAs) with neurodegeneration. Oxidative stress and excitotoxicity have been involved in the toxic pattern exerted by these organic acids. Studying the early pattern of toxicity exerted by these metabolites is crucial to explain the extent of damage that they can produce in the brain. Herein, we investigated the effects of the synthetic CBr agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) on early markers of GA-, 3-OHGA-, MMA- and PA-induced toxicity in brain synaptosomes from adult (90-day-old) and adolescent (30-day-old) rats. As pre-treatment, WIN exerted protective effects on the GA- and MMA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, and prevented the reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and lipid peroxidation induced by all metabolites. Our findings support a protective and modulatory role of cannabinoids in the early toxic events elicited by toxic metabolites involved in OAs.

  11. Measurement of Elastic Modulus of Collagen Type I Single Fiber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Dutov

    Full Text Available Collagen fibers are the main components of the extra cellular matrix and the primary contributors to the mechanical properties of tissues. Here we report a novel approach to measure the longitudinal component of the elastic moduli of biological fibers under conditions close to those found in vivo and apply it to type I collagen from rat tail tendon. This approach combines optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and exploits Euler-Bernoulli elasticity theory for data analysis. This approach also avoids drying for measurements or visualization, since samples are freshly extracted. Importantly, strains are kept below 0.5%, which appear consistent with the linear elastic regime. We find, surprisingly, that the longitudinal elastic modulus of type I collagen cannot be represented by a single quantity but rather is a distribution that is broader than the uncertainty of our experimental technique. The longitudinal component of the single-fiber elastic modulus is between 100 MPa and 360 MPa for samples extracted from different rats and/or different parts of a single tail. Variations are also observed in the fibril-bundle/fibril diameter with an average of 325±40 nm. Since bending forces depend on the diameter to the fourth power, this variation in diameter is important for estimating the range of elastic moduli. The remaining variations in the modulus may be due to differences in composition of the fibril-bundles, or the extent of the proteoglycans constituting fibril-bundles, or that some single fibrils may be of fibril-bundle size.

  12. Phleboviruses and the Type I Interferon Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Deborah Wuerth

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae contains a number of emerging virus species which pose a threat to both human and animal health. Most prominent members include Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, sandfly fever Naples virus (SFNV, sandfly fever Sicilian virus (SFSV, Toscana virus (TOSV, Punta Toro virus (PTV, and the two new members severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV and Heartland virus (HRTV. The nonstructural protein NSs is well established as the main phleboviral virulence factor in the mammalian host. NSs acts as antagonist of the antiviral type I interferon (IFN system. Recent progress in the elucidation of the molecular functions of a growing list of NSs proteins highlights the astonishing variety of strategies employed by phleboviruses to evade the IFN system.

  13. Chiari type I malformation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, L; Novegno, F; di Rocco, C

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of Chiari type I malformation (CIM) is more and more frequent in clinical practice due to the wide diffusion of magnetic resonance imaging. In many cases, such a diagnosis is made incidentally in asymptomatic patients, as including children investigated for different reasons such as mental development delay or sequelae of brain injury. The large number of affected patients, the presence of asymptomatic subjects, the uncertainties surrounding the pathogenesis of the malformation, and the different options for its surgical treatment make the management of CIM particularly controversial.This paper reports on the state of the art and the recent achievements about CIM aiming at providing further information especially on the pathogenesis, the natural history, and the management of the malformation, which are the most controversial aspects. A historial review introduces and explains the current classification. Furthermore, the main clinical, radiological, and neurophysiological findings of CIM are described to complete the picture of this heterogeneous and complex disease.

  14. THE ORIGIN OF TYPE I SPICULE OSCILLATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M.; Keys, P. H.; Keenan, F. P. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Pascoe, D. J. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Christian, D. J., E-mail: d.jess@qub.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    We use images of high spatial and temporal resolution, obtained with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope, to reveal how the generation of transverse waves in Type I spicules is a direct result of longitudinal oscillations occurring in the photosphere. Here we show how pressure oscillations, with periodicities in the range of 130-440 s, manifest in small-scale photospheric magnetic bright points, and generate kink waves in the Sun's outer atmosphere with transverse velocities approaching the local sound speed. Through comparison of our observations with advanced two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we provide evidence for how magnetoacoustic oscillations, generated at the solar surface, funnel upward along Type I spicule structures, before undergoing longitudinal-to-transverse mode conversion into waves at twice the initial driving frequency. The resulting kink modes are visible in chromospheric plasma, with periodicities of 65-220 s, and amplitudes often exceeding 400 km. A sausage mode oscillation also arises as a consequence of the photospheric driver, which is visible in both simulated and observational time series. We conclude that the mode conversion and period modification is a direct consequence of the 90 Degree-Sign phase shift encompassing opposite sides of the photospheric driver. The chromospheric energy flux of these waves are estimated to be Almost-Equal-To 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} W m{sup -2}, which indicates that they are sufficiently energetic to accelerate the solar wind and heat the localized corona to its multi-million degree temperatures.

  15. Nuclear spirals in galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Maciejewski, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Recent high-resolution observations indicate that nuclear spirals are often present in the innermost few hundred parsecs of disc galaxies. My models show that nuclear spirals form naturally as a gas response to non-axisymmetry in the gravitational potential. Some nuclear spirals take the form of spiral shocks, resulting in streaming motions in the gas, and in inflow comparable to the accretion rates needed to power local Active Galactic Nuclei. Recently streaming motions of amplitude expected...

  16. Ameloblasts express type I collagen during amelogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaraf-Weill, N; Gasse, B; Silvent, J; Bardet, C; Sire, J Y; Davit-Béal, T

    2014-05-01

    Enamel and enameloid, the highly mineralized tooth-covering tissues in living vertebrates, are different in their matrix composition. Enamel, a unique product of ameloblasts, principally contains enamel matrix proteins (EMPs), while enameloid possesses collagen fibrils and probably receives contributions from both odontoblasts and ameloblasts. Here we focused on type I collagen (COL1A1) and amelogenin (AMEL) gene expression during enameloid and enamel formation throughout ontogeny in the caudate amphibian, Pleurodeles waltl. In this model, pre-metamorphic teeth possess enameloid and enamel, while post-metamorphic teeth possess enamel only. In first-generation teeth, qPCR and in situ hybridization (ISH) on sections revealed that ameloblasts weakly expressed AMEL during late-stage enameloid formation, while expression strongly increased during enamel deposition. Using ISH, we identified COL1A1 transcripts in ameloblasts and odontoblasts during enameloid formation. COL1A1 expression in ameloblasts gradually decreased and was no longer detected after metamorphosis. The transition from enameloid-rich to enamel-rich teeth could be related to a switch in ameloblast activity from COL1A1 to AMEL synthesis. P. waltl therefore appears to be an appropriate animal model for the study of the processes involved during enameloid-to-enamel transition, especially because similar events probably occurred in various lineages during vertebrate evolution.

  17. Hantavirus Regulation of Type I Interferon Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery Matthys

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses primarily infect human endothelial cells (ECs and cause two highly lethal human diseases. Early addition of Type I interferon (IFN to ECs blocks hantavirus replication and thus for hantaviruses to be pathogenic they need to prevent early interferon induction. PHV replication is blocked in human ECs, but not inhibited in IFN deficient VeroE6 cells and consistent with this, infecting ECs with PHV results in the early induction of IFNβ and an array of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs. In contrast, ANDV, HTNV, NY-1V and TULV hantaviruses, inhibit early ISG induction and successfully replicate within human ECs. Hantavirus inhibition of IFN responses has been attributed to several viral proteins including regulation by the Gn proteins cytoplasmic tail (Gn-T. The Gn-T interferes with the formation of STING-TBK1-TRAF3 complexes required for IRF3 activation and IFN induction, while the PHV Gn-T fails to alter this complex or regulate IFN induction. These findings indicate that interfering with early IFN induction is necessary for hantaviruses to replicate in human ECs, and suggest that additional determinants are required for hantaviruses to be pathogenic. The mechanism by which Gn-Ts disrupt IFN signaling is likely to reveal potential therapeutic interventions and suggest protein targets for attenuating hantaviruses.

  18. Diagnosis and management of glutaric aciduria type I - revised recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelker, Stefan; Christensen, Ernst; Leonard, James V.; Greenberg, Cheryl R.; Boneh, Avihu; Burlina, Alberto B.; Burlina, Alessandro P.; Dixon, Marjorie; Duran, Marinus; Garcia Cazorla, Angels; Goodman, Stephen I.; Koeller, David M.; Kyllerman, Marten; Muehlhausen, Chris; Mueler, Edith; Okun, Juergen G.; Wilcken, Bridget; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Burgard, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria type I (synonym, glutaric acidemia type I) is a rare organic aciduria. Untreated patients characteristically develop dystonia during infancy resulting in a high morbidity and mortality. The neuropathological correlate is striatal injury which results from encephalopathic crises pre

  19. Effect of curcumin on the expression of collagen type I protein and transforming growth factor-β1mRNA in pulmonary fibrosis rats%姜黄素对肺纤维化大鼠I型胶原蛋白和转化生长因子β1mRNA表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈碧; 张德平; 高蔚

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the eitects ot curcumin on the expressions of collagen type I protein and transtorming growth factor-β1 mRNA in lung tissues of rats with pulmonary fibrosis.Methods 96 male SD rats were randomly divided into four groups with 24 rats in each group:the normal control group,the model group,the prednisone treated group,and the curcumin treated group.Pulmonary fibrosis was induced by intrabronchial injection of bleomycin A5.From the 15th day after bleomycin administration,rats in the prednisone treated group and the curcumin treated group were given prednisone(5 mg/kg)or curcumin(300 mg/kg) respectively once daily by intragastric administration.In the same way,rats in the normal control group and the model group were given 1% Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose(10 ml/kg)once daily.The histological changes of lung tissue were evaluated by Haematoxylin-eosin(HE)and Masson's trichrome.The rats were randomly sacrificed on the 21st,28th,42nd and 56th day after bleomycin administration.The type I collagen expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry.The transforming growth factor-β1(TG-β1)mRNA expression of lung was detected by the semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR).Results Pulmonary fibrosis in the eurcumin treated group was significantly reduced as cornpared with the model group and the prednisone treated group on the 42nd and 56th day(P<0.05).The expression of type I collagen protein in the ourcumin treated group was significantly decreased than that in the model group and the prednisone treated group on the 28th,42nd and 56th day after bleomycin administration(P<0.05).The TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the curcunfin treated group was O.61±0.09 and 0.48±0.16 respectively on the 21st and 28th day after bleomycin administration(P<0.05).It was significantly decreased than that in the model group on the 21st,28th day after blenmycin administration and lower as compared with the prednisone treated group on the 21st

  20. 下颌骨缺损修复过程中I型胶原基因表达的实验研究%The Experimental Study on the Gene Expession ofType- I Collagen in the Repair of Mandibular Defect in Rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林军; 王慧明; 曹之强; 姚航平

    2001-01-01

    To detect the gene expression of extracellar matrix type I collagen caused by biomaterial and the influence of type I collagen gene expression to the healing pattems in different time points, single hydroxyapatit and hydroxyapatit combined with TGF- β 1 were implanted in the mandibular defect model and single defect was used for control. Methods:In this experiment, mandibular defects were established in SD rats(n = 68), divided into 3 groups. Hydroxyapatit (HA) combined with TGF - β 1 as a bone graft substitute was tested by slot blot hybridiztion to observe type I collagen mRNA and the distribution of Ⅰ collagen protein under sirius red stain-poplarizing light. Results: The protein and mRNA of I collagen existed statistical difference (P < 0.05)in 3 groups. Conclusion: During the bone defect healing, there existed the I collagen mRNA increasing gradually. The study show TGF - β 1 promoting the bone healing process by the path of their corresponding collagen protein.%目的:了解生物材料和TGF--β1复合生物材料植入骨缺损区后细胞外基质内胶原基因表达的特点及其在骨愈合中的意义。方法:采用Slot Blot杂交及苦味酸天狼星红-偏振光方法观察68只大鼠下颌骨缺损区骨修复过程中I型胶原mRNA表达及材料骨界面区I型胶原蛋白的分布。结果:I型胶原的mRNA及其产物表达水平在三组之间有显著性差异,以TGF--β1组最高。结论:本研究表明外源性TGF--β1通过促进I型胶原mRNA表达及其产物的合成,加快骨缺损的愈合;I型胶原mRNA可被认为是骨形成、骨改建的分子标记。

  1. Compensating for Type-I Errors in Video Quality Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunnström, Kjell; Tavakoli, Samira; Søgaard, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact on compensating for Type-I errors in video quality assessment. A Type-I error is to incorrectly conclude that there is an effect. The risk increases with the number of comparisons that are performed in statistical tests. Type-I errors are an issue often neglected...

  2. Vitamin D dependent rickets type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Jong Kim

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is present in two forms, ergocalciferol (vitamin D2 produced by plants and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3 produced by animal tissues or by the action of ultraviolet light on 7-dehydrocholesterol in human skin. Both forms of vitamin D are biologically inactive pro-hormones that must undergo sequential hydroxylations in the liver and the kidney before they can bind to and activate the vitamin D receptor. The hormonally active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH2D], plays an essential role in calcium and phosphate metabolism, bone growth, and cellular differentiation. Renal synthesis of 1,25(OH2D from its endogenous precursor, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD, is the rate-limiting and is catalyzed by the 1?#7016;ydroxylase. Vitamin D dependent rickets type I (VDDR-I, also referred to as vitamin D 1?#7016;ydroxylase deficiency or pseudovitamin D deficiency rickets, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized clinically by hypotonia, muscle weakness, growth failure, hypocalcemic seizures in early infancy, and radiographic findings of rickets. Characteristic laboratory features are hypocalcemia, increased serum concentrations of parathyroid hormone (PTH, and low or undetectable serum concentrations of 1,25(OH2D despite normal or increased concentrations of 25OHD. Recent advances have showed in the cloning of the human 1?#7016;ydroxylase and revealed mutations in its gene that cause VDDR-I. This review presents the biology of vitamin D, and 1?#7016;ydroxylase mutations with clinical findings.

  3. [Esophageal atresia type I. Is impossible possible?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Temiño, M; Esteban, J A; Elías, J; González, N; Gracia, J; Romeo, M; Escartín, R; Burgués, P; Sainz, A; Pueyo, C

    2006-01-01

    Treatment of esophageal atresia with "long gap" remains difficult and controversial. According to the idea that esophageal anastomosis is imposible in most cases, several esophageal substitution methods have been proposed, as esophagocoloplasty, gastric transposition or reversed gastric tube. Nevertheless reconstruction of native esophagus is accepted as the best option if posible. "Long gap" definition is imprecise, expressed by variability in percent of these cases in total esophageal atresias reported in different series in literature. We report our experience in seven cases type I esophageal atresia with long gap and the different therapeutic options used, with attention to delayed or early esophageal anastomosis feasibility and outcome. We have treated 121 patients with esophageal atresia from whom we analized 7 cases with pure esophageal atresia with "long gap" (5.8%). Six patients underwent gastrostomy and two gastrostomy and esophagostomy. Five patient underwent primary repair with esophageal anastomosis, delayed between 14 days and 4 months in 4 cases. One patient underwent esophageal anastomosis in the first day without gastrostomy. Retroesternal esophagocoloplasty was performed in 2 patients about their first year of life. Esophagogram was done in first month after surgery and pH monitoring of gastroesophageal reflux. Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 28 years. Esophageal anastomosis was feasible in all 5 patients in whom it was tried. Stricture occurred in two patients, one patient underwent anastomotic resection and new esophageal anastomosis. Esophageal reflux was present in two patients, one of them required funduplication. One patient was dead by complications of cardiac malformation. Remaining patients have normal swallowing and are in normal growth curves. Patients with esophagocoloplasty had not relevant early or late complications. In most pure esophageal atresia, delayed or even early esophageal anastomosis is feasible, making use of surgical

  4. Type I Interferons Direct Gammaherpesvirus Host Colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy S E Tan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-herpesviruses colonise lymphocytes. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4 infects B cells via epithelial to myeloid to lymphoid transfer. This indirect route entails exposure to host defences, and type I interferons (IFN-I limit infection while viral evasion promotes it. To understand how IFN-I and its evasion both control infection outcomes, we used Mx1-cre mice to tag floxed viral genomes in IFN-I responding cells. Epithelial-derived MuHV-4 showed low IFN-I exposure, and neither disrupting viral evasion nor blocking IFN-I signalling markedly affected acute viral replication in the lungs. Maximising IFN-I induction with poly(I:C increased virus tagging in lung macrophages, but the tagged virus spread poorly. Lymphoid-derived MuHV-4 showed contrastingly high IFN-I exposure. This occurred mainly in B cells. IFN-I induction increased tagging without reducing viral loads; disrupting viral evasion caused marked attenuation; and blocking IFN-I signalling opened up new lytic spread between macrophages. Thus, the impact of IFN-I on viral replication was strongly cell type-dependent: epithelial infection induced little response; IFN-I largely suppressed macrophage infection; and viral evasion allowed passage through B cells despite IFN-I responses. As a result, IFN-I and its evasion promoted a switch in infection from acutely lytic in myeloid cells to chronically latent in B cells. Murine cytomegalovirus also showed a capacity to pass through IFN-I-responding cells, arguing that this is a core feature of herpesvirus host colonization.

  5. Fluoride alters type I collagen expression in the early stages of odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewska, I; Spodnik, J H; Domaradzka-Pytel, B; Sidor-Kaczmarek, J; Bereznowski, Z

    2006-11-01

    Fluoride alters the expression and post-translational modifications of extracellular matrix proteins in dentin. The aim of our study was to determine the effects of fluoride on type I collagen expression during the early stages of tooth germ development in rats. Pregnant dams were divided into three groups and fed a standard diet. From the fifth day of pregnancy the three groups received tap water with, respectively, trace amounts of fluoride (C), a low fluoride concentration (FL) or and a high fluoride concentration (FH). Changes in type I collagen expression and distribution were evaluated. The expression of type I collagen was restricted to the extracellular spaces of cells of mesenchymal origin. In the youngest animals the most intense immunoreactivity for type I collagen was detected in predentin of the FL group. Although the intensity of immunostaining increased in proportion to the age of the animals, the largest increase in the groups investigated was detected in the FL group. We concluded that a low concentration of fluoride can act as a stimulator of type I collagen deposition in the extracellular matrix of dentin, while high concentrations of fluoride have an opposite effect, acting as an inhibitor of type I collagen formation in dentin.

  6. Electromechanics of graphene spirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topi Korhonen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the most fascinating nanostructure morphologies are spirals, hybrids of somewhat obscure topology and dimensionality with technologically attractive properties. Here, we investigate mechanical and electromechanical properties of graphene spirals upon elongation by using density-functional tight-binding, continuum elasticity theory, and classical force field molecular dynamics. It turns out that electronic properties are governed by interlayer interactions as opposed to strain effects. The structural behavior is governed by van der Waals interaction: in its absence spirals unfold with equidistant layer spacings, ripple formation at spiral perimeter, and steadily increasing axial force; in its presence, on the contrary, spirals unfold via smooth local peeling, complex geometries, and nearly constant axial force. These electromechanical trends ought to provide useful guidelines not only for additional theoretical investigations but also for forthcoming experiments on graphene spirals.

  7. Electromechanics of graphene spirals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korhonen, Topi; Koskinen, Pekka, E-mail: pekka.koskinen@iki.fi [NanoScience Center, Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, 40014 Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2014-12-15

    Among the most fascinating nanostructure morphologies are spirals, hybrids of somewhat obscure topology and dimensionality with technologically attractive properties. Here, we investigate mechanical and electromechanical properties of graphene spirals upon elongation by using density-functional tight-binding, continuum elasticity theory, and classical force field molecular dynamics. It turns out that electronic properties are governed by interlayer interactions as opposed to strain effects. The structural behavior is governed by van der Waals interaction: in its absence spirals unfold with equidistant layer spacings, ripple formation at spiral perimeter, and steadily increasing axial force; in its presence, on the contrary, spirals unfold via smooth local peeling, complex geometries, and nearly constant axial force. These electromechanical trends ought to provide useful guidelines not only for additional theoretical investigations but also for forthcoming experiments on graphene spirals.

  8. Multiarm spirals in a two-dimensional cardiac substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursac, Nenad; Aguel, Felipe; Tung, Leslie

    2004-10-26

    A variety of chemical and biological nonlinear excitable media, including heart tissue, can support stable, self-organized waves of activity in a form of rotating single-arm spirals. In particular, heart tissue can support stationary and meandering spirals of electrical excitation, which have been shown to underlie different forms of cardiac arrhythmias. In contrast to single-arm spirals, stable multiarm spirals (multiple spiral waves that rotate in the same direction around a common organizing center) have not been demonstrated and studied yet in living excitable tissues. Here, we show that persistent multiarm spirals of electrical activity can be induced in monolayer cultures of neonatal rat heart cells by a short, rapid train of electrical point stimuli applied during single-arm-spiral activity. Stable formation is accomplished only in monolayers that show a relatively broad and steep dependence of impulse wavelength and propagation velocity on rate of excitation. The resulting multiarm spirals emit waves of electrical activity at rates faster than for single-arm spirals and exhibit two distinct behaviors, namely "arm-switching" and "tip-switching." The phenomenon of rate acceleration due to an increase in the number of spiral arms possibly may underlie the acceleration of functional reentrant tachycardias paced by a clinician or an antitachycardia device.

  9. Spherical long spirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, G. H.; Dinkova, C. L.

    2013-10-01

    Long spirals in the Euclidean plane have been introduced by A. Kurnosenko five years ago. Using a natural map of the shape sphere into the extended Gaussian plane we study spherical curves that are pre-images of plane long spirals. Loxodromes and spherical spiral antennas are typical examples of such spherical long spirals. The set of all planar spirals leaves invariant under an arbitrary similarity transformation. This set is divided in two disjoint classes by A. Kirnosenko. The first class is consist of the so-called short spirals which are widely used in geometric modeling. The second class of planar long spirals contains well-known logarithmic spiral and Archimedean spirals which have many applications in mathematics, astrophysics and industry. The notion of simplicial shape space is due to D. Kendall. The most popular simplicial shape space of order (2,3) is the set of equivalence classes of similar triangles in the plane. The sphere of radius 1/2 centered at the origin can be considered as a model of this quotient space, so-called the shape sphere. F. Bookstein and J. Lester showed that the one-point extension of the Euclidean plane, so-called the extended Gaussian plane, is another model of the same simplicial shape space. The present paper gives a description of long spirals on the shape sphere by the use a natural conformal mapping between two models. First, we examine long spirals in the extended Gaussian plane. After that, we describe some differential geometric properties of the shape sphere. Finally, we discuss parameterizations of long spirals on the shape sphere.

  10. Osteogensis imperfecta type I is commonly due to a COLIAI null allel of type I collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willing, M.C.; Pruchno, C.J. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)); Atkinson, M.; Byers, P.H. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1992-09-01

    Dermal fibroblasts from most individuals with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I produce about half the normal amount of type I procollagen, as a result of decreased synthesis of one of its constituent chains, pro[alpha](I). To test the hypothesis that decreased synthesis of pro[alpha](I) chains results from mutations in the COL1A1 gene, the authors used primer extension with nucleotide-specific chain termination to measure the contribution of individual COL1A1 alleles to the mRNA pool in fibroblasts from affected individuals. A polymorphic Mn/I restriction endonuclease site in the 3'-untranslated region of COL1A1 was used to distinguish the transcripts of the two alleles in heterozygous individuals. Twenty-three individuals from 21 unrelated families were studied. In each case there was marked diminution in steady-state mRNA levels from one COL1A2 allele. Loss of an allele through deletion or rearrangement was not the cause of the diminished COL1A1 mRNA levels. Primer extension with nucleotide-specific chain termination allows identification of the mutant COL1A1 allele in cell strains that are heterozygous for an expressed polymorphism. It is applicable to sporadic cases, to small families, and to large families in whom key individuals are uninformative at the polymorphic sites used in linkage analysis, making it a useful adjunct to the biochemical screening of collagenous proteins for OI. 40 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Dermal type I collagen assessment by digital image analysis*

    OpenAIRE

    Brianezi, Gabrielli; Grandi, Fabrizio; Bagatin, Ediléia; Enokihara, Mílvia Maria S. S.; Miot, Hélio Amante [UNESP

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is the main dermal component, and its evaluation is relevant to quantitative studies in dermatopathology. However, visual gradation (0 to 4+) has low precision and high subjectivity levels. This study aimed to develop and validate a digital morphometric analysis technique to estimate type I collagen levels in the papillary dermis. Four evaluators visually quantified (0 to 4+) the density of type I collagen in 63 images of forearm skin biopsies marked by immunohistochemistry an...

  12. Genesis of spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, Valery V

    2013-01-01

    Enigmatic spiral structure of many galaxies and its huge orbital momentum originated due to the capture of lightweight bare black hole by gravity of heavy primordial gas cloud at large impact parameter. The rotating of black hole caused the formation of accretion disc from the cloud and the transfer of orbital momentum to the disc, while during the fall to the center of mass, the spiral trace of black hole in the disc did create the spiral front line of sound waves in the gas, that further evolved into the stellar spiral arms. This mechanism opens the way to study features of spiral galaxy formation, say, an influence and a significance of dark matter in this process.

  13. Caspase-3 activation and increased procollagen type I in irradiated hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samara C. Ferreira-Machado

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The caspase-3-cleaved presence was evaluated in this study in the heart of irradiated rats, during the decline of ventricular function. Female Wistar rats were irradiated with a single dose of radiation (15 Gy delivered directly to the heart and the molecular, histological and physiological evaluations were performed at thirteen months post-irradiation. The expressions of procollagen type I, TGF-ß1 and caspase-3-cleaved were analyzed using Western blotting. Cardiac structural and functional alterations were investigated by echocardiography and electron microscopy. In the irradiated group, the levels of procollagen type I, TGF-ß1 and caspase-3-cleaved are increased. Significant histological changes (degeneration of heart tissue and collagen deposition and functional (reduced ejection fraction were observed. Data suggest that the cardiac function decline after exposure to ionizing radiation is related, in part, to increased collagen and increased caspase-3-cleaved.

  14. [Type-I and -II estradiol binding sites in the endometrium during blastocyst implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, A; Calzada, L; Hicks, J J; Velázquez, A

    1989-04-01

    The properties of type I and occupied and unoccupied type II cytosolic estrogen binding sites in the rat endometrium were analyzed on day five of pregnancy; the samples studied correspond to blastocyst receptive endometrium (implantation sites), nonreceptive endometrium and ovariectomized uterine horn endometrium, from the same pregnancy rats. The occupied binding site type II was analyzed by exchange assays. Dissociation constant obtained from experiments carried out at 4 or 25 degrees C are similar for each one of the binding site at the three different endometrium samples; the binding capacity (femtomoles/mg protein) from the sites type I and type II and the ratio between occupied (by endogenous estradiol) and unoccupied site type II, seems to be characteristic for each one of the three analyzed endometrium.

  15. Cochlea and other spiral forms in nature and art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinković, Slobodan; Stanković, Predrag; Štrbac, Mile; Tomić, Irina; Ćetković, Mila

    2012-01-01

    The original appearance of the cochlea and the specific shape of a spiral are interesting for both the scientists and artists. Yet, a correlation between the cochlea and the spiral forms in nature and art has been very rarely mentioned. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible correlation between the cochlea and the other spiral objects in nature, as well as the artistic presentation of the spiral forms. We explored data related to many natural objects and examined 13,625 artworks created by 2049 artists. We also dissected 2 human cochleas and prepared histologic slices of a rat cochlea. The cochlea is a spiral, cone-shaped osseous structure that resembles certain other spiral forms in nature. It was noticed that parts of some plants are arranged in a spiral manner, often according to Fibonacci numbers. Certain animals, their parts, or their products also represent various types of spirals. Many of them, including the cochlea, belong to the logarithmic type. Nature created spiral forms in the living world to pack a larger number of structures in a limited space and also to improve their function. Because the cochlea and other spiral forms have a certain aesthetic value, many artists presented them in their works of art. There is a mathematical and geometric correlation between the cochlea and natural spiral objects, and the same functional reason for their formation. The artists' imagery added a new aspect to those domains. Obviously, the creativity of nature and Homo sapiens has no limits--like the infinite distal part of the spiral. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neurofibromatosis Type I presenting with Spontaneous Pneumothorax: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, So Youn; Lee, Young Kyung; Moon, Ah Lim; Sung, Dong Wook [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, East-West Neo Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Neurofibromatosis type I is an autosomal dominant disease with variable clinical manifestations related to dermatologic, neurologic, skeletal, and endocrine system. Lung parenchymal involvement such as lung fibrosis and massive bullous emphysema is infrequent. Here, we report on a 36-year-old man with symptoms of dyspnea, and who has a spontaneous pneumothorax, multiple bullae, and pathologically confirmed neurofibromatosis type I

  17. Lung function abnormalities in children with type I diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gent, R; Brackel, HJL; de Vroede, M; van der Ent, CK

    2002-01-01

    Recent developments in intrabronchial administration of insulin raise lung function in patients with type I diabetes as important issue. Several studies in adults report abnormalities of lung function of these patients, The aim of this study was to investigate lung function in children with type I d

  18. Superluminous Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ogle, Patrick M; Nader, Cyril; Helou, George

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of spiral galaxies that are as optically luminous as elliptical brightest cluster galaxies, with r-band monochromatic luminosity L_r=8-14L* (4.3-7.5E44 erg/s). These super spiral galaxies are also giant and massive, with diameter D=57-134 kpc and stellar mass M_stars=0.3-3.4E11 M_sun. We find 53 super spirals out of a complete sample of 1,616 SDSS galaxies with redshift z8L*. The closest example is found at z=0.089. We use existing photometry to estimate their stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs). The SDSS and WISE colors are consistent with normal star-forming spirals on the blue sequence. However, the extreme masses and rapid SFRs of 5-65 M_sun/yr place super spirals in a sparsely populated region of parameter space, above the star-forming main sequence of disk galaxies. Super spirals occupy a diverse range of environments, from isolation to cluster centers. We find four super spiral galaxy systems that are late-stage major mergers--a possible clue to their formation. We su...

  19. Spiral Countercurrent Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoichiro; Knight, Martha; Finn, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    For many years, high-speed countercurrent chromatography conducted in open tubing coils has been widely used for the separation of natural and synthetic compounds. In this method, the retention of the stationary phase is solely provided by the Archimedean screw effect by rotating the coiled column in the centrifugal force field. However, the system fails to retain enough of the stationary phase for polar solvent systems such as the aqueous–aqueous polymer phase systems. To address this problem, the geometry of the coiled channel was modified to a spiral configuration so that the system could utilize the radially acting centrifugal force. This successfully improved the retention of the stationary phase. Two different types of spiral columns were fabricated: the spiral disk assembly, made by stacking multiple plastic disks with single or four interwoven spiral channels connected in series, and the spiral tube assembly, made by inserting the tetrafluoroethylene tubing into a spiral frame (spiral tube support). The capabilities of these column assemblies were successfully demonstrated by separations of peptides and proteins with polar two-phase solvent systems whose stationary phases had not been well retained in the earlier multilayer coil separation column for high-speed countercurrent chromatography. PMID:23833207

  20. Type I Interferons and Natural Killer Cell Regulation in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Lena; Aigner, Petra; Stoiber, Dagmar

    2017-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are known to mediate antitumor effects against several tumor types and have therefore been commonly used in clinical anticancer treatment. However, how IFN signaling exerts its beneficial effects is only partially understood. The clinically relevant activity of type I IFNs has been mainly attributed to their role in tumor immune surveillance. Different mechanisms have been postulated to explain how type I IFNs stimulate the immune system. On the one hand, they modulate innate immune cell subsets such as natural killer (NK) cells. On the other hand, type I IFNs also influence adaptive immune responses. Here, we review evidence for the impact of type I IFNs on immune surveillance against cancer and highlight the role of NK cells therein.

  1. [Autoimmune mechanisms toward type I collagen during parodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The article presents original data about autoimmune mechanisms according to the severity of the process during the chronic generalized Parodontitis. The medical examination of 179 patients with different forms of Parodontitis demonstrated that during Parodontitis the synthesis and re-synthesis of type I Collagen is negatively affected and as a result, type I Collagen concentration in the blood serum raises. In addition, the selection of antigen reactive lymphocytes increases toward Type I Collagen, which in turn boosts their quantity in blood and also stimulates the creation of auto-antibodies toward Type I Collagen. This is reflected by the increased quantity of auto-antibodies in the blood serum. The intensity of these processes amplifies as the Parodontitis inflammation becomes more severe. These results demonstrate that the autoimmune process develops toward Type I Collagen during Parodontitis and its intensity reflects the severity of the pathological processes in Parodontitis.

  2. The Spiral of Euroscepticism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galpin, Charlotte; Trenz, Hans-Jörg

    2017-01-01

    of Euroscepticism’, taking media autonomy seriously to understand how media logics and selective devices contribute to the shaping of public discourse about the EU. We review the literature on the media and EU legitimacy to show how media frames and their amplification on social media can account for the salience......Media scholars have increasingly examined the effects of a negativity bias that applies to political news. In the ‘spiral of cynicism’, journalist preferences for negative news correspond to public demands for sensational news. We argue that this spiral of cynicism in EU news results in a ‘spiral...

  3. Galaxy Zoo: Passive Red Spirals

    CERN Document Server

    Masters, Karen L; Romer, A Kathy; Nichol, Robert C; Bamford, Steven P; Schawinski, Kevin; Lintott, Chris J; Andreescu, Dan; Campbell, Heather C; Crowcroft, Ben; Doyle, Isabelle; Edmondson, Edward M; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M Jordan; Slosar, Anze; Szalay, Alexander S; Vandenberg, Jan

    2009-01-01

    We study the spectroscopic properties and environments of red spiral galaxies found by the Galaxy Zoo project. By carefully selecting face-on, disk dominated spirals we construct a sample of truly passive disks (not dust reddened, nor dominated by old stellar populations in a bulge). As such, our red spirals represent an interesting set of possible transition objects between normal blue spirals and red early types. We use SDSS data to investigate the physical processes which could have turned these objects red without disturbing their morphology. Red spirals prefer intermediate density regimes, however there are no obvious correlations between red spiral properties and environment - environment alone is not sufficient to determine if a galaxy will become a red spiral. Red spirals are a small fraction of spirals at low masses, but dominate at large stellar masses - massive galaxies are red independent of morphology. We confirm that red spirals have older stellar populations and less recent star formation than ...

  4. The Peculiar Characteristics of Fish Type I Interferons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Boudinot

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral type I interferons (IFNs have been discovered in fish. Genomic studies revealed their considerable number in many species; some genes encode secreted and non-secreted isoforms. Based on cysteine motifs, fish type I IFNs fall in two subgroups, which use two different receptors. Mammalian type I IFN genes are intronless while type III have introns; in fish, all have introns, but structurally, both subgroups belong to type I. Type I IFNs likely appeared early in vertebrates as intron containing genes, and evolved in parallel in tetrapods and fishes. The diversity of their repertoires in fish and mammals is likely a convergent feature, selected as a response to the variety of viral strategies. Several alternative nomenclatures have been established for different taxonomic fish groups, calling for a unified system. The specific functions of each type I gene remains poorly understood, as well as their interactions in antiviral responses. However, distinct induction pathways, kinetics of response, and tissue specificity indicate that fish type I likely are highly specialized, especially in groups where they are numerous such as salmonids or cyprinids. Unravelling their functional integration constitutes the next challenge to understand how these cytokines evolved to orchestrate antiviral innate immunity in vertebrates.

  5. SUPERLUMINOUS SPIRAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogle, Patrick M.; Lanz, Lauranne; Nader, Cyril; Helou, George, E-mail: ogle@ipac.caltech.edu [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of spiral galaxies that are as optically luminous as elliptical brightest cluster galaxies, with r-band monochromatic luminosity L{sub r} = 8–14L* (4.3–7.5 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup −1}). These super spiral galaxies are also giant and massive, with diameter D = 57–134 kpc and stellar mass M{sub stars} = 0.3–3.4 × 10{sup 11}M{sub ⊙}. We find 53 super spirals out of a complete sample of 1616 SDSS galaxies with redshift z < 0.3 and L{sub r} > 8L*. The closest example is found at z = 0.089. We use existing photometry to estimate their stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs). The SDSS and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer colors are consistent with normal star-forming spirals on the blue sequence. However, the extreme masses and rapid SFRs of 5–65 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} place super spirals in a sparsely populated region of parameter space, above the star-forming main sequence of disk galaxies. Super spirals occupy a diverse range of environments, from isolation to cluster centers. We find four super spiral galaxy systems that are late-stage major mergers—a possible clue to their formation. We suggest that super spirals are a remnant population of unquenched, massive disk galaxies. They may eventually become massive lenticular galaxies after they are cut off from their gas supply and their disks fade.

  6. Spiral 2 Week

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The main goal of this meeting is to present and discuss the current status of the Spiral-2 project at GANIL in front of a large community of scientists and engineers. Different issues have been tackled particularly the equipment around Spiral-2 like injectors, cryo-modules or beam diagnostics, a workshop was devoted to other facilities dedicated to radioactive ion beam production. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations.

  7. Spiral Shell Collection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    In 1988 Zheng Haigen, a seaman with the Towboat Company of the Shanghai Salvage Bureau, began collecting spiral shells. Today he has more than 600 in his collection. The most valuable are the rare parrot shell and a shell whose spirals wind counter-clockwise. In 1991 a miniature conch with a diameter of 0.31 millimeters that he found buried in tons of sand made the Guinness Book of World Records.

  8. Rotational KMS states and type I conformal nets

    CERN Document Server

    Longo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We consider KMS states on a local conformal net on the unit circle with respect to rotations. We prove that, if the conformal net is of type I, namely if it admits only type I DHR representations, then the extremal KMS states are the Gibbs states in an irreducible representation. Completely rational nets, the U(1)-current net, the Virasoro nets and their finite tensor products are shown to be of type I. In the completely rational case, we also give a direct proof that all factorial KMS states are Gibbs states.

  9. Biocompatibility of Novel Type I Collagen Purified from Tilapia Fish Scale: An In Vitro Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type I collagen (COL-1 is the prevailing component of the extracellular matrix in a number of tissues including skin, ligament, cartilage, bone, and dentin. It is the most widely used tissue-derived natural polymer. Currently, mammalian animals, including pig, cow, and rat, are the three major sources for purification of COL-1. To reduce the risk of zoonotic infectious diseases transmission, minimize the possibility of immunogenic reaction, and avoid problems related to religious issues, exploration of new sources (other than mammalian animals for the purification of type I collagen is highly desirable. Hence, the purpose of the current study was to investigate the in vitro responses of MDPC-23 to type I collagen isolated from tilapia scale in terms of cellular proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization. The results suggested that tilapia scale collagen exhibited comparable biocompatibility to porcine skin collagen, indicating it might be a potential alternative to type I collagen from mammals in the application for tissue regeneration in oral-maxillofacial area.

  10. Type I Chiari malformation presenting central sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Takuro; Miyazaki, Soichiro; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Kanemura, Takashi; Okawa, Masako; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Komada, Ichiro; Hatano, Taketo; Suzuki, Hideaki

    2014-04-01

    Sleep apnea is a rare but a well-known clinical feature of type I Chiari malformation. It may be obstructive or central in nature. Sleep apnea in patients with type I Chiari malformation rarely presents without accompanying neurological signs or symptoms. We here report a case of a 10-year-old girl who presented with central sleep apnea without any other neurological signs but was ultimately diagnosed with type I Chiari malformation. The patient initially showed mild improvement in symptoms after administration of an acetazolamide. Finally, posterior fossa decompression dramatically improved her respiratory status during sleep, both clinically and on polysomnography. This case suggests that type I Chiari malformation should be considered in the differential diagnoses of central apneas in children, even if there are no other neurological signs and symptoms. Furthermore, sagittal craniocervical magnetic resonance imaging may be necessary for a definitive diagnosis.

  11. Bouncing forward: families living with a type I diabetic child

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-08

    Dec 8, 2009 ... Original Research: Bouncing forward: families living with a type I diabetic child ... Quantitative data were analysed by means of correlation analysis, while qualitative data were analysed .... Research design and methodology.

  12. Characterization of a propylthiouracil-insensitive type I iodothyronine deiodinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Sanders (Jo); S. van der Geyten; E. Kaptein (Ellen); V.M. Darras (Veerle); E.R. Kuhn; J.L. Leonard; T.J. Visser (Theo)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractMammalian type I iodothyronine deiodinase (D1) activates and inactivates thyroid hormone by outer ring deiodination (ORD) and inner ring deiodination (IRD), respectively, and is potently inhibited by propylthiouracil (PTU). Here we describe the cloning and c

  13. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF TYPE I MARINE SANITATION DEVICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This performance test was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of two Type I Marine Sanitation Devices (MSDs): the Electro Scan Model EST 12, manufactured by Raritan Engineering Company, Inc., and the Thermopure-2, manufactured by Gross Mechanical Laboratories, Inc. Performance...

  14. Immunoglobulins in granular corneal dystrophy Groenouw type I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H U; Bojsen-Møller, M; Schrøder, H D

    1993-01-01

    Three patients with granular corneal dystrophy Groenouw type I underwent corneal grafting, and cryostat sections of the corneal buttons were examined immunohistochemically for immunoglobulins. Positive results were obtained for IgG, Kappa-, and Lambda chains with immunofluorescence technique...

  15. Suppression of type I migration by disk winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, Masahiro; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Guillot, Tristan

    2015-12-01

    Context. Planets less massive than Saturn tend to rapidly migrate inward in protoplanetary disks. This is the so-called type I migration. Simulations attempting to reproduce the observed properties of exoplanets show that type I migration needs to be significantly reduced over a wide region of the disk for a long time. However, the mechanism capable of suppressing type I migration over a wide region has remained elusive. The recently found turbulence-driven disk winds offer new possibilities. Aims: We investigate the effects of disk winds on the disk profile and type I migration for a range of parameters that describe the strength of disk winds. We also examine the in situ formation of close-in super-Earths in disks that evolve through disk winds. Methods: The disk profile, which is regulated by viscous diffusion and disk winds, was derived by solving the diffusion equation. We carried out a number of simulations and plot here migration maps that indicate the type I migration rate. We also performed N-body simulations of the formation of close-in super-Earths from a population of planetesimals and planetary embryos. Results: We define a key parameter, Kw, which determines the ratio of strengths between the viscous diffusion and disk winds. For a wide range of Kw, the type I migration rate is presented in migration maps. These maps show that type I migration is suppressed over the whole close-in region when the effects of disk winds are relatively strong (Kw ≲ 100). From the results of N-body simulations, we see that type I migration is significantly slowed down assuming Kw = 40. We also show that the results of N-body simulations match statistical orbital distributions of close-in super-Earths.

  16. Identification of type I iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase as a selenoenzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behne, D.; Kyriakopoulos, A.; Meinhold, H.; Koehrle, J. (Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Berlin (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-12-31

    A 27.8 kDa membrane selenoprotein was previously identified in rat thyroid, liver and kidney, the tissues with the highest activities of type I iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase. This membrane enzyme catalyzes the deiodination of L-thyroxine to the biologically active thyroid hormone 3,3',5-triiodothyronine. A decrease in the activity of this enzyme, observed here in the liver of selenium-deficient rats, was found to be due to the absence of a selenium-dependent membrane-bound component. By chemical and enzymatic fragmentation of the {sup 75}Se-labeled selenoprotein and of the 27 kDa substrate binding type I 5'-deiodinase subunit, affinity-labeled with N-bromoacetyl-({sup 125}I)L-thyroxine, and comparison of the tracer distribution in the peptide fragments the identity of the two proteins was shown. The data indicate that the deiodinase subunit contains one selenium atom per molecule and suggest that a highly reactive selenocysteine is the residue essential for the catalysis of 5'-deiodination. From the results it can be concluded that type I iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase is a selenoenzyme.

