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Sample records for rat brain investigated

  1. Stress-sensitive arterial hypertension, haemodynamic changes and brain metabolites in hypertensive ISIAH rats: MRI investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seryapina, A A; Shevelev, O B; Moshkin, M P; Markel, A L; Akulov, A E

    2017-05-01

    What is the central question of this study? Stress-sensitive arterial hypertension is considered to be controlled by changes in central and peripheral sympathetic regulating mechanisms, which eventually result in haemodynamic alterations and blood pressure elevation. Therefore, study of the early stages of development of hypertension is of particular interest, because it helps in understanding the aetiology of the disease. What is the main finding and its importance? Non-invasive in vivo investigation in ISIAH rats demonstrated that establishment of sustainable stress-sensitive hypertension is accompanied by a decrease in prefrontal cortex activity and mobilization of hypothalamic processes, with considerable correlations between haemodynamic parameters and individual metabolite ratios. The study of early development of arterial hypertension in association with emotional stress is of great importance for better understanding of the aetiology and pathogenesis of the hypertensive disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was applied to evaluate the changes in haemodynamics and brain metabolites in 1- and 3-month-old inherited stress-induced arterial hypertension (ISIAH) rats (10 male rats) with stress-sensitive arterial hypertension and in control normotensive Wistar Albino Glaxo (WAG) rats (eight male rats). In the 3-month-old ISIAH rats, the age-dependent increase in blood pressure was associated with increased blood flow through the renal arteries and decreased blood flow in the lower part of the abdominal aorta. The renal vascular resistance in the ISIAH rats decreased during ageing, although at both ages it remained higher than the renal vascular resistance in WAG rats. An integral metabolome portrait demonstrated that development of hypertension in the ISIAH rats was associated with an attenuation of the excitatory and energetic activity in the prefrontal cortex, whereas in the WAG rats the opposite age-dependent changes were observed. In contrast, in the

  2. Investigating hyperoxic effects in the rat brain using quantitative susceptibility mapping based on MRI phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Meng-Chi; Kuo, Li-Wei; Huang, Yun-An; Chen, Jyh-Horng

    2017-02-01

    To test whether susceptibility imaging can detect microvenous oxygen saturation changes, induced by hyperoxia, in the rat brain. A three-dimensional gradient-echo with a flow compensation sequence was used to acquire T2*-weighted images of rat brains during hyperoxia and normoxia. Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and QSM-based microvenous oxygenation venography were computed from gradient-echo (GRE) phase images and compared between the two conditions. Pulse oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) in the cortex was examined and compared with venous oxygen saturation (SvO 2 ) estimated by QSM. Oxygen saturation change calculated by a conventional Δ R2* map was also compared with the ΔSvO 2 estimated by QSM. Susceptibilities of five venous and tissue regions were quantified separately by QSM. Venous susceptibility was reduced by nearly 10%, with an SvO 2 shift of 10% during hyperoxia. A hyperoxic effect, confirmed by SpO 2 measurement, resulted in an SvO 2 increase in the cortex. The ΔSvO 2 between hyperoxia and normoxia was consistent with what was estimated by the Δ R2* map in five regions. These findings suggest that a quantitative susceptibility map is a promising technique for SvO 2 measurement. This method may be useful for quantitatively investigating oxygenation-dependent functional MRI studies. Magn Reson Med 77:592-602, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Serotonin metabolism in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schutte, H.H.

    1976-01-01

    The metabolism of serotonin in rat brain was studied by measuring specific activities of tryptophan in plasma and of serotonin, 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid and tryptophan in the brain after intravenous injection of tritiated tryptophan. For a detailed analysis of the specific activities, a computer simulation technique was used. It was found that only a minor part of serotonin in rat brain is synthesized from tryptophan rapidly transported from the blood. It is suggested that the brain tryptophan originates from brain proteins. It was also found that the serotonin in rat brain is divided into more than one metabolic compartment

  4. Investigations of oxidative stress effects and their mechanisms in rat brain after systemic administration of ceria engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardas, Sarita S.

    Advancing applications of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) in various fields create the opportunity for intended (e.g. drug and gene delivery) or unintended (e.g. occupational and environmental) exposure to ENM. However, the knowledge of ENM-toxicity is lagging behind their application development. Understanding the ENM hazard can help us to avoid potential human health problems associated with ENM applications as well as to increase their public acceptance. Ceria (cerium [Ce] oxide) ENM have many current and potential commercial applications. Beyond the traditional use of ceria as an abrasive, the scope of ceria ENM applications now extends into fuel cell manufacturing, diesel fuel additives and for therapeutic intervention as a putative antioxidant. However, the biological effects of ceria ENM exposure have yet to be fully defined. Both pro-and anti-oxidative effects of ceria ENM exposure are repeatedly reported in literature. EPA, NIEHS and OECD organizations have nominated ceria for its toxicological evaluation. All these together gave us the impetus to examine the oxidative stress effects of ceria ENM after systemic administration. Induction of oxidative stress is one of the primary mechanisms of ENM toxicity. Oxidative stress plays an important role in maintaining the redox homeostasis in the biological system. Increased oxidative stress, due to depletion of antioxidant enzymes or molecules and / or due to increased production of reactive oxygen (ROS) or nitrogen (RNS) species may lead to protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and/or DNA damage. Increased protein oxidation or lipid peroxidation together with antioxidant protein levels and activity can serve as markers of oxidative stress. To investigate the oxidative stress effects and the mechanisms of ceria-ENM toxicity, fully characterized ceria ENM of different sizes (˜ 5nm, 15nm, 30nm, 55nm and nanorods) were systematically injected into rats intravenously in separate experiments. Three brain regions

  5. Aluminum neurotoxicity in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yumoto, S [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Ohashi, H; Nagai, H; Kakimi, S; Ogawa, Y; Iwata, Y; Ishii, K

    1993-12-31

    To investigate the etiology of Alzheimer`s disease, we administered aluminum to healthy rats and examined the aluminum uptake in the brain and isolated brain cell nuclei by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Ten days after the last injection, Al was detected in the rat brain and in isolated brain cell nuclei by PIXE analysis. Al was also demonstrated in the brain after 15 months of oral aluminum administration. Moreover, Al was detected in the brain and isolated brain cell nuclei from the patients with Alzheimer`s disease. Silver impregnation studies revealed that spines attached to the dendritic processes of cortical nerve cells decreased remarkably after aluminum administration. Electron microscopy revealed characteristic inclusion bodies in the hippocampal nerve cells 75 days after the injection. These morphological changes in the rat brain after the aluminum administration were similar to those reportedly observed in the brain of Alzheimer`s disease patients. Our results indicate that Alzheimer`s disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminum in the brain, as well as in the nuclei of brain cells. (author).

  6. Aluminum neurotoxicity in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yumoto, S.; Ohashi, H.; Nagai, H.; Kakimi, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Iwata, Y.; Ishii, K.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, we administered aluminum to healthy rats and examined the aluminum uptake in the brain and isolated brain cell nuclei by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Ten days after the last injection, Al was detected in the rat brain and in isolated brain cell nuclei by PIXE analysis. Al was also demonstrated in the brain after 15 months of oral aluminum administration. Moreover, Al was detected in the brain and isolated brain cell nuclei from the patients with Alzheimer's disease. Silver impregnation studies revealed that spines attached to the dendritic processes of cortical nerve cells decreased remarkably after aluminum administration. Electron microscopy revealed characteristic inclusion bodies in the hippocampal nerve cells 75 days after the injection. These morphological changes in the rat brain after the aluminum administration were similar to those reportedly observed in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. Our results indicate that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminum in the brain, as well as in the nuclei of brain cells. (author)

  7. Investigation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression in hypothalamus of obese rats: Modulation by omega-3 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Maksoud, Sahar M; Hassanein, Sally I; Gohar, Neveen A; Attia, Saad M M; Gad, Mohamed Z

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was investigating the effect of omega-3 fatty acids (ω-3 FAs) on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression, using in vivo and in vitro models, to unravel the potential mechanisms of polyunsaturated fatty acids use in obesity. Twenty-nine Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups; lean controls fed normal chow diet for 14 weeks, obese controls fed 60% of their diet as saturated fats for 14 weeks, and ω-3 FAs-treated rats fed 60% saturated fat diet for 14 weeks with concomitant oral administration of 400 mg/kg/day ω-3 FAs, mainly docosahexaenoic acid and EPA, from week 12 to week 14. For the in vitro experiment, hypothalamic cells from six obese rats were cultured in the presence of different concentrations of ω-3 FAs to determine its direct effect on BDNF expression. In vivo results showed that obesity has negative effect on BDNF gene expression in rat hypothalamus that was reversed by administration of ω-3 FAs. Obese rats showed hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, normoinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and hyperleptinemia. Treatment with ω-3 FAs showed significant decrease in serum total cholesterol and TAG. Also serum glucose level and HOMA index were decreased significantly. In vitro results demonstrated the increase in BDNF expression by ω-3 FAs in a dose-dependent manner. Obesity causes down-regulation of BDNF gene expression that can be reversed by ω-3 FAs treatment, making them an interesting treatment approach for obesity and metabolic disease.

  8. Methodical investigations regarding the influence of narcosis on the distribution of L-3H-fucose in the brain of rats after intracerebral application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutoehrle, P.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of 3 H-fucose in the rat brain after intraventricular injection was investigated in wake and pentobarbital-anaesthetized test animals, using a method for autoradiography of water-soluble substances. By a specially developed procedure a director cannula was stereotactically implanted into a calotte through which, a few days later, an injection needle could be introduced into the lateral ventricle without narcosis. The autoradiogrammes were prepared from cryostat cuts of the cerebrum. The investigation proved the distribution of 3 H-fucose in the different sections of the brain to be very inhomogeneous and revealed that the tracer had mainly labelled the areas near the ventricle. With the aid of a micro-videomat, the blackened areas were measured in a certain frontal plane. The areas reached by the tracer, which were determined as parameters, were shown to increase as a function of the experimental time and to be always more extended in anaesthetized animals than in wake rats. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Neuroradiology of the normal and pathological anatomy of the rat brain. Pt. 2. Microangiographic investigations of the vascularisation of transplanted malignant brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, M; Weisser, G; Voigt, K; Mennel, H D

    1980-11-01

    70 BD-IX rats, in which chemically induced mixed gliomas have been transplanted intracerebrally, were investigated by microangiography. The pattern and the degree of tumor vascularisation of all animals was correlated with the histological findings. Dependent on the type of the tumor different localisations of tumor growth could be found: G XII-gliomas preferred the juxta-ventricular region and subarachnoid space whereas GL 2.2-gliomas mainly grew as solid intracerebral space occupying lesions. Microangiograms of all tumor stages from the 14th to 42nd day after transplantation revealed a typical vascular pattern consisting of lacunar glomerulose and netlike vessels. Further, necrosis, bleedings into the tumor, and irregularities of the capillary network could be demonstrated. The volume, age and vascularisation of the tumors are correlated and the results are discussed with regard to the principles of tumor growth and malignancy.

  10. Brain dysfunctions in Wistar rats exposed to municipal landfill leachates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chibuisi G. Alimba

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain damage induced by Olusosun and Aba-Eku municipal landfill leachates was investigated in Wistar rats. Male rats were orally exposed to 1–25% concentrations of the leachates for 30 days. Catalase (CAT and superoxide dismutase (SOD activities, and malondialdehyde (MDA concentrations in the brain and serum of rats were evaluated; body and brain weight gain and histopathology were examined. There was significant (p < 0.05 decrease in body weight gain and SOD activity but increase in absolute and relative brain weight gain, MDA concentration and CAT activity in both brain and serum of treated rats. The biochemical parameters, which were more altered in the brain than serum, corroborated the neurologic lesions; neurodegeneration of purkinje cells with loss of dendrites, perineural vacuolations of the neuronal cytoplasm (spongiosis and neuronal necrosis in the brain. The concentrations of Cr, Cu, Pb, As, Cd, Mn, Ni, sulphates, ammonia, chloride and phosphate in the leachate samples were above standard permissible limits. The interactions of the neurotoxic constituents of the leachates induced the observed brain damage in the rats via oxidative damage. This suggests health risk in wildlife and human populations.

  11. Risperidone treatment increases CB1 receptor binding in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Anna; Husum, Henriette; Holst, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    , the ghrelin receptor, neuropeptide Y, adiponectin and proopiomelanocortin. We investigated whether the expression of these factors was affected in rats chronically treated with the antipsychotic risperidone. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with risperidone (1.0 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (20...... showed that risperidone treatment altered CB(1) receptor binding in the rat brain. Risperidone-induced adiposity and metabolic dysfunction in the clinic may be explained by increased CB(1) receptor density in brain regions involved in appetite and regulation of metabolic function....

  12. [Investigating Quisling's brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalpe, Ingar O

    2004-12-16

    The trial against Vidkun Quisling (1887-1945) started on 20 August 1945. The question of whether he might suffer from a brain disease came up in court, and on Saturday 25 August he was examined by pneumoencephalography and cerebral angiography on the right side. Nothing pathological was found. Later on it has been claimed that these examinations were "experiments which today would be regarded as life-threatening". This is not correct; they were standard procedures at the time. What is criticizable is that Quisling was brought back to court in a relatively short time after the examinations. This paper gives a brief historic account of the development of the two methods, emphasising the contributions of Norwegian physicians such as Arne Engeset (1906-73) and Leif Emblem (1907-91). It has been claimed that the pneumoencephalography of Quisling has been used as an example of a normal finding from encephalography in the internationally renowned textbook "Clinical examination of the nervous system".

  13. ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pharmacotherapy Group, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Benin, Benin City, ... Methods: Forty-eight rats (P7-pups) were randomly assigned to one of four groups: ... Keywords: Hypoxic–ischemic brain injury, α-Lipoic acid, Cerebral infarct area, Edema, Antioxidants, .... Of the 48 rats initially used in the current study, 5.

  14. Development of antibodies against the rat brain somatostatin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theveniau, M; Rens-Domiano, S; Law, S F; Rougon, G; Reisine, T

    1992-05-15

    Somatostatin (SRIF) is a neurotransmitter in the brain involved in the regulation of motor activity and cognition. It induces its physiological actions by interacting with receptors. We have developed antibodies against the receptor to investigate its structural properties. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies were generated against the rat brain SRIF receptor. These antibodies (F4) were able to immunoprecipitate solubilized SRIF receptors from rat brain and the cell line AtT-20. The specificity of the interaction of these antibodies with SRIF receptors was further demonstrated by immunoblotting. F4 detected SRIF receptors of 60 kDa from rat brain and adrenal cortex and the cell lines AtT-20, GH3, and NG-108, which express high densities of SRIF receptors. They did not detect immunoreactive material from rat liver or COS-1, HEPG, or CRL cells, which do not express functional SRIF receptors. In rat brain, 60-kDa immunoreactivity was detected by F4 in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, and striatum, which have high densities of SRIF receptors. However, F4 did not interact with proteins from cerebellum and brain stem, which express few SRIF receptors. Immunoreactive material cannot be detected in rat pancreas or pituitary, which have been reported to express a 90-kDa SRIF receptor subtype. The selective detection of 60-kDa SRIF receptors by F4 indicates that the 60- and 90-kDa SRIF receptor subtypes are immunologically distinct. The availability of antibodies that selectively detect native and denatured brain SRIF receptors provides us with a feasible approach to clone the brain SRIF receptor gene(s).

  15. Oxidative stress and superoxide dismutase activity in brain of rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was envisaged to investigate the possible role of oxidative stress in permethrin neurotoxicity and to evaluate the protective effect of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in brain homogenates of Wistar rats. Oxidative stress measured as thiobarbituric acid reacting substances (TBARS) was found to ...

  16. Oxytocin biotransformation in the rat limbic brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burbach, J.P.H.; Schotman, P.; Kloet, E.R. de

    2006-01-01

    Two peptide fragments of oxytocin were isolated by high-pressure liquid chromatography from digests of oxytocin obtained after exposure to a SPM preparation of the rat limbic brain. The structures of these peptides, being Gln-Asn-Cys(O)x-Pro-Leu-GlyNH2 and Gln-Asn-Cys(-S-S-Cys)-Pro-Leu-GlyNH2, were

  17. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF MICROWAVE RADIATION ON BRAIN TISSUE IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Đinđić

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to microwave radiation induces multiple organ dysfunctions, especially in CNS.The aim of this work was investigation of biological effects of microwave radiation on rats' brain and determination of increased oxidative stress as a possible pathogenetic's mechanism.Wis tar rats 3 months old were divided in experimental (4 female and 4 male animal and control group (5 female and 4 male. This experimental group was constantly exposed to a magnetic field of 5 mG. We simulated using of mobile phones 30 min every day. The source of NIR emitted MF that was similar to mobile phones at 900 MHz. The rats were killed after 2 months. Biological effects were determined by observation of individual and collective behavior and body mass changes. Lipid per oxidation was determined by measuring quantity of malondialdehyde (MDA in brain homogenate.The animals in experimental group exposed to EMF showed les weight gain. The most important observations were changing of basic behavior models and expression of aggressive or panic behavior. The content of MDA in brain tissue is singificantly higher (1.42 times in rats exposed to electromagnetic fields (3,82±0.65 vs. control 2.69±0.42 nmol/mg proteins, p<0.01.Increased oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation after exposition in EM fields induced disorders of function and structure of brain.

  18. Brain protection by methylprednisolone in rats with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Mao; Lee, Ming-Hsueh; Wang, Ting-Chung; Weng, Hsu-Huei; Chung, Chiu-Yen; Yang, Jen-Tsung

    2009-07-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is clinically treated by high doses of methylprednisolone. However, the effect of methylprednisolone on the brain in spinal cord injury patients has been little investigated. This experimental study examined Bcl-2 and Bax protein expression and Nissl staining to evaluate an apoptosis-related intracellular signaling event and final neuron death, respectively. Spinal cord injury produced a significant apoptotic change and cell death not only in the spinal cord but also in the supraventricular cortex and hippocampal cornu ammonis 1 region in the rat brains. The treatment of methylprednisolone increased the Bcl-2/Bax ratio and prevented neuron death for 1-7 days after spinal cord injury. These findings suggest that rats with spinal cord injury show ascending brain injury that could be restricted through methylprednisolone management.

  19. Regulation of brain aromatase activity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roselli, C.E.; Ellinwood, W.E.; Resko, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and regulation of aromatase activity in the adult rat brain with a sensitive in vitro assay that measures the amount of 3 H 2 O formed during the conversion of [1 beta- 3 H]androstenedione to estrone. The rate of aromatase activity in the hypothalamus-preoptic area (HPOA) was linear with time up to 1 h, and with tissue concentrations up to 5 mgeq/200 microliters incubation mixture. The enzyme demonstrated a pH optimum of 7.4 and an apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of 0.04 microns. The greatest amount of aromatase activity was found in amygdala and HPOA from intact male rats. The hippocampus, midbrain tegmentum, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and anterior pituitary all contained negligible enzymatic activity. Castration produced a significant decrease in aromatase activity in the HPOA, but not in the amygdala or cerebral cortex. The HPOAs of male rats contained significantly greater aromatase activity than the HPOAs of female rats. In females, this enzyme activity did not change during the estrous cycle or after ovariectomy. Administration of testosterone to gonadectomized male and female rats significantly enhanced HPOA aromatase activities to levels approximating those found in HPOA from intact males. Therefore, the results suggest that testosterone, or one of its metabolites, is a major steroidal regulator of HPOA aromatase activity in rats

  20. Radiation therapy of 9L rat brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, S.D.; Kimler, B.F.; Morantz, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of radiation therapy on normal rats and on rats burdened with 9L brain tumors have been studied. The heads of normal rats were x-irradiated with single exposures ranging from 1000 R to 2700 R. Following acute exposures greater than 2100 R, all animals died in 8 to 12 days. Approximately 30% of the animals survived beyond 12 days over the range of 1850 to 1950 R; following exposures less than 1850 R, all animals survived the acute radiation effects, and median survival times increased with decreasing exposure. Three fractionated radiation schedules were also studied: 2100 R or 3000 R in 10 equal fractions, and 3000 R in 6 equal fractions, each schedule being administered over a 2 week period. The first schedule produced a MST of greater than 1 1/2 years; the other schedules produced MSTs that were lower. It was determined that by applying a factor of 1.9, similar survival responses of normal rats were obtained with single as with fractionated radiation exposures. Animals burdened with 9L gliosarcoma brain tumors normally died of the disease process within 18 to 28 days ater tumor inoculation. Both single and fractionated radiation therapy resulted in a prolongation of survival of tumor-burdened rats. This prolongation was found to be linearly dependent upon the dose; but only minimally dependent upon the time after inoculation at which therapy was initiated, or upon the fractionation schedule that was used. As with normal animals, similar responses were obtained with single as with fractionated exposures when a factor (1.9) was applied. All tumor-bearing animals died prior to the time that death was observed in normal, irradiated rats. Thus, the 9L gliosarcoma rat brain tumor model can be used for the pre-clinical experimental investigation of new therapeutic schedules involving radiation therapy and adjuvant therapies

  1. Incidence of brain tumours in rats exposed to an aerosol of 239PuO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, C.L.; Dagle, G.E.; Mahaffey, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Incidence of brain tumours was investigated in 3390 female and male Wistar rats exposed to an aerosol of 239 PuO 2 , or as sham-exposed controls. Lung doses ranged from 0.05 to 22 Gy. In females, six brain tumours were found in 1058 control rats (incidence, 0.6%) and 24 brain tumours in 2134 rats exposed to Pu (incidence, 1.1%); the survival-adjusted level of significance was p = 0.29 for comparing control with exposed females. In males, two brain tumours were found in 60 control rats (incidence, 3.3%) and seven brain tumours in 138 rats exposed to Pu (incidence, 5.1%); the survival-adjusted level of significance was p = 0.33. Brain tumour incidence was about five times greater in male than in female rats (p = 0.0001), a highly significant sex difference in brain tumour incidence. Tumour types were distributed similarly among control and Pu-exposed groups of both sexes; most were astrocytomas. Mean lifespans for rats with brain tumours were not significantly different between control and Pu-exposed rats. (author)

  2. Histochemical and ultrastructural investigations on the antioedematous and radioprotective effect of 0-(β-hydroxyethyl)-rutosides in the brain of rats after single dose irradiation. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiel, H.J.; Sauer, R.; Lierse, W.; Lehmann, F.M.

    1988-01-01

    The disturbances of the carbohydrate metabolism and the activation of acid phosphatases with and without protection by 0-(β-hydroxyethyl)-rutoside (HR) were studied in irradiated rat brains by means of the light microscope. The histochemically demonstrable deposition of glycogen and acid mucopolysaccarides serves as a criterion for a reversible lesion of the irradiated cerebral tissue. The extent of local activation of repair processes following to irradiation can be determined by the quantity of acid phosphatases in the lysosomes. For the dose range of 1 to 5 Gy, HR seems to exert a protective effect on the cellular metasbolism of the irradiated cerebral tissue shown by ba slight decrease of glycogen and mucopolysaccharide deposits compared to the untreated animals. However, when exceeding a threshold dose of 10 Gy, the deposition of carbohydrates in the HR group is strongly increased. A slightly increased activity of acid phosphatases induced by HR can be supposed at best for the dose range of 5 to 7.5 Gy. If the dose is even more increased, the reverse effect found in the carbohydrate metabolism, too, and an increased activation of acid phosphatases in the control group will be observed. This unexpected reversion of the protective effect could be related to the assumed inhibitory effect of HR on the ATPases and thus on the anaerobic part of glycolysis or to a breakdown of the cell interaction system of endothelial cells, glia cells, and neurons. (orig.) [de

  3. Rapamycin suppresses brain aging in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosova, Nataliya G; Vitovtov, Anton O; Muraleva, Natalia A; Akulov, Andrey E; Stefanova, Natalia A; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-06-01

    Cellular and organismal aging are driven in part by the MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) pathway and rapamycin extends life span inC elegans, Drosophila and mice. Herein, we investigated effects of rapamycin on brain aging in OXYS rats. Previously we found, in OXYS rats, an early development of age-associated pathological phenotypes similar to several geriatric disorders in humans, including cerebral dysfunctions. Behavioral alterations as well as learning and memory deficits develop by 3 months. Here we show that rapamycin treatment (0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg as a food mixture daily from the age of 1.5 to 3.5 months) decreased anxiety and improved locomotor and exploratory behavior in OXYS rats. In untreated OXYS rats, MRI revealed an increase of the area of hippocampus, substantial hydrocephalus and 2-fold increased area of the lateral ventricles. Rapamycin treatment prevented these abnormalities, erasing the difference between OXYS and Wister rats (used as control). All untreated OXYS rats showed signs of neurodegeneration, manifested by loci of demyelination. Rapamycin decreased the percentage of animals with demyelination and the number of loci. Levels of Tau and phospho-Tau (T181) were increased in OXYS rats (compared with Wistar). Rapamycin significantly decreased Tau and inhibited its phosphorylation in the hippocampus of OXYS and Wistar rats. Importantly, rapamycin treatment caused a compensatory increase in levels of S6 and correspondingly levels of phospo-S6 in the frontal cortex, indicating that some downstream events were compensatory preserved, explaining the lack of toxicity. We conclude that rapamycin in low chronic doses can suppress brain aging.

  4. Oxidative stress and superoxide dismutase activity in brain of rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JTEkanem

    effect of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in brain homogenates of Wistar rats. Oxidative stress measured as ..... on the brain and nervous system of humans as handlers and ... environment may be at higher health risk in that their internal ...

  5. Rat Brain Biogenic Amine Levels during Acute and Sub- acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-20

    May 20, 2011 ... substances in rat brain regions are altered during acute and sub-acute .... Different areas of the brain such as cerebral cortex (CC), cerebellum (CB), .... dopamine metabolism and differential motor behavioral tolerance.

  6. Simultaneous two-voxel localized 1H-observed 13C-edited spectroscopy for in vivo MRS on rat brain at 9.4 T: Application to the investigation of excitotoxic lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Bich-Thuy; Autret, Gwennhael; Mispelter, Joël; Méric, Philippe; Même, William; Montécot-Dubourg, Céline; Corrèze, Jean-Loup; Szeremeta, Frédéric; Gillet, Brigitte; Beloeil, Jean-Claude

    2009-05-01

    13C spectroscopy combined with the injection of 13C-labeled substrates is a powerful method for the study of brain metabolism in vivo. Since highly localized measurements are required in a heterogeneous organ such as the brain, it is of interest to augment the sensitivity of 13C spectroscopy by proton acquisition. Furthermore, as focal cerebral lesions are often encountered in animal models of disorders in which the two brain hemispheres are compared, we wished to develop a bi-voxel localized sequence for the simultaneous bilateral investigation of rat brain metabolism, with no need for external additional references. Two sequences were developed at 9.4 T: a bi-voxel 1H-( 13C) STEAM-POCE (Proton Observed Carbon Edited) sequence and a bi-voxel 1H-( 13C) PRESS-POCE adiabatically decoupled sequence with Hadamard encoding. Hadamard encoding allows both voxels to be recorded simultaneously, with the same acquisition time as that required for a single voxel. The method was validated in a biological investigation into the neuronal damage and the effect on the Tri Carboxylic Acid cycle in localized excitotoxic lesions. Following an excitotoxic quinolinate-induced localized lesion in the rat cortex and the infusion of U- 13C glucose, two 1H-( 13C) spectra of distinct (4 × 4 × 4 mm 3) voxels, one centred on the injured hemisphere and the other on the contralateral hemisphere, were recorded simultaneously. Two 1H bi-voxel spectra were also recorded and showed a significant decrease in N-acetyl aspartate, and an accumulation of lactate in the ipsilateral hemisphere. The 1H-( 13C) spectra could be recorded dynamically as a function of time, and showed a fall in the glutamate/glutamine ratio and the presence of a stable glutamine pool, with a permanent increase of lactate in the ipsilateral hemisphere. This bi-voxel 1H-( 13C) method can be used to investigate simultaneously both brain hemispheres, and to perform dynamic studies. We report here the neuronal damage and the

  7. Studies of aluminum in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipman, J.J.; Brill, A.B.; Som, P.; Jones, K.W.; Colowick, S.; Cholewa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of high aluminum concentrations in rat brains were studied using /sup 14/C autoradiography to measure the uptake of /sup 14/C 2-deoxy-D-glucose (/sup 14/C-2DG) and microbeam proton-induced x-ray emission (microPIXE) with a 20-..mu..m resolution to measure concentrations of magnesium, aluminum, potassium, and calcium. The aluminum was introduced intracisternally in the form of aluminum tartrate (Al-T) while control animals were given sodium tartrate (Na-T). The /sup 14/C was administered intravenously. The animals receiving Al-T developed seizure disorders and had pathological changes that included cerebral cortical atrophy. The results showed that there was a decreased uptake of /sup 14/C-2DG in cortical regions in which increased aluminum levels were measured, i.e., there is a correlation between the aluminum in the rat brain and decreased brain glucose metabolism. A minimum detection limit of about 16 ppM (mass fraction) or 3 x 10/sup 9/ Al atoms was obtained for Al under the conditions employed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Studies of aluminum in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipman, J.J.; Brill, A.B.; Som, P.; Jones, K.W.; Colowick, S.; Cholewa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of high aluminum concentrations in rat brains were studied using 14 C autoradiography to measure the uptake of 14 C 2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 14 C-2DG) and microbeam proton-induced x-ray emission (microPIXE) with a 20-μm resolution to measure concentrations of magnesium, aluminum, potassium, and calcium. The aluminum was introduced intracisternally in the form of aluminum tartrate (Al-T) while control animals were given sodium tartrate (Na-T). The 14 C was administered intravenously. The animals receiving Al-T developed seizure disorders and had pathological changes that included cerebral cortical atrophy. The results showed that there was a decreased uptake of 14 C-2DG in cortical regions in which increased aluminum levels were measured, i.e., there is a correlation between the aluminum in the rat brain and decreased brain glucose metabolism. A minimum detection limit of about 16 ppM (mass fraction) or 3 x 10 9 Al atoms was obtained for Al under the conditions employed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  9. Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury Induces Bone Loss in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Rhys D; Shultz, Sandy R; Sun, Mujun; Romano, Tania; van der Poel, Chris; Wright, David K; Wark, John D; O'Brien, Terence J; Grills, Brian L; McDonald, Stuart J

    2016-12-01

    Few studies have investigated the influence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on bone homeostasis; however, pathophysiological mechanisms involved in TBI have potential to be detrimental to bone. The current study assessed the effect of experimental TBI in rats on the quantity and quality of two different weight-bearing bones, the femur and humerus. Rats were randomly assigned into either sham or lateral fluid percussion injury (FPI) groups. Open-field testing to assess locomotion was conducted at 1, 4, and 12 weeks post-injury, with the rats killed at 1 and 12 weeks post-injury. Bones were analyzed using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), histomorphometric analysis, and three-point bending. pQCT analysis revealed that at 1 and 12 weeks post-injury, the distal metaphyseal region of femora from FPI rats had reduced cortical content (10% decrease at 1 week, 8% decrease at 12 weeks; p in trabecular bone volume ratio at 1 week post-injury and a 27% reduction at 12 weeks post-injury in FPI rats compared to sham (p in bone quantity and mechanical properties of the femoral midshaft between sham and TBI animals. There were no differences in locomotor outcomes, which suggested that post-TBI changes in bone were not attributed to immobility. Taken together, these findings indicate that this rat model of TBI was detrimental to bone and suggests a link between TBI and altered bone remodeling.

  10. Cognitive dysfunction and histological findings in adult rats one year after whole brain irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Ryuichi; Sato, Mitsuya; Takeda, Norio

    2001-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction and histological changes in the brain were investigated following irradiation in 20 Fischer 344 rats aged 6 months treated with whole brain irradiation (WBR) (25 Gy/single dose), and compared with the same number of sham-irradiated rats as controls. Performance of the Morris water maze task and the passive avoidance task were examined one year after WBR. Finally, histological and immunohistochemical examinations using antibodies to myelin basic protein (MBP), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neurofilament (NF) were performed of the rat brains. The irradiated rats continued to gain weight 7 months after WBR whereas the control rats stopped gaining weight. Cognitive functions in both the water maze task and the passive avoidance task were lower in the irradiated rats than in the control rats. Brain damage consisting of demyelination only or with necrosis was found mainly in the body of the corpus callosum and the parietal white matter near the corpus callosum in the irradiated rats. Immunohistochemical examination of the brains without necrosis found MBP-positive fibers were markedly decreased in the affected areas by irradiation; NF-positive fibers were moderately decreased and irregularly dispersed in various shapes in the affected areas; and GFAP-positive fibers were increased, with gliosis in those areas. These findings are similar to those in clinically accelerated brain aging in conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Binswanger's disease, and multiple sclerosis. (author)

  11. Housing conditions influence motor functions and exploratory behavior following focal damage of the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornicka-Pawlak, Elzbieta; Jabłońska, Anna; Chyliński, Andrzej; Domańska-Janik, Krystyna

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated influence of housing conditions on motor functions recovery and exploratory behavior following ouabain focal brain lesion in the rat. During 30 days post-surgery period rats were housed individually in standard cages (IS) or in groups in enriched environment (EE) and behaviorally tested. The EE lesioned rats showed enhanced recovery from motor impairments in walking beam task, comparing with IS animals. Contrarily, in the open field IS rats (both lesioned and control) traveled a longer distance, showed less habituation and spent less time resting at the home base than the EE animals. Unlike the EE lesioned animals, the lesioned IS rats, presented a tendency to hyperactivity in postinjury period. Turning tendency was significantly affected by unilateral brain lesion only in the EE rats. We can conclude that housing conditions distinctly affected the rat's behavior in classical laboratory tests.

  12. Testosterone supplementation restores vasopressin innervation in the senescent rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, E.; Fliers, E.; Swaab, D. F.

    1988-01-01

    The vasopressin (AVP) innervation in the male rat brain is decreased in senescence. This decrease is particularly pronounced in brain regions where AVP fiber density is dependent on plasma levels of sex steroids. Since plasma testosterone levels decrease progressively with age in the rat, the

  13. Correlation between subacute sensorimotor deficits and brain water content after surgical brain injury in rats

    OpenAIRE

    McBride, Devin W.; Wang, Yuechun; Sherchan, Prativa; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Brain edema is a major contributor to poor outcome and reduced quality of life after surgical brain injury (SBI). Although SBI pathophysiology is well-known, the correlation between cerebral edema and neurological deficits has not been thoroughly examined in the rat model of SBI. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between brain edema and deficits in standard sensorimotor neurobehavior tests for rats subjected to SBI. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected ...

  14. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Simonsen, Mette; Ott, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Sørensen, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Ammonia has a key role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the brain, glutamine synthetase (GS) rapidly converts blood-borne ammonia into glutamine which in high concentrations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction and osmolytic brain edema. In astrocyte-neuron cocultures and brains of healthy rats, inhibition of GS by methionine sulfoximine (MSO) reduced glutamine synthesis and increased alanine synthesis. Here, we investigate effects of MSO on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in sham and bile duct ligated (BDL) rats. Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, alanine, and aspartate and incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into these amino acids in brain, liver, muscle, kidney, and plasma were similar in sham and BDL rats treated with saline. Methionine sulfoximine reduced glutamine concentrations in liver, kidney, and plasma but not in brain and muscle; MSO reduced incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into glutamine in all tissues. It did not affect alanine concentrations in any of the tissues but plasma alanine concentration increased; incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into alanine was increased in brain in sham and BDL rats and in kidney in sham rats. It inhibited GS in all tissues examined but only in brain was an increased incorporation of (15)N-ammonia into alanine observed. Liver and kidney were important for metabolizing blood-borne ammonia.

  15. Increased Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Zucker Diabetic Rat Liver and Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Raza

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF, FA/FA rat is a genetic model of type 2 diabetes, characterized by insulin resistance with progressive metabolic syndrome. We have previously demonstrated mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the heart, kidneys and pancreas of ZDF rats. However, the precise molecular mechanism of disease progression is not clear. Our aim in the present study was to investigate oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in the liver and brain of ZDF rats. Methods: In this study, we have measured mitochondrial oxidative stress, bioenergetics and redox homeostasis in the liver and brain of ZDF rats. Results: Our results showed increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production in the ZDF rat brain compared to the liver, while nitric oxide (NO production was markedly increased both in the brain and liver. High levels of lipid and protein peroxidation were also observed in these tissues. Glutathione metabolism and mitochondrial respiratory functions were adversely affected in ZDF rats when compared to Zucker lean (ZL, +/FA control rats. Reduced ATP synthesis was also observed in the liver and brain of ZDF rats. Western blot analysis confirmed altered expression of cytochrome P450 2E1, iNOS, p-JNK, and IκB-a confirming an increase in oxidative and metabolic stress in ZDF rat tissues. Conclusions: Our data shows that, like other tissues, ZDF rat liver and brain develop complications associated with redox homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction. These results, thus, might have implications in understanding the etiology and pathophysiology of diabesity which in turn, would help in managing the disease associated complications.

  16. Ceftriaxone attenuates hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perinatal brain injury is the leading cause of subsequent neurological disability in both term and preterm baby. Glutamate excitotoxicity is one of the major factors involved in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. Glutamate transporter GLT1, expressed mainly in mature astrocytes, is the major glutamate transporter in the brain. HIE induced excessive glutamate release which is not reuptaked by immature astrocytes may induce neuronal damage. Compounds, such as ceftriaxone, that enhance the expression of GLT1 may exert neuroprotective effect in HIE. Methods We used a neonatal rat model of HIE by unilateral ligation of carotid artery and subsequent exposure to 8% oxygen for 2 hrs on postnatal day 7 (P7 rats. Neonatal rats were administered three dosages of an antibiotic, ceftriaxone, 48 hrs prior to experimental HIE. Neurobehavioral tests of treated rats were assessed. Brain sections from P14 rats were examined with Nissl and immunohistochemical stain, and TUNEL assay. GLT1 protein expression was evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Results Pre-treatment with 200 mg/kg ceftriaxone significantly reduced the brain injury scores and apoptotic cells in the hippocampus, restored myelination in the external capsule of P14 rats, and improved the hypoxia-ischemia induced learning and memory deficit of P23-24 rats. GLT1 expression was observed in the cortical neurons of ceftriaxone treated rats. Conclusion These results suggest that pre-treatment of infants at risk for HIE with ceftriaxone may reduce subsequent brain injury.

  17. Expression and Localization of TRK-Fused Gene Products in the Rat Brain and Retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maebayashi, Hisae; Takeuchi, Shigako; Masuda, Chiaki; Makino, Satoshi; Fukui, Kenji; Kimura, Hiroshi; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    The TRK-fused gene (TFG in human, Tfg in rat) was originally identified in human papillary thyroid cancer as a chimeric form of the NTRK1 gene. It has been reported that the gene product (TFG) plays a role in regulating phosphotyrosine-specific phosphatase-1 activity. However, no information regarding the localization of Tfg in rat tissues is available. In this study, we investigated the expression of Tfg mRNA in normal rat tissues using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We also produced an antibody against Tfg gene products and examined the localization of TFG in the rat brain and retina. The RT-PCR experiments demonstrated that two types of Tfg mRNA were expressed in rat tissues: the conventional form of Tfg (cTfg) and a novel variant form, retinal Tfg (rTfg). RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that cTfg was ubiquitously expressed in rat tissues, while rTfg was predominantly expressed in the brain and retina. Western blot analysis demonstrated two bands with molecular weights of about 30 kDa and 50 kDa in the rat brain. Immunohistochemistry indicated that TFG proteins were predominantly expressed by neurons in the brain. In the rat retina, intense TFG-immunoreactivity was detected in the layer of rods and cones and the outer plexiform layer

  18. Protective effect of Kombucha tea on brain damage induced by transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rat

    OpenAIRE

    Najmeh Kabiri; Mahbubeh Setorki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of study was to investigate the potential neuroprotective effects of Kombucha on cerebral damage induced by ischemia in rats (n=99). Cerebral infarct volume in the ischemic rats received Kombucha solution showed no significance alteration. However, the permeability of blood-brain barrier significantly decreased in both ischemic rats received 15 mg/kg Kombucha tea and Sham group. In addition, brain water content in the ischemic groups treated with Kombucha solution was significantly hi...

  19. Extreme hypoxia tolerance of naked mole-rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, John; Park, Thomas J

    2009-12-09

    Mammalian brains have extremely high levels of aerobic metabolism and typically suffer irreversible damage after brief periods of oxygen deprivation such as occur during stroke or cardiac arrest. Here we report that brain tissue from naked mole-rats, rodents that live in a chronically low-oxygen environment, is remarkably resistant to hypoxia: naked mole-rat neurons maintain synaptic transmission much longer than mouse neurons and can recover from periods of anoxia exceeding 30 min. We suggest that brain tolerance to hypoxia may result from slowed or arrested brain development in these extremely long-lived animals.

  20. Pomegranate extract protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and preserves brain DNA integrity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Maha A E; El Morsy, Engy M; Ahmed, Amany A E

    2014-08-21

    Interruption to blood flow causes ischemia and infarction of brain tissues with consequent neuronal damage and brain dysfunction. Pomegranate extract is well tolerated, and safely consumed all over the world. Interestingly, pomegranate extract has shown remarkable antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in experimental models. Many investigators consider natural extracts as novel therapies for neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the protective effects of standardized pomegranate extract against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion-induced brain injury in rats. Adult male albino rats were randomly divided into sham-operated control group, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) group, and two other groups that received standardized pomegranate extract at two dose levels (250, 500 mg/kg) for 15 days prior to ischemia/reperfusion (PMG250+I/R, and PMG500+I/R groups). After I/R or sham operation, all rats were sacrificed and brains were harvested for subsequent biochemical analysis. Results showed reduction in brain contents of MDA (malondialdehyde), and NO (nitric oxide), in addition to enhancement of SOD (superoxide dismutase), GPX (glutathione peroxidase), and GRD (glutathione reductase) activities in rats treated with pomegranate extract prior to cerebral I/R. Moreover, pomegranate extract decreased brain levels of NF-κB p65 (nuclear factor kappa B p65), TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-alpha), caspase-3 and increased brain levels of IL-10 (interleukin-10), and cerebral ATP (adenosine triphosphate) production. Comet assay showed less brain DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) damage in rats protected with pomegranate extract. The present study showed, for the first time, that pre-administration of pomegranate extract to rats, can offer a significant dose-dependent neuroprotective activity against cerebral I/R brain injury and DNA damage via antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and ATP-replenishing effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc

  1. [Expression of aquaporin-4 during brain edema in rats with thioacetamide-induced acute encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Qing; Zhu, Sheng-Mei; Zhou, Heng-Jun; Pan, Cai-Fei

    2011-09-27

    To investigate the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) during brain edema in rats with thioacetamide-induced acute liver failure and encephalopathy. The rat model of acute hepatic failure and encephalopathy was induced by intraperitoneal injection of thioacetamide (TAA) at a 24-hour interval for 2 consecutive days. Thirty-two SD rats were randomly divided into the model group (n = 24) and the control group (normal saline, n = 8). And then the model group was further divided into 3 subgroups by the timepoint of decapitation: 24 h (n = 8), 48 h (n = 8) and 60 h (n = 8). Then we observed their clinical symptoms and stages of HE, indices of liver function and ammonia, liver histology and brain water content. The expression of AQP4 protein in brain tissues was measured with Western blot and the expression of AQP4mRNA with RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction). Typical clinical manifestations of hepatic encephalopathy occurred in all TAA-administrated rats. The model rats showed the higher indices of ALT (alanine aminotransferase), AST (aspartate aminotransferase), TBIL (total bilirubin) and ammonia than the control rats (P liver failure and encephalopathy plays a significant role during brain edema. AQP4 is one of the molecular mechanisms for the occurrence of brain edema in hepatic encephalopathy.

  2. Hypobaric Hypoxia Imbalances Mitochondrial Dynamics in Rat Brain Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushbu Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain is predominantly susceptible to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction during hypobaric hypoxia, and therefore undergoes neurodegeneration due to energy crisis. Evidences illustrate a high degree of association for mitochondrial fusion/fission imbalance and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial fusion/fission is a recently reported dynamic mechanism which frequently occurs among cellular mitochondrial network. Hence, the study investigated the temporal alteration and involvement of abnormal mitochondrial dynamics (fusion/fission along with disturbed mitochondrial functionality during chronic exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (HH. The Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to simulated high altitude equivalent to 25000 ft for 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Mitochondrial morphology, distribution within neurons, enzyme activity of respiratory complexes, Δψm, ADP: ATP, and expression of fission/fusion key proteins were determined. Results demonstrated HH induced alteration in mitochondrial morphology by damaged, small mitochondria observed in neurons with disturbance of mitochondrial functionality and reduced mitochondrial density in neuronal processes manifested by excessive mitochondrial fragmentation (fission and decreased mitochondrial fusion as compared to unexposed rat brain hippocampus. The study suggested that imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics is one of the noteworthy mechanisms occurring in hippocampal neurons during HH insult.

  3. Tartrazine induced neurobiochemical alterations in rat brain sub-regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Diksha; Vyas, Krati; Singh, Shakuntala; John, P J; Soni, Inderpal

    2018-03-01

    Tartrazine is a synthetic lemon yellow azo dye primarily used as a food coloring. The present study aimed to screen the neurobiochemical effects of Tartrazine in Wistar rats after administering the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) level. Tartrazine (7.5 mg/kg b.w.) was administered to 21 day old weanling rats through oral gavage once daily for 40 consecutive days. On 41st day, the animals were sacrificed and brain sub regions namely, frontal cortex, corpus striatum, hippocampus and cerebellum were used to determine activities of anti-oxidant enzymes viz. Superoxide Dismutase (SOD), Catalase (CAT), Glutathione-Stransferase (GST), Glutathione Reductase (GR) and Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) and levels of lipid peroxides using Thio-barbituric Acid Reactive Substance (TBARS) assay. Our investigation showed a significant decrease in SOD and CAT activity, whereas there occurred a decline in GST and GR activity with an increase in GPx activity to counteract the oxidative damage caused by significantly increased levels of lipid peroxides. The possible mechanism of this oxidative damage might be attributed to the production of sulphanilc acid as a metabolite in azofission of tartrazine. It may be concluded that the ADI levels of food azo dyes adversely affect and alter biochemical markers of brain tissue and cause oxidative damage. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional Magnetic Resonance Study of Non-conventional Morphological Brains: malnourished rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition during brain development can cause serious problems that can be irreversible. Dysfunctional patterns of brain activity can be detected with functional MRI. We used BOLD functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI to investigate region differences of brain activity between control and malnourished rats. The food-competition method was applied to a rat model to induce malnutrition during lactation. A 7T magnet was used to detect changes of the BOLD signal associated with changes in brain activity caused by the trigeminal nerve stimulation in malnourished and control rats. Major neuronal activation was observed in malnourished rats in several brain regions, including cerebellum, somatosensory cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. Statistical analysis of the BOLD signals from various brain areas revealed significant differences in somatosensory cortex between the control and experimental groups, as well as a significant difference between the cerebellum and other structures in the experimental group. This study, particularly in malnourished rats, demonstrates increased BOLD activation in the cerebellum.

  5. Brain biochemistry of infant mice and rats exposed to lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berber, G.B.; Maes, J.; Gilliavod, N.; Casale, G.

    1978-05-01

    Brains of rats and mice exposed to lead from birth receive biochemical examinations. Mice are given drinking water with lead and are studied until they are 17 days old. Rats ae given lead in the diet and followed for more than a year. In mice a retardation in body growth and development in brain DNA is found. In rats, cathepsin is enhanced at almost all times. An important role of proteolytic processes and biogenic animes is suggested in lead encephalopathy. (33 references, 7 tables)

  6. Brain Insulin Administration Triggers Distinct Cognitive and Neurotrophic Responses in Young and Aged Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Clarissa B; Kalinine, Eduardo; Zimmer, Eduardo R; Hansel, Gisele; Brochier, Andressa W; Oses, Jean P; Portela, Luis V; Muller, Alexandre P

    2016-11-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for cognitive deficits and neurodegenerative disorders, and impaired brain insulin receptor (IR) signaling is mechanistically linked to these abnormalities. The main goal of this study was to investigate whether brain insulin infusions improve spatial memory in aged and young rats. Aged (24 months) and young (4 months) male Wistar rats were intracerebroventricularly injected with insulin (20 mU) or vehicle for five consecutive days. The animals were then assessed for spatial memory using a Morris water maze. Insulin increased memory performance in young rats, but not in aged rats. Thus, we searched for cellular and molecular mechanisms that might account for this distinct memory response. In contrast with our expectation, insulin treatment increased the proliferative activity in aged rats, but not in young rats, implying that neurogenesis-related effects do not explain the lack of insulin effects on memory in aged rats. Furthermore, the expression levels of the IR and downstream signaling proteins such as GSK3-β, mTOR, and presynaptic protein synaptophysin were increased in aged rats in response to insulin. Interestingly, insulin treatment increased the expression of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) receptors in the hippocampus of young rats, but not of aged rats. Our data therefore indicate that aged rats can have normal IR downstream protein expression but failed to mount a BDNF response after challenge in a spatial memory test. In contrast, young rats showed insulin-mediated TrkB/BDNF response, which paralleled with improved memory performance.

  7. CNS-syndrome. Characterization of rat brain intermediate filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedzvetskij, V.S.; Busygina, S.G.; Berezin, V.A.; Dvoretskij, A.I.

    1990-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of ionizing radiation on the content and polypeptide composition of filamentous and soluble glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in different regions of rat brain. Ionizing radiation was shown to decrease considerably the level of soluble GFAP in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, middle brain and hippocampus. Polypeptide composition of soluble GFAP detected by the immonublot-method was found to be changed considerably in different brain areas of irradiated animals

  8. Relationship between catalase activity and uptake of elemental mercury by rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eide, I.; Syversen, T.L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Uptake of mercury by brain after intravenous injection of elemental mercury was investigated in the rat. Catalase activity was inhibited by aminotriazole either by intraperitoneal affecting catalase in most tissues of the animal or by intraventricular injections affecting catalase in the brain selectively. Uptake of elemental mercury by rat brain was not influenced by intraperitoneal administration of aminotriazole resulting in 50% inhibition of brain catalase. However, when the inhibitor was injected intraventricularly in concentrations to give a 50% inhibition of brain catalase, it was shown that the mercury uptake by brain was significantly decreased. In the latter case when only brain catalase was inhibited and the supply of elemtal mercury to brain was maintained, mercury uptake by brain was proportional to the activity of catalase in brain tissue and to the injected amount of elemental mercury. Contrary to the intraventricular injection of aminotriazole, in animals recieving aminotriazole intraperitoneally prior to elemental mercury injection, we suggest that the lower activity of brain catalse is compensated by an increased supply of elemtal mercury caused by the generally lower oxidation rate in the animal. This view is supported by the finding that mercury uptake by liver increased due to aminotriazole intraperitoneally although activity of catalase was depressed. (author)

  9. In vitro comparison of rat and chicken brain neurotoxic esterase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, R.; Padilla, S.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic comparison was undertaken to characterize neurotoxic esterase (NTE) from rat and chicken brain in terms of inhibitor sensitivities, pH optima, and molecular weights. Paraoxon titration of phenyl valerate (PV)-hydrolyzing carboxylesterases showed that rat esterases were more sensitive than chicken to paraoxon inhibition at concentrations less than or equal to microM and superimposable with chicken esterases at concentrations of 2.5-1000 microM. Mipafox titration of the paraoxon-resistant esterases at a fixed paraoxon concentration of 100 microM (mipafox concentration: 0-1000 microM) resulted in a mipafox I50 of 7.3 microM for chicken brain NTE and 11.6 microM for rat brain NTE. NTE (i.e., paraoxon-resistant, mipafox-sensitive esterase activity) comprised 80% of chicken and 60% of rat brain paraoxon-resistant activity with the specific activity of chicken brain NTE approximately twice that of rat brain NTE. The pH maxima for NTE from both species was similar showing broad, slightly alkaline optima from pH 7.9 to 8.6. [ 3 H]Diisopropyl phosphorofluoridate (DFP)-labeled NTE from the brains of both species had an apparent mol wt of 160,000 measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In conclusion, NTE from both species was very similar, with the mipafox I50 for rat NTE within the range of reported values for chicken and human NTE, and the inhibitor parameters of the chicken NTE assay were applicable for the rat NTE assay

  10. Acute hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation is associated with increased extracellular brain adenosine in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Dale, Nicholas; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2015-01-01

    ) and cerebral blood flow (CBF). We measured the adenosine concentration with biosensors in rat brain slices exposed to ammonia and in a rat model with hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation. Exposure to ammonia in concentrations from 0.15-10 mM led to increases in the cortical adenosine concentration up to 18......Acute liver failure (ALF) can lead to brain edema, cerebral hyperperfusion and intracranial hypertension. These complications are thought to be mediated by hyperammonemia and inflammation leading to altered brain metabolism. As increased levels of adenosine degradation products have been found...... in brain tissue of patients with ALF we investigated whether hyperammonemia could induce adenosine release in brain tissue. Since adenosine is a potent vasodilator and modulator of cerebral metabolism we furthermore studied the effect of adenosine receptor ligands on intracranial pressure (ICP...

  11. Kappa opioid receptors stimulate phosphoinositide turnover in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Periyasamy, S.; Hoss, W. (Univ. of Toledo, OH (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various subtype-selective opioid agonists and antagonists on the phosphoinositide (PI) turnover response were investigated in the rat brain. The {kappa}-agonists U-50,488H and ketocyclazocine produced a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of IP's in hippocampal slices. The other {kappa}-agonists Dynorphin-A (1-13) amide, and its protected analog D(Ala){sup 2}-dynorphin-A (1-13) amide also produced a significant increase in the formation of ({sup 3}H)-IP's, whereas the {mu}-selective agonists (D-Ala{sup 2}-N-Me-Phe{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}-ol)-enkephalin and morphine and the {delta}-selective agonist (D-Pen{sup 2,5})-enkephalin were ineffective. The increase in IP's formation elicited by U-50,488H was partially antagonized by naloxone and more completely antagonized by the {kappa}-selective antagonists nor-binaltorphimine and MR 2266. The formation of IP's induced by U-50,488H varies with the regions of the brain used, being highest in hippocampus and amygdala, and lowest in striatum and pons-medullar. The results indicate that brain {kappa}- but neither {mu}- nor {delta}- receptors are coupled to the PI turnover response.

  12. Thymoquinone ameliorates lead-induced brain damage in Sprague Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radad, Khaled; Hassanein, Khaled; Al-Shraim, Mubarak; Moldzio, Rudolf; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the protective effects of thymoquinone, the major active ingredient of Nigella sativa seeds, against lead-induced brain damage in Sprague-Dawley rats. In which, 40 rats were divided into four groups (10 rats each). The first group served as control. The second, third and fourth groups received lead acetate, lead acetate and thymoquinone, and thymoquinone only, respectively, for one month. Lead acetate was given in drinking water at a concentration of 0.5 g/l (500 ppm). Thymoquinone was given daily at a dose of 20mg/kg b.w. in corn oil by gastric tube. Control and thymoquinone-treated rats showed normal brain histology. Treatment of rats with lead acetate was shown to produce degeneration of endothelial lining of brain blood vessels with peri-vascular cuffing of mononuclear cells consistent to lymphocytes, congestion of choroid plexus blood vessels, ischemic brain infarction, chromatolysis and neuronal degeneration, microglial reaction and neuronophagia, degeneration of hippocampal and cerebellar neurons, and axonal demyelination. On the other hand, co-administration of thymoquinone with lead acetate markedly decreased the incidence of lead acetate-induced pathological lesions. Thus the current study shed some light on the beneficial effects of thymoquinone against neurotoxic effects of lead in rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Brain glucose content in fetuses of ethanol-fed rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pullen, G.; Singh, S.P.; Snyder, A.K.; Hoffen, B.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated impaired placental glucose transfer and fetal hypoglycemia in association with ethanol ingestion by pregnant rats. The present study examines the relationship between glucose availability and fetal brain growth under the same conditions. Rats (EF) were fed ethanol (30% of caloric intake) in liquid diet throughout gestation. Controls received isocaloric diet without ethanol by pair-feeding (PF) or ad libitum (AF). On the 22nd day of gestation fetuses were obtained by cesarean section. Fetal brains were removed and freeze-clamped. Brain weight was significantly reduced (p < 0.001) by maternal ethanol ingestion (206 +/- 2, 212 +/- 4 and 194 +/- 2 mg in AF, FP and EF fetuses respectively). Similarly, fetal brain glucose content was lower (p < 0.05) in the EF group (14.3 +/- 0.9 mmoles/g dry weight) than in the PF (18.6 +/- 1.0) or the AF (16.2 +/- 0.9) groups. The protein: DNA ratio, an indicator of cell size, correlated positively (r = 0.371, p < 0.005) with brain glucose content. In conclusion, maternal ethanol ingestion resulted in lower brain weight and reduced brain glucose content. Glucose availability may be a significant factor in the determination of cell size in the fetal rat brain.

  14. Volumetric abnormalities of the brain in a rat model of recurrent headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhihua; Tang, Wenjing; Zhao, Dengfa; Hu, Guanqun; Li, Ruisheng; Yu, Shengyuan

    2018-01-01

    Voxel-based morphometry is used to detect structural brain changes in patients with migraine. However, the relevance of migraine and structural changes is not clear. This study investigated structural brain abnormalities based on voxel-based morphometry using a rat model of recurrent headache. The rat model was established by infusing an inflammatory soup through supradural catheters in conscious male rats. Rats were subgrouped according to the frequency and duration of the inflammatory soup infusion. Tactile sensory testing was conducted prior to infusion of the inflammatory soup or saline. The periorbital tactile thresholds in the high-frequency inflammatory soup stimulation group declined persistently from day 5. Increased white matter volume was observed in the rats three weeks after inflammatory soup stimulation, brainstem in the in the low-frequency inflammatory soup-infusion group and cortex in the high-frequency inflammatory soup-infusion group. After six weeks' stimulation, rats showed gray matter volume changes. The brain structural abnormalities recovered after the stimulation was stopped in the low-frequency inflammatory soup-infused rats and persisted even after the high-frequency inflammatory soup stimulus stopped. The changes of voxel-based morphometry in migraineurs may be the result of recurrent headache. Cognition, memory, and learning may play an important role in the chronification of migraines. Reducing migraine attacks has the promise of preventing chronicity of migraine.

  15. Protective effect of Kombucha tea on brain damage induced by transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Kabiri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to investigate the potential neuroprotective effects of Kombucha on cerebral damage induced by ischemia in rats (n=99. Cerebral infarct volume in the ischemic rats received Kombucha solution showed no significance alteration. However, the permeability of blood-brain barrier significantly decreased in both ischemic rats received 15 mg/kg Kombucha tea and Sham group. In addition, brain water content in the ischemic groups treated with Kombucha solution was significantly higher than the Sham group, although right hemispheres in all of the treated groups illustrated higher brain water content than the left ones. Brain anti-oxidant capacity elevated in the ischemic rats treated with Kombucha and in the Sham group. Brain and plasma malondialdehyde concentrations significantly decreased in both of the ischemic groups injected with Kombucha. The findings suggest that Kombucha tea could be useful for the prevention of cerebral damage.

  16. Relationship between changes of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activity and brain edema after brain injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the changes of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity and brain edema after injury in rats.   Methods: The brain injury models were made by using a free-falling body. The treatment model was induced by means of injecting AP5 into lateral ventricle before brain injury; water contents in brain cortex were measured with dry-wet method; and NMDA receptor activity was detected with a radio ligand binding assay.   Results: The water contents began to increase at 30 minutes and reached the peak at 6 hours after brain injury. The maximal binding (Bmax) of NMDA receptor increased significantly at 15 minutes and reached the peak at 30 minutes, then decreased gradually and had the lowest value 6 hours after brain injury. Followed the treatment with AP5, NMDA receptor activity in the injured brain showed a normal value; and the water contents were lower than that of AP5-free injury group 24 hours after brain injury.   Conclusions: It suggests that excessive activation of NMDA receptor may be one of the most important factors to induce the secondary cerebral impairments, and AP5 may protect the brain from edema after brain injury.

  17. Outer brain barriers in rat and human development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøchner, Christian B; Holst, Camilla Bjørnbak; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Complex barriers at the brain's surface, particularly in development, are poorly defined. In the adult, arachnoid blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier separates the fenestrated dural vessels from the CSF by means of a cell layer joined by tight junctions. Outer CSF-brain barrier provides...... diffusion restriction between brain and subarachnoid CSF through an initial radial glial end feet layer covered with a pial surface layer. To further characterize these interfaces we examined embryonic rat brains from E10 to P0 and forebrains from human embryos and fetuses (6-21st weeks post...

  18. Increased CD147 (EMMPRIN) expression in the rat brain following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ming; Li, Hong; Shang, Yanguo; Zhou, Ziwei; Zhang, Jianning

    2014-10-17

    The extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), or CD147, has been known to play a key regulatory role in vascular permeability and leukocyte activation by inducing the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The effects of traumatic brain injury on the expression of EMMPRIN remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated changes in EMMPRIN expression in a rat model of fluid percussion injury (FPI) and examined the potential association between EMMPRIN and MMP-9 expression. Adult male rats were subjected to FPI. EMMPRIN expression was markedly up-regulated in the brain tissue surrounding the injured region 6-48 h after TBI, as measured by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. EMMPRIN expression was localized to inflammatory cells. The increase in EMMPRIN expression was temporally correlated with an increase in MMP-9 levels. These data demonstrate, for the first time, changes in CD147 and MMP-9 expression following TBI. These data also suggest that CD147 and MMP-9 may play a role in vascular injuries after TBI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Neuropeptide Y receptors in rat brain: autoradiographic localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martel, J.C.; St-Pierre, S.; Quirion, R.

    1986-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor binding sites have been characterized in rat brain using both membrane preparations and receptor autoradiography. Radiolabelled NPY binds with high affinity and specificity to an apparent single class of sites in rat brain membrane preparations. The ligand selectivity pattern reveals strong similarities between central and peripheral NPY receptors. NPY receptors are discretely distributed in rat brain with high densities found in the olfactory bulb, superficial layers of the cortex, ventral hippocampus, lateral septum, various thalamic nuclei and area postrema. The presence of high densities of NPY and NPY receptors in such areas suggests that NPY could serve important functions as a major neurotransmitter/neuromodulator in the central nervous system

  20. Neuron-astrocyte interactions, pyruvate carboxylation and the pentose phosphate pathway in the neonatal rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Morken, Tora Sund; Brekke, Eva Mari Førland; Håberg, Asta; Widerøe, Marius; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Glucose and acetate metabolism and the synthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters, anaplerosis, glutamate-glutamine cycling and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) have been extensively investigated in the adult, but not the neonatal rat brain. To do this, 7 day postnatal (P7) rats were injected with [1-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]acetate and sacrificed 5, 10, 15, 30 and 45 min later. Adult rats were injected and sacrificed after 15 min. To analyse pyruvate carboxylation and PPP activity duri...

  1. Metabolic, gastrointestinal, and CNS neuropeptide effects of brain leptin administration in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, G; Seeley, RJ; Thiele, TE; Friedman, MI; Ji, H; Wilkinson, CW; Burn, P; Campfield, LA; Tenenbaum, R; Baskin, DG; Woods, SC; Schwartz, MW; Seeley, Randy J.; Thiele, Todd E.; Friedman, Mark I.; Wilkinson, Charles W.; Baskin, Denis G.; Woods, Stephen C.; Schwartz, Michael W.

    To investigate whether brain leptin involves neuropeptidergic pathways influencing ingestion, metabolism, and gastrointestinal functioning, leptin (3.5 mu g) was infused daily into the third cerebral ventricular of rats for 3 days. To distinguish between direct leptin effects and those secondary to

  2. Synthesis of [11C]citalopram and brain distribution studies in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ram, S.; Krishnan, K.R.R.; Bissette, G.; Knight, D.L.; Coleman, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The study of serotonin uptake sites in the living human brain by PET with [ 11 C]citalopram may be valuable in investigating the anatomic locus and the therapeutic role of depression and prevention of suicide. For this purpose, the authors have synthesized [ 11 C]citalopram. In vivo biodistribution in rats has been determined

  3. Brain perfusion in acute and chronic hyperglycemia in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikano, G.E.; LaManna, J.C.; Harik, S.I.

    1989-01-01

    Recent studies show that acute and chronic hyperglycemia cause a diffuse decrease in regional cerebral blood flow and that chronic hyperglycemia decreases the brain L-glucose space. Since these changes can be caused by a decreased density of perfused brain capillaries, we used 30 adult male Wistar rats to study the effect of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on (1) the brain intravascular space using radioiodinated albumin, (2) the anatomic density of brain capillaries using alkaline phosphatase histochemistry, and (3) the fraction of brain capillaries that are perfused using the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran method. Our results indicate that acute and chronic hyperglycemia do not affect the brain intravascular space nor the anatomic density of brain capillaries. Also, there were no differences in capillary recruitment among normoglycemic, acutely hyperglycemic, and chronically hyperglycemic rats. These results suggest that the shrinkage of the brain L-glucose space in chronic hyperglycemia is more likely due to changes in the blood-brain barrier permeability to L-glucose

  4. Hydrophilic solute transport across the rat blood-brain barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucchesi, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Brain capillary permeability-surface area products (PS) of hydrophilic solutes ranging in size from 180 to 5,500 Daltons were measured in rats according to the method of Ohno, Pettigrew and Rapoport. The distribution volume of 70 KD dextran at 10 minutes after i.v. injection was also measured to determine the residual volume of blood in brain tissue at the time of sacrifice. Small test solutes were injected in pairs in order to elucidate whether their transfer into the brain proceeds by diffusion through water- or lipid-filled channels or by vesicular transport. This issue was examined in rats whose blood-brain barrier (BBB) was presumed to be intact (untreated) and in rats that received intracarotid infusions to open the BBB (isosmotic salt (ISS) and hyperosmolar arabinose). Ohno PS values of 3 H-inulin and 14 C-L-glucose in untreated rats were found to decrease as the labelling time was lengthened. This was evidence that a rapidly equilibrating compartment exists between blood and brain that renders the Ohno two-compartment model inadequate for computing true transfer rate constants. When the data were reanalyzed using a multi-compartment graphical analysis, solutes with different molecular radii were found to enter the brain at approximately equal rates. Furthermore, unidirectional transport is likely to be initiated by solute adsorption to a glycocalyx coat on the luminal surface of brain capillary endothelium. Apparently, more inulin than L-glucose was adsorbed, which may account for its slightly faster transfer across the BBB. After rats were treated with intracarotid infusions of ISS or hyperosmolar arabinose, solute PS values were significantly increased, but the ratio of PS for each of the solute pairs approached that of their free-diffusion coefficients

  5. Imaging of aromatase distribution in rat and rhesus monkey brains with [{sup 11}C]vorozole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kayo [Division of Pharmacology, Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala SE-75124 (Sweden); Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala SE-75109 (Sweden)]. E-mail: kayo.takahashi@uppsala.imanet.se; Bergstroem, Mats [Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala SE-75109 (Sweden); Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala SE-75124 (Sweden); Fraendberg, Pernilla [Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala SE-75109 (Sweden); Vesstroem, Eva-Lotta [Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala SE-75109 (Sweden); Watanabe, Yasuyoshi [Department of Physiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Langstroem, Bengt [Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala SE-75109 (Sweden)

    2006-07-15

    Aromatase is an enzyme that converts androgens to estrogens and may play a role in mood and mental status. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that brain aromatase distribution could be evaluated with a novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracer [{sup 11}C]vorozole. Vorozole is a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor that reversibly binds to the heme domain of aromatase. In vitro experiments in rat brain, using frozen section autoradiography, illustrated specific binding in the medial amygdala (MA), the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BST) and the preoptic area (POA) of male rat brain. Specific binding in female rat brain was found in the MA and the BST; however, the signals were lower than those of males. The K {sub d} of [{sup 11}C]vorozole binding to aromatase in MA was determined to be 0.60{+-}0.06 nM by Scatchard plot analysis using homogenates. An in vivo PET study in female rhesus monkey brain demonstrated the uptake of [{sup 11}C]vorozole in the amygdala, where the uptake was blocked by the presence of excess amounts of unlabeled vorozole. Thus, this tracer has a high affinity for brain aromatase and could have a potential for in vivo aromatase imaging. This technique might enable the investigation of human brain aromatase in healthy and diseased persons.

