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Sample records for rat brain capillary

  1. Ultrastructural localization of cholinergic muscarinic receptors in rat brain cortical capillaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, PGM; deJong, GI; VanderZee, EA; vanDijken, H; Dijken, H. van

    1996-01-01

    Cholinergic innervation of the cerebrovasculature is known to regulate vascular tone, perfusion rate and permeability of the microvascular wall. Notably the cholinergic innervation of cerebral capillaries is of interest since these capillaries form the blood-brain barrier. Although there is a genera

  2. Calcium antagonists decrease capillary wall damage in aging hypertensive rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farkas, E.; de Jong, G.I.; Apro, E.; Keuker, J.I.H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Chronic hypertension during aging is a serious threat to the cerebral vasculature. The larger brain arteries can react to hypertension with an abnormal wall thickening, a loss of elasticity and a narrowed lumen. However, little is known about the hypertension-induced alterations of cerebral capillar

  3. In-capillary derivatization and capillary electrophoresis separation of amino acid neurotransmitters from brain microdialysis samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoroy, Luc; Parrot, Sandrine; Renaud, Louis; Renaud, Bernard; Zimmer, Luc

    2008-09-26

    A new in-capillary derivatization method with naphtalene-2,3-dicarboxyaldehyde (NDA)/CN(-) has been developed for capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection of brain microdialysate amino acids. Samples are sandwiched between two plugs of reagent mixture at the capillary inlet and subsequently separated. Highest derivatization yields are obtained by using a reagent to sample plug length ratio equal to 4, performing a first electrophoretic mixing followed by a zero potential amplification step before applying the separation voltage and using a NaCN to NDA concentration ratio equal to 1. This new single-step methodology allows the analysis of amino acid neurotransmitters in rat brain microdialysis samples.

  4. High temporal resolution for in vivo monitoring of neurotransmitters in awake epileptic rats using brain microdialysis and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrot, Sandrine; Sauvinet, Valérie; Riban, Véronique; Depaulis, Antoine; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2004-12-30

    A method for high temporal resolution monitoring of five neurotransmitters, dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), l-aspartate (L-Asp), in freely-moving rats using microdialysis and capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIFD) was developed. An on-line device, including microdialysis and derivatization with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde, mixes the dialysate with derivatization reagents directly in the collection tube, i.e. with no reactor. Thereafter, collected derivatized samples are analyzed off-line with an automated CE system coupled to a LIFD using a 442 nm excitation. The sampling time was limited by the minimal volume required for the analysis by the automated CE system used: neurotransmitters could be determined in 667 nl dialysates (940 nl after derivatization), i.e. in samples collected every 20 s with a flow rate of 2 microl/min. The detection limits at the dialysis probe were 3 x 10(-9), 1 x 10(-9), 1.9 x 10(-8), 4.2 x 10(-7), 2.1 x 10(-7) mol/l for DA, NA, GABA, Glu and L-Asp, respectively. The protocol was validated using in vitro/in vivo tests and the performances--repeatability, linearity, characteristics of the probes--were determined. Finally, the high temporal resolution allowed the simultaneous monitoring of these neurotransmitters in rats with genetic absence epilepsy and revealed, for the first time, increases in GABA concentrations concomitantly with the seizures, detected when our new microdialysis method was combined to electroencephalographic recordings.

  5. Down-regulation of selected Blood-brain Barrier Specific Genes from Capillaries to Bovine In Vitro Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Charlotte Goldeman; Saaby, Lasse; Brodin, Birger

    the in vivo gene expression of brain capillary endothelial cells. Primary bovine endothelial cells and rat astrocytes were cultured in different culture configurations and the mRNA expression of selected genes (vWF, Glut-1, P-gp, claudin-1,-5, occludin, JAM-1, LAT-1, SLC16A1, MRP-1,-4, BCRP, ZO-1, AP, TPA...

  6. Distribution of anionic sites on the capillary endothelium in an experimental brain tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, S; DePace, D; Finkelstein, S

    1988-02-01

    The distribution of anionic domains on the capillary endothelium of experimental brain tumors was determined using cationic ferritin (CF) in order to ascertain whether the pattern of these domains is different from that on normal cerebral capillaries. Tumors were induced by stereotaxic injection of cultured neoplastic glial cells, A15A5, into the caudate nucleus of Sprague-Dawley rats. Following a 14-21 day growth period tumors appeared as vascularized, sharply circumscribed masses which caused compression of the surrounding brain tissue. Anionic domains were distributed in a patchy and irregular pattern on the luminal plasma membrane of the endothelia of blood vessels in the tumors. Some variability in this pattern was observed infrequently in limited regions of the tumor where there was either a continuous layer of CF or an absence of CF binding. Plasmalemmal vesicles, coated vesicles, coated pits, multivesicular bodies, and some junctional complexes showed varying degrees of labeling with the probe. Capillaries in the tumor periphery and normal cerebral vessels showed a uniform distribution of anionic groups. These results indicate that there is an altered surface charge on the endothelial luminal plasma membrane of blood vessels in brain tumors. A correlation may exist between the altered surface charge and the degree to which the blood-brain barrier is impaired in these vessels.

  7. 大鼠液压脑损伤后皮层微血管改变与脑水肿的关系%Association of the changes of cortical capillaries with brain edema after lateral fluid percussion brain injury in adult rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马迎辉; 刘绍明; 邢国祥

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨大鼠液压脑损伤后皮层微血管损伤情况及其与伤后脑水肿的关系.方法 成年SD大鼠30只,随机分为正常组(n=6)、假手术组(n=6)、损伤组(n=18),其中损伤组分为伤后6h、24 h、72 h三亚组,每亚组6只.利用液压冲击法建立大鼠颅脑损伤模型,显微镜下观察直接损伤侧和非直接损伤侧皮层微血管损伤情况,CD34标记血管内皮细胞评价血管密度改变,干湿重法检测脑组织含水量的变化.结果 大鼠皮层微血管损伤后6h可见血管支行迂曲、扩张、充血,伤后24 h可见少量血栓形成,损伤后72 h可见有较多血栓形成.损伤组CD34阳性细胞数明显低于假手术组和对照组(P<0.05),而脑组织含水量明显高于假手术组和对照组(P<0.05),而后两组无统计学差异(P>0.05).损伤组直接损伤侧皮层微血管损伤较非直接损伤组严重,而且伤后24h较伤后6、72 h严重.结论 颅脑损伤后脑微血管损伤为全脑性血管损伤,这可能是伤后脑水肿形成的机制之一.%Objective To investigate the changes of the cortical capillaries and brain edema after lateral fluid percussion brain injury in adult rat and their relationship.Methods Thirty adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups,i.e.,normal group (n=6),sham-operated group (n=6) and injured group (n=18).The rat model was made by lateral fluid percussion brain injury with an impact of 2.3 kPa.The rats in injured group were killed 6,24 and 72 hours after injury with six rats in each time point.The pathological changes of cerebral tissues were detected by HE staining.The changes of cortical capillaries were evaluated by counting the number of CD34 marked vascular endothelial cells.The brain water content was calculated by wet and dry method.Results The HE staining showed that many cortical capillaries with no congestion and endothelial cells with normal shape could be seen in normal group and sham-operated group

  8. Flow distributions and spatial correlations in human brain capillary networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorthois, Sylvie; Peyrounette, Myriam; Larue, Anne; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-11-01

    The vascular system of the human brain cortex is composed of a space filling mesh-like capillary network connected upstream and downstream to branched quasi-fractal arterioles and venules. The distribution of blood flow rates in these networks may affect the efficiency of oxygen transfer processes. Here, we investigate the distribution and correlation properties of blood flow velocities from numerical simulations in large 3D human intra-cortical vascular network (10000 segments) obtained from an anatomical database. In each segment, flow is solved from a 1D non-linear model taking account of the complex rheological properties of blood flow in microcirculation to deduce blood pressure, blood flow and red blood cell volume fraction distributions throughout the network. The network structural complexity is found to impart broad and spatially correlated Lagrangian velocity distributions, leading to power law transit time distributions. The origins of this behavior (existence of velocity correlations in capillary networks, influence of the coupling with the feeding arterioles and draining veins, topological disorder, complex blood rheology) are studied by comparison with results obtained in various model capillary networks of controlled disorder. ERC BrainMicroFlow GA615102, ERC ReactiveFronts GA648377.

  9. Barrier Functionality of Porcine and Bovine Brain Capillary Endothelial Cells

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    Ailar Nakhlband

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To date, isolated cell based blood-brain barrier (BBB models have been widely used for brain drug delivery and targeting, due to their relatively proper bioelectrical and permeability properties. However, primary cultures of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs isolated from different species vary in terms of bioelectrical and permeability properties. Methods: To pursue this, in the current investigation, primary porcine and bovine BCECs (PBCECs and BBCECs, respectively were isolated and used as an in vitro BBB model. The bioelectrical and permeability properties were assessed in BCECs co-cultured with C6 cells with/without hydrocortisone (550 nM. The bioelectrical properties were further validated by means of the permeability coefficients of transcellular and paracellular markers. Results: The primary PBCECs displayed significantly higher trans-endothelial electrical resistance (~900 W.cm2 than BBCECs (~700 W.cm2 - both co-cultured with C6 cells in presence of hydrocortisone. Permeability coefficients of propranolol/diazepam and mannitol/sucrose in PBCECs were ~21 and ~2 (×10-6 cm.sec-1, where these values for BBCECs were ~25 and ~5 (×10-6 cm.sec-1. Conclusion: Upon our bioelectrical and permeability findings, both models display discriminative barrier functionality but porcine BCECs seem to provide a better platform than bovine BCECs for drug screening and brain targeting.

  10. Irradiation of rat brain reduces P-glycoprotein expression and function

    OpenAIRE

    Bart, J.; Nagengast, W B; Coppes, R P; Wegman, T D; van der Graaf, W T A; Groen, H J M; Vaalburg, W; de Vries, E G E; Hendrikse, N.H.

    2007-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) hampers delivery of several drugs including chemotherapeutics to the brain. The drug efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp), expressed on brain capillary endothelial cells, is part of the BBB. P-gp expression on capillary endothelium decreases 5 days after brain irradiation, which may reduce P-gp function and increase brain levels of P-gp substrates. To elucidate whether radiation therapy reduces P-gp expression and function in the brain, right hemispheres of rats wer...

  11. Alteration of water-soluble S-100 protein content in microembolized rat brain.

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    Harada,Yasuhiro

    1982-12-01

    Full Text Available The amount of S-100 protein in rat brain embolized with carbon microspheres decreased in parallel with the development of cerebral edema as judged by water content, recovering to the normal range by 24h after embolization. These results suggest the participation of S-100 protein in the permeability characterisitics of nervous system capillaries known as the blood-brain barrier.

  12. Scaling of brain metabolism and blood flow in relation to capillary and neural scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Brain is one of the most energy demanding organs in mammals, and its total metabolic rate scales with brain volume raised to a power of around 5/6. This value is significantly higher than the more common exponent 3/4 relating whole body resting metabolism with body mass and several other physiological variables in animals and plants. This article investigates the reasons for brain allometric distinction on a level of its microvessels. Based on collected empirical data it is found that regional cerebral blood flow CBF across gray matter scales with cortical volume V as CBF ~ V(-1/6), brain capillary diameter increases as V(1/12), and density of capillary length decreases as V(-1/6). It is predicted that velocity of capillary blood is almost invariant (~V(ε)), capillary transit time scales as V(1/6), capillary length increases as V(1/6+ε), and capillary number as V(2/3-ε), where ε is typically a small correction for medium and large brains, due to blood viscosity dependence on capillary radius. It is shown that the amount of capillary length and blood flow per cortical neuron are essentially conserved across mammals. These results indicate that geometry and dynamics of global neuro-vascular coupling have a proportionate character. Moreover, cerebral metabolic, hemodynamic, and microvascular variables scale with allometric exponents that are simple multiples of 1/6, rather than 1/4, which suggests that brain metabolism is more similar to the metabolism of aerobic than resting body. Relation of these findings to brain functional imaging studies involving the link between cerebral metabolism and blood flow is also discussed.

  13. Scaling of brain metabolism and blood flow in relation to capillary and neural scaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Karbowski

    Full Text Available Brain is one of the most energy demanding organs in mammals, and its total metabolic rate scales with brain volume raised to a power of around 5/6. This value is significantly higher than the more common exponent 3/4 relating whole body resting metabolism with body mass and several other physiological variables in animals and plants. This article investigates the reasons for brain allometric distinction on a level of its microvessels. Based on collected empirical data it is found that regional cerebral blood flow CBF across gray matter scales with cortical volume V as CBF ~ V(-1/6, brain capillary diameter increases as V(1/12, and density of capillary length decreases as V(-1/6. It is predicted that velocity of capillary blood is almost invariant (~V(ε, capillary transit time scales as V(1/6, capillary length increases as V(1/6+ε, and capillary number as V(2/3-ε, where ε is typically a small correction for medium and large brains, due to blood viscosity dependence on capillary radius. It is shown that the amount of capillary length and blood flow per cortical neuron are essentially conserved across mammals. These results indicate that geometry and dynamics of global neuro-vascular coupling have a proportionate character. Moreover, cerebral metabolic, hemodynamic, and microvascular variables scale with allometric exponents that are simple multiples of 1/6, rather than 1/4, which suggests that brain metabolism is more similar to the metabolism of aerobic than resting body. Relation of these findings to brain functional imaging studies involving the link between cerebral metabolism and blood flow is also discussed.

  14. Internalization of targeted quantum dots by brain capillary endothelial cells in vivo.

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    Paris-Robidas, Sarah; Brouard, Danny; Emond, Vincent; Parent, Martin; Calon, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Receptors located on brain capillary endothelial cells forming the blood-brain barrier are the target of most brain drug delivery approaches. Yet, direct subcellular evidence of vectorized transport of nanoformulations into the brain is lacking. To resolve this question, quantum dots were conjugated to monoclonal antibodies (Ri7) targeting the murine transferrin receptor. Specific transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis of Ri7-quantum dots was first confirmed in N2A and bEnd5 cells. After intravenous injection in mice, Ri7-quantum dots exhibited a fourfold higher volume of distribution in brain tissues, compared to controls. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that Ri7-quantum dots were sequestered throughout the cerebral vasculature 30 min, 1 h, and 4 h post injection, with a decline of signal intensity after 24 h. Transmission electron microscopic studies confirmed that Ri7-quantum dots were massively internalized by brain capillary endothelial cells, averaging 37 ± 4 Ri7-quantum dots/cell 1 h after injection. Most quantum dots within brain capillary endothelial cells were observed in small vesicles (58%), with a smaller proportion detected in tubular structures or in multivesicular bodies. Parenchymal penetration of Ri7-quantum dots was extremely low and comparable to control IgG. Our results show that systemically administered Ri7-quantum dots complexes undergo extensive endocytosis by brain capillary endothelial cells and open the door for novel therapeutic approaches based on brain endothelial cell drug delivery.

  15. Effect of Artemisia capillaries on Gene Expression of Lipid Metabolism in Rat

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    Woo-Seok Jang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective :The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of Artemisia capillaries on gene expression of lipid metabolism in rats. Method :The author performed several experimental items to analyze the total cholesterol and triglyceride in liver tissue, the gene expressions of CYP7A1 and HMG-CoA reductase. Results :1. In Artemisia capillaries group, the levels of total cholesterol in liver tissue were significantly decreased. 2. In Artemisia capillaries group, the ratios of CYP7A1, HMG-CoA reductase were as same as the normal group. Conclusion :From the above results, Artemisia capillaries can be used to treat hyperlipidemia.

  16. Abnormalities in the Fiber Composition and Capillary Architecture in the Soleus Muscle of Type 2 Diabetic Goto-Kakizaki Rats

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    Shinichiro Murakami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus is linked to impaired skeletal muscle glucose uptake and storage. This study aimed to investigate the fiber type distributions and the three-dimensional (3D architecture of the capillary network in the skeletal muscles of type 2 diabetic rats. Muscle fiber type transformation, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH activity, capillary density, and 3D architecture of the capillary network in the soleus muscle were determined in 36-week-old Goto-Kakizaki (GK rats as an animal model of nonobese type 2 diabetes and age-matched Wistar (Cont rats. Although the soleus muscle of Cont rats comprised both type I and type IIA fibers, the soleus muscle of GK rats had only type I fibers. In addition, total SDH activity in the soleus muscle of GK rats was significantly lower than that in Cont rats because GK rats had no high-SDH activity type IIA fiber in the soleus muscle. Furthermore, the capillary diameter, capillary tortuosity, and microvessel volume in GK rats were significantly lower than those in Cont rats. These results indicate that non-obese diabetic GK rats have muscle fiber type transformation, low SDH activity, and reduced skeletal muscle capillary content, which may be related to the impaired glucose metabolism characteristic of type 2 diabetes.

  17. Properties of the microcirculation in capillary bundles of rat spinotrapezius muscle fascia

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    Jacobitz, Frank; Engebrecht, Cheryn; Metzger, Ian; Porterfield, Colin

    2006-11-01

    Properties of the microcirculation in capillary bundles of rat spinotrapezius muscle fascia are investigated using microscope observations, empirical modeling, and numerical simulations. Capillary bundles consist of a network of feeding arterioles, draining venules, and capillary vessels. A dozen samples of muscle fascia tissue were prepared for microscope observation. The chosen method of preparation allows for the long-term preservation of the tissue samples for future studies. Capillary bundles are photographed under a microscope with 40x magnification. From the images, the microvasculature of the tissue samples is reconstructed. It was found, for example, that the distribution of vessel length in a capillary bundle follows a log-normal law. In addition to a statistical analysis of the vessel data, the network topology is used for numerical simulations of the flow in the capillary bundles. The numerical approach uses a sparse-matrix solver and it considers vessel elasticity and blood rheology. The numerical simulations show, for example, a strong pressure drop across the capillary vessels of the bundle.

  18. [Effect of tobacco smoke on permeability of capillary of pregnant and non-pregnant rats].

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    Florek, Tewa; Ignatowicz, Ewa; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Wachowiak, Anna; Wrzosek, Jagna

    2006-01-01

    From among 4200 chemical compounds contained in the tobacco smoke, nicotine and carbon monoxide are responsible for changes in the heart-vessel system to the greatest extent. Additionally, other toxic compounds, including the carcinogenic ones, have a significant impact on the biological activity in the tissues of blood vessels. A particularly complex picture of the detrimental impact of the tobacco smoke is presented in case of pregnant women, fetuses and newborns. The aim of the research was to assess the impact of tobacco smoke on the permeability of capillaries in different tissues of rats (lungs, brain, liver, kidneys) and testing of the potentially protective impact of rutine (3-rutinozide of quercetin). The research on the permeability of capillaries has been carried out applying Evans blue. The animals were divided into 8 research groups: pregnant animals--"control", "rutine", "tobacco smoke", "rutine+tobacco smoke", and non-pregnant animals--"control", "rutine", "tobacco smoke", "rutine+tobacco smoke". In the first stage of research (pregnant, non-pregnant-- groups: "rutine" and "rutine+tobacco smoke"), the water rutine solution in a dose of 40 mg/kg of body weight was administered. The non-pregnant and pregnant animals from groups "tobacco smoke" and "rutine+tobacco smoke" were exposed to tobacco smoke via inhalation (1500 mg CO/m3 of air) for 21 days. All the animals were injected with the water Evans blue solution in a dose of 30 mg/kg of body weight. After 30 minutes, the animals were killed by cutting the abdominal aorta, and lungs, brain, liver and kidneys were taken for further testing. The cotinine in the urine was determined by the HPLC method, using norephedrine as the internal standard, after the preceding extraction by means of the liquid-liquid technique. The concentration of cotinine in case of non-pregnant and pregnant females was respectively 11.8 +/- 1.9 pg/ml of urine and 12.0 +/- 2.5 microg/ml of urine. In case of the rats, which

  19. Coincident expression and distribution of melanotransferrin and transferrin receptor in human brain capillary endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberger, S; Food, M R; Gabathuler, R; Kennard, M L; Yamada, T; Yasuhara, O; McGeer, P L; Jefferies, W A

    1996-03-11

    One method of iron transport across the blood brain barrier (BBB) involves the transferrin receptor (TR), which is localized to the specialized brain capillary endothelium. The melanotransferrin (MTf) molecule, also called p97, has been widely described as a melanoma specific molecule, however, its expression in brain tissues has not been addressed. MTf has a high level of sequence homology to transferrin (Tf) and lactoferrin, but is unusual because it predominantly occurs as a membrane bound, glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored molecule, but can also occur as a soluble form. We have recently demonstrated that GPI-anchored MTf provides a novel route for cellular iron uptake which is independent of Tf and its receptor. Here we consider whether MTf may have a role in the transport of iron across the BBB. The distributions of MTf, Tf and the TR were studied immunohistochemically in human brain tissues. The distributions of MTf and TR were remarkably similar, and quite different from that of Tf. In all brain tissues examined, MTf and the TR were highly localized to capillary endothelium, while Tf itself was mainly localized to glial cells. These data suggest that MTf may play a role in iron transport within the human brain.

  20. Simultaneous determination of vigabatrin and amino acid neurotransmitters in brain microdialysates by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

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    Benturquia, Nadia; Parrot, Sandrine; Sauvinet, Valérie; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2004-07-01

    Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIFD) coupled to in vivo microdialysis sampling was used in order to monitor simultaneously a drug and several neurotransmitters in the brain extracellular fluid. Determination of the antiepileptic drug vigabatrin and the amino acid neurotransmitters glutamate (Glu), l-aspartate (l-Asp) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was performed on low-concentration samples which were derivatized with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA) and separated using a pH 9.2 75 mM sodium borate running buffer containing 60 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and 5mM hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD). Glu, l-Asp and vigabatrin derivatized at a concentration of 1.0 x 10(-9) M, and GABA derivatized at a concentration of 5.0 x 10(-9) M, produced peaks with signal-to-noise ratios of 8:1, 8:1, 4:1 and 5:1, respectively. The nature of the neurotransmitter peaks found in rat brain microdialysates was confirmed by both electrophoretic and pharmacological validations. This method was used for monitoring vigabatrin and amino acid neurotransmitters in microdialysates from the rat striatum during intracerebral infusion of the drug and revealed rapid vigabatrin-induced changes in GABA and Glu levels. This original application of CE-LIFD coupled to microdialysis represents a powerful tool for pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic investigations.

  1. Temporal profile of rat skeletal muscle capillary haemodynamics during recovery from contractions

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    Ferreira, Leonardo F; Padilla, Danielle J; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2006-01-01

    In skeletal muscle capillaries, red blood cell (RBC) flux (FRBC), velocity (VRBC) and haematocrit (HctCAP) are key determinants of microvascular O2 exchange. However, the mechanisms leading to the changes in FRBC, VRBC and HctCAP during muscle contractions and recovery thereafter are not fully understood. To address this issue we used intravital microscopy to investigate the temporal profile of the rat spinotrapezius muscle (n = 5) capillary haemodynamics during recovery from 3 min of twitch muscle contractions (1 Hz, 4–6 V). Specifically, we hypothesized that (1) during early recovery FRBC and VRBC would decrease rapidly and FRBC would display a biphasic response (consistent with a muscle pump effect on capillary haemodynamics), and (2) there would be a dynamic relationship between changes (Δ) in VRBC and HctCAP. The values at rest (R) and end-recovery (ER) were significantly lower (P 0.05). Based on the early decrease in FRBC(within 5 s), overall dynamic profile of FRBC and the ∼20 s ‘delay’ to the decrease in VRBC we conclude that the muscle pump does not appear to contribute substantially to the steady-state capillary haemodynamics in the contracting rat spinotrapezius muscle. Moreover, our findings suggest that alterations in VRBC do not obligate proportional changes in HctCAP within individual capillaries following muscle contractions. PMID:16581868

  2. Ultrastructure and histochemistry of rat myocardial capillary endothelial cells in response to diabetes and hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ludmila OKRUHLICOVA; Narcis TRIBULOVA; Peter WEISMANN; Ruzena SOTNIKOVA

    2005-01-01

    Insufficient growth and rarefaction of capillaries,followed by endothelial dysfunction may represent one of the most critical mechanisms involved in heart damage.In this study we examined histochemical and ultrastructural changes in myocardial capillary endothelium in two models of heart failure streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus (STZ) and NOdeficient hypertension in male Wistar rats.Diabetes was induced by a single i.v.dose of STZ (45 mg/kg) and chronic 9-week stage was analysed.To induce NO-deficient hypertension,animals were treated with inhibitor of NO synthase Lnitroarginine methylester (L-NAME) (40 mg/kg) for 4 weeks.Left ventricular tissue was processed for enzyme catalytic histochemistry of capillary alkaline phosphatase (AlPh),dipeptidyl peptidase Ⅳ (DPP Ⅳ),and endothelial NO synthase/NADPH-diaphorase (NOS) and for ultrastructural analysis.In diabetic and hypertensive rats,lower/absent AlPh and DPP Ⅳ activities were found in focal micro-areas.NOS activity was significantly reduced and persisted only locally.Quantitative evaluation demonstrated reduction of reaction product intensity of AlPh,DPP and NOS by 49.50%,74.36%,20.05% in diabetic and 62.93%,82.71%,37.65% in hypertensive rats.Subcellular alterations of endothelial cells were found in heart of both groups suggesting injury of capillary function as well as compensatory processes.Endothelial injury was more significant in diabetic animals,in contrast the adaptation was more evident in hypertensive ones.Concluding: both STZ-induced diabetes- and NO-deficient hypertension-related cardiomyopathy were accompanied by similar features of structural remodelling of cardiac capillary network manifested as angiogenesis and angiopathy.The latter was however,predominant and may accelerate disappearance of capillary endothelium contributing to myocardial dysfunction.

  3. In vitro discrimination of the role of LRP1 at the BBB cellular level: focus on brain capillary endothelial cells and brain pericytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Pietra; Saint-Pol, Julien; Kuntz, Mélanie; Boucau, Marie-Christine; Lamartiniere, Yordenca; Gosselet, Fabien; Fenart, Laurence

    2015-01-12

    Several studies have demonstrated that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) (dynamic cellular complex composed by brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) and surrounded by astrocytic end feet and pericytes) regulates the exchanges of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide between the blood and the brain. Deregulation of these exchanges seems to be a key trigger for the brain accumulation of Aβ peptide observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whereas the involvement of receptor for advanced glycation end-products in Aβ peptide transcytosis has been demonstrated in our laboratory, low-density lipoprotein receptor's role at the cellular level needs to be clarified. For this, we used an in vitro BBB model that consists of a co-culture of bovine BCECs and rat glial cells. This model has already been used to characterize low-density lipoprotein receptor-related peptide (LRP)'s involvement in the transcytosis of molecules such as tPA and angiopep-2. Our results suggest that Aβ peptide efflux across the BCEC monolayer involves a transcellular transport. However, the experiments with RAP discard an involvement of LRP family members at BCECs level. In contrast, our results show a strong transcriptional expression of LRP1 in pericytes and suggest its implication in Aβ endocytosis. Moreover, the observations of pericytes contraction and local downregulation of LRP1 in response to Aβ treatment opens up perspectives for studying this cell type with respect to Aβ peptide metabolism and AD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Uptake mechanism of ApoE-modified nanoparticles on brain capillary endothelial cells as a blood-brain barrier model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Wagner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The blood-brain barrier (BBB represents an insurmountable obstacle for most drugs thus obstructing an effective treatment of many brain diseases. One solution for overcoming this barrier is a transport by binding of these drugs to surface-modified nanoparticles. Especially apolipoprotein E (ApoE appears to play a major role in the nanoparticle-mediated drug transport across the BBB. However, at present the underlying mechanism is incompletely understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, the uptake of the ApoE-modified nanoparticles into the brain capillary endothelial cells was investigated to differentiate between active and passive uptake mechanism by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, different in vitro co-incubation experiments were performed with competing ligands of the respective receptor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study confirms an active endocytotic uptake mechanism and shows the involvement of low density lipoprotein receptor family members, notably the low density lipoprotein receptor related protein, on the uptake of the ApoE-modified nanoparticles into the brain capillary endothelial cells. This knowledge of the uptake mechanism of ApoE-modified nanoparticles enables future developments to rationally create very specific and effective carriers to overcome the blood-brain barrier.

  5. Microdialysis monitoring of catecholamines and excitatory amino acids in the rat and mouse brain: recent developments based on capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection--a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrot, Sandrine; Bert, Lionel; Mouly-Badina, Laurence; Sauvinet, Valérie; Colussi-Mas, Joyce; Lambás-Señas, Laura; Robert, Frédéric; Bouilloux, Jean-Pierre; Suaud-Chagny, Marie-Françoise; Denoroy, Luc; Renaud, Bernard

    2003-10-01

    1. Although microdialysis is a widely used approach for in vivo monitoring extracellular neurotransmitter concentrations, it has been previously limited in many cases by its poor temporal resolution. It is clear that when 10-30-min sampling is performed, short-lasting changes in extracellular neurotransmitter concentrations can be overlooked. Such a low sampling rate is necessary when combining microdialysis with the conventional analytical methods like high performance liquid chromatography. 2. Since capillary electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIFD) allows the detection of attomoles of neurotransmitters, the temporal resolution of microdialysis may be significantly improved: high sampling rates, in the range of 5 s to 1 min, have been already reported by our group and others using CE-LIFD for simultaneously analyzing catecholamines and amino acids in microdialysates. 3. The power of combining microdialyis and CE-LIFD is shown, using examples of physiological and pharmacological studies dealing with the dynamics of in vivo efflux processes and/or interactions between neurotransmitters.

  6. New aspects in fenestrated capillary and tissue dynamics in the sensory circumventricular organs of adult brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) generally consists of endothelial tight junction barriers that prevent the free entry of blood-derived substances, thereby maintaining the extracellular environment of the brain. However, the circumventricular organs (CVOs), which are located along the midlines of the brain ventricles, lack these endothelial barriers and have fenestrated capillaries; therefore, they have a number of essential functions, including the transduction of information between the blood circulation and brain. Previous studies have demonstrated the extensive contribution of the CVOs to body fluid and thermal homeostasis, energy balance, the chemoreception of blood-derived substances, and neuroinflammation. In this review, recent advances have been discussed in fenestrated capillary characterization and dynamic tissue reconstruction accompanied by angiogenesis and neurogliogenesis in the sensory CVOs of adult brains. The sensory CVOs, including the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT), subfornical organ (SFO), and area postrema (AP), have size-selective and heterogeneous vascular permeabilities. Astrocyte-/tanycyte-like neural stem cells (NSCs) sense blood- and cerebrospinal fluid-derived information through the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, a mechanical/osmotic receptor, Toll-like receptor 4, a lipopolysaccharide receptor, and Nax, a Na-sensing Na channel. They also express tight junction proteins and densely and tightly surround mature neurons to protect them from blood-derived neurotoxic substances, indicating that the NSCs of the CVOs perform BBB functions while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into new neurons and glial cells. In addition to neurogliogenesis, the density of fenestrated capillaries is regulated by angiogenesis, which is accompanied by the active proliferation and sprouting of endothelial cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling may be involved in angiogenesis and neurogliogenesis, both of

  7. Analysis of serotonin in brain microdialysates using capillary electrophoresis and native laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benturquia, Nadia; Couderc, François; Sauvinet, Valérie; Orset, Cyrille; Parrot, Sandrine; Bayle, Christophe; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2005-03-01

    Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. In this work, a method for analyzing 5-HT in brain microdialysis samples using a commercially available capillary electrophoresis (CE) system has been developed. A pH-mediated in-capillary preconcentration of samples was performed, and after separation by capillary zone electrophoresis, native fluorescence of 5-HT was detected by a 266 nm solid-state laser. The separation conditions for the analysis of 5-HT in standard solutions and microdialysates have been optimized, and this method has been validated on both pharmacological and analytical bases. Separation of 5-HT was performed using a 80 mmol/L citrate buffer, pH 2.5, containing 20 mmol/L hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD) and +30 kV voltage. The detection limit was 2.5 x 10(-10) mol/L. This method allows the in vivo brain monitoring of 5-HT using a simple, accurate CE measurement in underivatized microdialysis samples.

  8. Restraint stress-induced morphological changes at the blood-brain barrier in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra eSántha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is well known to contribute to the development of both neurological and psychiatric diseases. While the role of the blood-brain barrier is increasingly recognised in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier has been linked to stress-related psychiatric diseases only recently. In the present study the effects of restraint stress with different duration (1, 3 and 21 days were investigated on the morphology of the blood-brain barrier in male adult Wistar rats. Frontal cortex and hippocampus sections were immunostained for markers of brain endothelial cells (claudin-5, occludin and glucose transporter-1 and astroglia (GFAP. Staining pattern and intensity were visualized by confocal microscopy and evaluated by several types of image analysis. The ultrastructure of brain capillaries was investigated by electron microscopy. Morphological changes and intensity alterations in brain endothelial tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin were induced by stress. Following restraint stress significant increases in the fluorescence intensity of glucose transporter-1 were detected in brain endothelial cells in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Significant reductions in GFAP fluorescence intensity were observed in the frontal cortex in all stress groups. As observed by electron microscopy, one-day acute stress induced morphological changes indicating damage in capillary endothelial cells in both brain regions. After 21 days of stress thicker and irregular capillary basal membranes in the hippocampus and edema in astrocytes in both regions were seen. These findings indicate that stress exerts time-dependent changes in the staining pattern of tight junction proteins occludin, claudin-5 and glucose transporter-1 at the level of brain capillaries and in the ultrastructure of brain endothelial cells and astroglial endfeet, which may contribute to neurodegenerative processes

  9. Distribution of capillary transit times in isolated lungs of oxygen-tolerant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Madhavi; Gan, Zhuohui; Clough, Anne V; Molthen, Robert C; Roerig, David L; Audi, Said H

    2010-11-01

    Rats pre-exposed to 85% O₂ for 5-7 days tolerate the otherwise lethal effects of 100% O₂. The objective was to evaluate the effect of rat exposure to 85% O₂ for 7 days on lung capillary mean transit time t(c) and distribution of capillary transit times (h(c)(t)). This information is important for subsequent evaluation of the effect of this hyperoxia model on the redox metabolic functions of the pulmonary capillary endothelium. The venous concentration vs. time outflow curves of fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled dextran (FITC-dex), an intravascular indicator, and coenzyme Q₁ hydroquinone (CoQ₁H₂), a compound which rapidly equilibrates between blood and tissue on passage through the pulmonary circulation, were measured following their bolus injection into the pulmonary artery of isolated perfused lungs from rats exposed to room air (normoxic) or 85% O₂ for 7 days (hyperoxic). The moments (mean transit time and variance) of the measured FITC-dex and CoQ₁H₂ outflow curves were determined for each lung, and were then used in a mathematical model [Audi et al. J. Appl. Physiol. 77: 332-351, 1994] to estimate t(c) and the relative dispersion (RD(c)) of h (c)(t). Data analysis reveals that exposure to hyperoxia decreases lung t(c) by 42% and increases RD(c), a measure h(c)(t) heterogeneity, by 40%.

  10. Gene delivery of therapeutic polypeptides to brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Moos, Torben

    of the proteins. Morphological examination of the protein expression was determined using immunofluorescence detecting FLAG. Additionally, the transfection efficiency were determined by Flow cytometry. Perspective: Our study opens for knowledge on how non-viral gene therapy to BCECs can lead to protein secretion......Background: The potential for treatment of chronic disorders affecting the CNS is complicated by the inability of several drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). None-viral gene therapy applied to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) denotes a novel approach to overcome the restraints....... Results: mRNA expression of proteins with neuroprotective potential in RBEC were enabled. Their expression patters were compared with those of RBE4 and HeLa cells using RT-qPCR analyzes. The evidence for protein synthesis and secretion was obtained by detection of FLAG-tagged to the C-terminal of any...

  11. Calcium-activated potassium channels mediated blood-brain tumor barrier opening in a rat metastatic brain tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong John M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB impedes the delivery of therapeutic agents to brain tumors. While adequate delivery of drugs occurs in systemic tumors, the BTB limits delivery of anti-tumor agents into brain metastases. Results In this study, we examined the function and regulation of calcium-activated potassium (KCa channels in a rat metastatic brain tumor model. We showed that intravenous infusion of NS1619, a KCa channel agonist, and bradykinin selectively enhanced BTB permeability in brain tumors, but not in normal brain. Iberiotoxin, a KCa channel antagonist, significantly attenuated NS1619-induced BTB permeability increase. We found KCa channels and bradykinin type 2 receptors (B2R expressed in cultured human metastatic brain tumor cells (CRL-5904, non-small cell lung cancer, metastasized to brain, human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMEC and human lung cancer brain metastasis tissues. Potentiometric assays demonstrated the activity of KCa channels in metastatic brain tumor cells and HBMEC. Furthermore, we detected higher expression of KCa channels in the metastatic brain tumor tissue and tumor capillary endothelia as compared to normal brain tissue. Co-culture of metastatic brain tumor cells and brain microvessel endothelial cells showed an upregulation of KCa channels, which may contribute to the overexpression of KCa channels in tumor microvessels and selectivity of BTB opening. Conclusion These findings suggest that KCa channels in metastatic brain tumors may serve as an effective target for biochemical modulation of BTB permeability to enhance selective delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to metastatic brain tumors.

  12. Regulation of P-glycoprotein expression in brain capillaries in Huntington's disease and its impact on brain availability of antipsychotic agents risperidone and paliperidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yu-Han; Chern, Yijuang; Yang, Hui-Ting; Chen, Hui-Mei; Lin, Chun-Jung

    2016-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease marked by an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) tract on the huntingtin (HTT) protein that may cause transcriptional dysfunction. This study aimed to investigate the regulation and function of P-glycoprotein, an important efflux transporter, in brain capillaries in HD. The results showed that, compared with the littermate controls, R6/2 HD transgenic mice with the human mutant HTT gene had higher levels of P-glycoprotein mRNA and protein and enhanced NF-κB activity in their brain capillaries. Higher P-glycoprotein expression was also observed in the brain capillaries of human HD patients. Consistent with this enhanced P-glycoprotein expression, brain extracellular levels and brain-to-plasma ratios of the antipsychotic agents risperidone and paliperidone were significantly lower in R6/2 mice than in their littermate controls. Exogenous expression of human mutant HTT protein with expanded polyQ (mHTT-109Q) in HEK293T cells enhanced the levels of P-glycoprotein transcripts and NF-κB activity compared with cells expressing normal HTT-25Q. Treatment with the IKK inhibitor, BMS-345541, decreased P-glycoprotein mRNA level in cells transfected with mHTT-109Q or normal HTT-25Q In conclusion, mutant HTT altered the expression of P-glycoprotein through the NF-κB pathway in brain capillaries in HD and markedly affected the availability of P-glycoprotein substrates in the brain.

  13. Investigating Choroid Plexus Volume and Capillaries Length in 15.5 Day Foetus of Diabetic Mothers Compared to Normal Foetus in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mohammadi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder with systemic complications. Children of diabetic mothers are at risk of many disorders such as major and minor vascular injuries, retinopathy, and atherosclerosis. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of maternal diabetes on changes in choroid plexus volume and capillaries length in 15.5 day foetus. Methods: in this experimental study which was conducted on 30 male wistar rats, animals were divided into two groups; an experimental and a control group (n=10. Streptotosin was injected (55 mg/kg in experimental group to induce diabetes while in control group intra-peritoneal injection of buffer citrate was done for four weeks. In the last day of the fourth week, mating was done and zero day of pregnancy was determined with vaginal plug observation. on 15th day of pregnancy, rats were anatomized and a foetus was chosen from each mother. After foetal head fixation and tissue processing, serial horizontal sections were prepared and stained with haematoxylin-eosin. Choroid plexus volume was measured by stereological techniques and the results were analysed using ANOVA statistical test. Results: Results showed a significant difference between Choroid plexus volume and capillaries length in experimental and control groups, so that Choroid plexus volume and capillaries length were increased significantly in foetus of diabetic mothers(P<0.05. Conclusion: It is likely that maternal hyper-glycaemia induces a kind of angiogenesis in foetus that can cause many brain disorders.

  14. Oxytocin biotransformation in the rat limbic brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burbach, J.P.H.; Schotman, P.; Kloet, E.R. de

    2006-01-01

    Two peptide fragments of oxytocin were isolated by high-pressure liquid chromatography from digests of oxytocin obtained after exposure to a SPM preparation of the rat limbic brain. The structures of these peptides, being Gln-Asn-Cys(O)x-Pro-Leu-GlyNH2 and Gln-Asn-Cys(-S-S-Cys)-Pro-Leu-GlyNH2, were

  15. Neuroglobin in the rat brain: localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Allen, Gregg C; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2008-01-01

    in the rat brain using immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). This revealed the interesting finding that Ngb expression is restricted to a few neurone populations, many of which are involved in the sleep-wake cycle, circadian regulation or food regulation...

  16. Comparison of Capillary Architecture between Slow and Fast Muscles in Rats Using a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumagishi,Kanae

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The skeletal muscle is classified into 2 types, slow oxidative or fast glycolytic muscle. For further characterization, we investigated the capillary architecture in slow and fast muscles. The rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscles were used as representatives of slow and fast muscles, respectively. To investigate capillary density, sections of both types of muscle were stained with alkaline phosphatase;the soleus muscle showed more intense reactivity, indicating that it had a denser capillary structure than the EDL muscle. We then injected fluorescent contrast medium into samples of both muscle types for light and confocal-laser microscopic evaluation. The capillary density and capillary-to-fiber ratio were significantly higher, and the course of the capillaries was more tortuous, in the soleus muscle than in the EDL muscle. Capillary coursed more tortuously in the soleus than in the EDL muscle. Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH activity, an indicator of mitochondrial oxidative capacity, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression were also significantly higher in the soleus muscle. Thus, we conclude that slow oxidative muscle possess a rich capillary structure to provide demanded oxygen, and VEGF might be involved in the formation and/or maintenance of this highly capillarized architecture.

  17. Gene delivery of therapeutic polypeptides into brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Moos, Torben;

    has been to investigate the usage of BCEC as factories for recombinant protein production. A non-viral gene carrier was prepared from pullulan-spermine conjugated with plasmid DNA (Thomsen et al., 2011). In vitro transfection of Rat Brain Endothelial Cells (RBE4) and Human Brain Microvascular...... Endothelial cells (HBMECs) were conducted with three plasmids bearing cDNA encoding human BDNF, EPO or the FGL peptide. Results revealed a high expression of BDNF, EPO and FGL transcripts in transfected cells compared to the non-transfected cells, which strongly suggest that transfection were successful...

  18. Comprehensive Spatial Display of the Microcirculation in a Capillary Bundle from Rat Spinotrapezius Muscle Fascia Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Niki; Jacobitz, Frank; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert

    2012-11-01

    Previous investigations of the microcirculation in skeletal muscle have utilized a statistical display of fundamental hemodynamic variables without regard of actual microvascular details. The focus of this project is the development of a software tool to perform a spatial analysis of hemodynamic results. The vessel network considered in this study is a capillary bundle in rat spinotrapezius muscle fascia with transverse arterioles supplying blood, capillary vessels, and collecting venules removing blood. The software tool represents information about blood vessel location and connectivity in two matrices. The first matrix holds spatial locations of vessel intersections or nodes. This matrix is used to create a second matrix containing the locations of all microvessels. The second matrix is then used to produce result matrices holding the values of flow properties at the locations at which they are observed in the vessel network. The resulting images provide a full display, for example, of the pressure drop in the network. The highest velocities are obtained in the transverse arterioles and adjacent capillaries, while other vessels in the network show lower velocities. An area of elevated hematocrit is observed in the periphery of the network.

  19. Pore alterations of the endothelial lining of rat fenestrated intestinal capillaries exposed to acute stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aosa, Taishi; Chiba, Seiichi; Kitamura, Hirokazu; Ina, Keisuke; Tatsukawa, Shuji; Moriwaki, Chinatsu; Wei, Huixing; Gotoh, Koro; Masaki, Takayuki; Kakuma, Tetsuya; Shibata, Hirotaka; Fujikura, Yoshihisa

    2016-07-01

    Stress-induced inflammatory responses in the portal system are characterized by elevations in serum concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS translocation from the intestinal to the capillary lumen occurs via LPS endocytosis by the capillary endothelium. Because the capillary endothelium of the small intestinal submucosa is fenestrated, we determined the role of pore modifications within the fenestrated endothelium in relaying inflammatory stress responses in the portal vein. We evaluated changes in the diameter and density of endothelial pores of the lamina propria of intestinal villi induced by continuous light (CL) exposure for 48 h and the correlation between these changes and serum IL-6 concentration in the portal vein in a rat model. We found significant increases in both the pore diameter and density, accompanied by a significant increase in portal IL-6 concentration; these changes were significantly attenuated by pretreatment with propranolol, a beta adrenergic receptor antagonist. In contrast, intravenous noradrenaline administration mimicked CL-induced modifications of the diameter and density of pores and the elevation of portal vein IL-6 concentration. These findings suggested that stress-induced inflammatory responses in the portal system may be a part of the modifications of the endothelial pores triggered by sympathetic activation.

  20. Rapamycin alleviates brain edema after focal cerebral ischemia reperfusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Feng, Guoying; Miao, Yanying; Liu, Guixiang; Xu, Chunsheng

    2014-06-01

    Brain edema is a major consequence of cerebral ischemia reperfusion. However, few effective therapeutic options are available for retarding the brain edema progression after cerebral ischemia. Recently, rapamycin has been shown to produce neuroprotective effects in rats after cerebral ischemia reperfusion. Whether rapamycin could alleviate this brain edema injury is still unclear. In this study, the rat stroke model was induced by a 1-h left transient middle cerebral artery occlusion using an intraluminal filament, followed by 48 h of reperfusion. The effects of rapamycin (250 μg/kg body weight, intraperitoneal; i.p.) on brain edema progression were evaluated. The results showed that rapamycin treatment significantly reduced the infarct volume, the water content of the brain tissue and the Evans blue extravasation through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Rapamycin treatment could improve histological appearance of the brain tissue, increased the capillary lumen space and maintain the integrity of BBB. Rapamycin also inhibited matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression. These data imply that rapamycin could improve brain edema progression after reperfusion injury through maintaining BBB integrity and inhibiting MMP9 and AQP4 expression. The data of this study provide a new possible approach for improving brain edema after cerebral ischemia reperfusion by administration of rapamycin.

  1. Aquaporin 9 in rat brain after severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To reveal the expression and possible roles of aquaporin 9 (AQP9 in rat brain, after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI. METHODS: Brain water content (BWC, tetrazolium chloride staining, Evans blue staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC, immunofluorescence (IF, western blot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction were used. RESULTS: The BWC reached the first and second (highest peaks at 6 and 72 hours, and the blood brain barrier (BBB was severely destroyed at six hours after the TBI. The worst brain ischemia occurred at 72 hours after TBI. Widespread AQP9-positive astrocytes and neurons in the hypothalamus were detected by means of IHC and IF after TBI. The abundance of AQP9 and its mRNA increased after TBI and reached two peaks at 6 and 72 hours, respectively, after TBI. CONCLUSIONS: Increased AQP9 might contribute to clearance of excess water and lactate in the early stage of TBI. Widespread AQP9-positive astrocytes might help lactate move into neurons and result in cellular brain edema in the later stage of TBI. AQP9-positive neurons suggest that AQP9 plays a role in energy balance after TBI.

  2. Fluctuations and Stimulus-Induced Changes in Blood Flow Observed in Individual Capillaries in Layers 2 through 4 of Rat Neocortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinfeld, David; Mitra, Partha P.; Helmchen, Fritjof; Denk, Winfried

    1998-12-01

    Cortical blood flow at the level of individual capillaries and the coupling of neuronal activity to flow in capillaries are fundamental aspects of homeostasis in the normal and the diseased brain. To probe the dynamics of blood flow at this level, we used two-photon laser scanning microscopy to image the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) in individual capillaries that lie as far as 600 μ m below the pia mater of primary somatosensory cortex in rat; this depth encompassed the cortical layers with the highest density of neurons and capillaries. We observed that the flow was quite variable and exhibited temporal fluctuations around 0.1 Hz, as well as prolonged stalls and occasional reversals of direction. On average, the speed and flux (cells per unit time) of RBCs covaried linearly at low values of flux, with a linear density of ≈ 70 cells per mm, followed by a tendency for the speed to plateau at high values of flux. Thus, both the average velocity and density of RBCs are greater at high values of flux than at low values. Time-locked changes in flow, localized to the appropriate anatomical region of somatosensory cortex, were observed in response to stimulation of either multiple vibrissae or the hindlimb. Although we were able to detect stimulus-induced changes in the flux and speed of RBCs in some single trials, the amplitude of the stimulus-evoked changes in flow were largely masked by basal fluctuations. On average, the flux and the speed of RBCs increased transiently on stimulation, although the linear density of RBCs decreased slightly. These findings are consistent with a stimulus-induced decrease in capillary resistance to flow.

  3. Irradiation of rat brain reduces P-glycoprotein expression and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bart, J.; Nagengast, W.B.; Coppes, R.P.; Wegman, T.D.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Groen, H.J.; Vaalburg, W.; Vries, E.G.F. de; Hendrikse, N.H.

    2007-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) hampers delivery of several drugs including chemotherapeutics to the brain. The drug efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp), expressed on brain capillary endothelial cells, is part of the BBB. P-gp expression on capillary endothelium decreases 5 days after brain irradiation,

  4. Irradiation of rat brain reduces P-glycoprotein expression and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bart, J.; Nagengast, W. B.; Coppes, R. P.; Wegman, T. D.; van der Graaf, W. T. A.; Groen, H. J. M.; Vaalburg, W.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Hendrikse, N. H.

    2007-01-01

    The blood - brain barrier ( BBB) hampers delivery of several drugs including chemotherapeutics to the brain. The drug efflux pump P- glycoprotein ( P- gp), expressed on brain capillary endothelial cells, is part of the BBB. P- gp expression on capillary endothelium decreases 5 days after brain irrad

  5. Heterogeneity of capillary spacing in the hypertrophied plantaris muscle from young-adult and old rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degens, H.; Morse, C.I.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2009-01-01

    Heterogeneity of capillary spacing may affect tissue oxygenation. The determinants of heterogeneity of capillary spacing are, however, unknown. To investigate whether 1) impaired angiogenesis and increased heterogeneity of capillary spacing delays development of hypertrophy during aging and 2)

  6. Correlation of changes in capillary supply and epithelial in the hyperplastic buccal mucosa of zinc-deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J; Stohle, M R; Stablein, M J

    1981-02-01

    Lengths of capillaries and epithelial dimensions were measured on tracings of sections of buccal mucosa stained for the alkaline phosphatase from rats on a zinc-deficient diet. The diet-deficient animals showed the following increases over controls; length of capillaries X 2.67; thickness of cell layer, X1.47; thickness of keratin layer. X2.82; basal layer length: surface length ratio, X1.41. Lengthening of the basal layer and the capillaries showed high positive correlations with thickening of the basal layer cell layer. Lengthening of the capillaries exceeded the lengthening of the basal layer cell layer amd the thickening of the epithelium but fell short of the increased anabolic performance of the epithelium as quantitated in previous investigations.

  7. [Rat brain cells containing ezrin (cytovillin)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzhevskiĭ, D E; Kirik, O V; Giliarov, A V

    2011-01-01

    Ezrin (cytovillin or p81 protein) is an actin-binding protein, a member of ERM (ezrin, radixin and moesin) family, which species contribute to stabilization of the plasma membrane-formed structures. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the ezrin-containing cells in the rat brain and to describe their topography and morphological features. The most pronounced immunohistochemical reaction to ezrin was found in the epithelium of the choroid plexus, cells of the subcommissural organ and ventricular ependyma. Moreover, ezrin staining was also detected in the unidentifiable cells in the subventricular zone, rostral migration pathway and astrocytes in various brain areas. Preferential ezrin localization in the brain cells contributing to formation of barrier structures suggests its involvement in transport processes in the CNS.

  8. Gene delivery into primary brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Lichota, Jacek

    material into BCECs, which, theoretically, will result in expression and secretion of the recombinant protein from the BCECs and into the brain, thus turning BCECs into small recombinant protein factories. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using BCECs as small factories......-endothelial electrical resistance above 200 ohm*cm2, indicating that the BCECs formed a tight polar monolayer with functional tight junctions. This was confirmed by immunostaining for the thigh junction protein ZO-1. Rat BCECs were transfected with a red fluorescence protein Hc-RED for 24 hours. Positive transfection...

  9. The effects of hyperbaric air and hyperbaric oxygen on blood-brain barrier integrity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Nihal Gunes; Orhan, Nurcan; Yilmaz, Canan Ugur; Arican, Nadir; Ahishali, Bulent; Kucuk, Mutlu; Kaya, Mehmet; Toklu, Akin Savas

    2013-09-19

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment yields conflicting results on blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity under various pathological conditions and the effects of HBO on healthy brain is poorly understood. In this experimental study, the effects of HBO on BBB integrity were investigated in comparison with hyperbaric air (HBA) in intact rats. Four sessions of HBA or HBO were applied to intact rats in 24h. BBB integrity was functionally and structurally evaluated by determining extravasation of Evans blue (EB) dye and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) tracers. In immunohistochemical evaluation, relative staining intensity for occludin, a tight junction (TJ) protein, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4), a water-channel protein, was detected in the barrier type of microvessels of brain by image analysis. BBB permeability to EB dye significantly increased in animals in HBO treatment group compared to those in HBA and control groups (p<0.05). The immunoreactivity of occludin, a tight junction protein, remained essentially unaltered in capillaries of hippocampus in all groups. In animals exposed to HBO, AQP4 immunoreactivity significantly increased in parietal cortex compared to those in HBA and control groups (p<0.01). Ultrastructurally, frequent vesicles containing HRP reaction products were observed in capillary endothelial cells in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of rats subjected to both HBA and HBO. Our results indicate that the HBO administration to intact rats increased BBB permeability to both EB and HRP while HBA increased only HRP extravasation in these animals. The results of this study suggest that HBA also impairs the BBB integrity in intact rats as well as HBO.

