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Sample records for rat intestinal carbohydrase

  1. Nature of elevated rat intestinal carbohydrase activities after high-carbohydrate diet feeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, K.K.; Kwong, L.K.; Yamada, K.; Sunshine, P.; Koldovsky, O.

    1985-01-01

    Adult rats that were maintained on a low-carbohydrate intake showed rapid increase in the activities of sucrase, maltase, and lactase along the length of the small intestine when they were fed a high-starch diet. In the present study, the authors have identified these activity increases, and showed that they reflect proportional accumulations in enzyme-protein of sucrase-isomaltase, maltase-glucoamylase, and neutral lactase. It was determined that each of these enzymes exists in adult rat intestine in single immunoreactive form and accounts as a group for all sucrase, cellobiase, and most maltase and lactase activities. Dietary change from low to high carbohydrate (starch) resulted in an increase in [ 3 H]leucine accumulation in each of the enzymes, without a change in the amount of label accumulation in total intestinal proteins. The increase in label accumulation in the brush-border carbohydrase pools was matched generally by proportional elevation in the pool concentrations of sucrase-isomaltase and lactase but not maltase. These studies suggest that the elevation of intestinal carbohydrase concentrations induced by high-carbohydrate feeding may involve selective stimulation of their synthesis

  2. Carbohydrase and protease supplementation increased ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A trial was conducted to evaluate whether the addition of commercial enzyme preparations containing carbohydrases and a protease would increase the available metabolizable energy (ME) of maize-soya-based broiler diets. Seven thousand five hundred and sixty (7560) day-old Ross 788 chicks were randomly allocated ...

  3. Biotin absorption by distal rat intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, B.B.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1987-01-01

    We used the in vivo intestinal loop approach, with short (10-min) and long (3-h) incubations, to examine biotin absorption in proximal jejunum, distal ileum, cecum and proximal colon. In short-term studies, luminal biotin disappearance from rat ileum was about half that observed in the jejunum, whereas absorption by proximal colon was about 12% of that in the jejunum. In 3-h closed-loop studies, the absorption of 1.0 microM biotin varied regionally. Biotin absorption was nearly complete in the small intestine after 3 h; however, only about 15% of the dose had been absorbed in the cecum and 27% in the proximal colon after 3 h. Independent of site of administration, the major fraction of absorbed biotin was recovered in the liver; measurable amounts of radioactive biotin were also present in kidney and plasma. The results support the potential nutritional significance for the rat of biotin synthesized by bacteria in the distal intestine, by demonstrating directly an absorptive capability of mammalian large bowel for this vitamin

  4. Intestinal absorption and secretion of 65Zn in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methfessel, A.H.; Spencer, H.

    1974-01-01

    A single dose of 65 Zn Cl 2 was given by intubation to the intact rat or was instilled into the lumen of ligated intestinal sacs to determine the absorption, or injected intravenously via the tail vein to determine intestinal secretion of 65 Zn. Results indicated that the small intestine plays a major role in the absorption and secretion of zinc and that aging decreases the absorption of zinc for the duodenum of the rat

  5. Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury augments intestinal mucosal injury and bacterial translocation in jaundiced rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksek, Yunus Nadi; Kologlu, Murat; Daglar, Gül; Doganay, Mutlu; Dolapci, Istar; Bilgihan, Ayse; Dolapçi, Mete; Kama, Nuri Aydin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate local effects and degree of bacterial translocation related with intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in a rat obstructive jaundice model. Thirty adult Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250 g) were divided into three groups; including Group 1 (jaundice group), Group 2 (jaundice-ischemia group) and Group 3 (ischemia group). All rats had 2 laparotomies. After experimental interventions, tissue samples for translocation; liver and ileum samples for histopathological examination, 25 cm of small intestine for mucosal myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde levels and blood samples for biochemical analysis were obtained. Jaundiced rats had increased liver enzyme levels and total and direct bilirubin levels (p<0.05). Intestinal mucosal myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde levels were found to be high in intestinal ischemia-reperfusion groups (p<0.05). Intestinal mucosal damage was more severe in rats with intestinal ischemia-reperfusion after bile duct ligation (p<0.05). Degree of bacterial translocation was also found to be significantly high in these rats (p<0.05). Intestinal mucosa is disturbed more severely in obstructive jaundice with the development of ischemia and reperfusion. Development of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion in obstructive jaundice increases bacterial translocation.

  6. Intestinal morphometric and biomechanical changes during aging in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim: Previously we demonstrated pronounced morphometric and biomechanical remodeling in the rat intestine during physiological growth up to 32 weeks of age. The aim of the present study is to study intestinal geometric and biomechanical changes in aging rats. Materials and methods...... in the circumferential direction. In conclusion pronounced morphometric and biomechanical remodeling occurred in the rat intestine during aging. The observed changes likely reflect the changes of the physiological function of the intestine during ageing, similar to other tissues where function, mechanical loading......: Twenty-four male Wistar rats, aged from 6 to 22 months, were used in the study. The body weight and the wet weight per length of duodenal and ileal segments were measured at the termination of experiment. Morphometric data were obtained by measuring the wall thickness and wall cross-sectional area...

  7. Intestinal T lymphocytes of different rat strains in immunotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruder, M.C.; Spanhaak, S.; Bruijntjes, J.P.; Michielsen, C.P.P.C.; Vos, J.G.; Kuper, C.F.

    1999-01-01

    In order to study the intestinal mucosal immune cells, with emphasis on single T lymphocytcs, an inventory was made of single and organized lymphocytes in the epithelium and lamina propria of the small intestines of untreated Wistar, Fischer 344, and Lewis rats. The single and organized lymphocytes

  8. Drug absorption from the irradiated rat small intestine in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venho, V.M.K.

    1976-01-01

    The absorption of acidic drugs phenobarbitone and sulphafurazole, basic drugs mecamylamine and quinidine, and a neutral drug isoniazid was studied in situ. Rats were irradiated 750 rad whole-body with 60 Co and the absorption experiment was done three and six days thereafter using the cannulated small intestine of urethane-anaesthetized rats. Drug disappearance from the intestinal lumen and drug levels in the whole blood and intestinal wall were measured. In control rats phenobarbitone showed the most rapid absorption and mecamylamine the slowest. Irradiation retarded the disappearance of all drugs from the intestinal lumen on the third postirradiation day. Fluid absorption was also diminished. On the sixth postirradiation day the absorption of phenobarbitone, sulphafurazole and mecamylamine had returned to the control level, but the absorption of quinidine and isoniazid was still retarded. After i.v. administration of drugs they were not significantly excreted into the intestinal contents and irradiation did not modify excretion. The distribution of drugs between the intestinal fluid and the intestinal wall was complete in the first 10 min of experiment. Mecamylamine and quinidine were lowered in the whole blood by irradiation. Blood levels of drugs did not correlate well to the rate of disappearance of drugs from the intestinal lumen. The reversible changes in absorption induced by irradiation are probably secondary effects of irradiation on intestinal morphology, permeability and transport capacity, composition, and possibly blood flow. (orig.) [de

  9. Intestinal absorption of biotin in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, B.B.; Selhub, J.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1986-01-01

    We examined the absorption of biotin using the in vivo intestinal loop technique. Jejunal segments from male rats were filled with solutions containing [ 3 H]biotin and [ 14 C]inulin in Krebs-Ringer phosphate buffer, pH 6.5. Absorption was determined on the basis of luminal tritium disappearance after correction for inulin recovery. At biotin concentrations of 0.1 and 5.0 microM, luminal biotin disappearance was linear for at least 10 min. At biotin concentrations ranging from 2.3 nM to 75 microM, 10-28% of the administered dose was absorbed in 10 min. The concentration dependence of luminal biotin disappearance is consistent with the presence of both saturable and nonsaturable (linear) components of biotin uptake, with estimated Km = 9.6 microM and Jmax = 75.2 pmol/(2.5 cm loop X min). The rate constant for nonsaturable uptake is 3.1 pmol/(2.5 cm loop X min X microM). We conclude that at biotin concentrations less than 5 microM, biotin absorption proceeds largely by the saturable process, whereas at concentrations above 25 microM, nonsaturable uptake predominates. Additional studies demonstrated significantly less biotin uptake in the ileum than in the jejunum, a finding in agreement with previous in vitro studies

  10. Curcumin Attenuates Gamma Radiation Induced Intestinal Damage in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI-Tahawy, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    Small Intestine exhibits numerous morphological and functional alterations during radiation exposure. Oxidative stress, a factor implicated in the intestinal injury may contribute towards some of these alterations. The present work was designed to evaluate the efficacy of curcumin, a yellow pigment of turmeric on y-radiation-induced oxidative damage in the small intestine by measuring alterations in the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TSARS), serotonin metabolism, catecholamine levels, and monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity in parallel to changes in the architecture of intestinal tissues. In addition, monoamine level, MAO activity and TSARS level were determined in the serum. Curcumin was supplemented orally via gavages, to rats at a dose of (45 mg/ Kg body wt/ day) for 2 weeks pre-irradiation and the last supplementation was 30 min pre exposure to 6.5 Gy gamma radiations (applied as one shot dose). Animals were sacrificed on the 7th day after irradiation. The results demonstrated that, whole body exposure of rats to ionizing radiation has induced oxidative damage in small intestine obvious by significant increases of TSARS content, MAO activity and 5-hydroxy indole acetic acid (5-HIAA) and by significant decreases of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI) levels. In parallel histopathological studies of the small intestine of irradiated rats through light microscopic showed significant decrease in the number of villi, villus height, mixed sub mucosa layer with more fibres and fibroblasts. Intestinal damage was in parallel to significant alterations of serum MAO activity, TBARS, 5-HT, DA, NE and EPI levels. Administration of curcumin before irradiation has significantly improved the levels of monoamines in small intestine and serum of irradiated rats, which was associated with significant amelioration in MAO activity and TBARS contents

  11. Intestinal metaplasia induced by x-irradiation in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiromitsu; Terada, Yoritaka; Fujii, Isao; Yamamoto, Yukiko; Takizawa, Shoichi

    1978-01-01

    Total 400 rad of x-ray was given in 100 or 150 rad doses to the whole body of rats at intervals of one week, and one year and a half later, rats were killed. Disaccharidase was formed in most of animals, intestinal metaplasia only with goblet cells occurred in 65% of animals, and that with intestinal type of lacuna occurred in 36% of them. When 500 rad of x-ray was irradiated to each part of stomach day after day up to the total dose of 3,000 rad, biochemical intestinal metaplasia already occurred one week after the irradiation, and intestinal type lacuna occurred 2 months after the irradiation. Intestinal type lacuna was recognized in all animals killed 499 days after the irradiation, and intestinal metaplasia with Paneth's cells occurred in 6 out of 11 cases (56%). When a dose of 1,000 rad was irradiated to stomach three times at intervals of 2 days up to the total of 3,000 rad, much intestinal type lacuna was recognized 2 months after the irradiation, gastric adenoid cancerous changes appeared 4 months after, and gastric adenoid cancer occurred 6 months after. The above-mentioned results clarified that even if x-ray of a small dose was irradiated, intestinal metaplasia occurred, and that the period from the irradiation to occurrence of intestinal metaplasia was shortened by increasing a dose of x-ray. It was also clarified that not only intestinal metaplasia but also gastric adenoic cancer occurred due to a great amount of x-ray irradiation. (Ueda, J.)

  12. Intestinal metaplasia induced by x-irradiation in rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, H; Terada, Y; Fujii, I; Yamamoto, Y; Takizawa, S [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1978-04-01

    Total 400 rad of x-ray was given in 100 or 150 rad doses to the whole body of rats at intervals of one week, and one year and a half later, rats were killed. Disaccharidase was formed in most of animals, intestinal metaplasia only with goblet cells occurred in 65% of animals, and that with intestinal type of lacuna occurred in 36% of them. When 500 rad of x-ray was irradiated to each part of stomach day after day up to the total dose of 3,000 rad, biochemical intestinal metaplasia already occurred one week after the irradiation, and intestinal type lacuna occurred 2 months after the irradiation. Intestinal type lacuna was recognized in all animals killed 499 days after the irradiation, and intestinal metaplasia with Paneth's cells occurred in 6 out of 11 cases (56%). When a dose of 1,000 rad was irradiated to stomach three times at intervals of 2 days up to the total of 3,000 rad, much intestinal type lacuna was recognized 2 months after the irradiation, gastric adenoid cancerous changes appeared 4 months after, and gastric adenoid cancer occurred 6 months after. The above-mentioned results clarified that even if x-ray of a small dose was irradiated, intestinal metaplasia occurred, and that the period from the irradiation to occurrence of intestinal metaplasia was shortened by increasing a dose of x-ray. It was also clarified that not only intestinal metaplasia but also gastric adenoic cancer occurred due to a great amount of x-ray irradiation.

  13. The effect of fucoidan on intestinal flora and intestinal barrier function in rats with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Meilan; Ji, Xinqiang; Liang, Hui; Liu, Ying; Wang, Bing; Sun, Lingling; Li, Weiwei

    2018-02-21

    Recent research studies have shown that the intestinal flora are related to the occurrence and progress of breast cancer. This study investigates the effect of fucoidan on intestinal flora and intestinal barrier function in rats with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced breast cancers. Sixty female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the control group, the model group, and the F1 and F2 groups, which were fed fucoidan at concentrations of 200 and 400 mg per kg bw (body weight), respectively. Intestinal histopathological analysis was performed and 16S rDNA high-throughput sequencing was used to provide an overview of the intestinal flora composition. The contents of d-lactic acid (d-LA), diamine oxidase (DAO) and endotoxin in plasma were detected by ELISA. Expression levels of the tight junction (TJ) proteins, phosphorylated p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 were measured using western blotting. Our results suggested that the intestinal wall of the model group was damaged. However, after fucoidan intervention, the villi were gradually restored. ELISA showed that the levels of plasma endotoxin, d-LA and DAO decreased in the F1 and F2 groups compared to those in the model group. Fucoidan treatment also increased the expressions of ZO-1, occludin, claudin-1 and claudin-8. Furthermore, the expression levels of phosphorylated p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 were upregulated in fucoidan treatment groups. The results of 16S rDNA high-throughput sequencing indicated that fucoidan increased the diversity of the intestinal microbiota and induced changes in microbial composition, with the increased Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes phylum ratio. In conclusion, the supplement of fucoidan could improve the fecal microbiota composition and repair the intestinal barrier function. The study suggested the use of fucoidan as an intestinal flora modulator for potential prevention of breast cancer.

  14. Bile loss in the acute intestinal radiation syndrome in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraci, J.P.; Dunston, S.G.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.; Holeski, C.; Eaton, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of bile duct ligation (BDL), choledochostomy, bile acid sequestering within the intestinal lumen by cholestyramine, and fluid and electrolyte replacement on survival time and development of diarrhea after whole-body exposure to doses of ionizing radiation that result in death from acute intestinal injury were studied. BDL significantly prolonged survival and delayed the onset of diarrhea after exposure to 137 Cs gamma rays, fission neutrons, or cyclotron-produced neutrons in the range of doses that produce intestinal death or death from a combination of intestinal and hematopoietic injuries. Cannulation of the bile duct with exteriorized bile flow (choledochostomy) to protect the irradiated intestine from the mucolytic action of bile salts did not duplicate the effect of BDL in increasing survival time. Choledochostomy without fluid replacement eliminated the occurrence of diarrhea in 15.4 Gy irradiated rats. Diarrhea did occur in irradiated animals with choledochostomy if they received duodenal injections of fluid and electrolytes to replace the fluid lost as a result of bile drainage. Duodenal injection of fluid and electrolytes had no significant effect on survival time in irradiated rats. Injection of fluid and electrolytes into the peritoneal cavity of irradiated rats resulted in an increase in survival time that was comparable to that observed after BDL. Addition of antibiotics to the peritoneally injected fluid and electrolytes further increased survival time (up to 9 days). This survival time approached that seen in animals receiving the same radiation dose but which had the intestine exteriorized and shielded to minimize radiation injury to the intestine. Postmortem histological examinations of the irradiated small intestine showed mucosal regeneration in these long-term survivors receiving fluid and antibiotic therapy

  15. Zinc treatment ameliorates diarrhea and intestinal inflammation in undernourished rats

    OpenAIRE

    de Queiroz, Camila AA; Fonseca, Said Gonçalves C; Frota, Priscila B; Figueiredo, Ítalo L; Aragão, Karoline S; Magalhães, Carlos Emanuel C; de Carvalho, Cibele BM; Lima, Aldo Ângelo M; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A; Guerrant, Richard L; Moore, Sean R; Oriá, Reinaldo B

    2014-01-01

    Background WHO guidelines recommend zinc supplementation as a key adjunct therapy for childhood diarrhea in developing countries, however zinc’s anti-diarrheal effects remain only partially understood. Recently, it has been recognized that low-grade inflammation may influence stunting. In this study, we examined whether oral zinc supplementation could improve weight, intestinal inflammation, and diarrhea in undernourished weanling rats. Methods Rats were undernourished using a northeastern Br...

  16. Precision cut intestinal slices are an appropriate ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; van der Bij, Hendrik A.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used therapeutic agents, however, they are associated with a high prevalence of intestinal side effects. In this investigation, rat precision cut intestinal slices (PCIS) were evaluated as an ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal

  17. Effects of synbiotics on intestinal mucosal barrier in rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Xue

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: Probiotics can improve the concentration of colonic probiotics, while synbiotics can improve probiotics concentration and mucosa thickness in colon, decrease L/M ratio and bacterial translocation. Synbiotics shows more protective effects on intestinal mucosal barrier in rats after cecectomy and gastrostomy and the intervention of specific antibiotics.

  18. In vivo studies of biotin absorption in distal rat intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, B.B.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have extended their previous studies of biotin absorption in rat proximal jejunum (PJ) to examine biotin absorptive capacity of rat ileum (I) and proximal colon (PC) using in vivo intestinal loop technique. Intestinal loops (2.5 cm) were filled with 0.3 ml of solution containing ( 3 H)-biotin and ( 14 C)-inulin in phosphate buffer, pH 6.5. Biotin absorption was determined on the basis of luminal biotin disappearance after correction for inulin recovery and averaged (pmol/loop-10 min; X +/- SEM). In related experiments, 5-cm loops of PJ, distal I (DI), or PC were filled with 0.5 ml of solution of similar composition (1.0 μM biotin). The abdominal cavity was closed and the rats were allowed to recover from anesthesia, then sacrificed 3 hr after injection. Biotin absorption averaged 96.2% (PJ), 93.2% (DI), and 25.8% (PC) of the dose administered. These differences were reflected in the radioactive biotin content of plasma and intestinal loop, kidney, and liver. These data demonstrate significant biotin absorption in rat DI and PC, as required if the intestinal microflora are to be considered as a source of biotin for the host

  19. Hydroxycitric acid delays intestinal glucose absorption in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielinga, PY; Wachters-Hagedoorn, RE; Bouter, B; van Dijk, TH; Stellaard, F; Nieuwenhuizen, AG; Verkade, HJ; Scheurink, AJW; Nieuwenhuizen, Arie G.; Verkade, Henkjan J.

    In this study, we investigated in rats if hydroxycitric acid (HCA) reduces the postprandial glucose response by affecting gastric emptying or intestinal glucose absorption. We compared the effect of regulator HCA (310 mg/kg) and vehicle (control) on the glucose response after an intragastric or

  20. 21 CFR 184.1027 - Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product. 184... RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1027 Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product. (a) Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product is an enzyme preparation that includes...

  1. Prophylactic Ozone Administration Reduces Intestinal Mucosa Injury Induced by Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozkan Onal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury is associated with mucosal damage and has a high rate of mortality. Various beneficial effects of ozone have been shown. The aim of the present study was to show the effects of ozone in ischemia reperfusion model in intestine. Material and Method. Twenty eight Wistar rats were randomized into four groups with seven rats in each group. Control group was administered serum physiologic (SF intraperitoneally (ip for five days. Ozone group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days. Ischemia Reperfusion (IR group underwent superior mesenteric artery occlusion for one hour and then reperfusion for two hours. Ozone + IR group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days and at sixth day IR model was applied. Rats were anesthetized with ketamine∖xyzlazine and their intracardiac blood was drawn completely and they were sacrificed. Intestinal tissue samples were examined under light microscope. Levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathioneperoxidase (GSH-Px, malondyaldehide (MDA, and protein carbonyl (PCO were analyzed in tissue samples. Total oxidant status (TOS, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC were analyzed in blood samples. Data were evaluated statistically by Kruskal Wallis test. Results. In the ozone administered group, degree of intestinal injury was not different from the control group. IR caused an increase in intestinal injury score. The intestinal epithelium maintained its integrity and decrease in intestinal injury score was detected in Ozone + IR group. SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT values were high in ozone group and low in IR. TOS parameter was highest in the IR group and the TAC parameter was highest in the ozone group and lowest in the IR group. Conclusion. In the present study, IR model caused an increase in intestinal injury.In the present study, ozone administration had an effect improving IR associated tissue injury. In the present study, ozone therapy

  2. The Effect of Infliximab on Intestinal Anastomosis Healing in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktay Karaköse

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal anastomosis healing is a complex physiological process in which many local and systemic factors play a role. One of the significant cytokines in this process is TNF-α. Infliximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody which binds to TNF-α with high affinity. Although this agent is used in ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, intestinal surgery may be required in these patients. In this study it was aimed to determine whether or not there was any negative effect of preoperative single dose infliximab treatment on intestinal anastomosis healing. Two groups of 10 rats were formed. One of these groups was administered with a single dose of infliximab 8 mg/kg as a 20-minute intravenous infusion from the femoral vein. Four days after the infusion, a full layer incision was made to the colon and anastomosis was applied to all the rats. At 7 days after anastomosis, the subjects were sacrificed. The anastomosis segment was removed and the bursting pressure was measured. Tissue samples were taken from this segment for hydroxyproline concentration and histopathological examination. A blood sample was taken to measure TNF-α values. No statistically significant difference was determined between the groups in terms of bursting pressure, tissue hydroxyproline concentration or histopathological scoring. A single dose of 8 mg/kg infliximab administered 4 days preoperatively was not found to have any negative effect on intestinal anastomosis healing in rats.

  3. Intestinal excretion of metals by rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, S.G.

    1979-01-01

    The excretion of 65 Zn, sup(115m)Cd, 203 Hg, 207 Bi, 210 Pb, 60 Co, 64 Cu, 85 Sr and 86 Rb in the perfused sections of the intestinal tract in vivo was investigated by the pendular perfusion method. After intravenous administration the excretion of metals was investigated in the jejunum, in the colon and in some experiments also in the ileum. The fluid net movement in the jejunum and colon was measured in dependency on the energy spectrum of the applied metal isotope by means of 14 C or 3 H-polyethylene glycol 2000. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Local intravascular coagulation and fibrin deposition on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoots, Ivo G.; Levi, Marcel; Roossink, E. H. Paulina; Bijlsma, Pieter B.; van Gulik, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    Background. This study investigates intravascular coagulation and thrombotic obstruction in the splanchnic vasculature after intestinal ischemia in relation to epithelial integrity and function. Methods. Intestinal ischemia was induced in rats by superior mesenteric artery occlusion for 20 or 40

  5. Intestinal ion transport in rats with spontaneous arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübcke, R; Barbezat, G O

    1988-08-01

    1. Ion balance, intestinal ion transport in vivo with luminal Ringer, and direct voltage clamping in vivo with luminal Ringer and sodium-free choline-Ringer were studied in young (40 days old) and adult (120 days old) spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and age-matched normotensive controls (Wistar-Kyoto rats, WKY). 2. Faecal sodium output was significantly higher in SHR compared with WKY in both young (+67%) and adult (+43%) rats. 3. Small-intestinal sodium absorption was equal in young SHR and WKY, but significantly greater net sodium absorption was found in the ileum of adult SHR. In contrast, net sodium absorption was reduced from the colon of both young and adult SHR. 4. In adult SHR, the colonic transepithelial short-circuit current (Isc) and the transepithelial potential difference (PD) were significantly higher, whereas the transepithelial membrane resistance (Rm) was significantly lower than in WKY. There was an identical drop in Isc in both strains when luminal sodium was replaced by choline. These data cannot be explained by increased electrogenic cation (sodium) absorption in the SHR, but would favour chloride secretion. 5. It is suggested that in SHR membrane electrolyte transport abnormalities may also be present in the epithelial cells of the small and large intestine, as have been demonstrated already in blood cells by several investigators. The SHR may become an interesting experimental animal model for the study of generalized ion transport disorders.

  6. [Effect of rat intestinal flora on in vitro metabolic transformation of pumiloside].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hui; Li, Meng-Xuan; Li, Hai-Bo; Liu, Wen-Jun; Meng, Zhao-Qing; Huang, Wen-Zhe; Wang, Zhen-Zhong; Xiao, Wei

    2016-05-01

    To study the metabolic transformation of pumiloside by rat intestinal flora in vitro and identify its metabolites. Pumiloside was incubated in the rat intestinal flora in vitro. HPLC was used to monitor the metabolic process, and HPLC-Q-TOF-MS was used to identify the structures of biotransformation products. In vitro, pumiloside was easily metabolized by rat intestinal flora, and with the prolongation of metabolic time, pumiloside was transformed into several metabolites. Three metabolites were initially identified in this experiment. The study indicated that pumiloside could be extensively metabolized in the rat intestinal flora in vitro. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  7. Oxidized tissue proteins after intestinal reperfusion injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schanaider Alberto

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To analyse if the carbonyl proteins measurement could be validated as a method that allows the identification of an intestinal oxidative stress after ischemia and reperfusion injury. METHODS: Twenty-five male Wistar rats (n =21 weighting 200 to 250g were divided into three groups. Group I - control (n = 10. Group II - sham (n = 5 and Group III (n = 10 subjected to 60 minutes of intestinal ischemia and equal period of reperfusion. For this purpose it was clamped the superior mesenteric artery in its distal third. Histological changes and carbonyl protein levels were determined in the samples of all groups. In group III, samples of both normal and reperfused ileal segment were studied. RESULTS: All the reperfused segments showed mucosal and submucosal swelling and inflammatory infiltrate of the lamina propria. Levels of carbonyl protein rose in group III, including in the non-ischemic segments. The sensitivity and specificity of the carbonyl protein tissue levels were respectively 94% and 88%. CONCLUSION: The carbonyl protein method is a useful biologic marker of oxidative stress after the phenomenon of intestinal ischemia and reperfusion in rats. It was also noteworthy that the effects of oxidative stress could be seen far from the locus of the primary injury.

  8. Effect of anthraquinone derivatives on canine and rat intestinal motility.

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Villar, Rafael; Leng-Peschlow, E; Ruckebusch, Y

    1980-01-01

    The effects on gastrointestinal motility of 3 senna preparations containing 18% oxidized Ca-sennosides, 60% Ca-sennosides, or pure sennosides A + B were tested in dogs and rats as measured by electromyography. Oral administration of the oxidized products in the fasted animal increased the activity of the small intestine within 2 h and reduced both caecal and colonic contractions for 24 h. Severe diarrhoea was present 4-6 h after administration and lasted for at least 1 day. Ca-sennosides had ...

  9. Spontaneous and x-irradiation induced carcinomas of small intestine in Wistar-Furth rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeura, Y; Kosaki, G; Kitamura, H [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Nagatomo, T

    1980-04-01

    Spontaneous carcinoma of the small intestine in Wistar-Furth (WF) rats and carcinoma of the small intestine induced by local x-ray irradiation to the abdomen of WF rats without carcinoma were observed, and x-ray sensitivity of the small intestine mucosa was reported. Out of 19 rats with spontaneous carcinoma of the small intestine, 18 also had carcinoma of the colon, and 4 also had gastric cancer. They already had spontaneous carcinoma of the small intestine within 2 weeks after their birth, and the ratio of female and male was 13 : 6. Histological type of this carcinoma in all 19 rats was highly differentiated adenocarcinoma, and small intestine epithelium around carcinoma presented atypical epithelium. As to mice without carcinoma, x-ray, 1,000 R, 1,500 R, and 2,000 R, was irradiated to the abdomen of Sprague-Dawley (SD) and WF rats. In the irradiation with 1,000 R, carcinogenesis was not found in rats of both strains. In the irradiation with 1,500 R, carcinogenesis was hardly found, but in the irradiation with 2,000 R, carcinoma of small intestine occurred in 5 of 17 rats 15 weeks after the irradiation, 9 of 19 rats 25 weeks after the irradiation, and 9 of 14 rats 35 weeks after the irradiation. Histological type of carcinoma in irradiated rats was highly differentiated adenocarcinoma. The incidence of carcinoma in irradiated rats was higher in WF rats than SD rats through the course after the irradiation, which suggested that x-ray sensitivity of WF rats was higher than that of SD rats. Therefore, carcinoma of the small intestine in irradiated mice seemed to be induced by x-ray.

  10. Enhancement of intestinal growth in neonatal rats by epidermal growth factor in milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berseth, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    Breast milk has been shown to enhance neonatal intestinal growth. Because epidermal growth factor (EGF) is present in the milk of various mammalian species, the hypothesis was tested that EGF in rodent milk mediates, in part, the breast milk-enhanced intestinal growth in neonatal rat. Fifty-eight rat pups fed artificial formal that contained 1.2, 3.0, and 6.0 μg/ml EGF for 39 h had greater incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into DNA and DNA content of intestine than 29 pups fed unsupplemented formula. Pups fed EGF for 5 days had significantly greater body weight, intestinal weight, length, and DNA content than control pups. Conversely, pups fed pooled rat milk containing rabbit-derived antibody to EGF for 39 h had intestines of lower weight that contained less DNA than animals fed rat milk containing normal rabbit serum. EGF appears to mediate, in part, breast milk-enhanced neonatal intestinal growth

  11. Effect of honey consumption on intestinal motility in male albino rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: This study investigated the effects of honey on intestinal motility and transit using twenty (20) male albino rats of Wistar strain weighing 210-220g. The rats were randomly grouped into control and honey-fed (test) groups of ten (10) rats each. The control group was fed on normal rat chow ( Pfizer Company, Nigeria ) ...

  12. Consequences of Mrp2 deficiency for diclofenac toxicity in the rat intestine ex vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; van de Vegte, Dennis; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Sekine, Shuichi; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac (DCF) has a high prevalence of intestinal side effects in humans and rats. It has been reported that Mrp2 transporter deficient rats (Mrp2) are more resistant to DCF induced intestinal toxicity. This was explained in vivo by impaired Mrp2-dependent

  13. Intestinal absorption of PLAGA microspheres in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgé, C; Aprahamian, M; Marchais, H; Benoit, J P; Pinget, M

    1996-12-01

    Rhodamine B-labelled poly (DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) microspheres of 2 different sizes, 1-5 microns and 5-10 microns, were administered as a single dose (1.44 x 10(9) and 1.83 x 10(8) particles, respectively) into the ileal lumen of adult rats. The content of rhodamine in the mesenteric vein and ileal lumen was analysed periodically from 10 min to 48 h as well as the distribution of microspheres in the intestinal mucosa and various other tissues. The concentration of rhodamine decreased progressively in the intestinal lumen and was negligible after 24 h. The number of microspheres in the mesenteric vein increased rapidly and reached a maximum after 4 h whatever the size of the particles. It then decreased progressively, but more rapidly with microspheres > 5 microns than with microspheres PLAGA microspheres mainly crossed the intestinal mucosa at the site of Peyer's patches where microspheres of 5 microns were retained in the ileal lumen. A few small microspheres were occasionally observed in the epithelial cells. Only the smallest particles were recovered in the liver, lymph nodes and spleen while basement membranes were always labelled. It is concluded that PLAGA microspheres could be useful for the oral delivery of antigens if their size is between 1 and 5 microns.

  14. Zinc treatment ameliorates diarrhea and intestinal inflammation in undernourished rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Camila A A; Fonseca, Said Gonçalves C; Frota, Priscila B; Figueiredo, Italo L; Aragão, Karoline S; Magalhães, Carlos Emanuel C; de Carvalho, Cibele B M; Lima, Aldo Ângelo M; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A; Guerrant, Richard L; Moore, Sean R; Oriá, Reinaldo B

    2014-08-05

    WHO guidelines recommend zinc supplementation as a key adjunct therapy for childhood diarrhea in developing countries, however zinc's anti-diarrheal effects remain only partially understood. Recently, it has been recognized that low-grade inflammation may influence stunting. In this study, we examined whether oral zinc supplementation could improve weight, intestinal inflammation, and diarrhea in undernourished weanling rats. Rats were undernourished using a northeastern Brazil regional diet (RBD) for two weeks, followed by oral gavage with a saturated lactose solution (30 g/kg) in the last 7 days to induce osmotic diarrhea. Animals were checked for diarrhea daily after lactose intake. Blood was drawn in order to measure serum zinc levels by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Rats were euthanized to harvest jejunal tissue for histology and cytokine profiles by ELISA. In a subset of animals, spleen samples were harvested under aseptic conditions to quantify bacterial translocation. Oral zinc supplementation increased serum zinc levels following lactose-induced osmotic diarrhea. In undernourished rats, zinc improved weight gain following osmotic diarrhea and significantly reduced diarrheal scores by the third day of lactose intake (p diarrhea and undernutrition and support the use of zinc to prevent the vicious cycle of malnutrition and diarrhea.

  15. Transport of nattokinase across the rat intestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, M; Hong, K; Ito, Y; Misawa, S; Takeuchi, N; Kariya, K; Nishimuro, S

    1995-09-01

    Intraduodenal administration of nattokinase (NK) at a dose of 80 mg/kg, resulted in the degradation of fibrinogen in plasma suggesting transport of NK across the intestinal tract in normal rats. The action of NK on the cleavage of fibrinogen in the plasma from blood samples drawn at intervals after intraduodenal administration of the enzyme was investigated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blotting analysis with an anti-fibrinogen gamma chain antibody. The 270 kDa fragment carrying antigenic sites for the binding of the anti-fibrinogen gamma chain antibody appeared within 0.5 h and was then degraded gradually to a 105 kDa fragment via a 200 kDa fragment. This suggests that fibrinogen was degraded to a 105 kDa fragment via several intermediates (270 and 200 kDa). In parallel with the degradation process, plasma recalcification times were remarkably prolonged NK was also detected in the plasma from blood samples drawn 3 and 5 h after administration of the enzyme by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis with an anti-NK antibody. The results indicate that NK is absorbed from the rat intestinal tract and that NK cleaves fibrinogen in plasma after intraduodenal administration of the enzyme.

  16. Expression of an Intestine-Specific Transcription Factor (CDX1) in Intestinal Metaplasia and in Subsequently Developed Intestinal Type of Cholangiocarcinoma in Rat Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ping; Silberg, Debra G.; Sirica, Alphonse E.

    2000-01-01

    CDX1 is a caudal-type homeobox intestine-specific transcription factor that has been shown to be selectively expressed in epithelial cells in intestinal metaplasia of the human stomach and esophagus and variably expressed in human gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas (Silberg DG, Furth EE, Taylor JK, Schuck T, Chiou T, Traber PG: Gastroenterology 1997, 113: 478–486). Through the use of immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, we investigated whether CDX1 is also uniquely associated with the intestinal metaplasia associated with putative precancerous cholangiofibrosis induced in rat liver during furan cholangiocarcinogenesis, as well as expressed in neoplastic glands in a subsequently developed intestinal type of cholangiocarcinoma. In normal, control adult rat small intestine, specific nuclear immunoreactivity for CDX1 was most prominent in enterocytes lining the crypts. In comparison, epithelium from intestinal metaplastic glands within furan-induced hepatic cholangiofibrosis and neoplastic epithelium from later developed primary intestinal-type cholangiocarcinoma each demonstrated strong nuclear immunoreactivity for CDX1. CDX1-positive cells were detected in hepatic cholangiofibrotic tissue as early as 3 weeks after the start of chronic furan treatment. We further determined that the percentages of CDX1-positive neoplastic glands and glandular nuclei are significantly higher in primary tumors than in a derived, transplantable cholangiocarcinoma serially-propagated in vivo. Western blotting confirmed our immunohistochemical results, and no CDX1 immunoreactivity was detected in normal adult rat liver or in hyperplastic biliary epithelial cells. These findings indicate that CDX1 is specifically associated with early intestinal metaplasia and a later developed intestinal-type of cholangiocarcinoma induced in the liver of furan-treated rats. PMID:10666391

  17. Mucus reduction promotes acetyl salicylic acid-induced small intestinal mucosal injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Yosuke; Handa, Osamu; Naito, Yuji; Takayama, Shun; Mukai, Rieko; Ushiroda, Chihiro; Majima, Atsushi; Yasuda-Onozawa, Yuriko; Higashimura, Yasuki; Fukui, Akifumi; Dohi, Osamu; Okayama, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Naohisa; Katada, Kazuhiro; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Konishi, Hideyuki; Itoh, Yoshito

    2018-03-25

    Acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) is a useful drug for the secondary prevention of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases, but it has adverse effects on the small intestinal mucosa. The pathogenesis and prophylaxis of ASA-induced small intestinal injury remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the intestinal mucus, as the gastrointestinal tract is covered by mucus, which exhibits protective effects against various gastrointestinal diseases. ASA was injected into the duodenum of rats, and small intestinal mucosal injury was evaluated using Evans blue dye. To investigate the importance of mucus, Polysorbate 80 (P80), an emulsifier, was used before ASA injection. In addition, rebamipide, a mucus secretion inducer in the small intestine, was used to suppress mucus reduction in the small intestine of P80-administered rats. The addition of P80 reduced the mucus and exacerbated the ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Rebamipide significantly suppressed P80-reduced small intestinal mucus and P80-increased intestinal mucosal lesions in ASA-injected rats, demonstrating that mucus is important for the protection against ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. These results provide new insight into the mechanism of ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Mucus secretion-increasing therapy might be useful in preventing ASA-induced small intestinal mucosal injury. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of trichlorfon and fractionated irradiation on hydroproteolytic activity of pancreas and intestinal tissues of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocmierska-Grodzka, D [Akademia Medyczna, Bialystok (Poland). Zaklad Farmakologii

    1976-03-01

    Investigations were carried out of the hydroproteolytic activity of pancreas, small intestine and colon of rats after fractionated irradiation (5x150 R). Marked postirradiation enhancement of lipase activity was found in pancreas and duodenal part of intestine as well as an increase of B-glucuronidase and acid phosphatase activity in nearly all parts of the intestinal tissues. Fractionated irradiation resulted in an increase of pancreatic catheptic (proteolytic) activity, causing simultaneous decrease of proteolytic activity in intestine and colon. Preventive administation of Trichlorfon ten days before irradiation (10 mg or 30 mg/kg) evoked modification of hydroproteolytic activity in intestinal tissues of healthy and irradiated rats. 30mg/kg Trichlorfon exerted antilipolytic and anticatheptic effects in pancreas and intestinal tissues of irradiated rats.

  19. Potential Applications of Carbohydrases Immobilization in the Food Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contesini, Fabiano Jares; de Alencar Figueira, Joelise; Kawaguti, Haroldo Yukio; de Barros Fernandes, Pedro Carlos; de Oliveira Carvalho, Patrícia; Nascimento, Maria da Graça; Sato, Hélia Harumi

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrases find a wide application in industrial processes and products, mainly in the food industry. With these enzymes, it is possible to obtain different types of sugar syrups (viz. glucose, fructose and inverted sugar syrups), prebiotics (viz. galactooligossacharides and fructooligossacharides) and isomaltulose, which is an interesting sweetener substitute for sucrose to improve the sensory properties of juices and wines and to reduce lactose in milk. The most important carbohydrases to accomplish these goals are of microbial origin and include amylases (α-amylases and glucoamylases), invertases, inulinases, galactosidases, glucosidases, fructosyltransferases, pectinases and glucosyltransferases. Yet, for all these processes to be cost-effective for industrial application, a very efficient, simple and cheap immobilization technique is required. Immobilization techniques can involve adsorption, entrapment or covalent bonding of the enzyme into an insoluble support, or carrier-free methods, usually based on the formation of cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs). They include a broad variety of supports, such as magnetic materials, gums, gels, synthetic polymers and ionic resins. All these techniques present advantages and disadvantages and several parameters must be considered. In this work, the most recent and important studies on the immobilization of carbohydrases with potential application in the food industry are reviewed. PMID:23344046

  20. Role of intestinal bacteria in gliadin-induced changes in intestinal mucosa: study in germ-free rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Cinova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Celiac disease (CD is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the small intestine that is induced by dietary wheat gluten proteins (gliadins in genetically predisposed individuals. The overgrowth of potentially pathogenic bacteria and infections has been suggested to contribute to CD pathogenesis. We aimed to study the effects of gliadin and various intestinal bacterial strains on mucosal barrier integrity, gliadin translocation, and cytokine production. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Changes in gut mucosa were assessed in the intestinal loops of inbred Wistar-AVN rats that were reared under germ-free conditions in the presence of various intestinal bacteria (enterobacteria and bifidobacteria isolated from CD patients and healthy children, respectively and CD-triggering agents (gliadin and IFN-γ by histology, scanning electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and a rat cytokine antibody array. Adhesion of the bacterial strains to the IEC-6 rat cell line was evaluated in vitro. Gliadin fragments alone or together with the proinflammatory cytokine interferon (IFN-γ significantly decreased the number of goblet cells in the small intestine; this effect was more pronounced in the presence of Escherichia coli CBL2 and Shigella CBD8. Shigella CBD8 and IFN-γ induced the highest mucin secretion and greatest impairment in tight junctions and, consequently, translocation of gliadin fragments into the lamina propria. Shigella CBD8 and E. coli CBL2 strongly adhered to IEC-6 epithelial cells. The number of goblet cells in small intestine increased by the simultaneous incubation of Bifidobacterium bifidum IATA-ES2 with gliadin, IFN-γ and enterobacteria. B. bifidum IATA-ES2 also enhanced the production of chemotactic factors and inhibitors of metalloproteinases, which can contribute to gut mucosal protection. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the composition of the intestinal microbiota affects the permeability of the intestinal mucosa

  1. Ghrelin in small intestine, its contribution to regulation of food intake and body weight in cross-intestinal parabiotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hitoshi; Masaki, Takayuki; Kakuma, Tetsuya; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2011-01-01

    Ghrelin has been shown to be associated with feeding behavior in humans and rodents. It has been suggested that ghrelin may play a role behind the effect of bariatric surgery. Inbred rats were made into parabiotic pairs so that they shared a single abdominal cavity. A further operation is performed later in which the small intestines are transected and re-connected so that one rat continually lost nutrition to its partner. Changes in food intake and body weight were recorded. Seven weeks later, content of ghrelin in the plasma, stomach and upper intestines were measured in the paired rats. Rats which lost nutrients to its counterpart (Loss rats) ingested significantly more food than sham control rats (pgained nutrient (Gain rats) ingested less than controls (pweight, blood glucose, insulin, free fatty acids and triglycerides between the paired rats. There was significantly higher levels of ghrelin in the plasma (pGain rats, which ate less than controls. Because no remarkable changes in the ghrelin content were observed in the stomach, difference in the quality of the chime may affect the local synthesis and release of ghrelin.

  2. Myoelectric activity of the small intestine during morphine dependence and withdrawal in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuperman, D.A.; Sninsky, C.A.; Lynch, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors investigated (1) the effect of morphine dependence on the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) of the small intestine, (2) whether bacterial overgrowth developed in morphine-dependent rats, and (3) the effect of naloxone and methylbromide naltrexone, a peripheral opioid antagonist, on the MMC in morphine-naive and morphine-dependent rats. They also evaluated intestinal motility during naloxone-induced withdrawal in animals pretreated with clonidine. Intestinal myoelectric activity was monitored by four indwelling electrodes in unanesthetized, fasted rats. D-[ 14 C]xylose breath tests were performed before and after morphine-pellet implantation to evaluate the presence of bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. Naloxone had no effect on myoelectric activity of the small intestine in morphine-naive rats. Cycling activity fronts were present in morphine-dependent animals, but there was a significant prolongation of activity front periodicity and slowing of the propagation velocity. No significant increase in 14 CO 2 excretion was noted in the morphine-dependent rats. They conclude from their studies that (1) myoelectric activity of the small intestine develops incomplete tolerance to morphine; (2) bacterial overgrowth is not a feature of morphine dependence in the rat; (3) alterations of intestinal myoelectric activity are a component of the opiate withdrawal syndrome, and they appear at least partially mediated by a peripheral mechanism that can be suppressed by an α 2 -adrenergic agonist

  3. Myoelectric activity of the small intestine during morphine dependence and withdrawal in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuperman, D.A.; Sninsky, C.A.; Lynch, D.F.

    1987-04-01

    The authors investigated (1) the effect of morphine dependence on the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) of the small intestine, (2) whether bacterial overgrowth developed in morphine-dependent rats, and (3) the effect of naloxone and methylbromide naltrexone, a peripheral opioid antagonist, on the MMC in morphine-naive and morphine-dependent rats. They also evaluated intestinal motility during naloxone-induced withdrawal in animals pretreated with clonidine. Intestinal myoelectric activity was monitored by four indwelling electrodes in unanesthetized, fasted rats. D-(/sup 14/C)xylose breath tests were performed before and after morphine-pellet implantation to evaluate the presence of bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. Naloxone had no effect on myoelectric activity of the small intestine in morphine-naive rats. Cycling activity fronts were present in morphine-dependent animals, but there was a significant prolongation of activity front periodicity and slowing of the propagation velocity. No significant increase in /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ excretion was noted in the morphine-dependent rats. They conclude from their studies that (1) myoelectric activity of the small intestine develops incomplete tolerance to morphine; (2) bacterial overgrowth is not a feature of morphine dependence in the rat; (3) alterations of intestinal myoelectric activity are a component of the opiate withdrawal syndrome, and they appear at least partially mediated by a peripheral mechanism that can be suppressed by an ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonist.

  4. Effect of hypocholesterolemia on cholesterol synthesis in small intestine of diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feingold, K.R.; Moser, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    Studies by our and other laboratories have demonstrated that cholesterol synthesis is increased in the small intestine of insulinopenic diabetic animals. In normal animals, many factors have been shown to regulate cholesterol synthesis in the small intestine, including changes in plasma cholesterol levels. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of lowering plasma cholesterol levels on small intestine cholesterol synthesis in streptozocin-induced diabetic rats. In diabetic rats, 4-aminopyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (4-APP)-induced hypocholesterolemia (plasma cholesterol levels less than 20 mg/dl) resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in small intestine cholesterol synthesis, which was most marked in the distal small intestine, decreasing proximally. In the distal small intestine the incorporation of 3 H 2 O into cholesterol was 0.28 +/- 0.04 mumol.h-1.g-1 in diabetic rats versus 1.60 +/- 0.38 in diabetic rats administered 4-APP (P less than .01). This stimulation of cholesterol synthesis occurred in the upper villus, middle villus, and crypt cells isolated from the middle intestine of the 4-APP-treated diabetic animals. In agreement with these observations, functional hypocholesterolemia due to Triton WR-1339 administration also stimulated cholesterol synthesis 2.5-fold in the small intestine of normal and diabetic animals. In the distal small intestine, cholesterol synthesis was 0.43 +/- 0.10 mumol.h-1.g-1 in the diabetic rats versus 1.08 +/- 0.21 in diabetic rats treated with Triton WR-1339 (P less than .05). In both the 4-APP and Triton WR-1339 experiments, the response of the diabetic rats was similar to that observed in normal rats

  5. Studies on colon cancer prone rats. Spontaneous small intestinal carcinomas and tumor induction of small intestine by x-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeura, Y [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1979-12-01

    Histological investigation was carried out for Wister-Furth (WF) rats, prone to cancers of the colon and small intestine. Gastric cancer was observed in about 1/4 of the rats with the cancers of the colon and the small intestine, indicating that these rats could be the model animals of the cancer family syndrome with multi-cancers in the gastrointestinal tracts. The small intestine of WF and SD (Sprague-Dowley) rats as exposed to 1000, 2 x 1000, 1500, and 2000 R of x-rays at a dose rate of 157 R/min. In each group the stomach, small intestine, cecum, and colon were histologically investigated, immediately and 15, 25, and 35 weeks after irradiation. The rates of cancer occurrence in 15, 25, and 35 weeks were 5/17, 9/19, and 9/14 for WF strain and 1/8, 2/7, and 2/8 for SD strain, respectively. The rate increased with the increment of the days after irradiation. It was suggested that the atypical epithelium of the gastrointestinal tracts induced the cancer in high rates when some trigger was added.

  6. THE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF INTESTINAL NUTRIENT TRANSPORTER GENES IN RATS WITH RENAL FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Yamamoto

    2012-06-01

    has been still unclear how different of the intestinal function in CKD. In this study, we demonstrated the microarray analysis of global gene expression in intestine of adenine-induced CKD rat. DNA microarray analysis using Affymextrix rat gene chip revealed that CKD caused great changes in gene expression in the rat duodenum: about 400 genes exhibited more than a two-fold change in expression level. Gene ontology analysis showed that a global regulation of genes by CKD involved in iron ion binding, alcoholic, organic acid and lipid metabolism. Furthermore, we found markedly changes of a number of intestinal transporters gene expression related to iron metabolism. These results suggest that CKD may alter some nutrient metabolism in the small intestine by modifying the expression of specific genes. The intestinal transcriptome database of CKD might be useful to develop the novel drugs or functional foods for CKD patients.

  7. Effect of cocoa's theobromine on intestinal microbiota of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Peláez, Sandra; Camps-Bossacoma, Mariona; Massot-Cladera, Malen; Rigo-Adrover, Mar; Franch, Àngels; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Castell, Margarida

    2017-10-01

    To establish the role of cocoa theobromine on gut microbiota composition and fermentation products after cocoa consumption in rats. Lewis rats were fed either a standard diet (RF diet), a diet containing 10% cocoa (CC diet) or a diet including 0.25% theobromine (TB diet) for 15 days. Gut microbiota (fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled to flow cytometry and metagenomics analysis), SCFA and IgA-coated bacteria were analyzed in fecal samples. CC and TB diets induced lower counts of E. coli whereas TB diet led to lower counts of Bifidobacterium spp., Streptococcus spp. and Clostridium histolyticum-C. perfingens group compared to RF diet. Metagenomics analysis also revealed a different microbiota pattern among the studied groups. The SCFA content was higher after both CC and TB diets, which was mainly due to enhanced butyric acid production. Furthermore, both diets decreased the proportion of IgA-coated bacteria. Cocoa's theobromine plays a relevant role in some effects related to cocoa intake, such as the lower proportion of IgA-coated bacteria. Moreover, theobromine modifies gut microbiota although other cocoa compounds could also act on intestinal bacteria, attenuating or enhancing the theobromine effects. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Study of morbidity in orthotopic small intestine transplantation with Wistar rats: experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    LEE André Dong Won; GAMA-RODRIGUES Joaquim; GALVÃO Flávio H.; WAITZBERG Dan L.

    2002-01-01

    Background - Transplantation of the small intestine is a surgical procedure currently under investigation for its possible application in the treatment of patients with short bowel syndrome, aiming at the reintroduction of an oral diet. Aim - To define the morbidity and mortality of intestinal transplantation in small animals using microsurgery. Intra and postoperative morbidity and mortality were studied in Wistar rats submitted to orthotopic intestinal allotransplantation. Material and Meth...

  9. Selective sparing of goblet cells and paneth cells in the intestine of methotrexate-treated rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Verburg (Melissa); I.B. Renes (Ingrid); H.P. Meijer; J.A. Taminiau; H.A. Büller (Hans); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra); J. Dekker (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractProliferation, differentiation, and cell death were studied in small intestinal and colonic epithelia of rats after treatment with methotrexate. Days 1-2 after treatment were characterized by decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and decreased numbers and depths

  10. Immunoneutralization of endogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 reduces adaptive intestinal growth in diabetic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Bolette; Thulesen, Jesper; Hare, Kristine Juul

    2002-01-01

    in the proximal part of the small intestine (10.84+/-0.44 mm(2)). Antibody treatment had no effect on body weight, blood glucose concentrations and food intake. Thus, blocking of endogenous GLP-2 in a model of adaptive intestinal growth reduces the growth response, providing strong evidence for a physiological......Supraphysiological doses of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) have been shown to induce intestinal growth by increasing villus height and crypt depth and by decreasing apoptosis, but a physiological effect of GLP-2 has not yet been demonstrated. Earlier, we found elevated levels of endogenous GLP-2...... in untreated streptozotocin diabetic rats associated with marked intestinal growth. In the present study, we investigated the role of endogenous GLP-2 for this adaptive response. We included four groups of six rats: (1) diabetic rats treated with saline, (2) diabetic rats treated with non-specific antibodies...

  11. The role of metabolism in diclofenac-induced intestinal toxicity in rat and human in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; Makkinje, Miriam; de Graaf, Inge; Groothuis, Genoveva

    The use of Diclofenac (DCF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug is associated with severe gastro-intestinal side-effects. The mechanisms of drug-induced intestinal toxicity are largely unknown due to the lack of in vitro models. In vivo rat studies suggested that reactive metabolites of DCF

  12. Identification and characterization of novel gut-associated lymphoid tissues in rat small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitotsumatsu, Osamu; Hamada, Hiromasa; Naganuma, Makoto; Inoue, Nagamu; Ishii, Hiromasa; Hibi, Toshifumi; Ishikawa, Hiromichi

    2005-10-01

    The crypt lamina propria of the mouse small intestine has been shown to harbor multiple tiny clusters filled with c-kit- and interleukin 7 receptor (IL-7R)-positive lympho-hemopoietic cells (cryptopatches; CPs). However, it has remained an open question whether similar lymphoid tissue are present in the gastrointesitinal tract in other animals. In the present study, we investigated whether the small intestine of rats harbored lymphoid tissues similar to mouse CPs. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analyses were carried out using various antibodies, including those to c-kit and IL-7R molecules. Lymphocyte-filled villi (LFVs), populated predominantly with c-kit- and IL-7 receptor (IL-7R)-positive cells and less with T cell receptor (TCR)-alphabeta T cells were found throughout the small intestine of young adult rats. Although LFVs were absent from fetal rat intestine, they were first detected at around 2 weeks after birth. Notably, in most LFVs that settled in the antimesenteric wall of the small intestine in young adult rats, immunoglobulin M-positive B cells were also detectable at the bottom of the LFVs. In aged rats, lymphocytes in some LFVs displayed a different phenotype, comprising a large B-cell area that included a germinal center. Thus, these clusters represent the first description of isolated lymphoid follicles (ILFs) in the rat small intestine. The present study provides the first evidence for c-kit- and IL-7R-positive lymphocyte clusters in the rat small intestine. Our data also indicating that LFVs and ILFs may constitute novel organized gut-associated lymphoid tissues in lamina propria of the rat small intestine.

  13. [Effects of secretory and osmotic diarrhea on rats intestinal function and morphology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima de Mon, Margarita; Cioccia, Anna M; González, Eduardo; Hevia, Patricio

    2002-03-01

    In order to compare intestinal morphology and function, diarrhea was produced in rats using laxatives in the diet. The 14 day study included two groups of rats with diarrhea (osmotic or secretory), two groups without diarrhea but with a degree of malnutrition which was similar to that seen in the rats with diarrhea (malnourished without diarrhea) and a well-nourished group (control). The inclusion of laxatives(lactose or bisoxatin acetate) cause a reduction in food intake, diarrhea an malnutrition. It also caused a reduction in dietary protein and fat digestibility which was proportional to the severity of diarrhea and more pronounced in secretory diarrhea. In the malnourished rats without diarrhea, malnutrition did not affect their absorptive function. Both in the rats with secretory and osmotic diarrhea an intestinal hypertrophy was observed. This hypertrophy was proportional to the severity of diarrhea and independent of its aetiology. In the intestines of the rats with both types of diarrhea there was inflammation, a greater number of mitotic figures but the flattening of the villi seen in the malnourished rats without diarrhea was not seen. In osmotic diarrhea there was, in addition, a patchy damage of the surface of the jejunal mucosa and an increment in the number of goblet cells, indicating a more severe intestinal deterioration. Since despite this greater deterioration, these rats absorbed more protein and fat we concluded that the alterations in intestinal morphology seen in this study was not predictive of intestinal function. The study also showed that diarrhea had a trophic effect on the intestine which did not occur in malnourished rats without diarrhea.

  14. Intestinal tract is an important organ for lowering serum uric acid in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yu; Yin, Hua; Gao, Zhiyi; Li, Yue; Gao, Tao; Duan, Jinlian; Yang, Rong; Dong, Xianxiang; Zhang, Lumei; Duan, Weigang

    2017-01-01

    The kidney was recognized as a dominant organ for uric acid excretion. The main aim of the study demonstrated intestinal tract was an even more important organ for serum uric acid (SUA) lowering. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated normally or with antibiotics, uric acid, adenine, or inosine of the same molar dose orally or intraperitoneally for 5 days. Rat's intestinal tract was equally divided into 20 segments except the cecum. Uric acid in serum and intestinal segment juice was assayed. Total RNA in the initial intestinal tract and at the end ileum was extracted and sequenced. Protein expression of xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and urate oxidase (UOX) was tested by Western blot analysis. The effect of oral UOX in lowering SUA was investigated in model rats treated with adenine and an inhibitor of uric oxidase for 5 days. SUA in the normal rats was 20.93±6.98 μg/ml, and total uric acid in the intestinal juice was 308.27±16.37 μg, which is two times more than the total SUA. The uric acid was very low in stomach juice, and attained maximum in the juice of the first segment (duodenum) and then declined all the way till the intestinal end. The level of uric acid in the initial intestinal tissue was very high, where XDH and most of the proteins associated with bicarbonate secretion were up-regulated. In addition, SUA was decreased by oral UOX in model rats. The results suggested that intestinal juice was an important pool for uric acid, and intestinal tract was an important organ for SUA lowering. The uric acid distribution was associated with uric acid synthesis and secretion in the upper intestinal tract, and reclamation in the lower.

  15. Intestinal metaplasia induced by x-irradiation in different strains of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiromitsu; Naito, Masashi; Kawashima, Kengo; Ito, Akihiro

    1985-01-01

    Attempts were made to examine strain differences in the susceptibility of rats to intestinal metaplasia induced by X-irradiation. The gastric regions of 4 inbred male rats (SHR, F344, WKY, and LEW strains) in 5-week-old and 2 random bred male rats (SD, and WIS strains) were irradiated with a total dose of 20 Gy X-ray given in two equal fractions separated by three days. Upon sacrifice at 6 months after the last irradiation, the number of intestinal metaplastic crypts with positive reaction to alkaline phosphatase (ALP) appeared highest in the SHR and lowest in the WIS rats. Morphologically, the number of crypts with intestinal metaplasia in whole glandular stomachs of SHR, WIS, F344, and SD rats were higher than those in WKY and LEW rats. In the pyloric gland, it was highest in WIS rats, while in the fundic gland it was highest in SHR rats. The results show that the appearance and location of intestinal metaplasia by X-irradiation are greatly influenced by the strain of the rat. (author)

  16. Impaired Growth of Small Intestinal Epithelium by Adrenalectomy in Weaning Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Tohru; Minai, Yuji; Haga, Minoru

    2008-01-01

    Functional maturation of the small intestine occurs during the weaning period in rats. It is known that this development is facilitated by glucocorticoid. However, the effect of glucocorticoid on morphological development of small intestine has yet to be clarified. The present study evaluated the morphological development and cell proliferation of the small intestine in adrenalectomized (ADX) rat pups. To further understand the mechanism of glucocorticoid effects on intestinal development, we examined the localization of the glucocorticoid receptor in the small intestine. Microscopic analysis showed that growth of villi and crypts is age-dependent, and is significantly attenuated in ADX rats compared with sham-operated rats. BrdU-positive cells, i.e. proliferating cells, were primarily observed in crypt compartments and rapidly increased in number during the early weaning period. The increase in BrdU-positive cells could be attenuated by adrenalectomy. The morphological development of small intestine may be associated with increased proliferation of epithelial cells. On the other hand, glucocorticoid receptors were found in epithelial cells of the mid- and lower villi and not in crypts where BrdU-positive cells were localized. These results indicate that the growth of small intestine is attenuated by adrenalectomy, and that glucocorticoid indirectly acts on proliferation of epithelial cells during the weaning period

  17. Intestinal permeability of forskolin by in situ single pass perfusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen-Jun; Jiang, Dong-bo; Tian, Lu-Lu; Yin, Jia-Jun; Huang, Jian-Ming; Weng, Wei-Yu

    2012-05-01

    The intestinal permeability of forskolin was investigated using a single pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) technique in rats. SPIP was performed in different intestinal segments (duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon) with three concentrations of forskolin (11.90, 29.75, and 59.90 µg/mL). The investigations of adsorption and stability were performed to ensure that the disappearance of forskolin from the perfusate was due to intestinal absorption. The results of the SPIP study indicated that forskolin could be absorbed in all segments of the intestine. The effective permeability (P (eff)) of forskolin was in the range of drugs with high intestinal permeability. The P (eff) was highest in the duodenum as compared to other intestinal segments. The decreases of P (eff) in the duodenum and ileum at the highest forskolin concentration suggested a saturable transport process. The addition of verapamil, a P-glycoprotein inhibitor, significantly enhanced the permeability of forskolin across the rat jejunum. The absorbed fraction of dissolved forskolin after oral administration in humans was estimated to be 100 % calculated from rat P (eff). In conclusion, dissolved forskolin can be absorbed readily in the intestine. The low aqueous solubility of forskolin might be a crucial factor for its poor oral bioavailability. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. In vivo kinetics of intestinal absorption of riboflavin in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feder, S.; Daniel, H.; Rehner, G.

    1991-01-01

    To investigate absorption kinetics of riboflavin under in vivo conditions, with blood and lymph circulation intact, the small intestine of anesthetized rats was perfused with [ 14 C]riboflavin in a concentration range between 0.31 and 10.00 mumol/L. Apart from the uptake of riboflavin from the perfusate, passage of the vitamin into the portal (vena portae) and peripheral (vena femoralis) blood was determined. The absorption proved to be a dual process: at low substrate concentrations (less than 2 mumol/L) a saturable component predominated; at higher concentrations simple diffusion was found to be the prevailing uptake mechanism. The apparent transport constant of the saturable component was calculated to be 0.38 mumol/L. [ 14 C]flavin concentrations in the portal and peripheral blood were estimated as a function of the riboflavin concentration of the perfusion media. The dual character of the absorption was reflected by the portal blood flavin levels. Due to the high retaining and equalizing capacity of the liver, the [ 14 C]flavin level of the peripheral blood was relatively low and obeyed saturation kinetics. Constants of elimination, determined by pharmacokinetic calculations, were different for the two blood compartments but independent of the concentration of riboflavin in the perfusion media

  19. Intestinal tract is an important organ for lowering serum uric acid in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiyi; Li, Yue; Gao, Tao; Duan, Jinlian; Yang, Rong; Dong, Xianxiang; Zhang, Lumei

    2017-01-01

    The kidney was recognized as a dominant organ for uric acid excretion. The main aim of the study demonstrated intestinal tract was an even more important organ for serum uric acid (SUA) lowering. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated normally or with antibiotics, uric acid, adenine, or inosine of the same molar dose orally or intraperitoneally for 5 days. Rat’s intestinal tract was equally divided into 20 segments except the cecum. Uric acid in serum and intestinal segment juice was assayed. Total RNA in the initial intestinal tract and at the end ileum was extracted and sequenced. Protein expression of xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and urate oxidase (UOX) was tested by Western blot analysis. The effect of oral UOX in lowering SUA was investigated in model rats treated with adenine and an inhibitor of uric oxidase for 5 days. SUA in the normal rats was 20.93±6.98 μg/ml, and total uric acid in the intestinal juice was 308.27±16.37 μg, which is two times more than the total SUA. The uric acid was very low in stomach juice, and attained maximum in the juice of the first segment (duodenum) and then declined all the way till the intestinal end. The level of uric acid in the initial intestinal tissue was very high, where XDH and most of the proteins associated with bicarbonate secretion were up-regulated. In addition, SUA was decreased by oral UOX in model rats. The results suggested that intestinal juice was an important pool for uric acid, and intestinal tract was an important organ for SUA lowering. The uric acid distribution was associated with uric acid synthesis and secretion in the upper intestinal tract, and reclamation in the lower. PMID:29267361

  20. Regulation of early and delayed radiation responses in rat small intestine by capsaicin-sensitive nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junru; Zheng Huaien; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Ou Xuemei; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Mast cells protect against the early manifestations of intestinal radiation toxicity, but promote chronic intestinal wall fibrosis. Intestinal sensory nerves are closely associated with mast cells, both anatomically and functionally, and serve an important role in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis. This study examined the effect of sensory nerve ablation on the intestinal radiation response in an established rat model. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent sensory nerve ablation with capsaicin or sham ablation. Two weeks later, a localized segment of ileum was X-irradiated or sham irradiated. Structural, cellular, and molecular changes were examined 2 weeks (early injury) and 26 weeks (chronic injury) after irradiation. The mast cell dependence of the effect of sensory nerve ablation on intestinal radiation injury was assessed using c-kit mutant (Ws/Ws) mast cell-deficient rats. Results: Capsaicin treatment caused a baseline reduction in mucosal mast cell density, crypt cell proliferation, and expression of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, two neuropeptides released by sensory neurons. Sensory nerve ablation strikingly exacerbated early intestinal radiation toxicity (loss of mucosal surface area, inflammation, intestinal wall thickening), but attenuated the development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis (collagen I accumulation and transforming growth factor β immunoreactivity). In mast cell-deficient rats, capsaicin treatment exacerbated postradiation epithelial injury (loss of mucosal surface area), but none of the other aspects of radiation injury were affected by capsaicin treatment. Conclusions: Ablation of capsaicin-sensitive enteric neurons exacerbates early intestinal radiation toxicity, but attenuates development of chronic fibroproliferative changes. The effect of capsaicin treatment on the intestinal radiation response is partly mast cell dependent

  1. Methotrexate-induced intestinal mucositis delays gastric emptying and gastrointestinal transit of liquids in awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M. G. Soares

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Methotrexate and other anticancer agents can induce intestinal mucositis, which is one of the most common limiting factor that prevent further dose escalation of the methotrexate. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the gastric emptying and gastrointestinal transit of liquids in methotrexate-induced intestinal mucositis. METHODS: Wistar rats received methotrexate (2.5 mg/kg/day for 3 days, subcutaneously or saline. After 1, 3 and 7 days, sections of duodenum, jejunum and ileum were removed for assessment of epithelial damage and myeloperoxidase activity (biochemical marker of granulocyte infiltration. Others rats were pre-treated with methotrexate or saline, gavage-fed after 3 or 7 days with a standard test liquid meal, and sacrificed 10, 20 or 30-min later. Gastric and small intestine dye recoveries were measured by spectrophotometry. RESULTS: After 3 days of methotrexate, there was an epithelial intestinal damage in all segments, with myeloperoxidase activity increase in both in duodenum and ileum. Seven days after methotrexate, we observed a complete reversion of this intestinal damage. There was an increase in gastric dye recoveries after 10, 20, and 30-min post-prandial intervals after 3 days, but not after 7 days, of methotrexate. Intestine dye recoveries were decreased in the first and second segments at 10 min, in the third at 20 min, and in the second and third at 30 min, only after 3 days of methotrexate treatment. CONCLUSION: Methotrexate-induced intestinal mucositis delays gastric emptying and gastrointestinal transit of liquids in awake rats.

  2. The effect of recombinant growth hormone on intestinal anastomotic wound healing in rats with obstructive jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cağlikülekçi, Mehmet; Ozçay, Necdet; Oruğ, Taner; Aydoğ, Gülden; Renda, Nurten; Atalay, Fuat

    2002-03-01

    Several clinical and experimental studies have shown that obstructive jaundice delays wound healing. Growth hormone may prevent delayed wound healing, since it has effects on the release of mediators in jaundice, as well as increasing the protein synthesis. Forty male Wistar rats were allocated to four groups: Group I (n=10): intestinal anastomosis to normal small bowel, Group II (n=10): intestinal anastomosis to normal small bowel followed by growth hormone therapy (2mg/kg/day, subcutaneously), Group III (n=10): intestinal anastomosis to obstructive jaundice rat's small bowel, Group IV (n=10): intestinal anastomosis to obstructive jaundice rat's small bowel followed by growth hormone therapy at the same dosage The animals were observed for seven days then killed. Intraabdominal adhesions, anastomotic complications and anastomotic bursting pressures were recorded and tissue samples from the anastomotic site were obtained to measure hydroxyproline levels and for histopathologic examination. Growth hormone had a beneficial effect on the healing of intestinal anastomosis in both jaundiced and non-jaundiced rats. This was demonstrated by clinical and mechanical parameters such as a significant increase in anastomotic bursting pressure, hydroxyproline content and histopathological scores. Growth hormone reverses the adverse effects of obstructive jaundice on small bowel anastomotic healing. It can be hypothesized that this effect is due to augmentation of insulin-like growth factors, protection of hepatocytes, enhancement of intestinal epithelization, and reversal of the resultant malnutritional state caused by growth hormone in obstructive jaundice.

  3. Glucagon-like peptide-2 protects impaired intestinal mucosal barriers in obstructive jaundice rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Dong, Jia-Tian; Li, Xiao-Jing; Gu, Ye; Cheng, Zhi-Jian; Cai, Yuan-Kun

    2015-01-14

    To observe the protective effect of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) on the intestinal barrier of rats with obstructive jaundice and determine the possible mechanisms of action involved in the protective effect. Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a sham operation group, an obstructive jaundice group, and a GLP-2 group; each group consisted of 12 rats. The GLP-2 group was treated with GLP-2 after the day of surgery, whereas the other two groups were treated with the same concentration of normal saline. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin, and endotoxin levels were recorded at 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14 d. Furthermore, on the 14(th) day, body weight, the wet weight of the small intestine, pathological changes of the small intestine and the immunoglobulin A (IgA) expressed by plasma cells located in the small intestinal lamina propria were recorded for each group. In the rat model, jaundice was obvious, and the rats' activity decreased 4-6 d post bile duct ligation. Compared with the sham operation group, the obstructive jaundice group displayed increased yellow staining of abdominal visceral serosa, decreased small intestine wet weight, thinning of the intestinal muscle layer and villi, villous atrophy, uneven height, fusion, partial villous epithelial cell shedding, substantial inflammatory cell infiltration and significantly reduced IgA expression. However, no significant gross changes were noted between the GLP-2 and sham groups. With time, the levels of ALT, endotoxin and bilirubin in the GLP-2 group were significantly increased compared with the sham group (P jaundice group than in the GLP-2 group (P jaundice rats, which might be attributed to increased intestinal IgA and reduced bilirubin and endotoxin.

  4. 21 CFR 173.120 - Carbohydrase and cellulase derived from Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cellulase derived from Aspergillus niger. Carbohydrase and cellulase enzyme preparation derived from Aspergillus niger may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Aspergillus niger is classified as follows: Class, Deuteromycetes; order, Moniliales; family, Moniliaceae...

  5. On the transfer of serum proteins to the rat intestinal juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Norén, Ove; Poulsen, Mona D

    1994-01-01

    The in vivo pattern of serum proteins in the rat small-intestinal juice was characterized by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Immunoglobulins and albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, transferrin, and orosomucoid were present. Larger serum proteins were absent (ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin, alpha-1-macroglob...... proteins in the intestinal juice is a selective passage through the capillary wall followed by passive intercellular transport via delivery of the serum in the interstitial space during disintegration of the enterocytes....

  6. Effects of growth hormone plus a hyperproteic diet on methotrexate-induced injury in rat intestines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, M; Gomez-de-Segura, I A; Vázquez, I; López, J M; de Guevara, C L; De-Miguel, E

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether growth hormone treatment reduces injury to the intestinal mucosa induced by methotrexate (MTX). Wistar rats with intestinal injury induced by methotrexate were treated with daily growth hormone, beginning 3 days before MTX treatment until 3 or 4 days after MTX administration. The rats were killed at 3 or 7 days post-MTX administration. The rats were fed with either a normoproteic diet or a hyperproteic diet. Body weight, mortality, bacterial translocation, intestinal morphometry, proliferation and apoptosis and blood somatostatin and IGF-1 were determined. Combined administration of growth hormone and a hyperproteic diet reduces MTX-induced mortality. This effect was accompanied by increased cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis within the crypt. Morphometric data showed complete recovery of the mucosa by day 7 post-MTX administration. These results indicate a synergistic protective action of growth hormone combined with a hyperproteic diet to MTX-induced injury.