  6. Imaging of aromatase distribution in rat and rhesus monkey brains with [11C]vorozole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kayo; Bergstroem, Mats; Fraendberg, Pernilla; Vesstroem, Eva-Lotta; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Langstroem, Bengt

    2006-01-01

    Aromatase is an enzyme that converts androgens to estrogens and may play a role in mood and mental status. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that brain aromatase distribution could be evaluated with a novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracer [ 11 C]vorozole. Vorozole is a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor that reversibly binds to the heme domain of aromatase. In vitro experiments in rat brain, using frozen section autoradiography, illustrated specific binding in the medial amygdala (MA), the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BST) and the preoptic area (POA) of male rat brain. Specific binding in female rat brain was found in the MA and the BST; however, the signals were lower than those of males. The K d of [ 11 C]vorozole binding to aromatase in MA was determined to be 0.60±0.06 nM by Scatchard plot analysis using homogenates. An in vivo PET study in female rhesus monkey brain demonstrated the uptake of [ 11 C]vorozole in the amygdala, where the uptake was blocked by the presence of excess amounts of unlabeled vorozole. Thus, this tracer has a high affinity for brain aromatase and could have a potential for in vivo aromatase imaging. This technique might enable the investigation of human brain aromatase in healthy and diseased persons

  7. Microwave hyperthermia enhancement of methotrexate absorption in rat brains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, J.C.; Yuen, M.K.; Jung, D.T.

    1987-01-01

    The author studied enhanced absorption of methotrexate (MTX) in brains of male Wistar (10 weeks old, 500g) subjected to microwave hyperthermia. The rat was anesthetized using 40 mg/kg of sodium pentobarbital, IP and was placed in a stereotaxic head holder. Microwave energy (2450 MHz, 2.6 W/cm/sup 2/, CW) were applied directly to the left side of the rat's head by a coaxial applicator for 20 min. The body temperature was kept at 37.8 0 C. The brain temperature recorded in a similar group of animals using a Vitek probe was about 45 0 C. Three different MTX dosages, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, were injected intravenously immediately following microwave irradiation into three groups of rats in 1.5, 3 and 6 min., respectively. MTX was allowed to circulate for five min. before brains were removed for analysis. Standard HPLC procedures were applied to samples from anterior and posterior left hemisphere of the cerebrum, and the cerebellum. Samples from the right hemisphere were used for controls. The average absorption at the posterior left hemisphere was found to be 2.4, 9.6 and 12.4μg of MTX/g of brain tissue for 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, respectively. These results indicate that MTX absorption is significantly increased in rat brains subjected to microwave hyperthermia treatment

  8. Incorporation of DL-methionine /sup 3/H into the rat brain in the course of triethyl tin sulphate intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozik, M B; Ozarzewska, E; Piechowski, A [Akademia Medyczna, Poznan (Poland)

    1976-01-01

    The incorporation of DL-methionine /sup 3/H into the rat brain in the course of acute edema caused by the triethyl tin sulphate (TET) was investigated by autoradiography. The results indicate that TET intoxication effects in lower incorporation of methionine into the experimental rat brain in comparison to that in normal animals. The changes in dynamics of DL-methionine /sup 3/H incorporation after TET intoxication are presented. The possible pathogenetic mechanism of the observed changes is discussed.

  9. Antioxidant potential properties of mushroom extract (Agaricus bisporus) against aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waly, Mostafa I; Guizani, Nejib

    2014-09-01

    Aluminum (Al) is an environmental toxin that induces oxidative stress in neuronal cells. Mushroom cultivar extract (MCE) acted as a potent antioxidant agent and protects against cellular oxidative stress in human cultured neuronal cells. This study aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effect of MCE against Al-induced neurotoxicity in rat brain. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups (10 rats per group), control group, MCE-fed group, Al-administered group and MCE/Al-treated group. Animals were continuously fed ad-libitum their specific diets for 4 weeks. At the end of the experiment, all rats were sacrificed and the brain tissues were homogenized and examined for biochemical measurements of neurocellular oxidative stress indices [glutathione (GSH), Total Antioxidant Capacity (TAC), antioxidant enzymes and oxidized dichlorofluorescein (DCF)]. Al-administration caused inhibition of antioxidant enzymes and a significant decrease in GSH and TAC levels, meanwhile it positively increased cellular oxidized DCF level, as well as Al concentration in brain tissues. Feeding animals with MCE had completely offset the Al-induced oxidative stress and significantly restrict the Al accumulation in brain tissues of Al-administered rats. The results obtained suggest that MCE acted as a potent dietary antioxidant and protects against Al-mediated neurotoxicity, by abrogating neuronal oxidative stress.

  10. Salvia officinalis l. (sage) Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Oxidative Brain Damage In Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, N. N.; Abd El Azime, A.Sh.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the oxidative stress and the role of antioxidant system in the management of gamma irradiation induced whole brain damage in rats . Also, to elucidate the potential role of Salvia officinalis (sage) in alleviating such negative effects. Rats were subjected to gamma radiation (6 Gy). Sage extract was daily given to rats during 14 days before starting irradiation and continued after radiation exposure for another 14 days. The results revealed that the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyl content (PCC) and nitric oxide (NO) content were significantly increased, while the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) as well as the reduced glutathione (GSH) content were significantly decreased in the brain homogenate of irradiated rats. Additionally, brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as well as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), acid phosphatase (ACP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were significantly increased. On the other hand, the results showed that, administration of sage extract to rats was able to ameliorate the mentioned parameters and the values returned close to the normal ones. It could be concluded that sage extract, by its antioxidant constituents, could modulate radiation induced oxidative stress and enzyme activities in the brain.

  11. Effects of chronic aluminum exposure on learning and memory and brain-derived nerve growth factor in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘宝龙

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of chronic aluminum exposure on the learning and memory abilities and brain-derived nerve growth factor (BDNF) in SpragueDawley (SD) rats.Methods Thirty-two male SD rats were randomly and equally divided into 4 groups:control group and high-,middle-,and low-dose exposure groups.The rats in high-,middle-,and low-dose expo-

  12. Effect of maternal excessive sodium intake on postnatal brain development in rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung-a; Ahn, Young-mo; Lee, Hye-ah; Park, Hyesook; Kim, Young-ju; Lee, Hwa-young

    2015-04-01

    Postnatal brain development is affected by the in utero environment. Modern people usually have a high sodium intake. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sodium hyperingestion during pregnancy on the postnatal brain development of rat offspring. The sodium-overloaded rats received 1.8% NaCl in their drinking water for 7 days during the last week of gestation. Their body weight, urine, and blood levels of sodium and other parameters were measured. Some rats were sacrificed at pregnancy day 22 and the weight and length of the placenta and foetus were measured. The cerebral cortex and hippocampus were obtained from their offspring at postnatal day 1 and at postnatal weeks 1, 2, 4, and 8. Western blot analyses were conducted with brain tissue lysates. The sodium-overloaded animals had decreased weight gain in the last week of gestation as well as decreased food intake, increased water intake, urine volume, urine sodium, and serum sodium. There were no differences in placental weight and length. The foetuses of sodium-overloaded rats showed decreased body weight and size, and this difference was maintained postnatally for 2 weeks. In the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of the offspring, the protein levels of myelin basic protein, calmodulin/calcium-dependent protein kinase II, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were decreased or aberrantly expressed. The present data suggest that increased sodium intake during pregnancy affects the brain development of the offspring.

  13. Aging and sex influence the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saija, A.; Princi, P.; D'Amico, N.; De Pasquale, R.; Costa, G.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the existence of aging- and sex-related alterations in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the rat, by calculating a unidirectional blood-to-brain transfer constant (Ki) for the circulating tracer [ 14 C]-α-aminoisobutyric acid. The authors observed that: (a) the permeability of the BBB significantly increased within the frontal and temporo-parietal cortex, hypothalamus and cerebellum in 28-30 week old rats, in comparison with younger animals; (b) in several brain areas of female intact rats higher Ki values (even though not significantly different) were calculated at oestrus than at proestrus; (c) in 1-week ovariectomized rats there was a marked increase of Ki values at the level of the frontal, temporo-parietal and occipital cortex, cerebellum and brain-stem. One can speculate that aging and sex-related alterations in thee permeability of the BBB reflect respectively changes in brain neurochemical system activity and in plasma steroid hormone levels

  14. Dynamic Multi-Coil Technique (DYNAMITE) Shimming of the Rat Brain at 11.7 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juchem, Christoph; Herman, Peter; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Brown, Peter B.; McIntyre, Scott; Nixon, Terence W.; Green, Dan; Hyder, Fahmeed; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo rat model is a workhorse in neuroscience research, preclinical studies and drug development. A repertoire of MR tools has been developed for its investigation, however, high levels of B0 magnetic field homogeneity are required for meaningful results. The homogenization of magnetic fields in the rat brain, i.e. shimming, is a difficult task due to a multitude of complex, susceptibility-induced field distortions. Conventional shimming with spherical harmonic (SH) functions is capable of compensating shallow field distortions in limited areas, e.g. in the cortex, but performs poorly in difficult-to-shim subcortical structures or for the entire brain. Based on the recently introduced multi-coil approach for magnetic field modeling, the DYNAmic Multi-coIl TEchnique (DYNAMITE) is introduced for magnetic field shimming of the in vivo rat brain and its benefits for gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) are demonstrated. An integrated multi-coil/radio-frequency (MC/RF) system comprising 48 individual localized DC coils for B0 shimming and a surface transceive RF coil has been developed that allows MR investigations of the anesthetized rat brain in vivo. DYNAMITE shimming with this MC/RF setup is shown to reduce the B0 standard deviation to a third of that achieved with current shim technology employing static first through third order SH shapes. The EPI signal over the rat brain increased by 31% and a 24% gain in usable EPI voxels could be realized. DYNAMITE shimming is expected to critically benefit a wide range of preclinical and neuroscientific MR research. Improved magnetic field homogeneity, along with the achievable large brain coverage of this method will be crucial when signal pathways, cortical circuitry or the brain’s default network are studied. Along with the efficiency gains of MC-based shimming compared to SH approaches demonstrated recently, DYNAMITE shimming has the potential to replace conventional SH shim systems in small bore animal

  15. Demonstration of endogenous imipramine like material in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehavi, M.; Ventura, I.; Sarne, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The extraction and partial purification of an endogenous imipramine-like material from rat brain is described. The endogenous factor obtained after gel filtration and silica chromatography inhibits [ 3 H] imipramine specific binding and mimics the inhibitory effect of imipramine on [ 3 H] serotonin uptake in both brain and platelet preparations. The effects of the endogenous material are dose-dependent and it inhibits [ 3 H] imipramine binding in a competitive fashion. The factor is unevenly distributed in the brain with high concentration in the hypothalamus and low concentration in the cerebellum

  16. Improved apparatus for neutron capture therapy of rat brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hungyuan B.; Joel, D.D.; Slatkin, D.N.; Coderre, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    The assembly for irradiating tumors in the rat brain at the thermal neutron beam port of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor was redesigned to lower the average whole-body dose from different components of concomitant radiation without changing the thermal neutron fluence at the brain tumor. At present, the tumor-bearing rat is positioned in a rat holder that functions as a whole-body radiation shield. A 2.54 cm-thick collimator with a centered conical aperture, 6 cm diameter tapering to 2 cm diameter, is used to restrict the size of the thermal neutron field. Using the present holder and collimator as a baseline design, Monte Carlo calculations and mixed-field dosimetry were used to assess new designs. The computations indicate that a 0.5 cm-thick plate, made of 6 Li 2 CO 3 dispersed in polyethylene (Li-poly), instead of the existing rat holder, will reduce the whole-body radiation dose. Other computations show that a 10.16 cm-thick (4 inches) Li-poly collimator, having a centered conical aperture of 12 cm diameter tapering to 2 cm diameter, would further reduce the whole-body dose. The proposed irradiation apparatus of tumors in the rat brain, although requiring a 2.3-fold longer irradiation time, would reduce the average whole-body dose to less than half of that from the existing irradiation assembly. 7 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs

  17. The effect of chemotherapy on rat brain PET: preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Su; Kim, Il Han; Yu, A Ram; Park, Ji Ae; Woo, Sang Keun; Kim, Jong Guk; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Byeong Il; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Hee Joung; Kim, Kyeong Min [Korea Institute Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Chemotherapy was widely used for the therapy of cancer patients. When chemotherapy was performed, transient cognitive memory problem was occurred. This cognitive problem in brain was called as chemobrain. In this study, we have developed rat model for chemobrain. Cerebral glucose metabolism after chemotherapy was assessed using animal PET and voxel based statistical analysis method

  18. Impact of aspartame consumption on neurotransmitters in rat brain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Aspartame (APM), a common artificial sweetener, has been used for diabetic subjects and body weight control for a long time. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the impact of APM consumption on neurotransmitters and oxidative stress in rat's brain. Materials and Methods: Four groups of male ...

  19. The effect of chemotherapy on rat brain PET: preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Su; Kim, Il Han; Yu, A Ram; Park, Ji Ae; Woo, Sang Keun; Kim, Jong Guk; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Byeong Il; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Hee Joung; Kim, Kyeong Min

    2010-01-01

    Chemotherapy was widely used for the therapy of cancer patients. When chemotherapy was performed, transient cognitive memory problem was occurred. This cognitive problem in brain was called as chemobrain. In this study, we have developed rat model for chemobrain. Cerebral glucose metabolism after chemotherapy was assessed using animal PET and voxel based statistical analysis method

  20. Effect of chronic exposure to aspartame on oxidative stress in the brain of albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyyaswamy, Ashok; Rathinasamy, Sheeladevi

    2012-09-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the chronic effect of the artificial sweetener aspartame on oxidative stress in brain regions of Wistar strain albino rats. Many controversial reports are available on the use of aspartame as it releases methanol as one of its metabolite during metabolism. The present study proposed to investigate whether chronic aspartame (75 mg/kg) administration could release methanol and induce oxidative stress in the rat brain. To mimic the human methanol metabolism, methotrexate (MTX)-treated rats were included to study the aspartame effects. Wistar strain male albino rats were administered with aspartame orally and studied along with controls and MTX-treated controls. The blood methanol level was estimated, the animal was sacrificed and the free radical changes were observed in brain discrete regions by assessing the scavenging enzymes, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein thiol levels. It was observed that there was a significant increase in LPO levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, GPx levels and CAT activity with a significant decrease in GSH and protein thiol. Moreover, the increases in some of these enzymes were region specific. Chronic exposure of aspartame resulted in detectable methanol in blood. Methanol per se and its metabolites may be responsible for the generation of oxidative stress in brain regions.

  1. Effects of sevoflurane on adenylate cyclase and phosphodiesterases activity in brain of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Changdong; Yang Jianping; Dai Tijun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of sevoflurane on c adenylate cyclase (AC) and phosphodiesterases (PDE) activity in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem of rats, and to examine the role of cAMP in sevoflurane anesthesia. Methods: Fourty SD rats were delaminately designed and allocated randomly to 5 groups inhaling 1.5% sevoflurane i.e., no recovery (recovery group, n=8) and one hour after righting reflexrecovery (aware group, n=8). The brain tissues were rapidly dissected into cerebrocortex and hippocampus and brain stem.Then the adenylate cyclase and phosphodiesterases activity were assessed. Results: So far as the activity of AC is concerned, compared with the control group, the activity of AC in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem brain stem of induction group and anesthesia group, the cerebrocortex, and hippocampus in the recovery group were significantly increased; compared with those in the anesthesia group, the activity of AC in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem of aware group were significantly decreased (P<0.05); For the activity of PDE, compared with the control group, the activity of PDE in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem in the induction group and anesthesia group was significantly decreased, compared with that in anesthesia group, the activity of PDE in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem of recovery group and aware group was significantly increased (P<0.05). Conclusion: cAMP may play an important role in sevoflurane anesthesia. (authors)

  2. The Effect of Hydroxylated Fullerene Nanoparticles on Antioxidant Defense System in Brain Ischemia Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: According to the previous findings, brain ischemia attenuates the brain antioxidant defense system. This study aimed to investigate the effect of hydroxylated fullerene nanoparticle on antioxidant defense system in ischemic brain rat. Methods: In this Experimental study, rats were divided into three groups (n=6 in each group: sham, ischemic control, and ischemic treatment group. Brain ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery (MCA occlusion for 90 minutes followed by a 24-hour reperfusion. Ischemic treatment animals received fullerene nanoparticles intraperitoneally at a dose of 10mg/kg immediately after the end of MCA occlusion. After 24-h reperfusion period, brain catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD, and glutathione activities were assessed by biochemical methods. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc test. Results: The mean glutathione level and catalase and SOD activities in sham animals were 1±0.18%, 1±0.20%, and 1±0.04%, respectively. Induction of brain ischemia decreased the value of glutathione level and catalase and SOD activities in control ischemic rats and their values were obtained to be 0.55±0.09%, 0.44±0.05%, and 0.86±0.02%, respectively. Fullerene significantly increased the activities of catalase (0.93±0.29% and SOD (1.33±0.22% in ischemic treatment group compared to ischemic control rats, but did not change the glutathione level (0.52±0.25%. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that treatment with fullerene nanoparticles improves the brain antioxidant defense system, which is weakened during brain ischemia, through increasing catalase and SOD activities.

  3. Disruption of behavior and brain metabolism in artificially reared rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Benítez, Elsa L; Porras, Mercedes G; Parra, Leticia; González-Ríos, Jacquelina; Garduño-Torres, Dafne F; Albores-García, Damaris; Avendaño, Arturo; Ávila-Rodríguez, Miguel A; Melo, Angel I; Jiménez-Estrada, Ismael; Mendoza-Garrido, Ma Eugenia; Toriz, César; Diaz, Daniel; Ibarra-Coronado, Elizabeth; Mendoza-Ángeles, Karina; Hernández-Falcón, Jesús

    2017-12-01

    Early adverse life stress has been associated to behavioral disorders that can manifest as inappropriate or aggressive responses to social challenges. In this study, we analyzed the effects of artificial rearing on the open field and burial behavioral tests and on GFAP, c-Fos immunoreactivity, and glucose metabolism measured in anxiety-related brain areas. Artificial rearing of male rats was performed by supplying artificial milk through a cheek cannula and tactile stimulation, mimicking the mother's licking to rat pups from the fourth postnatal day until weaning. Tactile stimulation was applied twice a day, at morning and at night, by means of a camel brush on the rat anogenital area. As compared to mother reared rats, greater aggressiveness, and boldness, stereotyped behavior (burial conduct) was observed in artificially reared rats which occurred in parallel to a reduction of GFAP immunoreactivity in somatosensory cortex, c-Fos immunoreactivity at the amygdala and primary somatosensory cortex, and lower metabolism in amygdala (as measured by 2-deoxi-2-[ 18 fluoro]-d-glucose uptake, assessed by microPET imaging). These results could suggest that tactile and/or chemical stimuli from the mother and littermates carry relevant information for the proper development of the central nervous system, particularly in brain areas involved with emotions and social relationships of the rat. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 1413-1429, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effects of the Acute and Chronic Ethanol Intoxication on Acetate Metabolism and Kinetics in the Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ya-Ju; Wu, Liang-Chih; Ke, Chien-Chih; Chang, Chi-Wei; Kuo, Jung-Wen; Huang, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Fu-Du; Yang, Bang-Hung; Tai, Hsiao-Ting; Chen, Sharon Chia-Ju; Liu, Ren-Shyan

    2018-02-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) intoxication inhibits glucose transport and decreases overall brain glucose metabolism; however, humans with long-term EtOH consumption were found to have a significant increase in [1- 11 C]-acetate uptake in the brain. The relationship between the cause and effect of [1- 11 C]-acetate kinetics and acute/chronic EtOH intoxication, however, is still unclear. [1- 11 C]-acetate positron emission tomography (PET) with dynamic measurement of K 1 and k 2 rate constants was used to investigate the changes in acetate metabolism in different brain regions of rats with acute or chronic EtOH intoxication. PET imaging demonstrated decreased [1- 11 C]-acetate uptake in rat brain with acute EtOH intoxication, but this increased with chronic EtOH intoxication. Tracer uptake rate constant K 1 and clearance rate constant k 2 were decreased in acutely intoxicated rats. No significant change was noted in K 1 and k 2 in chronic EtOH intoxication, although 6 of 7 brain regions showed slightly higher k 2 than baseline. These results indicate that acute EtOH intoxication accelerated acetate transport and metabolism in the rat brain, whereas chronic EtOH intoxication status showed no significant effect. In vivo PET study confirmed the modulatory role of EtOH, administered acutely or chronically, in [1- 11 C]-acetate kinetics and metabolism in the rat brain. Acute EtOH intoxication may inhibit the transport and metabolism of acetate in the brain, whereas chronic EtOH exposure may lead to the adaptation of the rat brain to EtOH in acetate utilization. [1- 11 C]-acetate PET imaging is a feasible approach to study the effect of EtOH on acetate metabolism in rat brain. Copyright © 2017 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  5. Protective effects of edaravone on the radiation response of oligodendrocyte in rats following whole brain irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yingzhu; Tian Ye; Bao Shiyao; Bao Huan; Zhan Zhilin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of the oligodendrocyte lineage cells in the cortex following whole brain irradiation and the effects of the neotype free radical scavenger, edaravone on radiation response of oligodendrocyte in rats. Methods: 120 male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham- irradiation group, irradiation group and edaravone group. The model of whole-brain irradiation was established with exposure of the whole brain of the rats to 4 MeV X-rays with a single-dose of 10 Gy. The rats were injected intraperitoneally with edaravone at 0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg. Tissue microarray of irradiation-induced brain injury in rats was constructed. The expression of A2BS, oligodendrocyte market 4(O4) and 2', 3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'- phosphodiesterase (CNPase) in the cortex was examined by tissue microarray technology and immunohistochemistry. The positive cells were counted. Results: Compared with the sham-irradiation group, the number of A2BS-positive cells increased and the number of O4, CNPase-positive cells decreased significantly at certain time in the irradiation group(P<0.05). Compared with irradiation group, A2BS-positive cells decreased significantly after edaravone treatment, while O4-positive cells and CNPase-positive cells increased significantly (P<0.05, or P<0.01). Conclusions: The number of oligodendrocyte precursor cells in the cortex of rats increased reactively following whole brain irradiation and changed with time. Edaravone played a protective role in oligodendrocyte ischemic reaction in a dose-dependent manner. (authors)

  6. Protective effects of edaravone on the radiation response of oligodendrocyte in rats following whole brain irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yingzhu, Chen; Ye, Tian; Shiyao, Bao; Huan, Bao; Zhilin, Zhan [The Second Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou Univ., Suzhou (China)

    2007-08-15

    Objective: To investigate the changes of the oligodendrocyte lineage cells in the cortex following whole brain irradiation and the effects of the neotype free radical scavenger, edaravone on radiation response of oligodendrocyte in rats. Methods: 120 male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham- irradiation group, irradiation group and edaravone group. The model of whole-brain irradiation was established with exposure of the whole brain of the rats to 4 MeV X-rays with a single-dose of 10 Gy. The rats were injected intraperitoneally with edaravone at 0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg. Tissue microarray of irradiation-induced brain injury in rats was constructed. The expression of A2BS, oligodendrocyte market 4(O4) and 2', 3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'- phosphodiesterase (CNPase) in the cortex was examined by tissue microarray technology and immunohistochemistry. The positive cells were counted. Results: Compared with the sham-irradiation group, the number of A2BS-positive cells increased and the number of O4, CNPase-positive cells decreased significantly at certain time in the irradiation group(P<0.05). Compared with irradiation group, A2BS-positive cells decreased significantly after edaravone treatment, while O4-positive cells and CNPase-positive cells increased significantly (P<0.05, or P<0.01). Conclusions: The number of oligodendrocyte precursor cells in the cortex of rats increased reactively following whole brain irradiation and changed with time. Edaravone played a protective role in oligodendrocyte ischemic reaction in a dose-dependent manner. (authors)

  7. Gamma Knife irradiation method based on dosimetric controls to target small areas in rat brains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constanzo, Julie; Paquette, Benoit; Charest, Gabriel; Masson-Côté, Laurence; Guillot, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Targeted and whole-brain irradiation in humans can result in significant side effects causing decreased patient quality of life. To adequately investigate structural and functional alterations after stereotactic radiosurgery, preclinical studies are needed. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust standardized method of targeted irradiation on small regions of the rat brain. Methods: Euthanized male Fischer rats were imaged in a stereotactic bed, by computed tomography (CT), to estimate positioning variations relative to the bregma skull reference point. Using a rat brain atlas and the stereotactic bregma coordinates obtained from CT images, different regions of the brain were delimited and a treatment plan was generated. A single isocenter treatment plan delivering ≥100 Gy in 100% of the target volume was produced by Leksell GammaPlan using the 4 mm diameter collimator of sectors 4, 5, 7, and 8 of the Gamma Knife unit. Impact of positioning deviations of the rat brain on dose deposition was simulated by GammaPlan and validated with dosimetric measurements. Results: The authors’ results showed that 90% of the target volume received 100 ± 8 Gy and the maximum of deposited dose was 125 ± 0.7 Gy, which corresponds to an excellent relative standard deviation of 0.6%. This dose deposition calculated with GammaPlan was validated with dosimetric films resulting in a dose-profile agreement within 5%, both in X- and Z-axes. Conclusions: The authors’ results demonstrate the feasibility of standardizing the irradiation procedure of a small volume in the rat brain using a Gamma Knife

  8. An automatic rat brain extraction method based on a deformable surface model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiehua; Liu, Xiaofeng; Zhuo, Jiachen; Gullapalli, Rao P; Zara, Jason M

    2013-08-15

    The extraction of the brain from the skull in medical images is a necessary first step before image registration or segmentation. While pre-clinical MR imaging studies on small animals, such as rats, are increasing, fully automatic imaging processing techniques specific to small animal studies remain lacking. In this paper, we present an automatic rat brain extraction method, the Rat Brain Deformable model method (RBD), which adapts the popular human brain extraction tool (BET) through the incorporation of information on the brain geometry and MR image characteristics of the rat brain. The robustness of the method was demonstrated on T2-weighted MR images of 64 rats and compared with other brain extraction methods (BET, PCNN, PCNN-3D). The results demonstrate that RBD reliably extracts the rat brain with high accuracy (>92% volume overlap) and is robust against signal inhomogeneity in the images. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Aging-Dependent Changes in the Radiation Response of the Adult Rat Brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, Matthew K.; Forbes, M. Elizabeth; Robbins, Mike E.; Riddle, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of aging on the radiation response in the adult rat brain. Methods and Materials: Male rats 8, 18, or 28 months of age received a single 10-Gy dose of whole-brain irradiation (WBI). The hippocampal dentate gyrus was analyzed 1 and 10 weeks later for sensitive neurobiologic markers associated with radiation-induced damage: changes in density of proliferating cells, immature neurons, total microglia, and activated microglia. Results: A significant decrease in basal levels of proliferating cells and immature neurons and increased microglial activation occurred with normal aging. The WBI induced a transient increase in proliferation that was greater in older animals. This proliferation response did not increase the number of immature neurons, which decreased after WBI in young rats, but not in old rats. Total microglial numbers decreased after WBI at all ages, but microglial activation increased markedly, particularly in older animals. Conclusions: Age is an important factor to consider when investigating the radiation response of the brain. In contrast to young adults, older rats show no sustained decrease in number of immature neurons after WBI, but have a greater inflammatory response. The latter may have an enhanced role in the development of radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction in older individuals

  10. Neuroprotective Effect of Dexmedetomidine on Hyperoxia-Induced Toxicity in the Neonatal Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Sifringer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective agonist of α2-receptors with sedative, anxiolytic, analgesic, and anesthetic properties. Neuroprotective effects of dexmedetomidine have been reported in various brain injury models. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dexmedetomidine on neurodegeneration, oxidative stress markers, and inflammation following the induction of hyperoxia in neonatal rats. Six-day-old Wistar rats received different concentrations of dexmedetomidine (1, 5, or 10 µg/kg bodyweight and were exposed to 80% oxygen for 24 h. Sex-matched littermates kept in room air and injected with normal saline or dexmedetomidine served as controls. Dexmedetomidine pretreatment significantly reduced hyperoxia-induced neurodegeneration in different brain regions of the neonatal rat. In addition, dexmedetomidine restored the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio and attenuated the levels of malondialdehyde, a marker of lipid peroxidation, after exposure to high oxygen concentration. Moreover, administration of dexmedetomidine induced downregulation of IL-1β on mRNA and protein level in the developing rat brain. Dexmedetomidine provides protections against toxic oxygen induced neonatal brain injury which is likely associated with oxidative stress signaling and inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that dexmedetomidine may have a therapeutic potential since oxygen administration to neonates is sometimes inevitable.

  11. Development of acute hydrocephalus does not change brain tissue mechanical properties in adult rats, but in juvenile rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pong, Alice C; Jugé, Lauriane; Bilston, Lynne E; Cheng, Shaokoon

    2017-01-01

    Regional changes in brain stiffness were previously demonstrated in an experimental obstructive hydrocephalus juvenile rat model. The open cranial sutures in the juvenile rats have influenced brain compression and mechanical properties during hydrocephalus development and the extent by which closed cranial sutures in adult hydrocephalic rat models affect brain stiffness in-vivo remains unclear. The aims of this study were to determine changes in brain tissue mechanical properties and brain structure size during hydrocephalus development in adult rat with fixed cranial volume and how these changes were related to brain tissue deformation. Hydrocephalus was induced in 9 female ten weeks old Sprague-Dawley rats by injecting 60 μL of a kaolin suspension (25%) into the cisterna magna under anaesthesia. 6 sham-injected age-matched female SD rats were used as controls. MR imaging (9.4T, Bruker) was performed 1 day before and then at 3 days post injection. T2-weighted anatomical MR images were collected to quantify ventricle and brain tissue cross-sectional areas. MR elastography (800 Hz) was used to measure the brain stiffness (G*, shear modulus). Brain tissue in the adult hydrocephalic rats was more compressed than the juvenile hydrocephalic rats because the skulls of the adult hydrocephalic rats were unable to expand like the juvenile rats. In the adult hydrocephalic rats, the cortical gray matter thickness and the caudate-putamen cross-sectional area decreased (Spearman, P hydrocephalus is complex and is not solely dependent on brain tissue deformation. Further studies on the interactions between brain tissue stiffness, deformation, tissue oedema and neural damage are necessary before MRE can be used as a tool to track changes in brain biomechanics in hydrocephalus.

  12. Circulating and brain BDNF levels in stroke rats. Relevance to clinical studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Béjot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whereas brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels are measured in the brain in animal models of stroke, neurotrophin levels in stroke patients are measured in plasma or serum samples. The present study was designed to investigate the meaning of circulating BDNF levels in stroke patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Unilateral ischemic stroke was induced in rats by the injection of various numbers of microspheres into the carotid circulation in order to mimic the different degrees of stroke severity observed in stroke patients. Blood was serially collected from the jugular vein before and after (4 h, 24 h and 8 d embolization and the whole brains were collected at 4, 24 h and 8 d post-embolization. Rats were then selected from their degree of embolization, so that the distribution of stroke severity in the rats at the different time points was large but similar. Using ELISA tests, BDNF levels were measured in plasma, serum and brain of selected rats. Whereas plasma and serum BDNF levels were not changed by stroke, stroke induced an increase in brain BDNF levels at 4 h and 24 h post-embolization, which was not correlated with stroke severity. Individual plasma BDNF levels did not correlate with brain levels at any time point after stroke but a positive correlation (r = 0.67 was observed between individual plasma BDNF levels and stroke severity at 4 h post-embolization. CONCLUSION: Circulating BDNF levels do not mirror brain BDNF levels after stroke, and severe stroke is associated with high plasma BDNF in the very acute stage.

  13. Rat brain CYP2D enzymatic metabolism alters acute and chronic haloperidol side-effects by different mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksys, Sharon; Wadji, Fariba Baghai; Tolledo, Edgor Cole; Remington, Gary; Nobrega, Jose N; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2017-08-01

    Risk for side-effects after acute (e.g. parkinsonism) or chronic (e.g. tardive dyskinesia) treatment with antipsychotics, including haloperidol, varies substantially among people. CYP2D can metabolize many antipsychotics and variable brain CYP2D metabolism can influence local drug and metabolite levels sufficiently to alter behavioral responses. Here we investigated a role for brain CYP2D in acutely and chronically administered haloperidol levels and side-effects in a rat model. Rat brain, but not liver, CYP2D activity was irreversibly inhibited with intracerebral propranolol and/or induced by seven days of subcutaneous nicotine pre-treatment. The role of variable brain CYP2D was investigated in rat models of acute (catalepsy) and chronic (vacuous chewing movements, VCMs) haloperidol side-effects. Selective inhibition and induction of brain, but not liver, CYP2D decreased and increased catalepsy after acute haloperidol, respectively. Catalepsy correlated with brain, but not hepatic, CYP2D enzyme activity. Inhibition of brain CYP2D increased VCMs after chronic haloperidol; VCMs correlated with brain, but not hepatic, CYP2D activity, haloperidol levels and lipid peroxidation. Baseline measures, hepatic CYP2D activity and plasma haloperidol levels were unchanged by brain CYP2D manipulations. Variable rat brain CYP2D alters side-effects from acute and chronic haloperidol in opposite directions; catalepsy appears to be enhanced by a brain CYP2D-derived metabolite while the parent haloperidol likely causes VCMs. These data provide novel mechanistic evidence for brain CYP2D altering side-effects of haloperidol and other antipsychotics metabolized by CYP2D, suggesting that variation in human brain CYP2D may be a risk factor for antipsychotic side-effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Rutin protects against cognitive deficits and brain damage in rats with chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jie; Zhou, Qiong; Du, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Bai, Miao; Zhang, Zhuo; Xi, Ye; Li, Zhuyi; Miao, Jianting

    2014-08-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion is a critical causative factor for the development of cognitive decline and dementia in the elderly, which involves many pathophysiological processes. Consequently, inhibition of several pathophysiological pathways is an attractive therapeutic strategy for this disorder. Rutin, a biologically active flavonoid, protects the brain against several insults through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, but its effect on cognitive deficits and brain damage caused by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion remains unknown. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of rutin on cognitive impairments and the potential mechanisms underlying its action in rats with chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. We used Sprague-Dawley rats with permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO), a well-established model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. After rutin treatment for 12 weeks, the neuroprotective effect of rutin in rats was evaluated by behavioural tests, biochemical and histopathological analyses. BCCAO rats showed marked cognitive deficits, which were improved by rutin treatment. Moreover, BCCAO rats exhibited central cholinergic dysfunction, oxidative damage, inflammatory responses and neuronal damage in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, compared with sham-operated rats. All these effects were significantly alleviated by treatment with rutin. Our results provide new insights into the pharmacological actions of rutin and suggest that rutin has multi-targeted therapeutical potential on cognitive deficits associated with conditions with chronic cerebral hypoperfusion such as vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Efficiency analysis of clearance of two types of exogenous iron from the rat brain by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polikarpov, D. M., E-mail: polikarpov.imp@gmail.com; Cherepanov, V. M.; Gabbasov, R. R. [National Research Centre, ' Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Chuev, M. A.; Mischenko, I. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation); Korshunov, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Higher Nervous Activity and Neurophysiology (Russian Federation); Panchenko, V. Y. [National Research Centre, ' Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15

    Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} based ferrofluid was injected transcranially in the ventricle of the rat brain. At 3 months after the injection the rat was sacrificed and the brain was investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy and histological Perls Prussian blue method. Joint analysis of histological and Moessbauer data confirms that superparamagnetic nanoparticles Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, which constituted about 91 % of the iron of the ferrofluid, were cleared from the brain, while the concomitant chemical compound containing ferric ion in the high-spin state, remains intact.

  16. Whole body X-irradiation and impact of dietary factors on brain and testes of albino rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, S.S.; Chaturvedi, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    The study was undertaken to investigate the radioprotective effect of protein diet on the irradiated brain and testes. The study indicated that the less availability of protein in the diet caused a marked reduction in the protein and nucleic acid (DNA and RNA) contents of brain after irradiation. Further, the protein deficiency in diet brought about an increased deamination of protein in the brain of irradiated rats. It was noted that in response to irradiation the testes of protein deficient diet fed rats got adversely affected as compared to high protein diet fed animals. This paper gives evidence that feeding of protein enriched diet provides protection against ionizing radiation. (orig.) [de

  17. Autoradiographic visualization of insulin-like growth factor-II receptors in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelsohn, L.G.; Kerchner, G.A.; Clemens, J.A.; Smith, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    The documented presence of IGF-II in brain and CSF prompted us to investigate the distribution of receptors for IGF-II in rat brain slices. Human 125 -I-IGF-II (10 pM) was incubated for 16 hrs at 4 0 C with slide-mounted rat brain slices in the absence and presence of unlabeled human IGF-II (67 nM) or human insulin (86 nM). Slides were washed, dried, and exposed to X-ray film for 4-7 days. The results showed dense labeling in the granular layers of the olfactory bulbs, deep layers of the cerebral cortex, pineal gland, anterior pituitary, hippocampus (pyramidal cells CA 1 -CA 2 and dentate gyrus), and the granule cell layers of the cerebellum. Unlabeled IGF-II eliminated most of the binding of these brain regions while insulin produced only a minimal reduction in the amount of 125 I-IGF-II bound. These results indicate that a specific neural receptor for IGS-II is uniquely distributed in rat brain tissue and supports the notion that this peptide might play an important role in normal neuronal functioning

  18. Correlation between subacute sensorimotor deficits and brain water content after surgical brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Devin W; Wang, Yuechun; Sherchan, Prativa; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2015-09-01

    Brain edema is a major contributor to poor outcome and reduced quality of life after surgical brain injury (SBI). Although SBI pathophysiology is well-known, the correlation between cerebral edema and neurological deficits has not been thoroughly examined in the rat model of SBI. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between brain edema and deficits in standard sensorimotor neurobehavior tests for rats subjected to SBI. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or surgical brain injury via partial frontal lobectomy. All animals were tested for neurological deficits 24 post-SBI and fourteen were also tested 72 h after surgery using seven common behavior tests: modified Garcia neuroscore (Neuroscore), beam walking, corner turn test, forelimb placement test, adhesive removal test, beam balance test, and foot fault test. After assessing the functional outcome, animals were euthanized for brain water content measurement. Surgical brain injury resulted in significantly elevated frontal lobe brain water content 24 and 72 h after surgery compared to that of sham animals. In all behavior tests, significance was observed between sham and SBI animals. However, a correlation between brain water content and functional outcome was observed for all tests except Neuroscore. The selection of behavior tests is critical to determine the effectiveness of therapeutics. Based on this study's results, we recommend using beam walking, the corner turn test, the beam balance test, and the foot fault test since correlations with brain water content were observed at both 24 and 72 h post-SBI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Correlation between subacute sensorimotor deficits and brain water content after surgical brain injury in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Devin W.; Wang, Yuechun; Sherchan, Prativa; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Brain edema is a major contributor to poor outcome and reduced quality of life after surgical brain injury (SBI). Although SBI pathophysiology is well-known, the correlation between cerebral edema and neurological deficits has not been thoroughly examined in the rat model of SBI. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between brain edema and deficits in standard sensorimotor neurobehavior tests for rats subjected to SBI. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or surgical brain injury via partial frontal lobectomy. All animals were tested for neurological deficits 24 post-SBI and fourteen were also tested 72 hours after surgery using seven common behavior tests: modified Garcia neuroscore (Neuroscore), beam walking, corner turn test, forelimb placement test, adhesive removal test, beam balance test, and foot fault test. After assessing the functional outcome, animals were euthanized for brain water content measurement. Surgical brain injury resulted in a significantly elevated frontal lobe brain water content 24 and 72 hours after surgery compared to that of sham animals. In all behavior tests, significance was observed between sham and SBI animals. However, a correlation between brain water content and functional outcome was observed for all tests except Neuroscore. The selection of behavior tests is critical to determine the effectiveness of therapeutics. Based on this study’s results, we recommend using beam walking, the corner turn test, the beam balance test, and the foot fault test since correlations with brain water content were observed at both 24 and 72 hours post-SBI. PMID:25975171

  20. Characteristic effects of heavy ion irradiation on the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, X.Z.; Takahashi, S.; Kubota, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Takeda, H.; Zhang, R.; Fukui, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Heavy ion irradiation has the feature to administer a large radiation dose in the vicinity of the endpoint in the beam range, and its irradiation system and biophysical characteristics are different from ordinary irradiation instruments like X- or gamma-rays. Using this special feature, heavy ion irradiation has been applied for cancer treatment. The safety and efficacy of heavy ion irradiator have been demonstrated to a great extent. For instance, brain tumors treated by heavy-ion beams became smaller or disappearance. However, fundamental research related to such clinical phenotypes and their underlying mechanisms are little known. In order to clarify characteristic effects of heavy ion irradiation on the brain, we developed an experimental system for irradiating a restricted region of the rat brain using heavy ion beams. The characteristics of the heavy ion beams, histological, behavioral and elemental changes were studied in the rat following heavy ion irradiation. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, aged 12 weeks and weighing 260-340 g (Shizuoka Laboratory Animal Center, Hamamatsu, Japan) were used. Rats were deeply anesthetized 10-15 minutes before irradiation with ketamine (40 mg/kg) and xylazine (10 mg/kg), immobilized in a specifically designed jig, and irradiated with 290 MeV/nucleon charged carbon beams in a dorsal-to ventral direction, The left cerebral hemispheres of the brain were irradiated at doses of 100 Gy charged carbon particles. The depth-dose distribution of the heavy ion beams was modified to make a spread-out bragg peak of 5 mm wide with a range modulator. The characteristics of the heavy-ion beams (field and depth of the heavy-ion beams) were examined by a measuring paraffin section of rat brain at different thickness. That extensive necrosis was observed between 2.5 mm and 7.5 mm depth from the surface of the rat head, suggesting a relatively high dose and uniform dose was delivered among designed depths and the spread-out bragg peak used here

  1. Protective role of Cynodon dactylon in ameliorating the aluminium-induced neurotoxicity in rat brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumathi, Thangarajan; Shobana, Chandrasekar; Kumari, Balasubramanian Rathina; Nandhini, Devarajulu Nisha

    2011-12-01

    Cynodon dactylon (Poaceae) is a creeping grass used as a traditional ayurvedic medicine in India. Aluminium-induced neurotoxicity is well known and different salts of aluminium have been reported to accelerate damage to biomolecules like lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether the aqueous extract of C. dactylon (AECD) could potentially prevent aluminium-induced neurotoxicity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of the rat brain. Male albino rats were administered with AlCl(3) at a dose of 4.2 mg/kg/day i.p. for 4 weeks. Experimental rats were given C. dactylon extract in two different doses of 300 mg and 750 mg/keg/day orally 1 h prior to the AlCl(3) administration for 4 weeks. At the end of the experiments, antioxidant status and activities of ATPases in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of rat brain were measured. Aluminium administration significantly decreased the level of GSH and the activities of SOD, GPx, GST, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, and Mg(2+) ATPase and increased the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in all the brain regions when compared with control rats. Pre-treatment with AECD at a dose of 750 mg/kg b.w increased the antioxidant status and activities of membrane-bound enzymes (Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and Mg(2+) ATPase) and also decreased the level of LPO significantly, when compared with aluminium-induced rats. The results of this study indicated that AECD has potential to protect the various brain regions from aluminium-induced neurotoxicity.

  2. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of traumatic brain in SD rats model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ke; Li Yangbin; Li Zhiming; Huang Yong; Li Bin; Lu Guangming

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value and prospect of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in early diagnosis of traumatic brain with traumatic brain model in SD rats. Methods: Traumatic brain modal was established in 40 male SD rats utilizing a weigh-drop device, and MRS was performed before trauma and 4,8,24 and 48 hours after trauma. The ratio of N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Ct) and choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) were calculated and compared with pathological findings respectively. Results: Axonal changes were confirmed in microscopic study 4 hours after injury. The ratio of NAA/Ct decreased distinctly at 4 hours after trauma, followed by a steadily recover at 8 hours, and no significant change from 24h to 48h. There was no significant change in the ratio of Cho/Cr before and after trauma. Conclusion: MRS can be used to monitor the metabolic changes of brain non-invasively. MRS could play a positive role in early diagnosis, prognosis and follow-up of traumatic brain. (authors)

  3. Minocycline attenuates brain injury and iron overload after intracerebral hemorrhage in aged female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shuhui; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F; Novakovic, Nemanja; Fei, Zhou; Xi, Guohua

    2018-06-05

    Brain iron overload is involved in brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). There is evidence that systemic administration of minocycline reduces brain iron level and improves neurological outcome in experimental models of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke. However, there is evidence in cerebral ischemia that minocycline is not protective in aged female animals. Since most ICH research has used male models, this study was designed to provide an overall view of ICH-induced iron deposits at different time points (1 to 28 days) in aged (18-month old) female Fischer 344 rat ICH model and to investigate the neuroprotective effects of minocycline in those rats. According to our previous studies, we used the following dosing regimen (20 mg/kg, i.p. at 2 and 12 h after ICH onset followed by 10 mg/kg, i.p., twice a day up to 7 days). T2-, T2 ⁎ -weighted and T2 ⁎ array MRI was performed at 1, 3, 7 and 28 days to measure brain iron content, ventricle volume, lesion volume and brain swelling. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine changes in iron handling proteins, neuronal loss and microglial activation. Behavioral testing was used to assess neurological deficits. In aged female rats, ICH induced long-term perihematomal iron overload with upregulated iron handling proteins, neuroinflammation, brain atrophy, neuronal loss and neurological deficits. Minocycline significantly reduced ICH-induced perihematomal iron overload and iron handling proteins. It further reduced brain swelling, neuroinflammation, neuronal loss, delayed brain atrophy and neurological deficits. These effects may be linked to the role of minocycline as an iron chelator as well as an inhibitor of neuroinflammation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Carnosine supplementation protects rat brain tissue against ethanol-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel Turkcu, Ummuhani; Bilgihan, Ayşe; Biberoglu, Gursel; Mertoglu Caglar, Oznur

    2010-06-01

    Ethanol causes oxidative stress and tissue damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of antioxidant carnosine on the oxidative stress induced by ethanol in the rat brain tissue. Forty male rats were divided equally into four groups as control, carnosine (CAR), ethanol (EtOH), and ethanol plus carnosine (EtOH + CAR). Rats in the control group (n = 10) were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 0.9% saline; EtOH group (n = 10) with 2 g/kg/day ethanol, CAR group (n = 10) received carnosine at a dose of 1 mg/kg/day and EtOH + CAR group (n = 10) received carnosine (orally) and ethanol (i.p.). All animals were sacrificed using ketamine and brain tissues were removed. Malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO) and tissue carnosine levels, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were measured. Endogenous CAR levels in the rat brain tissue specimens were significantly increased in the CAR and EtOH groups when compared to the control animals. MDA and PCO levels in the EtOH group were significantly increased as compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). CAR treatment also decreased MDA levels in the CAR group as compared to the control group. Increased SOD activities were obtained in the EtOH + CAR group as compared to the control (P < 0.05). CAR levels in the rat brain were significantly increased in the CAR, EtOH and CAR + EtOH groups when compared to the control animals. These findings indicated that carnosine may appear as a protective agent against ethanol-induced brain damage.

  5. Brain and behavioral perturbations in rats following Western diet access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, Sara L; Davidson, Terry L; Lee, Tien-Jui; Kinzig, Kimberly P

    2015-10-01

    Energy dense "Western" diets (WD) are known to cause obesity as well as learning and memory impairments, blood-brain barrier damage, and psychological disturbances. Impaired glucose (GLUT1) and monocarboxylate (MCT1) transport may play a role in diet-induced dementia development. In contrast, ketogenic diets (KD) have been shown to be neuroprotective. We assessed the effect of 10, 40 and 90 days WD, KD and Chow maintenance on spontaneous alternation (SA) and vicarious trial and error (VTE) behaviors in male rats, then analyzed blood glucose, insulin, and ketone levels; and hippocampal GLUT1 and MCT1 mRNA. Compared to Chow and KD, rats fed WD had increased 90 day insulin levels. SA was decreased in WD rats at 10, but not 40 or 90 days. VTE was perturbed in WD-fed rats, particularly at 10 and 90 days, indicating hippocampal deficits. WD rats had lower hippocampal GLUT1 and MCT1 expression compared to Chow and KD, and KD rats had increased 90 day MCT1 expression compared to Chow and WD. These data suggest that WD reduces glucose and monocarboxylate transport at the hippocampus, which may result in learning and memory deficits. Further, KD consumption may be useful for MCT1 transporter recovery, which may benefit cognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Correlation Between Subacute Sensorimotor Deficits and Brain Edema in Rats after Surgical Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Devin W; Wang, Yuechun; Adam, Loic; Oudin, Guillaume; Louis, Jean-Sébastien; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    No matter how carefully a neurosurgical procedure is performed, it is intrinsically linked to postoperative deficits resulting in delayed healing caused by direct trauma, hemorrhage, and brain edema, termed surgical brain injury (SBI). Cerebral edema occurs several hours after SBI and is a major contributor to patient morbidity, resulting in increased postoperative care. Currently, the correlation between functional recovery and brain edema after SBI remains unknown. Here we examine the correlation between neurological function and brain water content in rats 42 h after SBI. SBI was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats via frontal lobectomy. Twenty-four hours post-ictus animals were subjected to four neurobehavior tests: composite Garcia neuroscore, beam walking test, corner turn test, and beam balance test. Animals were then sacrificed for right-frontal brain water content measurement via the wet-dry method. Right-frontal lobe brain water content was found to significantly correlate with neurobehavioral deficits in the corner turn and beam balance tests: the number of left turns (percentage of total turns) for the corner turn test and distance traveled for the beam balance test were both inversely proportional with brain water content. No correlation was observed for the composite Garcia neuroscore or the beam walking test.

  7. Localization of Brain Natriuretic Peptide Immunoreactivity in Rat Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam M Abdelalim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP exerts its functions through natriuretic peptide receptors. Recently, BNP has been shown to be involved in a wide range of functions. Previous studies reported BNP expression in the sensory afferent fibers in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. However, BNP expression and function in the neurons of the central nervous system are still controversial. Therefore, in this study, we investigated BNP expression in the rat spinal cord in detail using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. RT-PCR analysis showed that BNP mRNA was present in the spinal cord and DRG. BNP immunoreactivity was observed in different structures of the spinal cord, including the neuronal cell bodies and neuronal processes. BNP immunoreactivity was observed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and in the neurons of the intermediate column and ventral horn. Double-immunolabeling showed a high level of BNP expression in the afferent fibers (laminae I-II labeled with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, suggesting BNP involvement in sensory function. In addition, BNP was co-localized with CGRP and choline acetyltransferase in the motor neurons of the ventral horn. Together, these results indicate that BNP is expressed in sensory and motor systems of the spinal cord, suggesting its involvement in several biological actions on sensory and motor neurons via its binding to NPR-A and/or NPR-B in the DRG and spinal cord.

  8. Identification of rat brain opioid (enkephalin) receptor by photoaffinity labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeung, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    A photoreactive, radioactive enkephalin derivative was prepared and purified by high performance liquid chromatography. Rat brain and spinal cord plasma membranes were incubated with this radioiodinated photoprobe and were subsequently photolysed. Autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the solubilized and reduced membranes showed that a protein having an apparent molecular weight of 46,000 daltons was specifically labeled, suggesting that this protein may be the opioid (enkephalin) receptor

  9. Binding of tritiated corticosterone in brain sections of adrenalectomized rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrieau, A.; Vial, M.; Dussaillant, M.; Rostene, W.; Philibert, P.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique which permits to study the specific binding of tritiated corticosterone in brain sections of adrenalectomized rats is described. Under these conditions, the specific binding of the glucocorticoid represents 60 to 70% of the initial binding. The apparent dissociation constant and the number of binding sites, determined by Scatchard analysis, are in the range of 10 -8 M and 100 fmoles/mg of protein respectively [fr

  10. Neuron-astrocyte interactions, pyruvate carboxylation and the pentose phosphate pathway in the neonatal rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morken, Tora Sund; Brekke, Eva; Håberg, Asta; Widerøe, Marius; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Glucose and acetate metabolism and the synthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters, anaplerosis, glutamate-glutamine cycling and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) have been extensively investigated in the adult, but not the neonatal rat brain. To do this, 7 day postnatal (P7) rats were injected with [1-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]acetate and sacrificed 5, 10, 15, 30 and 45 min later. Adult rats were injected and sacrificed after 15 min. To analyse pyruvate carboxylation and PPP activity during development, P7 rats received [1,2-(13)C]glucose and were sacrificed 30 min later. Brain extracts were analysed using (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Numerous differences in metabolism were found between the neonatal and adult brain. The neonatal brain contained lower levels of glutamate, aspartate and N-acetylaspartate but similar levels of GABA and glutamine per mg tissue. Metabolism of [1-(13)C]glucose at the acetyl CoA stage was reduced much more than that of [1,2-(13)C]acetate. The transfer of glutamate from neurons to astrocytes was much lower while transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to glutamatergic neurons was relatively higher. However, transport of glutamine from astrocytes to GABAergic neurons was lower. Using [1,2-(13)C]glucose it could be shown that despite much lower pyruvate carboxylation, relatively more pyruvate from glycolysis was directed towards anaplerosis than pyruvate dehydrogenation in astrocytes. Moreover, the ratio of PPP/glucose-metabolism was higher. These findings indicate that only the part of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that transfers glutamine from astrocytes to neurons is operating in the neonatal brain and that compared to adults, relatively more glucose is prioritised to PPP and pyruvate carboxylation. Our results may have implications for the capacity to protect the neonatal brain against excitotoxicity and oxidative stress.

  11. Developmental vitamin D deficiency alters multiple neurotransmitter systems in the neonatal rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesby, James P; Turner, Karly M; Alexander, Suzanne; Eyles, Darryl W; McGrath, John J; Burne, Thomas H J

    2017-11-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that developmental vitamin D (DVD) deficiency is a risk factor for neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. DVD deficiency in rats is associated with altered brain structure and adult behaviours indicating alterations in dopamine and glutamate signalling. Developmental alterations in dopamine neurotransmission have also been observed in DVD-deficient rats but a comprehensive assessment of brain neurochemistry has not been undertaken. Thus, the current study determined the regional concentrations of dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin, glutamine, glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and associated metabolites, in DVD-deficient neonates. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a vitamin D deficient diet or control diet six weeks prior to mating until birth and housed under UVB-free lighting conditions. Neurotransmitter concentration was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography on post-mortem neonatal brain tissue. Ubiquitous reductions in the levels of glutamine (12-24%) were observed in DVD-deficient neonates compared with control neonates. Similarly, in multiple brain regions DVD-deficient neonates had increased levels of noradrenaline and serine compared with control neonates. In contrast, increased levels of dopamine and decreased levels of serotonin in DVD-deficient neonates were limited to striatal subregions compared with controls. Our results confirm that DVD deficiency leads to changes in multiple neurotransmitter systems in the neonate brain. Importantly, this regionally-based assessment in DVD-deficient neonates identified both widespread neurotransmitter changes (glutamine/noradrenaline) and regionally selective neurotransmitter changes (dopamine/serotonin). Thus, vitamin D may have both general and local actions depending on the neurotransmitter system being investigated. Taken together, these data suggest that DVD deficiency alters neurotransmitter systems relevant to schizophrenia in the developing rat

  12. Impairments of learning and memory in the rats after brain irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, Nobuhiko

    2002-01-01

    Clinical trials of hadrontherapy have been carried out world wide at several facilities including National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Cerebral dysfunction is one of the major concerns associated with radiotherapy of brain tumors. However, little is known about the neurochemical basis of brain dysfunction induced by proton irradiation. We investigated and reported here the early consequences of brain damages caused by proton beam. The animals that had memorized the location of the standard position were locally irradiated to brain with either 70 MeV protons or 290 MeV carbon ions. At 24 hr after irradiation, impairment of the long-term memory was not observed in the irradiated rats compared to control. Irradiated animals, however, required substantially longer time finding out the standard position than control rats when the standard platform displaced to a position different from memorized position. This follows that a single doses of 30 Gy, either protons or carbon ions, impairs the working memory of animals. Function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was analyzed by an in vivo binding assay using radioligand quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB). Irradiated rats were intravenously injected with 5.5 MBq of 3 H-QNB 24 hr after the irradiation, and decapitated 60 min after tracer injection. The autoradiographic studies showed an transitional increase of 3 H-QNB in vivo binding in the early phase after proton irradiation, even though no change in in-vitro 3 H-QNB binding was see in brain autoradiograms of irradiated rats. The cerebral blood flow and the histrogical features of brain were also changed at 3 months post-irradiation. These results indicate that the memory impairment caused by radiation is closely related to the early change of acetylcholine receptor in vivo. (author)

  13. Impairments of learning and memory in the rats after brain irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takai, Nobuhiko [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Clinical trials of hadrontherapy have been carried out world wide at several facilities including National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Cerebral dysfunction is one of the major concerns associated with radiotherapy of brain tumors. However, little is known about the neurochemical basis of brain dysfunction induced by proton irradiation. We investigated and reported here the early consequences of brain damages caused by proton beam. The animals that had memorized the location of the standard position were locally irradiated to brain with either 70 MeV protons or 290 MeV carbon ions. At 24 hr after irradiation, impairment of the long-term memory was not observed in the irradiated rats compared to control. Irradiated animals, however, required substantially longer time finding out the standard position than control rats when the standard platform displaced to a position different from memorized position. This follows that a single doses of 30 Gy, either protons or carbon ions, impairs the working memory of animals. Function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was analyzed by an in vivo binding assay using radioligand quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB). Irradiated rats were intravenously injected with 5.5 MBq of {sup 3}H-QNB 24 hr after the irradiation, and decapitated 60 min after tracer injection. The autoradiographic studies showed an transitional increase of {sup 3}H-QNB in vivo binding in the early phase after proton irradiation, even though no change in in-vitro {sup 3}H-QNB binding was see in brain autoradiograms of irradiated rats. The cerebral blood flow and the histrogical features of brain were also changed at 3 months post-irradiation. These results indicate that the memory impairment caused by radiation is closely related to the early change of acetylcholine receptor in vivo. (author)

  14. Estrone is neuroprotective in rats after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatson, Joshua W; Liu, Ming-Mei; Abdelfattah, Kareem; Wigginton, Jane G; Smith, Scott; Wolf, Steven; Simpkins, James W; Minei, Joseph P

    2012-08-10

    In various animal and human studies, early administration of 17β-estradiol, a strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic agent, significantly decreases the severity of injury in the brain associated with cell death. Estrone, the predominant estrogen in postmenopausal women, has been shown to be a promising neuroprotective agent. The overall goal of this project was to determine if estrone mitigates secondary injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats. Male rats were given either placebo (corn oil) or estrone (0.5 mg/kg) at 30 min after severe TBI. Using a controlled cortical impact device in rats that underwent a craniotomy, the right parietal cortex was injured using the impactor tip. Non-injured control and sham animals were also included. At 72 h following injury, the animals were perfused intracardially with 0.9% saline followed by 10% phosphate-buffered formalin. The whole brain was removed, sliced, and stained for TUNEL-positive cells. Estrone decreased cortical lesion volume (pcerebral cortical levels of TUNEL-positive staining (pprotective pathways such as the ERK1/2 and BDNF pathways, decreases ischemic secondary injury, and decreases apoptotic-mediated cell death. These results suggest that estrone may afford protection to those suffering from TBI.

  15. Chronic Antipsychotic Treatment in the Rat – Effects on Brain Interleukin-8 and Kynurenic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus K. Larsson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is associated with activation of the brain immune system as reflected by increased brain levels of kynurenic acid (KYNA and proinflammatory cytokines. Although antipsychotic drugs have been used for decades in the treatment of the disease, potential effects of these drugs on brain immune signaling are not fully known. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of chronic treatment with antipsychotic drugs on brain levels of cytokines and KYNA. Rats were treated daily by intraperitoneally administered haloperidol (1.5 mg/kg, n = 6, olanzapine (2 mg/kg, n = 6, and clozapine (20 mg/kg, n = 6 or saline ( n = 6 for 30 days. Clozapine, but not haloperidol or olanzapine-treated rats displayed significantly lower cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of interleukin-8 compared to controls. Whole brain levels of KYNA were not changed in any group. Our data suggest that the superior therapeutic effect of clozapine may be a result of its presently shown immunosuppressive action. Further, our data do not support the possibility that elevated brain KYNA found in patients with schizophrenia is a result of antipsychotic treatment.

  16. Edaravone attenuates neuronal apoptosis in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage rat model via suppression of TRAIL signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyi; Mo, Zhihuai; Lei, Junjie; Li, Huiqing; Fu, Ruying; Huang, Yanxia; Luo, Shijian; Zhang, Lei

    2018-06-01

    Edaravone is a new type of oxygen free radical scavenger and able to attenuate various brain damage including hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD). This study was aimed at investigating the neuroprotective mechanism of edaravone in rat hypoxic-ischemic brain damage model and its correlation with tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) signaling pathway. 75 seven-day-old Sprague-Dawley neonatal rats were equally divided into three groups: sham-operated group (sham), HIBD group and HIBD rats injected with edaravone (HIBD + EDA) group. Neurological severity and space cognitive ability of rats in each group were evaluated using Longa neurological severity score and Morris water maze testing. TUNEL assay and flow cytometry were used to determine brain cell apoptosis. Western blot was used to estimate the expression level of death receptor-5 (DR5), Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD), caspase 8, B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax). In addition, immunofluorescence was performed to detect caspase 3. Edaravone reduced neurofunctional damage caused by HIBD and improved the cognitive capability of rats. The above experiment results suggested that edaravone could down-regulate the expression of active caspase 3 protein, thereby relieving neuronal apoptosis. Taken together, edaravone could attenuate neuronal apoptosis in rat hypoxic-ischemic brain damage model via suppression of TRAIL signaling pathway, which also suggested that edaravone might be an effective therapeutic strategy for HIBD clinical treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of prenatal antimicrobial treatment on fetal brain damage due to autogenous fecal peritonitis in Wistar rats: A Histomorphometric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neylane Gadelha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate brain neuronal density in newborn rats whose mothers were subjected to fecal peritonitis and compare findings between rats born to mothers treated and not treated with antimicrobials. Methods: Peritonitis was induced with a 10% fecal suspension (4mL/kg in 2 pregnant rats. Of these, 1 received antimicrobial treatment 24 hours after peritonitis induction: moxifloxacin and dexamethasone plus 2 mL of the inner bark of the Schinus terebinthifolius raddi extract. One pregnant rat underwent no intervention and served as a control. Results: The newborn brains of rats born to mothers with fecal peritonitis were significantly smaller and of less firm consistency. Brain neuronal density was lower in the untreated group than in the control and treated groups (P<0.01. Conclusions: Untreated peritonitis caused brain damage in the offspring, which was averted by effective early antimicrobial treatment. This approach may provide an early avenue for translation of such therapy in humans. Keywords: peritonitis, brain injuries, rats

  18. Long-term BPA infusions. Evaluation in the rat brain tumor and rat spinal cord models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coderre, J.A.; Micca, P.L.; Nawrocky, M.M.; Joel, D.D.; Morris, G.M.

    2000-01-01

    In the BPA-based dose escalation clinical trial, the observations of tumor recurrence in areas of extremely high calculated tumor doses suggest that the BPA distribution is non-uniform. Longer (6-hour) i.v. infusions of BPA are evaluated in the rat brain tumor and spinal cord models to address the questions of whether long-term infusions are more effective against the tumor and whether long-term infusions are detrimental in the central nervous system. In the rat spinal cord, the 50% effective doses (ED 50 ) for myeloparesis were not significantly different after a single i.p. injection of BPA-fructose or a 6 hour i.v. infusion. In the rat 9L gliosarcoma brain tumor model, BNCT following 2-hr or 6-hr infusions of BPA-F produced similar levels of long term survival. (author)

  19. Estrogen restores brain insulin sensitivity in ovariectomized non-obese rats, but not in ovariectomized obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2014-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that obesity caused the reduction of peripheral and brain insulin sensitivity and that estrogen therapy improved these defects. However, the beneficial effect of estrogen on brain insulin sensitivity and oxidative stress in either ovariectomy alone or ovariectomy with obesity models has not been determined. We hypothesized that ovariectomy alone or ovariectomy with obesity reduces brain insulin sensitivity and increases brain oxidative stress, which are reversed by estrogen treatment. Thirty female rats were assigned as either sham-operated or ovariectomized. After the surgery, each group was fed either a normal diet or high-fat diet for 12 weeks. At week 13, rats in each group received either the vehicle or estradiol for 30 days. At week 16, blood and brain were collected for determining the peripheral and brain insulin sensitivity as well as brain oxidative stress. We found that ovariectomized rats and high-fat diet fed rats incurred obesity, reduced peripheral and brain insulin sensitivity, and increased brain oxidative stress. Estrogen ameliorated peripheral insulin sensitivity in these rats. However, the beneficial effect of estrogen on brain insulin sensitivity and brain oxidative stress was observed only in ovariectomized normal diet-fed rats, but not in ovariectomized high fat diet-fed rats. Our results suggested that reduced brain insulin sensitivity and increased brain oxidative stress occurred after either ovariectomy or obesity. However, the reduced brain insulin sensitivity and the increased brain oxidative stress in ovariectomy with obesity could not be ameliorated by estrogen treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigating the ''social brain'' through Williams syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamine, Masanori; Mimura, Masaru; Reiss, A.L.; Hoeft, F.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in social cognitive neuroscience have led to the concept of the ''social brain''. The social brain includes neural processes specialized for processing social information necessary for the recognition of self and others, and interpersonal relationships. Because of its unique behavioral phenotypic features which includes 'hypersociability', Williams syndrome has gained popularity among social cognitive neuroscientists. Individuals with Williams syndrome share the same genetic risk factor for cognitive-behavioral dysfunction utilizing brain imaging to elucidate endophenotype provides us with an unprecendented opportunity to study gene, brain and behavior relationships especially those related to social cognition. In this review, we provide an overview of neuroimaging studies on social cognition in Williams syndrome and discuss the neural basis of the social brain. (author)

  1. Thymoquinone attenuates brain injury via an antioxidative pathway in a status epilepticus rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Yi-ye

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus (SE results in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which contribute to seizure-induced brain injury. It is well known that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in status epilepticus (SE. Thymoquinone (TQ is a bioactive monomer extracted from black cumin (Nigella sativa seed oil that has anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and antioxidant activity in various diseases. This study evaluated the protective effects of TQ on brain injury in a lithium-pilocarpine rat model of SE and investigated the underlying mechanism related to antioxidative pathway.