  10. Decreases in rat brain aquaporin-4 expression following intracerebroventricular administration of an endothelin ET B receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Yutaka; Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-29

    Aquaporins (AQPs) comprise a family of water channel proteins, some of which are expressed in brain. Expressions of brain AQPs are altered after brain insults, such as ischemia and head trauma. However, little is known about the regulation of brain AQP expression. Endothelins (ETs), vasoconstrictor peptides, regulate several pathophysiological responses of damaged nerve tissues via ET(B) receptors. To show possible roles of ET(B) receptors in the regulation of brain AQP expression, the effects of intracerebroventricular administration of an ET(B) agonist were examined in rat brain. In the cerebrum, the copy numbers of AQP4 mRNAs were highest among AQP1, 3, 4, 5 and 9. Continuous administration of 500 pmol/day Ala(1,3,11,15)-ET-1, an ET(B) selective agonist, into rat brain for 7 days decreased the level of AQP4 mRNA in the cerebrum, but had no effect on AQP1, 3, 5 and 9 mRNA levels. The level of AQP4 protein in the cerebrum decreased by the administration of Ala(1,3,11,15)-ET-1. Immunohistochemical observations of Ala(1,3,11,15)-ET-1-infused rats showed that GFAP-positive astrocytes, but not neurons, activated microglia or brain capillary endothelial cells, had immunoreactivity for AQP4. These findings indicate that activation of brain ET(B) receptors causes a decrease in AQP4 expression, suggesting that ET down-regulates brain AQP4 via ET(B) receptors.

  11. Studies of aluminum in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipman, J.J.; Brill, A.B.; Som, P.; Jones, K.W.; Colowick, S.; Cholewa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of high aluminum concentrations in rat brains were studied using /sup 14/C autoradiography to measure the uptake of /sup 14/C 2-deoxy-D-glucose (/sup 14/C-2DG) and microbeam proton-induced x-ray emission (microPIXE) with a 20-..mu..m resolution to measure concentrations of magnesium, aluminum, potassium, and calcium. The aluminum was introduced intracisternally in the form of aluminum tartrate (Al-T) while control animals were given sodium tartrate (Na-T). The /sup 14/C was administered intravenously. The animals receiving Al-T developed seizure disorders and had pathological changes that included cerebral cortical atrophy. The results showed that there was a decreased uptake of /sup 14/C-2DG in cortical regions in which increased aluminum levels were measured, i.e., there is a correlation between the aluminum in the rat brain and decreased brain glucose metabolism. A minimum detection limit of about 16 ppM (mass fraction) or 3 x 10/sup 9/ Al atoms was obtained for Al under the conditions employed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Compromised Blood-Brain Barrier Competence in Remote Brain Areas in Ischemic Stroke Rats at Chronic Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Haller, Edward; Williams, Stephanie N.; Haim, Eithan D.; Tajiri, Naoki; Hernandez-Ontiveros, Diana G.; Frisina-Deyo, Aric; Boffeli, Sean M.; Sanberg, Paul R.; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a life threatening disease leading to long-term disability in stroke survivors. Cerebral functional insufficiency in chronic stroke might be due to pathological changes in brain areas remote from initial ischemic lesion, i.e. diaschisis. Previously, we showed that the damaged blood-brain barrier (BBB) was implicated in subacute diaschisis. The present study investigated BBB competence in chronic diaschisis using a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) rat model. Our results demonstrated significant BBB damage mostly in the ipsilateral striatum and motor cortex in rats at 30 days after tMCAO. The BBB alterations were also determined in the contralateral hemisphere via ultrastructural and immunohistochemical analyses. Major BBB pathological changes in contralateral remote striatum and motor cortex areas included: (1) vacuolated endothelial cells containing large autophagosomes, (2) degenerated pericytes displaying mitochondria with cristae disruption, (3) degenerated astrocytes and perivascular edema, (4) Evans Blue extravasation, and (5) appearance of parenchymal astrogliosis. Importantly, discrete analyses of striatal and motor cortex areas revealed significantly higher autophagosome accumulation in capillaries of ventral striatum and astrogliosis in dorsal striatum in both cerebral hemispheres. These widespread microvascular alterations in ipsilateral and contralateral brain hemispheres suggest persistent and/or continued BBB damage in chronic ischemia. The pathological changes in remote brain areas likely indicate chronic ischemic diaschisis, which should be considered in the development of treatment strategies for stroke. PMID:24610730

  13. [The expression of GFAP after brain concussion in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun-Bing; Li, Yong-Hong

    2006-04-01

    To study the expression of GFAP and pathologic changes after rats brain concussion, so that to provide evidence on brain concussion for forensic identification. Forty-five SD rats were divided into 3, 6, 12, 24 h and 2, 4, 7, 10 d and normal control groups in terms of different wounding time after brain concussion model established, and the expression of GFAP after rats brain concussion were then observed by using SP immunohistochemical method. In normal control brain, low-level GFAP expressions could be observed. After six hours' brain concussion, GFAP positive cells increased obviously. The trend reached to the peak at 7d, partly declined at 10d, then decreased gradually. Brain concussion induced the expression of GFAP. The detection of GFAP could be useful for diagnosis of brain concussion on forensic pathology, and could be a reference index for timing of injury after brain concussion.

  14. Physiological pathway for low-density lipoproteins across the blood-brain barrier: transcytosis through brain capillary endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Pietra; Gosselet, Fabien; Miller, Florence; Buee-Scherrer, Valerie; Torpier, Gérard; Cecchelli, Roméo; Fenart, Laurence

    2008-01-01

    Although an immense knowledge has accumulated concerning regulation of cholesterol homeostasis in the body, this does not include the brain, where details are just emerging. Using an in vitro blood-brain barrier model, the authors have demonstrated that low-density lipoprotein (LDL) underwent transcytosis through the endothelial cells (ECs) by a receptor-mediated process, bypassing the lysosomal compartment. Moreover, caveolae might be involved in these blood-borne molecule transports from the blood to the brain. Although several ligands are known to be internalized through cell surface caveolae, the subsequent intracellular pathways have remained elusive. By cell fractionation experiment and Western blot, the authors have demonstrated that the LDL receptor is located in the caveolae membrane fraction. Then, LDLs internalized were detected by electron microscopy in multivesicular bodies. The authors identified in brain capillary ECs a novel endosomal compartment, mildly acidic, positive for marker Lamp-1 but devoid of any degradative capability. From the point of view of pH, cellular location, and caveolae-derived formation, the multivesicular organelles described here can be related to the caveosome structure. These results could provide clues to physiological functions of caveolae-caveosome transcellular pathway in brain capillary ECs and may help in the rational design of more effective therapeutic drugs to the brain.

  15. Pharmacological therapy can increase capillary density in post-infarction remodeled rat hearts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kerckhoven, R; van Veghel, R; Saxena, PR; Schoemaker, RG

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Postinfarction hypertrophied hearts have been shown to display a lower capillary density and reduced mechanical efficiency amplified by tachycardia. We investigated whether pharmacological reduction of postinfarction tachycardia would induce capillary growth by treating myocardial infarct

  16. Liraglutide prevents microvascular insulin resistance and preserves muscle capillary density in high-fat diet-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Weidong; Fu, Zhuo; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Liu, Zhenqi

    2016-09-01

    Muscle microvasculature critically regulates endothelial exchange surface area to facilitate transendothelial delivery of insulin, nutrients, and oxygen to myocytes. Insulin resistance blunts insulin-mediated microvascular recruitment and decreases muscle capillary density; both contribute to lower microvascular blood volume. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and its analogs are able to dilate blood vessels and stimulate endothelial cell proliferation. In this study, we aim to determine the effects of sustained stimulation of the GLP-1 receptors on insulin-mediated capillary recruitment and metabolic insulin responses, small arterial endothelial function, and muscle capillary density. Rats were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 4 wk with or without simultaneous administration of liraglutide and subjected to a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp for 120 min after an overnight fast. Insulin-mediated muscle microvascular recruitment and muscle oxygenation were determined before and during insulin infusion. Muscle capillary density was determined and distal saphenous artery used for determination of endothelial function and insulin-mediated vasodilation. HFD induced muscle microvascular insulin resistance and small arterial vessel endothelial dysfunction and decreased muscle capillary density. Simultaneous treatment of HFD-fed rats with liraglutide prevented all of these changes and improved insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. These were associated with a significantly increased AMPK phosphorylation and the expressions of VEGF and its receptors. We conclude that GLP-1 receptor agonists may exert their salutary glycemic effect via improving microvascular insulin sensitivity and muscle capillary density during the development of insulin resistance, and early use of GLP-1 receptor agonists may attenuate metabolic insulin resistance as well as prevent cardiovascular complications of diabetes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Transient oxygen-glucose deprivation sensitizes brain capillary endothelial cells to rtPA at 4h of reoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Mélanie; Mysiorek, Caroline; Pétrault, Olivier; Boucau, Marie-Christine; Aijjou, Rachid; Uzbekov, Rustem; Bérézowski, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Thrombolysis treatment of acute ischemic stroke is limited by the pro-edematous and hemorrhagic effects exerted by reperfusion, which disrupts the blood-brain barrier (BBB) capillary endothelium in the infarct core. Most studies of the ischemic BBB overlook the complexity of the penumbral area, where the affected brain cells are still viable following deprivation. Our present objective was to examine in vitro the kinetic impact of reoxygenation on the integrity of ischemic BBB cells after oxygen-glucose deprivation. Through the use of a co-culture of brain capillary endothelial cells and glial cells, we first showed that the transendothelial permeability increase induced by deprivation can occur with both preserved cell viability and interendothelial tight junction network. The subtle and heterogeneous alteration of the tight junctions was observable only through electron microscopy. A complete permeability recovery was then found after reoxygenation, when Vimentin and Actin networks were reordered. However, still sparse ultrastructural alterations of tight junctions suggested an acquired vulnerability. Endothelial cells were then exposed to recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rtPA) to define a temporal profile for the toxic effect of this thrombolytic on transendothelial permeability. Interestingly, the reoxygenated BBB broke down with aggravated tight junction disruption when exposed to rtPA only at 4h after reoxygenation. Moreover, this breakdown was enhanced by 50% when ischemic glial cells were present during the first hours of reoxygenation. Our results suggest that post-stroke reoxygenation enables retrieval of the barrier function of brain capillary endothelium when in a non-necrotic environment, but may sensitize it to rtPA at the 4-hour time point, when both endothelial breakdown mechanisms and glial secretions could be identified and targeted in a therapeutical perspective.

  18. Electrical Stimulation of Denervated Rat Skeletal Muscle Retards Capillary and Muscle Loss in Early Stages of Disuse Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouki Nakagawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of low-frequency electrical muscle stimulation (ES on the decrease in muscle mass, fiber size, capillary supply, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP immunoreactivity in the early stages of denervation-induced limb disuse. Direct ES was performed on the tibialis anterior muscle following denervation in seven-week-old male rats. The rats were divided into the following groups: control (CON, denervation (DN, and denervation with direct ES (DN + ES. Direct ES was performed at an intensity of 16 mA and a frequency of 10 Hz for 30 min per day, six days a week, for one week. We performed immunohistochemical staining to determine the expression of dystrophin, CD34, and MMP-2 in transverse sections of TA muscles. The weight, myofiber cross-sectional area (FCSA, and capillary-to-fiber (C/F ratio of the tibialis anterior (TA muscle were significantly reduced in the DN group compared to the control and DN + ES groups. The MMP-2 positive area was significantly greater in DN and DN + ES groups compared to the control group. These findings suggest beneficial effects of direct ES in reducing muscle atrophy and capillary regression without increasing MMP-2 immunoreactivity in the early stages of DN-induced muscle disuse in rat hind limbs.

  19. Quantitative vascular neuroimaging of the rat brain using superparamagnetic nanoparticles: New insights on vascular organization and brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharagouzloo, Codi A; Timms, Liam; Qiao, Ju; Fang, Zihang; Nneji, Joseph; Pandya, Aniket; Kulkarni, Praveen; van de Ven, Anne L; Ferris, Craig; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2017-09-06

    A method called Quantitative Ultra-Short Time-to-Echo Contrast Enhanced (QUTE-CE) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) which utilizes superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as a contrast agent to yield positive contrast angiograms with high clarity and definition is applied to the whole live rat brain. QUTE-CE MRI intensity data are particularly well suited for measuring quantitative cerebral blood volume (qCBV). A global map of qCBV in the awake resting-state with unprecedented detail was created via application of a 3D MRI rat brain atlas with 173 segmented and annotated brain areas. From this map we identified two distributed, integrated neural circuits showing the highest capillary densities in the brain. One is the neural circuitry involved with the primary senses of smell, hearing and vision and the other is the neural circuitry of memory. Under isoflurane anesthesia, these same circuits showed significant decreases in qCBV suggesting a role in consciousness. Neural circuits in the brainstem associated with the reticular activating system and the maintenance of respiration, body temperature and cardiovascular function showed an increase in qCBV with anesthesia. During awake CO2 challenge, 84 regions showed significant increases relative to an awake baseline state. This CO2 response provides a measure of cerebral vascular reactivity and regional perfusion reserve with the highest response measured in the somatosensory cortex. These results demonstrate the utility of QUTE-CE MRI for qCBV analysis and offer a new perspective on brain function and vascular organization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characteristics of L-citrulline transport through blood-brain barrier in the brain capillary endothelial cell line (TR-BBB cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong-Eun; Kang, Young-Sook

    2017-05-10

    L-Citrulline is a neutral amino acid and a major precursor of L-arginine in the nitric oxide (NO) cycle. Recently it has been reported that L-citrulline prevents neuronal cell death and protects cerebrovascular injury, therefore, L-citrulline may have a neuroprotective effect to improve cerebrovascular dysfunction. Therefore, we aimed to clarify the brain transport mechanism of L-citrulline through blood-brain barrier (BBB) using the conditionally immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cell line (TR-BBB cells), as an in vitro model of the BBB. The uptake study of [(14)C] L-citrulline, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, and rLAT1, system b(0,+), and CAT1 small interfering RNA study were performed in TR-BBB cells. The uptake of [(14)C] L-citrulline was a time-dependent, but ion-independent manner in TR-BBB cells. The transport process involved two saturable components with a Michaelis-Menten constant of 30.9 ± 1.0 μM (Km1) and 1.69 ± 0.43 mM (Km2). The uptake of [(14)C] L-citrulline in TR-BBB cells was significantly inhibited by neutral and cationic amino acids, but not by anionic amino acids. In addition, [(14)C]L-citrulline uptake in the cells was markedly inhibited by 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH), which is the inhibitor of the large neutral amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), B(0), B(0,+) and harmaline, the inhibitor of system b(0,+). Gabapentin and L-dopa as the substrates of LAT1 competitively inhibited the uptake of [(14)C] L-citrulline. IC50 values for L-dopa, gabapentin, L-phenylalanine and L-arginine were 501 μM, 223 μM, 68.9 μM and 33.4 mM, respectively. The expression of mRNA for LAT1 was predominantly increased 187-fold in comparison with that of system b(0,+) in TR-BBB cells. In the studies of LAT1, system b(0,+) and CAT1 knockdown via siRNA transfection into TR-BBB cells, the transcript level of LAT1 and [(14)C] L-citrulline uptake by LAT1 siRNA were significantly reduced

  1. Morphological features of encephalopathy after chronic administration of the antiepileptic drug valproate to rats. A transmission electron microscopic study of capillaries in the cerebellar cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobaniec-Lotowska, M E; Sobaniec, W

    1996-01-01

    Long-term intragastric application of the antiepileptic drug sodium valproate (Vupral "Polfa") at the effective dose of 200 mg/kg b. w. once daily to rats for 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months revealed neurological disorders indicating cerebellum damage ("valproate encephalopathy"). The first ultrastructural changes in structural elements of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) in the cerebellar cortex were detectable after 3 months of the experiment. They became more severe in the later months of the experiment, and were most severe after 12 months, located mainly in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Lesions of the capillary included necrosis of endothelial cells. Organelles of these cells, in particular the mitochondria (increased number and size, distinct degeneration of their matrix and cristae) and Golgi apparatus were altered. Reduced size of capillary lumen and occlusion were caused by swollen endothelial cells which had luminal protrusions and swollen microvilli. Pressure on the vessel wall was produced by enlarged perivascular astrocytic processes. Fragments of necrotic endothelial cells were in the vascular lumens and in these there was loosening and breaking of tight cellular junctions. Damage to the vascular basement lamina was also observed. Damage to the capillary was accompanied by marked damage to neuroglial cells, mainly to perivascular processes of astrocytes. The proliferation of astrocytes (Bergmann's in particular) and occasionally of oligodendrocytes was found. Alterations in the structural elements of the BBB coexisted with marked lesions of neurons of the cerebellum (Purkinje cells are earliest). In electron micrographs both luminal and antiluminal sides of the BBB of the cerebellar cortex had similar lesions. The possible influence of the hepatic damage, mainly hyperammonemia, upon the development of valproate encephalopathy is discussed.

  2. Effect of acute hypoxic shock on the rat brain morphology and tripeptidyl peptidase I activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Emilia B; Dimitrova, Mashenka B; Ivanov, Ivaylo P; Pavlova, Velichka G; Dimitrova, Stella G; Kadiysky, Dimitar S

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxic events are known to cause substantial damage to the hippocampus, cerebellum and striatum. The impact of hypoxic shock on other brain parts is not sufficiently studied. Recent studies show that tripeptidyl peptidase I (TPPI) activity in fish is altered after a hypoxic stress pointing out at a possible enzyme involvement in response to hypoxia. Similar studies are not performed in mammals. In this work, the effect of sodium nitrite-induced acute hypoxic shock on the rat brain was studied at different post-treatment periods. Morphological changes in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, medulla oblongata, thalamus, mesencephalon and pons were assessed using silver-copper impregnation for neurodegeneration. TPPI activity was biochemically assayed and localized by enzyme histochemistry. Although less vulnerable to oxidative stress, the studied brain areas showed different histopathological changes, such as neuronal loss and tissue vacuolization, dilatation of the smallest capillaries and impairment of neuronal processes. TPPI activity was strictly regulated following the hypoxic stress. It was found to increase 12-24h post-treatment, then decreased followed by a slow process of recovery. The enzyme histochemistry revealed a temporary enzyme deficiency in all types of neurons. These findings indicate a possible involvement of the enzyme in rat brain response to hypoxic stress.

  3. Ceftriaxone attenuates hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perinatal brain injury is the leading cause of subsequent neurological disability in both term and preterm baby. Glutamate excitotoxicity is one of the major factors involved in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. Glutamate transporter GLT1, expressed mainly in mature astrocytes, is the major glutamate transporter in the brain. HIE induced excessive glutamate release which is not reuptaked by immature astrocytes may induce neuronal damage. Compounds, such as ceftriaxone, that enhance the expression of GLT1 may exert neuroprotective effect in HIE. Methods We used a neonatal rat model of HIE by unilateral ligation of carotid artery and subsequent exposure to 8% oxygen for 2 hrs on postnatal day 7 (P7 rats. Neonatal rats were administered three dosages of an antibiotic, ceftriaxone, 48 hrs prior to experimental HIE. Neurobehavioral tests of treated rats were assessed. Brain sections from P14 rats were examined with Nissl and immunohistochemical stain, and TUNEL assay. GLT1 protein expression was evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Results Pre-treatment with 200 mg/kg ceftriaxone significantly reduced the brain injury scores and apoptotic cells in the hippocampus, restored myelination in the external capsule of P14 rats, and improved the hypoxia-ischemia induced learning and memory deficit of P23-24 rats. GLT1 expression was observed in the cortical neurons of ceftriaxone treated rats. Conclusion These results suggest that pre-treatment of infants at risk for HIE with ceftriaxone may reduce subsequent brain injury.

  4. Correlation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to cognitive impairment following traumatic brain injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dezhi Kang; Zhang Guo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In vitro and in vivo studies have confirmed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) can promote survival and differentiation of cholinergic, dopaminergic and motor neurons, and axonal regeneration. BDNF has neuroprotective effects on the nervous system. OBJECTIVE: To explore changes in BDNF expression and cognitive function in rats after brain injury DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The neuropathology experiment was performed at the Second Research Room, Department of Neurosurgery, Fujian Medical University (China) from July 2007 to July 2008. MATERIALS: A total of 72 healthy, male, Sprague Dawley, rats were selected for this study. METHODS: Rat models of mild and moderate traumatic brain injury were created by percussion, according to Feeney's method (n = 24, each group). A bone window was made in rats from the sham operation group (n = 24), but no attack was conducted. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: At days 1,2, 4 and 7 following injury, BDNF expression in the rat frontal lobe cortex, hippocampus and basal forebrain was examined by immunohistochemistry (streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method). Changes in rat cognitive function were assessed by the walking test, balance-beam test and memory function detection. RESULTS: Cognitive impairment was aggravated at day 2, and recovered to normal at days 3 and 7 in rats from the mild and moderate traumatic brain injury groups. BDNF expression in the rat frontal lobe cortex, hippocampus and basal forebrain was increased at 1 day, decreased at day 2, and then gradually increased in the mild and moderate traumatic brain injury groups. BDNF expression was greater in rats from the moderate traumatic brain injury group than in the sham operation and mild traumatic brain injury groups (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: BDNF expression in the rat frontal lobe cortex, hippocampus and basal forebrain is correlated to cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury. BDNF has a protective effect on cognitive function in rats

  5. Amelioration of capillary regression and atrophy of the soleus muscle in hindlimb-unloaded rats by astaxanthin supplementation and intermittent loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazashi, Miho; Tanaka, Masayuki; Murakami, Shinichiro; Kondo, Hiroyo; Nagatomo, Fumiko; Ishihara, Akihiko; Roy, Roland R; Fujino, Hidemi

    2014-08-01

    A chronic decrease in neuromuscular activity (activation and/or loading) results in muscle atrophy and capillary regression that are due, in part, to the overproduction of reactive oxygen species. We have reported that antioxidant treatment with astaxanthin attenuates the overexpression of reactive oxygen species in atrophied muscles that, in turn, ameliorates capillary regression in hindlimb-unloaded rats. Astaxanthin supplementation, however, had little effect on muscle mass and fibre cross-sectional area. In contrast, intermittent loading of the hindlimbs of hindlimb-unloaded rats ameliorates muscle atrophy. Therefore, we hypothesized that the combination of astaxanthin supplementation and intermittent loading would attenuate both muscle atrophy and capillary regression during hindlimb unloading. As expected, 2 weeks of hindlimb unloading resulted in atrophy, a decrease in capillary volume and a shift towards smaller-diameter capillaries in the soleus muscle. Intermittent loading alone (1 h of cage ambulation per day) attenuated atrophy of the soleus, while astaxanthin treatment alone maintained the capillary network to near control levels. The combination of intermittent loading and astaxanthin treatment, however, ameliorated atrophy of the soleus and maintained the capillary volume and luminal diameters and the superoxide dismutase-1 protein levels near control values. These results indicate that intermittent loading combined with astaxanthin supplementation could be an effective therapy for both the muscle atrophy and the capillary regression associated with a chronic decrease in neuromuscular activity.

  6. Ethanol-induced damage to mucosal capillaries of rat stomach. Ultrastructural features and effects of prostaglandin F2 beta and cysteamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trier, J.S.; Szabo, S.; Allan, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    Impairment of the mucosal microcirculation may contribute to ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage. In this report, we describe diffuse and severe ultrastructural damage to the capillaries of the gastric glandular mucosa of the rat that occurred within 1 min after intragastric instillation of 100% ethanol. There was a gradient of damage in that endothelial cell structure was most severely disrupted in profiles of capillaries located close to the luminal surface but some morphologic evidence of damage was evident in the wall of capillary profiles to a mean depth of 256 micron. Capillary structure was generally normal in the deeper regions of the mucosa. Pretreatment with intragastric cysteamine, 30 mg/100 g, or intragastric prostaglandin F2 beta, 0.5 mg/100 g, significantly reduced the depth in the mucosa to which damage to capillaries extended. Pretreatment with intragastric prostaglandin F2 beta, 0.2 mg/100 g, afforded no significant protection. We conclude that a 1-min exposure to 100% ethanol induces striking damage to the microcirculation of glandular mucosa of the rat stomach with severe damage to capillary profiles near the lumen and sparing of capillary profiles near the muscularis mucosa, and pretreatment with the sulfhydryl agent, cysteamine, or with a large dose of prostaglandin F2 beta reduces the extent of but does not abolish ethanol-induced damage to gastric mucosal capillaries.

  7. Targeting immunoliposomes to transferrin receptors on brain capillary endothelial cells as a mean for cargo transport across the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Bruun, Jonas;

    2016-01-01

    transport further into the CNS. We studied transferrin receptor-targeted (OX26) immunoliposomes containing oxaliplatin with the aim of quantifying the uptake of OX26, liposomes and oxaliplatin in BCECs and the remaining CNS. The uptake of the immunoliposomes and their cargo was studied in 18-dayold rats...... higher both in vitro and in vivo when compared to isotypic IgG-conjugated liposomes. Quantitative analyses after capillary depletion revealed cargo transport from BCECs to the remaining CNS, but not differences could be detected between OX26- conjugated and isotype IgG control liposomes in vivo, whereas...

  8. 26Al uptake and accumulation in the rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, S.; Nagai, H.; Imamura, M.; Matsuzaki, H.; Hayashi, K.; Masuda, A.; Kumazawa, H.; Ohashi, H.; Kobayashi, K.

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the cause of Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia), 26Al incorporation in the rat brain was studied by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). When 26Al was injected into healthy rats, a considerable amount of 26Al entered the brain (cerebrum) through the blood-brain barrier 5 days after a single injection, and the brain 26Al level remained almost constant from 5 to 270 days. On the other hand, the level of 26Al in the blood decreased remarkably 75 days after injection. Approximately 89% of the 26Al taken in by the brain cell nuclei bound to chromatin. This study supports the theory that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminium (Al) in the brain, and brain cell nuclei.

  9. Oxidative stress and superoxide dismutase activity in brain of rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JTEkanem

    effect of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in brain homogenates of Wistar rats. Oxidative stress measured as ... SOD is an important enzyme family in living cells for maintaining ..... one unit of activity with oxidation rate of organic substrate in.

  10. Outer brain barriers in rat and human development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøchner, Christian B; Holst, Camilla Bjørnbak; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    diffusion restriction between brain and subarachnoid CSF through an initial radial glial end feet layer covered with a pial surface layer. To further characterize these interfaces we examined embryonic rat brains from E10 to P0 and forebrains from human embryos and fetuses (6-21st weeks post...

  11. Waxholm Space atlas of the Sprague Dawley rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Papp, Eszter A.; Trygve B. Leergaard; Calabrese, Evan; Johnson, G. Allan; Bjaalie, Jan G.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional digital brain atlases represent an important new generation of neuroinformatics tools for understanding complex brain anatomy, assigning location to experimental data, and planning of experiments. We have acquired a microscopic resolution isotropic MRI and DTI atlasing template for the Sprague Dawley rat brain with 39 µm isotropic voxels for the MRI volume and 78 µm isotropic voxels for the DTI. Building on this template, we have delineated 76 major anatomical structures in ...

  12. Actin purification from a gel of rat brain extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levilliers, N; Peron-Renner, M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1984-01-01

    Actin, 99% pure, has been recovered from rat brain with a high yield (greater than 15 mg/100 g brain). We have shown that: 1. a low ionic strength extract from rat brain tissue is capable of giving rise to a gel; 2. actin is the main gel component and its proportion is one order of magnitude higher than in the original extract; 3. actin can be isolated from this extract by a three-step procedure involving gelation, dissociation of the gel in 0.6 M KCl, followed by one or two depolymerization-polymerization cycles.

  13. A nanoengineered peptidic delivery system with specificity for human brain capillary endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Linping; Moghimi, Seyed Moein

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain-barrier (BBB) is a formidable obstacle for successful translocation of many drug molecules from the systemic circulation into the brain, and therefore a major challenge for neurotherapeutics. Nanoparticles may offer some opportunities for delivery of bioactive molecules into brain...

  14. Abnormalities in three-dimensional capillary architecture and imbalance between vascular endothelial growth factor-A and thrombospondin-1 in soleus muscle of ovariectomized rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masayuki; Kanazashi, Miho; Maezawa, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Hiroyo; Fujino, Hidemi

    2015-09-01

    Reduced ovarian hormone levels associated with menopause or ovariectomy (OVX) not only result in vascular dysfunction but also lead to structural abnormalities in capillaries. Therefore, the effect of OVX on the three-dimensional (3-D) architecture of capillary networks and the underlying molecular mechanisms were investigated in rat soleus muscle. Seven-week-old female Wistar rats were divided into the OVX and sham-treated (Sham) groups. The OVX group exhibited lower endurance exercise capacity compared to the sham group and resulted in decreased capillary diameter, number of anastomoses and capillary/anastomosis volume in soleus muscle, indicating 3-D structural abnormalities of capillary networks. Furthermore, OVX led to increased concentrations of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) protein and a decreased VEGF-A/TSP-1 ratio, an indicator of angio-adaptations, in soleus muscle compared with the Sham group. These results indicate OVX may induce 3-D capillary regression in soleus muscle through an imbalance between VEGF-A and TSP-1 expression, possibly associated with decreased exercise tolerance in ovariectomized rats.

  15. Targeting Cells With MR Imaging Probes: Cellular Interaction And Intracellular Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Uptake In Brain Capillary Endothelial and Choroidal Plexus Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambianica, I.; Bossi, M.; Gasco, P.; Gonzalez, W.; Idee, J. M.; Miserocchi, G.; Rigolio, R.; Chanana, M.; Morjan, I.; Wang, D.; Sancini, G.

    2010-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are considered for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications in brain including their use as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. In delivery application, the critical step is the transport across cell layers and the internalization of NPs into specific cells, a process often limited by poor targeting specificity and low internalization efficiency. The development of the models of brain endothelial cells and choroidal plexus epithelial cells in culture has allowed us to investigate into these mechanisms. Our strategy is aimed at exploring different routes to the entrapment of iron oxide NPs in these brain related cells. Here we demonstrated that not only cells endowed with a good phagocytic activity like activated macrophages but also endothelial brain capillary and choroidal plexus epithelial cells do internalize iron oxide NPs. Our study of the intracellular trafficking of NPs by TEM, and confocal microscopy revealed that NPs are mainly internalized by the endocytic pathway. Iron oxide NPs were dispersed in water and coated with 3,4-dihydroxyl-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) using standard procedures. Magnetic lipid NPs were prepared by NANOVECTOR: water in oil in water (W/O/W) microemulsion process has been applied to directly coat different iron based NPs by lipid layer or to encapsulate them into Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs). By these coating/loading the colloidal stability was improved without strong alteration of the particle size distribution. Magnetic lipid NPs could be reconstituted after freeze drying without appreciable changes in stability. L-DOPA coated NPs are stable in PBS and in MEM (Modified Eagle Medium) medium. The magnetic properties of these NPs were not altered by the coating processes. We investigated the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and interaction of these NPs with rat brain capillary endothelial (REB4) and choroidal plexus epithelial (Z310) cells. By means of widefield, confocal

  16. Cellular localization of Y-box binding protein 1 in brain tissue of rats, macaques, and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn Anja

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1 is considered to be one of the key regulators of transcription and translation. However, so far only limited knowledge exists regarding its cellular distribution in the adult brain. Results Analysis of YB-1 immunolabelling as well as double-labelling with the neuronal marker NeuN in rat brain tissue revealed a predominant neuronal expression in the dentate gyrus, the cornu ammonis pyramidal cell layer, layer III of the piriform cortex as well as throughout all layers of the parahippocampal cortex. In the hilus of the hippocampus single neurons expressed YB-1. The neuronal expression pattern was comparable in the hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex of adult macaques and humans. Double-labelling of YB-1 with the endothelial cell marker Glut-1, the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein, and the astrocytic marker GFAP did not indicate a co-localization. Following status epilepticus in rats, no induction of YB-1 occurred in brain capillary endothelial cells and neurons. Conclusion In conclusion, our study demonstrates that YB-1 is predominantly expressed in neurons in the adult brain of rats, macaques and humans. Lack of a co-localization with Glut-1 and P-glycoprotein argues against a direct role of YB-1 in the regulation of blood-brain barrier P-glycoprotein.

  17. Brain glucose content in fetuses of ethanol-fed rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pullen, G.; Singh, S.P.; Snyder, A.K.; Hoffen, B.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated impaired placental glucose transfer and fetal hypoglycemia in association with ethanol ingestion by pregnant rats. The present study examines the relationship between glucose availability and fetal brain growth under the same conditions. Rats (EF) were fed ethanol (30% of caloric intake) in liquid diet throughout gestation. Controls received isocaloric diet without ethanol by pair-feeding (PF) or ad libitum (AF). On the 22nd day of gestation fetuses were obtained by cesarean section. Fetal brains were removed and freeze-clamped. Brain weight was significantly reduced (p < 0.001) by maternal ethanol ingestion (206 +/- 2, 212 +/- 4 and 194 +/- 2 mg in AF, FP and EF fetuses respectively). Similarly, fetal brain glucose content was lower (p < 0.05) in the EF group (14.3 +/- 0.9 mmoles/g dry weight) than in the PF (18.6 +/- 1.0) or the AF (16.2 +/- 0.9) groups. The protein: DNA ratio, an indicator of cell size, correlated positively (r = 0.371, p < 0.005) with brain glucose content. In conclusion, maternal ethanol ingestion resulted in lower brain weight and reduced brain glucose content. Glucose availability may be a significant factor in the determination of cell size in the fetal rat brain.

  18. Non-signalling energy use in the developing rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engl, Elisabeth; Jolivet, Renaud; Hall, Catherine N; Attwell, David

    2017-03-01

    Energy use in the brain constrains its information processing power, but only about half the brain's energy consumption is directly related to information processing. Evidence for which non-signalling processes consume the rest of the brain's energy has been scarce. For the first time, we investigated the energy use of the brain's main non-signalling tasks with a single method. After blocking each non-signalling process, we measured oxygen level changes in juvenile rat brain slices with an oxygen-sensing microelectrode and calculated changes in oxygen consumption throughout the slice using a modified diffusion equation. We found that the turnover of the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton, followed by lipid synthesis, are significant energy drains, contributing 25%, 22% and 18%, respectively, to the rate of oxygen consumption. In contrast, protein synthesis is energetically inexpensive. We assess how these estimates of energy expenditure relate to brain energy use in vivo, and how they might differ in the mature brain.

  19. Compound 49b Restores Retinal Thickness and Reduces Degenerate Capillaries in the Rat Retina following Ischemia/Reperfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    Full Text Available We have recently reported that Compound 49b, a novel β-adrenergic receptor agonist, can significantly reduce VEGF levels in retinal endothelial cells (REC grown in diabetic-like conditions. In this study, we investigated whether Compound 49b could protect the retina under hypoxic conditions using the ischemia-reperfusion (I/R-induced model in rats, as well REC cultured in hypoxic conditions. Some rats received 1mM topical Compound 49b for the 2 (5 rats each group or 10 (4 rats in each group days post-I/R. Analyses for retinal thickness and cell loss in the ganglion cell layer was done at 2 days post-I/R, while numbers of degenerate capillaries and pericyte ghosts were measured at 10 days post-I/R. Additionally, REC were cultured in normal oxygen or hypoxia (5% O2 only or treated with 50 nM Compound 49b for 12 hours. Twelve hours after Compound 49b exposure, cells were collected and analyzed for protein levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3, vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF and its receptor (KDR, angiopoietin 1 and its receptor Tie2 for Western blotting. Data indicate that exposure to I/R significantly decreased retinal thickness, with increasing numbers of degenerate capillaries and pericyte ghosts. Compound 49b treatment inhibited these retinal changes. In REC cultured in hypoxia, levels of IGFBP-3 were reduced, which were significantly increased by Compound 49b. Hypoxia significantly increased protein levels of VEGF, KDR, Angiopoiein 1, and Tie2, which were reduced following Compound 49b treatment. These data strongly suggested that Compound 49b protected the retina against I/R-induced injury. This provides additional support for a role of β-adrenergic receptor actions in the retina.

  20. Quantitation of dopamine, serotonin and adenosine content in a tissue punch from a brain slice using capillary electrophoresis with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Huaifang; Pajski, Megan L; Ross, Ashley E; Venton, B Jill

    2013-01-01

    Methods to determine neurochemical concentrations in small samples of tissue are needed to map interactions among neurotransmitters. In particular, correlating physiological measurements of neurotransmitter release and the tissue content in a small region would be valuable. HPLC is the standard method for tissue content analysis but it requires microliter samples and the detector often varies by the class of compound being quantified; thus detecting molecules from different classes can be difficult. In this paper, we develop capillary electrophoresis with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry detection (CE-FSCV) for analysis of dopamine, serotonin, and adenosine content in tissue punches from rat brain slices. Using field-amplified sample stacking, the limit of detection was 5 nM for dopamine, 10 nM for serotonin, and 50 nM for adenosine. Neurotransmitters could be measured from a tissue punch as small as 7 µg (7 nL) of tissue, three orders of magnitude smaller than a typical HPLC sample. Tissue content analysis of punches in successive slices through the striatum revealed higher dopamine but lower adenosine content in the anterior striatum. Stimulated dopamine release was measured in a brain slice, then a tissue punch collected from the recording region. Dopamine content and release had a correlation coefficient of 0.71, which indicates much of the variance in stimulated release is due to variance in tissue content. CE-FSCV should facilitate measurements of tissue content in nanoliter samples, leading to a better understanding of how diseases or drugs affect dopamine, serotonin, and adenosine content.

  1. Blood-brain barrier permeability is positively correlated with cerebral microvascular perfusion in the early fluid percussion-injured brain of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yong; Pan, Yaohua; Wang, Mingliang; Huang, Xianjian; Yin, Yuhua; Wang, Yu; Jia, Feng; Xiong, Wenhao; Zhang, Nu; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2012-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening following traumatic brain injury (TBI) provides a chance for therapeutic agents to cross the barrier, yet the reduction of the cerebral microvascular perfusion after TBI may limit the intervention. Meanwhile, optimizing the cerebral capillary perfusion by the strategies such as fluid administration may cause brain edema due to the BBB opening post trauma. To guide the TBI therapy, we characterized the relationship between the changes in the cerebral capillary perfusion and BBB permeability after TBI. First, we observed the changes of the cerebral capillary perfusion by the intracardiac perfusion of Evans Blue and the BBB disruption with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the rat subjected to lateral fluid percussion (FP) brain injury. The correlation between two variables was next evaluated with the correlation analysis. Since related to BBB breakdown, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity was finally detected by gelatin zymography. We found that the ratios of the perfused microvessel numbers in the lesioned cortices were significantly reduced at 0 and 1 h post trauma compared with that in the normal cortex, which then dramatically recovered at 4 and 24 h after injury, and that the BBB permeability was greatly augmented in the ipsilateral parts at 4, 12, and 24 h, and in the contralateral area at 24 h after injury compared with that in the uninjured brain. The correlation analysis showed that the BBB permeability increase was related to the restoration of the cerebral capillary perfusion over a 24-h period post trauma. Moreover, the gelatin zymography analysis indicated that the MMP-9 activity in the injured brain increased at 4 h and significantly elevated at 12 and 24 h as compared to that at 0 or 1 h after TBI. Our findings demonstrate that the 4 h post trauma is a critical turning point during the development of TBI, and, importantly, the correlation analysis may guide us how to treat TBI.

  2. Neuroglobin expression in rats after traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Lin; Min Li; Aijia Shang; Yazhuo Hu; Xiao Yang; Ling Ye; Suyan Bian; Zhongfeng Wang; Dingbiao Zhou

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we used a rat model of severe closed traumatic brain injury to explore the relationship between neuroglobin, brain injury and neuronal apoptosis. Real-time PCR showed that neuroglobin mRNA expression rapidly increased in the rat cerebral cortex, and peaked at 30 minutes and 48 hours following traumatic brain injury. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that neuroglobin expression increased and remained high 2 hours to 5 days following injury. The rate of increase in the apoptosis-related Bax/Bcl-2 ratio greatly decreased between 30 minutes and 1 hour as well as between 48 and 72 hours post injury. Expression of neuroglobin and the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 greatly increased, while that of the proapoptotic factor decreased, in the cerebral cortex post severe closed traumatic brain injury. It suggests that neuroglobin might protect neurons from apoptosis after traumatic injury by regulating Bax/Bcl-2 pathway.

  3. Regional variations in the apparent diffusion coefficient and the intracellular distribution of water in rat brain during acute focal ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K F; Li, F; Tatlisumak, T; Garcia, J H; Sotak, C H; Fisher, M; Fenstermacher, J D

    2001-08-01

    The apparent diffusion coefficient of water (ADC) rapidly drops in ischemic tissue after cerebral artery occlusion. This acute drop is thought to be caused by the loss of extracellular fluid and the gain of intracellular fluid. To test the latter possibility, changes in ADC and the size of several cellular compartments were assessed in 3 regions of rat brain at the end of 90 minutes of focal cerebral ischemia. One middle cerebral artery was permanently occluded in 8 Sprague-Dawley rats; sham occlusions were performed in 2 other rats. ADC maps were generated 90 minutes later, and the brains were immediately perfusion fixed. Three regions of interest (ROIs) were defined on the basis of ADC range. Various neuronal, astrocytic, and capillary compartments in each ROI were quantified with light and electron microscopy. At the end of 90 minutes of ischemia, mean ADC was normal in the cortex of sham-operated rats and the contralateral cortex of ischemic rats (ROI-a), 25% lower in the ipsilateral frontoparietal cortex (ROI-b), and 45% lower in the ischemic lateral caudoputamen (ROI-c). At this time, the frequency of swollen astrocytic cell bodies and volume of swollen dendrites and astrocytic processes in neuropil were ROI-acapillary endothelial cells, pericytes, and perivascular foot processes were swollen. The initial lowering of ADC during focal ischemia probably is the result of not only the acute loss of extracellular fluid and concomitant swelling of various cellular compartments but also concurrent neuronal shrinkage.

  4. Distribution of nimodipine in brain following intranasal administration in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-zhi ZHANG; Xin-guo JIANG; Chun-hua WU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether nasally applied nimodipine (NM) could improve its systemic bioavailability and be transported directly from the nasal cavity to the brain. METHODS: NM was administered nasally, intravenously (iv), and orally to male Sprague-Dawley rats. At different times post dose, blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and brain tissue samples were collected, and the concentrations of NM in the samples were analyzed by HPLC. RESULTS:Oral systemic bioavailability of NM in rats was 1.17 %, nasal dosing improved bioavailibility to 67.4 %. Following intranasal administration, NM concentrations in olfactory bulb (OB) within 30 min post dose were found significant higher than in the other brain tissues. However, similar NM levels in different brain regions were observed after iv injection. AUC in CSF and OB from the nasal route was 1.26 and 1.39 fold compared with the iv route, respectively.The brain-to-plasma AUC ratios were significantly higher after nasal administration than after iv administration (P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Nasally administered NM could markedly improve the bioavailability and a fraction of the NM dose could be transported into brain via the olfactory pathway in rats.

  5. The effects of sex on brain iron status in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Qian; CHANG Yanzhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective:Iron plays essential roles in the human body. Studies have shown that iron is dis-tributed differently in male and female Rats in liver, spleen, bone marrow, kidney, heart. However, the effects of sex on iron distribution in central nervous system are not well established. Methods:To explore the effects of the above mentioned, in this study, female and male Sprague Dawley rats were used at 4 months of age. The synthesis of ferritin light chain (FTL), transferrin receptor1 (TfR1), ferroportin 1 (FPN1), divalent metal transporter 1 ( DMT1) in the cortex, hippocampus, striatum, cerebellum, and olfactory bulb was determined by Western blot a-nalysis. Results:The results showed that the levels of FTL protein in the cortex, hippocampus, striatum, cerebel-lum, and olfactory bulb were higher in female rats than in male rats, but the levels of TfR1 protein were lower in female rats than in male rats. There was no significant change in FPN1 and DMT1 expression in brain. Conclu-sions:These data suggest that sex have effects on brain iron status. Iron is distributed differently in central nervous system in male and female rats. However, the precise mechanisms need further study.

  6. Oxidative damage to rat brain in iron and copper overloads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacco-Sebio, Rosario; Ferrarotti, Nidia; Saporito-Magriñá, Christian; Semprine, Jimena; Fuda, Julián; Torti, Horacio; Boveris, Alberto; Repetto, Marisa G

    2014-08-01

    This study reports on the acute brain toxicity of Fe and Cu in male Sprague-Dawley rats (200 g) that received 0 to 60 mg kg(-1) (ip) FeCl2 or CuSO4. Brain metal contents and time-responses were determined for rat survival, in situ brain chemiluminescence and phospholipid and protein oxidation products. Metal doses hyperbolically defined brain metal content. Rat survival was 91% and 60% after Fe and Cu overloads. Brain metal content increased from 35 to 114 μg of Fe per g and from 3.6 to 34 μg of Cu per g. Brain chemiluminescence (10 cps cm(-2)) increased 3 and 2 times after Fe and Cu overloads, with half maximal responses (C50) of 38 μg of Fe per g of brain and 15 μg of Cu per g of brain, and with half time responses (t1/2) of 12 h for Fe and 20 h for Cu. Phospholipid peroxidation increased by 56% and 31% with C50 of 40 μg of Fe per g and 20 μg of Cu per g and with t1/2 of 9 h and 14 h. Protein oxidation increased by 45% for Fe with a C50 of 40 μg of Fe per g and 18% for Cu with a C50 of 10 μg of Cu per g and a t1/2 of 12 h for both metals. Fe and Cu brain toxicities are likely mediated by Haber-Weiss type HO˙ formation with subsequent oxidative damage.

  7. Demonstration of endogenous imipramine like material in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehavi, M.; Ventura, I.; Sarne, Y.

    1985-02-18

    The extraction and partial purification of an endogenous imipramine-like material from rat brain is described. The endogenous factor obtained after gel filtration and silica chromatography inhibits (/sup 3/H) imipramine specific binding and mimics the inhibitory effect of imipramine on (/sup 3/H) serotonin uptake in both brain and platelet preparations. The effects of the endogenous material are dose-dependent and it inhibits (/sup 3/H) imipramine binding in a competitive fashion. The factor is unevenly distributed in the brain with high concentration in the hypothalamus and low concentration in the cerebellum.

  8. The effect of chemotherapy on rat brain PET: preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Su; Kim, Il Han; Yu, A Ram; Park, Ji Ae; Woo, Sang Keun; Kim, Jong Guk; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Byeong Il; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Hee Joung; Kim, Kyeong Min [Korea Institute Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Chemotherapy was widely used for the therapy of cancer patients. When chemotherapy was performed, transient cognitive memory problem was occurred. This cognitive problem in brain was called as chemobrain. In this study, we have developed rat model for chemobrain. Cerebral glucose metabolism after chemotherapy was assessed using animal PET and voxel based statistical analysis method

  9. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF MICROWAVE RADIATION ON BRAIN TISSUE IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Đinđić

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to microwave radiation induces multiple organ dysfunctions, especially in CNS.The aim of this work was investigation of biological effects of microwave radiation on rats' brain and determination of increased oxidative stress as a possible pathogenetic's mechanism.Wis tar rats 3 months old were divided in experimental (4 female and 4 male animal and control group (5 female and 4 male. This experimental group was constantly exposed to a magnetic field of 5 mG. We simulated using of mobile phones 30 min every day. The source of NIR emitted MF that was similar to mobile phones at 900 MHz. The rats were killed after 2 months. Biological effects were determined by observation of individual and collective behavior and body mass changes. Lipid per oxidation was determined by measuring quantity of malondialdehyde (MDA in brain homogenate.The animals in experimental group exposed to EMF showed les weight gain. The most important observations were changing of basic behavior models and expression of aggressive or panic behavior. The content of MDA in brain tissue is singificantly higher (1.42 times in rats exposed to electromagnetic fields (3,82±0.65 vs. control 2.69±0.42 nmol/mg proteins, p<0.01.Increased oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation after exposition in EM fields induced disorders of function and structure of brain.

  10. Brain tumors induced in rats by human adenovirus type 12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murao,Tsuyoshi

    1974-02-01

    Full Text Available Oncogenesis of human adenovirus type 12 in the brain of rats was examined. Newborn rats of Sprague-Dawley and Donryu strains were injected intracranially with human adenovirus type 12. The incidence of intracranial tumors was 91% (30/33 in SpragueDawley and 56% (14/25 in Donryu rats. Except for one tumor nodule located in the parietal cortex of a Sprague.Dawley rat, all tumors developed in the paraventricular areas or in the meninges. Tumors were quite similar histologically to those induced in hamsters and mice resembling the undifferentiated human brain tumors such as medulloblastoma, ependymoblastoma and embryonic gliomas. From the histological features and primary sites of tumor development, it is suggested that the tumors in the brain of rats induced by adenovirus type 12 originate from the embryonic cells in the paraventricular area and also from the undifferentiated supporting cells of the peripheral nerves in the leptomeninges.

  11. Effects of magnesium sulfate on traumatic brain edema in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯东福; 朱志安; 卢亦成

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of magnesium sulfate on traumatic brain edema and explore its possible mechanism.Methods: Forty-eight Sprague-Dawley ( SD ) rats were randomly divided into three groups: Control, Trauma and Treatment groups. In Treatment group, magnesium sulfate was intraperitoneally administered immediately after the induction of brain trauma. At 24 h after trauma, total tissue water content and Na + , K + , Ca2 + , Mg2+ contents were measured. Permeability of blood-brain barrier (BBB)was assessed quantitatively by Evans Blue (EB) dye technique. The pathological changes were also studied.Results: Water, Na + , Ca2 + and EB contents in Treatment group were significantly lower than those in Trauma group ( P < 0. 05 ). Results of light microscopy and electron microscopy confirmed that magnesium sulfate can attenuate traumatic brain injury and relieve BBB injury.Conclusions: Treatment with MgSO4 in the early stage can attenuate traumatic brain edema and prevent BBB injury.

  12. Gene delivery of the therapeutic polypeptide erythropoietin to primary brain capillary endothelial cells for protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Moos, Torben

    2016-01-01

    in this passage, as turning BCECs into recombinant protein factories by transfection could result in protein secretion into the brain. The non-mitotic BCECs might, however, not be very susceptible to non-viral gene therapy in vivo, since this strategy is believed to be dependent on active cell division. We have...

  13. ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Hypoxic–ischemic brain injury, α-Lipoic acid, Cerebral infarct area, Edema, Antioxidants,. Inflammatory markers .... were then moved back to their respective dams and immediately ..... various pro-inflammatory cytokines is stimulated.

  14. Inducible gene manipulations in brain serotonergic neurons of transgenic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tillmann Weber

    Full Text Available The serotonergic (5-HT system has been implicated in various physiological processes and neuropsychiatric disorders, but in many aspects its role in normal and pathologic brain function is still unclear. One reason for this might be the lack of appropriate animal models which can address the complexity of physiological and pathophysiological 5-HT functioning. In this respect, rats offer many advantages over mice as they have been the animal of choice for sophisticated neurophysiological and behavioral studies. However, only recently technologies for the targeted and tissue specific modification of rat genes - a prerequisite for a detailed study of the 5-HT system - have been successfully developed. Here, we describe a rat transgenic system for inducible gene manipulations in 5-HT neurons. We generated a Cre driver line consisting of a tamoxifen-inducible CreERT2 recombinase under the control of mouse Tph2 regulatory sequences. Tissue-specific serotonergic Cre recombinase expression was detected in four transgenic TPH2-CreERT2 rat founder lines. For functional analysis of Cre-mediated recombination, we used a rat Cre reporter line (CAG-loxP.EGFP, in which EGFP is expressed after Cre-mediated removal of a loxP-flanked lacZ STOP cassette. We show an in-depth characterisation of this rat Cre reporter line and demonstrate its applicability for monitoring Cre-mediated recombination in all major neuronal subpopulations of the rat brain. Upon tamoxifen induction, double transgenic TPH2-CreERT2/CAG-loxP.EGFP rats show selective and efficient EGFP expression in 5-HT neurons. Without tamoxifen administration, EGFP is only expressed in few 5-HT neurons which confirms minimal background recombination. This 5-HT neuron specific CreERT2 line allows Cre-mediated, inducible gene deletion or gene overexpression in transgenic rats which provides new opportunities to decipher the complex functions of the mammalian serotonergic system.

  15. Hypoxic stress up-regulates Kir2.1 expression and facilitates cell proliferation in brain capillary endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamura, Hideto; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hisao [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Asai, Kiyofumi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Imaizumi, Yuji, E-mail: yimaizum@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan)

    2016-08-05

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is mainly composed of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs), astrocytes and pericytes. Brain ischemia causes hypoxic encephalopathy and damages BBB. However, it remains still unclear how hypoxia affects BCECs. In the present study, t-BBEC117 cells, an immortalized bovine brain endothelial cell line, were cultured under hypoxic conditions at 4–5% oxygen for 72 h. This hypoxic stress caused hyperpolarization of resting membrane potential. Patch-clamp recordings revealed a marked increase in Ba{sup 2+}-sensitive inward rectifier K{sup +} current in t-BBEC117 cells after hypoxic culture. Western blot and real-time PCR analyses showed that Kir2.1 expression was significantly up-regulated at protein level but not at mRNA level after the hypoxic culture. Ca{sup 2+} imaging study revealed that the hypoxic stress enhanced store-operated Ca{sup 2+} (SOC) entry, which was significantly reduced in the presence of 100 μM Ba{sup 2+}. On the other hand, the expression of SOC channels such as Orai1, Orai2, and transient receptor potential channels was not affected by hypoxic stress. MTT assay showed that the hypoxic stress significantly enhanced t-BBEC117 cell proliferation, which was inhibited by approximately 60% in the presence of 100 μM Ba{sup 2+}. We first show here that moderate cellular stress by cultivation under hypoxic conditions hyperpolarizes membrane potential via the up-regulation of functional Kir2.1 expression and presumably enhances Ca{sup 2+} entry, resulting in the facilitation of BCEC proliferation. These findings suggest potential roles of Kir2.1 expression in functional changes of BCECs in BBB following ischemia. -- Highlights: •Hypoxic culture of brain endothelial cells (BEC) caused membrane hyperpolarization. •This hyperpolarization was due to the increased expression of Kir2.1 channels. •Hypoxia enhanced store-operated Ca{sup 2+} (SOC) entry via Kir2.1 up-regulation. •Expression levels of putative SOC

  16. Capillary Hemangioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Capillary Hemangioma En Español Read in Chinese What is a capillary hemangioma? A capillary hemangioma (“strawberry” birthmark) is a benign ( ...