  7. Sex differences in hepatic and intestinal contributions to nevirapine biotransformation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, P F; Marinho, A T; Antunes, A M M; Marques, M M; Pereira, S A; Miranda, J P

    2015-05-25

    The understanding of the intestine contribution to drug biotransformation improved significantly in recent years. However, the sources of inter-individual variability in intestinal drug biotransformation, namely sex-differences, are still elusive. Nevirapine (NVP) is an orally taken anti-HIV drug associated with severe idiosyncratic reactions elicited by toxic metabolites, with women at increased risk. As such, NVP is a good model to assess sex-dimorphic metabolism. The aim of this study was to perform a comparative profiling of NVP biotransformation in rat intestine and liver and evaluate whether or not it is organ- and sex-dependent. Therefore, nevirapine-containing solutions were perfused through the intestine, in a specially designed chamber, or incubated with liver slices, from male and female Wistar rats. The levels of NVP and its Phase I metabolites were quantified by HPLC-UV. Liver incubation experiments yielded the metabolites 2-, 3-, 8-, and 12-OH-NVP, being 12-OH-NVP and 2-OH-NVP the major metabolites in males and females, respectively. Inter-sex differences in the metabolic profile were also detected in the intestine perfusion experiments. Herein, the metabolites 3- and 12-OH-NVP were only found in male rats, whereas 2-OH-NVP levels were higher in females, both in extraluminal (pbiotransformation was observed, strengthening the relevance of the intestinal contribution in the biotransformation of orally taken-drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Combined Effects of Muricid Extract and 5-Fluorouracil on Intestinal Toxicity in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Yazbeck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy drugs, such as 5-fluorouracil (5FU, are the standard approach for cancer and are associated with several peripheral toxicities. We previously demonstrated that Muricidae marine molluscs exhibit chemopreventive properties. This study investigated the combined effect of muricid extract derived from Dicathais orbita, with 5FU, on intestinal toxicity in rats. Groups of rats were orally gavaged water, muricid extract, or sunflower oil, with or without 5FU (150 mg/kg. Metabolic data was collected daily and small intestinal brush border enzyme activity was measured by sucrose breath test (SBT. Blood was collected by cardiac puncture for whole blood analysis. Intestinal biopsies were taken for histopathology. Neutrophil activity was measured by myeloperoxidase activity. No additional toxicity effects were observed in rats receiving the combination of 5FU and muricid extract compared to 5FU alone, as indicated by SBT, histopathology, and myeloperoxidase activity. Intestinal integrity was protected from 5FU-induced damage in the sunflower oil vehicle group, compared to controls, as measured by SBT, villus height, and crypt depth. We concluded that combination of muricid extract and 5FU did not confer any additional intestinal toxicity, further supporting its potential as a chemopreventive food product. In this model system, sunflower oil partially protected against 5FU-induced intestinal toxicity.

  9. THE EFFECT OF THE SOMATOSTATIN ANALOGUE OCTREOTIDE ON EXPERIMENTAL INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paran Haim

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Somatostatin has an inhibitory effect on the endocrine and exocrine secretions of the gut. It may have a beneficial effect in the conservative treatment of intestinal obstruction. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of octreotide in mechanical intestinal obstruction in rats. Method: Intestinal obstruction was induced in rats by ligation of a segment of the distal ileum. Animals were treated with the somatostatin analogue octreotide (n=16, or saline (n=16. Eight rats were operated but their intestine was not ligated (n=8 serving as sham controls. Forty eight hours after the operation, the animals were operated upon again and blood samples from the femoral vein were tested for electrolytes, urea, glucose, lactic acid, amylase, ph and bicarbonate. Portal vein blood samples were also obtained and tested for lactic acid and amylase. Results: Intestinal obstruction resulted, after 48 hours, in severe dilatation of bowel loops. A significant increase in plasma levels of urea, amylase and lactic acid was observed. Plasma pH decreased. In blood samples from the portal vein, a significant increase in lactic acid was observed, indicating metabolic acidosis, probably secondary to bowel ischemia. Octreotide treatment, resulted in less acidosis, with concomitant lower urea and lactic acid levels in the plasma and especially in the portal vein. Conclusion: Octreotide treatment may have a beneficial effect in the conservative treatment of selected cases of intestinal obstruction.

  10. Postirradiational changes in hematologic parameters and in intestinal microflora in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benova, K.; Striskova, K.; Dvorak, P.

    2007-01-01

    A decrease in the defense capacity of the body combined with penetration of intestinal microorganisms through the intestinal wall causes severe, often lethal complications of the acute radiation disease. We followed the clinical symptoms, the changes of hematological parameters and the changes of the composition of intestinal microflora in laboratory rats irradiated by a single, whole-body dose of 15 Gy gamma-rays. An increase of the common microflora in duodenum, liver and in oral cave and leucopenia in peripheral blood have been observe in all time intervals followed. The changes in red blood cells were characterized by anemia, manifesting clinically in hemorrhages and bloody diarrhea. (authors)

  11. Kefir milk enhances intestinal immunity in young but not old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoreux, K; Schmucker, D L

    2001-03-01

    The adjuvant effect of kefir fermented milk on the mucosal and systemic immune systems was examined in young (6 mo old) and old (26 mo old) rats. Kefir-fed rats consisted of young or old rats consuming kefir-fermented milk ad libitum on a daily basis in addition to the standard diet, for 28 d. Control rats consumed only the standard diet. The rats were immunized intraduodenally with cholera toxin (CT) on d 7 and 21 and killed on d 28. The nonspecific serum immunoglobulin (Ig)A titers in kefir-fed and control rats did not differ in either age group. The serum anti-CT IgA antibody concentrations were significantly higher in the kefir-fed young rats compared with their age-matched controls (+86%, P: 120%, P: kefir-fed rats compared with their respective controls. Nevertheless, these results demonstrate that a kefir-supplemented diet affects the intestinal mucosal and systemic immune responses to intraduodenal CT differently in young and old rats. Most importantly, our data suggest that orally administered kefir enhances the specific intestinal mucosal immune response against CT in young adult, but not in senescent rats.

  12. Changes in intestinal absorption of nutrients and brush border glycoproteins after total parenteral nutrition in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, S; Tanaka, S; Yoshioka, M; Serizawa, H; Tashiro, H; Shiozaki, H; Imaeda, H; Tsuchiya, M

    1992-01-01

    The effect of total parenteral nutrition on nutrients absorption and glycoprotein changes of brush border membrane was examined in rat small intestine. In total parenteral nutrition rats, a marked decrease in activity of brush border enzymes was observed mainly in the proximal and middle segments of the intestine. Galactose perfusion of jejunal segment showed that hexose absorption was significantly inhibited, while intestinal absorption of glycine or dipeptide, glycylglycine was not significantly affected by total parenteral nutrition treatment. When brush border membrane glycoprotein profile was examined by [3H]-glucosamine or [3H]-fucose incorporation into jejunal loops, significant changes were observed in the glycoprotein pattern of brush border membrane especially in the high molecular weight range over 120 kDa after total parenteral nutrition treatment, suggesting strong dependency of glycoprotein synthesis on luminal substances. Molecular weight of sucrase isomaltase in brush border membrane detected by specific antibody showed no significant difference, however, in total parenteral nutrition and control rats. Also, molecular weight of specific sodium glucose cotransporter of intestinal brush border membrane detected by selective photoaffinity labelling was not altered in total parenteral nutrition rats. It may be that prolonged absence of oral food intake may produce significant biochemical changes in brush border membrane glycoprotein and absorptive capacity of small intestine, but these changes were not observed in all brush border membrane glycoproteins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1582592

  13. A comparative study on the metabolism of Epimedium koreanum Nakai-prenylated flavonoids in rats by an intestinal enzyme (lactase phlorizin hydrolase) and intestinal flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Chen, Yan; Wang, Ying; Gao, Xia; Qu, Ding; Liu, Congyan

    2013-12-24

    The aim of this study was to compare the significance of the intestinal hydrolysis of prenylated flavonoids in Herba Epimedii by an intestinal enzyme and flora. Flavonoids were incubated at 37 °C with rat intestinal enzyme and intestinal flora. HPLC-UV was used to calculate the metabolic rates of the parent drug in the incubation and LC/MS/MS was used to determine the chemical structures of metabolites generated by different flavonoid glycosides. Rates of flavonoid metabolism by rat intestinal enzyme were quicker than those of intestinal flora. The sequence of intestinal flora metabolic rates was icariin>epimedin B>epimedin A>epimedin C>baohuoside I, whereas the order of intestinal enzyme metabolic rates was icariin>epimedin A>epimedin C>epimedin B>baohuoside I. Meanwhile, the LC/MS/MS graphs showed that icariin produced three products, epimedin A/B/C had four and baohuoside I yielded one product in incubations of both intestinal enzyme and flora, which were more than the results of HPLC-UV due to the fact LC/MS/MS has lower detectability and higher sensitivity. Moreover, the outcomes indicated that the rate of metabolization of flavonoids by intestinal enzyme were faster than those of intestinal flora, which was consistent with the HPLC-UV results. In conclusion, the metabolic pathways of the same components by intestinal flora and enzyme were the same. What's more, an intestinal enzyme such as lactase phlorizin hydrolase exhibited a more significant metabolic role in prenylated flavonoids of Herba Epimedi compared with intestinal flora.

  14. Iron metabolism in experimental rickets. Pt. 1. Intestinal absorption of iron in rat rickets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronicka, E.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations were carried out on iron 59 Fe absorption in rats with experimental rickets. It was found that rats with rickets as compared with controls do not show any significant differences in the degree of iron absorption in fasting state. The percent of absorbed iron increases when it is administered after previous feeding of rats. A greater rise in iron absorption after feeding was shown also by rats with rickets. On the other hand, administration of a shock dose of vitamin D at the time of rickets development causes after 7 days a significant decrease in total iron absorption given to fed rats. An excess of calcium in the diet of rats does not seem to impair directly the absorption of iron. The possibility of the causative effect of vitamin D deficiency on the composition of intestinal contents on changes in the degree of iron absorption observed after feeding of rats with rickets, is discussed. (author)

  15. Iron metabolism in experimental rickets. I. Intestinal absorption of iron in rat rickets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronicka, E [Pomorska Akademia Medyczna, Szczecin (Poland)

    1975-01-01

    Investigations were carried out on iron /sup 59/Fe absorption in rats with experimental rickets. It was found that rats with rickets as compared with controls do not show any significant differences in the degree of iron absorption in fasting state. The percent of absorbed iron increases when it is administered after previous feeding of rats. A greater rise in iron absorption after feeding was shown also by rats with rickets. On the other hand, administration of a shock dose of vitamin D at the time of rickets development causes after 7 days a significant decrease in total iron absorption given to fed rats. An excess of calcium in the diet of rats does not seem to impair directly the absorption of iron. The possibility of the causative effect of vitamin D deficiency on the composition of intestinal contents on changes in the degree of iron absorption observed after feeding of rats with rickets, is discussed.

  16. Therapeutic effect of an elemental diet on proline absorption across the irradiated rat small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohiuddin, M.; Kramer, S.

    1978-01-01

    Active absorption of [ 3 H]L-proline across the intestinal wall was used to measure functional change following irradiation of the exteriorized rat small intestine and to see whether an elemental amino acid diet would modify these changes. Segments (15 cm) of the exteriorized upper ileum of male Wistar rats were exposed to 1000 rad. Active transport against a concentration gradient of [ 3 H]L-proline from this irradiated segment was measured using the everted sac technique on days 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 30 post-irradiation. Irradiated rats maintained on a normal diet showed depression of absorptive function with only partial recovery by day 30. Irradiated rats maintained on an elemental amino acid diet also showed an initial drop in function but then recovered absorptive function completely by day 7

  17. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) tissue distribution in the rat as measured by radioimmunoassay and by radioreceptorassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, J.; Dupont, C.; Laburthe, M.; Bataille, D.; Rosselin, G.

    1977-01-01

    A new radioimmunoassay which allows the measurement of the rat vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, was performed. VIP is present in the whole digestive tract of rat, mainly between the duodenum and the colon. 1.5% of the total VIP is present in brain. The VIP-like immunoreactivity appears to correspond to biologically active molecule since a radioreceptorassay using liver plasma membranes as the target tissue, gives the same results as the radioimmunoassay [fr

  18. Stimulation of Intestinal Cl- Secretion Through CFTR by Caffeine Intake in Salt-Sensitive Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Wei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: High salt consumption is a major risk factor for hypertension, and sodium homeostasis is regulated by both intestinal sodium absorption and urinary sodium excretion. Chronic caffeine intake has been reported to attenuate salt-sensitive hypertension by promoting urinary sodium excretion; however, its exact role in intestinal sodium absorption remains unknown. Here, we investigated whether and how chronic caffeine consumption antagonizes salt-sensitive hypertension by inhibiting intestinal sodium absorption. Methods: Dahl salt-sensitive rats were fed 8% NaCl chow and 0.1% caffeine in their drinking water for 15 days. The blood pressure and fecal sodium content were measured. The effect of caffeine on the movement of Cl- in enterocyte cells was determined with the Ussing chamber assay. Results: Rats that were treated with caffeine displayed significantly lower mean blood pressure and higher fecal sodium content than the controls. Consistent with these findings, caffeine intake decreased fluid absorption by the intestine in the fluid perfusion experiment. Further, the results from the Ussing chamber assay indicated that caffeine promoted Cl- secretion through enterocyte apical cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, and thus inhibited sodium absorption. Moreover, depletion of cAMP or inhibition of CFTR completely abolished the effect of caffeine on Cl- secretion. Conclusion: The results indicate that chronic caffeine consumption reduces sodium absorption by promoting CFTR-mediated Cl- secretion in the intestine, which contributes to the anti-hypertensive effect of caffeine in salt-sensitive rats.

  19. Self-Microemulsifying Drug Delivery System: Formulation and Study Intestinal Permeability of Ibuprofen in Rats

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    Bharat Bhushan Subudhi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at developing a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS of Ibuprofen for investigating its intestinal transport behavior using the single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP method in rat. Methods. Ibuprofen loaded SMEDDS (ISMEDDS was developed and was characterized. The permeability behavior of Ibuprofen over three different concentrations (20, 30, and 40 µg/mL was studied in each isolated region of rat intestine by SPIP method at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. The human intestinal permeability was predicted using the Lawrence compartment absorption and transit (CAT model since effective permeability coefficients (Peff values for rat are highly correlated with those of human, and comparative intestinal permeability of Ibuprofen was carried out with plain drug suspension (PDS and marketed formulation (MF. Results. The developed ISMEDDS was stable, emulsified upon mild agitation with 44.4 nm ± 2.13 and 98.86% ± 1.21 as globule size and drug content, respectively. Higher Peff in colon with no significant Peff difference in jejunum, duodenum, and ileum was observed. The estimated human absorption of Ibuprofen for the SMEDDS was higher than that for PDS and MF (P<0.01. Conclusion. Developed ISMEDDS would possibly be advantageous in terms of minimized side effect, increased bioavailability, and hence the patient compliance.

  20. Effects of sex hormones on induction of intestinal metaplasia by X-irradiation in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiromitsu; Okamoto, Taro; Matsuda, Masahiro; Takahashi, Tadateru; Ogundigie, P.S.; Ito, Akihiro

    1993-01-01

    The influence of sex hormones on induction of intestinal metaplasia was examined in 5 week old Crj:CD (SD) rats of both sexes. At the age of 4 weeks, the animals were gonadectomized and given testosterone or dimethyl estradiol (DES). One week after operation, they were irradiated with two 10 Gy doses of X-rays to the gastric region at a 3 day interval for a total of 20 Gy. At the termination of the experiment, 6 months after the X-irradiation, the incidence of intestinal metaplasia with alkaline phosphatase (ALP) positive foci in males was significantly higher than in females, in orchidectomized males or orchidectomized plus DES treated rats (P<0.01). On the other hand, the incidence of intestinal metaplasia with ALP-positive foci in normal females appeared lower than in ovariectomized females (P<0.01), and was increased in rats by treatment with testosterone or decreased by DES. Numbers of foci of intestinal metaplasias with Paneth cells and total numbers appeared to increase in males treated with DES. The results suggested a promising role for testosterone in the development of ALP positive lesions and indicated considerable heterogeneity between intestinal metaplasia subtypes. (author)

  1. Effect of pomegranate juice pre-treatment on the transport of carbamazepine across rat intestine

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    D Adukondalu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available "n  "nBackground and the purpose of the study: Many drug substances along with a variety of naturally occurring dietary or herbal components interact with the CYP enzyme system.The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of pomegranate juice pre-treatment on the transport of carbamazepine across the rat intestine "nMethods: The transport of carbamazepine across different parts of rat intestine was studied by everted and non-everted sac methods. The control and pomegranate juice (10 ml Kg-1 for 7 days pre-treated rats were sacrificed and isolated the intestine. The sacs of intestine were prepared, treated with carbamazepine solution and then placed in dulbeccos buffer. Samples were collected periodically and the drug content was estimated using HPLC. Results and conclusion: The results show that there was a significant (p<0.05 difference in the transport of carbamazepine from the intestinal sacs of pretreated with pomegranate juice and control. It seems that pomegranatejuice might have induced CYP3A4enzymes and hence drug is extensively metabolized.

  2. Effects of Physical Exercise on the Intestinal Mucosa of Rats Submitted to a Hypothalamic Obesity Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J R; Freitas, J R; Grassiolli, S

    2016-10-01

    The small intestine plays a role in obesity as well as in satiation. However, the effect of physical exercise on the morphology and function of the small intestine during obesity has not been reported to date. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of physical exercise on morphological aspects of the rat small intestine during hypothalamic monosodium glutamate (MSG)-induced obesity. The rats were divided into four groups: Sedentary (S), Monosodium Glutamate (MSG), Exercised (E), and Exercised Monosodium Glutamate (EMSG). The MSG and EMSG groups received a daily injection of monosodium glutamate (4 g/kg) during the 5 first days after birth. The S and E groups were considered as control groups and received injections of saline. At weaning, at 21 days after birth, the EMSG and E groups were submitted to swimming practice 3 times a week until the 90th day, when all groups were sacrificed and the parameters studied recorded. Exercise significantly reduced fat deposits and the Lee Index in MSG-treated animals, and also reduced the thickness of the intestinal wall, the number of goblet cells and intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity. However, physical activity alone increased the thickness and height of villi, and the depth of the crypts. In conclusion, regular physical exercise may alter the morphology or/and functions of the small intestine, reducing the prejudicial effects of hypothalamic obesity. Anat Rec, 299:1389-1396, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Subchronic mild noise stress increases HRP permeability in rat small intestine in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, P. B.; van Raaij, M. T.; Dobbe, C. J.; Timmerman, A.; Kiliaan, A. J.; Taminiau, J. A.; Groot, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Recently we reported an increased trans- and paracellular protein permeability in rat small intestine after acute cold restraint stress. In the present study, we applied randomized 95- or 105-dB white noise pulses during 45 min/h, 12 h/day, duration 8 days, as a milder, but more chronic stressor to

  4. Similarity of hydrolyzing activity of human and rat small intestinal disaccharidases

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    Oku T

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Tsuneyuki Oku¹, Kenichi Tanabe¹, Shigeharu Ogawa², Naoki Sadamori¹, Sadako Nakamura¹¹Graduate School of Human Health Science, University of Nagasaki, Siebold, Nagayo, Japan; ²Juzenkai Hospital, Kagomachi, Nagasaki, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to clarify whether it is possible to extrapolate results from studies of the hydrolyzing activity of disaccharidases from rats to humans.Materials and methods: We measured disaccharidase activity in humans and rats using identical preparation and assay methods, and investigated the similarity in hydrolyzing activity. Small intestinal samples without malignancy were donated by five patients who had undergone bladder tumor surgery, and homogenates were prepared to measure disaccharidase activity. Adult rat homogenates were prepared using small intestine.Results: Maltase activity was the highest among the five disaccharidases, followed by sucrase and then palatinase in humans and rats. Trehalase activity was slightly lower than that of palatinase in humans and was similar to that of sucrase in rats. Lactase activity was the lowest in humans, but was similar to that of palatinase in rats. Thus, the hydrolyzing activity of five disaccharidases was generally similar in humans and rats. The relative activity of sucrose and palatinase versus maltase was generally similar between humans and rats. The ratio of rat to human hydrolyzing activity of maltase, sucrase, and palatinase was 1.9–3.1, but this was not a significant difference. Leaf extract from Morus alba strongly inhibited the activity of maltase, sucrase, and palatinase, but not trehalase and lactase, and the degree of inhibition was similar in humans and rats. L-arabinose mildly inhibited sucrase activity, but hardly inhibited the activity of maltase, palatinase, trehalase and lactase in humans and rats. The digestibility of 1-kestose, galactosylsucrose, and panose by small intestinal enzymes was very similar between humans and

  5. Probiotics and Probiotic Metabolic Product Improved Intestinal Function and Ameliorated LPS-Induced Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bo; Wu, Jie; Li, Xiaohui; Men, Xiaoming; Xu, Ziwei

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, we sought to determine the effects of Bacillus subtilis (BAS) and Bacillus licheniformis (BAL) in rats after lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute intestinal inflammation. We also determined whether the B. subtilis metabolic product (BASM) is as effective as the live-cell probiotic. 60 male SD rats were randomly assigned to five groups and administered a diet containing 0.05% B. licheniformis (BAL group), 0.05% B. subtilis (BAS group), 0.5% B. subtilis metabolic product (BASM group), or a basic diet (PC group and NC group) for 40 days. On day 40, BAL, BAS, BASM, and NC groups were injected with 4 mg/kg body weight LPS. 4 h later, all rats were anesthetized and sacrificed. The results showed that the administration of B. licheniformis and B. subtilis improved intestinal function as evidenced by histology, increased enzyme activity, and mucosal thickness. They also increased the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes and decreased mucosal myeloperoxidase activity and plasma TNF-α. In addition, the cecal content of B. subtilis-treated rats had significantly increased microbial diversity, decreased numbers of Firmicutes, and increased numbers of Bacteroidetes as compared to rats fed basic diets. Similar to BAS group, the cecal content of B. licheniformis-treated rats decreased the number of Firmicutes. Administration of B. subtilis metabolic product had similar effects on intestinal function, inflammation response, and microbial diversity as B. subtilis but these effects were attenuated. In conclusion, administration of probiotic strains B. licheniformis or B. subtilis improved intestinal function, ameliorated the inflammation response, and modulated microflora after LPS-induced acute inflammation in rats. Non-living cells also exerted probiotic properties but live cells tended to function better.

  6. Farnesoid X Receptor Activation Attenuates Intestinal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Rats.

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    Laurens J Ceulemans

    Full Text Available The farnesoid X receptor (FXR is abundantly expressed in the ileum, where it exerts an enteroprotective role as a key regulator of intestinal innate immunity and homeostasis, as shown in pre-clinical models of inflammatory bowel disease. Since intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI is characterized by hyperpermeability, bacterial translocation and inflammation, we aimed to investigate, for the first time, if the FXR-agonist obeticholic acid (OCA could attenuate intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury.In a validated rat model of intestinal IRI (laparotomy + temporary mesenteric artery clamping, 3 conditions were tested (n = 16/group: laparotomy only (sham group; ischemia 60min+ reperfusion 60min + vehicle pretreatment (IR group; ischemia 60min + reperfusion 60min + OCA pretreatment (IR+OCA group. Vehicle or OCA (INT-747, 2*30mg/kg was administered by gavage 24h and 4h prior to IRI. The following end-points were analyzed: 7-day survival; biomarkers of enterocyte viability (L-lactate, I-FABP; histology (morphologic injury to villi/crypts and villus length; intestinal permeability (Ussing chamber; endotoxin translocation (Lipopolysaccharide assay; cytokines (IL-6, IL-1-β, TNFα, IFN-γ IL-10, IL-13; apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3; and autophagy (LC3, p62.It was found that intestinal IRI was associated with high mortality (90%; loss of intestinal integrity (structurally and functionally; increased endotoxin translocation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production; and inhibition of autophagy. Conversely, OCA-pretreatment improved 7-day survival up to 50% which was associated with prevention of epithelial injury, preserved intestinal architecture and permeability. Additionally, FXR-agonism led to decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine release and alleviated autophagy inhibition.Pretreatment with OCA, an FXR-agonist, improves survival in a rodent model of intestinal IRI, preserves the gut barrier function and suppresses inflammation. These results turn

  7. Protective effect of lactobacillus acidophilus and isomaltooligosaccharide on intestinal mucosal barriers in rat models of antibiotic-associated diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Dan; Fang Lichao; Chen Bingbo; Wei Hong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect of synbiotics combined lactobacillus acidophilus and iso-malto-oligosaccharide (IMO) on intestinal mucosal barriers in rat models of antibiotic-associated diarrhea(AAD). Methods: Rat models of AAD were prepared with lincomycin gavage for 5 days. The synbiotics was orally administered to the AAD rats daily at three different strengths for 7 days. The intestinal flora and intestinal mucus SIgA levels were determined on d6, d9 and d13. The histopathological changes of ileal mucosa were studied on d13. Results: In the prepared AAD model rats (on d6) there were lower intestinal mucus SIgA levels and intestinal flora disorders were demonstrated. The intestinal floras of the rats administering synbiotics were readjusted to the similar pattern of healthy rats with bacterial translocation corrected on d13 and the levels of SIgA were not significantly different from of the control (P>0.05). The histopathological picture was basically normal in the treated models on d13. Conclusion: The synbiotics combined lactobacillus acidophilus and isomaltooligosaccharide possessed good protective effect on the intestinal mucosal barrier in lincomycin induced rat models of AAD. (authors)

  8. Free Total Rhubarb Anthraquinones Protect Intestinal Injury via Regulation of the Intestinal Immune Response in a Rat Model of Severe Acute Pancreatitis

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    Yuxia Xiong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal mucosal immune barrier dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. Rhubarb is a commonly used traditional Chinese medicine as a laxative in China. It markedly protects pancreatic acinar cells from trypsin-induced injury in rats. Free total rhubarb anthraquinones (FTRAs isolated and extracted from rhubarb display the beneficial effects of antibacteria, anti-inflammation, antivirus, and anticancer. The principal aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of FTRAs on the protection of intestinal injury and modification of the intestinal barrier function through regulation of intestinal immune function in rats with SAP. We established a rat model of SAP by injecting 3.5% sodium taurocholate (STC, 350 mg/kg into the biliopancreatic duct via retrograde injection and treated the rats with FTRAs (36 or 72 mg/kg or normal saline (control immediately and 12 h after STC injection. Then, we evaluated the protective effect of FTRAs on intestinal injury by pathological analysis and determined the levels of endotoxin (ET, interleukin 1β (IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, nitric oxide (NO, myeloperoxidase (MPO, capillary permeability, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors 3 (NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD domain (ASC, casepase-1, secretary immunoglobulin A (SIgA, regulatory T cells (Tregs, and the ratio of Th1/Th2 in the blood and/or small intestinal tissues or mesenteric lymph node (MLN cells. Moreover, the chemical profile of FTRAs was analyzed by HPLC-UV chromatogram. The results showed that FTRAs significantly protected intestinal damage and decreased the levels of ET, IL-1β, TNF-α, and NO in the blood and TNF-α, IL-1β, and protein extravasation in the intestinal tissues in SAP rats. Furthermore, FTRAs significantly decreased the expressions of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1, the number of Tregs and the ratio of Th1/Th2, while

  9. Soybean hull induced production of carbohydrases and protease among Aspergillus and their effectiveness in soy flour carbohydrate and protein separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Loman, Abdullah Al; Coffman, Anthony M; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2017-04-20

    Soybean hull consists mainly of three major plant carbohydrates, i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose and pectin. It is inexpensive and a good potential substrate for carbohydrase production because it is capable of inducing a complete spectrum of activities to hydrolyze complex biomass. Aspergillus is known for carbohydrase production but no studies have evaluated and compared, among Aspergillus species and strains, the soybean hull induced production of various carbohydrases. In this study, A. aculeatus, A. cinnamomeus, A. foetidus, A. phoenicis and 11 A. niger strains were examined together with T. reesei Rut C30, another known carbohydrase producer. The carbohydrases evaluated included pectinase, polygalacturonase, xylanase, cellulase, α-galactosidase and sucrase. Growth morphology and pH profiles were also followed. Among Aspergillus strains, morphology was found to correlate with both carbohydrase production and pH decrease profile. Filamentous strains gave higher carbohydrase production while causing slower pH decrease. The enzyme broths produced were also tested for separation of soy flour carbohydrate and protein. Defatted soy flour contains about 53% protein and 32% carbohydrate. The enzymatic treatment can increase protein content and remove indigestible oligo-/poly-saccharides, and improve use of soy flour in feed and food. Protease production by different strains was therefore also compared for minimizing protein degradation. A. niger NRRL 322 and A. foetidus NRRL 341 were found to be the most potent strains that produced maximal carbohydrases and minimal protease under soybean hull induction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of intestinal ischemia/reperfusion and lymph drainage on distant organs in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gui-Zhen; Zhou, Kai-Guo; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yu-Kang; Chen, Xue-Feng

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and lymph drainage on distant organs in rats. METHODS: Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley male rats, weighing 280-320 g, were randomly divided into blank, sham, I/R, and ischemia/reperfusion and drainage (I/R + D) groups (n = 8). All rats were subjected to 60 min ischemia by clamping the superior mesenteric artery, followed by 120 min reperfusion. The rats in the I/R + D group received intestinal lymph drainage for 180 min. In the sham group, the abdominal cavity was opened for 180 min, but the rats received no treatment. The blank group served as a normal and untreated control. A chromogenic limulus assay kit was used for quantitative detection of serum endotoxin. The serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, soluble cell adhesion molecules (sICAM-1), and high mobility group protein box 1 (HMGB1) were determined with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Histological evaluations of the intestine, liver, kidney, and lung were performed by hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. HMGB1 protein expression was assayed by western blot analysis. RESULTS: The serum levels of endotoxin and HMGB1 in the I/R and I/R + D groups were significantly higher than those in the sham group (endotoxin, I/R and I/R + D vs sham: 0.033 ± 0.004 EU/mL, 0.024 ± 0.003 EU/mL vs 0.017 ± 0.009 EU/mL, respectively, P drainage could block the “gut-lymph” pathway, improve intestinal barrier function, and attenuate distant organ injury incurred by intestinal I/R. PMID:23326132

  11. Structure of protein emulsion in food impacts intestinal microbiota, caecal luminal content composition and distal intestine characteristics in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Martin; Jaoui, Daphné; Douard, Véronique; Mat, Damien; Koeth, Fanny; Goustard, Bénédicte; Mayeur, Camille; Mondot, Stanislas; Hovaghimian, Anais; Le Feunteun, Steven; Chaumontet, Catherine; Davila, Anne-Marie; Tomé, Daniel; Souchon, Isabelle; Michon, Camille; Fromentin, Gilles; Blachier, François; Leclerc, Marion

    2017-10-01

    Few studies have evaluated in vivo the impact of food structure on digestion, absorption of nutrients and on microbiota composition and metabolism. In this study we evaluated in rat the impact of two structures of protein emulsion in food on gut microbiota, luminal content composition, and intestinal characteristics. Rats received for 3 weeks two diets of identical composition but based on lipid-protein matrices of liquid fine (LFE) or gelled coarse (GCE) emulsion. LFE diet led to higher abundance, when compared to the GCE, of Lactobacillaceae (Lactobacillus reuteri) in the ileum, higher β-diversity of the caecum mucus-associated bacteria. In contrast, the LFE diet led to a decrease in Akkermansia municiphila in the caecum. This coincided with heavier caecum content and higher amount of isovalerate in the LFE group. LFE diet induced an increased expression of (i) amino acid transporters in the ileum (ii) glucagon in the caecum, together with an elevated level of GLP-1 in portal plasma. However, these intestinal effects were not associated with modification of food intake or body weight gain. Overall, the structure of protein emulsion in food affects the expression of amino acid transporters and gut peptides concomitantly with modification of the gut microbiota composition and activity. Our data suggest that these effects of the emulsion structure are the result of a modification of protein digestion properties. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Intestinal absorption of calcium and magnesium in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erhart, J.

    1981-01-01

    Absorption of Ca and Mg was studied in isolated and perfused jejunum segments of rats using radioactive 45 Ca and 28 Mg. At ion concentrations of 1.5 and 10 mmol in the bath solution, the influence of uraemia, 1,25-(OH) 2 D 3 and the complementary ion was investigated. Absorption of Ca ++ was found to be slightly reduced by uraemia and renormalized by 1,25-(OH) 2 D 3 substitution. Transport of Ca ++ was significantly increased in the presence of Mg ++ , both in healthy rats and in animals with chronic uraemia. Mg ++ absorption, in contrast, was significantly reduced in rats with uraemia, and 1,25-(OH) 2 D 3 substitution was found to reduce it even further. In the presence of Ca ++ , transport of Mg ++ was lowered both in healthy rats and in rats with chronic uraemia. (MG) [de

  13. Sildenafil delays the intestinal transit of a liquid meal in awake rats

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    J.R.V Graça

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sildenafil slows down the gastric emptying of a liquid test meal in awake rats and inhibits the contractility of intestinal tissue strips. We studied the acute effects of sildenafil on in vivo intestinal transit in rats. Fasted, male albino rats (180-220 g, N = 44 were treated (0.2 mL, iv with sildenafil (4 mg/kg or vehicle (0.01 N HCl. Ten minutes later they were fed a liquid test meal (99m technetium-labeled saline injected directly into the duodenum. Twenty, 30 or 40 min after feeding, the rats were killed and transit throughout the gastrointestinal tract was evaluated by progression of the radiotracer using the geometric center method. The effect of sildenafil on mean arterial pressure (MAP was monitored in a separate group of rats (N = 14. Data (medians within interquartile ranges were compared by the Mann-Whitney U-test. The location of the geometric center was significantly more distal in vehicle-treated than in sildenafil-treated rats at 20, 30, and 40 min after test meal instillation (3.3 (3.0-3.6 vs 2.9 (2.7-3.1; 3.8 (3.4-4.0 vs 2.9 (2.5-3.1, and 4.3 (3.9-4.5 vs 3.4 (3.2-3.7, respectively; P < 0.05. MAP was unchanged in vehicle-treated rats but decreased by 25% (P < 0.05 within 10 min after sildenafil injection. In conclusion, besides transiently decreasing MAP, sildenafil delays the intestinal transit of a liquid test meal in awake rats.

  14. Transfer of milk prolactin ro the plasma of neonatal rats by intestinal absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitworth, N S; Grosvenor, C E [Tennessee Univ., Memphis (USA). Dept. of Physiology and Biophysics

    1978-11-01

    Prolactin passes from the systemic circulation of lactating rats into the milk where it can be consumed by the young rats during suckling. /sup 131/- labelled rat prolactin was detected in the plasma of 9- to 14-day-old rats after being nursed by mothers previously injected with /sup 131/I-labelled rat prolactin and after the pups had received /sup 131/I-labelled rat prolactin by gastric intubation. It was estimated that 16% of the /sup 131/I-labelled rat prolactin given by gastric intubation subsequently appeared in the plasma of the neonate. Gastric administration of 10.5 or 21.0 ..mu..g B-1 rat prolactin significantly raised the level of prolactin in the plasma of 13-day-old pups, but a similar increase was not observed when 27-day-old rats were given 46.2 ..mu..g B-1 prolactin by gastric intubation. The concentration of prolactin in the plasma of 13-to 14-day-old rats rose to 55 ng/ml 30 min after the onset of nursing by mothers whose mammary glands were full of milk, whereas the concentration in the plasma of mothers with empty mammary glands remained at basal values. It is concluded that the intestine of the newborn is permeable to prolactin and that milk may constitute an exogeneous source of prolactin for the suckled offspring.

  15. Angiotensin receptors and angiotensin I-converting enzyme in rat intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duggan, K.A.; Mendelsohn, F.A.; Levens, N.R.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to map the distribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors and ANG I-converting enzyme (ACE) in rat intestine. ANG II binding sites were visualized by in vitro autoradiography using iodinated [Sar1, Ile8]ANG II. The distribution of ACE was mapped using an iodinated derivative of lisinopril. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were killed and the interior of the whole intestine washed with ice-cold saline. Segments of duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon were quickly frozen in a mixture of isopentane and dry ice. Twenty-micron frozen sections were thaw-mounted onto gelatin-coated slides, incubated with either ligand, and exposed to X-ray film. After exposure and subsequent development, the films were quantitated by computerized densitometry. ANG II receptors were most dense in the colon, followed by the ileum, duodenum, and jejunum. Within each segment of intestine, specific ANG II binding sites were localized exclusively to the muscularis. In contrast, ACE was present in both the mucosa and the muscularis. The colocalization of ANG II receptors and ACE may suggest a role for locally generated ANG II in the control of intestinal function. The luminal orientation of ACE in the mucosa of the small intestine may suggest that at this site ACE serves primarily to hydrolyze dietary peptides

  16. Relation between radiation-induced tissue injury and its carcinogenesis of the rat small intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsubouchi, S [Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan). Research Inst.; Matsuzawa, T

    1975-06-01

    This study was undertaken to make clear the relationships between radiation-induced tissue injury and its carcinogenesis in the rat small intestine. The abdomens of Wistar rats were irradiated locally with 1000 to 2000 rads. Approximately 2 months following irradiation, visible nodules were found in the intestines of the groups receiving irradiation. Nodule incidence was 80 to 100% in groups that received 1750 or 2000 rads, 50% in the 1500-rad groups, and 3% in the 1000-rad groups, respectively. The histology of the nodules within 70 days postirradiation, revealed adenomatous hyperplasia, including invasion of submucosa, muscle layers, and serosa of the small intestine accompanied by an area of fibrous tissue resulting from desmoplastic reaction by irradiation injury. The nodule within 140 to 300 days postirradiation induced advanced tissue injuried, that is, a polypoid lesion in histology and intestinal nodular adhesion in macroscopic anatomy. Running parallel with the advance of the above mentioned tissue injuries, the nodules in 3 out of 18 rat during 200 to 300 days postirradiation showed mucoid adenocarcinoma.

  17. Relation between radiation-induced tissue injury and its carcinogenesis of the rat small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubouchi, Susumu; Matsuzawa, Taiju.

    1975-01-01

    This study was undertaken to make clear the relationships between radiation-induced tissue injury and its carcinogenesis in the rat small intestine. The abdomens of Wistar rats were irradiated locally with 1000 to 2000 rads. Approximately 2 months following irradiation, visible nodules were found in the intestines of the groups receiving irradiation. Nodule incidence was 80 to 100% in groups that received 1750 or 2000 rads, 50% in the 1500-rad groups, and 3% in the 1000-rad groups, respectively. The histology of the nodules within 70 days postirradiation, revealed adenomatous hyperplasia, including invasion of submucosa, muscle layers, and serosa of the small intestine accompanied by an area of fibrous tissue resulting from desmoplastic reaction by irradiation injury. The nodule within 140-300 days postirradiation induced advanced tissue injuried, that is, a polypoid lesion in histology and intestinal nodular adhesion in macroscopic anatomy. Running parallel with the advance of the above mentioned tissue injuries, the nodules in 3 out of 18 rat during 200-300 days postirradiation showed mucoid adenocarcinoma. (author)

  18. Saccharomyces boulardii ameliorates clarithromycin- and methotrexate-induced intestinal and hepatic injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, Deniz Güney; Kumral, Zarife Nigâr Özdemir; Ercan, Feriha; Deniz, Mustafa; Can, Güray; Cağlayan Yeğen, Berrak

    2013-08-28

    Saccharomyces boulardii is a probiotic used for the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. We aimed to investigate whether S. boulardii could alter the effects of clarithromycin (CLA) and methotrexate (MTX) on oro-caecal intestinal transit and oxidative damage in rats. Rats were divided into two groups receiving a single dose of MTX (20 mg/kg) or CLA (20 mg/kg per d) for 1 week. Groups were treated with either saline or S. boulardii (500 mg/kg) twice per d throughout the experiment. The control group was administered only saline. Following decapitation, intestinal transit and inflammation markers of glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase were measured in intestinal and hepatic tissues. CLA and MTX increased intestinal transit, while S. boulardii treatment slowed down CLA-facilitated transit back to control level. Both MTX and CLA increased lipid peroxidation while depleting the antioxidant GSH content in the hepatic and ileal tissues. Conversely, lipid peroxidation was depressed and GSH levels were increased in the ileal and hepatic tissues of S. boulardii-treated rats. Increased ileal neutrophil infiltration due to MTX and CLA treatments was also reduced by S. boulardii treatment. Histological analysis supported that S. boulardii protected intestinal tissues against the inflammatory effects of both agents. These findings suggest that S. boulardii ameliorates intestinal injury and the accompanying hepatic inflammation by supporting the antioxidant state of the tissues and by inhibiting the recruitment of neutrophils. Moreover, a preventive effect on MTXinduced toxicity is a novel finding of S. boulardii, proposing it as an adjunct to chemotherapy regimens.

  19. Cocoa-enriched diets modulate intestinal and systemic humoral immune response in young adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Berezo, Teresa; Franch, Angels; Ramos-Romero, Sara; Castellote, Cristina; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Castell, Margarida

    2011-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that a highly enriched cocoa diet affects both intestinal and systemic immune function in young rats. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether diets containing lower amounts of cocoa could also influence the systemic and intestinal humoral immune response. Fecal and serum samples were collected during the study and, at the end, intestinal washes were obtained and mesenteric lymph nodes and small-intestine walls were excised for gene expression assessment. IgA, IgM, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG2c concentrations were quantified in serum whereas S-IgA and S-IgM were determined in feces and intestinal washes. Animals receiving 5 and 10% cocoa for 3 wk showed no age-related increase in serum IgG1 and IgG2a concentrations, and IgG2a values were significantly lower than those in reference animals. Serum IgM was also decreased by the 10% cocoa diet. The 5 and 10% cocoa diets dramatically reduced intestinal S-IgA concentration and modified the expression of several genes involved in IgA synthesis. A diet containing 2% cocoa had no effect on most of the studied variables. The results demonstrate the downregulatory effect of a 5% or higher cocoa diet on the systemic and intestinal humoral immune response in adult rats. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Intraluminal polyethylene glycol stabilizes tight junctions and improves intestinal preservation in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltean, M; Joshi, M; Björkman, E; Oltean, S; Casselbrant, A; Herlenius, G; Olausson, M

    2012-08-01

    Rapidly progressing mucosal breakdown limits the intestinal preservation time below 10 h. Recent studies indicate that intraluminal solutions containing polyethylene glycol (PEG) alleviate preservation injury of intestines stored in UW-Viaspan. We investigated whether a low-sodium PEG solution is beneficial for intestines stored in histidine-tryptophane-ketoglutarate (HTK) preservation solution. Rat intestines used as control tissue (group 1) were perfused with HTK, groups 2 and 3 received either a customized PEG-3350 (group 2) or an electrolyte solution (group 3) intraluminally before cold storage. Tissue injury, brush-border maltase activity, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-3 expression in the tight junctions (TJ) were analyzed after 8, 14 and 20 h. We measured epithelial resistance and permeability (Ussing chamber) after 8 and 14 h. Group 2 had superior morphology while maltase activity was similar in all groups. TJ proteins rapidly decreased and decolocalized in groups 1 3; these negative events were delayed in group 2, where colocalization persisted for about 14 h. Intestines in group 2 had higher epithelial resistance and lower permeability than the other groups. These results suggest that a customized PEG solution intraluminally reduces the intestinal preservation injury by improving several major epithelial characteristics without negatively affecting the brush-border enzymes or promoting edema. © Copyright 2012 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  1. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J.; Jiang, Y. [Southern Medical University, Nanfang Hospital, Department of Anesthesia, Guangzhou, China, Department of Anesthesia, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Tang, Y.; Chen, B. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China); Sun, X. [Laboratory of Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndrome, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Su, L.; Liu, Z. [Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou, China, Department of Intensive Care Unit, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-06-25

    Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries.

  2. Effects of propofol on damage of rat intestinal epithelial cells induced by heat stress and lipopolysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, J.; Jiang, Y.; Tang, Y.; Chen, B.; Sun, X.; Su, L.; Liu, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Gut-derived endotoxin and pathogenic bacteria have been proposed as important causative factors of morbidity and death during heat stroke. However, it is still unclear what kind of damage is induced by heat stress. In this study, the rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) was treated with heat stress or a combination of heat stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, propofol, which plays an important role in anti-inflammation and organ protection, was applied to study its effects on cellular viability and apoptosis. Heat stress, LPS, or heat stress combined with LPS stimulation can all cause intestinal epithelial cell damage, including early apoptosis and subsequent necrosis. However, propofol can alleviate injuries caused by heat stress, LPS, or the combination of heat stress and LPS. Interestingly, propofol can only mitigate LPS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, and has no protective role in heat-stress-induced apoptosis. This study developed a model that can mimic the intestinal heat stress environment. It demonstrates the effects on intestinal epithelial cell damage, and indicated that propofol could be used as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of heat-stress-induced intestinal injuries

  3. Interdependency between mechanical parameters and afferent nerve discharge in remodeled diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rat intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Yang, Jian; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disorders are very common in diabetic patients, but the pathogenesis is still not well understood. Peripheral afferent nerves may be involved due to the complex regulation of gastrointestinal function by the enteric nervous system. We aimed to characterize the stimulus-response function of afferent fibers innervating the jejunum in the Goto-Kakizaki (GK) type 2 diabetic rat model. A key question is whether changes in afferent firing arise from remodeled tissue or from adaptive afferent processes. Seven 32-week-old male GK rats and seven age-matched normal Wistar rats were studied. Firing from mesenteric afferent nerves was recorded in excised jejunal segments of seven GK rats and seven normal Wistar rats during ramp test, stress relaxation test, and creep test. The circumferential stress-strain, spike rate increase ratio (SRIR), and single unit firing rates were calculated for evaluation of interdependency of the mechanical stimulations and the afferent nerve discharge. Elevated sensitivity to mechanical stimuli was found for diabetic nerve bundles and single unit activity ( P <0.05). The stress relaxed less in the diabetic intestinal segment ( P <0.05). Linear association between SRIR and the thickness of circumferential muscle layer was found at high stress levels as well as for SRIR and the glucose level. Altered viscoelastic properties and elevated mechanosensitivity were found in the GK rat intestine. The altered nerve signaling is related to muscle layer remodeling and glucose levels and may contribute to gastrointestinal symptoms experienced by diabetic patients.

  4. Epinephrine Injection effect on serotonin metabolism in small intestines of gamma irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saada, H.N.; Mahdy, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    The response of serotonin metabolism to epinephrine injection was examined in the small intestine of normal and whole body gamma irradiated rats. The data revealed that a single dose of 6 Gy induced decrease in serotonin content associated with increase of monoaminoxidase activity (MAO), and 5-hydroxyindol acetic acid (5-HIAA); at one and four hours, and one, three and seven days after exposure. Intraperitoneal administration of epinephrine to normal unirradiated rats at a dose of 0.2 mug/g increased serotonin content, decreased (MAO) activity, and (5-HIAA) level, one and four hours after treatment. No significant changes were recorded later. Injection of epinephrine to rats, 15 minutes before irradiation, resulted in no significant changes of serotonin content, MAO activity and 5-HIAA level at one, four hours and one day after irradiation. At three and seven days, the changes were less significant. The results obtained suggest that the effect of epinephrine on serotonin and 5-HIAA levels in the small intestine of rats is mediated by the opposing effect of epinephrine on the radiation induced increase of intestinal MAO activity

  5. Segmental-dependent membrane permeability along the intestine following oral drug administration: Evaluation of a triple single-pass intestinal perfusion (TSPIP) approach in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; West, Brady T; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-02-15

    In this paper we evaluate a modified approach to the traditional single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) rat model in investigating segmental-dependent permeability along the intestine following oral drug administration. Whereas in the traditional model one single segment of the intestine is perfused, we have simultaneously perfused three individual segments of each rat intestine: proximal jejunum, mid-small intestine and distal ileum, enabling to obtain tripled data from each rat compared to the traditional model. Three drugs, with different permeabilities, were utilized to evaluate the model: metoprolol, propranolol and cimetidine. Data was evaluated in comparison to the traditional method. Metoprolol and propranolol showed similar P(eff) values in the modified model in all segments. Segmental-dependent permeability was obtained for cimetidine, with lower P(eff) in the distal parts. Similar P(eff) values for all drugs were obtained in the traditional method, illustrating that the modified model is as accurate as the traditional, throughout a wide range of permeability characteristics, whether the permeability is constant or segment-dependent along the intestine. Three-fold higher statistical power to detect segmental-dependency was obtained in the modified approach, as each subject serves as his own control. In conclusion, the Triple SPIP model can reduce the number of animals utilized in segmental-dependent permeability research without compromising the quality of the data obtained.

  6. Effect of Da-Cheng-Qi Decoction on Pancreatitis-Associated Intestinal Dysmotility in Patients and in Rat Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianlei Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The impairment of intestinal motility and related infectious complications are the predominant clinical phenomenon in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. We aimed to investigate the effects of Da-Cheng-Qi decoction (DCQD on the gastrointestinal injury in SAP patients and the potential mechanism involved in rats. DCQD was enema administered to 70 patients for 7 days in West China Hospital. Mortality and organ failure during admission were observed and blood samples for laboratory analysis were collected. We also experimentally examined plasma inflammatory cytokines in rat serum and carried the morphometric studies of the gut. Intestinal propulsion index and serum and tissue vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP were also detected. Though DCQD did not affect the overall incidence of organ failure, it shortened the average time of paralytic intestinal obstruction and decreased the morbidity of infectious complications in patients with SAP. Compared with untreated rats, the DCQD lowered the levels of proinflammatory cytokine and decreased the mean pathological intestinal lesion scores. The VIP level in intestinal tissue or serum in DCQD group was obviously lowered and intestinal propulsion index was significantly improved. In conclusion, DCQD has good effect on pancreatitis-associated intestinal dysmotility in patients and in rat models.

  7. Biotransformation of Dioscorea nipponica by Rat Intestinal Microflora and Cardioprotective Effects of Diosgenin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Fu Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studying the biotransformation of natural products by intestinal microflora is an important approach to understanding how and why some medicines—particularly natural medicines—work. In many cases, the active components are generated by metabolic activation. This is critical for drug research and development. As a means to explore the therapeutic mechanism of Dioscorea nipponica (DN, a medicinal plant used to treat myocardial ischemia (MI, metabolites generated by intestinal microflora from DN were identified, and the cardioprotective efficacy of these metabolites was evaluated. Our results demonstrate that diosgenin is the main metabolite produced by rat intestinal microflora from DN. Further, our results show that diosgenin protects the myocardium against ischemic insult through increasing enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant levels in vivo and by decreasing oxidative stress damage. These mechanisms explain the clinical efficacy of DN as an anti-MI drug.

  8. Intestinal inflammation in TNBS sensitized rats as a model of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Selve

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available An enteritis, based on a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction, was induced in TNBS (2,4,4-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid sensitized rats by multiple intrajejunal challenge with TNBS via an implanted catheter. This treatment induced chronic inflammation of the distal small intestine characterized by intense hyperaemia, oedema and gut wall thickening as assessed by macroscopic scoring and weighing a defined part of the dissected intestine. Histologically, the inflammatory response included mucosal and submucosal cell infiltration by lymphocytes and histiocytes, transmural granulomatous inflammation with multinucleated cells and activated mesenteric lymph nodes. Ex vivo stimulated release of the inflammatory mediator LTB4 in the dissected part of the intestine was increased following TNBS treatment. Drug treatment with sulphasalazine or 5-aminosalicylic acid improved the enteritis score and attenuated TNBS induced oedema formation and LTB4 production. The applicability and relevance of this new model are discussed with respect to drug development and basic research of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  9. Interdependency between mechanical parameters and afferent nerve discharge in remodeled diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rat intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao J

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Jingbo Zhao,1 Jian Yang,1 Donghua Liao,1 Hans Gregersen2 1Giome Academia, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Giome Center, Department of Surgery, Chinese University of Hong Kong and Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong Background: Gastrointestinal disorders are very common in diabetic patients, but the pathogenesis is still not well understood. Peripheral afferent nerves may be involved due to the complex regulation of gastrointestinal function by the enteric nervous system. Objective: We aimed to characterize the stimulus–response function of afferent fibers innervating the jejunum in the Goto-Kakizaki (GK type 2 diabetic rat model. A key question is whether changes in afferent firing arise from remodeled tissue or from adaptive afferent processes. Design: Seven 32-week-old male GK rats and seven age-matched normal Wistar rats were studied. Firing from mesenteric afferent nerves was recorded in excised jejunal segments of seven GK rats and seven normal Wistar rats during ramp test, stress relaxation test, and creep test. The circumferential stress–strain, spike rate increase ratio (SRIR, and single unit firing rates were calculated for evaluation of interdependency of the mechanical stimulations and the afferent nerve discharge. Results: Elevated sensitivity to mechanical stimuli was found for diabetic nerve bundles and single unit activity (P<0.05. The stress relaxed less in the diabetic intestinal segment (P<0.05. Linear association between SRIR and the thickness of circumferential muscle layer was found at high stress levels as well as for SRIR and the glucose level. Conclusion: Altered viscoelastic properties and elevated mechanosensitivity were found in the GK rat intestine. The altered nerve signaling is related to muscle layer remodeling and glucose levels and may contribute to gastrointestinal symptoms experienced by diabetic patients. Keywords: afferents, spike rate, stress–strain, creep

  10. Aliskiren toxicity in juvenile rats is determined by ontogenic regulation of intestinal P-glycoprotein expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Peter; Beckman, David; McLean, Lee Anne; Yan, Jing-He

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile rat toxicity studies with the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren were initiated to support treatment in the pediatric population. In Study 1, aliskiren was administered orally to juvenile rats at doses of 0, 30, 100 or 300 mg/kg/day with repeated dosing from postpartum day (PPD) 8 to PPD 35/36. In-life, clinical pathology, anatomic pathology, and toxicokinetics evaluations were performed. In Study 2, single oral doses of aliskiren (0, 100 or 300 mg/kg) were given to 14-, 21-, 24-, 28-, 31- or 36-day-old rats; in-life data and toxicokinetics were evaluated. Study 3 was a single dose (3 mg/kg i.v.) pharmacokinetic study in juvenile rats on PPD 8, 14, 21 and 28. In Study 4, naïve rats were used to investigate ontogenic changes of the multidrug-resistant protein 1 (MDR1) and the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) mRNA in several organs. Oral administration of aliskiren at 100 and 300 mg/kg caused unexpected mortality and severe morbidity in 8-day-old rats. Aliskiren plasma and tissue concentrations were increased in rats aged 21 days and younger. Expression of MDR1 and OATP mRNA in the intestine, liver and brain was significantly lower in very young rats. In conclusion, severe toxicity and increased exposure in very young rats after oral administration of aliskiren are considered to be the result of immature drug transporter systems. Immaturity of MDR1 in enterocytes appears to be the most important mechanism responsible for the high exposure. - Highlights: • Aliskiren was orally administered to juvenile rats. • Unexpected severe toxicity and acute mortality occurred in rats aged 8 days. • Toxicity was associated with increased aliskiren plasma and tissue exposure. • Developmental changes of exposure correlated with ontogeny of transporters. • Immaturity of MDR1 in enterocytes causes increased exposure in very young rats

  11. Aliskiren toxicity in juvenile rats is determined by ontogenic regulation of intestinal P-glycoprotein expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Peter, E-mail: peterk.hoffmann@novartis.com [Preclinical Safety, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, East Hanover, NJ (United States); Beckman, David; McLean, Lee Anne [Preclinical Safety, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, East Hanover, NJ (United States); Yan, Jing-He [Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, East Hanover, NJ (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Juvenile rat toxicity studies with the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren were initiated to support treatment in the pediatric population. In Study 1, aliskiren was administered orally to juvenile rats at doses of 0, 30, 100 or 300 mg/kg/day with repeated dosing from postpartum day (PPD) 8 to PPD 35/36. In-life, clinical pathology, anatomic pathology, and toxicokinetics evaluations were performed. In Study 2, single oral doses of aliskiren (0, 100 or 300 mg/kg) were given to 14-, 21-, 24-, 28-, 31- or 36-day-old rats; in-life data and toxicokinetics were evaluated. Study 3 was a single dose (3 mg/kg i.v.) pharmacokinetic study in juvenile rats on PPD 8, 14, 21 and 28. In Study 4, naïve rats were used to investigate ontogenic changes of the multidrug-resistant protein 1 (MDR1) and the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) mRNA in several organs. Oral administration of aliskiren at 100 and 300 mg/kg caused unexpected mortality and severe morbidity in 8-day-old rats. Aliskiren plasma and tissue concentrations were increased in rats aged 21 days and younger. Expression of MDR1 and OATP mRNA in the intestine, liver and brain was significantly lower in very young rats. In conclusion, severe toxicity and increased exposure in very young rats after oral administration of aliskiren are considered to be the result of immature drug transporter systems. Immaturity of MDR1 in enterocytes appears to be the most important mechanism responsible for the high exposure. - Highlights: • Aliskiren was orally administered to juvenile rats. • Unexpected severe toxicity and acute mortality occurred in rats aged 8 days. • Toxicity was associated with increased aliskiren plasma and tissue exposure. • Developmental changes of exposure correlated with ontogeny of transporters. • Immaturity of MDR1 in enterocytes causes increased exposure in very young rats.

  12. Breakdown of mucin as barrier to digestive enzymes in the ischemic rat small intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Chang

    Full Text Available Loss of integrity of the epithelial/mucosal barrier in the small intestine has been associated with different pathologies that originate and/or develop in the gastrointestinal tract. We showed recently that mucin, the main protein in the mucus layer, is disrupted during early periods of intestinal ischemia. This event is accompanied by entry of pancreatic digestive enzymes into the intestinal wall. We hypothesize that the mucin-containing mucus layer is the main barrier preventing digestive enzymes from contacting the epithelium. Mucin breakdown may render the epithelium accessible to pancreatic enzymes, causing its disruption and increased permeability. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of mucin as a protection for epithelial integrity and function. A rat model of 30 min splanchnic arterial occlusion (SAO was used to study the degradation of two mucin isoforms (mucin 2 and 13 and two epithelial membrane proteins (E-cadherin and toll-like receptor 4, TLR4. In addition, the role of digestive enzymes in mucin breakdown was assessed in this model by luminal inhibition with acarbose, tranexamic acid, or nafamostat mesilate. Furthermore, the protective effect of the mucin layer against trypsin-mediated disruption of the intestinal epithelium was studied in vitro. Rats after SAO showed degradation of mucin 2 and fragmentation of mucin 13, which was not prevented by protease inhibition. Mucin breakdown was accompanied by increased intestinal permeability to FITC-dextran as well as degradation of E-cadherin and TLR4. Addition of mucin to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro protected against trypsin-mediated degradation of E-cadherin and TLR4 and reduced permeability of FITC-dextran across the monolayer. These results indicate that mucin plays an important role in the preservation of the mucosal barrier and that ischemia but not digestive enzymes disturbs mucin integrity, while digestive enzymes actively mediate epithelial cell

  13. Brain caspase-3 and intestinal FABP responses in preterm and term rats submitted to birth asphyxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.L. Figueira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal asphyxia can cause irreversible injury of multiple organs resulting in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC. This injury is dependent on time, severity, and gestational age, once the preterm babies need ventilator support. Our aim was to assess the different brain and intestinal effects of ischemia and reperfusion in neonate rats after birth anoxia and mechanical ventilation. Preterm and term neonates were divided into 8 subgroups (n=12/group: 1 preterm control (PTC, 2 preterm ventilated (PTV, 3 preterm asphyxiated (PTA, 4 preterm asphyxiated and ventilated (PTAV, 5 term control (TC, 6 term ventilated (TV, 7 term asphyxiated (TA, and 8 term asphyxiated and ventilated (TAV. We measured body, brain, and intestine weights and respective ratios [(BW, (BrW, (IW, (BrW/BW and (IW/BW]. Histology analysis and damage grading were performed in the brain (cortex/hippocampus and intestine (jejunum/ileum tissues, as well as immunohistochemistry analysis for caspase-3 and intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP. IW was lower in the TA than in the other terms (P<0.05, and the IW/BW ratio was lower in the TA than in the TAV (P<0.005. PTA, PTAV and TA presented high levels of brain damage. In histological intestinal analysis, PTAV and TAV had higher scores than the other groups. Caspase-3 was higher in PTAV (cortex and TA (cortex/hippocampus (P<0.005. I-FABP was higher in PTAV (P<0.005 and TA (ileum (P<0.05. I-FABP expression was increased in PTAV subgroup (P<0.0001. Brain and intestinal responses in neonatal rats caused by neonatal asphyxia, with or without mechanical ventilation, varied with gestational age, with increased expression of caspase-3 and I-FABP biomarkers.

  14. Effect of trefoil factor 3 on intestinal mucous barrier in rats with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

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    LIANG Kai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the change in intestinal mucous barrier in rats with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, the effect of trefoil factor 3 (TFF3 on intestinal mucous barrier in NASH rats, and the therapeutic effect of TFF3 on NASH. MethodsA total of 60 clean male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into normal group, model group, and treatment group, with 20 rats in each group. The rats in the normal group were given normal diet, and those in the model group and the treatment group were given high-fat diet to induce NASH. The rats in the treatment group were given intraperitoneal injection of rhTFF3 at a dose of 1 ml/kg/d (a concentration of 0.1 mg/ml, and those in the normal group and the model group were given normal saline at a dose of 1 ml/kg/d; the course of treatment was 3 weeks for all groups. At the end of week 15, fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran was given by gavage to evaluate intestinal permeability, and after the rats were sacrificed, serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, and endotoxin (ET and diamine oxidase (DAO activity were measured. HE staining was performed to observe the histopathological changes of the liver and the terminal ileum, PAS staining was performed to observe and count the goblet cells of the terminal ileum, immunohistochemistry was used to measure the expression of the tight junction protein Occludin and TFF3 in the terminal ileum, and quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure the mRNA transcription level of TFF3. A one-way analysis of variance was used for comparison between multiple groups, and the least significant difference t-test was used for further comparison between any two groups. ResultsThe model group had significant increases in serum levels of AST, ALT, TC, TG, and ET and DAO activity, and the treatment group had significant reductions compared with the model group (all P<0.01. The model

  15. Biosynthesis of methylmercury compounds by the intestinal flora of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, I.; Davies, M.; Grasso, P.

    1977-01-01

    The contents of the rat cecum and, to a lesser extent, those of the small intestine, synthesized methylmercury from mercuric chloride labeled with Hg 203 in vitro under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The rate of formation was approximately 18 ng/g cecal contents/20 hr. The synthesis of methylmercury was inhibited by antibiotics and by filtration of the cecal contents through membrane filters, indicating that the bacterial flora of the gut participates in the reaction. Pure cultures of bacteria, isolated from the intestinal tract of the rat, could methylate mercuric chloride. It was estimated that the total amount of methylmercury synthesized from ingested inorganic mercury in man is approximately 400 ng/day

  16. Developmental changes in intraepithelial T lymphocytes and NK cells in the small intestine of neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Castellote, Cristina; González-Castro, Ana M; Pelegrí, Carme; Castell, Margarida; Franch, Angels

    2005-11-01

    The main objective of this study was to characterize developmental changes in small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) subpopulations during the suckling period, thus contributing to the understanding of the development of diffuse gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) and to the identification of early mechanisms that protect the neonate from the first contact with diet and gut microbial antigens. The study was performed by double labeling and flow cytometry in IEL isolated from the proximal and distal small intestine of 1- to 21-d-old Lewis rats. During the suckling period, intraepithelial natural killer (NK) cells changed from a typical systemic phenotype, CD8+, to a specific intestinal phenotype, CD8-. Analysis of CD8+ IEL revealed a progressive increase in the relative number of CD8+ IEL co-expressing TCRalphabeta, cells associated with acquired immunity, whereas the percentage of CD8+ cells expressing the NK receptor, i.e. cells committed to innate immunity, decreased. At weaning, IEL maturity was still not achieved, as revealed by a phenotypic pattern that differed from that of adult rats. Thus, late after weaning, the regulatory CD8+CD4+ T IEL population appeared and the NK population declined. In summary, the intestinal intraepithelial compartment undergoes changes in its lymphocyte composition associated with the first ingestion of food. These changes are focused on a relatively high proportion of NK cells during the suckling period, and after weaning, an expansion of the regulatory CD8+CD4+ T cells.

  17. Ontogenic timing mechanism initiates the expression of rat intestinal sucrase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, K.Y.; Holt, P.R.

    1986-01-01

    Morphologic and enzymic differentiation occurs in rat small intestinal epithelium during 16-20 days of postnatal life. This change is considered to be initiated by an ontogenic timing mechanism and is modulated by extrinsic systemic and luminal factors. The importance of the ontogenic timing was tested directly using a transplantation technique in which jejunal isografts from newborn (day 0) and 5-day-old (day 5) rats were implanted under the skin of newborn (day 0) hosts. Isografts showing cryptvillus architecture were obtained in 44% and 21% of transplants, respectively. Day 0 isografts and host intestine expressed sucrase activity at about 16-18 days of age and showed similar crypt cell labeling and epithelial migration after [3H]thymidine injection. Day 5 isografts expressed sucrase activity when the hosts were 13 days of age, whereas host intestine showed no detectable sucrase activity. Isograft lactase activities in both experimental transplant models were significantly higher than host intestinal lactase up to 28 days of age, suggesting that luminal factors are important in modulating lactase activity during the first 4 wk of postnatal life. It is concluded that (a) no systemic factors at day 13 inhibit the expression of sucrase activity and (b) an ontogenic timing mechanism in the jejunum initiates the expression of sucrase activity

  18. Effects of leucine supplemented diet on intestinal absorption in tumor bearing pregnant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Mello Maria

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that amino acid oxidation is increased in tumor-bearing rat muscles and that leucine is an important ketogenic amino acid that provides energy to the skeletal muscle. Methods To evaluate the effects of a leucine supplemented diet on the intestinal absorption alterations produced by Walker 256, growing pregnant rats were distributed into six groups. Three pregnant groups received a normal protein diet (18% protein: pregnant (N, tumor-bearing (WN, pair-fed rats (Np. Three other pregnant groups were fed a diet supplemented with 3% leucine (15% protein plus 3% leucine: leucine (L, tumor-bearing (WL and pair-fed with leucine (Lp. Non pregnant rats (C, which received a normal protein diet, were used as a control group. After 20 days, the animals were submitted to intestinal perfusion to measure leucine, methionine and glucose absorption. Results Tumor-bearing pregnant rats showed impairment in food intake, body weight gain and muscle protein content, which were less accentuated in WL than in WN rats. These metabolic changes led to reduction in both fetal and tumor development. Leucine absorption slightly increased in WN group. In spite of having a significant decrease in leucine and methionine absorption compared to L, the WL group has shown a higher absorption rate of methionine than WN group, probably due to the ingestion of the leucine supplemented diet inducing this amino acid uptake. Glucose absorption was reduced in both tumor-bearing groups. Conclusions Leucine supplementation during pregnancy in tumor-bearing rats promoted high leucine absorption, increasing the availability of the amino acid for neoplasic cells and, mainly, for fetus and host utilization. This may have contributed to the better preservation of body weight gain, food intake and muscle protein observed in the supplemented rats in relation to the non-supplemented ones.

  19. Effects of leucine supplemented diet on intestinal absorption in tumor bearing pregnant rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventrucci, Gislaine; Mello, Maria Alice Roston de; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra

    2002-01-01

    It is known that amino acid oxidation is increased in tumor-bearing rat muscles and that leucine is an important ketogenic amino acid that provides energy to the skeletal muscle. To evaluate the effects of a leucine supplemented diet on the intestinal absorption alterations produced by Walker 256, growing pregnant rats were distributed into six groups. Three pregnant groups received a normal protein diet (18% protein): pregnant (N), tumor-bearing (WN), pair-fed rats (Np). Three other pregnant groups were fed a diet supplemented with 3% leucine (15% protein plus 3% leucine): leucine (L), tumor-bearing (WL) and pair-fed with leucine (Lp). Non pregnant rats (C), which received a normal protein diet, were used as a control group. After 20 days, the animals were submitted to intestinal perfusion to measure leucine, methionine and glucose absorption. Tumor-bearing pregnant rats showed impairment in food intake, body weight gain and muscle protein content, which were less accentuated in WL than in WN rats. These metabolic changes led to reduction in both fetal and tumor development. Leucine absorption slightly increased in WN group. In spite of having a significant decrease in leucine and methionine absorption compared to L, the WL group has shown a higher absorption rate of methionine than WN group, probably due to the ingestion of the leucine supplemented diet inducing this amino acid uptake. Glucose absorption was reduced in both tumor-bearing groups. Leucine supplementation during pregnancy in tumor-bearing rats promoted high leucine absorption, increasing the availability of the amino acid for neoplasic cells and, mainly, for fetus and host utilization. This may have contributed to the better preservation of body weight gain, food intake and muscle protein observed in the supplemented rats in relation to the non-supplemented ones

  20. Inhibition of gastric emptying and intestinal transit in anesthetized rats by a Tityus serrulatus scorpion toxin

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    L.E.A. Troncon

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a fraction (T1 of Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom prepared by gel filtration on gastric emptying and small intestinal transit were investigated in male Wistar rats. Fasted animals were anesthetized with urethane, submitted to tracheal intubation and right jugular vein cannulation. Scorpion toxin (250 µg/kg or saline was injected iv and 1 h later a bolus of saline (1.0 ml/100 g labeled with 99m technetium-phytate (10 MBq was administered by gavage. After 15 min, animals were sacrificed and the radioactivity remaining in the stomach was determined. Intestinal transit was evaluated by instillation of a technetium-labeled saline bolus (1.0 ml through a cannula previously implanted in the duodenum. After 60 min, the progression of the marker throughout 7 consecutive gut segments was estimated by the geometric center method. Gastric retention of the liquid test meal in rats injected with scorpion toxin (median: 88%; range: 52-95% was significantly higher (P<0.02 than in controls (54%; 21-76%, an effect which was not modified by gastric secretion blockade with ranitidine. The progression of the isotope marker throughout the small intestine was significantly slower (P<0.05 in rats treated with toxin (1.2; 1.0-2.5 than in control animals (2.3; 1.0-3.2. Inhibition of both gastric emptying and intestinal transit in rats injected with scorpion toxin suggests an increased resistance to aboral flow, which might be caused by abnormal neurotransmitter release or by the local effects of venom on smooth muscle cells.

  1. [Effects of astragalus polysaccharide on intestinal immune function of rats with severe scald injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cuilan; Zhan, Jianhua; Luo, Jinhua

    2015-02-01

    To observe the effects of astragalus polysaccharide (AP) on the intestinal mucosal morphology, level of secretory IgA (s-IgA) in intestinal mucus, and distribution of T lymphocyte subsets in Peyer's patch in rats with severe scald injury. One hundred and thirty SD rats were divided into sham injury group (SI, sham injured, n = 10), scald group (S, n = 30), low dosage group (LD, n = 30), moderate dosage group (MD, n = 30), and high dosage group (HD, n = 30) according to the random number table. Rats in the latter 4 groups were inflicted with 30% TBSA full-thickness scald on the back. From post injury hour 2, rats in groups LD, MD, and HD were intraperitoneally injected with 0.5 mL AP solution with the dosage of 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg each day respectively, and rats in group S were injected with 0.5 mL normal saline instead. Ten rats from group SI immediately after injury and 10 rats from each of the latter 4 groups on post injury day (PID) 3, 7, 14 were sacrificed, and their intestines were harvested. The morphology of ileal mucosa was examined after HE staining; the level of s-IgA in ileal mucus was determined with double-antibody sandwich ELISA method; the proportions of CD3⁺, CD4⁺, CD8⁺ T lymphocytes in Peyer's patches of intestine were determined with flow cytometer, and the proportion of CD4⁺ to CD8⁺ was calculated. Data were processed with one-way analysis of variance, analysis of variance of factorial design, and SNK test. (1) Villi in normal form and intact villus epithelial cells were observed in rats of group SI immediately after injury, while edema of villi and necrosis and desquamation of an enormous amount of villi were observed in groups with scalded rats on PID 3, with significant infiltration of inflammatory cells. On PID 7, no obvious improvement in intestinal mucosal lesion was observed in groups with scalded rats. On PID 14, the pathology in intestinal mucosa of rats remained nearly the same in group S, and it was alleviated obviously

  2. Kampo medicine "Dai-kenchu-to" prevents CPT-11-induced small-intestinal injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikakiyo, Motoya; Shimada, Mitsuo; Nakao, Toshihiro; Higashijima, Jun; Yoshikawa, Kozo; Nishioka, Masanori; Iwata, Takashi; Kurita, Nobuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The key anticancer agent, CPT-11 (irinotecan hydrochloride), induces severe diarrhea clinically. We investigated the effect of a Kampo medicine, Dai-kenchu-to (DKT), on CPT-11-induced intestinal injuries in rats. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: a control group; a CPT-11 group, given CPT-11 150 mg/kg intraperitoneally for 2 days; and a DKT group, given DKT 300 mg/kg orally for 5 days with CPT-11 150 mg/kg intraperitoneally on days 4 and 5. The rats were killed on day 6. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-12, interferon (IFN)-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α expression in the small intestine of the CPT-11 group was significantly higher than that of the control group. Interleukin-1β and IFN-γ expression was improved significantly by DKT (P DKT (P DKT suppressed CPT-11 induced inflammatory cytokines and apoptosis in the intestinal mucosa and maintained the mucosal integrity.