  2. Increased transfer of 45Ca into brain and cerebrospinal fluid from plasma during chronic hypocalcemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, V A; Rapoport, S I

    1988-06-28

    Recent studies have shown regulation of central nervous system [Ca] after chronic hypo- and hypercalcemia. To investigate the mechanism of this regulation, 3-week-old rats were fed diets for 8 weeks that contained low or normal levels of Ca. Plasma [Ca] was 40% less in rats fed the low Ca diet than in animals fed normal diet. Unidirectional transfer coefficients for Ca (KCa) and Cl (KCl) into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain were determined from the 10 min uptake of intravenously injected 45Ca and 36Cl in awake animals. KCa for CSF was 68% greater in low-Ca rats than in normal rats. Likewise, the values of KCa for brain regions with areas adjacent to the ventricles like the hippocampus and pons-medulla were 50% higher than in normal animals. On the other hand, KCas for parietal cortex, a brain region distant from the choroid plexus and not expected to be influenced by Ca entry into CSF, were similar between the groups. Comparison of the regional ratios of KCa/KCl revealed that a selective increase of Ca transport occurred into CSF and all brain regions except the parietal cortex in Ca-deficient rats. The results suggest that Ca homeostasis of CSF and brain [Ca] during chronic hypocalcemia is due to increased transfer of Ca from blood to brain, and that the regulation occurs via the CSF, possibly at the choroid plexus, but not via the cerebral capillaries.

  3. Marrow stromal cells administrated intracisternally to rats after traumatic brain injury migrate into the brain and improve neurological function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡德志; 周良辅; 朱剑虹

    2004-01-01

    @@ Marrow stromal cells(MSCs) have been reported to transplant into injured brain via intravenous or intraarterial or direct intracerebral administration.1-3 In the present study, we observed that MSCs migrated into the brain, survived and diffeneriated into neural cells after they were injected into the cisterna magna of rats, and that the behavior of the rats after traumatic brain injury (TBI) was improved.

  4. Fusogenic properties of Sendai virosome envelopes in rat brain preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, C M; Bryant, S O; Notabartolo, D; Wu, P; Meyer, E M

    1993-10-01

    Sendai virosomes were characterized with respect to their ability to bind to, fuse with, and introduce substances into several rat brain preparations. Encapsulation efficiency for Sendai virosomes was enhanced but binding to cerebral cortical P2 preparations was attenuated by addition of bovine brain phosphatidylcholine during reconstitution. A higher percentage of Sendai virosomes than phosphatidylcholine liposomes appeared to bind to, fuse with and subsequently deliver [14C]sucrose into osmotically labile pools of the P2 preparation. Fusogenic activity was estimated by measuring dequenching of fluorescently labelled N-NBD-phosphatidylethanolamine. More virosomally encapsulated [14C]sucrose was bound to the P2 fraction than introduced into osmotically labile organelles, and the fraction of vesicles undergoing fusion was intermediate between these two values. Non-encapsulated [14C]sucrose did not bind to and was not taken up by the P2 fraction in a quantifiable manner. Virosomal envelopes also bound to primary cultures of rat brain neurons and glia in an apparently saturable manner. Addition of increasing amounts of the adenoassociated virus-derived vector pJDT95 increased encapsulation efficiency, and virosomes reconstituted in the presence of 60 micrograms DNA retained most of their binding activity (5.4% of total label) compared to those containing [14C]sucrose alone (8.4%). These data indicate that Sendai virosomes may be useful in the delivery of substances into brain-derived tissues, potentially for the modulation of gene expression and neurotransmission.

  5. Effects of acupuncture on tissue oxygenation of the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G S; Erdmann, W

    1978-04-01

    Acupuncture has been claimed to be effective in restoring consciousness in some comatose patients. Possible mechanisms to explain alleged acupuncture-induced arousal may include vasodilatory effects caused by smypathetic stimulation which leads to an augmentation of cerebral microcirculation and thereby improves oxygen supply to the brain tissue. Experiments were performed in ten albino rats (Wistar) employing PO2 microelectrodes which were inserted into the cortex through small burholes. Brain tissue PO2 was continuously recorded before, during, and after acupuncture. Stimulation of certain acupuncture points (Go-26) resulted in immediate increase of PO2 in the frontal cortex of the rat brain. This effect was reproducible and was comparable to that obtained with increase of inspiratory CO2 known to induce arterial vasodilatation and thus capillary perfusion pressure. The effect was more significant as compared to tissue PO2 increases obtained after increase in inspiratory oxygen concentration from 21% to 100%. It appears that acupuncture causes increased brain tissue perfusion which may be, at least in part, responsible for arousal of unconscious patients.

  6. [Effect of leptin on long-term spatial memory of rats with white matter damage in developing brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Er-Cui; Jiang, Li

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the neuroprotective effect of leptin by observing its effect on spatial memory of rats with white matter damage in developing brain. A total of 80 neonatal rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: sham-operation (n=27), model (n=27) and leptin intervention (n=27). The rats in the model and leptin intervention groups were used to prepare a model of white matter damage in developing brain, and the rats in the leptin intervention group were given leptin (100 μg/kg) diluted with normal saline immediately after modelling for 4 consecutive days. The survival rate of the rats was observed and the change in body weight was monitored. When the rats reached the age of 21 days, the Morris water maze test was used to evaluate spatial memory. There was no significant difference in the survival rate of rats between the three groups (P>0.05). Within 10 days after birth, the leptin intervention group had similar body weight as the sham-operation group and significantly lower body weight than the model group (P0.05). The results of place navigation showed that from the second day of experiment, there was a significant difference in the latency period between the three groups (Pmemory impairment of rats with white matter damage in developing brain. It thus exerts a neuroprotective effect, and is worthy of further research.

  7. Multidimensional MRI-CT atlas of the naked mole-rat brain (Heterocephalus glaber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Fumiko; Hikishima, Keigo; Nambu, Sanae; Okanoya, Kazuo; Okano, Hirotaka J; Sasaki, Erika; Miura, Kyoko; Okano, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    Naked mole-rats have a variety of distinctive features such as the organization of a hierarchical society (known as eusociality), extraordinary longevity, and cancer resistance; thus, it would be worthwhile investigating these animals in detail. One important task is the preparation of a brain atlas database that provide comprehensive information containing multidimensional data with various image contrasts, which can be achievable using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Advanced MRI techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which generates high contrast images of fiber structures, can characterize unique morphological properties in addition to conventional MRI. To obtain high spatial resolution images, MR histology, DTI, and X-ray computed tomography were performed on the fixed adult brain. Skull and brain structures were segmented as well as reconstructed in stereotaxic coordinates. Data were also acquired for the neonatal brain to allow developmental changes to be observed. Moreover, in vivo imaging of naked mole-rats was established as an evaluation tool of live animals. The data obtained comprised three-dimensional (3D) images with high tissue contrast as well as stereotaxic coordinates. Developmental differences in the visual system were highlighted in particular by DTI. Although it was difficult to delineate optic nerves in the mature adult brain, parts of them could be distinguished in the immature neonatal brain. From observation of cortical thickness, possibility of high somatosensory system development replaced to the visual system was indicated. 3D visualization of brain structures in the atlas as well as the establishment of in vivo imaging would promote neuroimaging researches towards detection of novel characteristics of eusocial naked mole-rats.

  8. Multidimensional MRI-CT atlas of the naked mole-rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko eSeki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Naked mole-rats have a variety of distinctive features such as the organisation of a hierarchical society (known as eusociality, extraordinary longevity, and cancer resistance; thus, it would be worthwhile investigating these animals in detail. One important task is the preparation of a brain atlas database that provide comprehensive information containing multidimensional data with various image contrasts, which can be achievable using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Advanced MRI techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, which generates high contrast images of fibre structures, can characterise unique morphological properties in addition to conventional MRI. To obtain high spatial resolution images, MR histology, DTI, and X-ray computed tomography (CT were performed on the fixed adult brain. Skull and brain structures were segmented as well as reconstructed in stereotaxic coordinates. Data were also acquired for the neonatal brain to allow developmental changes to be observed. Moreover, in vivo imaging of naked mole-rats was established as an evaluation tool of live animals. The data obtained comprised three-dimensional (3D images with high tissue contrast as well as stereotaxic coordinates. Developmental differences in the visual system were highlighted in particular by DTI. Although it was difficult to delineate optic nerves in the mature adult brain, parts of them could be distinguished in the immature neonatal brain. From observation of cortical thickness, possibility of high somatosensory system development replaced to the visual system was indicated. 3D visualisation of brain structures in the atlas as well as the establishment of in vivo imaging would promote neuroimaging researches towards detection of novel characteristics of eusocial naked mole-rats.

  9. Influence of histidine on zinc transport into rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Atsushi; Suzuki, Mai; Okada, Shoji; Oku, Naoto [Shizuoka Univ. (Japan). School of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    2000-06-01

    The brain of rats injected intravenously with {sup 65}Zn-His or {sup 65}ZnCl{sub 2} was subjected to autoradiography to study the role of histidine on zinc transport into the brain. One hour after injection, the radioactivity from {sup 65}Zn-His was largely concentrated in the choroid plexus in the ventricles. Six days after injection, the radioactivity from {sup 65}Zn-His was relatively concentrated in the hippocampal CA3 and dentate gyrus and the amygdala. The relative distribution of {sup 65}Zn-His in the brain was similar to that of {sup 65}ZnCl{sub 2} group at both 1 h and 6 days, suggesting that histidine may participate in zinc uptake in the brain. On the other hand, the clearance of the {sup 65}Zn-His group from the blood was higher than that of the {sup 65}ZnCl{sub 2} group. Brain uptake of the former was lower than that of the latter both 1 h and 6 days after injection. These results suggest that zinc uptake in the brain is influenced by histidine levels in the bloodstream. (author)

  10. Influence of histidine on zinc transport into rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Atsushi; Suzuki, Mai; Okada, Shoji; Oku, Naoto

    2000-01-01

    The brain of rats injected intravenously with 65 Zn-His or 65 ZnCl 2 was subjected to autoradiography to study the role of histidine on zinc transport into the brain. One hour after injection, the radioactivity from 65 Zn-His was largely concentrated in the choroid plexus in the ventricles. Six days after injection, the radioactivity from 65 Zn-His was relatively concentrated in the hippocampal CA3 and dentate gyrus and the amygdala. The relative distribution of 65 Zn-His in the brain was similar to that of 65 ZnCl 2 group at both 1 h and 6 days, suggesting that histidine may participate in zinc uptake in the brain. On the other hand, the clearance of the 65 Zn-His group from the blood was higher than that of the 65 ZnCl 2 group. Brain uptake of the former was lower than that of the latter both 1 h and 6 days after injection. These results suggest that zinc uptake in the brain is influenced by histidine levels in the bloodstream. (author)

  11. Diallyl tetrasulfide improves cadmium induced alterations of acetylcholinesterase, ATPases and oxidative stress in brain of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pari, Leelavinothan; Murugavel, Ponnusamy

    2007-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a neurotoxic metal, which induces oxidative stress and membrane disturbances in nerve system. The garlic compound diallyl tetrasulfide (DTS) has the cytoprotective and antioxidant activity against Cd induced toxicity. The present study was carried out to investigate the efficacy of DTS in protecting the Cd induced changes in the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), membrane bound enzymes, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and antioxidant status in the brain of rats. In rats exposed to Cd (3 mg/kg/day subcutaneously) for 3 weeks, a significant (P + K + -ATPase, Mg 2+ -ATPase and Ca 2+ -ATPase) were observed in brain tissue. Oral administration of DTS (40 mg/kg/day) with Cd significantly (P < 0.05) diminished the levels of LPO and protein carbonyls and significantly (P < 0.05) increased the activities of ATPases, antioxidant enzymes, GSH and TSH in brain. These results indicate that DTS attenuate the LPO and alteration of antioxidant and membrane bound enzymes in Cd exposed rats, which suggest that DTS protects the brain function from toxic effects of Cd

  12. Distribution of kappa opioid receptors in the brain of young and old male rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggi, R.; Limonta, P.; Dondi, D.; Martini, L.; Piva, F.

    1989-01-01

    The experiments to be described have been designed in order to: (a) provide new information on the concentrations of opioid kappa receptors in different regions of the brain of the male rats; and (b) to analyze whether the density of brain kappa receptors might be modified by the process of aging. The concentration of kappa receptors was investigated in the hypothalamus, amygdala, mesencephalon, corpus striatum, hippocampus, thalamus, frontal poles, anterior and posterior cortex collected from male rats of 2 and 19 months of age. 3 H-bremazocine (BRZ) was used as the ligand of kappa receptors, after protection of mu and delta receptors respectively with dihydromorphine and d-ala-d-leu-enkephalin. The results obtained show that: (1) in young male rats, the number of kappa opioid receptors is different in the various brain areas examined. (2) Aging exerts little influence on the number of kappa receptors in the majority of the brain structures considered. However in the amygdala and in the thalamus the number of kappa receptors was increased in old animals

  13. Effects of Biotin Deficiency on Biotinylated Proteins and Biotin-Related Genes in the Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Masahiro; Aoyama, Yuki; Shimada, Ryoko; Sawamura, Hiromi; Ebara, Shuhei; Negoro, Munetaka; Fukui, Toru; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that functions as a cofactor for biotin-dependent carboxylases. The biochemical and physiological roles of biotin in brain regions have not yet been investigated sufficiently in vivo. Thus, in order to clarify the function of biotin in the brain, we herein examined biotin contents, biotinylated protein expression (e.g. holocarboxylases), and biotin-related gene expression in the brain of biotin-deficient rats. Three-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into a control group, biotin-deficient group, and pair-fed group. Rats were fed experimental diets from 3 wk old for 8 wk, and the cortex, hippocampus, striatum, hypothalamus, and cerebellum were then collected. In the biotin-deficient group, the maintenance of total biotin and holocarboxylases, increases in the bound form of biotin and biotinidase activity, and the expression of an unknown biotinylated protein were observed in the cortex. In other regions, total and free biotin contents decreased, holocarboxylase expression was maintained, and bound biotin and biotinidase activity remained unchanged. Biotin-related gene (pyruvate carboxylase, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter, holocarboxylase synthetase, and biotinidase) expression in the cortex and hippocampus also remained unchanged among the dietary groups. These results suggest that biotin may be related to cortex functions by binding protein, and the effects of a biotin deficiency and the importance of biotin differ among the different brain regions.

  14. The effect of infectious brain edema on NMDA receptor binding in rat's brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Guansheng; Chen Jianfang; Chen Xiang

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: The effect of the infectious brain edema (IBE) induced by Bordetella Pertussis (BP) on the specific binding of 3 H MK-801 in rat's brain in vivo was determined. METHODS: BP was injected via left internal carotid artery in rat model of infectious brain edema. Male SD rats were divided into three groups: 1) Group control (NS, n = 11); 2) Group IBF (BP, n = 12); 3) Group pretreatment of MK-801 + PB (MK-801, n = 4). Normal saline or BP 0.2 ml/kg was injected into left internal carotid artery in NS and BP group respectively. MK-801 0.5 mg/kg per day was injected i.p. two days before injection of BP in group MK-801. Rats were killed by decapitation at 24 hours after injection of BP. The specific binding of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor were measured with 3 H-MK-801 in the neuronal membrane of cerebral cortex. The Scatchard plots were performed. RESULTS: The B max values were 0.623 +- 0.082 and 0.606 +- 0.087 pmol/mg protein in group NS and BP respectively (t = 0.48, P>0.05). The Kd values were 43.1 +- 4.2 and 30.5 +- 3.0 nmol/L in group NS and BP respectively (t = 7.8, P<0.05). The specific binding of NMDA receptor was decreased by pretreatment of MK-801. CONCLUSIONS: The total number of NMDA receptor had not changed, whereas its affinity increased significantly in the model of brain edema induced by pertussis bacilli in rat. The increase of affinity of NMDA receptor can be blockaded by MK-801 pretreatment in vivo

  15. Glucocorticoids Protect Neonatal Rat Brain in Model of Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Harding

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE resulting from asphyxia in the peripartum period is the most common cause of neonatal brain damage and can result in significant neurologic sequelae, including cerebral palsy. Currently therapeutic hypothermia is the only accepted treatment in addition to supportive care for infants with HIE, however, many additional neuroprotective therapies have been investigated. Of these, glucocorticoids have previously been shown to have neuroprotective effects. HIE is also frequently compounded by infectious inflammatory processes (sepsis and as such, the infants may be more amenable to treatment with an anti-inflammatory agent. Thus, the present study investigated dexamethasone and hydrocortisone treatment given after hypoxic-ischemic (HI insult in neonatal rats via intracerebroventricular (ICV injection and intranasal administration. In addition, we examined the effects of hydrocortisone treatment in HIE after lipopolysaccharide (LPS sensitization in a model of HIE and sepsis. We found that dexamethasone significantly reduced rat brain infarction size when given after HI treatment via ICV injection; however it did not demonstrate any neuroprotective effects when given intranasally. Hydrocortisone after HI insult also significantly reduced brain infarction size when given via ICV injection; and the intranasal administration showed to be protective of brain injury in male rats at a dose of 300 µg. LPS sensitization did significantly increase the brain infarction size compared to controls, and hydrocortisone treatment after LPS sensitization showed a significant decrease in brain infarction size when given via ICV injection, as well as intranasal administration in both genders at a dose of 300 µg. To conclude, these results show that glucocorticoids have significant neuroprotective effects when given after HI injury and that these effects may be even more pronounced when given in circumstances of additional

  16. Global Proteomic Analysis of Brain Tissues in Transient Ischemia Brain Damage in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiann-Hwa Chen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia-reperfusion injury resulting from arterial occlusion or hypotension in patients leads to tissue hypoxia with glucose deprivation, which causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and neuronal death. A proteomic approach was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins in the brain of rats following a global ischemic stroke. The mechanisms involved the action in apoptotic and ER stress pathways. Rats were treated with ischemia-reperfusion brain injuries by the bilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery. The cortical neuron proteins from the stroke animal model (SAM and the control rats were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE to purify and identify the protein profiles. Our results demonstrated that the SAM rats experienced brain cell death in the ischemic core. Fifteen proteins were expressed differentially between the SAM rats and control rats, which were assayed and validated in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, the set of differentially expressed, down-regulated proteins included catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT and cathepsin D (CATD, which are implicated in oxidative stress, inflammatory response and apoptosis. After an ischemic stroke, one protein spot, namely the calretinin (CALB2 protein, showed increased expression. It mediated the effects of SAM administration on the apoptotic and ER stress pathways. Our results demonstrate that the ischemic injury of neuronal cells increased cell cytoxicity and apoptosis, which were accompanied by sustained activation of the IRE1-alpha/TRAF2, JNK1/2, and p38 MAPK pathways. Proteomic analysis suggested that the differential expression of CALB2 during a global ischemic stroke could be involved in the mechanisms of ER stress-induced neuronal cell apoptosis, which occurred via IRE1-alpha/TRAF2 complex formation, with activation of JNK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Based on these results, we also provide the molecular evidence supporting the ischemia

  17. Effect of sildenafil citrate (Viagra®) on trace element concentration in serum and brain of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayed, Abdel-Hasseb A; Gad, Shereen B

    2011-12-01

    As a vasodilator with good hemodynamic effects, sildenafil has been successfully used in the treatment of patients with pulmonary hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. By selectively inhibiting phosphodiestrase type 5 (PDE-5) and thus effectively reducing the breakdown of c GMP, sildenafil administration can markedly improve the erectile dysfunction. Sildenafil also elevates localized cerebral blood flow in rat brain. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of sildenafil on the level of trace elements (Zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), selenium (Se), cobalt (Co), and chromium (Cr)) in blood and brain of rats. Sixteen male albino rats weighing 180-200 g were divided into two groups (8 rats/group). Sildenafil (Viagra, Pfizer Inc.) was dissolved in saline and administered at a dose of 10mg/kg i.p. (0.5 ml volume) to rats in the treated group every 72 h for 12 injections. Rats in the control group were administered the same volume of saline as in treated group. All rats were sacrificed 24h after the last injection. Blood samples were collected and serum was separated and stored at -20°C. Brains were dissected and stored frozen until analysis. Trace elements concentrations were determined by flame emission atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results showed that sildenafil injection significantly (P<0.05) increased serum and brain Se and Cu concentrations. Moreover, sildenafil increased the Cr concentration in the brain tissue. It was concluded that sildenafil citrate administration increased serum Se and Cu as well as, increased brain Se, Cu, and Cr concentrations in rats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Electroacupuncture improves neurobehavioral function and brain injury in rat model of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan; Deng, Li; Tang, Huajun; Gao, Xiaoqing; Wang, Youhua; Guo, Kan; Kong, Jiming; Yang, Chaoxian

    2017-05-01

    Acupuncture has been widely used as a treatment for stroke in China for a long time. Recently, studies have demonstrated that electroacupuncture (EA) can accelerate intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)-induced angiogenesis in rats. In the present study, we investigated the effect of EA on neurobehavioral function and brain injury in ICH rats. ICH was induced by stereotactic injection of collagenase type I and heparin into the right caudate putamen. Adult ICH rats were randomly divided into the following three groups: model control group (MC), EA at non-acupoint points group (non-acupoint EA) and EA at Baihui and Dazhui acupoints group (EA). The neurobehavioral deficits of ICH rats were assessed by modified neurological severity score (mNSS) and gait analysis. The hemorrhage volume and glucose metabolism of hemorrhagic foci were detected by PET/CT. The expression levels of MBP, NSE and S100-B proteins in serum were tested by ELISA. The histopathological features were examined by haematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining. Apoptosis-associated proteins in the perihematomal region were observed by immunohistochemistry. EA treatment significantly promoted the recovery of neurobehavioral function in ICH rats. Hemorrhage volume reduced in EA group at day 14 when compared with MC and non-acupoint EA groups. ELISA showed that the levels of MBP, NSE and S100-B in serum were all down-regulated by EA treatment. The brain tissue of ICH rat in the EA group was more intact and compact than that in the MC and non-acupoint groups. In the perihematomal regions, the expression of Bcl-2 protein increased and expressions of Caspase-3 and Bax proteins decreased in the EA group vs MC and non-acupoint EA groups. Our data suggest that EA treatment can improve neurobehavioral function and brain injury, which were likely connected with the absorption of hematoma and regulation of apoptosis-related proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of tetrahydrocannabinol on glucose uptake in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miederer, I; Uebbing, K; Röhrich, J; Maus, S; Bausbacher, N; Krauter, K; Weyer-Elberich, V; Lutz, B; Schreckenberger, M; Urban, R

    2017-05-01

    Δ 9 -Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the psychoactive component of the plant Cannabis sativa and acts as a partial agonist at cannabinoid type 1 and type 2 receptors in the brain. The goal of this study was to assess the effect of THC on the cerebral glucose uptake in the rat brain. 21 male Sprague Dawley rats (12-13 w) were examined and received five different doses of THC ranging from 0.01 to 1 mg/kg. For data acquisition a Focus 120 small animal PET scanner was used and 24.1-28.0 MBq of [ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose were injected. The data were acquired for 70 min and arterial blood samples were collected throughout the scan. THC, THC-OH and THC-COOH were determined at 55 min p.i. Nine volumes of interest were defined, and the cerebral glucose uptake was calculated for each brain region. Low blood THC levels of glucose uptake (6-30 %), particularly in the hypothalamus (p = 0.007), while blood THC levels > 10 ng/ml (injected dose: ≥ 0.05 mg/kg) coincided with a decreased glucose uptake (-2 to -22 %), especially in the cerebellar cortex (p = 0.008). The effective concentration in this region was estimated 2.4 ng/ml. This glucose PET study showed that stimulation of CB1 receptors by THC affects the glucose uptake in the rat brain, whereby the effect of THC is regionally different and dependent on dose - an effect that may be of relevance in behavioural studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of different commercial fat sources on brain, liver and blood lipid profiles of rats in growth phase

    OpenAIRE

    Angelis-Pereira, Michel Cardoso de; Barcelos, Maria de Fátima Píccolo; Pereira, Juciane de Abreu Ribeiro; Pereira, Rafaela Corrêa; Souza, Raimundo Vicente de

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To investigate the fatty acid content of different fat sources and evaluate the effect of them on plasma and hepatic lipids and on the fatty acid profile of the brain tissue of Wistar rats. Methods: Thirty male albino Wistar rats received for 59 days, the following diets: diet added of margarine with low content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA); diet added of margarine with high content of PUFA; diet added of butter; diet added of hydrogenated vegetable fat; diet ad...

  1. Measurement of tritiated norepinephrine metabolism in intact rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitt, M.; Kowalik, S.; Barkai, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    A procedure for the study of NE metabolism in the intact rat brain is described. The method involves ventriculocisternal perfusion of the adult male rat with artificial CSF containing [ 3 H]NE. Radioactivity in the perfusate associated with NE and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxymandelic acid (DOMA), 3,4-dihydroxphenylethyleneglycol (DHPG), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxymandelic acid (VMA), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol (MHPG), and normetanephrine (NMN) is separated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). After 80 min the radioactivity in the perfusate reaches an apparent steady-state. Analysis of the steady-state samples shows higher activity in the fractions corresponding to DHPG and MHPG than in those corresponding to DOMA and VMA, confirming glycol formation as the major pathway of NE metabolism in rat brain. Pretreatment with an MAO inhibitor (tranylcypromine) results in a marked decrease in the deaminated metabolites DHPG and MHPG and a concurrent increase in NMN. The results indicate this to be a sensitive procedure for the in vivo determination of changes in NE metabolism. (Auth.)

  2. Antioxidant effect of sericin in brain and peripheral tissues of oxidative stress induced hypercholesterolemic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meetali Deori

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the antioxidant effect of crude sericin extract (CSE from Antheraea assamenisis (Aa in high cholesterol fed rats. Investigation was conducted by administering graded oral dose of 0.25 and 0.5 gm/kg body weight (b.w./day of CSE for a period of 28 days. Experiments were conducted in 30 rats and were divided into five groups: normal control (NC, high cholesterol fed (HCF, HCF + 0.065 gm/kg b.w./day fenofibrate (FF, HCF + sericin 0.25 gm/kg b.w./day (LSD and HCF + sericin 0.5 gm/kg b.w./day (HSD. In brain, heart, liver, serum and kidney homogenates nitric oxide (NO, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, protein carbonyl content (PCC, superoxide dismutase (SOD, reduced glutathione (GSH was measured. LSD treatment prevented the alterations in GSH and PCC levels in hypercholesterolemic (HyC brain tissue homogenates of rats. CSE lowers the serum total cholesterol level in HyC rats by promoting fecal cholesterol (FC excretion. CSE increases FC level by promoting inhibition of cholesterol absorption in intestine. The endogenous antioxidant reduced significantly and the oxidative stress (OS marker TBARS level increases significantly in the peripheral tissue of HCF rats. However, the administration of LSD and HSD exhibited a good antioxidant activity by reducing the TBARS level and increasing the endogenous antioxidant in peripheral tissue. In addition, a histological examination revealed loss of normal liver and kidney architecture in cholesterol fed rats which were retained in sericin treated groups. The findings of this study suggested that CSE improves hypercholesterolemia in rats fed a HyC diet. Clinical relevance of this effect of CSE seems worthy of further studies.

  3. A Vegetable, Launaea taraxacifolia, Mitigated Mercuric Chloride Alteration of the Microanatomy of Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoeye, Olatunde; Arinola, Ganiyu O

    2017-11-02

    Mercuric chloride is an environmental pollutant that affects the nervous systems of mammals. Oxidative damage is one of the mechanisms of its toxicity, and antioxidants should mitigate this effect. A vegetable with antioxidant activity is Launaea taraxacifolia, whose ethanolic extract (EELT) was investigated in this experiment to determine its effect against mercuric chloride (MC) intoxication in rat brain. Thirty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into five groups (n = 6) as follows: control; propylene glycol; EELT (400 mg/kg bwt) for 19 days; MC (HgCl 2 ) (4 mg/bwt) for 5 days from day 15 of the experiment; EELT+ MC, EELT (400 mg/kg bwt) for 14 days + MC (4 mg/bwt) for 5 days from day 15 of the experiment. All treatments were administered orally by gastric gavage. Behavioral tests were conducted on the 20th day, and rats were euthanized the same day. Blood and brain tissue were examined with regard to microanatomical parameters. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance with statistical significance set at p cerebral cortex, dentate gyrus, cornu ammonis 3, and cerebellum of rats. Treatment with EELT prior to MC administration significantly reduced the effect of MC on the hematological, behavioral, and ameliorated histological alterations of the brain. These findings may be attributed partially to the antioxidant property of EELT, which demonstrated protective effects against MC-induced behavioral parameters and alteration of microanatomy of rats' cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. In conclusion, EELT may be a valuable agent for further investigation in the prevention of acute neuropathy caused by inorganic mercury intoxication.

  4. Restraint stress-induced morphological changes at the blood-brain barrier in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra eSántha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is well known to contribute to the development of both neurological and psychiatric diseases. While the role of the blood-brain barrier is increasingly recognised in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier has been linked to stress-related psychiatric diseases only recently. In the present study the effects of restraint stress with different duration (1, 3 and 21 days were investigated on the morphology of the blood-brain barrier in male adult Wistar rats. Frontal cortex and hippocampus sections were immunostained for markers of brain endothelial cells (claudin-5, occludin and glucose transporter-1 and astroglia (GFAP. Staining pattern and intensity were visualized by confocal microscopy and evaluated by several types of image analysis. The ultrastructure of brain capillaries was investigated by electron microscopy. Morphological changes and intensity alterations in brain endothelial tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin were induced by stress. Following restraint stress significant increases in the fluorescence intensity of glucose transporter-1 were detected in brain endothelial cells in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Significant reductions in GFAP fluorescence intensity were observed in the frontal cortex in all stress groups. As observed by electron microscopy, one-day acute stress induced morphological changes indicating damage in capillary endothelial cells in both brain regions. After 21 days of stress thicker and irregular capillary basal membranes in the hippocampus and edema in astrocytes in both regions were seen. These findings indicate that stress exerts time-dependent changes in the staining pattern of tight junction proteins occludin, claudin-5 and glucose transporter-1 at the level of brain capillaries and in the ultrastructure of brain endothelial cells and astroglial endfeet, which may contribute to neurodegenerative processes

  5. Quantitative determination of deoxyribonucleic acid in rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, N. W.; Suwalski, R.

    1969-01-01

    1. A procedure is given for spectrophotometric analysis of rat brain DNA after its resolution into component bases. Amounts of tissue in the range 50–100mg. can be used. 2. The amount of DNA obtained by the present method is 80% greater than that reported for rat brain by a previous procedure specific for DNA thymine. Identity of the material is established by the base ratios of purines and pyrimidines. The features responsible for the higher yield are the presence of dioxan during alkaline hydrolysis of tissue, the determination of the optimum concentration of potassium hydroxide in this step and omission of organic washes of the initial acid-precipitated residues. 3. The requirement for dioxan during alkaline hydrolysis suggests a possible association of brain DNA with lipid. The concentration of potassium hydroxide that gives maximum yield is 0·1m, indicating that there may be internucleotide linkages in this DNA that are more sensitive to alkali than those of liver or thymus DNA. 4. This procedure gives low yields of DNA from liver. It is not suitable for analysis of the DNA from this tissue. PMID:5353529

  6. Neuroglobin in the rat brain: localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Allen, Gregg C; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2008-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a neuronal hemeprotein similar to myoglobin and hemoglobin and shares their capability for oxygen binding. It has thus been proposed that Ngb acts as an oxygen reservoir or combats reactive oxygen species. In the present study, we investigated the Ngb expression pattern in th...

  7. Effects of lanthanum exposure on elemental distribution in rat brains measured by synchrotron radiation XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Liuxing; Xiao Haiqing; He Xiao; Liu Nianqing; Zhao Yuliang; Chai Zhifang; Zhang Zhiyong

    2005-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) comprise a coherent series of 15 elements from lanthanum to lutetium and possessing very similar chemical properties. In recent decades, with the rapid increase of the exploitation of REE resources and their applications to modern industry and daily life, particularly to agriculture as fertilizer additives in China, more and more REEs are coming into environmental system as well as food chain through various ways. It has become increasingly important to obtain more information on the physiological function of REEs and their long-term biological effects on body of living beings. Epidemiological investigations found that the intelligence quotients (IQ) of children from the REE-high background regions are obviously different from that of the normal region. This indicated that REEs probably affect the function of brain. However, the mechanism is totally unknown. The contents and distributions of major and trace elements are sometimes good indicators of the physiological and pathological conditions of human and animal brains In this study, the effects of subchronic lanthanum exposure on the elemental distribution in the rat brains were studied. Wistar rats were exposed to lanthanum chloride through oral administration at O, 0.1, 2, and 40-mg/kg doses for 6 months. The elements such as Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, and Zn in brain slices were identified by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis. Differences in two-dimensional maps of elemental distribution were noticed. Cl, Ca, and Zn were primarily concentrated in hippocampus of the controls. With the increase of the lanthanum dosage, the Ca and Zn levels were significantly decreased, while the Cu levels were significantly elevated in cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Our results suggest that subchronic lanthanum exposure in rats appears to change elemental distribution in brain. The impact of lanthanides on brain function is not negligible.

  8. Effects of insulin combined with idebenone on blood-brain barrier permeability in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-Na; Liu, Li-Bo; Xue, Yi-Xue; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the effect of insulin combined with idebenone on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in experimental streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats as well as the underlying mechanisms. With a diabetic rat model, we show that insulin and idebenone normalize body weight and water intake and restore BBB permeability and that their combination displays a synergistic effect. The results from transmission electron microscopy show that the combination of insulin and idebenone significantly closed the tight junction (TJ) in diabetic rats. The results from Western blotting in diabetic rats show that the upregulation of TJ-associated proteins occludin, and zonula occludens (ZO)-1 caused by the combination of insulin and idebenone is more remarkable than that with either agent alone. In addition, the activations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and the expression levels of receptors for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were significantly decreased after treatment with insulin and idebenone in diabetic rats. These results suggest that the combination of insulin and idebenone could decrease the BBB permeability in diabetic rats by upregulating the expression of occludin, claudin-5, and ZO-1 and that the ROS/AGE/RAGE/NF-κB signal pathway might be involved in the process. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Myelin basic protein in brains of rats with low dose lead encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundstroem, R; Karlsson, B

    1987-02-01

    In the present study control rats and lead exposed rats which did not have any retardation of growth were examined by radioimmunological assay of myelin basic protein (MBP) of homogenates of cerebrum and cerebellum at 30, 60 and 120 days of age. Lead was administered on postnatal days 1-15 by daily intraperitoneal injections of 10 mg lead nitrate/kg body weight. This lead dose results in light microscopically discernible hemorrhagic encephalopathy in the cerebellum of 15-day old rats, but does not induce growth retardation. The controls were injected with vehicle only. The amount of lead in the blood and brain homogenates of lead-exposed and control rats 15-200 days old was estimated by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Significant differences between the lead-exposed and control rats were not found in the cerebral or cerebellar content of MBP. Considering the results of previous investigations, the findings do not exclude a hypo-myelinating effect of lead, but they suggest that exposure to lead without concomitant malnutrition does not cause hypo-myelination in the cerebrum and cerebellum of the developing rat.

  10. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen on lipid peroxidation and visual development in neonatal rats with hypoxia-ischemia brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Chen, Yan-Hui; Lv, Hong-Yan; Chen, Li-Ting

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) on lipid peroxidation and visual development in a neonatal rat model of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD). The rat models of HIBD were established by delayed uterus dissection and were divided randomly into two groups (10 rats each): HIBD and HBO-treated HIBD (HIBD+HBO) group. Another 20 rats that underwent sham-surgery were also divided randomly into the HBO-treated and control groups. The rats that underwent HBO treatment received HBO (0.02 MPa, 1 h/day) 24 h after the surgery and this continued for 14 days. When rats were 4 weeks old, their flash visual evoked potentials (F-VEPs) were monitored and the ultrastructures of the hippocampus were observed under transmission electron microscope. The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malonyldialdehyde (MDA) in the brain tissue homogenate were detected by xanthine oxidase and the thiobarbituric acid colorimetric method. Compared with the control group, the ultrastructures of the pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA3 area were distorted, the latencies of F-VEPs were prolonged (P0.05). HBO enhances antioxidant capacity and reduces the ultrastructural damage induced by hypoxic-ischemia, which may improve synaptic reconstruction and alleviate immature brain damage to promote the habilitation of brain function.

  11. Hyperthyroidism differentially regulates neuropeptide S system in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Carmen R; Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B; Martínez-Sánchez, Noelia; Gómez-Díaz, Consuelo; Lage, Ricardo; Varela, Luis; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; Castaño, Justo P; López, Miguel

    2012-04-23

    Thyroid hormones play an important role in the regulation of energy balance, sleep and emotional behaviors. Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a recently discovered neuropeptide, regulating feeding, sleep and anxiety. Here, we examined the effect of hyperthyroidism on the gene and protein expression of neuropeptide S and its receptor (NPS-R) in the hypothalamus, brainstem and amygdala of rats. Our results showed that the expression of NPS and NPS-R was differentially modulated by hyperthyroidism in the rat brain. NPS and NPS-R mRNA and protein levels were decreased in the hypothalamus of hyperthyroid rats. Conversely NPS-R expression was highly increased in the brainstem and NPS and NPS-R expression were unchanged in the amygdala of these rats. These data suggest that changes in anxiety and food intake patterns observed in hyperthyroidism could be associated with changes in the expression of NPS and NPS-R. Thus, the NPS/NPS-R system may be involved in several hyperthyroidism-associated comorbidities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Early VEGF inhibition attenuates blood-brain barrier disruption in ischemic rat brains by regulating the expression of MMPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Ping; Gao, Yi; Li, Chen-Long; Wang, Hong-Jun; Chen, Ling-Chao; Feng, Yan; Li, Rui-Yan; Li, Yong-Li; Jiang, Chuan-Lu

    2017-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition has been demonstrated to be an effective strategy in preserving the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Loss of the BBB is the key event associated with morbidity and mortality in these patients. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the present study, the effects of VEGF inhibition and the possible mechanism that underlies acute cerebral ischemia in rats was investigated. Following the induction of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion for a 90‑min period, either an anti‑VEGF neutralizing antibody (RB‑222; 5 or 10 µg), or IgG (control), was administered by intracerebroventricular injection at 1 h following reperfusion. Functional outcomes, BBB leakage, brain edema, microvessel numbers and the relative protein levels of VEGF, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, occludin and collagen-IV were then determined using neurological assessments, Evans Blue staining, brain water content, CD31 staining and western blotting. Treatment with RB‑222 at a dose of 5 and 10 µg significantly improved neurological functional outcomes and diminished infarct size, BBB leakage and brain edema compared with the MCAO and IgG groups at 24 h following reperfusion; 10 µg RB‑222 was more effective than a 5 µg dose of the antibody. In addition, RB‑222 reduced the number of immature microvessels, which subsequently attenuated BBB permeability. RB‑222 significantly repressed VEGF expression as well as decreased MMP‑2 and MMP‑9 expression. However, it enhanced occludin and collagen‑IV levels in the ischemic rat brain compared with the MCAO and IgG groups. Taken together, the results indicate that early inhibition of VEGF may have significant potential against cerebral ischemia, partly by regulating the expression of MMPs.

  13. The effects of voluntary, involuntary, and forced exercises on brain-derived neurotrophic factor and motor function recovery: a rat brain ischemia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Ke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stroke rehabilitation with different exercise paradigms has been investigated, but which one is more effective in facilitating motor recovery and up-regulating brain neurotrophic factor (BDNF after brain ischemia would be interesting to clinicians and patients. Voluntary exercise, forced exercise, and involuntary muscle movement caused by functional electrical stimulation (FES have been individually demonstrated effective as stroke rehabilitation intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of these three common interventions on brain BDNF changes and motor recovery levels using a rat ischemic stroke model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: One hundred and seventeen Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly distributed into four groups: Control (Con, Voluntary exercise of wheel running (V-Ex, Forced exercise of treadmill running (F-Ex, and Involuntary exercise of FES (I-Ex with implanted electrodes placed in two hind limb muscles on the affected side to mimic gait-like walking pattern during stimulation. Ischemic stroke was induced in all rats with the middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion model and fifty-seven rats had motor deficits after stroke. Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, rats were arranged to their intervention programs. De Ryck's behavioral test was conducted daily during the 7-day intervention as an evaluation tool of motor recovery. Serum corticosterone concentration and BDNF levels in the hippocampus, striatum, and cortex were measured after the rats were sacrificed. V-Ex had significantly better motor recovery in the behavioral test. V-Ex also had significantly higher hippocampal BDNF concentration than F-Ex and Con. F-Ex had significantly higher serum corticosterone level than other groups. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Voluntary exercise is the most effective intervention in upregulating the hippocampal BDNF level, and facilitating motor recovery. Rats that exercised voluntarily also showed less

  14. Corvitin restores metallothionein and glial fibrillary acidic protein levels in rat brain affected by pituitrin-izadrin

    OpenAIRE

    H. N. Shiyntum; O. O. Dovban; Y. P. Kovalchuk; T. Ya. Yaroshenko2; G. A. Ushakova1

    2017-01-01

    In this research, we investigated the effect of pituitrin-izadrin induced injury on the levels of metallothionein (MT) and soluble and filament forms of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the hippocampus, cerebellum, thalamus, and the cerebral cortex, and examined the effect of corvitin on the brain under the noted changes. Our results showed oppositely directed changes – a decrease in the level of MT and an increase in GFAP in the rat brain, with a tendency to astrogliosis development...

  15. Neuroprotective effect of Cucumis melo Var. flexuosus leaf extract on the brains of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Doaa S

    2017-02-01

    The central nervous system is one of the most vulnerable organs affected by the oxidative stress associated with diabetes mellitus. Healthy food provides an important source for antioxidants. Therefore, the protective effect of Cucumis melo var. flexuosus (C. melo var. flexuosus) leaf extract on the brains of diabetic rats was investigated. Adult male albino rats divided into 5 groups of 6 rats each were assigned into a normal control group and four diabetic groups. Diabetes was induced in rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 60 mg/kg bw). One of the four diabetic groups was left untreated and was considered as a diabetic control group while the three other groups were treated with C. melo var. flexuosus leaf extract at the doses of 30, 60 and 120 mg/kg bw for a period of 30 days. After completion of experimental duration plasma and brains were used for evaluating biochemical changes. The obtained data showed that C. melo var. flexuosus leaf extract treatment lowered blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin, brain tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin levels, brain malondialdehyde content and caspase-3 activity. Furthermore, the treatment resulted in a marked increase in plasma dopamine, melatonin, brain vascular endothelial growth factor-A levels, brain catalase and superoxide dismutase activities. From the present study, it can be concluded that the C. melo var. flexuosus leaf extract exerts a neuroprotective effect against oxidative damage associated with diabetes.

  16. The Effect of 2.45 GHz Microwave Radiation on Brain Cell Apoptosis in Sprague Dawley Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Saffiey Wan Abdullah; Rozaimah Abdul Rahim; Zulkifli Yusof

    2016-01-01

    Microwave radiation is a part of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiations present in the environment and is now being perceived as health risks. The study was performed to investigate the effect of 2.45 GHz microwave radiation on brain cell apoptosis in Sprague Dawley rat. In the research done, 32 Sprague Dawley rat were used and divided into four groups; control group, G1 (1 month exposure), G2 (2 months exposure) and G3 (3 months exposure). The presence of apoptotic activity in control group was compared molecularly with exposed group through DNA ladder test. Each exposed group were irradiated in GTEM cell at frequency of 2.45 GHz located at RF/ MW laboratory. There was presence of necrotic instead of apoptotic activity in brain cell and increase in weight of Sprague Dawley rat. Therefore the effect of 2.45GHz microwave radiation shown no presence of apoptosis and increase in weight of Sprague Dawley rat. (author)

  17. The in vivo phosphorylation sites of rat brain dynamin I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, Mark E; Anggono, Victor; Bache, Nicolai

    2007-01-01

    -824). To resolve the discrepancy and to better understand the biological roles of dynI phosphorylation, we undertook a systematic identification of all phosphorylation sites in rat brain nerve terminal dynI. Using phosphoamino acid analysis, exclusively phospho-serine residues were found. Thr(780) phosphorylation...... of their relative abundance and relative responses to depolarization. The multiple phospho-sites suggest subtle regulation of synaptic vesicle endocytosis by new protein kinases and new protein-protein interactions. The homologous dynI and dynIII phosphorylation indicates a high mechanistic similarity. The results...

  18. Regional distribution of enkephalinase in rat brain by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waksman, G.; Hamel, E.; Besselievre, R.; Fournie-Zaluski, M.C.; Roques, B.P.; Bouboutou, R.

    1984-01-01

    The first visualization of enkephalinase (neutral metalloendopeptidase, E.C.3.4.24.11) in rat brain was obtained by autoradiography, using a new tritiated inhibitor: [ 3 H]N-[(R, S) 3-(N-hydroxy) carboxamido-2-benzyl propanoyl]-glycine ( 3 H-HCBP-Gly). The preliminary analysis of sections clearly showed a discrete localization of enkephalinase in enkephalin enriched regions, such as caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus, and substantia nigra. Moreover 3 H-HCBP-Gly binding also occured in choroid plexus and spinal cord [fr

  19. Neuronal Rat Brain Damage Caused by Endogenous and Exogenous Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Aydın

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hyperthermia may induce pathologic alterations within body systems and organs including brain. In this study, neuronal effects of endogenous and exogenous hyperthermia (41°C were studied in rats. METHODS: The endogenous hyperthermia (41°C was induced by lipopolysaccharide and the exogenous by an (electric heater. Possible neuronal damage was evaluated by examining healthy, apoptotic and necrotic cells, and heat shock proteins (HSP 27, HSP 70 in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hypothalamus RESULTS: At cellular level, when all neuronal tissues are taken into account; (i a significant increase in the necrotic cells was observed in the both groups (p0.05. CONCLUSION: The neural tissue of brain can show different degree of response to hyperthermia. But we can conclude that endogenous hyperthermia is more harmful to central nervous system than exogenous hyperthermia

  20. Brain plasticity of rats exposed to prenatal immobilization stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badalyan B. Yu.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This histochemical and immunohistochemical study was aimed at examining the brain cellular structures of newborn rats exposed to prenatal immobilization (IMO stress. Methods. Histochemical method on detection of Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity and ABC immunohistochemical technique. Results. Cell structures with radial astrocytes marker GFAP, neuroepithelial stem cell marker gene nestin, stem-cells marker and the hypothalamic neuroprotective proline-rich polypeptide PRP-1 (Galarmin, a natural cytokine of a common precursor to neurophysin vasopressin associated glycoprotein have been revealed in several brain regions. Conclusions. Our findings indicate the process of generation of new neurons in response to IMO and PRP-1 involvement in this recovery mechanism, as PRP-1-Ir was detected in the above mentioned cell structures, as well as in the neurons and nerve fibers.

  1. Effect of cadmium exposure on lipids, lipid peroxidation and metal distribution in rat brain regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, T; Ali, M M; Chandra, S V

    1985-01-01

    Effect of cadmium treatment on brain lipids, lipid peroxidation and distribution of Zn, Cu and Fe in rat brain regions was investigated. Adult male rats were exposed to Cd (100 ppm Cd as cadmium acetate) in drinking water for 30 days. The Cd exposure resulted in a significant decrease in the phospholipid content and an increase in the lipid peroxidation in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. The total lipid content was not affected in any of the regions but a significant decrease in cholesterol and cerebroside contents were observed only in the cerebral cortex. A positive correlation between the increase in lipid peroxidation and decrease in the phospholipid content in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum was observed. A maximum accumulation of Cd occurred in the cerebral cortex. The Cu and Fe contents were significantly increased but the Zn levels decreased in the Cd-treated rats in all but the midbrain region. Results suggest that the increased peroxidation decomposition of structural lipids and the altered distribution of the essential trace metals in brain may play a significant role in Cd-induced neurotoxicity. 27 references, 2 tables.

  2. Acute administration of fenproporex increased acetylcholinesterase activity in brain of young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorak, Brena P; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Scaini, Giselli; Wessler, Letícia B; Heylmann, Alexandra S; Deroza, Pedro; Valvassori, Samira S; Zugno, Alexandra I; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2015-08-01

    Fenproporex is the second most commonly amphetamine-based anorectic consumed worldwide; this drug is rapidly converted into amphetamine, in vivo, and acts by increasing dopamine levels in the synaptic cleft. Considering that fenproporex effects on the central nervous system are still poorly known and that acetylcholinesterase is a regulatory enzyme which is involved in cholinergic synapses and may indirectly modulate the release of dopamine, the present study investigated the effects of acute administration of fenproporex on acetylcholinesterase activity in brain of young rats. Young male Wistar rats received a single injection of fenproporex (6.25, 12.5 or 25mg/kg i.p.) or vehicle (2% Tween 80). Two hours after the injection, the rats were killed by decapitation and the brain was removed for evaluation of acetylcholinesterase activity. Results showed that fenproporex administration increased acetylcholinesterase activity in the hippocampus and posterior cortex, whereas in the prefrontal cortex, striatum and cerebellum the enzyme activity was not altered. In conclusion, in the present study we demonstrated that acute administration of fenproporex exerts an effect in the cholinergic system causing an increase in the activity of acetylcholinesterase in a dose-dependent manner in the hippocampus and posterior cortex. Thus, we suggest that the imbalance in cholinergic homeostasis could be considered as an important pathophysiological mechanism underlying the brain damage observed in patients who use amphetamines such as fenproporex.

  3. Acute administration of fenproporex increased acetylcholinesterase activity in brain of young rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRENA P. TEODORAK

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fenproporex is the second most commonly amphetamine-based anorectic consumed worldwide; this drug is rapidly converted into amphetamine, in vivo, and acts by increasing dopamine levels in the synaptic cleft. Considering that fenproporex effects on the central nervous system are still poorly known and that acetylcholinesterase is a regulatory enzyme which is involved in cholinergic synapses and may indirectly modulate the release of dopamine, the present study investigated the effects of acute administration of fenproporex on acetylcholinesterase activity in brain of young rats. Young male Wistar rats received a single injection of fenproporex (6.25, 12.5 or 25mg/kg i.p. or vehicle (2% Tween 80. Two hours after the injection, the rats were killed by decapitation and the brain was removed for evaluation of acetylcholinesterase activity. Results showed that fenproporex administration increased acetylcholinesterase activity in the hippocampus and posterior cortex, whereas in the prefrontal cortex, striatum and cerebellum the enzyme activity was not altered. In conclusion, in the present study we demonstrated that acute administration of fenproporex exerts an effect in the cholinergic system causing an increase in the activity of acetylcholinesterase in a dose-dependent manner in the hippocampus and posterior cortex. Thus, we suggest that the imbalance in cholinergic homeostasis could be considered as an important pathophysiological mechanism underlying the brain damage observed in patients who use amphetamines such as fenproporex.

  4. The effect of astaxanthin on the aging rat brain: gender-related differences in modulating inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balietti, Marta; Giannubilo, Stefano R; Giorgetti, Belinda; Solazzi, Moreno; Turi, Angelo; Casoli, Tiziana; Ciavattini, Andrea; Fattorettia, Patrizia

    2016-01-30

    Astaxanthin (Ax) is a ketocarotenoid of the xanthophyll family with activities such as antioxidation, preservation of the integrity of cell membranes and protection of the redox state and functional integrity of mitochondria. The aim of this study was to investigate potential gender-related differences in the effect of Ax on the aging rat brain. In females, interleukin 1 beta (IL1β) was significantly lower in treated rats in both cerebral areas, and in the cerebellum, treated animals also had significantly higher IL10. In males, no differences were found in the cerebellum, but in the hippocampus, IL1β and IL10 were significantly higher in treated rats. These are the first results to show gender-related differences in the effect of Ax on the aging brain, emphasizing the necessity to carefully analyze female and male peculiarities when the anti-aging potentialities of this ketocarotenoid are evaluated. The observations lead to the hypothesis that Ax exerts different anti-inflammatory effects in female and male brains. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. The expression changes of inflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus following whole-brain irradiation in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu De; Tian Ye; Ding Weijun; Zhu Yaqun; Liu Chunfeng

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the change pattern of some inflammatory cytokines in brain tissue at the acute phase after brain irradiated. The whole brain of SD rats was irradiated by the single dose of 2, 15 or 30 Gy of 4 MeV electron beam. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used for the measurement of IL-1 β, IL-6, and TNF-α content in hippocampus tissue of rats at 1h, 6h, 12h, 1d, 2 and 1 week post-irradiation. The mRNA of IL-1 β, IL-6, and TNF-α were detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in the same experimental groups. It was analyzed about the influence of dosage and post-irradiation duration with the cytokines expression. Compared with both the normal control and the anesthetized with chloral hydrate but sham-irradiation groups, there were no difference about the three inflammatory cytokines expression in rats with 2 Gy irradiated. At 6h after irradiation with 15 Gy, 6 and 12h with 30 Gy groups, the content of IL-1β and TNF-α in hippocampus tissue were significantly increased, and were returned to normal level after 12 to 24h. The same change tendency of their mRNA relational level was observed in 15 and 30 Gy groups, but it happened earlier in 1h after exposure. Although the content of IL-6 in hippocampus kept stable in all the groups, its mRNA level raised obviously in 12h group. After 15-30 Gy whole-brain irradiation, the expression of some inflammatory cytokines increased abruptly in the hippocampus of SD rat within 1 day, but the interplay between inflammatory cytokines changes and the pathogenesis of radiation injury was incompletely understood at present. (authors)

  6. DNA microarray unravels rapid changes in transcriptome of MK-801 treated rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Kulikova, Sofya P; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Pinault, Didier; Masuo, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of MK-801 on gene expression patterns genome wide in rat brain regions. METHODS: Rats were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of MK-801 [0.08 (low-dose) and 0.16 (high-dose) mg/kg] or NaCl (vehicle control). In a first series of experiment, the frontoparietal electrocorticogram was recorded 15 min before and 60 min after injection. In a second series of experiments, the whole brain of each animal was rapidly removed at 40 min post-injection, and different regions were separated: amygdala, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, midbrain and ventral striatum on ice followed by DNA microarray (4 × 44 K whole rat genome chip) analysis. RESULTS: Spectral analysis revealed that a single systemic injection of MK-801 significantly and selectively augmented the power of baseline gamma frequency (30-80 Hz) oscillations in the frontoparietal electroencephalogram. DNA microarray analysis showed the largest number (up- and down- regulations) of gene expressions in the cerebral cortex (378), midbrain (376), hippocampus (375), ventral striatum (353), amygdala (301), and hypothalamus (201) under low-dose (0.08 mg/kg) of MK-801. Under high-dose (0.16 mg/kg), ventral striatum (811) showed the largest number of gene expression changes. Gene expression changes were functionally categorized to reveal expression of genes and function varies with each brain region. CONCLUSION: Acute MK-801 treatment increases synchrony of baseline gamma oscillations, and causes very early changes in gene expressions in six individual rat brain regions, a first report. PMID:26629322

  7. Effects of different endocrine disruptor (EDC) mixtures on gene expression in neonatal rat brain regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichtensteiger, Walter; Bassetti-Gaille, Catherine; Faass, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Sexual brain differentiation is a potential EDC target. It depends on a combination of estrogen receptor- and androgen receptor-mediated effects in males and on estrogens in females. It is not known how these processes are affected by real-world mixtures of EDCs. We investigated the effect of three...... EDC mixtures on gene expression in developing brain. Amix (8 anti-androgenic chemicals), Emix (4 estrogenic chemicals) and Tmix (Amix + Emix + paracetamol recently identified as anti-androgenic) were administered by oral gavage to rat dams from gestational day 7 until weaning, at doses corresponding...... to 450×, 200× and 100× high end human intakes (S. Christiansen et al., 2012. International Journal of Andrology 35, 303). At postnatal day 6, during the last part of sexual brain differentiation, exon microarray analyses were performed in medial preoptic area (MPO) in the highest dose group, and real...

  8. Effect of glycyrrhizin on traumatic brain injury in rats and its mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Xiangjin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To investigate the neuroprotective effects of glycyrrhizin (Gly as well as its effect on expression of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 in rats after traumatic brain injury (TBI. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham group, TBI group, and TBI+Gly group (n=36 per group. Rat TBI model was made by using the modified Feeney’s method. In TBI+Gly group, Gly was administered intravenously at a dosage of 10 mg/kg 30 min after TBI. At 24 h after TBI, motor function and brain water content were evaluated. Meanwhile, HMGB1/HMGB1 receptors including toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE/nuclear factor- κB(NF- κB signaling pathway and inflammatory cytokines in the injured brain tissues were detected using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blot, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Furthermore, HMGB1, RAGE and TLR4 immunohistochemistry and apoptosis were analyzed. Results: Beam walking performance impairment and brain edema were significantly reduced in TBI+Gly group compared with TBI group; meanwhile, the over-expressions of HMGB1/HMGB1 receptors (TLR4 and RAGE/NF-κB DNA-binding activity and inflammatory cytokines were inhibited. The percentages of HMGB1, RAGE and TLR4- positive cells and apoptotic cells were respectively 58.37%±5.06%, 54.15%±4.65%, 65.50%± 4.83%, 52.02%± 4.63% in TBI group and 39.99%±4.99%, 34.87%±5.02%, 43.33%±4.54%, 37.84%±5.16% in TBI+Gly group (all P<0.01 compared with TBI group. Conclusion: Gly can reduce secondary brain injury and improve outcomes in rat following TBI by down-regulation of HMGB1/HMGB1 receptors (TLR4 and RAGE/NF-κB - mediated inflammatory responses in the injured rat brain.

  9. Development of I-123-labeled amines for brain studies: localization of I-123 iodophenylalkyl amines in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winchell, H.S.; Baldwin, R.M.; Lin, T.H.

    1980-01-01

    Localization in rat brain of forty iodophenylalkyl amines labeled with I-123 was evaluated in an attempt to develop I-123-labeled amines useful for brain studies. For the amines studied, the highest activity in brain and the brain-to-blood activity ratios ranked p > m > o as related to iodine position on the benzene ring: for alkyl groups the rank order was α-methylethyl > ethyl > methyl > none; for N additions it was single lipophilic group > H > two lipophilic groups. It is suggested that introduction of a halogen into the ring structure of many amines results in greater concentration of the agent in brain than is seen with the nonhalogenated parent compound. The agent N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine was chosen for further study because, in the rat, it showed high brain activity (1.57%/g) and brain-blood ratio (12.6) at 5 min

  10. A palatable hyperlipidic diet causes obesity and affects brain glucose metabolism in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoyama Caio SM

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously shown that either the continuous intake of a palatable hyperlipidic diet (H or the alternation of chow (C and an H diet (CH regimen induced obesity in rats. Here, we investigated whether the time of the start and duration of these feeding regimens are relevant and whether they affect brain glucose metabolism. Methods Male Wistar rats received C, H, or CH diets during various periods of their life spans: days 30-60, days 30-90, or days 60-90. Experiments were performed the 60th or the 90th day of life. Rats were killed by decapitation. The glucose, insulin, leptin plasma concentration, and lipid content of the carcasses were determined. The brain was sliced and incubated with or without insulin for the analysis of glucose uptake, oxidation, and the conversion of [1-14C]-glucose to lipids. Results The relative carcass lipid content increased in all of the H and CH groups, and the H30-60 and H30-90 groups had the highest levels. Groups H30-60, H30-90, CH30-60, and CH30-90 exhibited a higher serum glucose level. Serum leptin increased in all H groups and in the CH60-90 and CH30-90 groups. Serum insulin was elevated in the H30-60, H60-90, CH60-90, CH30-90 groups. Basal brain glucose consumption and hypothalamic insulin receptor density were lower only in the CH30-60 group. The rate of brain lipogenesis was increased in the H30-90 and CH30-90 groups. Conclusion These findings indicate that both H and CH diet regimens increased body adiposity independent treatment and the age at which treatment was started, whereas these diets caused hyperglycemia and affected brain metabolism when started at an early age.

  11. Evidence for a zinc/proton antiporter in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, R A; Davis, N; Nipper, R W; Carter, P A

    2000-05-01

    The data presented in this paper are consistent with the existence of a plasma membrane zinc/proton antiport activity in rat brain. Experiments were performed using purified plasma membrane vesicles isolated from whole rat brain. Incubating vesicles in the presence of various concentrations of 65Zn2+ resulted in a rapid accumulation of 65Zn2+. Hill plot analysis demonstrated a lack of cooperativity in zinc activation of 65Zn2+ uptake. Zinc uptake was inhibited in the presence of 1 mM Ni2+, Cd2+, or CO2+. Calcium (1 mM) was less effective at inhibiting 65Zn2+ uptake and Mg2+ and Mn2+ had no effect. The initial rate of vesicular 65Zn2+ uptake was inhibited by increasing extravesicular H+ concentration. Vesicles preloaded with 65Zn2+ could be induced to release 65Zn2+ by increasing extravesicular H+ or addition of 1 mM nonradioactive Zn2+. Hill plot analysis showed a lack of cooperativity in H+ activation of 65Zn2+ release. Based on the Hill analyses, the stoichiometry of transport may include Zn2+/Zn2+ exchange and Zn2+/H+ antiport, the latter being potentially electrogenic. Zinc/proton antiport may be an important mode of zinc uptake into neurons and contribute to the reuptake of zinc to replenish presynaptic vesicle stores after stimulation.

  12. Various irrigation fluids affect postoperative brain edema and cellular damage during experimental neurosurgery in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Kazuhisa; Kawano, Takeshi; Morioka, Yujiro; Fujita, Yasutaka; Nishimura, Masuhiro

    2006-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate how various irrigation fluids used during neurosurgical procedures affect the degree of postoperative brain edema and cellular damage during experimental neurosurgery in rats. The cerebral cortex was exposed and incised crosswise with a surgical knife under irrigation with an artificial CSF, lactated Ringer's solution, or normal saline. Four hours after injury, irrigation was stopped and brain tissue samples were obtained from injured and uninjured sites. Specific gravity, cerebrovascular permeability, and TTC staining of the samples were evaluated. Incision and irrigation of the brain were not performed on the control group. At the injured site, specific gravities of the samples in the normal saline group and the lactated Ringer's solution group were significantly lower than the specific gravity in the artificial CSF group. The EB concentration was significantly higher in the lactated Ringer's solution group and relatively high in the normal saline group as compared with the artificial CSF group. TTC staining did not differ significantly between the artificial CSF group and the control group. It was significantly lower in the lactated Ringer's solution group and the normal saline group than in the control group and the artificial CSF group. As compared with normal saline and lactated Ringer's solution, artificial CSF reduced postoperative brain edema, cerebrovascular permeability, and cellular damage in sites injured by experimental neurosurgery in rats.

  13. Melatonin treatment reduces astrogliosis and apoptosis in rats with traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Babaee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Melatonin is known as an anti-inflammatory agent, and it has been proven to exert neuroprotection through inhibition of cell death (apoptosis in several models of brain injury.Secondary injury following the primary traumatic brain injury (TBI results in glial cells activation, especially astrocytes. In fact, astrocyte activation causes the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines that may lead to secondary injury. Since most TBI research studies have focused on injured neurons and paid little attention to glial cells, the aim of current study was to investigate the effects of melatonin against astrocytes activation (astrogliosis, as well as inhibition of apoptosis in brain tissue of male rats after TBI. Materials and Methods: The animals were randomly allocated into five groups: sham group, TBI+ vehicle group (1% ethanol in saline and TBI+ melatonin groups (5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg. All rats were intubated and then exposed to diffuse TBI, except for the sham group. Immunohistochemical methods were conducted using glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP marker and TUNEL assay to evaluate astrocyte reactivity and cell death, respectively. Results: The results showed that based on the number of GFAP positive astrocytes in brain cortex, astrogliosis was reduced significantly (P

  14. Neuroprotective actions of taurine on hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Yun; Ma, Peng-Sheng; Wu, Wei; Zhou, Ru; Hao, Yin-Ju; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Li, Yu-Xiang; Yu, Jian-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Taurine is an abundant amino acid in the nervous system, which has been proved to possess antioxidation, osmoregulation and membrane stabilization. Previously it has been demonstrated that taurine exerts ischemic brain injury protective effect. This study was designed to investigate whether the protective effect of taurine has the possibility to be applied to treat neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. Seven-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with left carotid artery ligation followed by exposure to 8% oxygen to generate the experimental group. The cerebral damage area was measured after taurine post-treatment with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining, Hematoxyline-Eosin (HE) staining and Nissl staining. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), myeloperoxtidase (MPO), ATP and Lactic Acid productions were assayed with ipsilateral hemisphere homogenates. Western-blot and immunofluorescence assay were processed to detect the expressions of AIF, Cyt C, Bax, Bcl-2 in brain. We found that taurine significantly reduced brain infarct volume and ameliorated morphological injury obviously reversed the changes of SOD, MDA, GSH-Px, T-AOC, ATP, MPO, and Lactic Acid levels. Compared with hypoxic-ischemic group, it showed marked reduction of AIF, Cyt C and Bax expressions and increase of Bcl-2 after post-treatment. We conclude that taurine possesses an efficacious neuroprotective effect after cerebral hypoxic-ischemic damage in neonatal rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cerebral circulation, metabolism, and blood-brain barrier of rats in hypocapnic hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, T.; Krieglstein, J.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of hypoxic hypoxia on physiological variables, cerebral circulation, cerebral metabolism, and blood-brain barrier were investigated in conscious, spontaneously breathing rats by exposing them to an atmosphere containing 7% O 2 . Hypoxia affected a marked hypotension, hypocapnia and alkalosis. Cortical tissue high-energy phosphates and glucose content were not affected by hypoxia, glucose 6-phosphate lactate, and pyruvate levels were significantly increased. Blood-brain barrier permeability, regional brain glucose content and lumped constant were not changed by hypoxia. Local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) rose by 40-70% of control values in gray matter and by 80-90% in white matter. Under hypoxia, columns of increased and decreased LCGU and were detectable in cortical gray matter. Color-coded [ 14 C]2-deoxy-D-glucose autoradiograms of rat brain are shown. Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) increased by 50-90% in gray matter and by up to 180% in white matter. Coupling between LCGU and LCBF in hypoxia remained unchanged. The data suggests a stimulation of glycolysis, increased glucose transport into the cell, and increased hexokinase activity. The physiological response of gray and white matter to hypoxia obviously differs. Uncoupling of the relation between LCGU and LCBF does not occur

  16. The effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on neuroinflammation response in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissa, Intissar; Guezguez, Sabrine; Ezzi, Lobna; Chakroun, Sana; Sallem, Amira; Kerkeni, Emna; Elghoul, Jaber; El Mir, Lassaad; Mehdi, Meriem; Cheikh, Hassen Ben; Haouas, Zohra

    2016-10-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO 2 NPs) are widely used for their whiteness and opacity in several applications such as food colorants, drug additives, biomedical ceramic, and implanted biomaterials. Research on the neurobiological response to orally administered TiO 2 NPs is still limited. In our study, we investigate the effects of anatase TiO 2 NPs on the brain of Wistar rats after oral intake. After daily intragastric administration of anatase TiO 2 NPs (5-10 nm) at 0, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg body weight (BW) for 60 days, the coefficient of the brain, acethylcholinesterase (AChE) activities, the level of interleukin 6 (IL-6), and the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were assessed to quantify the brain damage. The results showed that high-dose anatase TiO 2 NPs could induce a downregulated level of AChE activities and showed an increase in plasmatic IL-6 level as compared to the control group accompanied by a dose-dependent decrease inter-doses, associated to an increase in the cerebral IL-6 level as a response to a local inflammation in brain. Furthermore, we observed elevated levels of immunoreactivity to GFAP in rat cerebral cortex. We concluded that oral intake of anatase TiO 2 NPs can induce neuroinflammation and could be neurotoxic and hazardous to health.