  17. The superoxide dismutase mimetic tempol does not alleviate glucocorticoid-mediated rarefaction of rat skeletal muscle capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Erin R; Dunford, Emily C; Abdifarkosh, Ghoncheh; Turnbull, Patrick C; Perry, Christopher G R; Riddell, Michael C; Haas, Tara L

    2017-05-01

    Sustained elevations in circulating glucocorticoids elicit reductions in skeletal muscle microvascular content, but little is known of the underlying mechanisms. We hypothesized that glucocorticoid-induced oxidative stress contributes to this phenomenon. In rats that were implanted with corticosterone (CORT) or control pellets, CORT caused a significant decrease in muscle glutathione levels and a corresponding increase in protein carbonylation, an irreversible oxidative modification of proteins. Decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase and increased endothelin-1 mRNA levels were detected after 9 days of CORT, and blood flow to glycolytic muscles was diminished. Control and CORT rats were treated concurrently with drinking water containing the superoxide dismutase mimetic tempol (172 mg/L) or the α-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin (50 mg/L) for 6 or 16 days. Both tempol and prazosin alleviated skeletal muscle protein carbonylation. Tempol failed to prevent CORT-mediated capillary rarefaction and was ineffective in restoring skeletal muscle blood flow. In contrast, prazosin blocked capillary rarefaction and restored skeletal muscle blood flow to control levels. The failure of tempol to prevent CORT-induced skeletal muscle microvascular rarefaction does not support a dominant role of superoxide-induced oxidative stress in this process. Although a decrease in protein carbonylation was observed with prazosin treatment, our data suggest that the maintenance of skeletal muscle microvascular content is related more closely with counteracting the CORT-mediated influence on skeletal muscle vascular tone. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  18. Changes in intracellular calcium in brain cells of aged rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Li; Yunpeng Cao

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that voltage-dependent calcium influx, and enhancement of certain calcium-dependent processes in neurons, is related to aging. OBJECTIVE: To observe changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) in neurons of aged rats, and to compare with young rats. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized control experiment of neurophysiology was performed at the Central Laboratory of School of Pharmaceutical Science, China Medical University from June to August 2004. MATERIALS: Ten male, healthy, Wistar rats, 19 months old, were selected for the aged group. Ten male, 3-month-old, Wistar rats were selected for the young control group. Fura-2/AM was provided by the Institute of Pharmaceutical Research of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, and the F-2000 fluorospectrophotometer was a product of Hitachi, Japan. METHODS: Fluorescence Fura-2 spectrophotometer was used to measure [Ca2+]i in acutely dissociated brain cells of aged and young rats. The concentration of extracellular potassium was controlled by adding different volumes of chloridated potassium solution of high concentration. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: [Ca2+]i in neurons of young and aged rats in the presence of 1 mmol/L extracellular calcium concentration and 0 mmol/L (resting state), 5, 10, 20, and 40 mmol/L extracellular potassium. Absolute increase of [Ca2+]i in neurons of young and aged rats when extraceUular potassium was 5,10,20, 40 mmol/L. RESULTS: In the presence of 1 mmol/L extracellular Ca2+ and 0 mmol/L (resting state), 5, 10, 20, and 40 mmol/L extracellular potassium, [Ca2+]i in the neurons of aged rats was significantly less than that in young rats (P 0.05). CONCLUSION: The overload of [Ca2+]i in neurons of aged rats is greater than that of young rats under the same circumstances.

  19. Rapamycin suppresses brain aging in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosova, Nataliya G; Vitovtov, Anton O; Muraleva, Natalia A; Akulov, Andrey E; Stefanova, Natalia A; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-06-01

    Cellular and organismal aging are driven in part by the MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) pathway and rapamycin extends life span inC elegans, Drosophila and mice. Herein, we investigated effects of rapamycin on brain aging in OXYS rats. Previously we found, in OXYS rats, an early development of age-associated pathological phenotypes similar to several geriatric disorders in humans, including cerebral dysfunctions. Behavioral alterations as well as learning and memory deficits develop by 3 months. Here we show that rapamycin treatment (0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg as a food mixture daily from the age of 1.5 to 3.5 months) decreased anxiety and improved locomotor and exploratory behavior in OXYS rats. In untreated OXYS rats, MRI revealed an increase of the area of hippocampus, substantial hydrocephalus and 2-fold increased area of the lateral ventricles. Rapamycin treatment prevented these abnormalities, erasing the difference between OXYS and Wister rats (used as control). All untreated OXYS rats showed signs of neurodegeneration, manifested by loci of demyelination. Rapamycin decreased the percentage of animals with demyelination and the number of loci. Levels of Tau and phospho-Tau (T181) were increased in OXYS rats (compared with Wistar). Rapamycin significantly decreased Tau and inhibited its phosphorylation in the hippocampus of OXYS and Wistar rats. Importantly, rapamycin treatment caused a compensatory increase in levels of S6 and correspondingly levels of phospo-S6 in the frontal cortex, indicating that some downstream events were compensatory preserved, explaining the lack of toxicity. We conclude that rapamycin in low chronic doses can suppress brain aging.

  20. Comparison between capillary, venous and arterial levels of protein S100B in patients with severe brain pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrand, Ramona; Romner, Bertil; Reinstrup, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Protein S100B is soon in clinical use as a sensitive marker after mild traumatic head injury in adults. Initial studies of S100B in pediatric head injury have shown promising results. Venous sampling can be challenging in children and capillary samples are often a preferred option. The aim...... of the study was to investigate the relation between capillary, venous and arterial measurements of protein S100B, primarily by determining whether capillary S100B differ from venous and if capillary S100B can predict venous S100B levels, and secondarily, if arterial S100B samples can substitute venous samples...

  1. Simultaneous measurements of capillary filtration and diffusion capacities during graded infusions of noradrenaline (NA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) into the rat hindquarter vascular bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippe, B; Folkow, B

    1980-07-01

    The relationships between capillary diffusion capacity (PS) for Cr-EDTA respective capillary filtration capacity (CFC) and vascular resistance during graded intraarterial infusions of NA and 5-HT into the artificially constant flow perfused rat hindquarter vascular bed were investigated. During maximal vasodilatation PS for Cr-EDTA was some 5.5--5.7 ml/min x 100 g, CFC some 0.04 ml/min x mmHg x 100 g, while vascular resistance was 2.8 mmHg x ml-1 x min x 100 g (PRU100) and isogravimetric capillary pressure 12.8 mmHg on an average. Setting out from maximal vasodilatation, increasing doses of NA and 5-HT produced graded reductions in capillary surface area as reflected by progressive decreases in both PS for Cr-EDTA and CFC. These changes occurred simultaneously with progressive increases in both pre- and postcapillary resistances, causing elevations in both arterial and capillary hydrostatic pressures and hance in capillary fluid filtration at constant flow. Capillary hydrostatic pressure increased maximally to 45 mmHg (calculated for NA) and vascular resistance to some 21 mmHg x ml-1 x min x 100 g on an average. PS for Cr-EDTA decreased maximally to some 0.7--1 ml/min x 100 g for both NA and 5-HT and furthermore, the relationships between PS for Cr-EDTA and PRU100 for NA respective 5-HT were almost identical. This was taken to indicate that capillary surface area for nutritional exchange is affected similarly by both drugs. However, the CFU-PRU100 relationship was shifted towards some 30--50% higher CFC values for 5-HT than for NA at almost every level of vasoconstriction. This might suggest that 5-HT besides reducing capillary surface area also induced moderate increases in capillary permeability though increases in number and/or radius of large pores (gaps) (cf. Rippe, Kamiya & Folkow 1978). Even during NA-induced vasoconstriction, when virtually no changes in capillary permeability occurred, PS for Cr-EDTA was reduced to a relatively greater extent than CFC, the

  2. Expression of neuropeptide Y in rat brain ischemia

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    Babović Siniša S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The immunohistochemical method was used to follow the expression of neuropeptide Y in the course of pre ischemia of the rat brain. The aim of the study was to define all the areas of expression of this protein, show their localization, their map of distribution and histological types. Material and Methods. All the sections of telencephalon, diencephalon and midbrain were studied in resistant, and transitory ischemia, which enabled us to observe the reaction of neurons to an ischemic attack or to repeated attacks. The mapping was done for all three proteins by introducing our results into the maps of rat brain atlas, George Paxinos, Charles Watson. Photographing and protein expression was done using Analysis program. Results. The results of this research show that there is a differens in reaction between the resistant and transitory ischemia groups of rats, especially in the caudoputamen, gyrus dentatus, corpus amygdaloideum, particularly in the medial nucleus. The mapping shows the reaction in caudoputamen, gyrusdentatus, corpus amygdaloideum - especially in the central nucleus, then in the sensitive and secondary auditory cortex, mostly in the laminae V/VI, but less in neuron groups CA1, CA2, CA3 of hippocampus. Discussion. The phylogenetically older parts of the brain-rhinencephalon, also showed reaction, which lead us to conclude that both newer and older brain structures reacted immunohistochemically. Histological data have shown that small neurons are most commonly found while the second most common ones are big pyramidal cells of multipolar and bipolar type, with a different body shape. Conclusion. Our findings have confirmed the results obtained in some rare studies dealing with this issue, and offered a precise and detailed map of cells expressing neuropeptide Y in the rat brain following ischemic attack.

  3. Nerve growth factor receptor molecules in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniuchi, M.; Schweitzer, J.B.; Johnson, E.M. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have developed a method to immunoprecipitate rat nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor proteins and have applied the method to detect NGF receptor molecules in the rat brain. Crosslinking /sup 125/I-labeled NGF to either PC12 cells or cultured rat sympathetic neurons yielded two radiolabeled molecules (90 kDa and 220 kDa) that were immunoprecipitated by monoclonal antibody 192-IgG. Further, 192-IgG precipitated two radiolabeled proteins, with the expected sizes (80 kDa and 210 kDa) of noncrosslinked NGF receptor components, from among numerous surface-iodinated PC12 cell proteins. These results demonstrate the specific immunoprecipitation of NGF receptor molecules by 192-IgG. They applied the /sup 125/I-NGF crosslinking and 192-IgG-mediated immunoprecipitation procedures to plasma membrane preparations of rat brain: NGF receptor molecules of the same molecular masses as the peripheral receptor components were consistently detected in all regions and in preparations from whole brains. Removal of the peripheral sympathetic innervation of the brain did not eliminate these NGF receptor proteins, indicating that the receptor is endogenous to central nervous system tissues. They also observed retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-labeled 192-IgG from the parietal cortex to the nucleus basalis and from the hippocampus to the nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca and the medial septal nucleus. These findings demonstrate the presence in brain of NGF receptor molecules indistinguishable from those of the peripheral nervous system.

  4. Preserved modular network organization in the sedated rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dany V D'Souza

    Full Text Available Translation of resting-state functional connectivity (FC magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI applications from human to rodents has experienced growing interest, and bears a great potential in pre-clinical imaging as it enables assessing non-invasively the topological organization of complex FC networks (FCNs in rodent models under normal and various pathophysiological conditions. However, to date, little is known about the organizational architecture of FCNs in rodents in a mentally healthy state, although an understanding of the same is of paramount importance before investigating networks under compromised states. In this study, we characterized the properties of resting-state FCN in an extensive number of Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 40 under medetomidine sedation by evaluating its modular organization and centrality of brain regions and tested for reproducibility. Fully-connected large-scale complex networks of positively and negatively weighted connections were constructed based on Pearson partial correlation analysis between the time courses of 36 brain regions encompassing almost the entire brain. Applying recently proposed complex network analysis measures, we show that the rat FCN exhibits a modular architecture, comprising six modules with a high between subject reproducibility. In addition, we identified network hubs with strong connections to diverse brain regions. Overall our results obtained under a straight medetomidine protocol show for the first time that the community structure of the rat brain is preserved under pharmacologically induced sedation with a network modularity contrasting from the one reported for deep anesthesia but closely resembles the organization described for the rat in conscious state.

  5. Effect of glycolysis inhibition on mitochondrial function in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Ramírez, D; Torres-Vargas, C E; Guerrero-Castillo, S; Uribe-Carvajal, S; Hernández-Pando, R; Pedraza-Chaverri, J; Orozco-Ibarra, M

    2012-05-01

    Inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase enhances the neural vulnerability to excitotoxicity both in vivo and in vitro through an unknown mechanism possibly related to mitochondrial failure. However, as the effect of glycolysis inhibition on mitochondrial function in brain has not been studied, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of glycolysis inhibition induced by iodoacetate on mitochondrial function and oxidative stress in brain. Mitochondria were isolated from brain cortex, striatum and cerebellum of rats treated systemically with iodoacetate (25 mg/kg/day for 3 days). Oxygen consumption, ATP synthesis, transmembrane potential, reactive oxygen species production, lipoperoxidation, glutathione levels, and aconitase activity were assessed. Oxygen consumption and aconitase activity decreased in the brain cortex and striatum, showing that glycolysis inhibition did not trigger severe mitochondrial impairment, but a slight mitochondrial malfunction and oxidative stress were present.

  6. Effect of acute thioacetamide administration on rat brain phospholipid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osada, J.; Aylagas, H.; Miro-Obradors, M.J.; Arce, C.; Palacios-Alaiz, E.; Cascales, M. (Tufs Univ., Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Brain phospholipid composition and the ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate incorporation into brain phospholipids of control and rats treated for 3 days with thioacetamide were studied. Brain phospholipid content, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid did not show any significant change by the effect of thioacetamide. In contrast, thioacetamide induced a significant decrease in the levels of phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol and diphosphatidylglycerol. After 75 minutes of intraperitoneal label injection, specific radioactivity of all the above phospholipids with the exception of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine significantly increased. After 13 hours of isotope administration the specific radioactivity of almost all studied phospholipid classes was elevated, except for phosphatidic acid, the specific radioactivity of which did not change and for diphosphatidylglycerol which showed a decrease in specific radioactivity. These results suggest that under thioacetamide treatment brain phospholipids undergo metabolic transformations that may contribute to the hepatic encephalopathy induced by thioacetamide.

  7. Noninvasive method to assess the electrical brain activity from rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Ferrari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This research presents a noninvasive method for the acquisition of brain electrical signal in rat. Was used an electroencephalography (EEG system developed for bovine and adapted to rats. The bipolar electrode system (needle electrodes was glued on the surface of the head of the animal without surgical procedures and the other electrode was glued to the tail, as ground. The EEG activity was sampled at 120Hz for an hour. The accuracy and precision of the EEG measurement was performed using Fourier analysis and signal energy. For this, the digital signal was divided into sections successive of 3 seconds and was decomposed into four frequency bands: delta (0.3 to 4Hz, theta (4-8Hz, alpha (8-12Hz and beta (12-30Hz and energy (µV² of the series of time filtered were calculated. The method allowed the acquisition of non-invasive electrical brain signals in conscious rats and their frequency patterns were in agreement with previous studies that used surgical procedures to acquire EEG in rats. This system showed accuracy and precision and will allow further studies on behavior and to investigate the action of drugs on the central nervous system in rats without surgical procedures.

  8. Effects of shenmai injection on pulmonary aquaporin 1 in rats following traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yu; YAO Hai-xia; HU Ming-lun; WANG Liang-rong; JIN Li-da; WANG Wan-tie; LIN Li-na

    2011-01-01

    Background Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) has involved in fluid transport in diverse pulmonary edema diseases. Our study aimed to explore the dynamic changes of AQP1 in pulmonary water metabolism in rats following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the protective effect provided by shenmai injection.Methods Sixty male Sprague Dawley rats weighting 280-300 g were randomly divided into three groups: the normal control group, the model group and the shenrnai injection (SMI) group. One piece skull was taken away without injuring cerebral tissue in normal control group, while rats in model group and SMI group were subject to free fall injury in the cerebral hemisphere. Rats in model group received intraperitoneal normal sodium (15 mi/kg) at one hour post-injury and the same dose of shenmai injection instead in SMI group, respectively. The expression of AQP1 was detected by immunohistochemical analysis and semi-quantitative RT-PCR at 0 hour, 10 hours, 72 hours and 120 hours after TBI.Arterial blood gas analysis and lung wet to dry were also measured.Results AQP1 was mainly presented in the capillary endothelium and slightly alveolar epithelial cells in three groups, but the expression of AQP1 in the normal control group was positive and tenuous, weakly positive in the model and SMI groups,respectively. Compared with normal control group, AQP1 Mrna levels were down regulated in the model and SMI groups at 10 hours, 72 hours and 120 hours (P0.05).Conclusions The decreased AQP1 expression may be involved in the increased lung water content and dysfunction of pulmonary water metabolism following TBI. The treatment with SMI could improve water metabolism by promoting AQP1 expression.

  9. Expression of human factor IX in rat capillary endothelial cells: Toward somatic gene therapy for hemophilia B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shounan Yao; Wilson, J.M.; Nabel, E.G.; Kurachi, Sumiko; Hachiya, H.L.; Kurachi, Kotoku (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-09-15

    In aiming to develop a gene therapy approach for hemophilia B, the authors expressed and characterized human factor IX in rat capillary endothelial cells (CECs). Moloney murine leukemia virus-derived retrovirus vectors that contain human factor IX cDNA linked to heterologous promoters and the neomycin-resistant gene were constructed and employed to prepare recombinant retroviruses. Rat CECs and NIH 3T3 cells infected with these viruses were selected with the neomycin analogue, G418 sulfate, and tested for expression of factor IX. A construct with the factor IX cDNA under direct control by long terminal repeat gave the highest level of expression as quantitated by immunoassays as well as clotting activity assays. A single RNA transcript of 4.4 kilobases predicted by the construct and a recombinant factor IX were found. The recombinant human factor IX produced showed full clotting activity, demonstrating that CECs have an efficient mechanism for posttranslational modifications, including {gamma}-carboxylation, essential for its biological activity. These results, in addition to other properties of the endothelium, including large number of cells, accessibility, and direct contact with the circulating blood, suggest that CECs can serve as an efficient drug delivery vehicle producing factor IX in a somatic gene therapy for hemophilia B.

  10. Prostaglandin E2 metabolism in rat brain: Role of the blood-brain interfaces

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    Strazielle Nathalie

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 is involved in the regulation of synaptic activity and plasticity, and in brain maturation. It is also an important mediator of the central response to inflammatory challenges. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of the tissues forming the blood-brain interfaces to act as signal termination sites for PGE2 by metabolic inactivation. Methods The specific activity of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase was measured in homogenates of microvessels, choroid plexuses and cerebral cortex isolated from postnatal and adult rat brain, and compared to the activity measured in peripheral organs which are established signal termination sites for prostaglandins. PGE2 metabolites produced ex vivo by choroid plexuses were identified and quantified by HPLC coupled to radiochemical detection. Results The data confirmed the absence of metabolic activity in brain parenchyma, and showed that no detectable activity was associated with brain microvessels forming the blood-brain barrier. By contrast, 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase activity was measured in both fourth and lateral ventricle choroid plexuses from 2-day-old rats, albeit at a lower level than in lung or kidney. The activity was barely detectable in adult choroidal tissue. Metabolic profiles indicated that isolated choroid plexus has the ability to metabolize PGE2, mainly into 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGE2. In short-term incubations, this metabolite distributed in the tissue rather than in the external medium, suggesting its release in the choroidal stroma. Conclusion The rat choroidal tissue has a significant ability to metabolize PGE2 during early postnatal life. This metabolic activity may participate in signal termination of centrally released PGE2 in the brain, or function as an enzymatic barrier acting to maintain PGE2 homeostasis in CSF during the critical early postnatal period of brain development.

  11. Differential Expression of Sirtuins in the Ageing Rat Brain

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    Gilles J. Guillemin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Although there are seven mammalian sirtuins (SIRT1-7, little is known about their expression in the ageing brain. To characterise the change(s in mRNA and protein expression of SIRT1-7 and their associated proteins in the brain of ‘physiologically’ aged Wistar rats. We tested mRNA and protein expression levels of rat SIRT1-7, and the levels of associated proteins in the brain using RT-PCR and western blotting. Our data shows that SIRT1 expression increases with age, concurrently with increased acetylated p53 levels in all brain regions investigated. SIRT2 and FOXO3a protein levels increased only in the occipital lobe. SIRT3-5 expression declined significantly in the hippocampus and frontal lobe, associated with increases in superoxide and fatty acid oxidation levels, and acetylated CPS-1 protein expression, and a reduction in MnSOD level. While SIRT6 expression declines significantly with age acetylated H3K9 protein expression is increased throughout the brain. SIRT7 and Pol I protein expression increased in the frontal lobe. This study identifies previously unknown roles for sirtuins in regulating cellular homeostasis and healthy ageing.

  12. Postnatal development of aminopeptidase (arylamidase) activity in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gandarias, J M; Ramírez, M; Zulaica, J; Iribar, C; Casis, L

    1989-01-01

    Changes in the activities of Leu- and Arg-arylamidase in rat frontal and parietal cortices and the subcortical area (including thalamus, hypothalamus, and striatum) were examined in the 2nd, 4th, 8th, 12th, and 24th weeks of life. Average levels found in the subcortical region were greater than those in the cortical areas. The most marked changes in enzymatic activity in the course of brain development were found in the subcortical structure. Leu-arylamidase activity increased from the 2nd week up to the 8th week, returning to the 2nd week level at the 12th and 24th weeks. The maximum levels of Arg-arylamidase activity were found at the 4th and 8th weeks. These data suggest that proteolytic activity is involved in the postnatal development of rat brain.

  13. Effects of NOS inhibitor on dentate gyrus neurogenesis after diffuse brain injury in the adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SunLi-Sha; XuJiang-ping

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors on dentate gyrus neurogenesis after diffuse brain injury (DBI) in the adult rat brain. Methods Adult male SD rats were subjected to diffuse brain injury (DBI) model. By using systemic bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells, we compared the proliferation rate of

  14. Effects of magnesium sulfate on brain mitochondrial respiratory function in rats after experimental traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许民辉; 代文光; 邓洵鼎

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of magnesium sulfate on brain mitochondrial respiratory function in rats after experimental traumatic brain injury and the possible mechanism.Methods: The middle degree brain injury in rats was made by BIM-III multi-function impacting machine. The brain mitochondrial respiratory function was measured with oxygen electrode and the ultra-structural changes were observed with transmission electron microscope (TEM).Results: 1. The brain mitochondrial respiratory stage III and respiration control rate reduced significantly in the untreated groups within 24 and 72 hours. But treated Group A showed certain degree of recovery of respiratory function; treated Group B showed further improvement. 2. Untreated Group, treated Groups A and B had different degrees of mitochondrial ultra-structural damage respectively, which could be attenuated after the treatment with magnesium sulfate.Conclusions: The mitochondrial respiratory function decreases significantly after traumatic brain injury. But it can be apparently improved after magnesium sulfate management along with the attenuated damage of mitochondria discovered by TEM. The longer course of treatment can obtain a better improvement of mitochondrial respiratory function.

  15. Multiple opiate receptors in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S.; Bhargava, H.N.

    1986-03-01

    The characteristics of ..mu.., delta and kappa -opiate receptors in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were determined using the receptor binding assays. The ligands used were /sup 3/H-naltrexone (..mu..), /sup 3/H-ethylketocyclazocine (EKC, kappa) and /sup 3/H-Tyr-D-Ser-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr (DSTLE, delta). Since EKC binds to ..mu.. and delta receptors in addition to kappa, the binding was done in the presence of 100 nM each of DAGO and DADLE to suppress ..mu.. and delta sites, respectively. All three ligands bound to brain membranes of WKY rats at a single high affinity site with the following B/sub max/ (fmol/mg protein) and K/sub d/ (nM) values: /sup 3/H-naltrexone (130.5; 0.43) /sup 3/H-EKC (19.8, 1.7) and /sup 3/H-DSTLE (139, 2.5). The binding of /sup 3/H-naltrexone and /sup 3/H-DSTLE in the brain of WKY and SH did not differ. A consistent increase (22%) in B/sub max/ of /sup 3/H-EKC was found in SHR compared to WKY rats. However, the K/sub d/ values did not differ. The increase in B/sub max/ was due to increases in hypothalamus and cortex. It is concluded that SH rats have higher density of kappa-opiate receptors, particularly in hypothalamus and cortex, compared to WKY rats, and that kappa-opiate receptors may be involved in the pathophysiology of hypertension.

  16. Cultured human embryonic neocortical cells survive and grow in infarcted cavities of adult rat brains and interconnect with host brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Jin-sheng; YU Jian; CUI Chun-mei; ZHAO Zhan; HONG Hua; SHENG Wen-li; TAO Yu-qian; LI Ling; HUANG Ru-xun

    2005-01-01

    Background There are no reports on exnografting cultured human fetal neocortical cells in this infracted cavities of adult rat brains. This study was undertaken to observe whether cultured human cortical neurons and astrocytes can survive and grow in the infarcted cavities of adult rat brains and whether they interconnect with host brains.Methods The right middle cerebral artery was ligated distal to the striatal branches in 16 adult stroke-prone renovascular hypertensive rats. One week later, cultured cells from human embryonic cerebral cortexes were stereotaxically transferred to the infarcted cavity of 11 rats. The other 5 rats receiving sham transplants served as controls. For immunosuppression, all transplanted rats received intraperitoneal injection of cyclosporine A daily starting on the day of grafting. Immunohistochemistry for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), synaptophysin, neurofilament, and microtubule associated protein-2 (MAP-2) was performed on brain sections perfused in situ 8 weeks after transplantation.Results Grafts in the infarcted cavities of 6 of 10 surviving rats consisted of bands of neurons with an immature appearance, bundles of fibers, and GFAP-immunopositive astrocytes, which were unevenly distributed. The grafts were rich in synaptophysin, neurofilament, and MAP2-positive neurons with long processes. The graft/host border was diffuse with dendrites apparently bridging over to the host brain, into which neurofilament immunopositive fibers protruded. Conclusion Cultured human fetal brain cells can survive and grow in the infarcted cavities of immunodepressed rats and integrate with the host brain.

  17. Marrow stromal cells administrated intracisternally to rats after traumatic brain injury migrate into the brain and improve neurological function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡德志; 周良辅; 朱剑虹

    2004-01-01

    @@ Marrow stromal cells(MSCs) have been reported to transplant into injured brain via intravenous or intraarterial or direct intracerebral administration.1-3 In the present study, we observed that MSCs migrated into the brain, survived and diffeneriated into neural cells after they were injected into the cisterna magna of rats, and that the behavior of the rats after traumatic brain injury (TBI) was improved.

  18. Brain oxidative stress induced by obstructive jaundice in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chroni, Elisabeth; Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Karageorgos, Nikolaos; Konstantinou, Dimitris; Georgiou, Christos

    2006-02-01

    The effect of experimental obstructive jaundice on the oxidative status of brain tissues in rats was examined. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: Group I was the control, group II was the sham operated, and groups III and IV were bile duct ligated and killed on the 5th and the 10th day, respectively. Oxidative stress was assessed by measuring the thiol redox state (protein and nonprotein components) and lipid peroxidation level variations in samples from the cerebral cortex, midbrain, and cerebellar tissue in all animals. Results indicated the presence of oxidative stress in the jaundiced animals that was more pronounced on the 10th day as indicated by a decrease in reduced glutathione and protein thiol and an increase in protein disulphide and lipid peroxidation. A dramatic elevation of the level of total nonprotein mixed disulphide level was found specifically in the midbrain in the 10th day group. This suggests an accumulation of nonprotein disulfides other than oxidized glutathione, which remained unchanged, in this particular brain area. This study showed a correlation between experimental obstructive jaundice and the oxidative stress in the rats' brain, implying that a similar pathogenetic mechanism may play a key role in cholestatic liver disease, resulting in hepatic encephalopathy in humans.

  19. Gelation and fodrin purification from rat brain extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levilliers, N; Péron-Renner, M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1986-06-03

    Extracts from rat brain tissue have been shown to give rise to a gel which exhibits the following features. It is mainly enriched in actin and in a high-molecular-weight protein with polypeptide chains of 235 and 240 kDa, which we identified as fodrin. Tubulin is also a major component of the gel but it appears to be trapped non-specifically during the gelation process. Gelation is pH-, ionic strength- and Ca2+-concentration-dependent, and is optimal under the conditions which promote the interaction between polymerized actin and fodrin. In a similar way to that described for the purification of rat brain actin (Levilliers, N., Péron-Renner, M., Coffe, G. and Pudles, J. (1984) Biochimie 66, 531-537), we used the gelation system as a selective means of recovering fodrin from the mixture of a low-ionic-strength extract from whole rat brain and a high-ionic-strength extract of the particulate fraction. From this gel, fodrin was purified with a good yield by a simple procedure involving gel dissociation in 0.5 M KCl and depolymerization in 0.7 M KI, Bio-Gel A-15m chromatography, followed by ammonium sulfate precipitation.

  20. Carbofuran Modulating Functions of Acetylcholinesterase from Rat Brain In Vitro

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    Vivek Kumar Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbofuran, a potential environmental xenobiotic, has the ability to cross blood brain barrier and to adversely influence brain functions. In the present study, the impact of carbofuran on the biophysical and biochemical properties of rat brain AChE has been evaluated in vitro. This enzyme was membrane-bound which could be solubilised using Triton-X100 (0.2%, v/v, a nonionic detergent, in the extraction buffer (50 mM phosphate, pH 7.4. The enzyme was highly stable up to one month when stored at -20°C and exhibited optimum activity at pH 7.4 and 37°C. AChE displayed a direct relationship between activity and varying substrate concentrations (acetylthiocholine iodide (ATI by following Michaelis-Menten curve. The Km and Vmax values as computed from the Lineweaver-Burk double reciprocal plot of the data were found to be 0.07 mM and 0.066 µmole/mL/min, respectively. The enzyme exhibited IC50 value for carbofuran equal to 6.0 nM. The steady-state kinetic studies to determine mode of action of carbofuran on rat brain AChE displayed it to be noncompetitive in nature with Ki value equal to 5 nm. These experiments suggested that rat brain AChE was very sensitive to carbofuran and this enzyme might serve as a significant biomarker of carbofuran induced neurotoxicity.

  1. Oxymatrine reduces neuroinflammation in rat brain A signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiahui Mao; Yae Hu; Ailing Zhou; Bing Zheng; Yi Liu; Yueming Du; Jia Li; Jinyang Lu; Pengcheng Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral neuroinflammation models were established by injecting 10 μg lipopolysaccharide into the hippocampus of male Sprague-Dawley rats.The rats were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of 120,90,or 60 mg/kg oxymatrine daily for three days prior to the lipopolysaccharide injection.Twenty-four hours after model induction,the hippocampus was analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR,and the cerebral cortex was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blot assay.The results of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the real-time quantitative PCR showed that the secretion and mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α were significantly decreased in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of model rats treated with oxymatrine.Western blot assay and real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that toll-like receptor 4 mRNA and protein expression were significantly decreased in the groups receiving different doses of oxymatrine.Additionally,120 and 90 mg/kg oxymatrine were shown to reduce protein levels of nuclear factor-kB p65 in the nucleus and of phosphorylated IkBα in the cytoplasm of brain cells,as detected by western blot assay.Experimental findings indicate that oxymatrine may inhibit neuroinflammation in rat brain via downregulating the expression of molecules in the toll-like receptor 4/nuclear factor-kB signaling pathway.

  2. Magnetic micelles for DNA delivery to rat brains after mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mahasweta; Wang, Chunyan; Bedi, Raminder; Mohapatra, Shyam S; Mohapatra, Subhra

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes significant mortality, long term disability and psychological symptoms. Gene therapy is a promising approach for treatment of different pathological conditions. Here we tested chitosan and polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated magnetic micelles (CP-mag micelles or CPMMs), a potential MRI contrast agent, to deliver a reporter DNA to the brain after mild TBI (mTBI). CPMM-tomato plasmid (ptd) conjugate expressing a red-fluorescent protein (RFP) was administered intranasally immediately after mTBI or sham surgery in male SD rats. Evans blue extravasation following mTBI suggested CPMM-ptd entry into the brain via the compromised blood-brain barrier. Magnetofection increased the concentration of CPMMs in the brain. RFP expression was observed in the brain (cortex and hippocampus), lung and liver 48 h after mTBI. CPMM did not evoke any inflammatory response by themselves and were excreted from the body. These results indicate the possibility of using intranasally administered CPMM as a theranostic vehicle for mTBI. From the clinical editor: In this study, chitosan and PEI-coated magnetic micelles (CPMM) were demonstrated as potentially useful vehicles in traumatic brain injury in a rodent model. Magnetofection increased the concentration of CPMMs in the brain and, after intranasal delivery, CPMM did not evoke any inflammatory response and were excreted from the body.

  3. Effects of protein malnutrition on oxidative status in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feoli, Ana M; Siqueira, Ionara R; Almeida, Lúcia; Tramontina, Ana C; Vanzella, Cláudia; Sbaraini, Sabrina; Schweigert, Ingrid D; Netto, Carlos A; Perry, Marcos L S; Gonçalves, Carlos A

    2006-02-01

    This study evaluated the effects of protein malnutrition on oxidative status in rat brain areas. We investigated various parameters of oxidative status, free radical content (dichlorofluorescein formation), indexes of damage to lipid (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances assay), and protein damage (tryptophan and tyrosine content) in addition to total antioxidant reactivity levels and antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in different cerebral regions (cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum) from rats subjected to prenatal and postnatal protein malnutrition (control 25% casein and protein malnutrition 7% casein). Protein malnutrition altered various parameters of oxidative stress, especially damage to macromolecules. Free radical content was unchanged by protein malnutrition. There was an increase in levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, the index of lipid peroxidation, in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex (P brain structures (P malnutrition increased oxidative damage to lipids and proteins from the studied brain areas. These results may be an indication of an important mechanism for changes in brain development that are caused by protein malnutrition.

  4. Deferoxamine attenuates acute hydrocephalus after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinbing; Chen, Zhi; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F; Hua, Ya

    2014-10-01

    Acute post-traumatic ventricular dilation and hydrocephalus are relatively frequent consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Several recent studies have indicated that high iron levels in brain may relate to hydrocephalus development after intracranial hemorrhage. However, the role of iron in the development of post-traumatic hydrocephalus is still unclear. This study was to determine whether or not iron has a role in hydrocephalus development after TBI. TBI was induced by lateral fluid-percussion in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Some rats had intraventricular injection of iron. Acute hydrocephalus was measured by magnetic resonance T2-weighted imaging and brain hemorrhage was determined by T2* gradient-echo sequence imaging and brain hemoglobin levels. The effect of deferoxamine on TBI-induced hydrocephalus was examined. TBI resulted in acute hydrocephalus at 24 h (lateral ventricle volume: 24.1 ± 3.0 vs. 9.9 ± 0.2 mm(3) in sham group). Intraventricular injection of iron also caused hydrocephalus (25.7 ± 3.4 vs. 9.0 ± 0.6 mm(3) in saline group). Deferoxamine treatment attenuated TBI-induced hydrocephalus and heme oxygenase-1 upregulation. In conclusion, iron may contribute to acute hydrocephalus after TBI.

  5. Relationship between Morphofunctional Changes in Open Traumatic Brain Injury and the Severity of Brain Damage in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakova, F M; Barskov, I V; Gulyaev, M V; Prokhorenko, S V; Romanova, G A; Grechko, A V

    2016-07-01

    A correlation between the severity of morphofunctional disturbances and the volume of brain tissue injury determined by MRT was demonstrated on the model of open traumatic brain injury in rats. A relationship between the studied parameters (limb placing and beam walking tests and histological changes) and impact force (the height of load fell onto exposed brain surface) was revealed.

  6. Distinct transcriptional changes in donor kidneys upon brain death induction in rats : Insights in the processes of brain death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurs, TA; Gerbens, F; van der Hoeven, JAB; Ottens, PJ; Kooi, KA; Leuvenink, HGD; Hofstra, RMW; Ploeg, RJ

    2004-01-01

    Brain death affects hormone regulation, inflammatory reactivity and hemodynamic stability. In transplant models, donor organs retrieved from brain dead (BD) rats suffer from increased rates of primary nonfunction and lower graft survival. To unravel the mechanisms behind brain death we have performe

  7. Influence of histidine on zinc transport into rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Atsushi; Suzuki, Mai; Okada, Shoji; Oku, Naoto [Shizuoka Univ. (Japan). School of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    2000-06-01

    The brain of rats injected intravenously with {sup 65}Zn-His or {sup 65}ZnCl{sub 2} was subjected to autoradiography to study the role of histidine on zinc transport into the brain. One hour after injection, the radioactivity from {sup 65}Zn-His was largely concentrated in the choroid plexus in the ventricles. Six days after injection, the radioactivity from {sup 65}Zn-His was relatively concentrated in the hippocampal CA3 and dentate gyrus and the amygdala. The relative distribution of {sup 65}Zn-His in the brain was similar to that of {sup 65}ZnCl{sub 2} group at both 1 h and 6 days, suggesting that histidine may participate in zinc uptake in the brain. On the other hand, the clearance of the {sup 65}Zn-His group from the blood was higher than that of the {sup 65}ZnCl{sub 2} group. Brain uptake of the former was lower than that of the latter both 1 h and 6 days after injection. These results suggest that zinc uptake in the brain is influenced by histidine levels in the bloodstream. (author)

  8. Photoacoustic imaging for transvascular drug delivery to the rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ryota; Sato, Shunichi; Tsunoi, Yasuyuki; Kawauchi, Satoko; Takemura, Toshiya; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2015-03-01

    Transvascular drug delivery to the brain is difficult due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, various methods for safely opening the BBB have been investigated, for which real-time imaging methods are desired both for the blood vessels and distribution of a drug. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, which enables depth-resolved visualization of chromophores in tissue, would be useful for this purpose. In this study, we performed in vivo PA imaging of the blood vessels and distribution of a drug in the rat brain by using an originally developed compact PA imaging system with fiber-based illumination. As a test drug, Evans blue (EB) was injected to the tail vein, and a photomechanical wave was applied to the targeted brain tissue to increase the permeability of the blood vessel walls. For PA imaging of blood vessels and EB distribution, nanosecond pulses at 532 nm and 670 nm were used, respectively. We clearly visualized blood vessels with diameters larger than 50 μm and the distribution of EB in the brain, showing spatiotemporal characteristics of EB that was transvascularly delivered to the target tissue in the brain.

  9. Paravascular channels, cisterns, and the subarachnoid space in the rat brain: A single compartment with preferential pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedussi, Beatrice; van der Wel, Nicole N; de Vos, Judith; van Veen, Henk; Siebes, Maria; VanBavel, Ed; Bakker, Erik Ntp

    2016-06-15

    Recent evidence suggests an extensive exchange of fluid and solutes between the subarachnoid space and the brain interstitium, involving preferential pathways along blood vessels. We studied the anatomical relations between brain vasculature, cerebrospinal fluid compartments, and paravascular spaces in male Wistar rats. A fluorescent tracer was infused into the cisterna magna, without affecting intracranial pressure. Tracer distribution was analyzed using a 3D imaging cryomicrotome, confocal microscopy, and correlative light and electron microscopy. We found a strong 3D colocalization of tracer with major arteries and veins in the subarachnoid space and large cisterns, attributed to relatively large subarachnoid space volumes around the vessels. Confocal imaging confirmed this colocalization and also revealed novel cisternal connections between the subarachnoid space and ventricles. Unlike the vessels in the subarachnoid space, penetrating arteries but not veins were surrounded by tracer. Correlative light and electron microscopy images indicated that this paravascular space was located outside of the endothelial layer in capillaries and just outside of the smooth muscle cells in arteries. In conclusion, the cerebrospinal fluid compartment, consisting of the subarachnoid space, cisterns, ventricles, and para-arteriolar spaces, forms a continuous and extensive network that surrounds and penetrates the rat brain, in which mixing may facilitate exchange between interstitial fluid and cerebrospinal fluid.

  10. Lack of action of exogenously administered T3 on the fetal rat brain despite expression of the monocarboxylate transporter 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijota-Martínez, Carmen; Díez, Diego; Morreale de Escobar, Gabriella; Bernal, Juan; Morte, Beatriz

    2011-04-01

    Mutations of the monocarboxylate transporter 8 gene (MCT8, SLC16A2) cause the Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome, an X-linked syndrome of severe intellectual deficit and neurological impairment. Mct8 transports thyroid hormones (T4 and T3), and the Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome is likely caused by lack of T3 transport to neurons during critical periods of fetal brain development. To evaluate the role of Mct8 in thyroid hormone action in the fetal brain we administered T4 or T3 to thyroidectomized pregnant dams treated with methyl-mercapto-imidazol to produce maternal and fetal hypothyroidism. Gene expression was then measured in the fetal cerebral cortex. T4 increased Camk4, Sema3c, and Slc7a3 expression, but T3 was without effect. To investigate the cause for the lack of T3 action we analyzed the expression of organic anion transport polypeptide (Oatp14, Slco1c1), a T4 transporter, and Mct8 (Slc16a2), a T4 and T3 transporter, by confocal microscopy. Both proteins were present in the brain capillaries forming the blood-brain barrier and in the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus forming the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. It is concluded that T4 from the maternal compartment influences gene expression in the fetal cerebral cortex, possibly after transport via organic anion transporter polypeptide and/or Mct8, and conversion to T3 in the astrocytes. On the other hand, T3 does not reach the target neurons despite the presence of Mct8. The data indicate that T4, through local deiodination, provides most T3 in the fetal rat brain. The role of Mct8 as a T3 transporter in the fetal rat brain is therefore uncertain.

  11. Mass spectrometry imaging of rat brain lipid profile changes over time following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Aurelie; Muller, Ludovic; Jackson, Shelley N; Post, Jeremy; Baldwin, Katherine; Hoffer, Barry; Balaban, Carey D; Barbacci, Damon; Schultz, J Albert; Gouty, Shawn; Cox, Brian M; Woods, Amina S

    2016-10-15

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common public health issue that may contribute to chronic degenerative disorders. Membrane lipids play a key role in tissue responses to injury, both as cell signals and as components of membrane structure and cell signaling. This study demonstrates the ability of high resolution mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) to assess sequences of responses of lipid species in a rat controlled cortical impact model for concussion. A matrix of implanted silver nanoparticles was implanted superficially in brain sections for matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALDI) imaging of 50μm diameter microdomains across unfixed cryostat sections of rat brain. Ion-mobility time-of-flight MS was used to analyze and map changes over time in brain lipid composition in a rats after Controlled Cortical Impact (CCI) TBI. Brain MS images showed changes in sphingolipids near the CCI site, including increased ceramides and decreased sphingomyelins, accompanied by changes in glycerophospholipids and cholesterol derivatives. The kinetics differed for each lipid class; for example ceramides increased as early as 1 day after the injury whereas other lipids changes occurred between 3 and 7 days post injury. Silver nanoparticles MALDI matrix is a sensitive new tool for revealing previously undetectable cellular injury response and remodeling in neural, glial and vascular structure of the brain. Lipid biochemical and structural changes after TBI could help highlighting molecules that can be used to determine the severity of such injuries as well as to evaluate the efficacy of potential treatments. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Brain docosahexaenoic acid status and learning in young rats submitted to dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid deficiency and supplementation limited to lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Calatayud, Salvador; Redondo, Carlos; Martín, Eva; Ruiz, José Ignacio; García-Fuentes, Miguel; Sanjurjo, Pablo

    2005-05-01

    N-3 fatty acid deficiency has been related to decreased docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and increased docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) levels in brain and to learning disadvantages. The influence of n-3 deficiency and supplementation on brain fatty acids and learning were investigated in young rats. Newborn Wistar rats were assigned to three groups of cross-foster mothers. The control group (C) was nursed by mothers that received essential fatty acids during pregnancy and lactation, and the deficient group (D) was nursed by mothers that did not receive those fatty acids. The supplemental group (S) had the same conditions as D, receiving an additional DHA and arachidonic acid supplement during lactation. Cerebral cortex and hippocampus fatty acid composition was examined using thin-layer and capillary column gas chromatography, and learning was measured by passive-avoidance procedure. D brains showed low DHA and high DPA levels, but S brain composition was similar to C. Learning in the S group was unaffected, but in the D group, it was poorer than C. Learning was directly correlated with DHA levels and inversely with DPA levels in brain. Low DHA and high DPA brain levels both were correlated with poor learning. DPA seems not to be a suitable brain functional analogue of DHA, and DHA supplementation reversed both biochemical and learning adverse effects observed in n-3 deficiency.

  13. Milk Collection in the Rat Using Capillary Tubes and Estimation of Milk Fat Content by Creamatocrit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Heather A; Hallam, Megan C; Reimer, Raylene A

    2015-12-16

    Milk, as the sole source of nutrition for the newborn mammal, provides the necessary nutrients and energy for offspring growth and development. It also contains a vast number of bioactive compounds that greatly affect the development of the neonate. The analysis of milk components will help elucidate key factors that link maternal metabolism and health with offspring growth and development. The laboratory rat represents a popular model organism for maternal studies, and rat milk can be used to examine the effect of various maternal physiological, nutritional, and pharmacological interventions on milk components, which may then impact offspring health. Here a simple method of manually collecting milk from the lactating rat that can be performed by a single investigator, does not require specialized vacuum or suction equipment, and provides sufficient milk for subsequent downstream analysis is described. A method for estimating the fat content of milk by measuring the percentage of cream within the milk sample, known as the creamatocrit, is also presented. These methods can ultimately be used to increase insight into maternal-child health and to elucidate maternal factors that are involved in proper growth and development of offspring.

  14. In utero exposure to microwave radiation and rat brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, J H; Hardy, K A; Chamness, A F

    1984-01-01

    Timed-pregnancy rats were exposed in a circular waveguide system starting on day 2 of gestation. The system operated at 2,450 MHz (pulsed waves; 8 microseconds PW; 830 pps). Specific absorption rate (SAR) was maintained at 0.4 W/kg by increasing the input power as the animals grew in size. On day 18 of gestation the dams were removed from the waveguide cages and euthanized; the fetuses were removed and weighed. Fetal brains were excised and weighed, and brain RNA, DNA and protein were determined. Values for measured parameters of the radiated fetuses did not differ significantly from those of sham-exposed fetuses. A regression of brain weight on body weight showed no micrencephalous fetuses in the radiation group when using as a criterion a regression line based on two standard errors of the estimate of the sham-exposed group. In addition, metrics derived from brain DNA (ie, cell number and cell size) showed no significant differences when radiation was compared to sham exposure. We conclude that 2,450-MHz microwave radiation, at an SAR of 0.4 W/kg, did not produce significant alterations in brain organogenesis.

  15. Capillary sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... several times a day using capillary blood sampling. Disadvantages to capillary blood sampling include: Only a limited ... do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 1997-2017, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication ...

  16. Gene Expression Profiling during Pregnancy in Rat Brain Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Phyllis E

    2014-03-04

    The neurophysiological changes that occur during pregnancy in the female mammal have led to the coining of the phrases "expectant brain" and "maternal brain". Although much is known of the hormonal changes during pregnancy, alterations in neurotransmitter gene expression have not been well-studied. We examined gene expression in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) during pregnancy based on the fact that this nucleus not only modulates the physiological changes that occur during pregnancy but is also involved in the development of maternal behavior. This study was designed to identify genes that are differentially expressed between mid- and late-pregnancy in order to determine which genes may be associated with the onset and display of maternal behavior and the development of the maternal brain. A commercially available PCR array containing 84 neurotransmitter receptor and regulator genes (RT2 Profiler PCR array) was used. Brains were harvested from rats on days 12 and 21 of gestation, frozen, and micropunched to obtain the VMH. Total RNA was extracted, cDNA prepared, and SYBR Green qPCR was performed. In the VMH, expression of five genes were reduced on day 21 of gestation compared to day 12 (Chrna6, Drd5, Gabrr2, Prokr2, and Ppyr1) whereas Chat, Chrm5, Drd4, Gabra5, Gabrg2, LOC289606, Nmu5r2, and Npy5r expression was elevated. Five genes were chosen to be validated in an additional experiment based on their known involvement in maternal behavior onset. This experiment confirmed that gene expression for both the CCK-A receptor and the GABAAR γ2 receptor increases at the end of pregnancy. In general, these results identify genes possibly involved in the establishment of the maternal brain in rats and indicate possible new genes to be investigated.

  17. Characteristics of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nukina,Itaru

    1983-06-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh receptors were studied in the rat central nervous system (CNS using 3H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB, an antagonist of muscarinic ACh receptors. Scatchard analysis indicated that the rat CNS had a single 3H-QNB binding site with an apparent dissociation constant (Kd of 5.0 X 10(-10 M. Li+, Zn++ and Cu++ had strong effects on 3H-QNB binding which indicates that these metal ions might play important roles at muscarinic ACh receptor sites in the brain. Since antidepressants and antischizophrenic drugs displaced the binding of 3H-QNB, the anticholinergic effects of these drugs need to be taken into account when they are applied clinically. The muscarinic ACh receptor was successfully solubilized with lysophosphatidylcholine. By gel chromatography, with a Sepharose 6B column, the solubilized muscarinic ACh receptor molecule eluted at the fraction corresponding to a Stokes' radius of 6.1 nm. With the use of sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation, the molecular weight of the solubilized muscarinic ACh receptor was determined to be about 90,000 daltons. The regional distribution of 3H-QNB binding in rat brain was examined, and the highest level of 3H-QNB binding was found to be in the striatum followed by cerebral cortex and hippocampus, indicating that muscarinic ACh mechanisms affect CNS function mainly through these areas.

  18. Measurement of tritiated norepinephrine metabolism in intact rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitt, M.; Kowalik, S.; Barkai, A.I. (New York State Psychiatric Inst., New York (USA))

    1983-06-01

    A procedure for the study of NE metabolism in the intact rat brain is described. The method involves ventriculocisternal perfusion of the adult male rat with artificial CSF containing (/sup 3/H)NE. Radioactivity in the perfusate associated with NE and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxymandelic acid (DOMA), 3,4-dihydroxphenylethyleneglycol (DHPG), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxymandelic acid (VMA), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol (MHPG), and normetanephrine (NMN) is separated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). After 80 min the radioactivity in the perfusate reaches an apparent steady-state. Analysis of the steady-state samples shows higher activity in the fractions corresponding to DHPG and MHPG than in those corresponding to DOMA and VMA, confirming glycol formation as the major pathway of NE metabolism in the rat brain. Pretreatment with an MAO inhibitor (tranylcypromine) results in a marked decrease in the deaminated metabolites DHPG and MHPG and a concurrent increase in NMN. The results indicate this to be a sensitive procedure for the in vivo determination of changes in NE metabolism.

  19. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia attenuates traumatic brain injury in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaohuan; Wei, Zheng Zachory; Espinera, Alyssa; Lee, Jin Hwan; Ji, Xiaoya; Wei, Ling; Dix, Thomas A; Yu, Shan Ping

    2015-05-01

    Neonatal brain trauma is linked to higher risks of mortality and neurological disability. The use of mild to moderate hypothermia has shown promising potential against brain injuries induced by stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) in various experimental models and in clinical trials. Conventional methods of physical cooling, however, are difficult to use in acute treatments and in induction of regulated hypothermia. In addition, general anesthesia is usually required to mitigate the negative effects of shivering during physical cooling. Our recent investigations demonstrate the potential therapeutic benefits of pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) using the neurotensin receptor (NTR) agonist HPI201 (formerly known as ABS201) in stroke and TBI models of adult rodents. The present investigation explored the brain protective effects of HPI201 in a P14 rat pediatric model of TBI induced by controlled cortical impact. When administered via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, HPI201 induced dose-dependent reduction of body and brain temperature. A 6-h hypothermic treatment, providing an overall 2-3°C reduction of brain and body temperature, showed significant effect of attenuating the contusion volume versus TBI controls. Attenuation occurs whether hypothermia is initiated 15min or 2h after TBI. No shivering response was seen in HPI201-treated animals. HPI201 treatment also reduced TUNEL-positive and TUNEL/NeuN-colabeled cells in the contusion area and peri-injury regions. TBI-induced blood-brain barrier damage was attenuated by HPI201 treatment, evaluated using the Evans Blue assay. HPI201 significantly decreased MMP-9 levels and caspase-3 activation, both of which are pro-apototic, while it increased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene expression in the peri-contusion region. In addition, HPI201 prevented the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6. In sensorimotor activity assessments, rats in the HPI201

  20. Transport of monocarboxylic acids at the blood-brain barrier: Studies with monolayers of primary cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terasaki, T.; Takakuwa, S.; Moritani, S.; Tsuji, A. (Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University (Japan))

    1991-09-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the transport of monocarboxylic acids (MCAs) were studied by using primary cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial cells. Concentration-dependent uptake of acetic acid was observed, and the kinetic parameters were estimated as follows: the Michaelis constant, Kt, was 3.41 {plus minus} 1.87 mM, the maximum uptake rate, Jmax, was 144.7 {plus minus} 55.7 nmol/mg of protein/min and the nonsaturable first-order rate constant, Kd, was 6.66 {plus minus} 1.98 microliters/mg of protein/min. At medium pH below 7.0, the uptake rate of (3H)acetic acid increased markedly with decreasing medium pH, whereas pH-independent uptake was observed in the presence of 10 mM acetic acid. An energy requirement for (3H)acetic acid uptake was also demonstrated, because metabolic inhibitors (2,4-dinitrophenol and rotenone) reduced significantly the uptake rate (P less than .05). Carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoro-methoxyphenylhydrazone, a protonophore, inhibited significantly the uptake of (3H)acetic acid at medium pH of 5.0 and 6.0, whereas 4,4{prime}-diisothiocyanostilben-2,2{prime}-disulfonic acid did not. Several MCAs inhibited significantly the uptake rate of (3H)acetic acid, whereas di- and tricarboxylic acids did not. The uptake of (3H)acetic acid was competitively inhibited by salicylic acid, with an inhibition constant, Ki, of 3.60 mM, suggesting a common transport system between acetic acid and salicylic acid. Moreover, at the medium pH of 7.4, salicylic acid and valproic acid inhibited significantly the uptake of (3H)acetic acid, demonstrating that the transport of MCA drugs could also be ascribed to the MCA transport system at the physiologic pH.