  17. Spirality: A Noval Way to Measure Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Douglas; Arkansas Galaxy Evolution Survey

    2017-01-01

    We present the MATLAB code Spirality, a novel method for measuring spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. Computation time is typically on the order of 2 minutes per galaxy, assuming 8 GB of working memory. We tested the code using 117 synthetic spiral images with known pitches, varying both the spiral properties and the input parameters. The code yielded correct results for all synthetic spirals with galaxy-like properties. We also compared the code’s results to two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (2DFFT) measurements for the sample of nearby galaxies defined by DMS PPak. Spirality’s error bars overlapped 2DFFT’s error bars for 26 of the 30 galaxies. The two methods’ agreement correlates strongly with galaxy radius in pixels and also with i-band magnitude, but not with redshift, a result that is consistent with at least some galaxies’ spiral structure being fully formed by z=1.2, beyond which there are few galaxies in our sample. We also analyze apparent spiral structure of three galaxies beyond z=2. The Spirality code package also includes GenSpiral, which produces FITS images of synthetic spirals, and SpiralArmCount, which uses a one-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform to count the spiral arms of a galaxy after its pitch is determined.

  18. A role for the canonical nuclear factor-κB pathway in coupling neurotrophin-induced differential survival of developing spiral ganglion neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaud eVandenbosch

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophins are key players of neural development by controlling cell death programs. However, the signaling pathways that mediate their selective responses in different populations of neurons remain unclear. In the mammalian cochlea, sensory neurons differentiate perinatally into type I and type II population both expressing TrkB and TrkC, which bind respectively brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and neurotrophin-3 (NT3. How these two neuronal populations respond differentially to these two neurotrophins remains unknown. Here, we report in rat the segregation of the NFκB subunit p65 specifically within the type II population postnatally. Using dissociated cultures of embryonic and postnatal spiral ganglion neurons, we observed a specific requirement of NFκB for BDNF- but not NT3-dependent neuronal survival during a particular postnatal time window that corresponds to a period of neuronal cell death and hair cell innervation refinement in the developing cochlea. Consistently, postnatal p65 knockout mice showed a specific decreased number in type II spiral ganglion neurons. Taken together, these results identify NFκB as a type II neuron-specific factor that participates in the selective survival effects of BDNF and NT3 signaling on developing spiral ganglion neurons.

  19. Investigating Dwarf Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasooriya, Sachithra; Dunn, Jacqueline M.

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have proposed that dwarf elliptical / spheroidal galaxies form through the transformation of dwarf irregular galaxies. Early and late type dwarfs resemble each other in terms of their observed colors and light distributions (each can often be represented by exponential disks), providing reason to propose an evolutionary link between the two types. The existence of dwarf spirals has been largely debated. However, more and more recent studies are using the designation of dwarf spiral to describe their targets of interest. This project seeks to explore where dwarf spirals fit into the above mentioned evolutionary sequence, if at all. Optical colors will be compared between a sample of dwarf irregular, dwarf elliptical, and dwarf spiral galaxies. The dwarf irregular and dwarf elliptical samples have previously been found to overlap in both optical color and surface brightness profile shape when limiting the samples to their fainter members. A preliminary comparison including the dwarf spiral sample will be presented here, along with a comparison of available ultraviolet and near-infrared data. Initial results indicate a potential evolutionary link that merits further investigation.

  20. Influence of Term of Exposure to High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity on Myocardial Collagen Type I and III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Danielle Cristina Tomaz da [Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Lima-Leopoldo, Ana Paula; Leopoldo, André Soares [Departamento de Esportes, Centro de Educação Física e Desportos da Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES), Vitória, ES (Brazil); Campos, Dijon Henrique Salomé de; Nascimento, André Ferreira do [Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Sílvio Assis Junior de [Escola de Fisioterapia da Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Padovani, Carlos Roberto [Departamento de Bioestatística do Instituto de Ciências Biológicas da Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Cicogna, Antonio Carlos, E-mail: dany.tomaz@gmail.com [Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2014-02-15

    Obesity is a risk factor for many medical complications; medical research has shown that hemodynamic, morphological and functional abnormalities are correlated with the duration and severity of obesity. Present study determined the influence of term of exposure to high-fat diet-induced obesity on myocardial collagen type I and III. Thirty-day-old male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into two groups: a control (C) group fed a standard rat chow and an obese (Ob) group alternately fed one of four palatable high-fat diets. Each diet was changed daily, and the rats were maintained on their respective diets for 15 (C{sub 15} and Ob{sub 15}) and 30 (C{sub 30} and Ob{sub 30}) consecutive weeks. Obesity was determined by adiposity index. The Ob{sub 15} group was similar to the C{sub 15} group regarding the expression of myocardial collagen type I; however, expression in the Ob{sub 30} group was less than C{sub 30} group. The time of exposure to obesity was associated with a reduction in collagen type I in Ob{sub 30} when compared with Ob{sub 15}. Obesity did not affect collagen type III expression. This study showed that the time of exposure to obesity for 30 weeks induced by unsaturated high-fat diet caused a reduction in myocardial collagen type I expression in the obese rats. However, no effect was seen on myocardial collagen type III expression.

  1. 神经调节蛋白-1对心肌梗死大鼠缺血心肌 Toll 样受体及 I型胶原蛋白基因表达的影响%Effect of neural regulatory protein 1 on Toll like receptors and type I collagen gene expression in myocardial infarc-tion rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周俊; 王龙; 周芹; 熊琼

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the neural regulatory protein-1(NRG-1) influence on the gene expression of myo-cardial ischemia Toll like receptor(TLR) and type I collagen(Col I)”in rats with myocardial infarction.Methods 15 healthy male SD rats were randomly divided into 3 groups, 5 rats in each group .The myocardial infarction model was established by ligation of the anterior descending coronary artery in rats .The model group without drug intervention;pretreatment group via the tail vein medicine to give 0.01μg/g of recombinant human nueral regulatory protein 1 (rhNRG-1), and in myocardial in-farction model was established after administration;intervention group first established model of myocardial infarction , by 0.01μg/g by the rat tail vein injection , the three groups were sacrificed after 24 h to obtain the left ventricle .Used RT-PCR to de-tect the expression of TLR mRNA and Col I mRNA in myocardial infarction area and the surrounding area .Results Model group, pretreatment group and intervention group's TLR mRNA levels were 0.52 ±0.29 and 0.10 ±0.04, 0.30 ±0.46;Col I mRNA content were 0.81 ±0.65,0.60 ±0.41,2.57 ±1.13; compared with the model group , the pretreatment group's TLR mRNA expression decreased significantly , the difference were statistically significant ( P 0 .05).Compared with the mod-el group,intervention group's Col I mRNA expression increased significantly , and the difference was statistically significant (P 0.05).Correlation analysis showed that no significant correlation in the expression of Col I mRNA and TLR mRNA( r =-0.171, P =0.542).Conclusion In the early phase of myocardial infarction ,NRG-1 can inhibit the expres-sion of TLR,promote the expression of Col I ,help to repair myocardial tissue necrosis .For the intervention of TLR ,before the myocardial infarction given NRG-1 in advance is better than that of after myocardial infarction;for the intervention of Col I ,af-ter myocardial infarction give ,NRG-1 is better than that of

  2. Embracing the Spiral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Mao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Critical research demands that we interrogate our own positionality and social location. Critical reflexivity is a form of researcher critical consciousness that is constant and dynamic in a complex spiral-like process starting within our own experiences as racialized, gendered, and classed beings embedded in particular sociopolitical contexts. Across diverse critical methodologies, a group of graduate students and their supervisor explored their own conceptualization of the reflexivity spiral by reflecting on how their research motivations and methodologies emerged from their racializing, colonizing, language-learning, parenting, and identity negotiating experiences. In this article, they present a spiral model of the critical reflexivity process, review the literature on reflexivity, and conclude with a description of critical reflexivity as a social practice within a supportive and collaborative graduate school experience.

  3. Type I restriction endonucleases are true catalytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Piero R; Xu, Cuiling; Chi, Min

    2009-06-01

    Type I restriction endonucleases are intriguing, multifunctional complexes that restrict DNA randomly, at sites distant from the target sequence. Restriction at distant sites is facilitated by ATP hydrolysis-dependent, translocation of double-stranded DNA towards the stationary enzyme bound at the recognition sequence. Following restriction, the enzymes are thought to remain associated with the DNA at the target site, hydrolyzing copious amounts of ATP. As a result, for the past 35 years type I restriction endonucleases could only be loosely classified as enzymes since they functioned stoichiometrically relative to DNA. To further understand enzyme mechanism, a detailed analysis of DNA cleavage by the EcoR124I holoenzyme was done. We demonstrate for the first time that type I restriction endonucleases are not stoichiometric but are instead catalytic with respect to DNA. Further, the mechanism involves formation of a dimer of holoenzymes, with each monomer bound to a target sequence and, following cleavage, each dissociates in an intact form to bind and restrict subsequent DNA molecules. Therefore, type I restriction endonucleases, like their type II counterparts, are true enzymes. The conclusion that type I restriction enzymes are catalytic relative to DNA has important implications for the in vivo function of these previously enigmatic enzymes.

  4. Suppression of type I migration by disk winds

    CERN Document Server

    Ogihara, Masahiro; Guillot, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    Planets less massive than Saturn tend to rapidly migrate inward in protoplanetary disks. This is the so-called type I migration. Simulations attempting to reproduce the observed properties of exoplanets show that type I migration needs to be significantly reduced over a wide region of the disk for a long time. However, the mechanism capable of suppressing type I migration over a wide region has remained elusive. The recently found turbulence-driven disk winds offer new possibilities. We investigate the effects of disk winds on the disk profile and type I migration for a range of parameters that describe the strength of disk winds. We also examine the in situ formation of close-in super-Earths in disks that evolve through disk winds. The disk profile, which is regulated by viscous diffusion and disk winds, was derived by solving the diffusion equation. We carried out a number of simulations and plot here migration maps that indicate the type I migration rate. We also performed N-body simulations of the formati...

  5. Type I interferon: potential therapeutic target for psoriasis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihong Yao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is an immune-mediated disease characterized by aberrant epidermal differentiation, surface scale formation, and marked cutaneous inflammation. To better understand the pathogenesis of this disease and identify potential mediators, we used whole genome array analysis to profile paired lesional and nonlesional psoriatic skin and skin from healthy donors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We observed robust overexpression of type I interferon (IFN-inducible genes and genomic signatures that indicate T cell and dendritic cell infiltration in lesional skin. Up-regulation of mRNAs for IFN-alpha subtypes was observed in lesional skin compared with nonlesional skin. Enrichment of mature dendritic cells and 2 type I IFN-inducible proteins, STAT1 and ISG15, were observed in the majority of lesional skin biopsies. Concordant overexpression of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha-inducible gene signatures occurred at the same disease sites. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Up-regulation of TNF-alpha and elevation of the TNF-alpha-inducible gene signature in lesional skin underscore the importance of this cytokine in psoriasis; these data describe a molecular basis for the therapeutic activity of anti-TNF-alpha agents. Furthermore, these findings implicate type I IFNs in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Consistent and significant up-regulation of type I IFNs and their associated gene signatures in psoriatic skin suggest that type I IFNs may be potential therapeutic targets in psoriasis treatment.

  6. Plasmonic response of nanoscale spirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Jed I; Haglund, Richard F

    2010-08-11

    The Archimedean spiral geometry presents a platform for exploration of complex plasmonic mechanisms and applications. Here we show both through simulations and experiment that more complex plasmonic modes with unique near-field structure and larger mode volumes can be realized within a single, topologically robust structure. In the spiral, complex polarization response, resonant interactions and symmetry-breaking features are defined by the width and spacing of the spiral tracks and by the winding number of the spiral.

  7. Limiting Cholesterol Biosynthetic Flux Spontaneously Engages Type I IFN Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Autumn G; Williams, Kevin J; Argus, Joseph P; Zhou, Quan D; Brar, Gurpreet; Vergnes, Laurent; Gray, Elizabeth E; Zhen, Anjie; Wu, Nicholas C; Yamada, Douglas H; Cunningham, Cameron R; Tarling, Elizabeth J; Wilks, Moses Q; Casero, David; Gray, David H; Yu, Amy K; Wang, Eric S; Brooks, David G; Sun, Ren; Kitchen, Scott G; Wu, Ting-Ting; Reue, Karen; Stetson, Daniel B; Bensinger, Steven J

    2015-12-17

    Cellular lipid requirements are achieved through a combination of biosynthesis and import programs. Using isotope tracer analysis, we show that type I interferon (IFN) signaling shifts the balance of these programs by decreasing synthesis and increasing import of cholesterol and long chain fatty acids. Genetically enforcing this metabolic shift in macrophages is sufficient to render mice resistant to viral challenge, demonstrating the importance of reprogramming the balance of these two metabolic pathways in vivo. Unexpectedly, mechanistic studies reveal that limiting flux through the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway spontaneously engages a type I IFN response in a STING-dependent manner. The upregulation of type I IFNs was traced to a decrease in the pool size of synthesized cholesterol and could be inhibited by replenishing cells with free cholesterol. Taken together, these studies delineate a metabolic-inflammatory circuit that links perturbations in cholesterol biosynthesis with activation of innate immunity.

  8. General Analysis of Type I Planetary Migration with Stochastic Perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Fred C

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a generalized treatment of Type I planetary migration in the presence of stochastic perturbations. In many planet-forming disks, the Type I migration mechanism, driven by asymmetric torques, acts on a short time scale and compromises planet formation. If the disk also supports MHD instabilities, however, the corresponding turbulent fluctuations produce additional stochastic torques that modify the steady inward migration scenario. This work studies the migration of planetary cores in the presence of stochastic fluctuations using complementary methods, including a Fokker-Planck approach and iterative maps. Stochastic torques have two main effects: [1] Through outward diffusion, a small fraction of the planetary cores can survive in the face of Type I inward migration. [2] For a given starting condition, the result of any particular realization of migration is uncertain, so that results must be described in terms of the distributions of outcomes. In addition to exploring different regimes of...

  9. Mineralocorticoid specificity of renal type I receptors: in vivo binding studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, K.; Funder, J.W.

    1987-02-01

    The authors have injected rats with (TH)aldosterone or (TH) corticosterone, plus 100-fold excess of the highly specific glucocorticoid RU 28362, with or without excess unlabeled aldosterone or corticosterone and compared type I receptor occupancy in kidney and hippocampus. Thirty minutes after subcutaneous injection (TH)aldosterone was well retained in renal papilla-inner medulla, renal cortex-outer medulla, and hippocampus; in contrast, (TH)corticosterone was well retained only in hippocampus. Competition studies for (TH)aldosterone binding sites showed corticosterone to be a poor competitor in the kidney compared with hippocampus. Time-course studies, with rats killed 10-180 min after tracer administration, showed very low uptake/retention of (TH)corticosterone by kidney; in hippocampus (TH)corticosterone retention was similar to that of (TH)aldosterone in kidney, and retention of (TH)aldosterone by hippocampus was much more prolonged than of either tracer in any other tissue. Studies in 10-day-old rats, with very low levels of corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), showed a high degree of aldosterone selectivity in both zones of the kidney, whereas 9TH)aldosterone and (TH)corticosterone were equivalently bound in hippocampus. They interpret these data as evidenced for a mechanism unrelated to extravascular CBG conferring mineralocorticoid specificity on renal type I receptors and propose two models derived from their findings consistent with such differential selectivity.

  10. Overview of the Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, SS; Akolkar, B; Concannon, P; Erlich, H.; Hilner, JE; Julier, C.; Morahan, G; J. Nerup; Nierras, C.; Pociot, F; Todd, JA.

    2009-01-01

    The Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) is an international, multicenter research program with two primary goals. The first goal is to identify genomic regions and candidate genes whose variants modify an individual’s risk of type I diabetes (T1D) and help explain the clustering of the disease in families. The second goal is to make research data available to the research community and to establish resources that can be used by, and that are fully accessible to, the research community...

  11. MRI-visible pericochlear lesions in osteogenesis imperfecta type I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziyeh, S.; Berger, R.; Reisner, K. [Radiologische Klinik, St. Vincentiuskrankenhaeuser, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2000-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited generalized disorder of type-I collagen synthesis often associated with hearing loss. We present a case of OI type I in which hearing loss led to examination of the temporal bone with MRI. In the osseous otic capsule MRI demonstrated pericochlear lesions with soft tissue signal intensity and contrast enhancement. Changes similar to otosclerosis have been described in the temporal bone of OI patients when applying CT, but reports on MRI findings do not yet exist. (orig.)

  12. Protozoan parasites and type I interferons: a cold case reopened.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiting, Daniel P

    2014-10-01

    Protozoan parasites, such as Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, trypanosomes, and Leishmania, are a major cause of disease in both humans and other animals, highlighting the need to understand the full spectrum of strategies used by the host immune system to sense and respond to parasite infection. Although type II interferon (IFN-γ) has long been recognized as an essential antiparasite immune effector, much less is known about the role of type I interferons (IFN-α and -β) in host defense, particularly in vivo. Recent studies are reviewed which collectively highlight that type I IFN can be induced in response to parasite infection and influence the outcome of infection.

  13. Osteogenesis imperfecta type I: Molecular heterogeneity for COL1A1 null alleles of type I collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willing, M.C.; Deschenes, S.P.; Pitts, S.H.; Arikat, H.; Roberts, E.J.; Scott, D.A.; Slayton, R.L. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Byers, P.H. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I is the mildest form of inherited brittle-bone disease. Dermal fibroblasts from most affected individuals produce about half the usual amount of type I procollagen, as a result of a COL1A1 {open_quotes}null{close_quotes} allele. Using PCR amplification of genomic DNA from affected individuals, followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and SSCP, we identified seven different COL1A1 gene mutations in eight unrelated families with OI type I. Three families have single nucleotide substitutions that alter 5{prime} donor splice sites; two of these unrelated families have the same mutation. One family has a point mutation, in an exon, that creates a premature termination codon, and four have small deletions or insertions, within exons, that create translational frameshifts and new termination codons downstream of the mutation sites. Each mutation leads to both marked reduction in steady-state levels of mRNA from the mutant allele and a quantitative decrease in type I procollagen production. Our data demonstrate that different molecular mechanisms that have the same effect on type I collagen production result in the same clinical phenotype. 58 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Galactic Spiral Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Francis, Charles

    2009-01-01

    We describe the structure and composition of six major stellar streams in a population of 20 574 local stars in the New Hipparcos Reduction with known radial velocities. We find that, once fast moving stars are excluded, almost all stars belong to one of these streams. The results of our investigation have lead us to re-examine the hydrogen maps of the Milky Way, from which we identify the possibility of a symmetric two-armed spiral with half the conventionally accepted pitch angle. We describe a model of spiral arm motions which matches the observed velocities and composition of the six major streams, as well as the observed velocities of the Hyades and Praesepe clusters at the extreme of the Hyades stream. Stellar orbits are perturbed ellipses aligned at a focus in coordinates rotating at the rate of precession of pericentre. Stars join a spiral arm just before apocentre, follow the arm for more than half an orbit, and leave the arm soon after pericentre. Spiral pattern speed equals the mean rate of precess...

  15. Ferroelectricity in spiral magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostovoy, M

    2006-01-01

    It was recently observed that the ferroelectrics showing the strongest sensitivity to an applied magnetic field are spiral magnets. We present a phenomenological theory of inhomogeneous ferroelectric magnets, which describes their thermodynamics and magnetic field behavior, e.g., dielectric suscepti

  16. Noise reduction of spiral ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapka, Wojciech; Cempel, Czesław

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents noise reduction (NR) of spiral ducts as a result of computational modeling of acoustic wave propagation. Three-dimensional models were created with the finite element method in COMSOL Multiphysics version 3.3. Nine models of spiral ducts with 1-9 spiral leads were considered. Time-harmonic analysis was used to predict NR, which was shown in spectral and interval frequency bands. Spiral duct performance can be seen as a comparison of NR before and after a change from a circular to a spiral duct.

  17. Tracking Target and Spiral Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Flemming G.; Sporring, Jon; Nielsen, Mads

    2002-01-01

    A new algorithm for analyzing the evolution of patterns of spiral and target waves in large aspect ratio chemical systems is introduced. The algorithm does not depend on finding the spiral tip but locates the center of the pattern by a new concept, called the spiral focus, which is defined...... by the evolutes of the actual spiral or target wave. With the use of Gaussian smoothing, a robust method is developed that permits the identification of targets and spirals foci independently of the wave profile. Examples of an analysis of long image sequences from experiments with the Belousov...

  18. Tracking Target and Spiral Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Flemming G.; Sporring, Jon; Nielsen, Mads;

    2002-01-01

    A new algorithm for analyzing the evolution of patterns of spiral and target waves in large aspect ratio chemical systems is introduced. The algorithm does not depend on finding the spiral tip but locates the center of the pattern by a new concept, called the spiral focus, which is defined...... by the evolutes of the actual spiral or target wave. With the use of Gaussian smoothing, a robust method is developed that permits the identification of targets and spirals foci independently of the wave profile. Examples of an analysis of long image sequences from experiments with the Belousov...

  19. Histological evaluation of type I collagen scaffolds preparde under different dehydrothermal cross-linking conditions in a rat model%应用不同物理加强条件的Ⅰ型胶原支架的大白鼠动物模型与组织学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张聪; 张艳勤; Mark Spilker; Myron Spector; 李登云; 鲁玉梅; 许和平

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:In previous studies, the dehydrothermal cross-linking method was modified by the authors to improve the degradation property of colagen scaffolds. The cross-linking time was increased from 24 to 48 hours, and the cross-linking temperature increased from 105 to 115℃. OBJECTIVE:To verify the anti-degradation ability of colagen scaffolds prepared using the modified dehydrothermal cross-linking method and to obtain the optimal efficacy of the scaffolds on damaged tissue repair and regeneration. METHODS: Highly-purified type I colagen scaffolds with native triple helix structure were prepared and subjected to three different dehydrothermal cross-linking conditions: 105℃ for 24 hours, 105℃ for 48 hours and 115℃ for 24 hours. Material samples, 1 cm×1 cm, were implanted subcutaneously into the rat dorsum. The specimens were harvested at 3 days, 14 days and 42 postoperative days folowed by fixation and histological analysis using hematoxylin-eosin staining. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:No untoward foreign body and immunological reactions were observed in any groups. In the group of 105℃ for 48 hours, the scaffold retention and degree of pore openness were better than the other two groups at 14 days after scaffold implantation (P < 0.05). These findings indirectly suggest that the anti-degradation ability of colagen scaffolds can be strengthened under certain dehydrothermal cross-linking conditions: the cross-linking time is increased from 24 to 48 hours.%背景:为改善胶原支架的降解性能,作者对胶原支架的高温脱水物理交联方法进行了改进,将交联时间由24 h增加到48 h,将交联温度由105℃提高到115℃。目的:验证改进高温脱水物理交联方法制备胶原支架的抗降解能力,获取支架在体内对受损组织修复与再生的最佳功效。方法:将高纯度保持三螺旋结构的动物源性Ⅰ型胶原制成膜状支架,分别采取3种不同条件的高

  20. Morning glory disc anomaly with Chiari type I malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlow, Tim; Arepalli, Sruthi; Flanders, Adam E; Shields, Carol L

    2014-04-30

    Morning glory disc anomaly is a rare optic nerve dysplasia associated with various neovascular abnormalities. Due to these associations, children with morning glory disc anomaly have brain imaging and angiography to detect other congenital defects. The authors report the case of an infant with morning glory disc anomaly and coexisting Chiari type I malformation.

  1. Abnormal glutathione conjugation in patients with tyrosinaemia type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, DJW; PollThe, BT; Smit, GPA; Breimer, DD; Duran, M; Smeitink, JAM

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that tyrosinaemia type I may be associated with reduced glutathione availability due to conjugation of tyrosinaemia-associated reactive intermediates with glutathione. In the present study, the glutathione/glutathione S-transferase system of two tyrosinaemia patients

  2. Liver transplantation in glycogen storage disease type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers, Susanna J. B.; Visser, Gepke; Smit, Peter G. P. A.; Fuchs, Sabine A.

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), an inborn error of carbohydrate metabolism, is caused by defects in the glucose-6-transporter/glucose-6-phosphatase complex, which is essential in glucose homeostasis. Two types exist, GSDIa and GSDIb, each caused by different defects in the complex. GSDIa is

  3. Abnormal glutathione conjugation in patients with tyrosinaemia type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, DJW; PollThe, BT; Smit, GPA; Breimer, DD; Duran, M; Smeitink, JAM

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that tyrosinaemia type I may be associated with reduced glutathione availability due to conjugation of tyrosinaemia-associated reactive intermediates with glutathione. In the present study, the glutathione/glutathione S-transferase system of two tyrosinaemia patients

  4. RENAL COMPLICATIONS IN GLYCOGEN-STORAGE-DISEASE TYPE-I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    REITSMABIERENS, WCC

    1993-01-01

    Deficiency of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase is the biochemical defect in glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I). Normally this enzyme is present in the liver, intestine and kidneys. The lack of the enzyme in the kidney makes it obvious that glycogen storage will not be restricted to the liver bu

  5. Bianchi type I inflationary universe in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raj Bali; Vimal Chand Jain

    2002-07-01

    In this paper, we have investigated Bianchi type I inflationary universe in the presence of massless scalar field with a flat potential. To get an inflationary solution, we have considered a flat region in which potential is constant. The inflationary scenario of the model is discussed in detail.

  6. Interferon Type I Driven Immune Activation in Generalized Autoimmune Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Brkić (Zana)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes research performed on several generalized autoimmune diseases with the main focus on primary Sjögren’s syndrome. Interferon type I has been implicated in the pathogenesis of these diseases and will be introduced in this chapter together with other important immune f

  7. Method for identifying type I diabetes mellitus in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, Thomas O [Kennewick, WA; Qian, Weijun [Richland, WA; Jacobs, Jon M [Pasco, WA

    2011-04-12

    A method and system for classifying subject populations utilizing predictive and diagnostic biomarkers for type I diabetes mellitus. The method including determining the levels of a variety of markers within the serum or plasma of a target organism and correlating this level to general populations as a screen for predisposition or progressive monitoring of disease presence or predisposition.

  8. Controlling the Type I Error Rate in Stepwise Regression Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, John T.

    Three procedures used to control Type I error rate in stepwise regression analysis are forward selection, backward elimination, and true stepwise. In the forward selection method, a model of the dependent variable is formed by choosing the single best predictor; then the second predictor which makes the strongest contribution to the prediction of…

  9. Generalized metabolic bone disease in Neurofibromatosis type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeletal abnormalities are a recognized component of Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1), but a generalized metabolic bone defect in NF1 has not been fully characterized thus far. The purpose of this study was to characterize at the densitometric, biochemical, and pathological level the bone involvement ...

  10. An Extension of Type I Gaugeon Formalism for Quantum Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, R

    1993-01-01

    By introducing two kinds of gaugeon fields, we extend Yokoyama's Type I gaugeon formalism for quantum electrodynamics. The theory admits a q-number gauge transformation by which we can shift the gauge parameter into arbitrary numerical value; whereas in the original theory we cannot change the sign of the parameter. The relation to the Type II theory is also discussed.

  11. Imaging collagen type I fibrillogenesis with high spatiotemporal resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamov, Dimitar R; Stock, Erik; Franz, Clemens M; Jähnke, Torsten; Haschke, Heiko

    2015-02-01

    Fibrillar collagens, such as collagen type I, belong to the most abundant extracellular matrix proteins and they have received much attention over the last five decades due to their large interactome, complex hierarchical structure and high mechanical stability. Nevertheless, the collagen self-assembly process is still incompletely understood. Determining the real-time kinetics of collagen type I formation is therefore pivotal for better understanding of collagen type I structure and function, but visualising the dynamic self-assembly process of collagen I on the molecular scale requires imaging techniques offering high spatiotemporal resolution. Fast and high-speed scanning atomic force microscopes (AFM) provide the means to study such processes on the timescale of seconds under near-physiological conditions. In this study we have applied fast AFM tip scanning to study the assembly kinetics of fibrillar collagen type I nanomatrices with a temporal resolution reaching eight seconds for a frame size of 500 nm. By modifying the buffer composition and pH value, the kinetics of collagen fibrillogenesis can be adjusted for optimal analysis by fast AFM scanning. We furthermore show that amplitude-modulation imaging can be successfully applied to extract additional structural information from collagen samples even at high scan rates. Fast AFM scanning with controlled amplitude modulation therefore provides a versatile platform for studying dynamic collagen self-assembly processes at high resolution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dentin dysplasia type I : Five cases within one family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalk, WWI; Batenburg, RHK; Vissink, A

    1998-01-01

    Five cases of dentin dysplasia type I within one family are described. Clinically and radiologically, such patients are characterized by a delayed eruption pattern, opacity of the incisional margins, hypermobility of the teeth, short and defective roots, and obliterated pulp chambers. A conservative

  13. Loss of type I fibres in canine pectineus muscle hypotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihemelandu, E C

    1980-01-01

    The total number of fibres, as well as, the number of fibres per fibre type were determined by the indirect fibre-counting method in 32 pectineus muscles from 16 dogs of mixed sexes. Eight pairs of muscles from 8 dogs were judged to be hypotrophic, while the other 8 pairs from another 8 dogs were judged to be normal. The hypotrophic muscles had extremely small muscle fibres, particularly type II fibres. They also had apparently higher percentages of type II muscle fibres within a section. The apparently higher percentage of type II fibres usually observed in the hitsochemical examination of the sections of hypotrophic pectineus muscles did not result from failure of type II fibres to transform to type I fibres. It was rather due to too few type I fibres being present in these muscles as compared to the normal muscles. It was not because there were more type II fibres present in them than in the normal muscles. The fewer type I fibres resulted most likely from loss of already differentiated type I fibres. The loss may be of neural origin.

  14. Anti-inflammatory action of type I interferons deduced from mice expressing interferon beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscá, L; Bodelón, O G; Hortelano, S; Casellas, A; Bosch, F

    2000-05-01

    Type I interferons (IFN) are widely used for the therapeutic treatment of viral infections, tumor growth and various chronic diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Antagonism between type I IFNs and IFN-gamma has been described in cells of the immune system, in particular in the activation of macrophages. To study the systemic effects of type I IFNs we used transgenic mice carrying a human IFN-beta (hIFN-beta) gene under the control of the rat insulin I promoter. These animals expressed high levels of hIFN-beta in beta-pancreatic cells, and the ability of the macrophages to respond to pro-inflammatory stimuli was analyzed. Transgenic mice exhibited an increased extravasation of cells to the peritoneal cavity after eliciting with thioglycollate broth. The expression of the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, two enzymes involved in inflammation, was impaired in transgenic animals challenged with lipopolysaccharide and IFN-gamma. Analysis of the mechanisms leading to this attenuated inflammatory response showed a decrease in the serum levels of TNF-alpha and an inhibition of the activation of the transcription factor NF-KB in various tissues. These results indicate that systemic administration of IFN-beta might influence the response to pro-inflammatory stimuli, in particular through the antagonism of IFN-gamma signaling.

  15. Biomechanical regulation of type I collagen gene expression in ACLs in organ culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Adam H; Sah, Robert L; Paul Sung, K L

    2002-03-01

    In this study, an ex vivo organ culture system that allows the application of controlled loads to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was designed and used to characterize the influence of a step input in mechanical load on gene expression. A procedure for isolating bone-ACL-bone (B-ACL-B) complexes from rat knees was developed. After harvest and 24 hour culture, B-ACL-B complexes exhibited percentages of viability similar to that in intact ACLs (approximately 90%). Application of a physiologically relevant load of 5 N (superimposed on a I N tare load) resulted in changes in levels of mRNA encoding type I collagen. While levels of type I collagen mRNA significantly increased 32+/-13% (mean +/- standard errors of the mean (SEM)) over controls within the first hour of loading, levels decreased significantly to 44+/-9% of control after 2 h. Displacements induced by the 5 N load were measured by video dimensional analysis. Calculated axial strains of 0.141+/-0.034 were achieved rapidly during the first hour and remained essentially unchanged thereafter. These results demonstrate the feasibility of maintaining ligaments in organ culture and illustrate the time course expression of type I collagen following the application of a mechanical load.

  16. Genomic Analysis of Pathogenicity Determinants in Mycobacterium kansasii Type I

    KAUST Repository

    Guan, Qingtian

    2016-05-01

    Mycobacteria, a genus within Actinobacteria Phylum, are well known for two pathogens that cause human diseases: leprosy and tuberculosis. Other than the obligate human mycobacteria, there is a group of bacteria that are present in the environment and occasionally cause diseases in immunocompromised persons: the non-tuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM). Mycobacterium kansasii, which was first discovered in the Kansas state, is the main etiologic agent responsible for lung infections caused by NTM and raises attention because of its co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Five subspecies of M. kansasii (Type I-V) were described and only M. kansasii Type I is pathogenic to humans. M. kansasii is a Gram-positive bacteria that has a unique cell wall and secretion system, which is essential for its pathogenicity. We undertook a comparative genomics and transcriptomic approach to identify components of M. kansasii Type I pathogenicity. Our previous study showed that espA (ESX-1 essential protein) operon, a major component of the secretion system, is exclusively present in M. kansasii Type I. The purpose of this study was to test the functional role of the espA operon in pathogenicity and identify other components that may also be involved in pathogenicity. This study provides a new molecular diagnostic method for M. kansasii Type I infection using PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) technique to target the espAoperon. With detailed manual curation of the comparative genomics datasets, we found several genes exclusively present in M. kansasii Type I including ppsA/ppsC and whiB6, that we believe are involved, or have an effect on ESX-mediated secretion system. We have also highlighted, in our study, the differences in genetic components coding for the cell membrane composition between the five subspecies of M. kansasii. These results shed light on genetic components that are responsible for pathogenicity determinants in Type I M. kansasii and may help to design better

  17. Diagnosis and management of type I posterior laryngeal clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakthavachalam, Sivi; Schroeder, James W; Holinger, Lauren D

    2010-04-01

    We review the diagnosis and management of type I posterior laryngeal clefts (PLCs). We performed a retrospective study at a tertiary-care children's hospital of children who were diagnosed with a PLC between January 2003 and August 2008. We studied concurrent airway anomalies, comorbidities, presenting symptoms, age at the time of aspiration resolution, and rate of aspiration resolution. Sixty-seven children with PLCs were identified (41 boys and 26 girls). Fifty-nine had type I clefts, 6 had type II, and 2 had type III. Of the 59 type I cases, 15 (25.4%) were surgically repaired by endoscopy. Eleven of these 15 children (73.3%) have had symptomatic improvement since the surgery, and 7 of those 11 (63.6%) are tolerating thin liquids by mouth. Two of the 15 (13.3%) displayed no improvement with surgery, and 2 of the 15 (13.3%) were lost to follow-up. Forty-four of the 59 type I clefts (74.6%) were managed nonsurgically. Twenty of these 44 children (45.5%) did not present with aspiration. Twenty-four of the 44 (54.5%) presented with aspiration, and 16 of the 24 (66.7%) are now tolerating thin liquids by mouth. Seven of these 24 patients (29.2%) are still aspirating, and 1 has died. The average time to resolution of aspiration was 7.8 months for the surgical group and 13.6 months for the nonsurgical group (p = 0.19). In the surgical group, the average age at resolution of aspiration for patients who received their diagnosis at 0 to 6 months of age was 21.5 months; that for those with a diagnosis at 6 to 12 months was 27.3 months; and that for those with a diagnosis at older than 12 months was 27.3 months (p = 0.31). In the nonsurgical group, the average age at resolution of aspiration for patients who received their diagnosis at 0 to 12 months of age was 15.8 months; that for those with a diagnosis at 12 to 24 months was 27.3 months; and that for those with a diagnosis at older than 24 months was 77.3 months (p = 0.0015). We found that (1) the reported incidence of

  18. Bauhinia variegata (Caesalpiniaceae) leaf extract: An effective treatment option in type I and type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Yogesh A; Garud, Mayuresh S

    2016-10-01

    Among various metabolic disorders, diabetes mellitus is one of the most common disorder. Present study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of aqueous extract of Bauhinia variegata leaves (AE) in animal models of type I and type II diabetes. Type I diabetes was induced by streptozotocin at the dose of 55mg/kg (i.p.) in male Sprague Dawley rats while type II diabetes was induced by high fat diet and streptozotocin at the dose of 35mg/kg (i.p.). Diabetic animals were treated with AE at the dose of 250, 500 and 1000mg/kg. Glipizide (5mg/kg) was used as standard treatment drug. Treatment was given for 28days. Parameters evaluated were body weight, plasma glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, total proteins, albumin, creatinine and bun urea nitrogen. In type II diabetes, high density lipoprotein levels in plasma and plasma insulin level were also evaluated. Histopathological study of pancreases were carried out in type I study. AE showed significant decrease in plasma glucose significantly. AE was also found to decrease cholesterol, triglyceride, creatinine and blood urea nitrogen level in both types of diabetes. AE did not show any significant effect on plasma levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase. AE was found to increase the albumin and total protein levels. Histopathological study showed that AE decreases the necrotic changes in the pancreatic tissue. Aqueous extract of B. variegata leaves was found effective in treatment of both type I and type II diabetes.

  19. Type I TARPs promote dendritic growth of early postnatal neocortical pyramidal cells in organotypic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Mohammad I K; Jack, Alexander; Klatt, Oliver; Lorkowski, Markus; Strasdeit, Tobias; Kott, Sabine; Sager, Charlotte; Hollmann, Michael; Wahle, Petra

    2014-04-01

    The ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate glutamate receptors (AMPARs) have been implicated in the establishment of dendritic architecture. The transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) regulate AMPAR function and trafficking into synaptic membranes. In the current study, we employ type I and type II TARPs to modulate expression levels and function of endogenous AMPARs and investigate in organotypic cultures (OTCs) of rat occipital cortex whether this influences neuronal differentiation. Our results show that in early development [5-10 days in vitro (DIV)] only the type I TARP γ-8 promotes pyramidal cell dendritic growth by increasing spontaneous calcium amplitude and GluA2/3 expression in soma and dendrites. Later in development (10-15 DIV), the type I TARPs γ-2, γ-3 and γ-8 promote dendritic growth, whereas γ-4 reduced dendritic growth. The type II TARPs failed to alter dendritic morphology. The TARP-induced dendritic growth was restricted to the apical dendrites of pyramidal cells and it did not affect interneurons. Moreover, we studied the effects of short hairpin RNA-induced knockdown of endogenous γ-8 and showed a reduction of dendritic complexity and amplitudes of spontaneous calcium transients. In addition, the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of γ-8 was required for dendritic growth. Single-cell calcium imaging showed that the γ-8 CT domain increases amplitude but not frequency of calcium transients, suggesting a regulatory mechanism involving the γ-8 CT domain in the postsynaptic compartment. Indeed, the effect of γ-8 overexpression was reversed by APV, indicating a contribution of NMDA receptors. Our results suggest that selected type I TARPs influence activity-dependent dendritogenesis of immature pyramidal neurons.

  20. Forming Spirals From Shadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    What causes the large-scale spiral structures found in some protoplanetary disks? Most models assume theyre created by newly-forming planets, but a new study suggests that planets might have nothing to do with it.Perturbations from Planets?In some transition disks protoplanetary disks with gaps in their inner regions weve directly imaged large-scale spiral arms. Many theories currently attribute the formation of these structures to young planets: either the direct perturbations of a planet embedded in the disk cause the spirals, or theyre indirectly caused by the orbit of a planetary body outside of the arms.Another example of spiral arms detected in a protoplanetary disk, MWC 758. [NASA/ESA/ESO/M. Benisty et al.]But what if you could get spirals without any planets? A team of scientists led by Matas Montesinos (University of Chile) have recently published a study in which they examine what happens to a shadowed protoplanetary disk.Casting Shadows with WarpsIn the teams setup, they envision a protoplanetary disk that is warped: the inner region is slightly tilted relative to the outer region. As the central star casts light out over its protoplanetary disk, this disk warping would cause some regions of the disk to be shaded in a way that isnt axially symmetric with potentially interesting implications.Montesinos and collaborators ran 2D hydrodynamics simulations to determine what happens to the motion of particles within the disk when they pass in and out of the shadowed regions. Since the shadowed regions are significantly colder than the illuminated disk, the pressure in these regions is much lower. Particles are therefore accelerated and decelerated as they pass through these regions, and the lack of axial symmetry causes spiral density waves to form in the disk as a result.Initial profile for the stellar heating rate per unit area for one of the authors simulations. The regions shadowed as a result of the disk warp subtend 0.5 radians each (shown on the left

  1. Spiral 2 workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The accelerator and experimental facilities at GANIL will be transformed over the next 5-10 years. The centerpiece of the additions to the accelerator complex will be Spiral-2. This is the first phase of a new radioactive beam facility based on the ISOL principle. The main aim of Spiral-2 will be to produce intense, high quality beams of neutron-rich nuclei created in neutron-induced fission of heavy elements and accelerated by the existing CIME cyclotron. The principal aims of this workshop will be a) to publicize the new facilities, b) to discuss and define the science which might be carried out with them, c) to discuss the instrumentation and infrastructure required to exploit the new facilities and d) to help form collaborations of scientists wishing to design and construct the equipment needed to undertake the science programme. This document gathers most of the slides presented in the workshop.

  2. Spiral multicapillary columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimenko, A. P.; Naumenko, I. I.; Soboleva, V. K.

    2008-08-01

    It was shown in a theoretical study and confirmed by experiment that a spiral multicapillary column had maximum efficiency if the bunch of capillaries was additionally coiled around its longitudinal axis to produce an integral number of coils. This technique made it possible to manufacture gas-chromatographic columns with performance as high as 12 to 16 thousand theoretical plates. These columns can find various applications, especially if quick separation is required.

  3. Interweaving Chiral Spirals

    CERN Document Server

    Kojo, Toru; Fukushima, Kenji; McLerran, Larry; Pisarski, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    We elaborate how to construct the interweaving chiral spirals in (2+1) dimensions, that is defined as a superposition of differently oriented chiral spirals. We divide the two-dimensional Fermi sea into distinct wedges characterized by the opening angle 2 Theta and the depth Q \\simeq pF, where pF is the Fermi momentum. Each wedge earns an energy gain by forming a single chiral spiral. The optimal values for Theta and Q are chosen by the balance between this energy gain and the energy costs from the deformed Fermi surface (dominant at large Theta) and patch-patch interactions (dominant at small Theta). We estimate these energy gains and costs by means of the expansions in terms of 1/Nc, Lambda_QCD/Q, and Theta using a non-local four-Fermi interaction model: At small 1/Nc the mass gap (chiral condensate) is large enough and the interaction among quarks and the condensate is local in momentum space thanks to the form factor in our non-local model. The fact that patch-patch interactions lie only near the patch bo...

  4. Satellites of spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Smith, Rodney; Frenk, Carlos; White, Simon D. M.

    1993-01-01

    We present a survey of satellites around a homogeneous set of late-type spirals with luminosity similar to that of the Milky Way. On average, we find fewer than 1.5 satellites per primary, but we argue that we can treat the survey as an ensemble and so derive the properties of the halo of a 'typical' isolated spiral. The projected density profile of the ensemble falls off approximately as 1/r. Within 50 kpc the azimuthal distribution of satellites shows some evidence for the 'Holmberg effect', an excess near the minor axis of the primary; however, at larger projected distances, the distribution appears isotropic. There is a weak but significant correlation between the size of a satellite and its distance from its primary, as expected if satellites are tidally truncated. Neither Hubble type nor spectral characteristics correlate with apparent separation. The ensemble of satellites appears to be rotating at about 30 km/s in the same direction as the galactic disk. Satellites on prograde orbits tend to be brighter than those on retrograde orbits. The typical velocity difference between a satellite and its primary shows no clear dependence either on apparent separation, or on the rotation speed of the primary. Thus our survey demonstrates that isolated spiral galaxies have massive halos that extend to many optical radii.

  5. Type I lepra reaction presenting as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharkar, Vidya; Bhor, Urmila H; Mahajan, Sunanda; Khopkar, Uday

    2007-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is an unusual inflammatory reaction due to infectious and non-infectious causes occurring in human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. IRIS occurs after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. There are no reports of type I lepra reaction due to IRIS in published literature from India. We report two cases of HIV-infected males who presented with borderline tuberculoid leprosy in type 1 reaction after the initiation of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). Case 1 presented with multiple, tender, erythematous and hypoesthetic plaques on the trunk and extremities after 3 months of antiretroviral therapy. In case 2, type I lepra reaction was observed 2 months after the initiation of HAART.