  3. The Effect of Acupuncture and Electro-acupuncture at ST41 on Intestinal Hypomotility Induced with Loperamide in Rats

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    Lee Sang-mi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of acpuncture and electro-acupuncture of low(EA(L and high(EA(H frequency at Haegye(ST41 on intestinal hypomotility induced with loperamide in rats. Methods : We made suppressed state of intestinal motility with loperamide in rats and carried out needle retention acupuncture, low frequency electro-acupuncture and high frequency electro-acupuncture at ST41 in rats devided into pre-treatment group and post-treatment group. We fed charcoal to them after the treatment and measured the travel rate of charcoal in the gastrointestinal track to analyze which treatment is more effective in state of intestinal hypomotility. Results : None of acupuncture, EA(L and EA(H at ST41 had significant influences on intestinal motility of rat in normal state. Needle retention at ST41 did not significantly increase intestinal motility suppressed with loperamide in rats. Pre-treatment of EA(L and EA(H at ST41 significantly increased intestinal motility suppressed with loperamide in rats. Post-treatment of EA(L and EA(H at ST41 did not have significant influences on intestinal motility of rat in normal state. Conclusions : These results suggest that treatment of EA(L and EA(H at ST41 may be effective on gastric disorders such as intestinal hypomotility and its effect had more prevention than cure. Further study is necessary to know more effects of ST41 and electro-acupuncture of low and high frequency.

  4. Hydrolysis of pyrethroids by human and rat tissues: Examination of intestinal, liver and serum carboxylesterases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crow, J. Allen; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Potter, Philip M.; Ross, Matthew K.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrolytic metabolism of pyrethroid insecticides in humans is one of the major catabolic pathways that clear these compounds from the body. Rodent models are often used to determine the disposition and clearance rates of these esterified compounds. In this study the distribution and activities of esterases that catalyze pyrethroid metabolism have been investigated in vitro using several human and rat tissues, including small intestine, liver and serum. The major esterase in human intestine is carboxylesterase 2 (hCE2). We found that the pyrethroid trans-permethrin is effectively hydrolyzed by a sample of pooled human intestinal microsomes (5 individuals), while deltamethrin and bioresmethrin are not. This result correlates well with the substrate specificity of recombinant hCE2 enzyme. In contrast, a sample of pooled rat intestinal microsomes (5 animals) hydrolyze trans-permethrin 4.5-fold slower than the sample of human intestinal microsomes. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that pooled samples of cytosol from human or rat liver are ∼ 2-fold less hydrolytically active (normalized per mg protein) than the corresponding microsomal fraction toward pyrethroid substrates; however, the cytosolic fractions do have significant amounts (∼ 40%) of the total esteratic activity. Moreover, a 6-fold interindividual variation in carboxylesterase 1 protein expression in human hepatic cytosols was observed. Human serum was shown to lack pyrethroid hydrolytic activity, but rat serum has hydrolytic activity that is attributed to a single CE isozyme. We purified the serum CE enzyme to homogeneity to determine its contribution to pyrethroid metabolism in the rat. Both trans-permethrin and bioresmethrin were effectively cleaved by this serum CE, but deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, alpha-cypermethrin and cis-permethrin were slowly hydrolyzed. Lastly, two model lipase enzymes were examined for their ability to hydrolyze pyrethroids. However, no hydrolysis products could be detected

  5. Limited Nesting Stress Alters Maternal Behavior and In Vivo Intestinal Permeability in Male Wistar Pup Rats.

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    Nabila Moussaoui

    Full Text Available A few studies indicate that limited nesting stress (LNS alters maternal behavior and the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA axis of dams and offspring in male Sprague Dawley rats. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of LNS on maternal behavior in Wistar rats, and on the HPA axis, glycemia and in vivo intestinal permeability of male and female offspring. Intestinal permeability is known to be elevated during the first week postnatally and influenced by glucocorticoids. Dams and neonatal litters were subjected to LNS or normal nesting conditions (control from days 2 to 10 postnatally. At day 10, blood was collected from pups for determination of glucose and plasma corticosterone by enzyme immunoassay and in vivo intestinal permeability by oral gavage of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4kDa. Dams exposed to LNS compared to control showed an increase in the percentage of time spent building a nest (118%, self-grooming (69%, and putting the pups back to the nest (167%. LNS male and female pups exhibited a reduction of body weight by 5% and 4%, adrenal weights/100g body weight by 17% and 18%, corticosterone plasma levels by 64% and 62% and blood glucose by 11% and 12% respectively compared to same sex control pups. In male LNS pups, intestinal permeability was increased by 2.7-fold while no change was observed in females compared to same sex control. There was no sex difference in any of the parameters in control pups except the body weight. These data indicate that Wistar dams subjected to LNS during the first postnatal week have an altered repertoire of maternal behaviors which affects the development of the HPA axis in both sexes and intestinal barrier function in male offspring.

  6. Inhibition of Protease-activated Receptor 1 Ameliorates Intestinal Radiation Mucositis in a Preclinical Rat Model

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    Wang, Junru; Kulkarni, Ashwini [Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Chintala, Madhu [Schering-Plough Research Institute, Kenilworth, New Jersey (United States); Fink, Louis M. [Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Hauer-Jensen, Martin, E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu [Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Surgery Service, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, using a specific small-molecule inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) signaling, whether the beneficial effect of thrombin inhibition on radiation enteropathy development is due to inhibition of blood clotting or to cellular (PAR1-mediated) thrombin effects. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent fractionated X-irradiation (5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 9) of a 4-cm small-bowel segment. Early radiation toxicity was evaluated in rats receiving PAR1 inhibitor (SCH602539, 0, 10, or 15 mg/kg/d) from 1 day before to 2 weeks after the end of irradiation. The effect of PAR1 inhibition on development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis was evaluated in animals receiving SCH602539 (0, 15, or 30 mg/kg/d) until 2 weeks after irradiation, or continuously until termination of the experiment 26 weeks after irradiation. Results: Blockade of PAR1 ameliorated early intestinal toxicity, with reduced overall intestinal radiation injury (P=.002), number of myeloperoxidase-positive (P=.03) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive (P=.04) cells, and collagen III accumulation (P=.005). In contrast, there was no difference in delayed radiation enteropathy in either the 2- or 26-week administration groups. Conclusion: Pharmacological blockade of PAR1 seems to reduce early radiation mucositis but does not affect the level of delayed intestinal radiation fibrosis. Early radiation enteropathy is related to activation of cellular thrombin receptors, whereas platelet activation or fibrin formation may play a greater role in the development of delayed toxicity. Because of the favorable side-effect profile, PAR1 blockade should be further explored as a method to ameliorate acute intestinal radiation toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer and to protect first responders and rescue personnel in radiologic/nuclear emergencies.

  7. Maternal protein restriction affects gene expression and enzyme activity of intestinal disaccharidases in adult rat offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, D.F.; Pacheco, P.D.G.; Alvarenga, P.V.; Buratini, J. Jr; Castilho, A.C.S.; Lima, P.F.; Sartori, D.R.S.; Vicentini-Paulino, M.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the consequences of intrauterine protein restriction on the gastrointestinal tract and particularly on the gene expression and activity of intestinal disaccharidases in the adult offspring. Wistar rat dams were fed isocaloric diets containing 6% protein (restricted, n = 8) or 17% protein (control, n = 8) throughout gestation. Male offspring (n = 5-8 in each group) were evaluated at 3 or 16 weeks of age. Maternal protein restriction during pregnancy produced offspring with growth restriction from birth (5.7 ± 0.1 vs 6.3 ± 0.1 g; mean ± SE) to weaning (42.4 ± 1.3 vs 49.1 ± 1.6 g), although at 16 weeks of age their body weight was similar to control (421.7 ± 8.9 and 428.5 ± 8.5 g). Maternal protein restriction also increased lactase activity in the proximal (0.23 ± 0.02 vs 0.15 ± 0.02), medial (0.30 ± 0.06 vs 0.14 ± 0.01) and distal (0.43 ± 0.07 vs 0.07 ± 0.02 U·g -1 ·min -1 ) small intestine, and mRNA lactase abundance in the proximal intestine (7.96 ± 1.11 vs 2.38 ± 0.47 relative units) of 3-week-old offspring rats. In addition, maternal protein restriction increased sucrase activity (1.20 ± 0.02 vs 0.91 ± 0.02 U·g -1 ·min -1 ) and sucrase mRNA abundance (4.48 ± 0.51 vs 1.95 ± 0.17 relative units) in the duodenum of 16-week-old rats. In conclusion, the present study shows for the first time that intrauterine protein restriction affects gene expression of intestinal enzymes in offspring

  8. Rat enterohepatic circulation and intestinal distribution of enterally infused thyroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiStefano, J.J. III; Sternlicht, M.; Harris, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    The enterohepatic circulation (recycling), intestinal (gut) distribution, metabolism, and excretion of enterally infused thyroid hormones were studied in the intact rat under approximately normal physiological steady state conditions. Rats with 7-day osmotic minipumps implanted ip received constant intraduodenal infusions to steady state of very small trace doses of either 125I-labeled T3 (T3*) or T4 (T4*). Enterohepatic and other pathways remained open to normal function, and in particular, there was no biliary diversion or ligation. Complete feces and urine were collected daily, to assess daily distributions of radioactivity and establishment of the steady state, which occurred by day 3. On day 7, rats were anesthetized, blood was sampled, whole intestine and minipumps were removed, and the gut was separated into six segments. Fecal samples and the contents of each gut section were homogenized, ethanol extracted, evaporated, and reconstituted in NaOH for quantitative aqueous chromatography along with infusate, urine, and plasma samples, on Sephadex G-25 columns. No T3* or T4* was found in urine, but feces contained 39% of the T3* infused and 36% of the T4* infused in steady state. Statistically significant amounts of both T3* and T4* in systemic plasma on day 7 clearly indicated absorption of the hormones from the intestine, distinctly demonstrating an enterohepatic circulation of T3 and T4 under experimental conditions closely approximating the physiological steady state. This also establishes the intestine (with its contents) as an exchangeable hormone pool, physiologically internal to the system regulating thyroid hormones and their distribution. Gut contents contained 52 times more T3* and 4.34 times more T4* than corresponding plasma pools in steady state

  9. Intestinal Fungal Dysbiosis Is Associated With Visceral Hypersensitivity in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botschuijver, Sara; Roeselers, Guus; Levin, Evgeni; Jonkers, Daisy M; Welting, Olaf; Heinsbroek, Sigrid E M; de Weerd, Heleen H; Boekhout, Teun; Fornai, Matteo; Masclee, Ad A; Schuren, Frank H J; de Jonge, Wouter J; Seppen, Jurgen; van den Wijngaard, René M

    2017-10-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity is one feature of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Bacterial dysbiosis might be involved in the activation of nociceptive sensory pathways, but there have been few studies of the role of the mycobiome (the fungal microbiome) in the development of IBS. We analyzed intestinal mycobiomes of patients with IBS and a rat model of visceral hypersensitivity. We used internal transcribed spacer 1-based metabarcoding to compare fecal mycobiomes of 18 healthy volunteers with those of 39 patients with IBS (with visceral hypersensitivity or normal levels of sensitivity). We also compared the mycobiomes of Long-Evans rats separated from their mothers (hypersensitive) with non-handled (normally sensitive) rats. We investigated whether fungi can cause visceral hypersensitivity using rats exposed to fungicide (fluconazole and nystatin). The functional relevance of the gut mycobiome was confirmed in fecal transplantation experiments: adult maternally separated rats were subjected to water avoidance stress (to induce visceral hypersensitivity), then given fungicide and donor cecum content via oral gavage. Other rats subjected to water avoidance stress were given soluble β-glucans, which antagonize C-type lectin domain family 7 member A (CLEC7A or DECTIN1) signaling via spleen-associated tyrosine kinase (SYK), a SYK inhibitor to reduce visceral hypersensitivity, or vehicle (control). The sensitivity of mast cells to fungi was tested with mesenteric windows (ex vivo) and the human mast cell line HMC-1. α diversity (Shannon index) and mycobiome signature (stability selection) of both groups of IBS patients differed from healthy volunteers, and the mycobiome signature of hypersensitive patients differed from that of normally sensitive patients. We observed mycobiome dysbiosis in rats that had been separated from their mothers compared with non-handled rats. Administration of fungicide to hypersensitive rats reduced their visceral hypersensitivity to normal

  10. Carbohydrases in the digestive system of the spined soldier bug, Podisus maculiventris (Say) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghamari, Mahboob; Hosseininaveh, Vahid; Darvishzadeh, Ali; Chougule, Nanasaheb P

    2014-04-01

    The spined soldier bug, Podisus maculiventris, is a generalist predator of insects and has been used in biological control. However, information on the digestion of food in this insect is lacking. Therefore, we have studied the digestive system in P. maculiventris, and further characterized carbohydrases in the digestive tract. The midgut of all developmental stages was composed of anterior, median, and posterior regions. The volumes of the anterior midgut decreased and the median midgut increased in older instars and adults, suggesting a more important role of the median midgut in food digestion. However, carbohydrase activities were predominant in the anterior midgut. In comparing the specific activity of carbohydrases, α-amylase activity was more in the salivary glands (with two distinct activity bands in zymograms), and glucosidase and galactosidase activities were more in the midgut. Salivary α-amylases were detected in the prey hemolymph, demonstrating the role of these enzymes in extra-oral digestion. However, the catalytic efficiency of midgut α-amylase activity was approximately twofold more than that of the salivary gland enzymes, and was more efficient in digesting soluble starch than glycogen. Midgut α-amylases were developmentally regulated, as one isoform was found in first instar compared to three isoforms in fifth instar nymphs. Starvation significantly affected carbohydrase activities in the midgut, and acarbose inhibited α-amylases from both the salivary glands and midgut in vitro and in vivo. The structural diversity and developmental regulation of carbohydrases in the digestive system of P. maculiventris demonstrate the importance of these enzymes in extra-oral and intra-tract digestion, and may explain the capability of the hemipteran to utilize diverse food sources. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Inducing effect of clofibric acid on stearoyl-CoA desaturase in intestinal mucosa of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Tohru; Kadokura, Makiko; Mutoh, Yuki; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Okazaki, Mari; Mitsumoto, Atsushi; Kawashima, Yoichi; Kudo, Naomi

    2014-12-01

    Fibrates have been reported to elevate the hepatic proportion of oleic acid (18:1n-9) through inducing stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD). Despite abundant studies on the regulation of SCD in the liver, little is known about this issue in the small intestine. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of clofibric acid on the fatty acid profile, particularly monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), and the SCD expression in intestinal mucosa. Treatment of rats with a diet containing 0.5% (w/w) clofibric acid for 7 days changed the MUFA profile of total lipids in intestinal mucosa; the proportion of 18:1n-9 was significantly increased, whereas those of palmitoleic (16:1n-7) and cis-vaccenic (18:1n-7) acids were not changed. Upon the treatment with clofibric acid, SCD was induced and the gene expression of SCD1, SCD2, and fatty acid elongase (Elovl) 6 was up-regulated, but that of Elovl5 was unaffected. Fat-free diet feeding for 28 days increased the proportions of 16:1n-7 and 18:1n-7, but did not effectively change that of 18:1n-9, in intestinal mucosa. Fat-free diet feeding up-regulated the gene expression of SCD1, but not that of SCD2, Elovl6, or Elovl5. These results indicate that intestinal mucosa significantly changes its MUFA profile in response to challenges by clofibric acid and a fat-free diet and suggest that up-regulation of the gene expression of SCD along with Elovl6 is indispensable to elevate the proportion of 18:1n-9 in intestinal mucosa.

  12. Agmatine attenuates intestinal ischemia and reperfusion injury by reducing oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Inci; Ozacmak, Hale Sayan; Ozacmak, V Haktan; Barut, Figen; Araslı, Mehmet

    2017-11-15

    Oxidative stress and inflammatory response are major factors causing several tissue injuries in intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). Agmatine has been reported to attenuate I/R injury of various organs. The present study aims to analyze the possible protective effects of agmatine on intestinal I/R injury in rats. Four groups were designed: sham control, agmatine-treated control, I/R control, and agmatine-treated I/R groups. IR injury of small intestine was induced by the occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery for half an hour to be followed by a 3-hour-long reperfusion. Agmatine (10mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally before reperfusion period. After 180min of reperfusion period, the contractile responses to both carbachol and potassium chloride (KCl) were subsequently examined in an isolated-organ bath. Malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), and the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured in intestinal tissue. Plasma cytokine levels were determined. The expression of the intestinal inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was also assessed by immunohistochemistry. The treatment with agmatine appeared to be significantly effective in reducing the MDA content and MPO activity besides restoring the content of GSH. The treatment also attenuated the histological injury. The increases in the I/R induced expressions of iNOS, IFN-γ, and IL-1α were brought back to the sham control levels by the treatment as well. Our findings indicate that the agmatine pretreatment may ameliorate reperfusion induced injury in small intestine mainly due to reducing inflammatory response and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment and prophylaxis with sucralfate ameliorates hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced intestinal injury in pup rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sencan, Arzu Bostanci; Sencan, Aydin; Aktas, Safiye; Habif, Sara; Kabaroglu, Ceyda; Parildar, Zuhal; Karaca, Irfan

    2005-04-01

    Sucralfate is widely used as a cytoprotective agent in patients with peptic ulcer and other intestinal mucosal injury. The aim of this study is to investigate whether sucralfate has any effect on the prevention and treatment of hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced intestinal injury. Four groups of 10 1-day-old rat pups were studied. Hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/O)-induced intestinal injury was created. Group 1 was subjected to H/O just after birth and sacrificed at the end of the third day (Treatment Control). Group 2 was subjected to H/O just after birth and treated with sucralfate for 3 days. They were sacrificed at the end of the third day (Treatment). Group 3 was subjected to H/O on the third day after birth and then sacrificed (Prophylaxis Control). Group 4 was treated with sucralfate for the first 3 days, then H/O was created. Just after H/O, the pups were sacrificed (Prophylaxis). The intestinal tissues were harvested for histopathological investigation. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the intestinal tissues were determined. The mucosal injury grades of the treatment and prophylaxis groups were significantly lower than those of control groups (p<0.05). The mean MDA level in the treatment and prophylaxis groups were 0.42+/-0.17 and 0.21+/-0.23 nmol/mg respectively. The MDA levels of both groups were significantly lower than in the control groups (p<0.05). The present study shows that sucralfate has beneficial effects in an experimental model of hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced intestinal injury.

  14. Restoration of a healthy intestinal microbiota normalizes portal hypertension in a rat model of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Lezana, Teresa; Raurell, Imma; Bravo, Miren; Torres-Arauz, Manuel; Salcedo, María Teresa; Santiago, Alba; Schoenenberger, Andreu; Manichanh, Chaysavanh; Genescà, Joan; Martell, María; Augustin, Salvador

    2018-04-01

    Portal hypertension (PH) drives most of the clinical complications in chronic liver diseases. However, its progression in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and its association with the intestinal microbiota (IM) have been scarcely studied. Our aim was to investigate the role of the IM in the mechanisms leading to PH in early NASH. The experimental design was divided in two stages. In stage 1, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed for 8 weeks a high-fat, high-glucose/fructose diet (HFGFD) or a control diet/water (CD). Representative rats were selected as IM donors for stage 2. In stage 2, additional HFGFD and CD rats underwent intestinal decontamination, followed by IM transplantation with feces from opposite-diet donors (heterologous transplant) or autologous fecal transplant (as controls), generating four groups: CD-autotransplanted, CD-transplanted, HFGFD-autotransplanted, HFGFD-transplanted. After IM transplantation, the original diet was maintained for 12-14 days until death. HFGFD rats developed obesity, insulin resistance, NASH without fibrosis but with PH, intrahepatic endothelial dysfunction, and IM dysbiosis. In HFGFD rats, transplantation with feces from CD donors caused a significant reduction of PH to levels comparable to CD without significant changes in NASH histology. The reduction in PH was due to a 31% decrease of intrahepatic vascular resistance compared to the HFGFD-autotransplanted group (P protein kinase B-dependent endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling pathway. The IM exerts a direct influence in the development of PH in rats with diet-induced NASH and dysbiosis; PH, insulin resistance, and endothelial dysfunction revert when a healthy IM is restored. (Hepatology 2018;67:1485-1498). © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  15. Intestinal lymphangiectasis and lipidosis in rats following subchronic exposure to indole-3-carbinol via oral gavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Michael C; Crabbs, Torrie A; Wyde, Michael E; Painter, J Todd; Hill, Georgette D; Malarkey, David E; Lieuallen, Warren G; Nyska, Abraham

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the toxicity and carcinogenic potential of indole-3-carbinol (I3C), the National Toxicology Program has conducted 13-week subchronic studies in Fisher 344 rats and B6C3F1 mice, and chronic 2-year bioassays in Sprague-Dawley rats and B6C3F1 mice. While the chronic study results are not yet available, subchronic study results and short-term special evaluations of interim sacrifices in the 2-year rat bioassay are presented. F344 rats were orally gavaged ≤300 mg I3C/kg body weight 5 days a week for 13 weeks. Rats treated with ≥150 mg/kg demonstrated a dose-related dilation of lymphatics (lymphangiectasis) of the duodenum, jejunum, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Material within dilated lacteals stained positively for Oil Red O and Sudan Black, consistent with lipid. Electron microscopic evaluation confirmed extracellular lipid accumulation within the villar lamina propria, lacteals, and within villar macrophages. Analyses of hepatic and pulmonary CYP1A enzymes demonstrated dose-dependent I3C induction of CYP1A1 and 1A2. B6C3F1 mice orally gavaged ≤250 mg I3C/kg body weight did not demonstrate histopathological changes; however, hepatic CYP induction was similar to that in rats. The histopathologic changes of intestinal lymphangiectasis and lipidosis in this study share similarities with intestinal lymphangiectasia as observed in humans and dogs. However, the resultant clinical spectrum of protein-losing enteropathy was not present.

  16. The role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in enterocyte turnover during methotrexate-induced intestinal mucositis in a rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Sukhotnik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: Intestinal mucositis is a common side-effect in patients who receive aggressive chemotherapy. The Wnt signaling pathway is critical for establishing and maintaining the proliferative compartment of the intestine. In the present study, we tested whether Wnt/β-catenin signaling is involved in methotrexate (MTX-induced intestinal damage in a rat model. METHODS: Non-pretreated and pretreated with MTX Caco-2 cells were evaluated for cell proliferation and apoptosis using FACS analysis. Adult rats were divided into three experimental groups: Control rats; MTX-2 animals were treated with a single dose of MTX given IP and were sacrificed on day 2, and MTX-4 rats were treated with MTX similar to group B and were sacrificed on day 4. Intestinal mucosal damage, mucosal structural changes, enterocyte proliferation, and enterocyte apoptosis were measured at sacrifice. Real Time PCR and Western blot was used to determine the level of Wnt/β-catenin related genes and protein expression. RESULTS: In the vitro experiment, treatment with MTX resulted in marked decrease in early cell proliferation rates following by a 17-fold increase in late cell proliferation rates compared to early proliferation. Treatment with MTX resulted in a significant increase in early and late apoptosis compared to Caco-2 untreated cells. In the vivo experiment, MTX-2 and MTX-4 rats demonstrated intestinal mucosal hypoplasia. MTX-2 rats demonstrated a significant decrease in FRZ-2, Wnt 3A Wnt 5A, β-catenin, c-myc mRNA expression and a significant decrease in β-catenin and Akt protein levels compared to control animals. Four days following MTX administration, rats demonstrated a trend toward a restoration of Wnt/β-catenin signaling especially in ileum. CONCLUSIONS: Wnt/β-catenin signaling is involved in enterocyte turnover during MTX-induced intestinal mucositis in a rat.

  17. Simultaneous in vivo determination of calcium and phosphate effective intestinal absorption in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladizesky, M.; Mautalen, C.A.; Cabrejas, M.; Degrossi, O.J.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of a technique which allows a more precise assessment of the interrelation between calcium and phosphate transport systems. Rats were given an i.p. or oral dose of 47 Ca with 40 Ca as carrier and/or 32 P with 31 P as carrier. The animals were sacrificed and activities in body and excised gastrointestinal tract determined. The 1.28 MeV photopeak activity was measured for calcium 47, and phosphorus 32 activity was determined by measuring the Bremsstrahlung produced by this isotope in the rat's body in the 80 to 200 keV range. The rates of intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphate differed; there seemed to be no urinary excretion of the radioisotopes within 3 hours. The reciprocal influence of calcium and phosphate on the intestinal absorption was also studied. The technique is simple and allows the simultaneous in vivo measurement of the effective intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphate. (U.K.)

  18. Experimental study on the hydroxyproline content of enteroanastomoses established in irradiated intestines of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, S.

    1984-01-01

    Cross-bred Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to percutaneous X-irradiation of the rectosigmoid using a split-dose regimen and focal dose of 50 Gy. One day as well as one, two and four months after the cessation of irradiation a termino-terminal anastomosis was established in the area exposed to radiation. On days, 3, 7, 14 and 21 after surgery those parts of the intestine, which had been united by anastomosis, were removed in order to determine the hydroxyproline content of the latter. Further determinations were made in specimens of the tissue 1 cm above the anastomosis and carried out before surgery, after intraperitoneal injection of the anaesthetic alone or in animals subjected to laparatomy including intestinal exposure, where no anastomosis was established. In general, the collagen levels determined in colon anastomoses of irradiated or non-irradiated intestines of rats did not point to any adverse effects from radiation on the healing process. This result appears to be largely consistent with the experiences so far gained at the clinical level in the preoperative irradiation of colon carcinomas. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Claudin-3 expression in radiation-exposed rat models: A potential marker for radiation-induced intestinal barrier failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Sehwan; Lee, Jong-geol; Bae, Chang-hwan; Lee, Seung Bum [National Radiation Emergency Medical Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo [Laboratory of Experimental Pathology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung-Sook [National Radiation Emergency Medical Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Pathology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sunhoo, E-mail: sunhoo@kcch.re.kr [National Radiation Emergency Medical Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Pathology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Irradiation increased intestinal bacterial translocation, accompanied by claudin protein expression in rats. • Neurotensin decreased the bacterial translocation and restored claudin-3 expression. • Claudin-3 can be used as a marker in evaluating radiation induced intestinal injury. - Abstract: The molecular events leading to radiation-induced intestinal barrier failure are not well known. The influence of the expression of claudin proteins in the presence and absence of neurotensin was investigated in radiation-exposed rat intestinal epithelium. Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, irradiation, and irradiation + neurotensin groups, and bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph node and expression of claudins were determined. Irradiation led to intestinal barrier failure as demonstrated by significant bacterial translocation. In irradiated terminal ilea, expression of claudin-3 and claudin-4 was significantly decreased, and claudin-2 expression was increased. Administration of neurotensin significantly reduced bacterial translocation and restored the structure of the villi as seen by histologic examination. Among the three subtype of claudins, only claudin-3 expression was restored. These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of neurotensin on the disruption of the intestinal barrier is associated with claudin-3 alteration and that claudin-3 could be used as a marker in evaluating radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  20. Subacute stress and chronic stress interact to decrease intestinal barrier function in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauffer, Adriana; Vanuytsel, Tim; Vanormelingen, Christophe; Vanheel, Hanne; Salim Rasoel, Shadea; Tóth, Joran; Tack, Jan; Fornari, Fernando; Farré, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    Psychological stress increases intestinal permeability, potentially leading to low-grade inflammation and symptoms in functional gastrointestinal disorders. We assessed the effect of subacute, chronic and combined stress on intestinal barrier function and mast cell density. Male Wistar rats were allocated to four experimental groups (n = 8/group): 1/sham; 2/subacute stress (isolation and limited movement for 24 h); 3/chronic crowding stress for 14 days and 4/combined subacute and chronic stress. Jejunum and colon were collected to measure: transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER; a measure of epithelial barrier function); gene expression of tight junction molecules; mast cell density. Plasma corticosterone concentration was increased in all three stress conditions versus sham, with highest concentrations in the combined stress condition. TEER in the jejunum was decreased in all stress conditions, but was significantly lower in the combined stress condition than in the other groups. TEER in the jejunum correlated negatively with corticosterone concentration. Increased expression of claudin 1, 5 and 8, occludin and zonula occludens 1 mRNAs was detected after subacute stress in the jejunum. In contrast, colonic TEER was decreased only after combined stress, and the expression of tight junction molecules was unaltered. Increased mast cell density was observed in the chronic and combined stress condition in the colon only. In conclusion, our data show that chronic stress sensitizes the gastrointestinal tract to the effects of subacute stress on intestinal barrier function; different underlying cellular and molecular alterations are indicated in the small intestine versus the colon.

  1. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of infliximab in a rat model of intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergel, Ahmet; Kanter, Mehmet; Yucel, Ahmet Fikret; Aydin, Ibrahim; Erboga, Mustafa; Guzel, Ahmet

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective effects of infliximab on oxidative stress, cell proliferation and apoptosis in the rat intestinal mucosa after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). A total of 30 male Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups: sham, I/R and I/R+ infliximab; each group comprised 10 animals. Sham group animals underwent laparotomy without I/R injury. I/R groups after undergoing laparotomy, 1 hour of superior mesenteric artery ligation occurred, which was followed by 1 hour of reperfusion. In the infliximab group, 3 days before I/R, infliximab (3 mg/kg) was administered intravenously. All animals were killed at the end of reperfusion and intestinal tissues samples were obtained for biochemical and histopathological investigation in all groups. To date, no biochemical and histopathological changes have been reported regarding intestinal I/R injury in rats due to infliximab treatment. Infliximab treatment significantly decreased the elevated tissue malondialdehyde levels and increased reduced superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase enzyme activities in intestinal tissues samples. I/R caused severe histopathological injury including mucosal erosions, inflammatory cell infiltration, necrosis, hemorrhage, and villous congestion. Infliximab treatment significantly attenuated the severity of intestinal I/R injury, inhibiting I/R-induced apoptosis, and cell proliferation. Because of its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, infliximab pretreatment may have protective effects on the experimental intestinal I/R model of rats.

  2. Oral and nasal administration of chicken type II collagen suppresses adjuvant arthritis in rats with intestinal lesions induced by meloxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong-Qiu; Wei, Wei; Shen, Yu-Xian; Dai, Min; Liu, Li-Hua

    2004-11-01

    To investigate the curative effects of oral and nasal administration of chicken type II collagen (CII) on adjuvant arthritis (AA) in rats with meloxicam-induced intestinal lesions. AA model in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with or without intestinal lesions induced by meloxicam was established and those rats were divided randomly into six groups which included AA model, AA model+meloxicam, AA model+oral CII, AA model+nasal CII, AA model+ meloxicam+oral C II and AA model+meloxicam+nasal CII (n = 12). Rats was treated with meloxicam intragastrically for 7 d from d 14 after immunization with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and then treated with chicken CII intragastrically or nasally for 7 d. Histological changes of right hind knees were examined. Hind paw secondary swelling and intestinal lesions were evaluated. Synoviocyte proliferation was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H tetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. Activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and diamine oxidase (DAO) from supernatants of intestinal homogenates were assayed by spectrophotometric analysis. Intragastrical administration of meloxicam (1.5 mg/kg) induced multiple intestinal lesions in AA rats. There was a significant decrease of intestinal DAO activities in AA+meloxicam group (P<0.01) and AA model group (P<0.01) compared with normal group. DAO activities of intestinal homogenates in AA+meloxicam group were significantly less than those in AA rats (P<0.01). There was a significant increase of intestinal MPO activities in AA+meloxicam group compared with normal control (P<0.01). Oral or nasal administration of CII (20 microg/kg) could suppress the secondary hind paw swelling(P<0.05 for oral CII; P<0.01 for nasal CII), synoviocyte proliferation (P<0.01) and histopathological degradation in AA rats, but they had no significant effects on DAO and MPO changes. However, oral administration of CII (20 microg/kg) showed the limited efficacy on arthritis in AA+meloxicam model and the

  3. Effects of colchicine on the intestinal transport of endogenous lipid. Ultrastructural, biochemical, and radiochemical studies in fasting rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavelka, M.; Gangl, A.

    1983-01-01

    The involvement of microtubules in the transepithelial transport of exogenous lipid in intestinal absorptive cells has been suggested. Using electronmicroscopic, biochemical, and radiochemical methods, researchers have studied the effects of the antimicrotubular agent colchicine on the intestinal mucosa and on the intestinal transport of endogenous lipid of rats in the fasting state. After colchicine treatment, the concentration of triglycerides in intestinal mucosa of rats fasted for 24 h doubled, and electron microscopic studies showed a striking accumulation of lipid particles in absorptive epithelial cells of the tips of jejunal villi. These findings suggest that colchicine interferes with the intestinal transepithelial transport of endogenous lipoproteins. Additional studies, using an intraduodenal pulse injection of [ 14 C]linoleic acid, showed that colchicine does not affect the uptake of fatty acids by intestinal mucosa. However, it had divergent effects on fatty acid esterification, enhancing their incorporation into triglycerides relative to phospholipids, and caused a significant accumulation of endogenous diglycerides, triglycerides, and cholesterol esters within the absorptive intestinal epithelium. Detailed ultrastructural and morphometric studies revealed a decrease of visible microtubules, and a displacement of the smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, it is shown that after colchicine treatment, microvilli appear at the lateral plasma membrane of intestinal absorptive cells, a change not previously reported to our knowledge. Thus, our study shows that colchicine causes significant changes in enterocyte ultrastructure and colchicine perturbs the reesterification of absorbed endogenous fatty acids and their secretion in the form of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from the enterocyte

  4. Autoradiographic investigation of age-dependent proliferation kinetics in the mucosa of rat small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranz, D.; Laue, R.; Fuhrmann, I.

    1980-01-01

    Aging of cells depends on mitotic activity which is particularly evident in multicellular organisms. The cell kinetics of the mucosa of the small intestine in a total of 244 Wistar rats aged 6 days, 6 weeks, 6, 12, 23 and 28 months, resp., were studied histoautoradiographically. It could be demonstrated that the regeneration rate of cells per hour in the crypts of the small intestine and the migration velocity of the enterocytes differ in young and old individuals, and that the intermitotic cells have age-dependent properties as well. In addition, it could be proved that intermitotic cells have a non growth fraction, too, which, at an advanced age, decreases only slightly although significantly in terms of statistics. For the easily vulnerable crypt epithelium it is a reserve capacity and ban be included in the proliferating pool if necessary. (author)

  5. The effect of anaesthesia on the radiosensitivity of rat intestine, foot skin and R-1 tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Gaiser, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    A comparison has been made of the effects of Nembutal (sodium pentobarbital) and Ethrane (2-chloro-1,1,2-trifluoroethyldifluoromethyl ether) anaesthesia on the radiation responses of rat intestine, foot skin and R-1 rhabdomyosarcoma. Single-dose experiments under Nembutal or short-lasting Ethrane anaesthesia resulted in equivalent radiosensitivities for the R-1 sarcoma and foot skin, whereas Ethrane induced radiosensitization in the intestine. In the Ethrane anaesthesia lasting 3 hours, and in the split-dose experiments, Ethrane inhibited repair of radiation-induced damage in the R-1 sarcoma and in the foot skin. It is therefore recommended that the use of Ethrane as an anaesthetic should be avoided in experiments designed to investigate repair of damage in fractionated studies or during protracted irradiation treatments. (UK)

  6. Adaptation of intestinal hydrolases to starvation in rats: effect of thyroid function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galluser, M; Belkhou, R; Freund, J N

    1991-01-01

    The effects of long-term starvation on the activities of sucrase, lactase, and aminopeptidase, and on their respective mRNA were determined in the small intestine of thyroidectomized and sham-operated adult rats. Thyroidectomy reduced the protein loss at the level of the intestinal brush border...... membranes during starvation. Prolonged fasting caused a significant decrease in sucrase activity, but thyroidectomy partly prevented this effect. However, the amount of the corresponding mRNA dropped during long term starvation without incidence of thyroidectomy. Lactase activity in the brush border...... membranes was increased by starvation, and thyroidectomy caused a further elevation of the enzyme activity. Simultaneously, lactase mRNA content rose only slightly compared to the enzyme activity. Aminopeptidase activity and mRNA content decreased during starvation and thyroidectomy did not prevent...

  7. Use of intraperitoneal xenon-133 for imaging of intestinal strangulation in small bowel obstruction. [Rats; Dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulkley, G.B.; Gharagozloo, F.; Alderson, P.O.; Horn, S.D.; Zuidema, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    Intraperitoneal xenon-133 dissolved in saline solution was evaluated for the detection of early strangulation in a reproducible model of segmental intestinal obstruction in rats and dogs. There was a highly significant delay inexternally detected isotope washout from animals with strangulated loops compared with normal, sham operated and simple (nonstrangulated) obstruction control groups. Corresponding anterior abdominal gamma camera images showed marked retention of isotope at 1 hour in the strangulation obstruction groups and the sites of this activity corresponsed to the location of the ischemic loops. Blinded readings of these images by nuclear radiologists showed this method to be highly accurate for the detection of strangulation in these animal models. This method should be directly applicable to patients with intestinal obstruction.

  8. Intestinal immune system of young rats influenced by cocoa-enriched diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiro-Puig, Emma; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Ramos-Romero, Sara; Pérez-Berezo, Teresa; Castellote, Cristina; Permanyer, Joan; Franch, Angels; Izquierdo-Pulido, Maria; Castell, Margarida

    2008-08-01

    Gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) maintains mucosal homeostasis by counteracting pathogens and inducing a state of nonresponsiveness when it receives signals from food antigens and commensal bacteria. We report for the first time the influence of continuous cocoa consumption on GALT function in rats postweaning. Weaned Wistar rats were fed cocoa-enriched diets (4% or 10% food intake) for 3 weeks. The function of the primary inductive sites of GALT, such as Peyer's patches (PP) and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), was evaluated through an analysis of IgA-secretory ability and lymphocyte composition (T, B and natural killer cells), activation (IL-2 secretion and IL-2 receptor alpha expression) and proliferation. T-helper effector cell balance was also established based on cytokine profile (interferon gamma, IL-4 and IL-10) after mitogen activation. A 10% cocoa intake induced significant changes in PP and MLN lymphocyte composition and function, whereas a 4% cocoa diet did not cause significant modifications in either tissues. Cocoa diet strongly reduced secretory IgA (S-IgA) in the intestinal lumen, although IgA's secretory ability was only slightly decreased in PP. In addition, the 10% cocoa diet increased T-cell-antigen receptor gammadelta cell proportion in both lymphoid tissues. Thus, cocoa intake modulates intestinal immune responses in young rats, influencing gammadelta T-cells and S-IgA production.

  9. Influence of Hesperidin on the Systemic and Intestinal Rat Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariona Camps-Bossacoma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenols, widely found in edible plants, influence the immune system. Nevertheless, the immunomodulatory properties of hesperidin, the predominant flavanone in oranges, have not been deeply studied. To establish the effect of hesperidin on in vivo immune response, two different conditions of immune system stimulations in Lewis rats were applied. In the first experimental design, rats were intraperitoneally immunized with ovalbumin (OVA plus Bordetella pertussis toxin and alum as the adjuvants, and orally given 100 or 200 mg/kg hesperidin. In the second experimental design, rats were orally sensitized with OVA together with cholera toxin and fed a diet containing 0.5% hesperidin. In the first approach, hesperidin administration changed mesenteric lymph node lymphocyte (MLNL composition, increasing the TCRαβ+ cell percentage and decreasing that of B lymphocytes. Furthermore, hesperidin enhanced the interferon (IFN-γ production in stimulated MLNL. In the second approach, hesperidin intake modified the lymphocyte composition in the intestinal epithelium (TCRγδ+ cells and the lamina propria (TCRγδ+, CD45RA+, natural killer, natural killer T, TCRαβ+CD4+, and TCRαβ+CD8+ cells. Nevertheless, hesperidin did not modify the level of serum anti-OVA antibodies in either study. In conclusion, hesperidin does possess immunoregulatory properties in the intestinal immune response, but this effect is not able to influence the synthesis of specific antibodies.

  10. Ursodeoxycholic and deoxycholic acids: Differential effects on intestinal Ca(2+) uptake, apoptosis and autophagy of rat intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Valeria A; Rivoira, María A; Pérez, Adriana del V; Marchionatti, Ana M; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori G

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of sodium deoxycholate (NaDOC) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on Ca(2+) uptake by enterocytes and the underlying mechanisms. Rats were divided into four groups: a) controls, b) treated with NaDOC, c) treated with UDCA d) treated with NaDOC and UDCA. Ca(2+) uptake was studied in enterocytes with different degrees of maturation. Apoptosis, autophagy and NO content and iNOS protein expression were evaluated. NaDOC decreased and UDCA increased Ca(2+) uptake only in mature enterocytes. The enhancement of protein expression of Fas, FasL, caspase-8 and caspase-3 activity by NaDOC indicates triggering of the apoptotic extrinsic pathway, which was blocked by UDCA. NO content and iNOS protein expression were enhanced by NaDOC, and avoided by UDCA. The increment of acidic vesicular organelles and LC3 II produced by NaDOC was also prevented by UDCA. In conclusion, the inhibitory effects of NaDOC on intestinal Ca(2+) absorption occur by decreasing the Ca(2+) uptake by mature enterocytes. NaDOC triggers apoptosis and autophagy, in part as a result of nitrosative stress. In contrast, UDCA increases the Ca(2+) uptake by mature enterocytes, and in combination with NaDOC acts as an antiapoptotic and antiautophagic agent normalizing the transcellular Ca(2+) pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Gum acacia aqueous extract on the histology of the intestine and enzymes of both the intestine and the pancreas of albino rats treated with Meloxicam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Mawla, Ahmed M. A.; Osman, Husam Eldien H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) cause gastrointestinal damage both in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract, in addition to their undesirable side effects on the pancreas. Meloxicam like all NSAIDs has damaging effects on the gastrointestinal tract including perforations, ulcers and bleeding. Objective: The present work describes the effects of Gum acacia aqueous extract on the histology of intestine and enzymes of both intestine and Pancreas of albino rats treated with Meloxicam. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on four groups of equally weighed male rats, each group included ten animals; the first group was received a diet containing 0.2 mg/kg bw meloxicam per day; the second was given 1gm Gum acacia per day in its diet; the third was given meloxicam followed by gum in the same doses per day; while the fourth group (control rats) was placed on a normal diet and water. All rats were received their diet for a period of 21 days. Results: A considerable protective effect of Gum acacia aqueous extract on the histology of intestine of albino rats treated with meloxicam was recorded. In addition, the study displayed a significant increase (P < 0.001) in the intestinal enzymes; lipase, amylase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the 1st and 3rd groups animals while these enzymes were significantly decreased (P < 0.001) in the 2nd group when compared with the 4th control group. Conclusion: This study concluded that Gum acacia provides a protection and defense against the harmful effects of meloxicam therapy used as one of the novel anti-Cox-1 and Cox-2 NSAIDs. PMID:21772755

  12. Effects of Gum acacia aqueous extract on the histology of the intestine and enzymes of both the intestine and the pancreas of albino rats treated with Meloxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Mawla, Ahmed M A; Osman, Husam Eldien H

    2011-04-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) cause gastrointestinal damage both in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract, in addition to their undesirable side effects on the pancreas. Meloxicam like all NSAIDs has damaging effects on the gastrointestinal tract including perforations, ulcers and bleeding. The present work describes the effects of Gum acacia aqueous extract on the histology of intestine and enzymes of both intestine and Pancreas of albino rats treated with Meloxicam. This study was performed on four groups of equally weighed male rats, each group included ten animals; the first group was received a diet containing 0.2 mg/kg bw meloxicam per day; the second was given 1gm Gum acacia per day in its diet; the third was given meloxicam followed by gum in the same doses per day; while the fourth group (control rats) was placed on a normal diet and water. All rats were received their diet for a period of 21 days. A considerable protective effect of Gum acacia aqueous extract on the histology of intestine of albino rats treated with meloxicam was recorded. In addition, the study displayed a significant increase (P < 0.001) in the intestinal enzymes; lipase, amylase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the 1(st) and 3(rd) groups animals while these enzymes were significantly decreased (P < 0.001) in the 2(nd) group when compared with the 4(th) control group. This study concluded that Gum acacia provides a protection and defense against the harmful effects of meloxicam therapy used as one of the novel anti-Cox-1 and Cox-2 NSAIDs.

  13. Effects of Bifidobacterium breve on inflammatory gene expression in neonatal and weaning rat intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshikazu; Ikegami, Takako; Izumi, Hirohisa; Namura, Mariko; Ikeda, Tomomi; Ikuse, Tamaki; Baba, Yosuke; Kudo, Takahiro; Suzuki, Ryuyo; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    To examine the immune-modulatory effects of probiotics during early infancy, Bifidobacterium breve M-16V (B. breve) was administered to rat pups during the newborn or weaning period, and the expression of inflammatory genes was investigated using a cDNA microarray and real-time PCR. After B. breve administration, significant increases in the numbers of Bifidobacterium in both the cecum and colon were confirmed during the newborn period. The numbers of upregulated and downregulated genes were greater during the weaning period than in the newborn period and were greatest in the colon, with fewer genes altered in the small intestine and the fewest in the spleen. The expression of inflammation-related genes, including lipoprotein lipase (Lpl), glutathione peroxidase 2 (Gpx2), and lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (Lbp), was significantly reduced in the colon during the newborn period. In weaning rat pups, the expression of CD3d, a cell surface receptor-linked signaling molecule, was significantly enhanced in the colon; however, the expression of co-stimulatory molecules was not enhanced. Our findings support a possible role for B. breve in mediating anti-inflammatory and antiallergic reactions by modulating the expression of inflammatory molecules during the newborn period and by regulating the expression of co-stimulatory molecules during the weaning period. Gene expression in the intestine was investigated after feeding 5 × 10(8) cfu of B. breve every day to the F344/Du rat from days 1 to 14 (newborn group) and from days 21 to 34 (weaning group). mRNA was extracted from intestine, and the expression of inflammatory gene was analyzed by microarray and real-time PCR.

  14. Antibiotic suppression of intestinal microbiota reduces heme-induced lipoperoxidation associated with colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, O C B; Lin, C; Naud, N; Tache, S; Raymond-Letron, I; Corpet, D E; Pierre, F H

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that heme iron from red meat is associated with increased colorectal cancer risk. In carcinogen-induced-rats, a heme iron-rich diet increases the number of precancerous lesions and raises associated fecal biomarkers. Heme-induced lipoperoxidation measured by fecal thiobarbituric acid reagents (TBARs) could explain the promotion of colon carcinogenesis by heme. Using a factorial design we studied if microbiota could be involved in heme-induced carcinogenesis, by modulating peroxidation. Rats treated or not with an antibiotic cocktail were given a control or a hemoglobin-diet. Fecal bacteria were counted on agar and TBARs concentration assayed in fecal water. The suppression of microbiota by antibiotics was associated with a reduction of crypt height and proliferation and with a cecum enlargement, which are characteristics of germ-free rats. Rats given hemoglobin diets had increased fecal TBARs, which were suppressed by the antibiotic treatment. A duplicate experiment in rats given dietary hemin yielded similar results. These data show that the intestinal microbiota is involved in enhancement of lipoperoxidation by heme iron. We thus suggest that microbiota could play a role in the heme-induced promotion of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  15. Splenectomy attenuates severe thermal trauma-induced intestinal barrier breakdown in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang-dong; Chen, Zhen-yong; Yang, Peng; Huang, Wen-guang; Jiang, Chun-fang

    2015-12-01

    The severe local thermal trauma activates a number of systemic inflammatory mediators, such as TNF-α, NF-κB, resulting in a disruption of gut barrier. The gastrointestinal tight junction (TJ) is highly regulated by membrane-associated proteins including zonula occludens protein-1 (ZO-1) and occludin, which can be modulated by inflammatory cytokines. As splenectomy has been shown to reduce secretion of cytokines, we hypothesized that (1) severe scald injury up-regulates TNF-α and NF-κB, meanwhile down-regulates expression of ZO-1 and occludin, leading to the increased intestinal permeability, and (2) splenectomy can prevent the burn-induced decrease in ZO-1 and occludin expression, resulting in improved intestinal barrier. Wistar rats undergoing a 30% total body surface area (TBSA) thermal trauma were randomized to receive an accessorial splenectomy meanwhile or not. Intestinal injury was assessed by histological morphological analysis, and serum endotoxin levels, TNF-α, NF-κB, ZO-1 and occludin levels were detected by Western blotting in the terminal ileum mucosal tissue. 30% TBSA burn caused a significant increase in serum endotoxin levels, but NF-κB, and TNF-α, and the average intestinal villus height and mucosal thickness were decreased significantly. Burn injury could also markedly decrease the levels of ZO-1 and occludin in terminal ileum mucosal tissue (all PSplenectomy at 7th day after burn significantly reversed the burn-induced breakdown of ZO-1 and occludin (all PSplenectomy may provide a therapeutic benefit in restoring burn-induced intestinal barrier by decreasing the release of inflammatory cytokines and recovering TJ proteins.

  16. Study of morbidity in orthotopic small intestine transplantation with Wistar rats: experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEE André Dong Won

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background - Transplantation of the small intestine is a surgical procedure currently under investigation for its possible application in the treatment of patients with short bowel syndrome, aiming at the reintroduction of an oral diet. Aim - To define the morbidity and mortality of intestinal transplantation in small animals using microsurgery. Intra and postoperative morbidity and mortality were studied in Wistar rats submitted to orthotopic intestinal allotransplantation. Material and Method - The animals were divided into three groups: group A (37 donor animals, group B (37 recipient animals, and group C (10 control animals. Group B was divided into three subgroups according to survival time. Subgroup TI consisted of animals that died during surgery or due to causes directly related to surgical intervention, subgroup T2 consisted of animals that died between the 4th and 29th postoperative day, and subgroup T3 consisted of animals that survived after 30 days. Transplanted animals were evaluated in terms of surgical technique used (vascular and intestinal anastomosis, graft quality, surgical time, and clinical parameters. The animals that died by the 29th postoperative day were submitted to autopsy and the remaining ones were sacrificed after 30 days. Result - There was a high rate of complication of a surgical nature. Early mortality rate, i.e., mortality up to the third postoperative day, was 54% with vascular anastomosis being the major cause of death. Surgical time was evaluated in a restricted and homogeneous group and showed a strong prognostic value in terms of successful transplantation. Clinical parameters such as weight loss, reduction of ingestion, reduction of motor activity and diarrhea were directly correlated with acute rejection. Conclusion - The experimented intestinal transplant is a procedure companied by considerable morbidity and mortality due to surgical complications in postoperative period, vascular anastomosis and

  17. Studies on the age-dependent proliferation kinetics of the epithelium of the rat small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranz, D.; Dietze, F.; Laue, R.; Fuhrmann, I.

    1980-01-01

    The small intestine of 244 Wistar rats, aged 6 days, 6 weeks, 6, 12, 23, and 28 months, respectively. were investigated autoradiographically as to their age-dependent cell proliferation kinetics of the mucosal epithelial cells. There were age-dependent differences concerning the hourly regeneration ratio of the crypt cells and the migration velocity of the enterocytes. Both parameters became greater while the existing non growth fraction became smaller with increasing age. The non growth fraction seems to be a reserve being involved into the proliferating pool if required

  18. Intestinal absorption and excretion of zinc in streptozotocin-diabetic rats as affected by dietary zinc and protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.T.; Canfield, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    65 Zn was used to examine the effects of dietary zinc and protein on true zinc absorption and intestinal excretion of endogenous zinc by an isotope dilution technique in streptozotocin-diabetic and control rats. Four groups each of diabetic and control rats were fed diets containing 20 ppm Zn, 20% egg white protein (HMHP); 20 ppm Zn, 10% egg white protein (HMLP); 10 ppm Zn, 20% egg white protein (LMHP); and 10 ppm Zn, 10% egg white protein (LMLP). Measurement of zinc balance was begun 9 d after an i.m. injection of 65 Zn. True zinc absorption and the contribution of endogenous zinc to fecal zinc excretion were calculated from the isotopically labeled and unlabeled zinc in the feces, duodenum and kidney. Results from the isotope dilution study indicated that diabetic rats, but not control rats, absorbed more zinc from 20 ppm zinc diets than from 10ppm zinc diets and that all rats absorbed more zinc from 20% protein diets than from 10% protein diets. Furthermore, all rats excreted more endogenous zinc from their intestines when dietary zinc and protein levels resulted in greater zinc absorption. In diabetic and control rats, consuming equivalent amounts of zinc, the amount of zinc absorbed was not significantly different, but the amount of zinc excreted by the intestine was less in the diabetic rats. Decreased intestinal excretion of endogenous zinc may be a homeostatic response to the increased urinary excretion of endogenous zinc in the diabetic rats and may also lead to the elevated zinc concentrations observed in some organs of the diabetic rats

  19. Insights into embryo defenses of the invasive apple snail Pomacea canaliculata: egg mass ingestion affects rat intestine morphology and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreon, Marcos S; Fernández, Patricia E; Gimeno, Eduardo J; Heras, Horacio

    2014-06-01

    The spread of the invasive snail Pomacea canaliculata is expanding the rat lungworm disease beyond its native range. Their toxic eggs have virtually no predators and unusual defenses including a neurotoxic lectin and a proteinase inhibitor, presumably advertised by a warning coloration. We explored the effect of egg perivitellin fluid (PVF) ingestion on the rat small intestine morphology and physiology. Through a combination of biochemical, histochemical, histopathological, scanning electron microscopy, cell culture and feeding experiments, we analyzed intestinal morphology, growth rate, hemaglutinating activity, cytotoxicity and cell proliferation after oral administration of PVF to rats. PVF adversely affects small intestine metabolism and morphology and consequently the standard growth rate, presumably by lectin-like proteins, as suggested by PVF hemaglutinating activity and its cytotoxic effect on Caco-2 cell culture. Short-term effects of ingested PVF were studied in growing rats. PVF-supplemented diet induced the appearance of shorter and wider villi as well as fused villi. This was associated with changes in glycoconjugate expression, increased cell proliferation at crypt base, and hypertrophic mucosal growth. This resulted in a decreased absorptive surface after 3 days of treatment and a diminished rat growth rate that reverted to normal after the fourth day of treatment. Longer exposure to PVF induced a time-dependent lengthening of the small intestine while switching to a control diet restored intestine length and morphology after 4 days. Ingestion of PVF rapidly limits the ability of potential predators to absorb nutrients by inducing large, reversible changes in intestinal morphology and growth rate. The occurrence of toxins that affect intestinal morphology and absorption is a strategy against predation not recognized among animals before. Remarkably, this defense is rather similar to the toxic effect of plant antipredator strategies. This defense

  20. Insights into embryo defenses of the invasive apple snail Pomacea canaliculata: egg mass ingestion affects rat intestine morphology and growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos S Dreon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The spread of the invasive snail Pomacea canaliculata is expanding the rat lungworm disease beyond its native range. Their toxic eggs have virtually no predators and unusual defenses including a neurotoxic lectin and a proteinase inhibitor, presumably advertised by a warning coloration. We explored the effect of egg perivitellin fluid (PVF ingestion on the rat small intestine morphology and physiology.Through a combination of biochemical, histochemical, histopathological, scanning electron microscopy, cell culture and feeding experiments, we analyzed intestinal morphology, growth rate, hemaglutinating activity, cytotoxicity and cell proliferation after oral administration of PVF to rats. PVF adversely affects small intestine metabolism and morphology and consequently the standard growth rate, presumably by lectin-like proteins, as suggested by PVF hemaglutinating activity and its cytotoxic effect on Caco-2 cell culture. Short-term effects of ingested PVF were studied in growing rats. PVF-supplemented diet induced the appearance of shorter and wider villi as well as fused villi. This was associated with changes in glycoconjugate expression, increased cell proliferation at crypt base, and hypertrophic mucosal growth. This resulted in a decreased absorptive surface after 3 days of treatment and a diminished rat growth rate that reverted to normal after the fourth day of treatment. Longer exposure to PVF induced a time-dependent lengthening of the small intestine while switching to a control diet restored intestine length and morphology after 4 days.Ingestion of PVF rapidly limits the ability of potential predators to absorb nutrients by inducing large, reversible changes in intestinal morphology and growth rate. The occurrence of toxins that affect intestinal morphology and absorption is a strategy against predation not recognized among animals before. Remarkably, this defense is rather similar to the toxic effect of plant antipredator strategies

  1. Intestinal absorption and retention of cadmium in neonatal pigs compared to rats and guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasser, L.B.; Jarboe, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure intestinal absorption and retention of cadmium in the newborn pig and to compare data from the pig, rat and guinea pig, three species that differ greatly in their ability to absorb macromolecules at birth. Newborn pigs were administered a single oral dose of 50 μCi of /sup 115m/Cd 24 hours after birth and killed at intervals between 1 and 14 days after dosing. Cd absorption and gastrointestinal retention were then determined; these data were compared with similar data from the rat and guinea pig. Cd absorption in the neonate appears to be a two-step process; mucosal uptake of Cd from the lumen, probably by pinocytosis, followed by transfer of a portion of this Cd into the body. This transfer process is similar, but does not entirely coincide with changes associated with protein absorption in the neonate

  2. Small Intestinal Bypass Induces a Persistent Weight-Loss Effect and Improves Glucose Tolerance in Obese Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiaqing; Ren, Quan; Tan, Cai; Duan, Jinyuan

    2017-07-01

    This study investigated the role of proximal small intestinal bypass (PSIB) and distal small intestinal bypass (DSIB) as well as their long-term effects on weight loss and glucose metabolism in high-sugar and high-fat diet-induced obese rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: PSIB, bypassing 60% of the proximal small intestine length; DSIB, bypassing 60% of the distal small intestine length; sham-operated (Sham) animals; and control animals. All rats were fed a high-sugar and high-fat diet after surgery. The primary outcome measures were body weight, food intake, fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and the insulin tolerance test (ITT). Global body weight (BW) and food intake in the PSIB and DSIB groups were lower than those in the Sham group at postoperative week 2. BW and food intake in the PSIB group were lower than those in the DSIB group at postoperative week 24. The PSIB and DSIB groups exhibited improvement in glucose tolerance at postoperative weeks 4, 8, and 24. The PSIB and DSIB groups exhibited improvement in FBG at postoperative week 24, and only the DSIB group exhibited improvement in insulin sensitivity. This study provides experimental evidence that PSIB surgery induced a better and more persistent weight loss effect than DSIB surgery and that the two types of intestinal bypass surgeries yielded equivalent and stable long-term improvement in glucose tolerance in an obese rat model.

  3. Cytokine gene expression in intestine of rat during the postnatal developmental period: increased IL-1 expression at weaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengheri, E; Ciapponi, L; Vignolini, F; Nobili, F

    1996-01-01

    In the present study we have investigate whether cytokines are constitutively and differently expressed in intestine during the differentiative processes that take place at weaning. We have analyzed the expression of IL-1 beta, IL-2, IL-4 and IFN gamma by polymerase chain reaction in Peyer's patches (PP) and in intestine deprived of PP (I-PP) of rats from 16 to 30 days of age. The results showed a constitutive and marked expression of the cytokines already before weaning, with the exception of IL-2 in PP and IFN gamma in I-PP. IL-beta was the only cytokine to show a different expression at various ages with an initial increase at 19 days and a further elevation at 21 days when intestinal epithelium passes through major differentiative stages, suggesting an involvement of this cytokine in intestinal development. We have also tested whether treatment of rats with the immunosuppressor cyclosporin A (CsA) could affect intestinal differentiation. The results showed that only some markers of differentiation were affected (proliferation of staminal crypt cells and length of crypts). This was probably due to a direct effect rather than an immunomediated effect of CsA, since treatment of three intestinal cell lines (Caco-2, HT-29, FRIC) with CsA indicated that this drug can exert a cytostatic activity on intestinal cells.

  4. [Effect of glutamine on small intestinal repair in weanling rats after chronic diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zu-xiong; Ye, Li-yan; Zheng, Zhi-yong; Chen, Xin-min; Ren, Rong-na; Tong, Guo-yuan

    2005-05-01

    To investigate the nutrient effect of glutamine on small intestinal repair in weanling rats after chronic diarrhea. Forty 21-day-old wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups (8 in each). Animal model of chronic diarrhea was induced by a lactose enriched diet in the weanling Wistar rat, normal control group was fed with a standard semipurified diet, and after 14 days the rats in both groups were killed to test the establishment of the model. After the establishment of the model, the other groups were fed with the standard semipurified diet to recover for 7 days, and were randomly divided into three groups: non-intervention group, glutamine (Gln)-intervention group and control group. Glutamine concentrations in blood was detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Morphological changes including villus height and villus surface area of the jejunum were measured under a light microscope and electron microscope, expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) as an index of cell proliferation was observed using immunohistochemical staining and image analysis. The diarrhea rate in model group was 100 percent, average diarrhea index was 1.16 +/- 0.06, but both diarrhea rate and average diarrhea index in control group were 0 (P body weight, plasma Gln concentration, villus height, villus surface area and expression of PCNA in non-intervened group compared with the control group (P body weight, villus height and villus surface area in Gln-intervened group compared with control group (P 0.05). And compared with non-intervened group, except for body weight (P > 0.05), plasma glutamine, villus height, villus surface area and expression of PCNA were all significantly increased in Gln-intervened group. Chronic diarrhea can induce malnutrition and reduce the villus height, villus surface area, expression of PCNA and plasm glutamine concentration. Oral glutamine could improve the proliferation of crypt cell and promote repair of intestinal mucosa

  5. Intestinal absorption of dietary fat from a liquid diet perfused in rats at a submaximum level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simko, V.; Kelley, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The small intestine of rats was perfused in vivo for 2 h with a nutritionally complete liquid diet (68% calories from fat as corn oil). As the perfusion increased from 106 mg/2 h, the intestinal disappearance of the 14 C-triolein marker remained proportional to the load up to 2359 mg fat/2 h. Despite a decrease in absorption from 70 to 17%, this represents a very large fat intake. Fat absorption improved when medium-chain triglycerides or octanoic acid replaced corn oil (both p less than 0.01). Linoleic acid was absorbed from the diet less than corn oil (p less than 0.01). Dry ox bile reduced fat absorption (p less than 0.05); lipase and an antacid had no effect. Corn oil perfused alone was absorbed better than from the diet (p less than 0.01). Data with 14 C-triolein was confirmed by dry-weight disappearance of the diet and by net intestinal water balance. Usual feeding underutilizes a large reserve for fat absorption. This reserve should be considered in therapeutic nutrition

  6. Regional Morphology and Transport of PAMAM Dendrimers Across Isolated Rat Intestinal Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Dallin; Bond, Tanner; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2015-12-01

    Intestinal permeability of PAMAM dendrimers has been observed, giving rationale for their use in oral drug delivery as potential carriers of associated molecules. This study assessed the apparent permeability coefficients (Papp) of dendrimers across isolated rat intestinal regional mucosae, along with estimation of the maximum non-toxic concentration. Caco-2 monolayers were also used to assess the comparative Papp values between isolated mucosae and cell culture models. Concentrations from 0.1 to 10 mM of anionic and cationic dendrimers were tested in mucosae to assess their Papp, membrane TEER, [(14)C]-mannitol Papp, and histology. 0.1 mM concentrations of dendrimers were assessed over 120 min in Caco-2 cell monolayers as concentrations above that were cytotoxic. Jejunal transport of dendrimers was higher than transport in colonic epithelium. Monolayer Papp values of dendrimers were comparable to those of jejunal mucosae. Mucosae exposed to dendrimer concentrations of 10 mM for 120 min caused significant reduction in TEER and changes in tissue morphology; however, G3.5 was the only analogue that caused significant TEER reduction and morphological changes at 1 mM concentrations. Transport in jejunal mucosae appears to be the greatest indicating that the small intestinal will be the most likely region to target for oral drug delivery using PAMAM dendrimers. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Calcium absorption in rat large intestine in vivo: availability of dietary calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammann, P.; Rizzoli, R.; Fleisch, H.

    1986-01-01

    Calcium absorption in the large intestine of the rat was investigated in vivo. After a single injection of 45 CaCl 2 into the cecum, 26.0 +/- 2.5% (mean +/- SE, n = 9) of the 45 CaCl 2 injected disappeared. This absorption was modulated by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, increased to 64.0 +/- 4.2% under a low-Ca diet, and increased under low-Pi diet. In contrast, when the difference of nonradioactive Ca in the cecal content and the feces was measured, only 4.1 +/- 4.6% (not significant) was absorbed. Secretion of intravenously injected 45 Ca into the lumen was small and not altered by any of the conditions tested. When cecum contents were placed into duodenal tied loops, 14 +/- 6.2% were absorbed in situ when 45 Ca was given orally, whereas when 45 Ca was directly added to the content 35.6 +/- 4.6% were absorbed (P less than 0.02). These results indicate that the large intestine has an important vitamin D-dependent Ca absorptive system detectable if 45 Ca is injected into the cecum. However, it is not effective in vivo because the Ca arriving in the large intestine appears to be no longer in an absorbable form

  8. Lecithin inhibits fatty acid and bile salt absorption from rat small intestine in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, D R; Sillery, J

    1976-12-01

    During digestion of a fatty meal, long chain free fatty acids (FFA) and lecithin are among the lipids solubilized in intestinal contents as mixed micelles with bile salts. We hypothesized that if lecithin were not hydrolyzed, the mixed micelles would be abnormal, and absorption of FFA and bile salts would be depressed. To test this hypothesis, isolated segments of rat small intestine were infused in vivo with micellar solutions of 2 mMolar linoleic acid and 10 mMolar taurocholate to which was added 3 mMolar 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl lecithin (a common lecithin in bile and food), or 1-palmitoyl lysolecithin (the hydrolytic product of lecithin). Absorption of FFA and bile salt was measured under steady state conditions using a single-pass technique. Lecithin depressed the rate of FFA absorption by 40% (p less than 0.025) in jejunal and ileal segments whereas lysolecithin was associated with normal rates of FFA absorption. Lecithin also reduced taurocholate absorption from the ileum by 30% (p less than 0.05). These data support the idea that lecithin may depress FFA and bile salt absorption from the small intestine in pancreatic insufficiency.

  9. Acute and Chronic Effects of Dietary Lactose in Adult Rats Are not Explained by Residual Intestinal Lactase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Heijning, Bert J M; Kegler, Diane; Schipper, Lidewij; Voogd, Eline; Oosting, Annemarie; van der Beek, Eline M

    2015-07-08

    Neonatal rats have a high intestinal lactase activity, which declines around weaning. Yet, the effects of lactose-containing products are often studied in adult animals. This report is on the residual, post-weaning lactase activity and on the short- and long-term effects of lactose exposure in adult rats. Acutely, the postprandial plasma response to increasing doses of lactose was studied, and chronically, the effects of a 30% lactose diet fed from postnatal (PN) Day 15 onwards were evaluated. Intestinal lactase activity, as assessed both in vivo and in vitro, was compared between both test methods and diet groups (lactose vs. control). A 50%-75% decreased digestive capability towards lactose was observed from weaning into adulthood. Instillation of lactose in adult rats showed disproportionally low increases in plasma glucose levels and did not elicit an insulin response. However, gavages comprising maltodextrin gave rise to significant plasma glucose and insulin responses, indicative of a bias of the adult GI tract to digest glucose polymers. Despite the residual intestinal lactase activity shown, a 30% lactose diet was poorly digested by adult rats: the lactose diet rendered the animals less heavy and virtually devoid of body fat, whereas their cecum tripled in size, suggesting an increased bacterial fermentation. The observed acute and chronic effects of lactose exposure in adult rats cannot be explained by the residual intestinal lactase activity assessed.

  10. Maternal protein restriction affects gene expression and enzyme activity of intestinal disaccharidases in adult rat offspring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, D.F.; Pacheco, P.D.G.; Alvarenga, P.V.; Buratini, J. Jr; Castilho, A.C.S.; Lima, P.F.; Sartori, D.R.S.; Vicentini-Paulino, M.L.M. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2013-03-15

    This study investigated the consequences of intrauterine protein restriction on the gastrointestinal tract and particularly on the gene expression and activity of intestinal disaccharidases in the adult offspring. Wistar rat dams were fed isocaloric diets containing 6% protein (restricted, n = 8) or 17% protein (control, n = 8) throughout gestation. Male offspring (n = 5-8 in each group) were evaluated at 3 or 16 weeks of age. Maternal protein restriction during pregnancy produced offspring with growth restriction from birth (5.7 ± 0.1 vs 6.3 ± 0.1 g; mean ± SE) to weaning (42.4 ± 1.3 vs 49.1 ± 1.6 g), although at 16 weeks of age their body weight was similar to control (421.7 ± 8.9 and 428.5 ± 8.5 g). Maternal protein restriction also increased lactase activity in the proximal (0.23 ± 0.02 vs 0.15 ± 0.02), medial (0.30 ± 0.06 vs 0.14 ± 0.01) and distal (0.43 ± 0.07 vs 0.07 ± 0.02 U·g{sup -1}·min{sup -1}) small intestine, and mRNA lactase abundance in the proximal intestine (7.96 ± 1.11 vs 2.38 ± 0.47 relative units) of 3-week-old offspring rats. In addition, maternal protein restriction increased sucrase activity (1.20 ± 0.02 vs 0.91 ± 0.02 U·g{sup -1}·min{sup -1}) and sucrase mRNA abundance (4.48 ± 0.51 vs 1.95 ± 0.17 relative units) in the duodenum of 16-week-old rats. In conclusion, the present study shows for the first time that intrauterine protein restriction affects gene expression of intestinal enzymes in offspring.

  11. Penile enhancement using a porcine small intestinal submucosa graft in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leungwattanakij, S; Pummangura, N; Ratana-Olarn, K

    2006-01-01

    Several biodegradable materials have been experimented for penile enhancement, but none show the potential for clinical use. This study was designed to use porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) augmenting the normal tunica albuginea to increase the functional girth of the rat penis. In all, 20 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats constituted the study population. The animals were divided into two groups: group 1 consisted of the control (n=10) and group 2 (n=10) consisted of rats that underwent penile enhancement by a longitudinal I-shaped incision of the tunica albuginea on both sides, and the dissection of the plane between tunica albuginea and cavernosal tissue was carried out (n=10). The incision was then patched with a 3 x 10 mm2 piece of SIS, using a 6/0 nylon suture material. The penile length and mid-circumference were then measured using a Vernier Caliper before and 2 months after surgery. All rat penises underwent histological examination using Masson's trichome and Verhoff's van Giesen's stain for collagen and elastic fibers. The penile length, mid-circumference and degree of fibrosis score were expressed as mean+/-s.e. (standard error) and analyzed using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test. A statistical significance was accepted at P-value enhancement.

  12. The absorption and retention of plutonium in the small intestine of neonate rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsch, P.; Beauvallet, M.; Metivier, H.; Masse, R.; Moutairou, K.