  1. Sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2 expression and activity in brain capillary endothelial cells after transient ischemia in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Gess

    Full Text Available Expression and transport activity of Sodium-dependent Vitamin C Transporter 2 (SVCT2 was shown in various tissues and organs. Vitamin C was shown to be cerebroprotective in several animal models of stroke. Data on expression, localization and transport activity of SVCT2 after cerebral ischemia, however, has been scarce so far. Thus, we studied the expression of SVCT2 after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in mice by immunohistochemistry. We found an upregulation of SVCT2 after stroke. Co-stainings with Occludin, Von-Willebrand Factor and CD34 demonstrated localization of SVCT2 in brain capillary endothelial cells in the ischemic area after stroke. Time-course analyses of SVCT2 expression by immunohistochemistry and western blots showed upregulation in the subacute phase of 2-5 days. Radioactive uptake assays using (14C-labelled ascorbic acid showed a significant increase of ascorbic acid uptake into the brain after stroke. Taken together, these results provide evidence for the expression and transport activity of SVCT2 in brain capillary endothelial cells after transient ischemia in mice. These results may lead to the development of novel neuroprotective strategies in stroke therapy.

  2. Regulation of store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry activity by cell cycle dependent up-regulation of Orai2 in brain capillary endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kito, Hiroaki [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Pharmacology, Division of Pathological Sciences, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto (Japan); Yamamura, Hisao; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hideto [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ohya, Susumu [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Pharmacology, Division of Pathological Sciences, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto (Japan); Asai, Kiyofumi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Imaizumi, Yuji, E-mail: yimaizum@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-04-10

    Store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) via Orai1 and STIM1 complex is supposed to have obligatory roles in the regulation of cellular functions of vascular endothelial cells, while little is known about the contribution of Orai2. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses indicated the expression of Orai2 and STIM2, in addition to Orai1 and STIM1 in bovine brain capillary endothelial cell line, t-BBEC117. During the exponential growth of t-BBEC117, the knockdown of Orai1 and STIM1 significantly reduced the SOCE activity, whereas Orai2 and STIM2 siRNAs had no effect. To examine whether endogenous SOCE activity contributes to the regulation of cell cycle progression, t-BBEC117 were synchronized using double thymidine blockage. At the G2/M phase, Ca{sup 2+} influx via SOCE was decreased and Orai2 expression was increased compared to the G0/G1 phase. When Orai2 was knocked down at the G2/M phase, the decrease in SOCE was removed, and cell proliferation was partly attenuated. Taken together, Orai1 significantly contributes to cell proliferation via the functional expression, which is presumably independent of the cell cycle phases. In construct, Orai2 is specifically up-regulated during the G2/M phase, negatively modulates the SOCE activity, and may contribute to the regulation of cell cycle progression in brain capillary endothelial cells. - Highlights: • Orai1 is essential for SOCE activity in brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs). • Cell cycle independent expression of Orai1 regulated SOCE and cell proliferation. • Orai2 was up-regulated only at G2/M phase and this consequently reduced SOCE. • Orai2 as well as Orai1 is a key player controlling SOCE and proliferation in BCECs.

  3. Cerebrolysin attenuates blood-brain barrier and brain pathology following whole body hyperthermia in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Zimmermann-Meinzingen, Sibilla; Sharma, Aruna; Johanson, Conrad E

    2010-01-01

    The possibility that Cerebrolysin, a mixture of several neurotrophic factors, has some neuroprotective effects on whole body hyperthermia (WBH) induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB), brain edema formation and neuropathology were examined in a rat model. Rats subjected to a 4 h heat stress at 38 degrees C in a biological oxygen demand (BOD) incubator exhibited profound increases in BBB and BCSFB permeability to Evans blue and radioiodine tracers compared to controls. Hippocampus, caudate nucleus, thalamus and hypothalamus exhibited pronounced increase in water content and brain pathology following 4 h heat stress. Pretreatment with Cerebrolysin (1, 2 or 5 mL/kg i.v.) 24 h before WBH significantly attenuated breakdown of the BBB or BCSFB and brain edema formation. This effect was dose dependent. Interestingly, the cell and tissue injury following WBH in cerebrolysin-treated groups were also considerably reduced. These novel observations suggest that cerebrolysin can attenuate WBH induced BBB and BCSFB damage resulting in neuroprotection.

  4. Intranasal pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate decreases brain inflammatory mediators and provides neuroprotection after brain hypoxia-ischemia in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Zhao, Huijuan; Peng, Shuling; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-11-01

    Brain injury due to birth asphyxia is the major cause of death and long-term disabilities in newborns. We determined whether intranasal pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) could provide neuroprotection in neonatal rats after brain hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Seven-day old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to brain HI. They were then treated with intranasal PDTC. Neurological outcomes were evaluated 7 or 30 days after the brain HI. Brain tissues were harvested 6 or 24 h after the brain HI for biochemical analysis. Here, PDTC dose-dependently reduced brain HI-induced brain tissue loss with an effective dose (ED)50 at 27 mg/kg. PDTC needed to be applied within 45 min after the brain HI for this neuroprotection. This treatment reduced brain tissue loss and improved neurological and cognitive functions assessed 30 days after the HI. PDTC attenuated brain HI-induced lipid oxidative stress, nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, and various inflammatory mediators in the brain tissues. Inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase after brain HI reduced brain tissue loss. Our results suggest that intranasal PDTC provides neuroprotection possibly via reducing inflammation and oxidative stress. Intranasal PDTC may have a potential to provide neuroprotection to human neonates after birth asphyxia.

  5. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue.

  6. Properties of Opiate-Receptor Binding in Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pert, Candace B.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1973-01-01

    [3H]Naloxone, a potent opiate antagonist, binds stereospecifically to opiate-receptor sites in rat-brain tissue. The binding is time, temperature, and pH dependent and saturable with respect to [3H]naloxone and tissue concentration. The [3H]naloxone-receptor complex formation is bimolecular with a dissociation constant of 20 nM. 15 Opiate agonists and antagonists compete for the same receptors, whose density is 30 pmol/g. Potencies of opiates and their antagonists in displacing [3H]naloxone binding parallel their pharmacological potencies. PMID:4525427

  7. Risperidone treatment increases CB1 receptor binding in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Anna; Husum, Henriette; Holst, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Body weight gain is a common side effect of treatment with antipsychotics, but the mechanisms underlying this weight gain are unknown. Several factors may be involved in antipsychotic-induced body weight gain including the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB(1)), the serotonin receptor 2C...... positively correlated with visceral fat mass. Risperidone treatment increased CB(1) receptor binding in the arcuate nucleus (40%), hippocampus (25-30%) and amygdala (35%) without concurrent alterations in the CB(1) receptor mRNA. Risperidone treatment increased adiponectin mRNA. CONCLUSION: The present study...... showed that risperidone treatment altered CB(1) receptor binding in the rat brain. Risperidone-induced adiposity and metabolic dysfunction in the clinic may be explained by increased CB(1) receptor density in brain regions involved in appetite and regulation of metabolic function....

  8. Involvement of insulin-degrading enzyme in insulin- and atrial natriuretic peptide-sensitive internalization of amyloid-β peptide in mouse brain capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shingo; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Murata, Sho; Katsukura, Yuki; Suzuki, Hiroya; Funaki, Miho; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral clearance of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), which is implicated in Alzheimer's disease, involves elimination across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and we previously showed that an insulin-sensitive process is involved in the case of Aβ1-40. The purpose of this study was to clarify the molecular mechanism of the insulin-sensitive Aβ1-40 elimination across mouse BBB. An in vivo cerebral microinjection study demonstrated that [125I]hAβ1-40 elimination from mouse brain was inhibited by human natriuretic peptide (hANP), and [125I]hANP elimination was inhibited by hAβ1-40, suggesting that hAβ1-40 and hANP share a common elimination process. Internalization of [125I]hAβ1-40 into cultured mouse brain capillary endothelial cells (TM-BBB4) was significantly inhibited by either insulin, hANP, other natriuretic peptides or insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) inhibitors, but was not inhibited by phosphoramidon or thiorphan. Although we have reported the involvement of natriuretic peptide receptor C (Npr-C) in hANP internalization, cells stably expressing Npr-C internalized [125I]hANP but not [125I]hAβ1-40, suggesting that there is no direct interaction between Npr-C and hAβ1-40. IDE was detected in plasma membrane of TM-BBB4 cells, and internalization of [125I]hAβ1-40 by TM-BBB4 cells was reduced by IDE-targeted siRNAs. We conclude that elimination of hAβ1-40 from mouse brain across the BBB involves an insulin- and ANP-sensitive process, mediated by IDE expressed in brain capillary endothelial cells.

  9. Induction by mercury compounds of brain metallothionein in rats: Hg{sup 0} exposure induces long-lived brain metallothionein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasutake, Akira; Nakano, Atsuhiro [Biochemistry Section, National Institute for Minamata Disease, Kumamoto (Japan); Hirayama, Kimiko [Kumamoto University, College of Medical Science (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is one of the stress proteins which can easily be induced by various kind of heavy metals. However, MT in the brain is difficult to induce because of blood-brain barrier impermeability to most heavy metals. In this paper, we have attempted to induce brain MT in rats by exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) or metallic mercury vapor, both of which are known to penetrate the blood-brain barrier and cause neurological damage. Rats treated with MeHg (40 {mu}mol/kg per day x 5 days, p.o.) showed brain Hg levels as high as 18 {mu}g/g with slight neurological signs 10 days after final administration, but brain MT levels remained unchanged. However, rats exposed to Hg vapor for 7 days showed 7-8 {mu}g Hg/g brain tissue 24 h after cessation of exposure. At that time brain MT levels were about twice the control levels. Although brain Hg levels fell gradually with a half-life of 26 days, MT levels induced by Hg exposure remained unchanged for >2 weeks. Gel fractionation revealed that most Hg was in the brain cytosol fraction and thus bound to MT. Hybridization analysis showed that, despite a significant increase in MT-I and -II mRNA in brain, MT-III mRNA was less affected. Although significant Hg accumulation and MT induction were observed also in kidney and liver of Hg vapor-exposed rats, these decreased more quickly than in brain. The long-lived MT in brain might at least partly be accounted for by longer half-life of Hg accumulated there. The present results showed that exposure to Hg vapor might be a suitable procedure to provide an in vivo model with enhanced brain MT. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 27 refs.

  10. Correlation between light scattering signal and tissue reversibility in rat brain exposed to hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Miya; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    Light scattering signal is a potential indicator of tissue viability in brain because cellular and subcellular structural integrity should be associated with cell viability in brain tissue. We previously performed multiwavelength diffuse reflectance measurement for a rat global ischemic brain model and observed a unique triphasic change in light scattering at a certain time after oxygen and glucose deprivation. This triphasic scattering change (TSC) was shown to precede cerebral ATP exhaustion, suggesting that loss of brain tissue viability can be predicted by detecting scattering signal. In the present study, we examined correlation between light scattering signal and tissue reversibility in rat brain in vivo. We performed transcranial diffuse reflectance measurement for rat brain; under spontaneous respiration, hypoxia was induced for the rat by nitrogen gas inhalation and reoxygenation was started at various time points. We observed a TSC, which started at 140 +/- 15 s after starting nitrogen gas inhalation (mean +/- SD, n=8). When reoxygenation was started before the TSC, all rats survived (n=7), while no rats survived when reoxygenation was started after the TSC (n=8). When reoxygenation was started during the TSC, rats survived probabilistically (n=31). Disability of motor function was not observed for the survived rats. These results indicate that TSC can be used as an indicator of loss of tissue reversibility in brains, providing useful information on the critical time zone for treatment to rescue the brain.

  11. Distribution of the mRNA for protein phosphatase T in rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, W; Buttini, M; Limonta, S; Boddeke, H; Joost, HG

    1996-01-01

    We have recently cloned a novel protein serine/threonine phosphatase (PPT) from rat mRNA which is predominantly expressed in the brain (Becker et al., J. Biol. Chem., 269 (1994) 22586-22592). In the present study, the regional distribution of PPT mRNA in the brain of adult rats was characterized by

  12. Distribution of the mRNA for protein phosphatase T in rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, W; Buttini, M; Limonta, S; Boddeke, H; Joost, HG

    1996-01-01

    We have recently cloned a novel protein serine/threonine phosphatase (PPT) from rat mRNA which is predominantly expressed in the brain (Becker et al., J. Biol. Chem., 269 (1994) 22586-22592). In the present study, the regional distribution of PPT mRNA in the brain of adult rats was characterized by

  13. Role of stanniocalcin1 in brain injury of coal-burning-borne fluorosis rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈旭义

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the change of stanniocalcin 1(STC1) and calcium content in brain of coal-burning-borne fluorosis rats,and to explore the role of STC1 in brain injury of coal-burning-borne fluorosis.Methods Twenty four male SD rats were randomly divided into control,low,medium,

  14. Hypobaric Hypoxia Imbalances Mitochondrial Dynamics in Rat Brain Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushbu Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain is predominantly susceptible to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction during hypobaric hypoxia, and therefore undergoes neurodegeneration due to energy crisis. Evidences illustrate a high degree of association for mitochondrial fusion/fission imbalance and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial fusion/fission is a recently reported dynamic mechanism which frequently occurs among cellular mitochondrial network. Hence, the study investigated the temporal alteration and involvement of abnormal mitochondrial dynamics (fusion/fission along with disturbed mitochondrial functionality during chronic exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (HH. The Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to simulated high altitude equivalent to 25000 ft for 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Mitochondrial morphology, distribution within neurons, enzyme activity of respiratory complexes, Δψm, ADP: ATP, and expression of fission/fusion key proteins were determined. Results demonstrated HH induced alteration in mitochondrial morphology by damaged, small mitochondria observed in neurons with disturbance of mitochondrial functionality and reduced mitochondrial density in neuronal processes manifested by excessive mitochondrial fragmentation (fission and decreased mitochondrial fusion as compared to unexposed rat brain hippocampus. The study suggested that imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics is one of the noteworthy mechanisms occurring in hippocampal neurons during HH insult.

  15. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of Pimpinella anisum in rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimzadeh Fariba

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Essential oil of Pimpinella anisum L. Apiaceae (anise oil has been widely used in traditional Persian medicine to treat a variety of diseases, including some neurological disorders. This study was aimed to test the possible anti-seizure and anti-hypoxia effects of anise oil. Methods The effects of different concentrations of anise oil were tested on seizure attacks induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ injection and neuronal hypoxia induced by oxygen withdrawal as well as on production of dark neurons and induction of long-term potentiation (LTP in in vivo and in vitro experimental models of rat brain. Results Anise oil significantly prolonged the latency of seizure attacks and reduced the amplitude and duration of epileptiform burst discharges induced by injection of intraperitoneal PTZ. In addition, anise oil significantly inhibited production of dark neurons in different regions of the brain in epileptic rats. Anise oil also significantly enhanced the duration of the appearance of anoxic terminal negativity induced by oxygen withdrawal and inhibited induction of LTP in hippocampal slices. Conclusions Our data indicate the anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of anise oil, likely via inhibition of synaptic plasticity. Further evaluation of anise oil to use in the treatment of neurological disorders is suggested.

  16. DHA Depletion in Rat Brain Is Associated With Impairment on Spatial Learning and Memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING XIAO; LING WANG; RUO-JUN XU; ZHEN-YU CHEN

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) deficiency in brain on spatial learning and memory in rats. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were fed with an n-3 fatty acid deficient diet for two generations to induce DHA depletion in brain. DHA in seven brain regions was analyzed using the gas-liquid chromatography. Morris water maze (MWM) was employed as an assessing index of spatial learning and memory in the n-3 fatty acid deficient adult rats of second generation. Results Feeding an n-3 deficient diet for two generations depleted DHA differently by 39%-63% in the seven brain regions including cerebellum, medulla, hypothalamus, striatum, hippocampus, cortex and midbrain. The MWM test showed that the n-3 deficient rats took a longer time and swam a longer distance to find the escape platform than the n-3 Adq group. Conclusion The spatial learning and memory in adult rats are partially impaired by brain DHA depletion.

  17. Oral branched-chain amino acid supplements that reduce brain serotonin during exercise in rats also lower brain catecholamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sujean; Disilvio, Briana; Fernstrom, Madelyn H; Fernstrom, John D

    2013-11-01

    Exercise raises brain serotonin release and is postulated to cause fatigue in athletes; ingestion of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), by competitively inhibiting tryptophan transport into brain, lowers brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin synthesis and release in rats, and reputedly in humans prevents exercise-induced increases in serotonin and fatigue. This latter effect in humans is disputed. But BCAA also competitively inhibit tyrosine uptake into brain, and thus catecholamine synthesis and release. Since increasing brain catecholamines enhances physical performance, BCAA ingestion could lower catecholamines, reduce performance and thus negate any serotonin-linked benefit. We therefore examined in rats whether BCAA would reduce both brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. Sedentary and exercising rats received BCAA or vehicle orally; tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis rates were measured 1 h later in brain. BCAA reduced brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations, and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. These reductions in tyrosine concentrations and catecholamine synthesis, but not tryptophan or serotonin synthesis, could be prevented by co-administering tyrosine with BCAA. Complete essential amino acid mixtures, used to maintain or build muscle mass, were also studied, and produced different effects on brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. Since pharmacologically increasing brain catecholamine function improves physical performance, the finding that BCAA reduce catecholamine synthesis may explain why this treatment does not enhance physical performance in humans, despite reducing serotonin synthesis. If so, adding tyrosine to BCAA supplements might allow a positive action on performance to emerge.

  18. NO-tryptophan: a new small molecule located in the rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mangas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A highly specific monoclonal antibody directed against nitric oxide-tryptophan (NO-W with good affinity (10-9 M and specificity was developed. In the rat brain, using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, cell bodies containing NO-W were exclusively found in the intermediate and dorsal parts of the lateral septal nucleus. No immunoreactive fibres were found in the rat brain. This work reports the first visualization and the morphological characteristics of cell bodies containing NO-W in the mammalian brain. The restricted distribution of NO-W in the rat brain suggests that this molecule could be involved in specific physiological mechanisms. 

  19. NO-tryptophan: a new small molecule located in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangas, A; Yajeya, J; González, N; Duleu, S; Geffard, M; Coveñas, R

    2016-09-22

    A highly specific monoclonal antibody directed against nitric oxide-tryptophan (NO-W) with good affinity (10-9 M) and specificity was developed. In the rat brain, using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, cell bodies containing NO-W were exclusively found in the intermediate and dorsal parts of the lateral septal nucleus. No immunoreactive fibres were found in the rat brain. This work reports the first visualization and the morphological characteristics of cell bodies containing NO-W in the mammalian brain. The restricted distribution of NO-W in the rat brain suggests that this molecule could be involved in specific physiological mechanisms.

  20. Up-regulation of K{sub ir}2.1 by ER stress facilitates cell death of brain capillary endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kito, Hiroaki [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Yamazaki, Daiju [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Biological Chemistry, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ohya, Susumu; Yamamura, Hisao [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Asai, Kiyofumi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Imaizumi, Yuji, E-mail: yimaizum@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We found that application of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with tunicamycin to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) induced cell death. {yields} The ER stress facilitated the expression of inward rectifier K{sup +} channel (K{sub ir}2.1) and induced sustained membrane hyperpolarization. {yields} The membrane hyperpolarization induced sustained Ca{sup 2+} entry through voltage-independent nonspecific cation channels and consequently facilitated cell death. {yields} The K{sub ir}2.1 up-regulation by ER stress is, at least in part, responsible for cell death of BCECs under pathological conditions. -- Abstract: Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) form blood brain barrier (BBB) to maintain brain homeostasis. Cell turnover of BCECs by the balance of cell proliferation and cell death is critical for maintaining the integrity of BBB. Here we found that stimuli with tunicamycin, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer, up-regulated inward rectifier K{sup +} channel (K{sub ir}2.1) and facilitated cell death in t-BBEC117, a cell line derived from bovine BCECs. The activation of K{sub ir} channels contributed to the establishment of deeply negative resting membrane potential in t-BBEC117. The deep resting membrane potential increased the resting intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration due to Ca{sup 2+} influx through non-selective cation channels and thereby partly but significantly regulated cell death in t-BBEC117. The present results suggest that the up-regulation of K{sub ir}2.1 is, at least in part, responsible for cell death/cell turnover of BCECs induced by a variety of cellular stresses, particularly ER stress, under pathological conditions.

  1. Summary of high field diffusion MRI and microscopy data demonstrate microstructural aberration in chronic mild stress rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Ahmad Raza; Chuhutin, Andrey; Wiborg, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This data article describes a large, high resolution diffusion MRI data set from fixed rat brain acquired at high field strength. The rat brain samples consist of21adult rat brain hemispheres from animals exposed to chronic mild stress (anhedonic and resilient) and controls. Histology from...

  2. Anticancer and antioxidant properties of terpinolene in rat brain cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Elanur; Türkez, Hasan; Taşdemir, Sener

    2013-09-01

    Terpinolene (TPO) is a natural monoterpene present in essential oils of many aromatic plant species. Although various biological activities of TPO have been demonstrated, its neurotoxicity has never been explored. In this in vitro study we investigated TPO's antiproliferative and/or cytotoxic properties using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test, genotoxic damage potential using the single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE), and oxidative effects through total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidative stress (TOS) in cultured primary rat neurons and N2a neuroblastoma cells. Dose-dependent effects of TPO (at 10 mg L(-1), 25 mg L(-1), 50 mg L(-1), 100 mg L(-1), 200 mg L(-1), and 400 mg L(-1)) were tested in both cell types. Significant (P<0.05) decrease in cell proliferation were observed in cultured primary rat neurons starting with the dose of 100 mg L(-1) and in N2a neuroblastoma cells starting with 50 mg L(-1). TPO was not genotoxic in either cell type. In addition, TPO treatment at 10 mg L(-1), 25 mg L(-1), and 50 mg L(-1) increased TAC in primary rat neurons, but not in N2a cells. However, at concentrations above 50 mg L(-1) it increased TOS in both cell types. Our findings clearly demonstrate that TPO is a potent antiproliferative agent for brain tumour cells and may have potential as an anticancer agent, which needs to be further studied.

  3. Gene Expression Profiling during Pregnancy in Rat Brain Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phyllis E. Mann

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The neurophysiological changes that occur during pregnancy in the female mammal have led to the coining of the phrases “expectant brain” and “maternal brain”. Although much is known of the hormonal changes during pregnancy, alterations in neurotransmitter gene expression have not been well-studied. We examined gene expression in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH during pregnancy based on the fact that this nucleus not only modulates the physiological changes that occur during pregnancy but is also involved in the development of maternal behavior. This study was designed to identify genes that are differentially expressed between mid- and late-pregnancy in order to determine which genes may be associated with the onset and display of maternal behavior and the development of the maternal brain. A commercially available PCR array containing 84 neurotransmitter receptor and regulator genes (RT2 Profiler PCR array was used. Brains were harvested from rats on days 12 and 21 of gestation, frozen, and micropunched to obtain the VMH. Total RNA was extracted, cDNA prepared, and SYBR Green qPCR was performed. In the VMH, expression of five genes were reduced on day 21 of gestation compared to day 12 (Chrna6, Drd5, Gabrr2, Prokr2, and Ppyr1 whereas Chat, Chrm5, Drd4, Gabra5, Gabrg2, LOC289606, Nmu5r2, and Npy5r expression was elevated. Five genes were chosen to be validated in an additional experiment based on their known involvement in maternal behavior onset. This experiment confirmed that gene expression for both the CCK-A receptor and the GABAAR γ2 receptor increases at the end of pregnancy. In general, these results identify genes possibly involved in the establishment of the maternal brain in rats and indicate possible new genes to be investigated.

  4. Inhibition of lipid peroxidation in rat brain by nifedipine and clorazepate after electrically induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kułak, W; Sobaniec, W; Sobaniec-Lotowska, M

    1993-01-01

    The effect of nifedipine and clorazepate on the concentration of lipid peroxides (LP) in rat brain, and the characteristics of electrically induced seizures were assessed. A significant increase in the concentration of brain LP after electroshock was found. Both nifedipine (1.00 mg/kg per os) and clorazepate (20 mg/kg intraperitoneally) decreased the levels of LP in the rat brain after electroshock. Nifedipine combined with clorazepate brought an inhibition of LP formation and an additive anticonvulsant activity.

  5. Environmental enrichment promotes neural remodeling in newborn rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuanjun Liu; Yankui Guo; Yalu Li; Zhenying Yang

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and treatment with early environmental enrichment intervention on development of newborn rats, as evaluated by light and electron microscopy and morphometry. Early intervention with environmental enrichment intelligence training attenuated brain edema and neuronal injury, promoted neuronal repair, and increased neuronal plasticity in the frontal lobe cortex of the newborn rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  6. Selective glial vulnerability following transient global ischemia in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petito, C K; Olarte, J P; Roberts, B; Nowak, T S; Pulsinelli, W A

    1998-03-01

    Global cerebral ischemia selectively damages neurons, but its contribution to glial cell death is uncertain. Accordingly, adult male rats were sacrificed by perfusion fixation at 1, 2, 3, 5, and 14 days following 10 minutes of global ischemia. This insult produces CA1 hippocampal neuronal death at post-ischemic (PI) day 3, but minor or no damage to neurons in other regions. In situ end labeling (ISEL) and immunohistochemistry identified fragmented DNA of dead or dying glia and distinguished glial subtypes. Rare ISEL-positive oligodendroglia, astrocytes, and microglia were present in control brain. Apoptotic bodies and ISEL-positive glia significantly increased at PI day 1 in cortex and thalamus (p < 0.05), but were similar to controls in other regions and at other PI intervals. Most were oligodendroglia, although ISEL-positive microglia and astrocytes were also observed. These results show that oligodendroglia die rapidly after brief global ischemia and are more sensitive than neurons in certain brain regions. Their selective vulnerability to ischemia may be responsible for the delayed white matter damage following anoxia or CO poisoning or that associated with white matter arteriopathies. Glial apoptosis could contribute to the DNA ladders of apoptotic oligonucleosomes that have been found in post-ischemic brain.

  7. Kappa opioid receptors stimulate phosphoinositide turnover in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Periyasamy, S.; Hoss, W. (Univ. of Toledo, OH (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various subtype-selective opioid agonists and antagonists on the phosphoinositide (PI) turnover response were investigated in the rat brain. The {kappa}-agonists U-50,488H and ketocyclazocine produced a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of IP's in hippocampal slices. The other {kappa}-agonists Dynorphin-A (1-13) amide, and its protected analog D(Ala){sup 2}-dynorphin-A (1-13) amide also produced a significant increase in the formation of ({sup 3}H)-IP's, whereas the {mu}-selective agonists (D-Ala{sup 2}-N-Me-Phe{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}-ol)-enkephalin and morphine and the {delta}-selective agonist (D-Pen{sup 2,5})-enkephalin were ineffective. The increase in IP's formation elicited by U-50,488H was partially antagonized by naloxone and more completely antagonized by the {kappa}-selective antagonists nor-binaltorphimine and MR 2266. The formation of IP's induced by U-50,488H varies with the regions of the brain used, being highest in hippocampus and amygdala, and lowest in striatum and pons-medullar. The results indicate that brain {kappa}- but neither {mu}- nor {delta}- receptors are coupled to the PI turnover response.

  8. Quinolinic acid induces oxidative stress in rat brain synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, A; Galván-Arzate, S; Lisý, V; Ali, S F; Duhart, H M; Osorio-Rico, L; Ríos, C; St'astný, F

    2001-03-26

    The oxidative action of quinolinic acid (QUIN), and the protective effects of glutathione (GSH), and 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV), were tested in rat brain synaptosomes, Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was quantified after the exposure of synaptosomes to increasing concentrations of QUIN (25-500 microM). The potency of QUIN to induce lipid peroxidation (LP) was tested as a regional index of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) production, and the antioxidant actions of both GSH (50 microM) and APV (250 microM) on QUIN-induced LP were evaluated in synaptosomes prepared from different brain regions. QUIN induced concentration-dependent increases in ROS formation and TBARS in all regions analyzed, but increased production of fluorescent peroxidized lipids only in the striatum and the hippocampus, whereas both GSH and APV decreased this index. These results suggest that the excitotoxic action of QUIN involves regional selectivity in the oxidative status of brain synaptosomes, and may be prevented by substances exhibiting antagonism at the NMDA receptor.

  9. Gallic acid improved behavior, brain electrophysiology, and inflammation in a rat model of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkaki, Alireza; Farbood, Yaghoub; Gharib-Naseri, Mohammad Kazem; Badavi, Mohammad; Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Haghparast, Abbas; Mirshekar, Mohammad Ali

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the main causes of intellectual and cognitive disabilities. In the clinic it is essential to limit the development of cognitive impairment after TBI. In this study, the effects of gallic acid (GA; 100 mg/kg, per oral, from 7 days before to 2 days after TBI induction) on neurological score, passive avoidance memory, long-term potentiation (LTP) deficits, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the brain have been evaluated. Brain injury was induced following Marmarou's method. Data were analyzed by one-way and repeated measures ANOVA followed by Tukey's post-hoc test. The results indicated that memory was significantly impaired (p memory and LTP in the TBI rats. The brain tissue levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α were significantly reduced (p electrophysiological, and inflammatory disorders, probably via the decrease of cerebral proinflammatory cytokines.

  10. Dietary choline deprivation impairs rat brain mitochondrial function and behavioral phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacelli, Consiglia; Coluccia, Addolorata; Grattagliano, Ignazio; Cocco, Tiziana; Petrosillo, Giuseppe; Paradies, Giuseppe; De Nitto, Emanuele; Massaro, Antonio; Persichella, Michele; Borracci, Pietro; Portincasa, Piero; Carratù, Maria Rosaria

    2010-06-01

    Dietary choline deprivation (CD) is associated with behavioral changes, but mechanisms underlying these detrimental effects are not well characterized. For instance, no literature data are available concerning the CD effects on brain mitochondrial function related to impairment in cognition. Therefore, we investigated brain mitochondrial function and redox status in male Wistar rats fed a CD diet for 28 d. Moreover, the CD behavioral phenotype was characterized. Compared with rats fed a control diet (CTRL), CD rats showed lower NAD-dependent mitochondrial state III and state IV respiration, 40% lower complex I activity, and significantly higher reactive oxygen species production. Total glutathione was oxidatively consumed more in CD than in CTRL rats and the rate of protein oxidation was 40% higher in CD than in CTRL rats, reflecting an oxidative stress condition. The mitochondrial concentrations of cardiolipin, a phospholipid required for optimal activity of complex I, was 20% lower in CD rats than in CTRL rats. Compared with CTRL rats, the behavioral phenotype of CD rats was characterized by impairment in motor coordination and motor learning assessed with the rotarod/accelerod test. Furthermore, compared with CTRL rats, CD rats were less capable of learning the active avoidance task and the number of attempts they made to avoid foot shock was fewer. The results suggest that CD-induced dysfunction in brain mitochondria may be responsible for impairment in cognition and underline that, similar to the liver, the brain also needs an adequate choline supply for its normal functioning.

  11. Major involvement of Na(+) -dependent multivitamin transporter (SLC5A6/SMVT) in uptake of biotin and pantothenic acid by human brain capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Yasuo; Ito, Katsuaki; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Takashi; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the expression of Na(+) -dependent multivitamin transporter (SLC5A6/SMVT) and its contribution to the supply of biotin and pantothenic acid to the human brain via the blood-brain barrier. DNA microarray and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed that SLC5A6 is expressed in microvessels of human brain. The absolute expression levels of SLC5A6 protein in isolated human and monkey brain microvessels were 1.19 and 0.597 fmol/μg protein, respectively, as determined by a quantitative targeted absolute proteomics technique. Using an antibody-free method established by Kubo et al. (2015), we found that SLC5A6 was preferentially localized at the luminal membrane of brain capillary endothelium. Knock-down analysis using SLC5A6 siRNA showed that SLC5A6 accounts for 88.7% and 98.6% of total [(3) H]biotin and [(3) H]pantothenic acid uptakes, respectively, by human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. SLC5A6-mediated transport in hCMEC/D3 was markedly inhibited not only by biotin and pantothenic acid, but also by prostaglandin E2, lipoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, indomethacin, ketoprofen, diclofenac, ibuprofen, phenylbutazone, and flurbiprofen. This study is the first to confirm expression of SLC5A6 in human brain microvessels and to provide evidence that SLC5A6 is a major contributor to luminal uptake of biotin and pantothenic acid at the human blood-brain barrier. In humans, it was unclear (not concluded) about what transport system at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is responsible for the brain uptakes of two vitamins, biotin and pantothenic acid, which are necessary for brain proper function. This study clarified for the first time that the solute carrier 5A6/Na(+) -dependent multivitamin transporter SLC5A6/SMVT is responsible for the supplies of biotin and pantothenic acid into brain across the BBB in humans. DHA, docosahexaenoic acid; NSAID, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug; PGE2, prostaglandin E2. © 2015

  12. Lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of IP-10 mRNA in rat brain and in cultured rat astrocytes and microglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, LQ; Gourmala, N; Boddeke, HWGM; Gebicke-Haerter, PJ

    1998-01-01

    Using mRNA differential display technique, we have found a differentially expressed band in rat brain, designated HAP(2)G1, which was the strongest one induced in response to peripheral administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Sequence analysis showed that HAP(2)G1 cDNA is the rat homologue of th

  13. Cognitive dysfunction and histological findings in adult rats one year after whole brain irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Ryuichi; Sato, Mitsuya; Takeda, Norio [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Brain Research Inst.

    2001-12-01

    Cognitive dysfunction and histological changes in the brain were investigated following irradiation in 20 Fischer 344 rats aged 6 months treated with whole brain irradiation (WBR) (25 Gy/single dose), and compared with the same number of sham-irradiated rats as controls. Performance of the Morris water maze task and the passive avoidance task were examined one year after WBR. Finally, histological and immunohistochemical examinations using antibodies to myelin basic protein (MBP), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neurofilament (NF) were performed of the rat brains. The irradiated rats continued to gain weight 7 months after WBR whereas the control rats stopped gaining weight. Cognitive functions in both the water maze task and the passive avoidance task were lower in the irradiated rats than in the control rats. Brain damage consisting of demyelination only or with necrosis was found mainly in the body of the corpus callosum and the parietal white matter near the corpus callosum in the irradiated rats. Immunohistochemical examination of the brains without necrosis found MBP-positive fibers were markedly decreased in the affected areas by irradiation; NF-positive fibers were moderately decreased and irregularly dispersed in various shapes in the affected areas; and GFAP-positive fibers were increased, with gliosis in those areas. These findings are similar to those in clinically accelerated brain aging in conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Binswanger's disease, and multiple sclerosis. (author)

  14. Label-free dopamine imaging in live rat brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Bidyut; Banerjee, Arkarup; Das, Anand Kant; Nag, Suman; Kaushalya, Sanjeev Kumar; Tripathy, Umakanta; Shameem, Mohammad; Shukla, Shubha; Maiti, Sudipta

    2014-05-21

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission has been investigated extensively, yet direct optical probing of dopamine has not been possible in live cells. Here we image intracellular dopamine with sub-micrometer three-dimensional resolution by harnessing its intrinsic mid-ultraviolet (UV) autofluorescence. Two-photon excitation with visible light (540 nm) in conjunction with a non-epifluorescent detection scheme is used to circumvent the UV toxicity and the UV transmission problems. The method is established by imaging dopamine in a dopaminergic cell line and in control cells (glia), and is validated by mass spectrometry. We further show that individual dopamine vesicles/vesicular clusters can be imaged in cultured rat brain slices, thereby providing a direct visualization of the intracellular events preceding dopamine release induced by depolarization or amphetamine exposure. Our technique opens up a previously inaccessible mid-ultraviolet spectral regime (excitation ~270 nm, emission free imaging of native molecules in live tissue.

  15. Sex Differences in Serotonin 1 Receptor Binding in Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischette, Christine T.; Biegon, Anat; McEwen, Bruce S.

    1983-10-01

    Male and female rats exhibit sex differences in binding by serotonin 1 receptors in discrete areas of the brain, some of which have been implicated in the control of ovulation and of gonadotropin release. The sex-specific changes in binding, which occur in response to the same hormonal (estrogenic) stimulus, are due to changes in the number of binding sites. Castration alone also affects the number of binding sites in certain areas. The results lead to the conclusion that peripheral hormones modulate binding by serotonin 1 receptors. The status of the serotonin receptor system may affect the reproductive capacity of an organism and may be related to sex-linked emotional disturbances in humans.

  16. Antioxidant effects of calcium antagonists in rat brain homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, K; Ina, Y; Nagashima, K; Ohmori, K; Ohno, T

    2000-06-01

    We studied the antioxidant activities of calcium antagonists against autoxidation in rat brain homogenates. The homogenates were incubated for 30 min at 37 degrees C with or without a calcium antagonist and subsequently assayed for lipid peroxide content. Percent inhibition of the lipid peroxidation was used as an index of the antioxidant effect. Dihydropyridine calcium antagonists exhibited concentration-dependent (3-300 micromol/l) inhibitory effects against lipid peroxidation. The relative order of antioxidant potency and associated IC50 values (micromol/l) of the calcium antagonists for inhibition of the lipid peroxidation were as follows: nifedipine (51.5)>barnidipine (58.6)>benidipine (71.2)>nicardipine (129.3)>amlodipine (135.5)>nilvadipine (167.3)>nitrendipine (252.1)> diltiazem (>300)=verapamil (>300). These results suggest that some dihydropyridine calcium antagonists show antioxidant properties. The antioxidant effects of the calcium antagonists may contribute to their pharmacological actions.

  17. Localization and labeling of rat brain in MR image based on Paxinos-Watson atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jie; Cai, Chao; Ding, Mingyue; Zhou, Chengping

    2006-03-01

    Localization and labeling of function regions in brain is an important topic in experimental brain sciences because the huge amount of data collected by neuroscientists will become meaningless if we cannot give them a precise description of their locations. In this paper, we proposed a localization and labelling method of 3D MR image of rat brain based on Paxinos-Watson atlas. Our objective is to use the specific atlas to accomplish localization and labeling of specified tissue of interest (TOI) to mimic a veteran expert such that invisible or unclear anatomic function regions in the MR images of rat brain can be automatically identified and marked. We proposed a multi-step method to locate and label the TOIs from the MR image of rat brain. Firstly, pre-processing. It aims at the digitization and 3D reconstruction of the atlas and MRI of rat brain. Secondly, two-step registration. The global registration is to eliminate the big misalign and section angle offset as well as the scale between the MRI and atlas. We can choose some unambiguous and characteristic points manually, and based on these correspondences a coarse registration is obtained using affine model. The local registration is to address individual variability of rat brain that can be performed by using Snake model. Thirdly, post-processing. The goal is to locate and label the TOIs in the selected MR image of rat brain slice guided by well-registered atlas. The experiments demonstrated the feasibility of our method.

  18. Regional protein synthesis in rat brain following acute hemispheric ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienel, G A; Pulsinelli, W A; Duffy, T E

    1980-11-01

    Regional protein synthesis was measured in rat brain at intervals up to 48 h following occlusion of the four major arteries to the brain for either 10 or 30 min. Four-vessel occlusions produces ischemia in the cerebral hemispheres and oligemia in the midbrain-diencephalon and brainstem. During the hour following 10 min of ischemia, protein synthesis, measured by incorporation of [14C]valine into protein, was inhibited in the cerebral cortex by 67%. Normal rates of protein synthesis were attained within 4 h of recirculation. In rats subjected to 30 min of ischemia, protein synthesis was inhibited by 83% during the first hour of recirculation in the cortex, caudate-putamen, and hippocampus. Recovery of protein synthesis in these regions was slow (25-48 h). The midbrain-diencephalon showed less inhibition, 67%, and faster recovery (by 12 h). Protein synthesis was unaffected in the brainstem. [14C]Autoradiography revealed that the pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus and areas of the caudate and cortex failed to recover normal rates of protein synthesis even after 48 h. The accumulation of TCA-soluble [14C]valine was enhanced (55-65%) in the cortex, caudate, and hippocampus after 30 min of ischemia; the increase persisted for 12 h. A smaller rise in [14C]valine content (30%) and more rapid normalization of valine accumulation (by 7 h) were observed in the midbrain-diencephalon; no changes were found in the brainstem. In the cortex, recovery was more rapid when the duration of ischemia was reduced. Thus, the degree of inhibition of protein synthesis, the accumulation of valine in the tissue, and the length of time required to reestablish normal values for these processes were dependent on both the severity and the duration of the ischemic insult. Restoration of normal rates of protein synthesis after ischemia was slow compared with the normalization of cerebral energy metabolites.

  19. The quantitative analysis of S100 in the brain tissue and serum following diffuse brain injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qi; Huang Ping; Xing Bo; Tuo Ya; Zhang Yongpan; Tian Weiping; Wang Zhenyuan

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dynamics of the level of S100 in cerebrum, brainstem, and serum following the diffuse brain injury in rats and provide the experimental evidences for estimating injury time. Methods ELISA was used to determine whether S100 protein is changed after diffuse brain injury in rats. Forty rats were sacrificed at 0.5 hour, 2 hours, 4 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, 3 d and 7 d after diffuse brain injury and normal rats as control. Results The level of S100 in cerebrum, brainstem, and serum increased, followed by a decrease, and then further increased. The level of S100 could be detected to increase at 30 minutes and reached the peak at 4 hours after DBI. The level decreased gradually to the normal at 1d and till 3 d formed the second peak. The level returned to the normal at 7d following injury again. In the postmortem injury groups, there were no significant changes compared to the control group. Conclusion The present study showed that the time-dependent expression of S100 is obvious following diffuse brain injury in rats and suggested that S100 will be a suitable marker for diffuse brain injury age determination.

  20. Adenovirally Delivered Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor to Rat Retina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Hou; Dan Hu; Yannian Hui

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To study the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the rat retina delivered by adenovirus.Methods: Adenovirus with BDNF gene was injected into the vitreous. Gene expression was detected by immunofluorescence staining, and quantitative analysis was performed after injury and transfection by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).Results: The positive cells can be seen on the 3rd day and last 4 weeks by immunofluorescence staining. Positive cells in the control group were fewer than those in the transfection group or the fluorescence intensity was lower at every time point. Quantitative analysis showed that the expression of BDNF groups was higher than that of the control group at every time point(P < 0.01 ), and that of the injured group without transfection was higher than that of the control group on the 3rd day and the 7th day (P < 0.01 ).Conclusion: Efficient and stable transfer of BDNF gene could be achieved by adenovirus delivery into the retina of rats. Injury can promote the expression of BDNF in early period.

  1. Protocatechuic acid protects brain mitochondrial function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaming, Yoswaris; Sripetchwandee, Jirapas; Sa-Nguanmoo, Piangkwan; Pintana, Hiranya; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2015-10-01

    Brain mitochondrial dysfunction has been demonstrated in diabetic animals with neurodegeneration. Protocatechuic acid (PCA), a major metabolite of anthocyanin, has been shown to exert glycemic control and oxidative stress reduction in the heart. However, its effects on oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in the brain under diabetic condition have never been investigated. We found that PCA exerted glycemic control, attenuates brain mitochondrial dysfunction, and contributes to the prevention of brain oxidative stress in diabetic rats.

  2. Regional energy balance in rat brain after transient forebrain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsinelli, W A; Duffy, T E

    1983-05-01

    Phosphocreatine, ATP, and glucose were severely depleted, and the lactate levels were increased in the paramedian neocortex, dorsal-lateral striatum, and CA1 zone of hippocampus of rats exposed to 30 min of forebrain ischemia. Upon recirculation of the brain, phosphocreatine, ATP, and lactate concentrations recovered to control values in the paramedian neocortex and CA1 zone of hippocampus and to near-control values in the striatum. The phosphocreatine and ATP concentrations then fell and the lactate levels rose in the striatum after 6-24 h, and in the CA1 zone of hippocampus after 24-72 h. The initial recovery and subsequent delayed changes in the phosphocreatine, ATP, and lactate concentrations in the striatum and hippocampus coincided with the onset and progression of morphological injury in these brain regions. The results suggest that cells in these regions regain normal or near-normal mitochondrial function and are viable, in terms of energy production, for many hours before unknown mechanisms cause irreversible neuronal before unknown mechanisms cause irreversible neuronal injury.

  3. Rat brain aryl acylamidase: further characterization of multiple forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, L L; Halaris, A E; Freedman, D X

    1982-01-01

    1. Two fractions of aryl acylamidase (EC 3.5.1.13) were further separated from rat brain extracts at pH 7.5 by ammonium sulfate precipitation and Bio-Gel chromatography. 2. 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydro-beta-carboline competitively inhibited (67%) fraction-1 but slightly inhibited (13%) fraction-2. Tetrahydroharman, 6-hydroxy-tetrahydroharman and harminic acid slightly inhibited both fractions. Harmalol inhibited fraction-1 but enhanced fraction-2. 6-Methoxy-harman, 6-methoxy-harmalan and harmaline enhanced both fractions. 3. Pargyline did not affect either fraction. Methiothepin, cyproheptadine and chlorimipramine inhibited fraction-1 but stimulated fraction-2. 4. Neostigmine moderately (30%) inhibited AAA-2 but did not have any significant effect on AAA-1. 5. These results indicate that the beta-carboline compounds might play a role in regulating activity of AAA-1 and 2 in brain. 6. Both fractions might be related to serotonergic neurons but only AAA-2 might be associated with acetylcholinesterase.

  4. Effect of ethanol on enkephalinergic opioid system of rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyayev, N.A.; Balakireva, N.N.; Brusov, O.S.; Panchenko, L.F.

    1983-10-13

    Specific binding of /sup 3/H-morphine and /sup 3/H-(D-Ala/sup 2/, D-Leu/sup 5/)-enkephalin (H-EN) with opiatic receptors was studied on white rats along with the content of Met- and Leu-enkephalin and the activity of enkephalinase in various brain segments after single dose (20% solution in 0.9% NaCl, IP; 1.5-4.5 g/kg body weight) and chronic injection (20% EtOH substituted for drinking water) of ethanol. The single injection of EtOH (1.5-4.5 g/kg) resulted in a depression of the specific binding of H-EN with opiate receptors. Doses of 1.5 and 2.5 g/kg led to a lower content of Leu-enkephalin in mid-brain but to an increase of Met-enkephalin; the 4.5 g/kg dose had no effect on the striatum. With chronic administration of EtOH, most of the values obtained on the experimental animals were similar to the control data. 23 references.

  5. Cyclosporin safety in a simplified rat brain tumor implantation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco H. C. Felix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer is the second neurological cause of death. A simplified animal brain tumor model using W256 (carcinoma 256, Walker cell line was developed to permit the testing of novel treatment modalities. Wistar rats had a cell tumor solution inoculated stereotactically in the basal ganglia (right subfrontal caudate. This model yielded tumor growth in 95% of the animals, and showed absence of extracranial metastasis and systemic infection. Survival median was 10 days. Estimated tumor volume was 17.08±6.7 mm³ on the 7th day and 67.25±19.8 mm³ on 9th day post-inoculation. Doubling time was 24.25 h. Tumor growth induced cachexia, but no hematological or biochemical alterations. This model behaved as an undifferentiated tumor and can be promising for studying tumor cell migration in the central nervous system. Dexamethasone 3.0 mg/kg/day diminished significantly survival in this model. Cyclosporine 10 mg/kg/day administration was safely tolerated.

  6. Are soluble and membrane-bound rat brain acetylcholinesterase different

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, C.; el Mourabit, M.; Stutz, C.; Mark, J.; Waksman, A. (Centre de Neurochimie du C.N.R.S., Strasbourg, (France))

    1990-11-01

    Salt-soluble and detergent-soluble acetylcholinesterases (AChE) from adult rat brain were purified to homogeneity and studied with the aim to establish the differences existing between these two forms. It was found that the enzymatic activities of the purified salt-soluble AChE as well as the detergent-soluble AChE were dependent on the Triton X-100 concentration. Moreover, the interaction of salt-soluble AChE with liposomes suggests amphiphilic behaviour of this enzyme. Serum cholinesterase (ChE) did not bind to liposomes but its activity was also detergent-dependent. Detergent-soluble AChE remained in solution below critical micellar concentrations of Triton X-100. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified, Biobeads-treated and iodinated detergent-soluble 11 S AChE showed, under non reducing conditions, bands of 69 kD, 130 kD and greater than 250 kD corresponding, respectively, to monomers, dimers and probably tetramers of the same polypeptide chain. Under reducing conditions, only a 69 kD band was detected. It is proposed that an amphiphilic environment stabilizes the salt-soluble forms of AChE in the brain in vivo and that detergent-soluble Biobeads-treated 11 S AChE possess hydrophobic domain(s) different from the 20 kD peptide already described.

  7. Brain Metabolic Changes in Rats following Acoustic Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jun; Zhu, Yejin; Aa, Jiye; Smith, Paul F.; De Ridder, Dirk; Wang, Guangji; Zheng, Yiwen

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic trauma is the most common cause of hearing loss and tinnitus in humans. However, the impact of acoustic trauma on system biology is not fully understood. It has been increasingly recognized that tinnitus caused by acoustic trauma is unlikely to be generated by a single pathological source, but rather a complex network of changes involving not only the auditory system but also systems related to memory, emotion and stress. One obvious and significant gap in tinnitus research is a lack of biomarkers that reflect the consequences of this interactive “tinnitus-causing” network. In this study, we made the first attempt to analyse brain metabolic changes in rats following acoustic trauma using metabolomics, as a pilot study prior to directly linking metabolic changes to tinnitus. Metabolites in 12 different brain regions collected from either sham or acoustic trauma animals were profiled using a gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-based metabolomics platform. After deconvolution of mass spectra and identification of the molecules, the metabolomic data were processed using multivariate statistical analysis. Principal component analysis showed that metabolic patterns varied among different brain regions; however, brain regions with similar functions had a similar metabolite composition. Acoustic trauma did not change the metabolite clusters in these regions. When analyzed within each brain region using the orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis sub-model, 17 molecules showed distinct separation between control and acoustic trauma groups in the auditory cortex, inferior colliculus, superior colliculus, vestibular nucleus complex (VNC), and cerebellum. Further metabolic pathway impact analysis and the enrichment overview with network analysis suggested the primary involvement of amino acid metabolism, including the alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolic pathways, the arginine and proline metabolic pathways and the purine

  8. Cordycepin attenuates traumatic brain injury-induced impairments of blood-brain barrier integrity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Wang, Aihua; He, Yan; Si, Zhihua; Xu, Shan; Zhang, Shanchao; Wang, Kun; Wang, Dawei; Liu, Yiming

    2016-10-01

    Loss of blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity is a downstream event caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI). BBB integrity is affected by certain physiological conditions, including inflammation and oxidative stress. Cordycepin is a susbtance with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate whether cordycepin affects TBI-induced impairments of BBB integrity. Using TBI rats as the in vivo model and applying multiple techniques, including stroke severity evaluation, Evans blue assessment, quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting and ELISA, we investigated the dose-dependent protective effects of cordycepin on the TBI-induced impairments of BBB integrity. Cordycepin treatment attenuated the TBI-induced impairments in a dose-dependent manner, and played a role in protecting BBB integrity. Cordycepin was able to alleviate TBI-induced loss of tight junction proteins zonula occludens protein-1 (ZO-1) and occludin, which are important for BBB integrity. Moreover, cordycepin suppressed pro-inflammatory factors, including IL-1β, iNOS, MPO and MMP-9, and promoted anti-inflammation-associated factors arginase 1 and IL-10. Furthermore, cordycepin inhibited NADPH oxidase (NOX) expression and activity following TBI, probably through NOX1, but not NOX2 and NOX4. Cordycepin has protective effects against brain damages induced by TBI. The protection of cordycepin on BBB integrity was probably achieved through recovery of tight junction proteins, inhibition of local inflammation, and prevention of NOX activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Brain lipids in rats fed a diet supplemented with hen eggs of modified lipid content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodžić Aida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to research the impact of a diet supplemented with egg yolks of modified content, having in mind the type of fat added to the laying hens diet, on the brain lipids and their fatty acid composition in rats. During four weeks of the experiment, 64 Wistar rats, divided into four groups of 16 animals each (eight animals of both sexes, were fed the commercial rat feed (group C, or the feed that contained 70% of the commercial rat feed and 30% of freshly boiled yolks from the eggs originating from laying hens fed with 3% fish oil (group F, 3% palm olein (group P or 3% lard (group L. Concentration and content of total lipids and total cholesterol, as well as the fatty-acid composition of the total brain lipids were determined in the lipid extracts of the rats brains. Under unfavourable conditions, which in our case could be high dietary intake of the total fat due to egg yolk addition, the amount of total fat in the brain tissue or the mass of the organ itself can be changed. Applied dietary treatments could also influence the level of de novo synthesis of total cholesterol in the rat brain. High dietary fat intake, as well as the fat quality regarding its fatty acid composition, appear to be able to significantly influence the fatty acid profile of the total brain lipids in adult rats, whereas the level and quality of the changes also depend on sex.

  10. Garlic extract attenuates brain mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficit in obese-insulin resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintana, Hiranya; Sripetchwandee, Jirapas; Supakul, Luerat; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress in the obese-insulin resistant condition has been shown to affect cognitive as well as brain mitochondrial functions. Garlic extract has exerted a potent antioxidant effect. However, the effects of garlic extract on the brain of obese-insulin resistant rats have never been investigated. We hypothesized that garlic extract improves cognitive function and brain mitochondrial function in obese-insulin resistant rats induced by long-term high-fat diet (HFD) consumption. Male Wistar rats were fed either normal diet or HFD for 16 weeks (n = 24/group). At week 12, rats in each dietary group received either vehicle or garlic extract (250 and 500 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) for 28 days. Learning and memory behaviors, metabolic parameters, and brain mitochondrial function were determined at the end of treatment. HFD led to increased body weight, visceral fat, plasma insulin, cholesterol, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, indicating the development of insulin resistance. Furthermore, HFD rats had cognitive deficit and brain mitochondrial dysfunction. HFD rats treated with both doses of garlic extract had decreased body weight, visceral fat, plasma cholesterol, and MDA levels. Garlic extract also improved cognitive function and brain mitochondrial function, which were impaired in obese-insulin resistant rats caused by HFD consumption.