  17. Induction by mercury compounds of brain metallothionein in rats: Hg{sup 0} exposure induces long-lived brain metallothionein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasutake, Akira; Nakano, Atsuhiro [Biochemistry Section, National Institute for Minamata Disease, Kumamoto (Japan); Hirayama, Kimiko [Kumamoto University, College of Medical Science (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is one of the stress proteins which can easily be induced by various kind of heavy metals. However, MT in the brain is difficult to induce because of blood-brain barrier impermeability to most heavy metals. In this paper, we have attempted to induce brain MT in rats by exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) or metallic mercury vapor, both of which are known to penetrate the blood-brain barrier and cause neurological damage. Rats treated with MeHg (40 {mu}mol/kg per day x 5 days, p.o.) showed brain Hg levels as high as 18 {mu}g/g with slight neurological signs 10 days after final administration, but brain MT levels remained unchanged. However, rats exposed to Hg vapor for 7 days showed 7-8 {mu}g Hg/g brain tissue 24 h after cessation of exposure. At that time brain MT levels were about twice the control levels. Although brain Hg levels fell gradually with a half-life of 26 days, MT levels induced by Hg exposure remained unchanged for >2 weeks. Gel fractionation revealed that most Hg was in the brain cytosol fraction and thus bound to MT. Hybridization analysis showed that, despite a significant increase in MT-I and -II mRNA in brain, MT-III mRNA was less affected. Although significant Hg accumulation and MT induction were observed also in kidney and liver of Hg vapor-exposed rats, these decreased more quickly than in brain. The long-lived MT in brain might at least partly be accounted for by longer half-life of Hg accumulated there. The present results showed that exposure to Hg vapor might be a suitable procedure to provide an in vivo model with enhanced brain MT. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 27 refs.

  18. Pathophysiological Responses in Rat and Mouse Models of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lianhong; Yang, Jianhua; Li, Guoqian; Li, Yi; Wu, Rong; Cheng, Jinping; Tang, Yamei

    2017-03-01

    The brain is the major dose-limiting organ in patients undergoing radiotherapy for assorted conditions. Radiation-induced brain injury is common and mainly occurs in patients receiving radiotherapy for malignant head and neck tumors, arteriovenous malformations, or lung cancer-derived brain metastases. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms of radiation-induced brain injury are largely unknown. Although many treatment strategies are employed for affected individuals, the effects remain suboptimal. Accordingly, animal models are extremely important for elucidating pathogenic radiation-associated mechanisms and for developing more efficacious therapies. So far, models employing various animal species with different radiation dosages and fractions have been introduced to investigate the prevention, mechanisms, early detection, and management of radiation-induced brain injury. However, these models all have limitations, and none are widely accepted. This review summarizes the animal models currently set forth for studies of radiation-induced brain injury, especially rat and mouse, as well as radiation dosages, dose fractionation, and secondary pathophysiological responses.

  19. Acute Effects of Moderate and Strenuous Running on Trace Element Distribution in the Brain, Liver, and Spleen of Trained Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kıvanç Ergen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Trace elements such as manganese (Mn, cobalt (Co and chromium (Cr play key roles in metabolic reactions and are important in many physiological enzymatic processes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the acute effects of moderate and strenuous running (treadmill exercise on the levels of Mn, Co and Cr in the brain, liver, and spleen of trained rats. Study Design: Animal experiment. Material and Methods: Twenty-one Wistar-Albino adult male rats were used in the study. Rats were grouped as control group (no mandated exercise; n=8, moderate exercise group (30 min exercise duration; n=7, and strenuous exercise group (60 min exercise duration; n=6. The levels of Mn, Co, and Cr in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, brain stem, liver, and spleen were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results: Cr levels in liver of rats increased in parallel to the time course of running supporting the exercise training effect on the action of insulin. Compared to the control group, the level of Co significantly decreased in the brain stem of rats in the moderate exercise group (p=0.009 and in the frontal lobe of rats in the strenuous exercise group (p=0.004. In the strenuous exercise group, an examination of the brain stem revealed that the level of Mn significantly decreased (p=0.001, and levels of Co and Cr were apparently depleted to the extent that these elements were no longer detectable. Conclusion: A notable finding is that during or after single bout strenuous exercise, levels of Co decreased in the spleen and particularly decreased in the brain stem of regularly trained rats. From this study, it can be inferred that sportsmen should aware trace element disturbances among the body parts or depletion of some trace elements after single bout of chronic strenuous running exercise.

  20. [Changes of the Expression of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factors in Rats Trachea Induced by Acrolein Exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bing; Yang, Rui-an; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Yan-yan; Dan, Qi-qin; Zhang, Yun-hui

    2015-07-01

    To investigate expressional changes of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the trachea of rats with acrolein inhalation. Twenty two SD rats were divided into 2 groups: the rats in experimental group were subjected to acrolein inhalation for the induce of trachea inflammatory injury, while the rats with saline (NS) inhalation were as control. All the rats were sacrificed in 1,3,6 weeks after acrolein (n = 11 at each time point) or saline inhalation (n = 11 at each time point), the samples of trachea epithelium were harvested. The immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization was performed to detect the location of BDNF protein and mRNA in trachea. The expression of BDNF mRNA in the trachea tissues were determined by RT-PCR. There are positive cells in epithelium of trachea for BDNF protein and mRNA, with cytoplasm staining. The expression of BDNF mRNA in the trachea was increased at 1 week after acrolein inhalation (P 0.05). The inflammatory injury in trachea induced by acrolein exposure could be associated with the increased expression of BDNF. BDNF may be one of the crucial inflammatory factors in the process of inflammatory reaction in trachea with acrolein stimulation.

  1. Early inflammatory response in rat brain after peripheral thermal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Raul; Wu, Yimin; Lai, Qin; Mrizek, Michael; Berger, Jamie; Jimenez, David F; Barone, Constance M; Ding, Yuchuan

    2006-10-16

    Previous studies have shown that the cerebral complications associated with skin burn victims are correlated with brain damage. The aim of this study was to determine whether systemic thermal injury induces inflammatory responses in the brain. Sprague Dawley rats (n=28) were studied in thermal injury and control groups. Animals from the thermal injury (n=14) and control (n=14) group were anesthetized and submerged to the neck vertically in 85 degrees C water for 6 s producing a third degree burn affecting 60-70% of the animal body surface area. The controls were submerged in 37 degrees C water for 6 s. Early expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 1-beta (IL-1beta), and intracellular cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) protein levels in serum were determined at 3 (n=7) and 7 h (n=7) by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA). mRNA of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and ICAM-1 in the brain was measured at the same time points with a real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). An equal animal number was used for controls. Systemic inflammatory responses were demonstrated by dramatic up-regulations (5-50 fold) of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and ICAM-1 protein level in serum at 7 h after the thermal injury. However, as early as 3 h after peripheral thermal injury, a significant increase (3-15 fold) in mRNA expression of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and ICAM-1 was observed in brain homogenates, with increased levels remaining at 7 h after injury. This study demonstrated an early inflammatory response in the brain after severe peripheral thermal injury. The cerebral inflammatory reaction was associated with expression of systemic cytokines and an adhesion molecule.

  2. Effect of a water-maze procedure on the redox mechanisms in brain parts of aged rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Andreevna Krivova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Morris water maze (MWM is a tool for assessment of age-related cognitive deficits. In our work, MWM was used for appraisal of cognitive deficits in 11-month-old rats and investigation of the effect exerted by training in the Morris water maze on the redox mechanisms in rat brain parts. Young adult (3-month-old and aged (11-month-old male rats were trained in the water maze. Intact animals of the corresponding age were used as the reference groups. The level of pro- and antioxidant capacity in brain tissue homogenates was assessed using the chemiluminescence method.Cognitive deficits were found in 11-month-old rats: at the first day of training they showed only 30% of successful MWM trials. However, at the last training day the percentage of successful trials was equal for young adult and aged animals. This indicates that cognitive deficits in aged rats can be reversed by MWM training. Therewith, the MWM spatial learning procedure itself produces changes in different processes of redox homeostasis in 11-month-old and 3-month-old rats as compared to intact animals. Young adult rats showed a decrease in prooxidant capacity in all brain parts, while 11-month-old rats demonstrated an increase in antioxidant capacity in the olfactory bulb, pons + medulla oblongata and frontal lobe cortex. Hence, the MWM procedure activates the mechanisms that restrict the oxidative stress in brain parts. The obtained results may be an argument for further development of the animal training procedures aimed to activate the mechanisms responsible for age-related cognitive deficits. This may be useful not only for the development of training procedures applicable to human patients with age-related cognitive impairments, but also for their rehabilitation.

  3. Immunochemical method for quantitative evaluation of vasogenic brain edema following cold injury of rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodsch, W; Huerter, T; Hossmann, K A [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Hirnforschung, Koeln (Germany, F.R.). Forschungsstelle fuer Hirnkreislauf-Forschung

    1982-10-07

    An immunochemical method is described for quantitative assessment of serum proteins and hemoglobin content in brain tissue homogenates. Using a combination of affinity chromatography and radioimmunoassay, the sensitivity of the method is 50 ng hemoglobin and 100 ng serum protein per assay, respectively. The method was used to measure cerebral hematocrit, blood volume and serum protein extravasation in rat brain at various times following cold injury. In control rats cerebral blood volume was 6.88 +- 0.15 ml/100 g and cerebral hematocrit 26.4 +- 0.86% (means +- S.E.). Following cold injury blood volume did not significantly change, but there was a gradual increase of extravasated serum proteins, reaching a maximum of 21.54 +- 2.76 mg/g d.w. after 8 hours. Thereafter protein content gradually declined, but even after 64 h it was distinctly increased. Protein extravasation was partly dissociated from the increase of brain water and sodium which reached a maximum already after 2 h and which normalized within 32 and 64 h, respectively. It is concluded that edema fluid associated with cold injury is not simply an ultrafiltrate of blood serum but consists of cytotoxic and vasogenic components which follow a different time course both during formation and resolution of edema.

  4. Immunochemical method for quantitative evaluation of vasogenic brain edema following cold injury of rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodsch, W.; Huerter, T.; Hossmann, K.-A.

    1982-01-01

    An immunochemical method is described for quantitative assessment of serum proteins and hemoglobin content in brain tissue homogenates. Using a combination of affinity chromatography and radioimmunoassay, the sensitivity of the method is 50 ng hemoglobin and 100 ng serum protein per assay, respectively. The method was used to measure cerebral hematocrit, blood volume and serum protein extravasation in rat brain at various times following cold injury. In control rats cerebral blood volume was 6.88 +- 0.15 ml/100 g and cerebral hematocrit 26.4 +- 0.86% (means +- S.E.). Following cold injury blood volume did not significantly change, but there was a gradual increase of extravasated serum proteins, reaching a maximum of 21.54 +- 2.76 mg/g d.w. after 8 hours. Thereafter protein content gradually declined, but even after 64 h it was distinctly increased. Protein extravasation was partly dissociated from the increase of brain water and sodium which reached a maximum already after 2 h and which normalized within 32 and 64 h, respectively. It is concluded that edema fluid associated with cold injury is not simply an ultrafiltrate of blood serum but consists of cytotoxic and vasogenic components which follow a different time course both during formation and resolution of edema. (Auth.)

  5. Reduction in brain immunoreactive corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Hattori, T.; Murakami, K.; Suemaru, S.; Kawada, Y.; Kageyama, J.; Ota, Z.

    1985-01-01

    The brain CRF concentration of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) was examined by rat CRF radioimmunoassay. Anti-CRF serum was developed by immunizing rabbits with synthetic rat CRF. Synthetic rat CRF was also used as tracer and standard. The displacement of 125 I-rat CRF by serially diluted extracts of male Wistar rats hypothalamus, thalamus, midbrain, pons, medulla oblongata, cerebral cortex, cerebellum and neurointermediate lobe was parallel to the displacement of synthetic rat CRF. In both WKY and SHR the highest levels of CRF immunoreactivity were shown by the hypothalamus and neurointermediate lobe, and considerable CRF immunoreactivity was also detected in other brain regions. The CRF immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus, neurointermediate lobe, midbrain, medulla oblongata and cerebral cortex was significantly reduced in SHR and it may suggest that CRF abnormality may be implicated in the reported abnormalities in the pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic response and behavior of SHR

  6. Thymoquinone Attenuates Brain Injury via an Anti-oxidative Pathway in a Status Epilepticus Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yi-Ye; Li, Bing; Huang, Yong-Mei; Luo, Qiong; Xie, Yang-Mei; Chen, Ying-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) results in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which contribute to seizure-induced brain injury. It is well known that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in status epilepticus (SE). Thymoquinone (TQ) is a bioactive monomer extracted from black cumin (Nigella sativa) seed oil that has anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and antioxidant activity in various diseases. This study evaluated the protective effects of TQ on brain injury in a lithium-pilocarpine rat model of SE and investigated the underlying mechanism related to antioxidative pathway. Electroencephalogram and Racine scale were used to value seizure severity. Passive-avoidance test was used to determine learning and memory function. Moreover, anti-oxidative activity of TQ was observed using Western blot and super oxide dismutase (SOD) activity assay. Latency to SE increased in the TQ-pretreated group compared with rats in the model group, while the total power was significantly lower. Seizure severity measured on the Racine scale was significantly lower in the TQ group compared with the model group. Results of behavioral experiments suggest that TQ may also have a protective effect on learning and memory function. Investigation of the protective mechanism of TQ showed that TQ-pretreatment significantly increased the expression of Nrf2, HO-1 proteins and SOD in the hippocampus. These findings showed that TQ attenuated brain injury induced by SE via an anti-oxidative pathway.

  7. A Study on Neuroprotective Effects of Curcumin on the Diabetic Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Kong, X-J; Wang, Z-Q; Xu, F-S; Zhu, Y-T

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to study the neuroprotective therapeutic effect of curcumin on the male albino rat brain. Subarachnoid hemorrhage leads to severe mortality rate and morbidity, and oxidative stress is a crucial factor in subarachnoid hemorrhage. Therefore, we investigated the effect of curcumin on oxidative stress and glutamate and glutamate transporter-1 on a subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced male albino rats. The curcumin commonly used for the treatment and saline used for the control. Curcumin (10 mg/kg bwt) dissolved in saline and administered orally to the rats for one week. Glutamate, glutamate transporter-1, malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione reductase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were determined. Glutamate level was lower in the curcumin-treated rats compared to their respective controls. Glutamate transporter-1 did not alter in the curcumin-treated rats compared to their controls. Glutamate transporter-1 protein expression is significantly reduced in the curcumin-treated rats. MDA levels decreased 18 and 29 % in the hippocampus and the cortex region respectively. SOD (17% and 32%), and catalase (19% and 24%) activities were increased in the curcumin-treated hippocampus and the cortex region respectively. Glutathione reductase (13% and 19%) and LDH (21% and 30%) activities were increased in the treated hippocampus and the cortex region respectively. The mRNA expression of NK-kB and TLR4 was significantly reduced following curcumin treatment. Taking all these data together, the curcumin found to be effective against oxidative stress and glutamate neurotoxicity in the male albino rats.

  8. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate, by means of internal light delivery, photoacoustic imaging of the deep brain of rats in vivo. With fiber illumination via the oral cavity, we delivered light directly into the bottom of the brain, much more than can be delivered by external illumination. The study was performed using a photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system equipped with a 512-element full-ring transducer array, providing a full two-dimensional view aperture. Using internal illumination, the PACT system provided clear cross sectional photoacoustic images from the palate to the middle brain of live rats, revealing deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  9. [Measurement of the blood flow in various areas of the rat brain by means of microspheres].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroo, J; Gerber, G B

    1976-01-01

    A method is described to measure regional blood flow in different structures of the rat brain. Microspheres (15 micron) are injected, the brain is sectioned, stained for myeline, radioautographs are prepared and the microspheres in the different structures are counted. The values obtained for different brain structures are counted. The values obtained for different brain regions (cortex, corpus callosum, thalamus hipocampus, hypothalamic region, colliculi, cerebellum, pons, medulla) compare well with those published by others on larger animals. In rats fed 1% of lead from birth, higher blood flow is found in the cortex and a lower one in the interior part of the brain compared to controls.

  10. Brain-wide map of efferent projections from rat barrel cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela M. Zakiewicz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The somatotopically organized whisker barrel field of the rat primary somatosensory (S1 cortex is a commonly used model system for anatomical and physiological investigations of sensory processing. The neural connections of the barrel cortex have been extensively mapped. But most investigations have focused on connections to limited regions of the brain, and overviews in the literature of the connections across the brain thus build on a range of material from different laboratories, presented in numerous publications. Furthermore, given the limitations of the conventional journal article format, analyses and interpretations are hampered by lack of access to the underlying experimental data. New opportunities for analyses have emerged with the recent release of an online resource of experimental data consisting of collections of high-resolution images from 6 experiments in which anterograde tracers were injected in S1 whisker or forelimb representations. Building on this material, we have conducted a detailed analysis of the brain wide distribution of the efferent projections of the rat barrel cortex. We compare our findings with the available literature and reports accumulated in the Brain Architecture Management System (BAMS2 database. We report well-known and less known intracortical and subcortical projections of the barrel cortex, as well as distinct differences between S1 whisker and forelimb related projections. Our results correspond well with recently published overviews, but provide additional information about relative differences among S1 projection targets. Our approach demonstrates how collections of shared experimental image data are suitable for brain-wide analysis and interpretation of connectivity mapping data.

  11. Dynamics of pathomorphological changes in rat brain as a function of γ-radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, V.P.

    1990-01-01

    Neurohistological, histochemical, electron-microscopic and biometric techniques were used to study the response of rat brain to irradiation within a wide range of doses. Nerve cells were shown to be highly radioresistant. At the same time, synapses and blood-brain barrier structures were highly radiosensitive. The pathomorphologic changes in different brain areas followed a dose-time function

  12. Generation of primary cultures of bovine brain endothelial cells and setup of cocultures with rat astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans C; Brodin, Birger

    2014-01-01

    -brain barrier. The present protocol describes the setup of an in vitro coculture model based on primary cultures of endothelial cells from bovine brain microvessels and primary cultures of rat astrocytes. The model displays a high electrical tightness and expresses blood-brain barrier marker proteins....

  13. Low intensity microwave radiation induced oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megha, Kanu; Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Ahmed, Rafat; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade people have been constantly exposed to microwave radiation mainly from wireless communication devices used in day to day life. Therefore, the concerns over potential adverse effects of microwave radiation on human health are increasing. Until now no study has been proposed to investigate the underlying causes of genotoxic effects induced by low intensity microwave exposure. Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the influence of low intensity microwave radiation on oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in rat brain. The study was carried out on 24 male Fischer 344 rats, randomly divided into four groups (n=6 in each group): group I consisted of sham exposed (control) rats, group II-IV consisted of rats exposed to microwave radiation at frequencies 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz, specific absorption rates (SARs) 0.59, 0.58 and 0.66 mW/kg, respectively in gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) cell for 60 days (2h/day, 5 days/week). Rats were sacrificed and decapitated to isolate hippocampus at the end of the exposure duration. Low intensity microwave exposure resulted in a frequency dependent significant increase in oxidative stress markers viz. malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO) and catalase (CAT) in microwave exposed groups in comparison to sham exposed group (pmicrowave exposed groups (pmicrowave exposed animal (pmicrowave exposed groups as compared to their corresponding values in sham exposed group (pmicrowave radiation induces oxidative stress, inflammatory response and DNA damage in brain by exerting a frequency dependent effect. The study also indicates that increased oxidative stress and inflammatory response might be the factors involved in DNA damage following low intensity microwave exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Chronic sucrose intake decreases concentrations of n6 fatty acids, but not docosahexaenoic acid in the rat brain phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mašek, Tomislav; Starčević, Kristina

    2017-07-13

    We investigated the influence of high sucrose intake, administered in drinking water, on the lipid profile of the brain and on the expression of SREBP1c and Δ-desaturase genes. Adult male rats received 30% sucrose solution for 20 weeks (Sucrose group), or plain water (Control group). After the 20th week of sucrose treatment, the Sucrose group showed permanent hyperglycemia. Sucrose treatment also increased the amount of total lipids and fatty acids in the brain. The brain fatty acid profile of total lipids as well as phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine and cardiolipin of the Sucrose group was extensively changed. The most interesting change was a significant decrease in n6 fatty acids, including the important arachidonic acid, whereas the content of oleic and docosahexaenoic acid remained unchanged. RT-qPCR revealed an increase in Δ-5-desaturase and SREBP1c gene expression. In conclusion, high sucrose intake via drinking water extensively changes rat brain fatty acid profile by decreasing n6 fatty acids, including arachidonic acid. In contrast, the content of docosahexaenoic acid remains constant in the brain total lipids as well as in phospholipids. Changes in the brain fatty acid profile reflect changes in the lipid metabolism of the rat lipogenic tissues and concentrations in the circulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Voxel Scale Complex Networks of Functional Connectivity in the Rat Brain: Neurochemical State Dependence of Global and Local Topological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Schwarz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Network analysis of functional imaging data reveals emergent features of the brain as a function of its topological properties. However, the brain is not a homogeneous network, and the dependence of functional connectivity parameters on neuroanatomical substrate and parcellation scale is a key issue. Moreover, the extent to which these topological properties depend on underlying neurochemical changes remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated both global statistical properties and the local, voxel-scale distribution of connectivity parameters of the rat brain. Different neurotransmitter systems were stimulated by pharmacological challenge (d-amphetamine, fluoxetine, and nicotine to discriminate between stimulus-specific functional connectivity and more general features of the rat brain architecture. Although global connectivity parameters were similar, mapping of local connectivity parameters at high spatial resolution revealed strong neuroanatomical dependence of functional connectivity in the rat brain, with clear differentiation between the neocortex and older brain regions. Localized foci of high functional connectivity independent of drug challenge were found in the sensorimotor cortices, consistent with the high neuronal connectivity in these regions. Conversely, the topological properties and node roles in subcortical regions varied with neurochemical state and were dependent on the specific dynamics of the different functional processes elicited.

  16. Immunologic differentiation of two high-affinity neurotensin receptor isoforms in the developing rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudin, H; Lazaroff, B; Bachelet, C M; Pélaprat, D; Rostène, W; Beaudet, A

    2000-09-11

    Earlier studies have demonstrated overexpression of NT1 neurotensin receptors in rat brain during the first 2 weeks of life. To gain insight into this phenomenon, we investigated the identity and distribution of NT1 receptor proteins in the brain of 10-day-old rats by using two different NT1 antibodies: one (Abi3) directed against the third intracellular loop and the other (Abi4) against the C-terminus of the receptor. Immunoblot experiments that used Abi3 revealed the presence of two differentially glycosylated forms of the NT1 receptor in developing rat brain: one migrating at 54 and the other at 52 kDa. Whereas the 54-kDa form was expressed from birth to adulthood, the 52-kDa form was detected only at 10 and 15 days postnatal. Only the 52-kDa isoform was recognized by Abi4. By immunohistochemistry, both forms of the receptor were found to be predominantly expressed in cerebral cortex and dorsal hippocampus, in keeping with earlier radioligand binding and in situ hybridization data. However, whereas Abi4 immunoreactivity was mainly concentrated within nerve cell bodies and extensively colocalized with the Golgi marker alpha-mannosidase II, Abi3 immunoreactivity was predominantly located along neuronal processes. These results suggest that the transitorily expressed 52-kDa protein corresponds to an immature, incompletely glycosylated and largely intracellular form of the NT1 receptor and that the 54-kDa protein corresponds to a mature, fully glycosylated, and largely membrane-associated form. They also indicate that antibodies directed against different sequences of G-protein-coupled receptors may yield isoform-specific immunohistochemical labeling patterns in mammalian brain. Finally, the selective expression of the short form of the NT1 receptor early in development suggests that it may play a specific role in the establishment of neuronal circuitry. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Possible effects of rosuvastatin on noise-induced oxidative stress in rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alevtina Ersoy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of noise has recently gained more attention as it has become an integral part of our daily lives. However, its influence has yet to be fully elucidated. Other than being an unpleasant stimulus, noise may cause health disorders through annoyance and stress, including oxidative stress. Rosuvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, may possess antioxidant properties. Based on rat models, our project investigates the effect of rosuvastatin on noise-induced oxidative stress in the brain tissue. Thirty-two male Wistar albino rats were used. The rats were divided into four groups: Noise exposure plus rosuvastatin usage, only noise exposure, only rosuvastatin usage, and control. After the data had been collected, oxidant and antioxidant parameters were analyzed in the cerebral cortex, brain stem, and cerebellum. Results indicated that superoxide dismutase values were significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex, while malondialdehyde values in the brainstem and cerebellum were significantly increased in the group with only noise exposure. Superoxide dismutase values in the brainstem were significantly increased, but nitric oxide values in the cerebellum and brainstem and malondialdehyde values in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex were significantly decreased in the group where only rosuvastatin was used. During noise exposure, the use of rosuvastatin caused significantly increased superoxide dismutase values in the cerebral cortex and brainstem, but significantly reduced malondialdehyde values in the brain stem. Consequently, our data show that brain tissue was affected by oxidative stress due to continued exposure to noise. This noise-induced stress decreases with rosuvastatin therapy.

  18. Identification of blood-brain barrier function following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats at different stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zongyi Xie; Weiwei Shen; Ying Ma; Yuan Cheng

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have indicated that blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) significantly correlates with the development of brain injury and poor prognosis of patients subjected to SAH. OBJECTIVE: To investigate both functional and structural changes related to BBB in various phases after SAH in rats through quantitative and qualitative methods.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This experiment, a completely randomized design and controlled experiment, was performed at the Department of Neurosurgery, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences from June 2006 to March 2007.MATERIALS: A total of 128 female, healthy, Sprague-Dawley rats were selected for this study. Main reagents and instruments: Evans Blue dye (Sigma Company, USA), fluorescence spectrophotometer (Shimadzu Company, Japan), and transmission electron microscope (Olympus Company, Japan). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Brain tissue water content was determined by the wet-dry method. BBB permeability in the cerebral cortex was determined by Evans Blue dye and fluorescent spectrophotometer. The ultrastructural changes in BBB were observed with transmission electron microscope.RESULTS: Compared with the sham-operated group, SAH induced a significant increase in brain water content between 24 and 60 hours (F = 888.32, P 0.05). Electron microscopy demonstrated only a mild perivascular edema at 24 hours after SAH. By 36 hours, a notable perivascular edema was associated with a collapse of the capillary. Astrocytic endfeet surrounding the capillary were prominently swollen in the edematous areas. The above-mentioned abnormal ultrastructural changes in the BBB were reversed by 72 hours after SAH. No obvious morphological changes in the BBB were detected in the sham-operated rats.CONCLUSION: These results directly suggest that SAH could induce rapid changes in BBB function and structure during the acute phases of BBB breakdown. Moreover, these dynamic

  19. Effects of metformin on learning and memory behaviors and brain mitochondrial functions in high fat diet induced insulin resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintana, Hiranya; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2012-10-05

    Metformin is a first line drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Our previous study reported that high-fat diet (HFD) consumption caused not only peripheral and neuronal insulin resistance, but also induced brain mitochondrial dysfunction as well as learning impairment. However, the effects of metformin on learning behavior and brain mitochondrial functions in HFD-induced insulin resistant rats have never been investigated. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were divided into two groups to receive either a normal diet (ND) or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 12weeks. Then, rats in each group were divided into two treatment groups to receive either vehicle or metformin (15mg/kg BW twice daily) for 21days. All rats were tested for cognitive behaviors using the Morris water maze (MWM) test, and blood samples were collected for the determination of glucose, insulin, and malondialdehyde. At the end of the study, animals were euthanized and the brain was removed for studying brain mitochondrial function and brain oxidative stress. We found that in the HFD group, metformin significantly attenuated the insulin resistant condition by improving metabolic parameters, decreasing peripheral and brain oxidative stress levels, and improving learning behavior, compared to the vehicle-treated group. Furthermore, metformin completely prevented brain mitochondrial dysfunction caused by long-term HFD consumption. Our findings suggest that metformin effectively improves peripheral insulin sensitivity, prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction, and completely restores learning behavior, which were all impaired by long-term HFD consumption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Brain Metabolism Alterations Induced by Pregnancy Swimming Decreases Neurological Impairments Following Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia in Very Immature Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo F. Sanches

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prematurity, through brain injury and altered development is a major cause of neurological impairments and can result in motor, cognitive and behavioral deficits later in life. Presently, there are no well-established effective therapies for preterm brain injury and the search for new strategies is needed. Intra-uterine environment plays a decisive role in brain maturation and interventions using the gestational window have been shown to influence long-term health in the offspring. In this study, we investigated whether pregnancy swimming can prevent the neurochemical metabolic alterations and damage that result from postnatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HI in very immature rats.Methods: Female pregnant Wistar rats were divided into swimming (SW or sedentary (SE groups. Following a period of adaptation before mating, swimming was performed during the entire gestation. At postnatal day (PND3, rat pups from SW and SE dams had right common carotid artery occluded, followed by systemic hypoxia. At PND4 (24 h after HI, the early neurochemical profile was measured by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Astrogliosis, apoptosis and neurotrophins protein expression were assessed in the cortex and hippocampus. From PND45, behavioral testing was performed. Diffusion tensor imaging and neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging were used to evaluate brain microstructure and the levels of proteins were quantified.Results: Pregnancy swimming was able to prevent early metabolic changes induced by HI preserving the energetic balance, decreasing apoptotic cell death and astrogliosis as well as maintaining the levels of neurotrophins. At adult age, swimming preserved brain microstructure and improved the performance in the behavioral tests.Conclusion: Our study points out that swimming during gestation in rats could prevent prematurity related brain damage in progeny with high translational potential and possibly interesting cost

  1. Alpha-Tocopherol Reduces Brain Edema and Protects Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity following Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghnejad Azar, Adel; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Bohlooli, Shahab; Panahpour, Hamdollah

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the neuroprotective effects of α-tocopherol against edema formation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following transient focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Ninety-six male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 major groups (n = 32 in each), namely the sham, and control and α-tocopherol-treated (30 mg/kg) ischemic groups. Transient focal cerebral ischemia (90 min) was induced by occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery. At the end of the 24-hour reperfusion period, the animals were randomly selected and used for 4 investigations (n = 8) in each of the 3 main groups: (a) assessment of neurological score and measurement of infarct size, (b) detection of brain edema formation by the wet/dry method, (c) evaluation of BBB permeability using the Evans blue (EB) extravasation technique, and (d) assessment of the malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) concentrations using high-performance liquid chromatography methods. Induction of cerebral ischemia in the control group produced extensive brain edema (brain water content 83.8 ± 0.11%) and EB leakage into brain parenchyma (14.58 ± 1.29 µg/g) in conjunction with reduced GSH and elevated MDA levels (5.86 ± 0.31 mmol/mg and 63.57 ± 5.42 nmol/mg, respectively). Treatment with α-tocopherol significantly lowered brain edema formation and reduced EB leakage compared with the control group (p < 0.001, 80.1 ± 0.32% and 6.66 ± 0.87 µg/g, respectively). Meanwhile, treatment with α-tocopherol retained tissue GSH levels and led to a lower MDA level (p < 0.01, 10.17 ± 0.83 mmol/mg, and p < 0.001, 26.84 ± 4.79 nmol/mg, respectively). Treatment with α-tocopherol reduced ischemic edema formation and produced protective effects on BBB function following ischemic stroke occurrence. This effect could be through increasing antioxidant activity. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Serotonergic neurotoxic metabolites of ecstasy identified in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Douglas C; Duvauchelle, Christine; Ikegami, Aiko; Olsen, Christopher M; Lau, Serrine S; de la Torre, Rafael; Monks, Terrence J

    2005-04-01

    The selective serotonergic neurotoxicity of 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) depends on their systemic metabolism. We have recently shown that inhibition of brain endothelial cell gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GT) potentiates the neurotoxicity of both MDMA and MDA, indicating that metabolites that are substrates for this enzyme contribute to the neurotoxicity. Consistent with this view, glutathione (GSH) and N-acetylcysteine conjugates of alpha-methyl dopamine (alpha-MeDA) are selective neurotoxicants. However, neurotoxic metabolites of MDMA or MDA have yet to be identified in brain. Using in vivo microdialysis coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy and a high-performance liquid chromatography-coulometric electrode array system, we now show that GSH and N-acetylcysteine conjugates of N-methyl-alpha-MeDA are present in the striatum of rats administered MDMA by subcutaneous injection. Moreover, inhibition of gamma-GT with acivicin increases the concentration of GSH and N-acetylcysteine conjugates of N-methyl-alpha-MeDA in brain dialysate, and there is a direct correlation between the concentrations of metabolites in dialysate and the extent of neurotoxicity, measured by decreases in serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindole acetic (5-HIAA) levels. Importantly, the effects of acivicin are independent of MDMA-induced hyperthermia, since acivicin-mediated potentiation of MDMA neurotoxicity occurs in the context of acivicin-mediated decreases in body temperature. Finally, we have synthesized 5-(N-acetylcystein-S-yl)-N-methyl-alpha-MeDA and established that it is a relatively potent serotonergic neurotoxicant. Together, the data support the contention that MDMA-mediated serotonergic neurotoxicity is mediated by the systemic formation of GSH and N-acetylcysteine conjugates of N-methyl-alpha-MeDA (and alpha-MeDA). The mechanisms by which such metabolites access the brain and produce selective

  3. Characterization of [(3)H]harmane binding to rat whole brain membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, N J; Robinson, E S J; Husbands, S M; Delagrange, P; Nutt, D J; Hudson, A L

    2003-12-01

    This study investigates the binding of [(3)H]harmane to rat whole brain homogenates. Saturation studies revealed [(3)H]harmane labels a single, saturable, high-capacity population with high affinity. All the test compounds displaced [(3)H]harmane completely and in an apparently monophasic manner. The displacement profile of the test ligands indicated labeling of MAO-A. Given the high level of MAO-A binding, it is unlikely that a low-capacity I(2) site would be distinguishable from the total [(3)H]harmane population.

  4. Energy and glucose pathways in thiamine deficient primary rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, D; Karska-Wysocki, B

    2005-12-01

    Thiamine deficiency (TD) results in lactate acidosis, which is associated with neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate this alteration in primary rat brain endothelia. Spectrophotometric analysis of culture media revealed that only a higher concentration of pyrithiamine, which accelerates the intracellular blocking of thiamine, significantly elevated the lactate level and lactate dehydrogenase activity within 7 days. The medium without pyrithiamine and with a thiamine concentration comparable to pathophysiological plasma levels mildly reduced only the activity of transketolase. This suggests that significant metabolic changes may not occur at the early phase of TD in cerebral capillary cells, while anaerobic glycolysis in capillaries may be mediated during late stage/chronic TD.

  5. Free-Radical Scavenger Edaravone Treatment Confers Neuroprotection Against Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Hua; Li, Yong-Cai; Li, Xia; Shi, Hong; Gao, Yan-Qin; Vosler, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of neurological disability in young adults. Edaravone, a novel synthetic small-molecule free-radical scavenger, has been shown to have a neuroprotective effect in both animal models of cerebral ischemia and stroke patients; however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this report, we investigated the potential mechanisms of edaravone treatment in a rat model of TBI. TBI was induced in the right cerebral cortex of male adult rats using Feeney's weight-drop method. Edaravone (0.75, 1.5, or 3 mg/kg) or vehicle (normal saline) was intravenously administered at 2 and 12 h after TBI. Edaravone treatment significantly decreased hippocampal CA3 neuron loss, reduced oxidative stress, and decreased neuronal programmed cell death compared to vehicle treatment. The protective effects of edaravone treatment were also related to the pathology of TBI on non-neuronal cells, as edaravone decreased astrocyte and glial activation. Lastly, edaravone treatment significantly reduced the presence of inflammatory cytokines, cerebral edema, blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability, and, importantly, neurological deficits following TBI. Our results suggest that edaravone exerts a neuroprotective effect in the rat model of TBI. The likely mechanism is via inhibiting oxidative stress, leading to a decreased inflammatory response and glial activation, and thereby reducing neuronal death and improving neurological function. PMID:21732763

  6. Sex Differences in Serotonin 1 Receptor Binding in Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischette, Christine T.; Biegon, Anat; McEwen, Bruce S.

    1983-10-01

    Male and female rats exhibit sex differences in binding by serotonin 1 receptors in discrete areas of the brain, some of which have been implicated in the control of ovulation and of gonadotropin release. The sex-specific changes in binding, which occur in response to the same hormonal (estrogenic) stimulus, are due to changes in the number of binding sites. Castration alone also affects the number of binding sites in certain areas. The results lead to the conclusion that peripheral hormones modulate binding by serotonin 1 receptors. The status of the serotonin receptor system may affect the reproductive capacity of an organism and may be related to sex-linked emotional disturbances in humans.

  7. The effects of raloxifene treatment on oxidative status in brain tissues and learning process of ovariectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süreyya Osmanova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effects of estrogene on central nervous system are still controversial. Objective: We aimed to investigate the effects of raloxifene on the antioxidant enzyme [superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT] activities and malondialdehyde (MDA levels in brain homogenates of ovariectomized female rats and its effect on cognitive process of learning.Materials and Methods: Female Sprague Dawley rats (n=24 were divided into three groups. Three weeks after ovariectomy; nonovariectomized group (control group (n=8 was given physiological saline (SP as placebo. First ovariectomized group (n=8 received raloxifene 1mg/kg dissolved in a 1% solution of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC subcutaneusly (sc and second group of ovariectomized rats were given 1 % CMC 1mg/kg (sc every day for 14 days. Learning behaviors of rats were evaluated in active avoidence cage with using sound and electrical stimulation. The levels of oxidative stress (MDA and antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT in different regions of the brain homogenates were compared between three groups of decapitated rats.Results: Raloxifene had a significant attenuating effect on the levels of MDA in brain tissues suggesting raloxifene’s effect against lipid peroxidation at the end of training days. With the comparison of brain regions, cortex showed the highest average activity of SOD and CAT and cerebellum had the lowest average levels for both. Its effects on learning and cognitive process with active avoidence task were considered insignificant.Conclusion: Raloxifene treatment may have preventive effects for the brain against oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in rats

  8. Decreased α1-adrenergic receptor-mediated inositide hydrolysis in neurons from hypertensive rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldstein, J.B.; Gonzales, R.A.; Baker, S.P.; Sumners, C.; Crews, F.T.; Raizada, M.K.

    1986-01-01

    The expression of α 1 -adrenergic receptors and norepinephrine (NE)-stimulated hydrolysis of inositol phospholipid has been studied in neuronal cultures from the brains of normotensive (Wistar-Kyoto, WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. Binding of 125 I-1-[β-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethyl-aminomethyl] tetralone (HEAT) to neuronal membranes was 68-85% specific and was rapid. Competition-inhibition experiments with various agonists and antagonists suggested that 125 I-HEAT bound selectively to α 1 -adrenergic receptors. Specific binding of 125 I-HEAT to neuronal membranes from SH rat brain cultures was 30-45% higher compared with binding in WKY normotensive controls. This increase was attributed to an increase in the number of α 1 -adrenergic receptors on SH rat brain neurons. Incubation of neuronal cultures of rat brain from both strains with NE resulted in a concentration-dependent stimulation of release of inositol phosphates, although neurons from SH rat brains were 40% less responsive compared with WKY controls. The decrease in responsiveness of SH rat brain neurons to NE, even though the α 1 -adrenergic receptors are increased, does not appear to be due to a general defect in membrane receptors and postreceptor signal transduction mechanisms. This is because neither the number of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors nor the carbachol-stimulated release of inositol phosphates is different in neuronal cultures from the brains of SH rats compared with neuronal cultures from the brains of WKY rats. These observations suggest that the increased expression of α 1 -adrenergic receptors does not parallel the receptor-mediated inositol phosphate hydrolysis in neuronal cultures from SH rat brain

  9. Caspase Activation in Fetal Rat Brain Following Experimental Intrauterine Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharangpani, Aditi; Takanohashi, Asako; Bell, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Intrauterine inflammation has been implicated in developmental brain injuries, including the development of periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) and cerebral palsy (CP). Previous studies in our rat model of intrauterine inflammation demonstrated apoptotic cell death in fetal brains within the first 5 days after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration to mothers and eventual dysmyelination. Cysteine-containing, aspartate-specific proteases, or caspases, are proteins involved with apoptosis through both intracellular (intrinsic pathway) and extracellular (extrinsic pathway) mechanisms. We hypothesized that cell death in our model would occur mainly via activation of the extrinsic pathway. We further hypothesized that Fas, a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily, would be increased and the death inducing signaling complex (DISC) would be detectable. Pregnant rats were injected intracervically with LPS at E15 and immunoblotting, immunohistochemical and immunoprecipitation analyses were performed. The presence of the activated form of the effector caspase (caspase-3) was observed 24 h after LPS administration. Caspase activity assays demonstrated rapid increases in (i) caspases-9 and -10 within 1 h, (ii) caspase-8 at 2 h and (iii) caspase-3 at 4 h. At 24 h after LPS, activated caspase-3+/Fas+ cells were observed within the developing white matter. Lastly, the DISC complex (caspase-8, Fas and Fas-associated Death Domain (FADD)) was observed within 30 min by immunoprecipitation. Apoptosis in our model occurs via both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways, and activation of Fas may play a role. Understanding the mechanisms of cell death in models of intrauterine inflammation may affect development of future strategies to mitigate these injuries in children. PMID:18289516

  10. Blood-brain barrier alterations provide evidence of subacute diaschisis in an ischemic stroke rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Garbuzova-Davis

    Full Text Available Comprehensive stroke studies reveal diaschisis, a loss of function due to pathological deficits in brain areas remote from initial ischemic lesion. However, blood-brain barrier (BBB competence in subacute diaschisis is uncertain. The present study investigated subacute diaschisis in a focal ischemic stroke rat model. Specific focuses were BBB integrity and related pathogenic processes in contralateral brain areas.In ipsilateral hemisphere 7 days after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO, significant BBB alterations characterized by large Evans Blue (EB parenchymal extravasation, autophagosome accumulation, increased reactive astrocytes and activated microglia, demyelinization, and neuronal damage were detected in the striatum, motor and somatosensory cortices. Vascular damage identified by ultrastuctural and immunohistochemical analyses also occurred in the contralateral hemisphere. In contralateral striatum and motor cortex, major ultrastructural BBB changes included: swollen and vacuolated endothelial cells containing numerous autophagosomes, pericyte degeneration, and perivascular edema. Additionally, prominent EB extravasation, increased endothelial autophagosome formation, rampant astrogliosis, activated microglia, widespread neuronal pyknosis and decreased myelin were observed in contralateral striatum, and motor and somatosensory cortices.These results demonstrate focal ischemic stroke-induced pathological disturbances in ipsilateral, as well as in contralateral brain areas, which were shown to be closely associated with BBB breakdown in remote brain microvessels and endothelial autophagosome accumulation. This microvascular damage in subacute phase likely revealed ischemic diaschisis and should be considered in development of treatment strategies for stroke.

  11. Protective effect of crocin on acrolein-induced tau phosphorylation in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashedinia, Marzieh; Lari, Parisa; Abnous, Khalil; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Acrolein, as a by-product of lipid peroxidation, is implicated in brain aging and in the pathogenesis of oxidative stressmediated neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Widespread human exposure to the toxic environmental pollutant that is acrolein renders it necessary to evaluate the effects of exogenous acrolein on the brain. This study investigated the toxic effects of oral administration of 3 mg/kg/day acrolein on the rat cerebral cortex. Moreover, the neuroprotective effects of crocin, the main constituent of saffron, against acrolein toxicity were evaluated. We showed that acrolein decreased concentration of glutathione (GSH) and increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), Amyloid-beta (Abeta) and phospho-tau in the brain. Simultaneously, acrolein activated Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) signalling pathways. Co-administration of crocin significantly attenuated MDA, Abeta and p-tau levels by modulating MAPKs signalling pathways. Our data demonstrated that environmental exposure to acrolein triggers some molecular events which contribute to brain aging and neurodisorders. Additionally, crocin as an antioxidant is a promising candidate for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, such as brain aging and AD.

  12. Autoradiographic localization of (125I-Tyr4)bombesin-binding sites in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarbin, M.A.; Kuhar, M.J.; O'Donohue, T.L.; Wolf, S.S.; Moody, T.W.

    1985-01-01

    The binding of ( 125 I-Tyr 4 )bombesin to rat brain slices was investigated. Radiolabeled (Tyr 4 )bombesin bound with high affinity (K/sub d/ . 4 nM) to a single class of sites (B/sub max/ . 130 fmol/mg of protein); the ratio of specific to nonspecific binding was 6/1. Also, pharmacology studies indicated that the C-terminal of bombesin was important for the high affinity binding activity. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the ( 125 I-Tyr4)bombesin-binding sites were discretely distributed in certain gray but not white matter regions of rat brain. Highest grain densities were present in the olfactory bulb and tubercle, nucleus accumbens, suprachiasmatic and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, central medial thalamic nucleus, medial amygdaloid nucleus, hippocampus, dentate gyrus, subiculum, nucleus of the solitary tract, and substantia gelatinosa. Moderate grain densities were present in the parietal cortex, deep layers of the neocortex, rhinal cortex, caudate putamen, stria terminalis, locus ceruleus, parabrachial nucleus, and facial nucleus. Low grain densities were present in the globus pallidus, lateral thalamus, and midbrain. Negligible grain densities were present in the cerebellum, corpus callosum, and all regions treated with 1 microM unlabeled bombesin. The discrete regional distribution of binding suggests that endogenous bombesin-like peptides may function as important regulatory agents in certain brain loci

  13. Distribution of dearomatised white spirit in brain, blood, and fat tissue after repeated exposure of rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lof, A.; Lam, Henrik Rye; Gullstrand, E.

    1999-01-01

    Petroleum products with low content of aromatics have been increasingly used during the past years. This study investigates tissue disposition of dearomatised white spirit. In addition, brain neurotransmitter concentrations were measured. Male rats were exposed by inhalation to 0, 400 (2.29 mg....../l), or 800 p.p.m. (4.58 mg/l) of dearomatised white spirit, 6 hr/day, 5 days/week up to 3 weeks. Five rats from each group were sacrificed immediately after the exposure for 1, 2, or 3 weeks and 2, 4, 6, or 24 hr after the end of 3 weeks' exposure. After 3 weeks of exposure the concentration of total white...... spirit was 1.5 and 5.6 mg/kg in blood; 7.1 and 17.1 mg/kg in brain; 432 and 1452 mg/kg in fat tissue at the exposure levels of 400 and 800 p.p.m., respectively. The concentrations of n-nonane, n-decane, n-undecane, and total white spirit in blood and brain were not affected by the duration of exposure...

  14. Effects of post mortem interval and gender in DNA base excision repair activities in rat brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltys, Daniela Tathiana; Pereira, Carolina Parga Martins; Ishibe, Gabriela Naomi; Souza-Pinto, Nadja Cristhina de, E-mail: nadja@iq.usp.br

    2015-06-15

    Most human tissues used in research are of post mortem origin. This is the case for all brain samples, and due to the difficulty in obtaining a good number of samples, especially in the case of neurodegenerative diseases, male and female samples are often included in the same experimental group. However, the effects of post mortem interval (PMI) and gender differences in the endpoints being analyzed are not always fully understood, as is the case for DNA repair activities. To investigate these effects, in a controlled genetic background, base excision repair (BER) activities were measured in protein extracts obtained from Wistar rat brains from different genders and defined PMI up to 24 hours, using a novel fluorescent-based in vitro incision assay. Uracil and AP-site incision activity in nuclear and mitochondrial extracts were similar in all groups included in this study. Our results show that gender and PMI up to 24 hours have no influence in the activities of the BER proteins UDG and APE1 in rat brains. These findings demonstrate that these variables do not interfere on the BER activities included in these study, and provide a security window to work with UDG and APE1 proteins in samples of post mortem origin.

  15. Effects of post mortem interval and gender in DNA base excision repair activities in rat brains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltys, Daniela Tathiana; Pereira, Carolina Parga Martins; Ishibe, Gabriela Naomi; Souza-Pinto, Nadja Cristhina de

    2015-01-01

    Most human tissues used in research are of post mortem origin. This is the case for all brain samples, and due to the difficulty in obtaining a good number of samples, especially in the case of neurodegenerative diseases, male and female samples are often included in the same experimental group. However, the effects of post mortem interval (PMI) and gender differences in the endpoints being analyzed are not always fully understood, as is the case for DNA repair activities. To investigate these effects, in a controlled genetic background, base excision repair (BER) activities were measured in protein extracts obtained from Wistar rat brains from different genders and defined PMI up to 24 hours, using a novel fluorescent-based in vitro incision assay. Uracil and AP-site incision activity in nuclear and mitochondrial extracts were similar in all groups included in this study. Our results show that gender and PMI up to 24 hours have no influence in the activities of the BER proteins UDG and APE1 in rat brains. These findings demonstrate that these variables do not interfere on the BER activities included in these study, and provide a security window to work with UDG and APE1 proteins in samples of post mortem origin

  16. Effects of ebselen on ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, M; Altaş, M; Meydan, S; Nacar, E; Karcıoğlu, M; Ulutaş, K T; Serarslan, Y

    2014-10-01

    Interruption of blood flow may result in considerable tissue damage via ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury-induced oxidative stress in brain tissues. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of Ebselen treatment in short-term global brain I/R injury in rats. The study was carried out on 27 Wistar-albino rats, divided into three groups including Sham group (n = 11), I/R group (n = 8) and I/R+Ebselen group (n = 8). Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly increased in I/R group in comparison with the Sham group and I/R+Ebselen group (p Ebselen (p Ebselen group when compared with Sham group (p Ebselen group when compared with Sham (p Ebselen showed morphological improvement. Ebselen has neuron-protective effects due to its antioxidant properties as shown by the decrease in MDA overproduction, increase in SOD activity and the histological improvement after administration of Ebselen to I/R in brain tissue.

  17. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    , and aspartate and incorporation of (15)NH4(+) into these amino acids in brain, liver, muscle, kidney, and plasma were similar in sham and BDL rats treated with saline. Methionine sulfoximine reduced glutamine concentrations in liver, kidney, and plasma but not in brain and muscle; MSO reduced incorporation...... of (15)NH4(+) into glutamine in all tissues. It did not affect alanine concentrations in any of the tissues but plasma alanine concentration increased; incorporation of (15)NH4(+) into alanine was increased in brain in sham and BDL rats and in kidney in sham rats. It inhibited GS in all tissues examined...

  18. The expression and significance of tyrosine hydroxylase in the brain tissue of Parkinsons disease rats

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yuan; Lian, Yajun; Ma, Yunqing; Wu, Chuanjie; Zheng, Yake; Xie, Nanchang

    2017-01-01

    The expression and significance of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in brain tissue of rats with Parkinson's disease (PD) were explored and analyzed. A total of 120 clean-grade and healthy adult Wistar rats weighing 180–240 g were randomly divided equally into four groups according to the random number table method. Rats were sacrificed before and after the model establishment for 3, 6 or 8 weeks. The number of revolutions in rats was observed and the relative expression of TH mRNA in brain tissue w...

  19. [Interference of vitamin E on the brain tissue damage by electromagnetic radiation of cell phone in pregnant and fetal rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xian; Luo, Rui; Ma, Bin; Wang, Hui; Liu, Tian; Zhang, Jing; Lian, Zhishun; Cui, Xi

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the interlerence ot vitamin E on brain tissue damage by electromagnetic radiation of cell phone in pregnant and fetal rats. 40 pregnant rats were randomly divided into five groups (positive control, negative control, low, middle and high dosage of vitamin E groups). The low, middle and high dosage of vitamin E groups were supplemented with 5, 15 and 30 mg/ml vitamin E respectively since the first day of pregnancy. And the negative control group and the positive control group were given peanut oil without vitamin E. All groups except for the negative control group were exposed to 900MHz intensity of cell phone radiation for one hour each time, three times per day for 21 days. After accouchement, the right hippocampus tissue of fetal rats in each group was taken and observed under electron microscope. The vitality of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) in pregnant and fetal rats' brain tissue were tested. Compared with the negative control group, the chondriosomes in neuron and neuroglia of brain tissues was swelling, mild edema was found around the capillary, chromatin was concentrated and collected, and bubbles were formed in vascular endothelial cells (VEC) in the positive fetal rat control group, whereas the above phenomenon was un-conspicuous in the middle and high dosage of vitamin E groups. We can see uniform chromatin, abundant mitochondrion, rough endoplasmic reticulum and free ribosomes in the high dosage group. The apoptosis has not fond in all groups'sections. In the antioxidase activity analysis, compared with the negative control group, the vitality of SOD and GSH-Px significantly decreased and the content of MDA significantly increased both in the pregnant and fetal rats positive control group (P electromagnetic radiation of cell phone in pregnant rats and fetal rats.

  20. [Expression of c-jun protein after experimental rat brain concussion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Li, Yong-hong

    2010-02-01

    To observe e-jun protein expression after rat brain concussion and explore the forensic pathologic markers following brain concussion. Fifty-five rats were randomly divided into brain concussion group and control group. The expression of c-jun protein was observed by immunohistochemistry. There were weak positive expression of c-jun protein in control group. In brain concussion group, however, some neutrons showed positive expression of c-jun protein at 15 min after brain concussion, and reach to the peak at 3 h after brain concussion. The research results suggest that detection of c-jun protein could be a marker to determine brain concussion and estimate injury time after brain concussion.

  1. Mobilization of stem cell with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor promotes recovery after traumatic brain injury in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Marzban

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was designed to investigate the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF administration in rats for 6 weeks after traumatic brain injury (TBI. Methods: Adult male Wistar rats (n = 30 were injured with controlled cortical impact device and divided into four groups. The treatment groups (n = 10 each were injected subcutaneously with recombinant human G-CSF. Vehicle group (n=10 received phosphate buffered saline (PBS and only Brdu intraperitoneally. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU was used for mitotic labeling. Experimental rats were injected intraperitoneally with BrdU. Rats were killed at 6th week after traumatic brain injury. Neurological functional evaluation of animals was performed before and after injury using neurological severity scores (NSS. Animals were sacrificed 42 days after TBI and brain sections were stained using Brdu immunohistochemistry. Results: Statistically significant improvement in functional outcome was observed in treatment groups when compared with control (p<0.01. This benefit was visible 7 days after TBI and persisted until 42 days (end of trial. Histological analysis showed that Brdu cell positive was more in the lesion boundary zone at treatment animal group than all injected animals. Discussion: We believe that G-CSF therapeutic protocol reported here represents an attractive strategy for the development of a clinically significant noninvasive traumatic brain injury therapy.

  2. The role of melatonin in radiation induced biochemical disturbances in brain and thyroid gland in adult male albino rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Kader, S.M.; EI-Sherbiny, E.M.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation induced changes in adult male albino male rats before and after melatonin administration were monitored to detect some biochemical changes in brain and thyroid gland. The parameters monitored were dopamine (DA), norepinephdne (NE) and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) in brain and triiodothyronine (T 3 ) thyroxine (T 4 ) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in serum of irradiated adult male albino rats before and after intraperitoneal injection of melatonin. Results indicated that 6.0 Gy whole body γ-irradiated rats showed gradual and significant decrease in DA, NE and GABA contents in different brain areas under investigation (cerebellum, pons+medulla oblongata, corpus striatum, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and hippocampus). The maximum effect of whole body γ-irradiation was observed after 21 days. Moreover, gradual and significant decrease in serum T 3 and T 4 levels were recorded after γ-irradiation. However, TSH level showed significant elevation throughout the experimental period. Melatonin at a dose level of 15 mg/kg b.wt. was intraperitoneally injected daily 30 minutes after 6.0 Gy whole body γ-irradiation, ameliorated DA, NE and GABA contents in different brain areas compared to those measured in irradiated rats. Moreover, melatonin gradually attenuated the effect of γ-irradiation on serum T 3 and T 4 levels to reach nearly the control level at day 21 after melatonin injection. However, melatonin ameliorated the elevated TSH level induced by γ-irradiation to reach its corresponding control value at day 21

  3. Effect of ethanol on enkephalinergic opioid system of rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyayev, N.A.; Balakireva, N.N.; Brusov, O.S.; Panchenko, L.F.

    1983-10-13

    Specific binding of /sup 3/H-morphine and /sup 3/H-(D-Ala/sup 2/, D-Leu/sup 5/)-enkephalin (H-EN) with opiatic receptors was studied on white rats along with the content of Met- and Leu-enkephalin and the activity of enkephalinase in various brain segments after single dose (20% solution in 0.9% NaCl, IP; 1.5-4.5 g/kg body weight) and chronic injection (20% EtOH substituted for drinking water) of ethanol. The single injection of EtOH (1.5-4.5 g/kg) resulted in a depression of the specific binding of H-EN with opiate receptors. Doses of 1.5 and 2.5 g/kg led to a lower content of Leu-enkephalin in mid-brain but to an increase of Met-enkephalin; the 4.5 g/kg dose had no effect on the striatum. With chronic administration of EtOH, most of the values obtained on the experimental animals were similar to the control data. 23 references.

  4. Cyclosporin safety in a simplified rat brain tumor implantation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco H. C. Felix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer is the second neurological cause of death. A simplified animal brain tumor model using W256 (carcinoma 256, Walker cell line was developed to permit the testing of novel treatment modalities. Wistar rats had a cell tumor solution inoculated stereotactically in the basal ganglia (right subfrontal caudate. This model yielded tumor growth in 95% of the animals, and showed absence of extracranial metastasis and systemic infection. Survival median was 10 days. Estimated tumor volume was 17.08±6.7 mm³ on the 7th day and 67.25±19.8 mm³ on 9th day post-inoculation. Doubling time was 24.25 h. Tumor growth induced cachexia, but no hematological or biochemical alterations. This model behaved as an undifferentiated tumor and can be promising for studying tumor cell migration in the central nervous system. Dexamethasone 3.0 mg/kg/day diminished significantly survival in this model. Cyclosporine 10 mg/kg/day administration was safely tolerated.

  5. Disordered redox metabolism of brain cells in rats exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation or UHF electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaka, A P; Druzhyna, M O; Vovk, A V; Lukin, S М

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the changes of redox-state of mammalian brain cells as the critical factor of initiation and formation of radiation damage of biological structures in setting of continuous exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation or fractionated ultra high frequency electromagnetic radiation (UHF EMR) at non-thermal levels. The influence of low-intensity ionizing radiation was studied on outbred female rats kept for 1.5 years in the Chernobyl accident zone. The effects of total EMR in the UHF band of non-thermal spectrum were investigated on Wistar rats. The rate of formation of superoxide radicals and the rate of NO synthesis in mitochondria were determined by the EPR. After exposure to ionizing or UHF radiation, the levels of ubisemiquinone in brain tissue of rats decreased by 3 and 1.8 times, respectively. The content of NO-FeS-protein complexes in both groups increased significantly (р < 0.05). In the conditions of ionizing or EMR the rates of superoxide radical generation in electron-transport chain of brain cell mitochondria increased by 1.5- and 2-fold, respectively (р < 0.05). In brain tissue of rats kept in the Chernobyl zone, significant increase of NO content was registered; similar effect was observed in rats treated with UHFR (р < 0.05). The detected changes in the electron transport chain of mitochondria of brain cells upon low-intensity irradiation or UHF EMR cause the metabolic reprogramming of cell mitochondria that increases the rate of superoxide radical generation and nitric oxide, which may initiate the development of neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "The Chornobyl Nuclear Accident: Thirty Years After".

  6. Investigations of primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, T. W.; Josey, T.; Wang, Y.; Villanueva, M.; Ritzel, D. V.; Nelson, P.; Lee, J. J.

    2018-01-01

    The development of an advanced blast simulator (ABS) has enabled the reproducible generation of single-pulse shock waves that simulate free-field blast with high fidelity. Studies with rodents in the ABS demonstrated the necessity of head restraint during head-only exposures. When the head was not restrained, violent global head motion was induced by pressures that would not produce similar movement of a target the size and mass of a human head. This scaling artefact produced changes in brain function that were reminiscent of traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to impact-acceleration effects. Restraint of the rodent head eliminated these, but still produced subtle changes in brain biochemistry, showing that blast-induced pressure waves do cause brain deficits. Further experiments were carried out with rat brain cell aggregate cultures that enabled the conduct of studies without the gross movement encountered when using rodents. The suspension nature of this model was also exploited to minimize the boundary effects that complicate the interpretation of primary blast studies using surface cultures. Using this system, brain tissue was found not only to be sensitive to pressure changes, but also able to discriminate between the highly defined single-pulse shock waves produced by underwater blast and the complex pressure history exposures experienced by aggregates encased within a sphere and subjected to simulated air blast. The nature of blast-induced primary TBI requires a multidisciplinary research approach that addresses the fidelity of the blast insult, its accurate measurement and characterization, as well as the limitations of the biological models used.

  7. Accumulation of lactate in the rat brain during hyperammonaemia is not associated with impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witt, Anne Møller; Larsen, Fin Stolze; Bjerring, Peter Nissen

    2017-01-01

    In acute liver failure (ALF) cerebral oedema and high intracranial pressure (ICP) are potentially deadly complications. Astrocytes cultured in ammonia have shown mitochondrial dysfunction and in rat models of liver failure, de novo lactate production in the brain has been observed and has led...... to a hypothesis of compromised brain metabolism during ALF. In contrast, normal lactate levels are found in cerebral microdialysate of ALF patients and the oxygen: glucose ratio of cerebral metabolic rates remains normal. To investigate this inconsistency we studied the mitochondrial function in brain tissue...... with respirometry in animal models of hyperammonaemia. Wistar rats with systemic inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide or liver insufficiency induced by 90% hepatectomy were given ammonium or sodium acetate for 120 min. A cerebral cortex homogenate was studied with respirometry and substrates of the citric...

  8. Neuroprotective effect of ginger in the brain of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Akabawy, Gehan; El-Kholy, Wael

    2014-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus results in neuronal damage caused by increased intracellular glucose leading to oxidative stress. Recent evidence revealed the potential of ginger for reducing diabetes-induced oxidative stress markers. The aim of this study is to investigate, for the first time, whether the antioxidant properties of ginger has beneficial effects on the structural brain damage associated with diabetes. We investigated the observable neurodegenerative changes in the frontal cortex, dentate gyrus, and cerebellum after 4, 6, and 8 weeks of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in rats and the effect(s) of ginger (500 mg/kg/day). Sections of frontal cortex, dentate gyrus, and cerebellum were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and examined using light microscopy. In addition, quantitative immunohistochemical assessments of the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, caspase-3, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and Ki67 were performed. Our results revealed a protective role of ginger on the diabetic brain via reducing oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. In addition, this study revealed that the beneficial effect of ginger was also mediated by modulating the astroglial response to the injury, reducing AChE expression, and improving neurogenesis. These results represent a new insight into the beneficial effects of ginger on the structural alterations of diabetic brain and suggest that ginger might be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of diabetic-induced damage in brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Fractionated radiosurgery for 9L gliosarcoma in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Ho; Khil, Mark S.; Kolozsvary, Andrew; Gutierrez, Jorge A.; Brown, Stephen L.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Fractionated radiosurgery is being carried out in the clinic to improve the therapeutic ratio of single-dose radiosurgery using various fractionation schemes. Because there is a paucity of experimental radiobiological data in the literature on the tumor response and late-responding normal tissue of critical intracranial structures to radiosurgery, the present animal study was designed to compare the response following a single high dose of radiation with that obtained from calculated fractionated doses of radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Male Fischer rats with 9L gliosarcoma growing in their brains were stereotactically irradiated and assayed for the tumor control rate and brain tissue damage. The radiation dose needed for 50% tumor control (TCD 50 ) was used as the endpoint of the efficacy of radiosurgery. Normal brain damage was measured histologically following a period of time over 270 days. Histological evaluation included hematoxylin-eosin (H and E), Luxol fast blue and periodic acid Schiff (LFB/PAS) for the presence of myelin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) for the assessment of astrocytic re-activity. The optical density of optic nerves and chiasms staining with LFB/PAS was quantitatively measured using a computer image analysis to assess the magnitude of demyelination. Results: Radiosurgery (RS) was found to be more effective in curing small tumors than large tumors. The dose required to control 50% of the tumored animals for 120 days was 24, 31, and 40 Gy for 2-, 6-, and 12-day-old tumors, respectively. Using 12-day-old brain tumors, two fractions of 23.5 Gy and three fractions of 18.5 Gy were found to be equivalent to the single dose of 35 Gy for tumor control. For normal brain damages, the visual pathways including optic nerves and chiasm were found to be highly radiosensitive structures. A single dose of 35 Gy produced 100% severe optic neuropathy. The fractionated RS regimens spared substantial optic nerve damage. Conclusion

  10. Effects of sublethal doses of gamma radiation on the developing rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerda, H.; Carlsson, J.; Larsson, B.; Saefwenberg, J.O.