  6. Theoretical models for Type I and Type II supernova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Recent theoretical progress in understanding the origin and nature of Type I and Type II supernovae is discussed. New Type II presupernova models characterized by a variety of iron core masses at the time of collapse are presented and the sensitivity to the reaction rate /sup 12/C(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 16/O explained. Stars heavier than about 20 M/sub solar/ must explode by a ''delayed'' mechanism not directly related to the hydrodynamical core bounce and a subset is likely to leave black hole remnants. The isotopic nucleosynthesis expected from these massive stellar explosions is in striking agreement with the sun. Type I supernovae result when an accreting white dwarf undergoes a thermonuclear explosion. The critical role of the velocity of the deflagration front in determining the light curve, spectrum, and, especially, isotopic nucleosynthesis in these models is explored. 76 refs., 8 figs.

  7. MRI findings in an adolescent with type I citrullinaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longo, Daniela; Delfino, Luciana; Fariello, Giuseppe [Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Rome (Italy); Genovese, Elisabetta; Cannata, Vittorio [Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Direction/Medical Physics, Rome (Italy); Deodato, Federica; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo [Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital, Division of Metabolism, Department of Neuroscience, Rome (Italy); Goffredo, Bianca [Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital, Laboratory, Rome (Italy)

    2008-02-15

    Citrullinaemia is a rare inborn error of urea cycle metabolism. We describe the MRI findings in a 16-year-old boy with type I citrullinaemia during an episode of acute hyperammonaemic encephalopathy and compare them to his previous follow-up MRI studies. MRI revealed bilateral high signal intensity in the cingulate, perirolandic, parietal and temporoinsular cortex, the subcortical white matter and left thalamus. Diffusion-weighted imaging showed high signal intensity and low apparent diffusion coefficient values in the frontoparietal lobes. To our knowledge, MRI findings in an adolescent with type I citrullinaemia have not been previously reported. Since our patient's neuroradiological findings showed greater similarity to type II citrullinaemia, we think his brain injury during this acute episode was probably age-related and independent of the type of citrullinaemia. (orig.)

  8. Bianchi Type I Cosmologies in Arbitrary Dimensional Dilaton Gravities

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C M; Mak, M K; Chen, Chiang-Mei

    2000-01-01

    We study the low energy string effective action with an exponential type dilaton potential and vanishing torsion in a Bianchi type I space-time geometry. In the Einstein and string frames the general solution of the gravitational field equations can be expressed in an exact parametric form. Depending on the values of some parameters the obtained cosmological models can be generically divided into three classes, leading to both singular and nonsingular behaviors. The effect of the potential on the time evolution of the mean anisotropy parameter is also considered in detail, and it is shown that a Bianchi type I Universe isotropizes only in the presence of a dilaton field potential or a central deficit charge.

  9. Bianchi type I cosmologies in arbitrary dimensional dilaton gravities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiang-Mei; Harko, T.; Mak, M. K.

    2000-12-01

    We study the low energy string effective action with an exponential type dilaton potential and vanishing torsion in a Bianchi type I space-time geometry. In the Einstein and string frames the general solution of the gravitational field equations can be expressed in an exact parametric form. Depending on the values of the dilaton coupling constant and of the coefficient in the exponential, the obtained cosmological models can be generically divided into three classes, leading to both singular and non-singular behaviors. The effect of the potential on the time evolution of the mean anisotropy parameter is also considered in detail, and it is shown that a Bianchi type I universe isotropizes only in the presence of a dilaton field potential or a central deficit charge.

  10. [Citrullinemia type I with recurrent liver failure in a child].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindi, Verónica; Eiroa, Hernán

    2017-02-01

    Citrullinemia type I is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutation of the gene expressing ASS1 argininosuccinate synthetase, limiting enzyme of the urea cycle. The classic variants are associated with neonatal/infantile forms that cause hyperammonemia leading to death if treatment is not established. Initial symptoms of disorders of the urea cycle include neurological impairment with mild or moderate liver damage. We report a case of recurrent liver failure in an infant diagnosed with type I citrullinemia without severe neurological involvement that was referred to our center for liver transplantation. Acute liver failure can be caused by a wide range of disorders in which inborn errors of metabolism are included. Appropriate treatment of disorders of the urea cycle and in particular citrullinemia I can avoid the need for a transplant.

  11. Type I Interferons in Newborns—Neurotoxicity versus Antiviral Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Bogunovic

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In most children and adults, primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 is asymptomatic. However, very rarely (incidence of 1 in 1,000,000, it can cause herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE. HSE also occurs in infants but with a much starker incidence of one in three. This age difference in susceptibility to HSV-1-caused HSE is not well understood. In a recent article in mBio, authors have identified the choroid plexus as the anatomical site of robust HSV-1 replication in the brain. They point to low levels of type I interferon (IFN receptor as causal of the lack of HSV-1 replication control in neonates, in contrast to adults. Here, I discuss these findings in the context of human genetic evidence. I point to the balancing act of type I IFN acting as a neurotoxin and an antiviral agent, an evolutionary choice of a lesser evil.

  12. Discrete self similarity in filled type I strong explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalinewich, Almog; Sari, Re'em

    2013-12-01

    We present new solutions to the strong explosion problem in a non power law density profile. The unperturbed self similar solutions developed by Sedov, Taylor, and Von Neumann describe strong Newtonian shocks propagating into a cold gas with a density profile falling off as r-ω, where ω le 7-γ /γ +1 (filled type I solutions), and γ is the adiabatic index of the gas. The perturbations we consider are spherically symmetric and log periodic with respect to the radius. While the unperturbed solutions are continuously self similar, the log periodicity of the density perturbations leads to a discrete self similarity of the perturbations, i.e., the solution repeats itself up to a scaling at discrete time intervals. We discuss these solutions and verify them against numerical integrations of the time dependent hydrodynamic equations. This is an extension of a previous investigation on type II solutions and helps clarifying boundary conditions for perturbations to type I self similar solutions.

  13. Type-I integrable quantum impurities in the Heisenberg model

    CERN Document Server

    Doikou, Anastasia

    2013-01-01

    Type-I quantum impurities are investigated in the context of the integrable Heisenberg model. This type of defects is associated to the (q)-harmonic oscillator algebra. The transmission matrices associated to this particular type of defects are computed via the Bethe ansatz methodology for the XXX model, as well as for the critical and non-critical XXZ spin chain. In the attractive regime of the critical XXZ spin chain the transmission amplitudes for the breathers are also identified.

  14. Type I immediate hypersensitivity reaction to cyanocobalamin but not hydroxycobalamin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, F J; Hughes, R; O'Shea, D; Kirby, B

    2008-07-01

    We report a case of a 42-year-old woman with a background of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, who developed a type I immediate hypersensitivity reaction to intramuscular cyanocobalamin. Intradermal testing showed a positive reaction to cyanocobalamin. The patient was subsequently treated with intramuscular hydroxycobalamin after negative intradermal testing to this alternative B(12) compound. A review of previously described cases of hypersensitivity to either compound provides a rationale for the management of this rare but serious side-effect.

  15. Type-I integrable quantum impurities in the Heisenberg model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doikou, Anastasia, E-mail: adoikou@upatras.gr

    2013-12-21

    Type-I quantum impurities are investigated in the context of the integrable Heisenberg model. This type of defects is associated to the (q)-harmonic oscillator algebra. The transmission matrices associated to this particular type of defects are computed via the Bethe ansatz methodology for the XXX model, as well as for the critical and non-critical XXZ spin chain. In the attractive regime of the critical XXZ spin chain the transmission amplitudes for the breathers are also identified.

  16. Type I hypersensitivity reaction as a complication of lepa

    OpenAIRE

    Janthli, Deepa Manjunath; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Somashekar, Shruthi; Lohith, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reaction is defined as response to a drug which is noxious and unintended, and which occurs at doses normally used in man for the prophylaxis, diagnosis or therapy of disease, or for the modification of physiological functions. Type I hypersensitivity reaction is known as anaphylactic reaction which is due to immediate immunoglobulin E-mediated reaction. It is characterized by symptoms such as fever nausea, back pain, angiodema, rash, flushing, etc. Lepa generally refers to the a...

  17. Detection of candidal antigens in autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type I.

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, P; Perheentupa, J; Krohn, K J

    1996-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type I (APS I) is associated with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. To characterize the antibody responses in this subgroup of Candida albicans infections, we screened a candidal cDNA expression library with patient sera and found four cDNA clones encoding the immunopositive proteins enolase, heat shock protein 90, pyruvate kinase, and alcohol dehydrogenase. The reactivity to these antigens was studied further by immunoprecipitation assays with in vitro-tran...

  18. Imaging collagen type I fibrillogenesis with high spatiotemporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamov, Dimitar R, E-mail: stamov@jpk.com [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany); Stock, Erik [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany); Franz, Clemens M [DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1a, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Jähnke, Torsten; Haschke, Heiko [JPK Instruments AG, Bouchéstrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Fibrillar collagens, such as collagen type I, belong to the most abundant extracellular matrix proteins and they have received much attention over the last five decades due to their large interactome, complex hierarchical structure and high mechanical stability. Nevertheless, the collagen self-assembly process is still incompletely understood. Determining the real-time kinetics of collagen type I formation is therefore pivotal for better understanding of collagen type I structure and function, but visualising the dynamic self-assembly process of collagen I on the molecular scale requires imaging techniques offering high spatiotemporal resolution. Fast and high-speed scanning atomic force microscopes (AFM) provide the means to study such processes on the timescale of seconds under near-physiological conditions. In this study we have applied fast AFM tip scanning to study the assembly kinetics of fibrillar collagen type I nanomatrices with a temporal resolution reaching eight seconds for a frame size of 500 nm. By modifying the buffer composition and pH value, the kinetics of collagen fibrillogenesis can be adjusted for optimal analysis by fast AFM scanning. We furthermore show that amplitude-modulation imaging can be successfully applied to extract additional structural information from collagen samples even at high scan rates. Fast AFM scanning with controlled amplitude modulation therefore provides a versatile platform for studying dynamic collagen self-assembly processes at high resolution. - Highlights: • Continuous non-invasive time-lapse investigation of collagen I fibrillogenesis in situ. • Imaging of collagen I self-assembly with high spatiotemporal resolution. • Application of setpoint modulation to study the hierarchical structure of collagen I. • Observing real-time formation of the D-banding pattern in collagen I.

  19. Size-Dependent Rheology of Type-I Collagen Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Arevalo, Richard C.; Urbach, Jeffrey S.; Blair, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the system size dependent rheological response of branched type I collagen gels. When subjected to a shear strain, the highly interconnected mesh dynamically reorients, resulting in overall stiffening of the network. When a continuous shear strain is applied to a collagen network, we observe that the local apparent modulus, in the strain-stiffening regime, is strongly dependent on the gel thickness. In addition, we demonstrate that the overall network failure is determined by t...

  20. Spirality: A Noval Way to Measure Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Douglas W.; Boe, Benjamin; Henderson, Casey L.; Hartley, Matthew; Davis, Benjamin L.; Pour Imani, Hamed; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia D.

    2015-01-01

    We present the MATLAB code Spirality, a novel method for measuring spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. For a given pitch angle template, the mean pixel value is found along each of typically 1000 spiral axes. The fitting function, which shows a local maximum at the best-fit pitch angle, is the variance of these means. Error bars are found by varying the inner radius of the measurement annulus and finding the standard deviation of the best-fit pitches. Computation time is typically on the order of 2 minutes per galaxy, assuming at least 8 GB of working memory. We tested the code using 128 synthetic spiral images of known pitch. These spirals varied in the number of spiral arms, pitch angle, degree of logarithmicity, radius, SNR, inclination angle, bar length, and bulge radius. A correct result is defined as a result that matches the true pitch within the error bars, with error bars no greater than ±7°. For the non-logarithmic spiral sample, the correct answer is similarly defined, with the mean pitch as function of radius in place of the true pitch. For all synthetic spirals, correct results were obtained so long as SNR > 0.25, the bar length was no more than 60% of the spiral's diameter (when the bar was included in the measurement), the input center of the spiral was no more than 6% of the spiral radius away from the true center, and the inclination angle was no more than 30°. The synthetic spirals were not deprojected prior to measurement. The code produced the correct result for all barred spirals when the measurement annulus was placed outside the bar. Additionally, we compared the code's results against 2DFFT results for 203 visually selected spiral galaxies in GOODS North and South. Among the entire sample, Spirality's error bars overlapped 2DFFT's error bars 64% of the time. For those galaxies in which Source code is available by email request from the primary author.

  1. Spirality: A Novel Way to Measure Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

    CERN Document Server

    Shields, Douglas W; Pfountz, Casey; Davis, Benjamin L; Hartley, Matthew; Imani, Hamed Pour; Slade, Zac; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia

    2015-01-01

    We present the MATLAB code Spirality, a novel method for measuring spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. Computation time is typically on the order of 2 minutes per galaxy, assuming at least 8 GB of working memory. We tested the code using 117 synthetic spiral images with known pitches, varying both the spiral properties and the input parameters. The code yielded correct results for all synthetic spirals with galaxy-like properties. We also compared the code's results to two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (2DFFT) measurements for the sample of nearby galaxies defined by DMS PPak. Spirality's error bars overlapped 2DFFT's error bars for 26 of the 30 galaxies. The two methods' agreement correlates strongly with galaxy radius in pixels and also with i-band magnitude, but not with redshift, a result that is consistent with at least some galaxies' spiral structure being fully formed by z=1.2, beyond which there are few galaxies in our sample. The Spirality code pa...

  2. Collagen Type I Conduits for the Regeneration of Nerve Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvan Klein

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To date, reliable data to support the general use of biodegradable materials for bridging nerve defects are still scarce. We present the outcome of nerve regeneration following type I collagen conduit nerve repair in patients with large-diameter nerve gaps. Ten patients underwent nerve repair using a type I collagen nerve conduit. Patients were re-examined at a minimal follow-up of 14.0 months and a mean follow-up of 19.9 months. Regeneration of nerve tissue within the conduits was assessed by nerve conduction velocity (NCV, a static two-point discrimination (S2PD test, and as disability of arm shoulder and hand (DASH outcome measure scoring. Quality of life measures including patients’ perceived satisfaction and residual pain were evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS. No implant-related complications were observed. Seven out of 10 patients reported being free of pain, and the mean VAS was 1.1. The mean DASH score was 17.0. The S2PD was below 6 mm in 40%, between 6 and 10 mm in another 40% and above 10 mm in 20% of the patients. Eight out of 10 patients were satisfied with the procedure and would undergo surgery again. Early treatment correlated with lower DASH score levels. The use of type I collagen in large-diameter gaps in young patients and early treatment presented superior functional outcomes.

  3. Wild type measles virus attenuation independent of type I IFN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horvat Branka

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measles virus attenuation has been historically performed by adaptation to cell culture. The current dogma is that attenuated virus strains induce more type I IFN and are more resistant to IFN-induced protection than wild type (wt. Results The adaptation of a measles virus isolate (G954-PBL by 13 passages in Vero cells induced a strong attenuation of this strain in vivo. The adapted virus (G954-V13 differs from its parental strain by only 5 amino acids (4 in P/V/C and 1 in the M gene. While a vaccine strain, Edmonston Zagreb, could replicate equally well in various primate cells, both G954 strains exhibited restriction to the specific cell type used initially for their propagation. Surprisingly, we observed that both G954 strains induced type I IFN, the wt strain inducing even more than the attenuated ones, particularly in human plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells. Type I IFN-induced protection from the infection of both G954 strains depended on the cell type analyzed, being less efficient in the cells used to grow the viral strain. Conclusion Thus, mutations in M and P/V/C proteins can critically affect MV pathogenicity, cellular tropism and lead to virus attenuation without interfering with the α/β IFN system.

  4. Type I Gaucher disease: extraosseous extension of skeletal disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poll, L.W.; Koch, J.A.; Moedder, U. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf (Germany); vom Dahl, S.; Haeussinger, D. [Department of Internal Medicine, Divison of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf (Germany); Sarbia, M. [Department of Pathology, Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf (Germany); Niederau, C. [Department of Internal Medicine, St.-Josef Hospital Oberhausen, Oberhausen (Germany)

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the frequency and morphology of extraosseous extension in patients with Gaucher disease type I.Design and patients. MRI examinations of the lower extremities were analyzed in 70 patients with Gaucher disease type I. Additionally, the thoracic spine and the midface were investigated on MRI in two patients.Results. Four cases are presented in which patients with Gaucher disease type I and severe skeletal involvement developed destruction or protrusion of the cortex with extraosseous extension into soft tissues. In one patient, Gaucher cell deposits destroyed the cortex of the mandible and extended into the masseter muscle. In the second patient, multiple paravertebral masses with localized destruction of the cortex were apparent in the thoracic spine. In the third and fourth patient, cortical destruction with extraosseous tissue extending into soft tissues was seen in the lower limbs.Conclusions. Extraosseous extension is a rare manifestation of Gaucher bone disease. While an increased risk of cancer, especially hematopoietic in origin, is known in patients with Gaucher disease, these extraosseous benign manifestations that may mimic malignant processes should be considered in the differential diagnosis of extraosseous extension into soft tissues. A narrow neck of tissue was apparent in all cases connecting bone and extraosseous extensions. (orig.)

  5. Central Role of ULK1 in Type I Interferon Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Saleiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We provide evidence that the Unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1 is activated during engagement of the type I interferon (IFN receptor (IFNR. Our studies demonstrate that the function of ULK1 is required for gene transcription mediated via IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE and IFNγ activation site (GAS elements and controls expression of key IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs. We identify ULK1 as an upstream regulator of p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and establish that the regulatory effects of ULK1 on ISG expression are mediated possibly by engagement of the p38 MAPK pathway. Importantly, we demonstrate that ULK1 is essential for antiproliferative responses and type I IFN-induced antineoplastic effects against malignant erythroid precursors from patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. Together, these data reveal a role for ULK1 as a key mediator of type I IFNR-generated signals that control gene transcription and induction of antineoplastic responses.

  6. Type I/heterotic duality and M-theory amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael B.; Rudra, Arnab

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates relationships between low-energy four-particle scattering amplitudes with external gauge particles and gravitons in the E 8 × E 8 and SO(32) heterotic string theories and the type I and type IA superstring theories by considering a variety of tree level and one-loop Feynman diagrams describing such amplitudes in eleven-dimensional supergravity in a Horava-Witten background compactified on a circle. This accounts for a number of perturbative and non-perturbative aspects of low order higher derivative terms in the low-energy expansion of string theory amplitudes, which are expected to be protected by half maximal supersymmetry from receiving corrections beyond one or two loops. It also suggests the manner in which type I/heterotic duality may be realised for certain higher derivative interactions that are not so obviously protected. For example, our considerations suggest that R 4 interactions (where R is the Riemann curvature) might receive no perturbative corrections beyond one loop by virtue of a conspiracy involving contributions from (non-BPS) {Z}_2 D-instantons in the type I and heterotic SO(32) theories.

  7. Type I/heterotic duality and M-theory amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Michael B. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics,Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Rudra, Arnab [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics,Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Center for Quantum Mathematics and Physics (QMAP),Department of Physics, University of California,One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2016-12-14

    This paper investigates relationships between low-energy four-particle scattering amplitudes with external gauge particles and gravitons in the E{sub 8}×E{sub 8} and SO(32) heterotic string theories and the type I and type IA superstring theories by considering a variety of tree level and one-loop Feynman diagrams describing such amplitudes in eleven-dimensional supergravity in a Ho?rava-Witten background compactified on a circle. This accounts for a number of perturbative and non-perturbative aspects of low order higher derivative terms in the low-energy expansion of string theory amplitudes, which are expected to be protected by half maximal supersymmetry from receiving corrections beyond one or two loops. It also suggests the manner in which type I/heterotic duality may be realised for certain higher derivative interactions that are not so obviously protected. For example, our considerations suggest that R{sup 4} interactions (where R is the Riemann curvature) might receive no perturbative corrections beyond one loop by virtue of a conspiracy involving contributions from (non-BPS) ℤ{sub 2} D-instantons in the type I and heterotic SO(32) theories.

  8. Intermittency in spiral Poiseuille flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heise, M; Abshagen, J; Menck, A; Pflster, G [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, University of Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    The results of an experimental study on intermittent spiral vortices observed in a counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system with an additional axial through flow, i.e. Spiral-Poiseuille flow, are presented. Convectively unstable upstream propagating spiral vortices appear in the laminar basic flow from an oscillatory instability and in general become absolutely unstable at higher inner cylinder Reynolds number. It is found that at Reynolds numbers above the absolute stability border the spiral vortices become unstable and a complex flow state showing intermittent bursts appears. The intermittent flow state is characterised by an irregular alternation between clearly distinguishable 'laminar' phases corresponding to up-and downstream propagating spiral vortices as well as propagating Taylor vortices. For a sufficiently high rate of axial through flow it is found that intermittency can occur directly from the convectively unstable regime of the upstream propagating spiral vortices.

  9. Star Formation in Spiral Arms

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2011-01-01

    The origin and types of spiral arms are reviewed with an emphasis on the connections between these arms and star formation. Flocculent spiral arms are most likely the result of transient instabilities in the gas that promote dense cloud formation, star formation, and generate turbulence. Long irregular spiral arms are usually initiated by gravitational instabilities in the stars, with the gas contributing to and following these instabilities, and star formation in the gas. Global spiral arms triggered by global perturbations, such as a galaxy interaction, can be wavemodes with wave reflection in the inner regions. They might grow and dominate the disk for several rotations before degenerating into higher-order modes by non-linear effects. Interstellar gas flows through these global arms, and through the more transient stellar spiral arms as well, where it can reach a high density and low shear, thereby promoting self-gravitational instabilities. The result is the formation of giant spiral arm cloud complexes,...

  10. Coherence-Resonance-Induced Neuronal Firing near a Saddle-Node and Homoclinic Bifurcation Corresponding to Type-I Excitability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Bing; GU Hua-Guang; LI Yu-Ye

    2011-01-01

    @@ Excitability is an essential characteristic of excitable media such as nervous and cardiac systems.Different types of neuronal excitability are related to different bifurcation structures.We simulate the coherence resonance effect near a saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcation corresponding to type-I excitability in a theoretical neuron model,and recognize the obvious features of the corresponding firing pattern.Similar firing patterns are discovered in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.The results are not only helpful for understanding the dynamics of the saddle-node bifurcation and type-I excitability in a realistic nervous system,but also provide a practical indicator to identify types of excitability and bifurcation.%Excitability is an essential characteristic of excitable media such as nervous and cardiac systems. Different types of neuronal excitability are related to different bifurcation structures. We simulate the coherence resonance effect near a saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcation corresponding to type-I excitability in a theoretical neuron model, and recognize the obvious features of the corresponding firing pattern. Similar firing patterns are discovered in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. The results are not only helpful for understanding the dynamics of the saddle-node bifurcation and type-I excitability in a realistic nervous system, but also provide a practical indicator to identify types of excitability and bifurcation.

  11. Galaxy Zoo: Dust in Spirals

    CERN Document Server

    Masters, Karen L; Bamford, Steven; Mosleh, Moein; Lintott, Chris J; Andreescu, Dan; Edmondson, Edward M; Keel, William C; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M Jordan; Schawinski, Kevin; Slosar, Anze; Szalay, Alexander S; Thomas, Daniel; Vandenberg, Jan

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of dust on spiral galaxies by measuring the inclination-dependence of optical colours for 24,276 well-resolved SDSS galaxies visually classified in Galaxy Zoo. We find clear trends of reddening with inclination which imply a total extinction from face-on to edge-on of 0.7, 0.6, 0.5 and 0.4 magnitudes for the ugri passbands. We split the sample into "bulgy" (early-type) and "disky" (late-type) spirals using the SDSS fracdeV (or f_DeV) parameter and show that the average face-on colour of "bulgy" spirals is redder than the average edge-on colour of "disky" spirals. This shows that the observed optical colour of a spiral galaxy is determined almost equally by the spiral type (via the bulge-disk ratio and stellar populations), and reddening due to dust. We find that both luminosity and spiral type affect the total amount of extinction, with "disky" spirals at M_r ~ -21.5 mags having the most reddening. This decrease of reddening for the most luminous spirals has not been observed before ...

  12. Spiral Microstrip Antenna with Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, David G. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spiral microstrip antenna having resistor elements embedded in each of the spiral arms is provided. The antenna is constructed using a conductive back plane as a base. The back plane supports a dielectric slab having a thickness between one-sixteenth and one-quarter of an inch. A square spiral, having either two or four arms, is attached to the dielectric slab. Each arm of the spiral has resistor elements thereby dissipating an excess energy not already emitted through radiation. The entire configuration provides a thin, flat, high gain, wide bandwidth antenna which requires no underlying cavity. The configuration allows the antenna to be mounted conformably on an aircraft surface.

  13. Transgenic expression of an altered angiotensin type I AT1 receptor resulting in marked modulation of vascular type I collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun; Taylor, Linda; Rich, Celeste; Toselli, Paul; Stone, Philip; Green, Daniel; Warburton, Rod; Hill, Nicholas; Goldstein, Ronald; Polgar, Peter

    2012-05-01

    The angiotensin II (AngII) type I receptor (AT1) was modified by replacing its third intracellular loop and C-terminal tail with the corresponding regions from the bradykinin B2 receptor. Transgenic mice were produced that overexpress this mutated receptor (AB3T). Considerably less collagen content in the intact aorta and in primary aortic smooth muscle cells (aSMCs) cultures was observed in the transgenic mice. On the other hand, elastin content remained unchanged as measured by Western blot, and insoluble amino acid quantitation. The contraction of isolated aortas also remained unaltered. The aSMCs derived from the transgenic mice showed a reduction in AngII responsive type I collagen production. In aSMCs from transgenic mice, the cascade of Akt to the mammalian target rapamycin (mTOR) to p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K) was not AngII activated, while in the aSMCs from wild-type (WT) mice the cascade was AngII activated. Angiotensin activation of Smad2 and Stat3 was also reduced in the AB3T aSMCs. However, no change in the effect of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) on type I collagen production was observed. Also, the activation of ERK and JNK and G-protein linked signaling remained unaltered in response to AngII. Akt and PI3K activation inhibitors blocked AngII-stimulated type I collagen expression in WT aSMCs, whereas ERK inhibitor had no such effect. Our results point to an Akt/mTOR/p70S6K regulation of collagen production by AngII with participation of Smad2 and Stat3 cascades in this process.

  14. Rebuilding Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Major Observing Programme Leads to New Theory of Galaxy Formation Summary Most present-day large galaxies are spirals, presenting a disc surrounding a central bulge. Famous examples are our own Milky Way or the Andromeda Galaxy. When and how did these spiral galaxies form? Why do a great majority of them present a massive central bulge? An international team of astronomers [1] presents new convincing answers to these fundamental questions. For this, they rely on an extensive dataset of observations of galaxies taken with several space- and ground-based telescopes. In particular, they used over a two-year period, several instruments on ESO's Very Large Telescope. Among others, their observations reveal that roughly half of the present-day stars were formed in the period between 8,000 million and 4,000 million years ago, mostly in episodic burst of intense star formation occurring in Luminous Infrared Galaxies. From this and other evidence, the astronomers devised an innovative scenario, dubbed the "spiral rebuilding". They claim that most present-day spiral galaxies are the results of one or several merger events. If confirmed, this new scenario could revolutionise the way astronomers think galaxies formed. PR Photo 02a/05: Luminosity - Oxygen Abundance Relation for Galaxies (VLT) PR Photo 02b/05: The Spiral Rebuilding Scenario A fleet of instruments How and when did galaxies form? How and when did stars form in these island universes? These questions are still posing a considerable challenge to present-day astronomers. Front-line observational results obtained with a fleet of ground- and space-based telescopes by an international team of astronomers [1] provide new insights into these fundamental issues. For this, they embarked on an ambitious long-term study at various wavelengths of 195 galaxies with a redshift [2] greater than 0.4, i.e. located more than 4000 million light-years away. These galaxies were studied using ESO's Very Large Telescope, as well as the

  15. Brunenders: a partially attenuated historic poliovirus type I vaccine strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Barbara P; Liu, Ying; Brandjes, Alies; van Hoek, Vladimir; de Los Rios Oakes, Isabel; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H H V; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2015-09-01

    Brunenders, a type I poliovirus (PV) strain, was developed in 1952 by J. F. Enders and colleagues through serial in vitro passaging of the parental Brunhilde strain, and was reported to display partial neuroattenuation in monkeys. This phenotype of attenuation encouraged two vaccine manufacturers to adopt Brunenders as the type I component for their inactivated poliovirus vaccines (IPVs) in the 1950s, although today no licensed IPV vaccine contains Brunenders. Here we confirmed, in a transgenic mouse model, the report of Enders on the reduced neurovirulence of Brunenders. Although dramatically neuroattenuated relative to WT PV strains, Brunenders remains more virulent than the attenuated oral vaccine strain, Sabin 1. Importantly, the neuroattenuation of Brunenders does not affect in vitro growth kinetics and in vitro antigenicity, which were similar to those of Mahoney, the conventional type I IPV vaccine strain. We showed, by full nucleotide sequencing, that Brunhilde and Brunenders differ at 31 nucleotides, eight of which lead to amino acid changes, all located in the capsid. Upon exchanging the Brunenders capsid sequence with that of the Mahoney capsid, WT neurovirulence was regained in vivo, suggesting a role for the capsid mutations in Brunenders attenuation. To date, as polio eradication draws closer, the switch to using attenuated strains for IPV is actively being pursued. Brunenders preceded this novel strategy as a partially attenuated IPV strain, accompanied by decades of successful use in the field. Providing data on the attenuation of Brunenders may be of value in the further construction of attenuated PV strains to support the grand pursuit of the global eradication of poliomyelitis.

  16. Parents' emotional intelligence and children's type I diabetes management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zysberg, Leehu; Lang, Tally; Zisberg, Anna

    2013-09-01

    We hypothesized that parents' emotional intelligence associates with their children's type I diabetes outcomes. Eighty-one parents, the main caregivers of their diabetic children, filled out two measures of emotional intelligence and a demographic questionnaire. Three indicators of diabetes management were collected from the patients' files: hemoglobin A1c, mean blood tests per day, and mean blood glucose levels. Emotional intelligence associated with all glycemic management indices, though differences were found between the two measures. Of the demographic factors, income level showed some association with the outcome measures. The results are discussed in light of existing theories and models.

  17. Bianchi Type-I Universe with wet dark fluid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Singh; R Chaubey

    2008-09-01

    The Bianchi Type-I Universe filled with dark energy from a wet dark fluid has been considered. A new equation of state for the dark energy component of the Universe has been used. It is modeled on the equation of state = (ρ − ρ*) which can describe a liquid, for example water. The exact solutions to the corresponding field equations are obtained in quadrature form. The solution for constant deceleration parameter have been studied in detail for both power-law and exponential forms. The cases = 1 and = 0 have also been analysed.

  18. Size-dependent rheology of type-I collagen networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevalo, Richard C; Urbach, Jeffrey S; Blair, Daniel L

    2010-10-20

    We investigate the system size-dependent rheological response of branched type I collagen gels. When subjected to a shear strain, the highly interconnected mesh dynamically reorients, resulting in overall stiffening of the network. When a continuous shear strain is applied to a collagen network, we observe that the local apparent modulus, in the strain-stiffening regime, is strongly dependent on the gel thickness. In addition, we demonstrate that the overall network failure is determined by the ratio of the gel thickness to the mesh size. These findings have broad implications for cell-matrix interactions, the interpretation of rheological tissue data, and the engineering of biomimetic scaffolds.

  19. Stochastic eternal inflation in a Bianchi type I universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Ikjyot Singh; Haslam, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic eternal inflation is studied for a chaotic inflation potential in a Bianchi type I spacetime background. After deriving the appropriate stochastic Klein-Gordon equation, we give details on the conditions for eternal inflation. It is shown that for eternal inflation to occur, the amount of anisotropy must be small. In fact, it is shown that eternal inflation will only take place if the shear anisotropy variables take on values within a small region of the interior of the Kasner circle. We then calculate the probability of eternal inflation occurring based on techniques from stochastic calculus.

  20. Orthopedic Pathology in Children with Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Vashakmadze

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis type I is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner and results from the defective activity of the enzyme alpha-L-iduronidase, which leads to the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (mainly heparan and dermatan sulfate in the lysosomes and further multiple organ dysfunction. This severe genetic progressive disease can be detected at an early age by skeletal deformities and phenotypic data. Early enzyme replacement therapy and/or bone marrow transplantation can slow down irreversible damages to various organs and systems or reduce their severity and improve the quality of life for a child.

  1. Quarkyonic Chiral Spirals

    CERN Document Server

    Kojo, Toru; McLerran, Larry; Pisarski, Robert D

    2009-01-01

    We consider the formation of chiral density waves in Quarkyonic matter, which is a phase where cold, dense quarks experience confining forces. We model confinement following Gribov and Zwanziger, taking the gluon propagator, in Coulomb gauge and momentum space, as 1/(p^2)^2. We assume that the number of colors, N, is large, and that the quark chemical potential, mu, is much larger than renormalization mass scale, Lambda_QCD. To leading order in 1/N and Lambda_QCD, a gauge theory with Nf flavors of massless quarks in 3+1 dimensions naturally reduces to a gauge theory in 1+1 dimensions, with an enlarged flavor symmetry of SU(2Nf). Through an anomalous chiral rotation, in two dimensions a Fermi sea of massless quarks maps directly onto the corresponding theory in vacuum. A chiral condensate forms locally, and varies with the spatial position, z, as . Following Schon and Thies, we term this two dimensional pion condensate a (Quarkyonic) chiral spiral. Massive quarks also exhibit chiral spirals, with the magnitude...

  2. BMP type I receptor ALK2 is required for angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolli, Ester; Ernande, Laura; Thoonen, Robrecht; Kolodziej, Starsha A.; Leyton, Patricio A.; Cheng, Juan; Tainsh, Robert E. T.; Mayeur, Claire; Rhee, David K.; Wu, Mei. X.; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Zapol, Warren M.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Bloch, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling contributes to the development of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the identity of the BMP type I receptor involved in cardiac hypertrophy and the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. By using quantitative PCR and immunoblotting, we demonstrated that BMP signaling increased during phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs), as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of Smads 1 and 5 and induction of Id1 gene expression. Inhibition of BMP signaling with LDN193189 or noggin, and silencing of Smad 1 or 4 using small interfering RNA diminished the ability of phenylephrine to induce hypertrophy in NRCs. Conversely, activation of BMP signaling with BMP2 or BMP4 induced hypertrophy in NRCs. Luciferase reporter assay further showed that BMP2 or BMP4 treatment of NRCs repressed atrogin-1 gene expression concomitant with an increase in calcineurin protein levels and enhanced activity of nuclear factor of activated T cells, providing a mechanism by which BMP signaling contributes to cardiac hypertrophy. In a model of cardiac hypertrophy, C57BL/6 mice treated with angiotensin II (A2) had increased BMP signaling in the left ventricle. Treatment with LDN193189 attenuated A2-induced cardiac hypertrophy and collagen deposition in left ventricles. Cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of BMP type I receptor ALK2 (activin-like kinase 2), but not ALK1 or ALK3, inhibited BMP signaling and mitigated A2-induced cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular fibrosis in mice. The results suggest that BMP signaling upregulates the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cell pathway via BMP type I receptor ALK2, contributing to cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. PMID:26873969

  3. BMP type I receptor ALK2 is required for angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Mohd; Spagnolli, Ester; Ernande, Laura; Thoonen, Robrecht; Kolodziej, Starsha A; Leyton, Patricio A; Cheng, Juan; Tainsh, Robert E T; Mayeur, Claire; Rhee, David K; Wu, Mei X; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Buys, Emmanuel S; Zapol, Warren M; Bloch, Kenneth D; Bloch, Donald B

    2016-04-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling contributes to the development of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the identity of the BMP type I receptor involved in cardiac hypertrophy and the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. By using quantitative PCR and immunoblotting, we demonstrated that BMP signaling increased during phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs), as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of Smads 1 and 5 and induction of Id1 gene expression. Inhibition of BMP signaling with LDN193189 or noggin, and silencing of Smad 1 or 4 using small interfering RNA diminished the ability of phenylephrine to induce hypertrophy in NRCs. Conversely, activation of BMP signaling with BMP2 or BMP4 induced hypertrophy in NRCs. Luciferase reporter assay further showed that BMP2 or BMP4 treatment of NRCs repressed atrogin-1 gene expression concomitant with an increase in calcineurin protein levels and enhanced activity of nuclear factor of activated T cells, providing a mechanism by which BMP signaling contributes to cardiac hypertrophy. In a model of cardiac hypertrophy, C57BL/6 mice treated with angiotensin II (A2) had increased BMP signaling in the left ventricle. Treatment with LDN193189 attenuated A2-induced cardiac hypertrophy and collagen deposition in left ventricles. Cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of BMP type I receptor ALK2 (activin-like kinase 2), but not ALK1 or ALK3, inhibited BMP signaling and mitigated A2-induced cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular fibrosis in mice. The results suggest that BMP signaling upregulates the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cell pathway via BMP type I receptor ALK2, contributing to cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis.

  4. Stochastic Eternal Inflation in a Bianchi Type I Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Kohli, Ikjyot Singh

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze a Bianchi Type I model with a scalar field in a chaotic inflation potential, $V(\\phi) = \\frac{1}{2}\\phi^2$ in the context of stochastic eternal inflation. We use the typical slow-roll approximation in combination with expansion-normalized variables in an orthonormal frame approach to obtain a dynamical system which describes the dynamics of the shear anisotropy and the inflaton field. We first show that the dynamics of the inflaton field can be decoupled from the dynamics of the shear anisotropy. We then use a fixed-points analysis in combination with global techniques from topological dynamical systems theory to prove that the cosmological model under consideration isotropizes irrespective of an inflationary epoch, which has also described by other authors who have investigated a Bianchi Type I model under similar configurations. We then show that for inflation to occur, the amount of anisotropy must be very small. We also give a description of the stochastic dynamics of the inflato...

  5. Glycogen storage disease type I: clinical and laboratory profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenice L. Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To characterize the clinical, laboratory, and anthropometric profile of a sample of Brazilian patients with glycogen storage disease type I managed at an outpatient referral clinic for inborn errors of metabolism. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional outpatient study based on a convenience sampling strategy. Data on diagnosis, management, anthropometric parameters, and follow-up were assessed. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients were included (median age 10 years, range 1-25 years, all using uncooked cornstarch therapy. Median age at diagnosis was 7 months (range, 1-132 months, and 19 patients underwent liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation. Overweight, short stature, hepatomegaly, and liver nodules were present in 16 of 21, four of 21, nine of 14, and three of 14 patients, respectively. A correlation was found between height-for-age and BMI-for-age Z-scores (r = 0.561; p = 0.008. CONCLUSIONS: Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type I is delayed in Brazil. Most patients undergo liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation, even though the combination of a characteristic clinical presentation and molecular methods can provide a definitive diagnosis in a less invasive manner. Obesity is a side effect of cornstarch therapy, and appears to be associated with growth in these patients.

  6. Observations of Type I Bursts from Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Swank, J H

    2000-01-01

    Observations of Type I X-ray bursts have long been taken as evidence that the sources are neutron stars. Black body models approximate the spectral data and imply a suddenly heated neutron star cooling over characteristic times of seconds to minutes. The phenomena are convincingly explained in terms of nuclear burning of accreted gas on neutron stars with low mass companion stars. Prospects are promising that detailed theory and data from RXTE and future missions will lead to better determinations of important physical parameters (neutron star mass and radius, composition of the accreting gas, distance of the source). Among the variety of bursts observed, there are probably representatives of different kinds of explosive burning. RXTE's discovery of a 2.5 ms persistent coherent period from one Type I burster has now linked bursters indisputably to the epitome of a neutron star, a fast spinning magnetic compact object. Oscillations in some bursts had already been thought to arise from the neutron stars' rotati...

  7. Fascia versus cartilage graft in type I tympanoplasty: audiological outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Oh, Jung Ho; Lee, Hwan Ho

    2012-11-01

    Various materials such as fascia, perichondrium, and cartilage have been used for reconstruction of the tympanic membrane in middle ear surgery. Because of its stiffness, cartilage is resistant to resorption and retraction. However, cartilage grafts result in increased acoustic impedance, the main limitation to their use. The aim of this study was to compare the hearing results after cartilage tympanoplasty versus fascia tympanoplasty. This study included 114 patients without postoperative tympanic membrane perforation who underwent tympanoplasty type I between 2007 and 2010, 31 with fascia and 83 with cartilage. Preoperative and 1 year postoperative air-bone gap (ABG) and postoperative gain in ABG at frequencies of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 kHz were assessed. Both groups were statically similar in terms of the severity of middle ear pathology and the preoperative hearing levels. Overall, postoperative successful hearing results showed 77.4% of the fascia group and 77.1% of the cartilage group. Mean postoperative gains in ABG were 9.70 dB for the fascia group and 9.78 dB for the cartilage group. These results demonstrate that hearing after cartilage tympanoplasty is comparable to that after fascia tympanoplasty. Although cartilage is the ideal grafting material in problematic cases, it may be used in less severe cases, such as in type I tympanoplasty, without fear of impairing hearing.

  8. An unusual presentation of osteogenesis imperfecta type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebelo M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Marta Rebelo, Jandira Lima, José Diniz Vieira, José Nascimento CostaDepartment of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Coimbra, Coimbra, PortugalAbstract: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is a rare inherited disorder with a broad spectrum of clinical and genetic variability. The genetic diversity involves, in the majority of the cases, mutations in one of the genes that encodes the type 1 collagen protein (COL1 A1 and COL1 A2, but it is not a requirement for the diagnosis. The most benign form is OI type I. The authors present a case report of a 25-year-old woman who had severe low back pain associated with incapacity to walk and breast-feed post-partum. Symptoms developed 2 weeks after delivery. The radiological examination revealed severe osteoporosis with no abnormalities in the laboratory findings. The clinical signs and a positive personal and family history of multiple fractures in childhood suggested OI type I, although other diagnosis, such as pregnancy-associated osteoporosis, was also considered. The atypical presentation of this rare disorder in adulthood calls attention to the need for early diagnosis for prompt treatment. Treatment of OI is never curative, but it improves the quality of the patient’s life.Keywords: osteogenesis imperfecta, collagen, pregnancy, osteoporosis

  9. Effect of Type-I Interferon on Retroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Doménech

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Type-I interferons (IFN-I play an important role in the innate immune response to several retroviruses. They seem to be effective in controlling the in vivo infection, though many of the clinical signs of retroviral infection may be due to their continual presence which over-stimulates the immune system and activates apoptosis. IFN-I not only affect the immune system, but also operate directly on virus replication. Most data suggest that the in vitro treatment with IFN-I of retrovirus infected cells inhibits the final stages of virogenesis, avoiding the correct assembly of viral particles and their budding, even though the mechanism is not well understood. However, in some retroviruses IFN-I may also act at a previous stage as some retroviral LTRs posses sequences homologous to the IFNstimulated response element (ISRE. When stimulated, ISREs control viral transcription. HIV-1 displays several mechanisms for evading IFN-I, such as through Tat and Nef. Besides IFN-α and IFN-β, some other type I IFN, such as IFN-τ and IFN-ω, have potent antiviral activity and are promising treatment drugs.

  10. Discrete Self Similarity in Filled Type I Strong Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Yalinewich, Almog

    2014-01-01

    We present new solutions to the strong explosion problem in a non power law density profi{}le. The unperturbed self similar solutions developed by Sedov, Taylor and Von Neumann describe strong Newtonian shocks propagating into a cold gas with a density profile falling off as $r^{-\\omega}$, where $\\omega\\le\\frac{7-\\gamma}{\\gamma+1}$ (filled type I solutions), and $\\gamma$ is the adiabatic index of the gas. The perturbations we consider are spherically symmetric and log periodic with respect to the radius. While the unperturbed solutions are continuously self similar, the log periodicity of the density perturbations leads to a discrete self similarity of the perturbations, i.e., the solution repeats itself up to a scaling at discrete time intervals. We discuss these solutions and verify them against numerical integrations of the time dependent hydrodynamic equations. This is an extension of a previous investigation on type II solutions and helps clarifying boundary conditions for perturbations to type I self si...