  11. Tannic acid alleviates lead acetate-induced neurochemical perturbations in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashafaq, Mohammad; Tabassum, Heena; Vishnoi, Shruti; Salman, Mohd; Raisuddin, Sheikh; Parvez, Suhel

    2016-03-23

    Oxidative stress has been projected as a promising mechanism involved in lead exposure. The lead predisposition catalyzes oxidative reactions and generates reactive oxygen species. The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of oral administration of tannic acid (TA) on behavioral deficit, antioxidative deterioration induced by lead acetate (LA) exposure on experimental rat brain. Male Wistar rats were treated with 50mg/kg body weight of LA and TA for three times a week for two weeks. Our data showed LA-induced profound elevation of ROS production and oxidative stress, as evidenced by increased levels of oxidative stress markers such as lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl observed in LA treated rats, whereas significant depletion in the activity of non-enzymatic antioxidants, enzymatic antioxidants, neurotoxicity biomarker and histological changes were observed in LA treated rat brain. However, TA administration restored antioxidant status of brain significantly when compared to control. Our results demonstrate that TA exhibits potent antioxidant properties and suppresses oxidative damages in rat brain induced by LA treatment. These findings were further supported by the neurotoxicity biomarker and histopathological findings in the brain tissue showed that TA protected tissue from deleterious effects of LA exposure. It is concluded, these data suggest that LA induces oxidative stress and supplementation of TA has a powerful antioxidant effect, and it protected rat brain from poisonous effect of LA exposure in experimental rat.

  12. Using laser confocal scanning microscope to study ischemia-hypoxia injury in rat brain slice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The level of lipid peroxidation and cellular necrosis in rat living brain slices during brain ischemia-hypoxia injury have been observed using a laser confocal scanning microscope (LCSM) with double labeling of fluorescent probes D-399 (2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate) and propidium iodide (PI).The hypoxia and/or reoxygenation injury in rat brain slices is markedly decreased by pretreatment with L-NG-nitro-arginine (L-NNA) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC),showing that the nitric oxide (NO) and other free radicals play an important role in brain ischemia-hypoxia injury.

  13. Yawning and stretching predict brain temperature changes in rats:Support for the thermoregulatory hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie L Shoup-Knox

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent research suggests that yawning is an adaptive behavior that functions to promote brain thermoregulation among homeotherms. To explore the relationship between brain temperature and yawning we implanted thermocoupled probes in the frontal cortex of rats to measure brain temperature before, during and after yawning. Temperature recordings indicate that yawns and stretches occurred during increases in brain temperature, with brain temperatures being restored to baseline following the execution of each of these behaviors. The circulatory changes that accompany yawning and stretching may explain some of the thermal similarities surrounding these events. These results suggest that yawning and stretching may serve to maintain brain thermal homeostasis.

  14. Generation of primary cultures of bovine brain endothelial cells and setup of cocultures with rat astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans C; Brodin, Birger

    2014-01-01

    In vitro models of the blood-brain barrier are useful tools to study blood-brain barrier function as well as drug permeation from the systemic circulation to the brain parenchyma. However, a large number of the available in vitro models fail to reflect the tightness of the in vivo blood-brain...... barrier. The present protocol describes the setup of an in vitro coculture model based on primary cultures of endothelial cells from bovine brain microvessels and primary cultures of rat astrocytes. The model displays a high electrical tightness and expresses blood-brain barrier marker proteins....

  15. Protein-energy malnutrition during pregnancy alters caffeine's effect on brain tissue of neonate rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, M; Wilber, J F; Nakamoto, T

    1984-12-17

    We studied whether protein-energy malnutrition changed brain susceptibility to a small dose of caffeine in newborn rats. Since we had demonstrated previously that caffeine intake during lactation increased the brain neuropeptide on newborns, we investigated further the effects of the prenatal administration of caffeine on TRH and cyclo (His-Pro). From day 13 of gestation to delivery day, pregnant rats in one group were fed either a 20% or a 6% protein diet ad libitum, and those in the other group were pair-fed with each protein diet supplemented with caffeine at an effective dose of 2 mg/100 g body weight. Upon delivery, brain weight, brain protein, RNA, DNA and the neuropeptides thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and cyclo (His-Pro) were measured in the newborn rats. A 6% protein without caffeine diet caused reductions in brain weights and brain protein, RNA and DNA contents, but did not alter brain TRH and cyclo (His-Pro) concentrations in the newborn animals. In the offspring from dams fed a 6% protein diet, caffeine administration significantly elevated brain weights and brain contents of protein, RNA and DNA. In contrast, these values were similar between noncaffeine and caffeine-supplemented animals in a 20% protein diet group. Brain TRH and cyclo (His-Pro) concentrations were not changed by caffeine administration. These data suggest that caffeine augments protein synthesis in the newborn rat brain when malnourished, but that the same dose of caffeine did not affect protein synthesis in brains of newborn rats from normally nourished dams. Therefore, the present findings indicate that the nutritional status of mothers during pregnancy has important implication in the impact of caffeine on their offspring's brains.

  16. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Simonsen, Mette; Ott, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Sørensen, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Ammonia has a key role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the brain, glutamine synthetase (GS) rapidly converts blood-borne ammonia into glutamine which in high concentrations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction and osmolytic brain edema. In astrocyte-neuron cocultures and brains of healthy rats, inhibition of GS by methionine sulfoximine (MSO) reduced glutamine synthesis and increased alanine synthesis. Here, we investigate effects of MSO on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in sham and bile duct ligated (BDL) rats. Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, alanine, and aspartate and incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into these amino acids in brain, liver, muscle, kidney, and plasma were similar in sham and BDL rats treated with saline. Methionine sulfoximine reduced glutamine concentrations in liver, kidney, and plasma but not in brain and muscle; MSO reduced incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into glutamine in all tissues. It did not affect alanine concentrations in any of the tissues but plasma alanine concentration increased; incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into alanine was increased in brain in sham and BDL rats and in kidney in sham rats. It inhibited GS in all tissues examined but only in brain was an increased incorporation of (15)N-ammonia into alanine observed. Liver and kidney were important for metabolizing blood-borne ammonia.

  17. Brain capillary transit time heterogeneity in healthy volunteers measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced T1 -weighted perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Henrik B W; Vestergaard, Mark B; Lindberg, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    impulse response function was compatible with the adiabatic tissue homogeneity model. In two patients with complete occlusion of the internal carotid artery and in the patient with a brain tumor CTH was increased with values up to 6 s in the affected brain tissue, with an exponential like residue impulse...

  18. Localization profile of Cathepsin L in the brain of African giant rat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Localization profile of Cathepsin L in the brain of African giant rat ( Cricestomys gambianus ) ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Within the diencephalon high density of positive signals was observed in mediodorsal and ...

  19. Catechins decrease neurological severity score through apoptosis and neurotropic factor pathway in rat traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retty Ratnawati

    2017-08-01

    Administration of catechins decreased NSS through inhibiting inflammation and apoptosis, as well as induced the neurotrophic factors in rat brain injury. Catechins may serve as a potential intervention for TBI.

  20. Tumor necrosis factor α antibody prevents brain damage of rats with acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Ling Yang; Ji-Peng Li; Kai-Zong Li; Ke-Feng Dou

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the protective effects of tumor necrosis factor á (TNFα) antibody on pancreatic encephalopathy in rats.METHODS:One hundred and twenty SD rats were randomly divided into normal control group,acute necrotizing pancreatitis group and TNFα antibody treated group.Acute hemorrhage necrotizing pancreatitis model in rats was induced by retrograde injection of 50 g/L sodium taurocholate into the pancreatobiliary duct.Serum TNFα was detected and animals were killed 12 h after drug administration.Changes in content of brain water,MDA and SOD as well as leucocyte adhesion of brain microvessels were measured.RESULTS:In TNFα antibody treated group,serum TNFálevel was decreased.Content of brain water,MDA and SOD as well as leucocyte adhesion were decreased significantly in comparison with those of acute necrotizing pancreatitis group (P<0.05).CONCLUSION:TNFα antibody can alleviate the brain damage of rats with acute hemorrhage necrotizing pancreatitis.

  1. Protective effects of melatonin on the ionizing radiation induced DNA damage in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undeger, Ulko; Giray, Belma; Zorlu, A Faruk; Oge, Kamil; Baçaran, Nurçen

    2004-03-01

    Melatonin is an endogenously produced antioxidant with radioprotective actions while ionizing radiation is a well-known cytotoxic and mutagenic agent of which the biological results are attributable to its free radical producing effects. The effect of melatonin on the DNA strand breakage and lipid peroxidation induced by ionizing radiation in the rat brain were investigated in order to clarify its radioprotective ability. The DNA strand breakage in rat brain exposed to 1000 cGy ionizing radiation was assessed by alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis and the lipid peroxidation was evaluated by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentrations. A significant increase in DNA damage (p radiation treated rat brain. Pre-treatment of rats with intraperitoneal doses of 100 mg/kg melatonin provided a significant decrease in the DNA strand breakage and lipid peroxidation. Our results indicate that melatonin can protect brain cells from oxidative damage induced by ionizing radiation.

  2. Changing Numbers of Neuronal and Non-Neuronal Cells Underlie Postnatal Brain Growth in the Rat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fabiana Bandeira; Roberto Lent; Suzana Herculano-Houzel; Jon H. Kaas

    2009-01-01

    .... To test this hypothesis, here we investigate quantitatively the postnatal changes in the total number of neuronal and non-neuronal cells in the developing rat brain, and examine how these changes...

  3. A large-scale electrophoresis- and chromatography-based determination of gene expression profiles in bovine brain capillary endothelial cells after the re-induction of blood-brain barrier properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duban-Deweer Sophie

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs form the physiological basis of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The barrier function is (at least in part due to well-known proteins such as transporters, tight junctions and metabolic barrier proteins (e.g. monoamine oxidase, gamma glutamyltranspeptidase and P-glycoprotein. Our previous 2-dimensional gel proteome analysis had identified a large number of proteins and revealed the major role of dynamic cytoskeletal remodelling in the differentiation of bovine BCECs. The aim of the present study was to elaborate a reference proteome of Triton X-100-soluble species from bovine BCECs cultured in the well-established in vitro BBB model developed in our laboratory. Results A total of 215 protein spots (corresponding to 130 distinct proteins were identified by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, whereas over 350 proteins were identified by a shotgun approach. We classified around 430 distinct proteins expressed by bovine BCECs. Our large-scale gene expression analysis enabled the correction of mistakes referenced into protein databases (e.g. bovine vinculin and constitutes valuable evidence for predictions based on genome annotation. Conclusions Elaboration of a reference proteome constitutes the first step in creating a gene expression database dedicated to capillary endothelial cells displaying BBB characteristics. It improves of our knowledge of the BBB and the key proteins in cell structures, cytoskeleton organization, metabolism, detoxification and drug resistance. Moreover, our results emphasize the need for both appropriate experimental design and correct interpretation of proteome datasets.

  4. The expression of TRPA1 mRNA in the rat brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Du; Shua Li; Jinyu Zheng; Zhi-yuan Yu; Minjie Xie; Wei Wang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the distribution of TRPA1 (one kind of the TRP-like ion channel family) channel in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of rat. Methods: RT-PCR was used to amplify the fragment of TRPA1 in the DRG (dorsal root ganglion), hippocampus and cerebral cortex of adult SD rat. In situ hybridization staining was used to show the distribution of TRPA1 mRNA in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of adult rat brain. Results: Both RT-PCR and in situ hybridization staining showed that TRPA1 mRNA was expressed in hippocampus and cerebral cortex of the adult rat brain. Conclusion: Ourresults suggest that there is expression of TRPA1 mRNA both in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of the adult rat brain.

  5. BRAIN VOLUMES OF THE LAMB, RAT AND BIRD DO NOT SHOW HEMISPHERIC ASYMMETRY: A STEREOLOGICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bünyamin Sahin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that there are functional differences between right and left brain hemispheres. However, it is not clear whether these functional differences are reflected in morphometric differences. This study was carried out to investigate the right-left asymmetry, and sex and species differences of the brains using the Cavalieri principle for volume estimation. Seventeen lambs, 10 rats and 12 avian brains were used to estimate brain volumes. A transparent point grid was superimposed on the slices of lamb brains directly and the slices of the rat and avian brains were projected onto a screen at 10x magnification. Surface areas of the cut slice faces were estimated by simply counting the points that hit the slices. Mean brain volumes were 37.74 cm3, 598.95 mm3 and 730.38 mm3 and the coefficients of variations were 0.08, 0.05 and 0.05 for lamb, rat and avian brains respectively. The differences between left and right hemispheres did not show statistical significance (P > 0.05. However, the male brain volumes were larger than the females for the lamb and bird (P < 0.05. In light of such findings, it will be necessary to evaluate neuron number of the brain hemispheres to provide more useful data regarding inter-hemispheric brain asymmetry.

  6. Characterization of rat brain NCAM mRNA using DNA oligonucleotide probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1990-01-01

    A number of different isoforms of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been identified. The difference between these is due to alternative splicing of a single NCAM gene. In rat brain NCAM mRNAs with sizes of 7.4, 6.7, 5.2, 4.3 and 2.9 kb have been reported. We have synthesized six DNA...... the five NCAM mRNAs in rat brain....

  7. Increased expression of aquaporin-4 in brain tissue of amygdala-kindled rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinghui Chen; Yongbo Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent epileptic seizures can lead to brain edema, indicating that water regulation may be perturbed by seizures.We hypothesized that the expression of the brain water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP-4) may be upregulated in the epileptic brain.In the present study, we established the amygdala kindling model of epilepsy, and quantified AQP-4 protein and mRNA levels, using reverse transcription-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blotting, in epileptic and control rats.We found that AQP-4 was overexpressed in the cerebral cortex of rats with epilepsy compared with controls.These findings show that AQP-4 is highly expressed in the brain of amygdala-kindled rats, suggesting that repeated seizures affect water homeostasis in the brain.

  8. Effects of morphine dependence and withdrawal on levels of neurosteroids in rat brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai-zhen YAN; Yan-ning HOU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of morphine dependence and withdrawal on the concentrations of neurosteroids in rat brain. METHODS: A method of simultaneous quantification of neurosteroids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) had been established. RESULTS: The chronic morphine administration (ip) resulted in a marked decrease in the brain concentrations of pregnenolone (PREG), progesterone (PROG), and pregenenolone sulfate (PREGS) in rats killed 6 h after the last treatment. In contrast, there were no significant effects of morphine dependence on the brain concentrations of allopregnanolone (AP), dihydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and dihydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS). Naloxone-induced withdrawal produced a significant increase in the concentrations of PREG, PROG, AP, DHEA, PREGS, and DHEAS as compared with the control group.CONCLUSION: Morphine dependence and withdrawal affected the concentrations of neurosteroids in rat brain,which suggests that endogenous neurosteroids in brain might be related to the development of morphine dependence and withdrawal.

  9. Large litters rearing changes brain expression of GLUT3 and acetylcholinesterase activity in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vasconcelos, Vivian Sarmento; Machado, Sonia Salgueiro; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo; Bandeira, Bruno Carneiro; Ximenes-da-Silva, Adriana

    2012-09-06

    Effects of malnutrition in the brain are more pronounced during the period of growth spurt, corresponding to the suckling in rodents. Neuronal glucose transporter GLUT3 expression and acetylcholinesterase activity were studied in the brain of adult young rats (84 days old) suckled in litters formed by 6 (control group) or 12 pups (malnourished group). In the adult rats, brain weight, blood glucose levels and GLUT3 expression were decreased in malnourished group (5%, 18%, 58%, respectively, Pmalnutrition during suckling period decreased GLUT3 expression and increased acetylcholinesterase activity in the rat brain that could contribute to possible cognitive deficits and changes of brain metabolic activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Orally Administrated Ascorbic Acid Suppresses Neuronal Damage and Modifies Expression of SVCT2 and GLUT1 in the Brain of Diabetic Rats with Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naohiro Iwata

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is known to exacerbate cerebral ischemic injury. In the present study, we investigated antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects of oral supplementation of ascorbic acid (AA on cerebral injury caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion (MCAO/Re in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. We also evaluated the effects of AA on expression of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2 and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1 after MCAO/Re in the brain. The diabetic state markedly aggravated MCAO/Re-induced cerebral damage, as assessed by infarct volume and edema. Pretreatment with AA (100 mg/kg, p.o. for two weeks significantly suppressed the exacerbation of damage in the brain of diabetic rats. AA also suppressed the production of superoxide radical, activation of caspase-3, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β in the ischemic penumbra. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that expression of SVCT2 was upregulated primarily in neurons and capillary endothelial cells after MCAO/Re in the nondiabetic cortex, accompanied by an increase in total AA (AA + dehydroascorbic acid in the tissue, and that these responses were suppressed in the diabetic rats. AA supplementation to the diabetic rats restored these responses to the levels of the nondiabetic rats. Furthermore, AA markedly upregulated the basal expression of GLUT1 in endothelial cells of nondiabetic and diabetic cortex, which did not affect total AA levels in the cortex. These results suggest that daily intake of AA attenuates the exacerbation of cerebral ischemic injury in a diabetic state, which may be attributed to anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects via the improvement of augmented oxidative stress in the brain. AA supplementation may protect endothelial function against the exacerbated ischemic oxidative injury in the diabetic state and improve AA transport through SVCT2 in the cortex.

  11. Through metal binding, curcumin protects against lead- and cadmium-induced lipid peroxidation in rat brain homogenates and against lead-induced tissue damage in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Sheril; Limson, Janice L; Dairam, Amichand; Watkins, Gareth M; Daya, Santy

    2004-02-01

    Curcumin, the major constituent of turmeric is a known, naturally occurring antioxidant. The present study examined the ability of this compound to protect against lead-induced damage to hippocampal cells of male Wistar rats, as well as lipid peroxidation induced by lead and cadmium in rat brain homogenate. The thiobarbituric assay (TBA) was used to measure the extent of lipid peroxidation induced by lead and cadmium in rat brain homogenate. The results show that curcumin significantly protects against lipid peroxidation induced by both these toxic metals. Coronal brain sections of rats injected intraperitoneally with lead acetate (20 mg/kg) in the presence and absence of curcumin (30 mg/kg) were compared microscopically to determine the extent of lead-induced damage to the cells in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions, and to establish the capacity of curcumin to prevent such damage. Lead-induced damage to the neurons was significantly curtailed in the rats injected with curcumin. Possible chelation of lead and cadmium by curcumin as its mechanism of neuroprotection against such heavy metal insult to the brain was investigated using electrochemical, ultraviolet spectrophotometric and infrared spectroscopic analyses. The results of the study show that there is an interaction between curcumin and both cadmium and lead, with the possible formation of a complex between the metal and this ligand. These results imply that curcumin could be used therapeutically to chelate these toxic metals, thus potentially reducing their neurotoxicity and tissue damage.

  12. Synaptic and blood-brain barrier structural changes in a rat epilepsy model induced by coriaria lacton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiyan Cheng; Jichun Huang; Yi Han; Guangyi Liu; Ling Yin; Furong Zheng

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Structural and functional synaptic changes, as well as blood-brain barrier (BBB) changes, affect the micro-environment of nervous tissue and excitation, both of which play an important role in epilepsy.OBJECTIVE: To observe synaptic and BBB ultrastructural changes in the motor cortex of a rat epilepsy model induced by coriaria lacton, and to investigate the synaptic and BBB effects on the mechanism of epilepsy.DESIGN: A randomized controlled animal experiment.SETTING: Department of Histology and Embryology, Luzhou Medical College; and Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Luzhou Medical College.MATERIALS: Twenty healthy male Sprague Dawley rats, aged 8 weeks, were chosen for this study. The rats weighed (280 ± 50) g and were supplied by the Experimental Animal Center of Luzhou Medical College. Experimentation was performed in accordance with the ethical guidelines for the use and care of animals. The animals were randomly divided into a control group and an epilepsy group, with 10 rats in each group. METHODS: This study was performed at the Department of Histology and Embryology, and Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Luzhou Medical College between February and December 2006. According to the protocol, the epilepsy group was injected with 10 μL/100 g coriaria lacton into the lateral ventricles to establish an epileptic model. The control group rats were not administered anything. Eight days after the model was established, all rats were anesthetized with ether. The motor cortex was removed and sectioned into ultrathin sections. Synaptic and BBB ultrastructural changes were observed by electron microscopy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ①Structural changes of three different parts of the synapses, synaptic cleft width, postsynaptic density thickness, proportion of perforation synapses, curvature of synaptic interface, and length of active zones. ②Capillary and BBB changes (endothelium, basement membrane, pericyte, and the astrocyte endfeet).RESULTS: ①Curvature of

  13. Hyperammonemia,brain edema and blood-brain barrier alterations in prehepatic portal hypertensive rats and paravrtamol intoxication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Camila Scorticati; Juan P. Prestifilippo; Francisco X. Eizayaga; José L. Castro; Salvador Romay; Maria A. Fernández; Abraham Lemberg; Juan C. Perazzo

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the blood-brain barrier integrity, brain edema,animal behavior and ammonia plasma levels in prehepatic portal hypertensive rats with and without acute liver intoxication.METHODS: Adults male Wistar rats were divided into four groups. Group Ⅰ: sham operation; Ⅱ: Prehepatic portal hypertension, produced by partial portal vein ligation; Ⅲ:Acetaminophen intoxication and Ⅳ: Prehepatic portal hypertension plus acetaminophen. Acetaminophen was administered to produce acute hepatic injury. Portal pressure, liver serum enzymes and ammonia plasma levels were determined. Brain cortex water content was registered and trypan blue was utilized to study blood brain barrier integrity. Reflexes and behavioral tests were recorded.RESULTS: Portal hypertension was significantly elevated in groups Ⅱ and Ⅳ. Liver enzymes and ammonia plasma levels were increased in groups Ⅱ, Ⅳ and Ⅳ. Prehepatic portal hypertension (group Ⅱ), acetaminophen intoxication (group Ⅲ) and both (group Ⅳ) had changes in the blood brain-barrier integrity (trypan blue) and hyperammonemia. Cortical edema was present in rats with acute hepatic injury in groups Ⅲ and Ⅳ. Behavioral test (rota rod) was altered in group Ⅳ.CONCLUSION: These results suggest the possibility of another pathway for cortical edema production because blood brain barrier was altered (vasogenic) and hyperammonemia was registered (cytotoxic). Group Ⅳ, with behavioral altered test, can be considered as a model for study at an early stage of portal-systemic encephalopathy.

  14. Expression of c-jun in brain stem following moderate lateral fluid percussion brain injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the expression of c-jun in brain stem following moderate lateral fluid percussion brain injury in rats, and to observe the temporal patterns of its expressions following percussion.METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into normal control, sham operation control and injury groups. The rats of injury group subjected to moderate lateral fluid percussion injury (0.2 mPa), and then were subdivided into 5 min, 15 min, 30 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h and 12 h groups according to the time elapsed after injury. The expression of c-jun was studied by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. RESULTS: After percussion for 15 min, Jun positive neurons increased in brain stem progressively, and peaked at 12h. At 5min after percussion, the induction of c-jun mRNA was increased, and remained elevated up to 1h-2h after brain injury. CONCLUSION: The induction and expression of the c-jun in brain stem after fluid percussion brain injury were increased rapidly and lasted for a long time.

  15. Effect of L-arginine on metabolism of polyamines in rat's brain with extrahepatic cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolovic, Dusan; Bjelakovic, Gordana; Nikolic, Jelenka; Djindjic, Boris; Pavlovic, Dusica; Kocic, Gordana; Stojanovic, Ivana; Pavlovic, Voja

    2010-01-01

    Cholestatic encephalopathy results from accumulation of unconjugated bilirubin and hydrophobic bile acids in the brain. The aim of this study was to determine disturbances of polyamine metabolism in the brains of rats with experimental extrahepatic cholestasis and the effects of L-arginine administration. Wister rats were divided into groups: I: sham-operated, II: rats treated with L-arginine, III: animals with bile-duct ligation (BDL), and IV: cholestatic-BDL rats treated with L-arginine. Increased plasma gamma-glutamyltransferase and alkaline phosphatase activity and increased bile-acids and bilirubin levels in BDL rats were reduced by administration of L-arginine (P < 0.001). Cholestasis increased the brain's putrescine (P < 0.001) and decreased spermidine and spermine concentration (P < 0.05). The activity of polyamine oxidase was increased (P < 0.001) and diamine oxidase was decreased (P < 0.001) in the brains of BDL rats. Cholestasis increased the activity of arginase (P < 0.05) and decreased the level of citrulline (P < 0.001). Administration of L-arginine in BDL rats prevents metabolic disorders of polyamines and establishes a neuroprotective role in the brain during cholestasis.

  16. CXCL1 can be regulated by IL-6 and promotes granulocyte adhesion to brain capillaries during bacterial toxin exposure and encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Monica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocytes generally exert protective roles in the central nervous system (CNS, but recent studies suggest that they can be detrimental in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the most common model of multiple sclerosis. While the cytokines and adhesion molecules involved in granulocyte adhesion to the brain vasculature have started to be elucidated, the required chemokines remain undetermined. Methods CXCR2 ligand expression was examined in the CNS of mice suffering from EAE or exposed to bacterial toxins by quantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. CXCL1 expression was analyzed in IL-6-treated endothelial cell cultures by quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA. Granulocytes were counted in the brain vasculature after treatment with a neutralizing anti-CXCL1 antibody using stereological techniques. Results CXCL1 was the most highly expressed ligand of the granulocyte receptor CXCR2 in the CNS of mice subjected to EAE or infused with lipopolysaccharide (LPS or pertussis toxin (PTX, the latter being commonly used to induce EAE. IL-6 upregulated CXCL1 expression in brain endothelial cells by acting transcriptionally and mediated the stimulatory effect of PTX on CXCL1 expression. The anti-CXCL1 antibody reduced granulocyte adhesion to brain capillaries in the three conditions under study. Importantly, it attenuated EAE severity when given daily for a week during the effector phase of the disease. Conclusions This study identifies CXCL1 not only as a key regulator of granulocyte recruitment into the CNS, but also as a new potential target for the treatment of neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

  17. Population-averaged diffusion tensor imaging atlas of the Sprague Dawley rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veraart, Jelle; Leergaard, Trygve B; Antonsen, Bjørnar T; Van Hecke, Wim; Blockx, Ines; Jeurissen, Ben; Jiang, Yi; Van der Linden, Annemie; Johnson, G Allan; Verhoye, Marleen; Sijbers, Jan

    2011-10-15

    Rats are widely used in experimental neurobiological research, and rat brain atlases are important resources for identifying brain regions in the context of experimental microsurgery, tissue sampling, and neuroimaging, as well as comparison of findings across experiments. Currently, most available rat brain atlases are constructed from histological material derived from single specimens, and provide two-dimensional or three-dimensional (3D) outlines of diverse brain regions and fiber tracts. Important limitations of such atlases are that they represent individual specimens, and that finer details of tissue architecture are lacking. Access to more detailed 3D brain atlases representative of a population of animals is needed. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a unique neuroimaging modality that provides sensitive information about orientation structure in tissues, and is widely applied in basic and clinical neuroscience investigations. To facilitate analysis and assignment of location in rat brain neuroimaging investigations, we have developed a population-averaged three-dimensional DTI atlas of the normal adult Sprague Dawley rat brain. The atlas is constructed from high resolution ex vivo DTI images, which were nonlinearly warped into a population-averaged in vivo brain template. The atlas currently comprises a selection of manually delineated brain regions, the caudate-putamen complex, globus pallidus, entopeduncular nucleus, substantia nigra, external capsule, corpus callosum, internal capsule, cerebral peduncle, fimbria of the hippocampus, fornix, anterior commisure, optic tract, and stria terminalis. The atlas is freely distributed and potentially useful for several purposes, including automated and manual delineation of rat brain structural and functional imaging data.

  18. Immunocytochemical study on the intracellular localization of the type 2 glucocorticoid receptor in the rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekelen, J.A.M. van; Kiss, J.Z.; Westphal, H.M.; Kloet, E.R. de

    1987-01-01

    The localization of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) (type 2) in the rat brain was studied with immunocytochemistry using a monoclonal antibody against the rat liver GR. Strong GR immunoreactivity (GR-ir) was observed in neurons of limbic and brainstem structures known to be associated with the stre

  19. Expression of annexin and Annexin-mRNA in rat brain under influence of steroid drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, PH; Go, KG; ter Horst, GJ; Ruiters, MHJ; Solito, E; Parente, L; James, HE; Marshall, LF; Reulen, HJ; Baethmann, A; Marmarou, A; Ito, U; Hoff, JT; Kuroiwa, T; Czernicki, Z

    1997-01-01

    Brain tissue of rats pretreated with methylprednisolone or with the 21-aminosteroid U74389F, and that of untreated control rats, was assessed for the expression of Annexin-l (Anx-1) and the transcription of its mRNA. For this purpose Anx-1 cDNA was amplified and simultaneously a T7-RNA-polymerase pr

  20. Comparative proteomics of rat brain in the BCNU-induced model of cortical dysplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭谊

    2014-01-01

    Objective To screen the differential proteins in the brain(neocortex and hippocampus)between the rats with cortical dysplasia(CD)and control ones,and investigate the role of their alteration in the development of epilepsy in CD.Methods Cortical dysplasia was induced in rat pups via in utero delivery of BCNU.A two-dimensional electrophoresis

  1. The effects of trypsin on rat brain astrocyte activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Fereidoni

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are cells within the central nervous system which are activated in a wide spectrum of infections, and autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases. In pathologic states, they produce inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and nitric oxide (NO, and sometimes they induce apoptosis. Their protease-activated receptors (PARs can be activated by proteases, e.g. thrombin and trypsin, which are important in brain inflammation. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of different concentrations of trypsin (1 to 100U/ml on cultured astrocytes.In the present study, two-day rat infants' brains were isolated and homogenized after meninges removal, then cultivated in DMEM + 10% FBS medium. 10 days later, astrocytes were harvested and recultivated for more purification (up to 95%, using Immunocytochemistry method, in order to be employed for tests. They were affected by different concentrations of trypsin (1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 U/ml. To reveal the inflammation progress, NO concentrations (the Griess test were assessed after 24 and 48 hours.The results showed that trypsin concentration up to 20 U/ml caused a significant increase in NO, in a dose-dependent manner, on cultured astrocytes (P < 0.001. Trypsin 20 U/ml increased NO production fivefold the control group (P < 0.001. At higher concentrations than 20 U/ml, NO production diminished (P < 0.001. At 100 U/ml, NO production was less than the control group (P < 0.001.Inflammatory effects of trypsin 5-20 U/ml are probably due to the stimulation of astrocytes' PAR-2 receptors and the increasing of the activation of NF-κB, PKC, MAPKs. Stimulation of astrocytes' PAR-2 receptors causes an increase in iNOS activation which in turn leads to NO production. However, higher trypsin concentration possibly made astrocyte apoptosis; therefore, NO production diminished. These assumptions need to be further investigated.

  2. The metabolism of malate by cultured rat brain astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenna, M.C.; Tildon, J.T.; Couto, R.; Stevenson, J.H.; Caprio, F.J. (Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Since malate is known to play an important role in a variety of functions in the brain including energy metabolism, the transfer of reducing equivalents and possibly metabolic trafficking between different cell types; a series of biochemical determinations were initiated to evaluate the rate of 14CO2 production from L-(U-14C)malate in rat brain astrocytes. The 14CO2 production from labeled malate was almost totally suppressed by the metabolic inhibitors rotenone and antimycin A suggesting that most of malate metabolism was coupled to the electron transport system. A double reciprocal plot of the 14CO2 production from the metabolism of labeled malate revealed biphasic kinetics with two apparent Km and Vmax values suggesting the presence of more than one mechanism of malate metabolism in these cells. Subsequent experiments were carried out using 0.01 mM and 0.5 mM malate to determine whether the addition of effectors would differentially alter the metabolism of high and low concentrations of malate. Effectors studied included compounds which could be endogenous regulators of malate metabolism and metabolic inhibitors which would provide information regarding the mechanisms regulating malate metabolism. Both lactate and aspartate decreased 14CO2 production from malate equally. However, a number of effectors were identified which selectively altered the metabolism of 0.01 mM malate including aminooxyacetate, furosemide, N-acetylaspartate, oxaloacetate, pyruvate and glucose, but had little or no effect on the metabolism of 0.5 mM malate. In addition, alpha-ketoglutarate and succinate decreased 14CO2 production from 0.01 mM malate much more than from 0.5 mM malate. In contrast, a number of effectors altered the metabolism of 0.5 mM malate more than 0.01 mM. These included methionine sulfoximine, glutamate, malonate, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and ouabain.

  3. Brain and Serum Androsterone Is Elevated in Response to Stress in Rats with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servatius, Richard J; Marx, Christine E; Sinha, Swamini; Avcu, Pelin; Kilts, Jason D; Naylor, Jennifer C; Pang, Kevin C H

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to lateral fluid percussion (LFP) injury consistent with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) persistently attenuates acoustic startle responses (ASRs) in rats. Here, we examined whether the experience of head trauma affects stress reactivity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were matched for ASRs and randomly assigned to receive mTBI through LFP or experience a sham surgery (SHAM). ASRs were measured post injury days (PIDs) 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28. To assess neurosteroids, rats received a single 2.0 mA, 0.5 s foot shock on PID 34 (S34), PID 35 (S35), on both days (2S), or the experimental context (CON). Levels of the neurosteroids pregnenolone (PREG), allopregnanolone (ALLO), and androsterone (ANDRO) were determined for the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. For 2S rats, repeated blood samples were obtained at 15, 30, and 60 min post-stressor for determination of corticosterone (CORT) levels after stress or context on PID 34. Similar to earlier work, ASRs were severely attenuated in mTBI rats without remission for 28 days after injury. No differences were observed between mTBI and SHAM rats in basal CORT, peak CORT levels or its recovery. In serum and brain, ANDRO levels were the most stress-sensitive. Stress-induced ANDRO elevations were greater than those in mTBI rats. As a positive allosteric modulator of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors, increased brain ANDRO levels are expected to be anxiolytic. The impact of brain ANDRO elevations in the aftermath of mTBI on coping warrants further elaboration.

  4. Brain and Serum Androsterone is Elevated in Response to Stress in Rats with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Servatius

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to lateral fluid percussion (LFP injury consistent with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI persistently attenuates acoustic startle responses (ASRs in rats. Here, we examined whether the experience of head trauma affects stress reactivity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were matched for ASRs and randomly assigned to receive mTBI through LFP or experience a sham surgery (SHAM. ASRs were measured post injury days (PIDs 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28. To assess neurosteroids, rats received a single 2.0 mA, 0.5 s foot shock on PID 34 (S34, PID 35 (S35, on both days (2S, or the experimental context (CON. Levels of the neurosteroids pregnenolone (PREG, allopregnanolone (ALLO, and androsterone (ANDRO were determined for the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum. For 2S rats, repeated blood samples were obtained at 15, 30 and 60 min post-stressor for determination of corticosterone (CORT levels after stress or context on PID 34. Similar to earlier work, ASRs were severely attenuated in mTBI rats without remission for 28 days after injury. No differences were observed between mTBI and SHAM rats in basal CORT, peak CORT levels or its recovery. In serum and brain, ANDRO levels were the most stress-sensitive. Stress-induced ANDRO elevations were greater than those in mTBI rats. As a positive allosteric modulator of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA receptors, increased brain ANDRO levels are expected to be anxiolytic. The impact of brain ANDRO elevations in the aftermath of mTBI on coping warrants further elaboration.

  5. Serial Post-mortem Relaxometry in the Normal Rat Brain and Following Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Fagan, Andrew J.; Mullin, JM; Gallagher, L; Hadley, DM; Macrae, IM; Condon, B

    2008-01-01

    PUBLISHED Purpose: Investigation of MRI for non-invasive autopsy via measurements of serial changes in relaxation parameters of the rat brain during the post-mortem interval. Materials and Methods: Post-mortem relaxometry measurements were performed before and hourly after death for 24 hours on five control rats and five rats which underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Analyses were performed on representative regions of grey, white, and mixed grey/white matter structures. ...

  6. Relationship between changes of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activity and brain edema after brain injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the changes of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity and brain edema after injury in rats.   Methods: The brain injury models were made by using a free-falling body. The treatment model was induced by means of injecting AP5 into lateral ventricle before brain injury; water contents in brain cortex were measured with dry-wet method; and NMDA receptor activity was detected with a radio ligand binding assay.   Results: The water contents began to increase at 30 minutes and reached the peak at 6 hours after brain injury. The maximal binding (Bmax) of NMDA receptor increased significantly at 15 minutes and reached the peak at 30 minutes, then decreased gradually and had the lowest value 6 hours after brain injury. Followed the treatment with AP5, NMDA receptor activity in the injured brain showed a normal value; and the water contents were lower than that of AP5-free injury group 24 hours after brain injury.   Conclusions: It suggests that excessive activation of NMDA receptor may be one of the most important factors to induce the secondary cerebral impairments, and AP5 may protect the brain from edema after brain injury.

  7. Drug-induced trafficking of p-glycoprotein in human brain capillary endothelial cells as demonstrated by exposure to mitomycin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Andreas; Noack, Sandra; Hoffmann, Andrea; Maalouf, Katia; Buettner, Manuela; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Alms, Dana; Römermann, Kerstin; Naim, Hassan Y; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp; ABCB1/MDR1) is a major efflux transporter at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), restricting the penetration of various compounds. In other tissues, trafficking of Pgp from subcellular stores to the cell surface has been demonstrated and may constitute a rapid way of the cell to respond to toxic compounds by functional membrane insertion of the transporter. It is not known whether drug-induced Pgp trafficking also occurs in brain capillary endothelial cells that form the BBB. In this study, trafficking of Pgp was investigated in human brain capillary endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) that were stably transfected with a doxycycline-inducible MDR1-EGFP fusion plasmid. In the presence of doxycycline, these cells exhibited a 15-fold increase in Pgp-EGFP fusion protein expression, which was associated with an increased efflux of the Pgp substrate rhodamine 123 (Rho123). The chemotherapeutic agent mitomycin C (MMC) was used to study drug-induced trafficking of Pgp. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of single hCMEC/D3-MDR1-EGFP cells revealed that Pgp redistribution from intracellular pools to the cell surface occurred within 2 h of MMC exposure. Pgp-EGFP exhibited a punctuate pattern at the cell surface compatible with concentrated regions of the fusion protein in membrane microdomains, i.e., lipid rafts, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis of biotinylated cell surface proteins in Lubrol-resistant membranes. MMC exposure also increased the functionality of Pgp as assessed in three functional assays with Pgp substrates (Rho123, eFluxx-ID Gold, calcein-AM). However, this increase occurred with some delay after the increased Pgp expression and coincided with the release of Pgp from the Lubrol-resistant membrane complexes. Disrupting rafts by depleting the membrane of cholesterol increased the functionality of Pgp. Our data present the first direct evidence of drug-induced Pgp trafficking at the human BBB and indicate that Pgp has to be released from lipid

  8. Restoration of brain protein synthesis in mature and aged rats by a DA agonist, piribedil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustany, P; Trenque, T; Crambes, O; Moulin, M

    1995-01-01

    Brain ageing affects numerous cerebral metabolic pathways such as cerebral glucose consumption or protein synthesis rate. The pharmacological effect of a mixed D1-D2 dopaminergic agonist, piribedil, on this last metabolism is reported. Cerebral Protein Synthesis Rate (CPSR) was measured by the [35S]L-methionine autoradiographic procedure in 38 main brain regions of 11 and 26-month-old Wistar rats after a 2-month treatment per os at 9 and 30 mg/kg/day with piribedil. Mean decrease of CPSR was -21% during the 15-month ageing we followed, with important local variations. Mean CPSR increased with the two treatments, +25% in mature and +35% in aged rats. Treatments restored CPSR of aged rats to the exact mature subjects levels in quite all the brain regions. No dose-effect or asymetrical modification was statistically revealed for the two treatments. Metabolic increases involved particularly central brain gray structures, especially some DA-targeted brain nuclei concerned with behaviour and learning. This effect argued for a general metabotrophic effect of D1-D2 dopamine stimulation of the brain. The original pattern of local ageing of brain protein synthesis in rat was also incidentally reported. This was the first direct report of a wide and effective metabolic activation of CPSR in the brain during ageing by a curative dopaminergic agonist treatment.

  9. Congenital viral infections of the brain: lessons learned from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in the neonatal rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Bonthius

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The fetal brain is highly vulnerable to teratogens, including many infectious agents. As a consequence of prenatal infection, many children suffer severe and permanent brain injury and dysfunction. Because most animal models of congenital brain infection do not strongly mirror human disease, the models are highly limited in their abilities to shed light on the pathogenesis of these diseases. The animal model for congenital lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV infection, however, does not suffer from this limitation. LCMV is a well-known human pathogen. When the infection occurs during pregnancy, the virus can infect the fetus, and the developing brain is particularly vulnerable. Children with congenital LCMV infection often have substantial neurological deficits. The neonatal rat inoculated with LCMV is a superb model system of human congenital LCMV infection. Virtually all of the neuropathologic changes observed in humans congenitally infected with LCMV, including microencephaly, encephalomalacia, chorioretinitis, porencephalic cysts, neuronal migration disturbances, periventricular infection, and cerebellar hypoplasia, are reproduced in the rat model. Within the developing rat brain, LCMV selectively targets mitotically active neuronal precursors. Thus, the targets of infection and sites of pathology depend on host age at the time of infection. The rat model has further shown that the pathogenic changes induced by LCMV infection are both virus-mediated and immune-mediated. Furthermore, different brain regions simultaneously infected with LCMV can undergo widely different pathologic changes, reflecting different brain region-virus-immune system interactions. Because the neonatal rat inoculated with LCMV so faithfully reproduces the diverse neuropathology observed in the human counterpart, the rat model system is a highly valuable tool for the study of congenital LCMV infection and of all prenatal brain infections In addition, because LCMV

  10. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan K.; Sendhil Velan, S.; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Zorn, Carl; Marano, Gary D.

    2006-12-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging.

  11. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raylman, Raymond R [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Majewski, Stan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Lemieux, Susan K [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Velan, S Sendhil [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Kross, Brian [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Popov, Vladimir [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Smith, Mark F [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Weisenberger, Andrew G [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Zorn, Carl [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Marano, Gary D [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2006-12-21

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging.

  12. Traumatic brain injury impairs synaptic plasticity in hippocampus in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bao-liang; CHEN Xin; TAN Tao; YANG Zhuo; CARLOS Dayao; JIANG Rong-cai; ZHANG Jian-ning

    2011-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBl) often causes cognitive deficits and remote symptomatic epilepsy.Hippocampal regional excitability is associated with the cognitive function. However, little is known about injury-induced neuronal loss and subsequent alterations of hippocampal regional excitability. The present study was designed to determine whether TBl may impair the cellular circuit in the hippocampus.Methods Forty male Wistar rats were randomized into control (n=20) and TBl groups (n=20). Long-term potentiation,extracellular input/output curves, and hippocampal parvalbumin-immunoreactive and cholecystokinin-immunoreactive interneurons were compared between the two groups.Results TBI resulted in a significantly increased excitability in the dentate gyrus (DG), but a significantly decreased excitability in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) area. Using design-based stereological injury procedures, we induced interneuronal loss in the DG and CA3 subregions in the hippocampus, but not in the CA1 area.Conclusions TBl leads to the impairment of hippocampus synaptic plasticity due to the changing of interneuronal interaction. The injury-induced disruption of synaptic efficacy within the hippocampal circuit may underlie the observed cognitive deficits and symptomatic epilepsy.

  13. Localization of Brain Natriuretic Peptide Immunoreactivity in Rat Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam M Abdelalim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP exerts its functions through natriuretic peptide receptors. Recently, BNP has been shown to be involved in a wide range of functions. Previous studies reported BNP expression in the sensory afferent fibers in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. However, BNP expression and function in the neurons of the central nervous system are still controversial. Therefore, in this study, we investigated BNP expression in the rat spinal cord in detail using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. RT-PCR analysis showed that BNP mRNA was present in the spinal cord and DRG. BNP immunoreactivity was observed in different structures of the spinal cord, including the neuronal cell bodies and neuronal processes. BNP immunoreactivity was observed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and in the neurons of the intermediate column and ventral horn. Double-immunolabeling showed a high level of BNP expression in the afferent fibers (laminae I-II labeled with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, suggesting BNP involvement in sensory function. In addition, BNP was co-localized with CGRP and choline acetyltransferase in the motor neurons of the ventral horn. Together, these results indicate that BNP is expressed in sensory and motor systems of the spinal cord, suggesting its involvement in several biological actions on sensory and motor neurons via its binding to NPR-A and/or NPR-B in the DRG and spinal cord.

  14. Amphetamine administration improves neurochemical outcome of lateral fluid percussion brain injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, H S; Dose, J M; Prasad, R M

    1998-09-07

    This study examined the effects of the administration of D-amphetamine on the regional accumulation of lactate and free fatty acids (FFAs) after lateral fluid percussion (FP) brain injury in the rat. Rats were subjected to either FP brain injury of moderate severity (1.9 to 2.0 atm) or sham operation. At 5 min after injury, rats were treated with either d-amphetamine (4 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline. At 30 min and 60 min after brain injury, brains were frozen in situ, and cortices and hippocampi were excised at 0 degrees C. In the saline-treated brain injured rats, levels of lactate were increased in the ipsilateral left cortex and hippocampus at 30 min and 60 min after injury. These increases were attenuated by the administration of D-amphetamine at 5 min after lateral FP brain injury. At 30 and 60 min after FP brain injury, increases in the levels of all individual FFAs (palmitic, stearic, oleic and arachidonic acids) and of total FFAs were also observed in the ipsilateral cortex of the saline-treated injured rats. These increases in the ipsilateral cortex and hippocampus were also attenuated by the administration of d-amphetamine. Neither levels of lactate nor levels of FFAs were increased in the contralateral cortex in the saline-treated injured rats at 30 min or 60 min after FP brain injury. The levels of lactate and FFAs in the contralateral cortex were also unaffected by the administration of D-amphetamine. These results suggest that the attenuation of increases in the levels of lactate and FFAs in the ipsilateral cortex and hippocampus may be involved in the amphetamine-induced improvement in behavioral outcome after lateral FP brain injury.

  15. Phospholipase A_2 changes and its significance on brain tissue of rat in severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Multiple systemorgan failure is often compli-cated with SAP and PLA2could play an i mportantrole in the study of brain damages.Through thestudy of makingthe rat SAP model inthis study,thesignificance of PLA2on brain damages was surveyedand reported.Materials and methods1 The rat SAP model and its classificationEighty male Sprague-Dawley rats,weight(300±30)g,were randomly divided into4groups:thecontrol group,the sham-operation group,the SAPgroup and the treat ment group of SAP.The ratswere not given food but...

  16. Effect of domoic acid on metabolism of 5-hydroxytryptamine in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, B; Arufe, M; Alfonso, M; Duran, R

    1995-04-01

    Domoic acid (Dom) is a neurotoxic secondary amino acid that interacts with the glutamate receptors, producing neurological problems. In the present work, we study the effects of Dom on the levels of serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in discrete rat brain regions. The effects of Dom on the brain metabolism of serotonin are also discussed in this paper. Dom stimulates the rat brain serotoninergic system, increasing differentially the synthesis and the catabolism of 5-HT and the elimination of 5-HIAA.

  17. Functional Magnetic Resonance Study of Non-conventional Morphological Brains: malnourished rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition during brain development can cause serious problems that can be irreversible. Dysfunctional patterns of brain activity can be detected with functional MRI. We used BOLD functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI to investigate region differences of brain activity between control and malnourished rats. The food-competition method was applied to a rat model to induce malnutrition during lactation. A 7T magnet was used to detect changes of the BOLD signal associated with changes in brain activity caused by the trigeminal nerve stimulation in malnourished and control rats. Major neuronal activation was observed in malnourished rats in several brain regions, including cerebellum, somatosensory cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. Statistical analysis of the BOLD signals from various brain areas revealed significant differences in somatosensory cortex between the control and experimental groups, as well as a significant difference between the cerebellum and other structures in the experimental group. This study, particularly in malnourished rats, demonstrates increased BOLD activation in the cerebellum.

  18. Schwann Cells Transplantation Promoted and the Repair of Brain Stem Injury in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG WAN; YI-HUA AN; MEI-ZHEN SUN; YA-ZHUO ZHANG; ZHONG-CHENG WANG

    2003-01-01

    To explore the possibility of Schwann cells transplantation to promote the repair of injured brain stem reticular structure in rats. Methods Schwann cells originated from sciatic nerves of 1 to 2-day-old rats were expanded and labelled by BrdU in vitro, transplanted into rat brain stem reticular structure that was pre-injured by electric needle stimulus. Immunohistochemistry and myelin-staining were used to investigate the expression of BrdU, GAP-43 and new myelination respectively. Results BrdU positive cells could be identified for up to 8 months and their number increased by about 23%, which mainly migrated toward injured ipsilateral cortex. The GAP-43expression reached its peak in 1 month after transplantation and was significantly higher than that in the control group. New myelination could be seen in destructed brain stem areas. Conclusion The transplantation of Schwann cells can promote the restoration of injured brain stem reticular structure.

  19. Stereological brain volume changes in post-weaned socially isolated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Katrine; Helboe, Lone; Steiniger-Brach, Björn;

    2010-01-01

    have evaluated the neuroanatomical changes in this animal model in comparison to changes seen in schizophrenia. In this study, we applied stereological volume estimates to evaluate the total brain, the ventricular system, and the pyramidal and granular cell layers of the hippocampus in male and female...... Lister Hooded rats isolated from postnatal day 25 for 15 weeks. We observed the expected gender differences in total brain volume with males having larger brains than females. Further, we found that isolated males had significantly smaller brains than group-housed controls and larger lateral ventricles...... than controls. However, this was not seen in female rats. Isolated males had a significant smaller hippocampus, dentate gyrus and CA2/3 where isolated females had a significant smaller CA1 compared to controls. Thus, our results indicate that long-term isolation of male rats leads to neuroanatomical...

  20. Upregulated gene expression of local brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor after intracisternal administration of marrow stromal cells in rats with traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡德志; 周良辅; 朱剑虹; 毛颖; 吴雪海

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of rat marrow stromal cells (rMSCs) on gene expression of local brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) after injection of rMSCs into Cistern Magnum of adult rats subjected to traumatic brain injury(TBI).Results: Group cell transplantation had higher BDNF and NGF gene expressions than Group saline control during a period of less than 3 weeks (P<0.05).Conclusions: rMSCs transplantation via Cistern Magnum in rats subjected to traumatic brain injury can enhance expressions of local brain NGF and BDNF to a certain extent.

  1. Age-related changes in reactive oxygen species production in rat brain homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, A S; Kodavanti, P R; Mundy, W R

    2000-01-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and resultant oxidative stress have been implicated in the mechanism of brain dysfunction due to age-related neurodegenerative diseases or exposure to environmental chemicals. We have investigated intrinsic age-related differences in the ability of the various brain regions to generate ROS in the absence and presence of Fe(2)+. ROS production in crude brain homogenates from adult rats was linear with respect to time and tissue concentration, and was stimulated to a greater extent by Fe(2)+ than was TBARS production. ROS production was then determined in homogenates from cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebellum of 7-day-old, 14-day-old, 21-day-old, adult (3-6-month old), and aged (24-month-old) rats using the fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescin (DCFH). Basal levels of ROS production were similar in 7-, 14-, and 21-day olds, increased in adults, and highest in aged rats, and did not differ between brain regions. ROS production was stimulated by Fe(2)+ (0. 3-30 microM) in a concentration-dependent manner in all brain regions. However, the stimulation of ROS production by Fe(2)+ varied with age. ROS production was greater in 14- and 21-day-old rats compared with adult and aged animals. ROS production in 7-day-old rats was decreased at low Fe(2)+ concentrations and increased at high Fe(2)+ concentrations compared to adult and aged rats. These data show that brain homogenates from neonatal rats respond differently to Fe(2)+, and suggest that developing animals may be more sensitive to oxidative stress in the brain after exposure to toxicants. Published by Elsevier Science Inc.

  2. Oxidative state and oxidative metabolism in the brain of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Mariana Marques Nogueira; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; de Castro Ghizoni, Cristiane Vizioli; Bersani Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar; Comar, Jurandir Fernando

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the oxidative status of the brain of arthritic rats, based mainly on the observation that arthritis induces a pronounced oxidative stress in the liver of arthritis rats and that morphological alterations have been reported to occur in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis were used. These animals presented higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the total brain homogenate (25% higher) and in the mitochondria (+55%) when compared to healthy rats. The nitrite plus nitrate contents, nitric oxide (NO) markers, were also increased in both mitochondria (+27%) and cytosol (+14%). Arthritic rats also presented higher levels of protein carbonyl groups in the total homogenate (+43%), mitochondria (+69%) and cytosol (+145%). Arthritis caused a diminution of oxygen consumption in isolated brain mitochondria only when ascorbate was the electron donor. The disease diminished the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity by 55%, but increased the transmembrane potential by 16%. The pro-oxidant enzyme xanthine oxidase was 150%, 110% and 283% higher, respectively, in the brain homogenate, mitochondria and cytosol of arthritic animals. The same occurred with the calcium-independent NO-synthase activity that was higher in the brain homogenate (90%) and cytosol (122%) of arthritic rats. The catalase activity, on the other hand, was diminished by arthritis in all cellular fractions (between 30 and 40%). It is apparent that the brain of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis presents a pronounced oxidative stress and a significant injury to lipids and proteins, a situation that possibly contributes to the brain symptoms of the arthritis disease.

  3. Antenatal taurine supplementation for improving brain ultrastructure in fetal rats with intrauterine growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Liu, L; Chen, H

    2011-05-05

    Changes in brain ultrastructure of fetal rats with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) were explored and the effects of antenatal taurine supplementation on their brain ultrastructure were determined. Fifteen pregnant rats were randomly divided into three groups: control group, IUGR model group and IUGR group given antenatal taurine supplements. Taurine was added to the diet of the taurine group at a dose of 300 mg/kg/d from 12 days after conception until natural delivery. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe ultrastructural changes in the brains of the newborn rats. At the same time, brain cellular apoptosis was detected using TUNEL, and the changes in protein expression of neuron specific enolase and glial fibrillary acidic protein were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The results showed that: 1) The average body weight and cerebral weight were significantly lower in the IUGR group than in the control group (ptaurine was supplemented (ptaurine supplementation. 3) The results of TUNEL showed that the counts of apoptotic brain cells in IUGR groups were significantly increased from those in control groups and that taurine could significantly decrease brain cell apoptosis (ptaurine-supplementation could significantly increase the counts of neuron specific enolase and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactive cells in fetal rats with IUGR (ptaurine can significantly improve the IUGR fetal brain development.