    1987-01-01

    Ligated segments of rat intestine were used to study the effect of age on the jejunal transfer and retention of different chemical forms of soluble Pu(IV). After instillation of Pu-carbonate a 5-fold increase of transfer was observed for 1 week old animals as compared to adults. This transfer value decreased gradually until weaning. Such an age-related decrease was also observed after the instillation of Pu-transferrin for 2 weeks as compared to 12 week-old rats, but in the same range of age, no significant modification could be demonstrated after the instillation of Pu-DTPA complex. Similar modifications related to the age of animals were observed after either perfusion or instillation of the Pu-carbonate and Pu-DTPA chemical forms. Measurement of the area of the intestinal lumen allowed to establish that, in the jejunum, for the chemical forms of Pu studied, no increase of Pu retention could be observed in neonates as compared to adults. Therefore, no relationship could be established between transfer of Pu and its jejunal retention. 9 refs.; 3 tabs

  13. Carrier-mediated system for transport of biotin in rat intestine in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Said, H.M.; Redha, R.

    1987-01-01

    Transport of biotin was examined in rat intestine using the everted sac technique. Transport of 0.1 μM biotin was linear with time for at least 30 min of incubation and occurred at a rate 3.7 pmol g initial tissue wet wt -1 min -1 . Transport of biotin was higher in the jejunum than the ileum and was minimum in the colon (85 +/- 6, 36 +/- 6, and 2.8 +/- 0.6 pmol x g initial tissue wet wt -1 x 25 min -1 , respectively). In the jejunum, transport of biotin was saturable at low concentrations but linear at higher concentrations. The transport of low concentrations of biotin was 1) inhibited by structural analogues (desthiobiotin, biotin methyl ester, diaminobiotin, and biocytin), 2) Na + dependent, 3) energy dependent, 4) temperature dependent, and 5) proceeded against a concentration gradient in the serosal compartment. No metabolic alteration occurs to the biotin molecule during transport. This study demonstrates that biotin transport in rat intestine occurs by a carrier-mediated process at low concentrations and by simple diffusion at high concentrations. Furthermore, the carrier-mediated process is Na + , energy, and temperature dependent

  14. Induction of intestinal metaplasia in the glandular stomach of rats by x-irradiation prior to oral administration of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, I; Watanabe, H; Terada, Y; Naito, Y; Naito, M [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1980-12-01

    CD/CRJ rats were subjected to localized X-irradiation of the stomach and given N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in the drinking water. Rats given MNNG alone and non-treated rats were used as controls. Upon sacrifice at 15 months after the initial MNNG administration, intestinal metaplasia was observed; the histology was of complete type and the incidence was 100% in rats treated with X-rays and MNNG, whereas in rats treated with MNNG alone the intestinal metaplasia was of incomplete type and its incidence was 80%. However, the incidence of gastric cancer in rats treated with MNNG alone was 25%.

  15. The tripeptide feG ameliorates systemic inflammatory responses to rat intestinal anaphylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davison Joseph S

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Food allergies are generally associated with gastrointestinal upset, but in many patients systemic reactions occur. However, the systemic effects of food allergies are poorly understood in experimental animals, which also offer the opportunity to explore the actions of anti-allergic drugs. The tripeptide D-phenylalanine-D-glutamate-Glycine (feG, which potentially alleviates the symptoms of systemic anaphylactic reactions, was tested to determine if it also reduced systemic inflammatory responses provoked by a gastric allergic reaction. Results Optimal inhibition of intestinal anaphylaxis was obtained when 100 μg/kg of feG was given 20 min before the rats were challenged with antigen. The increase in total circulating neutrophils and accumulation of neutrophils in the heart, developing 3 h and 24 h, respectively, after antigen challenge were reduced by both feG and dexamethasone. Both anti-inflammatory agents reduced the increase in vascular permeability induced by antigen in the intestine and the peripheral skin (pinna, albeit with different time courses. Dexamethasone prevented increases in vascular permeability when given 12 h before antigen challenge, whereas feG was effective when given 20 min before ingestion of antigen. The tripeptide prevented the anaphylaxis induced up regulation of specific antibody binding of a cell adhesion molecule related to neutrophil activation, namely CD49d (α4 integrin. Conclusions Aside from showing that intestinal anaphylaxis produces significant systemic inflammatory responses in non-intestinal tissues, our results indicate that the tripeptide feG is a potent inhibitor of extra-gastrointestinal allergic reactions preventing both acute (30 min and chronic (3 h or greater inflammatory responses.

  16. A new method to measure intestinal secretion using fluorescein isothiocyanate-inulin in small bowel of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Abraham, Armando Salim; Judeeba, Sami; Alkukhun, Abedalrazaq; Alfadda, Tariq; Patron-Lozano, Roger; Rodriguez-Davalos, Manuel I; Geibel, John P

    2015-08-01

    Small intestine ischemia can be seen in various conditions such as intestinal transplantation. To further understand the pathologic disruption in ischemia-reperfusion injury, we have developed a method to measure fluid changes in the intestinal lumen of rats. Two 10-cm rat intestine segments were procured, connected to the terminal apertures of a perfusion device, and continuously infused with 3 mL of HEPES solution (control solution) containing 50 μM of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-inulin. The perfusion device consists of concentric chambers that contain the perfused bowel segments, which are maintained at 37°C via H₂O bath. The individual chamber has four apertures as follows: two fill and/or drain the surrounding HEPES solution on the blood side of the tissue. The others provide flow of HEPES solution containing FITC-inulin through the lumens. The experimental intestine was infused with the same solution with 100 μM of Forskolin. A pump continuously circulated solutions at 6 mL/min. Samples were collected at 15-min intervals until 150 min and were measured by the nanoflourospectrometer. A mean of 6-μM decrease in the FITC-inulin concentration in the Forskolin-treated experimental intestine was observed in comparison with that in the control intestine. The FITC-inulin count dilution in the experimental intestine is a result of an increase of fluid secretion produced by the effect of Forskolin, with P values inulin to allow real-time determinations of fluid and/or electrolyte movement along the small intestine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Protective effect of Saccharomyces boulardii against intestinal mucosal barrier injury in rats with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y T; Li, Y Q; Wang, Y Z

    2016-12-20

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect of Saccharomyces boulardii against intestinal mucosal barrier injury in rats with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methods: A total of 36 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats with a mean body weight of 180±20 g were randomly divided into control group, model group, and treatment group, with 12 rats in each group, after adaptive feeding for 1 week. The rats in the control group were given basic feed, and those in the model group and treatment group were given high-fat feed. After 12 weeks of feeding, the treatment group was given Saccharomyces boulardii (75×10 8 CFU/kg/d) by gavage, and those in the control group and model group were given isotonic saline by gavage. At the 20th week, blood samples were taken from the abdominal aorta to measure the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and endotoxins. The liver pathological changes, intestinal histopathological changes, and expression of occludin in the intestinal mucosa were observed. Fecal samples were collected to measure the changes in Escherichia coli and Bacteroides. A one-way analysis of variance and the SNK test were used for comparison between multiple groups, and the rank sum test was used as the non-parametric test. Results: Compared with the control group, the model group had significantly higher body weight, liver mass, and liver index ( P 0.05). Compared with the control group, the model group had significant increases in the levels of endotoxin, TNF-α, and IFABP ( P Saccharomyces boulardii can reduce body weight and improve hepatocyte steatosis. Saccharomyces boulardii can reduce endotoxemia in NAFLD rats and thus alleviate inflammatory response. Saccharomyces boulardii can also adjust the proportion of Escherichia coli and Bacteroides in the intestine of NAFLD rats.

  18. Subchronic mild noise stress increases HRP permeability in rat small intestine in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlsma, P B; van Raaij, M T; Dobbe, C J; Timmerman, A; Kiliaan, A J; Taminiau, J A; Groot, J A

    2001-05-01

    Recently we reported an increased trans- and paracellular protein permeability in rat small intestine after acute cold restraint stress. In the present study, we applied randomized 95- or 105-dB white noise pulses during 45 min/h, 12 h/day, duration 8 days, as a milder, but more chronic stressor to male rats. At 8 days before the noise experiments, 50% of the animals were cannulated in the vena cava for blood sampling during the experimental period. The other 50% of the animals were sacrificed at Day 9, segments of ileum were mounted in Ussing chambers and perfused at 37 degrees C. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was added mucosally, serosal appearance was detected enzymatically and tissues were fixed for electron microscopy. In the animals exposed to 95-dB noise, plasma corticosterone levels were enhanced twofold compared to controls, and ileal HRP flux was enhanced twofold. Electron micrographs of tissue from stressed or control animals showed no detectable paracellular staining of HRP. Quantification of HRP-containing endosomes in enterocytes revealed a twofold increase in endosome number in the animals exposed to 95-db noise indicating that the increased HRP permeability was primarily due to increased endocytosis. In contrast to the animals exposed to 95-dB noise, rats exposed to 105-dB noise showed no increase in corticosterone levels and ileal HRP fluxes were not significantly different from controls. We conclude that mild subchronic noise stress may cause a decrease in intestinal barrier function by increased transcytosis of luminal antigens.

  19. A study of the effects of pinealectomy on intestinal cell proliferation in infant newborn rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalio Marcelo Belini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Study the proliferation rate of jejunum and large intestine crypt epithelial cells, in rats pinealectomized immediately after borning. METHODS: Twenty-four male Wistar rats were distributed into two groups: Acute group (n=12 and Chronic group (n=12. Six animals of each group were operated for removal of the pineal gland (pinealectomy-PnX, and other six were controls (sham pinealectomy-C. Animals from acute and chronic group were sacrificed 15 and 90 days after the surgery, respectively. RESULTS: In acute group, pinealectomy of new-born rats has not caused significant alteration in cell proliferation (PnX=58,77?1,77 and C=60,88?1,10 in the descending colon/ PnX=31,56?0,45 and C=31,73?0,47 in the proximal jejunum and in crypt cell population (PnX=24,92?4,82 and C=23,60?2,48 in the descending colon/ PnX=39,92?3,49 and C=44,32?5,56 in the proximal jejunum. However, in chronic group there was an uprising crypt cell production per crypt in the proximal jejunum (PnX=57,54?2,19 and C=47,19?7,3and in the descending colon (PnX=37,78?2,22 and C=17,92?2,28. CONCLUSION: As the increase of intestinal crypts epithelial cells in chronic group is a carcinogenesis predetermining factor, the understanding of the interaction between pineal gland and this event has great importance.

  20. SURVEY OF HOUSE RAT INTESTINAL PARASITES FROM SURABAYA DISTRICT, EAST JAVA, INDONESIA THAT CAN CAUSE OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS IN HUMANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, R H

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of house rat zoonotic intestinal parasites from Surabaya District, East Java, Indonesia that have the potential to cause opportunistic infection in humans. House rat fecal samples were collected from an area of Surabaya District with a dense rat population during May 2015. Intestinal parasites were detected microscopically using direct smear of feces stained with Lugol's iodine and modified Ziehl-Neelsen stains. The fecal samples were also cultured for Strongyloides stercoralis. Ninety-eight house rat fecal samples were examined. The potential opportunistic infection parasite densities found in those samples were Strongyloides stercoralis in 53%, Hymenolepis nana in 42%, Cryptosporidium spp in 33%, and Blastocystis spp in 6%. This is the first report of this kind in Surabaya District. Measures need to be taken to control the house rat population in the study area to reduce the risk of the public health problem. Keywords: zoonotic intestinal parasites, opportunistic infection, house rat, densely populated area, Indonesia

  1. Synbiotic promotion of epithelial proliferation by orally ingested encapsulated Bifidobacterium breve and raffinose in the small intestine of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Satoshi; Iwama, Ami; Dinoto, Achmad; Suksomcheep, Akarat; Maeta, Kohshi; Kasai, Takanori; Hara, Hiroshi; Yokota, Atsushi

    2009-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of Bifidobacterium breve JCM1192(T )and/or raffinose on epithelial proliferation in the rat small and large intestines. WKAH/Hkm Slc rats (4 wk old) were fed a control diet, a diet supplemented with either encapsulated B. breve (30 g/kg diet, 1.5 x 10(7) colony-forming unit/g capsule) or raffinose (30 g/kg diet), or a diet supplemented with both encapsulated B. breve and raffinose, for 3 wk. Epithelial proliferation in the small intestine, as assessed by bromodeoxyuridine immunohistochemistry, was increased only in the B. breve plus raffinose-fed group. We determined the number of bifidobacteria in cecal contents using fluorescence in situ hybridization and confirmed the presence of ingested B. breve only in the B. breve plus raffinose-fed group. This suggests that the ingested B. breve cells used raffinose and were activated in the small intestine, where they subsequently influenced epithelial proliferation. In conclusion, we found a prominent synbiotic effect of encapsulated B. breve in combination with raffinose on epithelial proliferation in rat small intestine but not in large intestine. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a synbiotic that affects epithelial proliferation.

  2. The role of curcumin on intestinal oxidative stress, cell proliferation and apoptosis after ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Ahmet Fikret; Kanter, Mehmet; Pergel, Ahmet; Erboga, Mustafa; Guzel, Ahmet

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of curcumin on oxidative stress, cell proliferation and apoptosis in the rat intestinal mucosa after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). A total of 30 male Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups: sham, I/R and I/R+ curcumin; each group contain 10 animals. Sham group animals underwent laparotomy without I/R injury. After I/R groups animals underwent laparotomy, 1 h of superior mesenteric artery ligation were followed by 1 h of reperfusion. In the curcumin group, 3 days before I/R, curcumin (100 mg/kg) was administered by gastric gavage. All animals were sacrificed at the end of reperfusion and intestinal tissues samples were obtained for biochemical and histopathological investigation in all groups. Curcumin treatment significantly decreased the elevated tissue malondialdehyde levels and increased of reduced superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase enzyme activities in intestinal tissues samples. I/R caused severe histopathological injury including mucosal erosions and villous congestion and hemorrhage. Curcumin treatment significantly attenuated the severity of intestinal I/R injury, with inhibiting of I/R-induced apoptosis and cell proliferation. These results suggest that curcumin treatment has a protective effect against intestinal damage induced by intestinal I/R. This protective effect is possibly due to its ability to inhibit I/R-induced oxidative stress, apoptosis and cell proliferation.

  3. Orazipone, a locally acting immunomodulator, ameliorates intestinal radiation injury: A preclinical study in a novel rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerma, Marjan; Wang, Junru; Richter, Konrad K.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Intestinal radiation injury (radiation enteropathy) is relevant to cancer treatment, as well as to radiation accidents and radiation terrorism scenarios. This study assessed the protective efficacy of orazipone, a locally-acting small molecule immunomodulator. Methods and Materials: Male rats were orchiectomized, a 4-cm segment of small bowel was sutured to the inside of the scrotum, a proximal anteperistaltic ileostomy was created for intraluminal drug administration, and intestinal continuity was re-established by end-to-side anastomosis. After three weeks postoperative recovery, the intestine in the 'scrotal hernia' was exposed locally to single-dose or fractionated X-radiation. Orazipone (30 mg/kg/day) or vehicle was administered daily through the ileostomy, either during and after irradiation, or only after irradiation. Structural, cellular, and molecular aspects of intestinal radiation toxicity were assessed two weeks after irradiation. Results: Orazipone significantly ameliorated histologic injury and transforming growth factor-β immunoreactivity levels, both after single-dose and fractionated irradiation. Intestinal wall thickness was significantly reduced after single-dose and nonsignificantly after fractionated irradiation. Mucosal surface area and numbers of mast cells were partially restored by orazipone after single-dose irradiation. Conclusions: This work (1) demonstrates the utility of the ileostomy rat model for intraluminal administration of response modifiers in single-dose and fractionated radiation studies; (2) shows that mucosal immunomodulation during and/or after irradiation ameliorates intestinal toxicity; and (3) highlights important differences between single-dose and fractionated radiation regimens

  4. Modulatory effect of fenugreek seed mucilage and spent turmeric on intestinal and renal disaccharidases in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, G Suresh; Shetty, A K; Salimath, P V

    2005-06-01

    To elucidate the effect of feeding fenugreek seed mucilage and spent turmeric (10%) on disaccharidases activities, the specific activities of intestinal and renal disaccharidases viz., sucrase, maltase and lactase were measured in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Specific activities of intestinal disaccharidases were increased significantly during diabetes and amelioration of these activities during diabetes was clearly visible by supplementing fenugreek seed mucilage and spent turmeric in the diet. However during diabetes renal disaccharidases activities were significantly lower than those in the control rats. Fenugreek seed mucilage and spent turmeric supplementations were beneficial in alleviating the reduction in maltase activity during diabetes, however not much change in the activities of sucrase and lactase was observed upon feeding. This positive influence of feeding fenugreek seed mucilage and spent turmeric on intestinal and renal disaccharidases clearly indicates their beneficial role in the management of diabetes.

  5. Effects of intestinal bypass surgery on appetite, food intake, and body weight in obese and lean rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclafani, A; Koopmans, H S; Vasselli, J R; Reichman, M

    1978-04-01

    Jejunoileal bypass surgery or sham surgery was performed in female rats made obese with ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) knife cuts, and in lean control rats. After bypass surgery, the VMH rats underate and lost weight until they reached the body weight of the control sham rats, and they then maintained their weight at control levels. Bypass surgery in lean rats produced much smaller reductions in food intake and body weight. Both bypass groups initially consumed less of a sucrose solution and milk diet during 1 h/day tests, but their intakes returned to near normal levels during the second postoperative month. Reconnection of the intestinal tract in the VMH-bypass rats led to renewed hyperphagia and return to obese body weights. A second experiment revealed that bypass surgery reduces food intake and body weight in genetically obese (fatty) rats, but this effect is not as pronounced as that displayed by VMH rats. These results confirm recent clinical observations that reduced appetite and caloric intake are the major causes of the weight loss produced by intestinal bypass surgery.

  6. Arthritis by autoreactive T cell lines obtained from rats after injection of intestinal bacterial cell wall fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Klasen (Ina); J. Kool (Jeanette); M.J. Melief (Marie-José); I. Loeve (I.); W.B. van den Berg (Wim); A.J. Severijnen; M.P.H. Hazenberg (Maarten)

    1992-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ T cell lines (B13, B19) were isolated from the lymph nodes of Lewis rats 12 days after an arthritogenic injection of cell wall fragments of Eubacterium aerofaciens (ECW), a major resident of the human intestinal flora. These cell wall fragments consist of

  7. Effects of 1 alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D-3 on Transporters and Enzymes of the Rat Intestine and Kidney In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chow, Edwin C. Y.; Sun, Huadong; Khan, Ansar A.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Pang, K. Sandy

    1 alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D-3 (1,25(OH)(2)D-3), the natural ligand of the vitamin D receptor (VDR), was found to regulate bile acid related transporters and enzymes directly and indirectly in the rat intestine and liver in vivo. The kidney is another VDR-rich target organ in which VDR regulation

  8. Intestinal absorption and biliary elimination of glycyrrhizic acid diethyl ester in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koga K

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Kenjiro Koga,1 Mayuri Kawamura,1 Hiroshi Iwase,2 Nobuji Yoshikawa31Department of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokuriku University, Kanazawa, 2Research Division, 3Research and Development Division, Cokey Systems Co, Ltd, Matsusaka, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate absorption and elimination from the gastrointestinal tract of glycyrrhizic acid diethyl ester (GZ-DE which was prepared as a prodrug of glycyrrhizic acid (a poorly absorbed compound in rats.Methods: After the GZ-DE solution was administered via the intravenous, intraduodenal, intraileal, and stomach routes, GZ-DE and GZ concentrations in bile were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The stability of GZ-DE was estimated from residual GZ-DE and GZ produced in GZ-DE solutions prepared with distilled water, a pH 1.2 solution, 0.9% NaCl solution, and phosphate-buffered solution (pH 7.4 at 37°C.Results: GZ-DE was eliminated into bile by the pharmacokinetic parameters of apparent distribution rate constant (4.56 ± 0.36 per hour and apparent elimination rate constant (0.245 ± 0.042 per hour. After intravenous and intraduodenal administration of GZ-DE, the concentration ratio of GZ-DE to GZ in bile was approximately 4:1, and the bioavailability of GZ containing GZ-DE was three-fold higher compared with the bioavailability of GZ after intraduodenal administration. GZ-DE was immediately precipitated in pH 1.2 solution and was converted to GZ by hydrolysis in pH 7.4 solution.Conclusion: Improvement of intestinal absorption of GZ was made possible by administration of GZ-DE into the intestine where absorption of GZ is lower than in the strong acidic environment of the stomach. However, because the elimination rate in bile simulated from kinetic parameters of GZ-DE was higher than the conversion rate from GZ-DE to GZ by hydrolysis, it is thought that the availability of GZ as a revolutionary prodrug was not high from the

  9. Effects of gamma rays on non-vascular smooth muscles contractions (rat small intestine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azroony, R.; Ksies, F.; Alya, G.

    2003-03-01

    In this experiment, the contractile response evoked by activating the membranous cholinergic and adrenergic receptors in the smooth muscular fibres isolated from jejunum in rat small intestine is studied. Also the effect of gamma rays on regulating this contractile response after exposing the whole body of the animals to different doses of gamma rays (3, 5 and 7 Gy) emitted from 60 Co source is studied. Results show that irradiation lessens the sensitivity of muscarinic cholinergic receptors to their agonists in a dose dependent manner. And there is an important shift on irradiated rats where the maximum effect of acetylcholine (E max) can be obtained in higher concentrations of acetylcholine. Concerning the effects of gamma rays on adrenergic receptors, our results show that irradiation, also, decreases the sensitivity of α1 adrenergic receptors to their agonists, and this decrease is represented in a decrease of the irradiated muscular fibers response to the inhibitory effect of phenylephrine (more specific to α1 adrenergic receptors than α2 adrenergic receptors) in a dose dependent manner. While we have found that α2 adrenergic receptors have no important effect on regulating the contractile response of the smooth muscular fibers in the rat jejunum neither in smooth muscular fibers isolated from control animals nor in those fibers which where isolated from irradiated animals. (author)

  10. The Protective Role of Ginkgo Biloba against Radiation Induced Injury on Rat Gastro-intestinal Tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Ghazaly, M.A.; Gharib, O.A.; El-Sheikh, M.M.; Khayyal, M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo Biloba extract (EGb 761) is an antioxidant substance exhibits a wide variety of biological activities. The present study was performed to evaluate oxidative stress and inflammatory parameters of gastrointestinal injury induced by exposing rats to acute doses of γ-rays and the potential value of EGb 761 in preventing changes in these parameters. Male albino rats were treated orally with the extract in a dose of 100 mg/ kg for 7 successive days before whole body exposure to acute radiation levels of 2 and 6 Gray (Gy). Control groups were run concurrently. The rats were sacrificed 3 days after irradiation. Various inflammatory mediators and biochemical parameters were determined in the stomach and intestine. Both tissues were also examined histopathologically. Exposure to radiation led to dose dependent changes in the level of oxidative stress biomarkers (elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and nitrite associated with a glutathione (GSH) decrease as well as in the level of inflammatory parameters (elevation of Tumour necrosis factorα (TNF-α) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) associated with depletion of prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ). Pre-treatment with EGb 761 protected against the changes in both oxidative stress biomarkers and inflammatory mediators. EGb 761 exerted a protective effect against the radiation induced gastrointestinal damage, possibly through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties.

  11. Dietary xylo-oligosaccharide stimulates intestinal bifidobacteria and lactobacilli but has limited effect on intestinal integrity in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ellen Gerd; Licht, Tine Rask; Leser, Thomas Dyrmann

    2014-01-01

    Background: Consumption of prebiotics may modulate gut microbiota, subsequently affecting the bacterial composition, metabolite profile, and human health. Previous studies indicate that also changes in intestinal integrity may occur. In order to explore this further we have investigated the effec...

  12. Effect of adenine on bacterial translocation using technetium-99m labeled E. coli in an intestinal obstruction model in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugur Oflaz; Fatma Yurt Lambrecht; Osman Yilmaz; Cetin Pekcetin

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate effects of adenine on bacterial translocation (BT) using 99m Tc-labeled E. coli in an intestinal obstruction rat model. In the study twenty-one rats were used. The rats were divided into three groups according to different feeding patterns. The control group (CG) was fed with a standard chow diet for 7 days. Group A1 and group A2 were fed with adenine supplemented chow diet for 7 days. At the end of the feeding period, after all groups was submitted intestinal obstruction. 99m Tc-E. coli was injected into the rats' terminal ileum under anesthetic. The rats were sacrificed under aseptic conditions at 24th h after the surgery. The uptake of 99m Tc-E. coli was determined in organs such as the liver, mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen and ileum. Group A1 and group A2 results show that the uptake of 99m Tc-E. coli decreased in the blood and organs comparing to the CG. As a result, it was observed that adenine reduced the level of BT when compared with CG. The beneficial effect of adenine on BT in intestinal obstruction was observed. However, further studies are needed to more clearly assess how this benefit can be achieved. (author)

  13. RELATION BETWEEN GLUCOLIPID PROFILE AND SMALL INTESTINE HISTOLOGICAL PATTERNS IN DIABETIC RATS EXPOSED TO AN INTERMITTENT DIETARY RESTRICTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Hisano

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of an intermittent and prolonged dietary restriction on biochemical variables and histological small intestinal patterns in 12-month-old male eSMT rats are examined. These spontaneously diabetic animals were separated in two groups after weaning: 10 rats fed ad libitum with standard rat chow and 10 rats fed a restricted diet by deprivation of the same food for 24 hours every 72. At 12 months of age, animals were weighed and euthanized after tail vein bleeding for plasma analysis (glycemia- both fasting and 120 minutes after an oral glucose challenge-, triglyceridemia and total cholesterolemia. Small intestines were removed, weighed and measured in length.Intestinal specimens were fixed, embedded in paraffin, semi serially cut at 6 µm and stained with PAS-Hematoxilyn and Hematoxilyn-Eosin. Histometry was performed through a linear devise attached to ocular lens and lectin histochemistry was accomplished employing Canavalis ensiformis, Dolichos biflorus, Arachis hypogea, Ulex europaeus-I, Triticum vulgaris, Ricinus communis and Soy Bean (Glicine Max Agglutinin. Essentially, eSMT rats, a suitable animal model for studying diabetes and/or its complications, revealed at 12 months of age after undergoing the dietary restriction: 1.- An expected improvement in body weight and determined biochemical variables (fasting and after glucose overload glycemias, triglyceridemia and total cholesterolemia without reaching euglycemic values. 2.- Changes in most of the analyzed histometric patterns with no relevant reflection on morphometric ones, and 3.- No modifications in lectinhistochemical patterns.

  14. Searching for the molecular benchmark of physiological intestinal anastomotic healing in rats: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Gabriel J; Seifert, Michael; Kulemann, Birte; Holzner, Philipp A; Glatz, Torben; Timme, Sylvia; Sick, Olivia; Höppner, Jens; Hopt, Ulrich T; Marjanovic, Goran

    2014-01-01

    This investigation focuses on the physiological characteristics of gene transcription of intestinal tissue following anastomosis formation. In eight rats, end-to-end ileo-ileal anastomoses were performed (n = 2/group). The healthy intestinal tissue resected for this operation was used as a control. On days 0, 2, 4 and 8, 10-mm perianastomotic segments were resected. Control and perianastomotic segments were examined with an Affymetrix microarray chip to assess changes in gene regulation. Microarray findings were validated using real-time PCR for selected genes. In addition to screening global gene expression, we identified genes intensely regulated during healing and also subjected our data sets to an overrepresentation analysis using the Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia for Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Compared to the control group, we observed that the number of differentially regulated genes peaked on day 2 with a total of 2,238 genes, decreasing by day 4 to 1,687 genes and to 1,407 genes by day 8. PCR validation for matrix metalloproteinases-3 and -13 showed not only identical transcription patterns but also analogous regulation intensity. When setting the cutoff of upregulation at 10-fold to identify genes likely to be relevant, the total gene count was significantly lower with 55, 45 and 37 genes on days 2, 4 and 8, respectively. A total of 947 GO subcategories were significantly overrepresented during anastomotic healing. Furthermore, 23 overrepresented KEGG pathways were identified. This study is the first of its kind that focuses explicitly on gene transcription during intestinal anastomotic healing under standardized conditions. Our work sets a foundation for further studies toward a more profound understanding of the physiology of anastomotic healing.

  15. Antibiotic Treatment Affects Intestinal Permeability and Gut Microbial Composition in Wistar Rats Dependent on Antibiotic Class.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Vera-Lise Tulstrup

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are frequently administered orally to treat bacterial infections not necessarily related to the gastrointestinal system. This has adverse effects on the commensal gut microbial community, as it disrupts the intricate balance between specific bacterial groups within this ecosystem, potentially leading to dysbiosis. We hypothesized that modulation of community composition and function induced by antibiotics affects intestinal integrity depending on the antibiotic administered. To address this a total of 60 Wistar rats (housed in pairs with 6 cages per group were dosed by oral gavage with either amoxicillin (AMX, cefotaxime (CTX, vancomycin (VAN, metronidazole (MTZ, or water (CON daily for 10-11 days. Bacterial composition, alpha diversity and caecum short chain fatty acid levels were significantly affected by AMX, CTX and VAN, and varied among antibiotic treatments. A general decrease in diversity and an increase in the relative abundance of Proteobacteria was observed for all three antibiotics. Additionally, the relative abundance of Bifidobacteriaceae was increased in the CTX group and both Lactobacillaceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae were increased in the VAN group compared to the CON group. No changes in microbiota composition or function were observed following MTZ treatment. Intestinal permeability to 4 kDa FITC-dextran decreased after CTX and VAN treatment and increased following MTZ treatment. Plasma haptoglobin levels were increased by both AMX and CTX but no changes in expression of host tight junction genes were found in any treatment group. A strong correlation between the level of caecal succinate, the relative abundance of Clostridiaceae 1 family in the caecum, and the level of acute phase protein haptoglobin in blood plasma was observed. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced changes in microbiota may be linked to alterations in intestinal permeability, although the specific interactions remain to be elucidated as changes in

  16. Age- and gender-related hemorheological alterations in intestinal ischemia-reperfusion in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mester, Anita; Magyar, Zsuzsanna; Molnar, Akos; Somogyi, Viktoria; Tanczos, Bence; Peto, Katalin; Nemeth, Norbert

    2018-05-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is a life-threatening clinical disorder. During I/R, the microrheological parameters of blood (red blood cell deformability and aggregation) worsen, which may contribute to microcirculatory deterioration. Age and gender also have a great influence on hemorheological parameters. We aimed to investigate the gender and age-related microrheological alterations during intestinal I/R. After the cannulation of the left femoral artery, median laparotomy was performed in Crl:WI rats under general anesthesia. In the young control animals there were no other interventions (female n = 7; male n = 7). In the young (female n = 7; male n = 7) and older I/R groups (female n = 6; male n = 6), the superior mesenteric artery was clipped for 30 min, and a 120-min reperfusion period was observed afterward. Blood samples were taken before and at the 30-min ischemia, in the 30th, 60th, and 120th min of the reperfusion. Hematological parameters, erythrocyte deformability, and aggregation were determined. Hematocrit increased significantly in the younger female I/R group. Red blood cell count was higher in male and older animals. In case of white blood cell count, male animals had higher values compared with females. Platelet count elevated in the younger male and older female I/R animals. Red blood cell deformability worsened, mainly in the male and older I/R groups. Enhanced erythrocyte aggregation was seen in all groups, being more expressed in the female I/R groups. Microrheological parameters show gender and age-related differences during intestinal I/R. These observations have importance in the planning and evaluation of experimental data. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Exendin-4, but not dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition, increases small intestinal mass in GK rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Lotte; Pilgaard, Sofie; Orskov, Cathrine

    2007-01-01

    Long-term treatment with dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors (DPPIV-I) or glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 analogs may potentially affect intestinal growth by down- or upregulating the intestinotrophic hormone GLP-2. This study compared the intestinotrophic effects of 12-wk administration of vehicle......, exendin-4 (Ex-4; 5 nmol/kg bid sc), or DPPIV-I (NN-7201, 10 mg/kg qd orally) in GK rats. Some animals were observed additionally for 9 wk after the end of treatment. Both treatments lowered glycated hemoglobin A1c at wk 12 vs. control (Ex-4, -0.8%; DPPIV-I, -0.4%). Body weight was reduced by Ex-4 compared...... with control (361 +/- 4 vs. 399 +/- 5 g; P weight was identical in all groups...

  18. Antibiotic treatment affects intestinal permeability and gut microbial composition in Wistar rats dependent on antibiotic class

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulstrup, Monica Vera-Lise; Christensen, Ellen Gerd; Carvalho, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics are frequently administered orally to treat bacterial infections not necessarily related to the gastrointestinal system. This has adverse effects on the commensal gut microbial community, by disrupting the intricate balance between specific bacterial groups within this ecosystem...... potentially leading to dysbiosis. We hypothesized that modulation of community composition and function induced by antibiotics affects intestinal integrity depending on the antibiotic administered. To address this a total of 60 Wistar rats (n=12 per group) were dosed by oral gavage with either amoxicillin...... (AMX), cefataxime (CTX), vancomycin (VAN), metronidazole (MTZ), or water (CON) daily for 10-11 days. Bacterial composition, alpha diversity and cecum short chain fatty acid levels were significantly affected by AMX, CTX and VAN, and varied among antibiotic treatments. A general decrease in diversity...

  19. Intestinal levels of anandamide and oleoylethanolamide in food-deprived rats are regulated through their precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Gitte; Sørensen, Camilla; Schmid, Patricia C

    2006-01-01

    The anorectic lipid oleoylethanolamide and the orexigenic lipid anandamide both belong to the group of N-acylethanolamines that are generated by the enzyme N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine-hydrolyzing phospholipase D. The levels of the two bioactive lipids were investigated in rat intestines after 24...... h of starvation as well as after 1 and 4 h of re-feeding. Total levels of precursor phospholipids and N-acylethanolamines were decreased upon food-deprivation whereas the level of the anandamide precursor molecule was significantly increased. The level of 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol was unchanged...... as was the activity of N-acyltransferase, N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine-hydrolyzing phospholipase D, and fatty acid amide hydrolase upon starvation and re-feeding. It is concluded that remodeling of the amide-linked fatty acids of N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine is responsible for the opposite effects on levels...

  20. Kinetic analysis of zinc uptake and serosal transfer by vascularly perfused rat intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoadley, J.E.; Leinart, A.S.; Cousins, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Transport kinetics were examined for uptake of 65 Zn from the lumen and for transport of mucosal 65 Zn subsequent to uptake in the isolated, vascularly perfused intestines of rats fed either a zinc-deficient or zinc-adequate diet. Zinc depletion influenced the intestinal transport of zinc by 1) stimulating a saturable uptake mechanisms, 2) reducing secretion of mucosal 65 Zn into the lumen, and 3) increasing the rate of 65 Zn turnover in a rapidly absorbed mucosal zinc compartment. Uptake of 65 Zn involved both saturable and nonsaturable processes. The saturable process was stimulated by zinc depletion with the apparent maximal transport rate for the saturable mechanism increasing from 60 to 180 nmol Zn x g -1 x 30 min -1 . Most of the 65 Zn taken up was not involved in the short-term secretion or absorption, and mucosal 65 Zn retention was independent of dietary zinc status. Absorption of mucosal 65 Zn was nonsaturable, involved a rapid exchanging zinc compartment, and was stimulated by zinc depletion. The half-life for 65 Zn in this mucosal zinc compartment was ∼ 24 min in the zinc-adequate group and 13 min in the zinc-depleted group

  1. Receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide in rat anterior pituitary glands: Localization of binding to lactotropes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanke, I.E.; Rorstad, O.P.

    1990-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has been implicated as a physiological PRL-releasing factor; however, characterization of VIP receptors on normal pituitaries using radioligand-binding methods has been problematic. In this study we demonstrated specific receptors for VIP in anterior pituitary glands of female rats using HPLC-purified monoiodinated [Tyr(125I)10]VIP. Binding of VIP was reversible, saturable to receptor and radioligand, regulated by guanine nucleotides, and dependent on time and temperature. Scatchard analysis of competitive binding studies indicated high and low affinity binding sites, with equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) of 0.19 +/- 0.03 and 28 +/- 16 nM, respectively. The corresponding maximum numbers of binding sites were 158 +/- 34 fmol/mg and 11.7 +/- 6.9 pmol/mg. Binding was specific, as peptides with structural homology to VIP were less than 100th as potent as VIP. The rank order of potency of the peptides tested was VIP greater than rat (r) peptide histidine isoleucine = human (h) PHI greater than rGRF greater than bovine GRF = porcine PHI = VIP-(10-28) greater than hGRF greater than secretin greater than apamin greater than glucagon. Radioligand binding was associated primarily with lactotrope-enriched fractions prepared by unit gravity sedimentation of dispersed anterior pituitary cells. VIP stimulated PRL release from cultured rat anterior pituitary cells, with an ED50 of 1 nM. These results, comprising the first identification of specific VIP receptors in normal rat anterior pituitary tissue using radioligand-binding methods, provide additional support for a biological role of VIP in lactotrope function

  2. Enhancement of intestinal water absorption and sodium transport by glycerol in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wapnir, R A; Sia, M C; Fisher, S E

    1996-12-01

    Glycerol (Gly) is a hydrophilic, absorbable, and energy-rich solute that could make water absorption more efficient. We investigated the use of Gly in a high-energy beverage containing corn syrup (CS) by using a small intestine perfusion procedure in the rat, an approach shown earlier to provide good preclinical information. The effectiveness of several formulations with Gly and CS was compared with commercial products and to experimental formulas where Gly substituted for glucose (Glc). The CS-Gly combination was more effective than preparations on the market containing sucrose and Glc-fructose syrups (G-P and G-L, respectively) in maintaining a net water absorption balance in the test jejunal segment [CS-Gly = 0.21 +/- 0.226, G-L = -1.516 +/- 0.467, and G-P = -0.299 +/- 0.106 (SE) microliter.min-1.cm-1 (P = 0.0113)] and in reducing sodium release into the lumen [CS-Gly = -133.2 +/- 16.2, G-L = -226.7 +/- 25.2, and G-P = -245.6 +/- 23.4 nmol.min-1.cm-1 (P = 0.0022)]. In other preparations, at equal CS concentrations (60 and 80 g/l, respectively), Gly clearly improved net water absorption over a comparable Glc-containing product [CS60-Gly = 0.422 +/- 0.136 and CS80-Gly = 0.666 +/- 0.378 vs. CS60-Glc = -0.282 +/- 0.200 and CS80-Glc = -1.046 +/- 0.480 microliters.min-1.cm-1 (P = 0.0019)]. On the basis of the data of this rat intestine perfusion model, Gly could be a useful ingredient in energy-rich beverages and might enhance fluid absorption in humans.

  3. Cocoa Flavonoid-Enriched Diet Modulates Systemic and Intestinal Immunoglobulin Synthesis in Adult Lewis Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Pérez-Cano

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have reported that a diet containing 10% cocoa, a rich source of flavonoids, has immunomodulatory effects on rats and, among others effects, is able to attenuate the immunoglobulin (Ig synthesis in both systemic and intestinal compartments. The purpose of the present study was focused on investigating whether these effects were attributed exclusively to the flavonoid content or to other compounds present in cocoa. To this end, eight-week-old Lewis rats were fed, for two weeks, either a standard diet or three isoenergetic diets containing increasing proportions of cocoa flavonoids from different sources: one with 0.2% polyphenols from conventional defatted cocoa, and two others with 0.4% and 0.8% polyphenols, respectively, from non-fermented cocoa. Diet intake and body weight were monitored and fecal samples were obtained throughout the study to determine fecal pH, IgA, bacteria proportions, and IgA-coated bacteria. Moreover, IgG and IgM concentrations in serum samples collected during the study were quantified. At the end of the dietary intervention no clear changes of serum IgG or IgM concentrations were quantified, showing few effects of cocoa polyphenol diets at the systemic level. However, in the intestine, all cocoa polyphenol-enriched diets attenuated the age-related increase of both fecal IgA and IgA-coated bacteria, as well as the proportion of bacteria in feces. As these effects were not dependent on the dose of polyphenol present in the diets, other compounds and/or the precise polyphenol composition present in cocoa raw material used for the diets could be key factors in this effect.

  4. Dietary inulin intake and age can significantly affect intestinal absorption of calcium and magnesium in rats: a stable isotope approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudray, Charles; Rambeau, Mathieu; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Tressol, Jean Claude; Demigne, Christian; Gueux, Elyett; Mazur, Andrzej; Rayssiguier, Yves

    2005-01-01

    Background previous studies have shown that non-digestible inulin-type fructan intake can increase intestinal mineral absorption in both humans and animals. However, this stimulatory effect on intestinal absorption may depend on experimental conditions such as duration of fermentable fiber intake, mineral diet levels and animals' physiological status, in particular their age. Objectives the aim of this study was to determine the effect of inulin intake on Ca and Mg absorption in rats at different age stages. Methods eighty male Wistar rats of four different ages (2, 5, 10 and 20 months) were randomized into either a control group or a group receiving 3.75% inulin in their diet for 4 days and then 7.5% inulin for three weeks. The animals were fed fresh food and water ad libitum for the duration of the experiment. Intestinal absorption of Ca and Mg was determined by fecal monitoring using stable isotopic tracers. Ca and Mg status was also assessed. Results absorption of Ca and Mg was significantly lower in the aged rats (10 and 20 mo) than in the young and adult rat groups. As expected, inulin intake increased Ca and Mg absorption in all four rat groups. However, inulin had a numerically greater effect on Ca absorption in aged rats than in younger rats whereas its effect on Mg absorption remained similar across all four rat age groups. Conclusion the extent of the stimulatory effect of inulin on absorption of Ca may differ according to animal ages. Further studies are required to explore this effect over longer inulin intake periods, and to confirm these results in humans. PMID:16253138

  5. [Effects of Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1 inhibitor on intestinal injury of rats with burn sepsis and the mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W P; Zhao, G Y; Yang, X K

    2017-06-20

    Objective: To observe the effects of Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1) inhibitor on intestinal injury of rats with burn sepsis, and to explore the possible mechanism preliminarily. Methods: Ninety SD rats were divided into control group, pure sepsis group, and NHE1 inhibitor group according to the random number table, with 30 rats in each group. Full-thickness scald (hereinafter referred to as burn) model with 20% total body surface area were reproduced on the back of rats in pure sepsis and NHE1 inhibitor groups, and then 50 μL liquid of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 (2×10(5) colony forming unit/mL) were injected into the center of wounds on the back. Rats in NHE1 inhibitor group were intraperitoneally injected with 0.1 mmol/L NHE1 inhibitor cariporide (0.4 mg/kg) rapidly after the successful establishment of burn sepsis model, while rats in pure sepsis group were injected with the same volume of normal saline. Except for not being made burn wounds nor receiving bacterination, rats in control group were treated the same as those in pure sepsis group. Rats with burn sepsis in each group were laparotomized and injected with 200 mL fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran in the concentration of 0.1 mol/L in terminal ileum at 12 hours post injury, and their left ventricular blood and terminal ileum were collected 30 minutes later. The serum content of FITC-dextran was detected with fluorescence spectrophotometer ( n =10); the morphology of intestinal tissue was observed with HE staining ( n =10); the content of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in serum and intestinal tissue was determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ( n =20); the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in serum and intestinal tissue was detected with colorimetric method ( n =20); the protein expression of nuclear factor-kappa B-p65 (NF-κB-p65) and phosphorylation levels of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal pathway related proteins p38MAPK

  6. Influence of gastric pH modifiers on development of intestinal metaplasia induced by X-irradiation in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiromitsu; Okamoto, Taro; Fudaba, Yasuhiro; Ogundigie, P.S.; Ito, Akihiro

    1993-01-01

    The influence of gastric pH on intestinal metaplasia was examined in male Crj:CD(SD) rats. At the age of 5 weeks, animals were irradiated with two 10 Gy doses of X-rays to the gastric region at a 3-day interval (total 20 Gy), and 6 months after irradiation, received either secretin or histamine in silicon tubes for 2 months or had their bilateral submandibular salivary glands removed. The incidences of intestinal metaplasia in the fundus of animals after administration of secretin or histamine, or removal of the salivary glands were reduced, along with the pH values, as compared with values for rats given X-rays alone. In both the pyloric and the fundic gland mucosae, the numbers of alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-positive foci and type B metaplasias (intestinal crypts without Paneth cells) were also significantly decreased (P<0.01). In a second experiment, started six months after irradiation, rats were kept on 1% sodium chloride (NaCl) diet for 6 months. Subsequent removal of salivary glands along with histamine treatment brought about a marked drop in pH and in numbers of ALP-positive foci after three and five days. The present results thus indicated that development and maintenance of intestinal metaplasia can be influenced by a decrease of pH value. (author)

  7. Effects of positive acceleration exposure on intestinal mucosal barrier and sIgA level in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie QIU

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the effect of positive acceleration (+Gz on immune barrier of intestinal mucosa in rats. Methods  Thirty two male SD rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (8 each: Group A (control group, Group B (+5Gz group, Group C (+10Gz group and Group D (repeated exposure group. The animal centrifuge was used to simulate the exposure of acceleration. Group A was no disposed. +5Gz group and +10Gz group were subjected to centrifugal force of +5Gz and +10Gz respectively for 5min; repeated exposure group was continuously exposed to 1.5min under +5Gz value, 2min under +10Gz value and 1.5min under +5Gz. All groups were exposed to the respective acceleration once daily for 5 days. The damage of intestinal mucosa was observed by light microscopy after the experiment was finished, and the content of sIgA in intestinal mucosa was detected by ELISA. Results  Except for group A, intestinal mucosal injury was observed in the other three groups. Group D was shown as the most serious one, followed by group C and group B. Compared with group A, the level of sIgA was significantly lower in other three groups (P<0.05. The level of sIgA in group C was significantly lower than that in group B (P<0.05 and higher than that in group D (P<0.05. Conclusion  +Gz exposure can result in intestinal injury and weaken the function of immune barrier of intestinal mucosa in rats. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.10.14

  8. Studies on the in vitro absorption of spice principles--curcumin, capsaicin and piperine in rat intestines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, D; Srinivasan, K

    2007-08-01

    A comparative evaluation of the absorbability of three structurally similar and physiologically active spice principles in an in vitro system consisting of everted rat intestinal sacs was made. When everted sacs of rat intestines were incubated with 50-1000 microg of curcumin in 10 ml incubation medium, absorption of the spice principle was maximum at 100 microg concentration. The amount of absorbed curcumin present in the serosal fluid was negligible. This and the comparatively lower recovery of the original compound suggested that curcumin to some extent undergoes a modification during absorption. For similar concentrations of added piperine, about 44-63% of piperine disappeared from the mucosal side. Absorption of piperine which was maximum at 800 microg per 10 ml was about 63%. The absolute amounts of piperine absorbed in this in vitro system exceeded the amounts of curcumin. The absorbed piperine could be traced in both the serosal fluid and in the intestinal tissue, indicating that piperine did not undergo any metabolic change during the process of absorption. 7-12% of the absorbed piperine was found in the serosal fluid. When everted sacs of rat intestines were incubated with 10-500 microg of capsaicin, a maximum of 82-88% absorption could be seen in the lower concentrations, and the amount of absorbed capsaicin did not proportionately increase at higher concentrations. A relatively higher percentage of the absorbed capsaicin could be seen in the serosal fluid as compared to curcumin or piperine. When these spice active principles were associated with mixed micelles, their in vitro intestinal absorption was relatively higher. Curcumin absorption in everted intestinal sac increased from 48.7% to 56.1% when the same was present in micelles. In the case of capsaicin and piperine, increase in absorption was 27.8-44.4% and 43.4-57.4%, respectively, when they were present in micelles as compared to its native form.

  9. Exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) prevents chemotherapy-induced mucositis in rat small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kissow, Hannelouise; Viby, Niels-Erik; Hartmann, Bolette

    2012-01-01

    was analysed for weight loss, morphometric estimates and proliferation. Study 2 Rats were treated with GLP-2 or control vehicle 2 days before a single injection of 5-FU or saline. The treatments continued until kill 2 days after. The intestine was investigated for influx of myeloperoxidase (MPO)-positive cells...... and morphometric estimates, such as villus height, as a marker of mucositis. RESULTS STUDY 1: Two days after chemotherapy, there was a rise in endogenous GLP-2, followed by a marked increase in proliferation. Study 2 Exogenous GLP-2 was able to protect the intestine from severe weight loss and completely prevented...

  10. Effect of vitamin A deficiency on permeability of the small intestinal mucosa for macromolecules in adult rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmoshinskii, I.V.; Khvylya, S.I.; Kon', I.Ya.

    1987-01-01

    The authors study the effect of experimental vitamin A deficiency on absorption of macromolecules of hen's ovalbumin in the intestine. An electron-microscopic study of permeability of small intestine enterocytes for particles of colloidal lanthanum hydroxide La(OH) 3 was carried out at the same time. The concentration of unsplit hen's ovalbumin in the blood of the rats used in the experiment was determined by competitive radioimmunoassay. Samples of serum were incubated with indicator doses of 125 I-OA. Radioactivity of the precipitates was measured

  11. Effect of petroleum vapors inhalation on intestinal absorption of glucose and some amino acids in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szablicka, E.; Oledzka, R.

    1989-01-01

    The proper intestinal absorption of nutrients, particularly sugars and amino acids, is necessary to keep the organism healthy. It is well known that various toxic compounds present in the environment can have an unfavorable influence. On the other hand it is also known that crude oil which pollutes the aqueous environment affects birds' gastrointestinal tract. Little is known about the influence of petroleum vapors on the gastrointestinal tract of animals and humans. The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of petroleum vapors inhalation on intestinal absorption of some nutrients (glucose, leucine, methionine) in rats

  12. Evaluation of Intestinal Absorption and Bioavailability of a Bergenin-Phospholipid Complex Solid Dispersion in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haoshi; Wei, Yue; Xi, Long; Sun, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Tianhong

    2018-05-01

    Bergenin (BN) is a Biopharmaceutics Classification System class IV (BCS IV) drug with poor hydrophilicity and lipophilicity and is potentially eliminated by the efflux function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). These factors may explain its low oral bioavailability. In the present study, a BN-phospholipid complex solid dispersion (BNPC-SD) was prepared by solvent evaporation and characterized based on differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, infrared diffraction, solubility, octanol-water partition coefficient, and in vitro dissolution. To investigate how P-gp can inhibit BN absorption in vivo, the P-gp inhibitor verapamil was co-administered with BNPC-SD to Sprague Dawley rats. By in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion, the membrane permeability of BN from BNPC-SD was higher than that of BN given alone and was improved further by co-administered verapamil. A pharmacokinetics study was done in Sprague Dawley rats, with plasma BN levels estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography. C max and AUC 0 → t values for BN were significantly higher for BNPC-SD than for BN given alone and were increased further by verapamil. Thus, the relative oral bioavailability of BNPC-SD as well as BNPC-SD co-administered with verapamil was 156.33 and 202.46%, respectively, compared with the value for BN given alone. These results showed that BNPC-SD can increase the oral bioavailability of BCS IV drugs.

  13. Effects of divalent cations on vitamin B12 adsorption to brush borders of rat intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Satoru; Inada, Masami

    1976-01-01

    A brush border preparation from rat intestine was incubated with rat intrinsic factor-vitamin B 12 complex in 0.01M Tris-HCl buffer, pH 7.4. The 57 Co-B 12 uptake to brush borders was proportional to the amount of protein or to alkaline phosphatase activity in the preparations. The uptake increased with time of incubation. At 37 0 C, the uptake after incubation for 15 min. was 80-85% of that for one hr. The uptake at 4 0 C was approximately 70% of that at 37 0 C. There was no difference as a result of adding glucose to the incubation medium. The uptake was observed in the alkaline environment above pH 6.3. Maximum uptake occurred at pH 8.0. Brush borders washed with Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer (pH 7.4) exhibited no difference in B 12 uptake, whether in the presence of absence of calcium ion. But brush borders washed with ethylenediaminetetraacetate exhibited no uptake when incubated in calcium-free medium. The uptake reached a maximum by addition of calcium ion at a concentration of 0.3 mM, and was not alter up to 10 mM. Addition of magnesium ion exhibited no uptake. Calcium-dependent B 12 uptake was markedly inhibited by manganese ion. Magnesium ion seemed to slightly inhibit the calcium-dependent uptake. (auth.)

  14. The trophic effect of epidermal growth factor on morphological changes and polyamine metabolism in the small intestine of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujikawa, T; Bamba, T; Hosoda, S

    1990-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the morphological changes and polyamine metabolism in the atrophic small intestinal mucosa of rats caused by feeding elemental diet (ED; Elental, Ajinomoto, Tokyo) for several weeks. Four-week-old Wistar male rats were given ad libitum ED (1 kcal/ml) for 4 weeks. The body weight increased to the same extent as the control group fed a pellet diet. However, the small intestine became atrophic: the mucosal wet weight of the jejunum decreased to 70%, while that of the ileum decreased to 60%. EGF (10 micrograms/kg) was subcutaneously injected into these rats every 8 hours. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activities of the jejunal and ileal mucosa rose within 12 hours of the initial EGF administration. Mucosal DNA specific activities tended to increase. Next, EGF (30 micrograms/kg/day) was intraperitoneally administered with a Mini-osmotic pump for one week. The wet weight, protein and DNA contents of the ileal mucosa increased significantly compared with those of the saline administered controls, while the crypt cell production rate (CCPR) also increased. Histologically, increases in both villus height and crypt depth were confirmed. These findings indicate that EGF causes mucosal proliferation through polyamine metabolism even in the atrophic small intestine of mature rats after ED administration for 4 weeks.

  15. Treatment-time-dependence models of early and delayed radiation injury in rat small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, James W.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Kron, Tomas; Langberg, Carl W.

    2000-01-01

    Background: The present study modeled data from a large series of experiments originally designed to investigate the influence of time, dose, and fractionation on early and late pathologic endpoints in rat small intestine after localized irradiation. The objective was to obtain satisfactory descriptions of the regenerative response to injury together with the possible relationships between early and late endpoints. Methods: Two- and 26-week pathologic radiation injury data in groups of Sprague-Dawley rats irradiated with 27 different fractionation schedules were modeled using the incomplete repair (IR) version of the linear-quadratic model with or without various time correction models. The following time correction models were tested: (1) No time correction; (2) A simple exponential (SE) regenerative response beginning at an arbitrary time after starting treatment; and (3) A bi-exponential response with its commencement linked to accumulated cellular depletion and fraction size (the 'intelligent response model' [INTR]). Goodness of fit of the various models was assessed by correlating the predicted biological effective dose for each dose group with the observed radiation injury score. Results: (1) The incomplete repair model without time correction did not provide a satisfactory description of either the 2- or 26-week data. (2) The models using SE time correction performed better, providing modest descriptions of the data. (3) The INTR model provided reasonable descriptions of both the 2- and 26-week data, confirming a treatment time dependence of both early and late pathological endpoints. (4) The most satisfactory descriptions of the data by the INTR model were obtained when the regenerative response was assumed to cease 2 weeks after irradiation rather than at the end of irradiation. A fraction-size-dependent delay of the regenerative response was also suggested in the best fitting models. (5) Late endpoints were associated with low-fractionation sensitivity

  16. Effect of pH, buffer concentration and buffer composition on the absorption of theophylline from the small intestine of the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaey, C.J. de; Schurgers, N.

    1984-01-01

    The absorption of theophylline from the small intestine of the rat was investigated using buffer solutions of different pH (3.0–9.2), composition and concentration. The technique used, encloses luminal perfusion of an intestinal loop with collection of the blood draining the perfused loop, which

  17. Breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) limits net intestinal uptake of quercetin in rats by facilitating apical efflux of glucuronides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sesink, A.L.A.; Arts, I.C.W.; Boer, de V.C.J.; Breedveld, P.; Schellens, J.H.M.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Russel, F.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    The intestinal absorption of the flavonoid quercetin in rats is limited by the secretion of glucuronidated metabolites back into the gut lumen. The objective of this study was to determine the role of the intestinal efflux transporters breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1)/Abcg2 and multidrug

  18. Breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) limits net intestinal uptake of quercetin in rats by facilitating apical efflux of glucuronides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sesink, A.L.; Arts, I.C.; Boer, V.C. de; Breedveld, P.; Schellens, J.H.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Russel, F.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    The intestinal absorption of the flavonoid quercetin in rats is limited by the secretion of glucuronidated metabolites back into the gut lumen. The objective of this study was to determine the role of the intestinal efflux transporters breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1)/Abcg2 and multidrug

  19. gamma-Aminobutyric acid production in small and large intestine of normal and germ-free Wistar rats. Influence of food intake and intestinal flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berlo, C L; de Jonge, H R; van den Bogaard, A E; van Eijk, H M; Janssen, M A; Soeters, P B

    1987-09-01

    In recent hypotheses concerning the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is claimed to be produced by the colonic flora, although enzymes necessary to generate GABA have been reported to be present in intestinal mucosa. In this study, using normal and germ-free Wistar rats, we determined GABA levels and amino-grams of arterial blood and of venous effluent from small and large bowel. The data indicate that large and small intestinal mucosa significantly contribute to GABA production. In the fasted state GABA concentrations are greater in the venous effluent of the small bowel than in the venous effluent of the large bowel. Feeding increases the arterioportal differences, and uptake in the small bowel is still significantly higher than in the large bowel. This process is not, or can only be to a minor degree, bacterially mediated, because GABA production in the gut both in the fed and fasted state is of similar magnitude in germ-free and normal animals. gamma-Aminobutyric acid release correlates significantly with glutamine uptake in the small bowel of fasted rats. Only a small fraction of the glutamine taken up is needed to account for GABA release, so that conclusions concerning which amino acids may serve as precursors of GABA cannot be drawn. Further studies are needed to delineate the metabolic pathways leading to GABA synthesis.

  20. Decreased gastric emptying and gastrointestinal and intestinal transits of liquid after complete spinal cord transection in awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gondim F. de-A.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effect of complete spinal cord transection (SCT on gastric emptying (GE and on gastrointestinal (GI and intestinal transits of liquid in awake rats using the phenol red method. Male Wistar rats (N = 65 weighing 180-200 g were fasted for 24 h and complete SCT was performed between C7 and T1 vertebrae after a careful midline dorsal incision. GE and GI and intestinal transits were measured 15 min, 6 h or 24 h after recovery from anesthesia. A test meal (0.5 mg/ml phenol red in 5% glucose solution was administered intragastrically (1.5 ml and the animals were sacrificed by an iv thiopental overdose 10 min later to evaluate GE and GI transit. For intestinal transit measurements, 1 ml of the test meal was administered into the proximal duodenum through a cannula inserted into a gastric fistula. GE was inhibited (P<0.05 by 34.3, 23.4 and 22.7%, respectively, at 15 min, 6 h and 24 h after SCT. GI transit was inhibited (P<0.05 by 42.5, 19.8 and 18.4%, respectively, at 15 min, 6 h and 24 h after SCT. Intestinal transit was also inhibited (P<0.05 by 48.8, 47.2 and 40.1%, respectively, at 15 min, 6 h and 24 h after SCT. Mean arterial pressure was significantly decreased (P<0.05 by 48.5, 46.8 and 41.5%, respectively, at 15 min, 6 h and 24 h after SCT. In summary, our report describes a decreased GE and GI and intestinal transits in awake rats within the first 24 h after high SCT.

  1. Synergistic effect of aluminum and ionizing radiation upon ultrastructure, oxidative stress and apoptotic alterations in Paneth cells of rat intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltahawy, N A; Elsonbaty, S M; Abunour, S; Zahran, W E

    2017-03-01

    Environmental and occupational exposure to aluminum along with ionizing radiation results in serious health problems. This study was planned to investigate the impact of oxidative stress provoked by exposure to ionizing radiation with aluminum administration upon cellular ultra structure and apoptotic changes in Paneth cells of rat small intestine . Animals received daily aluminum chloride by gastric gavage at a dose 0.5 mg/Kg BW for 4 weeks. Whole body gamma irradiation was applied at a dose 2 Gy/week up to 8 Gy. Ileum malondialdehyde, advanced oxidative protein products, protein carbonyl and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were assessed as biomarkers of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and inflammation respectively along with superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities as enzymatic antioxidants. Moreover, analyses of cell cycle division and apoptotic changes were evaluated by flow cytometry. Intestinal cellular ultra structure was investigated using transmission electron microscope.Oxidative and inflammatory stresses assessment in the ileum of rats revealed that aluminum and ionizing radiation exposures exhibited a significant effect upon the increase in oxidative stress biomarkers along with the inflammatory marker tumor necrosis factor-α accompanied by a significant decreases in the antioxidant enzyme activities. Flow cytometric analyses showed significant alterations in the percentage of cells during cell cycle division phases along with significant increase in apoptotic cells. Ultra structurally, intestinal cellular alterations with marked injury in Paneth cells at the sites of bacterial translocation in the crypt of lumens were recorded. The results of this study have clearly showed that aluminum and ionizing radiation exposures induced apoptosis with oxidative and inflammatory disturbance in the Paneth cells of rat intestine, which appeared to play a major role in the pathogenesis of cellular damage. Furthermore, the

  2. Spatial Localization and Binding of the Probiotic Lactobacillus farciminis to the Rat Intestinal Mucosa: Influence of Chronic Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Da Silva

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at detecting the exogenously applied probiotic Lactobacillus farciminis in rats, after exposure to IBS-like chronic stress, based on 4-day Water Avoidance Stress (WAS. The presence of L. farciminis in both ileal and colonic mucosal tissues was demonstrated by FISH and qPCR, with ileum as the preferential niche, as for the SFB population. A different spatial distribution of the probiotic was observed: in the ileum, bacteria were organized in micro-colonies more or less close to the epithelium whereas, in the colon, they were mainly visualized far away from the epithelium. When rats were submitted to WAS, the L. farciminis population substantially decreased in both intestinal regions, due to a stress-induced increase in colonic motility and defecation, rather than a modification of bacterial binding to the intestinal mucin Muc2.

  3. Investigation of Microbiota Alterations and Intestinal Inflammation Post-Spinal Cord Injury in Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Gregory; Jeffrey, Elisabeth; Madorma, Derik; Marcillo, Alexander; Abreu, Maria T; Deo, Sapna K; Dietrich, W Dalton; Daunert, Sylvia

    2018-03-23

    Although there has been a significant amount of research focused on the pathophysiology of Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), there is limited information on the consequences of SCI on remote organs. SCI can produce significant effects on a variety of organ systems, including the gastrointestinal tract. Patients with SCI often suffer from severe, debilitating bowel dysfunction in addition to their physical disabilities, which is of major concern for these individuals due to the adverse impact on their quality of life. Herein, we report on our investigation into the effects of SCI and subsequent antibiotic treatment on the intestinal tissue and microbiota. For that, we employed a thoracic SCI rat model and investigated changes to the microbiota, pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, and bacterial communication molecule levels post injury and gentamicin treatment for seven days. We discovered significant changes, the most interesting being the differences in the gut microbiota beta diversity of 8-week SCI animals compared to control animals at the family, genus, and species level. Specifically, 35 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) were enriched in the SCI animal group and 3 were identified at species level; Lactobacillus intestinalis, Clostridium disporicum, and Bifidobacterium choerinum. In contrast, Clostridium saccharogumia was identified as depleted in the SCI animal group. Pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12, MIP-2, and TNF-α, were found to be significantly elevated in intestinal tissue homogenate 4-weeks post-SCI compared to 8-weeks post-injury. Further, levels of IL-1β, IL-12, and MIP-2 significantly correlated with changes in beta diversity 8-weeks post-SCI. Our data provide a greater understanding of the early effects of SCI on the microbiota and gastrointestinal tract, highlighting the need for further investigation to elucidate the mechanism underlying these effects.

  4. Purification of rat intestinal receptor for intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shoji; Itaya, Harutaka; Nakazawa, Osamu; Fukuda, Morimichi.

    1977-01-01

    The intrinsic factor (IF) in a rat gastric mucosal extract was bound efficiently to vitamin B 12 -sepharose without significant change in its nature to produce IF-vitamin B 12 -sepharose. The purification of the intestinal receptor for the IF-vitamin B 12 complex was performed by the affinity chromatography using the IF-vitamin B 12 -sepharose as the affinity adsorbent. As a result of admixing the gastric mucosal extract sample with B 12 -sepharose while stirring for 4 hours, the adsorption was performed without any break through. Further, it was recognized that the B 12 -bound protein purified by the affinity chromatography using B 12 -sepharose was not much changed as compared with that before purification. Furthermore, it was recognized that IF-B 12 -sepharose was able to be made by binding IF with B 12 -sepharose which was made by coupling B 12 with the market-available AH-sepharose. The IF-B 12 -sepharose was washed with buffer solution, and then was loaded with the small intestine mucosal extract. Thereafter, the receptor was eluted by making di-valent cation inert with the buffer solution. After the removal of EDTA in the eluted solution by dialysis, the activity of the receptor was measured. 48.5% of the receptor activity loaded was recovered by the elution with EDTA. The specific activity of the receptor represented by the final amount of B 12 (pg)/the amount of protein (mg) in the purified substance was 335 folds of the original activity. (Iwakiri, K.)

  5. Induction of intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury by portal vein outflow occlusion in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincenti, M.; Behrends, M.; Hirose, Ryutaro; Liu, T.; Niemann, C.U.; Dang, K.; Park, Y.H.; Blasi-Ibanez, A.; Serkova, N.J.

    2010-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia can occur from mesenteric artery (MA) occlusion and portal vein (PV) occlusion. The degree and mechanisms of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in these conditions may differ. Metabolic changes are seen early in I/R. This study compares tissue histology, inflammation, and metabolic response during small bowel I/R due to superior MA or PV occlusion. Anesthetized male Wistar rats (250-300 g) underwent laparotomy followed by MA or PV occlusion for 40 min. After 120 min of reperfusion, small bowel tissue was collected. The expression of heat shock protein (HSP)-32 and HSP70 was evaluated to compare physiological stress responses between groups. Metabolic profiles were obtained using 1 H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR)-based quantitative metabolomics. Histological injury of small bowel was graded from 0 (normal) to 4 (extensive ischemic damage). Protein expression of HSP32 and HSP70 increased when compared to sham but was not different in the MA I/R and PV I/R groups. Metabolic profiles demonstrated decreased glucose levels and highly elevated tissue lactate and amino acids and fatty acids following I/R, with more pronounced changes with PV occlusion. Lipid peroxidation was equally increased in both groups, while depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) was more severe with MA occlusion. The epithelial necrosis score was higher with MA (3.5±0.6) than with PV occlusion (2.3±0.8). Histological injury of the intestine is less pronounced following PV occlusion, most likely due to higher oxygen and substrate availability during I/R by PV occlusion. This conclusion is supported by a more pronounced metabolic synthetic response (increased glycolysis and fatty acid and amino acid accumulation) with PV occlusion, while oxidative stress was higher with MA occlusion. The inflammatory response showed little difference between the groups. (author)

  6. Effect of Kampo medicine “Dai-kenchu-to” on microbiome in the intestine of the rats with fast stress

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshikawa, Kozo; Shimada, Mitsuo; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kurita, Nobuhiro; Sato, Hirohiko; Utsunomiya, Tohru; Iwata, Takashi; Miyatani, Tomohiko; Higashijima, Jun; Kashihara, Hideya; Takasu, Chie; Matsumoto, Noriko; Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] Diversity of gut microbiome has been recently reported to be lost in inflammatory bowel disease. We have previously reported that the Dai-kenchu-to (DKT) prevented the bacterial translocation through suppression of cytokine and apoptosis in rat’s fast stress model. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DKT on maintenance of microbial diversity in rat’s intestine with inflammation. [Method] Wister rats were received the fast stress for 5 days. In DKT group, rats were ad...

  7. Lack of efficacy of blueberry in nutritional prevention of azoxymethane-initiated cancers of rat small intestine and colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xianli

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blueberries may lower relative risk for cancers of the gastrointestinal tract. Previous work indicated an inhibitory effect of consumed blueberry (BB on formation of aberrant crypt foci (ACF in colons of male Fisher F344 rats (inbred strain. However, effects of BB on colon tumors and in both genders are unknown. Methods We examined efficacy of BB in inhibition of azoxymethane (AOM-induced colon ACF and intestine tumors in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats (outbred strain. Pregnant rats were fed a diet with or without 10% BB powder; progeny were weaned to the same diet as their dam and received AOM as young adults. Results Male and female rats on control diet had similar numbers of ACF at 6 weeks after AOM administration. BB increased (P P P > 0.05 to reduce overall gastrointestinal tract tumor incidence in males, however, tumor incidence in females was unaffected (P > 0.1 by BB. There was a tendency (0.1 > P > 0.05 for fewer adenocarcinomas (relative to total of adenomatous polyps plus adenocarcinomas in colons of female than male tumor-bearing rats; in small intestine, this gender difference was significant (P P Conclusion Results did not indicate robust cancer-preventive effects of BB. Blueberry influenced ACF occurrence in distal colon and tumor progression in duodenum, in gender-specific fashion. Data indicate the potential for slowing tumor progression (adenomatous polyp to adenocarcinoma by BB.

  8. A probiotic strain of L. acidophilus reduces DMH-induced large intestinal tumors in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, G H; Royle, P J; Playne, M J

    1999-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria strains were examined for their influence on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced intestinal tumors in 100 male Sprague-Dawley rats. Lactobacillus acidophilus (Delvo Pro LA-1), Lactobacillus rhamnosus (GG), Bifidobacterium animalis (CSCC1941), and Streptococcus thermophilus (DD145) strains were examined for their influence when added as freeze-dried bacteria to an experimental diet based on a high-fat semipurified (AIN-93) rodent diet. Four bacterial treatments were compared: L. acidophilus, L. acidophilus + B. animalis, L. rhamnosus, and S. thermophilus, the bacteria being added daily at 1% freeze-dried weight (10(10) colony-forming units/g) to the diet. Trends were observed in the incidence of rats with large intestinal tumors for three treatments: 25% lower than control for L. acidophilus, 20% lower for L. acidophilus + B. animalis and L. rhamnosus treatments, and 10% lower for S. thermophilus. Large intestinal tumor burden was significantly lower for treated rats with L. acidophilus than for the control group (10 and 3 tumors/treatment group, respectively, p = 0.05). Large intestinal tumor mass index was also lower for the L. acidophilus treatment than for control (1.70 and 0.10, respectively, p L. acidophilus, no adenocarcinomas were present in the colons. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of bacterial chromosomal DNA fragments was used to differentiate introduced (exogenous) bacterial strains from indigenous bacteria of the same genera present in the feces. Survival during gut passage and displacement of indigenous lactobacilli occurred with introduced L. acidophilus and L. rhamnosus GG during the probiotic treatment period. However, introduced strains of B. animalis and S. thermophilus were not able to be isolated from feces. It is concluded that this strain of L. acidophilus supplied as freeze-dried bacteria in the diet was protective, as seen by a small but significant inhibition of tumors within the rat colon.

  9. Maltitol inhibits small intestinal glucose absorption and increases insulin mediated muscle glucose uptake ex vivo but not in normal and type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwuma, Chika Ifeanyi; Ibrahim, Mohammed Auwal; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of maltitol on intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake using ex vivo and in vivo experimental models. The ex vivo experiment was conducted in isolated jejunum and psoas muscle from normal rats. The in vivo study investigated the effects of a single bolus dose of maltitol on gastric emptying, intestinal glucose absorption and digesta transit in normal and type 2 diabetic rats. Maltitol inhibited glucose absorption in isolated rat jejunum and increased glucose uptake in isolated rat psoas muscle in the presence of insulin but not in the absence of insulin. In contrast, maltitol did not significantly (p > 0.05) alter small intestinal glucose absorption or blood glucose levels as well as gastric emptying and digesta transit in normal or type 2 diabetic rats. The results suggest that maltitol may not be a suitable dietary supplement for anti-diabetic food and food products to improve glycemic control.