  11. Type I/heterotic duality and M-theory amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates relationships between low-energy four-particle scattering amplitudes with external gauge particles and gravitons in the E_8 X E_8 and SO(32) heterotic string theories and the type I and type IA superstring theories by considering a variety of tree level and one-loop Feynman diagrams describing such amplitudes in eleven-dimensional supergravity in a Horava--Witten background compactified on a circle. This accounts for a number of perturbative and non-perturbative aspects of low order higher derivative terms in the low-energy expansion of string theory amplitudes, which are expected to be protected by half maximal supersymmetry from receiving corrections beyond one or two loops. It also suggests the manner in which type I/heterotic duality may be realised for certain higher derivative interactions that are not so obviously protected. For example, our considerations suggest that R**4 interactions (where R is the Riemann curvature) might receive no perturbative corrections beyond one loop ...

  12. The Importance of Disk Structure in Stalling Type I Migration

    CERN Document Server

    Kretke, Katherine A

    2012-01-01

    As planets form they tidally interact with their natal disks. Though the tidal perturbation induced by Earth and super-Earth mass planets is generally too weak to significantly modify the structure of the disk, the interaction is potentially strong enough to cause the planets to undergo rapid type I migration. This physical process may provide a source of short-period super-Earths, though it may also pose a challenge to the emergence and retention of cores on long-period orbits with sufficient mass to evolve into gas giants. Previous numerical simulations have shown that the type I migration rate sensitively depends upon the circumstellar disk's properties, particularly the temperature and surface density gradients. Here, we derive these structure parameters for 1) a self-consistent viscous-disk model based on a constant \\alpha-prescription, 2) an irradiated disk model that takes into account heating due to the absorption of stellar photons, and 3) a layered-accretion disk model with variable \\alpha-parameter...

  13. The decorin sequence SYIRIADTNIT binds collagen type I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalamajski, Sebastian; Aspberg, Anders; Oldberg, Ake

    2007-01-01

    Decorin belongs to the small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan family, interacts with fibrillar collagens, and regulates the assembly, structure, and biomechanical properties of connective tissues. The decorin-collagen type I-binding region is located in leucine-rich repeats 5-6. Site-directed mut....... These collagen-binding amino acids are exposed on the exterior of the beta-sheet-loop structure of the leucine-rich repeat. This resembles the location of interacting residues in other leucine-rich repeat proteins.......Decorin belongs to the small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan family, interacts with fibrillar collagens, and regulates the assembly, structure, and biomechanical properties of connective tissues. The decorin-collagen type I-binding region is located in leucine-rich repeats 5-6. Site......-directed mutagenesis of this 54-residue-long collagen-binding sequence identifies Arg-207 and Asp-210 in leucine-rich repeat 6 as crucial for the binding to collagen. The synthetic peptide SYIRIADTNIT, which includes Arg-207 and Asp-210, inhibits the binding of full-length recombinant decorin to collagen in vitro...

  14. Transforming growth factor β1 induces the expression of collagen type I by DNA methylation in cardiac fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Pan

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β, a key mediator of cardiac fibroblast activation, has a major influence on collagen type I production. However, the epigenetic mechanisms by which TGF-β induces collagen type I alpha 1 (COL1A1 expression are not fully understood. This study was designed to examine whether or not DNA methylation is involved in TGF-β-induced COL1A1 expression in cardiac fibroblasts. Cells isolated from neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured and stimulated with TGF-β1. The mRNA levels of COL1A1 and DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs were determined via quantitative polymerase chain reaction and the protein levels of collagen type I were determined via Western blot as well as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The quantitative methylation of the COL1A1 promoter region was analyzed using the MassARRAY platform of Sequenom. Results showed that TGF-β1 upregulated the mRNA expression of COL1A1 and induced the synthesis of cell-associated and secreted collagen type I in cardiac fibroblasts. DNMT1 and DNMT3a expressions were significantly downregulated and the global DNMT activity was inhibited when treated with 10 ng/mL of TGF-β1 for 48 h. TGF-β1 treatment resulted in a significant reduction of the DNA methylation percentage across multiple CpG sites in the rat COL1A1 promoter. Thus, TGF-β1 can induce collagen type I expression through the inhibition of DNMT1 and DNMT3a expressions as well as global DNMT activity, thereby resulting in DNA demethylation of the COL1A1 promoter. These findings suggested that the DNMT-mediated DNA methylation is an important mechanism in regulating the TGF-β1-induced COL1A1 gene expression.

  15. The perfect shape spiral stories

    CERN Document Server

    Hammer, Øyvind

    2016-01-01

    This book uses the spiral shape as a key to a multitude of strange and seemingly disparate stories about art, nature, science, mathematics, and the human endeavour. In a way, the book is itself organized as a spiral, with almost disconnected chapters circling around and closing in on the common theme. A particular strength of the book is its extremely cross-disciplinary nature - everything is fun, and everything is connected! At the same time, the author puts great emphasis on mathematical and scientific correctness, in contrast, perhaps, with some earlier books on spirals. Subjects include the mathematical properties of spirals, sea shells, sun flowers, Greek architecture, air ships, the history of mathematics, spiral galaxies, the anatomy of the human hand, the art of prehistoric Europe, Alfred Hitchcock, and spider webs, to name a few.

  16. Effects of micropatterned surfaces coated with type I collagen on the proliferation and morphology of tenocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xi; Wang Zhi [Institute of Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 37 Wainan Guoxue Street, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); Qin Tingwu [Institute of Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 37 Wainan Guoxue Street, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China)], E-mail: tingwuqin@hotmail.com; Liu Chengjun; Yang Zhiming [Institute of Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 37 Wainan Guoxue Street, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China)

    2008-11-15

    The effects of micropatterned surfaces coated with type I collagen (CNI) on the proliferation and morphology of rat tail tenocytes were investigated in this study. The micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane substrates were prepared by using the technique of microcontact printing and then coated with different concentrations of CNI by the microfluidic channels technology. After being seeded on the CNI-coated micropatterned substrates, the tenocytes were tested by MTT colorimetric assay at 1-, 3-, 5-, and 7-day time intervals to evaluate the proliferation of tenocytes on the substrates. The alignment and morphology of tenocytes on the CNI-coated substrates after incubation for 1 or 24 h were observed with SEM. The results showed tenocytes proliferated well with increase of CNI concentrations and identically aligned along the grooves of the CNI-coated micropatterned substrates. This could have a potential advantage in construction of engineered tendons in vitro.

  17. Effects of micropatterned surfaces coated with type I collagen on the proliferation and morphology of tenocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Wang, Zhi; Qin, Ting-Wu; Liu, Cheng-Jun; Yang, Zhi-Ming

    2008-11-01

    The effects of micropatterned surfaces coated with type I collagen (CNI) on the proliferation and morphology of rat tail tenocytes were investigated in this study. The micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane substrates were prepared by using the technique of microcontact printing and then coated with different concentrations of CNI by the microfluidic channels technology. After being seeded on the CNI-coated micropatterned substrates, the tenocytes were tested by MTT colorimetric assay at 1-, 3-, 5-, and 7-day time intervals to evaluate the proliferation of tenocytes on the substrates. The alignment and morphology of tenocytes on the CNI-coated substrates after incubation for 1 or 24 h were observed with SEM. The results showed tenocytes proliferated well with increase of CNI concentrations and identically aligned along the grooves of the CNI-coated micropatterned substrates. This could have a potential advantage in construction of engineered tendons in vitro.

  18. Spiral vane bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A spiral vane bioreactor of a perfusion type is described in which a vertical chamber, intended for use in a microgravity condition, has a central rotating filter assembly and has flexible membranes disposed to rotate annularly about the filter assembly. The flexible members have end portions disposed angularly with respect to one another. A fluid replenishment medium is input from a closed loop liquid system to a completely liquid filled chamber containing microcarrier beads, cells and a fluid medium. Output of spent medium is to the closed loop. In the closed loop, the output and input parameters are sensed by sensors. A manifold permits recharging of the nutrients and pH adjustment. Oxygen is supplied and carbon dioxide and bubbles are removed and the system is monitored and controlled by a microprocessor.

  19. Reflections on love's spirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Gerard

    2011-06-01

    This article seeks to explore how the experience of love and its expression might inform and guide reflection and inquiry into love. Despite the importance of love in our personal and professional lives, it remains a topic that has further scope for inquiry within nursing circles. The article takes as its catalyst an encounter that emerged out of a piece of research that was exploring individuals' experiences of becoming healers and the journey they undertook. One participant spoke deeply and profoundly of his experience of love, which generated for me a personal, experiential, and intellectual process of inquiry. The article seeks to try and create a synthesis between rational inquiry and subjective experience. It explores W. B. Yeats's notion of a gyre, a spiral, as an image and metaphor for integrating different conceptions and understandings of love. It seeks to illustrate how a more integrated understanding of love may open up spaces of inquiry that are more flexible, creative, and spontaneous.

  20. Spiral microfluidic nanoparticle separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Ali Asgar S.; Kuntaegowdanahalli, Sathyakumar S.; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.; Papautsky, Ian

    2008-02-01

    Nanoparticles have potential applications in many areas such as consumer products, health care, electronics, energy and other industries. As the use of nanoparticles in manufacturing increases, we anticipate a growing need to detect and measure particles of nanometer scale dimensions in fluids to control emissions of possible toxic nanoparticles. At present most particle separation techniques are based on membrane assisted filtering schemes. Unfortunately their efficiency is limited by the membrane pore size, making them inefficient for separating a wide range of sizes. In this paper, we propose a passive spiral microfluidic geometry for momentum-based particle separations. The proposed design is versatile and is capable of separating particulate mixtures over a wide dynamic range and we expect it will enable a variety of environmental, medical, or manufacturing applications that involve rapid separation of nanoparticles in real-world samples with a wide range of particle components.

  1. A Three-Family SU(6) Type I Compactification

    CERN Document Server

    Kakushadze, Z

    1998-01-01

    We construct a four dimensional chiral N=1 space-time supersymmetric Type I vacuum corresponding to a compactification on a toroidal Z_2 X Z_2 X Z_3 orbifold. Using recent results in four dimensional orientifolds, we argue that this model has a well defined world-sheet description. An interesting feature of this model is that the gauge group contains an SU(6) subgroup with three chiral generations. Moreover, this model contains D5-branes and therefore corresponds to a non-perturbative heterotic vacuum. This is the first example of a consistent chiral N=1 supersymmetric string vacuum which is non-perturbative from the heterotic viewpoint, has a perturbative description in a dual theory, and possesses phenomenologically interesting characteristics. We also compute superpotential in this theory, and point out a feature of this model which appears phenomenologically unappealing.

  2. Type I Interferon in Chronic Virus Infection and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Laura M; McGaha, Tracy L; Brooks, David G

    2017-08-01

    Type I interferons (IFN-Is) are emerging as key drivers of inflammation and immunosuppression in chronic infection. Control of these infections requires IFN-I signaling; however, prolonged IFN-I signaling can lead to immune dysfunction. IFN-Is are also emerging as double-edged swords in cancer, providing necessary inflammatory signals, while initiating feedback suppression in both immune and cancer cells. Here, we review the proinflammatory and suppressive mechanisms potentiated by IFN-Is during chronic virus infections and discuss the similar, newly emerging dichotomy in cancer. We then discuss how this understanding is leading to new therapeutic concepts and immunotherapy combinations. We propose that, by modulating the immune response at its foundation, it may be possible to widely reshape immunity to control these chronic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Successful type I Leptogenesis with SO(10)-inspired mass relations

    CERN Document Server

    Di Bari, Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    It is well-known that thermal leptogenesis through the decays of the lightest right-handed neutrinos encounters serious difficulties when SO(10)-inspired mass conditions are imposed on the Dirac neutrino mass matrix and light neutrino masses are generated through the type I see-saw mechanism. We show that these can be circumvented when the production from the next-to-lightest right-handed neutrinos and flavor effects are properly taken into account. Some conditions on the low energy parameters have to be satisfied in order for inverse processes involving the lightest right-handed neutrino not to wash-out the asymmetry. In particular we find m_1 \\gtrsim 0.001 eV, where m_1 is the mass of the lightest left-handed neutrino and that non-vanishing values of the mixing angle theta_13 are preferred in the case of a normal fully hierarchical spectrum of light neutrinos.

  4. Classical Bianchi type I cosmology in K-essence theory

    CERN Document Server

    Socorro, J; Espinoza-García, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    We use one of the simplest forms of the K-essence theory and we apply it to the classical anisotropic Bianchi type I cosmological model, with a barotropic perfect fluid modeling the usual matter content and with cosmological constant. The classical solutions for any but the stiff fluid and without cosmological constant are found in closed form, using a time transformation. We also present the solution whith cosmological constant and some particular values of the barotropic parameter. We present the possible isotropization of the cosmological model, using the ratio between the anisotropic parameters and the volume of the universe and show that this tend to a constant or to zero for different cases. We include also a qualitative analysis of the analog of the Friedmann equation.

  5. Gap Dependent Rheology in Type I Collagen Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevalo, Richard; Urbach, Jeffrey; Blair, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Branched type I collagen fiber networks provide extracellular support in mammalian tissues. The intricate network structure can succumb to partial or complete tearing under sufficient applied strain. Under small shear strains, in vitro collagen gels exhibit strain-stiffening while maintaining overall network integrity. Higher shear strains lead to network failure through discrete yielding events. We perform rheology and confocal-rheology experiments to fully elucidate the strain-stiffening and yielding behavior in these highly nonlinear materials. We apply continuous shear strains to collagen gels confined within the rheometer at fixed gaps. We observe that sheared collagen in the strain-stiffening and yielding regime has an apparent modulus that is strongly dependent on the collagen thickness. Moreover, we demonstrate that network yielding is universally controlled by the ratio of the collagen thickness to the mesh size. These results have broad implications for the interpretation of rheological data of extracellular matrix proteins and for the design of biomimetic scaffolds.

  6. Type I seesaw mechanism for quasi degenerate neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Joshipura, Anjan S; Vempati, Sudhir K

    2009-01-01

    We discuss symmetries and scenarios leading to quasi-degenerate neutrinos in type-I seesaw models. The existence of degeneracy in the present approach is not linked to any specific structure for the Dirac neutrino Yukawa coupling matrix $y_D$ and holds in general. Basic input is the application of the minimal flavour violation principle to the leptonic sector. Generalizing this principle, we assume that the structure of the right handed neutrino mass matrix is determined by $y_D$ and the charged lepton Yukawa coupling matrix $y_l$ in an effective theory invariant under specific groups ${\\cal G}_F$ contained in the full symmetry group of the kinetic energy terms. ${\\cal G}_F$ invariance also leads to specific structure for the departure from degeneracy. The neutrino mass matrix (with degenerate mass $m_0$) resulting after seesaw mechanism has a simple form ${\\cal M}_\

  7. Total energy of the Bianchi type I universes

    CERN Document Server

    Xulu, S S

    2000-01-01

    Using the symmetric energy-momentum complexes of Landau and Lifshitz, Papapetrou, and Weinberg we obtain the energy of the universe in anisotropic Bianchi type I cosmological models . The energy (due to matter plus field) is found to be zero and this agrees with a previous result of Banerjee and Sen who investigated this problem using the Einstein energy-momentum complex. Our result supports the importance of the energy-momentum complexes and contradicts the prevailing ``folklore'' that different energy-momentum complexes could give different and hence unacceptable energy distribution in a given space-time. The result that the total energy of the universe in these models is zero supports the viewpoint of Tryon. Rosen computed the total energy of the closed homogeneous isotropic universe and found that to be zero, which agrees with the studies of Tryon.

  8. Complete synchronization in coupled type-I neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nishant Malik; B Ashok; J Balakrishnan

    2010-02-01

    For a system of type-I neurons bidirectionally coupled through a nonlinear feedback mechanism, we discuss the issue of noise-induced complete synchronization (CS). For the inputs to the neurons, we point out that the rate of change of instantaneous frequency with the instantaneous phase of the stochastic inputs to each neuron matches exactly with that for the other in the event of CS of their outputs. Our observation can be exploited in practical situations to produce completely synchronized outputs in artificial devices. For excitatory–excitatory synaptic coupling, a functional dependence for the synchronization error on coupling and noise strengths is obtained. Finally, we report a noise-induced CS between nonidentical neurons coupled bidirectionally through random nonzero couplings in an all-to-all way in a large neuronal ensemble.

  9. Overview of the Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, S S; Akolkar, B; Concannon, P; Erlich, H; Hilner, J E; Julier, C; Morahan, G; Nerup, J; Nierras, C; Pociot, F; Todd, J A

    2009-12-01

    The Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) is an international, multicenter research program with two primary goals. The first goal is to identify genomic regions and candidate genes whose variants modify an individual's risk of type I diabetes (T1D) and help explain the clustering of the disease in families. The second goal is to make research data available to the research community and to establish resources that can be used by, and that are fully accessible to, the research community. To facilitate the access to these resources, the T1DGC has developed a Consortium Agreement (http://www.t1dgc.org) that specifies the rights and responsibilities of investigators who participate in Consortium activities. The T1DGC has assembled a resource of affected sib-pair families, parent-child trios, and case-control collections with banks of DNA, serum, plasma, and EBV-transformed cell lines. In addition, both candidate gene and genome-wide (linkage and association) studies have been performed and displayed in T1DBase (http://www.t1dbase.org) for all researchers to use in their own investigations. In this supplement, a subset of the T1DGC collection has been used to investigate earlier published candidate genes for T1D, to confirm the results from a genome-wide association scan for T1D, and to determine associations with candidate genes for other autoimmune diseases or with type II diabetes that may be involved with beta-cell function.

  10. Entoptic perceptions of spiral waves and rare inward spirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Ida

    2015-06-01

    This report concerns Entoptic Rotating Spiral Waves as observed and documented by the author over a period of 46 years (1962-2008). The manifestations of these state-dependent, elusive rotating spiral entities were brief, emerging only during sleep-to-waking arousal epochs (in limbo). The images were seen only with closed lids in favorable ambient lighting-here, termed the umbral view. The clusters of rotating spiral entities emerge briefly to conscious view; their angular subtenses are estimated to be between 1° and 4°, and the rotations at ten-turns per second. Epochs of these activities commonly continued for about 20 s, with longevity of each visible entity up to 4 s. 90% of all observed entities were circular and outwardly levorotary; 5% were elliptical, appearing only as horizontal (prolate) entities. Overlapping units were rare, and were chiefly elliptical. Observations of twin spirals were also rare, seen in counter rotations, each twin inwardly rotating.

  11. Riboflavin alleviates cardiac failure in Type I diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Zhao

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a common and serious comorbidity of diabetes. Oxidative stress has been associated with the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications including cardiomyopathy. The ability of antioxidants to inhibit injury has raised the possibility of new therapeutic treatment for diabetic heart diseases. Riboflavin constitutes an essential nutrient for humans and animals and it is an important food additive. Riboflavin, a precursor of flavin mononucleotide (FMN and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD, enhances the oxidative folding and subsequent secretion of proteins. The objective of this study was to investigate the cardioprotective effect of riboflavin in diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in 30 rats by a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ (70 mg /kg. Riboflavin (20 mg/kg was orally administered to animals immediately after induction of diabetes and was continued for eight weeks. Rats were examined for diabetic cardiomyopathy by left ventricular (LV remadynamic function. Myocardial oxidative stress was assessed by measuring the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, the level of malondialdehyde (MDA as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 protein level. Myocardial connective tissue growth factor (CTGF level was measured by Western blot in all rats at the end of the study. In the untreated diabetic rats, left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP rate of pressure rose (+dp/dt, and rate of pressure decay (−dp/dt were depressed while left ventricular enddiastolic pressure (LVEDP was increased, which indicated the reduced left ventricular contractility and slowing of left ventricular relaxation. The level of SOD decreased, CTGF and HO-1 protein expression and MDA content rose. Riboflavin treatment significantly improved left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in diabetic rats, there were persistent increases in significant activation of SOD and the level of HO-1 protein, and a decrease in the level of CTGF. These results suggest

  12. In vitro formation and thermal transition of novel hybrid fibrils from type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Song Chen, Toshiyuki Ikoma, Nobuhiro Ogawa, Satoshi Migita, Hisatoshi Kobayashi and Nobutaka Hanagata

    2010-01-01

    Novel type I collagen hybrid fibrils were fabricated by neutralizing a mixture of type I fish scale collagen solution and type I porcine collagen solution with a phosphate buffer saline at 28 °C. Their structure was discussed in terms of the volume ratio of fish/porcine collagen solution. Scanning electron and atomic force micrographs showed that the diameter of collagen fibrils derived from the collagen mixture was larger than those derived from each collagen, and all resultant fibrils exhib...

  13. On-chip spiral spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Redding, Brandon; Bromberg, Yaron; Sarma, Raktim; Cao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    We designed an on-chip spectrometer based on an evanescently-coupled multimode spiral waveguide. Interference between the modes in the waveguide forms a wavelength-dependent speckle pattern which can be used as a fingerprint to identify the input wavelength after calibration. Evanescent coupling between neighboring arms of the spiral enhances the temporal spread of light propagating through the spiral, leading to a dramatic increase in the spectral resolution. Experimentally, we demonstrated that a 250 {\\mu}m radius spiral spectrometer provides a resolution of 0.01 nm at a wavelength of 1520 nm. Spectra containing 40 independent spectral channels can be recovered simultaneously and the operation bandwidth can be increased further when measuring sparse spectra.

  14. Measuring with the spiral reader

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The spiral reader shown here was at the time, together with the Shivamatic scanning system, the basic equipment used for measuring bubble chamber pictures. Anne Anton sits at the table. (See Photo Archive 7408343.)

  15. Discovering Relationships Involving Baravelle Spirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.

    2006-01-01

    This article details an exploration of Baravelle spirals as visual representations of infinite geometric series, focusing on a variety of strategies used by preservice teachers in discovering patterns and investigating relationships of variables.

  16. Analytical approximations for spiral waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Löber, Jakob, E-mail: jakob@physik.tu-berlin.de; Engel, Harald [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, EW 7-1, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    We propose a non-perturbative attempt to solve the kinematic equations for spiral waves in excitable media. From the eikonal equation for the wave front we derive an implicit analytical relation between rotation frequency Ω and core radius R{sub 0}. For free, rigidly rotating spiral waves our analytical prediction is in good agreement with numerical solutions of the linear eikonal equation not only for very large but also for intermediate and small values of the core radius. An equivalent Ω(R{sub +}) dependence improves the result by Keener and Tyson for spiral waves pinned to a circular defect of radius R{sub +} with Neumann boundaries at the periphery. Simultaneously, analytical approximations for the shape of free and pinned spirals are given. We discuss the reasons why the ansatz fails to correctly describe the dependence of the rotation frequency on the excitability of the medium.

  17. Spiral-shaped disinfection reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2015-08-20

    This disclosure includes disinfection reactors and processes for the disinfection of water. Some disinfection reactors include a body that defines an inlet, an outlet, and a spiral flow path between the inlet and the outlet, in which the body is configured to receive water and a disinfectant at the inlet such that the water is exposed to the disinfectant as the water flows through the spiral flow path. Also disclosed are processes for disinfecting water in such disinfection reactors.

  18. IN VITRO ESTIMATES OF METABOLIC PARAMETERS AND THEIR USE IN PREDICTIVE PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING (PBPK) OF THE TYPE I PYRETHROIDS PERMETHRIN AND BIFENTHRIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroids are a class of neurotoxic insecticides that are used in a variety of agricultural and household activities. Hepatic clearance of the Type I pyrethroids permethrin and bifenthrin may be a critical determinant of their toxic effect. Rat LD50s reported in the literatur...

  19. Identification of a novel PROS1 c.1113T -> GG frameshift mutation in a family with mixed type I/type III protein S deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Kate, Min Ki; Mulder, Rene; Platteel, Mathieu; Brouwer, Jan-Leendert P.; van der Steege, Gerrit; van der Meer, Jan

    2006-01-01

    We report a family with type I and type III protein S (PS) deficiency, which showed to be phenotypic variants of the same genetic disease. Direct sequencing analysis of the PROS1 gene was performed to establish the genotype. The ratio of protein C antigen and total PS antigen levels (protein C/S rat

  20. [Clinical practice guideline 'Complex regional pain syndrome type I'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, R S G M; Zollinger, P E; Dijkstra, P U; Thomassen-Hilgersom, I L; Zuurmond, W W A; Rosenbrand, C J G M; Geertzen, J H B

    2007-07-28

    The development and treatment ofthe complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) are a subject of much discussion. Using the method for the development ofevidence-based guidelines, a multidisciplinary guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome has been drawn up. The diagnosis of CRPS-I is based on the clinical observation of signs and symptoms. For pain treatment, the WHO analgesic ladder is advised up to step z. In case of pain ofa neuropathic nature, anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants may be considered. For the treatment ofinflammatory symptoms, free-radical scavengers (dimethylsulphoxide or acetylcysteine) are advised. In order to enhance peripheral blood flow, vasodilatory medication may be considered. Percutaneous sympathetic blockades may be used for a cold extremity ifvasodilatory medication produces insufficient effect. To decrease functional limitations, standardised physiotherapy and occupational therapy are advised. To prevent the occurrence of CRPS-I after wrist fractures, the use of vitamin C is recommended. Adequate perioperative analgesia, limitation of operation time and limited use of bloodlessness are advised for the secondary prevention of CRPS-I. Use of regional anaesthetic techniques can also be considered in this connection.

  1. Horizontal visibility graphs generated by type-I intermittency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Ángel M.; Luque, Bartolo; Lacasa, Lucas; Gómez, Jose Patricio; Robledo, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    The type-I intermittency route to (or out of) chaos is investigated within the horizontal visibility (HV) graph theory. For that purpose, we address the trajectories generated by unimodal maps close to an inverse tangent bifurcation and construct their associated HV graphs. We show how the alternation of laminar episodes and chaotic bursts imprints a fingerprint in the resulting graph structure. Accordingly, we derive a phenomenological theory that predicts quantitative values for several network parameters. In particular, we predict that the characteristic power-law scaling of the mean length of laminar trend sizes is fully inherited by the variance of the graph degree distribution, in good agreement with the numerics. We also report numerical evidence on how the characteristic power-law scaling of the Lyapunov exponent as a function of the distance to the tangent bifurcation is inherited in the graph by an analogous scaling of block entropy functionals defined on the graph. Furthermore, we are able to recast the full set of HV graphs generated by intermittent dynamics into a renormalization-group framework, where the fixed points of its graph-theoretical renormalization-group flow account for the different types of dynamics. We also establish that the nontrivial fixed point of this flow coincides with the tangency condition and that the corresponding invariant graph exhibits extremal entropic properties.

  2. Bending rigidity of type I collagen homotrimer fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sejin; Leikin, Sergey; Losert, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    Normal type I collagen is an α1(I)2α2(I) heterotrimeric triple helix, but α1(I)3 homotrimers are also found in fetal tissues and various pathological conditions, e.g., causing bone fragility and reducing tendon tensile strength. It remains unclear whether homotrimers alter mechanical properties of individual fibrils or affect tissues by altering their organization at a higher level. To address this question, we investigated how homotrimers affect fibril bending rigidity. Homotrimer fibrils have been shown to be more loosely packed so that we expected them to be more susceptible to bending. However, homotrimer fibrils were more rigid despite being thinner and more hydrated. To quantify fibril rigidity, we analyzed their shape by Fourier decomposition, determined the correlation function for the direction along each fibril, and calculated the distribution of local fibril curvature. The estimated persistence length of homotrimer fibrils was 3 ˜ 10 times longer than for heterotrimer fibrils, indicating much higher bending rigidity of homotrimer fibrils.

  3. Two novel mutations involved in hereditary tyrosinemia type I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St-Louis, M.; Poudrier, J.; Phaneuf, D. [Univ. of Laval, Ste-Foy, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase, the last enzyme in the tyrosine catabolic pathway is the cause of hereditary tyrosinemia type I (HT1), an autosomal recessive disease. The disease has been reported worldwide. The incidence is much higher in two clusters: the Saguenay- Lac St-Jean region (Quebec, Canada) and in Scandinavia. Seven mutations have been reported in the last two years. Here we describe two new missense mutations identified by direct sequencing of PCR products in two HT1 patients, a Norwegian (patient No. 1) and a French-Canadian (patient No. 2). The first mutation consists of a G to A transition at position 337 of the FAH gene which predicts a change from glycine to serine (G337S). The second mutation is an A to G transition at position 381 which predicts a change from arginine to glycine (R381G). Patient No. 1 seems heterozygous for the G337S mutation and for a splice mutation (IVS12+5G{r_arrow}A) which was previously described. Patient No. 2 was also found heterozygous for the R381G mutation and for a rare nonsense mutation (E357X) already reported. In vitro transcription and translation were performed on mutant cDNA to demonstrate the responsibility of these two mutations in causing the decreased amount of FAH detected by Western blot analysis.

  4. Thermal denaturation of type I collagen vitrified gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Zhiyong, E-mail: zhiyong.xia@jhuapl.edu [The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Calderon-Colon, Xiomara [The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Trexler, Morgana, E-mail: morgana.trexler@jhuapl.edu [The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Elisseeff, Jennifer; Guo, Qiongyu [The Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)

    2012-01-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyzed the denaturation of vitrigels synthesized under different conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overall denaturation kinetics consisted of both reversible and irreversible steps. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More stable vitrigels were formed under high level of vitrification. - Abstract: The denaturation kinetics of type I collagen vitrigels synthesized under different vitrification time and temperature were analyzed by the classical Kissinger approach and the advanced model free kinetics (AMFK) using the Vyazovkin algorithm. The AMFK successfully elucidated the overall denaturation into reversible and irreversible processes. Depending on vitrification conditions, the activation energy for the irreversible process ranged from 100 to 200 kJ/mol, and the reversible enthalpy ranged from 250 to 300 kJ/mol. All of these values increased with the vitrification time and temperature, indicating that a more stable and complex structure formed with increased vitrification. The classical Kissinger method predicted the presence of a critical temperate of approximately 60 Degree-Sign C for the transition between reversible and irreversible processes. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of fibril structures in vitrigels both before and after full denaturation; however the fibrils had became thicker and rougher after denaturation.

  5. Fractal dimension analysis of cerebellum in Chiari Malformation type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Engin; Kara, Sadık; Akdemir, Hidayet; Kırış, Adem

    2015-09-01

    Chiari Malformation type I (CM-I) is a serious neurological disorder that is characterized by hindbrain herniation. Our aim was to evaluate the usefulness of fractal analysis in CM-I patients. To examine the morphological complexity features of this disorder, fractal dimension (FD) of cerebellar regions were estimated from magnetic resonance images (MRI) of 17 patients with CM-I and 16 healthy control subjects in this study. The areas of white matter (WM), gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were calculated and the corresponding FD values were computed using a 2D box-counting method in both groups. The results indicated that CM-I patients had significantly higher (p<0.05) FD values of GM, WM and CSF tissues compared to control group. According to the results of correlation analysis between FD values and the corresponding area values, FD and area values of GM tissues in the patients group were found to be correlated. The results of the present study suggest that FD values of cerebellar regions may be a discriminative feature and a useful marker for investigation of abnormalities in the cerebellum of CM-I patients. Further studies to explore the changes in cerebellar regions with the help of 3D FD analysis and volumetric calculations should be performed as a future work.

  6. Bio-inspired microstructures in collagen type I hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Yahya; Verbridge, Scott S; Agah, Masoud

    2015-06-01

    This article presents a novel technique to fabricate complex type I collagen hydrogel structures, with varying depth and width defined by a single fabrication step. This technique takes advantage of reactive ion etching lag to fabricate three-dimensional (3-D) structures in silicon. Then, a polydimethylsiloxane replica was fabricated utilizing soft lithography and used as a stamp on collagen hydrogel to transfer these patterns. Endothelial cells were seeded on the hydrogel devices to measure their interaction with these more physiologically relevant cell culture surfaces. Confocal imaging was utilized to image the hydrogel devices to demonstrate the robustness of the fabrication technique, and to study the cell-extracellular matrix interaction after cell seeding. In this study, we observed that endothelial cells remodeled the sharp scallops of collagen hydrogel structures and compressed the structures with low degree of slope. Such patterning techniques will enhance the physiological relevance of existing 3-D cell culture platforms by providing a technical bridge between the high resolution yet planar techniques of standard lithography with more complex yet low resolution 3-D printing methods.

  7. Type I seesaw mechanism for quasi-degenerate neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshipura, Anjan S., E-mail: anjan@prl.res.i [Physical Research Laboratory, Navarangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India); Patel, Ketan M., E-mail: kmpatel@prl.res.i [Physical Research Laboratory, Navarangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India); Vempati, Sudhir K., E-mail: vempati@cts.iisc.ernet.i [Centre for High Energy Physics, Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2010-06-21

    We discuss symmetries and scenarios leading to quasi-degenerate neutrinos in type I seesaw models. The existence of degeneracy in the present approach is not linked to any specific structure for the Dirac neutrino Yukawa coupling matrix y{sub D} and holds in general. Basic input is the application of the minimal flavour violation principle to the leptonic sector. Generalizing this principle, we assume that the structure of the right-handed neutrino mass matrix is determined by y{sub D} and the charged lepton Yukawa coupling matrix y{sub l} in an effective theory invariant under specific groups G{sub F} contained in the full symmetry group of the kinetic energy terms. G{sub F} invariance also leads to specific structure for the departure from degeneracy. The neutrino mass matrix (with degenerate mass m{sub 0}) resulting after seesaw mechanism has a simple form M{sub {nu}{approx}m0}(I-py{sub l}y{sub l}{sup T}) in one particular scenario based on supersymmetry. This form is shown to lead to correct description of neutrino masses and mixing angles. The thermal leptogenesis after inclusion of flavour effects can account for the observed baryon asymmetry of the universe within the present scenario. Rates for lepton flavour violating processes can occur at observable levels in the supersymmetric version of the scenario.

  8. Chemical abundances from planetary nebulae in local spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Richer, M G

    2015-01-01

    While the chemical abudances observed in bright planetary nebulae in local spiral galaxies are less varied than their counterparts in dwarfs, they provide new insight. Their helium abundances are typically enriched by less than 50\\% compared to the primordial abundance. Nitrogen abundances always show some level of secondary enrichment, but the absolute enrichment is not extreme. In particular, type I PNe are rare among the bright PNe in local spirals. The oxygen and neon abundances are very well correlated and follow the relation between these abundances observed in star-forming galaxies, implying that either the progenitor stars of these PNe modify neither abundance substantially or that they modify both to maintain the ratio (not predicted by theory). According to theory, these results imply that the progenitor stars of bright PNe in local spirals have masses of about $2\\,\\mathrm M_{\\odot}$ or less. If so, the progenitors of these PNe have substantial lifetimes that allow us to use them to study the recent...

  9. Diagnosis and management of glutaric aciduria type I--revised recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kölker, Stefan; Christensen, Ernst; Leonard, James V

    2011-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria type I (synonym, glutaric acidemia type I) is a rare organic aciduria. Untreated patients characteristically develop dystonia during infancy resulting in a high morbidity and mortality. The neuropathological correlate is striatal injury which results from encephalopathic crises ...

  10. Analysis of 19 genes for association with type I diabetes in the Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, J M M; Walker, N M; Smyth, D J; Todd, J A

    2009-12-01

    In recent years the pace of discovery of genetic associations with type I diabetes (T1D) has accelerated, with the total number of confirmed loci, including the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, reaching 43. However, much of the deciphering of the associations at these, and the established T1D loci, has yet to be performed in sufficient numbers of samples or with sufficient markers. Here, 257 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been genotyped in 19 candidate genes (INS, PTPN22, IL2RA, CTLA4, IFIH1, SUMO4, VDR, PAX4, OAS1, IRS1, IL4, IL4R, IL13, IL12B, CEACAM21, CAPSL, Q7Z4c4(5Q), FOXP3, EFHB) in 2300 affected sib-pair families and tested for association with T1D as part of the Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium's candidate gene study. The study had approximately 80% power at alpha=0.002 and a minor allele frequency of 0.2 to detect an effect with a relative risk (RR) of 1.20, which drops to just 40% power for a RR of 1.15. At the INS gene, rs689 (-23 HphI) was the most associated SNP (P=3.8 x 10(-31)), with the estimated RR=0.57 (95% confidence interval, 0.52-0.63). In addition, rs689 was associated with age-at-diagnosis of T1D (P=0.001), with homozygosity for the T1D protective T allele, delaying the onset of T1D by approximately 2 years in these families. At PTPN22, rs2476601 (R620W), in agreement with previous reports, was the most significantly associated SNP (P=6.9 x 10(-17)), with RR=1.55 (1.40-1.72). Evidence for association with T1D was observed for the IFIH1 SNP, rs1990760 (P=7.0 x 10(-4)), with RR=0.88 (0.82-0.95) and the CTLA4 SNP rs1427676 (P=0.0005), with RR=1.14 (1.06-1.23). In contrast, no convincing evidence of association was obtained for SUMO4, VDR, PAX4, OAS1, IRS1, IL4, IL4R, IL13, IL12B, CEACAM21 or CAPSL gene regions (http://www.T1DBase.org).

  11. DMPD: Type I interferon receptors: biochemistry and biological functions. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17502368 Type I interferon receptors: biochemistry and biological functions. de Wee...(.html) (.csml) Show Type I interferon receptors: biochemistry and biological functions. PubmedID 17502368 T...itle Type I interferon receptors: biochemistry and biological functions. Authors

  12. 46 CFR 160.077-13 - Materials-Type I and Commercial Hybrid PFD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials-Type I and Commercial Hybrid PFD. 160.077-13... Flotation Devices § 160.077-13 Materials—Type I and Commercial Hybrid PFD. (a) General. All commercial... material on each reversible side, if any. The material must be Type I material that is approved...

  13. DMPD: Signalling pathways mediating type I interferon gene expression. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17904888 Signalling pathways mediating type I interferon gene expression. Edwards M...csml) Show Signalling pathways mediating type I interferon gene expression. PubmedID 17904888 Title Signalli...ng pathways mediating type I interferon gene expression. Authors Edwards MR, Slat

  14. Wetting, prewetting and surface transitions in type-I superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indekeu, J. O.; van Leeuwen, J. M. J.

    1995-02-01

    Within the Ginzburg-Landau theory, which is quantitatively correct for classical superconductors, it is shown that a type-I superconductor can display an interface delocalization or “wetting” transition, in which a macroscopically thick superconducting layer intrudes from the surface into the bulk normal phase. The condition for this transition to occur is that the superconducting order parameter | ψ| 2 is enhanced at the surface. This corresponds to a negative surface extrapolation length b. The wetting transition takes place at bulk two-phase coexistence of normal and superconducting phases, at a temperature TD below the critical temperature Tc, and at magnetic field HD = Hc( TD). The field is applied parallel to the surface. Surprisingly, the order of the wetting transition is controlled by a bulk material constant, the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ. This is very unusual, since in other systems (fluids, Ising magnets,…) the order of the wetting transition depends on surface parameters that are difficult to determine or control. For superconductors, first-order wetting is predicted for 0 ≤ κ wetting for 0.374 wetting, the prewetting extension is also found. Unlike in standard wetting problems, the prewetting line does not terminate at a critical point but changes from first to second order at a tricritical point. Twinning-plane superconductivity (TPS) is reinterpreted as a prewetting phenomenon. The possibility of critical wetting in superconductors is especially interesting because this phenomenon has largely eluded experimental verification in any system until now. Furthermore, superconductors provide a realization of wetting in systems with short-range (exponentially decaying) interactions. This is very different from the usual long-range (algebraically decaying) interactions, such as van der Waals forces, and has important consequences for the wetting characteristics.

  15. Genetic homogeneity of autoimmune polyglandular disease type I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerses, P.; Aaltonen, J.; Vikman, A. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease (MIM 240300) characterized by hypoparathyroidism, primary adrenocortical failure, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. The disease is highly prevalent in two isolated populations, the Finnish population and the Iranian Jewish one. Sporadic cases have been identified in many other countries, including almost all European countries. The APECED locus has previously been assigned to chromosome 21q22.3 by linkage analyses in 14 Finnish families. Locus heterogeneity is a highly relevant question in this disease affecting multiple tissues and with great phenotypic diversity. To solve this matter, we performed linkage and haplotype analyses on APECED families rising from different populations. Six microsatellite markers on the critical chromosomal region of 2.6 cM on 21q22.3 were analyzed. Pair-wise linkage analyses revealed significant LOD scores for all these markers, maximum LOD score being 10.23. The obtained haplotype data and the geographic distribution of the great-grandparents of the Finnish APECED patients suggest the presence of one major, relatively old mutation responsible for {approximately}90% of the Finnish cases. Similar evidence for one founder mutation was also found in analyses of Iranian Jewish APECED haplotypes. These haplotypes, however, differed totally from the Finnish ones. The linkage analyses in 21 non-Finnish APECED families originating from several European countries provided independent evidence for linkage to the same chromosomal region on 21q22.3 and revealed no evidence for locus heterogeneity. The haplotype analyses of APECED chromosomes suggest that in different populations APECED is due to a spectrum of mutations in a still unknown gene on chromosome 21. 21 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Radio synchrotron emission, its polarization and Faraday rotation of the polarization angle are powerful tools to study the strength and structure of magnetic fields in galaxies. Unpolarized synchrotron emission traces isotropic turbulent fields which are strongest in spiral arms and bars (20-30 \\upmu G) and in central starburst regions (50-100 \\upmu G). Such fields are dynamically important; they affect gas flows and drive gas inflows in central regions. Polarized emission traces ordered fields, which can be regular or anisotropic turbulent, where the latter originates from isotropic turbulent fields by the action of compression or shear. The strongest ordered fields (10-15 \\upmu G) are generally found in interarm regions. In galaxies with strong density waves, ordered fields are also observed at the inner edges of spiral arms. Ordered fields with spiral patterns exist in grand-design, barred and flocculent galaxies and in central regions. Ordered fields in interacting galaxies have asymmetric distributions and are a tracer of past interactions between galaxies or with the intergalactic medium.—Faraday rotation measures of the diffuse polarized radio emission from galaxy disks reveal large-scale spiral patterns that can be described by the superposition of azimuthal modes; these are signatures of regular fields generated by mean-field dynamos. "Magnetic arms" between gaseous spiral arms may also be products of dynamo action, but need a stable spiral pattern to develop. Helically twisted field loops winding around spiral arms were found in two galaxies so far. Large-scale field reversals, like the one found in the Milky Way, could not yet be detected in external galaxies. In radio halos around edge-on galaxies, ordered magnetic fields with X-shaped patterns are observed. The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetic fields, in particular their first occurrence in young galaxies and their dynamical importance during galaxy evolution, will be studied with

  17. In vitro formation and thermal transition of novel hybrid fibrils from type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Song; Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Migita, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Ikoma, Toshiyuki [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Hanagata, Nobutaka, E-mail: HANAGATA.Nobutaka@nims.go.j [Nanotechnology Innovation Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    Novel type I collagen hybrid fibrils were fabricated by neutralizing a mixture of type I fish scale collagen solution and type I porcine collagen solution with a phosphate buffer saline at 28 {sup 0}C. Their structure was discussed in terms of the volume ratio of fish/porcine collagen solution. Scanning electron and atomic force micrographs showed that the diameter of collagen fibrils derived from the collagen mixture was larger than those derived from each collagen, and all resultant fibrils exhibited a typical D-periodic unit of {approx}67 nm, irrespective of volume ratio of both collagens. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed only one endothermic peak for the fibrils derived from collagen mixture or from each collagen solution, indicating that the resultant collagen fibrils were hybrids of type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen.

  18. In vitro formation and thermal transition of novel hybrid fibrils from type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Migita, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2010-06-01

    Novel type I collagen hybrid fibrils were fabricated by neutralizing a mixture of type I fish scale collagen solution and type I porcine collagen solution with a phosphate buffer saline at 28 °C. Their structure was discussed in terms of the volume ratio of fish/porcine collagen solution. Scanning electron and atomic force micrographs showed that the diameter of collagen fibrils derived from the collagen mixture was larger than those derived from each collagen, and all resultant fibrils exhibited a typical D-periodic unit of ~67 nm, irrespective of volume ratio of both collagens. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed only one endothermic peak for the fibrils derived from collagen mixture or from each collagen solution, indicating that the resultant collagen fibrils were hybrids of type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen.