    1975-01-01

    Newborn rats were irradiated with 60 Co gamma rays. Doses of 0, 80 or 160 rads were given to the whole body. The whole body and brain weights, DNA and RNA contents of the brain and 3 H-thymidine or 3 H-uridine incorporated by the brain were measured at 5, 10 or 15 days after birth. A dose of 160 rads produced clear alterations in the brain but no clear effects could be detected when 80 rads were given. (author)

  11. Glucose and amino acid metabolism in rat brain during sustained hypoglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.; Tyce, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    The metabolism of glucose in brains during sustained hypoglycemia was studied. [U- 14 C]Glucose (20 microCi) was injected into control rats, and into rats at 2.5 hr after a bolus injection of 2 units of insulin followed by a continuous infusion of 0.2 units/100 g rat/hr. This regimen of insulin injection was found to result in steady-state plasma glucose levels between 2.5 and 3.5 mumol per ml. In the brains of control rats carbon was transferred rapidly from glucose to glutamate, glutamine, gamma-aminobutyric acid and aspartate and this carbon was retained in the amino acids for at least 60 min. In the brains of hypoglycemic rats, the conversion of carbon from glucose to amino acids was increased in the first 15 min after injection. After 15 min, the specific activity of the amino acids decreased in insulin-treated rats but not in the controls. The concentrations of alanine, glutamate, and gamma-amino-butyric acid decreased, and the concentration of aspartate increased, in the brains of the hypoglycemic rats. The concentration of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, a cofactor in many of the reactions whereby these amino acids are formed from tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, was less in the insulin-treated rats than in the controls. These data provide evidence that glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, and GABA can serve as energy sources in brain during insulin-induced hypoglycemia

  12. Oxidative stress and apoptosis after acute respiratory hypoxia and reoxygenation in rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Coimbra-Costa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute hypoxia increases the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the brain. However, the effect of reoxygenation, unavoidable to achieve full recovery of the hypoxic organ, has not been clearly established. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of exposition to acute severe respiratory hypoxia followed by reoxygenation on the evolution of oxidative stress and apoptosis in the brain. We investigated the effect of in vivo acute severe normobaric hypoxia (rats exposed to 7% O2 for 6 h and reoxygenation in normoxia (21% O2 for 24 h or 48 h on oxidative stress markers, the antioxidant system and apoptosis in the brain. After respiratory hypoxia we found increased levels of HIF-1α expression, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and nitric oxide in brain extracts. Antioxidant defence systems such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, reduced glutathione (GSH and glutathione peroxidase (GPx and the reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG ratio were significantly decreased in the brain. After 24 h of reoxygenation, oxidative stress parameters and the anti-oxidant system returned to control values. Regarding the apoptosis parameters, acute hypoxia increased cytochrome c, AIF and caspase 3 activity in the brain. The apoptotic effect is greatest after 24 h of reoxygenation. Immunohistochemistry suggests that CA3 and dentate gyrus in the hippocampus seem more susceptible to hypoxia than the cortex. Severe acute hypoxia increases oxidative damage, which in turn could activate apoptotic mechanisms. Our work is the first to demonstrate that after 24 h of reoxygenation oxidative stress is attenuated, while apoptosis is maintained mainly in the hippocampus, which may, in fact, be the cause of impaired brain function. Keywords: Antioxidants, Apoptosis, Normobaric hypoxia, Oxidative stress, Reoxygenation

  13. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity in brain and behavioral analysis in adult rats after chronic administration of fenproporex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezin, Gislaine T; Scaini, Giselli; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Cardoso, Mariane R; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Constantino, Larissa S; Deroza, Pedro F; Ghedim, Fernando V; Valvassori, Samira S; Resende, Wilson R; Quevedo, João; Zugno, Alexandra I; Streck, Emilio L

    2012-12-01

    Fenproporex is an amphetamine-based anorectic and it is rapidly converted in vivo into amphetamine. It elevates the levels of extracellular dopamine in the brain. Acetylcholinesterase is a regulatory enzyme which is involved in cholinergic synapses and may indirectly modulate the release of dopamine. Thus, we investigated whether the effects of chronic administration of fenproporex in adult rats alters acquisition and retention of avoidance memory and acetylcholinesterase activity. Adult male Wistar rats received repeated (14 days) intraperitoneal injection of vehicle or fenproporex (6.25, 12.5 or 25 mg/kg i.p.). For behavioral assessment, animals were submitted to inhibitory avoidance (IA) tasks and continuous multiple trials step-down inhibitory avoidance (CMIA). Acetylcholinesterase activity was measured in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum. The administration of fenproporex (6.25, 12.5 and 25 mg/kg) did not induce impairment in short and long-term IA or CMIA retention memory in rats. In addition, longer periods of exposure to fenproporex administration decreased acetylcholinesterase activity in prefrontal cortex and striatum of rats, but no alteration was verified in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. In conclusion, the present study showed that chronic fenproporex administration decreased acetylcholinesterase activity in the rat brain. However, longer periods of exposure to fenproporex did not produce impairment in short and long-term IA or CMIA retention memory in rats.

  14. Investigation of Epidermal Growth Factor, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha and Thioredoxin System in Rats Exposed to Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol-Demirbilek Melike

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR, epidermal growth factor (EGF and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α have neuroprotective/neurotoxic effects in cerebral ischemia. We aimed to investigate the TrxR activity, EGF and TNF-α levels in cerebral ischemic, sham-operated and non-ischemic rat brains.

  15. Performance Enhancement of the RatCAP Awake Rat Brain PET System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaska, P.; Woody, C.; Schlyer, D.; Radeka, V.; O'Connor, P.; Park, S.-J.; Pratte, J.-F.; Junnarkar, S.; Purschke, M.; Southekal, S.; Stoll, S.; Schiffer, W.; Lee, D.; Neill, J.; Wharton, D.; Myers, N.; Wiley, S.; Kandasamy, A.; Fried, J.; Krishnamoorthy, S.; Kriplani, A.; Maramraju, S.; Lecomte, R.; Fontaine, R.

    2011-01-01

    The first full prototype of the RatCAP PET system, designed to image the brain of a rat while conscious, has been completed. Initial results demonstrated excellent spatial resolution, 1.8 mm FWHM with filtered backprojection and <1.5 mm FWHM with a Monte Carlo based MLEM method. However, noise equivalent countrate studies indicated the need for better timing to mitigate the effect of randoms. Thus, the front-end ASIC has been redesigned to minimize time walk, an accurate coincidence time alignment method has been implemented, and a variance reduction technique for the randoms is being developed. To maximize the quantitative capabilities required for neuroscience, corrections are being implemented and validated for positron range and photon noncollinearity, scatter (including outside the field of view), attenuation, randoms, and detector efficiency (deadtime is negligible). In addition, a more robust and compact PCI-based optical data acquisition system has been built to replace the original VME-based system while retaining the linux-based data processing and image reconstruction codes. Finally, a number of new animal imaging experiments have been carried out to demonstrate the performance of the RatCAP in real imaging situations, including an F-18 fluoride bone scan, a C-11 raclopride scan, and a dynamic C-11 methamphetamine scan.

  16. Radio frequency radiation effects on protein kinase C activity in rats' brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulraj, R.; Behari, J.

    2004-01-01

    The present work describes the effect of amplitude modulated radio frequency (rf) radiation (112 MHz amplitude-modulated at 16 Hz) on calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) activity on developing rat brain. Thirty-five days old Wistar rats were used for this study. The rats were exposed 2 h per day for 35 days at a power density of 1.0 mW/cm 2 (SAR=1.48 W/kg). After exposure, rats were sacrificed and PKC was determined in whole brain, hippocampus and whole brain minus hippocampus separately. A significant decrease in the enzyme level was observed in the exposed group as compared to the sham exposed group. These results indicate that this type of radiation could affect membrane bound enzymes associated with cell signaling, proliferation and differentiation. This may also suggest an affect on the behavior of chronically exposed rats

  17. Localization of receptors for bombesin-like peptides in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, T.W.; Getz, R.; O'Donohue, T.L.; Rosenstein, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    BN-like peptides and receptors are present in discrete areas of the mammalian brain. By radioimmunoassay, endogenous BN/GRP, neuromedin B, and ranatensin-like peptides are present in the rat brain. High-to-moderate concentrations of BN/GRP are present in the rat hypothalamus and thalamus, whereas moderate-to-high densities of neuromedin B and ranatensin-like peptides are present in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus, as well as in the hypothalamus and thalamus. While the distribution of neuromedin B and ranatensin-like peptides appears similar, it is distinct from that of BN/GRP. When released from CNS neurons, these peptides may interact with receptors for BN-like peptides. BN, GRP, ranatensin, and neuromedin B inhibit specific [ 125 I-Tyr4]BN binding with high affinity. By use of in vitro autoradiographic techniques to detect binding of [ 125 I-Tyr4]BN to receptors for BN-like peptides, high grain densities were found in the olfactory bulb and tubercle, the nucleus accumbens, the suprachiasmatic and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, the central medial and paraventricular thalamic nuclei, the hippocampus, the dentate gyrus, and the amygdala of the rat brain. Some of these receptors may be biologically active and mediate the biological effects of BN-like peptides. For example, when BN is directly injected into the nucleus accumbens, pronounced grooming results and the effects caused by BN are reversed by spantide and [D-Phe12]BN. Thus, the putative BN receptor antagonists may serve as useful agents to investigate the biological significance of BN-like peptides in the CNS

  18. Low glucose utilization and neurodegenerative changes caused by sodium fluoride exposure in rat's developmental brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunyang; Zhang, Shun; Liu, Hongliang; Guan, Zhizhong; Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Cheng; Lei, Rongrong; Xia, Tao; Wang, Zhenglun; Yang, Lu; Chen, Yihu; Wu, Xue; Zhang, Xiaofei; Cui, Yushan; Yu, Linyu; Wang, Aiguo

    2014-03-01

    Fluorine, a toxic and reactive element, is widely prevalent throughout the environment and can induce toxicity when absorbed into the body. This study was to explore the possible mechanisms of developmental neurotoxicity in rats treated with different levels of sodium fluoride (NaF). The rats' intelligence, as well as changes in neuronal morphology, glucose absorption, and functional gene expression within the brain were determined using the Morris water maze test, transmission electron microscopy, small-animal magnetic resonance imaging and Positron emission tomography and computed tomography, and Western blotting techniques. We found that NaF treatment-impaired learning and memory in these rats. Furthermore, NaF caused neuronal degeneration, decreased brain glucose utilization, decreased the protein expression of glucose transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, and increased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the rat brains. The developmental neurotoxicity of fluoride may be closely associated with low glucose utilization and neurodegenerative changes.

  19. Environmental Enrichment, Performance, and Brain Injury in Male and Female Rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elliott, Brenda M

    2004-01-01

    ...) and physical enrichment (PE) on the cognitive performance of neurologically intact and brain-injured rats and to determine if there are gender differences in these effects. Measures of basic (i.e...

  20. Catechins decrease neurological severity score through apoptosis and neurotropic factor pathway in rat traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retty Ratnawati

    2017-08-01

    Administration of catechins decreased NSS through inhibiting inflammation and apoptosis, as well as induced the neurotrophic factors in rat brain injury. Catechins may serve as a potential intervention for TBI.

  1. A non-equilibrium 24-hour vasopressin radioimmunoassay: development and basal levels in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinton, R.E.; Deshmukh, P.P.; Chen, A.; Davis, T.P.; Hsiao, S.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper the authors report a highly-sensitive non-equilibrium RIA which can be performed within 24 h. To demonstrate the sensitivity of this RIA, brain regions from rat were examined for vasopressin content. (Auth.)

  2. Effects of ionizing radiation on purinergic signaling modulation in rat brain nerve cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanojevic, I.; Milosevic, M.; Drakulic, D.; Horvat, A.; Stanojevic, I.)

    2007-01-01

    Purinergic signaling is composed of three modulatory components: a) source of extracellular nucleotides, b) specific receptor expression for these transmitter molecules and c) ectonucleotidase selection that dictate cell response gradually degradation extracellular nucleotides to nucleosides. ATP acts as a fast excitatory transmitter in the CNS. Postsynaptic actions of ATP are mediated by an extended family of purinergic, P2X receptors, widely expressed throughout the CNS. NTPDases hydrolyse extracellular ATP and ADP to AMP and are responsive for purinergfic termination. To investigate if ionizing irradiation could modulate CNS purinergic signalization we monitored activity of NTPDases and abundance of P2X7 receptor in synaptic plasma membranes after whole-body acute irradiation using low (0,5Gy) or therapeutic (2Gy) doses, 1h i 72h after irradiating juvenile (15-day old) and adult (90-day old) rats. Acute irradiation modulate purinergic system components investigated at the different ways in the rat development brain SPM and in the adult brain dependent of dose and time after irradiation [sr

  3. Chronic Hyperinsulinaemic Hypoglycaemia in Rats Is Accompanied by Increased Body Weight, Hyperleptinaemia, and Decreased Neuronal Glucose Transporter Levels in the Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vivi F. H.; Molck, Anne-Marie; Chapman, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    of cerebral glucose transporters. Compensatory measures in the brain during chronic insulin-induced hypoglycaemia are less well understood. The present study investigated how the brain of nondiabetic rats copes with chronic insulin-induced hypoglycaemia for up to eight weeks. Brain level of different...... substrate transporters and redox homeostasis was evaluated. Hyperinsulinaemia for 8 weeks consistently lowered blood glucose levels by 30–50% (4–6 mM versus 7–9 mM in controls). The animals had increased food consumption, body weights, and hyperleptinaemia. During infusion, protein levels of the brain......The brain is vulnerable to hypoglycaemia due to a continuous need of energy substrates to meet its high metabolic demands. Studies have shown that severe acute insulin-induced hypoglycaemia results in oxidative stress in the rat brain, when neuroglycopenia cannot be evaded despite increased levels...

  4. Selective labelling of 5-HT{sub 7} receptor recognition sites in rat brain using [{sup 3}H]5-carboxamidotryptamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowe, R.L.; Barnes, N.M. [Department of Pharmacology, The Medical School, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish a radioligand binding assay to selectively label the native 5-HT{sub 7} receptor expressed in rat brain. In rat whole brain (minus cerebellum and striatum) homogenate, ({+-})-pindolol (10 {mu}M)-insensitive [{sup 3}H]5-CT ([{sup 3}H]5-carboxamidotryptamine; 0.5 nM) specific binding (defined by 5-HT, 10 {mu}M) displayed a pharmacological profile similar to the recombinant 5-HT{sub 7} receptor, although the Hill coefficients for competition curves generated by methiothepin, ritanserin, sumatriptan, clozapine and pimozide were significantly less than unity. In homogenates of rat hypothalamus, ({+-})-pindolol (10 {mu}M)-insensitive [{sup 3}H]5-CT recognition sites also resembled, pharmacologically, the 5-HT{sub 7} receptor, although pimozide still generated Hill coefficients significantly less than unity. Subsequent studies were performed in the additional presence of WAY100635 (100 nM) to prevent [{sup 3}H]5-CT binding to residual, possibly, 5-HT{sub 1A} sites. Competition for this [{sup 3}H]5-CT binding indicated the labelling in whole rat brain homogenate of a homogenous population of sites with the pharmacological profile of the 5-HT{sub 7} receptor. Saturation studies also indicated that ({+-})-pindolol (10 {mu}M)/WAY 100635 (100 nM)-insensitive [{sup 3}H]5-CT binding to homogenates of whole rat brain was saturable and to an apparently homogenous population of sites which were labelled with nanomolar affinity (B{sub max}=33.2{+-}0.7 fmol mg{sup -1} protein, pK{sub d}=8.78{+-}0.05, mean{+-}S.E.M., n=3). The development of this 5-HT{sub 7} receptor binding assay will aid investigation of the rat native 5-HT{sub 7} receptor. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  5. Selective labelling of 5-HT7 receptor recognition sites in rat brain using [3H]5-carboxamidotryptamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stowe, R.L.; Barnes, N.M.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish a radioligand binding assay to selectively label the native 5-HT 7 receptor expressed in rat brain. In rat whole brain (minus cerebellum and striatum) homogenate, (±)-pindolol (10 μM)-insensitive [ 3 H]5-CT ([ 3 H]5-carboxamidotryptamine; 0.5 nM) specific binding (defined by 5-HT, 10 μM) displayed a pharmacological profile similar to the recombinant 5-HT 7 receptor, although the Hill coefficients for competition curves generated by methiothepin, ritanserin, sumatriptan, clozapine and pimozide were significantly less than unity. In homogenates of rat hypothalamus, (±)-pindolol (10 μM)-insensitive [ 3 H]5-CT recognition sites also resembled, pharmacologically, the 5-HT 7 receptor, although pimozide still generated Hill coefficients significantly less than unity. Subsequent studies were performed in the additional presence of WAY100635 (100 nM) to prevent [ 3 H]5-CT binding to residual, possibly, 5-HT 1A sites. Competition for this [ 3 H]5-CT binding indicated the labelling in whole rat brain homogenate of a homogenous population of sites with the pharmacological profile of the 5-HT 7 receptor. Saturation studies also indicated that (±)-pindolol (10 μM)/WAY 100635 (100 nM)-insensitive [ 3 H]5-CT binding to homogenates of whole rat brain was saturable and to an apparently homogenous population of sites which were labelled with nanomolar affinity (B max =33.2±0.7 fmol mg -1 protein, pK d =8.78±0.05, mean±S.E.M., n=3). The development of this 5-HT 7 receptor binding assay will aid investigation of the rat native 5-HT 7 receptor. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. Effects of GSM modulated radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation on permeability of blood-brain barrier in male & female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sırav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2016-09-01

    With the increased use of mobile phones, their biological and health effects have become more important. Usage of mobile phones near the head increases the possibility of effects on brain tissue. This study was designed to investigate the possible effects of pulse modulated 900MHz and 1800MHz radio-frequency radiation on the permeability of blood-brain barrier of rats. Study was performed with 6 groups of young adult male and female wistar albino rats. The permeability of blood-brain barrier to intravenously injected evans blue dye was quantitatively examined for both control and radio-frequency radiarion exposed groups. For male groups; Evans blue content in the whole brain was found to be 0.08±0.01mg% in the control, 0.13±0.03mg% in 900MHz exposed and 0.26±0.05mg% in 1800MHz exposed animals. In both male radio-frequency radiation exposed groups, the permeability of blood-brain barrier found to be increased with respect to the controls (pradiation exposure was found more effective on the male animals (p0.01). However 900MHz pulse modulated radio-frequency exposure was found effective on the permeability of blood-brain barrier of female animals. Results have shown that 20min pulse modulated radio-frequency radiation exposure of 900MHz and 1800MHz induces an effect and increases the permeability of blood-brain barrier of male rats. For females, 900MHz was found effective and it could be concluded that this result may due to the physiological differences between female and male animals. The results of this study suggest that mobile phone radation could lead to increase the permeability of blood-brain barrier under non-thermal exposure levels. More studies are needed to demonstrate the mechanisms of that breakdown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Acute Systemic Hypoxia and Hypercapnia on Brain Damage in a Rat Model of Hypoxia-Ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanchao Yang

    Full Text Available Therapeutic hypercapnia has the potential for neuroprotection after global cerebral ischemia. Here we further investigated the effects of different degrees of acute systemic hypoxia in combination with hypercapnia on brain damage in a rat model of hypoxia and ischemia. Adult wistar rats underwent unilateral common carotid artery (CCA ligation for 60 min followed by ventilation with normoxic or systemic hypoxic gas containing 11%O2,13%O2,15%O2 and 18%O2 (targeted to PaO2 30-39 mmHg, 40-49 mmHg, 50-59 mmHg, and 60-69 mmHg, respectively or systemic hypoxic gas containing 8% carbon dioxide (targeted to PaCO2 60-80 mmHg for 180 min. The mean artery pressure (MAP, blood gas, and cerebral blood flow (CBF were evaluated. The cortical vascular permeability and brain edema were examined. The ipsilateral cortex damage and the percentage of hippocampal apoptotic neurons were evaluated by Nissl staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL assay as well as flow cytometry, respectively. Immunofluorescence and western blotting were performed to determine aquaporin-4 (AQP4 expression. In rats treated with severe hypoxia (PaO2 50 mmHg, hypercapnia protected against these pathophysiological changes. Moreover, hypercapnia treatment significantly reduced brain damage in the ischemic ipsilateral cortex and decreased the percentage of apoptotic neurons in the hippocampus after the CCA ligated rats were exposed to mild or moderate hypoxemia (PaO2 > 50 mmHg; especially under mild hypoxemia (PaO2 > 60 mmHg, hypercapnia significantly attenuated the expression of AQP4 protein with brain edema (p < 0.05. Hypercapnia exerts beneficial effects under mild to moderate hypoxemia and augments detrimental effects under severe hypoxemia on brain damage in a rat model of hypoxia-ischemia.

  8. Role of aqueous extract of Cynodon dactylon in prevention of carbofuran- induced oxidative stress and acetylcholinesterase inhibition in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, D K; Sharma, R K; Rai, P K; Watal, G; Sharma, B

    2011-02-12

    The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorating effect of aqueous extract of C. dactylon on carbofuran induced oxidative stress (OS) and alterations in the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the brain of rats. Vitamin C was used as a positive control. Wistar rats were administered with single sub-acute oral dose (1.6 mgkg-1 b.wt.) of carbofuran for 24 h. The OS parameters such as lipid peroxidation (LPO) and the activities of antioxidant enzymes including super oxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and that of AChE were studied in brain. Carbofuran treatment significantly increased the activities of SOD and CAT by 75 and 60%, respectively. It also induced the level of LPO by 113%. In contrast, the activities of GST and AChE were recorded to be diminished by 25 and 33%, respectively. Pretreatment of the rats with aqueous extract of C. dactylon (oral; 500mgkg-1) restored SOD activity completely but CAT activity only partially (7%). Carbofuran induced LPO was moderated by 95% in the brain of C. dactylon treated rats. The observed changes in OS parameters in C. dactylon treated group were comparable to that observed in vitamin C (200 mg-kg-1 b. wt.) treated group. Surprisingly, C. dactylon treatment significantly recovered the activity of AChE to a similar level as observed in the brain of control group. In contrast vitamin C treatment did not cause significant change in the activity of AChE in carbofuran treated group. There were no noticeable changes in the aforementioned study parameters in the brain of rats receiving C. dactylon and vitamin C, only. The results suggest that the study is extremely important in the context of development of new anticholinestesterase and antioxidant antidotes against carbofuran from C. dactylon.

  9. Effect of naturally mouldy wheat or fungi administration on metallothioneins level in brain tissues of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasatkova, Anna; Krizova, Sarka; Krystofova, Olga; Adam, Vojtech; Zeman, Ladislav; Beklova, Miroslava; Kizek, Rene

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine level of metallothioneins (MTs) in brain tissues of rats administered by feed mixtures with different content of mouldy wheat or fungi. Selected male laboratory rats of Wistar albino at age of 28 days were used in our experiments. The rats were administered by feed mixtures with different content of vitamins, naturally mouldy wheat or fungi for 28 days. At the very end of the experiment, the animals were put to death and brains were sampled. MT level was determined by differential pulse voltammetry Brdicka reaction. We found that MTs' level in brain tissues from rats administered by standard feed mixtures was significantly higher compared to the level of MTs in rats supplemented by vitamins. Further we studied the effect of supplementation of naturally mouldy wheat on MTs level in rats. In mouldy wheat we detected the presence of following fungi species: Mucor spp., Absidia spp., Penicillium spp., Aspergillus spp. and Fusarium spp. Moreover we also identified and quantified following mycotoxins - deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, T2-toxin and aflatoxins. Level of MTs determined in rats treated with 33 or 66% of mouldy wheat was significantly lower compared to control ones. On the other hand rats treated with 100% of mouldy wheat had less MTs but not significantly. Supplementation of vitamins to rats fed by mouldy wheat had adverse effect on MTs level compared to rats with no other supplementation by vitamins. Moreover vitamins supplementation has no effect on MTs level in brain tissues of rats treated or non-treated with Ganoderma lucidum L. Both mycotoxins and vitamins have considerable effect on level of MTs in brain tissues. It can be assumed that the administered substances markedly influence redox metabolism, which could negatively influence numerous biochemical pathways including those closely related with MTs.

  10. [Alterations of glial fibrillary acidic protein in rat brain after gamma knife irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Z M; Jiang, B; Ma, J R

    2001-08-28

    To study glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity in different time and water content of the rat brain treated with gamma knife radiotherapy and to understand the alteration course of the brain lesion after a single high dose radiosurgical treatment. In the brains of the normal rats were irradiated by gamma knife with 160 Gy-high dose. The irradiated rats were then killed on the 1st day, 7th day, 14th day, and 28th day after radiotherapy, respectively. The positive cells of GFAP in brain tissue were detected by immunostaining; the water content of the brain tissue was measured by microgravimetry. The histological study of the irradiated brain tissue was performed with H.E. and examined under light microscope. The numbers of GFAP-positive astrocytes began to increase on the 1st day after gamma knife irradiation. It was enlarged markedly in the number and size of GFAP-stained astrocytes over the irradiated areas. Up to the 28th day, circumscribed necrosis foci (4 mm in diameter) was seen in the central area of the target. In the brain tissue around the necrosis, GFAP-positive astrocytes significantly increased (P gravity in the irradiated brain tissue the 14th and 28th day after irradiation. The results suggest that GFAP can be used as a marker for the radiation-induced brain injury. The brain edema and disruption of brain-blood barrier can be occurred during the acute stage after irradiation.

  11. The observation of blood-brain barrier of organic mercury poisoned rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwabara, Takeo; Yuasa, Tatsuhiko; Hidaka, Kazuyuki; Igarashi, Hironaka; Kaneko, Kiyotoshi; Miyatake, Tadashi

    1989-01-01

    Permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of methymercury chrolide (MMC) intoxicated rat brain was studied in vivo by gadlinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), measuring the longitudinal relaxation time (T 1 ) and the transverse relaxation time (T 2 ). MMC intoxicated rat brain showed the prolonged T 1 in the cerebral white matter and prolonged T 2 in the cerebellar cortex. After Gd-DTPA administration, T 1 of cerebral and cerebellar white matter shortened from 1.647 to 1.344 sec., and 1.290 to 1.223 sec. respectively. On the contrary, T 2 showed no change after Gd-DTPA injection. It was concluded that, although the shortening of T 1 after Gd-DTPA enhancement was rather little when compared with experimental brain ischemia, the shortening of the relaxation time of the MMC intoxicated rat brain was caused by the increased permeability of BBB. (author)

  12. The effect of Quinpirol and Sulpiride on the brain activity waves in conscious and aneasthetized rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komaki AR

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain's waves are produced by spontaneous activity of neurons. These waves are changed by neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNS. Concentration of these neurotransmitters can be changed by various drugs and total power of brain waves also increase or decrease by these drugs. In this research effect of Quinpirol and Sulpiride on the brain waves was investigated. Male wistar rats (weight 190-230 were aneasthetized with thiopental and two holes were made into the frontal and occipital area and two Ag/AgCl electrodes were fixed into these holes. One week after recovery, two electrodes were connected to the physiograph and the results were analyzed before and after intraperitoneal and intracerebroventricular (ICV injection of drugs by PC computer. Our results showed that intraperitoneal administration (5 mg/kg of diazepam reduced the depth of anesthesia. Conversely, intracerebroventricular injection of sulpiride increased the depth of anesthesia which was manifested by an increase in relative power of delta waves and reduction of relative power of alpha waves. This drug had a biphasic effect on EEG, at high doses in increased the depth of aneasthesia and total sleep. Wehteas depth of anesthesia was decreased at low dose. Simutanuos administration of sulpiride and quinpirole produced an effect on EEG similar to diazepam. As a result, biphasic effect of D2 agonist and antagonist drugs on brain waves are due to nonspecific action of these drugs on these receptors and this effect may be produced by other mechanisms

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of cold injury-induced brain edema in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houkin, Kiyohiro; Abe, Hiroshi; Hashiguchi, Yuji; Seri, Shigemi.

    1996-01-01

    The chronological changes of blood-brain barrier disruption, and diffusion and absorption of edema fluid were investigated in rats with cold-induced brain injury (vasogenic edema) using magnetic resonance imaging. Contrast medium was administered intravenously at 3 and 24 hours after lesioning as a tracer of edema fluid. Serial T 1 -weighted multiple-slice images were obtained for 180 minutes after contrast administration. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier was more prominent at 24 hours after lesioning than at 3 hours. Contrast medium leaked from the periphery of the injury and gradually diffused to the center of the lesion. Contrast medium diffused into the corpus callosum and the ventricular system (cerebrospinal fluid). Disruption of the blood-brain barrier induced by cold injury was most prominent at the periphery of the vasogenic edema. Edema fluid subsequently extended into the center of the lesion and was also absorbed by the ventricular system. Magnetic resonance imaging is a useful method to assess the efficacy of therapy for vasogenic edema. (author)

  14. Relationship of mechanical impact magnitude to neurologic dysfunction severity in a rat traumatic brain injury model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Hsun Hsieh

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major brain injury type commonly caused by traffic accidents, falls, violence, or sports injuries. To obtain mechanistic insights about TBI, experimental animal models such as weight-drop-induced TBI in rats have been developed to mimic closed-head injury in humans. However, the relationship between the mechanical impact level and neurological severity following weight-drop-induced TBI remains uncertain. In this study, we comprehensively investigated the relationship between physical impact and graded severity at various weight-drop heights.The acceleration, impact force, and displacement during the impact were accurately measured using an accelerometer, a pressure sensor, and a high-speed camera, respectively. In addition, the longitudinal changes in neurological deficits and balance function were investigated at 1, 4, and 7 days post TBI lesion. The inflammatory expression markers tested by Western blot analysis, including glial fibrillary acidic protein, beta-amyloid precursor protein, and bone marrow tyrosine kinase gene in chromosome X, in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and corpus callosum were investigated at 1 and 7 days post-lesion.Gradations in impact pressure produced progressive degrees of injury severity in the neurological score and balance function. Western blot analysis demonstrated that all inflammatory expression markers were increased at 1 and 7 days post-impact injury when compared to the sham control rats. The severity of neurologic dysfunction and induction in inflammatory markers strongly correlated with the graded mechanical impact levels.We conclude that the weight-drop-induced TBI model can produce graded brain injury and induction of neurobehavioral deficits and may have translational relevance to developing therapeutic strategies for TBI.

  15. Interactions between lysergic acid diethylamide and dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase systems in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungen, K V; Roberts, S; Hill, D F

    1975-08-22

    Investigations were carried out on the interactions of the hallucinogenic drug, D-lysergic acid diethylamide (D-LSD), and other serotonin antagonists with catecholamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase systems in cell-free preparations from different regions of rat brain. In equimolar concentration, D-LSD, 2-brono-D-lysergic acid diethylamide (BOL), or methysergide (UML) strongly blocked maximal stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by either norepinephrine or dopamine in particulate preparations from cerebral cortices of young adult rats. D-LSD also eliminated the stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity of equimolar concentrations of norepinephrine or dopamine in particulate preparations from rat hippocampus. The effects of this hallucinogenic agent on adenylate cyclase activity were most striking in particulate preparations from corpus striatum. Thus, in 10 muM concentration, D-LSD not only completely eradicated the response to 10 muM dopamine in these preparations but also consistently stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. L-LSD (80 muM) was without effect. Significant activation of striatal adenylate cyclase was produced by 0.1 muM D-LSD. Activation of striatal adenylate cyclase of either D-LSD or dopamine was strongly blocked by the dopamine-blocking agents trifluoperazine, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, and haloperidol. The stimulatory effects of D-LSD and dopamine were also inhibited by the serotonin-blocking agents, BOL, 1-methyl-D-lysergic acid diethylamide (MLD), and cyproheptadine, but not by the beta-adrenergic-blocking agent, propranolol. However, these serotonin antagonists by themselves were incapable of stimulating adenylate cyclase activity in the striatal preparations. Several other hallucinogens, which were structurally related to serotonin, were also inactive in this regard, e.g., mescaline, N,N-dimethyltryptamine, psilocin and bufotenine. Serotonin itself produced a small stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity in striatal preparations and

  16. Expression of annexin and Annexin-mRNA in rat brain under influence of steroid drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, PH; Go, KG; ter Horst, GJ; Ruiters, MHJ; Solito, E; Parente, L; James, HE; Marshall, LF; Reulen, HJ; Baethmann, A; Marmarou, A; Ito, U; Hoff, JT; Kuroiwa, T; Czernicki, Z

    1997-01-01

    Brain tissue of rats pretreated with methylprednisolone or with the 21-aminosteroid U74389F, and that of untreated control rats, was assessed for the expression of Annexin-l (Anx-1) and the transcription of its mRNA. For this purpose Anx-1 cDNA was amplified and simultaneously a T7-RNA-polymerase

  17. Mitochondrial monoaminoxidase activity and serotonin content in rat brain after whole-body γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savitskij, I.V.; Tsybul'skij, V.V.; Grivtsev, B.A.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that γ-irradiation of albino rats with a dose of 30 Gy leads to pronounced phase changes in monoaminoxidase activity and serotonin content in rat brain at early times after whole-body exposure. These is a similar direction of changes in the activity of the enzyme and in the content of the substrate adequate to the latter

  18. Structural and functional effects of social isolation on the hippocampus of rats with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaie, Babak; Lotfinia, Ahmad Ali; Ahmadi, Milad; Lotfinia, Mahmoud; Jafarian, Maryam; Karimzadeh, Fariba; Coulon, Philippe; Gorji, Ali

    2015-02-01

    Social isolation has significant long-term psychological and physiological consequences. Both social isolation and traumatic brain injury (TBI) alter normal brain function and structure. However, the influence of social isolation on recovery from TBI is unclear. This study aims to evaluate if social isolation exacerbates the anatomical and functional deficits after TBI in young rats. Juvenile male rats were divided into four groups; sham operated control with social contacts, sham control with social isolation, TBI with social contacts, and TBI with social isolation. During four weeks after brain injury in juvenile rats, we evaluated the animal behaviors by T-maze and open-field tests, recorded brain activity with electrocorticograms and assessed structural changes by histological procedures in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, CA1, and CA3 areas. Our findings revealed significant memory impairments and hyperactivity conditions in rats with TBI and social isolation compared to the other groups. Histological assessments showed an increase of the mean number of dark neurons, apoptotic cells, and caspase-3 positive cells in all tested areas of the hippocampus in TBI rats with and without social isolation compared to sham rats. Furthermore, social isolation significantly increased the number of dark cells, apoptotic neurons, and caspase-3 positive cells in the hippocampal CA3 region in rats with TBI. This study indicates the harmful effect of social isolation on anatomical and functional deficits induced by TBI in juvenile rats. Prevention of social isolation may improve the outcome of TBI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Transient Maternal Hypotension on Apoptotic Cell Death in Foetal Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamit Özyürek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intrauterine perfusion insufficiency induced by transient maternal hypotension has been reported to be associated with foetal brain malformations. However, the effects of maternal hypotension on apoptotic processes in the foetal brain have not been investigated experimentally during the intrauterine period. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of transient maternal hypotension on apoptotic cell death in the intrauterine foetal brain. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Three-month-old female Wistar albino rats were allocated into four groups (n=5 each. The impact of hypoxic/ischemic injury induced by transient maternal hypotension on the 15th day of pregnancy (late gestation in rats was investigated at 48 (H17 group or 96 hours (H19 group after the insult. Control groups underwent the same procedure except for induction of hypotension (C17 and H17 groups. Brain sections of one randomly selected foetus from each pregnant rat were histopathologically evaluated for hypoxic/ischemic injury in the metencephalon, diencephalon, and telencephalon by terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling and active cysteine-dependent aspartate-directed protease-3 (caspase-3 positivity for cell death. Results: The number of terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (+ cells in all the areas examined was comparable in both hypotension and control groups. The H17 group had active caspase-3 (+ cells in the metencephalon and telencephalon, sparing diencephalon, whereas the C19 and H19 groups had active caspase-3 (+ cells in all three regions. The number of active caspase-3 (+ cells in the telencephalon in the H19 group was higher compared with the metencephalon and diencephalon and compared with H17 group (p<0.05. Conclusion: Our results suggest that prenatal hypoxic/ischemic injury triggers apoptotic mechanisms. Therefore, blockade of apoptotic pathways, considering the time pattern of the insult, may

  20. Effects of Various Kynurenine Metabolites on Respiratory Parameters of Rat Brain, Liver and Heart Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Baran*

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we demonstrated that the endogenous glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid dose-dependently and significantly affected rat heart mitochondria. Now we have investigated the effects of L-tryptophan, L-kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine and kynurenic, anthranilic, 3-hydroxyanthranilic, xanthurenic and quinolinic acids on respiratory parameters (ie, state 2, state 3, respiratory control index (RC and ADP/oxygen ratio in brain, liver and heart mitochondria of adult rats. Mitochondria were incubated with glutamate/malate (5 mM or succinate (10 mM and in the presence of L-tryptophan metabolites (1 mM or in the absence, as control. Kynurenic and anthranilic acids significantly reduced RC values of heart mitochondria in the presence of glutamate/malate. Xanthurenic acid significantly reduced RC values of brain mitochondria in the presence of glutamate/malate. Furthermore, 3-hydroxykynurenine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid decreased RC values of brain, liver and heart mitochondria using glutamate/malate. In the presence of succinate, 3-hydroxykynurenine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid affected RC values of brain mitochondria, whereas in liver and heart mitochondria only 3-hydroxykynurenine lowered RC values significantly. Furthermore, lowered ADP/oxygen ratios were observed in brain mitochondria in the presence of succinate with 3-hydroxykynurenine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid, and to a lesser extent with glutamate/malate. In addition, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid significantly lowered the ADP/oxygen ratio in heart mitochondria exposed to glutamate/malate, while in the liver mitochondria only a mild reduction was found. Tests of the influence of L-tryptophan and its metabolites on complex I in liver mitochondria showed that only 3-hydroxykynurenine, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid and L-kynurenine led to a significant acceleration of NADH-driven complex I activities. The data indicate that L-tryptophan metabolites had different effects on brain, liver

  1. The metabolism of malate by cultured rat brain astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenna, M.C.; Tildon, J.T.; Couto, R.; Stevenson, J.H.; Caprio, F.J. (Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Since malate is known to play an important role in a variety of functions in the brain including energy metabolism, the transfer of reducing equivalents and possibly metabolic trafficking between different cell types; a series of biochemical determinations were initiated to evaluate the rate of 14CO2 production from L-(U-14C)malate in rat brain astrocytes. The 14CO2 production from labeled malate was almost totally suppressed by the metabolic inhibitors rotenone and antimycin A suggesting that most of malate metabolism was coupled to the electron transport system. A double reciprocal plot of the 14CO2 production from the metabolism of labeled malate revealed biphasic kinetics with two apparent Km and Vmax values suggesting the presence of more than one mechanism of malate metabolism in these cells. Subsequent experiments were carried out using 0.01 mM and 0.5 mM malate to determine whether the addition of effectors would differentially alter the metabolism of high and low concentrations of malate. Effectors studied included compounds which could be endogenous regulators of malate metabolism and metabolic inhibitors which would provide information regarding the mechanisms regulating malate metabolism. Both lactate and aspartate decreased 14CO2 production from malate equally. However, a number of effectors were identified which selectively altered the metabolism of 0.01 mM malate including aminooxyacetate, furosemide, N-acetylaspartate, oxaloacetate, pyruvate and glucose, but had little or no effect on the metabolism of 0.5 mM malate. In addition, alpha-ketoglutarate and succinate decreased 14CO2 production from 0.01 mM malate much more than from 0.5 mM malate. In contrast, a number of effectors altered the metabolism of 0.5 mM malate more than 0.01 mM. These included methionine sulfoximine, glutamate, malonate, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and ouabain.

  2. Molecular and functional characterization of riboflavin specific transport system in rat brain capillary endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mitesh; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2012-01-01

    Riboflavin is an important water soluble vitamin (B2) required for metabolic reactions, normal cellular growth, differentiation and function. Mammalian brain cells cannot synthesize riboflavin and must import from systemic circulation. However, the uptake mechanism, cellular translocation and intracellular trafficking of riboflavin in brain capillary endothelial cells are poorly understood. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the existence of riboflavin-specific transport system and delineate the uptake and intracellular regulation of riboflavin in immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cells (RBE4). The uptake of [3H]-Riboflavin is sodium, temperature and energy dependent but pH independent. [3H]-Riboflavin uptake is saturable with Km and Vmax values of 19 ± 3 µM and 0.235 ± 0.012 picomoles/min/mg protein, respectively. The uptake process is inhibited by unlabelled structural analogs (lumiflavin, lumichrome) but not by structurally unrelated vitamins. Ca++/calmodulin and protein kinase A (PKA) pathways are found to play an important role in the intracellular regulation of [3H]-Riboflavin. Apical and baso-lateral uptake of [3H]-Riboflavin clearly indicate that riboflavin specific transport system is predominantly localized on the apical side of RBE4 cells. A 628 bp band corresponding to riboflavin transporter is revealed in RT-PCR analysis. These findings, for the first time report the existence of a specialized and high affinity transport system for riboflavin in RBE4 cells. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle limiting drug transport inside the brain as it regulates drug permeation from systemic circulation. This transporter can be utilized for targeted delivery in enhancing brain permeation of highly potent drugs on systemic administration. PMID:22683359

  3. Finasteride inhibited brain dopaminergic system and open-field behaviors in adolescent male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Kang, Yun-Xiao; Ji, Xiao-Ming; Li, Ying-Kun; Li, Shuang-Cheng; Zhang, Xiang-Jian; Cui, Hui-Xian; Shi, Ge-Ming

    2018-02-01

    Finasteride inhibits the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. Because androgen regulates dopaminergic system in the brain, it could be hypothesized that finasteride may inhibit dopaminergic system. The present study therefore investigates the effects of finasteride in adolescent and early developmental rats on dopaminergic system, including contents of dopamine and its metabolites (dihydroxy phenyl acetic acid and homovanillic acid) and tyrosine hydroxylase expressions both at gene and protein levels. Meanwhile, open-field behaviors of the rats are examined because of the regulatory effect of dopaminergic system on the behaviors. Open-field behaviors were evaluated by exploratory and motor behaviors. Dopamine and its metabolites were assayed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and protein expressions were determined by real-time qRT-PCR and western blot, respectively. It was found that in adolescent male rats, administration of finasteride at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg for 14 days dose dependently inhibited open-field behaviors, reduced contents of dopamine and its metabolites in frontal cortex, hippocampus, caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, and down-regulated tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and protein expressions in substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. However, there was no significant change of these parameters in early developmental rats after finasteride treatment. These results suggest that finasteride inhibits dopaminergic system and open-field behaviors in adolescent male rats by inhibiting the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, and imply finasteride as a potential therapeutic option for neuropsychiatric disorders associated with hyperactivities of dopaminergic system and androgen. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Investigation of elemental changes in brain tissues following excitotoxic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegele, Rainer; Howell, Nicholas R.; Callaghan, Paul D.; Pastuovic, Zeljko

    2013-01-01

    Recently the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe has been used for elemental mapping of thin brain tissue sections. The fact that a very small portion of the proton energy is used for X-ray excitation combined with small variations of the major element concentrations makes μ-PIXE imaging and GeoPIXE analysis a challenging task. Excitotoxic brain injury underlies the pathology of stroke and various neurodegenerative disorders. Large fluxes in Ca +2 cytosolic concentrations are a key feature of the initiation of this pathophysiological process. In order to understand if these modifications are associated with changes in the elemental composition, several brain sections have been mapped with μ-PIXE. Increases in Ca +2 cytosolic concentrations were indicative of the pathophysiological process continuing 1 week after an initiating neural insult. We were able to measure significant variations in K and Ca concentration distribution across investigated brain tissue. These variations correlate very well with physiological changes visible in the brain tissue. Moreover, the obtained μ-PIXE results clearly demonstrate that the elemental composition changes significantly correlate with brain drauma

  5. Investigation of elemental changes in brain tissues following excitotoxic injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegele, Rainer, E-mail: rns@ansto.gov.au [Institute for Environmental Research, ANSTO, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Howell, Nicholas R.; Callaghan, Paul D. [Life Sciences, ANSTO, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Pastuovic, Zeljko [Institute for Environmental Research, ANSTO, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    Recently the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe has been used for elemental mapping of thin brain tissue sections. The fact that a very small portion of the proton energy is used for X-ray excitation combined with small variations of the major element concentrations makes μ-PIXE imaging and GeoPIXE analysis a challenging task. Excitotoxic brain injury underlies the pathology of stroke and various neurodegenerative disorders. Large fluxes in Ca{sup +2} cytosolic concentrations are a key feature of the initiation of this pathophysiological process. In order to understand if these modifications are associated with changes in the elemental composition, several brain sections have been mapped with μ-PIXE. Increases in Ca{sup +2} cytosolic concentrations were indicative of the pathophysiological process continuing 1 week after an initiating neural insult. We were able to measure significant variations in K and Ca concentration distribution across investigated brain tissue. These variations correlate very well with physiological changes visible in the brain tissue. Moreover, the obtained μ-PIXE results clearly demonstrate that the elemental composition changes significantly correlate with brain drauma.

  6. Neuroprotective effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in a juvenile rat model of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (rmTBI is an important medical concern for adolescent athletes that can lead to long-term disabilities. Multiple mild injuries may exacerbate tissue damage resulting in cumulative brain injury and poor functional recovery. In the present study, we investigated the increased brain vulnerability to rmTBI and the effect of hyperbaric oxygen treatment using a juvenile rat model of rmTBI. Two episodes of mild cortical controlled impact (3 days apart were induced in juvenile rats. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO was applied 1 hour/day × 3 days at 2 atmosphere absolute consecutively, starting at 1 day after initial mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI. Neuropathology was assessed by multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and tissue immunohistochemistry. After repetitive mTBI, there were increases in T2-weighted imaging-defined cortical lesions and susceptibility weighted imaging-defined cortical microhemorrhages, correlated with brain tissue gliosis at the site of impact. HBO treatment significantly decreased the MRI-identified abnormalities and tissue histopathology. Our findings suggest that HBO treatment improves the cumulative tissue damage in juvenile brain following rmTBI. Such therapy regimens could be considered in adolescent athletes at the risk of repeated concussions exposures.

  7. Expression of S100A6 in Rat Hippocampus after Traumatic Brain Injury Due to Lateral Head Acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Fang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In a rat model of traumatic brain injury (TBI, we investigated changes in cognitive function and S100A6 expression in the hippocampus. TBI-associated changes in this protein have not previously been reported. Rat S100A6 was studied via immunohistochemical staining, Western blot, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR after either lateral head acceleration or sham. Reduced levels of S100A6 protein and mRNA were observed 1 h after TBI, followed by gradual increases over 6, 12, 24, and 72 h, and then a return to sham level at 14 day. Morris water maze (MWM test was used to evaluate animal spatial cognition. TBI- and sham-rats showed an apparent learning curve, expressed as escape latency. Although TBI-rats displayed a relatively poorer cognitive ability than sham-rats, the disparity was not significant early post-injury. Marked cognitive deficits in TBI-rats were observed at 72 h post-injury compared with sham animals. TBI-rats showed decreased times in platform crossing in the daily MWM test; the performance at 72 h post-injury was the worst. In conclusion, a reduction in S100A6 may be one of the early events that lead to secondary cognitive decline after TBI, and its subsequent elevation is tightly linked with cognitive improvement. S100A6 may play important roles in neuronal degeneration and regeneration in TBI.

  8. Curcumin pretreatment attenuates brain lesion size and improves neurological function following traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samini, Fariborz; Samarghandian, Saeed; Borji, Abasalt; Mohammadi, Gholamreza; bakaian, Mahdi

    2013-09-01

    Turmeric has been in use since ancient times as a condiment and due to its medicinal properties. Curcumin, the yellow coloring principle in turmeric, is a polyphenolic and a major active constituent. Besides anti-inflammatory, thrombolytic and anti-carcinogenic activities, curcumin also possesses strong antioxidant property. The neuroprotective effects of curcumin were evaluated in a weight drop model of cortical contusion trauma in rat. Male Wistar rats (350-400 g, n=9) were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital (60 mg/kg i.p.) and subjected to head injury. Five days before injury, animals randomly received an i.p. bolus of either curcumin (50 and 100 mg/kg/day, n=9) or vehicle (n=9). Two weeks after the injury and drug treatment, animals were sacrificed and a series of brain sections, stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) were evaluated for quantitative brain lesion volume. Two weeks after the injury, oxidative stress parameter (malondialdehyde) was also measured in the brain. Curcumin (100 mg/kg) significantly reduced the size of brain injury-induced lesions (Pcurcumin (100 mg/kg). Curcumin treatment significantly improved the neurological status evaluated during 2 weeks after brain injury. The study demonstrates the protective efficacy of curcumin in rat traumatic brain injury model. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Protective role of Scoparia dulcis plant extract on brain antioxidant status and lipidperoxidation in STZ diabetic male Wistar rats

    OpenAIRE

    Pari, Leelavinothan; Latha, Muniappan

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis on the occurrence of oxidative stress in the brain of rats during diabetes by measuring the extent of oxidative damage as well as the status of the antioxidant defense system. Methods Aqueous extract of Scoparia dulcis plant was administered orally (200 mg/kg body weight) and the effect of extract on blood glucose, plasma insulin and the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance...

  10. Brain and Serum Androsterone is Elevated in Response to Stress in Rats with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Servatius

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to lateral fluid percussion (LFP injury consistent with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI persistently attenuates acoustic startle responses (ASRs in rats. Here, we examined whether the experience of head trauma affects stress reactivity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were matched for ASRs and randomly assigned to receive mTBI through LFP or experience a sham surgery (SHAM. ASRs were measured post injury days (PIDs 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28. To assess neurosteroids, rats received a single 2.0 mA, 0.5 s foot shock on PID 34 (S34, PID 35 (S35, on both days (2S, or the experimental context (CON. Levels of the neurosteroids pregnenolone (PREG, allopregnanolone (ALLO, and androsterone (ANDRO were determined for the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum. For 2S rats, repeated blood samples were obtained at 15, 30 and 60 min post-stressor for determination of corticosterone (CORT levels after stress or context on PID 34. Similar to earlier work, ASRs were severely attenuated in mTBI rats without remission for 28 days after injury. No differences were observed between mTBI and SHAM rats in basal CORT, peak CORT levels or its recovery. In serum and brain, ANDRO levels were the most stress-sensitive. Stress-induced ANDRO elevations were greater than those in mTBI rats. As a positive allosteric modulator of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA receptors, increased brain ANDRO levels are expected to be anxiolytic. The impact of brain ANDRO elevations in the aftermath of mTBI on coping warrants further elaboration.

  11. Effects of electromagnetic radiation produced by 3G mobile phones on rat brains: magnetic resonance spectroscopy, biochemical, and histopathological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, M; Turtay, M G; Oguzturk, H; Samdanci, E; Turkoz, Y; Tasdemir, S; Alkan, A; Bakir, S

    2012-06-01

    The effects of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) produced by a third-generation (3G) mobile phone (MP) on rat brain tissues were investigated in terms of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), biochemistry, and histopathological evaluations. The rats were randomly assigned to two groups: Group 1 is composed of 3G-EMR-exposed rats (n = 9) and Group 2 is the control group (n = 9). The first group was subjected to EMR for 20 days. The control group was not exposed to EMR. Choline (Cho), creatinin (Cr), and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) levels were evaluated by MRS. Catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) enzyme activities were measured by spectrophotometric method. Histopathological analyses were carried out to evaluate apoptosis in the brain tissues of both groups. In MRS, NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and NAA/Cho ratios were not significantly different between Groups 1 and 2. Neither the oxidative stress parameters, CAT and GSH-Px, nor the number of apoptotic cells were significantly different between Groups 1 and 2. Usage of short-term 3G MP does not seem to have a harmful effect on rat brain tissue.

  12. Adult and embryonic GAD transcripts are spatiotemporally regulated during postnatal development in the rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Popp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, is synthesized by glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD. GAD exists in two adult isoforms, GAD65 and GAD67. During embryonic brain development at least two additional transcripts exist, I-80 and I-86, which are distinguished by insertions of 80 or 86 bp into GAD67 mRNA, respectively. Though it was described that embryonic GAD67 transcripts are not detectable during adulthood there are evidences suggesting re-expression under certain pathological conditions in the adult brain. In the present study we systematically analyzed for the first time the spatiotemporal distribution of different GADs with emphasis on embryonic GAD67 mRNAs in the postnatal brain using highly sensitive methods. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: QPCR was used to precisely investigate the postnatal expression level of GAD related mRNAs in cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and olfactory bulb of rats from P1 throughout adulthood. Within the first three postnatal weeks the expression of both GAD65 and GAD67 mRNAs reached adult levels in hippocampus, cortex, and cerebellum. The olfactory bulb showed by far the highest expression of GAD65 as well as GAD67 transcripts. Embryonic GAD67 splice variants were still detectable at birth. They continuously declined to barely detectable levels during postnatal development in all investigated regions with exception of a comparatively high expression in the olfactory bulb. Radioactive in situ hybridizations confirmed the occurrence of embryonic GAD67 transcripts in the olfactory bulb and furthermore detected their localization mainly in the subventricular zone and the rostral migratory stream. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Embryonic GAD67 transcripts can hardly be detected in the adult brain, except for specific regions associated with neurogenesis and high synaptic plasticity. Therefore a functional role in processes like proliferation, migration or

  13. Effect of propofol in the immature rat brain on short- and long-term neurodevelopmental outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Karen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Propofol is commonly used as sedative in newborns and children. Recent experimental studies led to contradictory results, revealing neurodegenerative or neuroprotective properties of propofol on the developing brain. We investigated neurodevelopmental short- and long-term effects of neonatal propofol treatment. METHODS: 6-day-old Wistar rats (P6, randomised in two groups, received repeated intraperitoneal injections (0, 90, 180 min of 30 mg/kg propofol or normal saline and sacrificed 6, 12 and 24 hrs following the first injection. Cortical and thalamic areas were analysed by Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR for expression of apoptotic and neurotrophin-dependent signalling pathways. Long-term effects were assessed by Open-field and Novel-Object-Recognition at P30 and P120. RESULTS: Western blot analyses revealed a transient increase of activated caspase-3 in cortical, and a reduction of active mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK1/2, AKT in cortical and thalamic areas. qRT-PCR analyses showed a down-regulation of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, NGF, NT-3 in cortical and thalamic regions. Minor impairment in locomotive activity was observed in propofol treated adolescent animals at P30. Memory or anxiety were not impaired at any time point. CONCLUSION: Exposing the neonatal rat brain to propofol induces acute neurotrophic imbalance and neuroapoptosis in a region- and time-specific manner and minor behavioural changes in adolescent animals.

  14. Increased expression of EMMPRIN and VEGF in the rat brain after gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ming; Li, Hong; Huang, Huiling; Xu, Desheng; Zhi, Dashi; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Yipei

    2012-03-01

    The extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) has been known to play a key regulatory role in pathological angiogenesis. A elevated activation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) following radiation injury has been shown to mediate blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown. However, the roles of EMMPRIN and VEGF in radiation-induced brain injury after gamma knife surgery (GKS) are not clearly understood. In this study, we investigated EMMPRIN changes in a rat model of radiation injury following GKS and examined potential associations between EMMPRIN and VEGF expression. Adult male rats were subjected to cerebral radiation injury by GKS under anesthesia. We found that EMMPRIN and VEGF expression were markedly upregulated in the target area at 8-12 weeks after GKS compared with the control group by western blot, immunohistochemistry, and RT-PCR analysis. Immunofluorescent double staining demonstrated that EMMPRIN signals colocalized with caspase-3 and VEGF-positive cells. Our data also demonstrated that increased EMMPRIN expression was correlated with increased VEGF levels in a temporal manner. This is the first study to show that EMMPRIN and VEGF may play a role in radiation injuries of the central nervous system after GKS.

  15. A Microarray Study of Middle Cerebral Occlusion Rat Brain with Acupuncture Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microarray analysis was used to investigate the changes of gene expression of ischemic stroke and acupuncture intervention in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo rat brain. Results showed that acupuncture intervention had a remarkable improvement in neural deficit score, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral infarction volume of MCAo rats. Microarray analysis showed that a total of 627 different expression genes were regulated in ischemic stroke. 417 genes were upregulated and 210 genes were downregulated. A total of 361 different expression genes were regulated after acupuncture intervention. Three genes were upregulated and 358 genes were downregulated. The expression of novel genes after acupuncture intervention, including Tph1 and Olr883, was further analyzed by Real-Time Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR. Upregulation of Tph1 and downregulation of Olr883 indicated that the therapeutic effect of acupuncture for ischemic stroke may be closely related to the suppression of poststroke depression and regulation of olfactory transduction. In conclusion, the present study may enrich our understanding of the multiple pathological process of ischemic brain injury and indicate possible mechanisms of acupuncture on ischemic stroke.

  16. High resolution mapping of modafinil induced changes in glutamate level in rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Haris

    Full Text Available Modafinil is marketed in the United States for the treatment of narcolepsy and daytime somnolence due to shift-work or sleep apnea. Investigations of this drug in the treatment of cocaine and nicotine dependence in addition to disorders of executive function are also underway. Modafinil has been known to increase glutamate levels in rat brain models. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS has been commonly used to detect the glutamate (Glu changes in vivo. In this study, we used a recently described glutamate chemical exchange saturation transfer (GluCEST imaging technique to measure Modafinil induced regional Glu changes in rat brain and compared the results with Glu concentration measured by single voxel 1HMRS. No increases in either GluCEST maps or 1HMRS were observed after Modafinil injection over a period of 5 hours. However, a significant increase in GluCEST (19 ± 4.4% was observed 24 hours post Modafinil administration, which is consistent with results from previous biochemical studies. This change was not consistently seen with 1HMRS. GluCEST mapping allows regional cerebral Glu changes to be measured and may provide a useful clinical biomarker of Modafinil effects for the management of patients with sleep disorders and addiction.

  17. Changes in calcium and iron levels in the brains of rats during kainate induced epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Min-Qin; Ong, Wei-Yi; Makjanic, Jagoda; Watt, Frank

    1999-10-01

    Epilepsy is a recurrent disorder of cerebral function characterised by sudden brief attacks of altered consciousness, motor activity or sensory phenomena, and affects approximately 1% of the population. Kainic acid injection induces neuronal degeneration in rats, is associated with glial hypertrophy and proliferation in the CA3-CA4 fields of hippocampal complex, and is a model for temporal lobe epilepsy. In this study we have applied Nuclear Microscopy to the investigation of the elemental changes within the hippocampus and the cortex areas of the rat brain following kainate injection. Analyses of unstained freeze dried tissue sections taken at 1 day and 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks following injection were carried out using the Nuclear Microscopy facility at the Research Centre for Nuclear Microscopy, National University of Singapore. Quantitative analysis and elemental mapping indicates that there are significant changes in the calcium levels and distributions in the hippocampus as early as 1 day following injection. Preliminary results indicate a rapid increase in cellular calcium. High levels of calcium can activate calcium dependent proteins and phospholipases. Activation of phospholipase A 2 can be harmful to surrounding neurons through free radical damage. In addition to observed increases in calcium, there was evidence of increases in iron levels. This is consistent with measurements in other degenerative brain disorders, and may signal a late surge in free radical production.

  18. Changes in calcium and iron levels in the brains of rats during kainate induced epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, M.-Q.; Ong, W.-Y.; Makjanic, Jagoda; Watt, Frank

    1999-01-01

    Epilepsy is a recurrent disorder of cerebral function characterised by sudden brief attacks of altered consciousness, motor activity or sensory phenomena, and affects approximately 1% of the population. Kainic acid injection induces neuronal degeneration in rats, is associated with glial hypertrophy and proliferation in the CA3-CA4 fields of hippocampal complex, and is a model for temporal lobe epilepsy. In this study we have applied Nuclear Microscopy to the investigation of the elemental changes within the hippocampus and the cortex areas of the rat brain following kainate injection. Analyses of unstained freeze dried tissue sections taken at 1 day and 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks following injection were carried out using the Nuclear Microscopy facility at the Research Centre for Nuclear Microscopy, National University of Singapore. Quantitative analysis and elemental mapping indicates that there are significant changes in the calcium levels and distributions in the hippocampus as early as 1 day following injection. Preliminary results indicate a rapid increase in cellular calcium. High levels of calcium can activate calcium dependent proteins and phospholipases. Activation of phospholipase A 2 can be harmful to surrounding neurons through free radical damage. In addition to observed increases in calcium, there was evidence of increases in iron levels. This is consistent with measurements in other degenerative brain disorders, and may signal a late surge in free radical production

  19. The effect of nucleotides and adenosine on stimulus-evoked glutamate release from rat brain cortical slices

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Gillian C; Boarder, Michael R

    2000-01-01

    Evidence has previously been presented that P1 receptors for adenosine, and P2 receptors for nucleotides such as ATP, regulate stimulus-evoked release of biogenic amines from nerve terminals in the brain. Here we investigated whether adenosine and nucleotides exert presynaptic control over depolarisation-elicited glutamate release.Slices of rat brain cortex were perfused and stimulated with pulses of 46 mM K+ in the presence of the glutamate uptake inhibitor L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxyl...

  20. Neuroprotection, learning and memory improvement of a standardized extract from Renshen Shouwu against neuronal injury and vascular dementia in rats with brain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Li; Cheng, Yufang; Luo, Zhanyuan; Guo, Haibiao; Zhao, Wenjing; Gu, Quanlin; Yang, Xu; Xu, Jiangping; Bei, Weijian; Guo, Jiao

    2015-05-13

    The Renshen Shouwu capsule (RSSW) is a patented Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), that has been proven to improve memory and is widely used in China to apoplexy syndrome and memory deficits. To investigate the neuroprotective and therapeutic effect of the Renshen Shouwu standardized extract (RSSW) on ischemic brain neuronal injury and impairment of learning and memory related to Vascular Dementia (VD) induced by a focal and global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats. Using in vivo rat models of both focal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injuries induced by a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and VD with transient global brain I/R neuronal injuries induced by a four-vessel occlusion (4-VO) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, RSSW (50,100, and 200 mg kg(-1) body weights) and Egb761® (80 mg kg(-1)) were administered orally for 20 days (preventively 6 days+therapeutically 14 days) in 4-VO rats, and for 7 days (3 days preventively+4 days therapeutically) in MCAO rats. Learning and memory behavioral performance was assayed using a Morris water maze test including a place navigation trial and a spatial probe trial. Brain histochemical morphology and hippocampal neuron survival was quantified using microscope assay of a puffin brain/hippocampus slice with cresyl violet staining. MCAO ischemia/reperfusion caused infarct damage in rat brain tissue. 4-VO ischemia/reperfusion caused a hippocampal neuronal lesion and learning and memory deficits in rats. Administration of RSSW (50, 100, and 200mg/kg) or EGb761 significantly reduced the size of the insulted brain hemisphere lesion and improved the neurological behavior of MCAO rats. In addition, RSSW markedly reduced an increase in the brain infarct volume from an I/R-induced MCAO and reduced the cerebral water content in a dose-dependent way. Administration of RSSW also increased the pyramidal neuronal density in the hippocampus of surviving rats after transient global brain ischemia and improved the learning and memory

  1. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raylman, Raymond R; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan K; Velan, S Sendhil; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F; Weisenberger, Andrew G; Zorn, Carl; Marano, Gary D

    2006-01-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging

  2. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raylman, Raymond R [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Majewski, Stan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Lemieux, Susan K [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Velan, S Sendhil [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Kross, Brian [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Popov, Vladimir [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Smith, Mark F [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Weisenberger, Andrew G [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Zorn, Carl [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Marano, Gary D [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2006-12-21

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging.

  3. (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houghten, R.A.; Johnson, N.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1984-10-01

    The binding of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin to rat brain homogenates is complex. Although Scatchard analysis of saturation studies yields a straight line, detailed competition studies are multiphasic, suggesting that even at low concentrations of the compound, the /sup 3/H-ligand is binding to more than one class of site. A portion of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding is sensitive to low concentrations of morphine or D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin (less than 5 nM). The inhibition observed with each compound alone (5 nM) is the same as that seen with both together (each at 5 nM). Thus, the binding remaining in the presence of both morphine and the enkephalin does not correspond to either mu or delta sites. The portion of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding that is inhibited under these conditions appears to be equally sensitive to both morphine and the enkephalin and may correspond to mu1 sites. Treating membrane homogenates with naloxonazine, a mu1 selective antagonist, lowers (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding to the same degree as morphine and D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin alone or together. This possible binding of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin to mu1 sites is consistent with the role of mu1 sites in beta-endorphin analgesia and catalepsy in vivo.

  4. Toxicological aspects of interesterified fat: Brain damages in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'avila, Lívia Ferraz; Dias, Verônica Tironi; Vey, Luciana Taschetto; Milanesi, Laura Hautrive; Roversi, Karine; Emanuelli, Tatiana; Bürger, Marilise Escobar; Trevizol, Fabíola; Maurer, H Luana

    2017-07-05

    In recent years, interesterified fat (IF) has been used to replace hydrogenated vegetable fat (HVF), rich in trans isomers, being found in processed foods. Studies involving IF have shown deleterious influences on the metabolic system, similarly to HVF, whereas no studies regarding its influence on the central nervous system (CNS) were performed. Rats from first generation born and maintained under supplementation (3g/Kg, p.o.) of soybean-oil or IF until adulthood were assessed on memory, biochemical and molecular markers in the hippocampus. IF group showed higher saturated fatty acids and linoleic acid and lower docosahexaenoic acid incorporation in the hippocampus. In addition, IF supplementation impaired short and long-term memory, which were related to increased reactive species generation and protein carbonyl levels, decreased catalase activity, BDNF and TrkB levels in the hippocampus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show that lifelong IF consumption may be related to brain oxidative damage, memory impairments and neurotrophins modifications, which collectively may be present indifferent neurological disorders. In fact, the use of IF in foods was intended to avoid damage from HVF consumption; however this substitute should be urgently reviewed, since this fat can be as harmful as trans fat. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [3H]-beta-endorphin binding in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houghten, R.A.; Johnson, N.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    The binding of [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin to rat brain homogenates is complex. Although Scatchard analysis of saturation studies yields a straight line, detailed competition studies are multiphasic, suggesting that even at low concentrations of the compound, the 3 H-ligand is binding to more than one class of site. A portion of [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin binding is sensitive to low concentrations of morphine or D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin (less than 5 nM). The inhibition observed with each compound alone (5 nM) is the same as that seen with both together (each at 5 nM). Thus, the binding remaining in the presence of both morphine and the enkephalin does not correspond to either mu or delta sites. The portion of [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin binding that is inhibited under these conditions appears to be equally sensitive to both morphine and the enkephalin and may correspond to mu1 sites. Treating membrane homogenates with naloxonazine, a mu1 selective antagonist, lowers [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin binding to the same degree as morphine and D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin alone or together. This possible binding of [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin to mu1 sites is consistent with the role of mu1 sites in beta-endorphin analgesia and catalepsy in vivo

  6. Presynaptic localization of histamine H3-receptors in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Mizuguchi, H.; Fukui, H.; Wada, H.

    1991-01-01

    The localization of histamine H3-receptors in subcellular fractions from the rat brain was examined in a [3H] (R) alpha-methylhistamine binding assay and compared with those of histamine H1- and adrenaline alpha 1- and alpha 2-receptors. Major [3H](R) alpha-methylhistamine binding sites with increased specific activities ([3H]ligand binding vs. protein amount) were recovered from the P2 fraction by differential centrifugation. Minor [3H](R)alpha-methylhistamine binding sites with increased specific activities were also detected in the P3 fraction. Further subfractionation of the P2 fraction by discontinuous sucrose density gradient centrifugation showed major recoveries of [3H](R)alpha-methylhistamine binding in myelin (MYE) and synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) fractions. A further increase in specific activity was observed in the MYE fraction, but the SPM fraction showed no significant increase in specific activity. Adrenaline alpha 2-receptors, the pre-synaptic autoreceptors, in a [3H] yohimbine binding assay showed distribution patterns similar to histamine H3-receptors. On the other hand, post-synaptic histamine H1- and adrenaline alpha 1-receptors were closely localized and distributed mainly in the SPM fraction with increased specific activity. Only a negligible amount was recovered in the MYE fraction, unlike the histamine H3- and adrenaline alpha 2-receptors

  7. Differences in distribution and regulation of astrocytic aquaporin-4 in human and rat hydrocephalic brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjolding, Anders Daehli; Holst, Anders Vedel; Broholm, Helle

    2013-01-01

    findings to human pathophysiology. This study compares expression of aquaporin-4 in hydrocephalic human brain with human controls and hydrocephalic rat brain. Methods:  Cortical biopsies from patients with chronic hydrocephalus (n=29) were sampled secondary to planned surgical intervention. Aquaporin-4...