  10. Functional Comparison for Lipid Metabolism and Intestinal and Fecal Microflora Enzyme Activities between Low Molecular Weight Chitosan and Chitosan Oligosaccharide in High-Fat-Diet-Fed Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chen-Yuan; Feng, Shih-An; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Chiang, Meng-Tsan

    2017-07-24

    The present study investigated and compared the regulatory effects on the lipid-related metabolism and intestinal disaccharidase/fecal bacterial enzyme activities between low molecular weight chitosan and chitosan oligosaccharide in high-fat-diet-fed rats. Diet supplementation of low molecular weight chitosan showed greater efficiency than chitosan oligosaccharide in suppressing the increased weights in body and in liver and adipose tissues of high-fat-diet-fed rats. Supplementation of low molecular weight chitosan also showed a greater improvement than chitosan oligosaccharide in imbalance of plasma, hepatic, and fecal lipid profiles, and intestinal disaccharidase activities in high-fat-diet-fed rats. Moreover, both low molecular weight chitosan and chitosan oligosaccharide significantly decreased the fecal microflora mucinase and β-glucuronidase activities in high-fat-diet-fed rats. These results suggest that low molecular weight chitosan exerts a greater positive improvement than chitosan oligosaccharide in lipid metabolism and intestinal disaccharidase activity in high-fat-diet-induced obese rats.

  11. Intestinal mucosal mast cells from rats infected with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis contain protease-resistant chondroitin sulfate di-B proteoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, R.L.; Lee, T.D.G.; Seldin, D.C.; Austen, K.F.; Befus, A.D.; Bienenstock, J.

    1986-01-01

    Rats infected with the helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were injected i.p. with 2 mCi of [ 35 S] sulfate on days 13, 15, 17, and 19 after infection. The intestines were removed from animals on day 20 or 21 after infection, the intestinal cells were obtained by collagenase treatment and mechanical dispersion of the tissue, and the 35 S-labeled mucosal mast cells (MMC) were enriched to 60 to 65% purity by Percoll centrifugation. The isolated proteoglycans were of approx. 150,000 m.w., were resistant to pronase degradation, and contained highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate side chains. The presence in normal mammalian cells of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that contain a high percentage of the unusual disulfated di-B disaccharide has not been previously reported. The rat intestinal MMC proteoglycans are the first chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that have been isolated from an enriched populations of normal mast cells. They are homologous to the chondroitin sulfate-rich proteoglycans of the transformed rat basophilic leumekia-1 cell and the cultured interleukin 3-dependent mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell, in that these chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans are all highly sulfated, protease-resistant proteoglycans

  12. Maternal administration of cannabidiol promotes an anti-inflammatory effect on the intestinal wall in a gastroschisis rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.H. Callejas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastroschisis (GS is an abdominal wall defect that results in histological and morphological changes leading to intestinal motility perturbation and impaired absorption of nutrients. Due to its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and neuroprotective effects, cannabidiol (CBD has been used as a therapeutic agent in many diseases. Our aim was to test the effect of maternal CBD in the intestine of an experimental model of GS. Pregnant rats were treated over 3 days with CBD (30 mg/kg after the surgical induction of GS (day 18.5 of gestation and compared to controls. Fetuses were divided into 4 groups: 1 control (C; 2 C+CBD (CCBD; 3 gastroschisis (G, and 4 G+CBD (GCBD. On day 21.5 of gestation, the fetuses were harvested and evaluated for: a body weight (BW, intestinal weight (IW, and IW/BW ratio; b histometric analysis of the intestinal wall; c immunohistochemically analysis of inflammation (iNOS and nitrite/nitrate level. BW: GCBD was lower than CCBD (P<0.005, IW and IW/BW ratio: GCBD was smaller than G (P<0.005, GCBD presented lower thickness in all parameters compared to G (P<0.005, iNOS and nitrite/nitrate were lower concentration in GCBD than to G (P<0.005. Maternal use of CBD had a beneficial effect on the intestinal loops of GS with decreased nitrite/nitrate and iNOS expression.

  13. Enteral intestinal alkaline phosphatase administration in newborns decreases iNOS expression in a neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentea, Rebecca M; Liedel, Jennifer L; Fredrich, Katherine; Pritchard, Kirkwood; Oldham, Keith T; Simpson, Pippa M; Gourlay, David M

    2013-01-01

    To determine if intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) decreases intestinal injury resulting from experimentally induced necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). We hypothesized that IAP administration prevents the initial development of NEC related intestinal inflammation. Pre- and full-term newborn Sprague-Dawley rat pups were sacrificed on day 1 of life. Pre-term pups were exposed to intermittent hypoxia and formula containing LPS to induce NEC. Select NEC pups were given 40, 4 or 0.4 units/kg of bovine IAP (NEC+IAP40u, IAP4u or IAP0.4u) enterally, once daily. Ileal sections were evaluated by real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) for IAP, iNOS, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α mRNA and immunofluorescence for 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT). Experimentally induced NEC decreased IAP mRNA expression by 66% (p ≤ 0.001). IAP supplementation increased IAP mRNA expression to control. Supplemental enteral IAP decreased nitrosative stress as measured by iNOS mRNA expression and 3-NT staining in the NEC stressed pups (p ≤ 0.01), as well as decreased intestinal TNF-α mRNA expression. In addition, IAP decreased LSP translocation into the serum in the treated pups. We conclude that enterally administered IAP prevents NEC-related intestinal injury and inflammation. Enteral IAP may prove a useful strategy in the prevention of NEC in preterm neonates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Increased oral AUC of baicalin in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats due to the increased activity of intestinal beta-glucuronidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Deng, Yuan-Xiong; Liang, Yan; Pang, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Yao-Wu; Yang, Jian-Song; Xie, Lin; Wang, Guang-Ji

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of baicalin, a major bioactive component of Scutellariae radix, in diabetic conditions. The 4-week diabetic rats were induced by intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin. Plasma concentrations of baicalin were measured following oral (200 mg/kg) or intravenous (12 mg/kg) administration. Everted intestinal transport, intestinal mucosal metabolism of baicalin and intestinal beta-glucuronidase activity were also investigated. It was found that the diabetic condition significantly increased the exposure of baicalin following oral doses (AUC 100.77 +/- 4.16 microg x h/mL in diabetic rats vs. 48.48 +/- 7.94 microg x h/mL in normal rats). In contrast, the diabetic condition significantly decreased the exposure of baicalin following intravenous doses (AUC 11.20 +/- 2.28 microg x h/mL in diabetic rats vs. 18.02 +/- 3.45 microg x h/mL in normal rats). We also found lower apparent permeability coefficients of baicalin in the ileum of diabetic rats (8.43 x 10 (-6) +/- 2.40 x 10 (-6) cm/s in diabetic rats vs. 5.21 x 10 (-5) +/- 1.55 x 10 (-5) cm/s in normal rats). Further studies showed that the diabetic condition enhanced the hydrolysis of baicalin to baicalein in intestinal mucosal, accompanied by an increase of beta-glucuronidase activity. All these results suggested that the higher oral exposure of baicalin in diabetic rats did not result from the decreased hepatic metabolism or increased intestinal absorption of baicalin. The enhancement of intestinal beta-glucuronidase activity may partly account for the higher exposure of baicalin in diabetic rats after oral administration. Copyright Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York.

  15. Reduced Ischemia-Reoxygenation Injury in Rat Intestine After Luminal Preservation With a Tailored Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roskott, A.M.; Nieuwenhuijs, V.B.; Leuvenink, H.G.D.; Dijkstra, G.; Ottens, P.; de Jager, M.H.; Pereira, P.G.D.; Fidler, V.; Groothuis, G.M.M.; Ploeg, R.J.; de Graaf, I.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background. The intestine is extremely sensitive to ischemic preservation and reoxygenation injury. Current vascular perfusion and cold storage with University of Wisconsin (UW) solution neglect the intestinal lumen and the ongoing mucosal metabolism during hypothermia. This study was designed to

  16. Resveratrol efficiently improves pulmonary function via stabilizing mast cells in a rat intestinal injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Weicheng; Hu, Dan; Han, Xue; Wang, Hanbin; Yang, Jianyu; Xu, Yang; Li, Yuantao; Yao, Weifeng; Chen, Chaojin

    2017-09-15

    Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (IIR) leads to acute lung injury (ALI) distally by aggravating pulmonary oxidative stress. Resveratrol is effective in attenuating ALI through its antioxidant capacity. This study aimed to determine the effects of resveratrol on IIR-induced ALI and to explore the role of mast cells (MCs) activation in a rat model of IIR. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to IIR by occluding the superior mesenteric artery for 60min followed by 4-hour reperfusion. Resveratrol was intraperitoneally injected at a dose of 15mg/kg for 5days before IIR. MCs stabilizer/inhibitor cromolyn sodium and degranulator compound 48/80 were used to explore the interaction between resveratrol and MCs. Lung tissues were collected for pathological detection and MCs staining. Pulmonary protein expression of surfactant protein-C (SP-C), tryptase, p47 phox and gp91 phox (two NADPH oxidase subunits), ICAM-1(intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and P-selectin were detected. The levels of oxidative stress markers (SOD, MDA, H 2 O 2 and MPO) and β-hexosaminidase were also measured. At the end of IIR, lung injury was significantly increased and was associated with decreased expression of SP-C and increased lung oxidative stress. Increased inflammation as well as activation of MCs was also observed in the lungs after IIR. All these changes were prevented or reversed by resveratrol pretreatment or MCs inhibition with cromolyn sodium. However, these protective effects of resveratrol or cromolyn sodium were reduced by MCs degranulator compound 48/80. These findings reveal that resveratrol attenuates IIR-induced ALI by reducing NADPH oxidase protein expression and inflammation through stabilizing MCs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Transcriptomic Analysis of Intestinal Tissues from Two 90-Day Feeding Studies in Rats Using Genetically Modified MON810 Maize Varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutta Sharbati

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Global as well as specific expression profiles of selected rat tissues were characterized to assess the safety of genetically modified (GM maize MON810 containing the insecticidal protein Cry1Ab. Gene expression was evaluated by use of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS as well as RT-qPCR within rat intestinal tissues based on mandatory 90-day rodent feeding studies. In parallel to two 90-day feeding studies, the transcriptional response of rat tissues was assessed as another endpoint to enhance the mechanistic interpretation of GM feeding studies and/or to facilitate the generation of a targeted hypothesis. Rats received diets containing 33% GM maize (MON810 or near-isogenic control maize. As a site of massive exposure to ingested feed the transcriptomic response of ileal and colonic tissue was profiled via RT-qPCR arrays targeting apoptosis, DNA-damage/repair, unfolded protein response (UPR. For global RNA profiling of rat ileal tissue, we applied NGS.Results: No biological response to the GM-diet was observed in male and in female rat tissues. Transcriptome wide analysis of gene expression by RNA-seq confirmed these findings. Nevertheless, gene ontology (GO analysis clearly associated a set of distinctly regulated transcripts with circadian rhythms. We confirmed differential expression of circadian clock genes using RT-qPCR and immunoassays for selected factors, thereby indicating physiological effects caused by the time point of sampling.Conclusion: Prediction of potential unintended effects of GM-food/feed by transcriptome based profiling of intestinal tissue presents a novel approach to complement classical toxicological testing procedures. Including the detection of alterations in signaling pathways in toxicity testing procedures may enhance the confidence in outcomes of toxicological trials. In this study, no significant GM-related changes in intestinal expression profiles were found in rats fed GM-maize MON810. Relevant

  18. Transcriptomic Analysis of Intestinal Tissues from Two 90-Day Feeding Studies in Rats Using Genetically Modified MON810 Maize Varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharbati, Jutta; Bohmer, Marc; Bohmer, Nils; Keller, Andreas; Backes, Christina; Franke, Andre; Steinberg, Pablo; Zeljenková, Dagmar; Einspanier, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Background: Global as well as specific expression profiles of selected rat tissues were characterized to assess the safety of genetically modified (GM) maize MON810 containing the insecticidal protein Cry1Ab. Gene expression was evaluated by use of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) as well as RT-qPCR within rat intestinal tissues based on mandatory 90-day rodent feeding studies. In parallel to two 90-day feeding studies, the transcriptional response of rat tissues was assessed as another endpoint to enhance the mechanistic interpretation of GM feeding studies and/or to facilitate the generation of a targeted hypothesis. Rats received diets containing 33% GM maize (MON810) or near-isogenic control maize. As a site of massive exposure to ingested feed the transcriptomic response of ileal and colonic tissue was profiled via RT-qPCR arrays targeting apoptosis, DNA-damage/repair, unfolded protein response (UPR). For global RNA profiling of rat ileal tissue, we applied NGS. Results: No biological response to the GM-diet was observed in male and in female rat tissues. Transcriptome wide analysis of gene expression by RNA-seq confirmed these findings. Nevertheless, gene ontology (GO) analysis clearly associated a set of distinctly regulated transcripts with circadian rhythms. We confirmed differential expression of circadian clock genes using RT-qPCR and immunoassays for selected factors, thereby indicating physiological effects caused by the time point of sampling. Conclusion: Prediction of potential unintended effects of GM-food/feed by transcriptome based profiling of intestinal tissue presents a novel approach to complement classical toxicological testing procedures. Including the detection of alterations in signaling pathways in toxicity testing procedures may enhance the confidence in outcomes of toxicological trials. In this study, no significant GM-related changes in intestinal expression profiles were found in rats fed GM-maize MON810. Relevant alterations of

  19. Influence of Camembert consumption on the composition and metabolism of intestinal microbiota: a study in human microbiota-associated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Christophe; Sutren, Malène; Lepercq, Pascale; Juste, Catherine; Rigottier-Gois, Lionel; Lhoste, Evelyne; Lemée, Riwanon; Le Ruyet, Pascale; Doré, Joël; Andrieux, Claude

    2004-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the consequence of Camembert consumption on the composition and metabolism of human intestinal microbiota. Camembert cheese was compared with milk fermented by yoghurt starters and Lactobacillus casei as a probiotic reference. The experimental model was the human microbiota-associated (HM) rat. HM rats were fed a basal diet (HMB group), a diet containing Camembert made from pasteurised milk (HMCp group) or a diet containing fermented milk (HMfm group). The level of micro-organisms from dairy products was measured in faeces using cultures on a specific medium and PCR-temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis. The metabolic characteristics of the caecal microbiota were also studied: SCFA, NH3, glycosidase and reductase activities, and bile acid degradations. The results showed that micro-organisms from cheese comprised 10(5)-10(8) bacteria/g faecal sample in the HMCp group. Lactobacillus species from fermented milk were detected in HMfm rats. Consumption of cheese and fermented milk led to similar changes in bacterial metabolism: a decrease in azoreductase activity and NH3 concentration and an increase in mucolytic activities. However, specific changes were observed: in HMCp rats, the proportion of ursodeoxycholic resulting from chenodeoxycholic epimerisation was higher; in HMfm rats, alpha and beta-galactosidases were higher than in other groups and both azoreductases and nitrate reductases were lower. The results show that, as for fermented milk, Camembert consumption did not greatly modify the microbiota profile or its major metabolic activities. Ingested micro-organisms were able to survive in part during intestinal transit. These dairy products exert a potentially beneficial influence on intestinal metabolism.

  20. Symbiotic formulation in experimentally induced liver fibrosis in rats: intestinal microbiota as a key point to treat liver damage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Argenio, Giuseppe; Cariello, Rita; Tuccillo, Concetta; Mazzone, Giovanna; Federico, Alessandro; Funaro, Annalisa; De Magistris, Laura; Grossi, Enzo; Callegari, Maria L; Chirico, Marilena; Caporaso, Nicola; Romano, Marco; Morelli, Lorenzo; Loguercio, Carmela

    2013-05-01

    Evidence indicates that intestinal microbiota may participate in both the induction and the progression of liver damage. The aim of our research was the detection and evaluation of the effects of chronic treatment with a symbiotic formulation on CCl4 -induced rat liver fibrosis. CCl4 significantly increased gastric permeability in respect to basal values, and the treatment with symbiotic significantly decreased it. CCl4 per se induced a decrease in intestinal permeability. This effect was also seen in fibrotic rats treated with symbiotic and was still evident when normal rats were treated with symbiotic alone (P symbiotic treatment normalized the plasma levels of TNF-α and significantly enhanced anti-inflammatory cytokine IL 10. TNF-α, TGF-β, TLR4, TLR2, iNOS and α-SMA mRNA expression in the liver were up-regulated in rats with CCl4 -induced liver fibrosis and down-regulated by symbiotic treatment. Moreover, IL-10 and eNOS mRNA levels were increased in the CCL4 (+) symbiotic group. Symbiotic treatment of fibrotic rats normalized serum ALT, AST and improved histology and liver collagen deposition. DGGE analysis of faecal samples revealed that CCl4 administration and symbiotic treatment either alone or in combination produced modifications in faecal profiles vs controls. Our results provide evidence that in CCl4 -induced liver fibrosis, significant changes in gastro-intestinal permeability and in faecal flora occur. Treatment with a specific symbiotic formulation significantly affects these changes, leading to improvement in both liver inflammation and fibrosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Ciprofloxacin blocked enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated NSAID-induced enteropathy in rats partly by inhibiting intestinal β-glucuronidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ze-Yu; Sun, Bin-Bin; Shu, Nan; Xie, Qiu-Shi; Tang, Xian-Ge; Ling, Zhao-Li; Wang, Fan; Zhao, Kai-Jing; Xu, Ping; Zhang, Mian; Li, Ying; Chen, Yang; Liu, Li; Xia, Lun-Zhu; Liu, Xiao-Dong

    2016-07-01

    Diclofenac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which may cause serious intestinal adverse reactions (enteropathy). In this study we investigated whether co-administration of ciprofloxacin affected the pharmacokinetics of diclofenac and diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats. The pharmacokinetics of diclofenac was assessed in rats after receiving diclofenac (10 mg/kg, ig, or 5 mg/kg, iv), with or without ciprofloxacin (20 mg/kg, ig) co-administered. After receiving 6 oral doses or 15 intravenous doses of diclofenac, the rats were sacrificed, and small intestine was removed to examine diclofenac-induced enteropathy. β-Glucuronidase activity in intestinal content, bovine liver and E coli was evaluated. Following oral or intravenous administration, the pharmacokinetic profile of diclofenac displayed typical enterohepatic circulation, and co-administration of ciprofloxacin abolished the enterohepatic circulation, resulted in significant reduction in the plasma content of diclofenac. In control rats, β-glucuronidase activity in small intestinal content was region-dependent: proximal intestinediclofenac, typical enteropathy was developed with severe enteropathy occurred in distal small intestine. Co-administration of ciprofloxacin significantly alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy. Co-administration of ciprofloxacin attenuated enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats, partly via the inhibition of intestinal β-glucuronidase activity.

  2. Ciprofloxacin blocked enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated NSAID-induced enteropathy in rats partly by inhibiting intestinal β-glucuronidase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ze-yu; Sun, Bin-bin; Shu, Nan; Xie, Qiu-shi; Tang, Xian-ge; Ling, Zhao-li; Wang, Fan; Zhao, Kai-jing; Xu, Ping; Zhang, Mian; Li, Ying; Chen, Yang; Liu, Li; Xia, Lun-zhu; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Diclofenac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which may cause serious intestinal adverse reactions (enteropathy). In this study we investigated whether co-administration of ciprofloxacin affected the pharmacokinetics of diclofenac and diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats. Methods: The pharmacokinetics of diclofenac was assessed in rats after receiving diclofenac (10 mg/kg, ig, or 5 mg/kg, iv), with or without ciprofloxacin (20 mg/kg, ig) co-administered. After receiving 6 oral doses or 15 intravenous doses of diclofenac, the rats were sacrificed, and small intestine was removed to examine diclofenac-induced enteropathy. β-Glucuronidase activity in intestinal content, bovine liver and E coli was evaluated. Results: Following oral or intravenous administration, the pharmacokinetic profile of diclofenac displayed typical enterohepatic circulation, and co-administration of ciprofloxacin abolished the enterohepatic circulation, resulted in significant reduction in the plasma content of diclofenac. In control rats, β-glucuronidase activity in small intestinal content was region-dependent: proximal intestinediclofenac, typical enteropathy was developed with severe enteropathy occurred in distal small intestine. Co-administration of ciprofloxacin significantly alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy. Conclusion: Co-administration of ciprofloxacin attenuated enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats, partly via the inhibition of intestinal β-glucuronidase activity. PMID:27180979

  3. Electroacupuncture Inhibits Inflammation Reaction by Upregulating Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide in Rats with Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Feng He

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is emerging as an alternative therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this beneficial effect of acupuncture has not been fully understood. Here, we demonstrated that electroacupuncture at acupoints Zusanli (ST36, Xuanzhong (GB39; and Shenshu (BL23 markedly decreased the paw swelling and the histologic scores of inflammation in the synovial tissue, and reduced the body weight loss in an adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model. However, the electrical stimulation at nonacupoint did not produce any beneficial effects against the experimental arthritis. Most interestingly, the electroacupuncture treatment resulted in an enhanced immunostaining for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, a potent anti-inflammatory neuropeptide, in the synovial tissue. Moreover, the VIP-immunostaining intensity was significantly negatively correlated with the scores of inflammation in the synovial tissue (r=−0.483, P=.0026. In conclusion, these findings suggest that electroacupuncture may offer therapeutic benefits for the treatment of RA, at least partially through the induction of VIP expression.

  4. Assessment of in Vitro Digestibility of Dietary Carbohydrates Using Rat Small Intestinal Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Lazarte, Alvaro; Olano, Agustín; Villamiel, Mar; Moreno, F Javier

    2017-09-13

    There are few studies on the assessment of digestibility of nondigestible carbohydrates, despite their increasingly important role in human health. In vitro digestibility of a range of dietary carbohydrates classified as digestible (maltose, sucrose, and lactose), well-recognized (lactulose, fructooligosaccharides (FOS), and two types of galactooligosaccharides (GOS) differing in the predominant glycosidic linkage), and potential (lactosucrose and GOS from lactulose, OsLu) prebiotics using a rat small intestinal extract (RSIE) under physiological conditions of temperature and pH is described. Recognized and potential prebiotics were highly resistant to RSIE digestion although partial hydrolysis at different extents was observed. FOS and lactulose were the most resistant to digestion, followed closely by OsLu and more distantly by both types of GOS and lactosucrose. In GOS, β(1 → 6) linkages were more resistant to digestion than β(1 → 4) bonds. The reported in vitro digestion model is a useful, simple, and cost-effective tool to evaluate the digestibility of dietary oligosaccharides.

  5. Radiation effects on diamine oxidase activities in intestine and plasma of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ely, M.J.; Speicher, J.M.; Snyder, S.L.; Catravas, G.N.

    1985-01-01

    Diamine oxidase (DAO; EC 1.4.3.6) activity was measured in plasma and ileal tissue homogenates prepared from male Sprague-Dawley rats sacrificed at 1-15 days after acute whole-body irradiation with 14.5-MeV electrons. Animals irradiated with 1 Gy showed no significant changes in plasma and ileal DAO activities through day 13 relative to nonirradiated controls. Animals irradiated with 5, 10 and 12 Gy displayed marked declines in ileal DAO, with levels reaching a nadir on day 3. This was paralleled by a decrease in plasma DAO activity in all three dose groups. Recovery of ileal and plasma DAO levels was later seen as early as day 4 in animals irradiated with 5 and 10 Gy doses, but animals receiving 12 Gy did not survive beyond day 3. A further study highlights the relationship between radiation dose and levels of plasma and mucosal DAO on day 3, the time of maximum decrease at all doses tested. Mucosal DAO activity decreased almost linearly with doses up to 6 Gy. Plasma DAO levels closely paralleled the dose dependency of the mucosal levels. These data suggest that plasma DAO activity might be useful as a readily measurable marker of intestinal epithelial injury and recovery after acute radiation exposure

  6. [The role of nitric oxide on the dysfunction of intestinal motility in rats subjected to hemorrhagic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-ping; Wang, Xiao-rong; Zhao, Xiao-qi; Qiao, Hai-xia

    2013-09-01

    To determine the role of nitric oxide (NO) in intestinal motility dysfunction in rats subjected to hemorrhagic shock (HS). Sixteen male Wistar rats were randomly and equally divided into two groups. The HS model of rat was induced by bleeding from femoral artery. After animal models were made, different inducers were added, and duodenum samples were harvested for the determination of contractile response to acetylcholine (ACh) in vitro, activities of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), contents of NO in tissue, and morphological changes. The spontaneous contraction of intestinal smooth muscle and contractile response induced by ACh were significantly decreased at 180 minutes in HS group, compared with control group, the contractile response induced by ACh of intestinal smooth muscle was decreased by almost 60% (0.40±0.11 g×mm(-2)×s(-1) vs. 1.00±0.20 g×mm(-2)×s(-1), Phydrochloride (L-NAME) could significantly restore the suppressed contractile response of smooth muscle strips obtained from HS rats (0.97±0.25 vs. 0.40±0.11, P0.05). Compared with those of control group, iNOS activities (2.295±0.310 U/g vs. 1.319±0.322 U/g) and NO contents (2.880±0.353 μmol/g vs. 1.505±0.387 μmol/g) in duodenum of HS rats were both significantly increased (both P<0.01). Under light microscopy, the most significant morphological change in duodenum following HS was the infiltration of obvious inflammatory cells. The NO produced by the overexpression of iNOS induced by HS involves in the motility dysfunction of intestine through the mechanism of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) system. Moreover, NO-mediated infiltration of inflammatory cells in tissue may also contribute to the development of motility dysfunction of intestine following HS.

  7. MiR-144 Increases Intestinal Permeability in IBS-D Rats by Targeting OCLN and ZO1

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    Qiuke Hou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea (IBS-D is a chronic, functional bowel disorder characterized by abdominal pain or diarrhoea and altered bowel habits, which correlate with intestinal hyperpermeability. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are involved in regulating intestinal permeability in IBS-D. However, the role of miRNAs in regulating intestinal permeability and protecting the epithelial barrier remains unclear. Our goals were to (i identify differential expression of miRNAs and their targets in the distal colon of IBS-D rats; (ii verify in vitro whether occludin (OCLN and zonula occludens 1 (ZO1/TJP1 were direct targets of miR-144 and were down-regulated in IBS-D rats; and (iii determine whether down-regulation of miR-144 in vitro could reverse the pathological hallmarks of intestinal hyperpermeability via targeting OCLN and ZO1. Methods: The IBS-D rat model was established using 4% acetic acid and evaluated by haematoxylin-eosin (HE staining. The distal colon was obtained in order to perform miRNA microarray analysis and to isolate and culture colonic epithelial cells. When differential expression of miRNA was found, the results were verified by qRT-PCR, and the target genes were further explored by bioinformatics analysis. Correlation analyses were carried out to compare the expression of miRNA and target genes. Then, mutants, miRNA mimics and inhibitors of the target genes were constructed and transfected to colonic epithelial cells. qRT-PCR, western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs and dual-luciferase assays were used to investigate the expression of miR-144 and OCLN, ZO1 in IBS-D rats. Results: There were 8 up-regulated and 18 down-regulated miRNAs identified in the IBS-D rat model. Of these, miR-144 was markedly up-regulated and resulted in the down-regulation of OCLN and ZO1 expression. Overexpression of miR-144 by transfection of miR-144 precursor markedly inhibited the expression of OCLN and ZO1. Further

  8. Dysbiosis of Intestinal Microbiota and Decreased Antimicrobial Peptide Level in Paneth Cells during Hypertriglyceridemia-Related Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis in Rats

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    Chunlan Huang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG aggravates the course of acute pancreatitis (AP. Intestinal barrier dysfunction is implicated in the pathogenesis of AP during which dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota contributes to the dysfunction in intestinal barrier. However, few studies focus on the changes in intestine during HTG-related acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP. Here, we investigated the changes in intestinal microbiota and Paneth cell antimicrobial peptides (AMPs in HTG-related ANP (HANP in rats. Rats fed a high-fat diet to induce HTG and ANP was induced by retrograde injection of 3.5% sodium taurocholate into biliopancreatic duct. Rats were sacrificed at 24 and 48 h, respectively. Pancreatic and ileal injuries were evaluated by histological scores. Intestinal barrier function was assessed by plasma diamine oxidase activity and D-lactate level. Systemic and intestinal inflammation was evaluated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, interleukin (IL-1β, and IL-17A expression. 16S rRNA high throughput sequencing was used to investigate changes in intestinal microbiota diversity and structure. AMPs (α-defensin5 and lysozyme expression was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR and immunofluorescence. The results showed that compared with those of normal-lipid ANP (NANP groups, the HANP groups had more severe histopathological injuries in pancreas and distal ileum, aggravated intestinal barrier dysfunction and increased TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-17A expression in plasma and distal ileum. Principal component analysis showed structural segregation between the HANP and NANP group. α-Diversity estimators in the HANP group revealed decreased microbiota diversity compared with that in NANP group. Taxonomic analysis showed dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota structure. In the HANP group, at phyla level, Candidatus_Saccharibacteria and Tenericutes decreased significantly, whereas Actinobacteria increased. At genus level, Allobaculum, Bifidobacterium

  9. Role of ceftazidime dose regimen on the selection of resistant Enterobacter cloacae in the intestinal flora of rats treated for an experimental pulmonary infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); J.W. Mouton (Johan); M.T. ten Kate (Marian); A.J. Bijl; A. Ott (Alewijn); I.A.J.M. Bakker-Woudenberg (Irma)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: The effect of ceftazidime dosing increments and frequency of dosing on the selection of ceftazidime-resistant Enterobacter cloacae in the intestine was studied in rats, during treatment of a pulmonary infection caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae. Methods: Rats with pulmonary

  10. EFFECTS ON THE FETAL RAT INTESTINE OF MATERNAL MALNUTRITION AND EXPOSURE TO NITROFEN (2,4-DICHLOROPHENYL-P-NITROPHENYL ETHER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of maternal protein-energy malnutrition and exposure to nitrofen on selected aspects of intestinal morphology and function were studied in the fetal rat. Pregnant rats were fed, throughout gestation, diets containing 24% or 6% casein as the sole source of protein. Red...

  11. Changes in Enteric Neurons of Small Intestine in a Rat Model of Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan; Fei, Guijun; Fang, Xiucai; Yang, Xilin; Sun, Xiaohong; Qian, Jiaming; Wood, Jackie D; Ke, Meiyun

    2016-04-30

    Physical and/or emotional stresses are important factors in the exacerbation of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Several lines of evidence support that a major impact of stress on the gastrointestinal tract occurs via the enteric nervous system. We aimed to evaluate histological changes in the submucosal plexus (SMP) and myenteric plexus (MP) of the distal ileum in concert with the intestinal motor function in a rat model of IBS with diarrhea. The rat model was induced by heterotypic chronic and acute stress (CAS). The intestinal transit was measured by administering powdered carbon by gastric gavage. Double immunohistochemical fluorescence staining with whole-mount preparations of SMP and MP of enteric nervous system was used to assess changes in expression of choline acetyltransferase, vasoactive intestinal peptide, or nitric oxide synthase in relation to the pan neuronal marker, anti-Hu. The intestinal transit ratio increased significantly from control values of 50.8% to 60.6% in the CAS group. The numbers of enteric ganglia and neurons in the SMP were increased in the CAS group. The proportions of choline acetyltransferase- and vasoactive intestinal peptide-immunoreactive neurons in the SMP were increased (82.1 ± 4.3% vs. 76.0 ± 5.0%, P = 0.021; 40.5 ± 5.9% vs 28.9 ± 3.7%, P = 0.001), while nitric oxide synthase-immunoreactive neurons in the MP were decreased compared with controls (23.3 ± 4.5% vs 32.4 ± 4.5%, P = 0.002). These morphological changes in enteric neurons to CAS might contribute to the dysfunction in motility and secretion in IBS with diarrhea.

  12. Nopal feeding reduces adiposity, intestinal inflammation and shifts the cecal microbiota and metabolism in high-fat fed rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Moran-Ramos

    Full Text Available Nopal is a cactus plant widely consumed in Mexico that has been used in traditional medicine to aid in the treatment of type-2 diabetes. We previously showed that chronic consumption of dehydrated nopal ameliorated hepatic steatosis in obese (fa/fa rats; however, description of the effects on other tissues is sparse. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of nopal cladode consumption on intestinal physiology, microbial community structure, adipose tissue, and serum biochemistry in diet-induced obese rats. Rats were fed either a normal fat (NF diet or a HF diet containing 4% of dietary fiber from either nopal or cellulose for 6 weeks. Consumption of nopal counteracted HF-induced adiposity and adipocyte hypertrophy, and induced profound changes in intestinal physiology. Nopal consumption reduced biomarkers of intestinal inflammation (mRNA expression of IL-6 and oxidative stress (ROS, modfied gut microbiota composition, increasing microbial diversity and cecal fermentation (SCFA, and altered the serum metabolome. Interestingly, metabolomic analysis of dehydrated nopal revealed a high choline content, which appeared to generate high levels of serum betaine, that correlated negatively with hepatic triglyceride (TAG levels. A parallel decrease in some of the taxa associated with the production of trimethylamine, suggest an increase in choline absorption and bioavailability with transformation to betaine. The latter may partially explain the previously observed effect of nopal on the development of hepatic steatosis. In conclusion, this study provides new evidence on the effects of nopal consumption on normal and HF-diet induced changes in the intestine, the liver and systemic metabolism.

  13. Nopal feeding reduces adiposity, intestinal inflammation and shifts the cecal microbiota and metabolism in high-fat fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran-Ramos, Sofia; He, Xuan; Chin, Elizabeth L; Tovar, Armando R; Torres, Nimbe; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Raybould, Helen E

    2017-01-01

    Nopal is a cactus plant widely consumed in Mexico that has been used in traditional medicine to aid in the treatment of type-2 diabetes. We previously showed that chronic consumption of dehydrated nopal ameliorated hepatic steatosis in obese (fa/fa) rats; however, description of the effects on other tissues is sparse. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of nopal cladode consumption on intestinal physiology, microbial community structure, adipose tissue, and serum biochemistry in diet-induced obese rats. Rats were fed either a normal fat (NF) diet or a HF diet containing 4% of dietary fiber from either nopal or cellulose for 6 weeks. Consumption of nopal counteracted HF-induced adiposity and adipocyte hypertrophy, and induced profound changes in intestinal physiology. Nopal consumption reduced biomarkers of intestinal inflammation (mRNA expression of IL-6) and oxidative stress (ROS), modfied gut microbiota composition, increasing microbial diversity and cecal fermentation (SCFA), and altered the serum metabolome. Interestingly, metabolomic analysis of dehydrated nopal revealed a high choline content, which appeared to generate high levels of serum betaine, that correlated negatively with hepatic triglyceride (TAG) levels. A parallel decrease in some of the taxa associated with the production of trimethylamine, suggest an increase in choline absorption and bioavailability with transformation to betaine. The latter may partially explain the previously observed effect of nopal on the development of hepatic steatosis. In conclusion, this study provides new evidence on the effects of nopal consumption on normal and HF-diet induced changes in the intestine, the liver and systemic metabolism.

  14. Arginine, N-carbamylglutamate, and glutamine exert protective effects against oxidative stress in rat intestine

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    Liang Xiao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current study is to evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation with arginine (ARG, N-carbamylglutamate (NCG, and glutamine (GLN on rat intestinal morphology and antioxidant status under oxidative stress. Rats were fed for 30 d with one of the following iso-nitrogenous diets: basal diet (BD, BD plus 1% ARG, BD plus 0.1% NCG, and BD plus 1% GLN. On day 28, half of the rats fed BD were intraperitoneally injected with 12 mg/kg body weight of diquat (DT; i.e., the DT group and the other half was intraperitoneally injected with sterile solution (i.e., the control group. The other diet groups were intraperitoneally injected with 12 mg/kg body weight of DT (i.e., DT + 1% GLN [DT + GLN], DT + 1% ARG [DT + ARG], and DT + 0.1% NCG [DT + NCG]. Rat jejunum samples obtained at 48 h after DT injection were analyzed. Results showed that DT significantly decreased catalase (CAT activity and glutathione (GSH content by 58.25% and 56.57%, respectively, and elevated malondialdehyde (MDA content and crypt depth (CD by 19.39% and 22.13%, respectively, in the jejunum (P < 0.05, relative to the control group. Compared with the DT group, the DT + GLN group exhibited significantly improved villus height (VH, villus width (VW, villus surface area (VSA, CD and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC activity (P < 0.05; the DT + ARG group exhibited significantly increased the ratio of VH to CD (H:D and T-AOC activity (P < 0.05; the DT + GLN, DT + ARG and DT + NCG groups exhibited significantly enhanced CAT activity and GSH content as well as decreased MDA content (P < 0.05. Moreover, VH, VW, VSA, CD and GSH content in the DT + GLN group were higher whereas MDA content was lower compared with the corresponding values observed in both the DT + ARG and the DT + NCG groups (P < 0.05. The H:D ratio in the DT + ARG group significantly increased compared with that in the DT + NCG and DT + GLN groups (P < 0

  15. Electrical stimulation of the isolated rat intestine in the presence of nutrient stimulus enhances glucagon-like peptide-1 release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, Ann; Ort, Tatiana; Kajekar, Radhika; Hornby, Pamela J; Wade, Paul R

    2010-01-01

    The release of small intestinal hormones by constituents of ingested food, such as fatty acids, is integral to post-prandial responses that reduce food intake. Recent evidence suggests that small intestinal electrical stimulation reduces food intake, although the mechanism of action is debated. To test the hypothesis that intestinal stimulation directly alters hormone release locally we used isolated rat distal ileum and measured glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) released in the presence or absence of linoleic acid (LA) and electrical field stimulation (EFS). Intact segments were oriented longitudinally between bipolar stimulating electrodes in organ bath chambers containing modified Krebs–Ringers bicarbonate (KRB) buffer including protease inhibitors. Incubation in LA (3 mg ml −1 ) for 45 min increased GLP-1 concentration (21.9 ± 2.6 pM versus KRB buffer alone 3.6 ± 0.1 pM). Eleven electrical stimulation conditions were tested. In the presence of LA none of the stimulation conditions inhibited LA-evoked GLP-1 release, whereas two high frequency short pulse widths (14 V, 20 Hz, 5 ms and 14 V, 40 Hz, 5 ms) and one low frequency long pulse width (14 V, 0.4 Hz, 300 ms) EFS conditions enhanced LA-evoked GLP-1 release by >250%. These results are consistent with a local effect of intestinal electrical stimulation to enhance GLP-1 release in response to luminal nutrients in the intestines. Enhancing hormone release could improve the efficacy of intestinal electrical stimulation and provide a potential treatment for obesity and metabolic conditions

  16. The role of intestinal microbiota in development of irinotecan toxicity and in toxicity reduction through dietary fibres in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxi B Lin

    Full Text Available CPT-11 is a drug used as chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. CPT-11 causes toxic side-effects in patients. CPT-11 toxicity has been attributed to the activity of intestinal microbiota, however, intestinal microbiota may also have protective effects in CP!-11 chemotherapy. This study aimed to elucidate mechanisms through which microbiota and dietary fibres could modify host health. Rats bearing a Ward colon carcinoma were treated with a two-cycle CPT-11/5-fluorouracil therapy recapitulating clinical therapy of colorectal cancer. Animals were fed with a semi-purified diet or a semi-purified diet was supplemented with non-digestible carbohydrates (isomalto-oligosaccharides, resistant starch, fructo-oligosaccharides, or inulin in 3 independent experiments. Changes in intestinal microbiota, bacteria translocating to mesenteric lymphnodes, cecal GUD activity, and cecal SCFA production, and the intestinal concentration of CPT-11 and its metabolites were analysed. Non-digestible carbohydrates significantly influenced feed intake, body weight and other indicators of animal health. The identification of translocating bacteria and their quantification in cecal microbiota indicated that overgrowth of the intestine by opportunistic pathogens was not a major contributor to CPT-11 toxicity. Remarkably, fecal GUD activity positively correlated to body weight and feed intake but negatively correlated to cecal SN-38 concentrations and IL1-β. The reduction in CPT-11 toxicity by non-digestible carbohydrates did not correlate to stimulation of specific bacterial taxa. However, cecal butyrate concentrations and feed intake were highly correlated. The protective role of intestinal butyrate production was substantiated by a positive correlation of the host expression of MCT1 (monocarboxylate transporter 1 with body weight as well as a positive correlation of the abundance of bacterial butyryl-CoA gene with cecal butyrate concentrations. These correlations support the

  17. Regional-dependent intestinal permeability and BCS classification: elucidation of pH-related complexity in rats using pseudoephedrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairstein, Moran; Swissa, Rotem; Dahan, Arik

    2013-04-01

    Based on its lower Log P value relative to metoprolol, a marker for the low/high-permeability (P(eff)) class boundary, pseudoephedrine was provisionally classified as BCS low-permeability compound. On the other hand, following oral administration, pseudoephedrine fraction dose absorbed (F(abs)) and systemic bioavailability approaches 100%. This represents a challenge to the generally recognized P(eff)-F(abs) correlation. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the underlying mechanisms behind the confusion in pseudoephedrine's BCS classification. Pseudoephedrine's BCS solubility class was determined, and its physicochemical properties and intestinal permeability were thoroughly investigated, both in vitro and in vivo in rats, considering the complexity of the whole of the small intestine. Pseudoephedrine was found to be unequivocally a high-solubility compound. All of the permeability studies revealed similar phenomenon; at any given intestinal segment/pH, the permeability of metoprolol was higher than that of pseudoephedrine, however, as the intestinal region becomes progressively distal, and the pH gradually increases, pseudoephedrine's permeability rises above that of metoprolol in the former segment. This unique permeability pattern likely explains pseudoephedrine's complete absorption. In conclusion, pseudoephedrine is a BCS Class I compound; no discrepancy between P(eff) and F(abs) is involved in its absorption. Rather, it reflects the complexity behind P(eff) when considering the whole of the intestine. We propose to allow high-permeability classification to drugs with P(eff) that matches/exceeds the low/high class benchmark anywhere throughout the intestinal tract and not restricted necessarily to the jejunum.

  18. The Protective Role of Starch on Modulating Toxic Effects of Citrullus Colocynthis on Rat Liver and Intestine

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    Neda Eskandarzade

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite using Citrullus colocynthis on treatment of various diseases, serious gastrointestinal disorders like bleeding are reported. In Traditional Iranian Medicine (TIM, administering equal weights of starch with this plant is suggested to produce more tolerable preparations from it. Hence, we assessed histopathological changes in rat liver and intestine after using starch as corrective agent. Methods: We designed three experiments in Veterinary Medicine School of Shahid Bahonar University in Kerman, Iran in 2016. The procedure was applied in 2016 for 15 days. In the first experiment, group No. 2 and 3 received single daily dose of alcoholic pulp extract of C. colocynthis at 300 and 600 mg/kg extract consecutively. In the second experiment, group No. 4 and 5 received 300 and 600 mg/kg extract plus the same amount of starch consecutively. In the third experiment, group No. 6 and 7 received extract at 300 and 600 mg/kg plus the three times weight of starch consecutively. The live rats were euthanized and their liver and intestine were removed for histopathology examination. The samples were stained with hematoxyline-eosin (H&E. Results: Rats in all of the groups died from bleeding and diarrhea except for group No.6 that showed no symptoms seen in other rats. Microscopic examination of their intestine showed no histopathological lesions or other degenerative changes of the epithelium. Conclusion: Clearly further works in modern phytotherapy will be required to delineate the role of starch in reducing C. colocynthis toxicity. Consumption of adequate weight of starch with the toxic dose of C. colocynthis make it safe for digestive system but could not prevent necrotic changes in the liver.

  19. Polymer nanocomposites enhance S-nitrosoglutathione intestinal absorption and promote the formation of releasable nitric oxide stores in rat aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen; Perrin-Sarrado, Caroline; Ming, Hui; Lartaud, Isabelle; Maincent, Philippe; Hu, Xian-Ming; Sapin-Minet, Anne; Gaucher, Caroline

    2016-10-01

    Alginate/chitosan nanocomposite particles (GSNO-acNCPs), i.e. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) loaded polymeric nanoparticles incorporated into an alginate and chitosan matrix, were developed to increase the effective GSNO loading capacity, a nitric oxide (NO) donor, and to sustain its release from the intestine following oral administration. Compared with free GSNO and GSNO loaded nanoparticles, GSNO-acNCPs promoted 2.7-fold GSNO permeation through a model of intestinal barrier (Caco-2 cells). After oral administration to Wistar rats, GSNO-acNCPs promoted NO storage into the aorta during at least 17h, as highlighted by (i) a long-lasting hyporeactivity to phenylephrine (decrease in maximum vasoconstrictive effect of aortic rings) and (ii) N-acetylcysteine (a thiol which can displace NO from tissues)-induced vasodilation of aorxxtic rings preconstricted with phenylephrine. In conclusion, GSNO-acNCPs enhance GSNO intestinal absorption and promote the formation of releasable NO stores into the rat aorta. GSNO-acNCPs are promising carriers for chronic oral application devoted to the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity in rat cranial parasympathetic neurons: coexistence with vasoactive intestinal peptide and choline acetyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblanc, G.C.; Trimmer, B.A.; Landis, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is widely distributed in the sympathetic nervous system, where it is colocalized with norepinephrine. The authors report here that NPY-immunoreactive neurons are also abundant in three cranial parasympathetic ganglia, the otic, sphenopalatine, and ciliary, in the rat measured by radioimmunoassay. High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of the immunoreactive material present in the otic ganglion indicates that this material is very similar to porcine NPY and indistinguishable from the NPY-like immunoreactivity present in rat sympathetic neurons. These findings raise the possibility that NPY acts as a neuromodulator in the parasympathetic as well as the sympathetic nervous system. In contrast to what had been observed for sympathetic neurons, NPY-immunoreactive neurons in cranial parasympathetic ganglia do not contain detectable catecholamines or tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, and many do contain immunoreactivity for vasoactive intestinal peptide and/or choline acetyltransferase. These findings suggest that there is no simple rule governing coexpression of NPY with norepinephrine, acetylcholine, or vasoactive intestinal peptide in autonomic neurons. Further, while functional studies have indicated that NPY exerts actions on the peripheral vasculature which are antagonistic to those of acetylcholine and vasoactive intestinal peptide, the present results raise the possibility that these three substances may have complementary effects on other target tissues

  1. Edible Safety Assessment of Genetically Modified Rice T1C-1 for Sprague Dawley Rats through Horizontal Gene Transfer, Allergenicity and Intestinal Microbiota.

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    Kai Zhao

    Full Text Available In this study, assessment of the safety of transgenic rice T1C-1 expressing Cry1C was carried out by: (1 studying horizontal gene transfer (HGT in Sprague Dawley rats fed transgenic rice for 90 d; (2 examining the effect of Cry1C protein in vitro on digestibility and allergenicity; and (3 studying the changes of intestinal microbiota in rats fed with transgenic rice T1C-1 in acute and subchronic toxicity tests. Sprague Dawley rats were fed a diet containing either 60% GM Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt rice T1C-1 expressing Cry1C protein, the parental rice Minghui 63, or a basic diet for 90 d. The GM Bt rice T1C-1 showed no evidence of HGT between rats and transgenic rice. Sequence searching of the Cry1C protein showed no homology with known allergens or toxins. Cry1C protein was rapidly degraded in vitro with simulated gastric and intestinal fluids. The expressed Cry1C protein did not induce high levels of specific IgG and IgE antibodies in rats. The intestinal microbiota of rats fed T1C-1 was also analyzed in acute and subchronic toxicity tests by DGGE. Cluster analysis of DGGE profiles revealed significant individual differences in the rats' intestinal microbiota.

  2. Edible Safety Assessment of Genetically Modified Rice T1C-1 for Sprague Dawley Rats through Horizontal Gene Transfer, Allergenicity and Intestinal Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Ren, Fangfang; Han, Fangting; Liu, Qiwen; Wu, Guogan; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Xiao; Wang, Jinbin; Li, Peng; Shi, Wei; Zhu, Hong; Lv, Jianjun; Zhao, Xiao; Tang, Xueming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, assessment of the safety of transgenic rice T1C-1 expressing Cry1C was carried out by: (1) studying horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in Sprague Dawley rats fed transgenic rice for 90 d; (2) examining the effect of Cry1C protein in vitro on digestibility and allergenicity; and (3) studying the changes of intestinal microbiota in rats fed with transgenic rice T1C-1 in acute and subchronic toxicity tests. Sprague Dawley rats were fed a diet containing either 60% GM Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) rice T1C-1 expressing Cry1C protein, the parental rice Minghui 63, or a basic diet for 90 d. The GM Bt rice T1C-1 showed no evidence of HGT between rats and transgenic rice. Sequence searching of the Cry1C protein showed no homology with known allergens or toxins. Cry1C protein was rapidly degraded in vitro with simulated gastric and intestinal fluids. The expressed Cry1C protein did not induce high levels of specific IgG and IgE antibodies in rats. The intestinal microbiota of rats fed T1C-1 was also analyzed in acute and subchronic toxicity tests by DGGE. Cluster analysis of DGGE profiles revealed significant individual differences in the rats' intestinal microbiota.

  3. Binding of navy bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) lectin to the intestinal cells of the rat and its effect on the absorption of glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donatucci, D.A.; Liener, I.E.; Gross, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    The main objectives of this investigation were to study the binding of a lectin from navy beans with the epithelial cells of the rat intestine and to assess the effect of such binding on the ability of the intestine to absorb glucose. A Scatchard plot, based on the binding of 125 I-labeled lectin to isolated intestinal epithelial cells, was used to calculate an association constant (Ka) of 15 x 10(6)M-1 and the number of binding sites per cell, 12 x 10(6). Metabolic studies were conducted over a period of 5 d on groups of rats fed raw or autoclaved navy bean flour and casein with or without the purified lectin. Growth, protein digestibility, biological value and net protein utilization were significantly lower in animals that had been fed raw navy bean flour or casein plus lectin than in control groups fed diets containing autoclaved navy bean flour or casein alone. Vascular perfusion was used to measure the rate of uptake of glucose by the intestines of rats that had received the various dietary treatments. The rate of absorption of [ 14 C]glucose by intestines from rats fed raw navy bean flour or casein plus lectin was approximately one-half that of their counterparts fed the autoclaved flour or casein alone. These results provide evidence that the lectin, by virtue of its interference with intestinal absorption, is responsible, at least in part, for the nutritional inferiority of raw navy beans

  4. Restoration of impaired intestinal barrier function by the hydrolysed casein diet contributes to the prevention of type 1 diabetes in the diabetes-prone BioBreeding rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, J T J; Lammers, K; Hoogendijk, A; Boer, M W; Brugman, S; Beijer-Liefers, S; Zandvoort, A; Harmsen, H; Welling, G; Stellaard, F; Bos, N A; Fasano, A; Rozing, J

    2010-12-01

    Impaired intestinal barrier function is observed in type 1 diabetes patients and animal models of the disease. Exposure to diabetogenic antigens from the intestinal milieu due to a compromised intestinal barrier is considered essential for induction of the autoimmune process leading to type 1 diabetes. Since a hydrolysed casein (HC) diet prevents autoimmune diabetes onset in diabetes-prone (DP)-BioBreeding (BB) rats, we studied the role of the HC diet on intestinal barrier function and, therefore, prevention of autoimmune diabetes onset in this animal model. DP-BB rats were fed the HC diet from weaning onwards and monitored for autoimmune diabetes development. Intestinal permeability was assessed in vivo by lactulose-mannitol test and ex vivo by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). Levels of serum zonulin, a physiological tight junction modulator, were measured by ELISA. Ileal mRNA expression of Myo9b, Cldn1, Cldn2 and Ocln (which encode the tight junction-related proteins myosin IXb, claudin-1, claudin-2 and occludin) and Il-10, Tgf-ß (also known as Il10 and Tgfb, respectively, which encode regulatory cytokines) was analysed by quantitative PCR. The HC diet reduced autoimmune diabetes by 50% in DP-BB rats. In DP-BB rats, prediabetic gut permeability negatively correlated with the moment of autoimmune diabetes onset. The improved intestinal barrier function that was induced by HC diet in DP-BB rats was visualised by decreasing lactulose:mannitol ratio, decreasing serum zonulin levels and increasing ileal TEER. The HC diet modified ileal mRNA expression of Myo9b, and Cldn1 and Cldn2, but left Ocln expression unaltered. Improved intestinal barrier function might be an important intermediate in the prevention of autoimmune diabetes by the HC diet in DP-BB rats. Effects on tight junctions, ileal cytokines and zonulin production might be important mechanisms for this effect.

  5. Effect of lactobacillus acidophilus combined with iso-malto-oligosaccharide on the intestinal mucosal secretion of SlgA in rat models with antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Dan; Fang Lichao; Chen Bingbo; Wei Hong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the corrective effect of synbiotic (Lactobacillus acidophilus combined with iso-malto-oligosaccharide) on the decreased intestinal mucosal secretion of SlgA in rat models with antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). Methods: Rat models of AAD were prepared with lincomycin gavage for 6 days. One group of models were left with natural recovery and three other groups were given gavage with different strengths of synbiotic for 7 days. In each group, stool specimens were taken from 6-8 rats for flora examination, then the animals sacrificed and intestinal mucus contents of SIgA determined (with RIA) on d6, d9 and d13. Results: The intestinal flora in rat models of AAD was greatly altered with marked reduction in probiotics. Also, the intestinal mucus contents of SIgA were significantly decreased. Treatment with different strengths of synbiotic (Lactobacillus acidophilus combined with iso-malto-oligosaccharide) would significantly improve the condition with SIgA contents approaching normal. Conclusion: Synbiotic treatment could increase the intestinal mucosal secretion of SIgA with restoration of the mucosal immuno-barrier function in rat models with AAD. (authors)

  6. Effect of lactobacillus acidophilus combined with iso-malto-oligosaccharide on the intestinal mucosal secretion of SlgA in rat models with antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan, Du; Lichao, Fang; Bingbo, Chen; Hong, Wei [Third Military Medical Univ., Chongqing (China). Laboratory Animal Center

    2005-02-15

    Objective: To investigate the corrective effect of synbiotic (Lactobacillus acidophilus combined with iso-malto-oligosaccharide) on the decreased intestinal mucosal secretion of SlgA in rat models with antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). Methods: Rat models of AAD were prepared with lincomycin gavage for 6 days. One group of models were left with natural recovery and three other groups were given gavage with different strengths of synbiotic for 7 days. In each group, stool specimens were taken from 6-8 rats for flora examination, then the animals sacrificed and intestinal mucus contents of SIgA determined (with RIA) on d6, d9 and d13. Results: The intestinal flora in rat models of AAD was greatly altered with marked reduction in probiotics. Also, the intestinal mucus contents of SIgA were significantly decreased. Treatment with different strengths of synbiotic (Lactobacillus acidophilus combined with iso-malto-oligosaccharide) would significantly improve the condition with SIgA contents approaching normal. Conclusion: Synbiotic treatment could increase the intestinal mucosal secretion of SIgA with restoration of the mucosal immuno-barrier function in rat models with AAD. (authors)

  7. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase administration in newborns decreases systemic inflammatory cytokine expression in a neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentea, Rebecca M; Liedel, Jennifer L; Fredrich, Katherine; Welak, Scott R; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Oldham, Keith T; Simpson, Pippa M; Gourlay, David M

    2012-10-01

    Supplementation of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), an endogenous protein expressed in the intestines, decreases the severity of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC)-associated intestinal injury and permeability. We hypothesized that IAP administration is protective in a dose-dependent manner of the inflammatory response in a neonatal rat model. Pre- and full-term newborn Sprague-Dawley rat pups were sacrificed on day of life 3. Control pups were vaginally delivered and dam fed. Preterm pups were delivered via cesarean section and exposed to intermittent hypoxia and formula feeds containing lipopolysaccharide (NEC) with and without IAP. Three different standardized doses were administered to a group of pups treated with 40, 4, and 0.4U/kg of bovine IAP (NEC+IAP40, IAP4, or IAP0.4U). Reverse transcription-real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α on liver and lung tissues and serum cytokine analysis for interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α were performed. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests, expressed as mean±standard error of the mean and P≤0.05 considered significant. Levels of cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α increased significantly in NEC versus control, returning to control levels with increasing doses of supplemental enteral IAP. Hepatic and pulmonary TNF-α and iNOS messenger ribonucleic acid expressions increased in NEC, and the remaining elevated despite IAP supplementation. Proinflammatory cytokine expression is increased systemically with intestinal NEC injury. Administration of IAP significantly reduces systemic proinflammatory cytokine expression in a dose-dependent manner. Early supplemental enteral IAP may reduce NEC-related injury and be useful for reducing effects caused by a proinflammatory cascade. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparing the therapeutic efficiency of aminoguanidine and 3-aminobenzamide in lung and intestine toxicity caused by nitrogen mustard in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaren, H.; Korkmaz, A.; Kunak, Z. I.; Uysal, B.; Topal, T.; Kurt, B; Kenar, L.

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and peroxynitrite are responsible for sulfur mustard (SM) induced toxicity. Since endogenous production of peroxynitrite is known to lead to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation and sometimes ultimately cell death, in this study, it was aimed to compare the therapeutic efficiencies of aminoguanidine (iNOS inhibitor) and 3 aminobenzamide (PARP inhibitor) in lung and intestine toxicity caused by nitrogen mustard in rats. A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups. Group 1 served as control and given 2 ml saline, three groups received single dose of mechlorethamine (MEC) (3.5 mg/kg subcutaneously) with the same time intervals. Group 2 received MEC only, group 3 received selective iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG) (100 mg/kg i.p.) and, group 4 received PARP inhibitor 3 aminobenzamide (3-AB) (20 mg/kg i.p.). MEC injection resulted in severe lung toxicity with strong interstitial and alveolar edema, hemorrhage, emphysematous changes, Mild inflammatory cell infiltration and septal thickening. MEC injection also caused mucosal thinning, mild inflammatory cell infiltration, ischemic changes and multifocal, superficial ulcerations (erosions) in small intestine. In AG group, interstitial and alveolar edema, hemorrhage slightly reduced in lung comparing to MEC group. Inflammatory cell infiltration was minimal, septal thickening was similar to MEC group at densely edematous and hemorrhagical areas. In 3 AB group, edematous and hemorrhagic areas were very small, inflammatory cell infiltration was minimal and there were no densly densely edematous and hemorrhagical areas in lung. The results were better than AB group. In intestine, results of AG group were better than MEC group but worse than 3 AB group. These results suggest that both iNOS and PARP inhibitors are effective but PARP inhibitors may be more promising for treatment of SM induced early lung and intestinal toxicity.(author)

  9. Toxic effects of maternal zearalenone exposure on intestinal oxidative stress, barrier function, immunological and morphological changes in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Liu

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of maternal zearalenone (ZEN exposure on the intestine of pregnant Sprague-Dawley (SD rats and its offspring. Ninety-six pregnant SD rats were randomly divided into four groups and were fed with diets containing ZEN at concentrations of 0.3 mg/kg, 48.5 mg/kg, 97.6 mg/kg or 146.0 mg/kg from gestation days (GD 1 to 7. All rats were fed with mycotoxin-free diet until their offspring were weaned at three weeks of age. The small intestinal fragments from pregnant rats at GD8, weaned dams and pups were collected and studied for toxic effects of ZEN on antioxidant status, immune response, expression of junction proteins, and morphology. The results showed that ZEN induced oxidative stress, affected the villous structure and reduced the expression of junction proteins claudin-4, occludin and connexin43 (Cx43 in a dose-dependent manner in pregnant rats. Different effects on the expression of cytokines were also observed both in mRNA and protein levels in these pregnant groups. Ingestion of high levels of ZEN caused irreversible damage in weaned dams, such as oxidative stress, decreased villi hight and low expression of junction proteins and cytokines. Decreased expression of jejunal interleukin-8 (IL-8 and increased expression of gastrointestinal glutathione peroxidase (GPx2 mRNA were detected in weaned offspring, indicating long-term damage caused by maternal ZEN. We also found that the Nrf2 expression both in mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in the ZEN-treated groups of pregnant dams and the high-dose of ZEN group of weaned dams. The data indicate that modulation of Nrf2-mediated pathway is one of mechanism via which ZEN affects gut wall antioxidant and inflammatory responses.

  10. Effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 and distal bowel resection on intestinal and systemic adaptive responses in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Sarah W; de Heuvel, Elaine; Wallace, Laurie E; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens J; Brindle, Mary E; Chelikani, Prasanth K; Sigalet, David L

    2017-01-01

    To determine the effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), with or without massive distal bowel resection, on adaptation of jejunal mucosa, enteric neurons, gut hormones and tissue reserves in rats. GLP-2 is a gut hormone known to be trophic for small bowel mucosa, and to mimic intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome (SBS). However, the effects of exogenous GLP-2 and SBS on enteric neurons are unclear. Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to four treatments: Transected Bowel (TB) (n = 8), TB + GLP-2 (2.5 nmol/kg/h, n = 8), SBS (n = 5), or SBS + GLP-2 (2.5 nmol/kg/h, n = 9). SBS groups underwent a 60% jejunoileal resection with cecectomy and jejunocolic anastomosis. All rats were maintained on parenteral nutrition for 7 d. Parameters measured included gut morphometry, qPCR for hexose transporter (SGLT-1, GLUT-2, GLUT-5) and GLP-2 receptor mRNA, whole mount immunohistochemistry for neurons (HuC/D, VIP, nNOS), plasma glucose, gut hormones, and body composition. Resection increased the proportion of nNOS immunopositive myenteric neurons, intestinal muscularis propria thickness and crypt cell proliferation, which were not recapitulated by GLP-2 therapy. Exogenous GLP-2 increased jejunal mucosal surface area without affecting enteric VIP or nNOS neuronal immunopositivity, attenuated resection-induced reductions in jejunal hexose transporter abundance (SGLT-1, GLUT-2), increased plasma amylin and decreased peptide YY concentrations. Exogenous GLP-2 attenuated resection-induced increases in blood glucose and body fat loss. Exogenous GLP-2 stimulates jejunal adaptation independent of enteric neuronal VIP or nNOS changes, and has divergent effects on plasma amylin and peptide YY concentrations. The novel ability of exogenous GLP-2 to modulate resection-induced changes in peripheral glucose and lipid reserves may be important in understanding the whole-body response following intestinal resection, and is worthy of further study.

  11. Effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 and distal bowel resection on intestinal and systemic adaptive responses in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah W Lai

    Full Text Available To determine the effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2, with or without massive distal bowel resection, on adaptation of jejunal mucosa, enteric neurons, gut hormones and tissue reserves in rats.GLP-2 is a gut hormone known to be trophic for small bowel mucosa, and to mimic intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome (SBS. However, the effects of exogenous GLP-2 and SBS on enteric neurons are unclear.Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to four treatments: Transected Bowel (TB (n = 8, TB + GLP-2 (2.5 nmol/kg/h, n = 8, SBS (n = 5, or SBS + GLP-2 (2.5 nmol/kg/h, n = 9. SBS groups underwent a 60% jejunoileal resection with cecectomy and jejunocolic anastomosis. All rats were maintained on parenteral nutrition for 7 d. Parameters measured included gut morphometry, qPCR for hexose transporter (SGLT-1, GLUT-2, GLUT-5 and GLP-2 receptor mRNA, whole mount immunohistochemistry for neurons (HuC/D, VIP, nNOS, plasma glucose, gut hormones, and body composition.Resection increased the proportion of nNOS immunopositive myenteric neurons, intestinal muscularis propria thickness and crypt cell proliferation, which were not recapitulated by GLP-2 therapy. Exogenous GLP-2 increased jejunal mucosal surface area without affecting enteric VIP or nNOS neuronal immunopositivity, attenuated resection-induced reductions in jejunal hexose transporter abundance (SGLT-1, GLUT-2, increased plasma amylin and decreased peptide YY concentrations. Exogenous GLP-2 attenuated resection-induced increases in blood glucose and body fat loss.Exogenous GLP-2 stimulates jejunal adaptation independent of enteric neuronal VIP or nNOS changes, and has divergent effects on plasma amylin and peptide YY concentrations. The novel ability of exogenous GLP-2 to modulate resection-induced changes in peripheral glucose and lipid reserves may be important in understanding the whole-body response following intestinal resection, and is worthy of further study.

  12. Effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 and distal bowel resection on intestinal and systemic adaptive responses in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heuvel, Elaine; Wallace, Laurie E.; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens J.; Brindle, Mary E.; Chelikani, Prasanth K.; Sigalet, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), with or without massive distal bowel resection, on adaptation of jejunal mucosa, enteric neurons, gut hormones and tissue reserves in rats. Background GLP-2 is a gut hormone known to be trophic for small bowel mucosa, and to mimic intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome (SBS). However, the effects of exogenous GLP-2 and SBS on enteric neurons are unclear. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to four treatments: Transected Bowel (TB) (n = 8), TB + GLP-2 (2.5 nmol/kg/h, n = 8), SBS (n = 5), or SBS + GLP-2 (2.5 nmol/kg/h, n = 9). SBS groups underwent a 60% jejunoileal resection with cecectomy and jejunocolic anastomosis. All rats were maintained on parenteral nutrition for 7 d. Parameters measured included gut morphometry, qPCR for hexose transporter (SGLT-1, GLUT-2, GLUT-5) and GLP-2 receptor mRNA, whole mount immunohistochemistry for neurons (HuC/D, VIP, nNOS), plasma glucose, gut hormones, and body composition. Results Resection increased the proportion of nNOS immunopositive myenteric neurons, intestinal muscularis propria thickness and crypt cell proliferation, which were not recapitulated by GLP-2 therapy. Exogenous GLP-2 increased jejunal mucosal surface area without affecting enteric VIP or nNOS neuronal immunopositivity, attenuated resection-induced reductions in jejunal hexose transporter abundance (SGLT-1, GLUT-2), increased plasma amylin and decreased peptide YY concentrations. Exogenous GLP-2 attenuated resection-induced increases in blood glucose and body fat loss. Conclusions Exogenous GLP-2 stimulates jejunal adaptation independent of enteric neuronal VIP or nNOS changes, and has divergent effects on plasma amylin and peptide YY concentrations. The novel ability of exogenous GLP-2 to modulate resection-induced changes in peripheral glucose and lipid reserves may be important in understanding the whole-body response following intestinal resection, and is worthy

  13. Testing the absorption of the extracts of Coreopsis tinctoria Nutt. in the intestinal canal in rats using an Ussing chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Aierken, Guzhalinuer; Li, Xinxia; Li, Linlin; Mao, Xinmin

    2016-06-20

    Coreopsis tinctoria Nutt mainly distributed in Hetian region of Xinjiang at an altitude of 3000m, which is used as Uyghur traditional medicine because of its clearing heat, promoting circulation and removing toxicity and antihypertension, ect. effect. This research was to study the four ingredients in the extracts of Coreopsis tinctoria Nutt. that are absorbed in different intestinal segments in rats to lay the foundation for further study on the effective constituents, tissue distribution, metabolism, and spectrum-effect relationships of these extracts. High, medium, and low concentrations were prepared according to their pharmacological effects. Quantitative analysis multi-components by single marker was used to test the cumulative absorption volume Q, absorption rate constant Ka, and apparent permeability coefficient Papp of the four main ingredients in C. tinctoria Nutt. extract in different intestinal segments in rats using a Ussing chamber model and high-performance liquid chromatography. The Papp of chlorogenic acid and flavanomarein in the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon were 1.0×10(-6) to 10×10(-6)cms(-1). Papp of marein in the duodenum and jejunum was <1.0×10(-6), and was 1.0×10(-6) to 10×10(-6)cms(-1) in the ileum and colon. Papp of 3,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid in the duodenum was <1.0×10(-6)cms(-1), while it was 1.0×(1)0(-6) to 10×10(-6)cms(-1) in the jejunum, ileum, and colon. All four chemical components of the plant extract can be absorbed by the intestinal canal of rats, which conforms to zero-order absorption; the ileum presented the best absorption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Kampo medicine "Dai-kenchu-to" on microbiome in the intestine of the rats with fast stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Kozo; Shimada, Mitsuo; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kurita, Nobuhiro; Sato, Hirohiko; Utsunomiya, Tohru; Iwata, Takashi; Miyatani, Tomohiko; Higashijima, Jun; Kashihara, Hideya; Takasu, Chie; Matsumoto, Noriko; Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki

    2013-01-01

    Diversity of gut microbiome has been recently reported to be lost in inflammatory bowel disease. We have previously reported that the Dai-kenchu-to (DKT) prevented the bacterial translocation through suppression of cytokine and apoptosis in rat's fast stress model. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DKT on maintenance of microbial diversity in rat's intestine with inflammation. Wister rats were received the fast stress for 5 days. In DKT group, rats were administered with DKT (300 mg/kg/day) during the fast stress (DKT-group). The gut microbiomes were analyzed at before- and after- fast stress, and the effect of DKT for on microbial diversities of the gut were evaluated by the PCR-clone library method targeting the 16 S ribosomal RNA gene. In Control-group, Erysipelotrichaceae increased to 86% in after fast stress, OTU of before-fast stress was 111 and after fast stress was only 9 (changing rate: 58%). The diversity of microbiome was severely decreased. On the other hand, in DKT-group, diversity of microbiome was kept after fast stress (Lachnospiraceae: Ruminococcaceae: Coriobacteriales 54%, 22%, 5%), Operational taxonomic units of before fast stress was 52 and after fast stress was 55 (changing rate: 6%). Family Lachnospiraceae which includes butyrate-producing Clostridia (Clostridium IV and XIVa). DKT prevented the reduction of diversity of microbiome in rat's fast stress model. Our data suggested the new anti-inflammatory mechanism of DKT through gut microbiome.

  15. The effects of probiotic, prebiotic and synbiotic diets containing Bacillus coagulans and inulin on rat intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhari, Kh; Shekarforoush, S S; Sajedianfard, J; Hosseinzadeh, S; Nazifi, S

    2015-01-01

    An in vivo experiment was conducted to study the effects of probiotic Bacillus coagulans spores, with and without prebiotic, inulin, on gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota of healthy rats and its potentiality to survive in the GI tract. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=12) and fed as follows: standard diet (control), standard diet supplied with 5% w/w long chain inulin (prebiotic), standard diet with 10(9)/day spores of B. coagulans by orogastric gavage (probiotic), and standard diet with 5% w/w long chain inulin and 10(9) spores/day of B. coagulans by orogastric gavage (synbiotic). Rats were fed the diets for 30 days. At day 10, 20 and 30 of experiment, 24 h post administration, four rats from each group were randomly selected and after faecal collection were sacrificed. Small intestine, cecum, and colon were excised from each rat and used for microbial analysis. Administration of synbiotic and probiotic diets led to a significant (Pcoagulans was efficient in beneficially modulating GI microbiota and considering transitional characteristics of B. coagulans, daily consumption of probiotic products is necessary for any long-term effect.

  16. Consequences of Mrp2 deficiency for diclofenac-induced toxicity in rat intestine in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; van de Vegte, Dennis; Makkinje, Miriam; de Graaf, Inge; Groothuis, Genoveva

    Diclofenac (DCF), a widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is associated with high prevalence of severe intestinal side-effects. The reactive metabolite diclofenac acylglucuronide (DAG) formed in the liver, and transported by bile into the intestine was reported to be involved in

  17. Preservation of intestinal microvascular Po2 during normovolemic hemodilution in a rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bommel, J.; Siegemund, M.; Henny, C. P.; van den Heuvel, D. A.; Trouwborst, A.; Ince, C.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of hemodilution on the intestinal microcirculatory oxygenation is not clear. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of moderate normovolemic hemodilution on intestinal microvascular partial oxygen pressure (Po2) and its relation to the mesenteric venous Po2 (Pmvo2).

  18. Vascular, but not luminal, activation of FFAR1 (GPR40) stimulates GLP-1 secretion from isolated perfused rat small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Louise Wulff; Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Janus, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    -protein-cou- pled receptor, FFAR1 (previously GPR40), expressed on L cells and activated by long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) is a potential target. A link between FFAR1 activation and GLP-1 secretion has been demonstrated in cellular models and small-molecule FFAR1 agonists have been developed. In this study, we exam......- ined the effect of FFAR1 activation on GLP-1 secretion using isolated, per- fused small intestines from rats, a physiologically relevant model allowing distinction between direct and indirect effects of FFAR1 activation. The endogenous FFAR1 ligand, linoleic acid (LA), and four synthetic FFAR1 ago...