  4. Action of the pyrethroid insecticide cypermethrin on rat brain IIa sodium channels expressed in xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T J; Soderlund, D M

    1998-12-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides bind to a unique site on voltage-dependent sodium channels and prolong sodium currents, leading to repetitive bursts of action potentials or use-dependent nerve block. To further characterize the site and mode of action of pyrethroids on sodium channels, we injected synthetic mRNA encoding the rat brain IIa sodium channel alpha subunit, either alone or in combination with synthetic mRNA encoding the rat sodium channel beta1 subunit, into oocytes of the frog Xenopus laevis and assessed the actions of the pyrethroid insecticide [1R,cis,alphaS]-cypermethrin on expressed sodium currents by two-electrode voltage clamp. In oocytes expressing only the rat brain IIa alpha subunit, cypermethrin produced a slowly-decaying sodium tail current following a depolarizing pulse. In parallel experiments using oocytes expressing the rat brain IIa alpha subunit in combination with the rat beta1 subunit, cypermethrin produced qualitatively similar tail currents following a depolarizing pulse and also induced a sustained component of the sodium current measured during a step depolarization of the oocyte membrane. The voltage dependence of activation and steady-state inactivation of the cypermethrin-dependent sustained current were identical to those of the peak transient sodium current measured in the absence of cypermethrin. Concentration-response curves obtained using normalized tail current amplitude as an index of the extent of sodium channel modification by cypermethrin revealed that coexpression of the rat brain IIa alpha subunit with the rat beta1 subunit increased the apparent affinity of the sodium channel binding site for cypermethrin by more than 20-fold. These results confirm that the pyrethroid binding site is intrinsic to the sodium channel alpha subunit and demonstrate that coexpression of the rat brain IIa alpha subunit with the rat beta1 subunit alters the apparent affinity of this site for pyrethroids.

  5. Zinc supplementation ameliorates electromagnetic field-induced lipid peroxidation in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bediz, Cem Seref; Baltaci, Abdulkerim Kasim; Mogulkoc, Rasim; Oztekin, Esma

    2006-02-01

    Extremely low-frequency (0-300 Hz) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) generated by power lines, wiring and home appliances are ubiquitous in our environment. All populations are now exposed to EMF, and exposure to EMF may pose health risks. Some of the adverse health effects of EMF exposure are lipid peroxidation and cell damage in various tissues. This study has investigated the effects of EMF exposure and zinc administration on lipid peroxidation in the rat brain. Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to three groups; they were maintained untreated for 6 months (control, n = 8), exposed to low-frequency (50 Hz) EMF for 5 minutes every other day for 6 months (n = 8), or exposed to EMF and received zinc sulfate daily (3 mg/kg/day) intraperitoneally (n = 8). We measured plasma levels of zinc and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) in erythrocytes. TBARS and GSH levels were also determined in the brain tissues. TBARS levels in the plasma and brain tissues were higher in EMF-exposed rats with or without zinc supplementation, than those in controls (p < 0.001). In addition, TBARS levels were significantly lower in the zinc-supplemented rats than those in the EMF-exposed rats (p < 0.001). GSH levels were significantly decreased in the brain and erythrocytes of the EMF-exposed rats (p < 0.01), and were highest in the zinc-supplemented rats (p < 0.001). Plasma zinc was significantly lower in the EMF-exposed rats than those in controls (p < 0.001), while it was highest in the zinc-supplemented rats (p < 0.001). The present study suggests that long-term exposure to low-frequency EMF increases lipid peroxidation in the brain, which may be ameliorated by zinc supplementation.

  6. Antenatal taurine supplementation increases taurine content in intrauterine growth restricted fetal rat brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Teng, Hui-Yun; Liu, Jing; Wang, Hua-Wei; Zeng, Li; Zhao, Li-Fang

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the influence of antenatal taurine supplementation on taurine content in the brains of fetal rats with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Experiments were performed at the Central Laboratory of Bayi Children's Hospital Affiliated to Beijing Military General Hospital in China from January to June 2013. Fifteen pregnant rats were randomly divided into three groups: normal controls, an IUGR group and an IUGR + antenatal taurine supplement group (Taurine group) (n = 5). The IUGR model was induced using a low-protein diet throughout gestation. Rats in the taurine group were fed a diet supplemented with 300 mg/kg/day taurine for 12 days after conception until natural delivery. Two fetal rats were randomly selected in every litter, and taurine levels in the brains of rats were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results showed that (1) the mean body weight of the fetal rats in the normal control, IUGR and IUGR + antenatal taurine supplement groups was 6.619 ± 0.4132, 4.509 ± 0.454, and 5.176 ± 0.436 g (F = 429.818, P taurine levels in the brains of the fetal rats in the normal control, IUGR and taurine groups were (2.399 ± 0.134) × 10(5), (1.881 ± 0.166) × 10(5) and (2.170 ± 0.191) × 10(5) μg/g (F = 24.828, P taurine levels in IUGR fetal rat brains were lower than in the control animals, and that antenatal taurine supplementation could significantly increase taurine levels in the brains of fetal rats with IUGR.

  7. Effects of neonatal treatment with the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, on adult rat brain and behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newson, Penny N; van den Buuse, Maarten; Martin, Sally; Lynch-Frame, Ann; Chahl, Loris A

    2014-10-01

    Treatment of neonatal rats with the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel agonist, capsaicin, produces life-long loss of sensory neurons expressing TRPV1 channels. Previously it was shown that rats treated on day 2 of life with capsaicin had behavioural hyperactivity in a novel environment at 5-7 weeks of age and brain changes reminiscent of those found in subjects with schizophrenia. The objective of the present study was to investigate brain and behavioural responses of adult rats treated as neonates with capsaicin. It was found that the brain changes found at 5-7 weeks in rats treated as neonates with capsaicin persisted into adulthood (12 weeks) but were less in older rats (16-18 weeks). Increased prepulse inhibition (PPI) of acoustic startle was found in these rats at 8 and 12 weeks of age rather than the deficit commonly found in animal models of schizophrenia. Subjects with schizophrenia also have reduced flare responses to niacin and methylnicotinate proposed to be mediated by prostaglandin D2 (PGD2). Flare responses are accompanied by cutaneous plasma extravasation. It was found that the cutaneous plasma extravasation responses to methylnicotinate and PGD2 were reduced in capsaicin-treated rats. In conclusion, several neuroanatomical changes observed in capsaicin-treated rats, as well as the reduced cutaneous plasma extravasation responses, indicate that the role of TRPV1 channels in schizophrenia is worthy of investigation.

  8. Brain Aging and AD-Like Pathology in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Qin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Numerous epidemiological studies have linked diabetes mellitus (DM with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, whether or not diabetic encephalopathy shows AD-like pathology remains unclear. Research Design and Methods. Forebrain and hippocampal volumes were measured using stereology in serial coronal sections of the brain in streptozotocin- (STZ- induced rats. Neurodegeneration in the frontal cortex, hypothalamus, and hippocampus was evaluated using Fluoro-Jade C (FJC. Aβ aggregation in the frontal cortex and hippocampus was tested using immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Dendritic spine density in the frontal cortex and hippocampus was measured using Golgi staining, and western blot was conducted to detect the levels of synaptophysin. Cognitive ability was evaluated through the Morris water maze and inhibitory avoidant box. Results. Rats are characterized by insulin deficiency accompanied with polydipsia, polyphagia, polyuria, and weight loss after STZ injection. The number of FJC-positive cells significantly increased in discrete brain regions of the diabetic rats compared with the age-matched control rats. Hippocampal atrophy, Aβ aggregation, and synapse loss were observed in the diabetic rats compared with the control rats. The learning and memory of the diabetic rats decreased compared with those of the age-matched control rats. Conclusions. Our results suggested that aberrant metabolism induced brain aging as characterized by AD-like pathologies.

  9. Effect of manganese on the concentration of amino acids in different regions of the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipe, G W; Duhart, H; Newport, G D; Slikker, W; Ali, S F

    1999-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine if chronic exposure of weanlings and adult rats to Mn produces significant alterations in amino acid concentrations in different regions of the rat brain. Weanling (30 day old) and adult (90 day old) male rats were exposed to 10 and 20 mg Mn/kg body weight per day, by gavage, for 30 days. Forty-eight hours after the last dose, animals were sacrificed by decapitation and brains were dissected into different regions to determine the concentration of amino acids by HPLC/EC. A dose dependent decrease in body weight gain was found in the adult, but not in the weanling rats. Significant increases occurred in concentrations of aspartate, glutamate, glutamine, taurine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the cerebellum of the adult rats dosed with 20 mg/kg per day, Mn. A significant decrease in the concentration of glutamine was observed in caudate nucleus and hippocampus of weanling rats dosed with 10 mg/kg, Mn. These data suggest that chronic Mn exposure can produce a decrease in body weight gain in adult rats and alterations in amino acids in different regions of weanling and adult rat brains.

  10. Protection of GBE50 on brain mitochondria in rats with hyperlipidemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KaiSUN; GangLIU; Yun-xuanZHANG; Ghen-liangYIN; Gaj-junTIAN; Jia-huPAN

    2005-01-01

    AIM To study the protective effects of the new standardized preparation of Ginkgo biloba extracts(GBE50) anainst brain mitochondrial damages induced by hyperlipemia in rats. METHODS Rat model with hyperlipemia was established by feeding the young male SD rats (3 weeks after born) with high lipid food for 3 months. Then the rats were treated with different dosage of GBE50(ig) for 4 weeks. The prophylaxis rat group were fed with the mixture of high lipid food and GBE50 (50mg/kg/d). The brain mitochondria was separated for determination of the R3, R4 and RCR of the respiration function with the method of Clark's electrode. The mitochondrial transmembrane potential(Δψm) was derected by the Rho123 assay and the cytochrome c release was checked by spectrography. In addition, the parameters of oxidative stress (the activities of SOD, GSH-Px, and the MDA leve) and the activities of ATPase were assayed.

  11. Glucocorticoids modulate the NGF mRNA response in the rat hippocampus after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, P L; Patel, N; Harbuz, M S; Lightman, S L; Sharples, P M

    2001-02-23

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in the rat hippocampus is increased after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) and is neuroprotective. Glucocorticoids are regulators of brain neurotrophin levels and are often prescribed following TBI. The effect of adrenalectomy (ADX) and corticosterone (CORT) replacement on the expression of NGF mRNA in the hippocampus after TBI has not been investigated to date. We used fluid percussion injury and in situ hybridisation to evaluate the expression of NGF mRNA in the hippocampus 4 h after TBI in adrenal-intact or adrenalectomised rats (with or without CORT replacement). TBI increased expression of NGF mRNA in sham-ADX rats, but not in ADX rats. Furthermore, CORT replacement in ADX rats restored the increase in NGF mRNA induced by TBI. These findings suggest that glucocorticoids have an important role in the induction of hippocampal NGF mRNA after TBI.

  12. Circumventing the blood-brain barrier: Local delivery of cyclosporin A stimulates stem cells in stroke-injured rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuladhar, Anup; Morshead, Cindi M; Shoichet, Molly S

    2015-10-10

    Drug delivery to the central nervous system is limited by the blood-brain barrier, which can be circumvented by local delivery. In applications of stroke therapy, for example, stimulation of endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) by cyclosporin A (CsA) is promising. However, current strategies rely on high systemic drug doses to achieve small amounts of CsA in the brain tissue, resulting in systemic toxicity and undesirable global immunosuppression. Herein we describe the efficacy of local CsA delivery to the stroke-injured rat brain using an epi-cortically injected hydrogel composed of hyaluronan and methylcellulose (HAMC). CsA was encapsulated in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles dispersed in HAMC, allowing for its sustained release over 14days in vivo. Tissue penetration was sufficient to provide sustained CsA delivery to the sub-cortical NSPC niche. In comparison to systemic delivery using an osmotic minipump, HAMC achieved higher CsA concentrations in the brain while significantly reducing drug exposure in other organs. HAMC alone was beneficial in the stroke-injured rat brain, significantly reducing the stroke infarct volume relative to untreated stroke-injured controls. The combination of HAMC and local CsA release increased the number of proliferating cells in the lateral ventricles - the NSPC niche in the adult brain. Thus, we demonstrate a superior method of drug delivery to the rat brain that provides dual benefits of tissue protection and endogenous NSPC stimulation after stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of ketamine on aquaporin-4 expression and neuronal apoptosis in brain tissues following brain injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zangong Zhou; Xiangyu Ji; Li Song; Jianfang Song; Shiduan Wang; Yanwei Yin

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aquaporin-4 (AQP-4) is closely related to the formation of brain edema. Neuronal apoptosis plays an important part in the conversion of swelled neuron following traumatic brain injury. At present, the studies on the protective effect of ketamine on brain have involved in its effect on aquaporin-4 expression and neuronal apoptosis in the brain tissues following brain injury in rats.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of ketamine on AQP-4 expression and neuronal apoptosis in the brain tissue following rat brain injury, and analyze the time-dependence of ketamine in the treatment of brain injury.DESIGN: Randomized grouping design, controlled animal trial.SETTING: Department of Anesthesiology, the Medical School Hospital of Qingdao University.MATERIALS: Totally 150 rats of clean grade, aged 3 months, were involved and randomized into control group and ketamine-treated group, with 75 rats in each. Each group was divided into 5 subgroups separately at 6,12, 24, 48 and 72 hours after injury, with 15 rats at each time point. Main instruments and reagents:homemade beat machine, ketamine hydrochloride (Hengrui Pharmaceutical Factory, Jiangsu), rabbit anti-rat AQP-4 polyclonal antibody, SABC immunohistochemical reagent kit and TUNEL reagent kit (Boster Co.,Ltd.,Wuhan).METHODS: This trial was carried out in the Institute of Cerebrovascular Disease, Medical College of Qingdao University during March 2005 to February 2006. A weight-dropping rat model of brain injury was created with Feeney method. The rats in the ketamine-treated group were intraperitoneally administered with 50 g/L ketamine (120 mg/kg) one hour after injury, but ketamine was replaced by normal saline in the control group. In each subgroup, the water content of cerebral hemisphere was measured in 5 rats chosen randomly. The left 10 rats in each subgroup were transcardiacally perfused with ketamine, then the brain tissue was made into paraffin sections and stained by haematoxylin and eosin. Neuronal

  14. Effects of systemic immunogenic insults and circulating proinflammatory cytokines on the transcription of the inhibitory factor kappaB alpha within specific cellular populations of the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laflamme, N; Rivest, S

    1999-07-01

    Expression of the inhibitory factor kappaB alpha (IkappaB alpha) reflects the activity of nuclear factor kappaB(NF-kappaB) and is a powerful tool to investigate the regulation of the transcription factor within the CNS. IkappaB alpha mRNA was evaluated in the rat brain by means of in situ hybridization following different immunogenic stimuli; i.e., intraperitoneal (i.p.) and intravenous (i.v.) lipopolysaccharide (LPS), i.v. recombinant rat interleukin (IL) 1beta, IL-6, or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and intramuscular (i.m.) turpentine injection, used here as a model of systemic localized inflammatory insult. Systemic LPS, IL-1beta, and TNF-alpha caused a rapid and transient transcriptional activation of IkappaB alpha along the blood vessels of the entire brain; the signal was very intense 30-60 min after the i.v. injections and returned to undetectable levels from 2 to 12 h depending on the challenge. Double-labeling procedure provided the anatomical evidence that IkappaB alpha-expressing cells within the microvasculature were essentially of the endothelial type, as they were immunoreactive to the von Willebrand factor. Scattered small cells were also found across the brain of LPS-, IL-1beta-, and TNF-alpha-injected rats at time 1-3 h, and microglial (OX-42)-immunoreactive cells were positive for the transcript. Such expression within parenchymal microglia was nevertheless not observed in the brain following a localized and sterile inflammatory insult. Indeed, i.m. turpentine administration stimulated IkappaB alpha transcription quite uniquely within the endothelium of the brain capillaries, an effect that paralleled the swelling of the injection site and lasted up to 24 h after the aggression. In contrast to these immunogenic challenges, i.v. IL-6 injection failed to activate the gene encoding IkappaB alpha in the rat brain. These results indicate that NF-kappaB may play a crucial role in specific cellular populations of the CNS to trigger

  15. Acute hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation is associated with increased extracellular brain adenosine in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Dale, Nicholas; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) can lead to brain edema, cerebral hyperperfusion and intracranial hypertension. These complications are thought to be mediated by hyperammonemia and inflammation leading to altered brain metabolism. As increased levels of adenosine degradation products have been found...... in brain tissue of patients with ALF we investigated whether hyperammonemia could induce adenosine release in brain tissue. Since adenosine is a potent vasodilator and modulator of cerebral metabolism we furthermore studied the effect of adenosine receptor ligands on intracranial pressure (ICP......) and cerebral blood flow (CBF). We measured the adenosine concentration with biosensors in rat brain slices exposed to ammonia and in a rat model with hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation. Exposure to ammonia in concentrations from 0.15-10 mM led to increases in the cortical adenosine concentration up to 18...

  16. Influence of silver nanoparticles on neurons and blood-brain barrier via subcutaneous injection in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jinglong; Xiong, Ling; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Jianyu; Liu, Li; Li, Jiage; Wan, Ziyi; Xi, Tingfei

    2008-11-01

    Nanosilver has been widely used in medical biology; however, the distribution and interaction of nanosilver with cells is still unclear. There have been some reports demonstrating that nanoparticles can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The present study investigated the accumulation of silver nanoparticles in the brain, and the effects of silver nanoparticles on BBB. Nanosilver and microsilver (62.8 mg/kg) particles were subcutaneously injected into rats. The rats were sacrificed at predetermined time points and the brains were obtained for ultrastructural observation and silver level detection. The results showed that silver nanoparticles could traverse the BBB and move into the brain in the form of particle. The silver nanoparticles can induce neuronal degeneration and necrosis by accumulating in the brain over a long period of time.

  17. Quantitative autoradiography of (/sup 3/H)corticosterone receptors in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapolsky, R.M.; McEwen, B.S. (Rockefeller Univ., New York (USA)); Rainbow, T.C. (Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia (USA). School of Medicine)

    1983-07-25

    The authors have quantified corticosterone receptors in rat brain by optical density measurements of tritium-film autoradiograms. Rats were injected i.v. with 500 ..mu..Ci (/sup 3/H)corticosterone to label brain receptors. Frozen sections of brain were cut with a cryostat and exposed for 2 months against tritium-sensitive sheet film (LKB Ultrofilm). Tritium standards were used to convert optical density readings into molar concentrations of receptor. High levels of corticosterone receptors were present throughout the pyramidal and granule cell layers of the hippocampus. Moderate levels of receptors were found in the neuropil of the hippocampus, the lateral septum, the cortical nucleus of the amygdala and the entorhinal cortex. All other brain regions had low levels of receptors. These results extend previous non-quantitative autoradiographic studies of corticosterone receptors and provide a general procedure for the quantitative autoradiography of steroid hormone receptors in brain tissue.

  18. Capillary origami

    OpenAIRE

    Py, Charlotte; Reverdy, Paul; Doppler, L.; J. Bico; Roman, B.; Baroud, Charles,

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The hairs of a wet dog rushing out from a pond assemble into bundles; this is a common example of the effect of capillary forces on flexible structures. From a practical point of the deformation and adhesion of compliant structures induced by interfacial forces may lead to disastrous effects in mechanical microsystems.

  19. The effects of perinatal protein malnutrition on spatial learning and memory behaviour and brain-derived neurotrophic factor concentration in the brain tissue in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Xu, Ruo-Jun

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of perinatal protein malnutrition on brain derived-neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentration in brain tissue and spatial learning and memory performance in young rats. Nine pregnant Wistar rats were assigned into three groups. Rats in one group were fed with a control diet containing 20% protein. Rats in remaining two groups were fed with a diet containing 6% protein from gestation day eight and day 15 respectively till four weeks after birth. At four weeks of age, the rat pups were evaluated for spatial learning ability using Morris Water Maze (MWM) task. At the end of the behaviour tests, rat pups were sacrificed and the brain tissue samples were collected for measurement of total protein and BDNF concentrations. It was found that rat pups fed the low protein diet had lower body weight and slightly lighter brain compared to the control pups. Total protein levels in hippocampus and cerebral cortex were significantly lower in malnourished pups than the controls. The concentration of BDNF in the hippocampus was also significantly lower in rat pups suffered protein malnutrition from early pregnancy than in the controls. MWM tests showed that perinatal protein deprivation, particularly from early pregnancy, significantly impaired learning and memory ability. The results of the present study indicate that perinatal protein malnutrition had adverse influence on spatial navigation and brain BDNF levels in rats. The decreased hippocampal BDNF concentration might partially contribute to the poor learning memory performance in the protein deprived rats.

  20. Nose to brain delivery in rats: Effect of surface charge of rhodamine B labeled nanocarriers on brain subregion localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorso, A; Musumeci, T; Serapide, M F; Pellitteri, R; Uchegbu, I F; Puglisi, G

    2017-03-18

    Nose to brain delivery and nanotechnology are the combination of innovative strategies for molecules to reach the brain and to bypass blood brain barriers. In this work we investigated the fate of two rhodamine B labeled polymeric nanoparticles (Z-ave brain after intranasal administration in rats. A preliminary screening was carried out to select the suitable positive (chitosan/poly-l-lactide-co-glycolide) nanocarrier through photon correlation spectroscopy and turbiscan. Physico-chemical and technological characterizations of poly-l-lactide-co-glycolide (negative) and chitosan/poly-l-lactide-co-glycolide (positive) fluorescent labeled nanoparticles were performed. The animals were allocated to three groups receiving negative and positive polymeric nanoparticles via single intranasal administration or no treatment. The localization of both nanocarriers in different brain areas was detected using fluorescent microscopy. Our data revealed that both nanocarriers reach the brain and are able to persist in the brain up to 48h after intranasal administration. Surface charge influenced the involved pathways in their translocation from the nasal cavity to the central nervous system. The positive charge of nanoparticles slows down brain reaching and the trigeminal pathway is involved, while the olfactory pathway may be responsible for the transport of negatively charged nanoparticles, and systemic pathways are not excluded.

  1. Standardized Environmental Enrichment Supports Enhanced Brain Plasticity in Healthy Rats and Prevents Cognitive Impairment in Epileptic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouchi, Hayet Y.; Bodennec, Jacques; Morales, Anne; Georges, Béatrice; Bonnet, Chantal; Bouvard, Sandrine; Sloviter, Robert S.; Bezin, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Environmental enrichment of laboratory animals influences brain plasticity, stimulates neurogenesis, increases neurotrophic factor expression, and protects against the effects of brain insult. However, these positive effects are not constantly observed, probably because standardized procedures of environmental enrichment are lacking. Therefore, we engineered an enriched cage (the Marlau™ cage), which offers: (1) minimally stressful social interactions; (2) increased voluntary exercise; (3) multiple entertaining activities; (4) cognitive stimulation (maze exploration), and (5) novelty (maze configuration changed three times a week). The maze, which separates food pellet and water bottle compartments, guarantees cognitive stimulation for all animals. Compared to rats raised in groups in conventional cages, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited increased cortical thickness, hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal levels of transcripts encoding various genes involved in tissue plasticity and remodeling. In addition, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited better performances in learning and memory, decreased anxiety-associated behaviors, and better recovery of basal plasma corticosterone level after acute restraint stress. Marlau™ cages also insure inter-experiment reproducibility in spatial learning and brain gene expression assays. Finally, housing rats in Marlau™ cages after severe status epilepticus at weaning prevents the cognitive impairment observed in rats subjected to the same insult and then housed in conventional cages. By providing a standardized enriched environment for rodents during housing, the Marlau™ cage should facilitate the uniformity of environmental enrichment across laboratories. PMID:23342033

  2. The expression of Fetuin-A in brain tissues of WAG/Rij Rats, genetic rat model of absence epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Yüksel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the present study, we aimed to determine the Fetuin-A levels in different regions of the brain in absence epileptic Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij rats in order to contribute the identification of new potential biomarkers of the diagnosis, prognosis and follow up the epilepsy treatment. Methods: 1, 3 and 6 months old male WAG/Rij rats (n=21 with absence epilepsy were used in this study. All of the rats were decapitated under anesthesia and their cortex and thalamus tissues were isolated. Fetuin-A levels of the groups were determined by Western Blot method by using standard techniques and differences between densities of the groups were compared. Results: According to data obtained, there was no Fetuin-A expression in brain cortex and thalamus tissues of WAG/Rij rats with absence epilepsy. Conclusion: In this study, it was shown that Fetuin-A is not expressed in brain cortex and thalamus tissues of WAG/Rij rats with absence epilepsy throughout the age-related development. By evaluating the findings obtained, extensive researches that contain molecular and histological methods must be planned, Fetuin-A findings that are obtained experimentally must be confirmed. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (4: 387-390

  3. Standardized environmental enrichment supports enhanced brain plasticity in healthy rats and prevents cognitive impairment in epileptic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raafat P Fares

    Full Text Available Environmental enrichment of laboratory animals influences brain plasticity, stimulates neurogenesis, increases neurotrophic factor expression, and protects against the effects of brain insult. However, these positive effects are not constantly observed, probably because standardized procedures of environmental enrichment are lacking. Therefore, we engineered an enriched cage (the Marlau™ cage, which offers: (1 minimally stressful social interactions; (2 increased voluntary exercise; (3 multiple entertaining activities; (4 cognitive stimulation (maze exploration, and (5 novelty (maze configuration changed three times a week. The maze, which separates food pellet and water bottle compartments, guarantees cognitive stimulation for all animals. Compared to rats raised in groups in conventional cages, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited increased cortical thickness, hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal levels of transcripts encoding various genes involved in tissue plasticity and remodeling. In addition, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited better performances in learning and memory, decreased anxiety-associated behaviors, and better recovery of basal plasma corticosterone level after acute restraint stress. Marlau™ cages also insure inter-experiment reproducibility in spatial learning and brain gene expression assays. Finally, housing rats in Marlau™ cages after severe status epilepticus at weaning prevents the cognitive impairment observed in rats subjected to the same insult and then housed in conventional cages. By providing a standardized enriched environment for rodents during housing, the Marlau™ cage should facilitate the uniformity of environmental enrichment across laboratories.

  4. Brain activation patterns at exhaustion in rats that differ in inherent exercise capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa E Foley

    Full Text Available In order to further understand the genetic basis for variation in inherent (untrained exercise capacity, we examined the brains of 32 male rats selectively bred for high or low running capacity (HCR and LCR, respectively. The aim was to characterize the activation patterns of brain regions potentially involved in differences in inherent running capacity between HCR and LCR. Using quantitative in situ hybridization techniques, we measured messenger ribonuclease (mRNA levels of c-Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, in the brains of HCR and LCR rats after a single bout of acute treadmill running (7.5-15 minutes, 15° slope, 10 m/min or after treadmill running to exhaustion (15-51 minutes, 15° slope, initial velocity 10 m/min. During verification of trait differences, HCR rats ran six times farther and three times longer prior to exhaustion than LCR rats. Running to exhaustion significantly increased c-Fos mRNA activation of several brain areas in HCR, but LCR failed to show significant elevations of c-Fos mRNA at exhaustion in the majority of areas examined compared to acutely run controls. Results from these studies suggest that there are differences in central c-Fos mRNA expression, and potential brain activation patterns, between HCR and LCR rats during treadmill running to exhaustion and these differences could be involved in the variation in inherent running capacity between lines.

  5. Neuroanatomy-based matrix-guided trimming protocol for the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defazio, Rossella; Criado, Ana; Zantedeschi, Valentina; Scanziani, Eugenio

    2015-02-01

    Brain trimming through defined neuroanatomical landmarks is recommended to obtain consistent sections in rat toxicity studies. In this article, we describe a matrix-guided trimming protocol that uses channels to reproduce coronal levels of anatomical landmarks. Both setup phase and validation study were performed on Han Wistar male rats (Crl:WI(Han)), 10-week-old, with bodyweight of 298 ± 29 (SD) g, using a matrix (ASI-Instruments(®), Houston, TX) fitted for brains of rats with 200 to 400 g bodyweight. In the setup phase, we identified eight channels, that is, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 19, and 21, matching the recommended landmarks midway to the optic chiasm, frontal pole, optic chiasm, infundibulum, mamillary bodies, midbrain, middle cerebellum, and posterior cerebellum, respectively. In the validation study, we trimmed the immersion-fixed brains of 60 rats using the selected channels to determine how consistently the channels reproduced anatomical landmarks. Percentage of success (i.e., presence of expected targets for each level) ranged from 89 to 100%. Where 100% success was not achieved, it was noted that the shift in brain trimming was toward the caudal pole. In conclusion, we developed and validated a trimming protocol for the rat brain that allow comparable extensiveness, homology, and relevance of coronal sections as the landmark-guided trimming with the advantage of being quickly learned by technicians.

  6. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and blood brain barrier permeability in the rat brain after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lifang Lei; Xiaohong Zi; Qiuyun Tu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in the patho-physiological process of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. It has been recently observed that metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is closely related to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injuryOBJECTIVE: This study was designed to observe MMP-9 expression in the rat brain after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and to investigate its correlation to BBB permeability.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This study, a randomized controlled animal experiment, was performed at the Institute of Neurobiology, Central South University between September 2005 and March 2006.MATERIALS: Ninety healthy male SD rats, aged 3-4 months, weighing 200-280g, were used in the present study. Rabbit anti-rat MMP-9 polyclonal antibody (Boster, Wuhan, China) and Evans blue (Sigma, USA) were also used.METHODS: All rats were randomly divided into 9 groups with 10 rats in each group: normal control group, sham-operated group, and ischemia for 2 hours followed by reperfusion for 3,6,12 hours, 1,2,4 and 7 days groups. In the ischemia/reperfusion groups, rats were subjected to ischemia/reperfusion injury by suture occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. In the sham-operated group, rats were merely subjected to vessel dissociation. In the normal control group, rats were not modeled.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: BBB permeability was assessed by determining the level of effusion of Evans blue. MMP-9 expression was detected by an immunohistochemical method.RESULTS: All 90 rats were included in the final analysis. BBB permeability alteration was closely correlated to ischemia/reperfusion time. BBB permeability began to increase at ischemia/reperfusion for 3 hours, then it gradually reached a peak level at ischemia/reperfusion for 1 day, and thereafter it gradually decreased. MMP-9 expression began to increase at ischemia/reperfusion for 3 hours, then gradually reached its peak level 2 days after perfusion, and thereafter

  7. Acetaldehyde metabolism by brain mitochondria from UChA and UChB rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintanilla, M E; Tampier, L

    1995-01-01

    The acetaldehyde (AcH) oxidizing capacity of total brain homogenates from the genetically high-ethanol consumer (UChB) appeared to be greater than that of the low-ethanol consumer (UChA) rats. To gain further information about this strain difference, the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase (AIDH) in different subcellular fractions of whole brain homogenates from naive UChA and UChB rat strains of both sexes has been studied by measuring the rate of AcH disappearance and by following the reduction of NAD to NADH. The results demonstrated that the higher capacity of brain homogenates from UChB rats to oxidize AcH when compared to UChA ones was because the UChB mitochondrial low Km AIDH exhibits a much greater affinity for NAD than that of the UChA rats, as evidenced by four-to fivefold differences in the Km values for NAD. But the dehydrogenases from both strains exhibited a similar maximum rate at saturating NAD concentrations. Because intact brain mitochondria isolated from UChB rats oxidized AcH at a higher rate than did mitochondria from UChA rats only in state 4, but not in state 3, this strain difference in AIDH activity might be restricted in vivo to NAD disposition.

  8. Probing Intrinsic Resting-State Networks in the Infant Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajic, Dusica; Craig, Michael M.; Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) measures spontaneous fluctuations in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal in the absence of external stimuli. It has become a powerful tool for mapping large-scale brain networks in humans and animal models. Several rs-fMRI studies have been conducted in anesthetized and awake adult rats, reporting consistent patterns of brain activity at the systems level. However, the evolution to adult patterns of resting-state activity has not yet been evaluated and quantified in the developing rat brain. In this study, we hypothesized that large-scale intrinsic networks would be easily detectable but not fully established as specific patterns of activity in lightly anesthetized 2-week-old rats (N = 11). Independent component analysis (ICA) identified 8 networks in 2-week-old-rats. These included Default mode, Sensory (Exteroceptive), Salience (Interoceptive), Basal Ganglia-Thalamic-Hippocampal, Basal Ganglia, Autonomic, Cerebellar, as well as Thalamic-Brainstem networks. Many of these networks consisted of more than one component, possibly indicative of immature, underdeveloped networks at this early time point. Except for the Autonomic network, infant rat networks showed reduced connectivity with subcortical structures in comparison to previously published adult networks. Reported slow fluctuations in the BOLD signal that correspond to functionally relevant resting-state networks in 2-week-old rats can serve as an important tool for future studies of brain development in the settings of different pharmacological applications or disease. PMID:27803653

  9. Moderate hyperglycemia augments ischemic brain damage: a neuropathologic study in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsinelli, W A; Waldman, S; Rawlinson, D; Plum, F

    1982-11-01

    We compared the effects of glucose injection with those of saline or mannitol on ischemic brain damage and brain water content in a four-vessel occlusion (4-VO) rat model, which simultaneously causes severe forebrain ischemia and moderate hindbrain ischemia. Glucose given before onset of ischemia was followed by severe brain injury, with necrosis of the majority of neocortical neurons and glia, substantial neuronal damage throughout the remainder of forebrain, and severe brain edema. By comparison, saline injection before forebrain ischemia resulted in only scattered ischemic damage confined to neurons and no change in the brain water content. Mannitol injection before 4-VO or D-glucose injection during or after 4-VO produced no greater forebrain damage than did the saline injection. Morphologic damage in the cerebellum, however, was increased by D-glucose injection given either before or during 4-VO. The results demonstrate that hyperglycemia before severe brain ischemia or during moderate ischemia markedly augments morphologic brain damage.

  10. Low-intensity treadmill exercise and/or bright light promote neurogenesis in adult rat brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung Jin Kwon; Jeongsook Park; So Yun Park; Kwang Seop Song; Sun Tae Jung; So Bong Jung; Ik Ryeul Park; Wan Sung Choi; Sun Ok Kwon

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampus is a brain region responsible for learning and memory functions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of low-intensity exercise and bright light exposure on neurogenesis and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in adult rat hippocampus. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to control, exercise, light, or exercise + light groups (n = 9 per group). The rats in the exercise group were subjected to treadmill exercise (5 days per week, 30 minutes per day, over a 4-week period), the light group rats were irradiated (5 days per week, 30 minutes per day, 10 000 lx, over a 4-week period), the exercise + light group rats were subjected to treadmill exercise in combination with bright light exposure, and the control group rats remained sedentary over a 4-week period. Compared with the control group, there was a significant increase in neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rats in the exercise, light, and exercise + light groups. Moreover, the expression level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus was significantly higher in the exercise group and light group than that in the control group. Interestingly, there was no significant difference in brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression between the control group and exercise + light group. These results indicate that low-intensity treadmill exercise (first 5 minutes at a speed of 2 m/min, second 5 minutes at a speed of 5 m/min, and the last 20 minutes at a speed of 8 m/min) or bright-light exposure therapy induces positive biochemical changes in the brain. In view of these findings, we propose that moderate exercise or exposure to sunlight during childhood can be beneficial for neural development.

  11. Brain edema after intracerebral hemorrhage in rats: The role of inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiangjian

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH results in secondary brain edema and injury that may lead to death and disability. ICH also causes inflammation. It is unclear whether inflammation contributes to brain edema and neuron injury or functions in repairing the brain tissue. Aims: To understand the effect of inflammation in ICH, we have carried out an investigation on the various aspects and the dynamic changes of inflammation. Settings and Design: An ICH model was generated by injecting 50 ml autologous tail artery blood stereotactically into the right caudate nucleus of 30 rats, which were randomly divided into five ICH groups. Similarly, five Sham control groups were generated by inserting the needle to the right caudate nucleus of rats. Materials and Methods: Rat behavior was evaluated over the time course (6 h, 24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 7 d in each group. The rats were then killed by administering an overdose of pentobarbital. Following the euthanasia, the brain water content, neuronal loss, glia proliferation, inflammatory infiltration and brain morphology of the rats were measured. Additionally, the expression of TNF-a,IL-6, ICAM-1, VEGF, NF-kB, C3 and CR2 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed by student′s t test. Results: Rat brain water content increased progressively over the time course and reached its peak at 48h followed ICH. The maximum of inflammatory infiltrate (especially neutrophils and immunopositive cells of TNF-a, IL-6 and NF-kB, were at 48h. The expression of C3 and CR2 reached their peaks at 48-72h, while the expression ICAM-1 and VEGF were at maximum at 72h followed ICH. Conclusions: The results suggested that the inflammatory cytokines, complement system and VEGF may have a function in the development of the brain edema and neuron injury followed ICH.

  12. Astaxanthin alleviates brain aging in rats by attenuating oxidative stress and increasing BDNF levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wanqiang; Wang, Xin; Xiang, Qisen; Meng, Xu; Peng, Ye; Du, Na; Liu, Zhigang; Sun, Quancai; Wang, Chan; Liu, Xuebo

    2014-01-01

    Astaxanthin (AST) is a carotenoid pigment which possesses potent antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective properties. The aim of this study was to investigate whether administration of AST had protective effects on D-galactose-induced brain aging in rats, and further examined its protective mechanisms. The results showed that AST treatment significantly restored the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and increased glutathione (GSH) contents and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), but decreased malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonylation and 8-hydroxy-2- deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels in the brains of aging rats. Furthermore, AST increased the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, but decreased the expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the brains of aging rats. Additionally, AST ameliorated histopathological changes in the hippocampus and restored brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in both the brains and hippocampus of aging rats. These results suggested that AST could alleviate brain aging, which may be due to attenuating oxidative stress, ameliorating hippocampus damage, and upregulating BDNF expression.

  13. Changes and significance of occludin expression in rats with blood-brain barrier injury induced by microwave radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang LI

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the changes in occludin expression in hippocampus of rats injured by long-term microwave exposure at low dosage,and explore the mechanism of the effect of occludin on microwave-induced blood-brain barrier(BBB injury.Methods A total of 156 male Wistar rats were assigned into 4 groups(39 each according to the microwave dosage they received(0,2.5,5 and 10 mW/cm2.Irradiation was given 5 times/week and 6 minutes for each exposure for one month.Five rats of each group were sacrificed at each time point(6h and day 7,14,30 and 60 after irradiation,the structural changes in hippocampus tissues BBB were observed by light and electron microscopy.Another 3 rats of each group were sacrificed after an intravenous injection of 2% Evans blue(EB at the time points of 6h and day 7 and 30 after irradiation,and the change in BBB permeability was examined by laser scanning confocal microscopy.Western blotting,real-time PCR and image analysis were used to detect the gene and protein expression of occludin in hippocampus of rats.Results After microwave irradiation in doses of 2.5,5 and 10 mW/cm2,respectively,on day 7,14 and 30,the astrocytes were found to be swollen,the capillary gaps of hippocampus were broadened and tight junction(TJ structure was inconspicuous or widened.In sham-group(0 mW/cm2,the red fluorescence of EB was limited in lumens of blood vessels,while in 5 and 10 mW/cm2 groups,Evans blue was dispersed surrounding the blood vessels at 6h and day 7 till day 30 in an irradiation dose-dependent manner.In 5 and 10 mW/cm2 groups,the expression of occludin protein in hippocampus decreased at day 14(P 0.05.In the 2.5,5 and 10 mW/cm2 groups,mRNA expression of occludin began to significantly decrease at day 7 and 14 and it lowered to the nadir at day 30(P 0.05.Conclusions A long-term microwave irradiation with dosage of 2.5 to 10 mW/cm2 may destroy the structure of BBB of rats’ hippocampus and increase permeability in a radiation

  14. Ovariectomy-induced chronic abdominal hypernociception in rats: Relation with brain oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara B. Garrido-Suárez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context: Ovarian hormone deficiency observed in menopausal women increases the production of reactive oxygen species, which could be implicated in central sensitization subjacent in chronic functional pain syndromes. Aims: To examine the hyperalgesic state induced by ovariectomy in adult rats and its relation to some oxidative stress outcomes. Methods: The female Wistar rats were divided into normal, sham ovariectomized (OVX and OVX groups, which were tested for mechanical and thermal hypernociception during 6 weeks and a single acetic acid-induced test 6 weeks after surgery. Redox biomarkers determinations of superoxide dismutase (SOD enzyme activity, glutathione (GSH and nitrates/nitrites as an indicator of nitric oxide (NO concentrations were determined in the brain and cerebellum of 6 animals of each group. Results: Exclusivity OVX rats developed a robust state of mechanical hypernociception and allodynia in the abdomen, hindlimbs and proximal tail. Besides, thermal pain thresholds (hot plate decreased. That was established 3-4 weeks after OVX and lasted for the 6 weeks of the experiment. Increases in visceral sensitivity were also observed in OVX rats. SOD enzyme activity decreased in OVX rats, which showed major deficit for this enzymatic defense under visceral inflammatory injury. However GSH concentrations were increased in brain of OVX animals that allow the balance during acute inflammation. NO concentrations were raised only in OVX rats exposure to chemical inflammatory injury. Conclusions: OVX in rats provide a useful model, which mimics the functional pain in females that could be related with brain oxidative stress.

  15. Inhibition of tau hyperphosphorylation and beta amyloid production in rat brain by oral administration of atorvastatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Fen; LI Xu; SUO Ai-qin; ZHANG Jie-wen

    2010-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and the leading cause of dementia in the elderly. The two hallmark lesions in AD brain are deposition of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs).Hypercholesteremia is one of the risk factors of AD. But its role in the pathogenesis of AD is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between hypercholesteremia and tau phosphorylation or β-amyloid (Aβ),and evaluate the effect of atorvastatin on the level of tau phosphorylation and Aβ in the brains of rats fed with high cholesterol diet.Methods Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into normal diet control group, high cholesterol diet group,and high cholesterol diet plus atorvastatin (Lipitor, 15 mg·kg-1·d-1) treated group. Blood from caudal vein was collected to measure total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) at the end of the 3th and the 6th months by an enzymatic method. The animals were sacrificed 6 months later and brains were removed. All left brain hemispheres were fixed for immunohistochemistry. Hippocampus and cerebral cortex were separated from right hemispheres and homogenized separately. Tau phosphorylation and Aβ in the brain tissue were determined by Western blotting (using antibodies PHF-1 and Tau-1) and anti-Aβ40/anti-Aβ42, respectively.Results We found that high cholesterol diet led to hypercholesteremia of rats as well as hyperphosphorylation of tau and increased Aβ level in the brains. Treatment of the high cholesterol diet fed rats with atorvastatin prevented the changes of both tau phosphorylation and Aβ level induced by high cholesterol diet.Conclusions Hypercholesteremia could induce tau hyperphosphorylation and Aβ production in rat brain. Atorvastatin could inhibit tau hyperphosphorylation and decrease Aβ generation. It may play a protective role in the patho-process of hypercholesteremia

  16. Functionalized Solid-Sphere PEG-b-PCL Nanoparticles to Target Brain Capillary Endothelial Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Grossen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles are increasingly used to implement drug targeting strategies. In the present study, solid-sphere nanoparticles (SNPs made of poly(ethylene glycol-b-poly(ε-caprolactone (PEG-b-PCL were covalently linked to a monoclonal antibody (83-14 mAb targeted against the human insulin receptor that is highly expressed on human brain microvascular endothelial cells. Resulting targeted SNPs were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM, cryo-TEM, dynamic light scattering, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The critical aggregation concentration was determined using a fluorescence approach. Interaction with a well-characterized human in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (hCMEC/D3 was analysed using an array of methods (flow cytometry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and TEM. The toxicity on hCMEC/D3 cells and in addition on the human liver cell line HepG2 was assessed using the MTT assay. SNPs with a diameter of 80 nm and a homogeneous size distribution were obtained. Successful conjugation of 83-14 mAb using a heterobifunctional linker resulted in 5-6 molecules of fluorescently labeled 83-14 mAb per SNP. Functionalized SNPs were taken up by hCMEC/D3 cells efficiently without showing a significant toxic effect on cells of the blood-brain barrier and HepG2 cells. These results indicate that functionalized PEG-b-PCL SNPs are a promising candidate to deliver drugs to the CNS.

  17. Effect of borneol and electroacupuncture on the distribution of hyperforin in the rat brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Yu; Ming Ruan; Yong Sun; Xiaobing Cui; Yun Yu; Lingling Wang; Taihui Fang

    2011-01-01

    Hyperforin is an antidepressant drug that has unstable therapeutic effects, due to its poor ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Borneol and electroacupuncture have both been found to increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier. As such, the current study examined the distribution of hyperforin in the rat brain, and the effects on the brain distribution of hyperforin of borneol alone (orally administered), and borneol combined with electroacupuncture treatment. High-performance liquid chromatography technology and pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that treatment with borneol alone (300, 600 mg/kg) increased peak concentration and the area under the curve for hyperforin in the brain. In addition, the bioavailability of hyperforin in rat brain increased by 42.7%. However, increasing the dose of borneol dose did not appear to increase the distribution of hyperforin in the brain. Importantly, applying electroacupuncture at Baihui (GV 20) or Yamen (GV 15) appeared to enhance the brain-delivery effects of borneol, although this effect was weak. Overall, our results indicated that borneol alone or combined with electroacupuncture can provide promising strategies for brain-targeted delivery in central nervous system therapy.

  18. Liver and brain tryptophan metabolism following hydrocortisone administration to rats and gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, A R; Sourkes, T L; Young, S N

    1975-02-01

    1 Liver tryptophan pyrrolase activity is low in the mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) and is not induced by hydrocortisone (5 mg/kg). In contrast, there is measurable activity in the rat liver and this is induced by hydrocortisone. In vivo measurements confirmed the absence of induction in gerbils but suggested that they were able to metabolize tryptophan. However no detectable pyrrolase activity was found in any other tissues either before or after hydrocortisone. 2 In agreement with previous observations hydrocortisone decreased rat brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) 6 h after administration. Brain tryptophan concentrations were also decreased at this time. In contrast, hydrocortisone did not alter gerbil brain 5-HT, 5-HIAA or trytophan. alpha-Methyltryptophan activated hepatic tryptophan pyrrolase and decreased brain 5-HT and 5-HIAA in both animals. 3 Results suggest that the decrease in rat brain 5-HT and 5-HIAA following hydrocortisone may be associated with the rise in liver tryptophan pyrrolase and that the brain amine changes are mediated through the decrease in brain tryptophan concentration.

  19. Metabolism and disposition of 3,6-dibutanoylmorphine in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, R A; Nakatsu, K

    1986-09-01

    In previous studies from this laboratory it was found that dibutanoylmorphine (DBM) was more potent than morphine as an analgesic in rats and that it was less active than acetyl esters of morphine on behaviour. As DBM is a morphine prodrug, the aim of this work was to determine if rat brain homogenates were capable of deacylating DBM and monobutanoylmorphine (MBM) and to determine relative proportions of parent drug to metabolites in the brain in vivo. In 10% (w/v) brain homogenates, DBM was eliminated with a half-life of about 70 min (corrected for dilution), while MBM was eliminated 10 times as quickly. DBM and its metabolites were found in both blood and brain as early as 1 min after i.v. administration of DBM. After 5 min, the predominant form in blood was MBM and in brain it was DBM. Thus, rat brain possesses the capacity to metabolize DBM by deesterification and the parent drug, MBM, and morphine were found in blood and brain in vivo.

  20. MRI relaxation in the presence of fictitious fields correlates with myelin content in normal rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Hanne; Sierra, Alejandra; Mangia, Silvia; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom; Gröhn, Olli; Liimatainen, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Brain myelin plays an important role in normal brain function. Demyelination is involved in many degenerative brain diseases, thus quantitative imaging of myelin has been under active investigation. In previous work, we demonstrated the capability of the method known as Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF) in the rotating frame of rank n (RAFFn) to provide image contrast between white and gray matter in human and rat brains. Here, we provide evidence pointing to myelin being the major source of this contrast. RAFFn relaxation time constant (TRAFFn) was mapped in rat brain ex vivo. TRAFFn was quantified in 12 different brain areas. TRAFFn values were compared with multiple other MRI metrics (T1, T2 , continuous wave T1ρ, adiabatic T1ρ and T2ρ, magnetization transfer ratio), and with histologic measurements of cell density, myelin and iron content. Highest contrast between white and grey matter was obtained with TRAFFn in the rotating frames of ranks n = 4 and 5. TRAFFn values correlated strongly with myelin content, whereas no associations between TRAFFn and iron content or cell density were found. TRAFFn with n = 4 or 5 provides a high sensitivity for selective myelin mapping in the rat brain. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Imaging of aromatase distribution in rat and rhesus monkey brains with [{sup 11}C]vorozole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kayo [Division of Pharmacology, Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala SE-75124 (Sweden); Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala SE-75109 (Sweden)]. E-mail: kayo.takahashi@uppsala.imanet.se; Bergstroem, Mats [Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala SE-75109 (Sweden); Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala SE-75124 (Sweden); Fraendberg, Pernilla [Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala SE-75109 (Sweden); Vesstroem, Eva-Lotta [Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala SE-75109 (Sweden); Watanabe, Yasuyoshi [Department of Physiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Langstroem, Bengt [Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala SE-75109 (Sweden)

    2006-07-15

    Aromatase is an enzyme that converts androgens to estrogens and may play a role in mood and mental status. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that brain aromatase distribution could be evaluated with a novel positron emission tomography (PET) tracer [{sup 11}C]vorozole. Vorozole is a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor that reversibly binds to the heme domain of aromatase. In vitro experiments in rat brain, using frozen section autoradiography, illustrated specific binding in the medial amygdala (MA), the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BST) and the preoptic area (POA) of male rat brain. Specific binding in female rat brain was found in the MA and the BST; however, the signals were lower than those of males. The K {sub d} of [{sup 11}C]vorozole binding to aromatase in MA was determined to be 0.60{+-}0.06 nM by Scatchard plot analysis using homogenates. An in vivo PET study in female rhesus monkey brain demonstrated the uptake of [{sup 11}C]vorozole in the amygdala, where the uptake was blocked by the presence of excess amounts of unlabeled vorozole. Thus, this tracer has a high affinity for brain aromatase and could have a potential for in vivo aromatase imaging. This technique might enable the investigation of human brain aromatase in healthy and diseased persons.

  2. Anti-epileptic effects of neuropeptide Y gene transfection into the rat brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changzheng Dong; Wenqing Zhao; Wenling Li; Peiyuan Lv; Xiufang Dong

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y gene transfection into normal rat brain tissue can provide gene overexpression, which can attenuate the severity of kainic acid-induced seizures. In this study, a recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying the neuropeptide Y gene was transfected into brain tissue of rats with kainic acid-induced epilepsy through stereotactic methods. Following these transfections, we verified overexpression of the neuropeptide Y gene in the epileptic brain. Electroencephalograms showed that seizure severity was significantly inhibited and seizure latency was significantly prolonged up to 4 weeks after gene transfection. Moreover, quantitative fluorescent PCR and western blot assays revealed that the mRNA and protein expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits NR1, NR2A, and NR2B was inhibited in the hippocampus of epileptic rats. These findings indicate that neuropeptide Y may inhibit seizures via down-regulation of the functional expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

  3. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Esquivel-Martínez, Mauricio; Olmos-Orizaba, Berenice Eridani; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R.; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats). Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress. PMID:26180820

  4. Features of microelement maintenance in rat's brain tissues at experimental hypoxia of different degree.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarasova I.V.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Features of microelement maintenance (iron, zinc, copper, manganese, and cobalt, conditionally toxic chrome and toxic lead were studied in newborn rat's brain tissues at experimental hypoxia of different degree. Tissues of newborn rat’s brain are characterized by high level of saturation and considerable dynamism of microelement maintenance. Till the end of the first week of life, the maintenance of these microelements decreases in 1,5 – 10 times. The level of the toxic lead decreases more than in 2,5 times. The hypoxia of easy degree of newborn rats invokes reduction cobalt level 3 times, iron level 2 times, manganese – on 27,65 %, chrome – on 25,84%, zinc – on 16,43%. It means that considerable deficiency and disbalance of microelement maintenance rat's brain tissues. The heavy degree of hypoxia is characterized by further increase of deficiency and disbalance of microelements.

  5. Effect of pineapple peel extract on total phospholipids and lipid peroxidation in brain tissues of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erukainure OL; Ajiboye JA; Adejobi RO; Okafor OY; Kosoko SB; Owolabi FO

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the ability of the methanolic extract of pineapple peel to attenuate alcohol-induced changes in total phospholipids and lipid peroxidation in brain tissues. Methods:Oxidative stress was induced by oral administration of ethanol (20%w/v) at a dosage of 5 mL/kg bw in rats. After 28 days of treatment, the rats were fasted overnight and sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Brain tissues were assayed for total phospholipid (TP) content and malondialdehyde (MDA). Results:Administration of alcohol significantly caused a reduction in TP content. Treatment with pineapple peel extract significantly increased the TP content. Significant high levels of MDA was observed in alcohol-fed rats, treatment with pineapple peel extract significantly reduced the MDA levels. Conclusions:Results obtained from this study indicates that pineapple peel extract protects against alcohol-induced changes in total phospholipids and lipid peroxidation in brain tissues.

  6. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Esquivel-Martínez, Mauricio; Olmos-Orizaba, Berenice Eridani; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats). Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m ), besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress.

  7. Glucocorticoids modulate BDNF mRNA expression in the rat hippocampus after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, P L; Patel, N; Harbuz, M S; Lightman, S L; Sharples, P M

    2000-10-20

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in rat hippocampus is increased after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) and may be neuroprotective. Glucocorticoids are important regulators of brain neurotrophin levels and are often prescribed following TBI. The effect of adrenalectomy (ADX) on the expression of BDNF mRNA in the hippocampus after TBI has not been investigated to date. We used fluid percussion injury (FPI) and in situ hybridization to evaluate the expression of BDNF mRNA in the hippocampus 4 h after TBI in adrenal-intact or adrenalectomized rats (with or without corticosterone replacement). FPI and ADX independently increased expression of BDNF mRNA. In animals undergoing FPI, prior ADX caused further elevation of BDNF mRNA and this upregulation was prevented by corticosterone replacement in ADX rats. These findings suggest that glucocorticoids are involved in the modulation of the BDNF mRNA response to TBI.