  8. Differences in postmortem stability of sex steroid receptor immunoreactivity in rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fodor, Mariann; van Leeuwen, Fred W.; Swaab, Dick F.

    2002-01-01

    Difficulties in demonstrating sex steroid receptors in the human brain by immunohistochemistry (IHC) may depend on postmortem delay and a long fixation time. The effect of different postmortem times was therefore studied in rat brain kept in the skull at room temperature for 0, 6, or 24 hr after

  9. Effects of chronic social isolation on Wistar rat behavior and brain plasticity markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Jelena; Djordjevic, Ana; Adzic, Miroslav; Radojcic, Marija B

    2012-01-01

    Chronic stress is a contributing risk factor in the development of psychiatric illnesses, including depressive disorders. The mechanisms of their psychopathology are multifaceted and include, besides others, alterations in the brain plasticity. Previously, we investigated the effects of chronic social stress in the limbic brain structures of Wistar rats (hippocampus, HIPPO, and prefrontal cortex, PFC) and found multiple characteristics that resembled alterations described in some clinical studies of depression. We extended our investigations and followed the behavior of stressed animals by the open field test (OFT) and forced swimming test (FST), and the expression and polysialylation of synaptic plasticity markers, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and L1, in the HIPPO and PFC. We also determined the adrenal gland mass and plasma corticosterone (CORT) as a terminal part of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. Our data indicated that stressed animals avoided the central zone in the OFT and displayed decreased swimming, but prolonged immobility in the FST. The animals exhibited marked hypertrophy of the adrenal gland cortex, in spite of decreased serum CORT. Simultaneously, the stressed animals exhibited an increase in NCAM mRNA expression in the HIPPO, but not in the PFC. The synaptosomal NCAM of the HIPPO was markedly polysialylated, while cortical PSA-NCAM was significantly decreased. The results showed that chronic social isolation of Wistar rats causes both anxiety-like and depression-like behavior. These alterations are parallel with molecular changes in the limbic brain, including diminished NCAM sialylation in the PFC. Together with our previous results, the current observations suggest that a chronic social isolation model may potentially be used to study molecular mechanisms that underlie depressive symptomatology. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Effects of Mucuna pruriens on Free Fatty Acid Levels and Histopathological Changes in the Brains of Rats Fed a High Fructose Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgun, Bekir; Sarı, Aysel; Ozturk, Sait; Erol, Fatih Serhat; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanifi; Ulu, Ramazan

    2017-01-01

    To investigate free fatty acid levels and histopathological changes in the brain of rats fed a high fructose diet (HFrD) and to evaluate the effects of Mucuna pruriens, known to have antidiabetic activity, on these changes. The study comprised 28 mature female Wistar rats. The rats were divided into 4 groups, each included 7 rats. Group 1: control; group 2: fed an HFrD; group 3: fed normal rat chow and M. pruriens; group 4: fed an HFrD and M. pruriens for 6 weeks. At the end of 6 weeks, the rats were decapitated, blood and brain tissues were obtained. Serum glucose and triglyceride levels were measured. Free fatty acid levels were measured in 1 cerebral hemisphere of each rat and histopathological changes in the other. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare quantitative continuous data between 2 independent groups, and the Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare quantitative continuous data between more than 2 independent groups. Arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid levels were significantly higher in group 2 than in group 1 (p pruriens could have therapeutic effects on free fatty acid metabolism and local inflammatory responses in the brains of rats fed an HFrD. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Studies on cerebral protection of digoxin against hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kaiwei; Tan, Danfeng; He, Miao; Guo, Dandan; Huang, Juan; Wang, Xia; Liu, Chentao; Zheng, Xiangrong

    2016-08-17

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) is a major cause of neonatal acute deaths and chronic nervous system damage. Our present study was designed to investigate the possible neuroprotective effect of digoxin-induced pharmacological preconditioning after hypoxia-ischemia and underlying mechanisms. Neonatal rats were assigned randomly to control, HIBD, or HIBD+digoxin groups. Pharmacological preconditioning was induced by administration of digoxin 72 h before inducing HIBD by carotid occlusion+hypoxia. Behavioral assays, and neuropathological and apoptotic assessments were performed to examine the effects; the expression of Na/K ATPase was also assessed. Rats in the HIBD group showed deficiencies on the T-maze, radial water maze, and postural reflex tests, whereas the HIBD+digoxin group showed significant improvements on all behavioral tests. The rats treated with digoxin showed recovery of pathological conditions, increased number of neural cells and proliferative cells, and decreased number of apoptotic cells. Meanwhile, an increased expression level of Na/K ATPase was observed after digoxin preconditioning treatment. The preconditioning treatment of digoxin contributed toward an improved functional recovery and exerted a marked neuroprotective effect including promotion of cell proliferation and reduction of apoptosis after HIBD, and the neuroprotective action was likely associated with increased expression of Na/K ATPase.

  12. Diffusion-weighted MRI of myelination in the rat brain following treatment with gonadal hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, D.; Roberts, T.; Barkovich, A.J.; Prayer, L.; Kucharczyk, J.; Moseley, M.; Arieff, A.

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of high-resolution diffusion-weighted MRI to show maturation of white-matter structures in the developing rat brain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of gonadal steroid hormones on the rate of this development. Starting from their second postnatal day, 16 rat-pups of either sex were repeatedly treated with subcutaneous implants containing 17-beta estradiol or delta-androstene 3,17 dione, respectively. Serial T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted MRI was performed weekly for 8 weeks using a 4.7 T unit. Maturation of anterior optic pathways and hemisphere commissures was assessed. Diffusion-weighted images were processed to produce ''anisotropy index maps'', previously shown to be sensitive to white-matter maturation. Compared with untreated rat-pups, estrogen-treated animals showed accelerated, and testosterone-treated animals delayed maturation on anisotropy index maps and histological sections. In all animals, maturational changes appeared earlie on anisotropy index maps than on other MRI sequences or on myelin-sensitive stained sections. Diffusion-weighted imaging, and the construction of spatial maps sensitive to diffusion anisotropy, seem to be the most sensitive approach for the detection of maturational white-matter changes, and thus may hold potential for early diagnosis of temporary delay or permanent disturbances of white-matter development. (orig.). With 6 figs., 1 tab

  13. Diffusion-weighted MRI of myelination in the rat brain following treatment with gonadal hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, D. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of Vienna (Austria); Roberts, T. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), CA (United States); Barkovich, A.J. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), CA (United States); Prayer, L. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of Vienna (Austria); Kucharczyk, J. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), CA (United States); Moseley, M. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), CA (United States); Arieff, A. [Department of Medicine, Geriatrics Section, Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center and University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), CA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of high-resolution diffusion-weighted MRI to show maturation of white-matter structures in the developing rat brain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of gonadal steroid hormones on the rate of this development. Starting from their second postnatal day, 16 rat-pups of either sex were repeatedly treated with subcutaneous implants containing 17-beta estradiol or delta-androstene 3,17 dione, respectively. Serial T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted MRI was performed weekly for 8 weeks using a 4.7 T unit. Maturation of anterior optic pathways and hemisphere commissures was assessed. Diffusion-weighted images were processed to produce ``anisotropy index maps``, previously shown to be sensitive to white-matter maturation. Compared with untreated rat-pups, estrogen-treated animals showed accelerated, and testosterone-treated animals delayed maturation on anisotropy index maps and histological sections. In all animals, maturational changes appeared earlie on anisotropy index maps than on other MRI sequences or on myelin-sensitive stained sections. Diffusion-weighted imaging, and the construction of spatial maps sensitive to diffusion anisotropy, seem to be the most sensitive approach for the detection of maturational white-matter changes, and thus may hold potential for early diagnosis of temporary delay or permanent disturbances of white-matter development. (orig.). With 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Pattern of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expression after ablation of the sensorimotor cortex of the neonatal and adult rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dacić Sanja

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system has a limited capacity for self-repair after damage. However, the neonatal brain has agreater capacity for recovery than the adult brain. These differences in the regenerative capability depend on local environmental factors and the maturational stage of growing axons. Among molecules which have both growth-promoting and growth-inhibiting activities is the heterogeneous class of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs. In this paper, we investigated the chondroitin-4 and chondroitin-6 sulfate proteoglycan expression profile after left sensorimotor cortex ablation of the neonatal and adult rat brain. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that compared to the normal uninjured cortex, lesion provoked up regulation of CSPGs showing a different pattern of expression in the neonatal vs. the adult brain. Punctuate and membrane-bound labeling was predominate after neonatal lesion, where as heavy deposition of staining in the extracellular matrix was observed after adult lesion. Heavy deposition of CSPG immunoreactivity around the lesionsite in adult rats, in contrast to a less CSPG-rich environment in neonatal rats, indicated that enhancement of the recovery process after neonatal injury is due to amore permissive environment.

  15. Effects of enriched uranium on developing brain damage of neonatal rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Guixiong; Zhu Shoupeng; Wang Liuyi; Yang Shuqin; Zhu Lingli

    2001-01-01

    The model of irradiation-induced brain damage in vivo was settled first of all. The micro-auto-radiographic tracing showed that when the rat's brain at postnatal day after lateral ventricle injection with enriched uranium 235 U the radionuclides were mainly accumulated in the nucleus. At the same time autoradiographic tracks appeared in the cytoplasm and interval between cells. The effects of cerebrum exposure to alpha irradiation by enriched uranium on somatic growth and neuro-behavior development of neonatal rats were examined by determination of multiple parameters. In the growth and development of the neonatal rat's cerebrum exposure to enriched uranium, the somatic growth such as body weight and brain weight increase was lower significantly. The data indicated that the neonatal wistar rats having cerebrum exposure to alpha irradiation by enriched uranium showed delayed growth and abnormal neuro-behavior. The changes of neuron specific enolase (NSE), interleukin-1 β (IL- β), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and endothelin (ET) in cerebellum, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, diencephalons of the rat brain after expose to alpha irradiation by enriched uranium were examined with radioimmunoassay. The results showed that SOD and ET can be elevated by the low dose irradiation of enriched uranium, and can be distinctly inhibited by the high dose. The data in view of biochemistry indicated firstly that alpha irradiation from enriched uranium on the developing brain damage of neonatal rats were of sensibility, fragility and compensation in nervous cells

  16. Effects of nanoparticle zinc oxide on emotional behavior and trace elements homeostasis in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Salem; Slama, Imen Ben; Omri, Karim; El Ghoul, Jaber; El Mir, Lassaad; Rhouma, Khemais Ben; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; Sakly, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    Over recent years, nanotoxicology and the potential effects on human body have grown in significance, the potential influences of nanosized materials on the central nervous system have received more attention. The aim of this study was to determine whether zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) exposure cause alterations in emotional behavior and trace elements homeostasis in rat brain. Rats were treated by intraperitoneal injection of ZnO NPs (20-30 nm) at a dose of 25 mg/kg body weight. Sub -: acute ZnO NPs treatment induced no significant increase in the zinc content in the homogenate brain. Statistically significant decreases in iron and calcium concentrations were found in rat brain tissue compared to control. However, sodium and potassium contents remained unchanged. Also, there were no significant changes in the body weight and the coefficient of brain. In the present study, the anxiety-related behavior was evaluated using the plus-maze test. ZnO NPs treatment modulates slightly the exploratory behaviors of rats. However, no significant differences were observed in the anxious index between ZnO NP-treated rats and the control group (p > 0.05). Interestingly, our results demonstrated minimal effects of ZnO NPs on emotional behavior of animals, but there was a possible alteration in trace elements homeostasis in rat brain. © The Author(s) 2012.

  17. Effects of enriched uranium on developing brain damage of neonatal rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guixiong, Gu; Shoupeng, Zhu; Liuyi, Wang; Shuqin, Yang; Lingli, Zhu [Suzhou Medical College, Suzhou (China)

    2001-04-01

    The model of irradiation-induced brain damage in vivo was settled first of all. The micro-auto-radiographic tracing showed that when the rat's brain at postnatal day after lateral ventricle injection with enriched uranium {sup 235}U the radionuclides were mainly accumulated in the nucleus. At the same time autoradiographic tracks appeared in the cytoplasm and interval between cells. The effects of cerebrum exposure to alpha irradiation by enriched uranium on somatic growth and neuro-behavior development of neonatal rats were examined by determination of multiple parameters. In the growth and development of the neonatal rat's cerebrum exposure to enriched uranium, the somatic growth such as body weight and brain weight increase was lower significantly. The data indicated that the neonatal wistar rats having cerebrum exposure to alpha irradiation by enriched uranium showed delayed growth and abnormal neuro-behavior. The changes of neuron specific enolase (NSE), interleukin-1 {beta} (IL- {beta}), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and endothelin (ET) in cerebellum, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, diencephalons of the rat brain after expose to alpha irradiation by enriched uranium were examined with radioimmunoassay. The results showed that SOD and ET can be elevated by the low dose irradiation of enriched uranium, and can be distinctly inhibited by the high dose. The data in view of biochemistry indicated firstly that alpha irradiation from enriched uranium on the developing brain damage of neonatal rats were of sensibility, fragility and compensation in nervous cells.

  18. Volumetric changes in the aging rat brain and its impact on cognitive and locomotor functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamezah, Hamizah Shahirah; Durani, Lina Wati; Ibrahim, Nor Faeizah; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Kato, Tomoko; Shiino, Akihiko; Tanaka, Sachiko; Damanhuri, Hanafi Ahmad; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2017-12-01

    Impairments in cognitive and locomotor functions usually occur with advanced age, as do changes in brain volume. This study was conducted to assess changes in brain volume, cognitive and locomotor functions, and oxidative stress levels in middle- to late-aged rats. Forty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: 14, 18, 23, and 27months of age. 1 H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed using a 7.0-Tesla MR scanner system. The volumes of the lateral ventricles, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), hippocampus, striatum, cerebellum, and whole brain were measured. Open field, object recognition, and Morris water maze tests were conducted to assess cognitive and locomotor functions. Blood was taken for measurements of malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl content, and antioxidant enzyme activity. The lateral ventricle volumes were larger, whereas the mPFC, hippocampus, and striatum volumes were smaller in 27-month-old rats than in 14-month-old rats. In behavioral tasks, the 27-month-old rats showed less exploratory activity and poorer spatial learning and memory than did the 14-month-old rats. Biochemical measurements likewise showed increased MDA and lower glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in the 27-month-old rats. In conclusion, age-related increases in oxidative stress, impairment in cognitive and locomotor functions, and changes in brain volume were observed, with the most marked impairments observed in later age. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Stereological brain volume changes in post-weaned socially isolated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Katrine; Helboe, Lone; Steiniger-Brach, Björn

    2010-01-01

    Rearing rats in isolation after weaning is an environmental manipulation that leads to behavioural and neurochemical alterations that resemble what is seen in schizophrenia. The model is neurodevelopmental in origin and has been used as an animal model of schizophrenia. However, only a few studies...... Lister Hooded rats isolated from postnatal day 25 for 15 weeks. We observed the expected gender differences in total brain volume with males having larger brains than females. Further, we found that isolated males had significantly smaller brains than group-housed controls and larger lateral ventricles...... than controls. However, this was not seen in female rats. Isolated males had a significant smaller hippocampus, dentate gyrus and CA2/3 where isolated females had a significant smaller CA1 compared to controls. Thus, our results indicate that long-term isolation of male rats leads to neuroanatomical...

  20. In vivo imaging of brain androgen receptors in rats: a [18F]FDHT PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayum, M.A.; Doorduin, J.; Antunes, I.F.; Kwizera, C.; Zijlma, R.; Boer, J.A. den; Dierckx, R.A.J.O.; Vries, E.F.J. de

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Steroid hormones like androgens play an important role in the development and maintenance of several brain functions. Androgens can act through androgen receptors (AR) in the brain. This study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of positron emission tomography (PET) with 16β-[ 18 F]fluoro-5α-dihydrotestosterone ([ 18 F]FDHT) to image AR expression in the brain. Methods: Male Wistar rats were either orchiectomized to inhibit endogenous androgen production or underwent sham-surgery. Fifteen days after surgery, rats were subjected to a 90-min dynamic [ 18 F]FDHT PET scan with arterial blood sampling. In a subset of orchiectomized rats, 1 mg/kg dihydrotestosterone was co-injected with the tracer in order to saturate the AR. Plasma samples were analyzed for the presence of radioactive metabolites by radio-TLC. Pharmacokinetic modeling was performed to quantify brain kinetics of the tracer. After the PET scan, the animals were terminated for ex-vivo biodistribution. Results: PET imaging and ex vivo biodistribution studies showed low [ 18 F]FDHT uptake in all brain regions, except pituitary. [ 18 F]FDHT uptake in the surrounding cranial bones was high and increased over time. [ 18 F]FDHT was rapidly metabolized in rats. Metabolism was significantly faster in orchiectomized rats than in sham-orchiectomized rats. Quantitative analysis of PET data indicated substantial spill-over of activity from cranial bones into peripheral brain regions, which prevented further analysis of peripheral brain regions. Logan graphical analysis and kinetic modeling using 1- and 2-tissue compartment models showed reversible and homogenously distributed tracer uptake in central brain regions. [ 18 F]FDHT uptake in the brain could not be blocked by endogenous androgens or administration of dihydrotestosterone. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that imaging of AR availability in rat brain with [ 18 F]FDHT PET is not feasible. The low AR expression in the brain, the

  1. Metabolic mapping of the effects of the antidepressant fluoxetine on the brains of congenitally helpless rats

    OpenAIRE

    Shumake, Jason; Colorado, Rene A.; Barrett, Douglas W.; Gonzalez-Lima, F.

    2010-01-01

    Antidepressants require adaptive brain changes before efficacy is achieved, and they may impact the affectively disordered brain differently than the normal brain. We previously demonstrated metabolic disturbances in limbic and cortical regions of the congenitally helpless rat, a model of susceptibility to affective disorder, and we wished to test whether administration of fluoxetine would normalize these metabolic differences. Fluoxetine was chosen because it has become a first-line drug for...

  2. Utilization of 14C-tyrosine in brain and peripheral tissues of developmentally protein malnourished rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.; Leahy, J.P.; McConville, F.; Morgane, P.J.; Resnick, O.

    1978-01-01

    Prior studies of developmentally protein malnourished rats have reported substantial changes in brain and peripheral utilization of 14 C-leucine, 14 C-phenylalanine, and 14 C-tryptophan. In the present study rats born to dams fed a low protein diet (8% casein) compared to the offspring of control rats fed a normal diet (25% casein) showed few significant differences in the uptake and incorporation of 14 C-tyrosine into brain and peripheral tissues from birth to age 21 days. At birth, the 8% casein pups exhibited significant decreases in brain and peripheral tissue incorporation of tracer only at short post-injection times (10 and 20 min), but not at longer intervals (90 and 180 min). During ontogenetic development (Days 5-21), the 8% casein rats showed significant increases in uptake of 14 C-tyrosine into the brain and peripheral tissues on Day 11 and a significantly higher percent incorporation of tracer into brain protein on Day 21 as compared to the 25% casein rats. For the most part, there were no significant changes in incorporation of radioactivity in peripheral tissues for the 2 diet groups on these post-birth days. Overall, the data indicates that developmental protein malnutrition causes relatively fewer changes in brain and peripheral utilization of the semi-essential amino acid tyrosine than those observed in previous studies with essential amino acids

  3. Profiles of VGF Peptides in the Rat Brain and Their Modulations after Phencyclidine Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Noli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available From the VGF precursor protein originate several low molecular weight peptides, whose distribution in the brain and blood circulation is not entirely known. Among the VGF peptides, those containing the N-terminus portion were altered in the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF and hypothalamus of schizophrenia patients. “Hence, we aimed to better investigate the involvement of the VGF peptides in schizophrenia by studying their localization in the brain regions relevant for the disease, and revealing their possible modulations in response to certain neuronal alterations occurring in schizophrenia”. We produced antibodies against different VGF peptides encompassing the N-terminus, but also C-terminus-, TLQP-, GGGE- peptide sequences, and the so named NERP-3 and -4. These antibodies were used to carry out specific ELISA and immunolocalization studies while mass spectrometry (MS analysis was also performed to recognize the intact brain VGF fragments. We used a schizophrenia rat model, in which alterations in the prepulse inhibition (PPI of the acoustic startle response occurred after PCP treatment. In normal rats, all the VGF peptides studied were distributed in the brain areas examined including hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, accumbens and amygdaloid nuclei and also in the plasma. By liquid chromatography-high resolution mass, we identified different intact VGF peptide fragments, including those encompassing the N-terminus and the NERPs. PCP treatment caused behavioral changes that closely mimic schizophrenia, estimated by us as a disruption of PPI of the acoustic startle response. The PCP treatment also induced selective changes in the VGF peptide levels within certain brain areas. Indeed, an increase in VGF C-terminus and TLQP peptides was revealed in the prefrontal cortex (p < 0.01 where they were localized within parvoalbumin and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH containing neurons, respectively. Conversely, in the nucleus accumbens, PCP

  4. The effect of ingested sulfite on visual evoked potentials, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant status of brain in normal and sulfite oxidase-deficient aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsoy, Ozlem; Aras, Sinem; Ozkan, Ayse; Parlak, Hande; Aslan, Mutay; Yargicoglu, Piraye; Agar, Aysel

    2016-07-01

    Sulfite, commonly used as a preservative in foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals, is a very reactive and potentially toxic molecule which is detoxified by sulfite oxidase (SOX). Changes induced by aging may be exacerbated by exogenous chemicals like sulfite. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ingested sulfite on visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and brain antioxidant statuses by measuring superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Brain lipid oxidation status was also determined via thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in normal- and SOX-deficient aged rats. Rats do not mimic the sulfite responses seen in humans because of their relatively high SOX activity level. Therefore this study used SOX-deficient rats since they are more appropriate models for studying sulfite toxicity. Forty male Wistar rats aged 24 months were randomly assigned to four groups: control (C), sulfite (S), SOX-deficient (D) and SOX-deficient + sulfite (DS). SOX deficiency was established by feeding rats with low molybdenum (Mo) diet and adding 200 ppm tungsten (W) to their drinking water. Sulfite in the form of sodium metabisulfite (25 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was given by gavage. Treatment continued for 6 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, flash VEPs were recorded. Hepatic SOX activity was measured to confirm SOX deficiency. SOX-deficient rats had an approximately 10-fold decrease in hepatic SOX activity compared with the normal rats. The activity of SOX in deficient rats was thus in the range of humans. There was no significant difference between control and treated groups in either latence or amplitude of VEP components. Brain SOD, CAT, and GPx activities and brain TBARS levels were similar in all experimental groups compared with the control group. Our results indicate that exogenous administration of sulfite does not affect VEP components and the antioxidant/oxidant status of aged rat brains. © The Author

  5. Brain Aging and AD-Like Pathology in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Qin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Numerous epidemiological studies have linked diabetes mellitus (DM with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, whether or not diabetic encephalopathy shows AD-like pathology remains unclear. Research Design and Methods. Forebrain and hippocampal volumes were measured using stereology in serial coronal sections of the brain in streptozotocin- (STZ- induced rats. Neurodegeneration in the frontal cortex, hypothalamus, and hippocampus was evaluated using Fluoro-Jade C (FJC. Aβ aggregation in the frontal cortex and hippocampus was tested using immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Dendritic spine density in the frontal cortex and hippocampus was measured using Golgi staining, and western blot was conducted to detect the levels of synaptophysin. Cognitive ability was evaluated through the Morris water maze and inhibitory avoidant box. Results. Rats are characterized by insulin deficiency accompanied with polydipsia, polyphagia, polyuria, and weight loss after STZ injection. The number of FJC-positive cells significantly increased in discrete brain regions of the diabetic rats compared with the age-matched control rats. Hippocampal atrophy, Aβ aggregation, and synapse loss were observed in the diabetic rats compared with the control rats. The learning and memory of the diabetic rats decreased compared with those of the age-matched control rats. Conclusions. Our results suggested that aberrant metabolism induced brain aging as characterized by AD-like pathologies.

  6. Brain Aging and AD-Like Pathology in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Qin; Yin, Jie; Song, Yan-Feng; Zhang, Lang; Ren, Ying-Xiang; Wang, De-Gui; Gao, Li-Ping; Jing, Yu-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Numerous epidemiological studies have linked diabetes mellitus (DM) with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, whether or not diabetic encephalopathy shows AD-like pathology remains unclear. Research Design and Methods. Forebrain and hippocampal volumes were measured using stereology in serial coronal sections of the brain in streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced rats. Neurodegeneration in the frontal cortex, hypothalamus, and hippocampus was evaluated using Fluoro-Jade C (FJC). Aβ aggregation in the frontal cortex and hippocampus was tested using immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Dendritic spine density in the frontal cortex and hippocampus was measured using Golgi staining, and western blot was conducted to detect the levels of synaptophysin. Cognitive ability was evaluated through the Morris water maze and inhibitory avoidant box. Results. Rats are characterized by insulin deficiency accompanied with polydipsia, polyphagia, polyuria, and weight loss after STZ injection. The number of FJC-positive cells significantly increased in discrete brain regions of the diabetic rats compared with the age-matched control rats. Hippocampal atrophy, Aβ aggregation, and synapse loss were observed in the diabetic rats compared with the control rats. The learning and memory of the diabetic rats decreased compared with those of the age-matched control rats. Conclusions. Our results suggested that aberrant metabolism induced brain aging as characterized by AD-like pathologies. PMID:25197672

  7. Studies on estradiol-2/4-hydroxylase activity in rat brain and liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theron, C.N.

    1985-03-01

    A sensitive and specific radio-enzymatic assay was used to study estradiol-2/4-hydroxylase activity in rat liver microsomes and in microsomes obtained from 6 discrete brain areas of the rat. Kinetic parameters were determined for these enzyme activities. The effects of different P-450 inhibitors on estradiol-2/4-hydroxylase activity in brain and liver microsomes were also studied. In both organs these enzyme activities were found to be located mainly in the microsomal fraction and were inhibited by the 3 P-450 inhibitors tested. The hepatic estradiol-2/4-hydroxylase activity in adult male rats was significantly higher than that of females, but the enzyme activity in the brain did not exhibit a similar sex difference. Furthermore, estradiol-2/4-hydroxylase activity in rat liver was strongly induced by phenobarbitone treatment, but not in the brain. The phenobarbitone-induced activity in male and female rats exhibited significant kinetic differences. In female rats sexual maturation was associated with significant changes in the apparent Km of estradiol-2/4-hydroxylases in the liver and hypothalamus. Evidence was found that the in vitro estradiol-2/4-hydroxylase activity in rat brain and liver is due to more than one form of microsomal P-450. Kinetic studies showed important differences between the estradiol-2/4-hydroxylase activities in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. Significant differences in estradiol-2/4-hydroxylase activities were observed in the 6 brain areas studied, with the hippocampus showing the highest, and the hypothalamus the lowest activity at all developmental stages in both male and female rats

  8. Stereological brain volume changes in post-weaned socially isolated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Katrine; Helboe, Lone; Steiniger-Brach, Björn

    2010-01-01

    Lister Hooded rats isolated from postnatal day 25 for 15 weeks. We observed the expected gender differences in total brain volume with males having larger brains than females. Further, we found that isolated males had significantly smaller brains than group-housed controls and larger lateral ventricles...... have evaluated the neuroanatomical changes in this animal model in comparison to changes seen in schizophrenia. In this study, we applied stereological volume estimates to evaluate the total brain, the ventricular system, and the pyramidal and granular cell layers of the hippocampus in male and female...... than controls. However, this was not seen in female rats. Isolated males had a significant smaller hippocampus, dentate gyrus and CA2/3 where isolated females had a significant smaller CA1 compared to controls. Thus, our results indicate that long-term isolation of male rats leads to neuroanatomical...

  9. Glucose metabolism of fetal rat brain in utero, measured with labeled deoxyglucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyve, S [Department of General Physiology and Biophysics, Panum Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark); Gjedde, A [Positron Imaging Laboratories, McConnell Brain Imaging Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1991-01-01

    Mammals have low cerebral metabolic rates immediately after birth and, by inference, also before birth. In this study, we extended the deoxyglucose method to the fetal rat brain in utero. Rate constants for deoxyglucose transfer across the maternal placental and fetal blood-brain barriers, and lumped constant, have not been reported. Therefore, we applied a new method of determining the lumped constant regionally to the fetal rat brain in utero. The lumped constant averaged 0.55 +- 0.15 relative to the maternal circulation. On this basis, we determined the glucose metabolic rate of the fetal rat brain to be one third of the corresponding maternal value, or 19 +- 2 {mu}mol hg{sup -1} min{sup -1}. (author).

  10. Intracarotid injection of 195mPt-CDDP on rat brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikawa, Eishi; Kamitani, Hideki; Hori, Tomokatsu; Akaboshi, Mitsuhiko.

    1995-01-01

    We began to try intracarotid injection of 195m Pt-CDDP on transplanted rats of C6 glioma. As a control, normal rats were also treated with intracarotid injection of 195m Pt-CDDP. After injection, the tumor, the normal brain of injected site, the brain of contralateral site, and the blood were sampled for the measurement of the Pt uptake. On normal rats, the ratio of the Pt uptake of the brain to that of the blood was highest in 20 minutes after injection. The ratio of the Pt uptake of the brain of injected site to that of the blood was almost same as that of the brain of contralateral site, so it seemed that the Pt uptake was not so enhanced with intracarotid injection on the normal brain. On the other hand, the ratio of the Pt uptake of the transplanted brain tumor to that of the blood was greatly higher than that of the normal brain. So it seemed that the intracarotid injection of CDDP may have some activities against brain tumors. This study was now started, so we continue this study further more. (author)

  11. MR brain volumetric measurements are predictive of neurobehavioral impairment in the HIV-1 transgenic rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Rafael; Muthusamy, Siva; Wakim, Paul G; Sinharay, Sanhita; Lentz, Margaret R; Reid, William C; Hammoud, Dima A

    2018-01-01

    HIV infection is known to be associated with brain volume loss, even in optimally treated patients. In this study, we assessed whether dynamic brain volume changes over time are predictive of neurobehavorial performance in the HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rat, a model of treated HIV-positive patients. Cross-sectional brain MRI imaging was first performed comparing Tg and wild type (WT) rats at 3 and 19 months of age. Longitudinal MRI and neurobehavioral testing of another group of Tg and WT rats was then performed from 5 to 23 weeks of age. Whole brain and subregional image segmentation was used to assess the rate of brain growth over time. We used repeated-measures mixed models to assess differences in brain volumes and to establish how predictive the volume differences are of specific neurobehavioral deficits. Cross-sectional imaging showed smaller whole brain volumes in Tg compared to WT rats at 3 and at 19 months of age. Longitudinally, Tg brain volumes were smaller than age-matched WT rats at all time points, starting as early as 5 weeks of age. The Tg striatal growth rate delay between 5 and 9 weeks of age was greater than that of the whole brain. Striatal volume in combination with genotype was the most predictive of rota-rod scores and in combination with genotype and age was the most predictive of total exploratory activity scores in the Tg rats. The disproportionately delayed striatal growth compared to whole brain between 5 and 9 weeks of age and the role of striatal volume in predicting neurobehavioral deficits suggest an important role of the dopaminergic system in HIV associated neuropathology. This might explain problems with motor coordination and executive decisions in this animal model. Smaller brain and subregional volumes and neurobehavioral deficits were seen as early as 5 weeks of age, suggesting an early brain insult in the Tg rat. Neuroprotective therapy testing in this model should thus target this early stage of development, before brain

  12. Investigating the Intersession Reliability of Dynamic Brain-State Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Derek M; Zhao, Yrian; Keilholz, Shella D; Schumacher, Eric H

    2018-06-01

    Dynamic functional connectivity metrics have much to offer to the neuroscience of individual differences of cognition. Yet, despite the recent expansion in dynamic connectivity research, limited resources have been devoted to the study of the reliability of these connectivity measures. To address this, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 100 Human Connectome Project subjects were compared across 2 scan days. Brain states (i.e., patterns of coactivity across regions) were identified by classifying each time frame using k means clustering. This was done with and without global signal regression (GSR). Multiple gauges of reliability indicated consistency in the brain-state properties across days and GSR attenuated the reliability of the brain states. Changes in the brain-state properties across the course of the scan were investigated as well. The results demonstrate that summary metrics describing the clustering of individual time frames have adequate test/retest reliability, and thus, these patterns of brain activation may hold promise for individual-difference research.

  13. Fluoride Alteration of [3H]Glucose Uptake in Wistar Rat Brain and Peripheral Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalska, Anna; Kuter, Katarzyna; Żelazko, Aleksandra; Głogowska-Gruszka, Anna; Świętochowska, Elżbieta; Nowak, Przemysław

    2017-04-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of postnatal fluoride intake on [3H]glucose uptake and transport in rat brain and peripheral tissues. Sodium fluoride (NaF) in a concentration of 10 or 50 ppm was added to the drinking water of adult Wistar rats. The control group received distilled water. After 4 weeks, respective plasma fluoride levels were 0.0541 ± 0.0135 μg/ml (control), 0.0596 ± 0.0202 μg/ml (10 ppm), and 0.0823 ± 0.0199 μg/ml (50 ppm). Although plasma glucose levels were not altered in any group, the plasma insulin level in the fluoride (50 ppm) group was elevated (0.72 ± 0.13 μg/ml) versus the control group (0.48 ± 0.24 μg/ml) and fluoride (10 ppm) group. In rats receiving fluoride for 4 weeks at 10 ppm in drinking water, [3H]glucose uptake was unaltered in all tested parts of the brain. However, in rats receiving fluoride at 50 ppm, [3H]glucose uptake in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus with hypothalamus was elevated, versus the saline group. Fluoride intake had a negligible effect on [3H]glucose uptake by peripheral tissues (liver, pancreas, stomach, small intestine, atrium, aorta, kidney, visceral tissue, lung, skin, oral mucosa, tongue, salivary gland, incisor, molars, and jawbone). In neither fluoride group was glucose transporter proteins 1 (GLUT 1) or 3 (GLUT 3) altered in frontal cortex and striatum versus control. On the assumption that increased glucose uptake (by neural tissue) reasonably reflects neuronal activity, it appears that fluoride damage to the brain results in a compensatory increase in glucose uptake and utilization without changes in GLUT 1 and GLUT 3 expression.

  14. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) receptors in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, T.; Niwa, M.; Yamashita, K.; Kataoka, Y.; Shigematsu, K.

    1990-01-01

    1. Specific binding sites for neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) were investigated in rat brain areas using quantitative receptor autoradiography with 125 I-Bolton-Hunter NPY ( 125 I-BH-NPY) and 125 I-PYY, radioligands for PP-fold family peptides receptors. 2. There were no differences between localization of 125 I-BH-NPY and 125 I-PYY binding sites in the rat brain. High densities of the binding sites were present in the anterior olfactory nucleus, lateral septal nucleus, stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, posteromedial cortical amygdaloid nucleus, and area postrema. 3. In cold ligand-saturation experiments done in the presence of increasing concentrations of unlabeled NPY and PYY, 125 I-BH-NPY and 125 I-PYY binding to the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, layer I of the somatosensory frontoparietal cortex, molecular layer of the cerebellum, and area postrema was single and of a high affinity. There was a significant difference between the affinities of 125 I-BH-NPY (Kd = 0.96 nM) and 125 I-PYY binding (Kd = 0.05 nM) to the molecular layer of the cerebellum. The binding of the two radioligands to the other areas examined had the same affinities. 4. When comparing the potency of unlabeled rat pancreatic polypeptide (rPP), a family peptide of NPY and PYY, to inhibit the binding to the areas examined, rPP displaced 125 I-BH-NPY and 125 I-PYY binding to the area postrema more potently than it did the binding to the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, layer I of the somatosensory frontoparietal cortex, and molecular layer of the cerebellum. 5. Thus, the quantitative receptor autoradiographic method with 125 I-BH-NPY and 125 I-PYY revealed differences in binding characteristics of specific NPY and PYY binding sites in different areas of the rat brain. The results provide further evidence for the existence of multiple NPY-PYY receptors in the central nervous system

  15. In vivo study about specific captation of 125 I-insulin by rat brain structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanvitto, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    The specific captation of 125 I-insulin was evaluated by brain structures, as olfactory bulbous, hypothalamus and cerebellum in rats, from in vivo experiences that including two different aspects: captation measure of 125 I-insulin after the intravenous injection of the labelled hormone, in fed rats and in rats with 48 h of fast or convulsion, procedure by the pentylene tetrazole; captation measure of 125 I-insulin after intra-cerebral-ventricular injection of the labelled hormone in fed rats. (C.G.C.)

  16. Functional brain imaging to investigate the higher brain dysfunction induced by diffuse brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Tadashi; Inaji, Motoki; Ohno, Kikuo; Hiura, Mikio; Ishii, Kenji; Hosoda, Chihiro

    2011-01-01

    Higher brain dysfunction is the major problem of patients who recover from neurotrauma the prevents them from returning to their previous social life. Many such patients do not have focal brain damage detected with morphological imaging. We focused on studying the focal brain dysfunction that can be detected only with functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) in relation to the score of various cognition batteries. Patients who complain of higher brain dysfunction without apparent morphological cortical damage were recruited for this study. Thirteen patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) or cerebral concussion was included. They underwent a PET study to image glucose metabolism by 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and central benodiazepine receptor (cBZD-R) (marker of neuronal body) by 11 C-flumazenil, together with cognition measurement by WAIS-R, WMS-R, and WCST etc. PET data were compared with age matched normal controls using statistical parametric mapping (SPM)2. DAI patients had a significant decrease in glucose matabolism and cBZD-R distribution in the cingulated cortex than normal controls. Patients diagnosed with concussion because of shorter consciousness disturbance also had abnormal FDG uptake and cBZD-R distribution. Cognition test scores were variable among patients. Degree of decreased glucose metabolism and cBZD-R distribution in the dominant hemishphere corresponded well to the severity of cognitive disturbance. PET molecular imaging was useful to depict focal cortical dysfunction of neurotrauma patients even when morphological change was not apparent. This method may be promising to clarify the pathophysiology of higher brain dysfunction of patients with diffuse axonal injury or chronic traumatic encephalopathy. (author)

  17. Radioimmunoassay of met-enkephalin in microdissected areas of paraformaldehyde-fixed rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, F.M.A.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The effects were studied of various sample preparation procedures on rat brain met-enkephalin content, measured by radioimmunoassay. Whole brain met-enkephalin content of rats killed by decapitation followed by immediate tissue freezing was similar to that of rats killed by microwave irradiation and to those of rats anesthetized with pentobarbital or halothane before killing, whether previously perfused with paraformaldehyde or not. In contrast, a decrease (up to 80%) in met-enkephalin concentrations was observed when brain samples were frozen and thawed to mimic the procedure utilized in the ''punch'' technique for analysis of discrete brain nuclei. This decrease was totally prevented by paraformaldehyde perfusion of the brain prior to sacrifice. Brain perfusion did not alter the amount of immunoassayable met-enkephalin extracted from tissue or its profile after Sephadex chromatography. Paraformaldehyde perfusion results in better morphological tissue preservation and facilitates the ''punch'' dissecting technique. Paraformaldehyde perfusion may be the procedure of choice for the measurement of neuropeptides in specific brain nuclei dissected by the ''punch'' technique

  18. Site-specific effects of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug lysine clonixinate on rat brain opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortí, E; Coirini, H; Pico, J C

    1999-04-01

    In addition to effects in the periphery through inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, several lines of evidence suggest that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) act in the central nervous system. The possibility that the central action of NSAIDs involves regulation of opioid receptors was investigated by quantitative autoradiography of mu, delta, and kappa sites in rat brain slices. Increased (p lysine clonixinate. Labeling of delta receptors was lower in the lateral septum, and kappa sites decreased in thalamic nuclei. These effects were not mediated through direct interaction with opioid-binding sites, since receptor-binding assays using rat brain membranes confirmed that clonixinate up to 1 x 10(-4) mol/l does not inhibit mu, delta, and kappa receptor specific binding. Central effects of NSAIDs might, therefore, involve interaction with the opioid receptor system through indirect mechanisms.

  19. Standardized Environmental Enrichment Supports Enhanced Brain Plasticity in Healthy Rats and Prevents Cognitive Impairment in Epileptic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouchi, Hayet Y.; Bodennec, Jacques; Morales, Anne; Georges, Béatrice; Bonnet, Chantal; Bouvard, Sandrine; Sloviter, Robert S.; Bezin, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Environmental enrichment of laboratory animals influences brain plasticity, stimulates neurogenesis, increases neurotrophic factor expression, and protects against the effects of brain insult. However, these positive effects are not constantly observed, probably because standardized procedures of environmental enrichment are lacking. Therefore, we engineered an enriched cage (the Marlau™ cage), which offers: (1) minimally stressful social interactions; (2) increased voluntary exercise; (3) multiple entertaining activities; (4) cognitive stimulation (maze exploration), and (5) novelty (maze configuration changed three times a week). The maze, which separates food pellet and water bottle compartments, guarantees cognitive stimulation for all animals. Compared to rats raised in groups in conventional cages, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited increased cortical thickness, hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal levels of transcripts encoding various genes involved in tissue plasticity and remodeling. In addition, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited better performances in learning and memory, decreased anxiety-associated behaviors, and better recovery of basal plasma corticosterone level after acute restraint stress. Marlau™ cages also insure inter-experiment reproducibility in spatial learning and brain gene expression assays. Finally, housing rats in Marlau™ cages after severe status epilepticus at weaning prevents the cognitive impairment observed in rats subjected to the same insult and then housed in conventional cages. By providing a standardized enriched environment for rodents during housing, the Marlau™ cage should facilitate the uniformity of environmental enrichment across laboratories. PMID:23342033

  20. Standardized environmental enrichment supports enhanced brain plasticity in healthy rats and prevents cognitive impairment in epileptic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raafat P Fares

    Full Text Available Environmental enrichment of laboratory animals influences brain plasticity, stimulates neurogenesis, increases neurotrophic factor expression, and protects against the effects of brain insult. However, these positive effects are not constantly observed, probably because standardized procedures of environmental enrichment are lacking. Therefore, we engineered an enriched cage (the Marlau™ cage, which offers: (1 minimally stressful social interactions; (2 increased voluntary exercise; (3 multiple entertaining activities; (4 cognitive stimulation (maze exploration, and (5 novelty (maze configuration changed three times a week. The maze, which separates food pellet and water bottle compartments, guarantees cognitive stimulation for all animals. Compared to rats raised in groups in conventional cages, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited increased cortical thickness, hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal levels of transcripts encoding various genes involved in tissue plasticity and remodeling. In addition, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited better performances in learning and memory, decreased anxiety-associated behaviors, and better recovery of basal plasma corticosterone level after acute restraint stress. Marlau™ cages also insure inter-experiment reproducibility in spatial learning and brain gene expression assays. Finally, housing rats in Marlau™ cages after severe status epilepticus at weaning prevents the cognitive impairment observed in rats subjected to the same insult and then housed in conventional cages. By providing a standardized enriched environment for rodents during housing, the Marlau™ cage should facilitate the uniformity of environmental enrichment across laboratories.

  1. Metabolic Brain Network Analysis of Hypothyroidism Symptom Based on [18F]FDG-PET of Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hongkai; Tan, Ziyu; Zheng, Qiang; Yu, Jing

    2018-03-12

    Recent researches have demonstrated the value of using 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to reveal the hypothyroidism-related damages in local brain regions. However, the influence of hypothyroidism on the entire brain network is barely studied. This study focuses on the application of graph theory on analyzing functional brain networks of the hypothyroidism symptom. For both the hypothyroidism and the control groups of Wistar rats, the functional brain networks were constructed by thresholding the glucose metabolism correlation matrices of 58 brain regions. The network topological properties (including the small-world properties and the nodal centralities) were calculated and compared between the two groups. We found that the rat brains, like human brains, have typical properties of the small-world network in both the hypothyroidism and the control groups. However, the hypothyroidism group demonstrated lower global efficiency and decreased local cliquishness of the brain network, indicating hypothyroidism-related impairment to the brain network. The hypothyroidism group also has decreased nodal centrality in the left posterior hippocampus, the right hypothalamus, pituitary, pons, and medulla. This observation accorded with the hypothyroidism-related functional disorder of hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) feedback regulation mechanism. Our research quantitatively confirms that hypothyroidism hampers brain cognitive function by causing impairment to the brain network of glucose metabolism. This study reveals the feasibility and validity of applying graph theory method to preclinical [ 18 F]FDG-PET images and facilitates future study on human subjects.

  2. Investigation of Implantable Multi-Channel Electrode Array in Rat Cerebral Cortex Used for Recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Noriyuki; Fukayama, Osamu; Suzuki, Takafumi; Mabuchi, Kunihiko

    There have recently been many studies concerning the control of robot movements using neural signals recorded from the brain (usually called the Brain-Machine interface (BMI)). We fabricated implantable multi-electrode arrays to obtain neural signals from the rat cerebral cortex. As any multi-electrode array should have electrode alignment that minimizes invasion, it is necessary to customize the recording site. We designed three types of 22-channel multi-electrode arrays, i.e., 1) wide, 2) three-layered, and 3) separate. The first extensively covers the cerebral cortex. The second has a length of 2 mm, which can cover the area of the primary motor cortex. The third array has a separate structure, which corresponds to the position of the forelimb and hindlimb areas of the primary motor cortex. These arrays were implanted into the cerebral cortex of a rat. We estimated the walking speed from neural signals using our fabricated three-layered array to investigate its feasibility for BMI research. The neural signal of the rat and its walking speed were simultaneously recorded. The results revealed that evaluation using either the anterior electrode group or posterior group provided accurate estimates. However, two electrode groups around the center yielded poor estimates although it was possible to record neural signals.

  3. Activity-based anorexia activates nesfatin-1 immunoreactive neurons in distinct brain nuclei of female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharner, Sophie; Prinz, Philip; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Lommel, Reinhard; Kobelt, Peter; Hofmann, Tobias; Rose, Matthias; Stengel, Andreas

    2017-12-15

    Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is an established animal model for the eating disorder anorexia nervosa (AN). The pathophysiology of AN and the involvement of food intake-regulatory peptides is still poorly understood. Nesfatin-1, an anorexigenic peptide also involved in the mediation of stress, anxiety and depression might be a likely candidate involved in the pathogenesis of AN. Therefore, activation of nesfatin-1 immunoreactive (ir) brain nuclei was investigated under conditions of ABA. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were used and divided into four groups (n=6/group): activity-based anorexia (ABA), restricted feeding (RF), activity (AC) and ad libitum fed (AL). After the 21-day experimental period and development of ABA, brains were processed for c-Fos/nesfatin-1 double labeling immunohistochemistry. ABA increased the number of nesfatin-1 immunopositive neurons in the paraventricular nucleus, arcuate nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus and in the rostral part of the nucleus of the solitary tract compared to AL and AC groups (p0.05). Moreover, we observed significantly more c-Fos and nesfatin-1 ir double-labeled cells in ABA rats compared to RF, AL and AC in the supraoptic nucleus (p<0.05) and compared to AL and AC in the paraventricular nucleus, arcuate nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, dorsal raphe nucleus and the rostral raphe pallidus (p<0.05). Since nesfatin-1 plays a role in the inhibition of food intake and the response to stress, we hypothesize that the observed changes of brain nesfatin-1 might play a role in the pathophysiology and symptomatology under conditions of ABA and potentially also in patients with AN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pro-oxidant effects in the brain of rats concurrently exposed to uranium and stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, Victoria; Sanchez, Domenec J.; Belles, Montserrat; Albina, Luisa; Gomez, Mercedes; Domingo, Jose L.

    2007-01-01

    Metal toxicity may be associated with increased rates of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation within the central nervous system (CNS). Although the kidney is the main target organ for uranium (U) toxicity, this metal can also accumulate in brain. In this study, we investigated the modifications on endogenous antioxidant capacity and oxidative damage in several areas of the brain of U-exposed rats. Eight groups of adult male rats received uranyl acetate dihydrate (UAD) in the drinking water at 0, 10, 20, and 40 mg/kg/day for 3 months. Animals in four groups were concurrently subjected to restraint stress during 2 h/day throughout the study. At the end of the experimental period, cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were removed and processed to examine the following stress markers: reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as well as U concentrations. The results show that U significantly accumulated in hippocampus, cerebellum and cortex after 3 months of exposure. Moreover, UAD exposure promoted oxidative stress in these cerebral tissues. In cortex and cerebellum, TBARS levels were positively correlated with the U content, while in cerebellum GSSG and GSH levels were positively and negatively correlated, respectively, with U concentrations. In hippocampus, CAT and SOD activities were positively correlated with U concentration. The present results suggest that chronic oral exposure to UAD can cause progressive perturbations on physiological brain levels of oxidative stress markers. Although at the current UAD doses restraint scarcely showed additional adverse effects, its potential influence should not be underrated

  5. Cigarette smoking accelerated brain aging and induced pre-Alzheimer-like neuropathology in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen-Shan Ho

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking has been proposed as a major risk factor for aging-related pathological changes and Alzheimer's disease (AD. To date, little is known for how smoking can predispose our brains to dementia or cognitive impairment. This study aimed to investigate the cigarette smoke-induced pathological changes in brains. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were exposed to either sham air or 4% cigarette smoke 1 hour per day for 8 weeks in a ventilated smoking chamber to mimic the situation of chronic passive smoking. We found that the levels of oxidative stress were significantly increased in the hippocampus of the smoking group. Smoking also affected the synapse through reducing the expression of pre-synaptic proteins including synaptophysin and synapsin-1, while there were no changes in the expression of postsynaptic protein PSD95. Decreased levels of acetylated-tubulin and increased levels of phosphorylated-tau at 231, 205 and 404 epitopes were also observed in the hippocampus of the smoking rats. These results suggested that axonal transport machinery might be impaired, and the stability of cytoskeleton might be affected by smoking. Moreover, smoking affected amyloid precursor protein (APP processing by increasing the production of sAPPβ and accumulation of β-amyloid peptide in the CA3 and dentate gyrus region. In summary, our data suggested that chronic cigarette smoking could induce synaptic changes and other neuropathological alterations. These changes might serve as evidence of early phases of neurodegeneration and may explain why smoking can predispose brains to AD and dementia.

  6. Protective effect of pyruvate against ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in the developing rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Najeeb; Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Ullah, Ikram; Lee, Hae Young; Koh, Phil Ok; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2011-12-01

    Exposure to alcohol during the early stages of brain development can lead to neurological disorders in the CNS. Apoptotic neurodegeneration due to ethanol exposure is a main feature of alcoholism. Exposure of developing animals to alcohol (during the growth spurt period in particular) elicits apoptotic neuronal death and causes fetal alcohol effects (FAE) or fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). A single episode of ethanol intoxication (at 5 g/kg) in a seven-day-old developing rat can activate the apoptotic cascade, leading to widespread neuronal death in the brain. In the present study, we investigated the potential protective effect of pyruvate against ethanol-induced neuroapoptosis. After 4h, a single dose of ethanol induced upregulation of Bax, release of mitochondrial cytochrome-c into the cytosol, activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1), all of which promote apoptosis. These effects were all reversed by co-treatment with pyruvate at a well-tolerated dosage (1000 mg/kg). Histopathology performed at 24 and 48 h with Fluoro-Jade-B and cresyl violet stains showed that pyruvate significantly reduced the number of dead cells in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Immunohistochemical analysis at 24h confirmed that ethanol-induced cell death is both apoptotic and inhibited by pyruvate. These findings suggest that pyruvate treatment attenuates ethanol-induced neuronal cell loss in the developing rat brain and holds promise as a safe therapeutic and neuroprotective agent in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders in newborns and infants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Early and Later Life Stress Alter Brain Activity and Sleep in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrdalj, Jelena; Pallesen, Ståle; Milde, Anne Marita; Jellestad, Finn Konow; Murison, Robert; Ursin, Reidun; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Grønli, Janne

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to early life stress may profoundly influence the developing brain in lasting ways. Neuropsychiatric disorders associated with early life adversity may involve neural changes reflected in EEG power as a measure of brain activity and disturbed sleep. The main aim of the present study was for the first time to characterize possible changes in adult EEG power after postnatal maternal separation in rats. Furthermore, in the same animals, we investigated how EEG power and sleep architecture were affected after exposure to a chronic mild stress protocol. During postnatal day 2–14 male rats were exposed to either long maternal separation (180 min) or brief maternal separation (10 min). Long maternally separated offspring showed a sleep-wake nonspecific reduction in adult EEG power at the frontal EEG derivation compared to the brief maternally separated group. The quality of slow wave sleep differed as the long maternally separated group showed lower delta power in the frontal-frontal EEG and a slower reduction of the sleep pressure. Exposure to chronic mild stress led to a lower EEG power in both groups. Chronic exposure to mild stressors affected sleep differently in the two groups of maternal separation. Long maternally separated offspring showed more total sleep time, more episodes of rapid eye movement sleep and higher percentage of non-rapid eye movement episodes ending in rapid eye movement sleep compared to brief maternal separation. Chronic stress affected similarly other sleep parameters and flattened the sleep homeostasis curves in all offspring. The results confirm that early environmental conditions modulate the brain functioning in a long-lasting way. PMID:23922857

  8. Cigarette Smoking Accelerated Brain Aging and Induced Pre-Alzheimer-Like Neuropathology in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yuen-Shan; Yang, Xifei; Yeung, Sze-Chun; Chiu, Kin; Lau, Chi-Fai; Tsang, Andrea Wing-Ting; Mak, Judith Choi-Wo; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking has been proposed as a major risk factor for aging-related pathological changes and Alzheimer's disease (AD). To date, little is known for how smoking can predispose our brains to dementia or cognitive impairment. This study aimed to investigate the cigarette smoke-induced pathological changes in brains. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to either sham air or 4% cigarette smoke 1 hour per day for 8 weeks in a ventilated smoking chamber to mimic the situation of chronic passive smoking. We found that the levels of oxidative stress were significantly increased in the hippocampus of the smoking group. Smoking also affected the synapse through reducing the expression of pre-synaptic proteins including synaptophysin and synapsin-1, while there were no changes in the expression of postsynaptic protein PSD95. Decreased levels of acetylated-tubulin and increased levels of phosphorylated-tau at 231, 205 and 404 epitopes were also observed in the hippocampus of the smoking rats. These results suggested that axonal transport machinery might be impaired, and the stability of cytoskeleton might be affected by smoking. Moreover, smoking affected amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing by increasing the production of sAPPβ and accumulation of β–amyloid peptide in the CA3 and dentate gyrus region. In summary, our data suggested that chronic cigarette smoking could induce synaptic changes and other neuropathological alterations. These changes might serve as evidence of early phases of neurodegeneration and may explain why smoking can predispose brains to AD and dementia. PMID:22606286

  9. Chronic coffee and caffeine ingestion effects on the cognitive function and antioxidant system of rat brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Renata Viana; Silva-Oliveira, Eliane Moretto; Moraes, Márcio Flávio Dutra; Pereira, Grace Schenatto; Moraes-Santos, Tasso

    2011-10-01

    Coffee is a popular beverage consumed worldwide and its effect on health protection has been well studied throughout literature. This study investigates the effect of chronic coffee and caffeine ingestion on cognitive behavior and the antioxidant system of rat brains. The paradigms of open field and object recognition were used to assess locomotor and exploratory activities, as well as learning and memory. The antioxidant system was evaluated by determining the activities of glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as the lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione content. Five groups of male rats were fed for approximately 80 days with different diets: control diet (CD), fed a control diet; 3% coffee diet (3%Co) and 6% coffee diet (6%Co), both fed a diet containing brewed coffee; 0.04% caffeine diet (0.04%Ca) and 0.08% caffeine diet (0.08%Ca), both fed a control diet supplemented with caffeine. The estimated caffeine intake was approximately 20 and 40 mg/kg per day, for the 3%Co-0.04%Ca and 6%Co-0.08%Ca treatments, respectively. At 90 days of life, the animals were subjected to the behavioral tasks and then sacrificed. The results indicated that the intake of coffee, similar to caffeine, improved long-term memory when tested with object recognition; however, this was not accompanied by an increase in locomotor and exploratory activities. In addition, chronic coffee and caffeine ingestion reduced the lipid peroxidation of brain membranes and increased the concentration of reduced-glutathione. The activities of the GR and SOD were similarly increased, but no change in GPx activity could be observed. Thus, besides improving cognitive function, our data show that chronic coffee consumption modulates the endogenous antioxidant system in the brain. Therefore, chronic coffee ingestion, through the protection of the antioxidant system, may play an important role in preventing age-associated decline in the cognitive

  10. Beneficial Effect of HHI-Ⅰ(活血化瘀注射液Ⅰ号)on Cerebral Microcirculation,Blood-Brain Barrier in Rats and Anti-hypoxic Activity in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵连根; 吴咸中; 伍孝先

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of HHI-Ⅰ(活血化瘀注射液Ⅰ号) on the cerebral microcirculation,the blood-brain barrier permeability in rats and anti-hypoxic activity in mice.Methods:(1) The blood microcirculation of the brain in rats was investigated by laser Doppler flowmetry with the probes laid on the cerebral pia mater or inserted into the brain parenchyma.(2) The protective action of HHI-Ⅰagainst the brain microcirculation disturbance induced by intravenous injection of high-molecular dextran(10%,9 mL/kg)...

  11. Assessment of drug disposition in the perfused rat brain by statistical moment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakane, T.; Nakatsu, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Hashida, M.; Sezaki, H.; Yamashita, S.; Nadai, T.

    1991-01-01

    Drug disposition in the brain was investigated by statistical moment analysis using an improved in situ brain perfusion technique. The right cerebral hemisphere of the rat was perfused in situ. The drug and inulin were injected into the right internal carotid artery as a rapid bolus and the venous outflow curve at the posterior facial vein was obtained. The infusion rate was adjusted to minimize the flow of perfusion fluid into the left hemisphere. The obtained disposition parameters were characteristics and considered to reflect the physicochemical properties of each drug. Antipyrine showed a small degree of initial uptake. Therefore, its apparent distribution volume (Vi) and apparent intrinsic clearance (CLint,i) were small. Diazepam showed large degrees of both influx and efflux and, thus, a large Vi. Water showed parameters intermediate between those of antipyrine and those of diazepam. Imipramine, desipramine, and propranolol showed a large CLint,i compared with those of the other drugs. The extraction ratio of propranolol significantly decreased with increasing concentrations of unlabeled propranolol in the perfusion fluid. These findings may be explained partly by the tissue binding of these drugs. In conclusion, the present method is useful for studying drug disposition in the brain

  12. Inhibition of tryptophan - pyrrolase activity and elevation of brain tryptophan concentration by fluoxetine in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bano, S.; Sherkheli, M.A

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate in-vitro as well as in-vivo effects of various doses of fluoxetine (SSRI) on tryptophan metabolism in rates. Results: In in-vitro (10 - 1000 mM) as well in-vivo (0.5 - 30 mg/kg body wt.) studies, fluoxetine showed a statistically significant inhibition of rat liver tryptophan pyrrolase (tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase; EC 1.13.11.11) activity. Significant increases were noted at 10 and 30 mg/kg doses in brain, serum (total and free) and liver L-tryptophan concentrations. Similarly, serum non-esterified free fatty acids showed a significant increase at both doses. There was no effect on serum glucose and albumin concentrations. Conclusion: It is suggested that major mechanism of action of fluoxetine is that of elevating brain tryptophan concentration and hence 5-HT synthesis by increasing the availability of circulating tryptophan to the brain secondarily to inhibition of major tryptophan degrading enzyme, hepatic tryptophan pyrrolase. It is assumed that fluoxetine inhibits the binding of apoenzyme form of tryptophan pyrrolase with its cofactor haem. The results are discussed in relation to possible involvement of disturbed hepatic tryptophan metabolism in depressive illness. (author)

  13. Effects of endogenous pyrogen and prostaglandin E2 on hypothalamic neurons in rat brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T; Morimoto, A; Murakami, N

    1987-06-01

    We investigated the effects of endogenous pyrogen and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on the preoptic and anterior hypothalamic (POAH) neurons using brain slice preparations from the rat. Partially purified endogenous pyrogen did not change the activities of most of the neurons in the POAH region when applied locally through a micropipette attached to the recording electrode in proximity to the neurons. This indicates that partially purified endogenous pyrogen does not act directly on the neuronal activity in the POAH region. The partially purified endogenous pyrogen, applied into a culture chamber containing a brain slice, facilitated the activities in 24% of the total neurons tested, regardless of the thermal specificity of the neurons. Moreover, PGE2 added to the culture chamber facilitated 48% of the warm-responsive, 33% of the cold-responsive, and 29% of the thermally insensitive neurons. The direction of change in neuronal activity induced by partially purified endogenous pyrogen appears to be almost the same as that induced by PGE2 when these substances were applied by perfusion to the same neuron in the culture chamber. These results suggest that partially purified pyrogen applied to the perfusate of the culture chamber stimulates some constituents of brain tissue to synthesize and release prostaglandin, which in turn affects the neuronal activity of the POAH region.

  14. Effects of protein restriction, melatonin administration, and short daylength on brain benzodiazepine receptors in prepubertal male rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennaway, D.J.; Royles, P.; Webb, H.; Carbone, F.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility that there are changes in brain benzodiazepine binding sites controlled by photoperiod was investigated in two strains of male rats. The hypothesis was tested by 3H-diazepam binding studies in various brain regions of prepubertal rats maintained in 14 or 10 h of light or treated with late-afternoon injections of melatonin (50 micrograms/day). Protein restriction was applied during the experiment to sensitize the animals to the treatments. Under the conditions employed, rats kept in short daylength throughout or kept on long photoperiod and given late-afternoon melatonin injections showed evidence of delayed puberty (seminal vesicle, ventral prostate, and testis weight decreased by 45%, 55%, and 60% respectively, compared to control rats). Binding measurements were made 1 h before and 2 and 5 h after the onset of darkness in the pubertal (42-day-old) or experimentally prepubertal rats. In the rats of the Porton strain (for which protein restriction was obligatory for the gonadal response) there was no consistent treatment or time effects on specific binding of 3H-diazepam to washed membranes of the hypothalamus, midbrain, or striatum. Similarly, there were no differences in the stimulation of 3H-diazepam binding by 100 microM GABA or the inhibition of binding by 50 microM N-acetyl 5 methoxy kynurenamine. By contrast, in Wistar rats, specific binding to midbrain membranes was reduced 5 h after dark compared to 2 h (37% saline; 20% melatonin) and the extent of stimulation by GABA in the hypothalamus was increased 5 h after darkness (35.6% to 46.7% saline; 37.4% to 50% melatonin). Melatonin treatment resulted in significantly higher specific binding in the hypothalamus 2 h after dark (10%, control fed; 20%, protein restricted) but reduced the GABA induced stimulation of binding in the midbrain (35.5% to 25%, control fed; 33.7% to 23.5%, protein restricted)

  15. Mitochondrial targeted neuron focused genes in hippocampus of rats with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pushpa; Su, Yan A; Barry, Erin S; Grunberg, Neil E; Lei, Zhang

    2012-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) represents a major health problem in civilian populations as well as among the military service members due to (1) lack of effective treatments, and (2) our incomplete understanding about the progression of secondary cell injury cascades resulting in neuronal cell death due to deficient cellular energy metabolism and damaged mitochondria. The aim of this study was to identify and delineate the mitochondrial targeted genes responsible for altered brain energy metabolism in the injured brain. Rats were either grouped into naïve controls or received lateral fluid percussion brain injury (2-2.5 atm) and followed up for 7 days. Rats were either grouped into naïve controls or received lateral fluid percussion brain injury (2-2.5 atm) and followed for 7 days. The severity of brain injury was evaluated by the neurological severity scale-revised (NSS-R) at 3 and 5 days post TBI and immunohistochemical analyses at 7 days post TBI. The expression profiles of mitochondrial-targeted genes across the hippocampus from TBI and naïe rats were also examined by oligo-DNA microarrays. NSS-R scores of TBI rats (5.4 ± 0.5) in comparison to naïe rats (3.9 ± 0.5) and H and E staining of brain sections suggested a mild brain injury. Bioinformatics and systems biology analyses showed 31 dysregulated genes, 10 affected canonical molecular pathways including a number of genes involved in mitochondrial enzymes for oxidative phosphorylation, mitogen-activated protein Kinase (MAP), peroxisome proliferator-activated protein (PPAP), apoptosis signaling, and genes responsible for long-term potentiation of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Our results suggest that dysregulated mitochondrial-focused genes in injured brains may have a clinical utility for the development of future therapeutic strategies aimed at the treatment of TBI.

  16. Altered blood-brain barrier permeability in rats with prehepatic portal hypertension turns to normal when portal pressure is lowered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eizayaga, Francisco; Scorticati, Camila; Prestifilippo, Juan P; Romay, Salvador; Fernandez, Maria A; Castro, José L; Lemberg, Abraham; Perazzo, Juan C

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the blood-brain barrier integrity in prehepatic portal hypertensive rats induced by partial portal vein ligation, at 14 and 40 d after ligation when portal pressure is spontaneously normalized. METHODS: Adult male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: Group I: Sham14d , sham operated; Group II: PH14d , portal vein stenosis; (both groups were used 14 days after surgery); Group III: Sham40d, Sham operated and Group IV: PH40d Portal vein stenosis (Groups II and IV used 40 d after surgery). Plasma ammonia, plasma and cerebrospinal fluid protein and liver enzymes concentrations were determined. Trypan and Evans blue dyes, systemically injected, were investigated in hippocampus to study blood-brain barrier integrity. Portal pressure was periodically recorded. RESULTS: Forty days after stricture, portal pressure was normalized, plasma ammonia was moderately high, and both dyes were absent in central nervous system parenchyma. All other parameters were reestablished. When portal pressure was normalized and ammonia level was lowered, but not normal, the altered integrity of blood-brain barrier becomes reestablished. CONCLUSION: The impairment of blood-brain barrier and subsequent normalization could be a mechanism involved in hepatic encephalopathy reversibility. Hemodynamic changes and ammonia could trigger blood-brain barrier alterations and its reestablishment. PMID:16552803

  17. A wireless beta-microprobe based on pixelated silicon for in vivo brain studies in freely moving rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märk, J.; Benoit, D.; Balasse, L.; Benoit, M.; Clémens, J. C.; Fieux, S.; Fougeron, D.; Graber-Bolis, J.; Janvier, B.; Jevaud, M.; Genoux, A.; Gisquet-Verrier, P.; Menouni, M.; Pain, F.; Pinot, L.; Tourvielle, C.; Zimmer, L.; Morel, C.; Laniece, P.

    2013-07-01

    The investigation of neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the functional specificity of brain regions requires the development of technologies that are well adjusted to in vivo studies in small animals. An exciting challenge remains the combination of brain imaging and behavioural studies, which associates molecular processes of neuronal communications to their related actions. A pixelated intracerebral probe (PIXSIC) presents a novel strategy using a submillimetric probe for beta+ radiotracer detection based on a pixelated silicon diode that can be stereotaxically implanted in the brain region of interest. This fully autonomous detection system permits time-resolved high sensitivity measurements of radiotracers with additional imaging features in freely moving rats. An application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) allows for parallel signal processing of each pixel and enables the wireless operation. All components of the detector were tested and characterized. The beta+ sensitivity of the system was determined with the probe dipped into radiotracer solutions. Monte Carlo simulations served to validate the experimental values and assess the contribution of gamma noise. Preliminary implantation tests on anaesthetized rats proved PIXSIC's functionality in brain tissue. High spatial resolution allows for the visualization of radiotracer concentration in different brain regions with high temporal resolution.