  19. Oral administration of thymoquinone mitigates the effect of cisplatin on brush border membrane enzymes, energy metabolism and antioxidant system in rat intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Faaiza; Farooqui, Zeba; Abidi, Subuhi; Parwez, Iqbal; Khan, Farah

    2017-10-01

    Cisplatin (CP) is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent that elicits severe gastrointestinal toxicity. Nigella sativa, a member of family Ranunculaceae, is one of the most revered medicinal plant known for its numerous health benefits. Thymoquinone (TQ), a major bioactive component derived from the volatile oil of Nigella sativa seeds, has been shown to improve gastrointestinal functions in animal models of acute gastric/intestinal injury. In view of this, the aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of TQ on CP induced toxicity in rat intestine and to elucidate the mechanism underlying these effects. Rats were divided into four groups viz. control, CP, TQ and CP+TQ. Animals in CP+TQ and TQ groups were orally administered TQ (1.5mg/kg bwt) with and without a single intraperitoneal dose of CP (6mg/kg bwt) respectively. The effect of TQ was determined on CP induced alterations in the activities of brush border membrane (BBM), carbohydrate metabolism, and antioxidant defense enzymes in rat intestine. TQ administration significantly mitigated CP induced decline in the specific activities of BBM marker enzymes, both in the mucosal homogenates and in the BBM vesicles (BBMV) prepared from intestinal mucosa. Furthermore, TQ administration restored the redox and metabolic status of intestinal mucosal tissue in CP treated rats. The biochemical results were supported by histopathological findings that showed extensive damage to intestine in CP treated rats and markedly preserved intestinal histoarchitecture in CP and TQ co-treated group. The biochemical and histological data suggest a protective effect of TQ against CP-induced gastrointestinal damage. Thus, TQ may have a potential for clinical application to counteract the accompanying gastrointestinal toxicity in CP chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. The influence of X-rays, vitamin A and protease inhibitor on the hydroproteolytic activity and serotonin content in pancreas and intestine of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocmierska-Grodzka, D.

    1976-01-01

    Activity of MAO, hydroproteolytic enzymes including some lysosomal markers as well as serotonin content were examined in pancreas and intestinal tissue of rats 24 hours after irradiation with the dose of 800 R. It was stated that postirradiation disturbances of enzymatic activity in intestinal tract were accompanied by changes of serotonin content. Administration of vitamin A into rats caused in some parts of the intestine slight increase of acid phosphatase activity - and evident changes in serotonin content. Inhibitor of proteases (Trasylol) evidently prevented the disturbances of serotonin content both in rats exposed to X-rays or vitamin A administration - when simultaneously its influence on changes in hydroproteolytic activity (except of pancreas and colon) was of smaller degree. (orig.) [de

  1. Influence of X-rays, vitamin A and protease inhibitor on the hydroproteolytic activity and serotonin content in pancreas and intestine of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocmierska-Grodzka, D [Akademia Medyczna, Bialystok (Poland). Zaklad Farmakologii

    1976-06-01

    Activity of MAO, hydroproteolytic enzymes including some lysosomal markers as well as serotonin content were examined in pancreas and intestinal tissue of rats 24 hours after irradiation with the dose of 800 R. It was stated that postirradiation disturbances of enzymatic activity in intestinal tract were accompanied by changes of serotonin content. Administration of vitamin A into rats caused in some parts of the intestine slight increase of acid phosphatase activity - and evident changes in serotonin content. Inhibitor of proteases (Trasylol) evidently prevented the disturbances of serotonin content both in rats exposed to X-rays or vitamin A administration - when simultaneously its influence on changes in hydroproteolytic activity (except of pancreas and colon) was of smaller degree.

  2. Effect of short-term ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate pretreatment on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Eduardo Silvio Gouveia; Rabelo, Camila Menezes; Prado Neto, Alberico Ximenes do; Garcia, José Huygens Parente; Guimarães, Sérgio Botelho; Vasconcelos, Paulo Roberto Leitão de

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of preventive enteral administration of ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate (OKG) in an ischemia-reperfusion rat model. Sixty rats were randomized into five groups (G1-G5, n = 12). Each group was divided into two subgroups (n = 6) and treated with calcium carbonate (CaCa) or OKG by gavage. Thirty minutes later, the animals were anesthetized with xylazine 15mg + ketamine 1mg ip and subjected to laparotomy. G1-G3 rats served as controls. Rats in groups G4 and G5 were subjected to ischemia for 30 minutes. Ischemia was achieved by clamping the small intestine and its mesentery, delimiting a segment of bowel 5 cm long and 5 cm apart from the ileocecal valve. In addition, G5 rats underwent reperfusion for 30 minutes. Blood samples were collected at the end of the laparotomy (G1), after 30 minutes (G2, G4) and 60 minutes (G3, G5) to determine concentrations of metabolites (pyruvate, lactate), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and glutathione (GSH). There was a significant decrease in tissue pyruvate and lactate and plasma CPK levels in OKG-treated rats at the end of reperfusion period. GSH levels did not change significantly in ischemia and reperfusion groups. However, TBARS levels increased significantly (p<0.05) in tissue samples in OKG-treated rats subjected to ischemia for 30 minutes. Short-term pretreatment with OKG before induction of I/R decreases tissue damage, increases pyruvate utilization for energy production in the Krebs cycle and does not attenuate the oxidative stress in this animal model.

  3. Structured triglyceride vehicles for oral delivery of halofantrine: examination of intestinal lymphatic transport and bioavailability in conscious rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, René; Porter, Christopher J H; Müllertz, Anette

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the influence of triglyceride vehicle intramolecular structure on the intestinal lymphatic transport and systemic absorption of halofantrine in conscious rats. METHODS: Conscious, lymph cannulated and nonlymph cannulated rats were dosed orally with three structurally different...... triglycerides; sunflower oil, and two structured triglycerides containing different proportion and position of medium-(M) and long-chain (L) fatty acids on the glycerol backbone. The two structured triglycerides were abbreviated MLM and LML to reflect the structural position on the glycerol. The concentration...... animals, and this was most pronounced for the animals dosed with the structured triglycerides. CONCLUSIONS: Using MLM as vehicle increases the portal absorption of halofantrine and results in similar lymphatic transport levels when compared to sunflower oil. Total absorption when assessed as absorption...

  4. Metabolism of all-trans-retinoic acid and all-trans-retinyl acetate. Demonstration of common physiological metabolites in rat small intestinal mucosa and circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullum, M.E.; Zile, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics and metabolism of physiological doses of all-trans-retinoic acid were examined in blood and small intestinal mucosa of vitamin A-depleted rats. A major portion of intrajugularly injected retinoic acid is rapidly (within 2 min) sequestered by tissues; subsequently 13-cis-retinoic acid and polar metabolites are released into circulation. All-trans-retinoic acid appears in small intestinal epithelium within 2 min after dosing and is the major radioactive compound there for at least 2 h. Retinoyl glucuronide and 13-cis-retinoic acid are early metabolites of all-trans-retinoic acid in the small intestine of bile duct-cannulated rats. Retinoyl glucuronide, the major metabolite of retinoic acid intestinal epithelium, in contrast to other polar metabolites, was not detected in circulation. An examination of [ 3 H]retinyl acetate metabolites under steady state conditions in vitamin A-repleted rats demonstrates the occurrence of all-trans-retinoic acid and 13-cis-retinoic acid in circulation and in intestinal epithelium, in a pattern similar to that found after injection of retinoic acid into vitamin A-depleted rats. These data establish that all-trans-retinoic acid, 13-cis-retinoic acid, and retinoyl glucuronide are physiological metabolites of vitamin A in target tissues, and therefore are important candidates as mediators of the biological effect of the vitamin

  5. Role of the intestinal tight junction modulator zonulin in the pathogenesis of type I diabetes in BB diabetic-prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Tammara; Berti, Irene; Sapone, Anna; Gerarduzzi, Tania; Not, Tarcisio; Zielke, Ronald; Fasano, Alessio

    2005-02-22

    Increased intestinal permeability has been observed in numerous human autoimmune diseases, including type-1 diabetes (T1D) and its' animal model, the BB-wor diabetic prone rat. We have recently described zonulin, a protein that regulates intercellular tight junctions. The objective of this study was to establish whether zonulin-dependent increased intestinal permeability plays a role in the pathogenesis of T1D. In the BB diabetic-prone rat model of T1D, intestinal intraluminal zonulin levels were elevated 35-fold compared to control BB diabetic-resistant rats. Zonulin up-regulation was coincident with decreased small intestinal transepithelial electrical resistance, and was followed by the production of autoantibodies against pancreatic beta cells, which preceded the onset of clinically evident T1D by approximately 25 days. In those diabetic prone rats that did not progress to diabetes, both intraluminal zonulin and transepithelial electrical resistance were similar to those detected in diabetic-resistant animal controls. Blockade of the zonulin receptor reduced the cumulative incidence of T1D by 70%, despite the persistence of intraluminal zonulin up-regulation. Moreover, treatment responders did not seroconvert to islet cell antibodies. Combined together, these findings suggest that the zonulin-induced loss in small intestinal barrier function is involved in the pathogenesis of T1D in the BB diabetic-prone animal model.

  6. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 in radiation exposed small intestinal mucosa of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwag, Hyon Joo; Lee, Kyoung Ja; Rhee, Chung Sik

    2003-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of enzymes whose main function is the degradation of the extracellular matrix. Several studies have revealed that MMPs and TIMPs are related to the wound healing process and in photoaging caused by ultraviolet irradiation. However, the expressions of MMP and TIMP after irradiation have not, to the best of our knowledge, been studied. This study investigates the expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 in rat intestinal mucosa following irradiation. The entire abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats was irradiated using a single dose method. The rats were sacrificed on day 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 14 following irradiation. Histopathological observations were made using hematoxilin and eosin staining. The expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 were examined using immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting and ELISA. Radiation induced damage, associated with atrophic villi, and infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed from the first postirradiation day, and severe tissue damage was observed on the second and the third postirradiation days. An increase in mitosis and the number of regenerating crypts, as evidence of regeneration, were most noticeable on the fifth postirradiation day. From the immunohistochemistry, the MMP-2 expression was observed from the first postirradiation day, but was most conspicuous on the third and the fifth postirradiation days. The TIMP-2 expression was most conspicuous on the fifth postirradiation day. From the immunoblotting, the MMP-2 expression was strongly positive on the third postirradiation day, and that of TIMP-2 showed a strong positive response on the fifth postirradiation day. In ELISA, tests, the expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-2. were increased in the postirradiation groups compared to those of the normal controls, and showed a maximum increase on the fifth postirradiation day. These results were statistically significant. The expressions of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 were increased in the intestinal mucosa of the rats

  7. Effect of certain natural antioxidants in protecting against damage caused by gamma radiation in ischemic rat intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, T.A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in various clinical pathologies one of which is ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)- induced injury. Intestinal I/R enhances production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inflammatory mediators and induces apoptosis. In other hand. the intestinal tract shows a high sensitivity to ionizing radiation due to a rapid cell turnover and is often implicated in radiation sickness the radiation damage may either be a consequence of a direct effect resulting in disruption of critical molecule (such as an enzyme or DNA) or an indirect effect through ionization of water molecules and formation of ROS. consequently, supplementation of antioxidants may be a beneficial approach to protect against cellular damages associated with oxidative stress. the current study was aimed to evaluate the possible protective effects of vitamin E (100 mg/kg p.o.), tomato extract (67 mg/kg. p.o.) and turmeric (100 mg/kg, p.o) against ileal injury induced in rats by total occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery for 30 min followed by reperfusion for another 30 min. Furthermore, this protective effect of the mentioned drugs was extended into injury that could happened in ileal tissues of rats exposed to (6 Gy) gamma radiation followed by intestinal I/R. Drugs were administered one daily for 14 consecutive days prior to the ischemic insult. Damage induced by I/R was manifested by depletion of ileal content of reduced glutathion (GSH) as well as Lactate dehydrogenas (LDH) activity, associated with elevation of ileal contents of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), nitrite, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Intestinal ischemic insults were exacerbated by radiation injury on comparing different untreated controls; except the ileal content of GSH which has elevated due to the preconditioning effect of irradiation. Vitamin E provided a significant protection against the decrease in LDH activity as well as the increase in TBARS

  8. Simulated rat intestinal fluid improves oral exposure prediction for poorly soluble compounds over a wide dose range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Berghausen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Solubility can be the absorption limiting factor for drug candidates and is therefore a very important input parameter for oral exposure prediction of compounds with limited solubility. Biorelevant media of the fasted and fed state have been published for humans, as well as for dogs in the fasted state. In a drug discovery environment, rodents are the most common animal model to assess the oral exposure of drug candidates. In this study a rat simulated intestinal fluid (rSIF is proposed as a more physiologically relevant media to describe drug solubility in rats. Equilibrium solubility in this medium was tested as input parameter for physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK simulations of oral pharmacokinetics in the rat. Simulations were compared to those obtained using other solubility values as input parameters, like buffer at pH 6.8, human simulated intestinal fluid and a comprehensive dissolution assay based on rSIF. Our study on nine different compounds demonstrates that the incorporation of rSIF equilibrium solubility values into PBPK models of oral drug exposure can significantly improve the reliability of simulations in rats for doses up to 300 mg/kg compared to other media. The comprehensive dissolution assay may help to improve further simulation outcome, but the greater experimental effort as compared to equilibrium solubility may limit its use in a drug discovery environment. Overall, PBPK simulations based on solubility in the proposed rSIF medium can improve prioritizing compounds in drug discovery as well as planning dose escalation studies, e.g. during toxicological investigations.

  9. Human Breast Milk and Infant Formulas Differentially Modify the Intestinal Microbiota in Human Infants and Host Physiology in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenmin; Roy, Nicole C; Guo, Yanhong; Jia, Hongxin; Ryan, Leigh; Samuelsson, Linda; Thomas, Ancy; Plowman, Jeff; Clerens, Stefan; Day, Li; Young, Wayne

    2016-02-01

    In the absence of human breast milk, infant and follow-on formulas can still promote efficient growth and development. However, infant formulas can differ in their nutritional value. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of human milk (HM) and infant formulas in human infants and a weanling rat model. In a 3 wk clinical randomized controlled trial, babies (7- to 90-d-old, male-to-female ratio 1:1) were exclusively breastfed (BF), exclusively fed Synlait Pure Canterbury Stage 1 infant formula (SPCF), or fed assorted standard formulas (SFs) purchased by their parents. We also compared feeding HM or SPCF in weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats for 28 d. We examined the effects of HM and infant formulas on fecal short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and bacterial composition in human infants, and intestinal SCFAs, the microbiota, and host physiology in weanling rats. Fecal Bifidobacterium concentrations (mean log copy number ± SEM) were higher (P = 0.003) in BF (8.17 ± 0.3) and SPCF-fed infants (8.29 ± 0.3) compared with those fed the SFs (6.94 ± 0.3). Fecal acetic acid (mean ± SEM) was also higher (P = 0.007) in the BF (5.5 ± 0.2 mg/g) and SPCF (5.3 ± 2.4 mg/g) groups compared with SF-fed babies (4.3 ± 0.2 mg/g). Colonic SCFAs did not differ between HM- and SPCF-fed rats. However, cecal acetic acid concentrations were higher (P = 0.001) in rats fed HM (42.6 ± 2.6 mg/g) than in those fed SPCF (30.6 ± 0.8 mg/g). Cecal transcriptome, proteome, and plasma metabolite analyses indicated that the growth and maturation of intestinal tissue was more highly promoted by HM than SPCF. Fecal bacterial composition and SCFA concentrations were similar in babies fed SPCF or HM. However, results from the rat study showed substantial differences in host physiology between rats fed HM and SPCF. This trial was registered at Shanghai Jiào tong University School of Medicine as XHEC-C-2012-024. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Activity of retinene palmitasynthetase and retinene palmitatehydrolase in the small intestine mucosa and membranes of its cells in white rats affected by A-avitaminosis and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leutskij, K.M.; Sovtysik, D.D.

    1977-01-01

    A combined action of A-avitaminosis and ionizing radiation on the activity of retinenepalmitatesynthetase and retinenepalmitatehydrolase in the small intestine mucosa and cell membranes of white rats has been investigated. The activity of retinenepalmitatehydrolase has been shown to decrease in the irradiated animals deficient in vitamin A as compared to the control nonirradiated animals. The activity of retinenepalmitatesynthetase affected by a combination of A-avitaminosis and irradiation increases as compared to the control nonirradiated rats both in the small intestine mucosa and its cell membranes

  11. Synergistic effect of supplemental enteral nutrients and exogenous glucagon-like peptide 2 on intestinal adaptation in a rat model of short bowel syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaowen; Nelson, David W; Holst, Jens Juul

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Short bowel syndrome (SBS) can lead to intestinal failure and require total or supplemental parenteral nutrition (TPN or PN, respectively). Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-dependent, proglucagon-derived gut hormone that stimulates intestinal adaptation. OBJECTIVE: Our...... objective was to determine whether supplemental enteral nutrients (SEN) modulate the intestinotrophic response to a low dose of GLP-2 coinfused with PN in a rat model of SBS (60% jejunoileal resection plus cecectomy). DESIGN: Rats were randomly assigned to 8 treatments by using a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial design...

  12. Dietary effects of marine food intake on intestinal and hepatic enzyme activities in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, M; Caride, B; Lamas, A; Taboada, C

    2001-03-01

    Dietary effects of two diets high in protein from two marine species (Haliotis tuberculata and Anemonia viridis) as compared to a high-quality patron protein such as casein (or casein supplemented with olive oil) on intestinal and hepatic enzymes were studied. After 23 days, the two marine species as diet compared to casein increased the disaccharidase and alkaline phosphatase activities. Feeding Haliotis tuberculata meal produced a decrease on intestinal leucine aminopeptidase activity. The hepatic gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity decreased slightly in animals fed Haliotis tuberculata meal. Supplementation of casein with olive oil tended to decrease the intestinal and hepatic enzyme activity.

  13. Dietary fat and bile juice, but not obesity, are responsible for the increase in small intestinal permeability induced through the suppression of tight junction protein expression in LETO and OLETF rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Takuya

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increase in the intestinal permeability is considered to be associated with the inflammatory tone and development in the obesity and diabetes, however, the pathogenesis of the increase in the intestinal permeability is poorly understood. The present study was performed to determine the influence of obesity itself as well as dietary fat on the increase in intestinal permeability. Methods An obese rat strain, Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF, and the lean counter strain, Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO, were fed standard or high fat diets for 16 weeks. Glucose tolerance, intestinal permeability, intestinal tight junction (TJ proteins expression, plasma bile acids concentration were evaluated. In addition, the effects of rat bile juice and dietary fat, possible mediators of the increase in the intestinal permeability in the obesity, on TJ permeability were explored in human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Results The OLETF rats showed higher glucose intolerance than did the LETO rats, which became more marked with the prolonged feeding of the high fat diet. Intestinal permeability in the OLETF rats evaluated by the urinary excretion of intestinal permeability markers (Cr-EDTA and phenolsulfonphthalein was comparable to that in the LETO rats. Feeding the high fat diet increased intestinal permeability in both the OLETF and LETO rats, and the increases correlated with decreases in TJ proteins (claudin-1, claudin-3, occludin and junctional adhesion molecule-1 expression in the small, but not in the large intestine (cecum or colon. The plasma bile acids concentration was higher in rats fed the high fat diet. Exposure to bile juice and the fat emulsion increased TJ permeability with concomitant reductions in TJ protein expression (claudin-1, claudin-3, and junctional adhesion molecule-1 in the Caco-2 cell monolayers. Conclusion Excessive dietary fat and/or increased levels of luminal bile juice, but not genetic obesity, are

  14. Apolipoprotein B synthesis in rat small intestine: regulation by dietary triglyceride and biliary lipid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, N.O.; Kollmer, M.E.; Glickman, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B (apoB) synthesis rates have been determined, in vivo, in rat enterocytes. Following intralumenal administration of a pulse of [ 3 H]leucine, newly synthesized apoB was quantitated by specific immunoprecipitation and compared to [ 3 H]leucine incorporation into total, trichloroacetic acid-insoluble protein. ApoB synthesis rates were determined after acute administration of either 0.1 or 1 g of triglyceride to fasting animals. No differences were found at any time from 90 min to 6 hr after challenge and values were not different from the basal values established in fasted controls. Animals rechallenged with triglyceride after 8 days' intake of fat-free chow also failed to demonstrate a change in intestinal apoB synthesis rate. By contrast, enterocyte content of apoB appeared to fall, temporarily, with the onset of active triglyceride flux. Groups of animals were then subjected to external bile diversion for 48 hr, a maneuver designed to remove all lumenal sources of lipid. Jejunal apoB synthesis rates fell by 43% (from 0.76% +/- 0.14 to 0.43% +/- 0.12, P less than 0.001), a change that was completely prevented by continuous replacement with 10 mM Na taurocholate. The suppression of jejunal apoB synthesis, induced by prolonged bile diversion, was reversed after 14 hr, but not 8 hr, of intralumenal perfusion with 10 mM Na taurocholate. The addition of micellar fatty acid-monoolein to the perfusate for 4 hr produced no further change in apoB synthesis. Ileal apoB synthesis rates fell by 70% (from 0.61% +/- 0.15 to 0.18% +/- 0.10, P less than 0.001) following 48 hr external bile diversion, a change that was only partially prevented by continuous bile salt replacement. These results suggest that jejunal apoB synthesis demonstrates bile salt dependence but not regulation by acute triglyceride flux

  15. Histological studies on the regeneration of small-intestine epithelium of rats irradiated with sublethal doses of x rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewicki, Z; Figurski, R; Sulikowska, A

    1975-01-01

    The dynamics of regeneration of small-intestine epithelium was studied in rats irradiated with x rays in sublethal doses of 550, 600, or 750 R. Sixty-two irradiated and 22 control animals were used in the experiment. They were killed 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 14, and 25 days after the irradiation. Specimens of duodenum and jejunum were examined histologically, the sections being stained with H. E. and p.a.S. Already 1 and 2 days after irradiation the intestinal villi became shorter and deformed. The blood vessels were damaged, the enterocytes showed features of degeneration and vacuolization, the epithelium was detached by the exudate which accumulated in the strong. Irradiation markedly disturbed the regeneration of intestinal epithelium in the period from the 1st to the 6th day. Cytological calculations indicate tha on the 1st and 2nd days after irradiation the number of epithelial cells of the villi, and particularly of young cryptal ones, markedly dropped. On the 4th and 6th days increased proliferation of young cryptal cells considerably surpassed the physiological rate. The accompanying disturbances in differentiation consisted in a decreased acidophilic to basophilic cells ration and in retardation of maturation of goblet cells. The absolute number of goblet cells was increased, as well as their proportion to the number of enterocytes.

  16. Features of blood serum protein spectrum and cytokine spectrum of rats with chronic carrageenan-induced intestinal inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Tkachenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been established that features of modern diet might be considered as a possible source of inflammatory diseases of gastrointestinal tract. Particular attention is paid to the role of different food additives in the development of intestinal inflammation, including the food additive E407, known as carrageenan. A model of chronic carrageenan-induced gastroenterocolitis of moderate severity has been elaborated, which allows us to study carrageenan-induced intestinal inflammation. In particular, the features of blood serum protein spectrum and cytokine spectrum in chronic carrageenan-induced intestinal inflammation are not studied. The female Wistar rats have been used for the experiment. Chronic carrageenan-induced gastroenterocolitis has been reproduced by the free access of animals to 1% solution of carrageenan in drinking water. Laboratory animals have been divided into 3 groups. Group № 1 consisted of experimental animals, who consumed food additive carrageenan during 2 weeks and group № 2 included experimental animals, who consumed food additive carrageenan during 4 weeks. Group № 3 consisted of intact healthy animals. The development of gastroenterocolitis has been proved morphologically and biochemically. Manipulations with animals have been carried out in accordance with the provisions of the European Convention for the Protection of Vertebrate Animals used for Experimental and other Scientific Purposes (Strasbourg, 1986. It has been established that the disease has been associated with dysproteinemia. The level of α1-globulins increased after 2 weeks of carrageenan consumption and has been normalized in animals, who consumed carrageenan during 4 weeks. The similar changes have been observed for α2-globulins level. It could be explained by production of acute phase proteins, such as α1-acid glycoprotein, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, α2-macroglobulin, ceruloplasmin, etc. The intake of carrageenan also caused

  17. Enzymatic conversion of all-trans-β-carotene to retinal by a cytosolic enzyme from rabbit and rat intestinal mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshman, M.R.; Mychkovsky, I.; Attlesey, M.

    1989-01-01

    Enzymatic conversion of all-trans-β-carotene to retinal by a partially purified enzyme from rabbit and rat intestinal mucosa was demonstrated. The enzymatic product was characterized based on the following evidence: (i) the product gave rise to its O-ethyloxime by treatment with O-ethylhydroxylamine with an absorption maximum at 363 nm in ethanol characteristics of authentic retinal O-ethyloxime. High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of this derivative yielded a sharp peak with a retention time of 7.99 min corresponding to the authentic compound; (ii) the mass spectrum of the O-ethyloxime of the enzymatic product was identical to that of authentic retinal O-ethyloxime; (iii) the specific activity of the enzymatically formed [ 14 C]retinal O-ethyloxime remained constant even after repeated crystallization; (iv) the enzymatic product exhibited an absorption maximum at 370 nm in light petroleum characteristic of authentic retinal. This retinol was enzymatically esterified to retinyl palmitate by rat pancreatic esterase with a retention time of 10 min on HPLC corresponding to authentic retinyl palmitate. Thus, the enzymatic product of β-carotene cleavage by the partially purified intestinal enzyme was unequivocally confirmed to be retinal

  18. The effect of sex differences on induction of intestinal metaplasia in x-ray irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiromitsu; Takizawa, Shoichi; Terada, Yoritake; Naito, Masashi; Naito, Yukiko

    1980-01-01

    The effects of sex differences and ovarian resection on induction of intestinal metaplasia in x-ray irradiated mice were discussed. 1,000 rad of x-ray was irradiated to the stomach of female and male mice twice at intervals of 3 days. The range of intestinal metaplasia in male mice was wider than that in female mice. A total of 400 rad was irradiated to the whole body of mice which underwent ovarian resection (group 1), mice which underwent autotransplantation of the ovary after ovarian resection (group 2), and mice which underwent sham-ovarian resection (group 3). The incidence of intestinal metaplasia in the group 1 was significantly higher than that in the group 3. The weight of the uterus decreased gradually in order of the group 3, group 2, and group 1. It was suggested from above-mentioned results that disappearance or lowering of femal sex hormones, that is, male or androphacy, induced intestinal metaplasia. (Tsunoda, M.)

  19. rates of gastric emptying and small intestinal motility in pregnant rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-09-30

    Sep 30, 2016 ... The animals were allowed 2 weeks to acclimatize and had .... our thinking may have compressed intestinal lumen. ... The assistance given by Akpamu U from the onset of this research work to its end is greatly acknowledged.

  20. IGF-1 decreases portal vein endotoxin via regulating intestinal tight junctions and plays a role in attenuating portal hypertension of cirrhotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tian-Yu; Su, Li-Ping; Ma, Chun-Ye; Zhai, Xiao-Han; Duan, Zhi-Jun; Zhu, Ying; Zhao, Gang; Li, Chun-Yan; Wang, Li-Xia; Yang, Dong

    2015-07-08

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction is not only the consequence of liver cirrhosis, but also an active participant in the development of liver cirrhosis. Previous studies showed that external administration of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) improved intestinal barrier function in liver cirrhosis. However, the mechanism of IGF-1 on intestinal barrier in liver cirrhosis is not fully elucidated. The present study aims to investigate the mechanisms of IGF-1 improving intestinal barrier function via regulating tight junctions in intestines. We used carbon tetrachloride induced liver cirrhotic rats to investigate the effect of IGF-1 on intestinal claudin-1 and occludin expressions, serum alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) levels, severity of liver fibrosis, portal pressures, enterocytic apoptosis and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) levels in portal vein. The changes of IGF-1 in serum during the development of rat liver cirrhosis were also evaluated. Additionally, we assessed the effect of IGF-1 on claudin-1 and occludin expressions, changes of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and apoptosis in Caco-2 cells to confirm in vivo findings. Serum IGF-1 levels were decreased in the development of rat liver cirrhosis, and external administration of IGF-1 restored serum IGF-1 levels. External administration of IGF-1 reduced serum ALT and AST levels, severity of liver fibrosis, LPS levels in portal vein, enterocytic apoptosis and portal pressure in cirrhotic rats. External administration of IGF-1 increased the expressions of claudin-1 and occludin in enterocytes, and attenuated tight junction dysfunction in intestines of cirrhotic rats. LPS decreased TEER in Caco-2 cell monolayer. LPS also decreased claudin-1 and occludin expressions and increased apoptosis in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, IGF-1 attenuated the effect of LPS on TEER, claudin-1 expression, occludin expression and apoptosis in Caco-2 cells. Tight junction dysfunction develops during the

  1. Intestinal helminths infection of rats (Ratus norvegicus) in the Belgrade area (Serbia): the effect of sex, age and habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataranovski, M; Mirkov, I; Belij, S; Popov, A; Petrovic, Z; Gaci, Z; Kataranovski, D

    2011-05-01

    Gastrointestinal helminths of Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) from the Belgrade area were studied as a part of a wider ecological research of rats in Serbia (data on the distribution, population ecology, economic and epizoothiological-epidemiological importance, and density control). Rats were captured from May 2005 to July 2009 at both urban and suburban-rural sites. Of a total of 302 trapped rats 48% were males and 52% females, with 36.5% and 38.8% of juvenile-subadult individuals, per sex respectively. Intestinal helminth infection was noted in 68.5% of rats, with a higher prevalence in male hosts and in adult individuals. Higher numbers of infected juveniles-subadults were noted in suburban-rural habitats, while an opposite tendency was noted in adult rats. Seven helminth species were recovered, of which five were nematode (Heterakis spumosa, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Capillaria sp., Trichuris muns and Syphacia muris) and two cestode species (Hymenolepis diminuta and Rodentolepis fraterna). The most prevalent parasites were Heterakis spumosa (36.7%) and Hymenolepis diminuta (30.5 %). Sex and habitat-related differences were noted in the prevalence of infection with Capillaria sp. and Trichuris muris, while there were no age-related differences in the prevalence of infection with any individual helminth species. Significantly higher prevalence of infection was noted in summer as compared to spring or winter, with a tendency to be higher in autumn as compared to spring. The only significant difference in the prevalence of infection between habitat-related was noted during spring. H. spumosa was most prevalent in summer, while H. diminuta and N. brasiliensis in autumn. The mean intensity of infection with H. spumosa, R. fraterna, S. muris and T muris was higher in autumn than in the other seasons, while N. brasiliensis and Capillaria sp. occured in winter. No more than four helminth species were found in one host.

  2. The Turning Point for Morphomechanical Remodeling During Complete Intestinal Obstruction in Rats Occurs After 12-24 h.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Daming; Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Huang, Zhiyong; Gregersen, Hans

    2018-05-01

    Intestinal obstruction prompts luminal dilation and wall remodeling proximal to the site of obstruction. Studies on temporal and spatial morphomechanical remodeling are needed for comprehending the pathophysiology of acute intestinal obstruction. The aim was to estimate the no-load and zero-stress morphomechanical properties in circumferential and longitudinal direction at 0, 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h after complete intestinal obstruction. Obstruction of the distal ileum was created surgically by placement of a polyethylene ring for up to 48 h in 30 rats. Sham and normal groups were also studied (n = 12). Five 6 cm-long intestinal segments proximal to the obstruction site were used for histological, morphometric and mechanical analysis at the designated times. Morphomechanical changes were huge but only subtle changes were observed between the 5 segments during the obstruction period. Due to dilation, the serosal length and mucosal length increased continuously from 6 to 48 h (p h and beyond (p h where after the opening angle increased and the bending angle returned to pre-obstruction levels. For the residual stretch ratios and the position of the neutral axis the turning point was found after 24 h. Histologically, the thickness and area of most wall layers were quite stable for the first 12 h but with an increase at the 24 h time point that continued to the 48 h time point. The most pronounced change was found for the circumferential muscle layer (p h after creating the obstruction.

  3. Alteration of lipid metabolism in rats with intestinal syndrome of raiation sickness in conditions of parenteral feeding with lipofundfin and infusolipol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, S.A.; Yusupova, I.U.; Grozdov, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    Local X-irradiation of rat abdomen (13.5 Gy) caused a pronounced intestinal syndrome which was partially coped with by parenteral feeding. The results indicate (1) a satisfactory assimilation of fatty emulsions used at certain doses and with certain parenteral diet composition, (2) a favourable effect of fatty emulsions on lipid metabolism in irradiated rats, and (3) some advantages of the parenteral feeding with infusolipol over lipofundin S

  4. Activated Α7nachr Improves Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction and Intestinal Injury Induced by Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Rats: Inhibition of the Proinflammatory Response Through the Th17 Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyan Chen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Backgrund/Aims: To investigate the effects of activated α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR on postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD and intestinal injury induced by cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB and its relationship with the Th17 response in order to provide a theoretical basis for organ protection and targeted drug therapy during the perioperative period. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rat models of CPB were established. Rat intestinal and brain injuries were observed after CPB using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Cell apoptosis was determined using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. Inflammatory factors and markers of brain injury in rat serum were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression levels of Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3, ZO-1, occludin, AQP4, RORγT, and α7nAchR were examined using western blotting. Transcription factor RORγT expression was determined using real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Th17 cells in the peripheral blood and spleen were determined using flow cytometry. α7nAchR knockout rats were established. The Th17 response in the peripheral blood and spleen of α7nAchR knockout rats was further verified using flow cytometry. Results: CPB can induce POCD and intestinal injury in rats. α7nAchR activation markedly reduced intestinal injury, POCD, neuronal apoptosis, proinflammatory factor expression, and number of CD4+IL-17+ cells. α7nAchR knockout significantly increased serum D-lactic acid, FABP2, S-100β, NSE, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-17 secretion. The number of CD4+IL-17+ cells was also significantly increased. Conclusion: α7nAchR activation markedly ameliorates the intestinal injury and POCD induced by CPB. Inhibition of the Th17 immune response can reduce the proinflammatory response, which could provide a new method for clinical perioperative organ protection and targeted drug therapy.

  5. Absorption kinetics of vitamin E nanoemulsion and green tea microstructures by intestinal in situ single perfusion technique in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saratale, Rijuta Ganesh; Lee, Hee-Seok; Koo, Yong Eui; Saratale, Ganesh Dattatraya; Kim, Young Jun; Imm, Jee Young; Park, Yooheon

    2018-04-01

    The absorption kinetics of food ingredients such as nanoemulsified vitamin E and green tea microstructures were evaluated by the intestinal in situ single perfusion technique. Absorption rate, sub-acute oral toxicity and organ morphology in a rat model were examined. The intestinal in situ single perfusion technique and HPLC analysis were applied to investigate the absorption rate of selected materials by examining time-dependent changes in the serum levels of catechin and dl-α-tocopherol. The acute toxicity test and histopathological evaluation were applied to analyze the safety of microsized green tea and nanosized vitamin E in a rat model. Total serum dl-α-tocopherol levels significantly increased with nanosized vitamin E administration (PE until 90min after administration showed significantly increased absorption rate of serum dl-α-tocopherol levels at each time point (10min interval) (PE and microsized green tea did not show signs of acute toxicity or death after 14days of observation. In addition, macroscopic analysis showed that there were no changes in representative organ sections of rats following the oral administration of food-related nanoscale materials. We successfully demonstrated that using nanosized vitamin E increased absorption rate to a greater extent than normal food-related material, and these results occurs via safety analyses on food-related nanoscale materials for human consumption. These results could be useful for the design and development of novel nanoemulsified vitamin E and microsized green tea formulations that can overcome the problem of their bioavailability and improve their efficacy while still maintaining their essential therapeutic efficacies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. To observe the intensity of the inflammatory reaction caused by neonatal urine and meconium on the intestinal wall of rats in order to understand etiology of intestinal damage in gastroschisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devdas S Samala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this experimental study was to observe the intensity of the inflammatory reaction caused by neonatal urine and meconium on the intestinal wall of rats to better understand etiology of intestinal damage in gastroschisis. Materials and Methods: A total of 24 adult Wistar rats were used as experimental models to simulate the effect of exposed bowel in cases of gastroschisis. The peritoneal cavity of the rats was injected with substances which constitute human amniotic fluid to study the effect on the bowel. Sterile urine and meconium were obtained from newborn humans. The rats were divided into four groups according to the material to be injected. In Group I (Control group 3 mL of distilled water was injected, in Group II (Urine group 3 mL of neonatal urine was injected, in Group III (Meconium group 5% meconium suspension was injected, while in Group IV, a combination of 5% meconium suspension and urine was injected. A total of 3mL solution was injected into the right inferior quadrant twice a day for 5 days. The animals were sacrificed on the 6 th day by a high dose of thiopentone sodium. A segment of small bowel specimen was excised, fixed in paraffin, and stained with hematoxylin-eosin for microscopic analysis for determination of the degree of inflammatory reaction in the intestinal wall. All pathology specimens were studied by the same pathologist. Results: The maximum bowel damage was seen in Group II (Urine group in the form of serositis, severe enteritis, parietal necrosis, and peeling. A lesser degree of damage was observed in Group III (Meconium group as mild enteritis (mild lymphoid hyperplasia. The least damage was seen in Group IV (Combination of meconium and urine and Group I (Control group. Conclusion: The intraabdominal injection of neonatal human urine produces significant inflammatory reactions in the intestinal wall of rats.

  7. Effects of stress on gastrointestinal function: interactions of neural and endocrine systems in mediating stress-induced intestinal dysfunction in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    The etiology of stress-induced intestinal dysfunction is completely unresolved, and the lack of an appropriate animal model has hindered studies of causality. We compared a number of stressors and their resultant effects on intestinal transit, a measure of the propulsive motor activity of the gut, in the rat. We found that the response of the intestine to stress, and the neural systems activated by stress, were dependent on the type and duration of stress, as well as the animal strain, and gender. We developed a model, acute wrapping restraint stress, to fully characterize the effects of stress on intestinal transit. Wrap restraint stress is a nonulcerogenic model in which rats are subjected to acute restraint by wrapping them in a harness of paper tape to restrict, but not prevent movement of the upper body and forelimbs. Transit was evaluated by the geometric center method, in which a radiomarker ( 51 Cr) is instilled directly into the proximal duodenum and proximal colon via a surgically placed intestinal cannula, in fasted, adult female Sprague Dawley rats

  8. Lateralized hippocampal effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide on learning and memory in rats in a model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Margarita; Belcheva, Stiliana; Belcheva, Iren; Negrev, Negrin; Tashev, Roman

    2012-06-01

    Findings of pharmacological studies revealed that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) plays a modulatory role in learning and memory. A role of the peptide in the neurobiological mechanisms of affective disorders was also suggested. The objectives are to study the involvement of VIP in learning and memory processes after unilateral and bilateral local application into hippocampal CA1 area in rats with a model of depression (bilateral olfactory bulbectomy--OBX) and to test whether VIP receptors could affect cognition. VIP (50 ng) and combination (VIP(6-28) 10 ng + VIP 50 ng) microinjected bilaterally or into the right CA1 area improved the learning and memory of OBX rats in shuttle-box and step-through behavioral tests as compared to the saline-treated OBX controls. Left-side VIP microinjections did not affect the number of avoidances (shuttle box) and learning criteria (step through) as compared to the left-side saline-treated OBX controls. The administration of the combination into left CA1 influenced positively the performance in the step-through task. VIP antagonist (VIP(6-28), 10 ng) did not affect learning and memory of OBX rats. These findings suggest asymmetric effect of VIP on cognitive processes in hippocampus of rats with OBX model of depression. Our results point to a lateralized modulatory effect of VIP injected in the hippocampal CA1 area on the avoidance deficits in OBX rats. The right CA1 area was predominantly involved in the positive effect of VIP on learning and memory. A possible role of the PAC1 receptors is suggested.

  9. Downregulation of hepatic and intestinal ATP-binding-cassette transporters abcg5 and abcg8 expression associated with altered sterol fluxes in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloks, VW; Bakker-van Waarde, WW; Verkade, HJ; Kema, IP; Havinga, R; Wolters, H; Schaap, FG; Sauer, PJJ; Vink, E; Groen, AK; Kuipers, F

    ABSTRACT: P234 Downregulation of Hepatic and Intestinal ATP-Binding-Cassette Transporters Abcg5 and Abcg8 Expression Associated with Altered Sterol Fluxes in Rats with Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes Vincent W. Bloks, Willie W. Bakker-van Waarde, Henkjan J. Verkade, Ido P. Kema, Rick Havinga, Henk

  10. Fate and effect of ingested Bacillus cereus spores and vegetative cells in the intestinal tract of human-flora-associated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcks, Andrea; Hansen, Bjarne Munk; Hendriksen, Niels Bohse

    2006-01-01

    The fate and effect of Bacillus cereus F4433/73R in the intestine of human-flora-associated rats was studied using bacteriological culturing techniques and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in combination with cell assays and immunoassays for detection of enterotoxins. In faecal samples...

  11. Sorbitol increases muscle glucose uptake ex vivo and inhibits intestinal glucose absorption ex vivo and in normal and type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwuma, Chika Ifeanyi; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested that sorbitol, a known polyol sweetener, possesses glycemic control potentials. However, the effect of sorbitol on intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake still remains elusive. The present study investigated the effects of sorbitol on intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake as possible anti-hyperglycemic or glycemic control potentials using ex vivo and in vivo experimental models. Sorbitol (2.5% to 20%) inhibited glucose absorption in isolated rat jejuna (IC 50 = 14.6% ± 4.6%) and increased glucose uptake in isolated rat psoas muscle with (GU 50 = 3.5% ± 1.6%) or without insulin (GU 50 = 7.0% ± 0.5%) in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, sorbitol significantly delayed gastric emptying, accelerated digesta transit, inhibited intestinal glucose absorption, and reduced blood glucose increase in both normoglycemic and type 2 diabetic rats after 1 h of coingestion with glucose. Data of this study suggest that sorbitol exhibited anti-hyperglycemic potentials, possibly via increasing muscle glucose uptake ex vivo and reducing intestinal glucose absorption in normal and type 2 diabetic rats. Hence, sorbitol may be further investigated as a possible anti-hyperglycemic sweetener.

  12. Characterization of an endoprotease from rat small intestinal mucosal secretory granules which generates somatostatin-28 from prosomatostatin by cleavage after a single arginine residue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beinfeld, M. C.; Bourdais, J.; Kuks, P.; Morel, A.; Cohen, P.

    1989-01-01

    We have extracted, characterized, and partially purified an enzyme from secretory granules from rat small intestinal mucosa which cleaves a synthetic prosomatostatin substrate on the carboxyl side of a single arginine residue. This substrate Leu-Gln-Arg-Ser-Ala-Asn-Ser-NH2 contains the monobasic

  13. The influence of intestine-based treatment using Xuan Bai Cheng Qi Tang on the concentration of trace elements in the main organs of COPD rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiamin Yang

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: This study showed that “treating from the intestine” using Xuan Bai Cheng Qi Tang and its modified formulae can regulate the concentration of trace elements in the main organs of COPD rats. This may be one of the mechanisms for intestine-based treatment for COPD.

  14. Histopathologic changes induced in rats by localized x-irradiation of an exteriorized segment of the small intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebes, J I; Zaldivar, R; Vogel, Jr, H H [Tennessee Univ., Memphis (USA). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Tennessee Univ., Memphis (USA). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1975-10-01

    The sequence of histopathological changes was described after X-irradiation of the exteriorized segment (3 cm) of the rat ileum with a single dose of 2,200 R. A one-year follow-up was provided in rats whose exteriorized intestinal segments were irradiated. Comparisons were made between one group of animals in which the superior mesenteric artery and vein were clamped during irradiation and a second group in which these vessels were not clamped. A third group of sham-irradiated controls was used for comparisons. There was a delay in the onset and progression of the radiation damage to the mucosa of the hypoxic animals in the acute post-irradiation phase. In addition, prolongation of survival in the rats with the superior mesenteric vessels clamped was observed. Mucosal regeneration was noted, occurring at 52 days post-exposure. No adenocarcinomas were found up to 354 days after irradiation. An angiofibroma and a highly differentiated osteoid lesion were described.

  15. Localization of plutonium retention in the small intestine of the neonatal rat, guinea pig, baboon and macaca after Pu-citrate ingestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsch, P.; Lataillade, G.; Beauvallet, M.; L'Hullier, I.; Lepage, M.; Metivier, H.; Masse, R.; Moutairou, K.; avi, 526, Republique Populaire du Benin)

    1988-01-01

    The retention of Pu-citrate in the gastrointestinal wall was compared at similar post ingestion times after ingestion at 2 days of age by rats and guinea pigs and at 1 to 34 days by neonatal primates. The small intestine was the main site of the Pu retention in all species. In rats and primates, most of the Pu was retained in the distal ileum, whereas in guinea pigs it was more homogeneously distributed. In the rats, Pu was retained in the epithelial cells on villi, but in the guinea pigs and primates it was confined to the macrophages under the epithelial cells in the lacteal region. (author)

  16. Effects of Onion (Allium cepa L. Extract Administration on Intestinal α-Glucosidases Activities and Spikes in Postprandial Blood Glucose Levels in SD Rats Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Ho Kim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Diets high in calories and sweetened foods with disaccharides frequently lead to exaggerated postprandial spikes in blood glucose. This state induces immediate oxidant stress and free radicals which trigger oxidative stress-linked diabetic complications. One of the therapeutic approaches for decreasing postprandial hyperglycemia is to retard absorption of glucose by the inhibition of carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes,α-amylase and α-glucosidases, in the digestive organs. Therefore, the inhibitory activity of Korean onion (Allium cepa L. extract against rat intestinal α-glucosidases, such as sucrase, maltase, and porcine pancreatic α-amylase were investigated in vitro and in vivo. The content of quercetin in ethyl alcohol extract of onion skin (EOS was 6.04 g/100 g dried weight of onion skin. The in vitro half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50 of EOS and quercetin, a major phenolic in onion, on rat intestinal sucrase were 0.40 and 0.11 mg/mL, respectively. The postprandial blood glucose lowering effects of EOS and quercetin were compared to a known type 2 diabetes drug (Acarbose, a strong α-glucosidase inhibitor in the Sprague-Dawley (SD rat model. In rats fed on sucrose, EOS significantly reduced the blood glucose spike after sucrose loading. The area under the blood glucose-time curve (AUClast in EOS-treated SD rats (0.5 g-EOS/kg was significantly lower than in untreated SD rats (259.6 ± 5.1 vs. 283.1 ± 19.2 h·mg/dL. The AUClast in quercetin-treated SD rats (0.5 g-quercetin/kg was similar to in EOS-treated group (256.1 ± 3.2 vs. 259.6 ± 5.1 h·mg/dL. Results from this study indicates that although quercetin does have blood glucose lowering potential via α-glucosidase inhibition, there are other bioactive compounds present in onion skin. Furthermore, the effects of two weeks administration of EOS in a high carbohydrate-dietary mixture (Pico 5053 on sucrase and maltase activities in intestine were evaluated in SD rat model

  17. Carbohydrase and phytase supplementation in diets for semi-heavy laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Geraldo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to evaluate the association of phytase with an enzymatic complex comprised of carbohydrases (α-galactosidase, galactomannan, xylanase and β-glucanase in nutrition reduction diets for semi-heavy laying hens and its effect on egg performance and egg quality. Four hundred Isa Brown laying hens with 42 to 57 weeks of age were distributed in an entirely random experiment with five treatments and 8 repetitions, during five production periods of 21 days. Variables studied: egg production, feed intake, mean egg weight, feed conversion, Haugh unit, percentage of yolk, egg white and albumen, yolk color, eggshell thickness and specific gravity. There was a significant interaction (p 0.05 of treatment on production, egg weight or internal and external egg quality. Treatment effects on feed conversion showed better values for hens fed with the control diet. The levels of nutrient reduction used in the diets with or without enzyme supplementation did not provide good results with regard to feed conversion and feed intake. However, they did not affect the other parameters for egg production and internal and external egg quality.

  18. Vagal afferents are essential for maximal resection-induced intestinal adaptive growth in orally fed rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, David W; Liu, Xiaowen; Holst, Jens Juul

    2006-01-01

    in mucosal mass, protein, DNA, and histology. Both systemic and perivagal capsaicin significantly attenuated by 48-100% resection-induced increases in ileal mucosal mass, protein, and DNA in rats fed orally. Villus height was significantly reduced in resected rats given capsaicin compared with vehicle...

  19. Effect of honey consumption on intestinal motility in male albino rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    fed on rat feed, water and honey ( 1 ml of honey to every 10 ml initial drinking water daily) for twenty two (22) weeks after which the rats were starved over night before the experiment and sacrificed by stunning. .... stand for 30 minutes after which it settled into three .... with sucrose and a sugar-free diet on neutrophil.

  20. Germination and conjugation of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in the intestine of gnotobiotic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcks, Andrea; Ørum-Smidt, Lasse; Bahl, Martin Iain

    2008-01-01

    of growth and sporulation of vegetative cells. For the first time conjugative plasmid transfer in a mammalian intestinal tract was shown between two B. thuringiensis strains. Significance and Impact of the Study: Strains of B. thuringiensis are used worldwide to combat insect pests, and this study brings...

  1. Effects of bile diversion in rats on intestinal sphingomyelinases and ceramidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duan, R. D.; Verkade, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Havinga, R.; Nilsson, A.

    Alkaline sphingomyelinase (Alk-SMase) and neutral ceramidase (N-CDase) in the intestinal microvillar membrane are responsible for dietary sphingomyelin digestion. The activities of the enzymes require the presence of bile salt, and the enzymes can be released into the gut lumen in active forms by

  2. Intestinal capacity to digest and absorb carbohydrates is maintained in a rat model of cholestasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los, E. Leonie; Wolters, Henk; Stellaard, Frans; Kuipers, Folkert; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.

    Cholestasis is associated with systemic accumulation of bile salts and with deficiency of bile in the intestinal lumen. During the past years bile salts have been identified as signaling molecules that regulate lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism. Bile salts have also been shown to activate

  3. The effects of selected flavonoids on cytochromes P450 in rat liver and small intestine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížková, J.; Burdová, K.; Stiborová, M.; Křen, Vladimír; Hodek, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2009), s. 201-204 ISSN 1337-6853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD305/09/H008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : flavonoids * cytochrome p450 * small intestine Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  4. Total Glucosides of Paeony Promote Intestinal Motility in Slow Transit Constipation Rats through Amelioration of Interstitial Cells of Cajal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feiye Zhu

    Full Text Available Using an atropine-diphenoxylate-induced slow transit constipation (STC model, this study explored the effects of the total glucosides of paeony (TGP in the treatment of STC and the possible mechanisms.A prospective experimental animal study.The constipation model was set up in rats with an oral gavage of atropine-diphenoxylate and then treated with the TGP. The volume and moisture content of the faeces were observed and the intestinal kinetic power was evaluated. Meanwhile, the colorimetric method and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were employed to determine the changes of nitric oxide (NO, nitric oxide synthase (NOS, vasoative intestinal peptide (VIP and the P substance (SP in the serum, respectively. The protein expressions of c-kit and stem cell factor (SCF were assessed by immunohistochemical analysis and western blot, respectively, and the mRNA level of c-kit was measured by a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR.The TGP attenuated STC responses in terms of an increase in the fecal volume and moisture content, an enhancement of intestinal transit rate and the reduction of NO, NOS and VIP in the serum. In addition, the c-kit, a labeling of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC increased at both protein and mRNA levels. SCF, which serves as a ligand of c-kit also increased at protein level.The analysis of our data indicated that the TGP could obviously attenuate STC through improving the function of ICC and blocking the inhibitory neurotransmitters such as NO, NOS and VIP.

  5. Total Glucosides of Paeony Promote Intestinal Motility in Slow Transit Constipation Rats through Amelioration of Interstitial Cells of Cajal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feiye; Xu, Shan; Zhang, Yongsheng; Chen, Fangming; Ji, Jinjun; Xie, Guanqun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Using an atropine-diphenoxylate-induced slow transit constipation (STC) model, this study explored the effects of the total glucosides of paeony (TGP) in the treatment of STC and the possible mechanisms. Study Design A prospective experimental animal study. Methods The constipation model was set up in rats with an oral gavage of atropine-diphenoxylate and then treated with the TGP. The volume and moisture content of the faeces were observed and the intestinal kinetic power was evaluated. Meanwhile, the colorimetric method and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were employed to determine the changes of nitric oxide (NO), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), vasoative intestinal peptide (VIP) and the P substance (SP) in the serum, respectively. The protein expressions of c-kit and stem cell factor (SCF) were assessed by immunohistochemical analysis and western blot, respectively, and the mRNA level of c-kit was measured by a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results The TGP attenuated STC responses in terms of an increase in the fecal volume and moisture content, an enhancement of intestinal transit rate and the reduction of NO, NOS and VIP in the serum. In addition, the c-kit, a labeling of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) increased at both protein and mRNA levels. SCF, which serves as a ligand of c-kit also increased at protein level. Conclusion The analysis of our data indicated that the TGP could obviously attenuate STC through improving the function of ICC and blocking the inhibitory neurotransmitters such as NO, NOS and VIP. PMID:27478893

  6. Effect of acute, slightly increased intra-abdominal pressure on intestinal permeability and oxidative stress in a rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Leng

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH is known as a common, serious complication in critically ill patients. Bacterial translocation and permeability changes are considered the pathophysiological bases for IAH-induced enterogenic endotoxemia and subsequent multiorgan failure. Nevertheless, the effects of slightly elevated intra-abdominal pressures (IAPs on the intestinal mucosa and the associated mechanisms remain unclear. METHODS: To investigate the acute effects of different nitrogen pneumoperitoneum grades on colonic mucosa, male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to six groups with different IAPs (0 [control], 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 mmHg, n = 6/group. During 90 min of exposure, we dynamically monitored the heart rate and noninvasive hemodynamic parameters. After gradual decompression, arterial blood gas analyses were conducted. Thereafter, structural injuries to the colonic mucosa were identified using light microscopy. Colon permeability was determined using the expression of tight junction proteins, combined with fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FD-4 absorption. The pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance was determined based on the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and antioxidant enzymes. RESULTS: IAH significantly affected the histological scores of the colonic mucosa, tight junction protein expression, mucosal permeability, and pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance. Interestingly, elevations of IAP that were lower than the threshold for IAH also showed a similar, undesirable effect. In the 8 mmHg group, mild hyponatremia, hypocalcemia, and hypoxemia occurred, accompanied by reduced blood and abdominal perfusion pressures. Mild microscopic inflammatory infiltration and increased MDA levels were also detected. Moreover, an 8-mm Hg IAP markedly inhibited the expression of tight junction proteins, although no significant differences in FD-4 permeability were observed between the 0- and 8-mmHg groups. CONCLUSIONS: Acute exposure to slightly

  7. Pretreatment with remifentanil protects against the reduced-intestinal contractility related to the ischemia and reperfusion injury in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Sayan-Ozacmak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Serious functional and structural alterations of gastrointestinal tract are observed in failure of blood supply, leading to gastrointestinal dismotility. Activation of opioid receptors provides cardioprotective effect against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injury. The aim of the present study was to determine whether or not remifentanil could reduce I/R injury of small intestine. METHODS: Male Wistar Albino rats were subjected to mesenteric ischemia (30 min followed by reperfusion (3 h. Four groups were designed: sham control; remifentanil alone; I/R control; and remifentanil + I/R. Animals in remifentanil + I/R group were subjected to infusion of remifentanil (2 ug kg-1 min-1 for 60 min, half of which started before inducing ischemia. Collecting the ileum tissues, evaluation of damage was based on contractile responses to carbachol, levels of lipid peroxidation and neutrophil infiltration, and observation of histopathological features in intestinal tissue. RESULTS: Following reperfusion, a significant decrease in carbachol-induced contractile response, a remarkable increase in both lipid peroxidation and neutrophil infiltration, and a significant injury in mucosa were observed. An average contractile response of remifentanil + I/R group was significantly different from that of the I/R group. Lipid peroxidation and neutrophil infiltration were also significantly suppressed by the treatment. The tissue samples of the I/R group were grade 4 in histopathological evaluation. In remifentanil + I/R group, on the other hand, the mucosal damage was moderate, staging as grade 1. CONCLUSIONS: The pretreatment with remifentanil can attenuate the intestinal I/R injury at a remarkable degree possibly by lowering lipid peroxidation and leukocyte infiltration.

  8. Direct demonstration of guanine nucleotide sensitive receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide in the anterior lobe of the rat pituitary gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agui, T.; Matsumoto, K.

    1990-01-01

    The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors were identified on the membranes from the rat anterior pituitary gland with [ 125 I]VIP. The dissociation constant (Kd) and the maximal binding capacity (Bmax) values were estimated from the competitive inhibition data. The Kd and Bmax values were 1.05 +/- 0.75 nM and 103 +/- 11 fmol/mg protein, respectively. The order of molar potency of related peptides to inhibit [ 125 I]VIP binding was VIP greater than peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI) greater than secretin greater than glucagon. Glucagon was not effective to inhibit the binding. [ 125 I]VIP binding was effectively inhibited by the addition of guanine nucleotides. The order of molar potency to inhibit the binding was Gpp(NH)p greater than GTP greater than GDP greater than GMP greater than ATP. These results directly suggest the coupling of VIP receptors with guanine nucleotide binding proteins in the anterior pituitary gland

  9. Effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 and distal bowel resection on intestinal and systemic adaptive responses in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Sarah W; de Heuvel, Elaine; Wallace, Laurie E

    2017-01-01

    mount immunohistochemistry for neurons (HuC/D, VIP, nNOS), plasma glucose, gut hormones, and body composition. RESULTS: Resection increased the proportion of nNOS immunopositive myenteric neurons, intestinal muscularis propria thickness and crypt cell proliferation, which were not recapitulated by GLP-2......-2 attenuated resection-induced increases in blood glucose and body fat loss. CONCLUSIONS: Exogenous GLP-2 stimulates jejunal adaptation independent of enteric neuronal VIP or nNOS changes, and has divergent effects on plasma amylin and peptide YY concentrations. The novel ability of exogenous GLP-2......OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), with or without massive distal bowel resection, on adaptation of jejunal mucosa, enteric neurons, gut hormones and tissue reserves in rats. BACKGROUND: GLP-2 is a gut hormone known to be trophic for small bowel mucosa...

  10. Morphological and functional changes after benzalkonium chloride treatment of the small intestinal Thiry-Vella loop in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Móricz, K; Gyetvai, B; Bárdos, G

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effects of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) treatment on the small intestine and its functioning in rats surgically prepared with Thiry-Vella intestinal loop. The loops were treated with either BAC, which ablated much of the myenteric plexus and extrinsic innervation, or with physiological saline (SAL). In vivo drinking experiments were performed to examine the effect on fluid intake and behavioral indices of distending the loop with a balloon. Spontaneous motility and its changes induced by acetylcholine (ACh) and histamine (His) were studied on isolated stripes in vitro. Finally, samples from the loops were examined histologically. Though reduction of the cell number was less than expected and no differences of the thickness of the muscular layer between the two groups was observed, BAC treatment altered the pattern of spontaneous activity and also the sensitivity to ACh and His in isolated stripes. In vivo distension of the SAL-treated loops reduced fluid intake and produced signs of aversivity; these effects were absent in the BAC-treated group. Our results show that despite the differences in the degree of ablation from those obtained by others, BAC treatment can be used to study the mechanisms underlying the effects of the enteral stimuli on the behavior.

  11. The pathways for absorbtion of stearin acid and leucine in the rat small intestine after gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadtochij, V.V.; Brodskij, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    Males of rats were used to study the disorders of structural-functional mechanisms of lipid absorption in late periods after coarse-fractionated gamma irradiation of abdomen (35 Gr integral dose, 7 Gr x 5 every other day, Co 60 , 2.3 Gr/min dose rate) Lipid absorption and separation was studied according to intensity of 3 H-stearic acid inclusion into ultrastructures of epitheliocyte of small intestine villus of irradiated animals. The state of protein-synthesizing epitheliocyte system was evaluated by pulse mark (fragment incubation with 3 H-lencine in vitro). The correlation between the rate of mark passing into Golgi complex and its separation into intercellular space was revealed. Lipid passing with 3 H-stearic acid through Golgi complex, granular endoplasmic net and disorder of their separation into lacunar intercellular space decelerated in late periods after irradiation. It is shown that the transport of fatty acid, avoiding the stages of esterification and triglyceride synthesis in enduplasmic net, increases in small intestine epitheliocytes during radiation effect. Mechanisms. of some phenomena are explained presumably

  12. Early decrease in total hemolytic complement activity (CH100) after fasting or intestinal bypass in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, M; Violi, V; Muri, M; Roncoroni, L; Mora, G; Ronzoni, M

    1986-01-01

    An evaluation of total hemolytic complement activity (CH100) after fasting or intestinal bypass was performed in rats. The experiment lasted 6 days. Three groups, of 5 animals each, were studied. On the 1st day, basal values of total complement (TC), albumin and body weight were determined. Group A received normal, ad libitum feeding, group B started on a 'water only' diet, group C underwent intestinal bypass. On the 4th and 6th day the parameters were assessed. TC mean values were significantly lower in groups B and C, as compared to group A, on the 4th as well as on the 6th day (p less than 0.01 by Mann-Whitney's U test). Body weight showed a similar trend. Differences in albumin were never statistically significant. Limitations of the analytical method are discussed. The data show that fasting or bypass-induced malabsorption may determine an early decrease in total hemolytic complement activity, though a development of an immune deficiency is not proved.

  13. Impact of synbiotic diets including inulin, Bacillus coagulans and Lactobacillus plantarum on intestinal microbiota of rat exposed to cadmium and mercury

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    Dornoush Jafarpour

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of two probiotics and a prebiotic (inulin on intestinal microbiota of rats exposed to cadmium and mercury. Fifty-four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into nine groups. All groups except control group were fed standard rat chow with 5% inulin and treated as follows: i control (standard diet, ii Lactobacillus plantarum- treated group (1×109 CFU/day, iii Bacillus coagulans-treated group (1×109 spores/day, iv cadmium-treated group (200 μg/rat/day, v L. plantarum and cadmium-treated group, vi B. coagulans and cadmium-treated group, vii mercury-treated group (10 μg/rat/day, viii L. plantarum and mercurytreated group, ix B. coagulans and mercurytreated group. Cadmium, mercury and probiotics were daily gavaged to individual rats for 42 days. Treatment effects on intestinal microbiota composition of rats were determined. Data showed that cadmium and mercury accumulation in rat intestine affected the gastrointestinal tract and had a reduction effect on all microbial counts (total aerobic bacteria, total anaerobic bacteria, total Lactic acid bacteria, L. plantarum and B. coagulans counts compared to the control group. It was also observed that application of synbiotics in synbiotic and heavy metals-treated groups had a significant effect and increased the number of fecal bacteria compared to the heavy metals groups. Based on our study, it can be concluded that L. plantarum and B. coagulans along with prebiotic inulin play a role in protection against cadmium and mercury inhibitory effect and have the potential to be a beneficial supplement in rats’ diets.

  14. Effects of garlic oil and two of its major organosulfur compounds, diallyl disulfide and diallyl trisulfide, on intestinal damage in rats injected with endotoxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, Y.-H.; Jen, L.-N.; Su, H.-Y.; Lii, C.-K.; Sheen, L.-Y.; Liu, C.-T.

    2006-01-01

    Garlic and its active components are known to possess antioxidant and antiinflammatory effects. The present study investigated the effects of garlic oil and its organosulfur compounds on endotoxin-induced intestinal mucosal damage. Wistar rats received by gavage 50 or 200 mg/kg body weight garlic oil (GO), 0.5 mmol/kg body weight diallyl disulfide or diallyl trisulfide, or the vehicle (corn oil; 2 ml/kg body weight) every other day for 2 weeks before being injected with endotoxin (i.p., 5 mg/kg body weight). Control rats were administered with corn oil and were injected with sterile saline. Samples for the measurement of proinflammatory cytokines were collected 3 h after injection, and all other samples were collected 18 h after injection. The low dose of GO suppressed endotoxin-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity, ulceration, and apoptosis in the intestinal mucosa (P < 0.05). The high dose of GO significantly lowered the peripheral level of nitrate/nitrite and endotoxin-induced iNOS activity in the intestinal mucosa (P < 0.05) but worsened intestinal mucosal damage accompanied by elevated peripheral proinflammatory cytokines. Diallyl trisulfide but not diallyl disulfide showed similar toxic effect as that of high-dose GO. These results suggest the preventive effect and possible toxicity of garlic oil and its organosulfur compounds in endotoxin-induced systemic inflammation and intestinal damage

  15. The in vivo pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion investigation of mesaconine in rats and its in vitro intestinal absorption study using UPLC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiuxiu; Tang, Minghai; Liu, Taohong; Wang, Chunyan; Tang, Qiaoxin; Xiao, Yaxin; Yang, Ruixin; Chao, Ruobing

    2017-12-27

    1. Mesaconine, an ingredient from Aconitum carmichaelii Debx., has been proven to have cardiac effect. For further development and better pharmacological elucidation, the in vivo process and intestinal absorptive behavior of mesaconine should be investigated comprehensively. 2. An ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the quantitation of mesaconine in rat plasma, tissue homogenates, urine and feces to investigate the in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles, tissue distribution and excretion. The intestinal absorptive behavior of mesaconine was investigated using in vitro everted rat gut sac model. 3. Mesaconine was well distributed in tissues and a mass of unchanged form was detected in feces. It was difficultly absorbed into blood circulatory system after oral administration. The insufficient oral bioavailability of mesaconine may be mainly attributed to its low intestinal permeability due to a lack of lipophilicity. The absorption of mesaconine in rat's intestine is a first-order process with the passive diffusion mechanism.

  16. Effect of mass of neptunium V in intestinal absorption in the monkey and the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metivier, H.; Masse, R.; Lafuma, J.

    1983-01-01

    The coefficient of gastrointestinal transfer of neptunium as pentavalent neptunyl nitrate was studied in rats and monkeys as a function of the ingested mass. In both species, the transfer coefficient ranged between 1.10 - 3 - 1.10 - 2 when the administered mass varied from 0.3 ng to 2 mg per kg. At low concentrations, the values obtained in the monkey are about twice as low as thoses obtained in the rat. Considering the strong urinary excretion, the amounts retained at the organ levels represent about 0.1% in the rat and 0.04% in the monkey for low concentrations. The values obtained are usually in good agreement with the few data published on the rat [fr

  17. Differences of first-pass effect in the liver and intestine contribute to the stereoselective pharmacokinetics of rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline epimers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Zheng, Mei; Liu, Jia; Huang, Zhifeng; Bai, Yidan; Ren, Zhuoying; Wang, Ziwen; Tian, Yangli; Qiao, Zhou; Liu, Wenyuan; Feng, Feng

    2017-09-14

    Uncaria rhynchophylla (Miq.) Miq. ex Havil., is a plant species used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat cardiovascular and central nervous system diseases. Rhynchophylline (RIN) and isorhynchophylline (IRN), a pair of epimers, are major alkaloids isolated from U. rhynchophylla and exhibit diverse pharmacological effects. Our previous study demonstrated that the pharmacokinetics of these epimers existed stereoselectivity after oral administration; however, the specific mechanism remains unknown and merits investigation. In the present study, the aim was to elucidate the mechanism underlying stereoselective pharmacokinetic characteristics of RIN and IRN in rats. The total (F), hepatic (F h ) and intestinal (F a ·F g ) bioavailabilities of each epimer were measured using portal vein cannulated rats following different dosing routes (intravenous, intraportal and intraduodenal) to assess individual contributions of the liver and intestine in stereoselective pharmacokinetics. Then the differences of first-pass metabolism in the liver and intestine between two epimers were evaluated by in vitro incubation with rat liver microsomes, intestinal S9 and gastrointestinal (GI) content solutions, respectively. Meanwhile, the membrane permeability and efflux by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) were examined by in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion with and without P-gp inhibitor verapamil. The configurational interconversion at different pH values and the excretions via feces and urine were also examined. Pharmacokinetic data showed that the total bioavailability of RIN was 5.9 folds higher than that of IRN (23.4% vs. 4.0%). The hepatic availability of RIN was 4.6 folds higher than that of IRN (46.9% vs. 10.3%), whereas the intestinal availability of RIN (48.1%) was comparable to that of IRN (42.7%). In addition, intestinal perfusion showed that IRN possessed higher intestinal permeability than RIN and co-perfusion with verapamil could affect absorption process of RIN but not IRN

  18. Structured triglyceride vehicles for oral delivery of halofantrine: examination of intestinal lymphatic transport and bioavailability in conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, René; Porter, Christopher J H; Müllertz, Anette; Kristensen, Henning G; Charman, William N

    2002-09-01

    To compare the influence of triglyceride vehicle intramolecular structure on the intestinal lymphatic transport and systemic absorption of halofantrine in conscious rats. Conscious, lymph cannulated and nonlymph cannulated rats were dosed orally with three structurally different triglycerides; sunflower oil, and two structured triglycerides containing different proportion and position of medium-(M) and long-chain (L) fatty acids on the glycerol backbone. The two structured triglycerides were abbreviated MLM and LML to reflect the structural position on the glycerol. The concentration of halofantrine in blood and lymph samples was analyzed by HPLC. Both the lymphatic transport and the total absorption of halofantrine were enhanced by the use the MLM triglyceride. The estimated total absorption of halofantrine in the lymph cannulated animals was higher than in the nonlymph cannulated animals, and this was most pronounced for the animals dosed with the structured triglycerides. Using MLM as vehicle increases the portal absorption of halofantrine and results in similar lymphatic transport levels when compared to sunflower oil. Total absorption when assessed as absorption in the blood plus lymphatic transport for halofantrine after administration in the MLM triglyceride was higher than after administration in sunflower oil.

  19. Interaction of PHM, PHI and 24-glutamine PHI with human VIP receptors from colonic epithelium: comparison with rat intestinal receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laburthe, M.; Couvineau, A.; Rouyer-Fessard, C.; Moroder, L.

    1985-01-01

    PHM, the human counterpart of porcine Peptide Histidine Isoleucine amide (PHI), is shown to be a VIP agonist with low potency on human VIP receptors located in colonic epithelial cell membranes. Its potency is identical to that of PHI but by 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of VIP itself in inhibiting 125 I-VIP binding and in stimulating adenylate cyclase activity. This contrasts markedly with the behavior of PHI on rat VIP receptors located in intestinal epithelial cell membranes where PHI is a potent agonist with a potency that is 1/5 that of VIP. In another connection, the authors show that 24-glutamine PHI has the same affinity as 24-glutamic acid PHI (the natural peptide) for rat or human VIP receptors. These results indicate that while PHI may exert some physiological function through its interaction with VIP receptors in rodents, its human counterpart PHM is a very poor agonist of VIP in human. Furthermore, they show that the drastic change in position 24 of PHI (neutral versus acid residue) does not affect the activity of PHI, at least on VIP receptors. 21 references, 1 figure

  20. Expression and role of 5-HT7 receptor in brain and intestine in rats with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bai-cang; Dong, Lei; Wang, Yan; Wang, Sheng-hao; Cao, Ming-bo

    2007-12-05

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine7 receptor (5-HT(7) receptor, 5-HT(7)R) plays an important role in the regulation of smooth muscle relaxation and visceral sensation and might be involved in the pathogenesis of the gastrointestinal dyskinesia, abdominal pain and visceral paresthesia in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the 5-HT(7) receptor in the pathogenesis of IBS. A rat model of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) was established by colonic instillation of acetic acid and restraint stress. A rat model with irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) was established by stomach irrigated with 0 - 4 degrees C cool water daily for 14 days. The content and distribution of 5-HT in the brain and gut were examined by immunohistochemistry and the mRNA expression of the 5-HT(7) receptor was determined by fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The accumulation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in all the same tissues was measured by radioimmunity. The models of IBS were reliable by identification. The immunohistochemistry results showed that there were significantly more 5-HT positive cells in the IBS-D group than in the control group in the hippocampus, hypothalamus, jejunum, ileum, proximate colon and distal colon (P intestine is related to the IBS pathogenesis. The up-regulated expression of the 5-HT(7) receptor in the brain and colon might play an important role in the pathogenesis of IBS-C.