  8. Effects of anesthesia on [11C]raclopride binding in the rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Simonsen, Mette; Møller, Arne

    Background Very often rats are anesthetized prior to micro positron emission tomography (microPET) brain imaging in order to prevent head movements. Anesthesia can be administered by inhalation agents, such as isoflurane, or injection mixtures, such as fentanyl-fluanisone-midazolam. Unfortunately......, anesthesia affects a variety of physiological variables, including in the brain. Aim The aim of this study was to compare the effects of inhalation and injection anesthesia on the binding potential of the dopaminergic D2/3 tracer [11C]raclopride used for PET brain imaging in human and animal studies....... Materials & Methods Nine male Lew/Mol rats were assigned to either inhalation (isoflurane; N=4) or injection (fentanyl-fluanisone-midazolam; N=5) anesthesia. Catheters were surgically placed in femoral arteries and veins for blood sampling and tracer injection. After a short attenuation scan, the rats were...

  9. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Ortiz-Avila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats. Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential ΔΨm, besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress.

  10. DISTRIBUTION OF GLIAL FIBRILLARY ACIDIC PROTEIN IN DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE RAT BRAIN UNDER CADMIUM EXPOSURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Yu P; Prischepa, I V; Si, U; Nedzvetsky, V S; Kot, Y G; Persky, E E; Ushakova, G A

    2015-01-01

    The chronic effects of low doses of cadmium on the distribution of soluble and filament forms of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and their polypeptide fragments in different parts of the rat brain were investigated. Obtained results showed dose-dependent effect of cadmium on the soluble form of GFAP and more pronounced effect on the filament form and composition of the polypeptide fragments of the protein in the rat brain. Prolonged intoxication by cadmium ions in a dose of 1.0 μg/kg of body weight induced a significant decrease in soluble GFAP and an increase in the filament form in the rat brain, pointing to the development of reactive astrogliosis and the risk of neurodegeneration.

  11. Prospective microglia and brain macrophage distribution pattern in normal rat brain shows age sensitive dispersal and stabilization with development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Payel; Mukherjee, Nabanita; Ghosh, Krishnendu; Mallick, Suvadip; Pal, Chiranjib; Laskar, Aparna; Ghosh, Anirban

    2015-09-01

    The monocytic lineage cells in brain, generally speaking brain macrophage and/or microglia show some dissimilar distribution patterns and disagreement regarding their origin and onset in brain. Here, we investigated its onset and distribution/colonization pattern in normal brain with development. Primarily, early and late embryonic stages, neonate and adult brains were sectioned for routine H/E staining; a modified silver-gold staining was used for discriminating monocytic lineage cells in brain; and TEM to deliver ultramicroscopic details of these cells in brain. Immunofluorescence study with CD11b marker revealed the distribution of active microglia/macrophage like cells. Overall, in early embryonic day 12, the band of densely stained cells are found at the margin of developing ventricles and cells sprout from there dispersed towards the outer edge. However, with development, this band shrunk and the dispersion trend decreased. The deeply stained macrophage like cell population migration from outer cortex to ventricle observed highest in late embryonic days, continued with decreased amount in neonates and settled down in adult. In adult, a few blood borne macrophage like cells were observed through the vascular margins. TEM study depicted less distinguishable features of cells in brain in early embryo, whereas from late embryo to adult different neuroglial populations and microglia/macrophages showed distinctive features and organization in brain. CD11b expression showed some similarity, though not fully, with the distribution pattern depending on the differentiation/activation status of these macrophage lineage cells. This study provides some generalized spatial and temporal pattern of macrophage/microglia distribution in rat brain, and further indicates some intrigue areas that need to be addressed.

  12. Effect of Piper betle leaf extract on alcoholic toxicity in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, R; Rajendra Prasad, N; Pugalendi, K V

    2003-01-01

    The protective effect of Piper betle, a commonly used masticatory, has been examined in the brain of ethanol-administered Wistar rats. Brain of ethanol-treated rats exhibited increased levels of lipids, lipid peroxidation, and disturbances in antioxidant defense. Subsequent to the experimental induction of toxicity (i.e., the initial period of 30 days), aqueous P. betle extract was simultaneously administered in three different doses (100, 200, and 300 mg kg(-1)) for 30 days along with the daily dose of alcohol. P. betle coadministration resulted in significant reduction of lipid levels (free fatty acids, cholesterol, and phospholipids) and lipid peroxidation markers such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and hydroperoxides. Further, antioxidants, like reduced glutathione, vitamin C, vitamin E, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, were increased in P. betle-coadministered rats. The higher dose of extract (300 mg kg(-1)) was more effective, and these results indicate the neuroprotective effect of P. betle in ethanol-treated rats.

  13. EFFECT OF GINKGO BILOBA EXTRACT ON BRAIN EDEMA AFTER SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙保亮; 夏作理; 杨明峰; 邱平明

    2001-01-01

    @@ The aim of this study was to investigate the protectiveeffect of Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb) on brain edemaafter subarachnoid hemorrhage . Eighty male and femaleWistar rats, weighing 300~ 350g, were used in the ex-periment. Animals were divided into pure SAH group andEGb-treated group. Dynamic changes of regional cerebralblood flow (rCBF) were detected in eight rats from eachgroup. Brain water and electrolytes contents at differenttime points were detected in thirty-two rats from eachgroup (eight rats at each time point from each group) .EGb. provided by Pizhou Pharmaceutical Factory(Xuzhou, Jiangsu, China), was injected intraperi-toneally 30 minutes before operation and repeated withsingle dose of 15mg/kg .every 6 hours.

  14. Effects of Graded Hypothermia on Hypoxic-ischemic Brain Damage in the Neonatal Rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-yan Xia; Yi-xin Xia

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of graded hypothermia on neuropathologic alteratiors of neonatal rat brain after exposed to hypoxic-ischemic insult at 37℃, 33℃, 31℃, and 28℃, respectively, and to observe the effect of hypothermia on 72-kDa heat shock protein (HSP72) expression after hypoxic-ischemic insult. Methods Seven days old Wistar rats were subjected to unilateral common carotid artery ligation followed by exposure to hypoxia in 8% oxygen for 2 hours at 37℃, 33℃, 31℃, and 28℃, respectively. The brain temperature was monitored indirectly by inserting a mini-thermocouple probe into the temporal muscle during hypoxia. After hypoxia-ischemia their mortality was assessed. Neuronal damage was assessed with HE staining 72 hours after hypoxia. HSP72 expression at 0.5, 24, and 72 hours of recovery was immunohistochemically assessed using a monoclonal antibody to HSP72. Results Hypoxia-ischemia caused 10.5% (2/19) of mortality in rat of 37℃ group, but no death occurred in 33℃, 31℃ or 28℃ groups. HE staining showed neuropathologic damage was extensive in rats exposed to hypoxia-ischemia at 37℃ (more than 80.0%). The incidence of severe brain damage was significantly decreased in 33℃ (53.3%) and 31℃ groups (44.4%), and no histologic injury was seen in the 28℃ group of rats. Expression of HSP72 was manifest and persistent in the rat brain of 37℃ group, but minimum in the rat brain of 28℃ group. Conclusion Mild and moderate hypothermia might prevent cerebral visible neuropathologic damage associated with hypoxic-ischemic injury by decreasing stress response.

  15. Safety evaluation of mercury based Ayurvedic formulation (Sidh Makardhwaj) on brain cerebrum, liver & kidney in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Gajendra Kumar; Amita Srivastava; Surinder Kumar Sharma; Yogendra Kumar Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Sidh Makardhwaj (SM) is a mercury based Ayurvedic formulation used in rheumatoid arthritis and neurological disorders. However, toxicity concerns due to mercury content are often raised. Therefore, the present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of SM on brain cerebrum, liver and kidney in rats. Methods: Graded doses of SM (10, 50, 100 mg/kg), mercuric chloride (1 mg/kg) and normal saline were administered orally to male Wistar rats for 28 days. Behaviou...

  16. Predator Cat Odors Activate Sexual Arousal Pathways in Brains of Toxoplasma gondii Infected Rats

    OpenAIRE

    House, Patrick K.; Ajai Vyas; Robert Sapolsky

    2011-01-01

    Cat odors induce rapid, innate and stereotyped defensive behaviors in rats at first exposure, a presumed response to the evolutionary pressures of predation. Bizarrely, rats infected with the brain parasite Toxoplasma gondii approach the cat odors they typically avoid. Since the protozoan Toxoplasma requires the cat to sexually reproduce, this change in host behavior is thought to be a remarkable example of a parasite manipulating a mammalian host for its own benefit. Toxoplasma does not infl...

  17. Effects of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor on Local Inflammation in Experimental Stroke of Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Yongjun Jiang; Ning Wei; Juehua Zhu; Tingting Lu; Zhaoyao Chen; Gelin Xu; Xinfeng Liu

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate whether brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) can modulate local cerebral inflammation in ischemic stroke. Rats were subjected to ischemia by occluding the right middle cerebral artery (MCAO) for 2 hours. Rats were randomized as control, BDNF, and antibody groups. The local inflammation was evaluated on cellular, cytokine, and transcription factor levels with immunofluorescence, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, real-time qPCR, and electrophoretic mobil...

  18. A Comparison of Psychotomimetic Drug Effects on Rat Brain Norepinephrine Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-02-19

    chemical . Rats remained in the water for a maxi- Indircet evidence for participation of brain cate- mum of 20 minutes, but were removed prior to that...ANI) NOH EPINEPHRINE 45 TABLE 1 Endogenous noresiinephrine content mo rat whole braiin after treatment with various psychoactive drugs or exposure to...conclusion that any differences exist b.-tween these two psychoactive effect of LSD on cerebral norepincphrine metab- drugs with respect to serotonin

  19. Element distribution in the brain sections of rats measured by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N. Q.; Zhang, F.; Wang, X. F.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Chai, Z. F.; Huang, Y. Y.; He, W.; Zhao, X. Q.; Zuo, A. J.; Yang, R.

    2004-02-01

    The concentration of trace elements in brain sections was measured by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence. The relative concentration was calculated by means of the normalization of Compton scattering intensity approximately 22 keV, after the normalization for collecting time of X-ray spectrum and the counting of the ion chamber, and subtracting the contribution of the polycarbonate film for supporting sample. Furthermore, the statistical evaluation of the element distribution in various regions of the brain sections of the 20-day-old rats was tested. For investigating the distribution of elements in the brain of iodine deficient rats, Wistar rats were fed with iodine deficient diet and deionized water (ID group). The rats were fed the same iodine deficient diet, but drank KIO 3 solution as control (CT group). The results showed that the contents of calcium (Ca) in thalamus (TH) and copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) in cerebral cortex (CX) of ID rats were significantly lower than that of control rats, while the contents of phosphor (P), sulfur (S), potassium (K), rubidium (Rb), bromine (Br), chlorine (Cl), zinc (Zn), Ca and Cu of ID in hippocampus (H) and the contents of Br, Cl, Zn and Ca in cerebral cortex of ID rats were significantly higher. Especially, the difference of Br, Cl, Zn and Ca in H between ID and CT was more significant. The contents of all elements measured in H were higher than (or equal to) CX and/or TH for both groups, except low Cl of the control rats. Furthermore Zn and Cu contents along the hippocampal fissure in both groups were 1.5 ( Ptimes higher than in hippocampus, respectively. Considering the results of cluster analysis our study shows that the marked alterations in the spatial distribution of Zn and Ca of ID rats brain during brain development stages. In addition, the effect of the perfusion with 0.9% NaCl solution before taking brain on the distribution of elements in the brain sections was observed and discussed.

  20. Macrophagic and microglial responses after focal traumatic brain injury in the female rat

    OpenAIRE

    Turtzo, L. Christine; Lescher, Jacob; Janes, Lindsay; Dean, Dana D.; Budde, Matthew D.; Joseph A Frank

    2014-01-01

    Background After central nervous system injury, inflammatory macrophages (M1) predominate over anti-inflammatory macrophages (M2). The temporal profile of M1/M2 phenotypes in macrophages and microglia after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats is unknown. We subjected female rats to severe controlled cortical impact (CCI) and examined the postinjury M1/M2 time course in their brains. Methods The motor cortex (2.5 mm left laterally and 1.0 mm anteriorly from the bregma) of anesthetized female ...

  1. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of serotonin release in the rat brain cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, E; Betz, R; Göthert, M

    1988-05-01

    Rat brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-serotonin were superfused with physiological salt solution (containing citalopram, an inhibitor of serotonin uptake) and the effect of histamine on the electrically (3 Hz) evoked 3H overflow was studied. Histamine decreased the evoked overflow in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of histamine was antagonized by impromidine and burimamide, but was not affected by pheniramine, ranitidine, metitepine and phentolamine. Given alone, impromidine facilitated the evoked overflow, whereas burimamide, pheniramine and ranitidine had no effect. The results suggest that histamine inhibits serotonin release in the rat brain cortex via histamine H3 receptors, which may be located presynaptically.

  2. Molecular cloning, expression and in situ hybridization of rat brain glutamic acid decarboxylase messenger RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, J F; Legay, F; Dumas, S; Tappaz, M; Mallet, J

    1987-01-14

    A cDNA library was generated in the expression vector lambda GT11 from rat brain poly(A)+ RNAs and screened with a GAD antiserum. Two clones reacted positively. One of them was shown to express a GAD activity which was specifically trapped on anti-GAD immunogel and was inhibited by gamma-acetylenic-GABA. Blot hybridization analysis of RNAs from rat brain revealed a single 4 kilobases band. Preliminary in situ hybridizations showed numerous cells labelled by the GAD probe such as the Purkinje and stellate cells in the cerebellar cortex and the cells of the reticular thalamic nucleus.

  3. Responsiveness of fetal rat brain cells to glia maturation factor during neoplastic transformation in cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugen, A; Laerum, O D; Bock, E

    1981-01-01

    The effect of partially purified extracts from adult pig brains containing a glia maturation protein factor (BE) has been investigated on neural cells during carcinogenesis. Pregnant BD IX-rats were given a single transplacental dose of the carcinogen ethylnitrosourea (EtNU) on the 18th day of ge...... on GFA-content was seen any longer, although some few weakly GFA positive cells could be observed in all permanent cell lines. Fetal rat brain cells therefore seem to become less responsive to this differentiation inducer during neoplastic transformation in cell culture....

  4. Prevention of brain infarction by postischemic administration of histidine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Naoto; Liu, Keyue; Arai, Tatsuru

    2005-03-28

    Focal cerebral ischemia for 2 h by occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery provoked severe brain infarction in the rat brain after 24 h. Intraperitoneal administration of histidine, a precursor of histamine, immediately and 6 h after reperfusion, alleviated brain infarction. The infarct size in the histidine (200 mg/kg, 500 mg/kg, and 1000 mg/kg, each time) groups was 71%, 39%, and 7% of that in the control group, respectively. Although intracerebroventricular administration of mepyramine (3 nmol), an H1 antagonist, did not affect the morphologic outcome in histidine-treated rats, ranitidine (30 nmol), an H2 antagonist, completely abolished the alleviation caused by histidine. These findings indicate that postischemic administration of histidine prevents development of brain infarction by stimulating central histamine H2 receptors.

  5. Pharmacological activities of clobazam and diazepam in the rat: relation to drug brain levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccia, S; Carli, M; Garattini, S; Poggesi, E; Rech, R; Samanin, R

    1980-02-01

    Brain distribution and various pharmacological effects of clobazam and diazepam were studied in rats. When given at 10 mg/kg i.p. the compounds reached peak brain levels 15 min after injection, and showed similar half lives. At peak time brain levels were proportional to the dose administered. Very little of the N-desmethylmetabolite of each compound was found in the brain. Clobazam was less effective than diazepam in protecting rats from pentetrazol convulsions. Disrupting rota-rod performance and increasing punished responses in a "conflict" test, the relative potencies ranging from 4 to 8 in the various tests. The results are discussed in relation to the importance of animal species selection for predicting favourable therapeutic effects in humans.

  6. A quantitative in-vivo MR imaging study of brain dehydration in diabetic rats and rats treated with peptide hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldseth, O; Jones, R A; Skottner, A

    1997-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to evaluate the combination of quantitative diffusion, T2 and Magnetisation Transfer Imaging of brain water homeostasis using untreated diabetes as an animal model of brain dehydration. In addition, experimental groups of diabetic rats treated with insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) and normal rats treated with IGF-I and growth hormone were studied using the same MR imaging protocol. Untreated diabetes caused weight reduction and an increase in water intake, indicating a general body dehydration linked to chronic blood hyperosmolarity. In the investigated cortical gray matter untreated diabetes caused a significant reduction in the apparent diffusion coefficient of water (ADC) and an increase in T2 relaxtivity (R2) when compared to a control group. No significant changes were observed for the calculated magnetisation transfer parameters Kfor and T1sat. Both ADC and R2 normalized after appropriate insulin treatment whereas only ADC was normalized after IGF-I treatment. IGF-I treatment of normal rats caused significantly higher rate of increase in body weight compared to normal controls. There were, however, no significant changes in ADC, R2 nor the magnetisation transfer parameters measured in the cortical gray matter of the IGF-I treated normal rats. In conclusion, we found that changes in brain water homeostasis during diabetes were detected by quantitative MR imaging, and that the dehydration induced by diabetes was normalized by insulin treatment but not by IGF-I.

  7. Brain monoamine metabolism is altered in rats following spontaneous, long-distance running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, M; Svensson, T H; Thorén, P

    1987-06-01

    Brain monoamine metabolism in rats was studied during spontaneous, long-term running in a microprocessor-controlled wheel cage. Immediately after heavy spontaneous exercise, DOPA accumulation was decreased in dopamine-rich brain regions such as the limbic forebrain and corpus striatum, indicating a decreased rate of synthesis of dopamine in brain. In contrast, DOPA accumulation was increased in the noradrenaline-predominated region of the brain stem, indicating an increased synthesis of noradrenaline in this region. Alterations in brain monoamine metabolism were normalized in exercising animals analysed 24 h after the last running period. Changes in brain monoamine metabolism may be involved in the mechanisms underlying the clinically observed psychological effects of physical exercise.

  8. Dynamic effects of point source electroporation on the rat brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabi, Shirley; Last, David; Guez, David; Daniels, Dianne; Hjouj, Mohammad Ibrahim; Salomon, Sharona; Maor, Elad; Mardor, Yael

    2014-10-01

    In spite of aggressive therapy, existing treatments offer poor prognosis for glioblastoma multiforme due to tumor infiltration into the surrounding brain as well as poor blood-brain barrier penetration of most therapeutic agents. In this paper we present a novel approach for a minimally invasive treatment and a non-invasive response assessment methodology consisting of applying intracranial point-source electroporation and assessing treatment effect volumes using magnetic resonance imaging. Using a unique setup of a single intracranial electrode and an external surface electrode we treated rats' brains with various electroporation protocols and applied magnetic resonance imaging to study the dependence of the physiological effects on electroporation treatment parameters. The extent of blood-brain barrier disruption and later volumes of permanent brain tissue damage were found to correlate significantly with the treatment voltages (r(2)=0.99, pelectroporation when planning a treatment for brain tumors.

  9. A new model of diffuse brain injury in rats. Part I: Pathophysiology and biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmarou, A; Foda, M A; van den Brink, W; Campbell, J; Kita, H; Demetriadou, K

    1994-02-01

    This report describes the development of an experimental head injury model capable of producing diffuse brain injury in the rodent. A total of 161 anesthetized adult rats were injured utilizing a simple weight-drop device consisting of a segmented brass weight free-falling through a Plexiglas guide tube. Skull fracture was prevented by cementing a small stainless-steel disc on the calvaria. Two groups of rats were tested: Group 1, consisting of 54 rats, to establish fracture threshold; and Group 2, consisting of 107 animals, to determine the primary cause of death at severe injury levels. Data from Group 1 animals showed that a 450-gm weight falling from a 2-m height (0.9 kg-m) resulted in a mortality rate of 44% with a low incidence (12.5%) of skull fracture. Impact was followed by apnea, convulsions, and moderate hypertension. The surviving rats developed decortication flexion deformity of the forelimbs, with behavioral depression and loss of muscle tone. Data from Group 2 animals suggested that the cause of death was due to central respiratory depression; the mortality rate decreased markedly in animals mechanically ventilated during the impact. Analysis of mathematical models showed that this mass-height combination resulted in a brain acceleration of 900 G and a brain compression gradient of 0.28 mm. It is concluded that this simple model is capable of producing a graded brain injury in the rodent without a massive hypertensive surge or excessive brain-stem damage.

  10. Energetic, oxidative and ionic exchange in rat brain and liver mitochondria at experimental audiogenic epilepsy (Krushinsky-Molodkina model).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venediktova, Natalya I; Gorbacheva, Olga S; Belosludtseva, Natalia V; Fedotova, Irina B; Surina, Natalia M; Poletaeva, Inga I; Kolomytkin, Oleg V; Mironova, Galina D

    2017-01-09

    The role of brain and liver mitochondria at epileptic seizure was studied on Krushinsky-Molodkina (KM) rats which respond to sound with an intensive epileptic seizure (audiogenic epilepsy). We didn't find significant changes in respiration rats of brain and liver mitochondria of KM and control rats; however the efficiency of АТР synthesis in the KM rat mitochondria was 10% lower. In rats with audiogenic epilepsy the concentration of oxidative stress marker malondialdehyde in mitochondria of the brain (but not liver) was 2-fold higher than that in the control rats. The rate of H2O2 generation in brain mitochondria of КМ rats was twofold higher than in the control animals when using NAD-dependent substrates. This difference was less pronounced in liver mitochondria. In KM rats, the activity of mitochondrial ATP-dependent potassium channel was lower than in liver mitochondria of control rats. The comparative study of the mitochondria ability to retain calcium ions revealed that in the case of using the complex I and complex II substrates, permeability transition pore is easier to trigger in brain and liver mitochondria of KM and КМs rats than in the control ones. The role of the changes in the energetic, oxidative, and ionic exchange in the mechanism of audiogenic epilepsy generation in rats and the possible correction of the epilepsy seizures are discussed.

  11. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields induce oxidative stress in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikonda, Pavan K; Rajendra, Pilankatta; Devendranath, D; Gunasekaran, B; Channakeshava; Aradhya, Shivakumara R S; Sashidhar, Rao B; Subramanyam, Chivukula

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was conducted to understand the influence of long-term exposure of rats to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF), focusing on oxidative stress (OS) on different regions of rat's brain. Male Wistar rats (21-day-old) were exposed to ELF-MF (50 Hz; 50 and 100 µT) for 90 days continuously; hippocampal, cerebellar and cortical regions from rats were analyzed for (i) reactive oxygen species (ROS), (ii) metabolites indicative of OS and (iii) antioxidant enzymes. In comparison to control group rats, the rats that were continuously exposed to ELF-MF caused OS and altered glutathione (GSH/GSSG) levels in dose-dependent manner in all the regions of the brain. Accumulation of ROS, lipid peroxidation end products and activity of superoxide dismutase in different regions was in the descending order of cerebellum glutathione peroxidase activity were in the descending order of hippocampus 50 µT. Varied influences observed in different regions of the brain, as documented in this study, may contribute to altered metabolic patterns in its related regions of the central nervous system, leading to aberrant neuronal functions.

  12. Summary of high field diffusion MRI and microscopy data demonstrate microstructural aberration in chronic mild stress rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Ahmad Raza; Chuhutin, Andrey; Wiborg, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This data article describes a large, high resolution diffusion MRI data set from fixed rat brain acquired at high field strength. The rat brain samples consist of21adult rat brain hemispheres from animals exposed to chronic mild stress (anhedonic and resilient) and controls. Histology from...... amygdala of the same brain hemispheres is also included with three different stains: DiI and Hoechst stained microscopic images (confocal microscopy) andALDH1L1 antibody based immunohistochemistry.These stains may be used to evaluate neurite density (DiI), nuclear density (Hoechst) and astrocytic density...

  13. Circulating and Brain BDNF Levels in Stroke Rats. Relevance to Clinical Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Yannick Béjot; Claude Mossiat; Maurice Giroud; Anne Prigent-Tessier; Christine Marie

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whereas brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels are measured in the brain in animal models of stroke, neurotrophin levels in stroke patients are measured in plasma or serum samples. The present study was designed to investigate the meaning of circulating BDNF levels in stroke patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Unilateral ischemic stroke was induced in rats by the injection of various numbers of microspheres into the carotid circulation in order to mimic the different degrees o...

  14. Recovery of energy metabolism in rat brain after carbon monoxide hypoxia.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, S D; Piantadosi, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) may inhibit mitochondrial electron transport in the brain and increase the toxic effects of the gas. This hypothesis was investigated in anesthetized rats during CO exposure and recovery at either normobaric or hyperbaric O2 concentrations. During exposure and recovery, we measured the oxidation level of cerebrocortical cytochrome c oxidase by differential spectroscopy and biochemical metabolites known to reflect aerobic energy provision in the brain. CO exposure (HbCO = ...

  15. Total anesthesia, rats brain surgery, nitric oxide (NO) and free radicals

    OpenAIRE

    Jelenković Ankica V.; Jovanović Marina; Ninković Milica; Maksimović M.; Bošković Bogdan

    2005-01-01

    It is expected that clinical recovery after surgically induced brain trauma is followed by molecular and biochemical restitution. Seven days after surgery, we investigated whether the plastic cannula implanted in the left brain ventricle of adult Wistar rats (n = 6-7), performed in pentobarbital anesthesia, could influence oxidative stress elements (superoxide anion and lipid peroxidation), as well as the antioxidative system (superoxide dismuthase-SOD). Also, we investigated whether nitric o...

  16. Voluntary Alcohol Intake following Blast Exposure in a Rat Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yi Wei; Meyer, Nathan P.; Shah, Alok S.; Budde, Matthew D.; Stemper, Brian D.; Olsen, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholism is a frequent comorbidity following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), even in patients without a previous history of alcohol dependence. Despite this correlational relationship, the extent to which the neurological effects of mTBI contribute to the development of alcoholism is unknown. In this study, we used a rodent blast exposure model to investigate the relationship between mTBI and voluntary alcohol drinking in alcohol naïve rats. We have previously demonstrated in Sprague Dawley rats that blast exposure leads to microstructural abnormalities in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and other brain regions that progress from four to thirty days. The mPFC is a brain region implicated in alcoholism and drug addiction, although the impact of mTBI on drug reward and addiction using controlled models remains largely unexplored. Alcohol naïve Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to a blast model of mTBI (or sham conditions) and then tested in several common measures of voluntary alcohol intake. In a seven-week intermittent two-bottle choice alcohol drinking test, sham and blast exposed rats had comparable levels of alcohol intake. In a short access test session at the conclusion of the two-bottle test, blast rats fell into a bimodal distribution, and among high intake rats, blast treated animals had significantly elevated intake compared to shams. We found no effect of blast when rats were tested for an alcohol deprivation effect or compulsive drinking in a quinine adulteration test. Throughout the experiment, alcohol drinking was modest in both groups, consistent with other studies using Sprague Dawley rats. In conclusion, blast exposure had a minimal impact on overall alcohol intake in Sprague Dawley rats, although intake was increased in a subpopulation of blast animals in a short access session following intermittent access exposure. PMID:25910266

  17. Development of regional cerebral oedema after lateral fluid-percussion brain injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, T K; Soares, H; Thomas, M; Cloherty, K

    1990-01-01

    Most studies attempting to characterize post-traumatic oedema formation have focused on the acute postinjury period. We have recently developed a new model of lateral (parasagittal) fluidpercussion (FP) brain injury in the rat. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the temporal course of oedema formation and resolution in this experimental model of brain injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 67) were anaesthetized and subjected to FP brain injury of moderate severity. Animals were sacrified at 1 hour, 6 hours, 24 hours, 2 days, 3 days, 5 days and 7 days after brain injury, brains removed and assayed for water content using either specific gravitimetric or wet weight/dry weight techniques. In the injured left parietal cortex, a significant increase in water content was observed by 6 hours postinjury (p less than 0.05) that persisted up to 5 days postinjury. A prolonged and significant increase in water content was also observed in the left (ipsilateral) hippocampus which began at 1 hour postinjury (p less than 0.05) and continued up to 3 days. Other regions examined showed no significant regional oedema after brain injury. These results suggest that lateral FP brain injury produces an early focus oedema that persists for a prolonged period after trauma. This model may be useful in the evaluation of novel pharmacological therapies designed to reduce cerebral oedema after brain injury.

  18. Application of capillary gas chromatography to the study of hydrolysis of the nerve agent VX in rat plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonierbale, E; Debordes, L; Coppet, L

    1997-01-24

    We present here a gas chromatography technique allowing the detection and quantification of VX [O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl)methylphosphonothiolate] as well as its P-S bond hydrolysis product diisopropylaminoethanethiol directly from spiked rat plasma. This technique was applied to study VX hydrolysis in rat plasma. We observed that 53 +/- 4% of 374 microM VX disappeared from spiked plasma after 2 h. VX disappearance was mainly related to enzymatic cleavage of the P-S bond (Km = 2.5 mM and Vmax = 13.3 nmol min-1 ml-1 of rat plasma). The activity was totally inhibited by 1 mM Hg2+ and was also inhibited by metal chelators.

  19. Effects of white spirits on rat brain 5-HT receptor functions and synaptic remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, Henrik Rye; Plenge, P.; Jørgensen, O.S.

    2001-01-01

    Previously, inhalation exposure to different types of white spirit (i.e. complex mixtures of aliphatic, aromatic, alkyl aromatic, and naphthenic hydrocarbons) has been shown to induce neurochemical effects in rat brains. Especially, the serotonergic system was involved at the global, regional...... applied as indices for synaptic remodeling in forebrain, hippocampus, and entorhinal cortex. Male Wistar rats were exposed to 0, 400, or 800 ppm of aromatic (20 vol.% aromatic hydrocarbons) or dearomatized white spirit (catalytically hydrogenated white spirit) in the inhaled air for 6 h/day, 7 days...... that inhalation exposure to high concentrations of white spirit may be neurotoxic to rats, especially the aromatic white spirit type....

  20. Naoxintong dose effects on inflammatory factor expression in the rat brain following focal cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangjian Zhang; Li Xü; Zuoran Chen; Shuchao Hu; Liying Zhang; Haiyan Li; Ruichun Liu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Certain components of tetramethylpyrazine, a traditional Chinese medicine, exhibit protective effects against brain injury.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of different Naoxintong doses on expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (κ B), interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and complement 3 in rats following focal cerebral ischemia.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The randomized experiment was performed at the Laboratory of Neurology, Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University from June 2004 to June 2006. MATERIAIS: A total of 150 adult, healthy, male, Sprague Dawley rats, weighing 280-320 g, were selected. Naoxintong powder (mainly comprising szechwan lovage rhizome, milkvetch root, danshen root, and radix angelicae sinensis) was obtained from Buchang Pharmacy Co., Ltd. in Xianyang City of Shanxi Province of China, lot number 040608.METHODS: The rats were randomly assigned into sham operation, saline, high-dose Naoxintong, moderate-dose Naoxintong, and low-dose Naoxintong groups, with 30 rats in each group. Rat models of middle cerebral artery occlusion were established using the suture method, with the exception of the sham operation group. Rats in the high-dose, moderate-dose and low-dose Naoxintong groups received 4, 2, and 1 glkg Naoxintong respectively, by gavage. Rats in the saline group were treated with 1 mL saline by gavage. All rats were administered by garage at 5 and 23 hours following surgery, and subsequently, once per day.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: At 6, 24, 48, 72 hours, and 7 days following model establishment, brain water content was measured. Histopathological changes in brain tissues were detected using hematoxylin-eosin staining. Expression of nuclear factor- κB, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and complement 3 was examined by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: A total of 150 rats were included in the final analysis with no loss. Brain water content was significantly increased in the ischemic hemisphere of rats from the saline, as

  1. Fenbendazole treatment may influence lipopolysaccharide effects in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Randy L; Choi, Dong-Young; Kincer, Jeanie F; Cass, Wayne A; Bing, Guoying; Gash, Don M

    2007-10-01

    In evaluating discrepant results between experiments in our laboratory, we collected data that challenge the notion that anthelminthic drugs like FBZ do not alter inflammatory responses. We found that FBZ significantly modulates inflammation in F344 rats intrastriatally injected with LPS. FBZ treatment of LPS-injected rats significantly increased weight loss, microglial activation, and dopamine loss; in addition, FBZ attenuated the LPS-induced loss of astrocytes. Therefore, FBZ treatment altered the effects of LPS injection. Caution should be used in interpreting data collected from rats treated with LPS and FBZ.

  2. Effect of monoamine nervous transmitter and neuropeptide Y in the aged rats with myocardial injury after brain ischemia-reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanism of myocardial injury after brain ischemia-reperfusion in aged rats from the changes in Dopamine (DA), Noradrenalin (NE), Epinephrine(E) and Neuropeptide Y(NPY).METHODS: Young (5 months) and aged (20 months or more) rats were divided into model groups and normal control groups, respectively. We observed the following items in rats with 60 minute reperfusion after 30 minute brain ischemia: the pathological changed of myocardium, the activities of lactic dehydrrogenase(LDH), creatine phosphokinase(CPK), the contents of NE, DA, E, NPY. RESULTS:The CPK and LDH activities in the young model rats were higher than those in the young control rats was higher than that in the young control rats (P<0.05). The serum CPK activity in the aged control rats was higher than that in the young control rats (P<0.05). The myocardial CPK activity was higher in the aged model rats compared with the young molel rats (P<0.05) and was higher in aged control rats compared with the young control rats (P<0.01). The myocardial LDH activity was lower in the aged control rats than that in the young control rats (P<0.05) and aged model rats (P<0.01). The serum NE level, the level of NE and DA in the hypothalamus were higher obviously than those in the young control rats. The serum NE contents in the two model groups (young and aged) were higher respectively than the two control rats (young and aged). The following items’ contents were higher in the aged model rats than in the young model rats: serum NE, serum E, hypothalamus NE. The hypothalamus NE and E content was lower in the aged model rats than in te aged control rats. NPY level in the brain tissue was lower in the aged control rats than that in the young control rats and aged model rats (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: The myocardial injury after brain ischemia-reperfusion was concerned with the enhanced excitability of sympathetic-adrenal system, espectially in the aged rats. However, the change in myocardial

  3. Effects of anesthesia on [11C]raclopride binding in the rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Simonsen, Mette; Møller, Arne

    Background Very often rats are anesthetized prior to micro positron emission tomography (microPET) brain imaging in order to prevent head movements. Anesthesia can be administered by inhalation agents, such as isoflurane, or injection mixtures, such as fentanyl-fluanisone-midazolam. Unfortunately....... Materials & Methods Nine male Lew/Mol rats were assigned to either inhalation (isoflurane; N=4) or injection (fentanyl-fluanisone-midazolam; N=5) anesthesia. Catheters were surgically placed in femoral arteries and veins for blood sampling and tracer injection. After a short attenuation scan, the rats were...... PET scanned for 90 minutes after injection of [11C]raclopride. Results We found that rats anesthetized with isoflurane had double the binding potential in the striatum compared with fentanyl-fluanisone-midazolam anesthetized rats. Conclusion Our results are in agreement with other studies showing...

  4. Metabolic enhancer piracetam attenuates rotenone induced oxidative stress: a study in different rat brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dinesh Kumar; Joshi, Neeraj; Raju, Kunumuri Sivarama; Wahajuddin, Muhammad; Singh, Rama Kant; Singh, Sarika

    2015-01-01

    Piracetam is clinically being used nootropic drug but the details of its neuroprotective mechanism are not well studied. The present study was conducted to assess the effects of piracetam on rotenone induced oxidative stress by using both ex vivo and in vivo test systems. Rats were treated with piracetam (600 mg/kg b.w. oral) for seven constitutive days prior to rotenone administration (intracerebroventricular, 12 µg) in rat brain. Rotenone induced oxidative stress was assessed after 1 h and 24 h of rotenone administration. Ex vivo estimations were performed by using two experimental designs. In one experimental design the rat brain homogenate was treated with rotenone (1 mM, 2 mM and 4 mM) and rotenone+piracetam (10 mM) for 1 h. While in second experimental design the rats were pretreated with piracetam for seven consecutive days. On eighth day the rats were sacrificed, brain homogenate was prepared and treated with rotenone (1 mM, 2 mM and 4mM) for 1h. After treatment the glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were estimated in brain homogenate. In vivo study showed that pretreatment of piracetam offered significant protection against rotenone induced decreased GSH and increased MDA level though the protection was region specific. But the co-treatment of piracetam with rotenone did not offer significant protection against rotenone induced oxidative stress in ex vivo study. Whereas ex vivo experiments in rat brain homogenate of piracetam pretreated rats, showed the significant protection against rotenone induced oxidative stress. Findings indicated that pretreatment of piracetam significantly attenuated the rotenone induced oxidative stress though the protection was region specific. Piracetam treatment to rats led to its absorption and accumulation in different brain regions as assessed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. In conclusion, study indicates the piracetam is able to enhance the antioxidant capacity in brain cells

  5. Zinc influences on brain development, pituitary an thyroidfunction iniodine-deficient pregnant and neonatal rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoxia Yang; Jianchao Bian; Xin Wang; Haiming Wang; Yongping Liu; Shuzhen Wang; Zhichun Mu; Xinluan Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Zinc (Zn) has been shown to greatly influence brain development. Zn supplements may reduce injury to cell membranes of the thyroid gland due to iodine deficiency. OBJECTIVE: To establish an iodine deficiency rat model using low-iodine food, which was supplemented with compound Zn and Zn gluconate, to observe the effects of Zn on brain development, as well as pituitary gland and thyroid gland function in iodine-deficient rats. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomized grouping study of neural development was performed in the central laboratory of Shandong Institute for Prevention and Treatment of Endemic Disease from 1998 to 1999. MATERIALS: A total of 270 Wistar, female rats, one month after weaning, were used in this study, including 150 pregnant and 120 neonatal rats. Rats were randomly divided into six groups: normal control, model, iodine, compound Zn, iodine and compound Zn, and zinc gluconate. Each group contained 25 pregnant rats and 20 nenoatal rats. METHODS: The pregnant rats and 20 neonatal rats, and well as the normal group, were fed standard chow and allowed free access to tap water (containing 5 μ g/L iodine and 1 mg/L Zn). The remaining five groups were fed low-iodine chow. However, the model group received distilled water, the iodine group received potassium-iodide distilled water (containing 300 μ g/L iodine), the compound Zn group received distilled water and intragastrically administrated 10 mL/kg compound Zn solution, once per day, the iodine and compound Zn group received distilled water with 300 p g/L iodine and intragastrically administrated 10 mL/kg compound Zn solution, once per day. All treatments lasted 90 days. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All pregnant rats were sacrificed on the day 21 of pregnancy. Body mass, number and rate of fetal absorption, as well as fetal death and malformation, were determined. Thyroid and pituitary gland weights were measured, as well as serum levels of thyroid hormone, gonadotropin, and sex hormones. In the

  6. Electrical Guidance of Human Stem Cells in the Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Feng Feng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Limited migration of neural stem cells in adult brain is a roadblock for the use of stem cell therapies to treat brain diseases and injuries. Here, we report a strategy that mobilizes and guides migration of stem cells in the brain in vivo. We developed a safe stimulation paradigm to deliver directional currents in the brain. Tracking cells expressing GFP demonstrated electrical mobilization and guidance of migration of human neural stem cells, even against co-existing intrinsic cues in the rostral migration stream. Transplanted cells were observed at 3 weeks and 4 months after stimulation in areas guided by the stimulation currents, and with indications of differentiation. Electrical stimulation thus may provide a potential approach to facilitate brain stem cell therapies.

  7. A warmer ambient temperature increases the passage of interleukin-1β into the brains of old rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Jessica B.; Peloso, Elizabeth; Satinoff, Evelyn

    2008-01-01

    We have demonstrated that after intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection, old rats mount fevers similar to those of young rats at an ambient temperature (Ta) of 31°C, but not at 21°C. The same is true for intraperitoneal or intravenous IL-1β administration. The underlying mechanism responsible for blunted fever in old rats may be a deficiency in communication between the periphery and the brain. Possibly, peripheral cytokine actions are altered in old rats, such that the signal that reaches the brain is diminished. Here, we hypothesized that at standard laboratory temperatures, not enough IL-1β is reaching the brain for fever to occur and that a warmer Ta would increase the influx of IL-1β into the brain, enabling old rats to generate fever. Young (3–5 mo) and old (23–29 mo) Long-Evans rats were maintained for 3 days at either Ta 21 or 31°C prior to intravenous injection with radiolabeled IL-1β to measure passage across the blood-brain barrier. Young rats showed similar influx of IL-1β into the brain at the two Tas, but old rats showed significant influx only at the warmer Ta. These data suggest that the lack of fever at a cool Ta may be due to a reduced influx of IL-1β into the brain. PMID:18448612

  8. Gamma Knife irradiation method based on dosimetric controls to target small areas in rat brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constanzo, Julie; Paquette, Benoit; Charest, Gabriel [Center for Radiotherapy Research, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12th Avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, Québec J1H 5N4 (Canada); Masson-Côté, Laurence; Guillot, Mathieu, E-mail: mathieu.guillot@usherbrooke.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, 3001 12th Avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, Québec J1H 5N4, Canada and Center for Radiotherapy Research, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12th Avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, Québec J1H 5N4 (Canada)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Targeted and whole-brain irradiation in humans can result in significant side effects causing decreased patient quality of life. To adequately investigate structural and functional alterations after stereotactic radiosurgery, preclinical studies are needed. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust standardized method of targeted irradiation on small regions of the rat brain. Methods: Euthanized male Fischer rats were imaged in a stereotactic bed, by computed tomography (CT), to estimate positioning variations relative to the bregma skull reference point. Using a rat brain atlas and the stereotactic bregma coordinates obtained from CT images, different regions of the brain were delimited and a treatment plan was generated. A single isocenter treatment plan delivering ≥100 Gy in 100% of the target volume was produced by Leksell GammaPlan using the 4 mm diameter collimator of sectors 4, 5, 7, and 8 of the Gamma Knife unit. Impact of positioning deviations of the rat brain on dose deposition was simulated by GammaPlan and validated with dosimetric measurements. Results: The authors’ results showed that 90% of the target volume received 100 ± 8 Gy and the maximum of deposited dose was 125 ± 0.7 Gy, which corresponds to an excellent relative standard deviation of 0.6%. This dose deposition calculated with GammaPlan was validated with dosimetric films resulting in a dose-profile agreement within 5%, both in X- and Z-axes. Conclusions: The authors’ results demonstrate the feasibility of standardizing the irradiation procedure of a small volume in the rat brain using a Gamma Knife.

  9. Functional brain activation during retrieval of visceral pain-conditioned passive avoidance in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Bradesi, Sylvie; Charles, Jonathan R; Pang, Raina D; Maarek, Jean-Michel I; Mayer, Emeran A; Holschneider, Daniel P

    2011-12-01

    This study assessed functional brain activation in rats during expectation of visceral pain. Male rats were trained in step-down passive avoidance (PA) for 2 days. Upon stepping down from a platform, conditioned animals received noxious colorectal distension delivered through a colorectal balloon, whereas the balloon in control rats remained uninflated. On day 3, PA behavior was assessed while [(14)C]-iodoantipyrine was infused intravenously, followed by immediate euthanasia. Regional cerebral blood flow-related tissue radioactivity (rCBF) was analyzed by statistical parametric mapping using 3-dimensional brains reconstructed from autoradiographic brain slice images. Associated with retrieved PA behavior, conditioned rats compared with control subjects showed increases in rCBF in sensory (anterior insula, somatosensory cortex), limbic/paralimbic regions (anterior cingulate, prelimbic cortex, amygdala), all regions previously reported to show activation during acute visceral pain. Increases in rCBF were also noted in the dorsal hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, and caudate putamen, regions associated with retrieval of PA. Organization of the underlying brain network was further delineated by functional connectivity analysis. This revealed in conditioned rats a strongly and positively connected corticostriatal cluster (cingulate, prelimbic cortex, caudate putamen). The amygdala and cerebellar hemispheres formed another positively connected cluster, which was negatively connected with the corticostriatal cluster, suggesting corticolimbic modulation. Prelimbic cortex, nucleus accumbens, and anterior insula emerged in conditioned animals as hubs. Our results show that during retrieval of PA, brain areas implicated in PA expression as well as those implicated in acute visceral pain processing were recruited, in line with findings from human brain imaging studies on pain expectation. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased expression of receptor for advanced glycation end-products worsens focal brain ischemia in diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Xing; Jinting He; Weidong Yu; Lingling Hou; Jiajun Chen

    2012-01-01

    A rat model of diabetes mellitus was induced by a high fat diet, followed by focal brain ischemia induced using the thread method after 0.5 month. Immunohistochemistry showed that expression of receptor for advanced glycation end-products was higher in the ischemic cortex of diabetic rats compared with non-diabetic rats with brain ischemia. Western blot assay revealed increased phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase expression, and unchanged phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase protein expression in the ischemic cortex of diabetic rats compared with non-diabetic rats with brain ischemia. Additionally, phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase protein was not detected in any rats in the two groups. Severity of limb hemiplegia was worse in diabetic rats with brain ischemia compared with ischemia alone rats. The results suggest that increased expression of receptor for advanced glycation end-products can further activate the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway in mitogen-activated protein kinase, thereby worsening brain injury associated with focal brain ischemia in diabetic rats.

  11. Neuroprotective effects of edaravone on early brain injury in rats after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yang; DING Xin-sheng; XU Shu; WANG Wei; ZUO Qi-long; KUAI Feng

    2009-01-01

    Background The underlying mechanism of early neurobiological impairment after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is not well understood,but the system of reactive oxygen superoxide (ROS) might be involved.Edaravone (MC1-186),a potent free radical scavenger that prevents apoptosis of neurons,was thus used in this study to see its possible therapeutic effect in early brain injury due to SAH in a rat model.Methods One hundred and twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups:group 1,control rats receiving sham operation only;group 2,rats with SAH treated by saline;group 3,rats with SAH treated with 1 mg/kg MCI-186 injected intraperitoneally;and group 4,rats with SAH treated with 3 mg/kg MC1-186.Treated with either saline or MC1-186 twice daily for two consecutive days after SAH,the rats were sacrificed for measurements of malondialdehyde (MDA) and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and histological analysis of caspase-3 protein by Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining.In addition,mortality and neurological scores were statistically analyzed by the chi-square test and Dunn's procedure respectively for each group.One-way analysis of variance followed by the Tukey's procedure was also used in data analysis.Results The rats in group 2 that received saline only showed neurological impairment as well as elevated mortality,and were found to have significantly increased levels of MDA and caspase-3,but reduced SOD activities in brain tissues (P<0.05).When treated with MC1-186 at two different dosages,the rats in groups 3 and 4 had markedly decreased levels of MDA and caspase-3 but increased SOD activities in the brain tissue (P<0.05),along with improved scores of neurological evaluation (P<0.05).Conclusions This study sheds some lights on the therapy of SAH-induced early brain injury by providing the promising data indicating that MC1-186,a radical scavenger,can efficiently diminish apoptosis of neurons and thus prevent the function

  12. Brain catecholamines in spontaneously hypertensive and DOCA-salt hypertensive rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujino,Kazuyuki

    1984-08-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations and alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (alpha-MPT induced disappearance of catecholamines, adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine, were measured in selected areas of the brainstem and hypothalamus of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. The catecholamine levels were measured by a sensitive radioenzymatic assay method combined with microdissection of the rat brain. The adrenaline concentration was higher in the area A1 of young SHR, but not in adult SHR, than in age-matched control rats. Noradrenaline concentrations and the alpha-MPT induced noradrenaline disappearance were less in the rostral part of the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS and the nucleus hypothalamic anterior of young SHR, and in the rostral part of the NTS of adult SHR. On the other hand in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats, the concentrations of adrenaline and noradrenaline were the same as in control rats in the examined areas. The alpha-MPT induced noradrenaline disappearance was less in the rostral part of the NTS of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. Dopamine concentrations and the alpha-MPT induced dopamine disappearance were the same in the examined areas of SHR and DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. The results suggest that SHR have a change in adrenergic neural activity in the brainstem and a decrease in noradrenergic neural activity in the brainstem and hypothalamus while DOCA-salt hypertensive rats have a decrease in noradrenergic neural activity in the brainstem. Such changes in brain catecholaminergic neurons may have played an important role in the development of hypertension in these rats.

  13. The diffusion permeability to water of the rat blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolwig, T G; Lassen, N A

    1975-01-01

    The diffusion permeability to water of the rat blood-brain-barrier (BBB) was studied. Preliminary data obtained with the Oldendorf tissue uptake method (Oldendorf 1970) in seizure experiments suggested that the transfer from blood to brain of labelled water is diffusion-limited. More definite evi...... passage increased from 0.26 to 0.67 when the arterial carbon dioxide tension was changed from 15 to 85 mm Hg, a change increasing the cerebral blood flow about sixfold. This finding suggests that water does not pass the blood-brain barrier as freely as lipophilic gases....

  14. Circulating and brain BDNF levels in stroke rats. Relevance to clinical studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Béjot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whereas brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels are measured in the brain in animal models of stroke, neurotrophin levels in stroke patients are measured in plasma or serum samples. The present study was designed to investigate the meaning of circulating BDNF levels in stroke patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Unilateral ischemic stroke was induced in rats by the injection of various numbers of microspheres into the carotid circulation in order to mimic the different degrees of stroke severity observed in stroke patients. Blood was serially collected from the jugular vein before and after (4 h, 24 h and 8 d embolization and the whole brains were collected at 4, 24 h and 8 d post-embolization. Rats were then selected from their degree of embolization, so that the distribution of stroke severity in the rats at the different time points was large but similar. Using ELISA tests, BDNF levels were measured in plasma, serum and brain of selected rats. Whereas plasma and serum BDNF levels were not changed by stroke, stroke induced an increase in brain BDNF levels at 4 h and 24 h post-embolization, which was not correlated with stroke severity. Individual plasma BDNF levels did not correlate with brain levels at any time point after stroke but a positive correlation (r = 0.67 was observed between individual plasma BDNF levels and stroke severity at 4 h post-embolization. CONCLUSION: Circulating BDNF levels do not mirror brain BDNF levels after stroke, and severe stroke is associated with high plasma BDNF in the very acute stage.

  15. Brain receptors for thyrotropin releasing hormone in morphine tolerant-dependent rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhargava, H.N.; Das, S.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of chronic treatment of rats with morphine and its subsequent withdrawal on the brain receptors for thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) labeled with /sup 3/H-(3MeHis/sup 2/)TRH (MeTRH). Male Sprague Dawley rats were implanted with 4 morphine pellets (each containing 75 mg morphine base) during a 3-day period. Placebo pellet implanted rats served as controls. Both tolerance to and dependence on morphine developed as a result of this procedure. For characterization of brain TRH receptors, the animals were sacrificed 72 h after the implantation of first pellet. In another set of animals the pellets were removed and were sacrificed 24 h later. The binding of /sup 3/H-MeTRH to membranes prepared from brain without the cerebellum was determined. /sup 3/H-MeTRH bound to brain membranes prepared from placebo pellet implanted rats at a single high affinity site with a B/sub max/ value of 33.50 +/- 0.97 fmol/mg protein and a K/sub d/ of 5.18 +/- 0.21 nM. Implantation of morphine pellets did not alter the B/sub max/ value of /sup 3/H-MeTRH but decreased the K/sub d/ value significantly. Abrupt or naloxone precipitated withdrawal of morphine did not alter B/sub max/ or the K/sub d/ values. The binding of /sup 3/H-MeTRH to brain areas was also determined. The results suggest that the development of tolerance to morphine is associated with enhanced sensitivity of brain TRH receptors, however abrupt withdrawal of morphine does not change the characteristics of brain TRH receptors.

  16. Aqueous Date Fruit Efficiency as Preventing Traumatic Brain Deterioration and Improving Pathological Parameters after Traumatic Brain Injury in Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamze Badeli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Following traumatic brain injury, disruption of blood-brain-barrier and consequent brain edema are critical events which might lead to increasing intracranial pressure (ICP, and nerve damage. The current study assessed the effects of aqueous date fruit extract (ADFE on the aforementioned parameters. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, diffused traumatic brain injury (TBI was generated in adult male rats using Marmarou’s method. Experimental groups include two pre-treatment (oral ADFE, 4 and 8 mL/kg for 14 days, vehicle (distilled water, for 14 days and sham groups. Brain edema and neuronal injury were measured 72 hours after TBI. Veterinary coma scale (VCS and ICP were determined at -1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 hours after TBI. Differences among multiple groups were assessed using ANOVA. Turkey’s test was employed for the ANOVA post-hoc analysis. The criterion of statistical significance was sign at P<0.05. Results: Brain water content in ADFE-treated groups was decreased in comparison with the TBI+vehicle group. VCS at 24, 48 and 72 hours after TBI showed a significant increase in ADFE groups in comparison with the TBI+vehicle group. ICP at 24, 48 and 72 hours after TBI, was decreased in ADFE groups, compared to the TBI+vehicle. Brain edema, ICP and neuronal injury were also decreased in ADFE group, but VCS was increased following on TBI. Conclusion: ADFE pre-treatment demonstrated an efficient method for preventing traumatic brain deterioration and improving pathological parameters after TBI.