  18. Effects of propranolol and clonidine on brain edema, blood-brain barrier permeability, and endothelial glycocalyx disruption after fluid percussion brain injury in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genét, Gustav Folmer; Bentzer, Peter; Hansen, Morten Bagge

    2018-01-01

    clonidine would decrease brain edema, blood-brain barrier permeability, and glycocalyx disruption at 24 hours after trauma. METHODS: We subjected 53 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats to lateral fluid percussion brain injury and randomized infusion with propranolol (n = 16), propranolol + clonidine (n = 16......), vehicle (n = 16), or sham (n = 5) for 24 hours. Primary outcome was brain water content at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes were blood-brain barrier permeability and plasma levels of syndecan-1 (glycocalyx disruption), cell damage (histone-complexed DNA fragments), epinephrine, norepinephrine, and animal.......555). We found no effect of propranolol and propranolol/clonidine on blood-brain barrier permeability and animal motor scores. Unexpectedly, propranolol and propranolol/clonidine caused an increase in epinephrine and syndecan-1 levels. CONCLUSION: This study does not provide any support for unselective...

  19. Transport of cysteate by synaptosomes isolated from rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.F.; Pastuszko, A.

    1986-01-01

    Synaptosomes isolated from rat brain were observed to take up cysteic acid by a high affinity transport system (K/sub M = 12.3 +/- 2.1 μM; V/sub m/ = 2.5 n mole/mg protein/minute). This uptake was competitively inhibited by aspartate (K/sub i/ = 13.3 +/- 1.8 μM) and cysteine sulfinate (K/sub i/ = 13.3 +/- 3.3 μM). Addition of extrasynaptosomal cysteate, aspartate or cysteine sulfinate to synaptosomes loaded with [ 35 S] cysteate induced rapid efflux of the cysteate. This efflux was via stoichiometric exchange of amino acids with half maximal rates at 5.0 +/- 1.1 μM aspartate or 8.0 +/- 1.3 μM cysteine sulfinate. Conversely, added extrasynaptosomal cysteate exchanged for endogenous aspartate and glutamate with half maximal rates at 5.0 +/- 0.4 μM cysteate. In the steady state after maximal accumulation of cysteate, the intrasynaptosomal cysteate concentrations exceeded the extrasynaptosomal concentrations by up to 10,000 fold. The measured concentration ratios were the same, within experimental error, as those for aspartate and glutamate. Depolarization, with either high K + or veratridine, of the plasma membrane of synaptosomes loaded with cysteate caused parallel release of cysteate, aspartate and glutamate. It is concluded that neurons transport cysteate, cysteine sulfinate, aspartate and glutamate with the same transport system. This transport system catalyzes homoexchange and heteroexchange as well as net uptake and release of all these amino acids

  20. Purification and properties of adenosine kinase from rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Y; Goto, H; Ogasawara, N

    1980-12-04

    Adenosine kinase (ATP:adenosine 5'-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.20) has been purified to apparent homogeneity from rat brain by (NH4)2SO4 fractionation, affinity chromatography on AMP-Sepharose 4B, gel filtration with Sephadex G-100, and DE-52 cellulose column chromatography. The yield was 56% of the initial activity with a final specific activity of 7.8 mumol/min per mg protein. The molecular weight was estimated as 38 000 by gel filtration with Sephadex G-100 and 41 000 by acrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The enzyme catalyzed the phosphorylation of adenosine, deoxyadenosine, arabinoadenosine, inosine and ribavirin. The activity of deoxyadenosine phosphorylation was 20% that of adenosine phosphorylation. The pH optimum profile was biphasic; a sharp pH optimum at pH 5.5 and a broad pH optimum at pH 7.5-8.5. The Km value for adenosine was 0.2 microM and the maximum activity was observed at 0.5 microM. At higher concentrations of adenosine, the activity was strongly inhibited. The Km value for ATP was 0.02 mM and that for Mg2+ was 0.1 mM. GTP, dGTP, dATP and UTP were also proved to be effective phosphate donors. Co2+ was as effective as Mg2+, and Ca2+, Mn2+ or Ni2+ showed about 50% of the activity for Mg2+. The kinase is quite unstable, but stable in the presence of a high concentration of salt; e.g., 0.15 M KCl.

  1. Long-term streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats leads to severe damage of brain blood vessels and neurons via enhanced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongying; Fan, Shourui; Song, Dianping; Wang, Zhuo; Ma, Shungao; Li, Shuqing; Li, Xiaohong; Xu, Mian; Xu, Min; Wang, Xianmo

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate pathophysiological alterations and oxidative stress in various stages of streptozotocin (STZ)‑induced diabetes mellitus (DM) in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (120) were randomized into DM and control groups. Body mass, plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels, as well as aldose reductase (AR) activities, in brain tissue and serum were determined. Electron microscopy was used to observe neuron and vessel changes in the brain. In STZ‑treated rats, blood glucose, low density lipoproteins, triglycerides and total cholesterol levels increased 1.43‑3.0‑fold and high density lipoprotein, HbA1c and insulin sensitivity index increased 1.1‑1.23‑fold compared with control. At week 16 following treatment, DM rat serum H2O2 concentration was increased, indicating oxidative stress and mRNA levels of GPx and SOD were 2‑fold higher than the control. Protein GPx and SOD levels were reduced (PNeuron cells and blood vessels in the DM rat brains became increasingly abnormal over time with altered Golgi bodies, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum cisterns, concurrent with SOD inactivation and AR protein accumulation. Disease progression in rats with STZ‑induced DM included brain pathologies with vascular and neuron cell abnormalities, associated with the reduction of SOD, CAT and GPx activities and also AR accumulation.

  2. Quantitative autoradiography of [3H]corticosterone receptors in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapolsky, R.M.; McEwen, B.S.; Rainbow, T.C.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have quantified corticosterone receptors in rat brain by optical density measurements of tritium-film autoradiograms. Rats were injected i.v. with 500 μCi [ 3 H]corticosterone to label brain receptors. Frozen sections of brain were cut with a cryostat and exposed for 2 months against tritium-sensitive sheet film (LKB Ultrofilm). Tritium standards were used to convert optical density readings into molar concentrations of receptor. High levels of corticosterone receptors were present throughout the pyramidal and granule cell layers of the hippocampus. Moderate levels of receptors were found in the neuropil of the hippocampus, the lateral septum, the cortical nucleus of the amygdala and the entorhinal cortex. All other brain regions had low levels of receptors. These results extend previous non-quantitative autoradigraphic studies of corticosterone receptors and provide a general procedure for the quantitative autoradiography of steroid hormone receptors in brain tissue. (Auth.)

  3. Photoacoustic imaging to detect rat brain activation after cocaine hydrochloride injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) was employed to detect small animal brain activation after the administration of cocaine hydrochloride. Sprague Dawley rats were injected with different concentrations (2.5, 3.0, and 5.0 mg per kg body) of cocaine hydrochloride in saline solution through tail veins. The brain functional response to the injection was monitored by photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system with horizontal scanning of cerebral cortex of rat brain. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was also used for coronal view images. The modified PAT system used multiple ultrasonic detectors to reduce the scanning time and maintain a good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The measured photoacoustic signal changes confirmed that cocaine hydrochloride injection excited high blood volume in brain. This result shows PAI can be used to monitor drug abuse-induced brain activation.

  4. Oxcarbazepine causes neurocyte apoptosis and developing brain damage by triggering Bax/Bcl-2 signaling pathway mediated caspase 3 activation in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y; Zhong, M; Cai, F-C

    2018-01-01

    Anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are the main methods for treatment of neonatal seizures; however, a few AEDs may cause developing brain damage of neonate. This study aims to investigate effects of oxcarbazepine (OXC) on developing brain damage of neonatal rats. Both of neonatal and adult rats were divided into 6 groups, including Control, OXC 187.5 mg/kg, OXC 281.25 mg/kg, OXC 375 mg/kg group, LEV and PHT group. Body weight and brain weight were evaluated. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and Nissl staining were used to observe neurocyte morphology and Nissl bodies, respectively. Apoptosis was examined using TUNEL assay, and caspase 8 activity was evaluated using spectrophotometer method. Cytochrome C-release was evaluated using flow cytometry. Western blot was used to examine Bax and Bcl-2 expression. OXC 375 mg/kg treatment significantly decreased brain weight compared to Control group in neonatal rats (P5 rats) (pOxcarbazepine at a concentration of 281.25 mg/kg or more causes neurocyte apoptosis and developing brain damage by triggering Bax/Bcl-2 signaling pathway mediated caspase 3 activation in neonatal rats.

  5. Neuroanatomy-based matrix-guided trimming protocol for the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defazio, Rossella; Criado, Ana; Zantedeschi, Valentina; Scanziani, Eugenio

    2015-02-01

    Brain trimming through defined neuroanatomical landmarks is recommended to obtain consistent sections in rat toxicity studies. In this article, we describe a matrix-guided trimming protocol that uses channels to reproduce coronal levels of anatomical landmarks. Both setup phase and validation study were performed on Han Wistar male rats (Crl:WI(Han)), 10-week-old, with bodyweight of 298 ± 29 (SD) g, using a matrix (ASI-Instruments(®), Houston, TX) fitted for brains of rats with 200 to 400 g bodyweight. In the setup phase, we identified eight channels, that is, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 19, and 21, matching the recommended landmarks midway to the optic chiasm, frontal pole, optic chiasm, infundibulum, mamillary bodies, midbrain, middle cerebellum, and posterior cerebellum, respectively. In the validation study, we trimmed the immersion-fixed brains of 60 rats using the selected channels to determine how consistently the channels reproduced anatomical landmarks. Percentage of success (i.e., presence of expected targets for each level) ranged from 89 to 100%. Where 100% success was not achieved, it was noted that the shift in brain trimming was toward the caudal pole. In conclusion, we developed and validated a trimming protocol for the rat brain that allow comparable extensiveness, homology, and relevance of coronal sections as the landmark-guided trimming with the advantage of being quickly learned by technicians. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  6. Neuroprotective effect of Quince leaf hydroalcoholic extract on intracerebroventricular streptozotocin-induced oxidative stress in cortical tissue of rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Hajizadeh Moghaddam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Oxidative stress is a result of the imbalance between free radicals and the antioxidant system of the body. Increased oxidative stress in brain causes dysfunction of brain activities, destruction of neurons, and disease such as Alzheimer. Antioxidants, for example vitamins, phenolic compounds and flavonoids have been extensively investigated as potential therapeutic agents in vitro and in vivo for prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present experimental study, the neuro-protective effect of quince leaf hydroalcoholic extract (QLHE on intracerebroventricular streptozotocin (icv-STZ-induced oxidative stress in cortical tissue of rat brain was examined. Methods: In the present experimental research, forty-two Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, sham, icv-STZ and icv-STZ treated with QLHE groups. The ICV-STZ group rats were injected unilaterally with ICV-STZ (3 mg/kg using a stereotactic device and QLHE (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg/day were administered for 6 weeks starting from 3 weeks before of ICV-STZ injection. The rats were killed at the end of the study and their brain cortical tissue superoxide dismutase and catalase activity were measured. The assay of catalase and superoxide dismutase was performed by following the Genet method. The amount of protein was determined according to the Bradford method.The statistical analysis was performed using one way ANOVA. Data were expressed as mean±SD and  P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The present study indicated that in the ICV-STZ group showed significant decrease (P<0.001 in enzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase and catalase in the cortical tissue of the brain. Treatment of different doses of QLHE significantly increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activity compared to icv-STZ group (P<0.001 in cortical tissue of the brain. Conclusion: The study demonstrated the effectiveness of quince leaf hydroalcoholic extract as a powerful antioxidant

  7. Effect of ketamine on aquaporin-4 expression and neuronal apoptosis in brain tissues following brain injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zangong Zhou; Xiangyu Ji; Li Song; Jianfang Song; Shiduan Wang; Yanwei Yin

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aquaporin-4 (AQP-4) is closely related to the formation of brain edema. Neuronal apoptosis plays an important part in the conversion of swelled neuron following traumatic brain injury. At present, the studies on the protective effect of ketamine on brain have involved in its effect on aquaporin-4 expression and neuronal apoptosis in the brain tissues following brain injury in rats.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of ketamine on AQP-4 expression and neuronal apoptosis in the brain tissue following rat brain injury, and analyze the time-dependence of ketamine in the treatment of brain injury.DESIGN: Randomized grouping design, controlled animal trial.SETTING: Department of Anesthesiology, the Medical School Hospital of Qingdao University.MATERIALS: Totally 150 rats of clean grade, aged 3 months, were involved and randomized into control group and ketamine-treated group, with 75 rats in each. Each group was divided into 5 subgroups separately at 6,12, 24, 48 and 72 hours after injury, with 15 rats at each time point. Main instruments and reagents:homemade beat machine, ketamine hydrochloride (Hengrui Pharmaceutical Factory, Jiangsu), rabbit anti-rat AQP-4 polyclonal antibody, SABC immunohistochemical reagent kit and TUNEL reagent kit (Boster Co.,Ltd.,Wuhan).METHODS: This trial was carried out in the Institute of Cerebrovascular Disease, Medical College of Qingdao University during March 2005 to February 2006. A weight-dropping rat model of brain injury was created with Feeney method. The rats in the ketamine-treated group were intraperitoneally administered with 50 g/L ketamine (120 mg/kg) one hour after injury, but ketamine was replaced by normal saline in the control group. In each subgroup, the water content of cerebral hemisphere was measured in 5 rats chosen randomly. The left 10 rats in each subgroup were transcardiacally perfused with ketamine, then the brain tissue was made into paraffin sections and stained by haematoxylin and eosin. Neuronal

  8. Cloning and expression of a rat brain α2B-adrenergic receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flordellis, C.S.; Handy, D.E.; Bresnahan, M.R.; Zannis, V.I.; Gavras, H.

    1991-01-01

    The authors isolated a cDNA clone (RBα 2B ) and its homologous gene (GRα 2B ) encoding an α 2B -adrenergic receptor subtype by screening a rat brain cDNA and a rat genomic library. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that both clones code for a protein of 458 amino acids, which is 87% homologous to the human kidney glycosylated adrenergic receptor (α 2 -C4) and divergent from the rat kidney nonglycosylated α 2B subtype (RNGα 2 ). Transient expression of RBα 2B in COS-7 cells resulted in high-affinity saturable binding for [ 3 H]rauwolscine and a high receptor number in the membranes of transfected COS-7 cells. Pharmacological analysis demonstrated that the expressed receptor bound adrenergic ligands with the following order of potency: rauwolscine > yohimbine > prazosin > oxymetazoline, with a prazosin-to-oxymetazoline K i ratio of 0.34. This profile is characteristic of the α 2B -adrenergic receptor subtype. Blotting analysis of rat brain mRNA gave one major and two minor mRNA species, and hybridization with strand-specific probes showed that both DNA strands of GRα 2B may be transcriptionally active. These findings show that rat brain expresses an α 2B -adrenergic receptor subtype that is structurally different from the rat kidney nonglycosylated α 2B subtype. Thus the rat expresses at least two divergent α 2B -adrenergic receptors

  9. Metabolic mapping of the effects of the antidepressant fluoxetine on the brains of congenitally helpless rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumake, Jason; Colorado, Rene A; Barrett, Douglas W; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2010-07-09

    Antidepressants require adaptive brain changes before efficacy is achieved, and they may impact the affectively disordered brain differently than the normal brain. We previously demonstrated metabolic disturbances in limbic and cortical regions of the congenitally helpless rat, a model of susceptibility to affective disorder, and we wished to test whether administration of fluoxetine would normalize these metabolic differences. Fluoxetine was chosen because it has become a first-line drug for the treatment of affective disorders. We hypothesized that fluoxetine antidepressant effects may be mediated by decreasing metabolism in the habenula and increasing metabolism in the ventral tegmental area. We measured the effects of fluoxetine on forced swim behavior and regional brain cytochrome oxidase activity in congenitally helpless rats treated for 2 weeks with fluoxetine (5mg/kg, i.p., daily). Fluoxetine reduced immobility in the forced swim test as anticipated, but congenitally helpless rats responded in an atypical manner, i.e., increasing climbing without affecting swimming. As hypothesized, fluoxetine reduced metabolism in the habenula and increased metabolism in the ventral tegmental area. In addition, fluoxetine reduced the metabolism of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. This study provided the first detailed mapping of the regional brain effects of an antidepressant drug in congenitally helpless rats. All of the effects were consistent with previous studies that have metabolically mapped the effects of serotonergic antidepressants in the normal rat brain, and were in the predicted direction of metabolic normalization of the congenitally helpless rat for all affected brain regions except the prefrontal cortex. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuropeptide Y binding sites in rat brain identified with purified neuropeptide Y-I125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, M.W.; Miller, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a widely distributed neuronally localized peptide with 36 amino acids, 5 of which are tyrosines. The authors wished to investigate the properties of specific receptors for NPY. They therefore labeled the tyrosines with I125 using chloramine T and then purified the peptide using HPLC. A single mono-iodinated species of NPY which yielded > 85% specific binding in rat forebrain synaptosomes was selected as the ligand for all subsequent experiments. A time course of binding showed that equilibrium conditions were reached in 60 minutes at 21 0 C. Scatchard plots revealed a single class of binding sites with a Kd and a Bmax of 3 x 10-10 M and 28 pmol/mg, respectively. Competition binding with unlabeled NPY showed 50% displacement of bound ligand at 1 x 10-10 M NPY. Competition binding with rat pancreatic polypeptide (RPP), a homologous peptide possessing little NPY-like activity, showed 50% displacement of bound ligand at 2 x 10 -7 M RPP. No binding was observed on F-11 or PC12 neuronal cell lines, or on HSWP fibroblast cells. They conclude that NPY-I125 purified to homogeneity with HPLC is a highly selective ligand for NPY receptor sites. They are currently investigating such sites in brain, gut, and other tissues

  11. Regional brain glucose use in unstressed rats after two days of starvation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mans, A.M.; Davis, D.W.; Hawkins, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Regional brain glucose use was measured in conscious, unrestrained, fed rats and after 2 days of starvation, using quantitative autoradiography and [6- 14 C]glucose. Plasma glucose, lactate, and ketone body concentrations and brain glucose and lactate content were measured in separate groups of rats. Glucose concentrations were lower in starved rats in both plasma and brain; plasma ketone body concentrations were elevated. Glucose use was found to be lower throughout the brain by about 12%. While some areas seemed to be affected more than others, statistical analysis showed that none were exceptionally different. The results could not be explained by increased loss of 14 C as lactate or pyruvate during the experimental period, because the arteriovenous differences of these species were insignificant. The calculated contribution by ketone bodies to the total energy consumption was between 3 and 9% for the brain as a whole in the starved rats and could, therefore, partially account for the depression seen in glucose use. It was concluded that glucose oxidation is slightly depressed throughout the brain after 2 days of starvation

  12. Huperzine A protects isolated rat brain mitochondria against beta-amyloid peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Zheng, Chun Yan; Yang, Ling; Tang, Xi Can; Zhang, Hai Yan

    2009-06-01

    Our previous work in cells and animals showed that mitochondria are involved in the neuroprotective effect of huperzine A (HupA). In this study, the effects of HupA on isolated rat brain mitochondria were investigated. In addition to inhibiting the Abeta(25-35) (40 microM)-induced decrease in mitochondrial respiration, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis, enzyme activity, and transmembrane potential, HupA (0.01 or 0.1 microM) effectively prevented Abeta-induced mitochondrial swelling, reactive oxygen species increase, and cytochrome c release. More interestingly, administration of HupA to isolated mitochondria promoted the rate of ATP production and blocked mitochondrial swelling caused by normal osmosis. These results indicate that HupA protects mitochondria against Abeta at least in part by preserving membrane integrity and improving energy metabolism. These direct effects on mitochondria further extend the noncholinergic functions of HupA.

  13. Positron-labeled antioxidant 6-deoxy-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-ascorbic acid: Increased uptake in transient global ischemic rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Fumihiko; Shibata, Shigenobu; Watanabe, Shigenori; Masuda, Kouji; Maeda, Minoru

    1996-05-01

    The in vivo uptake and distribution of 6-deoxy-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-ascorbic acid ({sup 18}F-DFA) were investigated in rat brains following postischemic reperfusion. Global cerebral ischemia was induced in male Wistar rats for 20 min by occlusion of four major arteries. Two time points were chosen for {sup 18}F-DFA injection to rats subjected to cerebral ischemia, at the start of recirculation and 5 days following recirculation. The rats were then killed at 2 h after tail-vein administration of {sup 18}F-DFA and tissue radioactivity concentration was determined. Increased uptake of radioactivity in particular brain regions, including the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, and amygdala following injection of {sup 18}F-DFA, compared to the sham-operated control, was observed 5 days after reperfusion. Similar results were also obtained in in vitro experiments using brain slices. Abnormal in vivo accumulation of {sup 45}Ca, a marker of regional postischemic injury, was observed in these brain regions in tissue dissection experiments. Furthermore, metabolite analysis of nonradioactive DFA using {sup 19}F-NMR showed that DFA remained intact in the postischemic reperfusion brain. The present results indicate that {sup 18}F-DFA increasingly accumulates in damaged regions of postischemic reperfusion brain.

  14. An autoradiographic map of (3H)diprenorphine binding in rat brain: effects of social interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panksepp, J.; Bishop, P.

    1981-01-01

    (3H)Diprenorphine binding was analyzed autoradiographically in the brains of 33 day old rat pups. A photographic atlas of diprenorphine binding in the coronal plane is provided to highlight the dispersion of opioid receptor systems through the brain. To determine whether brain opioid release may be induced by social interactions, half the animals were sacrificed following a 30 min period of social interaction while the other half were sacrificed following 30 min of social isolation. Opioid binding was higher in isolate-tested animals than socially-tested ones, suggesting that social interaction may promote endogenous brain opioid release

  15. Neurotransmitter Mechanisms in the Nucleus Accumbens Septi and Related Regions in the Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-30

    Brain Res 77, 507-12. Palkovits XI (1973): Isolated removal of hypothalamic or other brain nuclei of the rat, Brain Res 59, 449-50. Phillipson O T...and operated animals were killed by decapitation, the lesioned animals 6-14 days after operation. The brain was rapidly removed and frozen on a... electrocoagulation with 2 mA for 20 s. This led to a the pH adjusted to 7.2 with NaOH A hocle was made lesion centered in the parafascicular and

  16. Inhibitory Effect on Cerebral Inflammatory Response following Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats: A Potential Neuroprotective Mechanism of N-Acetylcysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Chen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although N-acetylcysteine (NAC has been shown to be neuroprotective for traumatic brain injury (TBI, the mechanisms for this beneficial effect are still poorly understood. Cerebral inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of secondary brain injury after TBI. However, it has not been investigated whether NAC modulates TBI-induced cerebral inflammatory response. In this work, we investigated the effect of NAC administration on cortical expressions of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB and inflammatory proteins such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 after TBI. As a result, we found that NF-κB, proinflammatory cytokines, and ICAM-1 were increased in all injured animals. In animals given NAC post-TBI, NF-κB, IL-1β, TNF-α, and ICAM-1 were decreased in comparison to vehicle-treated animals. Measures of IL-6 showed no change after NAC treatment. NAC administration reduced brain edema, BBB permeability, and apoptotic index in the injured brain. The results suggest that post-TBI NAC administration may attenuate inflammatory response in the injured rat brain, and this may be one mechanism by which NAC ameliorates secondary brain damage following TBI.

  17. Effects of anpirtoline on regional serotonin synthesis in the rat brain: an autoradiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Arata; Nakai, Akio; Tohyama, Yoshihiro; Nguyen, Khnah Q.; Diksic, Mirko

    2006-01-01

    Anpirtoline has been described as an agonist at 5-HT 1B receptors with a relatively high potency. It also acts as an agonist at 5-HT 1A receptors, but has a lower potency than at the 5-HT 1B sites. There is very little known about the mechanism by which anpirtoline influences regional 5-HT synthesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acutely and chronically administered anpirtoline on 5-HT synthesis in the rat brain using the autoradiographic α-[ 14 C]methyl-L-tryptophan method. In the acute study, anpirtoline (2.0 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 30 min before the tracer injection. The control rats were injected with the same volume of saline. In the chronic study, anpirtoline (2 mg/kg per day) was injected subcutaneously in saline once a day for 10 days. There were no significant differences between the plasma-free and total tryptophan concentrations between the anpirtoline treatment and the respective control groups. In the acute experiment, 5-HT synthesis rates in all of the brain areas investigated were significantly decreased by anpirtoline when compared to the saline-treated group. In the chronic anpirtoline experiment, 5-HT synthesis rates of almost all of the projection areas, as well as the raphe nuclei, were normalized or had a tendency to be normalized. These results suggest that it is likely that the terminal 5-HT 1B receptors are involved in the regulation of 5-HT synthesis in the projection areas and that 5-HT synthesis, in the raphe, is likely influenced by anpirtoline's 5-HT 1A and/or 5-HT 1B agonistic properties

  18. The perinatal effects of maternal caffeine intake on fetal and neonatal brain levels of testosterone, estradiol, and dihydrotestosterone in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaismailoglu, S; Tuncer, M; Bayrak, S; Erdogan, G; Ergun, E L; Erdem, A

    2017-08-01

    Testosterone, estradiol, and dihydrotestosterone are the main sex steroid hormones responsible for the organization and sexual differentiation of brain structures during early development. The hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, adrenal cells, and gonads play a key role in the production of sex steroids and express adenosine receptors. Caffeine is a non-selective adenosine antagonist; therefore, it can modulate metabolic pathways in these tissues. Besides, the proportion of pregnant women that consume caffeine is ∼60%. That is why the relationship between maternal caffeine consumption and fetal development is important. Therefore, we aimed to investigate this modulatory effect of maternal caffeine consumption on sex steroids in the fetal and neonatal brain tissues. Pregnant rats were treated with a low (0.3 g/L) or high (0.8 g/L) dose of caffeine in their drinking water during pregnancy and lactation. The testosterone, estradiol, and dihydrotestosterone levels in the frontal cortex and hypothalamus were measured using radioimmunoassay at embryonic day 19 (E19), birth (PN0), and postnatal day 4 (PN4). The administration of low-dose caffeine increased the body weight in PN4 male and female rats and anogenital index in PN4 males. The administration of high-dose caffeine decreased the adrenal weight in E19 male rats and increased testosterone levels in the frontal cortex of E19 female rats and the hypothalamus of PN0 male rats. Maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy affects sex steroid levels in the frontal cortex and hypothalamus of the offspring. This concentration changes of the sex steroids in the brain may influence behavioral and neuroendocrine functions at some point in adult life.

  19. Role of melatonin in mitigating nonylphenol-induced toxicity in frontal cortex and hippocampus of rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Heena; Ashafaq, Mohammad; Parvez, Suhel; Raisuddin, Sheikh

    2017-03-01

    Nonylphenol (NP), an environmental endocrine disruptor mimics estrogen and is a potential toxicant both under in vitro and in vivo conditions. In this study, the effect of melatonin on NP- induced neurotoxicity and cognitive alteration was investigated in adult male Wistar rats. Melatonin supplementation has been known to protect cells from neurotoxic injury. The animals were divided into three groups namely, control (vehicle) which received olive oil orally and treated rats received NP (25 mg/kg, per os) thrice a week for 45 days while the third group i.e., NP + melatonin, animals were co-administered melatonin (10 mg/kg, i.p.) along with NP. On the 46th day, rats were assessed for anxiety, motor co-ordination, grip strength and cognitive performance using Morris water maze test and then sacrificed for biochemical and histopathological assays in brain tissues. Melatonin improved the behavioral performance in NP exposed group. The results showed that NP significantly decreased the activity of acetylcholine esterase (AchE), monoamine oxidase (MAO) and Na + /K + -ATPase, in rat brain tissue along with other enzymes of antioxidant milieu. The outcome of the study shows that NP, like other persistent endocrine disrupting pollutants, creates a potential risk of cognitive, neurochemical and histopathological perturbations as a result of environmental exposure. Taken together, our study demonstrates that melatonin is protective against NP-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Curcumin exerts neuroprotective effects against homocysteine intracerebroventricular injection-induced cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataie, Amin; Sabetkasaei, Masoumeh; Haghparast, Abbas; Moghaddam, Akbar Hajizadeh; Ataee, Ramin; Moghaddam, Shiva Nasiraei

    2010-08-01

    Aging is the major risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative stress and is involved in their pathophysiology. Oxidative stress can induce neuronal damage and modulate intracellular signaling, ultimately leading to neuronal death by apoptosis or necrosis. In this study we investigated the neuroprotective properties of the natural polyphenolic antioxidant compound, curcumin, against homocysteine (Hcy) neurotoxicity. Curcumin (5, 15, or 45 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally once daily for a period of 10 days beginning 5 days prior to Hcy (0.2 micromol/microl) intracerebroventricular injection in rats. Biochemical and behavioral studies, including passive avoidance learning and locomotor activity tests, were evaluated 24 hours after the last injection of curcumin or vehicle. Results indicated that Hcy induces lipid peroxidation and increases malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide anion (SOA) levels in whole rat brain. In addition, Hcy impaired memory retention in the passive avoidance learning test. However, curcumin treatment significantly decreased MDA and SOA levels and improved learning and memory in rats. These results suggest that Hcy may induce lipid peroxidation in rat brain and that polyphenol treatment (curcumin) improves learning and memory deficits by protecting the nervous system against oxidative stress.

  1. Effects of anesthesia on [11C]raclopride binding in the rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Simonsen, Mette; Møller, Arne

    Background Very often rats are anesthetized prior to micro positron emission tomography (microPET) brain imaging in order to prevent head movements. Anesthesia can be administered by inhalation agents, such as isoflurane, or injection mixtures, such as fentanyl-fluanisone-midazolam. Unfortunately......, anesthesia affects a variety of physiological variables, including in the brain. Aim The aim of this study was to compare the effects of inhalation and injection anesthesia on the binding potential of the dopaminergic D2/3 tracer [11C]raclopride used for PET brain imaging in human and animal studies....... Materials & Methods Nine male Lew/Mol rats were assigned to either inhalation (isoflurane; N=4) or injection (fentanyl-fluanisone-midazolam; N=5) anesthesia. Catheters were surgically placed in femoral arteries and veins for blood sampling and tracer injection. After a short attenuation scan, the rats were...

  2. Differentiation in boron distribution in adult male and female rats' normal brain: A BNCT approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodarzi, Samereh; Pazirandeh, Ali; Jameie, Seyed Behnamedin; Baghban Khojasteh, Nasrin

    2012-01-01

    Boron distribution in adult male and female rats' normal brain after boron carrier injection (0.005 g Boric Acid+0.005 g Borax+10 ml distilled water, pH: 7.4) was studied in this research. Coronal sections of control and trial animal tissue samples were irradiated with thermal neutrons. Using alpha autoradiography, significant differences in boron concentration were seen in forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain sections of male and female animal groups with the highest value, four hours after boron compound injection. - Highlights: ► Boron distribution in male and female rats' normal brain was studied in this research. ► Coronal sections of animal tissue samples were irradiated with thermal neutrons. ► Alpha and Lithium tracks were counted using alpha autoradiography. ► Different boron concentration was seen in brain sections of male and female rats. ► The highest boron concentration was seen in 4 h after boron compound injection.

  3. Effect of Piper betle leaf extract on alcoholic toxicity in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, R; Rajendra Prasad, N; Pugalendi, K V

    2003-01-01

    The protective effect of Piper betle, a commonly used masticatory, has been examined in the brain of ethanol-administered Wistar rats. Brain of ethanol-treated rats exhibited increased levels of lipids, lipid peroxidation, and disturbances in antioxidant defense. Subsequent to the experimental induction of toxicity (i.e., the initial period of 30 days), aqueous P. betle extract was simultaneously administered in three different doses (100, 200, and 300 mg kg(-1)) for 30 days along with the daily dose of alcohol. P. betle coadministration resulted in significant reduction of lipid levels (free fatty acids, cholesterol, and phospholipids) and lipid peroxidation markers such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and hydroperoxides. Further, antioxidants, like reduced glutathione, vitamin C, vitamin E, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, were increased in P. betle-coadministered rats. The higher dose of extract (300 mg kg(-1)) was more effective, and these results indicate the neuroprotective effect of P. betle in ethanol-treated rats.

  4. PET Imaging Reveals Brain Metabolic Changes in Adolescent Rats Following Chronic Escalating Morphine Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Hou, Haifeng; Feng, Jin; Zhang, Xiaohui; Chen, Yao; Wang, Jing; Ji, Jianfeng; He, Xiao; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Hong

    2018-04-10

    Non-medical use of prescription opioids, especially among adolescents, has been substantially increased in recent years. However, the neuromechanism remains largely unexplored. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the brain metabolic changes in adolescent rats following chronic escalating morphine administration using positron emission tomography (PET). 2-Deoxy-2-[ 18 F]Fluoro-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) microPET imaging was performed, and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was used for image analysis. Glucose transporter 3 (Glut-3), dopamine D 2 receptor (D 2 R), and Mμ-opioid receptor (μ-OR) were used for immunostaining analysis. Cerebral glucose metabolism was increased in the corpus callosum (CC) and right retrosplenial dysgranular cortex (rRSD), while it was decreased in the right ventral pallidum (rVP). The expressions of Glut-3, D 2 R, and μ-OR were increased in CC and rRSD, while they were decreased in rVP. Furthermore, glucose metabolism and Glut-3 expression were positively correlated with the expressions of D 2 R or μ-OR in CC, rRSD, and rVP. [ 18 F]FDG microPET brain imaging study in combination with immunohistological investigation revealed that CC, rRSD, and rVP were specifically involved in opioid dependence in adolescents. Our findings provided valuable insights into the neuromechanism of adolescent addiction of prescription opioids and might have important implications for the development of prevention and intervention approaches.

  5. Comparison of Trazodone, Diazepame and Dibenzepine Influences on Rat Brain Beta-Endorphins Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radivoj Jadrić

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to establish the extent of influence of different psychotropic drugs to brain β-endorphins in experimental animals. The study was performed on albino Wistar rats (weight 250 g, treated with different psychoactive drugs. RIA technique was employed for quantification of brain β-endorphins. Brain β-endorphins were higher in experiment group treated with trazodone (929 pg/g ± 44,43; X±SD, and dibenzepine (906,63 pg/g ± 74,06, yet with lower brain content in rats treated with diazepame (841,55 pg/g ± 68,47, compared to brain β-endorphins content of control group treated with saline solution (0,95% NaCl (873,5 pg/g ± 44,89. Significant differences were obtained comparing brain β-endorphins of trazodone vs. diaze-pame treated animals, with diazepame group having lower values (p<0,02. This study showed differences in changes of rat brain β-endorphins contents when different psy-choactive drugs are used. Therefore, we consider that β-endorphins could be used for evaluation of effects of psychoactive drugs, as a useful parameter in therapy with these psycho pharmaceuticals.

  6. Urodynamic function during sleep-like brain states in urethane anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, J; Lovick, T

    2016-01-28

    The aim was to investigate urodynamic parameters and functional excitability of the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) during changes in sleep-like brain states in urethane anesthetized rats. Simultaneous recordings of detrusor pressure, external urethral sphincter (EUS) electromyogram (EMG), cortical electroencephalogram (EEG), and single-unit activity in the PAG were made during repeated voiding induced by continuous infusion of saline into the bladder. The EEG cycled between synchronized, high-amplitude slow wave activity (SWA) and desynchronized low-amplitude fast activity similar to slow wave and 'activated' sleep-like brain states. During (SWA, 0.5-1.5 Hz synchronized oscillation of the EEG waveform) voiding became more irregular than in the 'activated' brain state (2-5 Hz low-amplitude desynchronized EEG waveform) and detrusor void pressure threshold, void volume threshold and the duration of bursting activity in the external urethral sphincter EMG were raised. The spontaneous firing rate of 23/52 neurons recorded within the caudal PAG and adjacent tegmentum was linked to the EEG state, with the majority of responsive cells (92%) firing more slowly during SWA. Almost a quarter of the cells recorded (12/52) showed phasic changes in firing rate that were linked to the occurrence of voids. Inhibition (n=6), excitation (n=4) or excitation/inhibition (n=2) was seen. The spontaneous firing rate of 83% of the micturition-responsive cells was sensitive to changes in EEG state. In nine of the 12 responsive cells (75%) the responses were reduced during SWA. We propose that during different sleep-like brain states changes in urodynamic properties occur which may be linked to changing excitability of the micturition circuitry in the periaqueductal gray. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of diet on brain metabolites and behavior in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liso Navarro, Ana A; Sikoglu, Elif M; Heinze, Cailin R; Rogan, Ryan C; Russell, Vivienne A; King, Jean A; Moore, Constance M

    2014-08-15

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a heterogeneous psychiatric disorder affecting 5-10% of children. One of the suggested mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of ADHD is insufficient energy supply to neurons. Here, we investigated the role of omega 3 fatty acids in altering neural energy metabolism and behavior of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), which is an animal model of ADHD. To this end, we employed Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) to evaluate changes in brain neurochemistry in the SHR following consumption of one of three experimental diets (starting PND 21): fish oil enriched (FOE), regular (RD) and animal fat enriched (AFE) diet. Behavioral tests were performed to evaluate differences in locomotor activity and risk-taking behavior (starting PND 44). Comparison of frontal lobe metabolites showed that increased amounts of omega 3 fatty acids decreased total Creatine levels (tCr), but did not change Glutamate (Glu), total N-Acetylaspartate (tNAA), Lactate (Lac), Choline (Cho) or Inositol (Ino) levels. Although behavior was not significantly affected by different diets, significant correlations were observed between brain metabolites and behavior in the open field and elevated plus maze. SHR with higher levels of brain tCr and Glu exhibited greater hyperactivity in a familiar environment. On the other hand, risk-taking exploration of the elevated plus maze's open arms correlated negatively with forebrain tNAA and Lac levels. These findings support the possible alteration in energy metabolites in ADHD, correlating with hyperactivity in the animal model. The data also suggest that omega 3 fatty acids alter brain energy and phospholipid metabolism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Effects on Antioxidant Enzyme Systems in Rat Brain Tissues of Lead Nitrate and Mercury Chloride

    OpenAIRE

    Baş, Hatice; Kalender, Suna; Karaboduk, Hatice; Apaydın, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of lead nitrate and mercury chloride in brain tissues of Wistar rats. Mercury chloride (0.02 mg/kg bw) and lead nitrate (45 mg/kg bw) were administered orally for 28 days rats. The mercury chloride and lead nitrate treated animals were exhibited a significant inhibition of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutation peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase activities and increasing of malondialdehyde levels. In our present study mercury c...

  9. Aluminium and Gamma Irradiation Induced Oxidative Damage in Brain Tissue of Male Rats - Protective Role of Ferulic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, S.Z.; Hanafi, N.; Noaman, E.

    2011-01-01

    The current study was carried out to investigate the potential role of ferulic acid (FA) against Aluminium chloride (AlCl 3 ), γ- radiation either alone or combination induced oxidative stress in brain tissue of Wistar rats. The period of the experiment was eight weeks. Animals were administrated by aluminium chloride at a dose of 8.5 mg/kg/day and exposed to a single dose (4 Gy) of γ-radiation. FA was administered orally (50 mg/Kg body weight)/day. Histopathological observations and myeloid protein distribution were recorded in brain tissue. Induction of oxidative stress was recorded after all exposures. Brain tissue of AlCl 3 and γ- irradiation treatments either alone or combined revealed many altered changes and myeloid protein distribution. Also a decrease in serotonin concentration was recorded. An increase in Malonaldialdahyde (MDA) and acetylcholinesterase activity and percentage of saturated fatty acids in plasma and brain tissue was recorded. Reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) in blood and brain showed a significant decrease. Treatment of AlCl 3 loaded animals by FA showed simple atrophy as shrunken morphology saw in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and a decrease in myeloid protein deposition. FA treatment of AlCl 3 loaded or irradiated animals represented a significant increase in serotonin concentration and ameliorated affects on oxidative stress markers, acetylcholinesterase activity and percentage of saturated fatty acids in plasma and brain tissue. In conclusion FA has a role in reducing the oxidative stress of AlCl 3 and γ- irradiation on brain tissue of rats

  10. *NO and oxyradical metabolism in new cell lines of rat brain capillary endothelial cells forming the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasig, I E; Giese, H; Schroeter, M L; Sporbert, A; Utepbergenov, D I; Buchwalow, I B; Neubert, K; Schönfelder, G; Freyer, D; Schimke, I; Siems, W E; Paul, M; Haseloff, R F; Blasig, R

    2001-09-01

    To investigate the relevance of *NO and oxyradicals in the blood-brain barrier (BBB), differentiated and well-proliferating brain capillary endothelial cells (BCEC) are required. Therefore, rat BCEC (rBCEC) were transfected with immortalizing genes. The resulting lines exhibited endothelial characteristics (factor VIII, angiotensin-converting enzyme, high prostacyclin/thromboxane release rates) and BBB markers (gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, alkaline phosphatase). The control line rBCEC2 (mock transfected) revealed fibroblastoid morphology, less factor VIII, reduced gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, weak radical defence, low prostanoid metabolism, and limited proliferation. Lines transfected with immortalizing genes (especially rBCEC4, polyoma virus large T antigen) conserved primary properties: epitheloid morphology, subcultivation with high proliferation rate under pure culture conditions, and powerful defence against reactive oxygen species (Mn-, Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione) effectively controlling radical metabolism. Only 100 microM H2O2 overcame this defence and stimulated the formation of eicosanoids similarly as in primary cells. Some BBB markers were expressed to a lower degree; however, cocultivation with astrocytes intensified these markers (e.g., alkaline phosphatase) and paraendothelial tightness, indicating induction of BBB properties. Inducible NO synthase was induced by a cytokine plus lipopolysaccharide mixture in all lines and primary cells, resulting in *NO release. Comparing the cell lines obtained, rBCEC4 are stable immortalized and reveal the best conservation of properties from primary cells, including enzymes producing or decomposing reactive species. These cells can be subcultivated in large amounts and, hence, they are suitable to study the role of radical metabolism in the BBB and in the cerebral microvasculature. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  11. Agonist and antagonist binding to rat brain muscarinic receptors: influence of aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurwitz, D.; Egozi, Y.; Henis, Y.I.; Kloog, Y.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the binding properties of muscarinic receptors in six brain regions in mature and old rats of both sexes by employing direct binding of [ 3 H]-antagonist as well as of the labeled natural neurotransmitter, [ 3 H]-acetylcholine [( 3 H]-AcCh). In addition, age-related factors were evaluated in the modulation processes involved in agonist binding. The results indicate that as the rat ages the density of the muscarinic receptors is altered differently in the various brain regions: it is decreased in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and olfactory bulb of both male and female rats, but is increased (58%) in the brain stem of senescent males while no significant change is observed for females. The use of the highly sensitive technique measuring direct binding of [ 3 H]-AcCh facilitated the separate detection of age-related changes in the two classes (high- and low-affinity) of muscarinic agonist binding sites. In old female rats the density of high-affinity [ 3 H]-AcCh binding sites was preserved in all tissues studied, indicating that the decreases in muscarinic receptor density observed with [ 3 H]-antagonist represent a loss of low-affinity agonist binding sites. In contrast, [ 3 H]-AcCh binding is decreased in the hypothalamus and increased in the brain stem of old male rats. These data imply sexual dimorphism of the aging process in central cholinergic mechanisms

  12. Imaging of water distribution in the rat brain by activation autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogure, K.; Kawashima, K.; Iwata, R.; Ido, T.

    1990-01-01

    Regional water distribution in the rat brain was obtained autoradiographically by activation analysis. The autoradiogram obtained for the normal rat brain showed high accumulation of water in the areas of sensory-motor cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and amygdaloid cortex, whereas corpus callosum and internal capsule showed low water contents as expected. The estimated values of water content were 78.6 +/- 4.9 weight % for gray matter, and 73.5 +/- 4.9 weight % for white matter, respectively. The mean values of the water content were consistent with those obtained by a conventional drying-weighing method

  13. Changes in Male Rat Sexual Behavior and Brain Activity Revealed by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Response to Chronic Mild Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guotao; Yang, Baibing; Chen, Jianhuai; Zhu, Leilei; Jiang, Hesong; Yu, Wen; Zang, Fengchao; Chen, Yun; Dai, Yutian

    2018-02-01

    Non-organic erectile dysfunction (noED) at functional imaging has been related to abnormal brain activity and requires animal models for further research on the associated molecular mechanisms. To develop a noED animal model based on chronic mild stress and investigate brain activity changes. We used 6 weeks of chronic mild stress to induce depression. The sucrose consumption test was used to assess the hedonic state. The apomorphine test and sexual behavior test were used to select male rats with ED. Rats with depression and ED were considered to have noED. Blood oxygen level-dependent-based resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies were conducted on these rats, and the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and functional connectivity were analyzed to determine brain activity changes. The sexual behavior test and resting-state fMRI were used for outcome measures. The induction of depression was confirmed by the sucrose consumption test. A low intromission ratio and increased mount and intromission latencies were observed in male rats with depression. No erection was observed in male rats with depression during the apomorphine test. Male rats with depression and ED were considered to have noED. The possible central pathologic mechanism shown by fMRI involved the amygdaloid body, dorsal thalamus, hypothalamus, caudate-putamen, cingulate gyrus, insular cortex, visual cortex, sensory cortex, motor cortex, and cerebellum. Similar findings have been found in humans. The present study provided a novel noED rat model for further research on the central mechanism of noED. The present study developed a novel noED rat model and analyzed brain activity changes based at fMRI. The observed brain activity alterations might not extend to humans. The present study developed a novel noED rat model with brain activity alterations related to sexual arousal and erection, which will be helpful for further research involving the central mechanism of noED. Chen

  14. Effects of acrylamide and acrylic acid on creatine kinase activity in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohriyama, Kazuaki; Matsuoka, Masato; Igisu, Hideki

    1994-01-01

    In vitro, both acrylamide and acrylic acid inhibited creatine kinase (CK) activity in rat brain homogenates, and acrylic acid was more potent than acrylamide. In vivo, however, when given i.p. 50 mg/kg per day for 8 days to rats, only acrylamide inhibited CK activity in the brain and caused apparent neurological signs. 14 C in the brain 24 h after the injection of 14 C-labelled chemicals was more than 7 times greater with acrylamide than with acrylic acid. The inhibition of CK activity by acrylamide varied in eight regions of the brain; from 54% in hypothalamus to 27% in cerebellar vermis. The regional difference of CK inhibition, however, did not agree well with either 14 C distribution or with the distribution in regions which appear clinically or pathologically vulnerable to acrylamide. (orig.)

  15. Fish oil improves motor function, limits blood-brain barrier disruption, and reduces Mmp9 gene expression in a rat model of juvenile traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, K L; Berman, N E J; Gregg, P R A; Levant, B

    2014-01-01

    The effects of an oral fish oil treatment regimen on sensorimotor, blood-brain barrier, and biochemical outcomes of traumatic brain injury (TBI) were investigated in a juvenile rat model. Seventeen-day old Long-Evans rats were given a 15mL/kg fish oil (2.01g/kg EPA, 1.34g/kg DHA) or soybean oil dose via oral gavage 30min prior to being subjected to a controlled cortical impact injury or sham surgery, followed by daily doses for seven days. Fish oil treatment resulted in less severe hindlimb deficits after TBI as assessed with the beam walk test, decreased cerebral IgG infiltration, and decreased TBI-induced expression of the Mmp9 gene one day after injury. These results indicate that fish oil improved functional outcome after TBI resulting, at least in part from decreased disruption of the blood-brain barrier through a mechanism that includes attenuation of TBI-induced expression of Mmp9. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Increased CD147 and MMP-9 expression in the normal rat brain after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hong; Wei Ming; Li Shenghui; Zhou Ziwei; Xu Desheng

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced vascular injury is a major complication of Gamma knife surgery (GKS). Previous studies have shown that CD147 and MMP-9 are closely associated with vascular remodeling and pathological angiogenesis. Thus, we analysed changes in CD147 and MMP-9 expression in the cerebral cortex to investigate the correlation between CD147 and MMP-9 in the rat following GKS. Adult male Wistar rats were subjected to GKS at a maximum dose of 75 Gy and then euthanized 1 to 12 weeks later. Using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis, we found that CD147 and MMP-9 expression were markedly upregulated in the target area 8-12 weeks after GKS when compared with the control group. Immunofluorescent double staining demonstrated that CD147 signals colocalized with CD31, GFAP and MMP-9-positive cells. Importantly, CD147 levels correlated with increased MMP-9 expression in irradiated brain tissue. For the first time, these data demonstrate a potential relationship between CD147 and MMP-9 following GKS. In addition, our study also suggests that CD147 and MMP-9 may play a role in vascular injury after GKS. (author)

  17. Neutrotoxic effects of fructose administration in rat brain: implications for fructosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto A. Macongonde

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fructose accumulates in tissue and body fluids of patients affected by hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI, a disorder caused by the deficiency of aldolase B. We investigated the effect of acute fructose administration on the biochemical profile and on the activities of the Krebs cycle enzymes in the cerebral cortex of young rats. Rats received a subcutaneous injection of NaCl (0.9 %; control group or fructose solution (5 μmol/g; treated group. Twelve or 24 h after the administration, the animals were euthanized and the cerebral cortices were isolated. Peripheral blood (to obtain the serum and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF from the animals were also collected. It was observed that albumin levels were decreased and cholesterol levels were increased in CSF of animals 12 h after the administration of fructose. In addition, serum lactate levels were increased 12 h after the administration, as compared to control group. Furthermore, malate dehydrogenase activity was increased in cerebral cortex from treated group 24 h after the administration of this carbohydrate. Herein we demonstrate that fructose administration alters biochemical parameters in CSF and serum and bioenergetics parameters in the cerebral cortex. These findings indicate a possible role of fructose on brain alterations found in HFI patients.

  18. Sub-acute nickel exposure impairs behavior, alters neuronal microarchitecture, and induces oxidative stress in rats' brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijomone, Omamuyovwi Meashack; Okori, Stephen Odey; Ijomone, Olayemi Kafilat; Ebokaiwe, Azubike Peter

    2018-02-26

    Nickel (Ni) is a heavy metal with wide industrial uses. Environmental and occupational exposures to Ni are potential risk factors for neurological symptoms in humans. The present study investigated the behavior and histomorphological alterations in brain of rats sub-acutely exposed to nickel chloride (NiCl 2 ) and the possible involvement of oxidative stress. Rats were administered with 5, 10 or 20 mg/kg NiCl 2 via intraperitoneal injections for 21 days. Neurobehavioral assessment was performed using the Y-maze and open field test (OFT). Histomorphological analyses of brain tissues, as well as biochemical determination of oxidative stress levels were performed. Results showed that Ni treatments significantly reduced body weight and food intake. Cognitive and motor behaviors on the Y-maze and OFT, respectively, were compromised following Ni treatments. Administration of Ni affected neuronal morphology in the brain and significantly reduced percentage of intact neurons in both hippocampus and striatum. Additionally, markers of oxidative stress levels and nitric oxide (NO) levels were significantly altered following Ni treatments. These data suggest that compromised behavior and brain histomorphology following Ni exposures is associated with increase in oxidative stress.

  19. Electrical coupling between hippocampal astrocytes in rat brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meme, William; Vandecasteele, Marie; Giaume, Christian; Venance, Laurent

    2009-04-01

    Gap junctions in astrocytes play a crucial role in intercellular communication by supporting both biochemical and electrical coupling between adjacent cells. Despite the critical role of electrical coupling in the network organization of these glial cells, the electrophysiological properties of gap junctions have been characterized in cultures while no direct evidence has been sought in situ. In the present study, gap-junctional currents were investigated using simultaneous dual whole-cell patch-clamp recordings between astrocytes from rat hippocampal slices. Bidirectional electrotonic coupling was observed in 82% of the cell pairs with an average coupling coefficient of 5.1%. Double patch-clamp analysis indicated that junctional currents were independent of the transjunctional voltage over a range from -100 to +110 mV. Interestingly, astrocytic electrical coupling displayed weak low-pass filtering properties compared to neuronal electrical synapses. Finally, during uncoupling processes triggered by either the gap-junction inhibitor carbenoxolone or endothelin-1, an increase in the input resistance in the injected cell paralleled the decrease in the coupling coefficient. Altogether, these results demonstrate that hippocampal astrocytes are electrically coupled through gap-junction channels characterized by properties that are distinct from those of electrical synapses between neurons. In addition, gap-junctional communication is efficiently regulated by endogenous compounds. This is taken to represent a mode of communication that may have important implications for the functional role of astrocyte networks in situ.

  20. Anti-ischemic effect of curcumin in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pradeep K; Khanna, Vinay K; Ali, Mohd M; Khan, Mohd Y; Srimal, Rikhab C

    2008-06-01

    Turmeric has been in use since ancient times as a condiment and due to its medicinal properties. Curcumin, the yellow colouring principle in turmeric, is polyphenolic and major active constituent. Besides anti-inflammatory, thrombolytic and anticarcinogenic activities, curcumin also possesses strong antioxidant property. In view of the novel combination of properties, neuroprotective efficacy of curcumin was studied in rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model. Rats were subjected to 2 h of focal ischemia followed by 72 h of reperfusion. They were pre-treated with curcumin (100 mg/kg, po) for 5 days prior to MCAO and for another 3 days after MCAO. The parameters studied were behavioural, biochemical and histological. Treatment with curcumin could significantly improve neurobehavioral performance compared to untreated ischemic rats as judged by its effect on rota-rod performance and grid walking. A significant inhibition in lipid peroxidation and an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in corpus striatum and cerebral cortex was observed following treatment with curcumin in MCAO rats as compared to MCAO group. Intracellular calcium levels were decreased following treatment with curcumin in MCAO rats. Histologically, a reduction in the infarct area from 33% to 24% was observed in MCAO rats treated with curcumin. The study demonstrates the protective efficacy of curcumin in rat MCAO model.

  1. Involvement of neuronal IL-1β in acquired brain lesions in a rat model of neonatal encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, Alexandre; Lavoie, Karine; Brochu, Marie-Elsa; Grbic, Djordje; Lepage, Martin; Gris, Denis; Sebire, Guillaume

    2013-09-05

    Infection-inflammation combined with hypoxia-ischemia (HI) is the most prevalent pathological scenario involved in perinatal brain damage leading to life-long neurological disabilities. Following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or HI aggression, different patterns of inflammatory responses have been uncovered according to the brain differentiation stage. In fact, LPS pre-exposure has been reported to aggravate HI brain lesions in post-natal day 1 (P1) and P7 rat models that are respectively equivalent - in terms of brain development - to early and late human preterm newborns. However, little is known about the innate immune response in LPS plus HI-induced lesions of the full-term newborn forebrain and the associated neuropathological and neurobehavioral outcomes. An original preclinical rat model has been previously documented for the innate neuroimmune response at different post-natal ages. It was used in the present study to investigate the neuroinflammatory mechanisms that underline neurological impairments after pathogen-induced inflammation and HI in term newborns. LPS and HI exerted a synergistic detrimental effect on rat brain. Their effect led to a peculiar pattern of parasagittal cortical-subcortical infarcts mimicking those in the human full-term newborn with subsequent severe neurodevelopmental impairments. An increased IL-1β response in neocortical and basal gray neurons was demonstrated at 4 h after LPS + HI-exposure and preceded other neuroinflammatory responses such as microglial and astroglial cell activation. Neurological deficits were observed during the acute phase of injury followed by a recovery, then by a delayed onset of profound motor behavior impairment, reminiscent of the delayed clinical onset of motor system impairments observed in humans. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) reduced the extent of brain lesions confirming the involvement of IL-1β response in their pathophysiology. In rat pups at a neurodevelopmental age

  2. Assessment of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Transient Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Model after Localized Brain Cooling in Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Soo [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang 14068 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung-Koo [Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Mi Jung [Department of Pathology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang 14068 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Phil Hye [Department of Neurology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); Ju, Young-Su [Department of Industrial Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang 14068 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Dae Young [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul 05355 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye Jeong [Department of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul 07441 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwan Seop [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang 14068 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of localized brain cooling on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in rats, by using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. Thirty rats were divided into 3 groups of 10 rats each: control group, localized cold-saline (20℃) infusion group, and localized warm-saline (37℃) infusion group. The left middle cerebral artery (MCA) was occluded for 1 hour in anesthetized rats, followed by 3 hours of reperfusion. In the localized saline infusion group, 6 mL of cold or warm saline was infused through the hollow filament for 10 minutes after MCA occlusion. DCE-MRI investigations were performed after 3 hours and 24 hours of reperfusion. Pharmacokinetic parameters of the extended Tofts-Kety model were calculated for each DCE-MRI. In addition, rotarod testing was performed before tMCAO, and on days 1-9 after tMCAO. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) immunohisto-chemistry was performed to identify infiltrating neutrophils associated with the inflammatory response in the rat brain. Permeability parameters showed no statistical significance between cold and warm saline infusion groups after 3-hour reperfusion 0.09 ± 0.01 min{sup -1} vs. 0.07 ± 0.02 min{sup -1}, p = 0.661 for K{sup trans}; 0.30 ± 0.05 min{sup -1} vs. 0.37 ± 0.11 min{sup -1}, p = 0.394 for kep, respectively. Behavioral testing revealed no significant difference among the three groups. However, the percentage of MPO-positive cells in the cold-saline group was significantly lower than those in the control and warm-saline groups (p < 0.05). Localized brain cooling (20℃) does not confer a benefit to inhibit the increase in BBB permeability that follows transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in an animal model, as compared with localized warm-saline (37℃) infusion group.

  3. Assessment of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Transient Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Model after Localized Brain Cooling in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Soo; Lee, Seung-Koo; Kwon, Mi Jung; Lee, Phil Hye; Ju, Young-Su; Yoon, Dae Young; Kim, Hye Jeong; Lee, Kwan Seop

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of localized brain cooling on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in rats, by using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. Thirty rats were divided into 3 groups of 10 rats each: control group, localized cold-saline (20℃) infusion group, and localized warm-saline (37℃) infusion group. The left middle cerebral artery (MCA) was occluded for 1 hour in anesthetized rats, followed by 3 hours of reperfusion. In the localized saline infusion group, 6 mL of cold or warm saline was infused through the hollow filament for 10 minutes after MCA occlusion. DCE-MRI investigations were performed after 3 hours and 24 hours of reperfusion. Pharmacokinetic parameters of the extended Tofts-Kety model were calculated for each DCE-MRI. In addition, rotarod testing was performed before tMCAO, and on days 1-9 after tMCAO. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) immunohisto-chemistry was performed to identify infiltrating neutrophils associated with the inflammatory response in the rat brain. Permeability parameters showed no statistical significance between cold and warm saline infusion groups after 3-hour reperfusion 0.09 ± 0.01 min -1 vs. 0.07 ± 0.02 min -1 , p = 0.661 for K trans ; 0.30 ± 0.05 min -1 vs. 0.37 ± 0.11 min -1 , p = 0.394 for kep, respectively. Behavioral testing revealed no significant difference among the three groups. However, the percentage of MPO-positive cells in the cold-saline group was significantly lower than those in the control and warm-saline groups (p < 0.05). Localized brain cooling (20℃) does not confer a benefit to inhibit the increase in BBB permeability that follows transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in an animal model, as compared with localized warm-saline (37℃) infusion group

  4. Assessment of blood-brain barrier permeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in transient middle cerebral artery occlusion model after localized brain cooling in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Soo; Lee, Kwan Seop; Kwon, Mi Jung; Ju, Young Su [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Koo; Lee, Phil Hye [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Dae Young [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of localized brain cooling on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in rats, by using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. Thirty rats were divided into 3 groups of 10 rats each: control group, localized cold-saline (20 .deg. ) infusion group, and localized warm-saline (37 .deg. ) infusion group. The left middle cerebral artery (MCA) was occluded for 1 hour in anesthetized rats, followed by 3 hours of reperfusion. In the localized saline infusion group, 6 mL of cold or warm saline was infused through the hollow filament for 10 minutes after MCA occlusion. DCE-MRI investigations were performed after 3 hours and 24 hours of reperfusion. Pharmacokinetic parameters of the extended Tofts-Kety model were calculated for each DCE-MRI. In addition, rotarod testing was performed before tMCAO, and on days 1-9 after tMCAO. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) immunohisto-chemistry was performed to identify infiltrating neutrophils associated with the inflammatory response in the rat brain. Permeability parameters showed no statistical significance between cold and warm saline infusion groups after 3-hour reperfusion 0.09 ± 0.01 min{sup -1} vs. 0.07 ± 0.02 min{sup -1},p = 0.661 for K{sup trans}; 0.30 ± 0.05 min{sup -1} vs. 0.37 ± 0.11 min{sup -1},p = 0.394 for kep, respectively. Behavioral testing revealed no significant difference among the three groups. However, the percentage of MPO-positive cells in the cold-saline group was significantly lower than those in the control and warm-saline groups (p < 0.05). Localized brain cooling (20 .deg. ) does not confer a benefit to inhibit the increase in BBB permeability that follows transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in an animal model, as compared with localized warm-saline (37 .deg. ) infusion group.

  5. Assessment of blood-brain barrier permeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in transient middle cerebral artery occlusion model after localized brain cooling in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Soo; Lee, Kwan Seop; Kwon, Mi Jung; Ju, Young Su; Lee, Seung Koo; Lee, Phil Hye; Yoon, Dae Young; Kim, Hye Jeong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of localized brain cooling on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in rats, by using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. Thirty rats were divided into 3 groups of 10 rats each: control group, localized cold-saline (20 .deg. ) infusion group, and localized warm-saline (37 .deg. ) infusion group. The left middle cerebral artery (MCA) was occluded for 1 hour in anesthetized rats, followed by 3 hours of reperfusion. In the localized saline infusion group, 6 mL of cold or warm saline was infused through the hollow filament for 10 minutes after MCA occlusion. DCE-MRI investigations were performed after 3 hours and 24 hours of reperfusion. Pharmacokinetic parameters of the extended Tofts-Kety model were calculated for each DCE-MRI. In addition, rotarod testing was performed before tMCAO, and on days 1-9 after tMCAO. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) immunohisto-chemistry was performed to identify infiltrating neutrophils associated with the inflammatory response in the rat brain. Permeability parameters showed no statistical significance between cold and warm saline infusion groups after 3-hour reperfusion 0.09 ± 0.01 min -1 vs. 0.07 ± 0.02 min -1 ,p = 0.661 for K trans ; 0.30 ± 0.05 min -1 vs. 0.37 ± 0.11 min -1 ,p = 0.394 for kep, respectively. Behavioral testing revealed no significant difference among the three groups. However, the percentage of MPO-positive cells in the cold-saline group was significantly lower than those in the control and warm-saline groups (p < 0.05). Localized brain cooling (20 .deg. ) does not confer a benefit to inhibit the increase in BBB permeability that follows transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in an animal model, as compared with localized warm-saline (37 .deg. ) infusion group

  6. In vivo regulation of the serotonin-2 receptor in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockmeier, C.A.; Kellar, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    Serotonin-2 (5-HT-2) receptors in brain were measured using ( 3 H)ketanserin. The authors examined the effects of amitriptyline, an anti-depressant drug, of electroconvulsive shock (ECS) and of drug-induced alterations in presynaptic 5-HT function on ( 3 H)ketanserin binding to 5-HT-2 receptors in rat brain. The importance of intact 5-HT axons to the up-regulation of 5-HT-2 receptors by ECS was also investigated, and an attempt was made to relate the ECS-induced increase in this receptor to changes in 5-HT presynaptic mechanisms. Twelve days of ECS increased the number of 5-HT-2 receptors in frontal cortex. Neither the IC 50 nor the Hill coefficient of 5-HT in competing for ( 3 H)ketanserin binding sites was altered by ECS. Repeated injections of amitriptyline reduced the number of 5-HT-2 receptors in frontal cortex. Reserpine, administered daily for 12 days, caused a significant increase in 5-HT-2 receptors, but neither daily injections of p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) nor lesions of 5-HT axons with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) affected 5-HT-2 receptors. However, regulation of 5-HT-2 receptors by ECS was dependent on intact 5-HT axons since ECS could not increase the number of 5-HT-2 receptors in rats previously lesioned with 5,7-DHT. Repeated ECS, however, does not appear to affect either the high-affinity uptake of ( 3 H)5-HT or ( 3 H)imipramine binding, two presynaptic markers of 5-HT neuronal function. 5-HT-2 receptors appear to be under complex control. ECS or drug treatments such as reserpine or amitriptyline, which affect several monoamine neurotransmission systems including 5-HT, can alter 5-HT-2 receptors. 28 references, 1 figure, 7 tables

  7. Impaired rate of microsomal fatty acid elongation in undernourished neonatal rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Y.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Hypomyelination caused by undernourishment in characterized by low concentrations of myelin lipids and marked reduction in lignocerate (C/sub 24:0/) and nervonate (C/sub 24:1/) moiety of cerebroside and sulfatide. Since microsomal elongation is the major source of long chain (22 to 24 carbons) fatty acids in the brain, the effect of neonatal undernourishment on acyl elongation was investigated. Undernourishment of suckling rats were induced after birth by restricting maternal dietary intake to 40% of that consumed by dams fed ad libitum. Neonates suckled by the normally fed dams served as controls. Microsomal elongation was measured as nmol from [2- 14 C] malonyl CoA incorporated/h per mg of protein. At 19 days of age, rates of behenoyl CoA (C/sub 22:0/) and erucoyl CoA (C/sub 22:1/) elongation in whole brain of undernourished neonates were 30-40% lower than that of the control, whereas the elongation rates of acyl CoA 16, 18 and 20 carbons in length either saturated or monounsaturated were similar in both groups. Undernourishment had no effect on cytoplasmic de novo fatty acid synthesis from acetyl CoA. If there are multiple elongation factors, the results indicate that the depressed activity of elongating enzyme(s) for C/sub 22:0/ and C/sub 22:1/ is an important contributing factor in lowering S/sub 24:0/ and C/sub 24:1/ content in cerebroside and sulfatide. This impairment may be a specific lesion leading to hypomyelination in undernourished rats

  8. Diurnal variation of. beta. -endorphin like immunoreactivity in rat brain, pituitary gland, and plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo, I.A.; Perry, M.L.S.; Carrasco, M.A.; Dias, R.D. (Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias); Orsingher, O.A. (Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina))

    1984-09-01

    ..beta..-endorphin like immunoreactivity was measured in the brain, pituitary gland and plasma of rats at 2 A.M, 8 A.M, 2 P.M and 8 P.M. Values were higher in the brain and pituitary gland at 8 P.M and in the plasma at 8 A.M and 2 P.M. The findings suggest a circadian rhythm in the production and release of ..beta..-endorphin immunoreactive material.