  1. Effects of plasma CGRP and NPY level changes on intestinal mucosal barrier injury after scald in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Lijian; Zhu Qingxian; He Ming; Zhang Hongyan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the significance of plasma CGRP and NPY levels changes immediately after scald in rats. Methods: Thirty-two rat models of 30% TBSA III degree scald were prepared. Eight animals each were sacrificed at 3, 6,12 and 24 hrs; taking blood samples for determination of plasma CGRP, NPY levels and 5 cm of ileum for pathologic study. As controls, eight animals without scald were treated in the same way. Results: Plasma CGRP levels were decreased significantly after scald, reaching bottom value at 12 hr and remained lower than those in controls at 24 hr (p 0.05). Plasma levels of CGRP were negatively correlated to plasma NPY levels (p<0.01). Ileum mucosal injuries presented as edema, congestion with necrosis and slough of epithelium were most marked at 12 hr. Conclusion: Plasma CGRP and NPY levels changed significantly after scald and were mutually negatively correlated. Post-scald intestinal mucosa barrier injuries were possibly related to the changes of levels of those vasoactive peptides

  2. Effects of burn with and without Escherichia coli infection in rats on intestinal vs. splenic T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, T; Al-Ghoul, W; Namak, S; Fazal, N; Durazo-Arvizu, R; Choudhry, M; Sayeed, M M

    2001-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of burn injury with and without an Escherichia coliseptic complication on T-cell proliferation, interleukin-2 production, and Ca(2+) signaling responses in intestinal Peyer's patch and splenic T cells. Prospective, randomized, sham-controlled animal study. University medical center research laboratory. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were subjected to a 30% total body surface area, full skin thickness burn. Infection in rats was induced via intraperitoneal inoculation of E. coli, 10(9) colony forming units/kg, with or without a prior burn. Rat Peyer's patch and splenic T lymphocytes were isolated by using a nylon wool cell purification protocol. T-cell proliferation, interleukin-2 production, and Ca(2+) signaling responses were measured after stimulation of cells with the mitogen, concanavalin A. T-cell proliferation was determined by measuring incorporation of (3)H-thymidine into T-cell cultures. Interleukin-2 production by T-cell cultures was measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Intracellular T-cell Ca2(+ )concentration, [Ca(2+)](i), was measured by the use of Ca(2+)-specific fluorescent label, fura-2, and its fluorometric quantification. [Ca(2+)](i) was also evaluated by the use of digital video imaging of fura-2 loaded individual T cells. T-cell proliferation and interleukin-2 production were suppressed substantially in both Peyer's patch and splenic T cells 3 days after either the initial burn alone or burn followed by the E. coli inoculation at 24 hrs after the initial burn. There seemed to be no demonstrable additive effects of E. coli infection on the effects produced by burn injury alone. The T-cell proliferation and interleukin-2 production suppressions with burn or burn-plus-infection insults were correlated with attenuated Ca(2+) signaling. E. coli infection alone suppressed T-cell proliferation in Peyer's patch but not in splenic T cells at 2 days postbacterial inoculation; E. coli infection had no effect on

  3. Colonic insufflation with carbon monoxide gas inhibits the development of intestinal inflammation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takagi Tomohisa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is complex, and an effective therapeutic strategy has yet to be established. Recently, carbon monoxide (CO has been reported to be capable of reducing inflammation by multiple mechanisms. In this study, we evaluated the role of colonic CO insufflation in acute colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS in rats. Methods Acute colitis was induced with TNBS in male Wistar rats. Following TNBS administration, the animals were treated daily with 200 ppm of intrarectal CO gas. The distal colon was removed to evaluate various parameters of inflammation, including thiobarbituric acid (TBA-reactive substances, tissue-associated myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, and the expression of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC-1 in colonic mucosa 7 days after TNBS administration. Results The administration of TNBS induced ulceration with surrounding edematous swelling in the colon. In rats treated with CO gas, the colonic ulcer area was smaller than that of air-treated rats 7 days after TNBS administration. The wet colon weight was significantly increased in the TNBS-induced colitis group, which was markedly abrogated by colonic insufflation with CO gas. The increase of MPO activity, TBA-reactive substances, and CINC-1 expression in colonic mucosa were also significantly inhibited by colonic insufflation with CO gas. Conclusions Colonic insufflation with CO gas significantly ameliorated TNBS-induced colitis in rats. Clinical application of CO gas to improve colonic inflammatory conditions such as IBD might be useful.

  4. Effects of Lactobacillus salivarius Ren on cancer prevention and intestinal microbiota in 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine-induced rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Fan, Xing; Fang, Bing; Zhu, Chengzhen; Zhu, Jun; Ren, Fazheng

    2015-06-01

    Probiotics have been suggested as a prophylactic measure in colon cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of Lactobacillus salivarius Ren (Ren) in modulating colonic microbiota structure and colon cancer incidence in a rat model after injection with 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine (DMH). The results indicated that oral administration of Ren could effectively suppress DMH-induced colonic carcinogenesis. A significant decrease in cancer incidence (87.5% to 25%) was detected in rats fed with a dose of 5 × 10(10) CFU/kg bodyweight per day. Using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and Real-time PCR combined with multivariate statistical methods, we demonstrated that injection with DMH significantly altered the rat gut microbiota, while Ren counteracted these DMH-induced adverse effects and promoted reversion of the gut microbiota close to the healthy state. Tvalue biplots followed by band sequencing identified 21 bacterial strains as critical variables affected by DMH and Ren. Injection of DMH significantly increased the amount of Ruminococcus species (sp.) and Clostridiales bacteria, as well as decreasing the Prevotella sp. Administration of Ren reduced the amount of Ruminococcus sp., Clostridiales bacteria, and Bacteroides dorei, and increased the amount of Prevotella. Real-time PCR results were consistent with the results derived by t-value biplots. These findings suggested that Ren is a potential agent for colon cancer prevention. In conclusion, the results in the present study suggest a potential therapeutic approach based on the modulation of intestinal microflora by probiotics may be beneficial in the prevention of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  5. Melatonin prevents inflammation and oxidative stress caused by abdominopelvic and total body irradiation of rat small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guney, Y; Hicsonmez, A; Uluoglu, C; Guney, H Z; Ozel Turkcu, U; Take, G; Yucel, B; Caglar, G; Bilgihan, A; Erdogan, D; Nalca Andrieu, M; Kurtman, C; Zengil, H

    2007-10-01

    We investigated the day-night differences in intestinal oxidative-injury and the inflammatory response following total body (TB) or abdominopelvic (AP) irradiation, and the influence of melatonin administration on tissue injury induced by radiation. Rats (male Wistar, weighing 220-280 g) in the irradiated groups were exposed to a dose of 8 Gy to the TB or AP region in the morning (resting period - 1 h after light onset) or evening (activity span - 13 h after light onset). Vehicle or melatonin was administered immediately before, immediately after and 24 h after irradiation (10, 2.0 and 10 mg/kg, ip, respectively) to the irradiated rats. AP (P < 0.05) and TB (P < 0.05) irradiation applied in the morning caused a significant increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels. Melatonin treatment in the morning (P < 0.05) or evening (P < 0.05) decreased TBARS levels after TB irradiation. After AP irradiation, melatonin treatment only in the morning caused a significant decrease in TBARS levels (P < 0.05). Although we have confirmed the development of inflammation after radiotherapy by histological findings, neither AP nor TB irradiation caused any marked changes in myeloperoxidase activity in the morning or evening. Our results indicate that oxidative damage is more prominent in rats receiving TB and AP irradiation in the morning and melatonin appears to have beneficial effects on oxidative damage irrespective of the time of administration. Increased neutrophil accumulation indicates that melatonin administration exerts a protective effect on AP irradiation-induced tissue oxidative injury, especially in the morning.

  6. Melatonin prevents inflammation and oxidative stress caused by abdominopelvic and total body irradiation of rat small intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Guney

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the day-night differences in intestinal oxidative-injury and the inflammatory response following total body (TB or abdominopelvic (AP irradiation, and the influence of melatonin administration on tissue injury induced by radiation. Rats (male Wistar, weighing 220-280 g in the irradiated groups were exposed to a dose of 8 Gy to the TB or AP region in the morning (resting period - 1 h after light onset or evening (activity span - 13 h after light onset. Vehicle or melatonin was administered immediately before, immediately after and 24 h after irradiation (10, 2.0 and 10 mg/kg, ip, respectively to the irradiated rats. AP (P < 0.05 and TB (P < 0.05 irradiation applied in the morning caused a significant increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS levels. Melatonin treatment in the morning (P < 0.05 or evening (P < 0.05 decreased TBARS levels after TB irradiation. After AP irradiation, melatonin treatment only in the morning caused a significant decrease in TBARS levels (P < 0.05. Although we have confirmed the development of inflammation after radiotherapy by histological findings, neither AP nor TB irradiation caused any marked changes in myeloperoxidase activity in the morning or evening. Our results indicate that oxidative damage is more prominent in rats receiving TB and AP irradiation in the morning and melatonin appears to have beneficial effects on oxidative damage irrespective of the time of administration. Increased neutrophil accumulation indicates that melatonin administration exerts a protective effect on AP irradiation-induced tissue oxidative injury, especially in the morning.

  7. Intracerebroventricular Infusion of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP Rescues the Luteinizing Hormone Surge in Middle-Aged Female Rats

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    Yan eSun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive aging is characterized by delayed and attenuated luteinizing hormone (LH surges apparent in middle-aged rats. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN contains the circadian clock that is responsible for the timing of diverse neuroendocrine rhythms. Electrophysiological studies suggest vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP originating from the SCN excites gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons and affects daily patterns of GnRH-LH release. Age-related LH surge dysfunction correlates with reduced VIP mRNA expression in the SCN and fewer GnRH neurons with VIP contacts expressing c-fos, a marker of neuronal activation, on the day of the LH surge. To determine if age-related LH surge dysfunction reflects reduced VIP availability or altered VIP responsiveness under estradiol positive feedback conditions, we assessed the effect of intracerebroventricular (icv VIP infusion on c-fos expression in GnRH neurons and on LH release in ovariohysterectomized, hormone-primed young and middle-aged rats. Icv infusion of VIP between 1300 and 1600 h significantly advanced the time of peak LH release, increased total and peak LH release, and increased the number of GnRH neurons expressing c-fos on the day of the LH surge in middle-aged rats. Surprisingly, icv infusion of VIP in young females significantly reduced the number of GnRH neurons expressing c-fos and delayed and reduced the LH surge. These observations suggest that a critical balance of VIP signaling is required to activate GnRH neurons for an appropriately timed and robust LH surge in young and middle-aged females. Age-related LH surge changes may, in part, result from decreased availability and reduced VIP-mediated neurotransmission under estradiol positive feedback conditions.

  8. Internal radiotherapy of liver cancer with rat hepato-carcinoma-intestine-pancreas gene as a liver tumor-specific promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herve, J.; Cunha, A. Sa; Liu, B.; Valogne, Y.; Longuet, M.; Bregerie, O.; Guettier, C.; Samuel, D.; Brechot, C.; Faivre, J. [Hop Paul Brousse, INSERM, Hepatobiliary Ctr, U785, F-94800 Villejuif (France); Herve, J.; Cunha, A. Sa; Liu, B.; Valogne, Y.; Longuet, M.; Bregerie, O.; Guettier, C.; Samuel, D.; Brechot, C.; Faivre, J. [Univ Paris Sud, Fac Med, F-94800 Villejuif (France); Boisgard, R.; Tavitian, B. [INSERM, U803, F-91400 Orsay (France); Boisgard, R.; Tavitian, B. [CEA, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, Lab Imagerie Mol Expt, F-91400 Orsay (France); Roux, J.; Cales, P. [Univ Angers, UPRES EA 3859, Lab Hemodynam Interact Fibrose et Invas Tumorale H, Angers (France); Clerc, J. [Hop Cochin, AP HP, Dept Nucl Med, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    The hepato-carcinoma-intestine-pancreas (HIP) gene, also called pancreatitis-associated protein-1 (PAP1) or Reg III {alpha}, is activated in most human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) but not in normal liver, which suggests that HIP regulatory sequence could be used as efficient liver tumor-specific promoters to express a therapeutic polynucleotide in liver cancer. The sodium iodide sym-porter (NIS), which has recognized therapeutic and reporter gene properties, is appropriate to evaluate the transcriptional strength and specificity of the HIP promoter in HCC. For this purpose, we constructed a recombinant rat HIP-NIS adeno-viral vector (AdrHIP-NIS), and evaluated its performance as a mediator of selective radio-iodide uptake in tumor hepatocytes. Western blot, immunofluorescence, and iodide uptake assays were performed in AdrHIP-NIS-infected primary hepatocytes and transformed hepatic and non-hepatic cells. Nuclear imaging, tissue counting and immuno-histo-chemistry were performed in normal and HCC-bearing Wistar rats infected with AdrHIP-NIS intra-tumorally or via the hepatic artery. In AdrHIP-NIS-infected transformed hepatic cells, functional NIS was strongly expressed, as in cells infected with a cytomegalovirus-NIS vector. No NIS expression was found in AdrHIP-NIS-infected normal hepatocytes or transformed non-hepatic cells. In rats bearing multi-nodular HCC, AdrHIP-NIS triggered functional NIS expression that was preferential in tumor hepatocytes. Administration of 18 mCi of {sup 131}I resulted in the destruction of AdrHIP-NIS-injected nodules. This study has identified the rHIP regulatory sequence as a potent liver tumor-specific promoter for the transfer of therapeutic genes, and AdrHIP-NIS-mediated. {sup 131}I therapy as a valuable option for the treatment of multi-nodular HCC. (authors)

  9. Internal radiotherapy of liver cancer with rat hepato-carcinoma-intestine-pancreas gene as a liver tumor-specific promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herve, J.; Cunha, A. Sa; Liu, B.; Valogne, Y.; Longuet, M.; Bregerie, O.; Guettier, C.; Samuel, D.; Brechot, C.; Faivre, J.; Herve, J.; Cunha, A. Sa; Liu, B.; Valogne, Y.; Longuet, M.; Bregerie, O.; Guettier, C.; Samuel, D.; Brechot, C.; Faivre, J.; Boisgard, R.; Tavitian, B.; Boisgard, R.; Tavitian, B.; Roux, J.; Cales, P.; Clerc, J.

    2008-01-01

    The hepato-carcinoma-intestine-pancreas (HIP) gene, also called pancreatitis-associated protein-1 (PAP1) or Reg III α, is activated in most human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) but not in normal liver, which suggests that HIP regulatory sequence could be used as efficient liver tumor-specific promoters to express a therapeutic polynucleotide in liver cancer. The sodium iodide sym-porter (NIS), which has recognized therapeutic and reporter gene properties, is appropriate to evaluate the transcriptional strength and specificity of the HIP promoter in HCC. For this purpose, we constructed a recombinant rat HIP-NIS adeno-viral vector (AdrHIP-NIS), and evaluated its performance as a mediator of selective radio-iodide uptake in tumor hepatocytes. Western blot, immunofluorescence, and iodide uptake assays were performed in AdrHIP-NIS-infected primary hepatocytes and transformed hepatic and non-hepatic cells. Nuclear imaging, tissue counting and immuno-histo-chemistry were performed in normal and HCC-bearing Wistar rats infected with AdrHIP-NIS intra-tumorally or via the hepatic artery. In AdrHIP-NIS-infected transformed hepatic cells, functional NIS was strongly expressed, as in cells infected with a cytomegalovirus-NIS vector. No NIS expression was found in AdrHIP-NIS-infected normal hepatocytes or transformed non-hepatic cells. In rats bearing multi-nodular HCC, AdrHIP-NIS triggered functional NIS expression that was preferential in tumor hepatocytes. Administration of 18 mCi of 131 I resulted in the destruction of AdrHIP-NIS-injected nodules. This study has identified the rHIP regulatory sequence as a potent liver tumor-specific promoter for the transfer of therapeutic genes, and AdrHIP-NIS-mediated. 131 I therapy as a valuable option for the treatment of multi-nodular HCC. (authors)

  10. Intestinal anti-inflammatory effects of RGD-functionalized silk fibroin nanoparticles in trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced experimental colitis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Nogales A

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Alba Rodriguez-Nogales,1 Francesca Algieri,1 Laura De Matteis,2 A. Abel Lozano-Perez,3 Jose Garrido-Mesa,1 Teresa Vezza,1 J M. de la Fuente,2 Jose Luis Cenis,3 Julio Gálvez,1,* Maria Elena Rodriguez-Cabezas1,* 1CIBER-EHD, Department of Pharmacology, ibs.GRANADA, Center for Biomedical Research, University of Granada, Granada, 2Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, 3Department of Biotechnology, Instituto Murciano de Investigación y Desarrollo Agrario y Alimentario, Murcia, Spain *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Current treatment of inflammatory bowel disease is based on the use of immunosuppressants or anti-inflammatory drugs, which are characterized by important side effects that can limit their use. Previous research has been performed by administering these drugs as nanoparticles that target the ulcerated intestinal regions and increase their bioavailability. It has been reported that silk fibroin can act as a drug carrier and shows anti-inflammatory properties. Purpose: This study was designed to enhance the interaction of the silk fibroin nanoparticles (SFNs with the injured intestinal tissue by functionalizing them with the peptide motif RGD (arginine–glycine–aspartic acid and to evaluate the intestinal anti-inflammatory properties of these RGD-functionalized silk fibroin nanoparticles (RGD-SFNs in the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS model of rat colitis. Materials and methods: SFNs were prepared by nanoprecipitation in methanol, and the linear RGD peptide was linked to SFNs using glutaraldehyde as the crosslinker. The SFNs (1 mg/rat and RGD-SFNs (1 mg/rat were administered intrarectally to TNBS-induced colitic rats for 7 days. Results: The SFN treatments ameliorated the colonic damage, reduced neutrophil infiltration, and improved the compromised oxidative status of the colon. However, only the rats treated with RGD-SFNs showed a significant reduction in the

  11. Effect of orally administered betel leaf (Piper betle Linn.) on digestive enzymes of pancreas and intestinal mucosa and on bile production in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, M S; Platel, K; Saraswathi, G; Srinivasan, K

    1995-10-01

    The influence of two varieties of betel leaf (Piper betle Linn.) namely, the pungent Mysore and non-pungent Ambadi, was examined on digestive enzymes of pancreas and intestinal mucosa and on bile secretion in experimental rats. The betel leaves were administered orally at two doses which were either comparable to human consumption level or 5 times this. The results indicated that while these betel leaves do not influence bile secretion and composition, they have a significant stimulatory influence on pancreatic lipase activity. Besides, the Ambadi variety of betel leaf has a positive stimulatory influence on intestinal digestive enzymes, especially lipase, amylase and disaccharidases. A slight lowering in the activity of these intestinal enzymes was seen when Mysore variety of betel leaf was administered, and this variety also had a negative effect on pancreatic amylase. Further, both the betel leaf varieties have shown decreasing influence on pancreatic trypsin and chymotrypsin activities.

  12. The effect of the transfusion of stored RBCs on intestinal microvascular oxygenation in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bommel, J.; de Korte, D.; Lind, A.; Siegemund, M.; Trouwborst, A.; Verhoeven, A. J.; Ince, C.; Henny, C. P.

    2001-01-01

    Although it is known that the transfusion of stored RBCs does not always improve tissue O(2) consumption under conditions of limited tissue oxygenation, the efficiency of O(2) delivery to the microcirculation by stored RBCs has never been determined. In a rat hemorrhagic shock model, the effects of

  13. Diclofenac causes more leakage than naproxen in anastomoses in the small intestine of the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijver, R.J. van der; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Lomme, R.M.L.M.; Hendriks, T.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs such as the cyclooxygenase isoenzyme inhibitors diclofenac and naproxen are increasingly used for perioperative pain relief, while their potential effects on wound healing are scarcely investigated. METHODS: In 104 male Wistar rats, an anastomosis was

  14. Biomechanical testing and material characterization for the rat large intestine: regional dependence of material parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolis, Dimitrios P; Orfanidis, Ioannis K; Peroulis, Michalis

    2011-12-01

    The function of the large bowel is to absorb water from the remaining indigestible food matter and subsequently pass useless waste material from the body, but there has been only a small amount of data in the literature on its biomechanical characteristics that would facilitate our understanding of its transport function. Our study aims to fill this gap by affording comprehensive inflation/extension data of intestinal segments from distinct areas, spanning a physiologically relevant deformation range (100-130% axial stretches and 0-15 mmHg lumen pressures). These data were characterized by the Fung-type exponential model in the thick-walled setting, showing reasonable agreement, i.e. root-mean-square error ~30%. Based on optimized material parameters, i.e. a(1)testing and material characterization results for the large intestine of healthy young animals are expected to aid in comprehending the adaptation/remodeling that occurs with ageing, pathological conditions and surgical procedures, as well as for the development of suitable biomaterials for replacement.

  15. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of infliximab on acute lung injury in a rat model of intestinal ischemia/reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzel, Ahmet; Kanter, Mehmet; Guzel, Aygul; Pergel, Ahmet; Erboga, Mustafa

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of infliximab on acute lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). A total of 30 male Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups: sham, I/R and I/R+ infliximab; each group contain 10 animals. Sham group animals underwent laparotomy without I/R injury. After I/R groups animals underwent laparotomy, 1 h of superior mesenteric artery ligation were followed by 1 h of reperfusion. In the infliximab group, 3 days before I/R, infliximab (3 mg/kg) was administered by intravenously. All animals were sacrificed at the end of reperfusion and lung tissues samples were obtained for biochemical and histopathological investigation in all groups. To date, no more biochemical and histopathological changes on intestinal I/R injury in rats by infliximab treatment have been reported. Infliximab treatment significantly decreased the elevated tissue malondialdehyde levels and increased of reduced superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase enzyme activities in lung tissues samples. Intestinal I/R caused severe histopathological injury including edema, hemorrhage, increased thickness of the alveolar wall and a great number of inflammatory cells that infiltrated the interstitium and alveoli. Infliximab treatment significantly attenuated the severity of intestinal I/R injury. Furthermore, there is a significant reduction in the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase and arise in the expression of surfactant protein D in lung tissue of acute lung injury induced by intestinal I/R with infliximab therapy. It was concluded that infliximab treatment might be beneficial in acute lung injury, therefore, shows potential for clinical use. Because of its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, infliximab pretreatment may have protective effects in acute lung injury induced by intestinal I/R.

  16. CriticalSorb™ promotes permeation of flux markers across isolated rat intestinal mucosae and Caco-2 monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayden, D J; Bzik, V A; Lewis, A L; Illum, L

    2012-09-01

    CriticalSorb™ is a novel absorption enhancer based on Solutol(®) HS15, one that has been found to enhance the nasal transport. It is in clinical trials for nasal delivery of human growth hormone. The hypothesis was that permeating enhancement effects of the Solutol(®)HS15 component would translate to the intestine. Rat colonic mucosae were mounted in Ussing chambers and Papp values of [(14)C]-mannitol, [(14)C]-antipyrine, FITC-dextran 4000 (FD-4), and TEER values were calculated in the presence of CriticalSorb™. Tissues were fixed for H & E staining. Caco-2 monolayers were grown on Transwells™ for similar experiments. CriticalSorb™(0.01% v/v) significantly increased the Papp of [(14)C]-mannitol, FD-4 [(14)C]-antipyrine across ileal and colonic mucosae, accompanied by a decrease in TEER. In Caco-2 monolayers, it also increased the Papp of [(14)C]-mannitol FD-4 and [(14)C]-antipyrine over 120 min. In both monolayers and tissues, it acted as a moderately effective P-glycoprotein inhibitor. There was no evidence of cytotoxicity in Caco-2 at concentrations of 0.01% for up to 24 h and histology of tissues showed intact epithelia at 120 min. Solutol(®) HS15 is the key component in CriticalSorb™ that enables non-cytotoxic in vitro intestinal permeation and its mechanism of action is a combination of increased paracellular and transcellular flux.

  17. L-Theanine Administration Modulates the Absorption of Dietary Nutrients and Expression of Transporters and Receptors in the Intestinal Mucosa of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiongxian Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available L-theanine has various advantageous functions for human health; whether or not it could mediate the nutrients absorption is unknown yet. The effects of L-theanine on intestinal nutrients absorption were investigated using rats ingesting L-theanine solution (0, 50, 200, and 400 mg/kg body weight per day for two weeks. The decline of insulin secretion and glucose concentration in the serum was observed by L-theanine. Urea and high-density lipoprotein were also reduced by 50 mg/kg L-theanine. Jejunal and ileac basic amino acids transporters SLC7a1 and SLC7a9, neutral SLC1a5 and SLC16a10, and acidic SLC1a1 expression were upregulated. The expression of intestinal SGLT3 and GLUT5 responsible for carbohydrates uptake and GPR120 and FABP2 associated with fatty acids transport were inhibited. These results indicated that L-theanine could inhibit the glucose uptake by downregulating the related gene expression in the small intestine of rats. Intestinal gene expression of transporters responding to amino acids absorption was stimulated by L-theanine administration.

  18. Evaluation of the synergistic effect of Allium sativum, Eugenia jambolana, Momordica charantia, Ocimum sanctum and Psidium guajav on hepatic and intestinal drug metabolizing enzymes in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims/Background: Present study investigated the synergistic effect of polyherbal formulations (PHF of Allium sativum L Eugenia jambolana Lam., Momordica charantia L., Ocimum sanctum Linn and Psidium guajava L. in the inhibition/induction of hepatic and intestinal CYPs and Phase-II conjugated drug metabolizing enzymes. Consumption of these herbal remedy has been extensively documented for diabetes treatment in Auyureda. Methodology: PHF of these five herbs was prepared and different doses were orally administered to Sprague Dawley rats of different groups except control group. Expression of mRNA and activity of drug metabolizing enzymes were examined by RT-PCR and HPLC in isolated liver and intestine microsomes in PHF pretreated rats. Results: Activities of hepatic and intestinal Phase-II enzyme levels increased along with mRNA levels except CYP3A mRNA level. PHF administration increases the activity of hepatic and intestinal UDPGT and GST in response to dose and time; however, activity of hepatic SULT increased at higher doses. Conclusions: CYPs and Phase-II conjugated enzymes levels can be modulated in dose and time dependent manner. Observations suggest that poly herbal formulation might be a possible cause of herb-drug interaction, due to changes in pharmacokinetic of crucial CYPs and Phase-II substrate drug. [J Complement Med Res 2016; 5(4.000: 372-382

  19. The rat IgGFcγBP and Muc2 C-terminal domains and TFF3 in two intestinal mucus layers bind together by covalent interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yu

    Full Text Available The secreted proteins from goblet cells compose the intestinal mucus. The aims of this study were to determine how they exist in two intestinal mucus layers.The intestinal mucosa was fixed with Carnoy solution and immunostained. Mucus from the loose layer, the firm layer was gently suctioned or scraped, respectively, lysed in SDS sample buffer with or without DTT, then subjected to the western blotting of rTFF3, rIgGFcγBP or rMuc2. The non-reduced or reduced soluble mucus samples in RIPA buffer were co-immunoprecipitated to investigate their possible interactions. Polyclonal antibodies for rTFF3, the rIgGFcγBP C-terminal domain and the rMuc2 C-terminal domain confirmed their localization in the mucus layer and in the mucus collected from the rat intestinal loose layer or firm layer in both western blot and immunoprecipitation experiments. A complex of rTFF3, which was approximately 250 kDa, and a monomer of 6 kDa were present in both layers of the intestinal mucus; rIgGFcγBP was present in the complex (250-280 kDa under non-reducing conditions, but shifted to 164 kDa under reducing conditions in both of the layers. rMuc2 was found mainly in a complex of 214-270 kDa under non-reducing conditions, but it shifted to 140 kDa under reducing conditions. The co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that binding occurs among rTFF3, rIgGFcγBP and rMuc2 in the RIPA buffer soluble intestinal mucus. Blocking the covalent interaction by 100 mM DTT in the RIPA buffer soluble intestinal mucus disassociated their binding.Rat goblet cell-secreted TFF3, IgGFcγBP and Muc2, existing in the two intestinal mucus layers, are bound together by covalent interactions in the soluble fraction of intestinal mucus and form heteropolymers to be one of the biochemical mechanisms of composing the net-like structure of mucus.

  20. Alkaline Phosphatase for the Prevention of Intestinal and Renal Injury in a Rat Model of Cardiopulmonary Bypass with Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    prevention of intestinal and kidney injury after pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. In this model, we place 5-10kg...first abstract submissions to either Pediatric Academic Society or American Thoracic Society meetings by November. Secondary analysis of serum...rats. Transition to the piglet model also had multiple benefits beyond greater consistency of surgical approach. We now have a true pediatric model and

  1. The effects of three absorption-modifying critical excipients on the in vivo intestinal absorption of six model compounds in rats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Dahlgren; Carl, Roos; Pernilla, Johansson; Christer, Tannergren; Anders, Lundqvist; Peter, Langguth; Markus, Sjöblom; Erik, Sjögren; Hans, Lennernäs

    2018-05-11

    Pharmaceutical excipients that may affect gastrointestinal (GI) drug absorption are called critical pharmaceutical excipients (CPEs), or absorption-modifying excipients (AMEs) if they act by altering the integrity of the intestinal epithelial cell membrane. Some of these excipients increase intestinal permeability, and subsequently the absorption and bioavailability of the drug. This could have implications for both the assessment of bioequivalence and the efficacy of the absorption-enhancing drug delivery system. The absorption-enhancing effects of AMEs/CPEs with different mechanisms (chitosan, sodium caprate, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) have previously been evaluated in the rat single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) model. However, it remains unclear whether these SPIP data are predictive in a more in vivo like model. The same excipients were in this study evaluated in rat and dog intraintestinal bolus models. SDS and chitosan did exert an absorption-enhancing effect in both bolus models, but the effect was substantially lower than those observed in the rat SPIP model. This illustrates the complexity of the AME/CPE effects, and indicates that additional GI physiological factors need to be considered in their evaluation. We therefore recommend that AME/CPE evaluations obtained in transit-independent, preclinical permeability models (e.g. Ussing, SPIP) should be verified in animal models better able to predict in vivo relevant GI effects, at multiple excipient concentrations. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Transformation of ergosterol peroxide to cytotoxic substances by rat intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo-Sang; Ma, Chao-Mei; Park, Dong-Ki; Yoshimi, Yasuharu; Hatanaka, Minoru; Hattori, Masao

    2008-05-01

    Ergosterol peroxide (EPO, 1) is a major antitumor sterol produced by edible or medicinal mushrooms. Following oral administration of 1 to rats or anaerobic in vitro incubation of 1 with rat fecal bacteria, three metabolites were detected and their structures were identified to be 5alpha,6alpha-epoxyergosta-8(14),22-diene-3beta,7alpha-diol (M1, 2), 5alpha,6alpha-epoxyergosta-8,22-diene-3beta,7alpha-diol (M2, 3), and 5alpha,6alpha-epoxy-3beta-hydroxyergosta-22-ene-7-one (M3, 4) by spectroscopic analysis. Of these, M2 and M3 showed more potent inhibitory activity than the original compound 1 against proliferation of CACO-2, WiDr, DLD-1 and Colo320 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. These findings suggest that bacterial metabolites of EPO play a significant role in its cytotoxic activity against human colorectal cancer cells.

  3. Modulation of Intestinal Barrier and Bacterial Endotoxin Production Contributes to the Beneficial Effect of Nicotinic Acid on Alcohol-Induced Endotoxemia and Hepatic Inflammation in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption causes nicotinic acid deficiency. The present study was undertaken to determine whether dietary nicotinic acid supplementation provides beneficial effects on alcohol-induced endotoxin signaling and the possible mechanisms at the gut-liver axis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pair-fed the Lieber-DeCarli liquid diets containing ethanol or isocaloric maltose dextrin for eight weeks, with or without dietary supplementation with 750 mg/liter nicotinic acid. Chronic alcohol feeding elevated the plasma endotoxin level and activated hepatic endotoxin signaling cascade, which were attenuated by nicotinic acid supplementation. Alcohol consumption remarkably decreased the mRNA levels of claudin-1, claudin-5, and ZO-1 in the distal intestine, whereas nicotinic acid significantly up-regulated these genes. The concentrations of endotoxin, ethanol, and acetaldehyde in the intestinal contents were increased by alcohol exposure, and niacin supplementation reduced the intestinal endotoxin and acetaldehyde levels. Nicotinic acid supplementation upregulated the intestinal genes involved in aldehyde detoxification via transcriptional regulation. These results demonstrate that modulation of the intestinal barrier function and bacterial endotoxin production accounts for the inhibitory effects of nicotinic acid on alcohol-induced endotoxemia and hepatic inflammation.

  4. Evaluation of jojoba oil as a low-energy fat. 2. Intestinal transit time, stomach emptying and digestibility in short-term feeding studies in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuren, P M; Nugteren, D H

    1989-01-01

    The influence of jojoba oil (JO) incorporation in the diet on stomach emptying and intestinal transit time, and the digestion and absorption of JO were investigated in short-term feeding studies in rats. The animals were fed purified diets containing 18% (w/w) fat, of which half consisted of a mixture of lard and sunflower seed oil (SF) supplemented with an equivalent amount of JO. The control animals were fed a mixture of lard and SF (18%). No treatment-related differences were observed in the rate of stomach emptying or the intestinal transit time. Comparative lipid analysis of lymph, intestinal content, intestinal mucosa and faeces indicated that most of the ingested JO was degraded and absorbed. Part of the JO was present as wax ester in the lymph. Hydrolysis of JO was much slower than that of triacylglycerols and continued in the alimentary tract beyond the small intestine due to bacterial processes. JO did not influence the absorption of the conventional fat.

  5. Protective Effects of Bifidobacterium on Intestinal Barrier Function in LPS-Induced Enterocyte Barrier Injury of Caco-2 Monolayers and in a Rat NEC Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xiang; Linglong, Peng; Weixia, Du; Hong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Zonulin protein is a newly discovered modulator which modulates the permeability of the intestinal epithelial barrier by disassembling intercellular tight junctions (TJ). Disruption of TJ is associated with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). It has been shown bifidobacterium could protect the intestinal barrier function and prophylactical administration of bifidobacterium has beneficial effects in NEC patients and animals. However, it is still unknown whether the zonulin is involved in the gut barrier dysfunction of NEC, and the protective mechanisms of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function are also not well understood. The present study aims to investigate the effects of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function, zonulin regulation, and TJ integrity both in LPS-induced enterocyte barrier injury of Caco-2 monolayers and in a rat NEC model. Our results showed bifidobacterium markedly attenuated the decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and the increase in paracellular permeability in the Caco-2 monolayers treated with LPS (P zonulin release (P zonulin (P zonulin protein release and improvement of intestinal TJ integrity.

  6. Dose-response studies of depletion and repopulation of rat intestinal mucosal mast cells after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedgwick, D.M.; Ferguson, A.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of radiation on gut mucosal mast cells (MMC) and tissue eosinophils were examined. Groups of rats were given single doses of whole-body irradiation from 0.5 to 5 Gy. Serum rat mast cell protease II (RMCPII) concentration showed a significant dose-dependent fall after 1 Gy on day 3 and 1.5 Gy on day 7. MMC counts and tissue RMCPII values on day 7 decreased significantly by 70% after 1 Gy and were undetectable with larger doses. Rats with normal and expanded MMC populations were irradiated or given anaphylaxis. Serum RMCPII concentrations did not change after irradiation, but there was a 10-fold increase in RMCPII after anaphylaxis. Tissue eosinophils in jejunum were 50% of control at 7 days after 2 Gy, and this effect was progressively more marked with higher doses. Similar effects on MMC and eosinophils were demonstrated in ileum, ascending colon and rectum. After 4.5 Gy, repopulation of the gut with MMC did not occur until week 3-4 postirradiation and MMC counts were still 50% below those of controls at 5 weeks postirradiation. Counts of tisse eosinophils 5 weeks after 4.5 Gy irradiation had returned to control levels in jejunum but were still significantly depleted in colon. (Author)

  7. Inhibition of coagulation and inflammation by activated protein C or antithrombin reduces intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoots, Ivo G.; Levi, Marcel; van Vliet, Arlène K.; Maas, Adrie M.; Roossink, E. H. Paulina; van Gulik, Thomas M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether administration of activated protein C or antithrombin reduces local splanchnic derangement of coagulation and inflammation and attenuates intestinal dysfunction and injury following intestinal ischemia/reperfusion. Design: Randomized prospective animal study. Setting:

  8. Protective Effects of Bifidobacterium on Intestinal Barrier Function in LPS-Induced Enterocyte Barrier Injury of Caco-2 Monolayers and in a Rat NEC Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Ling

    Full Text Available Zonulin protein is a newly discovered modulator which modulates the permeability of the intestinal epithelial barrier by disassembling intercellular tight junctions (TJ. Disruption of TJ is associated with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC. It has been shown bifidobacterium could protect the intestinal barrier function and prophylactical administration of bifidobacterium has beneficial effects in NEC patients and animals. However, it is still unknown whether the zonulin is involved in the gut barrier dysfunction of NEC, and the protective mechanisms of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function are also not well understood. The present study aims to investigate the effects of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function, zonulin regulation, and TJ integrity both in LPS-induced enterocyte barrier injury of Caco-2 monolayers and in a rat NEC model. Our results showed bifidobacterium markedly attenuated the decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and the increase in paracellular permeability in the Caco-2 monolayers treated with LPS (P < 0.01. Compared with the LPS group, bifidobacterium significantly decreased the production of IL-6 and TNF-α (P < 0.01 and suppressed zonulin release (P < 0.05. In addition, bifidobacterium pretreatment up-regulated occludin, claudin-3 and ZO-1 expression (P < 0.01 and also preserved these proteins localization at TJ compared with the LPS group. In the in vivo study, bifidobacterium decreased the incidence of NEC from 88 to 47% (P < 0.05 and reduced the severity in the NEC model. Increased levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in the ileum of NEC rats were normalized in bifidobacterium treated rats (P < 0.05. Moreover, administration of bifidobacterium attenuated the increase in intestinal permeability (P < 0.01, decreased the levels of serum zonulin (P < 0.05, normalized the expression and localization of TJ proteins in the ileum compared with animals with NEC. We concluded that bifidobacterium may

  9. Effects of a carbohydrase complex added in different inclusion rates in feeds for broilers on growth performance, digesta viscosity and foot pad health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölln, M; Weiß, H; Hankel, J; Kamphues, J

    2017-06-01

    Foot pad dermatitis (FPD) is a widespread disease in poultry and important for economic and animal welfare reasons. It is well recognized that using non-starch polysaccharide (NSP)-degrading enzymes can affect excreta/litter quality (not only in terms of moisture content but also regarding water evaporation) at high stocking densities and might help to prevent FPD and further negative effects of NSP. This study aimed to evaluate effects of a carbohydrase complex (CC) in different dietary inclusion rates on performance, digesta viscosity and foot pad health in broilers from 9 to 37 days of life. In total, 240 broilers were divided into 12 floor pens of 20 birds and received one of four different experimental diets. The four wheat- and soyabean meal-based diets only differed in the inclusion rate of CC: 0%, 50%, 100% and 500% of the recommended dose of CC (Endo-1,4-ß-xylanase and Endo-1,3(4)-ß-glucanase; 50 g/t). The addition of CC led to a significant decrease of digesta viscosity in the proximal small intestine, a tendency of improved feed conversion ratio, and significantly favoured FPD-scores (Treatment 2). At the higher tested inclusion rate of CC (500% of recommended dose), the FPD score was worser than in the treatments with 50% and 100% of the recommended enzyme dosage. No improvements among treatments were observed in terms of body weight and dry matter content of excreta and litter at the end of trial. The low positive effects on foot pad health in this study were presumably associated with the low NSP content in the experimental diets (soluble arabinoxylans: 7.38 g/kg as fed). In conclusion, the addition of the evaluated CC reduced digesta viscosity. An improvement of foot pad health could only be seen in the treatment with 50% of the recommended enzyme dosage in the diet. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Red wine alcohol promotes quercetin absorption and directs its metabolism towards isorhamnetin and tamarixetin in rat intestine in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoni, Stefania; Gee, Jennifer; Bennett, Richard; Valoti, Massimo; Sgaragli, Giampietro

    2006-04-01

    Moderate consumption of red wine has been associated with beneficial effects on human health, and this has been attributed to the flavonoid content. Factors that influence the bioavailability of this group of polyphenolic compounds are therefore important. Using the rat cannulated everted jejunal sac technique, we have investigated the effect of alcohol on the intestinal absorption of quercetin and its 3-O-glucoside from red wine. Tissue preparations were incubated in whole or dealcoholised red wine, diluted 1 : 1 with Krebs buffer for 20 min at 37 degrees C, after which the mucosa was removed and processed for HPLC analysis. Tissues exposed to red wine had significantly higher amounts of both quercetin (x 3; P wine, were significantly elevated approximately two fold (P moderate alcohol content of red wine contributes to its beneficial health effects in humans by both increasing the absorption of quercetin and quercetin-3-O-glucoside and by channelling their metabolism towards O-methylation to yield compounds (T and I), which have potential protective effects against cancer and cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Fine-structural effects of 1200-R abdominal x irradiation on rat intestinal epithelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieb, R.J.; McDonald, T.F.; McKenney, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Male Charles River CD rats were shielded from the xiphoid process cranially with lead and were exposed to 1200-R abdominal x irradiation. Animals were sacrificed at 1 through 4 days following irradiation and tissues from both ileum and jejunum were prepared for electron microscopic examination. At the fine-structural level early changes were confined to a proliferation and dilation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum and to an increase in the number of lysosomes. At 4 days postirradiation, cells covering the villi were cuboidal rather than columnar and appeared to be immature crypt-type cells. The appearance of these cells was coincident with the onset of diarrhea in these animals

  12. Daikenchuto, a Kampo medicine, regulates intestinal fibrosis associated with decreasing expression of heat shock protein 47 and collagen content in a rat colitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Ken; Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Hayashi, Natsuko; Hirai, Yasuko; Mizushima, Katsura; Horie, Ryusuke; Fukumoto, Kohei; Yamada, Shinya; Harusato, Akihito; Hirata, Ikuhiro; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Yoshida, Naohisa; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Handa, Osamu; Konishi, Hideyuki; Wakabayashi, Naoki; Yagi, Nobuaki; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP) 47 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of intestinal fibrosis. Daikenchuto (DKT), a traditional Japanese herbal (Kampo) medicine, has been reported to ameliorate intestinal inflammation. The aims of this study were to determine time-course profiles of several parameters of fibrosis in a rat model, to confirm the HSP47-expressing cells in the colon, and finally to evaluate DKT's effects on intestinal fibrosis. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats weighing 200 g using an enema of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). HSP47 localization was determined by immunohistochemistry. Colonic inflammation and fibrosis were assessed by macroscopic, histological, morphometric, and immunohistochemical analyses. Colonic mRNA expression of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), HSP47, and collagen type I were assessed by real time-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). DKT was administered orally once a day from 8 to 14 d after TNBS administration. The colon was removed on the 15th day. HSP47 immunoreactivity was coexpressed with α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells located in the subepithelial space. Intracolonic administration of TNBS resulted in grossly visible ulcers. Colonic inflammation persisted for 6 weeks, and fibrosis persisted for 4 weeks after cessation of TNBS treatment. The expression levels of mRNA and proteins for TGF-β1, HSP47, and collagen I were elevated in colonic mucosa treated with TNBS. These fibrosis markers indicated that DKT treatment significantly inhibited TNBS-induced fibrosis. These findings suggest that DKT reduces intestinal fibrosis associated with decreasing expression of HSP47 and collagen content in the intestine.

  13. Excessive fructose intake causes 1,25-(OH)2D3-dependent inhibition of intestinal and renal calcium transport in growing rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douard, Veronique; Sabbagh, Yves; Lee, Jacklyn; Patel, Chirag; Kemp, Francis W.; Bogden, John D.; Lin, Sheldon

    2013-01-01

    We recently discovered that chronic high fructose intake by lactating rats prevented adaptive increases in rates of active intestinal Ca2+ transport and in levels of 1,25-(OH)2D3, the active form of vitamin D. Since sufficient Ca2+ absorption is essential for skeletal growth, our discovery may explain findings that excessive consumption of sweeteners compromises bone integrity in children. We tested the hypothesis that 1,25-(OH)2D3 mediates the inhibitory effect of excessive fructose intake on active Ca2+ transport. First, compared with those fed glucose or starch, growing rats fed fructose for 4 wk had a marked reduction in intestinal Ca2+ transport rate as well as in expression of intestinal and renal Ca2+ transporters that was tightly associated with decreases in circulating levels of 1,25-(OH)2D3, bone length, and total bone ash weight but not with serum parathyroid hormone (PTH). Dietary fructose increased the expression of 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) and decreased that of 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), suggesting that fructose might enhance the renal catabolism and impair the synthesis, respectively, of 1,25-(OH)2D3. Serum FGF23, which is secreted by osteocytes and inhibits CYP27B1 expression, was upregulated, suggesting a potential role of bone in mediating the fructose effects on 1,25-(OH)2D3 synthesis. Second, 1,25-(OH)2D3 treatment rescued the fructose effect and normalized intestinal and renal Ca2+ transporter expression. The mechanism underlying the deleterious effect of excessive fructose intake on intestinal and renal Ca2+ transporters is a reduction in serum levels of 1,25-(OH)2D3. This finding is significant because of the large amounts of fructose now consumed by Americans increasingly vulnerable to Ca2+ and vitamin D deficiency. PMID:23571713

  14. Estrogen protects the liver and intestines against sepsis-induced injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Göksel; Arbak, Serap; Kurtaran, Pelin; Gedik, Nursal; Yeğen, Berrak C

    2005-09-01

    Sepsis is commonly associated with enhanced generation of reactive oxygen metabolites, leading to multiple organ dysfunctions. The aim of this study was to examine the putative protective role of estradiol against sepsis-induced oxidative organ damage. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture method in Wistar albino rats. Sham-operated (control) and sepsis groups received saline or estradiol propionate (10 mg/kg) intraperitoneally immediately after the operation and at 12 h. Twenty-four hours after the surgery, rats were decapitated and malondialdehyde, glutathione levels, and myeloperoxidase activity were determined in the liver and ileum, while oxidant-induced tissue fibrosis was determined by collagen contents. Tissues were also examined microscopically. Serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase levels, and lactate dehydrogenase were measured for the evaluation of liver functions and tissue damage, respectively. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha was also assayed in serum samples. In the saline-treated sepsis group, glutathione levels were decreased significantly, while the malondialdehyde levels, myeloperoxidase activity, and collagen content were increased in the tissues (P Liver function tests and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels, which were increased significantly (P < 0.001) following sepsis, were decreased (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001) with estradiol treatment. The results demonstrate the role of oxidative mechanisms in sepsis-induced tissue damage, and estradiol, by its antioxidant properties, ameliorates oxidative organ injury, implicating that treatment with estrogens might be applicable in clinical situations to ameliorate multiple organ damage induced by sepsis.

  15. Contrasting effects of the stomach and small intestine of rats on copper absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, M.; Craft, N.; Lewis, C.; Holbrook, J.; Rose, A.; Reiser, S.; Smith, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Since the severity of copper deficiency has been shown to be enhanced by feeding diets containing fructose but ameliorated by diets containing starch, we decided to investigate the effect of fructose or starch on copper absorption. As copper transport has been reported to occur also from the stomach, it was possible that copper absorption is inhibited by fructose already from that tissue. Under anesthesia, stomachs of 72 rats fed copper-deficient or supplemented diets containing fructose or starch were ligated prior to the oral administration of 64 Cu. Gastric absorption of 64 Cu was studied when the isotope was administered by gastric tube either in diet containing fructose or starch or in water. 64 Cu was not absorbed from the stomach regardless of the type of dietary treatment, copper status or whether the copper was administered either in diet or in water. In addition, the absorption of 64 Cu from a diet containing either fructose or starch or from a saline solution was studied using the isolated ligated duodenal loop. When 64 Cu was administered with dietary fructose 64 Cu retention and absorption were impaired when compared to starch. When 64 Cu was administered in saline solution, differences in retention and absorption between the four dietary groups disappeared. It is suggested that the requirements for copper rather than the decreased absorption of copper are responsible at least in part for the more pronounced severity of copper deficiency in rats fed fructose compared to those fed starch

  16. [Determination of H2S in Rat Intestinal Perfusion Solution Based on Fluorescence Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jun-feng; Li, Xin-xia; Shen, Xue-ru; Huojia, Miliban; Guan, Ming

    2015-08-01

    Under alkaline conditions, Fluorescein mercury has strong fluorescence, however, when it met S(2-), its fluorescence would quench, in view of the above, a fluorescence method for determination of H2S in biological samples was established. In the 0.1 mol · L(-1) NaOH dilution, when the concentration of fluorescein Mercury and Na2S was 5.0 × 10(-5) and 1.0 × 10(-5) mol · L(-1) respectively, the fluorescence intensity of system was determined at 522 nm. The results showed that, at the range of 4.0 × 10(-7)~2.0 × 10(-6) mol · L(-1), the concentration decreasing of H2S and fluorescence intensity had good linear relationship, r=0.9980, the RSD of precision test was 4.59% (n=7), the detection limit was 3.5 × 10(-8) mol · L(-1), the content of H2S in the sample were 1.01 × 10(-6) and 1.15 × 10(-6) mol · L(-1), and the recovery rate was 95.8%~101.0%, the method has the advantages of simple operation, high sensitivity, good selectivity, can accurately determine of H2S in intestinal perfused solution, and provides the basis for the determination of endogenous H2S.

  17. Curcumin protects intestinal mucosal barrier function of rat enteritis via activation of MKP-1 and attenuation of p38 and NF-κB activation.

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    Wei-Bing Song

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intestinal mucosa barrier (IMB dysfunction results in many notorious diseases for which there are currently few effective treatments. We studied curcumin's protective effect on IMB and examined its mechanism by using methotrexate (MTX induced rat enteritis model and lipopolysaccharide (LPS treated cell death model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Curcumin was intragastrically administrated from the first day, models were made for 7 days. Cells were treated with curcumin for 30 min before exposure to LPS. Rat intestinal mucosa was collected for evaluation of pathological changes. We detected the activities of D-lactate and diamine oxidase (DAO according to previous research and measured the levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO and superoxide dismutase (SOD by colorimetric method. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α and interleukin 1β (IL-1β were determined by RT-PCR and IL-10 production was determined by ELISA. We found Curcumin decreased the levels of D-lactate, DAO, MPO, ICAM-1, IL-1β and TNF-α, but increased the levels of IL-10 and SOD in rat models. We further confirmed mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1 was activated but phospho-p38 was inhibited by curcumin by western blot assay. Finally, NF-κB translocation was monitored by immunofluorescent staining. We showed that curcumin repressed I-κB and interfered with the translocation of NF-κB into nucleus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The effect of curcumin is mediated by the MKP-1-dependent inactivation of p38 and inhibition of NF-κB-mediated transcription. Curcumin, with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities may be used as an effective reagent for protecting intestinal mucosa barrier and other related intestinal diseases.

  18. Soluble Dietary Fibers Can Protect the Small Intestinal Mucosa Without Affecting the Anti-inflammatory Effect of Indomethacin in Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Hiroki; Hirakawa, Tomoe; Wada, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    How to prevent the small intestinal damage induced by NSAIDs is an urgent issue to be resolved. In the present study, we examined the effects of soluble dietary fibers on both anti-inflammatory and ulcerogenic effects of indomethacin in arthritic rats. Male Wistar rats weighing 180-220 g were used. Arthritis was induced by injecting Freund's complete adjuvant (killed M. tuberculosis) into the plantar region of the right hindpaw. The animals were fed a regular powder diet for rats or a diet supplemented with soluble dietary fibers such as pectin or guar gum. Indomethacin was administered once a day for 3 days starting 14 days after the adjuvant injection, when marked arthritis was observed. The volumes of the hindpaw were measured before and after indomethacin treatment to evaluate the effect of indomethacin on edema. The lesions in the small intestine were examined 24 h after the final dosing of indomethacin. Hindpaw volume was increased about 3 times 14 days after injection of the adjuvant. Indomethacin (3-10 mg/kg, p.o.) decreased hindpaw volume dose-dependently, but caused severe lesions in the small intestine at doses of 6 and 10 mg/kg. The addition of pectin (1-10 %) or guar gum (10 %) to the diet markedly decreased the lesion formation without affecting the anti-edema action of indomethacin. The same effects of pectin were observed when indomethacin was administered subcutaneously. It is suggested that soluble dietary fibers can prevent intestinal damage induced by NSAIDs without affecting the anti-inflammatory effect of these agents.

  19. Sucralfate protects intestinal epithelial cells from radiation-induced apoptosis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuu-Matsuyama, Mutsumi; Shichijo, Kazuko; Okaichi, Kumio

    2006-01-01

    Radiotherapy for malignant pelvic disease is often followed by acute radiation colitis (ARC). It has been reported that sucralfate treatment has a protective effect against ARC, though the mechanisms of action are unknown. The effects of sucralfate on X-ray radiation-induced apoptosis was studied at 4 Gy in the colonic crypt cells of rats. Sucralfate enemas given prior to radiation resulted in the following: reduction in number of apoptotic colonic crypt cells; reduction in number of caspase-3 positive cells; decreases in p53 accumulation and p21 expression; decreases of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. The protective effects of sucralfate against ARC may be partially due to the suppression of radiation-induced apoptosis by way of p53 in the colon and the protection of the colonic epithelial stem cell region. (author)

  20. Effect of postradiation bleeding on proliferative activity of cells in small intestine crypts of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, N V [Institut za Nuklearne Nauke Boris Kidric, Vinca (Yugoslavia)

    1975-12-01

    The effect of postradiation bleeding on the dynamics of duodenal crypt's cell proliferation in rats was studied. The animals, females, three months old, weighing 170 or 180 g, were exposed to radiation of 800 R (115 R/min) and immediately after irradiation were bled by cardiac puncture to 50% of total blood volume. Proliferative activity of duodenal epithelium cells was monitored for a period of five days after irradiation. For control purposes normal, irradiated and only bled animals were used. The results demonstrated that although there are no significant differences in proliferative activity of duodenal epithelium cells in irradiated and bled animals and only irradiated animals, the postradiation reparative processes in irradiated and bled animals is considerably more stable. It is considered that bleeding itself by its hypoxic activity reduced the sensitivity of epithelium to the dose of radiation used. On the other hand, bleeding removed the damaging agents which appear after total body irradiation.

  1. Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery Suppresses Hepatic Gluconeogenesis and Increases Intestinal Gluconeogenesis in a T2DM Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong; Zhou, Zhou; Kong, Fanzhi; Feng, Suibin; Li, Xuzhong; Sha, Yanhua; Zhang, Guangjun; Liu, Haijun; Zhang, Haiqing; Wang, Shiguang; Hu, Cheng; Zhang, Xueli

    2016-11-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is an effective surgical treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present study aimed to investigate the effects of RYGB on glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and intestinal morphological adaption, as well as hepatic and intestinal gluconeogenesis. Twenty adult male T2DM rats induced by high-fat diet and low dose of streptozotocin were randomly divided into sham and RYGB groups. The parameters of body weight, food intake, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and serum lipid profiles were assessed to evaluate metabolic changes. Intestinal sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) for light microscopy examination. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression levels of key regulatory enzymes of gluconeogenesis [phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase)] were determined through reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blotting, respectively. RYGB induced significant improvements in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, along with weight loss and decreased food intake. RYGB also decreased serum triglyceride (TG) and free fatty acid (FFA) levels. The jejunum and ileum exhibited a marked increase in the length and number of intestinal villi after RYGB. The RYGB group exhibited downregulated mRNA and protein expression levels of PEPCK and G6Pase in the liver and upregulated expression of these enzymes in the jejunum and ileum tissues. RYGB ameliorates glucose and lipid metabolism accompanied by weight loss and calorie restriction. The small intestine shows hyperplasia and hypertrophy after RYGB. Meanwhile, our study demonstrated that the reduced hepatic gluconeogenesis and increased intestinal gluconeogenesis may contribute to improved glucose homeostasis after RYGB.

  2. A sulphonamido-indanone derivative CGP 28237 (ZK 34228), a novel non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent without gastro-intestinal ulcerogenicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, I; Schweizer, A; Glatt, M; Werner, H

    1987-01-01

    CGP 28237 (5-methylsulphonylamino-6-phenoxy-1-indanone) belongs to a series of structurally novel indanones. The compound is a weak acid (pK = 6.98), but it does not contain a carboxylic group. CGP 28237 exhibits potent anti-inflammatory activity in developing and established adjuvant arthritis in rats (ED40 approximately 0.5 mg/kg p.o.) and good activity in carrageenin oedema (ED40 approximately 3 mg/kg p.o.). It inhibits yeast-induced fever in rats with ED50 values of 1, 2 and 10 mg/kg p.o. at 1, 3 and 5 hours after drug administration. The antinociceptive activity in mice (phenyl-p-benzoquinone writhing) and rats (acetic-acid writhing) is weak. CGP 28237 has been shown to be non-ulcerogenic in rats under acute and chronic test conditions: it does not cause mucosal lesions in the stomach at 2 X 400 mg/kg p.o., it does not enhance gastro-intestinal blood loss during 10 days' oral treatment with 400 mg/kg p.o., and it did not induce gastro-intestinal lesions in a 4-week toxicity study up to 1000 mg/kg p.o. Although CGP 28237 is not a cyclooxygenase inhibitor in bovine seminal vesicle microsomes, it inhibits prostaglandin synthesis in zymosan-stimulated murine macrophages (IC50 approximately 3 X 10(-6) mol/l) and protects rabbits against arachidonic acid-induced lung embolism with 10 mg/kg p.o. CGP 28237 may represent a novel anti-inflammatory drug with excellent gastro-intestinal tolerability.

  3. Regulation of epithelial differentiation in rat intestine by intraluminal delivery of an adenoviral vector or silencing RNA coding for Schlafen 3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlo L Kovalenko

    Full Text Available Although we stimulate enterocytic proliferation to ameliorate short gut syndrome or mucosal atrophy, less effort has been directed at enterocytic differentiation. Schlafen 3 (Slfn3 is a poorly understood protein induced during IEC-6 enterocytic differentiation. We hypothesized that exogenous manipulation of Slfn3 would regulate enterocytic differentiation in vivo. Adenoviral vector coding for Slfn3 cDNA (Ad-GFP-Slfn3 or silencing RNA for Slfn3 (siSlfn3 was introduced intraluminally into rat intestine. We assessed Slfn3, villin, sucrase-isomaltase (SI, Dpp4, and Glut2 by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. We also studied Slfn3 and these differentiation markers in atrophic defunctionalized jejunal mucosa and the crypt-villus axis of normal jejunum. Ad-GFP-Slfn3 but not Ad-GFP increased Slfn3, villin and Dpp4 expression in human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. Injecting Ad-GFP-Slfn3 into rat jejunum in vivo increased mucosal Slfn3 mRNA three days later vs. intraluminal Ad-GFP. This Slfn3 overexpression was associated with increases in all four differentiation markers. Injecting siSlfn3 into rat jejunum in vivo substantially reduced Slfn3 and all four intestinal mucosal differentiation markers three days later, as well as Dpp4 specific activity. Endogenous Slfn3 was reduced in atrophic mucosa from a blind-end Roux-en-Y anastomosis in parallel with differentiation marker expression together with AKT and p38 signaling. Slfn3 was more highly expressed in the villi than the crypts, paralleling Glut2, SI and Dpp4. Slfn3 is a key intracellular regulator of rat enterocytic differentiation. Understanding how Slfn3 works may identify targets to promote enterocytic differentiation and maintain mucosal function in vivo, facilitating enteral nutrition and improving survival in patients with mucosal atrophy or short gut syndrome.

  4. Relationship between digestive enzymes and food habit of Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae) larvae: Characterization of carbohydrases and digestion of microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, C S; Lucena, S A; Moreira, B H S; Brazil, R P; Gontijo, N F; Genta, F A

    2012-08-01

    The sandfly Lutzomyia longipalpis (Lutz and Neiva, 1912) is the main vector of American Visceral Leishmaniasis. In spite of its medical importance and several studies concerning adult digestive physiology, biochemistry and molecular biology, very few studies have been carried out to elucidate the digestion in sandfly larvae. Even the breeding sites and food sources of these animals in the field are largely uncharacterized. In this paper, we describe and characterize several carbohydrases from the gut of L. longipalpis larvae, and show that they are probably not acquired from food. The enzyme profile of this insect is consistent with the digestion of fungal and bacterial cells, which were proved to be ingested by larvae under laboratory conditions. In this respect, sandfly larvae might have a detritivore habit in nature, being able to exploit microorganisms usually encountered in the detritus as a food source. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mesenteric ischemia-reperfusion injury: clearly improved hemodynamics but only minor protection of the rat small intestine by (sub)therapeutic heparin sodium and enoxaparin doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walensi, Mikolaj; de Groot, Herbert; Schulz, Rainer; Hartmann, Matthias; Petrat, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Tissue protection against ischemia (I)/reperfusion (R) injury by heparins can be due to their anticoagulant and/or non-anticoagulant properties. Here we studied the protective potential of the anticoagulant and the non-anticoagulant features of heparin sodium (HepSo) and enoxaparin (Enox) against mesenteric I/R injury in a rat model. Mesenteric I/R was induced in rats (n = 6 per group) by superior mesenteric artery occlusion (SMAO; 90 min) and reopening (120 min). Therapeutic/clinical and subtherapeutic/non-anticoagulant doses of HepSo (0.25 mg/kg bolus + 0.25 mg/kg × h; 0.05 mg/kg bolus + 0.1 mg/kg × h) or Enox (0.5 mg/kg bolus + 0.5 mg/kg × h; 0.05 mg/kg bolus + 0.1 mg/kg × h) were administered intravenously starting 30 min before SMAO to the end of reperfusion. Systemic/vital and intestinal microcirculatory parameters were measured during the whole experimental procedure, those of small intestine injury at the end. During intestinal reperfusion, mean arterial blood pressure and heart rates were significantly increased by HepSo and, less effectively, by Enox, in a dose-dependent manner. Intestinal microcirculation was only affected by the therapeutic HepSo dose, which decreased the microvascular flow and S(O2) during reperfusion. The subtherapeutic Enox treatment, as opposed to any HepSo dose, most effectively diminished I/R-induced intestinal hemorrhages, myeloperoxidase activity (as a measure of neutrophil invasion), and histopathological changes. Therapeutic but, to a lesser extent, also the subtherapeutic doses of both HepSo and Enox clearly improve hemodynamics during mesenteric reperfusion, while intestinal protection is exclusively provided by Enox, especially at its subtherapeutic dose. Alterations in intestinal microcirculation are not responsible for these effects. Thus, non-anticoagulant Enox doses and, preferably, heparin(oid)s unable to affect coagulation, could diminish clinical risks of I/R-induced gastrointestinal complications. Copyright

  6. Dietary intervention with green dwarf banana flour (Musa sp AAA) prevents intestinal inflammation in a trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid model of rat colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarminio, Viviane; Fruet, Andrea C; Witaicenis, Aline; Rall, Vera L M; Di Stasi, Luiz C

    2012-03-01

    Dietary products are among the therapeutic approaches used to modify intestinal microflora and to promote protective effects during the intestinal inflammatory process. Because the banana plant is rich in resistant starch, which is used by colonic microbiota for the anaerobic production of the short-chain fatty acids that serve as a major fuel source for colonocytes: first, green dwarf banana flour produces protective effects on the intestinal inflammation acting as a prebiotic and, second, combination of this dietary supplementation with prednisolone presents synergistic effects. For this, we used the trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS) model of rat colitis. Our results revealed that the protective effect produced by a combination of 10% green dwarf banana flour with prednisolone was more pronounced than those promoted by a single administration of prednisolone or a diet containing 10% or 20% banana flour. This beneficial effect was associated with an improvement in the colonic oxidative status because the banana flour diet prevented the glutathione depletion and inhibited myeloperoxidase activity and lipid peroxidation. In addition, the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity was associated with an inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity, a reduction in macroscopic and microscopic scores, and an extension of the lesions. In conclusion, the dietary use of the green dwarf banana flour constitutes an important dietary supplement and complementary medicine product to prevention and treatment of human inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Mechanism of Sevoflurane Preconditioning-Induced Protections against Small Intestinal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury Is Independent of Mast Cell in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Gan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to investigate whether sevoflurane preconditioning can protect against small intestinal ischemia reperfusion (IIR injury and to explore whether mast cell (MC is involved in the protections provided by sevoflurane preconditioning. Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to sevoflurane or treated with MC stabilizer cromolyn sodium (CS were subjected to 75-minute superior mesenteric artery occlusion followed by 2-hour reperfusion in the presence or absence of MC degranulator compound 48/80 (CP. Small intestinal ischemia reperfusion resulted in severe intestinal injury as demonstrated by significant elevations in intestinal injury scores and p47phox and gp91phox, ICAM-1 protein expressions and malondialdehyde and IL-6 contents, and MPO activities as well as significant reductions in SOD activities, accompanied with concomitant increases in mast cell degranulation evidenced by significant increases in MC counts, tryptase expression, and β-hexosaminidase concentrations, and those alterations were further upregulated in the presence of CP. Sevoflurane preconditioning dramatically attenuated the previous IIR-induced alterations except MC counts, tryptase, and β-hexosaminidase which were significantly reduced by CS treatment. Furthermore, CP exacerbated IIR injury was abrogated by CS but not by sevoflurane preconditioning. The data collectively indicate that sevoflurane preconditioning confers protections against IIR injury, and MC is not involved in the protective process.

  8. Influence of intoxication with vanadium compounds on the intestinal absorption of calcium in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witkowska, D.; Oledzka, R.; Pietrzyk, B.

    1986-01-01

    Calcium is transferred to the plasma after absorption from the gastrointestinal tract and by resorption from the bone. It is recognized that many environmental poisons, e.g. heavy metal, pesticides etc. cause alterations in calcium homeosthasis in human beings and experimental animals. Although vanadium is not considered to be as important a health hazard to man as lead or cadmium it must be nevertheless regarded as a dangerous pollutant. There exists an obvious risk of pollution by and poisoning due to the high vanadium content of crude oil and the industrial use of vanadium as a steel additive. The toxic effects of this element and its compounds in many biological systems have been reviewed in detail but little is known about vanadium influence on calcium metabolism. The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of various treatments with vanadium compounds, containing vanadium as VO 2+ (VOSO 4 ) and VO 3 (NaVO 3 ) ions, exert on calcium transport through the rat duodenum

  9. The Effect of A Single Sub-Lethal Dose of Whole Body Irradiation on the Small Intestine of Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ramli, M. A.; Kubba, M. A.; Al-Bassam, L. S.; Belhaj, K.; Al-shawish, N. M.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of whole body radiation with a single sub-lethal dose at 4 Gy on rat small intestine was studied histologically and quantitatively. Irradiated animals were euthanized at 24 hours, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post- irradiation. Crypts of Leiberkuhn and peyer's patches were especially targeted by irradiation. The crypts showed severe cellular fragmentation in the germinal cellular compartments twenty Four hours after irradiation resulting in partial denudation of villi especially at their Tips. At three days, these cells resumed their proliferative activity with the appearance of unusually large numbers of mitotic figures. Cellular regeneration in the crypts and on the villous surface showed improvement with advancing time till day 28 when the villi had complete epithelial covering and the proliferative activity of the germinal cryptic cells returned to normal. The quantitative study included the measurement of about fifty villi at each time after irradiation. A significant decrease in villous length was noticed at twenty four hours post-irradiation compared to the control values. The length of villi plateaued at about this level till day twenty one when it slightly increased to reach a sub normal mean length on day 28. We concluded that whole body irradiation with a single dose at 4 Gy was enough to induce cryptic cellular necrosis with sloughing of epithelial villous columnar covering. This cellular damage was, however, sub- total since quick regenerative cellular activity was noticed three days post-irradiation. The decrease in the villous length paralleled the cryptic cellular damage whereas full recovery was not achieved despite obvious cellular regeneration.

  10. Red wine alcohol promotes quercetin absorption and directs its metabolism towards isorhamnetin and tamarixetin in rat intestine in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoni, Stefania; Gee, Jennifer; Bennett, Richard; Valoti, Massimo; Sgaragli, Giampietro

    2006-01-01

    Moderate consumption of red wine has been associated with beneficial effects on human health, and this has been attributed to the flavonoid content. Factors that influence the bioavailability of this group of polyphenolic compounds are therefore important. Using the rat cannulated everted jejunal sac technique, we have investigated the effect of alcohol on the intestinal absorption of quercetin and its 3-O-glucoside from red wine. Tissue preparations were incubated in whole or dealcoholised red wine, diluted 1 : 1 with Krebs buffer for 20 min at 37°C, after which the mucosa was removed and processed for HPLC analysis. Tissues exposed to red wine had significantly higher amounts of both quercetin (× 3; P<0.001) and quercetin-3-O-glucoside (× 1.5; P<0.01) associated with them, compared with sacs incubated in the dealcoholised equivalent. In addition, both tamarixetin (T) and isorhamnetin (I), in the mucosal tissue from sacs exposed to the whole wine, were significantly elevated approximately two fold (P<0.05; P<0.01, respectively). Similar results were obtained when sacs were incubated in Krebs buffer containing a mixture of pure quercetin and quercetin-3-O-glucoside with or without alcohol, and, although effects on the apparent absorption of Q and Q-3-G were not so marked, concentrations of the metabolites quercetin-3-O-glucuronide and I were significantly increased by the presence of alcohol (P<0.01 and P<0.001, respectively). It is therefore plausible that the moderate alcohol content of red wine contributes to its beneficial health effects in humans by both increasing the absorption of quercetin and quercetin-3-O-glucoside and by channelling their metabolism towards O-methylation to yield compounds (T and I), which have potential protective effects against cancer and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:16444288

  11. Vasodilatory effect of the stable vasoactive intestinal peptide analog RO 25-1553 in murine and rat lungs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yin

    Full Text Available Stable analogs of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP have been proposed as novel line of therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD based on their bronchodilatory and anti-inflammatory effects. We speculated that VIP analogs may provide additional benefits in that they exert vasodilatory properties in the lung, and tested this hypothesis in both ex vivo and in vivo models.In isolated perfused mouse lungs and in an in vivo rat model, pulmonary blood vessels were preconstricted by hypoxia and hemodynamic changes in response to systemic (ex vivo or inhaled (in vivo administration of the cyclic VIP analog RO 25-1553 were determined.In mouse lungs, RO 25-1553 reduced intrinsic vascular resistance at normoxia, and attenuated the increase in pulmonary artery pressure in response to acute hypoxia. Consistently, inhalation of RO 25-1553 (1 mg · mL(-1 for 3 min caused an extensive and sustained (> 60 min inhibition of the pulmonary arterial pressure increase in response to hypoxia in vivo that was comparable to the effects of inhaled sildenafil. This effect was not attributable to systemic cardiovascular effects of RO 25-1553, but to a lung specific reduction in pulmonary vascular resistance, while cardiac output and systemic arterial hemodynamics remained unaffected. No adverse effects of RO 25-1553 inhalation on pulmonary gas exchange, ventilation-perfusion matching, or lung fluid content were detected.Our findings demonstrate that inhaled delivery of the stable VIP analog RO 25-1553 induces a potent and sustained vasodilatory effect in the pulmonary circulation with no detectable adverse effects. Therapeutic inhalation of RO 25-1553 may provide vascular benefits in addition to its reported anti-inflammatory and bronchodilatory effects in COPD, yet caution is warranted given the overall poor results of vasodilator therapies for pulmonary hypertension secondary to COPD in a series of recent clinical trials.