  19. In vitro formation and thermal transition of novel hybrid fibrils from type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Chen, Toshiyuki Ikoma, Nobuhiro Ogawa, Satoshi Migita, Hisatoshi Kobayashi and Nobutaka Hanagata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel type I collagen hybrid fibrils were fabricated by neutralizing a mixture of type I fish scale collagen solution and type I porcine collagen solution with a phosphate buffer saline at 28 °C. Their structure was discussed in terms of the volume ratio of fish/porcine collagen solution. Scanning electron and atomic force micrographs showed that the diameter of collagen fibrils derived from the collagen mixture was larger than those derived from each collagen, and all resultant fibrils exhibited a typical D-periodic unit of ~67 nm, irrespective of volume ratio of both collagens. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed only one endothermic peak for the fibrils derived from collagen mixture or from each collagen solution, indicating that the resultant collagen fibrils were hybrids of type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen.

  20. Simulations of Normal Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bottema, R

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented of numerical simulations of normal isolated late type spiral galaxies. Specifically the galaxy NGC 628 is used as a template. The method employs a TREESPH code including stellar particles, gas particles, cooling and heating of the gas, star formation according to a Jeans criterion, and Supernova feedback. A regular spiral disc can be generated as an equilibrium situation of two opposing actions. On the one hand cooling and dissipation of the gas, on the other hand gas heating by the FUV field of young stars and SN mechanical forcing. The disc exhibits small and medium scale spiral structure of which the multiplicity increases as a function of radius. The theory of swing amplification can explain, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the emerging spiral structure. In addition, swing amplification predicts that the existence of a grand design m=2 spiral is only possible if the disc is massive. The simulations show that the galaxy is then unstable to bar formation. A general criterion is ...

  1. Orientation decoding: Sense in spirals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Colin W G; Mannion, Damien J

    2015-04-15

    The orientation of a visual stimulus can be successfully decoded from the multivariate pattern of fMRI activity in human visual cortex. Whether this capacity requires coarse-scale orientation biases is controversial. We and others have advocated the use of spiral stimuli to eliminate a potential coarse-scale bias-the radial bias toward local orientations that are collinear with the centre of gaze-and hence narrow down the potential coarse-scale biases that could contribute to orientation decoding. The usefulness of this strategy is challenged by the computational simulations of Carlson (2014), who reported the ability to successfully decode spirals of opposite sense (opening clockwise or counter-clockwise) from the pooled output of purportedly unbiased orientation filters. Here, we elaborate the mathematical relationship between spirals of opposite sense to confirm that they cannot be discriminated on the basis of the pooled output of unbiased or radially biased orientation filters. We then demonstrate that Carlson's (2014) reported decoding ability is consistent with the presence of inadvertent biases in the set of orientation filters; biases introduced by their digital implementation and unrelated to the brain's processing of orientation. These analyses demonstrate that spirals must be processed with an orientation bias other than the radial bias for successful decoding of spiral sense.

  2. Kinetics of anaerobic degradation of glycol-based type I aircraft deicing fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, T; Veltman, S; Switzenbaum, M

    2001-01-01

    The kinetics of anaerobic degradation of glycol-based Type I aircraft deicing fluids (ADFs) were characterized using suspended-growth fill-and-draw reactors. Both Type I ADFs tested showed near-complete anaerobic degradability. First-order degradation rate constants of 3.5 d(-1) for the propylene glycol-based Type I ADF and 5.2 d(-1) for the ethylene glycol-based Type I ADF were obtained through continuous-culture means under mesophilic conditions (35 degrees C). Fill-and-draw operation at lower temperatures affected anaerobic degradability only minimally down to 25 degrees C but substantially below 25 degrees C. High Type I ADF feed concentrations substantially affected degradability. Batch testing of fill-and-draw reactors resulted in first-order degradation rate constants of 1.9 d(-1) for propylene glycol-based Type I ADF and 3.5 d(-1) for ethylene glycol-based Type I ADF.

  3. Spiral Inflector For Compact Cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Karamysheva, G A

    2004-01-01

    Compact cyclotron for explosives detection by nuclear resonance absorption of γ-rays in nitrogen is under development [1] Cyclotron will be equipped with the external ion source. The injection system consists of a double-drift beam bunching system, a spiral inflector, beam diagnostics, focusing and adjustment elements [2]. The spiral inflector for ion bending from axial to median plane is used. Computer model of spiral inflector for the Customs cyclotron is developed. 3D electrostatic field calculations of the designed inflector are performed. Calculated electric field map and magnetic field map of the cyclotron [3] are used for beam dynamic simulations. Numeric simulations are carried out for 500 particles using code for calculation of particle dynamics by integration of differential equations in Cartesian coordinate system written in MATLAB. Direct Coulomb particle-to-particle method is used to take into account space-charge effects.

  4. Transient spirals as superposed instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Sellwood, J A

    2014-01-01

    We present evidence that recurrent spiral activity, long manifested in simulations of disk galaxies, results from the super-position of a few transient spiral modes. Each mode lasts between five and ten rotations at its corotation radius where its amplitude is greatest. The scattering of stars as each wave decays takes place over narrow ranges of angular momentum, causing abrupt changes to the impedance of the disk to subsequent traveling waves. Partial reflections of waves at these newly created features, allows new standing-wave instabilities to appear that saturate and decay in their turn, scattering particles at new locations, creating a recurring cycle. The spiral activity causes the general level of random motion to rise, gradually decreasing the ability of the disk to support further activity unless the disk contains a dissipative gas component from which stars form on near-circular orbits. We also show that this interpretation is consistent with the behavior reported in other recent simulations with l...

  5. Magnetic Fields in Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Radio synchrotron emission is a powerful tool to study the strength and structure of magnetic fields in galaxies. Unpolarized synchrotron emission traces isotropic turbulent fields which are strongest in spiral arms and bars (20-30\\mu G) and in central starburst regions (50-100\\mu G). Such fields are dynamically important; they affect gas flows and drive gas inflows in central regions. Polarized emission traces ordered fields, which can be regular or anisotropic turbulent, where the latter originates from isotropic turbulent fields by the action of compression or shear. The strongest ordered fields (10-15\\mu G) are generally found in interarm regions. In galaxies with strong density waves, ordered fields are also observed at the inner edges of spiral arms. Ordered fields with spiral patterns exist in grand-design, barred and flocculent galaxies, and in central regions. Ordered fields in interacting galaxies have asymmetric distributions and are a tracer of past interactions between galaxies or with the interg...

  6. Efficient Algorithm for Rectangular Spiral Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Breckenridge, William

    2008-01-01

    An algorithm generates grid coordinates for a computationally efficient spiral search pattern covering an uncertain rectangular area spanned by a coordinate grid. The algorithm does not require that the grid be fixed; the algorithm can search indefinitely, expanding the grid and spiral, as needed, until the target of the search is found. The algorithm also does not require memory of coordinates of previous points on the spiral to generate the current point on the spiral.

  7. Stellar Spirals in Triaxial Dark Matter Halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shaoran; Sijacki, Debora

    2017-03-01

    Two-armed grand-design spirals may form if the shape of its dark matter halo changes abruptly enough. The feasibility of such a mechanism is tested in realistic simulations. The interplay of such externally-driven spirals and self-induced transient spirals is then studied. Subhaloes are also found to lead to transient grand-design spiral structures when they impact the disk.

  8. Gi-protein-coupled 5-HT1B/D receptor agonist sumatriptan induces type I hyperalgesic priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F; Levine, Jon D

    2016-08-01

    We have recently described a novel form of hyperalgesic priming (type II) induced by agonists at two clinically important Gi-protein-coupled receptors (Gi-GPCRs), mu-opioid and A1-adenosine. Like mu-opioids, the antimigraine triptans, which act at 5-HT1B/D Gi-GPCRs, have been implicated in pain chronification. We determined whether sumatriptan, a prototypical 5-HT1B/D agonist, produces type II priming. Characteristic of hyperalgesic priming, intradermal injection of sumatriptan (10 ng) induced a change in nociceptor function such that a subsequent injection of prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) induces prolonged mechanical hyperalgesia. However, onset to priming was delayed 3 days, characteristic of type I priming. Also characteristic of type I priming, a protein kinase Cε, but not a protein kinase A inhibitor attenuated the prolongation phase of PGE2 hyperalgesia. The prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia was also permanently reversed by intradermal injection of cordycepin, a protein translation inhibitor. Also, hyperalgesic priming did not occur in animals pretreated with pertussis toxin or isolectin B4-positive nociceptor toxin, IB4-saporin. Finally, as observed for other agonists that induce type I priming, sumatriptan did not induce priming in female rats. The prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia induced by sumatriptan was partially prevented by coinjection of antagonists for the 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D, but not 5-HT7, serotonin receptors and completely prevented by coadministration of a combination of the 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D antagonists. Moreover, the injection of selective agonists, for 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors, also induced hyperalgesic priming. Our results suggest that sumatriptan, which signals through Gi-GPCRs, induces type I hyperalgesic priming, unlike agonists at other Gi-GPCRs, which induce type II priming.

  9. Type I IFN signaling in CD8– DCs impairs Th1-dependent malaria immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Ashraful; Best, Shannon E.; Montes de Oca, Marcela; James, Kylie R.; Ammerdorffer, Anne; Edwards, Chelsea L.; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Amante, Fiona H.; Bunn, Patrick T.; Sheel, Meru; Sebina, Ismail; Koyama, Motoko; Varelias, Antiopi; Hertzog, Paul J.; Kalinke, Ulrich; Gun, Sin Yee; Rénia, Laurent; Ruedl, Christiane; MacDonald, Kelli P.A.; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Engwerda, Christian R.

    2014-01-01

    Many pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, and protozoan parasites, suppress cellular immune responses through activation of type I IFN signaling. Recent evidence suggests that immune suppression and susceptibility to the malaria parasite, Plasmodium, is mediated by type I IFN; however, it is unclear how type I IFN suppresses immunity to blood-stage Plasmodium parasites. During experimental severe malaria, CD4+ Th cell responses are suppressed, and conventional DC (cDC) function is curtailed through unknown mechanisms. Here, we tested the hypothesis that type I IFN signaling directly impairs cDC function during Plasmodium infection in mice. Using cDC-specific IFNAR1-deficient mice, and mixed BM chimeras, we found that type I IFN signaling directly affects cDC function, limiting the ability of cDCs to prime IFN-γ–producing Th1 cells. Although type I IFN signaling modulated all subsets of splenic cDCs, CD8– cDCs were especially susceptible, exhibiting reduced phagocytic and Th1-promoting properties in response to type I IFNs. Additionally, rapid and systemic IFN-α production in response to Plasmodium infection required type I IFN signaling in cDCs themselves, revealing their contribution to a feed-forward cytokine-signaling loop. Together, these data suggest abrogation of type I IFN signaling in CD8– splenic cDCs as an approach for enhancing Th1 responses against Plasmodium and other type I IFN–inducing pathogens. PMID:24789914

  10. Inspired Spirals. Teaching Art with Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Discusses spirals in nature, man-made objects, and art. Focuses on art that incorporates the spiral, including works by M. C. Escher and Frank Lloyd Wright, an African headdress, and a burial urn. Describes activities to help students make spirals of their own, such as constructing a coil clay pot. (CMK)

  11. Scale height determination of spiral galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    计朝晖; 商朝晖; 彭秋和

    1997-01-01

    The method adopted here is based on the rigorous solution of Poison’s equation for logarithmic disturbance density within finite thickness galaxies. After their spiral arms are fitted directly with logarithmic spirals, the morphological parameters, scale heights and their relative errors for 32 spiral galaxies, such as NGC4814, are ob-tained.

  12. Elastic and viscoelastic properties of a type I collagen fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopakayang, Ratchada; De Vita, Raffaella; Kwansa, Albert; Freeman, Joseph W

    2012-01-21

    A new mathematical model is presented to describe the elastic and viscoelastic properties of a single collagen fiber. The model is formulated by accounting for the mechanical contribution of the collagen fiber's main constituents: the microfibrils, the interfibrillar matrix and crosslinks. The collagen fiber is modeled as a linear elastic spring, which represents the mechanical contribution of the microfibrils, and an arrangement in parallel of elastic springs and viscous dashpots, which represent the mechanical contributions of the crosslinks and interfibrillar matrix, respectively. The linear elastic spring and the arrangement in parallel of elastic springs and viscous dashpots are then connected in series. The crosslinks are assumed to gradually break under strain and, consequently, the interfibrillar is assumed to change its viscous properties. Incremental stress relaxation tests are conducted on dry collagen fibers reconstituted from rat tail tendons to determine their elastic and viscoelastic properties. The elastic and total stress-strain curves and the stress relaxation at different levels of strain collected by performing these tests are then used to estimate the parameters of the model and evaluate its predictive capabilities.

  13. Experimental Neuromyelitis Optica Induces a Type I Interferon Signature in the Spinal Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Nathalie; Zeka, Bleranda; Schanda, Kathrin; Fujihara, Kazuo; Illes, Zsolt; Dahle, Charlotte; Reindl, Markus; Lassmann, Hans; Bradl, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an acute inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) which predominantly affects spinal cord and optic nerves. Most patients harbor pathogenic autoantibodies, the so-called NMO-IgGs, which are directed against the water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4) on astrocytes. When these antibodies gain access to the CNS, they mediate astrocyte destruction by complement-dependent and by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In contrast to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients who benefit from therapies involving type I interferons (I-IFN), NMO patients typically do not profit from such treatments. How is I-IFN involved in NMO pathogenesis? To address this question, we made gene expression profiles of spinal cords from Lewis rat models of experimental neuromyelitis optica (ENMO) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We found an upregulation of I-IFN signature genes in EAE spinal cords, and a further upregulation of these genes in ENMO. To learn whether the local I-IFN signature is harmful or beneficial, we induced ENMO by transfer of CNS antigen-specific T cells and NMO-IgG, and treated the animals with I-IFN at the very onset of clinical symptoms, when the blood-brain barrier was open. With this treatment regimen, we could amplify possible effects of the I-IFN induced genes on the transmigration of infiltrating cells through the blood brain barrier, and on lesion formation and expansion, but could avoid effects of I-IFN on the differentiation of pathogenic T and B cells in the lymph nodes. We observed that I-IFN treated ENMO rats had spinal cord lesions with fewer T cells, macrophages/activated microglia and activated neutrophils, and less astrocyte damage than their vehicle treated counterparts, suggesting beneficial effects of I-IFN. PMID:26990978

  14. New triterpenoid saponins from cacti and anti-type I allergy activity of saponins from cactus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuta, Kazutaka; Baba, Masaki; Ito, Satoru; Kinoshita, Kaoru; Koyama, Kiyotaka; Takahashi, Kunio

    2012-07-15

    The research in our laboratory focuses on the isolation of saponins from cactus. In this study, we report five new triterpenoid saponins, dumortierinoside A methyl ester (1), pachanoside I1 (2), pachanoside D1 (3), gummososide A (4), and gummososide A methyl ester (5). Compounds 1-3 isolated from Isolatocereus dumortieri Backbg., and compounds 4 and 5 were isolated from Stenocereus alamosensis A. C. Gibson & K. E. Horak. Compound 2 possessed a new pachanane-type triterpene skeleton, pachanol I, in its aglycon. The aglycon of 3 was pachanol D, while those of 4 and 5 were both gummosogenin, which we have previously reported, but this is the first report of pachanol D and gummosogenin in their aglycon forms. Additionally, we evaluated the anti-type I allergy activity of the saponins with RBL-2H3 (Rat basophilic leukemia) cells by measuring the β-hexosaminidase release inhibitory activity. As a result of these studies, gummososide A methyl ester (5) was found to show activity (IC(50)=99.5 μM) and thurberoside A exhibited mild activity (IC(50)=166.9 μM).

  15. Enhancing effects of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene on type I allergic responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Makoto; Kobayashi, Ryo; Okamura, Tetsunori; Ikeda, Koji; Satoh, Masahiko; Inagaki, Naoki; Nagai, Hiroichi; Nagase, Hisamitsu

    2012-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene; PCE) are commonly identified as environmental contaminants of groundwater. Previously, we investigated the enhancing effects of TCE and PCE on antigen-induced histamine release and inflammatory mediator production in rat mast cells. In this study, to examine the potential effect of TCE and PCE on antigen-induced histamine release from mouse mast cells, mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) were sensitized with anti-dinitrophenol (DNP) monoclonal IgE antibody and then stimulated with DNP-BSA containing with TCE or PCE. Both TCE and PCE significantly enhanced antigen-induced histamine release from BMMC. Next we investigated the effects of TCE and PCE on the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reaction in vivo using ICR mice. TCE and PCE significantly enhanced the PCA reaction in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we examined the enhancing effects of ingesting small amount of TCE and PCE in drinking water on antigen-stimulated allergic responses. After the ICR mice had ingested TCE or PCE in their drinking water for 2 or 4 weeks, we performed the PCA reaction. Both TCE and PCE ingestion enhanced the PCA reaction in a dose-dependent manner for 4 weeks. These results suggest that exposure to TCE and PCE leads to the augmentation of type I allergic responses in many species.

  16. Developmental Stage-dependent Regulation of Prolyl 3-Hydroxylation in Tendon Type I Collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taga, Yuki; Kusubata, Masashi; Ogawa-Goto, Kiyoko; Hattori, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxyproline (3-Hyp), which is unique to collagen, is a fairly rare post-translational modification. Recent studies have suggested a function of prolyl 3-hydroxylation in fibril assembly and its relationships with certain disorders, including recessive osteogenesis imperfecta and high myopia. However, no direct evidence for the physiological and pathological roles of 3-Hyp has been presented. In this study, we first estimated the overall alterations in prolyl hydroxylation in collagens purified from skin, bone, and tail tendon of 0.5-18-month-old rats by LC-MS analysis with stable isotope-labeled collagen, which was recently developed as an internal standard for highly accurate collagen analyses. 3-Hyp was found to significantly increase in tendon collagen until 3 months after birth and then remain constant, whereas increased prolyl 3-hydroxylation was not observed in skin and bone collagen. Site-specific analysis further revealed that 3-Hyp was increased in tendon type I collagen in a specific sequence region, including a previously known modification site at Pro(707) and newly identified sites at Pro(716) and Pro(719), at the early ages. The site-specific alterations in prolyl 3-hydroxylation with aging were also observed in bovine Achilles tendon. We postulate that significant increases in 3-Hyp at the consecutive modification sites are correlated with tissue development in tendon. The present findings suggest that prolyl 3-hydroxylation incrementally regulates collagen fibril diameter in tendon.

  17. Solitons in spiraling Vogel lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Torner, Lluis

    2012-01-01

    We address light propagation in Vogel optical lattices and show that such lattices support a variety of stable soliton solutions in both self-focusing and self-defocusing media, whose propagation constants belong to domains resembling gaps in the spectrum of a truly periodic lattice. The azimuthally-rich structure of Vogel lattices allows generation of spiraling soliton motion.

  18. The enigma of auroral spirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerendel, G.

    One of the most spectacular forms that the aurora borealis can assume is the large-scale spiral Spirals are dominantly observed along the poleward boundary of the auroral oval during active periods Two concepts have been pursued in explaining their origin and in particular the counterclockwise sense of rotation of the luminous structures when viewed along the magnetic field direction An essentially magnetostatic theory following Hallinan 1976 attributes the spiral pattern to the twisting of field-lines caused by a centrally located upward field-aligned current According to Oguti 1981 and followers a clockwise rotation of the plasma flow produces the anticlockwise structure There are observations seemingly confirming or contradicting either theory In this paper it is argued that both concepts are insufficient in that only parts of the underlying physics are considered Besides field-aligned currents and plasma flow one has to take into at least two further aspects The ionospheric conductivity modified by particle precipitation has an impact on the magnetospheric plasma dynamics Furthermore auroral arcs are not fixed entities subject to distortions by plasma flows or twisted field-lines but sites of transient releases of energy We suggest that auroral spirals are ports of entry or exit of plasma into or out of the auroral oval This way it can be understood why a clockwise plasma flow can create an anticlockwise luminous pattern

  19. Type I and III procollagen propeptides in growth hormone-deficient patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L T; Jørgensen, J O; Risteli, J;

    1991-01-01

    The effect of increasing doses of growth hormone on collagen synthesis in GH-treated GH-deficient patients was determined in a short-term study. The synthesis of type I and III collagen was estimated by measurements of the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen and the aminoterminal...... propeptide of type III procollagen. Type I collagen is mainly found in bone and type III collagen in loose connective tissue. We observed a GH dose dependency of both procollagen propeptides. Serum type I procollagen propeptide was significantly higher following GH doses of 4 and 6 IU/day for 14 days...... procollagen propeptide increased twice as much as type I procollagen propeptide, by 47 vs 25%, at a GH dose of 6 IU/day compared with 2 IU/day. The differences between the effects on type I and type III collagen may reflect differences in secretion or turn-over rate of collagen in bone and loose connective...

  20. Type I interferon promotes cell-to-cell spread of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Suzanne E; Sit, Brandon; Shaker, Andrew; Currie, Elissa; Tan, Joël M J; van Rijn, Jorik; Higgins, Darren E; Brumell, John H

    2017-03-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) play a critical role in antiviral immune responses, but can be deleterious to the host during some bacterial infections. Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) induces a type I IFN response by activating cytosolic antiviral surveillance pathways. This is beneficial to the bacteria as mice lacking the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR1(-/-) ) are resistant to systemic infection by Lm. The mechanisms by which type I IFNs promote Lm infection are unclear. Here, we show that IFNAR1 is required for dissemination of Lm within infection foci in livers of infected mice and for efficient cell-to-cell spread in vitro in macrophages. IFNAR1 promotes ActA polarization and actin-based motility in the cytosol of host cells. Our studies suggest type I IFNs directly impact the intracellular life cycle of Lm and provide new insight into the mechanisms used by bacterial pathogens to exploit the type I IFN response. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Deformation-dependent enzyme mechanokinetic cleavage of type I collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Karla E-K; Bourne, Jonathan W; Torzilli, Peter A

    2009-05-01

    Collagen is a key structural protein in the extracellular matrix of many tissues. It provides biological tissues with tensile mechanical strength and is enzymatically cleaved by a class of matrix metalloproteinases known as collagenases. Collagen enzymatic kinetics has been well characterized in solubilized, gel, and reconstituted forms. However, limited information exists on enzyme degradation of structurally intact collagen fibers and, more importantly, on the effect of mechanical deformation on collagen cleavage. We studied the degradation of native rat tail tendon fibers by collagenase after the fibers were mechanically elongated to strains of epsilon=1-10%. After the fibers were elongated and the stress was allowed to relax, the fiber was immersed in Clostridium histolyticum collagenase and the decrease in stress (sigma) was monitored as a means of calculating the rate of enzyme cleavage of the fiber. An enzyme mechanokinetic (EMK) relaxation function T(E)(epsilon) in s(-1) was calculated from the linear stress-time response during fiber cleavage, where T(E)(epsilon) corresponds to the zero order Michaelis-Menten enzyme-substrate kinetic response. The EMK relaxation function T(E)(epsilon) was found to decrease with applied strain at a rate of approximately 9% per percent strain, with complete inhibition of collagen cleavage predicted to occur at a strain of approximately 11%. However, comparison of the EMK response (T(E) versus epsilon) to collagen's stress-strain response (sigma versus epsilon) suggested the possibility of three different EMK responses: (1) constant T(E)(epsilon) within the toe region (epsiloncollagen triple helix may be by a conformational change in the triple helix since the decrease in T(E)(epsilon) appeared concomitant with stretching of the collagen molecule.

  2. On Generalized Euler Spirals in E^3

    OpenAIRE

    Saracoglu, Semra

    2012-01-01

    The Cornu spirals on plane are the curves whose curvatures are linear. Generalized planar cornu spirals and Euler spirals in E^3, the curves whose curvatures are linear are defined in [1,5]. In this study, these curves are presented as the ratio of two rational linear functions. Also here, generalized Euler spirals in E^3 has been defined and given their some various characterizations. The approach I used in this paper is useful in understanding the role of Euler spirals in E^3 in differentia...

  3. Differential effect of cholesterol on type I and II feline coronavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Tomomi; Satomi, Yui; Oyama, Yuu; Doki, Tomoyoshi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal disease of domestic and wild felidae that is caused by feline coronavirus (FCoV). FCoV has been classified into types I and II. Since type I FCoV infection is dominant in the field, it is necessary to develop antiviral agents and vaccines against type I FCoV infection. However, few studies have been conducted on type I FCoV. Here, we compare the effects of cholesterol on types I and II FCoV infections. When cells were treated methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) and inoculated with type I FCoV, the infection rate decreased significantly, and the addition of exogenous cholesterol to MβCD-treated cells resulted in the recovery of the infectivity of type I FCoV. Furthermore, exogenous cholesterol increased the infectivity of type I FCoV. In contrast, the addition of MβCD and exogenous cholesterol had little effect on the efficiency of type II FCoV infection. These results strongly suggest that the dependence of infection by types I and II FCoV on cholesterol differs.

  4. Neuromyelitis optica-like pathology is dependent on type I interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorooshi, Reza; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Asgari, Nasrin; Owens, Trevor

    2013-09-01

    Neuromyelitis optica is an antibody-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. Reports have suggested that interferon beta which is beneficial for multiple sclerosis, exacerbates neuromyelitis optica. Our aim was to determine whether type I interferon plays a role in the formation of neuromyelitis optica lesions. Immunoglobulin G from a neuromyelitis optica patient was injected intracerebrally with human complement to type I interferon receptor deficient and wildtype mice. Loss of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein was reduced in type I interferon receptor deficient mice brain. Our findings suggest that type I interferon signaling contributes to neuromyelitis optica pathogenesis.

  5. Interfering with immunity: detrimental role of type I IFNs during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stifter, Sebastian A; Feng, Carl G

    2015-03-15

    Type I IFNs are known to inhibit viral replication and mediate protection against viral infection. However, recent studies revealed that these cytokines play a broader and more fundamental role in host responses to infections beyond their well-established antiviral function. Type I IFN induction, often associated with microbial evasion mechanisms unique to virulent microorganisms, is now shown to increase host susceptibility to a diverse range of pathogens, including some viruses. This article presents an overview of the role of type I IFNs in infections with bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and viral pathogens and discusses the key mechanisms mediating the regulatory function of type I IFNs in pathogen clearance and tissue inflammation.

  6. Osteoporosis in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type I: A Case Report – Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurtuluş Kaya

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type I (MEN type-I is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary cancer syndrome presented mostly by tumours of the parathyroids, endocrine pancreas and anterior pituitary. Primary hyperparathyroidism is the most common clinical expression in affected patients, present in more than 90% of cases. Osteoporosis is a frequent and early complication of primary hyperparathyroidism in MEN type I. A case with a diagnosis of MEN type-I, 39 years old, presented with humeral, femural and L4 vertebral fractures after falling is evaluated in the view of the literature in this case report. (From the World of Osteoporosis 2008;14:40-3

  7. Interaction of multiarmed spirals in bistable media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ya-feng; Ai, Bao-quan; Liu, Fu-cheng

    2013-05-01

    We study the interaction of both dense and sparse multiarmed spirals in bistable media modeled by equations of the FitzHugh-Nagumo type. A dense one-armed spiral is characterized by its fixed tip. For dense multiarmed spirals, when the initial distance between tips is less than a critical value, the arms collide, connect, and disconnect continuously as the spirals rotate. The continuous reconstruction between the front and the back drives the tips to corotate along a rough circle and to meander zigzaggedly. The rotation frequency of tip, the frequency of zigzagged displacement, the frequency of spiral, the oscillation frequency of media, and the number of arms satisfy certain relations as long as the control parameters of the model are fixed. When the initial distance between tips is larger than the critical value, the behaviors of individual arms within either dense or sparse multiarmed spirals are identical to that of corresponding one-armed spirals.

  8. Localized spirals in Taylor-Couette flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, M; Abshagen, J; Küter, D; Hochstrate, K; Pfister, G; Hoffmann, Ch

    2008-02-01

    We present a type of spiral vortex state that appears from a supercritical Hopf bifurcation below the linear instability of circular Couette flow in a Taylor-Couette system with rigid end plates. These spirals have been found experimentally as well as numerically as "pure" states but also coexist with "classical" spirals (or axially standing waves for smaller systems) which typically appear from linear instability in counterrotating Taylor-Couette flow. These spiral states have an axial distribution of the strongly localized amplitude in the vicinity of the rigid end plates that confine the system in the axial direction. Furthermore, they show significantly different oscillation frequencies compared to the critical spiral frequencies. Despite the localization of the amplitude near the ends, the states appear as global states with spirals that propagate either toward the middle from each end of the system or vice versa. In contrast to classical spirals, these states exhibit a spatial or a spatiotemporal reflection symmetry.

  9. Effects on survival of shRNA mediated APE/Ref1 gene silencing in rat spiral ganglion cells in oxidative stress%shRNA沉默APE/Ref1对体外培养大鼠耳蜗螺旋神经节细胞过氧化氢损伤的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜振东; 钟诚; 李太军; 向召兰; 张学渊

    2014-01-01

    目的 通过转染pGenesil-APE/Ref1-shRNA抑制体外培养大鼠耳蜗螺旋神经节细胞(spiral ganglion cell,SGC)中无嘌呤无嘧啶核酸内切酶/氧化还原因子1(apurinic/apyrimidimic endonuclase/redox factor 1,APE/Ref1)的表达,观察SGC在过氧化氢(H2O2)所致氧化应激环境中的活性及凋亡情况,探讨APE/Ref1在SGC抗氧化损伤过程中的作用.方法 体外培养大鼠SGC,加入pGenesil-APE/Ref1-shRNA转染72 h,更换培养基后加入不同浓度的H2O2 (0、10、25、50、100、300μmol/L)干预1h,更换正常培养基后继续培养24h.通过免疫印迹、分光光度检测法、原位缺口末端标记法(TUNEL)、四甲基偶氮唑蓝法(MTT)分别检测SGC APE/Refl、磷酸化组蛋白H2AX的表达、caspase3活性、细胞活性以及凋亡情况.结果 pGenesil-APE/Ref1-shRNA能明显抑制APE/Ref1的表达,H2O2损伤浓度在50 ~ 300 μmol/L时,与对照组相比,pGenesil-APE/Ref1-shRNA组磷酸化组蛋白H2AX表达增加,caspase 3活性增加,细胞凋亡率增高,细胞活性降低,差异具有统计学意义(P值均<0.05).结论 pGenesil-APE/Ref1-shRNA抑制APE/Refl表达后,大鼠体外培养SGC抗氧化损伤能力降低;APE/Ref1可能通过DNA修复功能,实现对SGC的保护作用.%Objective To investigate the effects of reducing APE/Refl expression in the cultures of rat spiral ganglion cells with oxidative damage induced by H2O2.Methods Primary cultured rat spiral ganglion cells were infected with small interfering RNA to APE/Refl (Apel siRNA) for 72 h,followed by treating with H2O2(0,10,25,50,100 and 300 μmol/L) for 1 h,and then cultured in normal medium for 24 h.Western blot were used to detect the level of APE/Refl protein and phosphorylation of histone protein H2AX in the infected cells.The caspase3 activation was tested by spectrophotometric method.The cell viability was determined by MTT and the apoptosis of spiral ganglion cells was determined by terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated nick

  10. Acquired Chiari malformation type I associated with a supratentorial fistulous arteriovenous malformation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuo-Wei; Kuo, Meng-Fai; Lee, Chung-Wei; Tu, Yong-Kwang

    2015-03-01

    A case of acquired Chiari malformation type I with frontal fistulous arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is presented, and the pathophysiology is discussed. The tonsillar herniation and hydrocephalus both resolved after AVM was excised. This case provides some insight into the complex hemodynamic change exerted by the fistulous AVM and the mechanism of the development of acquired Chiari malformation type I.

  11. An unusual association of microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I with cardiac and brain anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutia, Euden; Verma, Arushi; Gupta, Amit Kumar; Maria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Less than 100 cases of primordial dwarfism have been reported worldwide out of which Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I comprise about primordial dwarfism of antenatal onset due to Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I. Our case is also unique in being associated with hitertho unreported association of subpulmonic ventricular septal defect and a dorsal interhemispheric cyst in the brain.

  12. Injury-Induced Type I IFN Signaling Regulates Inflammatory Responses in the Central Nervous System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    Innate glial response is critical for the induction of inflammatory mediators and recruitment of leukocytes to sites of the injury in the CNS. We have examined the involvement of type I IFN signaling in the mouse hippocampus following sterile injury (transection of entorhinal afferents). Type I I...

  13. Item Discrimination and Type I Error in the Detection of Differential Item Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanju; Brooks, Gordon P.; Johanson, George A.

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, DeMars stated that when impact exists there will be Type I error inflation, especially with larger sample sizes and larger discrimination parameters for items. One purpose of this study is to present the patterns of Type I error rates using Mantel-Haenszel (MH) and logistic regression (LR) procedures when the mean ability between the…

  14. CONFIRMATION OF CLINICAL-DIAGNOSIS IN REQUESTS FOR PRENATAL PREDICTION OF SMA TYPE-I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    COBBEN, JM; DEVISSER, M; SCHEFFER, H; OSINGA, J; VANDERSTEEGE, G; BUYS, CHCM; VANOMMEN, GJ; TENKATE, LP

    The recent discovery of a major SMA-locus in the chromosomal region 5q makes it possible to carry out prenatal DNA studies in families in which a child with SMA type I has been born. Since direct mutation analysis is not yet possible, the reliability of prenatal prediction of SMA type I usually

  15. Type I interferon signalling is not required for the induction of endotoxin tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Yalda; Poznanski, Sophie M; Vahedi, Fatemeh; Chen, Branson; Chew, Marianne V; Lee, Amanda J; Ashkar, Ali A

    2017-02-08

    Endotoxin, or LPS tolerance, is an immunomodulatory mechanism that results in a significantly diminished response to secondary LPS exposure, which may serve to protect the host against endotoxic shock. Type I interferons (IFNs) are cytokines released upon LPS binding to TLR4 and have been shown to have immunomodulatory properties. Due to this regulatory function of type I IFN, we aimed to investigate the role of type I IFN signalling in LPS tolerance. Our data suggests that type I IFN does not play a role in LPS tolerance in vitro, as both wild type and IFNAR1(-/-) peritoneal macrophages showed reduced cytokine production after secondary LPS exposure. Furthermore, both wild type and IFNAR1(-/-) mice were protected from a lethal dose of LPS after receiving three small doses to induce tolerance. However, IFNAR(-/-) mice seemed to recover faster than wild type mice, suggesting type I IFN signalling plays a detrimental role in LPS-induced sepsis. Although type I IFN may have a regulatory function in microbial infections, it does not seem to play a role in endotoxin tolerance. Type I IFN involvement in bacterial infection remains complex and further studies are needed to define the regulatory function of type I IFN signalling.

  16. 46 CFR 171.067 - Treatment of stepped and recessed bulkheads in Type I subdivision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Treatment of stepped and recessed bulkheads in Type I... Treatment of stepped and recessed bulkheads in Type I subdivision. (a) For the purpose of this section— (1) The main transverse watertight bulkhead immediately forward of a stepped bulkhead is referred to...

  17. Hypotrophy of type I fibres with central nuclei: recovery 4 years after diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricoy, J R; Cabello, A

    1985-02-01

    A case of myopathy is reported in a child, first biopsied at 11/2 years of age and whose muscle showed hypotrophy of type I fibres with central nuclei. The case was followed up with another biopsy from the contralateral muscle at 6 years of age. The second sample showed only predominance of type I fibres.

  18. Hypotrophy of type I fibres with central nuclei: recovery 4 years after diagnosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Ricoy, J R; Cabello, A.

    1985-01-01

    A case of myopathy is reported in a child, first biopsied at 11/2 years of age and whose muscle showed hypotrophy of type I fibres with central nuclei. The case was followed up with another biopsy from the contralateral muscle at 6 years of age. The second sample showed only predominance of type I fibres.

  19. CONFIRMATION OF CLINICAL-DIAGNOSIS IN REQUESTS FOR PRENATAL PREDICTION OF SMA TYPE-I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    COBBEN, JM; DEVISSER, M; SCHEFFER, H; OSINGA, J; VANDERSTEEGE, G; BUYS, CHCM; VANOMMEN, GJ; TENKATE, LP

    1993-01-01

    The recent discovery of a major SMA-locus in the chromosomal region 5q makes it possible to carry out prenatal DNA studies in families in which a child with SMA type I has been born. Since direct mutation analysis is not yet possible, the reliability of prenatal prediction of SMA type I usually depe

  20. The type I interferons: Basic concepts and clinical relevance in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de Padilla, Consuelo M; Niewold, Timothy B

    2016-01-15

    There is increasing scientific and clinical interest in elucidating the biology of type I Interferons, which began approximately 60 years ago with the concept of "viral interference", a property that reduces the ability of a virus to infect cells. Although our understanding of the multiple cellular and molecular functions of interferons has advanced significantly, much remains to be learned and type I Interferons remain an active and fascinating area of inquiry. In this review, we cover some general aspects of type I interferon genes, with emphasis on interferon-alpha, and various aspects of molecular mechanisms triggered by type I interferons and toll-like receptor signaling by the Janus activated kinase/signal transducer activation of transcription (JAK-STAT) pathway and interferon regulatory factor pathway. We will also describe the role of type I interferons in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, and its potential use as therapeutic agent.

  1. No Evidence for Presence of Bacteria in Modic Type I Changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedderkopp, Niels; Thomsen, Karsten; Manniche, Claus;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Recent studies suggest an association between sciatica and Propionibacterium acnes. "Modic type I changes" in the vertebrae are closely associated with sciatica and lower back pain, and recent studies have questioned the ability of conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI......) to differentiate between degenerative Modic type I changes and vertebral abnormalities caused by infection. Purpose: To test whether bacteria could be cultured from biopsies of Modic type I changes. Material and Methods: Twenty-four consecutive patients with Modic type I changes in lumbar vertebrae had a biopsy......, and in another patient coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated from one biopsy. Both patients received oral antibiotics without convincing effect on symptoms. Conclusion: Our results showed no evidence of bacteria in vertebrae with Modic type I changes. The isolation of staphylococci from two patients...

  2. Spiral Galaxies as Chiral Objects?

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, S; Capozziello, Salvatore; Lattanzi, Alessandra

    2005-01-01

    Spiral galaxies show axial symmetry and an intrinsic 2D-chirality. Environmental effects can influence the chirality of originally isolated stellar systems and a progressive loss of chirality can be recognised in the Hubble sequence. We point out a preferential modality for genetic galaxies as in microscopic systems like aminoacids, sugars or neutrinos. This feature could be the remnant of a primordial symmetry breaking characterizing systems at all scales.

  3. Spiral mining for lunar volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, H. H.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Sviatoslavsky, I. N.; Carrier, W. D., III

    Lunar spiral mining, extending outward from a periodically mobile central power and processing station represents an alternative for comparison with more traditional mining schemes. In this concept, a mining machine would separate regolith fines and extract the contained volatiles. Volatiles then would be pumped along the miner's support arm to the central station for refining and for export or storage. The basic architecture of the central processing station would be cylindrical. A central core area could house the power subsystem of hydrogen-oxygen engines or fuel cells. Habitat sections and other crew occupied areas could be arranged around the power generation core. The outer cylinder could include all volatile refining subsystems. Solar thermal power collectors and reflectors would be positioned on top of the central station. Long term exploitation of a volatile resource region would begin with establishment of a support base at the center of a long boundary of the region. The mining tract for each spiral mining system would extend orthogonal to this boundary. New spiral mining systems would be activated along parallel tracts as demand for lunar He-3 and other solar wind volatiles increased.

  4. Transient spirals as superposed instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellwood, J. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Carlberg, R. G., E-mail: sellwood@physics.rutgers.edu, E-mail: carlberg@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2014-04-20

    We present evidence that recurrent spiral activity, long manifested in simulations of disk galaxies, results from the superposition of a few transient spiral modes. Each mode lasts between 5 and 10 rotations at its corotation radius where its amplitude is greatest. The scattering of stars as each wave decays takes place over narrow ranges of angular momentum, causing abrupt changes to the impedance of the disk to subsequent traveling waves. Partial reflections of waves at these newly created features allows new standing-wave instabilities to appear that saturate and decay in their turn, scattering particles at new locations, creating a recurring cycle. The spiral activity causes the general level of random motion to rise, gradually decreasing the ability of the disk to support further activity unless the disk contains a dissipative gas component from which stars form on near-circular orbits. We also show that this interpretation is consistent with the behavior reported in other recent simulations with low-mass disks.

  5. 5-HT and GABA modulate intrinsic excitability of type I interneurons in Hermissenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Nan Ge; Tian, Lian-Ming; Crow, Terry

    2009-11-01

    The sensory neurons (photoreceptors) in the visual system of Hermissenda are one site of plasticity produced by Pavlovian conditioning. A second site of plasticity produced by conditioning is the type I interneurons in the cerebropleural ganglia. Both photoreceptors and statocyst hair cells of the graviceptive system form monosynaptic connections with identified type I interneurons. Two proposed neurotransmitters in the graviceptive system, serotonin (5-HT) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), have been shown to modify synaptic strength and intrinsic neuronal excitability in identified photoreceptors. However, the potential role of 5-HT and GABA in plasticity of type I interneurons has not been investigated. Here we show that 5-HT increased the peak amplitude of light-evoked complex excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), enhanced intrinsic excitability, and increased spike activity of identified type I(e(A)) interneurons. In contrast, 5-HT decreased spike activity and intrinsic excitability of type I(e(B)) interneurons. The classification of two categories of type I(e) interneurons was also supported by the observation that 5-HT produced opposite effects on whole cell steady-state outward currents in type I(e) interneurons. Serotonin produced a reduction in the amplitude of light-evoked complex inhibitory PSPs (IPSPs), increased spontaneous spike activity, decreased intrinsic excitability, and depolarized the resting membrane potential of identified type I(i) interneurons. In contrast to the effects of 5-HT, GABA produced inhibition in both types of I(e) interneurons and type I(i) interneurons. These results show that 5-HT and GABA can modulate the intrinsic excitability of type I interneurons independent of the presynaptic effects of the same transmitters on excitability and synaptic efficacy of photoreceptors.

  6. Double-stranded RNA induces biphasic STAT1 phosphorylation by both type I interferon (IFN)-dependent and type I IFN-independent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempoya, Junichi; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Hayakari, Ryo; Xing, Fei; Yoshida, Hidemi; Okumura, Ken; Satoh, Kei

    2012-12-01

    Upon viral infection, pattern recognition receptors sense viral nucleic acids, leading to the production of type I interferons (IFNs), which initiate antiviral activities. Type I IFNs bind to their cognate receptor, IFNAR, resulting in the activation of signal-transducing activators of transcription 1 (STAT1). Thus, it has long been thought that double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced STAT1 phosphorylation is mediated by the transactivation of type I IFN signaling. Foreign RNA, such as viral RNA, in cells is sensed by the cytoplasmic sensors retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA-5). In this study, we explored the molecular mechanism responsible for STAT1 phosphorylation in response to the sensing of dsRNA by cytosolic RNA sensors. Polyinosinic-poly(C) [poly(I:C)], a synthetic dsRNA that is sensed by both RIG-I and MDA-5, induces STAT1 phosphorylation. We found that the poly(I:C)-induced initial phosphorylation of STAT1 is dependent on the RIG-I pathway and that MDA-5 is not involved in STAT1 phosphorylation. Furthermore, pretreatment of the cells with neutralizing antibody targeting the IFN receptor suppressed the initial STAT1 phosphorylation in response to poly(I:C), suggesting that this initial phosphorylation event is predominantly type I IFN dependent. In contrast, neither the known RIG-I pathway nor type I IFN is involved in the late phosphorylation of STAT1. In addition, poly(I:C) stimulated STAT1 phosphorylation in type I IFN receptor-deficient U5A cells with delayed kinetics. Collectively, our study provides evidence of a comprehensive regulatory mechanism in which dsRNA induces STAT1 phosphorylation, indicating the importance of STAT1 in maintaining very tight regulation of the innate immune system.