  9. Diurnal variation of β-endorphin like immunoreactivity in rat brain, pituitary gland, and plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izquierdo, I.A.; Perry, M.L.S.; Carrasco, M.A.; Dias, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    β-endorphin like immunoreactivity was measured in the brain, pituitary gland and plasma of rats at 2 A.M, 8 A.M, 2 P.M and 8 P.M. Values were higher in the brain and pituitary gland at 8 P.M and in the plasma at 8 A.M and 2 P.M. The findings suggest a circadian rhythm in the production and release of β-endorphin immunoreactive material. (Author) [pt

  10. Long-term evolution of cerebral hemodynamics after brain irradiation in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyeux, A.; Ochrymowicz-Bemelmans, D.

    1985-01-01

    Long-term evolution of radioisotope indices, evaluating respectively the cerebral blood flow (CBF), the cerebral blood volume (CBV) and the cephalic specific distribution space of iodoantipyrine (ΔIAP) of rat, was studied after brain irradiation at 20 Gy. Radioinduced hemodynamic alterations evidenced by this approach are biphasic and support the prominent role of circulation impairment in the genesis of delayed brain radionecrosis [fr

  11. Fenbendazole treatment may influence lipopolysaccharide effects in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Randy L; Choi, Dong-Young; Kincer, Jeanie F; Cass, Wayne A; Bing, Guoying; Gash, Don M

    2007-10-01

    In evaluating discrepant results between experiments in our laboratory, we collected data that challenge the notion that anthelminthic drugs like FBZ do not alter inflammatory responses. We found that FBZ significantly modulates inflammation in F344 rats intrastriatally injected with LPS. FBZ treatment of LPS-injected rats significantly increased weight loss, microglial activation, and dopamine loss; in addition, FBZ attenuated the LPS-induced loss of astrocytes. Therefore, FBZ treatment altered the effects of LPS injection. Caution should be used in interpreting data collected from rats treated with LPS and FBZ.

  12. Peony glycosides reverse the effects of corticosterone on behavior and brain BDNF expression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qing-Qiu; Huang, Zhen; Ip, Siu-Po; Xian, Yan-Fang; Che, Chun-Tao

    2012-02-01

    Repeated injections of corticosterone (CORT) induce the dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, resulting in depressive-like behavior. This study aimed to examine the antidepressant-like effect and the possible mechanisms of total glycosides of peony (TGP) in the CORT-induced depression model in rats. The results showed that the 3-week CORT injections induced the significant increase in serum CORT levels in rats. Repeated CORT injections also caused depression-like behavior in rats, as indicated by the significant decrease in sucrose consumption and increase in immobility time in the forced swim test. Moreover, it was found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein levels in the hippocampus and frontal cortex were significantly decreased in CORT-treated rats. Treatment of the rats with TGP significantly suppressed the depression-like behavior and increased brain BDNF levels in CORT-treated rats. The results suggest that TGP produces an antidepressant-like effect in CORT-treated rats, which is possibly mediated by increasing BDNF expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Differential subnetwork of chemokines/cytokines in human, mouse, and rat brain cells after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yang; Deng, Wenjun; Wang, Zixing; Ning, MingMing; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Yiming; Lo, Eng H; Xing, Changhong

    2017-04-01

    Mice and rats are the most commonly used animals for preclinical stroke studies, but it is unclear whether targets and mechanisms are always the same across different species. Here, we mapped the baseline expression of a chemokine/cytokine subnetwork and compared responses after oxygen-glucose deprivation in primary neurons, astrocytes, and microglia from mouse, rat, and human. Baseline profiles of chemokines (CX3CL1, CXCL12, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10) and cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNFα) showed significant differences between human and rodents. The response of chemokines/cytokines to oxygen-glucose deprivation was also significantly different between species. After 4 h oxygen-glucose deprivation and 4 h reoxygenation, human and rat neurons showed similar changes with a downregulation in many chemokines, whereas mouse neurons showed a mixed response with up- and down-regulated genes. For astrocytes, subnetwork response patterns were more similar in rats and mice compared to humans. For microglia, rat cells showed an upregulation in all chemokines/cytokines, mouse cells had many down-regulated genes, and human cells showed a mixed response with up- and down-regulated genes. This study provides proof-of-concept that species differences exist in chemokine/cytokine subnetworks in brain cells that may be relevant to stroke pathophysiology. Further investigation of differential gene pathways across species is warranted.

  14. [Plasticity of memory in the brain of white rats after long-term exposure to titanium in drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuliński, S; Strusiński, A

    2001-01-01

    The experiment was conducted on male white rats from breeding base of the National Institute of Hygiene: WIS own breeding. During sixteen months the drinking water with TiCl3 in concentrations 5 and 25 mg/l, what is equivalent respectively 0.45 and 2.25 mg per 1 kg of daily weight of rats, was given the animals. After 3 and 15 months of exposure the rats were taught to differentiate and remember sight effects. The investigation of each cluster of rats, living previously in the same cage, was going non-stop by 24 hours for 5 days. The training was carried on in the special adopted cages making possible to record all correct and incorrect attempts in day long cycle. Percentage indicator, the ratio of mistakes to all number of the attempts, was used for assessment the training effectiveness in each group and the result in intoxicated group were compared with control group. During the whole time of exposition the supplying drinking water with TiCl3 in concentrations 5 and 25 mg/l has not caused changes in rats confirming possibility to evoke disorders of brain memory plasticity.

  15. Evaluation of passive avoidance learning and spatial memory in rats exposed to low levels of lead during specific periods of early brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao Barkur, Rajashekar; Bairy, Laxminarayana K

    2015-01-01

    Widespread use of heavy metal lead (Pb) for various commercial purposes has resulted in the environmental contamination caused by this metal. The studies have shown a definite relationship between low level lead exposure during early brain development and deficit in children's cognitive functions. This study investigated the passive avoidance learning and spatial learning in male rat pups exposed to lead through their mothers during specific periods of early brain development. Experimental male rats were divided into 5 groups: i) the normal control group (NC) (N = 12) consisted of rat offspring born to mothers who were given normal drinking water throughout gestation and lactation, ii) the pre-gestation lead exposed group (PG) (N = 12) consisted of rat offspring, mothers of these rats had been exposed to 0.2% lead acetate in the drinking water for 1 month before conception, iii) the gestation lead exposed group (G) (N = 12) contained rat offspring born to mothers who had been exposed to 0.2% lead acetate in the drinking water throughout gestation, iv) the lactation lead exposed group (L) (N = 12) had rat offspring, mothers of these rats exposed to 0.2% lead acetate in the drinking water throughout lactation and v) the gestation and lactation lead exposed group (GL) (N = 12) contained rat offspring, mothers of these rats were exposed to 0.2% lead acetate throughout gestation and lactation. The study found deficit in passive avoidance learning in the G, L and GL groups of rats. Impairment in spatial learning was found in the PG, G, L and GL groups of rats. Interestingly, the study found that gestation period only and lactation period only lead exposure was sufficient to cause deficit in learning and memory in rats. The extent of memory impairment in the L group of rats was comparable with the GL group of rats. So it can be said that postnatal period of brain development is more sensitive to neurotoxicity compared to prenatal exposure. This work is available in Open

  16. Which radiopharmaceuticals for to-morrow. Heart and brain investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziere, B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a critical review of the various radiopharmaceuticals which have been or are presently designed for functional imaging of brain or heart using positron (PET) or single photon emission tomography. Currently used radiopharmaceuticals have been classified into two broad categories: 'passive' radiotracers intended to visualize the perfusion of the organ and 'active' or 'specific' radiotracers used to investigate metabolism or neurotransmission processes. Moreover, the potential interest of radioactive peptides or oligonucleotides which would be biologically stable in vivo and which could target proteins involved in inter or intra-cellular communications will be reviewed. (authors). 47 refs

  17. Regional brain distribution of toluene in rats and in a human autopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ameno, Kiyoshi; Kiriu, Takahiro; Fuke, Chiaki; Ameno, Setsuko; Shinohara, Toyohiko; Ijiri, Iwao (Kagawa Medical School (Japan). Dept. of Forensic Medicine)

    1992-02-01

    Toluene concentrations in 9 brain regions of acutely exposed rats and that in 11 brain regions of a human case who inhaled toluene prior to death are described. After exposure to toluene by inhalation (2000 or 10 000 ppm) for 0.5 h or by oral dosing (400 mg/kg.), rats were killed by decapitation 0.5 and 4 h after onset of inhalation and 2 and 10 h after oral ingestion. After each experimental condition the highest range of brain region/blood toluene concentration ratio (BBCR) was in the brain stem regions (2.85-3.22) such as the pons and medulla oblongata, the middle range (1.77-2.12) in the midbrain, thalamus, caudate-putamen, hypothalamus and cerebellum, and the lowest range (1.22-1.64) in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. These distribution patterns were quite constant. Toluene concentration in various brain regions were unevenly distributed and directly related blood levels. In a human case who had inhaled toluene vapor, the distribution among brain regions was relatively similar to that in rats, the highest concentration ratios being in the corpus callosum (BBCR:2.66) and the lowest in the hippocampus (BBCR:1.47). (orig.).

  18. Hyperthyreosis effects on the learning and glial intermediate filaments of rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kyrychenko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of hyperthyreosis on oxidative stress, state of glial intermediate filaments and memotry was investigated. Significant increasing of lipid peroxidation products into both hippocampus and cortex and change for the worse of memory was observed. Analysis of the behavioral reactions of rats in the test of passive avoidance conditioned reflex showed that the acquisition of skills of all groups of animals did not differ by time waiting period (latent period. Time saving memory test conditioned reflex of passive avoidance was excellent in the group of rats treated with thyroxine compared with controls. The change of polypeptide GFAP was observed in hippocampus and cortex. Both soluble and filamentous forms of GFAP increased in hippocampus of rat with hyperthyreosis. In filament fractions, increase in the intensity of 49 kDa polypeptide band was found. In the same fraction of insoluble cytoskeleton proteins degraded HFKB polypeptides with molecular weight in the region of 46–41 kDa appeared. Marked increase of degraded polypeptides was found in the soluble fraction of the brain stem. The intensity of the intact polypeptide (49 kDa, as well as in the filament fraction, significantly increased. It is possible that increasing concentrations of soluble subunits glial filaments may be due to dissociation of own filaments during the reorganization of cytoskeleton structures. Given the results of Western blotting for filament fraction, increased content of soluble intact 49 kDa polypeptide is primarily the result of increased expression of HFKB and only partly due to redistribution of existing filament structures. Calculation and analysis of indicators showed high correlation between the increase in content and peroxidation products of HFKB. These results indicate the important role of oxidative stress in the induction of astroglial reactive response under conditions of hyperthyroidism. This data shows the possibility of the glial cell

  19. Attenuation of Streptozotocin-Induced Lipid Profile Anomalies in the Heart, Brain, and mRNA Expression of HMG-CoA Reductase by Diosgenin in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shuang; Xu, Rihao; Li, Dan; Zhu, Zhicheng; Wang, Tiance; Liu, Kexiang

    2015-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with significant morbidity and mortality that contributes to pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Diosgenin, a naturally occurring aglycone, is present abundantly in fenugreek. The steroidal saponin is being used as a traditional medicine for diabetes. The present study has investigated the effects of diosgenin on lipid profile in the heart and brain, mRNA expression, and hepatic HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) activity of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In our study, diosgenin was administered (40 mg/kg b.w.) orally for 45 days to control animals and experimentally induced diabetic rats. The effects of diosgenin on glucose, plasma insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, and phospholipids (PLs) in the heart and brain were studied. The levels of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, PLs, and HMGR activity were increased significantly (P rats. Administration of diosgenin to diabetic rats significantly reduced blood glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, PLs levels, and also HMGR activity. In addition, the plasma insulin level was increased in diosgenin-treated diabetic rats. The above findings were correlated with histological observations of the heart and brain. The results showed that administration of diosgenin remarkably increased plasma insulin level with absolute reduction of blood glucose, lipid profile, and HMGR level when compared to diabetic control rats. The results have suggested that diosgenin prevents hypercholesterolemia and hepatosteatosis by modulation of enzymatic expression that is associated with cholesterol metabolism.

  20. Metabolic enhancer piracetam attenuates rotenone induced oxidative stress: a study in different rat brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dinesh Kumar; Joshi, Neeraj; Raju, Kunumuri Sivarama; Wahajuddin, Muhammad; Singh, Rama Kant; Singh, Sarika

    2015-01-01

    Piracetam is clinically being used nootropic drug but the details of its neuroprotective mechanism are not well studied. The present study was conducted to assess the effects of piracetam on rotenone induced oxidative stress by using both ex vivo and in vivo test systems. Rats were treated with piracetam (600 mg/kg b.w. oral) for seven constitutive days prior to rotenone administration (intracerebroventricular, 12 µg) in rat brain. Rotenone induced oxidative stress was assessed after 1 h and 24 h of rotenone administration. Ex vivo estimations were performed by using two experimental designs. In one experimental design the rat brain homogenate was treated with rotenone (1 mM, 2 mM and 4 mM) and rotenone+piracetam (10 mM) for 1 h. While in second experimental design the rats were pretreated with piracetam for seven consecutive days. On eighth day the rats were sacrificed, brain homogenate was prepared and treated with rotenone (1 mM, 2 mM and 4mM) for 1h. After treatment the glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were estimated in brain homogenate. In vivo study showed that pretreatment of piracetam offered significant protection against rotenone induced decreased GSH and increased MDA level though the protection was region specific. But the co-treatment of piracetam with rotenone did not offer significant protection against rotenone induced oxidative stress in ex vivo study. Whereas ex vivo experiments in rat brain homogenate of piracetam pretreated rats, showed the significant protection against rotenone induced oxidative stress. Findings indicated that pretreatment of piracetam significantly attenuated the rotenone induced oxidative stress though the protection was region specific. Piracetam treatment to rats led to its absorption and accumulation in different brain regions as assessed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. In conclusion, study indicates the piracetam is able to enhance the antioxidant capacity in brain cells

  1. Protective effect of Xingnaojia formulation on rats with brain and liver damage caused by chronic alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang; Wang, S U; Guo, Zhi-Gang; Huang, Ning; Zhao, Fan-Rong; Zhu, Mo-Li; Ma, Li-Juan; Liang, Jin-Ying; Zhang, Yu-Lin; Huang, Zhong-Lin; Wan, Guang-Rui

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effect of a formulation of traditional Chinese medicine extracts known as Xingnaojia (XNJ) on the liver function, learning ability and memory of rats with chronic alcoholism and to verify the mechanism by which it protects the brain and liver. A rat model of chronic alcoholism was used in the study. The spatial learning ability and memory of the rats were tested. The rats were then sacrificed and their brains and hepatic tissues were isolated. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and levels of glutamate (Glu), N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subtype 2B (NR2B), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in the hippocampus were analyzed. The ultrastructure of the hepatic tissue was observed by electron microscopy. In addition, the activities of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in serum were tested and the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol (TCHOL) were analyzed. XNJ enhanced the learning and memory of rats with chronic alcoholism. Treatment with XNJ increased the activity of SOD, and decreased the expression levels of NR2B mRNA and NR2B, CB1 and CDK5 proteins in the brain tissues compared with those in the model rats. It also increased the activity of ALDH in the serum and liver, decreased the serum levels of LDL, TG and TCHOL and increased the serum level of HDL. These results indicate that XNJ exhibited a protective effect against brain and liver damage in rats with chronic alcoholism.

  2. Human umbilical cord blood cells restore brain damage induced changes in rat somatosensory cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Geissler

    Full Text Available Intraperitoneal transplantation of human umbilical cord blood (hUCB cells has been shown to reduce sensorimotor deficits after hypoxic ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats. However, the neuronal correlate of the functional recovery and how such a treatment enforces plastic remodelling at the level of neural processing remains elusive. Here we show by in-vivo recordings that hUCB cells have the capability of ameliorating the injury-related impairment of neural processing in primary somatosensory cortex. Intact cortical processing depends on a delicate balance of inhibitory and excitatory transmission, which is disturbed after injury. We found that the dimensions of cortical maps and receptive fields, which are significantly altered after injury, were largely restored. Additionally, the lesion induced hyperexcitability was no longer observed in hUCB treated animals as indicated by a paired-pulse behaviour resembling that observed in control animals. The beneficial effects on cortical processing were reflected in an almost complete recovery of sensorimotor behaviour. Our results demonstrate that hUCB cells reinstall the way central neurons process information by normalizing inhibitory and excitatory processes. We propose that the intermediate level of cortical processing will become relevant as a new stage to investigate efficacy and mechanisms of cell therapy in the treatment of brain injury.

  3. Parkia biglobosa Improves Mitochondrial Functioning and Protects against Neurotoxic Agents in Rat Brain Hippocampal Slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayode Komolafe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Methanolic leaf extracts of Parkia biglobosa, PBE, and one of its major polyphenolic constituents, catechin, were investigated for their protective effects against neurotoxicity induced by different agents on rat brain hippocampal slices and isolated mitochondria. Methods. Hippocampal slices were preincubated with PBE (25, 50, 100, or 200 µg/mL or catechin (1, 5, or 10 µg/mL for 30 min followed by further incubation with 300 µM H2O2, 300 µM SNP, or 200 µM PbCl2 for 1 h. Effects of PBE and catechin on SNP- or CaCl2-induced brain mitochondrial ROS formation and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm were also determined. Results. PBE and catechin decreased basal ROS generation in slices and blunted the prooxidant effects of neurotoxicants on membrane lipid peroxidation and nonprotein thiol contents. PBE rescued hippocampal cellular viability from SNP damage and caused a significant boost in hippocampus Na+, K+-ATPase activity but with no effect on the acetylcholinesterase activity. Both PBE and catechin also mitigated SNP- or CaCl2-dependent mitochondrial ROS generation. Measurement by safranine fluorescence however showed that the mild depolarization of the ΔΨm by PBE was independent of catechin. Conclusion. The results suggest that the neuroprotective effect of PBE is dependent on its constituent antioxidants and mild mitochondrial depolarization propensity.

  4. Localization of glucocorticoid receptor mRNA in the male rat brain by in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronsson, M.; Fuxe, K.; Dong, Y.; Agnati, L.F.; Okret, S.; Gustafsson, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The localization and distribution of mRNA encoding the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was investigated in tissue sections of the adult male rat brain by in situ hybridization and RNA blot analysis. GR mRNA levels were measured by quantitative autoradiography with 35S- and 32P-labeled RNA probes, respectively. Strong labeling was observed within the pyramidal nerve cells of the CA1 and CA2 areas of the hippocampal formation, in the granular cells of the dentate gyrus, in the parvocellular nerve cells of the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, and in the cells of the arcuate nucleus, especially the parvocellular part. Moderate labeling of a large number of nerve cells was observed within layers II, III, and VI of the neocortex and in many thalamic nuclei, especially the anterior and ventral nuclear groups as well as several midline nuclei. Within the cerebellar cortex, strong labeling was observed all over the granular layer. In the lower brainstem, strong labeling was found within the entire locus coeruleus and within the mesencephalic raphe nuclei rich in noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine cell bodies, respectively. A close correlation was found between the distribution of GR mRNA and the distribution of previously described GR immunoreactivity. These studies open the possibility of obtaining additional information on in vivo regulation of GR synthesis and how the brain may alter its sensitivity to circulating glucocorticoids

  5. Grape powder consumption affects the expression of neurodegeneration-related brain proteins in rats chronically fed a high-fructose-high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hsiang; Chou, Liang-Mao; Chien, Yi-Wen; Wu, Chi-Hao; Chang, Jung-Su; Lin, Ching-I; Lin, Shyh-Hsiang

    2017-05-01

    Abnormal glucose metabolism in the brain is recognized to be associated with cognitive decline. Because grapes are rich in polyphenols that produce antioxidative and blood sugar-lowering effects, we investigated how grape consumption affects the expression and/or phosphorylation of neurodegeneration-related brain proteins in aged rats fed a high-fructose-high-fat (HFHF) diet. Wistar rats were maintained on the HFHF diet from the age of 8 weeks to 66 weeks, and then on an HFHF diet containing either 3% or 6% grape powder as an intervention for 12 weeks. Western blotting was performed to measure the expression/phosphorylation levels of several cortical and hippocampal proteins, including amyloid precursor protein (APP), tau, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGEs), erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Inclusion of up to 6% grape powder in the diet markedly reduced RAGE expression and tau hyperphosphorylation, but upregulated the expression of Nrf2 and BDNF, as well as the phosphorylation of PI3K and ERK, in the brain tissues of aged rats fed the HFHF diet. Thus, grape powder consumption produced beneficial effects in HFHF-diet-fed rats, exhibiting the potential to ameliorate changes in neurodegeneration-related proteins in the brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel herbal treatment reduces depressive-like behaviors and increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in the brain of type 2 diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo C

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chun Luo,1,* Yuting Ke,1,* Yanyan Yuan,1 Ming Zhao,1 Fuyan Wang,1 Yisheng Zhang,2 Shizhong Bu1 1Runliang Diabetes Laboratory, Diabetes Research Center, Ningbo University, 2Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Ningbo Medical Center, Li Huili Eastern Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Radix Puerariae and hawthorn fruit have been demonstrated to treat diabetes. They offer potential benefits for preventing depression in diabetes. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the combination of Radix Puerariae and hawthorn fruit (CRPHF could prevent depression in a diabetic rat model generated by feeding the rats with a high-fat diet and a low-dose streptozotocin (STZ. Methods: The CRPHF was provided by the Shanghai Chinese Traditional Medical University. Twenty-four rats were randomly divided into four groups: normal control, normal-given-CRPHF (NC, diabetic control, and diabetic-given-CRPHF (DC groups. The type 2 diabetic model was created by feeding the rats with a high-fat diet for 4 weeks followed by injection of 25 mg/kg STZ. CRPHF was given at 2 g/kg/d to the rats of NC and DC groups by intragastric gavage daily for 4 weeks after the type 2 diabetic model was successfully created. Body weight, random blood glucose (RBG, oral glucose tolerance test, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C were measured during the study. Depressive-like behavior was evaluated at the end of the treatment by using the open field test (OFT, the elevated plus-maze test (EPMT, locomotor activity test (LAT, and forced swimming test (FST. Levels of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the prefrontal cortex were evaluated by using Western blot. Results: 1 CRPHF reduced RBG and improved glucose tolerance in diabetic rats

  7. Electrical Guidance of Human Stem Cells in the Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Feng Feng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Limited migration of neural stem cells in adult brain is a roadblock for the use of stem cell therapies to treat brain diseases and injuries. Here, we report a strategy that mobilizes and guides migration of stem cells in the brain in vivo. We developed a safe stimulation paradigm to deliver directional currents in the brain. Tracking cells expressing GFP demonstrated electrical mobilization and guidance of migration of human neural stem cells, even against co-existing intrinsic cues in the rostral migration stream. Transplanted cells were observed at 3 weeks and 4 months after stimulation in areas guided by the stimulation currents, and with indications of differentiation. Electrical stimulation thus may provide a potential approach to facilitate brain stem cell therapies.

  8. Daily Dose effect of Valerian root extract on some Neurotransmitter contents in different Brain areas of male Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waggas, Abeer M

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the daily effect of valerian (Valeriana officinalis L .) root extract on epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) , and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contents in different brain areas (cerebellum , pons plus medulla oblongata , striatum , cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and hippocampus) of male albino rats .The daily intraperitoneal ( i.p.) injection of 300 mg/kg body wt valerian for 30 days caused a significant increase in epinephrine ( E ) content in pons plus medulla oblongata, cerebral cortex , hypothalamus and in midbrain . Norepinephrine (NE ) content was significantly increased in all brain areas tested except in cerebellum and cerebral cortex . Dopamine (DA) content was significantly increased in all tested brain areas except in cerebral cortex and hippocampus . moreover , there was also a significant increase in serotonin (5-HT ) and 5-hydroxyindol acetic acid (5-HIAA) contents in all tested brain areas . However, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content was significantly decreased in all tested brain areas . After the extract withdrawal, the increase in ( E, NE, DA , 5-HT ) contents and the decrease in GABA content persisted in pons plus medulla oblongata , striatum , midbrain and hippocampus , and this might be due to regional differences toward the effect. The increase in E, NE, DA , 5-HT and 5-HIAA contents, at the same time the decrease in GABA content in the different brain areas of albino rats may be due to the presence of both valepotriates and valerenic acid in the extract which mediated the GABA ergic mechanisms including the inhibition of GABA metabolism and the increase in GABA synthesis and release , although agonized the GABAA receptors which led to the inhibit of the neurotransmitter release. Valerian root extract may be useful as a herbal medicine having sedative effect and it is safe. (author)

  9. Deep-brain electrical microstimulation is an effective tool to explore functional characteristics of somatosensory neurons in the rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Jia Jiang

    Full Text Available In neurophysiology researches, peripheral stimulation is used along with recordings of neural activities to study the processing of somatosensory signals in the brain. However, limited precision of peripheral stimulation makes it difficult to activate the neuron with millisecond resolution and study its functional properties in this scale. Also, tissue/receptor damage that could occur in some experiments often limits the amount of responses that can be recorded and hence reduces data reproducibility. To overcome these limitations, electrical microstimulation (ES of the brain could be used to directly and more precisely evoke neural responses. For this purpose, a deep-brain ES protocol for rat somatosensory relay neurons was developed in this study. Three male Wistar rats were used in the experiment. The ES was applied to the thalamic region responsive to hindpaw tactile stimulation (TS via a theta glass microelectrode. The resulting ES-evoked cortical responses showed action potentials and thalamocortical relay latencies very similar to those evoked by TS. This result shows that the developed deep-brain ES protocol is an effective tool to bypass peripheral tissue for in vivo functional analysis of specific types of somatosensory neurons. This protocol could be readily applied in researches of nociception and other somatosensory systems to allow more extensive exploration of the neural functional networks.

  10. Investigation of G72 (DAOA expression in the human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirsch Steven

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms at the G72/G30 locus on chromosome 13q have been associated with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder in more than ten independent studies. Even though the genetic findings are very robust, the physiological role of the predicted G72 protein has thus far not been resolved. Initial reports suggested G72 as an activator of D-amino acid oxidase (DAO, supporting the glutamate dysfunction hypothesis of schizophrenia. However, these findings have subsequently not been reproduced and reports of endogenous human G72 mRNA and protein expression are extremely limited. In order to better understand the function of this putative schizophrenia susceptibility gene, we attempted to demonstrate G72 mRNA and protein expression in relevant human brain regions. Methods The expression of G72 mRNA was studied by northern blotting and semi-quantitative SYBR-Green and Taqman RT-PCR. Protein expression in human tissue lysates was investigated by western blotting using two custom-made specific anti-G72 peptide antibodies. An in-depth in silico analysis of the G72/G30 locus was performed in order to try and identify motifs or regulatory elements that provide insight to G72 mRNA expression and transcript stability. Results Despite using highly sensitive techniques, we failed to identify significant levels of G72 mRNA in a variety of human tissues (e.g. adult brain, amygdala, caudate nucleus, fetal brain, spinal cord and testis human cell lines or schizophrenia/control post mortem BA10 samples. Furthermore, using western blotting in combination with sensitive detection methods, we were also unable to detect G72 protein in a number of human brain regions (including cerebellum and amygdala, spinal cord or testis. A detailed in silico analysis provides several lines of evidence that support the apparent low or absent expression of G72. Conclusion Our results suggest that native G72 protein is not normally present in the tissues that we analysed

  11. The Rat Homolog of the Schizophrenia Susceptibility Gene ZNF804A Is Highly Expressed during Brain Development, Particularly in Growth Cones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinna, Katja Hvid; Rich, Karen; Fex Svenningsen, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    it decreases towards adult levels. This time point is developmentally the equivalent to the second trimester of fetal development in humans. An exception to this expression pattern is the hippocampus where the expression of Zfp804A appears to increase again in the adult brain. Using laser capture...... developmental mechanisms are suggested in the pathophysiology for schizophrenia, expression of Zfp804A, the rat homolog of ZNF804A, was investigated in the developing rat brain. We found that expression of Zfp804A in most brain regions is developmentally regulated and peaks around birth, where after...... expression was therefore investigated with immunochemistry in such cultures. Interestingly, before day 4, the protein is mostly found in the perinuclear region of the cell but at day 4, ZFP804A was instead found throughout the cell and particularly in the growth cones. In conclusion we demonstrate that Zfp...

  12. Brain receptors for thyrotropin releasing hormone in morphine tolerant-dependent rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhargava, H.N.; Das, S.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of chronic treatment of rats with morphine and its subsequent withdrawal on the brain receptors for thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) labeled with /sup 3/H-(3MeHis/sup 2/)TRH (MeTRH). Male Sprague Dawley rats were implanted with 4 morphine pellets (each containing 75 mg morphine base) during a 3-day period. Placebo pellet implanted rats served as controls. Both tolerance to and dependence on morphine developed as a result of this procedure. For characterization of brain TRH receptors, the animals were sacrificed 72 h after the implantation of first pellet. In another set of animals the pellets were removed and were sacrificed 24 h later. The binding of /sup 3/H-MeTRH to membranes prepared from brain without the cerebellum was determined. /sup 3/H-MeTRH bound to brain membranes prepared from placebo pellet implanted rats at a single high affinity site with a B/sub max/ value of 33.50 +/- 0.97 fmol/mg protein and a K/sub d/ of 5.18 +/- 0.21 nM. Implantation of morphine pellets did not alter the B/sub max/ value of /sup 3/H-MeTRH but decreased the K/sub d/ value significantly. Abrupt or naloxone precipitated withdrawal of morphine did not alter B/sub max/ or the K/sub d/ values. The binding of /sup 3/H-MeTRH to brain areas was also determined. The results suggest that the development of tolerance to morphine is associated with enhanced sensitivity of brain TRH receptors, however abrupt withdrawal of morphine does not change the characteristics of brain TRH receptors.

  13. The diffusion permeability to water of the rat blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolwig, T G; Lassen, N A

    1975-01-01

    The diffusion permeability to water of the rat blood-brain-barrier (BBB) was studied. Preliminary data obtained with the Oldendorf tissue uptake method (Oldendorf 1970) in seizure experiments suggested that the transfer from blood to brain of labelled water is diffusion-limited. More definite...... passage increased from 0.26 to 0.67 when the arterial carbon dioxide tension was changed from 15 to 85 mm Hg, a change increasing the cerebral blood flow about sixfold. This finding suggests that water does not pass the blood-brain barrier as freely as lipophilic gases....

  14. Prolactin prevents acute stress-induced hypocalcemia and ulcerogenesis by acting in the brain of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Takahiko; Soya, Hideaki; Tamashiro, Kellie L K; Sakai, Randall R; McEwen, Bruce S; Nakai, Naoya; Ogata, Masato; Suzuki, Ikukatsu; Nakashima, Kunio

    2004-04-01

    Stress causes hypocalcemia and ulcerogenesis in rats. In rats under stressful conditions, a rapid and transient increase in circulating prolactin (PRL) is observed, and this enhanced PRL induces PRL receptors (PRLR) in the choroid plexus of rat brain. In this study we used restraint stress in water to elucidate the mechanism by which PRLR in the rat brain mediate the protective effect of PRL against stress-induced hypocalcemia and ulcerogenesis. We show that rat PRL acts through the long form of PRLR in the hypothalamus. This is followed by an increase in the long form of PRLR mRNA expression in the choroid plexus of the brain, which provides protection against restraint stress in water-induced hypocalcemia and gastric erosions. We also show that PRL induces the expression of PRLR protein and corticotropin-releasing factor mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus. These results suggest that the PRL levels increase in response to stress, and it moves from the circulation to the cerebrospinal fluid to act on the central nervous system and thereby plays an important role in helping to protect against acute stress-induced hypocalcemia and gastric erosions.

  15. Kolaviron and vitamin E ameliorate hematotoxicity and oxidative stress in brains of prepubertal rats treated with an anticonvulsant phenytoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoeye, Olatunde; Adedara, Isaac A; Bakare, Oluwafemi S; Adeyemo, Oluwatobi A; Egun, Christa; Farombi, Ebenezer O

    2014-06-01

    Phenytoin (PHT), an anticonvulsant agent, widely used for the treatment of epilepsy has been reported to exhibit toxic side effects. The present study investigated the protective effects of kolaviron and vitamin E on hematotoxicity and neurotoxicity induced by phenytoin, in prepubertal male rats. The animals were treated with PHT (75 mg/kg) separately or in combination with either kolaviron (200 mg/kg) or vitamin E (500 mg/kg) for 14 days. Phenytoin treatment significantly decreased the hemoglobin, white blood cells, lymphocytes and mean corpuscular volume levels without affecting red blood cell, packed cell volume, neutrophils, mean corpuscular hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration when compared with the control rats. There was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide levels with marked depletion in antioxidant status in brains of PHT-treated rats when compared with the control. Although PHT treatment had no effect on the granular layer, widest diameter of Purkinje cells and Purkinje layer of the cerebellum, it significantly reduced its molecular layer and the density of Purkinje cell. Administration of PHT significantly reduced the densities of the granule cells of the dentate gyrus and the pyramidal neurons of the cornu ammonis of hippocampus proper. Co-treatment with kolaviron and vitamin E effectively reversed the PHT-mediated alterations in the hematology, brain antioxidant status and histomorphometry when compared to PHT only. Taken together, the present data indicate the abilities of kolaviron and vitamin E to ameliorate phenytoin-induced hematotoxicity and oxidative stress in brains of rats.

  16. Blood-ocular and blood-brain barrier function in streptozocin-induced diabetes in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeepea, O.; Karlsson, C.; Alm, A.

    1984-01-01

    Edetic acid labeled with chromium 51 was injected intravenously in normal rats and in rats with streptozocin-induced diabetes. One hour after the injection the animals were killed and the concentrations of edetic acid 51Cr in vitreous body, retina, and brain were determined. No significant difference was observed between the two groups for either tissue. In a second series, a mixture of tritiated 1-glucose and aminohippuric acid tagged with carbon 14 was injected instead of edetic acid. A substantial accumulation of aminohippuric acid 14C compared with tritiated 1-glucose was observed in the vitreous body and the brain of diabetic rats in comparison with the control group. It is concluded that untreated streptozocin-induced diabetes in rats for one to two weeks will not cause a generalized increase in the permeability of the blood-ocular or the blood-brain barriers, but organic acids may accumulate in the vitreous body as well as in the brain as a consequence of reduced outward transport through these barriers

  17. Effects of white spirits on rat brain 5-HT receptor functions and synaptic remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, Henrik Rye; Plenge, P.; Jørgensen, O.S.

    2001-01-01

    Previously, inhalation exposure to different types of white spirit (i.e. complex mixtures of aliphatic, aromatic, alkyl aromatic, and naphthenic hydrocarbons) has been shown to induce neurochemical effects in rat brains. Especially, the serotonergic system was involved at the global, regional, an...

  18. Temporal and spatial dynamics of corticosteroid receptor down-regulation in rat brain following social defeat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, B; Felszeghy, K; Horváth, K M; Nyakas, C; de Boer, S.F.; Bohus, B; Koolhaas, J M

    The experiments explored the nature and time course of changes in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) binding in homogenates of various brain regions and pituitary of male Wistar rats following social defeat stress. One week after defeat, the binding capacity of GRs was

  19. Antidiabetic and Neuroprotective Effects of Trigonella Foenum-graecum Seed Powder in Diabetic Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigonella foenum-graecum seed powder (TSP has been reported to have hypoglycemic and hyperinsulinemic action. The objective of the study was to examine the antidiabetic and neuroprotective role of TSP in hyperglycemiainduced alterations in blood glucose, insulin levels and activities of membrane linked enzymes (Na+K+ATPase, Ca2+ATPase, antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase, calcium (Ca2+ levels, lipid peroxidation, membrane fluidity and neurolipofuscin accumulation in the diabetic rat brain. Female Wistar rats weighing between 180 and 220 g were made diabetic by a single injection of alloxan monohydrate (15 mg/100 g body weight, diabetic rats were given 2 IU insulin, per day with 5% TSP in the diet for three weeks. A significant increase in lipid peroxidation was observed in diabetic brain. The increased lipid peroxidation following chronic hyperglycemia was accompanied with a significant increase in the neurolipofuscin deposition and Ca2+ levels with decreased activities of membrane linked ATPases and antioxidant enzymes in diabetic brain. A decrease in synaptosomal membrane fluidity may influence the activity of membrane linked enzymes in diabetes. The present study showed that TSP treatment can reverse the hyperglycemia induced changes to normal levels in diabetic rat brain. TSP administration amended effect of hyperglycemia on alterations in lipid peroxidation, restoring membrane fluidity, activities of membrane bound and antioxidant enzymes, thereby ameliorating the diabetic complications.

  20. Insulin binding to brain capillaries is reduced in genetically obese, hyperinsulinemic Zucker rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, M.W.; Figlewicz, D.F.; Kahn, S.E.; Baskin, D.G.; Greenwood, M.R.; Porte, D. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    In order to study the role of plasma insulin in regulating the binding of insulin to the endothelium of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), insulin binding to a purified preparation of brain capillaries was measured in both genetically obese Zucker rats and lean Zucker controls. We found a reduction of 65% in brain capillary insulin binding site number in the obese compared to lean rats with no change in receptor affinity. Furthermore, specific insulin binding to brain capillaries was negatively correlated (p less than 0.05) to the plasma insulin level, suggesting a role for plasma insulin in regulating insulin binding. A similar relationship was observed between insulin receptor number in liver membranes and the plasma insulin level. We conclude that obese, hyperinsulinemic Zucker rats exhibit a reduction in the number of BBB insulin receptors, which parallels the reduction seen in other peripheral tissues. Since insulin receptors have been hypothesized to participate in the transport of insulin across the BBB, the reduction observed in the obese rats may account for the decrease in cerebrospinal fluid insulin uptake previously demonstrated in these animals

  1. The Physiochemistry of Capped Nanosilver Predicts Its Biological Activity in Rat Brain Endothelial Cells (REBEC4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The “capping” or coating of nanosilver (nanoAg) extends its potency by limiting its oxidation and aggregation and stabilizing its size and shape. The ability of such coated nanoAg to alter the permeability and activate oxidative stress pathways in rat brain endothelia...

  2. Brain SERT Expression of Male Rats Is Reduced by Aging and Increased by Testosterone Restitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Jaime Herrera-Pérez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In preclinical and clinical studies aging has been associated with a deteriorated response to antidepressant treatment. We hypothesize that such impairment is explained by an age-related decrease in brain serotonin transporter (SERT expression associated with low testosterone (T levels. The objectives of this study were to establish (1 if brain SERT expression is reduced by aging and (2 if the SERT expression in middle-aged rats is increased by T-restitution. Intact young rats (3–5 months and gonad-intact middle-aged rats with or without T-restitution were used. The identification of the brain SERT expression was done by immunofluorescence in prefrontal cortex, lateral septum, hippocampus, and raphe nuclei. An age-dependent reduction of SERT expression was observed in all brain regions examined, while T-restitution recovered the SERT expression only in the dorsal raphe of middle-aged rats. This last action seems relevant since dorsal raphe plays an important role in the antidepressant action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. All data suggest that this mechanism accounts for the T-replacement usefulness to improve the response to antidepressants in the aged population.

  3. Inositol trisphosphate and thapsigargin discriminate endoplasmic reticulum stores of calcium in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verma, A; Hirsch, D J; Hanley, M R

    1990-01-01

    ATP dependent Ca2+ accumulation into oxalate-loaded rat brain microsomes is potently inhibited by thapsigargin with an IC50 of 2 nM and maximal inhibition at 10 nM. Approximately 15% of the total A23187-releasable microsomal calcium store is insensitive to thapsigargin concentrations up to 100 mi...

  4. PRENATAL EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS ALTERS NEUROTROPHIN IMMUNOREACTIVITY AND APOPTOSIS IN RAT BRAIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the present study, the effects of the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos [CPF; O,O'diethyl O-3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridyl) phosphorothionate] on the regional distribution of three neurotrophic factors and on levels of apoptosis in gestational rat brain were characterized. P...

  5. Differential distribution of calcineurin Aα isoenzyme mRNA's in rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttini, M.; Limonta, S.; Luyten, M.; Boddeke, H.

    1993-01-01

    Specific antisense oligonucleotide probes for the α isoforms of the catalytic subunit (A-subunit) of calcineurin were prepared and the distribution of Aα1 and Aα2 mRNA's has been studied in rat brain using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Clear regional differences have been observed for the

  6. Aging and Lateralization of the Rat Brain on a Biochemical Level

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krištofíková, Z.; Říčný, J.; Ort, Michael; Řípová, D.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 8 (2010), s. 1138-1146 ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0517; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : rat * brain * biochemistry Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.608, year: 2010

  7. Rat brain sagittal organotypic slice cultures as an ex vivo dopamine cell loss system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey-Chapman, Amy; Connor, Bronwen

    2017-02-01

    Organotypic brain slice cultures are a useful tool to study neurological function as they provide a more complex, 3-dimensional system than standard 2-dimensional in vitro cell cultures. Building on a previously developed mouse brain slice culture protocol, we have developed a rat sagittal brain slice culture system as an ex vivo model of dopamine cell loss. We show that rat brain organotypic slice cultures remain viable for up to 6 weeks in culture. Using Fluoro-Gold axonal tracing, we demonstrate that the slice 3-dimensional cytoarchitecture is maintained over a 4 week culturing period, with particular focus on the nigrostriatal pathway. Treatment of the cultures with 6-hydroxydopamine and desipramine induces a progressive loss of Fluoro-Gold-positive nigral cells with a sustained loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive nigral cells. This recapitulates the pattern of dopaminergic degeneration observed in the rat partial 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model and, most importantly, the progressive pathology of Parkinson's disease. Our slice culture platform provides an advance over other systems, as we demonstrate for the first time 3-dimensional cytoarchitecture maintenance of rat nigrostriatal sagittal slices for up to 6 weeks. Our ex vivo organotypic slice culture system provides a long term cellular platform to model Parkinson's disease, allowing for the elucidation of mechanisms involved in dopaminergic neuron degeneration and the capability to study cellular integration and plasticity ex vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. AQP4 expression and its relationship with brain edema after gamma kife radiosurgery in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Guangjian; Xu Minhui; Zou Yongwen; Gen Mingying; Li Feipeng; Tang Wenyuan; Sun Shanquan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore AQP4 expression and its relationship with brain edema after gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) in rats. Methods: Wistar rats were divided into two groups-the control group and experimental group. The experimental group model was established by radiating rat left rotral caudate nucleus with GKRS (100 Gy, 4 mm), and was examinded at interval times of 1 d, 3 d, 7 d, 15 d, 30 d and 45 d. Brain water content (BWC) was determined by wet-dry weighing method. AQP4 expression on mRNA and protein were measured by immunohistochemistry (ICH) and in situ hybridization (ISH). Results: In control group, AQP4 protein and its mRNA were expressed in subpial astrocytes, choroid plexus, ependyma and perivascular astrocytes. After GKRS, AQP4 protein and its mRNA in these sites were enhanced, and became most remarkable at 30 d. The positive corrlationship was showed between AQP4 and its mRNA, and AQP4 and BWC. Conclusions: AQP4 protein and its mRNA can be induced in some brain zone after irradiating rat left rotral caudate nucleus with GKRS. The increased expression of AQP4 and its mRNA may play a role in the ocurrence or development of brain edema after GKRS. (authors)

  9. Combined treatment with progesterone and magnesium sulfate positively affects traumatic brain injury in immature rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Nazan; Baykara, Basak; Kiray, Muge; Cetin, Ferihan; Aksu, Ilkay; Dayi, Ayfer; Gurpinar, Tugba; Ozdemir, Durgul; Arda, M Nuri

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that head trauma results in damage in hippocampal and cortical areas of the brain and impairs cognitive functions. The aim of this study is to explore the neuroprotective effect of combination therapy with magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) and progesterone in the 7-days-old rat pups subjected to contusion injury. Progesterone (8 mg/kg) and MgSO4 (150 mg/kg) were injected intraperitoneally immediately after induction of traumatic brain injury. Half of groups were evaluated 24 hours later, the remaining animals 3 weeks after trauma or sham surgery. Anxiety levels were assessed with open field activity and elevated plus maze; learning and memory performance were evaluated with Morris Water maze in postnatal 27 days. Combined therapy with progesterone and magnesium sulfate significantly attenuated trauma-induced neuronal death, increased brain VEGF levels and improved spatial memory deficits that appear later in life. Brain VEGF levels were higher in rats that received combined therapy compared to rats that received either medication alone. Moreover, rats that received combined therapy had reduced hipocampus and prefrontal cortex apoptosis in the acute period. These results demonstrate that combination of drugs with different mechanisms of action may be preferred in the treatment of head trauma.

  10. Oxidative Stress in the Developing Rat Brain due to Production of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wilhelm, Jiří; Vytášek, Richard; Uhlík, Jiří; Vajner, Luděk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2016, č. 2016 (2016), č. článku 5057610. ISSN 1942-0900 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0298 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : oxidative stress * developing rat brain * lipid peroxidation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.593, year: 2016

  11. Brain scan in cerebral ischemia. An experimental model in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    A rapid embolic method for consistent induction of stroke in the rat is described. Brain scans were performed using a micro-pinhole collimator system, and the value of the model for studies in localization of radiopharmaceuticals in cerebral ischemia is demonstrated

  12. Neuroglobin in the rat brain (II): co-localisation with neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Kelsen, Jesper; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2008-01-01

    In an accompanying article, we found that neuroglobin (Ngb) was expressed in a few well-defined nuclei in the rat brain. Here, we show by use of immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation (ISH) that Ngb co-localise with several specific neurotransmitters. Ngb co-localise consistently with tyr...

  13. 60Co γ-irradiation enhances expression of GAP-43 mRNA in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Bingyin; Cai Wenqin; Zhang Chenggang

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the expression of GAP-43 mRNA and nerve regeneration in rat brain after 60 Co γ-irradiation. Methods: Wistar rats were subjected to whole-body irradiation with 8 Gy 60 Co γ-rays. The expression of GAP-43 was detected by in situ hybridization histochemistry using Dig-cRNA probe. Results: It was found that the expression of GAP-43 mRNA increased in the cerebral cortex, caudate, putamen, globus pallidum, thalamus and hypothalamus one week after 8 Gy 60 Co γ-irradiation. The peak of GAP-43 mRNA expression was observed in the fourth week and then began to decrease but still remained at a higher than normal level. However, it decreased to a low level after 7 weeks. Conclusion: Enhanced expression of GAP-43 mRNA after 60 Co γ-irradiation in rat brain is associated with nerve regeneration and reconstruction of synapse

  14. Effects of low doses of gamma radiation on DNA synthesis in the developing rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerda, H.

    1983-01-01

    Rats of one or ten days of age were irradiated with low doses of gamma radiation, and synthesis of DNA was examined by the incorporation of 3 H-thymidine in the cerebellum and the rest of the brain in vivo. DNA synthesis was depressed in both parts of the brain but the effects were larger in cerebellum. A minimum was found about 10 hours after irradiation in the older rats and later (18 h) in the younger ones. The dose response in 10 day-old rats, was biphasic and showed that cerebellum was more affected. Autoradiographs showed that fewer cells entered the cycle and those synthesizing showed a depressed rate of synthesis. These findings are discussed in relation to induction of cell death. (Auth.)

  15. Soft-food diet induces oxidative stress in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Ayaka; Hori, Norio; Ono, Yumie; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Onozuka, Minoru; Lee, Masaichi Chang-il

    2012-02-02

    Decreased dopamine (DA) release in the hippocampus may be caused by dysfunctional mastication, although the mechanisms involved remain unclear. The present study examined the effects of soft- and hard-food diets on oxidative stress in the brain, and the relationship between these effects and hippocampal DA levels. The present study showed that DA release in the hippocampus was decreased in rats fed a soft-food diet. Electron spin resonance studies using the nitroxyl spin probe 3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl directly demonstrated a high level of oxidative stress in the rat brain due to soft-food diet feeding. In addition, we confirmed that DA directly react with reactive oxygen species such as hydroxyl radical and superoxide. These observations suggest that soft-food diet feeding enhances oxidative stress, which leads to oxidation and a decrease in the release of DA in the hippocampus of rats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Glutamate decarboxylase activity in rat brain during experimental epileptic seizures induced by pilocarpine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netopilova, M; Drsata, J [Department of Biochemical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Charles University, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Haugvicova, R; Kubova, H; Mares, P [Institute of Physiology, Czech Academy of Sciences, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic)

    1998-07-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity was studied rat brain parts in a pilocarpine model of epileptic seizures. An increased enzyme activity was found in hippocampus a cerebellum during the acute phase of seizures, while the cortex and cerebellum showed increased GAD activity in the chronic phase of the process. Systematic administration of pilocarpine to rats induces status epilepticus. The aim of this research was to find out if seizures induced by pilocarpine are connected changes in glutamate decarboxylase activity, the enzyme that catalyzes synthesis of inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. GAD was assayed by means of radiometric method using {sup 14}C-carboxyl-labelled glutamate and measurement of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} radioactivity. Obtained results suggest that pilocarpine seizures are connected with changes of GAD activity in individual parts of rat brain. (authors)

  17. Glutamate decarboxylase activity in rat brain during experimental epileptic seizures induced by pilocarpine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Netopilova, M.; Drsata, J.; Haugvicova, R.; Kubova, H.; Mares, P.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity was studied rat brain parts in a pilocarpine model of epileptic seizures. An increased enzyme activity was found in hippocampus a cerebellum during the acute phase of seizures, while the cortex and cerebellum showed increased GAD activity in the chronic phase of the process. Systematic administration of pilocarpine to rats induces status epilepticus. The aim of this research was to find out if seizures induced by pilocarpine are connected changes in glutamate decarboxylase activity, the enzyme that catalyzes synthesis of inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. GAD was assayed by means of radiometric method using 14 C-carboxyl-labelled glutamate and measurement of 14 CO 2 radioactivity. Obtained results suggest that pilocarpine seizures are connected with changes of GAD activity in individual parts of rat brain. (authors)

  18. The modulatory effect of estradiol benzoate on superoxide dismutase activity in the developing rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejic S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of copper,zinc (CuZn- and manganese (Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD to exogenous estradiol benzoate (EB was investigated in Wistar rats during postnatal brain development. Enzyme activities were measured in samples prepared from brains of rats of both sexes and various ages between 0 and 75 days, treated sc with 0.5 µg EB/100 g body weight in 0.1 ml olive oil/100 g body weight, 48 and 24 h before sacrifice. In females, EB treatment stimulated MnSOD activity on days 0 (66.1%, 8 (72.7% and 15 (81.7%. In males, the stimulatory effect of EB on MnSOD activity on day 0 (113.6% disappeared on day 8 and on days 15 and 45 it became inhibitory (40.3 and 30.5%, respectively. EB had no effect on the other age groups. The stimulatory effect of EB on CuZnSOD activity in newborn females (51.8% changed to an inhibitory effect on day 8 (38.4% and disappeared by day 45 when inhibition was detected again (48.7%. In males, the inhibitory effect on this enzyme was observed on days 0 (45.0% and 15 (28.9%, and then disappeared until day 60 when a stimulatory effect was observed (38.4%. EB treatment had no effect on the other age groups. The sensitivity of MnSOD to estradiol differed significantly between sexes during the neonatal and prepubertal period, whereas it followed a similar pattern thereafter. The sensitivity of CuZnSOD to estradiol differed significantly between sexes during most of the study period. Regression analysis showed that the sensitivity of MnSOD to this estrogen tended to decrease similarly in both sexes, whereas the sensitivity of CuZnSOD showed a significantly different opposite tendency in female and male rats. These are the first reports indicating hormonal modulation of antioxidant enzyme activities related to the developmental process.

  19. Metabolic fate of 13N-labeled ammonia in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, A.J.L.; McDonald, J.M.; Gelbard, A.S.; Gledhill, R.F.; Duffy, T.E.

    1979-01-01

    After infusion of physiological concentrations of [ 13 N]ammonia for 10 min via one internal carotid artery, the relative specific activities of glutamate, glutamine (α-amino), and glutamine (amide) in rat brain were approximately 1:5:400, respectively. Analysis of metabolites, after infusion of [ 13 N]ammonia into one lateral cerebral ventricle, indicated that ammonia entering the brain from the cerebrospinal fluid is also metabolized in a small glutamate pool. Pretreatment with methionine sulfoximine led to a decrease in the label present in brain glutamine following carotid artery infusion of [ 13 N]ammonia. 13 N activity in brain glutamate was greater than in the α-amino group of glutamine. The amount of label recovered in the right cerebral hemisphere, 5 s after a rapid bolus injection of [ 13 N]ammonia via the right common carotid artery, was independent of concentration within the bolus over a 1000-fold range indicating that ammonia enters the brain largely by diffusion. In normal rats approximately 60% of the label recovered in brain was incorporated into glutamine, indicating that the t 1 /sub// 2 for conversion of ammonia to glutamine in the small pool is in the range of 1 to 3 s or less. The data emphasize the importance of the small pool glutamine synthetase as a metabolic trap for the detoxification of blood-borne and endogenously produced brain ammonia. The possibility that the astrocytes represent the anatomical site of the small pool is considered

  20. Methylmercury Causes Blood-Brain Barrier Damage in Rats via Upregulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Takahashi

    Full Text Available Clinical manifestations of methylmercury (MeHg intoxication include cerebellar ataxia, concentric constriction of visual fields, and sensory and auditory disturbances. The symptoms depend on the site of MeHg damage, such as the cerebellum and occipital lobes. However, the underlying mechanism of MeHg-induced tissue vulnerability remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we used a rat model of subacute MeHg intoxication to investigate possible MeHg-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB damage. The model was established by exposing the rats to 20-ppm MeHg for up to 4 weeks; the rats exhibited severe cerebellar pathological changes, although there were no significant differences in mercury content among the different brain regions. BBB damage in the cerebellum after MeHg exposure was confirmed based on extravasation of endogenous immunoglobulin G (IgG and decreased expression of rat endothelial cell antigen-1. Furthermore, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, a potent angiogenic growth factor, increased markedly in the cerebellum and mildly in the occipital lobe following MeHg exposure. VEGF expression was detected mainly in astrocytes of the BBB. Intravenous administration of anti-VEGF neutralizing antibody mildly reduced the rate of hind-limb crossing signs observed in MeHg-exposed rats. In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time that MeHg induces BBB damage via upregulation of VEGF expression at the BBB in vivo. Further studies are required in order to determine whether treatment targeted at VEGF can ameliorate MeHg-induced toxicity.

  1. Pomegranate Alleviates Oxidative Damage and Neurotransmitter Alterations in Rats Brain Exposed to Aluminum Chloride and/or Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Said, U.Z.; EL-Tahawey, N.A.; Elassal, A.A.; Elsayed, E.M.; Shousha, W.Gh.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum and gamma radiation, both are potent neurotoxins and have been implicated in many human neuro degenerative diseases. The present study was designed to investigate the role of pomegranate in alleviating oxidative damage and alteration of neurotransmitters in the brain of rats exposed to aluminum chloride (AlCl 3 ), and/or gamma radiation (IR). The results revealed that rats whole body exposed to γ- rays, (1 Gy/week up to 4 Gy), and/or administered aluminum chloride (35 mg/kg body weight), via gavages for 4 weeks, resulted in brain tissue damage, featuring by significant increase of the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), associated with significant decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities, as well as glutathione (GSH) content indicating occurrence of oxidative stress. A significant decrease of serotonin (5-HT) level associated with a significant increase of 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), in addition to a significant decrease in dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI) contents recorded at the 1st, 7th and 14th day post-irradiation, indicating alterations in the metabolism of brain monoamines. On the other hand, the results exhibited that, supplementation of rats with pomegranate, via gavages, at a dose of 3 ml /kg body weight/ day, for 4 weeks along with AlCl 3 with or without radiation has significantly ameliorated the changes occurred in the mentioned parameters and the values returned close to the normal ones. It could be concluded that pomegranate, by its antioxidant constituents might antagonize brain oxidative damage and minimize the severity of aluminum (Al), and/or radiation-induced neurotransmitters disorders

  2. The effect of electromagnetic radiation on the rat brain: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eser, Olcay; Songur, Ahmet; Aktas, Cevat; Karavelioglu, Ergun; Caglar, Veli; Aylak, Firdevs; Ozguner, Fehmi; Kanter, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the structural changes of electromagnetic waves in the frontal cortex, brain stem and cerebellum. 24 Wistar Albino adult male rats were randomly divided into four groups: group I consisted of control rats, and groups II-IV comprised electromagnetically irradiated (EMR) with 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz. The heads of the rats were exposed to 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz microwaves irradiation for 1h per day for 2 months. While the histopathological changes in the frontal cortex and brain stem were normal in the control group, there were severe degenerative changes, shrunken cytoplasm and extensively dark pyknotic nuclei in the EMR groups. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that the Total Antioxidative Capacity level was significantly decreased in the EMR groups and also Total Oxidative Capacity and Oxidative Stress Index levels were significantly increased in the frontal cortex, brain stem and cerebellum. IL-1β level was significantly increased in the EMR groups in the brain stem. EMR causes to structural changes in the frontal cortex, brain stem and cerebellum and impair the oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine system. This deterioration can cause to disease including loss of these areas function and cancer development.

  3. Changes in Rat Brain Tissue Microstructure and Stiffness during the Development of Experimental Obstructive Hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugé, Lauriane; Pong, Alice C.; Bongers, Andre; Sinkus, Ralph; Bilston, Lynne E.; Cheng, Shaokoon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding neural injury in hydrocephalus and how the brain changes during the course of the disease in-vivo remain unclear. This study describes brain deformation, microstructural and mechanical properties changes during obstructive hydrocephalus development in a rat model using multimodal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Hydrocephalus was induced in eight Sprague-Dawley rats (4 weeks old) by injecting a kaolin suspension into the cisterna magna. Six sham-injected rats were used as controls. MR imaging (9.4T, Bruker) was performed 1 day before, and at 3, 7 and 16 days post injection. T2-weighted MR images were collected to quantify brain deformation. MR elastography was used to measure brain stiffness, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was conducted to observe brain tissue microstructure. Results showed that the enlargement of the ventricular system was associated with a decrease in the cortical gray matter thickness and caudate-putamen cross-sectional area (P hydrocephalus development, increased space between the white matter tracts was observed in the CC+PVWM (P hydrocephalus development. PMID:26848844

  4. Combination cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells for brain stroke in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba; Farahmandnia, Mohammad; Razi, Zahra; Delavari, Somayeh; Shakibajahromi, Benafsheh; Sarvestani, Fatemeh Sabet; Kazemi, Sepehr; Semsar, Maryam

    2015-05-01

    Brain stroke is the second most important events that lead to disability and morbidity these days. Although, stroke is important, there is no treatment for curing this problem. Nowadays, cell therapy has opened a new window for treating central nervous system disease. In some previous studies the Mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells. In this study, we have designed an experiment to assess the combination cell therapy (Mesenchymal and Neural stem cells) effects on brain stroke. The Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adult rat bone marrow and the neural stem cells were isolated from ganglion eminence of rat embryo 14 days. The Mesenchymal stem cells were injected 1 day after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and the neural stem cells transplanted 7 day after MCAO. After 28 days, the neurological outcomes and brain lesion volumes were evaluated. Also, the activity of Caspase 3 was assessed in different groups. The group which received combination cell therapy had better neurological examination and less brain lesion. Also the combination cell therapy group had the least Caspase 3 activity among the groups. The combination cell therapy is more effective than Mesenchymal stem cell therapy and neural stem cell therapy separately in treating the brain stroke in rats.

  5. Fetal hypothalamic transplants into brain irradiated rats: Graft morphometry and host behavioral responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearlman, S.H.; Rubin, P.; White, H.C.; Wiegand, S.J.; Gash, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that neural implants can ameliorate or prevent some of the long-term changes associated with CNS irradiation. Using a rat model, the initial study focused on establishing motor, regulatory, and morphological changes associated with brain radiation treatments. Secondly, fetal hypothalamic tissue grafts were placed into the third ventricle of rats which had been previously irradiated. Adult male Long Evans rats received one of three radiation doses (15, 22.5, ampersand 30 Gy) or no radiation. Three days after irradiation, 7 animals in each dose group received an embryonic day 17 hypothalamic graft into the third ventricle while the remaining 8-9 animals in each group received injections of vehicle solution (sham). Few changes were observed in the 15 and 22.5 Gy animals, however rats in the 30 Gy treatment group showed stereotypic and ambulatory behavioral hyperactivity 32 weeks after irradiation. Regulatory changes in the high dose group included decreased growth rate and decreased urine osmolalities, but these measures were extremely variable among animals. Morphological results demonstrated that 30 Gy irradiated animals showed extensive necrosis primarily in the fimbria, which extended into the internal capsule, optic nerve, hippocampus, and thalamus. Hemorrhages were found in the hippocampus, thalamus, and fimbria. Defects in the blood-brain barrier also were evident by entry of intravascularly injected horseradish peroxidase into the parenchyma of the brain. Animals in the 30 Gy grafted group showed fewer behavioral changes and less brain damage than their sham grafted counterparts. Specifically, activity measures were comparable to normal levels, and a dilute urine was not found in the 30 Gy implanted rats. Morphological changes support these behavioral results since only two 30 Gy implanted rats showed necrosis

  6. Fast and Accurate Rat Head Motion Tracking With Point Sources for Awake Brain PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Alan; Staelens, Steven; Stroobants, Sigrid; Verhaeghe, Jeroen

    2017-07-01

    To avoid the confounding effects of anesthesia and immobilization stress in rat brain positron emission tomography (PET), motion tracking-based unrestrained awake rat brain imaging is being developed. In this paper, we propose a fast and accurate rat headmotion tracking method based on small PET point sources. PET point sources (3-4) attached to the rat's head are tracked in image space using 15-32-ms time frames. Our point source tracking (PST) method was validated using a manually moved microDerenzo phantom that was simultaneously tracked with an optical tracker (OT) for comparison. The PST method was further validated in three awake [ 18 F]FDG rat brain scans. Compared with the OT, the PST-based correction at the same frame rate (31.2 Hz) reduced the reconstructed FWHM by 0.39-0.66 mm for the different tested rod sizes of the microDerenzo phantom. The FWHM could be further reduced by another 0.07-0.13 mm when increasing the PST frame rate (66.7 Hz). Regional brain [ 18 F]FDG uptake in the motion corrected scan was strongly correlated ( ) with that of the anesthetized reference scan for all three cases ( ). The proposed PST method allowed excellent and reproducible motion correction in awake in vivo experiments. In addition, there is no need of specialized tracking equipment or additional calibrations to be performed, the point sources are practically imperceptible to the rat, and PST is ideally suitable for small bore scanners, where optical tracking might be challenging.

  7. Effects Of Amitryptilin Administration on Rat Sera and Brain Beta-endorphins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radivoj Jadrić

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to establish the influence of antidepressive drugs on serum and brain beta-endorphins in experimental animals. Experiment was performed on albino Wistar rats. Antidepressant amitryptiline was used, and for quantification of sera and brain beta-endorphins RIA technique. Our results showed difference between sera and brain beta-endorphins concentration in amitryptiline pretreated animals, vs. those in serum and brain of control group treated with 0.95% NaCl. This study shows that use of psychoactive drugs have influence on sera and brain beta-endorphins concentration. Beta-endorphins could be of great importance, used as markers for evaluation of antidepressant drug effects.

  8. Cholecystokinin receptors: Biochemical demonstration and autoradiographical localization in rat brain and pancreas using [3H] cholecystokinin8 as radioligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dijk, A.; Richards, J.G.; Trzeciak, A.; Gillessen, D.; Moehler, H.

    1984-01-01

    Since cholecystokinin8 (CCK8) seems to be the physiological ligand of CCK receptors in the brain, it would be the most suitable probe for the characterization of CCK receptors in radioligand binding studies. [ 3 H]CCK8 was synthetized with a specific radioactivity sufficient for the detection of high affinity binding sites. [ 3 H]CCK8 binds saturably and reversibly to distinct sites in rat brain and pancreas with nanomolar affinity. While the C-terminal tetrapeptide of CCK is the minimal structure required for nanomolar affinity in the brain, the entire octapeptide sequence is required for binding affinity in pancreas. Desulfated CCK8 and several gastrin-I peptides, which are likewise unsulfated, show virtually no affinity to the binding sites in pancreas but high affinity in cerebral cortex. The ligand specificity of the CCK peptides corresponds to their electrophysiological potency in the brain and their stimulation of secretion in pancreas, respectively. Autoradiographically, high densities of [ 3 H]CCK8 binding sites were found in cerebral cortex and olfactory bulb, medium levels in nucleus accumbens, hippocampus, dentate gyrus, and striatum with virtually no labeling in cerebellum. This pattern is similar to the distribution of CCK-like immunoreactivity in the brain. In pancreas, equally high levels of [ 3 H]CCK8 labeling were found in the exocrine and endocrine region. [ 3 H]CCK8 binding sites differ from those identified previously with [ 125 I]Bolton-Hunter-CCK33 by their sensitivity to guanyl nucleotides in the brain, their ion dependency in the brain, and pancreas, and their different autoradiographical localization in some parts of the brain. The distribution of CCK binding sites labeled with [ 3 H]CCK8 appears to correlate better with the CCK immunoreactivity than those labeled with [ 125 I]Bolton-Hunter-CCK33. Thus, [ 3 H]CCK8 appears to be the radioligand of choice for the investigation of CCK receptors

  9. Differential metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal in liver, lung and brain of mice and rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Ruijin; Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Mishin, Vladimir; Richardson, Jason R.; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The lipid peroxidation end-product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is generated in tissues during oxidative stress. As a reactive aldehyde, it forms Michael adducts with nucleophiles, a process that disrupts cellular functioning. Liver, lung and brain are highly sensitive to xenobiotic-induced oxidative stress and readily generate 4-HNE. In the present studies, we compared 4-HNE metabolism in these tissues, a process that protects against tissue injury. 4-HNE was degraded slowly in total homogenates and S9 fractions of mouse liver, lung and brain. In liver, but not lung or brain, NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H markedly stimulated 4-HNE metabolism. Similar results were observed in rat S9 fractions from these tissues. In liver, lung and brain S9 fractions, 4-HNE formed protein adducts. When NADH was used to stimulate 4-HNE metabolism, the formation of protein adducts was suppressed in liver, but not lung or brain. In both mouse and rat tissues, 4-HNE was also metabolized by glutathione S-transferases. The greatest activity was noted in livers of mice and in lungs of rats; relatively low glutathione S-transferase activity was detected in brain. In mouse hepatocytes, 4-HNE was rapidly taken up and metabolized. Simultaneously, 4-HNE-protein adducts were formed, suggesting that 4-HNE metabolism in intact cells does not prevent protein modifications. These data demonstrate that, in contrast to liver, lung and brain have a limited capacity to metabolize 4-HNE. The persistence of 4-HNE in these tissues may increase the likelihood of tissue injury during oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Lipid peroxidation generates 4-hydroxynonenal, a highly reactive aldehyde. • Rodent liver, but not lung or brain, is efficient in degrading 4-hydroxynonenal. • 4-hydroxynonenal persists in tissues with low metabolism, causing tissue damage

  10. Differential metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal in liver, lung and brain of mice and rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ruijin; Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Mishin, Vladimir [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University-Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Richardson, Jason R. [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers University-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Science, School of Health Sciences and Practice, New York Medical College