  12. Yuanhuapine-induced intestinal and hepatotoxicity were correlated with disturbance of amino acids, lipids, carbohydrate metabolism and gut microflora function: A rat urine metabonomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanyan; Duan, Jin-Ao; Guo, Jianming; Shang, Erxin; Tang, Yuping; Qian, Yefei; Tao, Weiwei; Liu, Pei

    2016-07-15

    This research was designed to study metabonomic characteristics of the toxicity induced by yuanhuapine, a major bioactive diterpenoid in a well-known traditional Chinese medicine-Genkwa Flos. General observation, blood biochemistry and histopathological examination were used to reflect yuanhuapine-induced toxicity. Urine samples from rats in control and yuanhuapine treated rats were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS). Pattern recognition methods including principal components analysis (PCA), partial least-squared discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), orthogonal partial least-squared discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) and computational system analysis were integrated to obtain comprehensive metabonomic profiling and pathways of the biological data sets. The results suggested that yuanhuapine could induce intestinal and liver damage. And 14 endogenous metabolites as biomarkers related to the amino acids metabolism, lipids metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and gut microflora were significantly changed in the urine of yuanhuapine treated rats, which were firstly constructed the metabolomic feature profiling and metabolite interaction network of yuanhuapine-induced injury using pattern recognition methods and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) approach. The present study showed that yuanhuapine-induced intestinal and hepatic toxicity were correlated with disturbance of amino acids metabolism, lipids metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and gut microflora. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Roles of pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors as well as matrix metalloproteinases in healing of NSAID-induced small intestinal ulcers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyenge, Melinda; Amagase, Kikuko; Kunimi, Shino; Matsuoka, Rie; Takeuchi, Koji

    2013-10-06

    We examined changes in the expression of a pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and an anti-angiogenic factor, endostatin, as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 in the rat small intestine after administration of indomethacin and investigated the roles of these factors in the healing of indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulcers. Male SD rats were given indomethacin (10mg/kg) p.o. and euthanized at various time points (3-24h and 2-7days) after the administration. To impair the healing of these lesions, low-dose of indomethacin (2mg/kg) was given p.o. once daily for 6days starting 1day after ulceration. Levels of VEGF, endostatin, MMP-2 and MMP-9 were determined by Western blotting. The expression of both VEGF and endostatin was upregulated after the ulceration. Repeated administration of low-dose indomethacin impaired the ulcer healing with a decrease of VEGF expression and a further increase of endostatin expression, resulting in a marked decrease in the ratio of VEGF/endostatin expression. The levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were both significantly increased after the ulceration, but these responses were suppressed by the repeated indomethacin treatment. The healing of these ulcers was significantly delayed by the repeated administration of MMP inhibitors such as ARP-101 and SB-3CT. The results confirm the importance of the balance between pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic activities in the healing of indomethacin-induced small intestinal damage and further suggest that the increased expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 is another important factor for ulcer healing in the small intestine. © 2013.

  14. Effects of the Brown Seaweed Laminaria japonica Supplementation on Serum Concentrations of IgG, Triglycerides, and Cholesterol, and Intestinal Microbiota Composition in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Young Kim

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbial communities play critical roles in various aspects of body function of the host. Prebiotics, such as dietary fiber, can affect health of the host by altering the composition of intestinal microbiota. Although brown seaweed Laminaria japonica is rich in dietary fiber, studies on its prebiotic potential are quite rare. In this study, basal diet (control, basal diet supplemented with dried L. japonica (DLJ, heat-treated dried L. japonica (HLJ, or heated dried L. japonica with added fructooligosaccharide (FHLJ was fed to rats for 16 weeks. Serum concentrations of IgG, triglyceride, and cholesterol were measured. In addition, the intestinal microbiota composition was analyzed by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene. As compared to the control group, DLJ, HLJ, and FHLJ groups showed significantly higher serum IgG concentration, but had lower weight gain and serum triglyceride concentration. Moreover, DLJ, HLJ, and FHLJ groups showed lower Fimicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio when compared with the control group. As compared with the control group, obesity-associated bacterial genera (Allobaculum, Turicibacter, Coprobacillus, Mollicute, and Oscilibacter, and the genera with pathogenic potentials (Mollicute, Bacteroides, Clostridium, Escherichia, and Prevotella decreased while leanness-associated genera (Alistipes, Bacteroides, and Prevotella, and lactic acid bacterial genera (Subdoligranulum, Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Enterococcus, and Bifidobacterium increased in all treatment groups. On the contrary, butyric acid producing genera including Subdoligranulum, Roseburia, Eubacterium, Butyrivibrio, and Anaerotruncus increased significantly only in FHLJ group. The overall results support multiple prebiotic effects of seaweed L. japonica on rats as determined by body weight reduction, enhanced immune response, and desirable changes in intestinal microbiota composition, suggesting the great potential of L. japonica as an

  15. Effect of a cocoa diet on the small intestine and gut-associated lymphoid tissue composition in an oral sensitization model in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps-Bossacoma, Mariona; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Franch, Àngels; Untersmayr, Eva; Castell, Margarida

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have attributed to the cocoa powder the capacity to attenuate the immune response in a rat oral sensitization model. To gain a better understanding of cocoa-induced mechanisms at small intestinal level, 3-week-old female Lewis rats were fed either a standard diet or a diet containing 10% cocoa for 4 weeks with or without concomitant oral sensitization with ovalbumin (OVA). Thereafter, we evaluated the lymphocyte composition of the Peyer's patches (PPL), small intestine epithelium (IEL) and lamina propria (LPL). Likewise, gene expression of several immune molecules was quantified in the small intestine. Moreover, histological samples were used to evaluate the proportion of goblet cells, IgA+ cells and granzyme+cells as well. In cocoa-fed animals, we identified a five-time reduction in the percentage of IgA+ cells in intestinal tissue together with a decreased proportion of TLR4+ IEL. Analyzing the lymphocyte composition, almost a double proportion of TCRγδ+cells and an increase of NK cell percentage in PPL and IEL were found. In addition, a rise in CD25+, CD103+ and CD62L- cell proportions was observed in CD4+ PPL from cocoa-fed animals, along with a decrease in gene expression of CD11b, CD11c and IL-10. These results suggest that changes in PPL and IEL composition and in the gene expression induced by the cocoa diet could be involved, among other mechanisms, on its tolerogenic effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Protective effect of probiotics on intestinal barrier function in malnourished rats after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Gang Ren; Hui Liu; Jian-Wen Jiang; Li Jiang; Hui Chen; Hai-Yang Xie; Lin Zhou; Shu-Sen Zheng

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most patients waiting for liver transplantation have end-stage liver diseases with malnutrition, which is prone to induce intestinal barrier dysfunction after liver transplantation. We aimed to study the effect of probiotics on intestinal barrier function  in  malnourished  rats  following  liver  transplantation with long-term antibiotics. METHODS: Twelve  Lewis  rats  were  selected  as  donors. Twelve  BN  rats,  which  served  as  recipients,  were  subjected  to malnutrition  by  semi-starvation  for  4-5  weeks.  They  were randomly  divided  into  two  groups:  a  control  group  which received  phosphate-buffered  saline  and  a  probiotics  group which received Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus. All recipients were injected with intramuscular imipenem and subcutaneous cyclosporine  A.  Furthermore,  six  normal  BN  rats  without any drugs or operations served as a normal group. Eight days after operation, all rats were sacrificed for examination of the following  parameters:  serum  levels  of  endotoxin  and  TNF-α, bacterial  translocation,  intestinal  microflora,  ileocecal  sIgA, lymphocyte  numbers,  and  phenotypes  (CD4,  CD8,  αβTCR, γδTCR) of Peyer's patches. RESULTS: In  recipients  subjected  to  malnutrition,  weight decreased  by  20%  and  they  survived  until  8  days  after operation.  Compared  with  the  normal  group,  all  recipients on  postoperative  day  8  showed  increased  levels  of  serum endotoxin  and  TNF-α  as  well  as  increased  counts  of translocated  bacteria.  Meanwhile,  there  were  decreases  in

  17. Evaluation of the potential effect of Allium sativum, Momordica charantia, Eugenia jambolana, Ocimum sanctum & Psidium guajava on intestinal P-glycoprotein in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra Kumar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims/Background: This study was evaluated synergistic effect of Polyherbal formulation (PHF of Allium sativum L., Eugenia jambolana Lam., Momordica charantia L., Ocimum sanctum Linn and Psidium guajava L on p-glycoprotein of intestine. These five herbs were traditionally used for diabetes. These herbs are commonly present in ayurvedic product as antidiabetics in India. Methodology: PHF was prepared by five indigenous herbs. Different doses (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg/day of was orally administered to Sprague-Dawley rats of different groups for multiple weeks except control groups. Alteration in Pgp expression was evaluated by RT-PCR and western blotting while modulation in activity of Pgp was evaluated using rhodamine 123 as transport substrate by in-situ absorption and everted gut sac method. Results: In PHF pretreated group received 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg/day for seven days, mRNA level decreased by 1.75, 2.45 and 2.37 fold respectively as compared to control. Similarly when PHF at dose of 100 mg/kg/day was given consequently for four weeks maximum decrease in Pgp expression level was observed only after one week and further increase in the treatment duration did not produce significant decrease compared to first week treatment. Pgp mediated transport of rhodamine 123 was significantly decreased with everted gut sac prepared from PHF pretreated rats (one week compared to those prepared from vehicle treated rats. Conclusions: In conclusion, we report that PHF pretreatment down regulated the expression of intestinal Pgp and this down regulated intestinal Pgp would result in decreased functional activity. Additionally this down regulated Pgp expression might affect the bioavailability of antidiabetic Pgp substrate drugs. [J Complement Med Res 2017; 6(1.000: 68-74

  18. Prebiotic potential of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) in Wistar rats: effects of levels of supplementation on hindgut fermentation, intestinal morphology, blood metabolites and immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Lipismita; Chaturvedi, Vishwa Bandhu; Saikumar, Guttula; Somvanshi, Ramesh; Pattanaik, Ashok Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Many studies have been conducted using purified prebiotics such as inulin or fructooligosaccharides (FOS) as nutraceuticals, but there is very little information available on the prebiotic potential of raw products rich in inulin and FOS, such as Jerusalem artichoke (JA; Helianthus tuberosus L.). The present experiment aimed to evaluate the prebiotic effects of JA tubers in rats. Seventy-two Wistar weanling rats divided into four groups were fed for 12 weeks on a basal diet fortified with pulverized JA tubers at 0 (control), 20, 40 and 60 g kg(-1) levels. Enhanced cell-mediated immunity in terms of skin indurations (P = 0.082) and CD4+ T-lymphocyte population (P = 0.002) was observed in the JA-supplemented groups compared with the control group. Blood haemoglobin (P = 0.017), glucose (P = 0.001), urea (P = 0.004) and calcium (P = 0.048) varied favourably upon inclusion of JA. An increasing trend (P = 0.059) in the length of large intestine was apparent in the JA-fed groups. The tissue mass of caecum (P = 0.069) and colon (P = 0.003) was increased in the JA-supplemented groups, accompanied by higher (P = 0.007) caecal crypt depth. The pH and ammonia concentrations of intestinal digesta decreased and those of lactate and total volatile fatty acids increased in the JA-fed groups. The results suggest that JA had beneficial effects on immunity, blood metabolites, intestinal morphometry and hindgut fermentation of rats. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Detection and Specific Enumeration of Multi-Strain Probiotics in the Lumen Contents and Mucus Layers of the Rat Intestine After Oral Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Ji; Orlovich, David A; Tagg, John R; Fawcett, J Paul

    2009-12-01

    Although the detection of viable probiotic bacteria following their ingestion and passage through the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been well documented, their mucosal attachment in vivo is more difficult to assess. In this study, we investigated the survival and mucosal attachment of multi-strain probiotics transiting the rat GIT. Rats were administered a commercial mixture of the intestinal probiotics Lactobacillus acidophilus LA742, Lactobacillus rhamnosus L2H and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 and the oral probiotic Streptococcus salivarius K12 every 12 h for 3 days. Intestinal contents, mucus and faeces were tested 6 h, 3 days and 7 days after the last dose by strain-specific enumeration on selective media and by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. At 6 h, viable cells and DNA corresponding to all four probiotics were detected in the faeces and in both the lumen contents and mucus layers of the ileum and colon. Viable probiotic cells of B. lactis and L. rhamnosus were detected for 7 days and L. acidophilus for 3 days after the last dose. B. lactis and L. rhamnosus persisted in the ileal mucus and colon contents, whereas the retention of L. acidophilus appeared to be relatively higher in colonic mucus. No viable cells of S. salivarius K12 were detected in any of the samples at either day 3 or 7. The study demonstrates that probiotic strains of intestinal origin but not of oral origin exhibit temporary colonisation of the rat GIT and that these strains may have differing relative affinities for colonic and ileal mucosa.

  20. Lactobacillus bulgaricus Prevents Intestinal Epithelial Cell Injury Caused by Enterobacter sakazakii-Induced Nitric Oxide both In Vitro and in the Newborn Rat Model of Necrotizing Enterocolitis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Catherine J.; Williams, Monica; Petrosyan, Mikael; Guner, Yigit; Mittal, Rahul; Mock, Dennis; Upperman, Jeffrey S.; Ford, Henri R.; Prasadarao, Nemani V.

    2009-01-01

    Enterobacter sakazakii is an emerging pathogen that has been associated with outbreaks of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) as well as infant sepsis and meningitis. Our previous studies demonstrated that E. sakazakii induces NEC in a newborn rat model by inducing enterocyte apoptosis. However, the mechanisms responsible for enterocyte apoptosis are not known. Here we demonstrate that E. sakazakii induces significant production of nitric oxide (NO) in rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) upon infection. The elevated production of NO, which is due to increased expression of inducible NO synthase, is responsible for apoptosis of IEC-6 cells. Notably, pretreatment of IEC-6 cells with Lactobacillus bulgaricus (ATCC 12278) attenuated the upregulation of NO production and thereby protected the cells from E. sakazakii-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, pretreatment with L. bulgaricus promoted the integrity of enterocytes both in vitro and in the infant rat model of NEC, even after challenge with E. sakazakii. Infection of IEC-6 cells with E. sakazakii upregulated several genes related to apoptosis, cytokine production, and various signaling pathways, as demonstrated by rat gene array analysis, and this upregulation was subdued by pretreatment with L. bulgaricus. In agreement with these data, L. bulgaricus pretreatment protected newborn rats infected with E. sakazakii from developing NEC, resulting in improved survival. PMID:19075027

  1. Comparison of the gravimetric, phenol red, and 14C-PEG-3350 methods to determine water absorption in the rat single-pass intestinal perfusion model

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, Steven C.; Rinaldi, M. T. S.; Vukovinsky, K. E.

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether the gravimetric method provided an accurate measure of water flux correction and to compare the gravimetric method with methods that employ nonabsorbed markers (eg, phenol red and 14C-PEG-3350). Phenol red, 14C-PEG-3350, and 4-[2-[[2-(6-amino-3-pyridinyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]amino]ethoxy]-methyl ester, (R)-benzene acetic acid (Compound I) were co-perfused in situ through the jejunum of 9 anesthetized rats (single-pass intestinal perfusion [SPIP]). Wat...

  2. Influência do antibiótico nas lesões de isquemia e reperfusão intestinal: estudo experimental em ratos The influence of antibiotics on intestinal ischemia and reperfusion: experimental study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Pessole Biondo-Simões

    2000-01-01

    reperfusion have been studied. Free radicals appear to be envolved in the phisiopathology of the ischemia and reperfusions lesions. The intestinal barrier disruption would allow bacterial translocation and increase in the severity of such lesions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate intestinal injury after ischemia and reperfusion with and without antibiotic coverage. Under ether anesthesia forty-two Wistar male rats were submitted to an abdominal midline incision. The mesenteric arteries were clamped for 30 minutes. After this period of ischemia, reperfusion was induced for equal period of time. Twenty-one rats received eritromicin, 50mg/kg orally, 24 hours before the operation. The remain animals were operated without antibiotics coverage. Each of the two groups animals were divided into 3 others groups: control, ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion groups. After the reperfusion period, a intestinal segment was excised for histopathological studies. Results were evaluated according to the criteria of CHIU and col. and were submitted to statical analysis. In the control group any difference was found in the intestines of the animals with and without antibiotic coverage. The ischemia group, with or without antibiotic, showed lesions that ranged from vilos loss to mucosal infarction. The lesions were similar in the ischemia-reperfusion group. We verified that intestines submitted to reperfusion under antibiotic coverage showed more severe lesions than ischemic intestines without antibiotics coverage (p= 0,0303. We can conclude that the administrations of antibiotics before the induction of ischemia or ischemia-reperfusion does not improve the severity of histological lesions.

  3. Effects of Diclofenac, L-NAME, L-Arginine, and Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on Gastrointestinal, Liver, and Brain Lesions, Failed Anastomosis, and Intestinal Adaptation Deterioration in 24 Hour-Short-Bowel Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lojo, Nermin; Rasic, Zarko; Zenko Sever, Anita; Kolenc, Danijela; Vukusic, Darko; Drmic, Domagoj; Zoricic, Ivan; Sever, Marko; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 was previously used to ameliorate wound healing following major surgery and counteract diclofenac toxicity. To resolve the increasing early risks following major massive small bowel resectioning surgery, diclofenac combined with nitric oxide (NO) system blockade was used, suggesting therapy with BPC 157 and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS substrate) L-arginine, is efficacious. Immediately after anastomosis creation, short-bowel rats were untreated or administered intraperitoneal diclofenac (12 mg/kg), BPC 157 (10 μg/kg or 10 ng/kg), L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 5 mg/kg), L-arginine (100 mg/kg) alone or combined, and assessed 24 h later. Short-bowel rats exhibited poor anastomosis healing, failed intestine adaptation, and gastrointestinal, liver, and brain lesions, which worsened with diclofenac. This was gradually ameliorated by immediate therapy with BPC 157 and L-arginine. Contrastingly, NOS-blocker L-NAME induced further aggravation and lesions gradually worsened. Specifically, rats with surgery alone exhibited mild stomach/duodenum lesions, considerable liver lesions, and severe cerebral/hippocampal lesions while those also administered diclofenac showed widespread severe lesions in the gastrointestinal tract, liver, cerebellar nuclear/Purkinje cells, and cerebrum/hippocampus. Rats subjected to surgery, diclofenac, and L-NAME exhibited the mentioned lesions, worsening anastomosis, and macro/microscopical necrosis. Thus, rats subjected to surgery alone showed evidence of deterioration. Furtheremore, rats subjected to surgery and administered diclofenac showed worse symptoms, than the rats subjected to surgery alone did. Rats subjected to surgery combined with diclofenac and L-NAME showed the worst deterioration. Rats subjected to surgery exhibited habitual adaptation of the remaining small intestine, which was markedly reversed in rats subjected to surgery and diclofenac, and those with surgery, diclofenac, and

  4. Correction of enhanced Na(+)-H+ exchange of rat small intestinal brush-border membranes in streptozotocin-induced diabetes by insulin or 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudeja, P.K.; Wali, R.K.; Klitzke, A.; Sitrin, M.D.; Brasitus, T.A.

    1991-01-01

    Diabetes was induced in rats by administration of a single i.p. injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg body wt). After 7 d, diabetic rats were further treated with insulin or 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1,25(OH)2D3] for an additional 5-7 d. Control, diabetic, diabetic + insulin, and diabetic + 1,25(OH)2D3 rats were then killed, their proximal small intestines were removed, and villus-tip epithelial cells were isolated and used to prepare brush-border membrane vesicles. Preparations from each of these groups were then analyzed and compared with respect to their amiloride-sensitive, electroneutral Na(+)-H+ exchange activity, using 22 Na uptake as well as acridine orange techniques. The results of these experiments demonstrated that (a) H+ gradient-dependent 22 Na uptake as well as Na+ gradient-dependent transmembrane H+ fluxes were significantly increased in diabetic vesicles compared to their control counterparts, (b) kinetic studies demonstrated that this enhanced 22 Na uptake in diabetes was a result of increased maximal velocity (Vmax) of this exchanger with no change in apparent affinity (Km) for Na+, (c) serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 were significantly lower in diabetic animals compared with their control counterparts; and (d) insulin or 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment restored the Vmax alterations to control values, without any significant changes in Km, concomitant with significantly increasing the serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 in diabetic animals. These results indicate that Na(+)-H+ activity is significantly increased in proximal small intestinal luminal membranes of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Moreover, alterations in the serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 may, at least in part, explain this enhanced antiporter activity and its correction by insulin

  5. Chemoprotective Effect of Taurine on Potassium Bromate-Induced DNA Damage, DNA-Protein Cross-Linking and Oxidative Stress in Rat Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mir Kaisar; Khan, Aijaz Ahmed; Ali, Shaikh Nisar; Mahmood, Riaz

    2015-01-01

    Potassium bromate (KBrO3) is widely used as a food additive and is a major water disinfection by-product. It induces multiple organ toxicity in humans and experimental animals and is a probable human carcinogen. The present study reports the protective effect of dietary antioxidant taurine on KBrO3-induced damage to the rat intestine. Animals were randomly divided into four groups: control, KBrO3 alone, taurine alone and taurine+ KBrO3. Administration of KBrO3 alone led to decrease in the activities of intestinal brush border membrane enzymes while those of antioxidant defence and carbohydrate metabolism were also severely altered. There was increase in DNA damage and DNA-protein cross-linking. Treatment with taurine, prior to administration of KBrO3, resulted in significant attenuation in all these parameters but the administration of taurine alone had no effect. Histological studies supported these biochemical results showing extensive intestinal damage in KBrO3-treated animals and greatly reduced tissue injury in the taurine+ KBrO3 group. These results show that taurine ameliorates bromate induced tissue toxicity and oxidative damage by improving the antioxidant defence, tissue integrity and energy metabolism. Taurine can, therefore, be potentially used as a therapeutic/protective agent against toxicity of KBrO3 and related compounds. PMID:25748174

  6. Effect of Cereal Type and Enzyme Addition on Performance, Pancreatic Enzyme Activity, Intestinal Microflora and Gut Morphology of Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalantar M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of grain and carbohydrase enzyme supplementation were investigated on digestive physiology of chickens. A total of 625 one-day-old chicks (Ross 308 were randomly assigned to five treatments in a completely randomized design. Treatments included two different types of grains (wheat, and barley with or without a multi-carbohydrase supplement. A corn-based diet was also considered to serve as a control. Feeding barley-based diet with multi-carbohydrase led to higher feed intake (P < 0.01 than those fed corn- and wheat-based diets. Birds fed on barley and wheat diets had lower weight gain despite a higher feed conversion ratio (P < 0.01. Total count and number of different type of bacteria including Gram-negative, E. coli, and Clostridia increased after feeding wheat and barley but the number of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria decreased (P < 0.01. Feeding barley and wheat diets reduced villus height in different parts of the small intestine when compared to those fed on a corn diet. However, enzyme supplementation of barley and wheat diets improved weight gain and feed conversion ratio and resulted in reduced number of E. coli and Clostridia and increased number of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria, and also restored the negative effects on intestinal villi height (P < 0.01. The activities of pancreatic α-amylase and lipase were (P < 0.01 increased in chickens fed wheat and barley diets when compared to the control fed on a corn diet. Enzyme supplementation reduced the activities of pancreatic α-amylase and lipase (P < 0.01. In conclusion, various dietary non-starch polysaccharides without enzyme supplementation have an adverse effect on digesta viscosity, ileal microflora, villi morphology, and pancreatic enzyme activity.

  7. Oral administration of Saccharomyces boulardii ameliorates carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis in rats via reducing intestinal permeability and modulating gut microbial composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Zhu, Lin; Xie, Ao; Yuan, Jieli

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the effects of orally administrated Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) on the progress of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver fibrosis, 34 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four experimental groups including the control group (n = 8), the cirrhotic group (n = 10), the preventive group (n = 8), and the treatment group (n = 8). Results showed that the liver expression levels of collagen, type I, alpha 1 (Col1A1), alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) increased significantly in cirrhotic rats compared with control and decreased by S. boulardii administration. Treatment of S. boulardii also attenuated the increased endotoxin levels and pro-inflammatory cytokines in CCl4-treated rats. And, these were associated with the changes of intestinal permeability and fecal microbial composition. Our study suggested that oral administration of S. boulardii can promote the liver function of CCl4-treated rats, and the preventive treatment of this probiotic yeast may decelerate the progress of liver fibrosis.

  8. Administration of Lactobacillus salivarius LI01 or Pediococcus pentosaceus LI05 prevents CCl4-induced liver cirrhosis by protecting the intestinal barrier in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ding; Lv, Longxian; Fang, Daiqiong; Wu, Wenrui; Hu, Chenxia; Xu, Lichen; Chen, Yanfei; Guo, Jing; Hu, Xinjun; Li, Ang; Guo, Feifei; Ye, Jianzhong; Li, Yating; Andayani, Dewi; Li, Lanjuan

    2017-07-31

    Alterations in the gut microbiome have been reported in liver cirrhosis, and probiotic interventions are considered a potential treatment strategy. This study aimed to evaluate the effects and mechanisms of Lactobacillus salivarius LI01, Pediococcus pentosaceus LI05, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Clostridium butyricum MIYAIRI and Bacillus licheniformis Zhengchangsheng on CCl 4 -induced cirrhotic rats. Only administration of LI01 or LI05 prevented liver fibrosis and down-regulated the hepatic expression of profibrogenic genes. Serum endotoxins, bacterial translocations (BTs), and destruction of intestinal mucosal ultrastructure were reduced in rats treated with LI01 or LI05, indicating maintenance of the gut barrier as a mechanism; this was further confirmed by the reduction of not only hepatic inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-17A, but also hepatic TLR2, TLR4, TLR5 and TLR9. Metagenomic sequencing of 16S rRNA gene showed an increase in potential beneficial bacteria, such as Elusimicrobium and Prevotella, and a decrease in pathogenic bacteria, such as Escherichia. These alterations in gut microbiome were correlated with profibrogenic genes, gut barrier markers and inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, L. salivarius LI01 and P. pentosaceus LI05 attenuated liver fibrosis by protecting the intestinal barrier and promoting microbiome health. These results suggest novel strategies for the prevention of liver cirrhosis.

  9. Food-grade TiO2 impairs intestinal and systemic immune homeostasis, initiates preneoplastic lesions and promotes aberrant crypt development in the rat colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettini, Sarah; Boutet-Robinet, Elisa; Cartier, Christel; Coméra, Christine; Gaultier, Eric; Dupuy, Jacques; Naud, Nathalie; Taché, Sylviane; Grysan, Patrick; Reguer, Solenn; Thieriet, Nathalie; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Thiaudière, Dominique; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Carrière, Marie; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Pierre, Fabrice H; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Houdeau, Eric

    2017-01-20

    Food-grade titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) containing a nanoscale particle fraction (TiO 2 -NPs) is approved as a white pigment (E171 in Europe) in common foodstuffs, including confectionary. There are growing concerns that daily oral TiO 2 -NP intake is associated with an increased risk of chronic intestinal inflammation and carcinogenesis. In rats orally exposed for one week to E171 at human relevant levels, titanium was detected in the immune cells of Peyer's patches (PP) as observed with the TiO 2 -NP model NM-105. Dendritic cell frequency increased in PP regardless of the TiO 2 treatment, while regulatory T cells involved in dampening inflammatory responses decreased with E171 only, an effect still observed after 100 days of treatment. In all TiO 2 -treated rats, stimulation of immune cells isolated from PP showed a decrease in Thelper (Th)-1 IFN-γ secretion, while splenic Th1/Th17 inflammatory responses sharply increased. E171 or NM-105 for one week did not initiate intestinal inflammation, while a 100-day E171 treatment promoted colon microinflammation and initiated preneoplastic lesions while also fostering the growth of aberrant crypt foci in a chemically induced carcinogenesis model. These data should be considered for risk assessments of the susceptibility to Th17-driven autoimmune diseases and to colorectal cancer in humans exposed to TiO 2 from dietary sources.

  10. The effect of storage time of human red cells on intestinal microcirculatory oxygenation in a rat isovolemic exchange model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raat, N. J.; Verhoeven, A. J.; Mik, E. G.; Gouwerok, C. W.; Verhaar, R.; Goedhart, P. T.; de Korte, D.; Ince, C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the storage time of human leukodepleted red blood cell concentrates compromises intestinal microvascular oxygen concentration oxygen (muPo(2)) during isovolemic exchange transfusion at low hematocrit. Design: Prospective, randomized, controlled study. Setting:

  11. Ellagitannins from pomegranate ameliorates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in rats while enhancing its chemotoxicity against HT-29 colorectal cancer cells through intrinsic apoptosis induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Xin; Lam, Kar Ho; Feng, Yibin; Xu, Kai; Sze, Stephen C W; Tang, Chi Wai; Leung, George P H; Lee, Calvin Kai-Fai; Shi, Jun; Yang, Zhijun; Li, Sheng-Tao; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Zhang, Yanbo

    2018-06-19

    Worldwide, colorectal cancer (CRC) is a deleterious disease causing millions of death annually. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a first-line chemotherapy for CRC, but chemoresistance and gastrointestinal mucositis limit its efficacy. Polyphenol-rich foods are increasingly popular due to their potential beneficial role in cancer. Ellagitannins is a group of phenolic compounds commonly found in pomegranate, strawberries, raspberries, etc. The objective of this study was to explore whether ellagitannins from pomegranate (PETs) could ameliorate 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis and enhance its efficacy against CRC. The results showed that PETs (100 mg/kg) counteracted 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in rats. The number of apoptotic cells per crypt was reduced from 1.50±0.21 to 0.85±0.18 (P<0.05). Moreover, PETs induced HT-29 CRC cell death through intrinsic apoptosis as demonstrated by dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, increased Bax to Bcl-2 ratio, and cleavage of caspase 9 and caspase 3. PETs and 5-FU combination treatments exhibited synergistic cytotoxicity against HT-29 cells with a weighted combination index of 0.3494. PETs (80 µg/mL) and 5-FU (40 µg/mL) treatments for 48 h induced 14.03±0.76% and 16.42±1.15% of HT-29 cells to undergo apoptosis while the combination treatment further increased apoptosis cells to 34.00±1.54% (P<0.05). Combination treatment of the cells also enhanced S phase cell cycle arrest as compared with PETs or 5-FU monotherapy (P<0.05). These results suggest that dietary ellagitannins from pomegranate could alleviate intestinal mucositis in rats induced by 5-FU while enhancing its toxicity against HT-29 cells through potentiation of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

  12. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  13. A new model for portal protein profile analysis in course of ileal intraluminal bile acid infusion using an in situ perfused rat intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnani, Marco; Tsivian, Matvey; Neri, Flavia; Zvi, Ido Ben; Mantovani, Irina; Nanni, Paolo; Benevento, Marco; Simoni, Patrizia; Marangoni, Antonella; Pariali, Milena; Fato, Romana; Bergamini, Christian; Leoni, Serena; Azzaroli, Francesco; Mazzella, Giuseppe; Nardo, Bruno; Roda, Enrico; Aldini, Rita

    2011-07-01

    Due to the importance of intestinal transport in pharmacological studies and the emerging role of intestinal signaling activity in the gut-liver axis, we have developed a new method to investigate intestinal transport and liver signaling using cell and serum free mesenteric perfusion system in the rat. The method regarding bile acid active absorption was validated, then, the portal venous content was examined for fibroblast growth factor 15(FGF15), a putative signaling protein produced by the ileal enterocytes following bile acid absorption. After isolation and cannulation of the relevant vessels (abdominal aorta and portal vein), the abdominal aorta and the terminal ileum were infused with respectively Krebs-Ringer solution and tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDCA) and the absorption was assessed by its recovery in the portal vein. After immunoblot, liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis were performed both on gel bands digestion products and on portal outflow samples in order to evaluate if negligible amounts of FGF15 were present in the portal circulation. TUDCA absorption was efficient, intestinal morphology and oxygen consumption were normal. Despite accurate analysis, we could not find FGF15. Our method proved to be reliable for studying the active bile acid absorption. It is also suitable to identify molecules produced by enterocytes and transferred to the portal circulation in response to absorption of different substances such as nutrients or drugs. Since FGF15 was not recovered we suggest the possibilities that this protein is produced in very little amounts, poorly transferred outside the cell, or that it is extremely unstable and rapidly degraded.

  14. Effect of nuclear factor kappa B on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression and neutrophil infiltration in lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiao-Feng; Yao, Ji-Hong; Li, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Xue-Song; Feng, Bing-An; Yang, Chun-Ming; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the pathogenesis of lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), and its effect on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression and neutrophil infiltration. METHODS: Twenty-four Wistar rats were divided randomly into control, I/R and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) treatment groups, n = 8 in each. I/R group and PDTC treatment group received superior mysenteric artery (SMA) occluding for 1 h and reperfusion for 2 h. PDTC group was administrated with intraperitoneal injection of 2% 100 mg/kg PDTC 1 h before surgery. Lung histology and bronchia alveolus lung fluid (BALF) protein were assayed. Serum IL-6, lung malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) as well as the expression level of NF-κB and ICAM-1 were measured. RESULTS: Lung injury induced by intestinal I/R, was characterized by edema, hemorrhage and neutrophil infiltration as well as by the significant rising of BALF protein. Compared to control group, the levels of serum IL-6 and lung MDA and MPO increased significantly in I/R group (P = 0.001). Strong positive expression of NF-κB p65 and ICAM-1 was observed. After the administration of PDTC, the level of serum IL-6, lung MDA and MPO as well as NF-κB and ICAM-1 decreased significantly (P < 0.05) when compared to I/R group. CONCLUSION: The activation of NF-κB plays an important role in the pathogenesis of lung injury induced by intestinal I/R through upregulating the neutrophil infiltration and lung ICAM-1 expression. PDTC as an inhibitor of NF-κB can prevent lung injury induced by intestinal I/R through inhibiting the activity of NF-κB. PMID:16489637

  15. Tubular scaffolds of gelatin and poly(ε-caprolactone)-block-poly(γ-glutamic acid) blending hydrogel for the proliferation of the primary intestinal smooth muscle cells of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jwo, Shyh-Chuan; Chiu, Chu-Hua; Hsieh, Ming-Fa; Tang, Shye-Jye

    2013-01-01

    The proper regeneration of intestinal muscle for functional peristalsis is the most challenging aspect of current small intestine tissue engineering. This study aimed to fabricate a hydrogel scaffold for the proliferation of intestinal smooth muscle cells (ISMCs). Tubular porous scaffolds of 10–20 wt% gelatin and 0.05–0.1 wt% poly(ε-caprolactone)-block-poly(γ-glutamic acid) blending hydrogel were cross-linked by carbodiimide and succinimide in an annular space of a glass mold. The scaffolds with higher gelatin contents degraded slower in the phosphate buffer solution. In rheological measurements, the hydrated scaffolds were elastic (all tangent delta <0.45); they responded differentially to frequency, indicating a complete viscoelastic property that is beneficial for soft tissue regeneration. Isolated rat ISMCs, with the characteristic biomarkers α-SMA, calponin and myh11, were loaded into the scaffolds by using either static or centrifugal methods. The average cell density inside the scaffolds increased in a time-dependent manner in most scaffolds of both seeding groups, although at early time points (seven days) the centrifugal seeding method trapped cells more efficiently and yielded a higher cell density than the static seeding method. The static seeding method increased the cell density from 7.5-fold to 16.3-fold after 28 days, whereas the centrifugal procedure produced a maximum increase of only 2.4-fold in the same period. In vitro degradation data showed that 50–80% of the scaffold was degraded by the 14th day. However, the self-secreted extracellular matrix maintained the integrity of the scaffolds for cell proliferation and spreading for up to 28 days. Confocal microscopic images revealed cell–cell contacts with the formation of a 3D network, demonstrating that the fabricated scaffolds were highly biocompatible. Therefore, these polymeric biomaterials hold great promise for in vivo applications of intestinal tissue engineering. (paper)

  16. Hydrolysed inulin alleviates the azoxymethane-induced preneoplastic aberrant crypt foci by altering selected intestinal microbiota in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattananandecha, Thanawat; Sirilun, Sasithorn; Duangjitcharoen, Yodsawee; Sivamaruthi, Bhagavathi Sundaram; Suwannalert, Prasit; Peerajan, Sartjin; Chaiyasut, Chaiyavat

    2016-09-01

    Context Inulin, a non-digestible carbohydrate isolated from Helianthus tuberosus L. (Asteraceae), has been shown to alter the gut beneficial bacteria including Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacteria. Inulin also influences the activities of intestinal microbiota that could prevent the colon cancer development. Objective This study determines the effect of hydrolysed inulin with different degrees of polymerisation on alteration of intestinal microbiota and their activities on azoxymethane (AOM)-induced preneoplastic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. Materials and methods Seventy-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups (three control and three AOM-treated groups) and the animal were fed with either a normal diet or diet containing 10% of long-chain inulin (InuL) or short-chain inulin (InuS), respectively, for 17 weeks. Colon cancer was induced in rats by injecting AOM subcutaneously at the 8th and 9th week of the study period. At the end of the experiment, cecal contents of rats were examined for selected microbiota, organic acids, putrefactive compounds and microbial enzymes. ACF formation was microscopically examined. Results The inulin diets significantly increased the weight and decreased the pH of the caecal content. The rats fed with InuL-supplemented diet showed approximately 2.9- and 6.8-fold increases in the biomass of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacteria, respectively. Naive and AOM-treated rats fed with inulin-supplemented diet showed ∼1.3- and ∼2.2-fold decreases in the biomass of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, respectively. Inulins significantly decreased the colonic concentration of phenol, p-cresol and indole. Reduction in the activity of microbial enzymes such as β-glucuronidase, azoreductase and nitroreductase were observed in inulin-treated animals. Reduction in the ACF formation has been observed in inulin-treated groups. Discussion and conclusion The present study demonstrates that dietary

  17. The effects of glutamine-supplemented diet on the intestinal mucosa of the malnourished growing rat Os efeitos de dieta com suplementação de glutamina sobre a mucosa intestinal do rato desnutrido em crescimento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uenis Tannuri

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine is the most abundant amino acid in the blood and plays a key role in the response of the small intestine to systemic injuries. Mucosal atrophy is an important phenomenon that occurs in some types of clinical injury, such as states of severe undernutrition. Glutamine has been shown to exert powerful trophic effects on the gastrointestinal mucosa after small bowel resection or transplant, radiation injury, surgical trauma, ischemic injury and administration of cytotoxic drugs. Since no study has been performed on the malnourished animal, we examined whether glutamine exerts a trophic effect on the intestinal mucosa of the malnourished growing rat. Thirty-five growing female rats (aged 21 days were divided into 4 groups: control - chow diet; malnutrition diet; malnutrition+chow diet; and malnutrition+glutamine-enriched chow diet (2%. For the first 15 days of the experiment, animals in the test groups received a malnutrition diet, which was a lactose-enriched diet designed to induce diarrhea and malnutrition. For the next 15 days, these animals received either the lactose-enriched diet, a regular chow diet or a glutamine-enriched chow diet. After 30 days, the animals were weighed, sacrificed, and a section of the jejunum was taken and prepared for histological examination. All the animals had similar weights on day 1 of experiment, and feeding with the lactose-enriched diet promoted a significant decrease in body weight in comparison to the control group. Feeding with both experimental chow-based diets promoted significant body weight gains, although the glutamine-enriched diet was more effective. RESULTS: The morphological and morphometric analyses demonstrated that small intestinal villous height was significantly decreased in the malnourished group, and this change was partially corrected by the two types of chow-based diet. Crypt depth was significantly increased by malnutrition, and this parameter was partially corrected by the two

  18. Unraveling the Rat Intestine, Spleen and Liver Genome-Wide Transcriptome after the Oral Administration of Lavender Oil by a Two-Color Dye-Swap DNA Microarray Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kubo, Hiroko; Shibato, Junko; Saito, Tomomi; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Rakwal, Randeep; Shioda, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The use of lavender oil (LO) – a commonly, used oil in aromatherapy, with well-defined volatile components linalool and linalyl acetate – in non-traditional medicine is increasing globally. To understand and demonstrate the potential positive effects of LO on the body, we have established an animal model in this current study, investigating the orally administered LO effects genome wide in the rat small intestine, spleen, and liver. The rats were administered LO at 5 mg/kg (usual therapeutic ...

  19. Influence of atropine and loperamide on reduced intestinal transit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of Calotropis procera latex alone and in the presence of loperamide and atropine on intestinal transit in rats were determined to elucidate the action of C. procera on intestinal transit. Six groups of rats containing ten rats per group were used. Each rat in the control group (I) received 0.5 ml of normal saline.

  20. The association of yogurt starters with Lactobacillus casei DN 114.001 in fermented milk alters the composition and metabolism of intestinal microflora in germ-free rats and in human flora-associated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djouzi, Z; Andrieux, C; Degivry, M C; Bouley, C; Szylit, O

    1997-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of milk and of various fermented milks on the composition and metabolic activities of the intestinal microflora. Groups of eight rats were fed for 6 wk a diet containing 30% nonfermented milk (M), yogurt (Y), milk fermented with Lactobacillus casei (LcFM) or milk fermented with the association of L. casei DN 114.001 and yogurt starters (LcYFM). In the first study, the survival of the lactic acid bacteria from the fermented milks was assessed by bacterial enumeration in feces of germ-free rats (GF rats) fed milk or fermented milks. The metabolic activities of the lactic acid bacteria were studied in these rats by the measurement of glycolytic activities and products of bacterial fermentation, i.e., acetate and lactate (isoforms L and D). In a second study, the effects of fermented milks on the composition and metabolism [gas, glycolytic activities, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), alcohol and ammonia] of human flora were studied using human flora-associated rats (HF rats). In GF rats, the survival of L. casei in the feces did not differ between those fed the LcFM and LcYFM diets. L. bulgaricus was detected in the feces of the rats fed Y, whereas Streptoccus thermophilus was found in the feces of the LcYFM group. In HF rats, fecal concentration of Bifidobacteria was greater in the LcFM group than in the others. beta-Glucuronidase (EC 3.2.1.31) activity was lower in rats fed LcFM and Y than in those fed M and LcYFM, whereas beta-galactosidase (3.2.1.23), alpha-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1 20) and beta-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) activities were higher in the LcYFM group compared with the others. Methane excretion was higher in rats fed Y than in other groups. Cecal SCFA concentrations did not differ in LcFM, Y and M groups, but total SCFA, acetate, propionate and butyrate were significantly greater in the LcYFM group. These results suggest that milk fermented with the combination of L. casei and yogurt starters leads to specific

  1. Extract Against Toxic Sodium The Protective Role of Grape Seed Proanthocyanidins Nitrites and Gamma Irradiation Induced Histological Changes in Intestine and Urinary Bladder of Male Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El- Azeem, M.G.; El-Nashar, D.E.M.

    2010-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (a grape seed extract) possess a broad spectrum of biological activities. The present study was performed to investigate the effect of gamma radiation exposure and toxic sodium nitrites induced oxidative stress on the intestine and urinary bladder histologically and also to evaluate the possible protective role of proanthocyanidins. Seventy adult male albino rats, each weighing 95-105 g were used and divided into 7 groups as follows: The first group represents the control group. The second experimental group were exposed to 7 Gy gamma-rays as a single dose and sacrificed on the 7th day. The third experimental group received by a stomach tube daily 50 mg/kg b.wt of sodium nitrite for 4 weeks. The fourth experimental group received proanthocyanidins, Grape seed extracts (antioxidant) (100 mg/kg) body wt.) daily for seven days before irradiation and the continued for 14 days post irradiation. The fifth group of animals received grape seed extract after being exposed to gamma radiation for two weeks, while the sixth experimental group received the same antioxidant for seven days before and after received sodium nitrite (50 mg/kg) daily for 4 weeks. Finally, the seventh experimental groups was treated with the same antioxidant in same dose and time after received sodium nitrite for 4 weeks. The animals were then sacrificed on the end of each experimental duration. The results revealed that both gamma-radiation and sodium nitrite induced different histological changes in the intestine and urinary bladder of irradiated and sodium nitrite received animals. The effect of gamma radiation exposure showed marked degeneration of intestinal villi, vaculation in the lining epithelium cells and karyolytic nuclei. In addition, using sodium nitrite lead to necrosis of intestinal glandular cells. The effect of gamma radiation on urinary bladder was presented by, hyperplasia and vaculation of mucosal epithelium, congestion of blood capillaries. Rats from nitrite

  2. Effect of short-term ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate pretreatment on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves,Eduardo Silvio Gouveia; Rabelo,Camila Menezes; Prado Neto,Alberico Ximenes do; Garcia,José Huygens Parente; Guimarães,Sérgio Botelho; Vasconcelos,Paulo Roberto Leitão de

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of preventive enteral administration of ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate (OKG) in an ischemia-reperfusion rat model. METHODS: Sixty rats were randomized into five groups (G1-G5, n = 12). Each group was divided into two subgroups (n = 6) and treated with calcium carbonate (CaCa) or OKG by gavage. Thirty minutes later, the animals were anesthetized with xylazine 15mg + ketamine 1mg ip and subjected to laparotomy. G1-G3 rats served as controls. Rats in groups G4 ...

  3. Weight loss and morphometric study of intestinal mucosa in rats after massive intestinal resection: influence of a glutamine-enriched diet Perda de peso e estudo morfométrico da mucosa intestinal de ratos submetidos à ressecção subtotal de intestino delgado: influência do uso de dieta com glutamina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Resende Ribeiro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Short-bowel syndrome is responsible for significant metabolic alterations that compromise nutritional status. Glutamine is considered an essential nutrient for enterocytes, so beneficial effects from supplementation of the diet with glutamine are hypothesized. PURPOSE: In this study, the effect of a diet enriched with glutamine was evaluated in rats undergoing extensive small bowel resection, with analysis of postoperative weight loss and intestinal morphometrics of villi height, crypt depth, and thickness of the duodenal and remnant jejunal mucosa. METHODS: Three groups of male Wistar rats were established receiving the following diets: with glutamine, without glutamine, and the standard diet of laboratory ration. All animals underwent an extensive small bowel resection, including the ileocecal valve, leaving a remnant jejunum of only 25 cm from the pylorus that was anastomosed lateral-laterally to the ascendant colon. The animals were weighed at the beginning and end of the experiment (20th postoperative day. Then they were killed and the remnant intestine was removed. Fragments of duodenal and jejunal mucosa were collected from the remnant intestine and submitted to histopathologic exam. The morphometric study of the intestinal mucosa was accomplished using a digital system (KS 300 connected to an optic microscope. Morphometrics included villi height, crypt depth, and the total thickness of intestinal mucosa. RESULTS: The weight loss comparison among the 3 groups showed no significant loss difference. The morphometric studies showed significantly taller duodenal villi in the glutamine group in comparison to the without glutamine group, but not different from the standard diet group. The measurements obtained comparing the 3 groups for villi height, crypt depth, and thickness of the remnant jejunum mucosa were greater in the glutamine-enriched diet group than for the without-glutamine diet group, though not significantly different from with

  4. In vivo detection and quantification of tetracycline by use of a whole-cell biosensor in the rat intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Licht, Tine Rask

    2004-01-01

    was observed. Reintroduction of the E. coli MC4100/pTGFP2 strain into animals already colonized by the plasmid-free E. coli strain the day before euthanasia made it possible to extract and analyze the biosensors from intestinal samples. The induction of GFP in the biosensor cells extracted from the animals...

  5. Nanoparticle formulation of a poorly soluble cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist improves absorption by rat and human intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siissalo, Sanna; De Waard, Hans; De Jager, Marina H.; Hayeshi, Rose; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Hinrichs, Wouter L.J.; Dinter-Heidorn, Heike; Van Dam, Annie; Proost, Johannes H.; Groothuis, Geny M.M.; De Graaf, Inge A.M.

    The inclusion of nanoparticles dispersed in a hydrophilic matrix is one of the formulation strategies to improve the bioavailability of orally administered Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) class II and IV drugs by increasing their dissolution rate in the intestine. To confirm that the

  6. Heterogeneous expression of melatonin receptor MT1 mRNA in the rat intestine under control and fasting conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soták, Matúš; Mrnka, Libor; Pácha, Jiří

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 2 (2006), s. 183-188 ISSN 0742-3098 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP305/03/D140 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : melatonin receptor, * malnutrition * intestine Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.228, year: 2006

  7. Effect of diet containing phytate and phytase on the activity and messenger ribonucleic acid expression of carbohydrase and transporter in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N; Ru, Y J; Li, F D; Cowieson, A J

    2008-12-01

    The effect of dietary phytate and phytase on carbohydrase activity and hexose transport was investigated in broiler chickens. Diets containing phytate P (2.2 or 4.4 g/kg) with different phytase dose rates (0, 500, or 1,000 phytase units/kg) were fed to 504 female Cobb chicks for 3 wk. Diets containing high phytate concentrations depressed (P diets containing phytate also decreased (P diets containing increased phytate upregulated (P competence, and phytase can ameliorate these effects for chickens.

  8. Protection of radiation-induced damage to the hematopoietic system, small intestine and salivary glands in rats by JNJ7777120 compound, a histamine H4 ligand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego J Martinel Lamas

    Full Text Available Based on previous data on the histamine radioprotective effect on highly radiosensitive tissues, in the present work we aimed at investigating the radioprotective potential of the H4R ligand, JNJ7777120, on ionizing radiation-induced injury and genotoxic damage in small intestine, salivary glands and hematopoietic tissue. For that purpose, rats were divided into 4 groups. JNJ7777120 and JNJ7777120-irradiated groups received a daily subcutaneous JNJ7777120 injection (10 mg/kg starting 24 h before irradiation. Irradiated groups received a single dose of 5 Gy on whole-body using Cesium-137 source and were sacrificed 3 or 30 days after irradiation. Tissues were removed, fixed, stained with hematoxylin and eosin or PAS staining and histological characteristics were evaluated. Proliferative and apoptotic markers were studied by immunohistochemistry, while micronucleus assay was performed to evaluate DNA damage. Submandibular gland (SMG function was evaluated by methacholine-induced salivation. Results indicate that JNJ7777120 treatment diminished mucosal atrophy and preserved villi and the number of crypts after radiation exposure (240±8 vs. 165±10, P<0.01. This effect was associated to a reduced apoptosis and DNA damage in intestinal crypts. JNJ7777120 reduced radiation-induced aplasia, preserving medullar components and reducing formation of micronucleus and also it accelerated bone marrow repopulation. Furthermore, it reduced micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood (27±8 vs. 149±22, in 1,000 erythrocytes, P<0.01. JNJ7777120 completely reversed radiation-induced reduced salivation, conserving glandular mass with normal histological appearance and reducing apoptosis and atrophy of SMG. JNJ7777120 exhibits radioprotective effects against radiation-induced cytotoxic and genotoxic damages in small intestine, SMG and hematopoietic tissues and, thus, could be of clinical value for patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  9. Enteral nutrients potentiate glucagon-like peptide-2 action and reduce dependence on parenteral nutrition in a rat model of human intestinal failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Adam S.; Murali, Sangita G.; Hitt, Stacy; Solverson, Patrick M.; Holst, Jens J.

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a nutrient-dependent, proglucagon-derived gut hormone that shows promise for the treatment of short bowel syndrome (SBS). Our objective was to investigate how combination GLP-2 + enteral nutrients (EN) affects intestinal adaption in a rat model that mimics severe human SBS and requires parenteral nutrition (PN). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of five groups and maintained with PN for 18 days: total parenteral nutrition (TPN) alone, TPN + GLP-2 (100 μg·kg−1·day−1), PN + EN + GLP-2(7 days), PN + EN + GLP-2(18 days), and a nonsurgical oral reference group. Animals underwent massive distal bowel resection followed by jejunocolic anastomosis and placement of jugular catheters. Starting on postoperative day 4, rats in the EN groups were allowed ad libitum access to EN. Groups provided PN + EN + GLP-2 had their rate of PN reduced by 0.25 ml/day starting on postoperative day 6. Groups provided PN + EN + GLP-2 demonstrated significantly greater body weight gain with similar energy intake and a safe 80% reduction in PN compared with TPN ± GLP-2. Groups provided PN + EN + GLP-2 for 7 or 18 days showed similar body weight gain, residual jejunal length, and digestive capacity. Groups provided PN + EN + GLP-2 showed increased jejunal GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and IGF-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) expression. Treatment with TPN + GLP-2 demonstrated increased jejunal expression of epidermal growth factor. Cessation of GLP-2 after 7 days with continued EN sustained the majority of intestinal adaption and significantly increased expression of colonic proglucagon compared with PN + EN + GLP-2 for 18 days, and increased plasma GLP-2 concentrations compared with TPN alone. In summary, EN potentiate the intestinotrophic actions of GLP-2 by improving body weight gain allowing for a safe 80% reduction in PN with increased jejunal expression of GLP-2R, IGF-I, and IGFBP-5 following distal bowel

  10. Effect of colchicine on rat small intestinal absorptive cells. II. Distribution of label after incorporation of [3H]fucose into plasma membrane glycoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellinger, A.; Pavelka, M.; Gangl, A.

    1983-01-01

    By means of radioautography the influence was tested of various periods (5, 15, 30, 40 min, 2 hr) of pretreatment with colchicine, administered intraperitoneally to rats at a dosage of 0.5 mg/100 g of body weight, on the intracellular pathway of [ 3 H]fucose in absorptive cells of the small intestine. Administration of colchicine for 30 min and longer time intervals causes delay in the insertion of [ 3 H]fucose into the oligosaccharide chains of glycoconjugates in the Golgi apparatus, and results in redistribution of the label apparent over the different portions of the plasma membrane. In controls, at 2 and 4 hr after administration of [ 3 H]fucose the apical plasma membrane is strongly labeled. Colchicine causes equalization of the reaction of apical and basolateral regions of the plasma membrane: the number of silver grains attributable to the apical plasma membrane is reduced; following treatment with colchicine, apical portions of the plasma membrane comprise 31.6 +/- 1.8% of the silver grains, 38.6 +/- 3.8% are attributable to basolateral membrane regions. The colchicine-induced equalization of the density of label of apical and basolateral regions of the plasma membrane, in addition to the occurrence of basolateral microvillus borders, suggests microtubules to be important in the maintenance of the polar organization of small intestinal absorptive cells

  11. Screening for in vitro metabolites of kakkalide and irisolidone in human and rat intestinal bacteria by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guozhe; Gong, Tianxing; Kano, Yoshihiro; Yuan, Dan

    2014-02-01

    Kakkalide and irisolidone, the main isoflavones of Flos Puerariae, exhibit a wide spectrum of bioactivities. Intestinal bacteria biotransformation plays an important role in the metabolic pathways of flavones, and is directly related to the bioactivities of the prodrugs after oral administration. To the best of our knowledge, the metabolic pathways of kakkalide and irisolidone in vitro have not been comprehensively studied yet. This paper describes the strategy using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC/Q-TOF MS) for the rapid analysis of the metabolic profiles of kakkalide and irisolidone after incubated with human and rat intestinal bacteria. Bacteria incubated samples were prepared and analyzed after incubated under anaerobic conditions for 48 h. A total of 17 metabolites, including parent compounds, were detected in human and rat intestinal bacteria incubated samples. The results obtained indicate that hydrolysis, dehydroxylation, demethoxylation, demethylation, hydroxylation, decarbonylation, and reduction were the detected metabolic pathways of kakkalide and irisolidone in vitro. The conversion rate of irisolidone in human and rat bacteria was 8.57% and 6.51%, respectively. Biochanin A was the relatively main metabolite of irisolidone, and the content of biochanin A in human and rat bacteria was 3.68% and 4.25%, respectively. The conversion rate of kakkalide in human and rat bacteria was 99.92% and 98.58%, respectively. Irisolidone was the main metabolite of kakkalide, and the content of irisolidone in human and rat bacteria was 89.58% and 89.38%, respectively. This work not only provides the evidence of kakkalide and irisolidone metabolites in vivo, but also demonstrates a simple, fast, sensitive, and inexpensive method for identification of metabolites of other compounds transformed by intestinal bacteria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Amebiasis intestinal Intestinal amebiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JULIO CÉSAR GÓMEZ

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica es el patógeno intestinal más frecuente en nuestro medio -después de Giardia lamblia-, una de las principales causas de diarrea en menores de cinco años y la cuarta causa de muerte en el mundo debida a infección por protozoarios. Posee mecanismos patogénicos complejos que le permiten invadir la mucosa intestinal y causar colitis amebiana. El examen microscópico es el método más usado para su identificación pero la existencia de dos especies morfológicamente iguales, una patógena ( E. histolytica y una no patógena ( Entamoeba dispar, ha llevado al desarrollo de otros métodos de diagnóstico. El acceso al agua potable y los servicios sanitarios adecuados, un tratamiento médico oportuno y el desarrollo de una vacuna, son los ejes para disminuir la incidencia y mortalidad de esta entidad.Entamoeba histolytica is the most frequent intestinal pathogen seen in our country, after Giardia lamblia, being one of the main causes of diarrhea in children younger than five years of age, and the fourth leading cause of death due to infection for protozoa in the world. It possesses complex pathogenic mechanisms that allow it to invade the intestinal mucosa, causing amoebic colitis. Microscopy is the most used method for its identification, but the existence of two species morphologically identical, the pathogen one ( E. histolytica, and the non pathogen one ( E. dispar, have taken to the development of other methods of diagnosis. The access to drinkable water and appropriate sanitary services, an opportune medical treatment, and the development of a vaccine are the axes to diminish the incidence and mortality of this entity.

  13. Effect of short-term ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate pretreatment on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion in rats Efeitos do pré-tratamento em curto prazo com ornitina alfa-cetoglutarato na isquemia-reperfusão intestinal em ratos

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    Eduardo Silvio Gouveia Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of preventive enteral administration of ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate (OKG in an ischemia-reperfusion rat model. METHODS: Sixty rats were randomized into five groups (G1-G5, n = 12. Each group was divided into two subgroups (n = 6 and treated with calcium carbonate (CaCa or OKG by gavage. Thirty minutes later, the animals were anesthetized with xylazine 15mg + ketamine 1mg ip and subjected to laparotomy. G1-G3 rats served as controls. Rats in groups G4 and G5 were subjected to ischemia for 30 minutes. Ischemia was achieved by clamping the small intestine and its mesentery, delimiting a segment of bowel 5 cm long and 5 cm apart from the ileocecal valve. In addition, G5 rats underwent reperfusion for 30 minutes. Blood samples were collected at the end of the laparotomy (G1, after 30 minutes (G2, G4 and 60 minutes (G3, G5 to determine concentrations of metabolites (pyruvate, lactate, creatine phosphokinase (CPK, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS and glutathione (GSH. RESULTS: There was a significant decrease in tissue pyruvate and lactate and plasma CPK levels in OKG-treated rats at the end of reperfusion period. GSH levels did not change significantly in ischemia and reperfusion groups. However, TBARS levels increased significantly (pOBJETIVO: Investigar os efeitos da administração enteral preventiva de ornitina alfa-cetoglutarato (OKG em modelo de isquemia-reperfusão no rato. MÉTODOS: Sessenta ratos foram randomizados em cinco grupos (G1-G5, n=12. Cada grupo foi redistribuído em dois subgrupos (n=6 e tratado com carbonato de cálcio (CaCa ou OKG por gavagem. Trinta minutos mais tarde, os animais foram anestesiados com xilazina 1mg+cetamina 15mg i.p. e submetidos à laparotomia. Os ratos dos grupos G4-G5 foram submetidos à isquemia por 30 minutos. A isquemia foi obtida por pinçamento do intestino delgado, delimitando um segmento com 5 cm de comprimento e distando 5 cm da válvula ileocecal. O

  14. Acute but not chronic ethanol exposure impairs retinol oxidation in the small and large intestine of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Ellendt, K.; Lindros, K.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Ethanol has been shown to inhibit retinol oxidation at the level of alcohol dehydrogenase in liver and colon but not previously in the small intestine. In the present study we investigated how chronic alcohol feeding and acute ethanol exposure affects retinol dehydrogenase...... higher, respectively). While chronic alcohol feeding did not affect these parameters, acute ethanol exposure reduced V(max) and V(max)/K(m) dose-dependently (p

  15. Biotransformation and metabolic profile of Xian-Ling-Gu-Bao capsule, a traditional Chinese medicine prescription, with rat intestinal microflora by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

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    Gao, Meng-Xue; Tang, Xi-Yang; Zhang, Feng-Xiang; Yao, Zhi-Hong; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Dai, Yi

    2018-04-01

    Xian-Ling-Gu-Bao capsule (XLGB), a well-known traditional Chinese medicine prescription, has been used for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. The safety and efficacy of XLGB have been confirmed based on the principle of evidence-based medicine. XLGB is usually administered orally, after which its multiple components are brought into contact with intestinal microflora in the alimentary tract and biotransformed. However, investigations on the comprehensive metabolic profile of XLGB are absent. In this study, 12 representative compounds bearing different typical structures (including iridoid glycosides, prenylated flavonol glycosides, prenylated flavonoids, triterpenoid saponins, steroidal saponins, coumarins and monoterpene phenols) were selected and then investigated for their biotransformation in rat intestinal microflora. In addition, the metabolic profile of XLGB in rat intestinal microflora was investigated by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. As a result, a total of 87 biotransformation components were identified from incubated solutions of 12 representative compounds and XLGB, which underwent 16 metabolic reactions (including deglycosylation, glycosylation, dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, oxidation, epoxidation, hydroxylation, dehydration, hydration, hydrolysis, methylation, isomerization, cyclization, pyrolysis reaction, amino acid conjugation and nucleophilic addition reaction with NH 3 ). This demonstrated that the deglycosylation reaction by cleavage of the sugar moieties is the main metabolic pathway of a variety of glycosides, including prenylated flavonol glycosides, coumarin glycosides, iridoid glycosides and saponins. In addition, compared with the biotransformation of 12 representative compounds, a different biotransformed fate was observed in the XLGB incubated samples of rat intestinal microflora. It is worth noting that the amino acid conjugation was first discovered

  16. Effects of medium-chain triglycerides, long-chain triglycerides, or 2-monododecanoin on fatty acid composition in the portal vein, intestinal lymph, and systemic circulation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yi-Qian Nancy; Ling, Pei-Ra; Qu, Jason Zhensheng; Bistrian, Bruce R

    2008-01-01

    Fatty acid absorption patterns can have a major impact on the fatty acid composition in the portal, intestinal lymph, and systemic circulation. This study sought to determine the effects of long-chain triglycerides (LCT), medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), and 2-monododecanoin (2mono) on intestinal fatty acid composition during continuous feeding over a brief period. The lipid sources were 100% LCT, 100% MCT, a 50:50 mixture of LCT and MCT (LCT/MCT), and a 50:50 mixture of LCT and 2mono (LCT/2mono). A total of 27 rats were randomly given 1 of the 4 diets at 200 kcal/kg/d, with 30% of total calories from lipids over 3 hours. MCT significantly increased each of the medium-chain fatty acids (C6:0, C8:0, and C10:0) as free fatty acids in the portal vein and about 10%/mol of C10:0 as triglycerides in the lymph compared with the other groups. There was significantly less C10:0 in lymphatic triglycerides with LCT/MCT than with MCT, but more than in the LCT and LCT/2mono diets. MCT also significantly increased the contents of C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, and C20:4 in the lymphatic triglycerides compared with all other groups including LCT/MCT. The amount of linoleic acid (C18:2) in lymphatic triglycerides followed the relative amounts of this fatty acid in the diet, with the greatest in LCT followed by LCT/MCT and LCT/2mono and least in MCT. A so-called structured lipid composed of the medium-chain fatty acid dodecanoic acid on the 2 position and long-chain fatty acids on the 1 and 3 positions appeared to be endogenously synthesized in response to the LCT/2mono diet. The original differences in MCT and LCT content in the diets were preserved in the fatty acid composition in the intestinal free fatty acids and triglycerides during feeding. In addition, the duration of lipid administration can play a role in altering fatty acid composition in the intestine.

  17. Effects of Medium-Chain Triglycerides, Long-Chain Triglycerides, or 2-Monododecanoin on Fatty Acid Composition in the Portal Vein, Intestinal Lymph, and Systemic Circulation in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy You, Yi-Qian; Ling, Pei-Ra; Qu, Jason Zhensheng; Bistrian, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Fatty acid absorption patterns can have a major impact on the fatty acid composition in the portal, intestinal lymph, and systemic circulation. This study sought to determine the effects of long-chain triglycerides (LCT), medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), and 2-monododecanoin (2mono) on intestinal fatty acid composition during continuous feeding over a brief period. Methods The lipid sources were 100% LCT, 100% MCT, a 50:50 mixture of LCT and MCT (LCT/MCT), and a 50:50 mixture of LCT and 2mono (LCT/2mono). A total of 27 rats were randomly given 1 of the 4 diets at 200 kcal/kg/d, with 30% of total calories from lipids over 3 hours. Results MCT significantly increased each of the medium-chain fatty acids (C6:0, C8:0, and C10:0) as free fatty acids in the portal vein and about 10%/mol of C10:0 as triglycerides in the lymph compared with the other groups. There was significantly less C10:0 in lymphatic triglycerides with LCT/MCT than with MCT, but more than in the LCT and LCT/2mono diets. MCT also significantly increased the contents of C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, and C20:4 in the lymphatic triglycerides compared with all other groups including LCT/MCT. The amount of linoleic acid (C18:2) in lymphatic triglycerides followed the relative amounts of this fatty acid in the diet, with the greatest in LCT followed by LCT/MCT and LCT/2mono and least in MCT. A so-called structured lipid composed of the medium-chain fatty acid dodecanoic acid on the 2 position and long-chain fatty acids on the 1 and 3 positions appeared to be endogenously synthesized in response to the LCT/2mono diet. Conclusions The original differences in MCT and LCT content in the diets were preserved in the fatty acid composition in the intestinal free fatty acids and triglycerides during feeding. In addition, the duration of lipid administration can play a role in altering fatty acid composition in the intestine. PMID:18407910

  18. Effects of β-Glucans Ingestion on Alveolar Bone Loss, Intestinal Morphology, Systemic Inflammatory Profile, and Pancreatic β-Cell Function in Rats with Periodontitis and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Viviam de O.; Lobato, Raquel V.; Orlando, Débora R.; Borges, Bruno D.B.; de Sousa, Raimundo V.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of β-glucan ingestion (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on the plasmatic levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), alveolar bone loss, and pancreatic β-cell function (HOMA-BF) in diabetic rats with periodontal disease (PD). Besides, intestinal morphology was determined by the villus/crypt ratio. A total of 48 Wistar rats weighing 203 ± 18 g were used. Diabetes was induced by the intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (80 mg/kg) and periodontal inflammation, by ligature. The design was completely randomized in a factorial scheme 2 × 2 × 2 (diabetic or not, with or without periodontitis, and ingesting β-glucan or not). The animals received β-glucan by gavage for 28 days. Alveolar bone loss was determined by scanning electron microscopy (distance between the cementoenamel junction and alveolar bone crest) and histometric analysis (bone area between tooth roots). β-glucan reduced plasmatic levels of TNF-α in diabetic animals with PD and of IL-10 in animals with PD (p < 0.05). β-glucan reduced bone loss in animals with PD (p < 0.05). In diabetic animals, β-glucan improved β-cell function (p < 0.05). Diabetic animals had a higher villus/crypt ratio (p < 0.05). In conclusion, β-glucan ingestion reduced the systemic inflammatory profile, prevented alveolar bone loss, and improved β-cell function in diabetic animals with PD. PMID:28906456

  19. Mechanism of action of hypoglycemic effects of an intestine-specific inhibitor of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) in obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Shohei; Katsumi, Sohei; Mera, Yasuko; Kuroki, Yukiharu; Nashida, Reiko; Kakutani, Makoto; Ohta, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Diminished insulin sensitivity in the peripheral tissues and failure of pancreatic beta cells to secrete insulin are known major determinants of type 2 diabetes mellitus. JTT-130, an intestine-specific microsomal transfer protein inhibitor, has been shown to suppress high fat-induced obesity and ameliorate impaired glucose tolerance while enhancing glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. We investigated the effects of JTT-130 on glucose metabolism and elucidated the mechanism of action, direct effects on insulin sensitivity and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in a high fat diet-induced obesity rat model. Male Sprague Dawley rats fed a high-fat diet were treated with a single administration of JTT-130. Glucose tolerance, hyperglycemic clamp and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic testing were performed to assess effects on insulin sensitivity and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, respectively. Plasma GLP-1 and tissue triglyceride content were also determined under the same conditions. A single administration of JTT-130 suppressed plasma glucose elevations after oral glucose loading and increased the disposition index while elevating GLP-1. JTT-130 also enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in hyperglycemic clamp tests, whereas increased insulin sensitivity was observed in hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp tests. Single-dose administration of JTT-130 decreased lipid content in the liver and skeletal muscle. JTT-130 demonstrated acute and direct hypoglycemic effects by enhancing insulin secretion and/or insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Pharmacological Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Lactobacillus plantarum MA2 isolated from Tibet kefir on lipid metabolism and intestinal microflora of rats fed on high-cholesterol diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanping; Xu, Nv; Xi, Aodeng; Ahmed, Zaheer; Zhang, Bin; Bai, Xiaojia

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of Lactobacillus plantarum MA2, an isolate from Chinese traditional Tibet kefir, on cholesterol-lowering and microflora of rat in vivo. Rats were fed on cholesterol-enriched experimental diet, supplemented with lyophilized L. plantarum MA2 powder, with a dose of 10(11) cells/day per mice. The results showed that L. plantarum MA2 feeding significantly lowered serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides level, while there was no change in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In addition, liver total cholesterol and triglycerides was also decreased. However, fecal cholesterol and triglycerides was increased significantly (P MA2 increased the population of lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria in the fecal, but it did not change the number of Escherichia coli as compared to control. Moreover, pH, moisture, and organic acids in the fecal were also measured. The present results indicate the probiotic potential of the L. plantarum MA2 strain in hypocholesterolemic effect and also increasing the probiotic count in the intestine.

  1. Intestinal Lymphangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview of Crohn Disease Additional Content Medical News Intestinal Lymphangiectasia (Idiopathic Hypoproteinemia) By Atenodoro R. Ruiz, Jr., MD, ... Overview of Malabsorption Bacterial Overgrowth Syndrome Celiac Disease Intestinal ... Intolerance Short Bowel Syndrome Tropical Sprue Whipple ...

  2. Intestinal Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colostomy ) is required to relieve an obstruction. Understanding Colostomy In a colostomy, the large intestine (colon) is cut. The part ... 1 What Causes Intestinal Strangulation? Figure 2 Understanding Colostomy Gastrointestinal Emergencies Overview of Gastrointestinal Emergencies Abdominal Abscesses ...

  3. Hepatic and intestinal glucuronidation of mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, an active metabolite of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, in humans, dogs, rats, and mice: an in vitro analysis using microsomal fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanioka, Nobumitsu; Isobe, Takashi; Kinashi, Yu; Tanaka-Kagawa, Toshiko; Jinno, Hideto

    2016-07-01

    Mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) is an active metabolite of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and has endocrine-disrupting effects. MEHP is metabolized into glucuronide by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes in mammals. In the present study, the hepatic and intestinal glucuronidation of MEHP in humans, dogs, rats, and mice was examined in an in vitro system using microsomal fractions. The kinetics of MEHP glucuronidation by liver microsomes followed the Michaelis-Menten model for humans and dogs, and the biphasic model for rats and mice. The K m and V max values of human liver microsomes were 110 µM and 5.8 nmol/min/mg protein, respectively. The kinetics of intestinal microsomes followed the biphasic model for humans, dogs, and mice, and the Michaelis-Menten model for rats. The K m and V max values of human intestinal microsomes were 5.6 µM and 0.40 nmol/min/mg protein, respectively, for the high-affinity phase, and 430 µM and 0.70 nmol/min/mg protein, respectively, for the low-affinity phase. The relative levels of V max estimated by Eadie-Hofstee plots were dogs (2.0) > mice (1.4) > rats (1.0) ≈ humans (1.0) for liver microsomes, and mice (8.5) > dogs (4.1) > rats (3.1) > humans (1.0) for intestinal microsomes. The percentages of the V max values of intestinal microsomes to liver microsomes were mice (120 %) > rats (57 %) > dogs (39 %) > humans (19 %). These results suggest that the metabolic abilities of UGT enzymes expressed in the liver and intestine toward MEHP markedly differed among species, and imply that these species differences are strongly associated with the toxicity of DEHP.

  4. Enhancing effect of medium-chain triglycerides on intestinal absorption of d-alpha-tocopherol acetate from lecithin-dispersed preparations in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, E; Kurohara, H; Kageyu, A; Kurosaki, Y; Nakayama, T; Kimura, T

    1989-02-01

    The effect of formulations of lecithin-dispersed preparation on the absorption of d-alpha-tocopherol acetate (VEA) from the small intestine was investigated in rats. When lecithin-dispersed preparations containing VEA or polysorbate 80 (PS-80)-solubilized solution of VEA were intraduodenally administered, VEA was hydrolyzed to d-alpha-tocopherol (VE) and was not detected in the plasma nor in the thoracic lymph. The maximum plasma concen