  7. Spiral modes and the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. C.

    Recent refinements of the density-wave theory of galactic spiral modes are reviewed, and their implications for models of the structure of the Milky Way are investigated. The quasi-stationary-spiral-structure hypothesis, the structure of D100, the WASER excitation mechanisms of pure trailing spirals and rudimentary barred spirals, and modal calculations are discussed. For the Milky Way, the finding of a one-armed spiral mode causing kinematical-distance asymmetry, and some observational verifications of the spiral-gravitational-field (SGF) model for the region within about 3 kpc of the sun are reported. The importance of constructing a plausible SGF model, rather than using a circular model, for the study of the outer regions of the Milky Way is stressed. The addition of a large halo or corona to the Galactic-mass-distribution model is found to imply only scale changes in the density-wave SGF model.

  8. RESEARCH AND IMPROVEMENT OF SPIRAL BUNKER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董正筑; 曹璎珞; 王启广

    1996-01-01

    A great attention has been paid to slowing the degradation of coal nowadays. The spiral bunker is the main measure to lower the degradation. In this paper the application and research of spiral bunker are introduced. And two non-normal spiral chutes are discussed. One is in the tangential direction of the inner wall of the bunker, another is in the direction of the diameter of the bunker. Mathematical models of the non-normal spiral chutes are set up to optimize the geometrical parameters of the spiral curved surface, which would ensure that coal travels smoothly to the bottom of the bunker. The results would be useful for designing and retrofitting the spiral bunker.

  9. OXIDATIVE AND HYDROLYTIC METABOLISM OF TYPE I PYRETHROIDS IN RAT AND HUMAN HEPATIC MICROSOMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroids are a class of neurotoxic insecticides used in a variety of agricultural and household activities. Increased potential for human exposure to pyrethroids has prompted pharmacokinetic research. To that end, our laboratory has determined the in vitro clearance of the T...

  10. Type I interferons regulate susceptibility to inflammation-induced preterm birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletti, Monica; Presicce, Pietro; Lawson, Matthew J.; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Stankiewicz, Traci E.; Vanoni, Simone; Harley, Isaac T.W.; McAlees, Jaclyn W.; Giles, Daniel A.; Moreno-Fernandez, Maria E.; Rueda, Cesar M.; Senthamaraikannan, Paranth; Karns, Rebekah; Hoebe, Kasper; Janssen, Edith M.; Karp, Christopher L.; Hildeman, David A.; Hogan, Simon P.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Chougnet, Claire A.; Way, Sing Sing

    2017-01-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is a leading worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality in infants. Maternal inflammation induced by microbial infection is a critical predisposing factor for PTB. However, biological processes associated with competency of pathogens, including viruses, to induce PTB or sensitize for secondary bacterial infection–driven PTB are unknown. We show that pathogen/pathogen-associated molecular pattern–driven activation of type I IFN/IFN receptor (IFNAR) was sufficient to prime for systemic and uterine proinflammatory chemokine and cytokine production and induction of PTB. Similarly, treatment with recombinant type I IFNs recapitulated such effects by exacerbating proinflammatory cytokine production and reducing the dose of secondary inflammatory challenge required for induction of PTB. Inflammatory challenge–driven induction of PTB was eliminated by defects in type I IFN, TLR, or IL-6 responsiveness, whereas the sequence of type I IFN sensing by IFNAR on hematopoietic cells was essential for regulation of proinflammatory cytokine production. Importantly, we also show that type I IFN priming effects are conserved from mice to nonhuman primates and humans, and expression of both type I IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines is upregulated in human PTB. Thus, activation of the type I IFN/IFNAR axis in pregnancy primes for inflammation-driven PTB and provides an actionable biomarker and therapeutic target for mitigating PTB risk. PMID:28289719

  11. The regulation of immune responses by DC derived Type I IFN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eGommerman

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Our immune system bears the tremendous task of mounting effective anti-microbial responses whilst maintaining immunoregulatory functions to avoid autoimmunity. In order to quickly respond to pathogens, Dendritic cells (DC are armed with pattern recognition receptors (PRRs, allowing them to recognize highly conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs that are uniquely expressed by invading microbes. PRR activation can trigger DCs to release the pleiotropic cytokine, Type I IFN, which facilitates various biological functions in different immune cell types. In this review, we will discuss the classical PRR-induced Type I IFN response in DCs as well as describe a novel mechanism for Type I IFN induction by the Tumor-Necrosis Factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF members, TNFR-1 and Lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR. While PRR activation during viral infection, produces large amounts of Type I IFN in a relative short period of time, TNFRSF-induced Type I IFN expression is modest with gradual kinetics. Type I IFN can exert pro-inflammatory effects, but in some cases it also facilitates immune-regulatory functions. Therefore, DCs are important regulators of immune responses by carefully modulating Type I IFN expression.

  12. A Probable Short Decimetric Type I-like Noise Storm: Associated with Type III Bursts?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-Xiang Xie; Min Wang; Yi-Hua Yan

    2005-01-01

    A rare Type I-like noise storm was observed with the solar radio spectrometers (1.0-2.0 GHz and 2.60-3.8 GHz) at National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC) on September 23, 1998. We concentrate on checking the Type I-like noise storm occurred in the decay phase of a Type IV radio burst. This noise storm consists of many Type I bursts and isolated Type III or Type III pair bursts.It has a bandwidth of ≤ 0.5 GHz. The duration of each Type I burst is of the order of 100-300ms. The total duration is greater than 11 minutes. The circular polarization degree of the components of Type I and associated Type III bursts are about 40%-100% and almost 100%, respectively, which is greater than that of the background continuum (nearly the precision of our instrument). This short decimetric Type I-like storm may be another kind or the extension of the kind of metric Type I storm, and may possess the duality of metric and decimetric radio emission. It may be in favor of an earlier emission mechanism of the fundamental plasma radiation due to the coalescence of Langmuir waves with low-frequency waves.

  13. Role of Leptin and SOCS3 in Inhibiting the Type I Interferon Response During Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terán-Cabanillas, Elí; Hernández, Jesús

    2017-02-01

    Obesity provokes an imbalance in the immune system, including an aberrant type I interferon response during some viral infections and after TLR stimulation. SOCS3 overexpression and altered systemic leptin levels could be responsible for the reduced type I interferon production in people with obesity and, eventually, significantly increase the risk of viral infection. The aim of this study was to determine whether SOCS3- and leptin-induced tolerance are responsible for the reduced type I interferon production in people with obesity. SOCS3 overexpression in PBMCs from people with obesity was inhibited with the small interfering RNA (siRNA) assay, and leptin-induced tolerance was evaluated in PBMCs from non-obese volunte\\ers and U937 cells treated with TLR ligands. SOCS3, but not SOCS1, gene silencing via siRNA increased the type I interferon response in PBMCs obtained from people with obesity. On the other hand, leptin induced SOCS3 expression and inhibited type I interferons in PBMCs from healthy donors and in U937 monocytes stimulated with TLR ligands. Taken together, these results demonstrate that reduced type I interferon production in obesity is caused by SOCS3 overexpression as well as tolerance induced by leptin. Here, we demonstrate a key role of leptin and SOCS3 in inhibiting the type I interferon response during obesity.

  14. Procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP) as an indicator of type I collagen metabolism: ELISA development, reference interval, and hypovitaminosis D induced hyperparathyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orum, O; Hansen, M; Jensen, Charlotte Harken;

    1996-01-01

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for quantification of the N-terminal propeptide of human procollagen type I (PINP) utilizing purified alpha 1-chain specific rabbit antibodies is described. The ELISA measured the content of the alpha 1-chain of PINP independent of the molecula...

  15. Uncovering spiral structure in flocculent galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Thornley, M D

    1996-01-01

    We present K'(2.1 micron) observations of four nearby flocculent spirals, which clearly show low-level spiral structure and suggest that kiloparsec-scale spiral structure is more prevalent in flocculent spirals than previously supposed. In particular, the prototypical flocculent spiral NGC 5055 is shown to have regular, two-arm spiral structure to a radius of 4 kpc in the near infrared, with an arm-interarm contrast of 1.3. The spiral structure in all four galaxies is weaker than that in grand design galaxies. Taken in unbarred galaxies with no large, nearby companions, these data are consistent with the modal theory of spiral density waves, which maintains that density waves are intrinsic to the disk. As an alternative, mechanisms for driving spiral structure with non-axisymmetric perturbers are also discussed. These observations highlight the importance of near infrared imaging for exploring the range of physical environments in which large-scale dynamical processes, such as density waves, are important.

  16. The DESIR Facility at SPIRAL2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bertram Blank; Desir

    2010-08-01

    The DESIR Collaboration proposes the construction of an experimental facility to exploit the low-energy beams from SPIRAL1, SPIRAL2 and S3. The high degree of purity required to push experiments towards the limits of stability will be achieved by the implementation in the SPIRAL2 production building of a high-efficiency RFQ cooler coupled to a high-resolution mass separator. Beams from the low-energy branch of the separator spectrometer S3 and from SPIRAL1 will allow complementary studies of refractory elements produced by means of fusion reactions as well as of light and intense exotic beams, respectively.

  17. Solvable Model of Spiral Wave Chimeras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Erik Andreas; Laing, Carlo R.; Strogatz, Steven H.

    2010-01-01

    Spiral waves are ubiquitous in two-dimensional systems of chemical or biological oscillators coupled locally by diffusion. At the center of such spirals is a phase singularity, a topological defect where the oscillator amplitude drops to zero. But if the coupling is nonlocal, a new kind of spiral...... can occur, with a circular core consisting of desynchronized oscillators running at full amplitude. Here, we provide the first analytical description of such a spiral wave chimera and use perturbation theory to calculate its rotation speed and the size of its incoherent core....

  18. Type of spiral wave with trapped ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuting; Li, Haihong; Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Junzhong

    2011-12-01

    Pattern formation in ultracold quantum systems has recently received a great deal of attention. In this work, we investigate a two-dimensional model system simulating the dynamics of trapped ions. We find a spiral wave that is rigidly rotating, but with a peculiar core region in which adjacent ions oscillate in antiphase. The formation of this spiral wave is ascribed to the excitability previously reported by Lee and Cross. The breakup of the spiral wave is probed and, especially, an extraordinary scenario of the disappearance of the spiral wave, caused by spontaneous expansion of the antiphase core, is unveiled.

  19. Scale heights of 84 northern spiral galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马骏; 彭秋和

    1997-01-01

    Using the method proposed by Peng (1988) on the basis of density waves theory and the solution of three-dimensional Poisson s equation for a logarithmic disturbance of density,and analyzing the spiral patterns,the scale heights of 84 northern spiral galaxies,whose images are taken from the Digitized Sky Survey at Xinglong Observational Station of Beijing Observatory,are measured.The spiral arms of all these galaxies have been fitted on their photographs with some logarithmic spiral curves for getting their correct inclinations.

  20. Evolution of Spiral Waves in Excitable Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KEN Ji-Rong; ZHU Tao; MO Shu-Fan

    2009-01-01

    Spiral waves, whose rotation center can be regarded as a point defect, widely exist in various two-dimensional excitable systems. In this paper, by making use of Duan's topological current theory, we obtain the charge density of spiral waves and the topological inner structure of its topological charge. The evolution of spiral wave is also studied from the topological properties of a two-dimensional vector field. The spiral waves are found generating or annihilating at the limit points and encountering, splitting, or merging at the bifurcation points of the two-dimensional vector field. Some applications of our theory are also discussed.

  1. Angiogenic Type I Collagen Extracellular Matrix Integrated with Recombinant Bacteriophages Displaying Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Junghyo; Korkmaz Zirpel, Nuriye; Park, Hyun-Ji; Han, Sewoon; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Shin, Jisoo; Cho, Seung-Woo; Nam, Chang-Hoon; Chung, Seok

    2016-01-21

    Here, a growth-factor-integrated natural extracellular matrix of type I collagen is presented that induces angiogenesis. The developed matrix adapts type I collagen nanofibers integrated with synthetic colloidal particles of recombinant bacteriophages that display vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The integration is achieved during or after gelation of the type I collagen and the matrix enables spatial delivery of VEGF into a desired region. Endothelial cells that contact the VEGF are found to invade into the matrix to form tube-like structures both in vitro and in vivo, proving the angiogenic potential of the matrix.

  2. Bianchi Type-I, V and VIo models in modified generalized scalar–tensor theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Singh; R Chaubey

    2007-08-01

    In modified generalized scalar–tensor (GST) theory, the cosmological term is a function of the scalar field and its derivatives $\\dot{}^{2}$. We obtain exact solutions of the field equations in Bianchi Type-I, V and VIo space–times. The evolution of the scale factor, the scalar field and the cosmological term has been discussed. The Bianchi Type-I model has been discussed in detail. Further, Bianchi Type-V and VIo models can be studied on the lines similar to Bianchi Type-I model.

  3. Potential Involvement of Type I Interferon Signaling in Immunotherapy in Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Lina Mattson; Antonio Lentini; Gawel, Danuta R.; Tejaswi V. S. Badam; Mikael Benson; Torbjorn Ledin; Nestor, Colm E; Mika Gustafsson; Jordi Serra-Musach; Janne Bjorkander; Zou Xiang; Huan Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) reverses the symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) in most patients. Recent studies report type I interferons shifting the balance between type I T helper cell (Th1) and type II T helper cells (Th2) towards Th2 dominance by inhibiting the differentiation of naive T cells into Th1 cells. As SIT is thought to cause a shift towards Th1 dominance, we hypothesized that SIT would alter interferon type I signaling. To test this, allergen and diluent challenged CD4...

  4. Neskinchenna spiral u seredovyshchi z vtratamy [The endless spiral in environment with losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Talaluiev

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Found dispersion equation that describes the endless spiral of losses in the environment. The analytical expression for the wave resistance spiral, seen as a long line in lossy environment, and analytical expressions for the fields in cylindrical coordinates. The question of coordination sources of RF energy spiral.

  5. Elimination of Spiral Waves and Competition between Travelling Wave Impulses and Spiral Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Guo-Yong; ZHANG Guang-Cai; WANG Guang-Rui; CHEN Shi-Gang; SUN Peng

    2005-01-01

    @@ The interaction between travelling wave impulses and spiral waves is studied and the results of their competition are related to the exciting period. From the results, it is known that the formation and development of spiral waves in cardiac tissue depend on the period by which the travelling wave impulses are excited. A method is proposed to eliminate spiral waves, which is easily operated.

  6. Influence of type-I Interferon receptor expression level on the response to type-I Interferons in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booy, Stephanie; van Eijck, Casper H J; Dogan, Fadime; van Koetsveld, Peter M; Hofland, Leo J

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy with limited treatment options. Type-I interferons (e.g. IFN-α/-β) have several anti-tumour activities. Over the past few years, clinical studies evaluating the effect of adjuvant IFN-α therapy in pancreatic cancer yielded equivocal results. Although IFN-α and -β act via the type-I IFN receptor, the role of the number of receptors present on tumour cells is still unknown. Therefore, this study associated, for the first time, in a large panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines the effects of IFN-α/-β with the expression of type-I IFN receptors. The anti-tumour effects of IFN-α or IFN-β on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in 11 human pancreatic cell lines. Type-I IFN receptor expression was determined on both the mRNA and protein level. After 7 days of incubation, IFN-α significantly reduced cell growth in eight cell lines by 5-67%. IFN-β inhibited cell growth statistically significant in all cell lines by 43-100%. After 3 days of treatment, IFN-β induced significantly more apoptosis than IFN-α. The cell lines variably expressed the type-I IFN receptor. The maximal inhibitory effect of IFN-α was positively correlated with the IFNAR-1 mRNA (P interferon receptor expression and seems, therefore, more promising than IFN-α. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  7. 氧化还原因子1对体外培养大鼠耳蜗螺旋神经节氧化损伤的保护作用%Adenovirus-mediated APE/Ref-1 expression protects rat spiral ganglion cells from oxidative damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜振东; 张学渊; 袁伟; 魏运军; 钟诚

    2008-01-01

    Objective To address the question if apurinic/apyrimidimic endonuclase/redox factor 1 (APE/Ref-1) involved in preventing spiral ganglion cells oxidative damage after oxidative stress. Methods Primary cultured rat spiral ganglion cells were infected with the adenovirus containing APE/Ref-1 for 48 h, then treated with H2O2 (0, 10,25,50,100,300 μmol/L)for 1 h, and finally changed back into normal medium. Western blot were used to detect the level of APE/Ref-1 protein in the infected cells to ensure APE/Ref-1 over expression as a result of adenovirus infection. The cell viability was determined by MTF and the apoptosis of spiral ganglion cells was determined by terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL). Results Western blot showed that infection of adenovirus resulted in APE/Ref-1 over expression in the spiral ganglion cells. Over expression of APE/Ref-1 significantly improved cell viability in cultures treated with different concentration H2O2 from 50 to 300 μmol/L However, the apoptosis of cells was significantly inhibited. Conclusions Overe xpression of APE/Ref-1 could protect spiral ganglion cells from oxidative damage.%目的 观察表达无嘌呤无嘧啶核酸内切酶/氧化还原因子1(apurinic/apyrimidimicendonuclase/redox factor 1,APE/Ref-1)的重组腺病毒感染对H2O2所致体外培养大鼠耳蜗螺旋神经节细胞氧化损伤的保护作用.方法 体外培养大鼠耳蜗螺旋神经节细胞,APE/Ref-1腺病毒表达载体感染48 h后,加入不同浓度H2O2(0、10、25、50、100及300 μmol/L)干预1 h,更换正常培养液后继续培养24 h,通过蛋白免疫印迹分析、四甲基偶氮唑蓝(MTT)法、原位缺口末端标记法(TUNEL)分别检测感染后螺旋神经节细胞APE/Ref-1蛋白表达、细胞活力以及凋亡情况.结果 通过腺病毒感染实现了APE/Ref-1基因在体外培养耳蜗螺旋神经节细胞的过表达,H2O2浓度为50~300 μmol/L时,APE/Ref-1组同对照组比较,细胞活

  8. Spiral 2 the scientific objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-15

    The French ministry of research took the decision to build Spiral-2 in May 2005. Its construction costs are estimated to 130 million euros while its operating costs will near 8.5 million euros per year. The construction works will last 5 years. The Spiral-2 facility is based on a high power, superconducting driver Linac, which will deliver a high intensity, 40 MeV deuteron beam as well as a variety of heavy-ion beams with mass over charge ratio equal to 3 and energy up to 14.5 MeV/nucleon. Using a carbon converter, fast neutrons from the breakup of the 5 mA of deuterons impinging on a uranium carbide target will induce a rate of up to 10{sup 14} fissions/s. The radioactive ion beam intensities in the mass range from A = 60 to 140 will be of the order of 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 11} particles/s surpassing by one or two orders-of-magnitude any existing facility in the world. A direct irradiation of the UC{sub 2} target with {sup 3,4}He, {sup 6,7}Li or {sup 12}C may also be used. Different production targets will be used to produce high-intensity beams of light radioactive species with the Isol technique. The extracted radioactive ion beam will be accelerated to energies up to 20 MeV/nucleons by the existing Cime cyclotron. One of the most important features of the future Ganil accelerator complex will be the capability of delivering up to 5 stable or radioactive beams simultaneously in the energy range from the keV to several tens of MeV/nucleons. The document details also the future contribution of Spiral-2 concerning the structure of exotic nuclei, the thermodynamical aspects of nuclear matter, nucleosynthesis, the fundamental basic interactions, and the use of neutrons. (A.C.)

  9. Emergency Physicians Think in Spirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, Tia; Whalen, Desmond; Pollard, Megan; Dubrowski, Adam

    2015-11-17

    As adult learners, junior clerks on core rotations in emergency medicine (EM) are expected to "own" their patients and follow them from presentation to disposition in the Emergency Department (ED). Traditionally, we teach clerks to present an exhaustive linear list of symptoms and signs to their preceptors. This does not apply well to the fast-paced ED setting. Mnemonics have been developed to teach clerks how to present succinctly and cohesively. To address the need for continual patient reassessment throughout the patient's journey in the ED, we propose a complimentary approach called SPIRAL.

  10. Bianchi Type-I cosmological mesonic stiff fluid models in Lyra's geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S D Katore; S V Thakare; K S Adhao

    2008-07-01

    Bianchi Type-I cosmological models in Lyra's geometry are obtained when the source of gravitational field is a perfect fluid coupled with massless mesonic scalar field. Some physical and kinematical properties of the models are also discussed.

  11. Renal function in tyrosinaemia type I after liver transplantation : A long-term follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, LJWM; van Spronsen, FJ; Bijleveld, CMA; van Dael, CML

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinaemia type I is an autosomal recessive inborn error of tyrosine catabolism caused by a deficiency of the enzyme fumarylacetoacetase that results in liver failure, hepatocellular carcinoma, renal tubular dysfunction and acute intermittent porphyria. When treated with liver transplan

  12. The large increase in incidence of Type I diabetes mellitus in Poland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kretowski, A.; Kowalska, I.; Peczynska, J.

    2001-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: A rising incidence of Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus in different countries in Europe during the last decade has been recently reported. However, in the early 1990s, Poland was reported to have a stable low incidence of this disease. This study aimed to estimate...... the annual incidence of Type I diabetes in a north-eastern region of Poland (Białystok region) and investigate if it is associated with age, sex, urban rural differences and the season of disease onset. METHODS: A register of patients with Type I diabetes using two independent sets of data sources...... in the incidence was also found, with a peak in winter and nadir in summer. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: These results show that the north-eastern region of Poland is an area with a moderate rather than a low risk of Type I diabetes. Our observations confirm the important role of environmental and socio...

  13. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) deficiency might contribute to the onset of type I diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubí, B

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of type I diabetes is rising worldwide, particularly in young children. Type I diabetes is considered a multifactorial disease with genetic predisposition and environmental factors participating. Currently, despite years of research, there is no consensus regarding the factors that initiate the autoimmune response. Type I diabetes is preceded by autoimmunity to islet antigens, among them the protein glutamic acid decarboxylase, GAD-65. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) is formed from vitamin B6 by the action of pyridoxal kinase. Interaction of GAD65 with PLP is necessary for GAD65-mediated synthesis of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). PLP is also a required cofactor for dopamine synthesis by L-aromatic decarboxylase (L-AADC). Both GAD65 and L-AADC are expressed in pancreatic islets. Here it is proposed that lack of the vitamin B6 derivative pyridoxal 5'-phosphate might contribute to the appearance of pancreatic islet autoimmunity and type I diabetes onset.

  14. OI Issues: Type I - Understanding the Mildest Form of Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people. Managing and Treating Type I OI in Adults Osteoporosis (low bone density) is an almost universal consequence ... are approved by FDA for preventing and treating osteoporosis in adults. The goal is to prevent additional loss of ...

  15. Type I Error Rates and Power Estimates of Selected Parametric and Nonparametric Tests of Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnik, Stephen F.; Algina, James

    1987-01-01

    Estimated Type I Error rates and power are reported for the Brown-Forsythe, O'Brien, Klotz, and Siegal-Tukey procedures. The effect of aligning the data using deviations from group means or group medians is investigated. (RB)

  16. Can we predict and/or prevent type I diabetes? | Sandler | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The highest risk for the development of type I diabetes resides with ... of high titres (> 40 Juvenile Diabetes Foundation units) of islet cell antibodies (ICA), while ... Antibodies which precipitate an islet membrane protein (MW 641<) are highly ...

  17. Unified theory of type I and type II irregularities in the equatorial electrojet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudan, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    A nonlinear unified theory of type I and II irregularities is presented that explains their principal observed characteristics. The power spectrum is predicted by using Kolmogoroff-type conservation law for the power flow in cascading eddies.

  18. Habitat‑specific type I polyketide synthases in soils and street sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hill, Patrick; Piel, Jörn; Aris‑Brosou, Stéphane; Krištůfek, Václav; Boddy, Christopher N.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2014-01-01

    Actinomycetes produce many pharmaceutically useful compounds through type I polyketide biosynthetic pathways. Soil has traditionally been an important source for these actinomycete-derived pharmaceuticals. As the rate of antibiotic discovery has decreased and the incidence of antibiotic resistance h

  19. Nuclear export signal of PRRSV NSP1α is necessary for type I IFN inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi; Liu, Shaoning; Sun, Wenbo; Chen, Lei; Yoo, Dongwan; Li, Feng; Ren, Sufang; Guo, Lihui; Cong, Xiaoyan; Li, Jun; Zhou, Shun; Wu, Jiaqiang; Du, Yijun; Wang, Jinbao

    2016-12-01

    The nonstructural protein 1α (NSP1α) of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a nucleo-cytoplasmic protein that suppresses the production of type I interferon (IFN). In this study, we investigated the relationship between the subcellular distribution of NSP1α and its inhibition of type I IFN. NSP1α was found to contain the classical nuclear export signal (NES) and NSP1α nuclear export was CRM-1-mediated. NSP1α was shuttling between the nucleus and cytoplasm. We also showed that the nuclear export of NSP1α was necessary for its ability for type I IFN inhibition. NSP1α was also found to interact with CBP, which implies a possible mechanism of CBP degradation by NSP1α. Taken together, our results describe a novel mechanism of PRRSV NSP1α for type I IFN inhibition and suppression of the host innate antiviral response. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. The role of type I interferons in intestinal infection, homeostasis, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyeseon; Kelsall, Brian L

    2014-07-01

    Type I interferons are a widely expressed family of effector cytokines that promote innate antiviral and antibacterial immunity. Paradoxically, they can also suppress immune responses by driving production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and dysregulation of these cytokines can contribute to host-mediated immunopathology and disease progression. Recent studies describe their anti-inflammatory role in intestinal inflammation and the locus containing IFNAR, a heterodimeric receptor for the type I interferons has been identified as a susceptibility region for human inflammatory bowel disease. This review focuses on the role of type I IFNs in the intestine in health and disease and their emerging role as immune modulators. Clear understanding of type I IFN-mediated immune responses may provide avenues for fine-tuning existing IFN treatment for infection and intestinal inflammation. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Comparison of candidate serologic markers for type I and type II ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Dan; Kuhn, Elisabetta; Bristow, Robert E

    2011-01-01

    To examine the value of individual and combinations of ovarian cancer associated blood biomarkers for the discrimination between plasma of patients with type I or II ovarian cancer and disease-free volunteers....

  2. High density lipoproteins as indicators of endothelial dysfunction in children with diadetes type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobanova S.M.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to study the level of blood high density lipoproteins (HDL in the groups of children with different course of diadetes type I in order to find out the dependence of course and complications of diabetes on that level. Materials and methods: Blood high density lipoprotein (HDL levels were investigated in children and adolescents with diadetes type I, depending on the duration of diadetes type I, age, stage of sexual development, the stage of diabetic nephropathy and levels of plasma endothelin-1 (E-1. Results: Decrease in HDL level with increasing duration of diadetes type I in prepubertate patients, higher indices of HDL cholesterol were determined in girls, especially with impaired puberty. HDL cholesterol was higher in diabetic nephropathy at the stage of proteinuria and high level of blood endothelin-1. Conclusion: The revealed changes were considered to cause deregulation of vascular endothelium as a manifestation of the initial stages of endothelial dysfunction

  3. Expanding the phenotypic and mutational spectrum in microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Issa, Mahmoud; Magdy, Ahmed; El-Kotoury, Ahmed; Amr, Khalda

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in the RNU4ATAC gene cause microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I. It encodes U4atac, a small nuclear RNA that is a component of the minor spliceosome. Six distinct mutations in 30 patients diagnosed as microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I have been described. We report on three additional patients from two unrelated families presenting with a milder phenotype of microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I and metopic synostosis. Patient 1 had two novel heterozygous mutations in the 3' prime stem-loop, g.66G > C and g.124G > A while Patients 2 and 3 had a homozygous mutation g.55G > A in the 5' prime stem-loop. Although they manifested the known spectrum of clinical features of microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I, they lacked evidence of severe developmental delay and neurological symptoms. These findings expand the mutational and phenotypic spectrum of this syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Natural Rubber Latex Hypersensitivity: Incidence and Prevalence of Type I Allergy in the Dental Professional

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    HAMANN, CURTIS P; TURJANMAA, KRISTIINA; RIETSCHEL, ROBERT; SIEW, CHAKWAN; OWENSBY, DAVID; GRUNINGER, STEPHEN E; SULLIVAN, KIM M

    1998-01-01

    The authors investigated the prevalence of immediate (Type I) hypersensitivity to gloves made from natural rubber latex, or NRL, by performing skin-prick tests on 2,166 dental workers over the course of a two-year period...

  5. Type I Error Rates and Power Estimates of Selected Parametric and Nonparametric Tests of Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnik, Stephen F.; Algina, James

    1987-01-01

    Estimated Type I Error rates and power are reported for the Brown-Forsythe, O'Brien, Klotz, and Siegal-Tukey procedures. The effect of aligning the data using deviations from group means or group medians is investigated. (RB)

  6. Recessive MYL2 mutations cause infantile type I muscle fibre disease and cardiomyopathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weterman, Marian A. J; Barth, Peter G; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Aronica, Eleonora; Poll-The, Bwee-Tien; Brouwer, Oebele F; van Tintelen, J. Peter; Qahar, Zohal; Bradley, Edward J; de Wissel, Marit; Salviati, Leonardo; Angelini, Corrado; van den Heuvel, Lambertus; Thomasse, Yolande E. M; Backx, Ad P; Nurnberg, Guun; Nurnberg, Peter; Baas, Frank

    2013-01-01

    A cardioskeletal myopathy with onset and death in infancy, morphological features of muscle type I hypotrophy with myofibrillar disorganization and dilated cardiomyopathy was previously reported in three Dutch families...

  7. Keratosis spinulosa developing in borderline-tuberculoid lesions during type I lepra reaction: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thankappan, T P; Sulochana, G

    1991-03-01

    Two cases of borderline-tuberculoid leprosy which developed keratosis spinulosa over the anaesthetic areas alone during type I lepra reactions are described. Both patients only developed spiny papules during the period of reaction and subsided with control of the reaction. The probable mechanism of this peculiar phenomenon might be due to the generation of epidermal growth factors by local T cell activation during the type I lepra reaction.

  8. Comparing acquired angioedema with hereditary angioedema (types I/II): findings from the Icatibant Outcome Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, H J; Zanichelli, A; Caballero, T; Bouillet, L; Aberer, W; Maurer, M; Fain, O; Fabien, V; Andresen, I

    2017-04-01

    Icatibant is used to treat acute hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency types I/II (C1-INH-HAE types I/II) and has shown promise in angioedema due to acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-AAE). Data from the Icatibant Outcome Survey (IOS) were analysed to evaluate the effectiveness of icatibant in the treatment of patients with C1-INH-AAE and compare disease characteristics with those with C1-INH-HAE types I/II. Key medical history (including prior occurrence of attacks) was recorded upon IOS enrolment. Thereafter, data were recorded retrospectively at approximately 6-month intervals during patient follow-up visits. In the icatibant-treated population, 16 patients with C1-INH-AAE had 287 attacks and 415 patients with C1-INH-HAE types I/II had 2245 attacks. Patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II were more often male (69 versus 42%; P = 0·035) and had a significantly later mean (95% confidence interval) age of symptom onset [57·9 (51·33-64·53) versus 14·0 (12·70-15·26) years]. Time from symptom onset to diagnosis was significantly shorter in patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II (mean 12·3 months versus 118·1 months; P = 0·006). Patients with C1-INH-AAE showed a trend for higher occurrence of attacks involving the face (35 versus 21% of attacks; P = 0·064). Overall, angioedema attacks were more severe in patients with C1-INH-HAE types I/II versus C1-INH-AAE (61 versus 40% of attacks were classified as severe to very severe; P types I/II, respectively. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  9. Type I hypersensitivity to Parthenium hysterophorus in patients with parthenium dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmi Chembolli; Srinivas C

    2007-01-01

    Background: Parthenium dermatitis is a major problem in urban and rural India. Patients with severe allergic rhinitis due to exposure to pollens of parthenium are reported to have parthenium specific IgE and IgG antibodies. Parthenium induces contact dermatitis by Type IV hypersensitivity and allergic rhinitis by Type-I hypersensitivity. Aims: The study was undertaken to detect Type-I and Type-IV hypersensitivity amongst patients with parthenium dermatitis. Methods: Fourteen patients wit...

  10. Evidence for the Involvement of Type I Interferon in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Peter M.; Oliver, Eduardo; Dorfmuller, Peter; Dubois, Olivier D.; Reed, Daniel M.; Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Mohamed, Nura A.; Perros, Frederic; Antigny, Fabrice; Fadel, Elie; Schreiber, Benjamin E.; Holmes, Alan M.; Southwood, Mark; Hagan, Guy; Wort, Stephen J.; Bartlett, Nathan; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Coghlan, John G.; Humbert, Marc; Zhao, Lan; Mitchell, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Evidence is increasing of a link between interferon (IFN) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Conditions with chronically elevated endogenous IFNs such as systemic sclerosis are strongly associated with PAH. Furthermore, therapeutic use of type I IFN is associated with PAH. This was recognized at the 2013 World Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension where the urgent need for research into this was highlighted. Objective To explore the role of type I IFN in PAH. Methods and Results Cells were cultured using standard approaches. Cytokines were measured by ELISA. Gene and protein expression were measured using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. The role of type I IFN in PAH in vivo was determined using type I IFN receptor knockout (IFNAR1−/−) mice. Human lung cells responded to types I and II but not III IFN correlating with relevant receptor expression. Type I, II, and III IFN levels were elevated in serum of patients with systemic sclerosis associated PAH. Serum interferon γ inducible protein 10 (IP10; CXCL10) and endothelin 1 were raised and strongly correlated together. IP10 correlated positively with pulmonary hemodynamics and serum brain natriuretic peptide and negatively with 6-minute walk test and cardiac index. Endothelial cells grown out of the blood of PAH patients were more sensitive to the effects of type I IFN than cells from healthy donors. PAH lung demonstrated increased IFNAR1 protein levels. IFNAR1−/− mice were protected from the effects of hypoxia on the right heart, vascular remodeling, and raised serum endothelin 1 levels. Conclusions These data indicate that type I IFN, via an action of IFNAR1, mediates PAH. PMID:24334027

  11. Congenital neuromuscular disease with type I fibre hypotrophy, ophthalmoplegia and myofibril degeneration.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugie, H.; Hanson, R.; Rasmussen, G.; Verity, M A

    1982-01-01

    We report a 7-year-old boy with progressive, early onset somatic and cranial muscle weakness associated with external ophthalmoplegia, facial weakness, type I fibre hypotrophy and myofibril degeneration. We separate this condition from congenital fibre type disproportion because of the facial weakness, ophthalmoplegia, central nucleation, and lysis in type I fibres. The case, which is similar to that described by Bender and Bender (1977), nosologically should be classified between the centron...

  12. Expression of collagen type I in unaltered and osteoarthritic menisci of knee joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sladojević Igor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Knee osteoarthritis is a progressive degenerative disease which affects meniscal tissue. The aim of this study was to determine the differences in collagen type I expression in macroscopically unaltered and osteoarthritic menisci, and correlate the expression with the grade of macroscopic damage, age and body mass index of patients, preoperative condition of anterior cruciate ligament, angulation and knee contracture. Material and Methods. The control group consisted of 10 macroscopically unaltered menisci, while the experimental group had 35 osteoarthritic menisci. Besides macroscopic grading of meniscal damage, the analysis of collagen type I expression was determined by immunohistochemical staining with the corresponding antibody using semiquantitative scale scores and quantitative parameters: intensity of expression and stained area size. Results. The results of semiquantitative evaluation showed a statistically significant decrease in collagen type I expression in osteoarthritic menisci, which correlated with an increase in macroscopic damage grade. The results of quantitative evaluation did not show a statistically significant decrease in the expression. In posterior meniscal horns, a more intense collagen type I expression was seen in the women, as well as a positive correlation of quantitatively evaluated expression with body mass index. Collagen type I expression in the anterior horns was significantly lower in varus alignment. Conclusion. In the semiquantitative evaluation, collagen type I expression in osteoarthritic menisci was significantly lower compared to macroscopically unchanged menisci. The decrease in the expression level correlates with the increase in the grade of macroscopic meniscal damage. There was no statistically significant difference in the quantitative evaluation of expression.

  13. Acemannan stimulates gingival fibroblast proliferation; expressions of keratinocyte growth factor-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and type I collagen; and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jettanacheawchankit, Suwimon; Sasithanasate, Siriruk; Sangvanich, Polkit; Banlunara, Wijit; Thunyakitpisal, Pasutha

    2009-04-01

    Aloe vera has long been used as a traditional medicine for inducing wound healing. Gingival fibroblasts (GFs) play an important role in oral wound healing. In this study, we investigated the effects of acemannan, a polysaccharide extracted from Aloe vera gel, on GF proliferation; keratinocyte growth factor-1 (KGF-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and type I collagen production; and oral wound healing in rats. [(3)H]-Thymidine incorporation assay and ELISA were used. Punch biopsy wounds were created at the hard palate of male Sprague Dawley rats. All treatments (normal saline; 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide; plain 1% Carbopol; and Carbopol containing 0.5%, 1%, and 2% acemannan (w/w)) were applied daily. Wounded areas and histological features were observed at day 7 after treatment. From our studies, acemannan at concentrations of 2, 4, 8, and 16 mg/ml significantly induced cell proliferation (P<0.05). Acemannan concentrations between 2 - 16 mg/ml significantly stimulated KGF-1, VEGF, and type I collagen expressions (P<0.05). Wound healing of animals receiving Carbopol containing 0.5% acemannan (w/w) was significantly better than that of the other groups (P<0.05). These findings suggest that acemannan plays a significant role in the oral wound healing process via the induction of fibroblast proliferation and stimulation of KGF-1, VEGF, and type I collagen expressions.

  14. Spiral density waves in M81. I. Stellar spiral density waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Chien-Chang; Lin, Lien-Hsuan; Wang, Hsiang-Hsu; Taam, Ronald E., E-mail: hhwang@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, R.O.C (China)

    2014-04-20

    Aside from the grand-design stellar spirals appearing in the disk of M81, a pair of stellar spiral arms situated well inside the bright bulge of M81 has been recently discovered by Kendall et al. The seemingly unrelated pairs of spirals pose a challenge to the theory of spiral density waves. To address this problem, we have constructed a three-component model for M81, including the contributions from a stellar disk, a bulge, and a dark matter halo subject to observational constraints. Given this basic state for M81, a modal approach is applied to search for the discrete unstable spiral modes that may provide an understanding for the existence of both spiral arms. It is found that the apparently separated inner and outer spirals can be interpreted as a single trailing spiral mode. In particular, these spirals share the same pattern speed 25.5 km s{sup –1} kpc{sup –1} with a corotation radius of 9.03 kpc. In addition to the good agreement between the calculated and the observed spiral pattern, the variation of the spiral amplitude can also be naturally reproduced.

  15. ANGULAR-MOMENTUM IN BINARY SPIRAL GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OOSTERLOO, T

    1993-01-01

    In order to investigate the relative orientations of spiral galaxies in pairs, the distribution of the angle between the spin-vectors for a new sample of 40 binary spiral galaxies is determined. From this distribution it is found, contrary to an earlier result obtained by Helou (1984), that there is

  16. QS Spiral: Visualizing Periodic Quantified Self Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Cuttone, Andrea; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we propose an interactive visualization technique QS Spiral that aims to capture the periodic properties of quantified self data and let the user explore those recurring patterns. The approach is based on time-series data visualized as a spiral structure. The interactivity includes ...

  17. Scaling effects in spiral capsule robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Hu, Rong; Chen, Bai; Tang, Yong; Xu, Yan

    2017-04-01

    Spiral capsule robots can be applied to human gastrointestinal tracts and blood vessels. Because of significant variations in the sizes of the inner diameters of the intestines as well as blood vessels, this research has been unable to meet the requirements for medical applications. By applying the fluid dynamic equations, using the computational fluid dynamics method, to a robot axial length ranging from 10(-5) to 10(-2) m, the operational performance indicators (axial driving force, load torque, and maximum fluid pressure on the pipe wall) of the spiral capsule robot and the fluid turbulent intensity around the robot spiral surfaces was numerically calculated in a straight rigid pipe filled with fluid. The reasonableness and validity of the calculation method adopted in this study were verified by the consistency of the calculated values by the computational fluid dynamics method and the experimental values from a relevant literature. The results show that the greater the fluid turbulent intensity, the greater the impact of the fluid turbulence on the driving performance of the spiral capsule robot and the higher the energy consumption of the robot. For the same level of size of the robot, the axial driving force, the load torque, and the maximum fluid pressure on the pipe wall of the outer spiral robot were larger than those of the inner spiral robot. For different requirements of the operating environment, we can choose a certain kind of spiral capsule robot. This study provides a theoretical foundation for spiral capsule robots.

  18. Tracing the spiral arms in IP Pegasi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baptista, R.; Morales-Rueda, L.; Harlaftis, E.T.; Marsh, T.R.; Steeghs, D.

    2005-01-01

    We report the analysis of time-resolved spectroscopy of IP Pegasi in outburst with eclipse mapping techniques to investigate the location and geometry of the observed spiral structures. We were able to obtain an improved view of the spiral structures with the aid of light curves extracted in

  19. Quantitative analysis of spirality in elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dojcsak, Levente

    2013-01-01

    We use an automated galaxy morphology analysis method to quantitatively measure the spirality of galaxies classified manually as elliptical. The data set used for the analysis consists of 60,518 galaxy images with redshift obtained by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and classified manually by Galaxy Zoo, as well as the RC3 and NA10 catalogues. We measure the spirality of the galaxies by using the Ganalyzer method, which transforms the galaxy image to its radial intensity plot to detect galaxy spirality that is in many cases difficult to notice by manual observation of the raw galaxy image. Experimental results using manually classified elliptical and S0 galaxies with redshift <0.3 suggest that galaxies classified manually as elliptical and S0 exhibit a nonzero signal for the spirality. These results suggest that the human eye observing the raw galaxy image might not always be the most effective way of detecting spirality and curves in the arms of galaxies.

  20. Termination of pinned spirals by local stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Guo, Ming-Ming; Ma, Jun

    2016-02-01

    The termination of pinned spirals on a defect by means of local stimuli is studied. On a completely unexcitable defect, the elimination process is discussed and its corresponding mechanism is presented. Especially, the mechanism of unpinning spirals on a partially unexcitable defect, which has not been investigated so far, is explored. With fixed pacing frequency ω L , there exists a maximal radius R max above which the pinned spiral cannot be removed. It is found that the value of R max does not increase as ω L in a dynamical regime, forming a platform in the R\\textit{max}\\text-ωL curves. Based on analyzing the dispersion relation on the spiral tip around the obstacle, the underlying mechanism is clarified. Also, it is found that when multiple spirals are pinned, the value of R max decreases on a partially unexcitable defect while the change is very slight on a completely unexcitable one.

  1. Illusory spirals and loops in crystal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtukenberg, Alexander G; Zhu, Zina; An, Zhihua; Bhandari, Misha; Song, Pengcheng; Kahr, Bart; Ward, Michael D

    2013-10-22

    The theory of dislocation-controlled crystal growth identifies a continuous spiral step with an emergent lattice displacement on a crystal surface; a mechanistic corollary is that closely spaced, oppositely winding spirals merge to form concentric loops. In situ atomic force microscopy of step propagation on pathological L-cystine crystals did indeed show spirals and islands with step heights of one lattice displacement. We show by analysis of the rates of growth of smaller steps only one molecule high that the major morphological spirals and loops are actually consequences of the bunching of the smaller steps. The morphology of the bunched steps actually inverts the predictions of the theory: Spirals arise from pairs of dislocations, loops from single dislocations. Only through numerical simulation of the growth is it revealed how normal growth of anisotropic layers of molecules within the highly symmetrical crystals can conspire to create features in apparent violation of the classic theory.

  2. Skin as marker for collagen type I/III ratio in abdominal wall fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, E; De Hertogh, G; Junge, K; Klinge, U; Miserez, M

    2014-08-01

    An altered collagen metabolism could play an important role in hernia development. This study compared collagen type I/III ratio and organisation between hernia and control patients, and analysed the correlation in collagen type I/III ratio between skin and abdominal wall fascia. Collagen organisation was analysed in Haematoxylin-Eosin sections of anterior rectus sheath fascia, and collagen type I/III ratio, by crosspolarisation microscopy, in Sirius-Red sections of skin and anterior rectus sheath fascia, of 19 control, 10 primary inguinal, 10 recurrent inguinal, 13 primary incisional and 8 recurrent incisional hernia patients. Compared to control patients [7.2 (IQR = 6.8-7.7) and 7.2 (IQR = 5.8-7.9)], collagen type I/III ratio was significantly lower in skin and anterior rectus sheath fascia of primary inguinal [5.2 (IQR = 3.8-6.3) and 4.2 (IQR = 3.8-4.7)], recurrent inguinal [3.2 (IQR = 3.1-3.6) and 3.3 (IQR = 3-3.7)], primary incisional [3.5 (IQR = 3-3.9) and 3.4 (IQR = 3.3-3.6)] and recurrent incisional hernia [3.2 (IQR = 3.1-3.9) and 3.2 (IQR = 2.9-3.2)] patients; also incisional and recurrent inguinal hernia had lower ratio than primary inguinal hernia patients. Furthermore, collagen type I/III ratio was significantly correlated (r = 0.81; P fascia. Finally, collagen organisation was comparable between hernia and control patients. Furthermore, in both skin and abdominal wall fascia of hernia patients, collagen type I/III ratio was lower compared to control patients, with more pronounced abnormalities in incisional and recurrent inguinal hernia patients. Importantly, collagen type I/III ratio in skin was representative for that in abdominal wall fascia.

  3. Impairments and activity limitations in subjects with chronic upper-limb complex regional pain syndrome type I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.C. Schasfoort (Fabiënne); J.B.J. Bussmann (Hans); H.J. Stam (Henk)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To determine the degree of impairments and activity limitations and their interrelationship in complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS type I). DESIGN: Cross-sectional study interrelating impairments and objectively measured activity limitations. SETTING: Ambulatory and

  4. Gallium nitrate increases type I collagen and fibronectin mRNA and collagen protein levels in bone and fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockman, R S; Guidon, P T; Pan, L C; Salvatori, R; Kawaguchi, A

    1993-08-01

    Gallium is a Group IIIa transitional element with therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of metabolic bone disorders. Previously described antiresorptive effects of gallium on osteoclasts are not sufficient to account for the full range of effects of gallium on bone structure and metabolism. We have recently shown that gallium nitrate inhibits osteocalcin gene expression and the synthesis of osteocalcin protein, an osteoblast-specific bone matrix protein that is thought to serve as a signal to trigger osteoclastic resorption. Here we present evidence for an additional mechanism by which gallium may function to augment bone mass by altering matrix protein synthesis by osteoblastic and fibroblastic cells. Rat calvarial explants exposed to gallium nitrate for 48 h showed increased incorporation of 3H-proline into hydroxyproline and collagenase digestible protein. In addition, gallium treatment increased steady-state mRNA levels for fibronectin and type I procollagen chains in primary rat calvarial osteoblast-enriched cultures, the ROS 17/2.8 osteoblastic osteosarcoma line, and nontransformed human dermal fibroblasts. These findings suggest that the exposure of mesenchymally-derived cells to gallium results in an altered pattern of matrix protein synthesis that would favor increased bone formation.

  5. Isolation and characterization of type I antifreeze proteins from cunner, Tautogolabrus adspersus, order Perciformes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Rod S; Shears, Margaret A; Graham, Laurie A; Davies, Peter L; Fletcher, Garth L

    2011-10-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are produced by many species of teleost fish that inhabit potentially lethal ice-laden seawater and afford them protection from freezing. To date type I AFPs have been fully characterized in two teleost orders: Pleuronectiformes and Scorpaeniformes. In this study, we report the isolation and complete characterization of a type I AFP present in fish from a third order: cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus), order Perciformes (family Labridae). This protein was purified from blood plasma and found to belong to what is now known as classical type I AFP with their small size (mass 4095.16 Da), alanine richness (> 57 mol%), high α-helicity (> 99%) with the ability to undergo reversible thermal denaturation, 11 amino acid (ThrX(10)) repeat regions within the primary structure, the capacity to impart a hexagonal bipyramidal shaping to ice crystals and the conservation of an ice-binding site found in many of the other type I AFPs. Partial de novo sequencing of the plasma AFP accounted for approximately half of the peptide mass. Sequencing of a combined liver and skin cDNA library indicated that the protein is produced without a signal sequence. In addition the translated product of the AFP cDNA suggests that it codes for the AFP isolated from plasma. These results further solidify the hypothesis that type I AFPs are multiphyletic in origin and suggest that they represent remarkable examples of convergent evolution within three orders of teleost fish.

  6. Between types I and II: Intertype flux exotic states in thin superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Camacho, W. Y.; da Silva, R. M.; Vagov, A.; Shanenko, A. A.; Aguiar, J. Albino

    2016-08-01

    The Bogomolnyi point separates superconductivity types I and II while itself hiding infinitely degenerate magnetic flux configurations, including very exotic states (referred to here as flux "monsters"). When the degeneracy is removed, the Bogomolnyi point unfolds into a finite, intertype domain in the phase diagram between types I and II. One can expect that in this case the flux monsters can escape their "prison" at the Bogomolnyi point, occupying the intertype domain and shaping its internal structure. Our calculations reveal that such exotic flux distributions are indeed stable in the intertype regime of thin superconductors made of a type-I material, where the Bogomolnyi degeneracy is removed by stray magnetic fields. They can be classified into three typical patterns that are qualitatively different from those in types I and II: superconducting islands separated by vortex chains; stripes/worms/labyrinths patterns; and mixtures of giant vortices and vortex clusters. Our findings shed light on the problem of the interchange between types I and II, raising important questions on the completeness of the textbook classification of the superconductivity types.

  7. Type I interferon causes thrombotic microangiopathy by a dose-dependent toxic effect on the microvasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, David; Jury, Alexa; Williams, Jac; Scolding, Neil; Bellamy, Chris; Gunther, Claudia; Ritchie, Diane; Gale, Daniel P.; Kanwar, Yashpal S.; Challis, Rachel; Buist, Holly; Overell, James; Weller, Belinda; Flossmann, Oliver; Blunden, Mark; Meyer, Eric P.; Krucker, Thomas; Evans, Stephen J. W.; Campbell, Iain L.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Chandran, Siddharthan

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs have been reported to cause thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), yet evidence supporting a direct association is often weak. In particular, TMA has been reported in association with recombinant type I interferon (IFN) therapies, with recent concern regarding the use of IFN in multiple sclerosis patients. However, a causal association has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we adopt a combined clinical and experimental approach to provide evidence of such an association between type I IFN and TMA. We show that the clinical phenotype of cases referred to a national center is uniformly consistent with a direct dose-dependent drug-induced TMA. We then show that dose-dependent microvascular disease is seen in a transgenic mouse model of IFN toxicity. This includes specific microvascular pathological changes seen in patient biopsies and is dependent on transcriptional activation of the IFN response through the type I interferon α/β receptor (IFNAR). Together our clinical and experimental findings provide evidence of a causal link between type I IFN and TMA. As such, recombinant type I IFN therapies should be stopped at the earliest stage in patients who develop this complication, with implications for risk mitigation. PMID:27663672

  8. Data with hierarchical structure: impact of intraclass correlation and sample size on type-I error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musca, Serban C; Kamiejski, Rodolphe; Nugier, Armelle; Méot, Alain; Er-Rafiy, Abdelatif; Brauer, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Least squares analyses (e.g., ANOVAs, linear regressions) of hierarchical data leads to Type-I error rates that depart severely from the nominal Type-I error rate assumed. Thus, when least squares methods are used to analyze hierarchical data coming from designs in which some groups are assigned to the treatment condition, and others to the control condition (i.e., the widely used "groups nested under treatment" experimental design), the Type-I error rate is seriously inflated, leading too often to the incorrect rejection of the null hypothesis (i.e., the incorrect conclusion of an effect of the treatment). To highlight the severity of the problem, we present simulations showing how the Type-I error rate is affected under different conditions of intraclass correlation and sample size. For all simulations the Type-I error rate after application of the popular Kish (1965) correction is also considered, and the limitations of this correction technique discussed. We conclude with suggestions on how one should collect and analyze data bearing a hierarchical structure.

  9. Data with hierarchical structure: impact of intraclass correlation and sample size on Type-I error

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serban C Musca

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Least squares analyses (e.g., ANOVAs, linear regressions of hierarchical data leads to Type-I error rates that depart severely from the nominal Type-I error rate assumed. Thus, when least squares methods are used to analyze hierarchical data coming from designs in which some groups are assigned to the treatment condition, and others to the control condition (i.e., the widely used "groups nested under treatment" experimental design, the Type-I error rate is seriously inflated, leading too often to the incorrect rejection of the null hypothesis (i.e., the incorrect conclusion of an effect of the treatment. To highlight the severity of the problem, we present simulations showing how the Type-I error rate is affected under different conditions of intraclass correlation and sample size. For all simulations the Type-I error rate after application of the popular Kish (1965 correction is also considered, and the limitations of this correction technique discussed. We conclude with suggestions on how one should collect and analyze data bearing a hierarchical structure.

  10. Type-I interband cascade lasers near 3.2 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuchao; Li, Lu; Yang, Rui Q.; Gupta, James A.; Aers, Geof C.; Dupont, Emmanuel; Baribeau, Jean-Marc; Wu, Xiaohua; Johnson, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Interband cascade (IC) lasers have been demonstrated based on type-I InGaAsSb/AlAsSb quantum well (QW) active regions. These type-I IC lasers are composed of 6-cascade stages and InAs/AlSb superlattice cladding layers. In contrast to the use of quinary AlGaInAsSb barriers for active region in previous type-I QW lasers, the type-I QW active region in each stage is sandwiched by digitally graded multiple InAs/AlSb QW electron injector and GaSb/AlSb QW hole injector. The fabricated type-I IC lasers were able to operate in continuous wave and pulsed modes at temperatures up to 306 and 365 K, respectively. The threshold current densities of broad-area lasers were around 300 A/cm2 at 300 K with a lasing wavelength near 3.2 μm. The implications and prospects of these initial results are discussed.

  11. Structural Variation of Type I-F CRISPR RNA Guided DNA Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausch, Patrick; Müller-Esparza, Hanna; Gleditzsch, Daniel; Altegoer, Florian; Randau, Lennart; Bange, Gert

    2017-08-17

    CRISPR-Cas systems are prokaryotic immune systems against invading nucleic acids. Type I CRISPR-Cas systems employ highly diverse, multi-subunit surveillance Cascade complexes that facilitate duplex formation between crRNA and complementary target DNA for R-loop formation, retention, and DNA degradation by the subsequently recruited nuclease Cas3. Typically, the large subunit recognizes bona fide targets through the PAM (protospacer adjacent motif), and the small subunit guides the non-target DNA strand. Here, we present the Apo- and target-DNA-bound structures of the I-Fv (type I-F variant) Cascade lacking the small and large subunits. Large and small subunits are functionally replaced by the 5' terminal crRNA cap Cas5fv and the backbone protein Cas7fv, respectively. Cas5fv facilitates PAM recognition from the DNA major groove site, in contrast to all other described type I systems. Comparison of the type I-Fv Cascade with an anti-CRISPR protein-bound I-F Cascade reveals that the type I-Fv structure differs substantially at known anti-CRISPR protein target sites and might therefore be resistant to viral Cascade interception. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Solar Interactions on Spiral Petroglyphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brian F.; Preston, Robert A.

    2003-11-01

    Like most prehistoric cultures, the ancestors of the native Puebloan people of the Southwest were aware of the yearly cycle of the sun. This and other natural phenomena are fundamental for interpreting their world view, religion, and art. Some researchers have argued that rock art, particularly petroglyphs, displays this focus on the natural world through the distinctive interplay of sunlight on these carvings. However, the question of whether or not these interactions occur by intention or chance has hampered the acceptance of this evidence by the archaeological community. To address this question we have performed a detailed study of a complete sample of over 100 spiral petroglyphs within a limited area (less than 20 km^2) of central New Mexico. We have examined this sample on both solstices and equinoxes, and have observed well-defined and consistent sunlight interactions on about 80This work clearly demonstrates the reality and profusion of this ancient cultural tradition. Several examples will be presented.

  13. DMPD: RAPping production of type I interferon in pDCs through mTOR. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18800159 RAPping production of type I interferon in pDCs through mTOR. Costa-Mattio...li M, Sonenberg N. Nat Immunol. 2008 Oct;9(10):1097-9. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show RAPping production... of type I interferon in pDCs through mTOR. PubmedID 18800159 Title RAPping production of type I interferon

  14. [Growth behavior of spiral ganglion explants on cochlear implant electrodes and their materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S; Mlynski, R; Volkenstein, S; Stark, T; Schwaab, M; Dazert, S; Brors, D

    2009-04-01

    With the increasing use of cochlear implants (CIs), the insertion of alloplastic material into the inner ear is nowadays an established treatment for severe to profound hearing loss in children and adults. Beyond its widespread use, the biocompatibility of the CI electrode and its interaction with the neural structures of the cochlea is not yet established. To investigate the survival and growth behavior of spiral ganglion neurons on different CI materials, spiral ganglion explants from newborn rats were cultured on silicone and platinum, on a surface combination of silicone and platinum, and, finally, on a CI electrode. The results of this study indicate that the growth of spiral ganglion neurons in vitro is strongly influenced by the different materials and their arrangement, with platinum exhibiting the highest degree of biocompatibility with respect to neurite extension. Level differences in the surface structure between silicone and platinum lead to inhibition of neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, the culturing of spiral ganglion explants on a CI electrode leads to neurite sprouting toward the electrodes made of platinum. The biocompatibility of CI materials with spiral ganglion neurons was shown in this study, but it differs with different CI materials. Besides the material itself, the arrangement of the materials can affect the neurite extension.

  15. Trace element geochemistry of ordinary chondrite chondrules: the type I/type II chondrule dichotomy

    CERN Document Server

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    We report trace element concentrations of silicate phases in chondrules from LL3 ordinary chondrites Bishunpur and Semarkona. Results are similar to previously reported data for carbonaceous chondrites, with rare earth element (REE) concentrations increasing in the sequence olivine ~ 10 K/h) than type I chondrules. Appreciable Na concentrations (3-221 ppm) are measured in olivine from both chondrule types; type II chondrules seem to have behaved as closed systems, which may require chondrule formation in the vicinity of protoplanets or planetesimals. At any rate, higher solid concentrations in type II chondrule forming regions may explain the higher oxygen fugacities they record compared to type I chondrules. Type I and type II chondrules formed in different environments and the correlation between high solid concentrations and/or oxygen fugacities with rapid cooling rates is a key constraint that chondrule formation models must account for.

  16. Electroweak naturalness in three-flavour Type I see-saw and implications for leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, Jackson D; Volkas, Raymond R

    2015-01-01

    In the Type I see-saw model, the naturalness requirement that corrections to the electroweak $\\mu$ parameter not exceed 1 TeV results in a rough bound on the lightest right-handed neutrino mass, $M_{N_1}\\lesssim 3\\times 10^7$ GeV. In this letter we derive generic bounds applicable in any three-flavour Type I see-saw model. We find $M_{N_1}\\lesssim 4\\times 10^7$ GeV and $M_{N_2}\\lesssim 7\\times 10^7$ GeV. In the limit of one massless neutrino, there is no naturalness bound on $M_{N_3}$ in the Poincare protected decoupling limit. Our results confirm that no Type I see-saw model can explain the observed neutrino masses and baryogenesis via hierarchical ($N_1$-, $N_2$-, or $N_3$-dominated) thermal leptogenesis whilst remaining completely natural.

  17. A new method for correcting type I and type II constricted (cup and lop) ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaogeng, Hu; Hongxing, Zhuang; Qinghua, Yang; Haiyue, Jiang; Yanyong, Zhao

    2006-01-01

    Tanzer suggested the term "constricted ear," denoting a spectrum of deformities limited to the superior third of the ear. Tanzer classified the constricted ear into three types. Type I ears have involvement of the helix, which usually is flattened. Type II ears show involvement of both the helix and the scapha. With type III ears, the auricle is rolled into a nearly tubular form that some authors regard as a form of microtia. The authors' new method for correcting the constricted ear varies in accordance with the diverse degree of deformity. The new method was used to correct constricted ears through a one-stage operation in eight type I cases. For the remaining six type 2 cases, the methods were combined with composite grafting. Most of the patients were satisfied with the final results. Therefore, the authors conclude that their approach is suitable for the treatment of type I and type II constricted ears.

  18. On the Energy Momentum in Bianchi Type I-III-V-VI0 Space-Time

    CERN Document Server

    Aygun, S; Tarhan, I; Aygun, Melis; Aygun, Sezgin; Tarhan, Ismail

    2006-01-01

    In this study, using the energy momentum definitions of Einstein, Moller, Bergmann-Thomson, Landau-Lifshitz and Papapetrou we compute the total energy-momentum distribution (due to matter and fields including gravitation) of the universe based on general Bianchi type I-III-V-VI(o) space-time and its transforms type I, III, V, VI(o) metrics, respectively. The energy-momentum densities are found exactly same for Einstein and Bergmann-Thomson definitions. The total energy and momentum is found to be zero for Bianchi types I and VI(o) space-times. These results are same as a previous works of Radinschi, Banerjee-Sen, Xulu and Aydogdu-Salti. Another point is that our study agree with previous works of Cooperstock-Israelit, Rosen, Johri et al.

  19. RAIDD Mediates TLR3 and IRF7 Driven Type i Interferon Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maney, S K; Xu, H C; Huang, J

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Viral infections represent a global health problem with the need for new viral therapies and better understanding of the immune response during infection. The most immediate and potent anti-viral defense mechanism is the production of type I interferon (IFN-I) which are activated...... the molecular interaction of RAIDD with interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) and its phosphorylating kinase IKKϵ. Using an IFN-4α driven dual luciferase analysis in RAIDD deficient cells, type I IFN activation by IKKϵ and IRF7 was dramatically reduced. Furthermore, deletion of either the caspase recruitment...... domain (CARD) or death domain (DD) of RAIDD inhibited IKKϵ and IRF7 mediated interferon-4α activation. Conclusion: We have identified that the adaptor molecule RAIDD coordinates IKKϵ and IRF7 interaction to ensure efficient expression of type I interferon. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG...

  20. Nature of elevated blood pressure in normoalbuminuric type I diabetic patients. Essential hypertension?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, K; Rasmussen, E; Jensen, T

    1993-01-01

    This study was undertaken to characterize type I diabetic patients with essential hypertension with respect to kidney function, renal hormones, and endothelial function. After 4 weeks without antihypertensive treatment, a cross-sectional study was carried out in the following groups: group 1, 14...... healthy controls; group 2, 13 nondiabetic patients with essential hypertension (blood pressure > or = 140/90 mm Hg); group 3, 11 type I diabetic patients with hypertension but urinary albumin excretion (UAE) persistently normal (UAE: 10 mg/24 h, range 3 to 18) both before, during, and after discontinuing...... antihypertensive treatment; group 4, 15 type I diabetic patients with clinical nephropathy (UAE: 611 mg/24 h, range 192 to 3837) and hypertension. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were similar in the three hypertensive groups: 147/96 +/- 8/6, 150/94 +/- 11/9, and 152/92 +/- 12/6 mm Hg (groups 2, 3, and 4...

  1. Management of osteogenesis imperfecta type I in pregnancy; a review of literature applied to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Mauro; Perelli, Federica; Maggio, Luana; Coccia, Maria Elisabetta; Quaranta, Michela; Gizzo, Salvatore; Mecacci, Federico

    2016-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare heritable heterogenous disorder characterized by bone fragility and susceptibility to fractures with a wide spectrum of clinical expression due to defects in collagen type I biosynthesis. The purpose of the review is to highlight the practical norms in pregnancies with osteogenesis imperfecta. We carried out a literature review in MEDLINE on OI during pregnancy, focusing on diagnosis, therapy and delivery. We reviewed 28 articles (case reports, original articles and reviews). Pregnant women affected by type I OI should be closely monitored to assess fetal well-being and detect pregnancy-related complications associated with an increased risk for osteoporosis, restrictive pulmonary disease, cephalopelvic disproportion and other problems related to connective tissue disorders. Mode of delivery remains controversial and should be determined on an individual basis. In conclusion, women affected by type I OI represent a subset of patients whose pregnancies should be considered high risk and warrant a multidisciplinary approach in a referral center.

  2. Type I hair cell degeneration in the utricular macula of the waltzing guinea pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Stig A; Raarup, Merete Krog; Ulfendahl, Mats

    2008-01-01

    Waltzing guinea pigs are an inbred guinea pig strain with a congenital and progressive balance and hearing disorder. A unique rod-shaped structure is found in the type I vestibular hair cells, that traverses the cell in an axial direction, extending towards the basement membrane. The present study...... estimates the total number of utricular hair cells and supporting cells in waltzing guinea pigs and age-matched control animals using the optical fractionator method. Animals were divided into four age groups (1, 7, 49 and 343 day-old). The number of type I hair cells decreased by 20% in the 343 day......-old waltzing guinea pigs compared to age-matched controls and younger animals. Two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy using antibodies against fimbrin and betaIII-tubulin showed that the rods were exclusive to type I hair cells. There was no significant change in the length of the filament rods with age...

  3. The athlete with type I diabetes: managing insulin, diet and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, P J; Stallkamp, E T; Kwatra, S

    1996-04-01

    The numerous benefits of exercise for patients with insulin-dependent (type I) diabetes mellitus include an increase in insulin sensitivity and a reduction of blood glucose levels. However, competitive athletes with type I diabetes must be careful when planning to exercise. The most common potential complications in these athletes include exercise-induced hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia and postexercise hypoglycemia due to increased insulin sensitivity. With proper modifications of insulin dose and diet, plus careful blood glucose monitoring, athletes with type I diabetes can exercise safely and regularly. To prevent hypoglycemia, the insulin dose may need to be reduced by 30 or 50 percent before exercise. Avoiding regular insulin at bedtime and reducing the evening insulin dose may help prevent nocturnal hypoglycemia after exercise. A tailored diet should reduce the chance of hypoglycemia.

  4. Experimental Study on Spiral Patterns in Dielectric Barrier Discharge System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shu-Hua; DONG Li-Fang; LIU Fu-Cheng; LI Shu-Feng; LI Xue-Chen; WANG Hong-Fang

    2006-01-01

    Spiral patterns are obtained in a dielectric barrier discharge system with water electrodes. The dynamics of spiral formation and transition is investigated. Wavelength characteristic of spiral patterns is also studied. Correlation measurements indicate that the wavelength of spiral pattern increases with the increasing gas gap width and oscillates with the increasing drive frequency.

  5. Molecular evolution of the porcine type I interferon family: subtype-specific expression and antiviral activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongming Sang

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNs, key antiviral cytokines, evolve to adapt with ever-changing viral threats during vertebrate speciation. Due to novel pathogenic pressure associated with Suidae speciation and domestication, porcine IFNs evolutionarily engender both molecular and functional diversification, which have not been well addressed in pigs, an important livestock species and animal model for biomedical sciences. Annotation of current swine genome assembly Sscrofa10.2 reveals 57 functional genes and 16 pseudogenes of type I IFNs. Subfamilies of multiple IFNA, IFNW and porcine-specific IFND genes are separated into four clusters with ∼ 60 kb intervals within the IFNB/IFNE bordered region in SSC1, and each cluster contains mingled subtypes of IFNA, IFNW and IFND. Further curation of the 57 functional IFN genes indicates that they include 18 potential artifactual duplicates. We performed phylogenetic construction as well as analyses of gene duplication/conversion and natural selection and showed that porcine type I IFN genes have been undergoing active diversification through both gene duplication and conversion. Extensive analyses of the non-coding sequences proximal to all IFN coding regions identified several genomic repetitive elements significantly associated with different IFN subtypes. Family-wide studies further revealed their molecular diversity with respect to differential expression and restrictive activity on the resurgence of a porcine endogenous retrovirus. Based on predicted 3-D structures of representative animal IFNs and inferred activity, we categorized the general functional propensity underlying the structure-activity relationship. Evidence indicates gene expansion of porcine type I IFNs. Genomic repetitive elements that associated with IFN subtypes may serve as molecular signatures of respective IFN subtypes and genomic mechanisms to mediate IFN gene evolution and expression. In summary, the porcine type I IFN profile has

  6. A type I interferon signature characterizes chronic antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascio, Federica; Pontrelli, Paola; Accetturo, Matteo; Oranger, Annarita; Gigante, Margherita; Castellano, Giuseppe; Gigante, Maddalena; Zito, Anna; Zaza, Gianluigi; Lupo, Antonio; Ranieri, Elena; Stallone, Giovanni; Gesualdo, Loreto; Grandaliano, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Chronic antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) represents the main cause of kidney graft loss. To uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying this condition, we characterized the molecular signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and, separately, of CD4(+) T lymphocytes isolated from CAMR patients, compared to kidney transplant recipients with normal graft function and histology. We enrolled 29 patients with biopsy-proven CAMR, 29 stable transplant recipients (controls), and 8 transplant recipients with clinical and histological evidence of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy. Messenger RNA and microRNA profiling of PBMCs and CD4(+) T lymphocytes was performed using Agilent microarrays in eight randomly selected patients per group from CAMR and control subjects. Results were evaluated statistically and by functional pathway analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) and validated in the remaining subjects. In PBMCs, 45 genes were differentially expressed between the two groups, most of which were up-regulated in CAMR and were involved in type I interferon signalling. In the same patients, 16 microRNAs were down-regulated in CAMR subjects compared to controls: four were predicted modulators of six mRNAs identified in the transcriptional analysis. In silico functional analysis supported the involvement of type I interferon signalling. To further confirm this result, we investigated the transcriptomic profiles of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in an independent group of patients, observing that the activation of type I interferon signalling was a specific hallmark of CAMR. In addition, in CAMR patients, we detected a reduction of circulating BDCA2(+) dendritic cells, the natural type I interferon-producing cells, and their recruitment into the graft along with increased expression of MXA, a type I interferon-induced protein, at the tubulointerstitial and vascular level. Finally, interferon alpha mRNA expression was significantly increased in CAMR compared to control

  7. Prevention of liver fibrosis by triple helix-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides targeted to the promoter region of type I collagen gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koilan, Subramaniyan; Hamilton, David; Baburyan, Narina; Padala, Mythili K; Weber, Karl T; Guntaka, Ramareddy V

    2010-10-01

    Hepatic fibrosis leading to cirrhosis remains a global health problem. The most common etiologies are alcoholism and viral infections. Liver fibrosis is associated with major changes in both quantity and composition of extracellular matix and leads to disorganization of the liver architecture and irreversible damage to the liver function. As of now there is no effective therapy to control fibrosis. The end product of fibrosis is abnormal synthesis and accumulation of type I collagen in the extracellular matrix, which is produced by activated stellate or Ito cells in the damaged liver. Therefore, inhibition of transcription of type I collagen should in principle inhibit its production and accumulation in liver. Normally, DNA exists in a duplex form. However, under some circumstances, DNA can assume triple helical (triplex) structures. Intermolecular triplexes, formed by the addition of a sequence-specific third strand to the major groove of the duplex DNA, have the potential to serve as selective gene regulators. Earlier, we demonstrated efficient triplex formation between the exogenously added triplex-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides (TFOs) and a specific sequence in the promoter region of the COL1A1 gene. In this study we used a rat model of liver fibrosis, induced by dimethylnitrosamine, to test whether these TFOs prevent liver fibrosis. Our results indicate that both the 25-mer and 18-mer TFOs, specific for the upstream nucleotide sequence from -141 to -165 (relative to the transcription start site) in the 5' end of collagen gene promoter, effectively prevented accumulation of liver collagen and fibrosis. We also observed improvement in liver function tests. However, mutations in the TFO that eliminated formation of triplexes are ineffective in preventing fibrosis. We believe that these TFOs can be used as potential antifibrotic therapeutic molecules.

  8. An Active Type I-E CRISPR-Cas System Identified in Streptomyces avermitilis

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems, the small RNA-dependent immune systems, are widely distributed in prokaryotes. However, only a small proportion of CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified to be active in bacteria. In this work, a naturally active type I-E CRISPR-Cas system was found in Streptomyces avermitilis. The system shares many common genetic features with the type I-E system of Escherichia coli, and meanwhile shows unique characteristics. It not only degrades plasmid DNA with target protospacers, b...

  9. No association of the IRS1 and PAX4 genes with type I diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, R.; Brorsson, C.; Boehm, B.

    2009-01-01

    To reassess earlier suggested type I diabetes (T1D) associations of the insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and the paired domain 4 gene (PAX4) genes, the Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) evaluated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering the two genomic regions. Sixteen SNPs we...... of tagging SNPs, more than one genotyping platform in high throughput studies, and sufficient power to draw solid conclusions in genetic studies of human complex diseases. Genes and Immunity (2009) 10, S49-S53; doi:10.1038/gene.2009.91 Udgivelsesdato: 2009/12...

  10. Reactivity of alveolar epithelial cells in primary culture with type I cell monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danto, S I; Zabski, S M; Crandall, E D

    1992-03-01

    An understanding of the process of alveolar epithelial cell growth and differentiation requires the ability to trace and analyze the phenotypic transitions that the cells undergo. This analysis demands specific phenotypic probes to type II and, especially, type I pneumocytes. To this end, monoclonal antibodies have been generated to type I alveolar epithelial cells using an approach designed to enhance production of lung-specific clones from a crude lung membrane preparation. The monoclonal antibodies were screened by a combination of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemical techniques, with the determination of type I cell specificity resting primarily on immunoelectron microscopic localization. Two of these new markers of the type I pneumocyte phenotype (II F1 and VIII B2) were used to analyze primary cultures of type II cells growing on standard tissue culture plastic and on a variety of substrata reported to affect the morphology of these cells in culture. On tissue culture plastic, the antibodies fail to react with early (days 1 to 3) type II cell cultures. The cells become progressively more reactive with time in culture to a plateau of approximately 6 times background by day 8, with a maximum rate of increase between days 3 and 5. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that type II cells in primary culture undergo at least partial differentiation into type I cells. Type II cells grown on laminin, which reportedly delays the loss of type II cell appearance, and on fibronectin, which has been reported to facilitate cell spreading and loss of type II cell features, develop the type I cell markers during cultivation in vitro with kinetics similar to those on uncoated tissue culture plastic. Cells on type I collagen and on tissue culture-treated Nuclepore filters, which have been reported to support monolayers with type I cell-like morphology, also increase their expression of the II F1 and VIII B2 epitopes around days 3 to 5. Taken

  11. A Case of Type I Sialidosis With Osteonecrosis Revealing a New Mutation in NEU1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Urbanski

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sialidosis is a rare lysosomal storage disease. The 2 forms described are as follows: the early-onset form, or type II, presents with dysostosis multiplex, while the late-onset form, or type I, does not involve bone in the literature. We report the case of a 42-year-old woman with type I sialidosis who presents with osteonecrosis of both humeral and femoral heads. Molecular study reveals a never listed mutation of NEU1 in exon 5, p.Gly273Asp (c.818G>A, and a second known missense mutation.

  12. Orthodontic treatment in adult with type I temporomandibular dysfunction : A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sai Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between occlusion and TMJ has been the subject of considerable controversy. It is widely believed that the TMJ signs and symptoms such as Joint pain, clicking, locking and headaches are secondary to abnormalities of occlusion, with actual derangement being uncommon. This case report is to put forward the hypothesis that, type I TMD is often due primarily to occlusal interferences for which orthodontic treatment is generally effective. This case report underlines the significance of fixed orthodontic appliance along with the anterior bite plane splint used in correction of type I TMD.

  13. Perelman's Entropy Functional at Type I Singularities of the Ricci Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Mantegazza, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    We study blow-ups around fixed points at Type I singularities of the Ricci flow on closed manifolds using Perelman's W-functional. First, we give an alternative proof of the result obtained by Naber and Enders-M\\"{u}ller-Topping that blow-up limits are non-flat gradient shrinking Ricci solitons. Our second and main result relates a limit W-density at a Type I singular point to the entropy of the limit gradient shrinking soliton obtained by blowing-up at this point. In particular, we show that no entropy is lost at infinity during the blow-up process.

  14. Type I and type II second harmonic generation of conically refracted beams

    CERN Document Server

    Turpin, Alex; Kalkandjiev, Todor K; Trull, Jose; Cojocaru, Crina; Mompart, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Type I and type II second harmonic generation (SHG) of a beam transformed by the conical refraction phenomenon are presented. We show that, for type I, the second harmonic intensity pattern is a light ring with a point of null intensity while, for type II, the light ring possesses two dark regions. Taking into account the different two-photon processes involved in SHG, we have derived analytical expressions for the resulting transverse intensity patterns that are in good agreement with the experimental data. Finally, we have investigated the spatial evolution of the second harmonic signals, showing that they behave as conically refracted beams.

  15. Types I and III procollagen extension peptides in serum respond to fracture in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joerring, S; Jensen, L T; Andersen, G R

    1992-01-01

    Markers of types I and III collagen turnover were measured in serial blood samples in 16 patients with a Colles' fracture. The collagen markers were the carboxy-terminal extension peptide of type I procollagen (PICP) and the amino-terminal extension peptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP......). Significant increases were found of PIIINP within 1 week and of PICP within 2 weeks. This sequential appearance of PIIINP and PICP was found to be in agreement with the appearance of types III and I collagen during early fracture healing as demonstrated in previous animal experimental studies. PICP had...... prove relevant as non-invasive markers of normal and pathological fracture healing in humans....

  16. Congenital neuromuscular disease with type I fibre hypotrophy, ophthalmoplegia and myofibril degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugie, H; Hanson, R; Rasmussen, G; Verity, M A

    1982-06-01

    We report a 7-year-old boy with progressive, early onset somatic and cranial muscle weakness associated with external ophthalmoplegia, facial weakness, type I fibre hypotrophy and myofibril degeneration. We separate this condition from congenital fibre type disproportion because of the facial weakness, ophthalmoplegia, central nucleation, and lysis in type I fibres. The case, which is similar to that described by Bender and Bender (1977), nosologically should be classified between the centronuclear myopathies and congenital fibre type disproportion, and most likely represents a congenital or neonatal disturbance of trophic interaction between nerve and muscle.

  17. Locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I cosmology in f(R, T) gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamir, M.F. [National University of Computer and Emerging Sciences, Department of Sciences and Humanities, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2015-08-15

    This manuscript is devoted to the investigation of the Bianchi type I universe in the context of f(R, T) gravity. For this purpose, we explore the exact solutions of locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I spacetime. The modified field equations are solved by assuming an expansion scalar θ proportional to the shear scalar σ, which gives A = B{sup n}, where A, B are the metric coefficients and n is an arbitrary constant. In particular, three solutions have been found and physical quantities are calculated in each case. (orig.)

  18. Spiral Wave Dynamics in a Response System Subjected to a Spiral Wave Forcing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guang-Zhao; CHEN Yong-Qi; TANG Guo-Ning; LIU Jun-Xian

    2011-01-01

    @@ Unidirectional linear error feedback coupling of two excitable medium systems displaying spiral waves is considered.The spiral wave in the response system is thus subjected to a spiral wave forcing.We find that the unidirectional feedback coupling can lead to richer behaviour than the mutual coupling.The spiral wave dynamics in the response system depends on the coupling strength and frequency mismatch.When the coupling strength is small, the feedback coupling induces the drift or meander of the forced spiral wave.When the coupling strength is large enough, the feedback coupling may lead to the transition from spiral wave to anti-target or target-like wave.The generation of anti-target wave in coupled excitable media is observed for the first time.Furthermore, when the coupling strength is strong, the synchronization between two subsystems can be established.%Unidirectional linear error feedback coupling of two excitable medium systems displaying spiral waves is considered. The spiral wave in the response system is thus subjected to a spiral wave forcing. We find that the unidirectional feedback coupling can lead to richer behaviour than the mutual coupling. The spiral wave dynamics in the response system depends on the coupling strength and frequency mismatch. When the coupling strength is small, the feedback coupling induces the drift or meander of the forced spiral wave. When the coupling strength is large enough, the feedback coupling may lead to the transition from spiral wave to anti-target or target-like wave. The generation of anti-target wave in coupled excitable media is observed for the first time. Furthermore,when the coupling strength is strong, the synchronization between two subsystems can be established.

  19. SPIRAL CONTACTOR FOR SOLVENT EXTRACTION COLUMN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, C.R.

    1961-06-13

    The patented extraction apparatus includes a column, perforated plates extending across the column, liquid pulse means connected to the column, and an imperforate spiral ribbon along the length of the column.

  20. Asymptotic theory for spiral wave reflections

    CERN Document Server

    Langham, Jacob; Barkley, Dwight

    2014-01-01

    Resonantly forced spiral waves in excitable media drift in straight-line paths, their rotation centers behaving as point-like objects moving along trajectories with a constant velocity. Interaction with medium boundaries alters this velocity and may often result in a reflection of the drift trajectory. Such reflections have diverse characteristics and are known to be highly non-specular in general. In this context we apply the theory of response functions, which via numerically computable integrals, reduces the reaction-diffusion equations governing the whole excitable medium to the dynamics of just the rotation center and rotation phase of a spiral wave. Spiral reflection trajectories are computed by this method for both small and large-core spiral waves. Such calculations provide insight into the process of reflection as well as explanations for differences in trajectories across parameters, including the effects of incidence angle and forcing amplitude. Qualitative aspects of these results are preserved fa...

  1. Featured Image: The Birth of Spiral Arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    In this figure, the top panels show three spiral galaxies in the Virgo cluster, imaged with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The bottom panels provide a comparison with three morphologically similar galaxies generated insimulations. The simulations run by Marcin Semczuk, Ewa okas, and Andrs del Pino (Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Poland) were designed to examine how the spiral arms of galaxies like the Milky Way may have formed. In particular, the group exploredthe possibility that so-called grand-design spiral arms are caused by tidal effects as a Milky-Way-like galaxy orbits a cluster of galaxies. The authors show that the gravitational potential of the cluster can trigger the formation of two spiral arms each time the galaxy passes through the pericenter of its orbit around the cluster. Check out the original paper below for more information!CitationMarcin Semczuk et al 2017 ApJ 834 7. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/834/1/7

  2. THE BIRTH AND DEATH PROCESSES OF HYPERCYCLE SPIRALS

    OpenAIRE

    KAZUMASA OIDA

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of hypercycle spirals in a two-dimensional cellular automaton model is analyzed. Each spiral can be approximated by an Archimedean spiral with center, width, and phase change according to Brownian motion. A barrier exists between two spirals if the phase synchronization hypothesis is taken into account, and the occurrence rate of pair decay (simultaneous disappearance of two spirals) can be explained through a random walk simulation with the barrier. Simulation experiments show t...

  3. Simulations of dual morphology in spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, S L

    2003-01-01

    Gas and stars in spiral galaxies are modelled with the DUAL code, using hydrodynamic and N-body techniques. The simulations reveal morphological differences mirroring the dual morphologies seen in B and K' band observations of many spiral galaxies. In particular, the gaseous images are more flocculent with lower pitch angles than the stellar images, and the stellar arm-interarm contrast correlates with the degree of morphological decoupling.

  4. On Three-Dimensional Spiral Galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Xin-Lian; PENG Qiu-He; LONG Min; PENG Fang; ZOU Zhi-Gang

    2000-01-01

    Density waves in 3D spiral galaxies are studied. In order to eliminate the forbidden region near the corotation in the grand-design galaxies, we assume that the perturbation satisfies the stable condition Q(r) > 1 over all the disk except that at the corotation. Then, a new method is put forward here to determine some basic parameters of spiral galaxies. We apply it to our Galaxy, and the results are in good agreement with the previous results.

  5. View factors of cylindrical spiral surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, Vladimir A.; Solovjov, Vladimir P.

    2016-03-01

    Analytical expressions are presented for the view factors (radiative configuration factors) associated with the flat right cylindrical spiral surface. Such cylindrical spiral systems are widely applied as electrical resistance heating elements for lighting devices, electronic radio tubes, high-speed gas flow heaters, and other appliances used for scientific, industrial and domestic purposes. Derivation of the view factors is based on the invariant principles and the results presented in Lebedev (2000, 2003,1988) [1-3].

  6. Twisted Radiation by Electrons in Spiral Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Katoh, M; Mirian, N S; Konomi, T; Taira, Y; Kaneyasu, T; Hosaka, M; Yamamoto, N; Mochihashi, A; Takashima, Y; Kuroda, K; Miyamoto, A; Miyamoto, K; Sasaki, S

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically show that a single free electron in circular/spiral motion radiates an electromagnetic wave possessing helical phase structure and carrying orbital angular momentum. We experimentally demonstrate it by double-slit diffraction on radiation from relativistic electrons in spiral motion. We show that twisted photons should be created naturally by cyclotron/synchrotron radiations or Compton scatterings in various situations in astrophysics. We propose promising laboratory vortex photon sources in various wavelengths ranging from radio wave to gamma-rays.

  7. The distribution of prime numbers on the square root spiral

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, Harry K

    2008-01-01

    Prime Numbers clearly accumulate on defined spiral graphs,which run through the Square Root Spiral. These spiral graphs can be assigned to different spiral-systems, in which all spiral-graphs have the same direction of rotation and the same -second difference- between the numbers, which lie on these spiral-graphs. A mathematical analysis shows, that these spiral graphs are caused exclusively by quadratic polynomials. For example the well known Euler Polynomial x2+x+41 appears on the Square Root Spiral in the form of three spiral-graphs, which are defined by three different quadratic polynomials. All natural numbers,divisible by a certain prime factor, also lie on defined spiral graphs on the Square Root Spiral (or Spiral of Theodorus, or Wurzelspirale). And the Square Numbers 4, 9, 16, 25, 36 even form a highly three-symmetrical system of three spiral graphs, which divides the square root spiral into three equal areas. Fibonacci number sequences also play a part in the structure of the Square Root Spiral. Wit...

  8. The histopathology of type I (lepra) and type II (ENL) reactions in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, V N; Gautam, R K; Koranne, R V; Beohar, P C

    1986-01-01

    The histopathological features in type I (lepra) reaction comprised a loose and disorganised granuloma in the upper and mid-dermis, dermal edema and variable cellular contents, namely, epithelioid cells, lymphocytes, giant cells, and macrophages. While ENL reactions, were characterised by predominant involvement of subcutaneous vessels, vasculitis, and polymorphonuclear infiltration in and around the blood vessels.

  9. An Active Type I-E CRISPR-Cas System Identified in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yi; Wang, Shiwei; Chen, Zhi; Guo, Yajie; Song, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems, the small RNA-dependent immune systems, are widely distributed in prokaryotes. However, only a small proportion of CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified to be active in bacteria. In this work, a naturally active type I-E CRISPR-Cas system was found in Streptomyces avermitilis. The system shares many common genetic features with the type I-E system of Escherichia coli, and meanwhile shows unique characteristics. It not only degrades plasmid DNA with target protospacers, but also acquires new spacers from the target plasmid DNA. The naive features of spacer acquisition in the type I-E system of S. avermitilis were investigated and a completely conserved PAM 5'-AAG-3' was identified. Spacer acquisition displayed differential strand bias upstream and downstream of the priming spacer, and irregular integrations of new spacers were observed. In addition, introduction of this system into host conferred phage resistance to some extent. This study will give new insights into adaptation mechanism of the type I-E systems in vivo, and meanwhile provide theoretical foundation for applying this system on the genetic modification of S. avermitilis.

  10. Tyrosinernia type I treated by NTBC : How does AFP predict liver cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelink, C. J. L.; van Hasselt, P.; van der Ploeg, A.; van den Heuvel-Elbrink, M. M.; Wijburg, F. A.; Bijleveld, C. M. A.; van Spronsen, F. J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Tyrosinemia type I is associated with an increased risk of liver cancer development. The formation of the pathogenic fumarylacetoacetate is prevented by 2-(2-nitro-4-3 trifluoro-methylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione (NTBC). Still, some patients with NTBC treatment develop liver cancer. A r

  11. Elevated carboxy terminal cross linked telopeptide of type I collagen in alcoholic cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Hansen, M; Hillingsø, Jens

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The carboxy terminal cross linked telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) has been put forward as a marker of bone resorption. Patients with alcoholic liver disease may have osteodystrophy. AIMS: To assess circulating and regional concentrations of ICTP in relation to liver dysfunction...

  12. Health Related Quality of Life in Patients with Diabetes Mellitys Type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.E. Hart (Bertien)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractDiabetes mellitus type I (DMT1 I is a chronic disease caused by the autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, resulting in an absolute inability to produce the hormone insulin which is necessary for the regulation of blood glucose levels. The autoimmune

  13. Training-induced changes in peritendinous type I collagen turnover determined by microdialysis in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langberg, Henning; Rosendal, L; Kjaer, M

    2001-01-01

    1. Acute exercise is found to increase collagen type I formation locally in peritendinous connective tissue of the Achilles' tendon in humans, as determined from changes in interstitial concentrations of collagen propeptide (PICP) and a collagen degradation product (ICTP) by the use of microdialy...... in local connective tissue of the peritendinous Achilles' region. Early in the process both synthesis and degradation are elevated, whereas later, the anabolic processes are dominating causing a net synthesis of type I collagen in tendon-related tissue in humans.......1. Acute exercise is found to increase collagen type I formation locally in peritendinous connective tissue of the Achilles' tendon in humans, as determined from changes in interstitial concentrations of collagen propeptide (PICP) and a collagen degradation product (ICTP) by the use...... of microdialysis catheters. However, the local collagen type I turnover response to training is unknown. 2. Nineteen young males were studied before and after 4 and 11 weeks of physical training. Microdialysis catheters with a high molecular mass cut-off value (3000 kDa), allowing the determination of PICP...

  14. An Active Type I-E CRISPR-Cas System Identified in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Qiu

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas systems, the small RNA-dependent immune systems, are widely distributed in prokaryotes. However, only a small proportion of CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified to be active in bacteria. In this work, a naturally active type I-E CRISPR-Cas system was found in Streptomyces avermitilis. The system shares many common genetic features with the type I-E system of Escherichia coli, and meanwhile shows unique characteristics. It not only degrades plasmid DNA with target protospacers, but also acquires new spacers from the target plasmid DNA. The naive features of spacer acquisition in the type I-E system of S. avermitilis were investigated and a completely conserved PAM 5'-AAG-3' was identified. Spacer acquisition displayed differential strand bias upstream and downstream of the priming spacer, and irregular integrations of new spacers were observed. In addition, introduction of this system into host conferred phage resistance to some extent. This study will give new insights into adaptation mechanism of the type I-E systems in vivo, and meanwhile provide theoretical foundation for applying this system on the genetic modification of S. avermitilis.

  15. Chiari Type I Malformations in Young Adults: Implications for the College Health Practitioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Mary Jane; Vaughn, John A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe 2 cases of Chiari type I malformation (CM-I) in students presenting to a college health center within a 6-month period. A review of CM-I, including epidemiology, typical presentation, evaluation, and management, is followed by a discussion of the clinical and functional implications of the disorder in an…

  16. Type I Interferons Regulate Immune Responses in Humans with Blood-Stage Plasmodium falciparum Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes de Oca, Marcela; Kumar, Rajiv; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Amante, Fiona H.; Sheel, Meru; Faleiro, Rebecca J.; Bunn, Patrick T.; Best, Shannon E.; Beattie, Lynette; Ng, Susanna S.; Edwards, Chelsea L.; Boyle, Glen M.; Price, Ric N.; Anstey, Nicholas M.; Loughland, Jessica R.; Burel, Julie; Doolan, Denise L.; Haque, Ashraful; McCarthy, James S.; Engwerda, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The development of immunoregulatory networks is important to prevent disease. However, these same networks allow pathogens to persist and reduce vaccine efficacy. Here, we identify type I interferons (IFNs) as important regulators in developing anti-parasitic immunity in healthy volunteers infected for the first time with Plasmodium falciparum. Type I IFNs suppressed innate immune cell function and parasitic-specific CD4+ T cell IFNγ production, and they promoted the development of parasitic-specific IL-10-producing Th1 (Tr1) cells. Type I IFN-dependent, parasite-specific IL-10 production was also observed in P. falciparum malaria patients in the field following chemoprophylaxis. Parasite-induced IL-10 suppressed inflammatory cytokine production, and IL-10 levels after drug treatment were positively associated with parasite burdens before anti-parasitic drug administration. These findings have important implications for understanding the development of host immune responses following blood-stage P. falciparum infection, and they identify type I IFNs and related signaling pathways as potential targets for therapies or vaccine efficacy improvement. PMID:27705789

  17. Random Numbers Demonstrate the Frequency of Type I Errors: Three Spreadsheets for Class Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Sean

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes three spreadsheet exercises demonstrating the nature and frequency of type I errors using random number generation. The exercises are designed specifically to address issues related to testing multiple relations using correlation (Demonstration I), t tests varying in sample size (Demonstration II) and multiple comparisons…

  18. Type I Error Inflation in DIF Identification with Mantel-Haenszel: An Explanation and a Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magis, David; De Boeck, Paul

    2014-01-01

    It is known that sum score-based methods for the identification of differential item functioning (DIF), such as the Mantel-Haenszel (MH) approach, can be affected by Type I error inflation in the absence of any DIF effect. This may happen when the items differ in discrimination and when there is item impact. On the other hand, outlier DIF methods…

  19. Many Tests of Significance: New Methods for Controlling Type I Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keselman, H. J.; Miller, Charles W.; Holland, Burt

    2011-01-01

    There have been many discussions of how Type I errors should be controlled when many hypotheses are tested (e.g., all possible comparisons of means, correlations, proportions, the coefficients in hierarchical models, etc.). By and large, researchers have adopted familywise (FWER) control, though this practice certainly is not universal. Familywise…

  20. Bianchi Type I Cosmological Models in Eddington-inspired Born–Infeld Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiberiu Harko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider the dynamics of a barotropic cosmological fluid in an anisotropic, Bianchi type I space-time in Eddington-inspired Born–Infeld (EiBI gravity. By assuming isotropic pressure distribution, we obtain the general solution of the field equations in an exact parametric form. The behavior of the geometric and thermodynamic parameters of the Bianchi type I Universe is studied, by using both analytical and numerical methods, for some classes of high density matter, described by the stiff causal, radiation, and pressureless fluid equations of state. In all cases the study of the models with different equations of state can be reduced to the integration of a highly nonlinear second order ordinary differential equation for the energy density. The time evolution of the anisotropic Bianchi type I Universe strongly depends on the initial values of the energy density and of the Hubble function. An important observational parameter, the mean anisotropy parameter, is also studied in detail, and we show that for the dust filled Universe the cosmological evolution always ends into isotropic phase, while for high density matter filled universes the isotropization of Bianchi type I universes is essentially determined by the initial conditions of the energy density.

  1. LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION IN TYROSINEMIA TYPE-I - THE GRONINGEN EXPERIENCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIJBURG, FA; REITSMA, WCC; SLOOFF, MJH; VANSPRONSEN, FJ; KOETSE, HA; REIJNGOUD, DJ; SMIT, GPA; BERGER, Ruud; BIJLEVELD, CMA

    1995-01-01

    Dietary treatment cannot prevent a lethal outcome in many patients with hereditary tyrosinaemia type I (van Spronsen et al 1994). Therefore, until the discovery of 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione (NTBC) as a potential drug (Lindstedt et al 1992), orthotopic liver transplant

  2. The type I interferon response during viral infections: a "SWOT" analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaajetaan, Giel R; Bruggeman, Cathrien A; Stassen, Frank R

    2012-03-01

    The type I interferon (IFN) response is a strong and crucial moderator for the control of viral infections. The strength of this system is illustrated by the fact that, despite some temporary discomfort like a common cold or diarrhea, most viral infections will not cause major harm to the healthy immunocompetent host. To achieve this, the immune system is equipped with a wide array of pattern recognition receptors and the subsequent coordinated type I IFN response orchestrated by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and conventional dendritic cells (cDCs). The production of type I IFN subtypes by dendritic cells (DCs), but also other cells is crucial for the execution of many antiviral processes. Despite this coordinated response, morbidity and mortality are still common in viral disease due to the ability of viruses to exploit the weaknesses of the immune system. Viruses successfully evade immunity and infection can result in aberrant immune responses. However, these weaknesses also open opportunities for improvement via clinical interventions as can be seen in current vaccination and antiviral treatment programs. The application of IFNs, Toll-like receptor ligands, DCs, and antiviral proteins is now being investigated to further limit viral infections. Unfortunately, a common threat during stimulation of immunity is the possible initiation or aggravation of autoimmunity. Also the translation from animal models to the human situation remains difficult. With a Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats ("SWOT") analysis, we discuss the interaction between host and virus as well as (future) therapeutic options, related to the type I IFN system.

  3. Activation of the chicken type I IFN response by infectious bronchitis coronavirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kint, J.; Fernandez Gutierrez, M.M.; Maier, H.J.; Britton, P.; Langereis, M.A.; Koumans, J.; Wiegertjes, G.F.; Forlenza, M.

    2015-01-01

    Coronaviruses from both the Alpha and Betacoronavirus genera, interfere with the type I interferon (IFN) response in various ways, ensuring limited activation of the IFN response in most cell types. Of Gammacoronaviruses that mainly infect birds, little is known about activation of the host immune r

  4. Functional and evolutionary studies of type I MADS box genes in Petunia hybrida and arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemer, Marian

    2008-01-01

    MADS-box genes are very important for plant development and especially for the formation of the flower. The MADS box family of transcription factors in plants can be subdivided into two classes: the MIKC-type genes, which play essential roles in flower formation, and the type I genes, which are func

  5. 46 CFR 160.077-21 - Approval Testing-Type I and Commercial Hybrid PFD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... exempt from this test. (3) Buoyancy and inflation medium retention test, UL 1517, Section S10, except the..., 46 CFR 160.176-13(d)(2) through (d)(5) for Type I hybrid PFDs. UL 1517, Section S8, for Type V...

  6. Change in perceived health and functioning over time in patients with type I diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hart, H.E.; Redekop, W.K.; Bilo, H.J.; Berg, M.; Meyboom-de Jong, B.

    Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate perceived health and functioning (PHF) of patients with type I diabetes mellitus (DMT1) over time and to compare change in perceived PHF with that of a sample of the general population. Methods: In a Dutch cohort of 234 patients with DMT1 we

  7. Distribution and mechanism of Type I-E CRISPR-Cas systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staals, R.H.J.; Brouns, S.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the CRISPR type I system encompasses six different subtypes (I-A to I-F), only three subtypes have been studied in detail to date. This review includes an analysis of the distribution of CRISPR-Cas systems among the different bacterial and archaeal lineages, and will focus on our

  8. Tyrosinernia type I treated by NTBC: How does AFP predict liver cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J.L. Koelink; P. van Hasselt; A. van der Ploeg; M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink; F.A. Wijburg; C.M.A. Bijleveld; F.J. van Spronsen

    2006-01-01

    Background: Tyrosinemia type I is associated with an increased risk of liver cancer development. The formation of the pathogenic fumarylacetoacetate is prevented by 2-(2-nitro-4-3 trifluoro-methylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione (NTBC). Still, some patients with NTBC treatment develop liver cancer. A r

  9. Peripheral nerve pathology in patients with severely affected complex regional pain syndrome type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Bodde, Marlies I.; van den Dungen, Johannes; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is a chronic pain syndrome with no clinical evidence of nerve injury; however, recently, changes in muscle tissue have been found in case of CRPS-I. Our aim was to search for histological changes in peripheral nerves of amputated limbs from patients wit

  10. Determination of markers for collagen type I turnover in peritendinous human tissue by microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J L; Langberg, Henning; Heinemeier, K M

    2006-01-01

    Previous results from our group have shown that loading of human tendon elevates tendinous type I collagen production measured by microdialysis. However, exclusion of the observed elevation as a response to trauma from inserting the microdialysis catheters or a possible influence from the collagen...

  11. Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I): Assessment of disease severity, therapeutic options and early diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ru, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Bepaalde stoffen in bloed en urine, zogeheten biomarkers, kunnen gebruikt worden voor het stellen van de diagnose van de stofwisselingsziekte Mucopolysaccharidose type I (MPS I) op basis van bloed afgenomen bij de hielprikscreening. Dit blijkt uit het onderzoek van Minke de Ru dat zich richtte op he

  12. PRDM16 represses the type I interferon response in adipocytes to promote mitochondrial and thermogenic programing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissig, Megan; Ishibashi, Jeff; Harms, Matthew J; Lim, Hee-Woong; Stine, Rachel R; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Seale, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    Brown adipose has the potential to counteract obesity, and thus, identifying signaling pathways that regulate the activity of this tissue is of great clinical interest. PRDM16 is a transcription factor that activates brown fat-specific genes while repressing white fat and muscle-specific genes in adipocytes. Whether PRDM16 also controls other gene programs to regulate adipocyte function was unclear. Here, we identify a novel role for PRDM16 in suppressing type I interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes (ISGs), including Stat1, in adipocytes in vitro and in vivo Ectopic activation of type I IFN signaling in brown adipocytes induces mitochondrial dysfunction and reduces uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression. Prdm16-deficient adipose displays an exaggerated response to type I IFN, including higher STAT1 levels and reduced mitochondrial gene expression. Mechanistically, PRDM16 represses ISGs through binding to promoter regions of these genes and blocking the activating function of IFN regulatory factor 1 (IRF1). Together, these data indicate that PRDM16 diminishes responsiveness to type I IFN in adipose cells to promote thermogenic and mitochondrial function. © 2017 The Authors.

  13. Liver transplantation for glycogen storage disease types I, III, and IV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matern, D; Starzl, TE; Arnaout, W; Barnard, J; Bynon, JS; Dhawan, A; Emond, J; Haagsma, EB; Hug, G; Lachaux, A; Smit, GPA; Chen, YT

    1999-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) types I, III, and IV can be associated with severe liver disease. The possible development of hepatocellular carcinoma and/or hepatic failure make these GSDs potential candidates for liver transplantation. Early diagnosis and initiation of effective dietary therapy hav

  14. Tilted Bianchi type I dust fluid cosmological model in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raj Bali; Keshav Sharma

    2002-03-01

    In this paper, we have investigated a tilted Bianchi type I cosmological model filled with dust of perfect fluid in general relativity. To get a determinate solution, we have assumed a condition = between metric potentials. The physical and geometrical aspects of the model together with singularity in the model are also discussed.

  15. Short-term moderate sodium restriction induces relative hyperfiltration in normotensive normoalbuminuric Type I diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luik, PT; Hoogenberg, K; van der Kleij, FGH; Beusekamp, BJ; Kerstens, MN; de Jong, PE; Dullaart, RPF; Navis, GJ

    2002-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis. Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased extracellular volume. Sodium restriction might seem a logical form of treatment but data on its renal effects is conflicting. We therefore studied the effects of sodium restriction on renal haemodynamics in

  16. Therapy-Resistant Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I : To Amputate or Not?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodde, M.I.; Dijkstra, P.U.; den Dunnen, W.F.A.; Geertzen, J.H.B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Amputation for the treatment of long-standing, therapy-resistant complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is controversial. An evidence-based decision regarding whether or not to amputate is not possible on the basis of current guidelines. The aim of the current study was to system

  17. Informed Decision-Making Regarding Amputation for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodde, Marlies I.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Schrier, Michiel; van den Dungen, Johannes; den Dunnen, Wilfred E.; Geertzen, Joannes

    2014-01-01

    Background: Literature on complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) discussing the decision to amputate or not, the level of amputation, or the timing of the amputation is scarce: We evaluated informed decision-making regarding amputation for CRPS-I. Methods: We describe our findings in a retro

  18. Functional and evolutionary studies of type I MADS box genes in Petunia hybrida and arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemer, Marian

    2008-01-01

    MADS-box genes are very important for plant development and especially for the formation of the flower. The MADS box family of transcription factors in plants can be subdivided into two classes: the MIKC-type genes, which play essential roles in flower formation, and the type I genes, which are

  19. RAIDD Mediates TLR3 and IRF7 Driven Type I Interferon Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathish Kumar Maney

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Viral infections represent a global health problem with the need for new viral therapies and better understanding of the immune response during infection. The most immediate and potent anti-viral defense mechanism is the production of type I interferon (IFN-I which are activated rapidly following recognition of viral infection by host pathogen recognition receptors (PRR. The mechanisms of innate cellular signaling downstream of PRR activation remain to be fully understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that CASP2 and RIPK1 domain-containing adaptor with death domain (CRADD/RAIDD is a critical component in type I IFN production. Methods: The role of RAIDD during IFN-I production was investigated using western blot, shRNA mediated lentiviral knockdown, immunoprecipitation and IFN-I driven dual luciferase assay. Results: Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed the molecular interaction of RAIDD with interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7 and its phosphorylating kinase IKKε. Using an IFN-4α driven dual luciferase analysis in RAIDD deficient cells, type I IFN activation by IKKε and IRF7 was dramatically reduced. Furthermore, deletion of either the caspase recruitment domain (CARD or death domain (DD of RAIDD inhibited IKKε and IRF7 mediated interferon-4α activation. Conclusion: We have identified that the adaptor molecule RAIDD coordinates IKKε and IRF7 interaction to ensure efficient expression of type I interferon.

  20. DENV inhibits type I IFN production in infected cells by cleaving human STING.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Aguirre

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a pathogen with a high impact on human health. It replicates in a wide range of cells involved in the immune response. To efficiently infect humans, DENV must evade or inhibit fundamental elements of the innate immune system, namely the type I interferon response. DENV circumvents the host immune response by expressing proteins that antagonize the cellular innate immunity. We have recently documented the inhibition of type I IFN production by the proteolytic activity of DENV NS2B3 protease complex in human monocyte derived dendritic cells (MDDCs. In the present report we identify the human adaptor molecule STING as a target of the NS2B3 protease complex. We characterize the mechanism of inhibition of type I IFN production in primary human MDDCs by this viral factor. Using different human and mouse primary cells lacking STING, we show enhanced DENV replication. Conversely, mutated versions of STING that cannot be cleaved by the DENV NS2B3 protease induced higher levels of type I IFN after infection with DENV. Additionally, we show that DENV NS2B3 is not able to degrade the mouse version of STING, a phenomenon that severely restricts the replication of DENV in mouse cells, suggesting that STING plays a key role in the inhibition of DENV infection and spread in mice.

  1. Search for Millisecond Periodicities in Type I X-ray Bursts of the Rapid Burster

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, D W; Rutledge, R E; Morgan, E H; Guerriero, R A; Bildsten, L; Van der Klis, M; Van Paradijs, J; Moore, C B; Dotani, T; Asai, K

    2000-01-01

    We have searched the rising portion of type I X-ray bursts observed from the Rapid Burster with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer for the presence of periodicities. The 95 per cent confidence upper limit on the average root-mean-square variation of near coherent pulsations with a width of 98 per cent significance) at 306.5 Hz.

  2. Neuromyelitis optica-like pathology is dependent on type I interferon response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorooshi, Reza; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Asgari, Nasrin;

    2013-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica is an antibody-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. Reports have suggested that interferon beta which is beneficial for multiple sclerosis, exacerbates neuromyelitis optica. Our aim was to determine whether type I interferon plays a role in ...

  3. Renal Function in Glycogen Storage Disease Type I, Natural Course, and Renopreservative Effects of ACE Inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Danielle H. J.; Rake, Jan Peter; Navis, Gerjan; Fidler, Vaclav; van Dael, Catharina M. L.; Smit, G. Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Renal failure is a major complication in glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I). We studied the natural course of renal function in GSD I patients. We studied differences between patients in optimal and nonoptimal metabolic control and possible renoprotective effects of a

  4. Type I interferon induction is detrimental during infection with the Whipple's disease bacterium, Tropheryma whipplei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatoun Al Moussawi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the first line of defense against pathogens. Upon infection macrophages usually produce high levels of proinflammatory mediators. However, macrophages can undergo an alternate polarization leading to a permissive state. In assessing global macrophage responses to the bacterial agent of Whipple's disease, Tropheryma whipplei, we found that T. whipplei induced M2 macrophage polarization which was compatible with bacterial replication. Surprisingly, this M2 polarization of infected macrophages was associated with apoptosis induction and a functional type I interferon (IFN response, through IRF3 activation and STAT1 phosphorylation. Using macrophages from mice deficient for the type I IFN receptor, we found that this type I IFN response was required for T. whipplei-induced macrophage apoptosis in a JNK-dependent manner and was associated with the intracellular replication of T. whipplei independently of JNK. This study underscores the role of macrophage polarization in host responses and highlights the detrimental role of type I IFN during T. whipplei infection.

  5. Distribution and mechanism of Type I-E CRISPR-Cas systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staals, R.H.J.; Brouns, S.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the CRISPR type I system encompasses six different subtypes (I-A to I-F), only three subtypes have been studied in detail to date. This review includes an analysis of the distribution of CRISPR-Cas systems among the different bacterial and archaeal lineages, and will focus on our mechanisti

  6. Effect of Collagen Type I or Type II on Chondrogenesis by Cultured Human Articular Chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Vonk, L.A.; van Rijen, M.H.P.; Akrum, V.; Langeveld, D.; van Boxtel, A.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Current cartilage repair procedures using autologous chondrocytes rely on a variety of carriers for implantation. Collagen types I and II are frequently used and valuable properties of both were shown earlier in vitro, although a preference for either was not demonstrated. Recently,

  7. Type I hypersensitivity to Parthenium hysterophorus in patients with parthenium dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Chembolli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parthenium dermatitis is a major problem in urban and rural India. Patients with severe allergic rhinitis due to exposure to pollens of parthenium are reported to have parthenium specific IgE and IgG antibodies. Parthenium induces contact dermatitis by Type IV hypersensitivity and allergic rhinitis by Type-I hypersensitivity. Aims: The study was undertaken to detect Type-I and Type-IV hypersensitivity amongst patients with parthenium dermatitis. Methods: Fourteen patients with clinical features of parthenium dermatitis who patch tested positive to parthenium were included in the study. Patch testing was done by standard method and results interpreted as recommended by the ICDRG. Serum IgE was determined by chemiluminescence immuno assay system (CLIA. Prick testing was performed and interpreted by standard method. Results: Twelve out of the 14 patients included, showed a positive prick test. Serum IgE was elevated in all patients to varying degrees (mean IgE-1279.9 IU/ml; N - up to 100 IU/ml. Conclusion: The positive patch test, prick test and elevated serum IgE suggest that both Type-I and Type-IV hypersensitivity may play a role in the induction and perpetuation of parthenium dermatitis in most patients. To date, delayed hypersensitivity was thought to be solely responsible for parthenium dermatitis. This study suggests that a combined type-I and type IV hypersensitivity mechanisms may be operational.

  8. Recurrent subdural hygromas after foramen magnum decompression for Chiari Type I malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Erlick A C; Steele, Louise F; Magdum, Shailendra A

    2014-06-01

    A paediatric case of foramen magnum decompression for Chiari Type I malformation complicated by recurrent subdural hygromas (SH) and raised intracranial pressure without ventriculomegaly is described. SH pathogenesis is discussed, with consideration given to arachnoid fenestration. We summarise possibilities for treatment and avoidance of this unusual consequence of foramen magnum decompression.

  9. The human P-glycoprotein transporter enhances the type I interferon response to Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, Nadejda; Kaplan Zeevi, Millie; Weinstein, Shiri; Peer, Dan; Herskovits, Anat A

    2015-06-01

    Human multidrug efflux transporters are known for their ability to extrude antibiotics and toxic compounds out of cells, yet accumulating data indicate they have additional functions in diverse physiological processes not related to drug efflux. Here, we show that the human multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (also named MDR1 and ABCB1) is transcriptionally induced in the monocytic cell line THP-1 upon infection with the human intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Notably, we found that P-gp is important for full activation of the type I interferon response elicited against L. monocytogenes bacteria. Both inhibition of P-gp function by verapamil and inhibition of its transcription using mRNA silencing led to a reduction in the magnitude of the type I response in infected cells. This function of P-gp was specific to type I interferon cytokines elicited against cytosolic replicating bacteria and was not observed in response to cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP), a molecule that was shown to be secreted by L. monocytogenes during infection and to trigger type I interferons. Moreover, P-gp was not involved in activation of other proinflammatory cytokines, such as those triggered by vacuolar-restricted L. monocytogenes or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Taken together, these findings demonstrate a role for P-gp in proper development of an innate immune response against intracellular pathogens, highlighting the complexity in employing therapeutic strategies that involve inhibition of multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps.

  10. Localization of type I interferon receptor limits interferon-induced TLR-3 in epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study aimed to expand on the role of type I IFNs in the influenza-induced upregulation of TLR3 and determine whether and how the localization of the IFN-alpha/beta receptor (IFNAR) in respiratory epithelial cells could modify IFN-induced responses. Using differentiated prima...

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A CLASS-SPECIFIC IMMUNOASSAY FOR THE TYPE I PYRETHROID INSECTICIDES. (R825433)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A general enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed for the type I pyrethroid insecticides, such as permethrin, phenothrin, resmethrin and bioresmethrin. Polyclonal antibodies were generated by immunizing with a permethrin derivative, 2,2-dimethyl-3-(5′-carboxy-pe...

  12. Stressful life events and psychological dysfunction in complex regional pain syndrome type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, JHB; de Bruijn-Kofman, AT; de Bruijn, HP; van de Wiel, HBM; Dijkstra, PU

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine to what extent stressful life events and psychological dysfunction play a role in the pathogenesis of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I (CRPS). Design: A comparative study between a CRPS group and a control group. Stressful life events and psychological dysfunction evalua

  13. Propolis Modifies Collagen Types I and III Accumulation in the Matrix of Burnt Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Olczyk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing represents an interactive process which requires highly organized activity of various cells, synthesizing cytokines, growth factors, and collagen. Collagen types I and III, serving as structural and regulatory molecules, play pivotal roles during wound healing. The aim of this study was to compare the propolis and silver sulfadiazine therapeutic efficacy throughout the quantitative and qualitative assessment of collagen types I and III accumulation in the matrix of burnt tissues. Burn wounds were inflicted on pigs, chosen for the evaluation of wound repair because of many similarities between pig and human skin. Isolated collagen types I and III were estimated by the surface plasmon resonance method with a subsequent collagenous quantification using electrophoretic and densitometric analyses. Propolis burn treatment led to enhanced collagens and its components expression, especially during the initial stage of the study. Less expressed changes were observed after silver sulfadiazine (AgSD application. AgSD and, with a smaller intensity, propolis stimulated accumulation of collagenous degradation products. The assessed propolis therapeutic efficacy, throughout quantitatively and qualitatively analyses of collagen types I and III expression and degradation in wounds matrix, may indicate that apitherapeutic agent can generate favorable biochemical environment supporting reepithelization.

  14. Fulminant type I diabetes mellitus associated with nivolumab in a patient with relapsed classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, Wataru; Ohashi, Ken; Yamauchi, Nobuhiko; Tobinai, Kensei

    2017-03-01

    We report the case of a patient with relapsed classical Hodgkin lymphoma who developed fulminant type I diabetes mellitus as a severe adverse event of treatment with the anti-programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) antibody, nivolumab. On the first day of the sixth cycle, the blood glucose level was markedly elevated (375 mg/dL). Although neither ketoacidosis nor ketonuria was detected, the markedly acute onset of the hyperglycemia was consistent with the typical clinical course of fulminant type I diabetes mellitus, and this diagnosis was supported by clinical data. All autoantibodies associated with type I diabetes mellitus were negative. The endogenous insulin secretion ceased completely within 2 weeks. After the blood glucose level was brought under control, nivolumab was resumed and continued without other major adverse events. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) analysis revealed that the patient carried the HLA-B*4002 haplotype, a susceptibility allele for this type of diabetes mellitus. This case suggests that fulminant type I diabetes mellitus may be triggered by nivolumab in patients with a genetic background associated with the condition, warranting careful future consideration of this particular adverse event.

  15. Localization of type I interferon receptor limits interferon-induced TLR-3 in epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study aimed to expand on the role of type I IFNs in the influenza-induced upregulation of TLR3 and determine whether and how the localization of the IFN-alpha/beta receptor (IFNAR) in respiratory epithelial cells could modify IFN-induced responses. Using differentiated prima...

  16. Endogenous and recombinant type I interferons and disease activity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, Finn; Krakauer, Martin; Limborg, Signe;

    2012-01-01

    with endogenous type I IFN-like activity, the effect of IFN-ß therapy, and clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disease activity in MS patients. Endogenous type I IFN activity was associated with decreased expression of the integrin subunit CD49d (VLA-4) on CD4+CD26(high) T cells (Th1 helper cells......Although treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) with the type I interferon (IFN) IFN-ß lowers disease activity, the role of endogenous type I IFN in MS remains controversial. We studied CD4+ T cells and CD4+ T cell subsets, monocytes and dendritic cells by flow cytometry and analysed the relationship...... the percentage of CD4+ T cells expressing CD71 and HLA-DR (activated T cells), and this was associated with an increased risk of clinical disease activity. In contrast, induction of CD71 and HLA-DR was not observed in untreated MS patients with evidence of endogenous type IFN I activity. In conclusion...

  17. Rotational effects in thermonuclear type I bursts: equatorial crossing and directionality of flame spreading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavecchi, Y.; Watts, A.L.; Levin, Y.; Braithwaite, J.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study on thermonuclear (type I) bursts on accreting neutron stars, we addressed and demonstrated the importance of the effects of rotation, through the Coriolis force, on the propagation of the burning flame. However, that study only analysed cases of longitudinal propagation, where

  18. Quality of life in adults with childhood-onset of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Edward C T H; van de Sandt-Renkema, Nienke; Krabbe, Paul F M; Aronson, Daniel C; Severijnen, René S V M

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The clinical presentation of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I (CRPS I) in children differs compared to the presentation in adults. Reported results of treatment of CRPS I in children are usually more favourable and seem better than the reported treatment of adults with CRPS I. We

  19. Team physician #5. Salter-Harris type I fracture of the distal radius due to weightlifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, A P; Sponseller, P D

    1989-02-01

    A Salter-Harris Type I distal radius fracture was sustained by a skeletally immature adolescent while performing a supine bench press during weight training. Closed reduction was accomplished without difficulty. Fractures in adolescence due to weightlifting are rare but illustrate the need for proper instruction and supervision.

  20. Cardiac abnormalities in adults with the attenuated form of mucopolysaccharidosis type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.I.I. Soliman (Osama Ibrahim Ibrahim); R.G.M. Timmermans (Remco); A. Nemes (Attila); W.B. Vletter (Wim); J.H.P. Wilson (Paul); F.J. ten Cate (Folkert); M.L. Geleijnse (Marcel)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Cardiac involvement in mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) has been studied primarily in its most severe forms. Cardiac involvement, particularly left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function, in the attenuated form of MPS I is less well known. Methods: Cardiac funct

  1. Influence of type I IFN signaling on anti-MOG antibody-mediated demyelination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Carsten Tue; Khorooshi, Reza M. H.; Asgari, Nasrin

    2017-01-01

    is to investigate whether administration of anti-MOG antibody would be sufficient for demyelination and to determine if type I interferon (IFN) signaling plays a similar role in anti-MOG antibody-mediated pathology, as has been shown for neuromyelitis optica-like pathology. Methods Purified IgG2a monoclonal anti...

  2. Cognitive Dysfunction Is Worse among Pediatric Patients with Bipolar Disorder Type I than Type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, Lindsay S.; West, Amy E.; Jacobs, Rachel; Sweeney, John A.; Pavuluri, Mani N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Impaired profiles of neurocognitive function have been consistently demonstrated among pediatric patients with bipolar disorder (BD), and may aid in the identification of endophenotypes across subtypes of the disorder. This study aims to determine phenotypic cognitive profiles of patients with BD Type I and II. Methods: Subjects (N =…

  3. The Difference in Self-Esteem between Type I Diabetics and Type II Diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerbrock, Linda Kay

    Diabetes Mellitus is a disease which can affect an individual both physically and emotionally. Type I diabetics, representing about 10% of the diabetic population, can be characterized as having little or no insulin supply in their pancreas. Usually under the age of 30, they are required to take one or more insulin injections daily and must follow…

  4. A higher-dimensional Bianchi type-I inflationary Universe in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S D Katore; K S Adhav; V G Mete; A Y Shaikh

    2012-01-01

    A five-dimensional Bianchi type-I inflationary Universe is investigated in the presence of massless scalar field with a flat potential. To get an inflationary Universe, a flat region in which the potential is constant is considered. Some physical and kinematical properties of the Universe are also discussed.

  5. Recessive MYL2 mutations cause infantile type I muscle fibre disease and cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weterman, Marian A. J.; Barth, Peter G.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y.; Aronica, Eleonora; Poll-The, Bwee-Tien; Brouwer, Oebele F.; van Tintelen, J. Peter; Qahar, Zohal; Bradley, Edward J.; de Wissel, Marit; Salviati, Leonardo; Angelini, Corrado; van den Heuvel, Lambertus; Thomasse, Yolande E. M.; Backx, Ad P.; Nurnberg, Gudrun; Nurnberg, Peter; Baas, Frank

    A cardioskeletal myopathy with onset and death in infancy, morphological features of muscle type I hypotrophy with myofibrillar disorganization and dilated cardiomyopathy was previously reported in three Dutch families. Here we report the genetic cause of this disorder. Multipoint parametric linkage

  6. Recessive MYL2 mutations cause infantile type I muscle fibre disease and cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weterman, M.A.J.; Barth, P.G.; Spaendonck-Zwarts, K.Y. van; Aronica, E.; Poll-The, B.T.; Brouwer, O.F.; Tintelen, J.P. van; Qahar, Z.; Bradley, E.J.; Wissel, M. de; Salviati, L.; Angelini, C.; Heuvel, L.P. van den; Thomasse, Y.E.; Backx, A.P.C.M.; Nurnberg, G.; Nurnberg, P.; Baas, F.

    2013-01-01

    A cardioskeletal myopathy with onset and death in infancy, morphological features of muscle type I hypotrophy with myofibrillar disorganization and dilated cardiomyopathy was previously reported in three Dutch families. Here we report the genetic cause of this disorder. Multipoint parametric linkage

  7. Exploring Type I and Type II Errors Using Rhizopus Sporangia Diameter Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert A.; Burns, Gerard; Freud, Brian; Fenning, Stacy; Hoffman, Rosemary; Sabapathi, Durai

    2000-01-01

    Presents exercises in which students can explore Type I and Type II errors using sporangia diameter measurements as a means of differentiating between two species. Examines the influence of sample size and significance level on the outcome of the analysis. (SAH)

  8. MASA's and certain type I closed faces of C*-algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Lawrence G

    2007-01-01

    A result of Akemann, Anderson, and Pedersen states that if a sequence of pure states of a C*-algebra A approaches infinity in a certain sense, then there is a MASA B such that each of the states has the unique extension property with respect to B. We generalize this in two ways: We prove that B can be required to contain an approximate identity of A, and we show that the discrete space which underlies the result cited can be replaced with a totally disconnected space. We consider two special kinds of type I closed faces, both related to the above, atomic closed faces and closed faces with nearly closed extreme boundary. One specific question is whether an atomic closed face always has an "isolated point". We give a counterexample for this and also show that the answer is yes if the the atomic face has nearly closed extreme boundary. We prove a complement to Glimm's theorem on type I C*-algebras which arises from the theory of type I closed faces. One of our examples is a type I closed face which is isomorphic...

  9. Short-term moderate sodium restriction induces relative hyperfiltration in normotensive normoalbuminuric Type I diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luik, PT; Hoogenberg, K; van der Kleij, FGH; Beusekamp, BJ; Kerstens, MN; de Jong, PE; Dullaart, RPF; Navis, GJ

    Aims/hypothesis. Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased extracellular volume. Sodium restriction might seem a logical form of treatment but data on its renal effects is conflicting. We therefore studied the effects of sodium restriction on renal haemodynamics in

  10. Informed Decision-Making Regarding Amputation for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodde, Marlies I.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Schrier, Michiel; van den Dungen, Johannes; den Dunnen, Wilfred E.; Geertzen, Joannes

    2014-01-01

    Background: Literature on complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) discussing the decision to amputate or not, the level of amputation, or the timing of the amputation is scarce: We evaluated informed decision-making regarding amputation for CRPS-I. Methods: We describe our findings in a

  11. An autosomal locus causing autoimmune disease: Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I assigned to chromosome 21

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Aaltonen (Johanna); P. Björses (Petra); L.A. Sandkuijl (Lodewijk); J. Perheentupa (Jaakko); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease characterized by a variable combination of the failure of the endocrine glands. The pathogenesis of this unique autoimmune disease is unknown; unlike many other autoimmune diseases, APECED does

  12. Effect of Collagen Type I or Type II on Chondrogenesis by Cultured Human Articular Chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; Saris, D.B.F.; Vonk, L.A.; Rijen, van M.H.P.; Akrum, V.; Langeveld, D.; Boxtel, van A.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Current cartilage repair procedures using autologous chondrocytes rely on a variety of carriers for implantation. Collagen types I and II are frequently used and valuable properties of both were shown earlier in vitro, although a preference for either was not demonstrated. Recently, ho

  13. Magnetic diagnostic of SOL-filaments generated by type I ELMs on JET and ASDEX Upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Vianello, N.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2011-01-01

    This contribution is focused on the magnetic signatures of type I ELM filaments. On JET a limited number of high time resolution magnetic coils were used to derive essential ELM filament parameters. The method uses forward modelling and simultaneous fitting of magnetic pickup coil signals to a si...

  14. Mobitz type I atrio-ventricular block in dengue myocarditis, requiring temporary pacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. de Mel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of dengue myocarditis related Mobitz type I atrio-ventricular (A-V block. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such a patient requiring pacing. An early response to methylprednisolone suggests the possibility of a therapeutic role for steroids in these patients.

  15. SIGNATURES OF LONG-LIVED SPIRAL PATTERNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Garcia, Eric E. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A., E-mail: ericmartinez@inaoep.mx, E-mail: martinez@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: r.gonzalez@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, UNAM, Campus Morelia, Michoacan, C.P. 58089 (Mexico)

    2013-03-10

    Azimuthal age/color gradients across spiral arms are a signature of long-lived spirals. From a sample of 19 normal (or weakly barred) spirals where we have previously found azimuthal age/color gradient candidates, 13 objects were further selected if a two-armed grand-design pattern survived in a surface density stellar mass map. Mass maps were obtained from optical and near-infrared imaging, by comparison with a Monte Carlo library of stellar population synthesis models that allowed us to obtain the mass-to-light ratio in the J band, (M/L){sub J}, as a function of (g - i) versus (i - J) color. The selected spirals were analyzed with Fourier methods in search of other signatures of long-lived modes related to the gradients, such as the gradient divergence toward corotation, and the behavior of the phase angle of the two-armed spiral in different wavebands, as expected from theory. The results show additional signatures of long-lived spirals in at least 50% of the objects.

  16. Fast magnetohydrodynamic density waves in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yu-Qing; Han, J. L.; Fan, Zuhui

    1999-09-01

    The newly observed large-scale structures of a southern grand-design spiral galaxy NGC 2997 in total and polarized radio-continuum emission together with their overall correlations with the known optical spiral structure are physically interpreted in terms of fast magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) density waves in contrast to slow MHD density waves in NGC 6946. The global spiral pattern of such fast MHD density waves extends from the very centre, where the disc rotates almost rigidly within ~0.5arcmin, all the way to the outer disc with a more or less flat rotation curve. To strengthen the case, several known features of spiral galaxies M51 and IC 342 are referred to and their pattern identifications discussed. It is emphasized that the nature of a magnetized spiral galaxy would be much better appreciated by examining large-scale structures in optical, atomic hydrogen Hi, total and polarized radio-continuum and infrared emission together. As various star-formation processes occur concurrently and/or sequentially in spiral arms of high gas concentration, relatively broad and fuzzy Hi arms, roughly coincident with optical arms in the inner disc, are expected to extend from the extremities of fading optical arms further into the outer gas disc. We predict that the south-east `magnetic arm', apparently isolated from any optical features, in total and polarized radio-continuum intensity maps of NGC 2997 should be associated with an Hi gas arm yet to be detected in 21-cm line emission.

  17. Arm & Interarm Star Formation in Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Foyle, Kelly; Walter, Fabian; Leroy, Adam

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between spiral arms and star formation in the grand-design spirals NGC 5194 and NGC 628 and in the flocculent spiral NGC 6946. Filtered maps of near-IR (3.6 micron) emission allow us to identify "arm regions" that should correspond to regions of stellar mass density enhancements. The two grand-design spirals show a clear two-armed structure, while NGC 6946 is more complex. We examine these arm and interarm regions, looking at maps that trace recent star formation - far-ultraviolet (GALEX NGS) and 24 micron emission (Spitzer, SINGS) - and cold gas - CO (Heracles) and HI (Things). We find the star formation tracers and CO more concentrated in the spiral arms than the stellar 3.6 micron flux. If we define the spiral arms as the 25% highest pixels in the filtered 3.6 micron images, we find that the majority (60%) of star formation tracers occurs in the interarm regions; this result persists qualitatively even when considering the potential impact of finite data resolution and diffu...

  18. Do Bars Drive Spiral Density Waves?

    CERN Document Server

    Buta, R J; Elmegreen, B G; Salo, H; Laurikainen, E; Elmegreen, D M; Puerari, I; Block, D L

    2009-01-01

    We present deep near-infrared K_s-band AAT IRIS2 observations of a selected sample of nearby barred spiral galaxies, including some with the strongest known bars. The sample covers a range of Hubble types from SB0- to SBc. The goal is to determine if the torque strengths of the spirals correlate with those of the bars, which might be expected if the bars actually drive the spirals as has been predicted by theoretical studies. This issue has implications for interpreting bar and spiral fractions at high redshift. Analysis of previous samples suggested that such a correlation exists in the near-infrared, where effects of extinction and star formation are less important. However, the earlier samples had only a few excessively strong bars. Our new sample largely confirms our previous studies, but still any correlation is relatively weak. We find two galaxies, NGC 7513 and UGC 10862, where there is a only a weak spiral in the presence of a very strong bar. We suggest that some spirals probably are driven by their ...

  19. Radial transport of dust in spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobyov, E I; Shchekinov, Yu. A.

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by recent observations which detect dust at large galactocentric distances in the disks of spiral galaxies, we propose a mechanism of outward radial transport of dust by spiral stellar density waves. We consider spiral galaxies in which most of dust formation is localized inside the corotation radius. We show that in the disks of such spiral galaxies, the dust grains can travel over radial distances that exceed the corotation radius by roughly 25%. A fraction of the dust grains can be trapped on kidney-shaped stable orbits between the stellar spiral arms and thus can escape the destructive effect of supernova explosions. These grains form diffuse dusty spiral arms, which stretch 4-5 kpc from the sites of active star formation. About 10% of dust by mass injected inside corotation, can be transported over radial distances 3-4 kpc during approximately 1.0 Gyr. This is roughly an order of magnitude more efficient than can be provided by the turbulent motions.

  20. IFNγ influences type I interferon response and susceptibility to Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Jenna L; Olson, Julie K

    2013-08-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) induces a demyelinating disease in susceptible SJL mice that has similarities to multiple sclerosis in humans. TMEV infection of susceptible mice leads to a persistent virus infection of the central nervous system (CNS), which promotes the development of demyelinating disease associated with an inflammatory immune response in the CNS. TMEV infection of resistant C57BL6 mice results in viral clearance without development of demyelinating disease. Interestingly, TMEV infection of resistant mice deficient in IFNγ leads to a persistent virus infection in the CNS and development of demyelinating disease. We have previously shown that the innate immune response affects development of TMEV- induced demyelinating disease, thus we wanted to determine the role of IFNγ during the innate immune response. TMEV-infected IFNγ-deficient mice had an altered innate immune response, including reduced expression of innate immune cytokines, especially type I interferons. Administration of type I interferons, IFNα and IFNß, to TMEV-infected IFNγ-deficient mice during the innate immune response restored the expression of innate immune cytokines. Most importantly, administration of type I interferons to IFNγ-deficient mice during the innate immune response decreased the virus load in the CNS and decreased development of demyelinating disease. Microglia are the CNS resident immune cells that express innate immune receptors. In TMEV-infected IFNγ-deficient mice, microglia had reduced expression of innate immune cytokines, and administration of type I interferons to these mice restored the innate immune response by microglia. In the absence of IFNγ, microglia from TMEV-infected mice had reduced expression of some innate immune receptors and signaling molecules, especially IRF1. These results suggest that IFNγ plays an important role in the innate immune response to TMEV by enhancing the expression of innate immune cytokines