  17. Paradoxical effects of brain death and associated trauma on rat mesenteric microcirculation: an intravital microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Simas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Experimental findings support clinical evidence that brain death impairs the viability of organs for transplantation, triggering hemodynamic, hormonal, and inflammatory responses. However, several of these events could be consequences of brain death-associated trauma. This study investigated microcirculatory alterations and systemic inflammatory markers in brain-dead rats and the influence of the associated trauma. METHOD: Brain death was induced using intracranial balloon inflation; sham-operated rats were trepanned only. After 30 or 180 min, the mesenteric microcirculation was observed using intravital microscopy. The expression of Pselectin and ICAM-1 on the endothelium was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. The serum cytokine, chemokine, and corticosterone levels were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. White blood cell counts were also determined. RESULTS: Brain death resulted in a decrease in the mesenteric perfusion to 30%, a 2.6-fold increase in the expression of ICAM-1 and leukocyte migration at the mesentery, a 70% reduction in the serum corticosterone level and pronounced leukopenia. Similar increases in the cytokine and chemokine levels were seen in the both the experimental and control animals. CONCLUSION: The data presented in this study suggest that brain death itself induces hypoperfusion in the mesenteric microcirculation that is associated with a pronounced reduction in the endogenous corticosterone level, thereby leading to increased local inflammation and organ dysfunction. These events are paradoxically associated with induced leukopenia after brain damage

  18. Phospholipase A2 changes and its significance on brain tissue of rat in severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Xuan; Chen Xi; Ji Zongzheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective To survey changes and the significance of phospholipase A2(PLA2) on brain tissue of SD rat in acute pancreatitis. Methods With retrograde injection of 3% taurocholate sodium into pancreatic and biliary duct, rat model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) was made,and it included four groups: the control group, the sham-operation group, the SAP group and the PLA2 inhibitor-treated group of SAP. Serum amylases, PLA2 and PLA2 in brain tissue were measured and the brain tissue changes were observed. Results There were no significant difference in serum amylases, PLA2 and PLA2 in brain tissue between the sham-operation and the control groups; the levels of serum amylases, PLA2 and PLA2 in brain tissue in the SAP group were higher than those in the control. In the SAP group expansion and hemorrhage of meninges, intracephalic arteriolar hyperemia, in meninges and cephalic-parenchyma infiltration of inflammatory cells and interval broaden were observed, significant differences were found between two groups.Compared with the SAP group, the level of serum amylase, PLA2 and PLA2 in brain tissue were reduced significantly in the treatment group of SAP. Pathological damages in the treatment group were significantly reduced when compared with the SAP group. Conclusion PLA2 might play an important role in brain tissue damages in severe acute pancreatitis.

  19. The low levels of eicosapentaenoic acid in rat brain phospholipids are maintained via multiple redundant mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuck T; Domenichiello, Anthony F; Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Liu, Zhen; Masoodi, Mojgan; Bazinet, Richard P

    2013-09-01

    Brain eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) levels are 250- to 300-fold lower than docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), at least partly, because EPA is rapidly β-oxidized and lost from brain phospholipids. Therefore, we examined if β-oxidation was necessary for maintaining low EPA levels by inhibiting β-oxidation with methyl palmoxirate (MEP). Furthermore, because other metabolic differences between DHA and EPA may also contribute to their vastly different levels, this study aimed to quantify the incorporation and turnover of DHA and EPA into brain phospholipids. Fifteen-week-old rats were subjected to vehicle or MEP prior to a 5 min intravenous infusion of (14)C-palmitate, (14)C-DHA, or (14)C-EPA. MEP reduced the radioactivity of brain aqueous fractions for (14)C-palmitate-, (14)C-EPA-, and (14)C-DHA-infused rats by 74, 54, and 23%, respectively; while it increased the net rate of incorporation of plasma unesterified palmitate into choline glycerophospholipids and phosphatidylinositol and EPA into ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and phosphatidylserine. MEP also increased the synthesis of n-3 docosapentaenoic acid (n-3 DPA) from EPA. Moreover, the recycling of EPA into brain phospholipids was 154-fold lower than DHA. Therefore, the low levels of EPA in the brain are maintained by multiple redundant pathways including β-oxidation, decreased incorporation from plasma unesterified FA pool, elongation/desaturation to n-3 DPA, and lower recycling within brain phospholipids.

  20. 65zinc uptake from blood into brain and other tissues in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pullen, R.G.; Franklin, P.A.; Hall, G.H. (Sunderland Polytechnic, Tyne Wear (England))

    1990-10-01

    Zinc is essential for normal growth, development and brain function although little is known about brain zinc homeostasis. Therefore, in this investigation we have studied 65Zn uptake from blood into brain and other tissues and have measured the blood-brain barrier permeability to 65Zn in the anaesthetized rat in vivo. Adult male Wistar rats within the weight range 500-600 g were used. 65ZnCl2 and (125I)albumin, the latter serving as a vascular marker, were injected in a bolus of normal saline I.V. Sequential arterial blood samples were taken during experiments that lasted between 5 min and 5 hr. At termination, samples from the liver, spleen, pancreas, lung, heart, muscle, kidney, bone, testis, ileum, blood cells, csf, and whole brain were taken and analysed for radio-isotope activity. Data have been analysed by Graphical Analysis which suggests 65Zn uptake from blood by all tissues sampled was unidirectional during this experimental period except brain, where at circulation times less than 30 min, 65Zn fluxes were bidirectional. In addition to the blood space, the brain appears to contain a rapidly exchanging compartment(s) for 65Zn of about 4 ml/100g which is not csf.

  1. L-DEPRENYL REDUCES BRAIN-DAMAGE IN RATS EXPOSED TO TRANSIENT HYPOXIA-ISCHEMIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KNOLLEMA, S; AUKEMA, W; HOM, H; KORF, J; TERHORST, GJ

    1995-01-01

    Background and Purpose L-Deprenyl (Selegiline) protects animal brains against toxic substances such as 1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and 6-hydroxydopamine. Experiments were conducted to test whether L-deprenyl prevents or reduces cerebral damage in a transient hypoxia/ischemia rat model. Metho

  2. Brain-specific modulation of kynurenic acid synthesis in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, J B; Hodgkins, P S; Rassoulpour, A;

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate modulatory mechanisms that control the synthesis of the neuroprotective endogenous excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist kynurenate. De novo kynurenate formation was examined in vitro using tissue slices from rat brain, liver, and kidney. In slices from ...

  3. Effect of chronic exposure to aspartame on oxidative stress in the brain of albino rats

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok Iyyaswamy; Sheeladevi Rathinasamy

    2012-09-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the chronic effect of the artificial sweetener aspartame on oxidative stress in brain regions of Wistar strain albino rats. Many controversial reports are available on the use of aspartame as it releases methanol as one of its metabolite during metabolism. The present study proposed to investigate whether chronic aspartame (75 mg/kg) administration could release methanol and induce oxidative stress in the rat brain. To mimic the human methanol metabolism, methotrexate (MTX)-treated rats were included to study the aspartame effects. Wistar strain male albino rats were administered with aspartame orally and studied along with controls and MTX-treated controls. The blood methanol level was estimated, the animal was sacrificed and the free radical changes were observed in brain discrete regions by assessing the scavenging enzymes, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein thiol levels. It was observed that there was a significant increase in LPO levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, GPx levels and CAT activity with a significant decrease in GSH and protein thiol. Moreover, the increases in some of these enzymes were region specific. Chronic exposure of aspartame resulted in detectable methanol in blood. Methanol per se and its metabolites may be responsible for the generation of oxidative stress in brain regions.

  4. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and different ATPases by a novel phosphorothionate (RPR-II) in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M F; Siddiqui, M K; Jamil, K

    2000-10-01

    A novel phosphorothionate (2-butenoic acid-3-(diethoxy phosphinothioyl)-methyl ester (RPR-II), synthesized at the Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad, targets its effect on rat brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and Na(+)-K(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+) ATPases, as evident in this investigation. Three subchronic doses 0.014 (low), 0.028 (medium), and 0.042 (high) mg kg(-1) were administered to rats daily for a period of 90 days RPR-II caused statistically significant dose- and time-dependent inhibition in brain AChE and also in Na(+)-K(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+) ATPases in both male and female rats after 45 and 90 days of treatment. The low dose was generally insignificant while the medium and high doses were significantly effective. Females were more susceptible than males with regard to brain AChE, Na(+)-K(+), and Mg(2+) ATPases, which indicates sexual dimorphism in the treated rats. Interestingly, after 28 days post-treatment, recovery of these enzymes was observed. The relative sensitivities of these enzymes indicated that brain AChE was more sensitive than any of the ATPases, but among the ATPases Na(+)-K(+) ATPase was more susceptible than Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) ATPases. This compound, besides inhibiting the target of organophosphates, AChE, also inhibited different ATPases, suggesting both synaptic transmission and nerve conduction were affected.

  5. Differential distribution of calcineurin Aα isoenzyme mRNA's in rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttini, M.; Limonta, S.; Luyten, M.; Boddeke, H.

    1993-01-01

    Specific antisense oligonucleotide probes for the α isoforms of the catalytic subunit (A-subunit) of calcineurin were prepared and the distribution of Aα1 and Aα2 mRNA's has been studied in rat brain using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Clear regional differences have been observed for the Aα

  6. Local oxytocin expression and oxytocin receptor binding in the male rat brain is associated with aggressiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calcagnoli, Federica; de Boer, Sietse F.; Beiderbeck, Daniela I.; Althaus, Monika; Koolhaas, Jaap M.; Neumann, Inga D.

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated in male wild-type Groningen rats that enhancing brain oxytocin (OXT) levels acutely produces marked pro-social explorative and anti-aggressive effects. Moreover, these pharmacologically-induced changes are moderated by the individual's aggressive phenotype, suggesting an inv

  7. Effect of chronic exposure to aspartame on oxidative stress in the brain of albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyyaswamy, Ashok; Rathinasamy, Sheeladevi

    2012-09-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the chronic effect of the artificial sweetener aspartame on oxidative stress in brain regions of Wistar strain albino rats. Many controversial reports are available on the use of aspartame as it releases methanol as one of its metabolite during metabolism. The present study proposed to investigate whether chronic aspartame (75 mg/kg) administration could release methanol and induce oxidative stress in the rat brain. To mimic the human methanol metabolism, methotrexate (MTX)-treated rats were included to study the aspartame effects. Wistar strain male albino rats were administered with aspartame orally and studied along with controls and MTX-treated controls. The blood methanol level was estimated, the animal was sacrificed and the free radical changes were observed in brain discrete regions by assessing the scavenging enzymes, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein thiol levels. It was observed that there was a significant increase in LPO levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, GPx levels and CAT activity with a significant decrease in GSH and protein thiol. Moreover, the increases in some of these enzymes were region specific. Chronic exposure of aspartame resulted in detectable methanol in blood. Methanol per se and its metabolites may be responsible for the generation of oxidative stress in brain regions.

  8. Inositol trisphosphate and thapsigargin discriminate endoplasmic reticulum stores of calcium in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verma, A; Hirsch, D J; Hanley, M R

    1990-01-01

    ATP dependent Ca2+ accumulation into oxalate-loaded rat brain microsomes is potently inhibited by thapsigargin with an IC50 of 2 nM and maximal inhibition at 10 nM. Approximately 15% of the total A23187-releasable microsomal calcium store is insensitive to thapsigargin concentrations up to 100 mi...

  9. Brain SERT Expression of Male Rats Is Reduced by Aging and Increased by Testosterone Restitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Jaime Herrera-Pérez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In preclinical and clinical studies aging has been associated with a deteriorated response to antidepressant treatment. We hypothesize that such impairment is explained by an age-related decrease in brain serotonin transporter (SERT expression associated with low testosterone (T levels. The objectives of this study were to establish (1 if brain SERT expression is reduced by aging and (2 if the SERT expression in middle-aged rats is increased by T-restitution. Intact young rats (3–5 months and gonad-intact middle-aged rats with or without T-restitution were used. The identification of the brain SERT expression was done by immunofluorescence in prefrontal cortex, lateral septum, hippocampus, and raphe nuclei. An age-dependent reduction of SERT expression was observed in all brain regions examined, while T-restitution recovered the SERT expression only in the dorsal raphe of middle-aged rats. This last action seems relevant since dorsal raphe plays an important role in the antidepressant action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. All data suggest that this mechanism accounts for the T-replacement usefulness to improve the response to antidepressants in the aged population.

  10. The Physiochemistry of Capped Nanosilver Predicts Its Biological Activity in Rat Brain Endothelial Cells (REBEC4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The “capping” or coating of nanosilver (nanoAg) extends its potency by limiting its oxidation and aggregation and stabilizing its size and shape. The ability of such coated nanoAg to alter the permeability and activate oxidative stress pathways in rat brain endothelia...

  11. Dragon's blood may have radioprotective effects in radiation-induced rat brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Nian; Li, Yu-Juan; Li, Xu; Wang, Xiao; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiao; Dai, Rong-Ji; Meng, Wei-Wei; Wang, Hai-Long; Ma, Hong; Schläppi, Michael; Deng, Yu-Lin

    2012-07-01

    Dragon's blood is a bright red resin obtained from Dracaena cochinchinensis. It is a traditional medicinal that is used for wound healing and to stop bleeding. Its main biological activity appears to be from phenolic compounds found in Dragon's blood. In this study, the radioprotective effects of Dragon's blood were examined after whole brain irradiation of rats with either 100 MeV/u Carbon (12)C(6+) heavy ions or (60)Co γ-rays. The amounts of radiation-induced oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines and apoptosis in irradiated rat brains were compared with and without Dragon's blood treatment. Compared to the "irradiation only" control group, the Dragon's blood treatment group significantly decreased malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide levels, and increased superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels induced by oxidative stress in radiation exposed rats (P Dragon's blood also significantly reduced radiation-induced inflammatory cytokines of tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ and interleukin-6 levels (P Dragon's blood significantly increased expression of brain-derived neurophic factor and inhibited the expression of pro-apoptotic caspase 3 (P Dragon's blood significantly inhibited expression of the AP-1 transcription factor family members c-fos and c-jun proteins (P Dragon's blood has radioprotective properties in rat brains after both heavy ions and (60)Co γ-ray exposure.

  12. Regional localization of halopemide, a new psychotropic agent, in the rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loonen, A.J.M.; Van Wijngaarden, I.; Janssen, P.A.J.; Soudijn, W.

    1978-01-01

    Halopemide is a new psychotropic agent, structurally related to the neuroleptics of the butyrophenone type, but with a different pharmacological and clinical profile. The concentration of halopemide in the rat brain is about 10 times less than that of R 29800, its chemical congener and of spiperone,

  13. Steroid Anti-Inflammatory Effects Did Not Improve Organ Quality in Brain-Dead Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebolledo, Rolando A.; Liu, Bo; Akhtar, Mohammed Z.; Ottens, Petra J.; Zhang, Jian-ning; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.

    2015-01-01

    Effect of glucocorticoid administration on improving the outcomes of kidney and liver allografts has not been clearly elucidated. This study investigated the effect of prednisolone administration after onset of brain death (BD) on kidney and liver in a controlled rat model of BD. BD was induced in

  14. Age dependent accumulation of N-acyl-ethanolamine phospholipids in ischemic rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, B.; Petersen, G.; Hansen, Harald S.;

    2000-01-01

    of various age (1, 6, 12, 19, 30, and ~70 days) by the use of P NMR spectroscopy of lipid extracts. This ability to accumulate NAPE was compared with the activity of N-acyltransferase and of NAPE-hydrolyzing phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) in brain microsomes. These two enzymes are involved in the formation...... and degradation of NAPE, respectively. The results showed that 1) the ability to accumulate NAPE during post-decapitative ischemia is especially high in the youngest rats and is markedly reduced in older brains [in 1-day-old rat brains NAPE accumulated to 1.5% of total phospholipids, while in 30-day-old rat......N-acyl-ethanolamine phospholipids (NAPE) can be formed as a stress response during neuronal injury, and they are precursors for N-acyl- ethanolamines (NAE), some of which are endocannabinoids. The levels of NAPE accumulated during post-decapitative ischemia (6 h at 37°C) were studied in rat brains...

  15. Metabolic, gastrointestinal, and CNS neuropeptide effects of brain leptin administration in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, G; Seeley, RJ; Thiele, TE; Friedman, MI; Ji, H; Wilkinson, CW; Burn, P; Campfield, LA; Tenenbaum, R; Baskin, DG; Woods, SC; Schwartz, MW; Seeley, Randy J.; Thiele, Todd E.; Friedman, Mark I.; Wilkinson, Charles W.; Baskin, Denis G.; Woods, Stephen C.; Schwartz, Michael W.

    To investigate whether brain leptin involves neuropeptidergic pathways influencing ingestion, metabolism, and gastrointestinal functioning, leptin (3.5 mu g) was infused daily into the third cerebral ventricular of rats for 3 days. To distinguish between direct leptin effects and those secondary to

  16. The rate of training response to aerobic exercise affects brain function of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Orsolya; Koltai, Erika; Takeda, Masaki; Mimura, Tatsuya; Pajk, Melitta; Abraham, Dora; Koch, Lauren Gerard; Britton, Steven L; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Boldogh, Istvan; Radak, Zsolt

    2016-10-01

    There is an increasing volume of data connecting capacity to respond to exercise training with quality of life and aging. In this study, we used a rat model in which animals were selectively bred for low and high gain in running distance to test t whether genetic segregation for trainability is associated with brain function and signaling processes in the hippocampus. Rats selected for low response (LRT) and high response training (HRT) were randomly divided into control or exercise group that trained five times a week for 30 min per day for three months at 70% VO2max. All four groups had similar running distance before training. With training, HRT rats showed significantly greater increases in VO2max and running distance than LRT rats (p brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), ratio of phospho and total cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), and apoptotic index, also showed significant differences between LRT and HRT groups. These findings suggest that aerobic training responses are not localized to skeletal muscle, but differently involve signaling processes in the brain of LRT and HRT rats.

  17. The influence of microwave radiation from cellular phone on fetal rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Ji; Yuhua, Zhang; Xiao-qian, Yang; Rongping, Jiang; Dong-mei, Guo; Xi, Cui

    2012-03-01

    The increasing use of cellular phones in our society has brought focus on the potential detrimental effects to human health by microwave radiation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the intensity of oxidative stress and the level of neurotransmitters in the brains of fetal rats chronically exposed to cellular phones. The experiment was performed on pregnant rats exposed to different intensities of microwave radiation from cellular phones. Thirty-two pregnant rats were randomly divided into four groups: CG, GL, GM, and GH. CG accepted no microwave radiation, GL group radiated 10 min each time, GM group radiated 30 min, and GH group radiated 60 min. The 3 experimental groups were radiated 3 times a day from the first pregnant day for consecutively 20 days, and on the 21st day, the fetal rats were taken and then the contents of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), malondialdehyde (MDA), noradrenaline (NE), dopamine (DA), and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HT) in the brain were assayed. Compared with CG, there were significant differences (Pcellular phones during pregnancy has certain harm on fetal rat brains.

  18. Acute effect of aspartame-induced oxidative stress in Wistar albino rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Iyaswamy; Sheeladevi, Rathinasamy; Wankhar, Dapkupar

    2015-09-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the acute effect of aspartame on oxidative stress in the Wistar albino rat brain. We sought to investigate whether acute administration of aspartame (75 mg/kg) could release methanol and induce oxidative stress in the rat brain 24 hours after administration. To mimic human methanol metabolism, methotrexate treated rats were used to study aspartame effects. Wistar strain male albino rats were administered with aspartame orally as a single dose and studied along with controls and methotrexate treated controls. Blood methanol and formate level were estimated after 24 hours and rats were sacrificed and free radical changes were observed in discrete regions by assessing the scavenging enzymes, reduce dglutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation and protein thiol levels. There was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation levels, superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), glutathione peroxidase levels (GPx), and catalase activity (CAT) with a significant decrease in GSH and protein thiol. Aspartame exposure resulted in detectable methanol even after 24 hours. Methanol and its metabolites may be responsible for the generation of oxidative stress in brain regions. The observed alteration in aspartame fed animals may be due to its metabolite methanol and elevated formate. The elevated free radicals due to methanol induced oxidative stress.

  19. Estrogen inhibits lipid peroxidation after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Zhu; Xiao Han; Dafeng Ji; Guangming Lv; Meiyu Xu

    2012-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley neonatal rats within 7 days after birth were used in this study. The left common carotid artery was occluded and rats were housed in an 8% O2 environment for 2 hours to establish a hypoxic-ischemic brain damage model. 17β-estradiol (1 × 10-5 M) was injected into the rat abdominal cavity after the model was successfully established. The left hemisphere was obtained at 12, 24, 48, 72 hours after operation. Results showed that malondialdehyde content in the left brain of neonatal rats gradually increased as modeling time prolonged, while malondialdehyde content of 17β-estrodial-treated rats significantly declined by 24 hours, reached lowest levels at 48 hours, and then peaked at 72 hours after injury. Nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate histochemical staining showed the nitric oxide synthase-positive cells and fibers dyed blue/violet and were mainly distributed in the cortex, hippocampus and medial septal nuclei. The number of nitric oxide synthase-positive cells peaked at 48 hours and significantly decreased after 17β-estrodial treatment. Our experimental findings indicate that estrogen plays a protective role following hypoxic-ischemic brain damage by alleviating lipid peroxidation through reducing the expression of nitric oxide synthase and the content of malondialdehyde.

  20. Increased CD133+ cell infiltration in the rat brain following fluid percussion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Wei; Ziwei Zhou; Shenghui Li; Chengwei Jing; Dashi Zhi; Jianning Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The prominin-1/CD133 epitope is expressed in undifferentiated cells. Studies have reported that craniocerebral trauma in animal models of fluid percussion injury induces production of a specific stem cell subgroup. It has been hypothesized that fluid percussion injury induces CD133+ cell infiltration in the brain tissue. The present study established a traumatic brain injury model through fluid percussion injury. Immunohistochemical staining showed significantly increased CD133 antigen expression in the rat brain following injury. CD133+ cells were mainly distributed in hippocampal CA1-3 regions, as well as the dentate gyrus and hilus, of the lesioned hemisphere. Occasional cells were also detected in the cortex. In addition, reverse transcription-PCR revealed that no change in CD133 mRNA expression in injured brain tissue. These results suggested that fluid percussion injury induced CD133 antigen expression in the brain tissues as a result of conformational epitope changes, but not transcriptional expression.

  1. Age-dependent pharmacokinetics and effect of roscovitine on Cdk5 and Erk1/2 in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Hatem; Jimenez, Patricia; Song, Hairong; Vita, Marina; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel; Hassan, Moustapha

    2008-07-01

    Roscovitine is a cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) and signal-regulated kinase (Erk1/2) inhibitor that has been shown to be effective against several cancer types including brain tumors. We have shown previously that roscovitine crosses the blood brain barrier (BBB) and is rapidly eliminated from both plasma and brain in adult rats. However, age-dependent kinetics and its effects on the brain have not been reported. In the present study, we investigated the pharmacokinetics of roscovitine in adult and in 14 days old rats after the administration of a single dose of 25 mg/kg. Moreover, we studied the effect of the drug on Cdk5 and Erk1/2 activities in three brain regions, hippocampus, frontal cortex and cerebellum. The pharmacokinetics of roscovitine followed a two-compartment model in both plasma and brain in both adult and young rats. The terminal elimination half-life was 7 h in brain as well as in plasma in rat pups compared to Roscovitine induced a significant Cdk5 inhibition and significant Erk1/2 activation in all studied pups brain regions at 2 h. This is the first study describing age-dependent pharmacokinetics of roscovitine and showing the high brain exposure of infant rats to the drug. Thus, roscovitine may be a promising candidate for the treatment of brain tumors in children.

  2. Transcriptome sequencing of gene expression in the brain of the HIV-1 transgenic rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming D Li

    Full Text Available The noninfectious HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg rat was developed as a model of AIDs-related pathology and immune dysfunction by manipulation of a noninfectious HIV-1(gag-pol virus with a deleted 3-kb SphI-MscI fragment containing the 3' -region of gag and the 5' region of pol into F344 rats. Our previous studies revealed significant behavioral differences between HIV-1Tg and F344 control rats in their performance in the Morris water maze and responses to psychostimulants. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these behavioral differences remain largely unknown. The primary goal of this study was to identify differentially expressed genes and enriched pathways affected by the gag-pol-deleted HIV-1 genome. Using RNA deep sequencing, we sequenced RNA transcripts in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of HIV-1Tg and F344 rats. A total of 72 RNA samples were analyzed (i.e., 12 animals per group × 2 strains × 3 brain regions. Following deep-sequencing analysis of 50-bp paired-end reads of RNA-Seq, we used Bowtie/Tophat/Cufflinks suites to align these reads into transcripts based on the Rn4 rat reference genome and to measure the relative abundance of each transcript. Statistical analyses on each brain region in the two strains revealed that immune response- and neurotransmission-related pathways were altered in the HIV-1Tg rats, with brain region differences. Other neuronal survival-related pathways, including those encoding myelin proteins, growth factors, and translation regulators, were altered in the HIV-1Tg rats in a brain region-dependent manner. This study is the first deep-sequencing analysis of RNA transcripts associated the HIV-1Tg rat. Considering the functions of the pathways and brain regions examined in this study, our findings of abnormal gene expression patterns in HIV-1Tg rats suggest mechanisms underlying the deficits in learning and memory and vulnerability to drug addiction and other psychiatric disorders

  3. Brain of rats intoxicated with acrylamide: observation with 4.7 tesla magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Y; Matsumura, H; Igisu, H; Yokota, A

    2000-10-01

    When rats were injected intraperitoneally with acrylamide (50 mg/kg per day) for 8 days, all animals developed ataxia and weakness in the hindlimbs. On examining their brain with an ultrahigh-field (4.7 T) magnetic resonance (MR) spectrometer, the lateral ventricles on both sides and the third ventricle were dilated. The aqueduct and cisterns were also enlarged. The size of the cerebral cortex was quantified in three MR image slices covering the cerebrum. Compared with the images of the brain of body weight-matched controls, the cerebral cortex of rats intoxicated with acrylamide was found to be smaller in the primary motor area in all slices, and in the primary or secondary sensory area in two slices. Taken together with previous enzymatic analyses, rats intoxicated with acrylamide (50 mg/kg per day for 8 days) seem to represent an animal model of acrylamide encephalopathy not only biochemically but also structurally.

  4. Effects of Nonylphenol on Brain Gene Expression Profiles in F1 Generation Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN-YIN XIA; PING ZHANG; YANG WANG

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of nonylphenol on brain gene expression profiles in F1 generation rats by microarray technique.Methods mRNA was extracted from the brain of 2-day old F1 generation male rats Whose F0 female generation was either exposed to nonylphenol or free from nonylphenol exposure,and then it was reversely transcribed to cDNA hbeled with cy5 and cy3 fluorescence.Subsequently,cDNA probes were hybridized to two BiostarR-40S cDNA gene chips and fluorescent signals of cy5 and cy3 were scanned and analyzed. Results Two genes were differentially down-regulated.Conclusion Nonylphenol may disturb the neurcendocrine function of male rats when administered perinatally.

  5. Fluid-percussion–induced traumatic brain injury model in rats

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Various attempts have been made to replicate clinical TBI using animal models. The fluid-percussion model (FP) is one of the oldest and most commonly used models of experimentally induced TBI. Both central (CFP) and lateral (LFP) variations of the model have been used. Developed initially for use in larger species, the standard FP device was adapted more than 20 years ago to induce consistent degrees of brain injury in ...

  6. Differential metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal in liver, lung and brain of mice and rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ruijin; Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Mishin, Vladimir [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University-Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Richardson, Jason R. [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers University-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Science, School of Health Sciences and Practice, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University-Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers University-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The lipid peroxidation end-product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is generated in tissues during oxidative stress. As a reactive aldehyde, it forms Michael adducts with nucleophiles, a process that disrupts cellular functioning. Liver, lung and brain are highly sensitive to xenobiotic-induced oxidative stress and readily generate 4-HNE. In the present studies, we compared 4-HNE metabolism in these tissues, a process that protects against tissue injury. 4-HNE was degraded slowly in total homogenates and S9 fractions of mouse liver, lung and brain. In liver, but not lung or brain, NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H markedly stimulated 4-HNE metabolism. Similar results were observed in rat S9 fractions from these tissues. In liver, lung and brain S9 fractions, 4-HNE formed protein adducts. When NADH was used to stimulate 4-HNE metabolism, the formation of protein adducts was suppressed in liver, but not lung or brain. In both mouse and rat tissues, 4-HNE was also metabolized by glutathione S-transferases. The greatest activity was noted in livers of mice and in lungs of rats; relatively low glutathione S-transferase activity was detected in brain. In mouse hepatocytes, 4-HNE was rapidly taken up and metabolized. Simultaneously, 4-HNE-protein adducts were formed, suggesting that 4-HNE metabolism in intact cells does not prevent protein modifications. These data demonstrate that, in contrast to liver, lung and brain have a limited capacity to metabolize 4-HNE. The persistence of 4-HNE in these tissues may increase the likelihood of tissue injury during oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Lipid peroxidation generates 4-hydroxynonenal, a highly reactive aldehyde. • Rodent liver, but not lung or brain, is efficient in degrading 4-hydroxynonenal. • 4-hydroxynonenal persists in tissues with low metabolism, causing tissue damage.

  7. Safety evaluation of mercury based Ayurvedic formulation (Sidh Makardhwaj) on brain cerebrum, liver & kidney in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gajendra; Srivastava, Amita; Sharma, Surinder Kumar; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Sidh Makardhwaj (SM) is a mercury based Ayurvedic formulation used in rheumatoid arthritis and neurological disorders. However, toxicity concerns due to mercury content are often raised. Therefore, the present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of SM on brain cerebrum, liver and kidney in rats. Graded doses of SM (10, 50, 100 mg/kg), mercuric chloride (1 mg/kg) and normal saline were administered orally to male Wistar rats for 28 days. Behavioural parameters were assessed on days 1, 7, 14 and 28 using Morris water maze, passive avoidance, elevated plus maze and rota rod. Liver and kidney function tests were done on day 28. Animals were sacrificed and brain cerebrum acetylcholinesterase activity, levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH) in brain cerebrum, liver, kidney were estimated. The levels of mercury in brain cerebrum, liver and kidney were estimated and histopathology of these tissues was also performed. SM in the doses used did not cause significant change in neurobehavioural parameters, brain cerebrum AChE activity, liver (ALT, AST, ALP bilirubin) and kidney (serum urea and creatinine) function tests as compared to control. The levels of mercury in brain cerebrum, liver, and kidney were found to be raised in dose dependent manner. However, the levels of MDA and GSH in these tissues did not show significant changes at doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg. Also, there was no histopathological change in cytoarchitecture of brain cerebrum, liver, and kidney tissues at doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg. The findings of the present study suggest that Sidh Makardhwaj upto five times the equivalent human dose administered for 28 days did not show any toxicological effects on rat brain cerebrum, liver and kidney.

  8. Safety evaluation of mercury based Ayurvedic formulation (Sidh Makardhwaj on brain cerebrum, liver & kidney in rats

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    Gajendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Sidh Makardhwaj (SM is a mercury based Ayurvedic formulation used in rheumatoid arthritis and neurological disorders. However, toxicity concerns due to mercury content are often raised. Therefore, the present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of SM on brain cerebrum, liver and kidney in rats. Methods: Graded doses of SM (10, 50, 100 mg/kg, mercuric chloride (1 mg/kg and normal saline were administered orally to male Wistar rats for 28 days. Behavioural parameters were assessed on days 1, 7, 14 and 28 using Morris water maze, passive avoidance, elevated plus maze and rota rod. Liver and kidney function tests were done on day 28. Animals were sacrificed and brain cerebrum acetylcholinesterase activity, levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, reduced glutathione (GSH in brain cerebrum, liver, kidney were estimated. The levels of mercury in brain cerebrum, liver and kidney were estimated and histopathology of these tissues was also performed. Results: SM in the doses used did not cause significant change in neurobehavioural parameters, brain cerebrum AChE activity, liver (ALT, AST, ALP bilirubin and kidney (serum urea and creatinine function tests as compared to control. The levels of mercury in brain cerebrum, liver, and kidney were found to be raised in dose dependent manner. However, the levels of MDA and GSH in these tissues did not show significant changes at doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg. Also, there was no histopathological change in cytoarchitecture of brain cerebrum, liver, and kidney tissues at doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg. Interpretation & conclusions: The findings of the present study suggest that Sidh Makardhwaj upto five times the equivalent human dose administered for 28 days did not show any toxicological effects on rat brain cerebrum, liver and kidney.

  9. A Metabolomic Approach to Clarifying the Effect of AST-120 on 5/6 Nephrectomized Rats by Capillary Electrophoresis with Mass Spectrometry (CE-MS

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    Takaaki Abe

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The oral adsorbent AST-120 is composed of spherical carbon particles and has an adsorption ability for certain small-molecular-weight compounds that accumulate in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. So far, very few compounds are known to be adsorbed by AST-120 in vivo. To examine the effect of AST-120 in vivo, we comprehensively evaluated the plasma concentrations of 146 compounds (61 anions and 85 cations in CKD model rats, with or without four weeks of treatment with AST-120. By capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, we identified 6 anions and 17 cations that were significantly decreased by AST-120 treatment. In contrast, we also identified 2 cations that were significantly increased by AST-120. Among them, 4 anions, apart from indoxyl sulfate and hippurate, and 19 cations were newly identified in this study. The plasma levels of N-acetyl-neuraminate, 4-pyridoxate, 4-oxopentanoate, glycine, γ-guanidinobutyrate, N-γ-ethylglutamine, allantoin, cytosine, 5-methylcytosine and imidazole-4-acetate were significantly increased in the CKD model compared with the sham-operated group, and were significantly decreased by AST-120 treatment. Therefore, these 10 compounds could be added as uremic compounds that indicate the effect of AST-120 treatment. This study provides useful information not only for identifying the indicators of AST-120, but also for clarifying changes in the metabolic profile by AST-120 treatment in the clinical setting.

  10. A metabolomic approach to clarifying the effect of AST-120 on 5/6 nephrectomized rats by capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry (CE-MS).

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    Akiyama, Yasutoshi; Takeuchi, Yoichi; Kikuchi, Koichi; Mishima, Eikan; Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Chitose; Toyohara, Takafumi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Hozawa, Atsushi; Ito, Sadayoshi; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Abe, Takaaki

    2012-11-14

    The oral adsorbent AST-120 is composed of spherical carbon particles and has an adsorption ability for certain small-molecular-weight compounds that accumulate in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). So far, very few compounds are known to be adsorbed by AST-120 in vivo. To examine the effect of AST-120 in vivo, we comprehensively evaluated the plasma concentrations of 146 compounds (61 anions and 85 cations) in CKD model rats, with or without four weeks of treatment with AST-120. By capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, we identified 6 anions and 17 cations that were significantly decreased by AST-120 treatment. In contrast, we also identified 2 cations that were significantly increased by AST-120. Among them, 4 anions, apart from indoxyl sulfate and hippurate, and 19 cations were newly identified in this study. The plasma levels of N-acetyl-neuraminate, 4-pyridoxate, 4-oxopentanoate, glycine, γ-guanidinobutyrate, N-γ-ethylglutamine, allantoin, cytosine, 5-methylcytosine and imidazole-4-acetate were significantly increased in the CKD model compared with the sham-operated group, and were significantly decreased by AST-120 treatment. Therefore, these 10 compounds could be added as uremic compounds that indicate the effect of AST-120 treatment. This study provides useful information not only for identifying the indicators of AST-120, but also for clarifying changes in the metabolic profile by AST-120 treatment in the clinical setting.

  11. Testosterone replacement attenuates cognitive decline in testosterone-deprived lean rats, but not in obese rats, by mitigating brain oxidative stress.

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    Pintana, Hiranya; Pongkan, Wanpitak; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2015-10-01

    Testosterone replacement improves metabolic parameters and cognitive function in hypogonadism. However, the effects of testosterone therapy on cognition in obese condition with testosterone deprivation have not been investigated. We hypothesized that testosterone replacement improves cognitive function in testosterone-deprived obese rats by restoring brain insulin sensitivity, brain mitochondrial function, and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Thirty male Wistar rats had either a bilateral orchiectomy (ORX: O, n = 24) or a sham operation (S, n = 6). ORX rats were further divided into two groups fed with either a normal diet (NDO) or a high-fat diet (HFO) for 12 weeks. Then, ORX rats in each dietary group were divided into two subgroups (n = 6/subgroup) and were given either castor oil or testosterone (2 mg/kg/day, s.c.) for 4 weeks. At the end of this protocol, cognitive function, metabolic parameters, brain insulin sensitivity, hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and brain mitochondrial function were determined. We found that testosterone replacement increased peripheral insulin sensitivity, decreased circulation and brain oxidative stress levels, and attenuated brain mitochondrial ROS production in HFO rats. However, testosterone failed to restore hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive function in HFO rats. In contrast, in NDO rats, testosterone decreased circulation and brain oxidative stress levels, attenuated brain mitochondrial ROS production, and restored hippocampal synaptic plasticity as well as cognitive function. These findings suggest that testosterone replacement improved peripheral insulin sensitivity and decreased oxidative stress levels, but failed to restore hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive function in testosterone-deprived obese rats. However, it provided beneficial effects in reversing cognitive impairment in testosterone-deprived non-obese rats.

  12. Combination cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells for brain stroke in rats.

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    Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba; Farahmandnia, Mohammad; Razi, Zahra; Delavari, Somayeh; Shakibajahromi, Benafsheh; Sarvestani, Fatemeh Sabet; Kazemi, Sepehr; Semsar, Maryam

    2015-05-01

    Brain stroke is the second most important events that lead to disability and morbidity these days. Although, stroke is important, there is no treatment for curing this problem. Nowadays, cell therapy has opened a new window for treating central nervous system disease. In some previous studies the Mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells. In this study, we have designed an experiment to assess the combination cell therapy (Mesenchymal and Neural stem cells) effects on brain stroke. The Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adult rat bone marrow and the neural stem cells were isolated from ganglion eminence of rat embryo 14 days. The Mesenchymal stem cells were injected 1 day after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and the neural stem cells transplanted 7 day after MCAO. After 28 days, the neurological outcomes and brain lesion volumes were evaluated. Also, the activity of Caspase 3 was assessed in different groups. The group which received combination cell therapy had better neurological examination and less brain lesion. Also the combination cell therapy group had the least Caspase 3 activity among the groups. The combination cell therapy is more effective than Mesenchymal stem cell therapy and neural stem cell therapy separately in treating the brain stroke in rats.

  13. Changes in Rat Brain Tissue Microstructure and Stiffness during the Development of Experimental Obstructive Hydrocephalus.

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    Jugé, Lauriane; Pong, Alice C; Bongers, Andre; Sinkus, Ralph; Bilston, Lynne E; Cheng, Shaokoon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding neural injury in hydrocephalus and how the brain changes during the course of the disease in-vivo remain unclear. This study describes brain deformation, microstructural and mechanical properties changes during obstructive hydrocephalus development in a rat model using multimodal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Hydrocephalus was induced in eight Sprague-Dawley rats (4 weeks old) by injecting a kaolin suspension into the cisterna magna. Six sham-injected rats were used as controls. MR imaging (9.4T, Bruker) was performed 1 day before, and at 3, 7 and 16 days post injection. T2-weighted MR images were collected to quantify brain deformation. MR elastography was used to measure brain stiffness, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was conducted to observe brain tissue microstructure. Results showed that the enlargement of the ventricular system was associated with a decrease in the cortical gray matter thickness and caudate-putamen cross-sectional area (P hydrocephalus development, increased space between the white matter tracts was observed in the CC+PVWM (P hydrocephalus development.

  14. Autoradiographic visualization of insulin-like growth factor-II receptors in rat brain

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    Mendelsohn, L.G.; Kerchner, G.A.; Clemens, J.A.; Smith, M.C.

    1986-03-01

    The documented presence of IGF-II in brain and CSF prompted us to investigate the distribution of receptors for IGF-II in rat brain slices. Human /sup 125/-I-IGF-II (10 pM) was incubated for 16 hrs at 4/sup 0/C with slide-mounted rat brain slices in the absence and presence of unlabeled human IGF-II (67 nM) or human insulin (86 nM). Slides were washed, dried, and exposed to X-ray film for 4-7 days. The results showed dense labeling in the granular layers of the olfactory bulbs, deep layers of the cerebral cortex, pineal gland, anterior pituitary, hippocampus (pyramidal cells CA/sub 1/-CA/sub 2/ and dentate gyrus), and the granule cell layers of the cerebellum. Unlabeled IGF-II eliminated most of the binding of these brain regions while insulin produced only a minimal reduction in the amount of /sup 125/I-IGF-II bound. These results indicate that a specific neural receptor for IGS-II is uniquely distributed in rat brain tissue and supports the notion that this peptide might play an important role in normal neuronal functioning.

  15. Sildenafil Improves Brain Injury Recovery following Term Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia in Male Rat Pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Armin; Khoja, Zehra; Johnstone, Aaron; Dale, Laura; Rampakakis, Emmanouil; Wintermark, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Term asphyxiated newborns remain at risk of developing brain injury despite available neuropreventive therapies such as hypothermia. Neurorestorative treatments may be an alternative. This study investigated the effect of sildenafil on brain injury induced by neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) at term-equivalent age. Neonatal HI was induced in male Long-Evans rat pups at postnatal day 10 (P10) by left common carotid ligation followed by a 2-hour exposure to 8% oxygen; sham-operated rat pups served as the control. Both groups were randomized to oral sildenafil or vehicle twice daily for 7 consecutive days. Gait analysis was performed on P27. At P30, the rats were sacrificed, and their brains were extracted. The surfaces of both hemispheres were measured on hematoxylin and eosin-stained brain sections. Mature neurons and endothelial cells were quantified near the infarct boundary zone using immunohistochemistry. HI caused significant gait impairment and a reduction in the size of the left hemisphere. Treatment with sildenafil led to an improvement in the neurological deficits as measured by gait analysis, as well as an improvement in the size of the left hemisphere. Sildenafil, especially at higher doses, also caused a significant increase in the number of neurons near the infarct boundary zone. In conclusion, sildenafil administered after neonatal HI may improve brain injury recovery by promoting neuronal populations.

  16. Huayu capsule enhances limb-catching capability of rats with experimental open traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyang Zhou; Juan Zhang; Yong Wang; Haibing Qian; Li Gong; Guojun Huang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is hard to cure the open traumatic brain injury (TBI), especially for the brain functional recovery after brain injury. In this regard, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has a wide prospect.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of Huayu capsule on limb-catching capability of rat models of open TBI,and investigate its possible mechanism.DESIGN: Randomized and controlled study.SETTING: Grade 3 Pharmacological Laboratory of TCM, State Administration of TCM, Chengdu University of TCM.MATERIALS: This study was performed from October 2005 to January 2006. Fifty Sprague-Dawley rats of either gender, aged 3 months old, weighing from 190 to 220 g, were involved in this study. Huayu capsule was made and supplied by the Department of TCM Processing of Chengdu University of TCM, Lot No.050121; Xuefuzhuyu oral liquid was manufactured by Jilin Aodong Yanbian Pharmaceutical Industry Co.,Ltd., Lot No. 050406.METHODS: Open right parietal lobe TBI rat models were made as described in references. The involved rat models were randomized into 5 groups according to gender and body mass: model group, high-, middle-,low-dose Huayu capsule groups and Xuefuzhuyu oral liquid group, with 10 rats in each. Rats in the model group were administrated with distilled water of 5 mL/kg; Rats in the high-, middle- and low-dose Huayu capsule groups were administrated with 1.030, 0.515, 0.258 g/kg raw herbs; Rats in the Xuefuzhuyu oral liquid group were administrated with Xuefuzhuyu oral liquid of 5 mL/kg, intragastrically once a day for 7 days successively for all after recovering consciousness from anesthetization. ① One hour after administration on the 6th day, rats in each group were placed on a 100 cm fine straight iron wire paralleling to the ground and 20 cm above the operational table. The time of the rats keeping on the wire was counted and it indicated the nerve-muscle catching capability. The longer the remained time, the better the nerve-muscle catching capability.② Twenty

  17. Uptake and biodistribution of rizatriptan to blood and brain following different routes of administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun; Quan, Li-Hui; Guo, Yi; Liu, Chun-Yu; Liao, Yong-Hong

    2007-06-07

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the biodistribution profiles of rizatriptan in the blood and brain of Wistar rats after peroral, subcutaneous, intranasal and intratracheal administration with a particular view to determining the applicability of inhalation delivery to achieve rapid and high availability of the drug in both blood and the brain. Following the intratracheal administration of the drug (4.0mg/kg) to the rats, the absolute bioavailability was found to be 91.2%, significantly higher than those from intranasal or peroral routes, and T(max) in plasma and brain was attained within 2 min, significantly shorter than the T(max) of intranasal ( approximately 10 min in both plasma and brain), subcutaneous (16.7 min in plasma and 22.5 min in brain) and peroral (30.0 min in plasma and 45.0 min in brain) administration. In addition, other pharmacokinetic parameters associated with rapid onset of action including AUC(plasma/brain) and C(max), of intratracheal instillated rizatriptan appeared also to be comparable or superior to those of other delivered routes. Although AUC(brain)/AUC(plasma) ratios after intranasal delivery (43.4%) differed significantly from the ratios shown after intratracheal instillation (23.2%), the AUC(brain 0-120 min) via the latter routes was slightly but not significantly higher than that from the former routes. The results in the present study indicated that pulmonary delivery of rizatriptan may achieve maximum plasma and brain concentrations significantly more rapidly compared with intranasal, subcutaneous and peroral administration and be a promising delivery method with extremely rapid onset of action in the pain relief of migraine.

  18. Dietary Virgin Olive Oil Reduces Blood Brain Barrier Permeability, Brain Edema, and Brain Injury in Rats Subjected to Ischemia-Reperfusion

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    Fatemeh Mohagheghi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that dietary virgin olive oil (VOO reduces hypoxia-reoxygenation injury in rat brain slices. We sought to extend these observations in an in vivo study of rat cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Four groups, each consisting of 18 Wistar rats, were studied. One group (control received saline, while three treatment groups received oral VOO (0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mL/kg/day, respectively. After 30 days, blood lipid profiles were determined, before a 60-min period of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. After 24-h reperfusion, neurological deficit scores, infarct volume, brain edema, and blood brain barrier permeability were each assessed in subgroups of six animals drawn from each main group. VOO reduced the LDL/HDL ratio in doses of 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mL/kg/day in comparison to the control group (p < 0.05, and offered cerebroprotection from ischemia-reperfusion. For controls vs. doses of 0.25 vs. 0.5 vs. 0.75 mL/kg/day, attenuated corrected infarct volumes were 207.82 ± 34.29 vs. 206.41 ± 26.23 vs. 124.21 ± 14.73 vs. 108.46 ± 31.63 mm3; brain water content of the infarcted hemisphere was 82 ±± 0.25 vs. 81.5 ± 0.56 vs. 80.5 ± 0.22 vs. 80.5 ± 0.34%; and blood brain barrier permeability of the infarcted hemisphere was 11.31 ± 2.67 vs. 9.21 ± 2.28 vs. 5.83 ± 1.6 vs. 4.43 ± 0.93 µg/g tissue (p < 0.05 for measures in doses 0.5 and 0.75 mL/kg/day vs. controls. Oral administration of VOO reduces infarct volume, brain edema, blood brain barrier permeability, and improves neurologic deficit scores after transient MCAO in rats.

  19. Response to Deep Brain Stimulation in Three Brain Targets with Implications in Mental Disorders: A PET Study in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casquero-Veiga, Marta; Hadar, Ravit; Pascau, Javier; Winter, Christine; Desco, Manuel; Soto-Montenegro, María Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate metabolic changes in brain networks by deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and dorsomedial thalamus (DM) using positron emission tomography (PET) in naïve rats. Methods 43 male Wistar rats underwent stereotactic surgery and concentric bipolar platinum-iridium electrodes were bilaterally implanted into one of the three brain sites. [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose-PET (18FDG-PET) and computed tomography (CT) scans were performed at the 7th (without DBS) and 9th day (with DBS) after surgery. Stimulation period matched tracer uptake period. Images were acquired with a small-animal PET-CT scanner. Differences in glucose uptake between groups were assessed with Statistical Parametric Mapping. Results DBS induced site-specific metabolic changes, although a common increased metabolic activity in the piriform cortex was found for the three brain targets. mPFC-DBS increased metabolic activity in the striatum, temporal and amygdala, and reduced it in the cerebellum, brainstem (BS) and periaqueductal gray matter (PAG). NAcc-DBS increased metabolic activity in the subiculum and olfactory bulb, and decreased it in the BS, PAG, septum and hypothalamus. DM-DBS increased metabolic activity in the striatum, NAcc and thalamus and decreased it in the temporal and cingulate cortex. Conclusions DBS induced significant changes in 18FDG uptake in brain regions associated with the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuitry. Stimulation of mPFC, NAcc and DM induced different patterns of 18FDG uptake despite interacting with the same circuitries. This may have important implications to DBS research suggesting individualized target selection according to specific neural modulatory requirements. PMID:28033356

  20. Regulation of calpain activity in rat brain with altered Ca2+ homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averna, Monica; Stifanese, Roberto; De Tullio, Roberta; Passalacqua, Mario; Defranchi, Enrico; Salamino, Franca; Melloni, Edon; Pontremoli, Sandro

    2007-01-26

    Activation of calpain occurs as an early event in correlation with an increase in [Ca2+]i induced in rat brain upon treatment with a high salt diet for a prolonged period of time. The resulting sequential events have been monitored in the brain of normal and hypertensive rats of the Milan strain, diverging for a constitutive alteration in the level of [Ca2+]i found to be present in nerve cells of hypertensive animals. After 2 weeks of treatment, the levels of the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase and of native calpastatin are profoundly decreased. These degradative processes, more pronounced in the brain of hypertensive rats, are progressively and efficiently compensated in the brain of both rat strains by different incoming mechanisms. Along with calpastatin degradation, 15-kDa still-active inhibitory fragments are accumulated, capable of efficiently replacing the loss of native inhibitor molecules. A partial return to a more efficient control of Ca2+ homeostasis occurs in parallel, assured by an early increase in the expression of Ca2+-ATPase and of calpastatin, both producing, after 12 weeks of a high salt (sodium) diet, the restoration of almost original levels of the Ca2+ pump and of significant amounts of native inhibitor molecules. Thus, conservative calpastatin fragmentation, associated with an increased expression of Ca2+-ATPase and of the calpain natural inhibitor, has been demonstrated to occur in vivo in rat brain. This represents a sequential adaptive response capable of overcoming the effects of calpain activation induced by a moderate long term elevation of [Ca2+]i.

  1. The protective effect of Nigella sativa oil in the brain of the biliary obstructed rats

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    Hale Zerrin Toklu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is one of the important mechanisms of jaundice induced encephalopathy. The aim of this study was to examine the possible protective effect of Nigella sativa (NS seed oil against the oxidative stress of brain tissue induced by experimentalobstructive jaundice in rats.BiliarY obstruction was performed in male Wistar albino rats by bile duct ligation and scission (BDL. Intragastric NS oil (1 mg/kg p.o. or saline was administered for 28 days. At the end of the experiment, in the half of the rats the blood brain barrier (BBB permeability wasevaluated by Evans blue (EB extravasation. Other rats were decapitated and brain tissue samples were obtained for the measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA and glutathione(GSH levels, myeloperoxidase (MPO and Na+,K+-ATPase activities.ChronIC biliary obstruction caused a significant increase in the BBB permeability which was verified by EB extravasation while this effect was attenuated by NS oil treatment. On the other hand, BDL-induced decrease in brain GSH level and Na+,K+-ATPase activity were el-evated back to control level in NS oil-treated BDL group. Increase in tissue MDA level, and MPO activity due to BDL were also attenuated by NS oil treatment.Our results suggest that NS oil treatment protects the brain from oxidative damage following bile duct ligation in rats. This effect possibly involves the inhibition of neutrophil infiltration and lipid peroxidation and the restoration of antioxidant status in the tissue. Accordingly, supplementing cirrhotic patients with adjuvant therapy of NS oil may have some benefit against hepatic encephalopathy

  2. Lithium ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced neurotoxicity in the cortex and hippocampus of the adult rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Sohail; Ali, Tahir; Abid, Muhammad Noman; Jo, Myeung Hoon; Khan, Amjad; Kim, Min Woo; Yoon, Gwang Ho; Cheon, Eun Woo; Rehman, Shafiq Ur; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2017-09-01

    Lithium an effective mood stabilizer, primary used in the treatment of bipolar disorders, has been reported as a protective agent in various neurological disorders. In this study, we examined the neuroprotective role of lithium chloride (LiCl) against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the cortex and hippocampus of the adult rat brain. We determined that LiCl -attenuated LPS-induced activated toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling and significantly reduced the nuclear factor-kB (NF-KB) translation factor and various other inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). We also analyzed that LiCl significantly abrogated activated gliosis via attenuation of specific markers for activated microglia, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule (Iba-1) and astrocytes, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in both the cortex and hippocampus of the adult rat brain. Furthermore, we also observed that LiCl treatment significantly ameliorated the increase expression level of apoptotic neurodegeneration protein markers Bax/Bcl2, activated caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) in the cortex and hippocampus regions of the LPS-treated adult rat brain. In addition, the morphological results of the fluoro-jade B (FJB) and Nissl staining showed that LiCl attenuated the neuronal degeneration in the cortex and hippocampus regions of the LPS-treated adult rat brain. Taken together, our Western blot and morphological results indicated that LiCl significantly prevents the LPS-induced neurotoxicity via attenuation of neuroinflammation and apoptotic neurodegeneration in the cortex and hippocampus of the adult rat brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Protective Effects of Sufentanil Pretreatment on Rat Brains under the State of Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Man; Peng, Xiao-Chun; Wang, Li-Shen; Dong, Ai-Ping; Shen, Shu-Wei; Wang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to observe the protective effects of sufentanil pretreatment on rat cerebral injury during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and to explore the underlying mechanism. Twenty-four male adult Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were divided into 4 groups. Then, the rat CPB model was established. A 14G trocar was inserted into the atrium dextrum. For rats in S1 and S5 groups, sufentanil (1 µgKg(-1) and 5 µgKg(-1)) were applied before CPB process. After the operation, rat brain samples were harvested for measurement of the water content of the brains, total calcium in brain tissue and the level of serum S100β. Compared with the Sham group, the water content and the total calcium of the brain tissue, and the expression of S100β in serum were significantly increased in the CPB group (PCPB group, sufentanil treatment significantly reduced the water content of the brains, the total calcium and S100β expression (PCPB, S1, and S5 compared with Sham group during CPB. Compared with the Sham group, the levels of pH and blood lactate in other groups were decreased and increased, respectively, in the post-CPB period. During the CPB and post-CPB periods, the hematocrit levels were significantly down-regulated in groups CPB, S1, and S5 compared with Sham group. In conclusion, sufentanil pretreatment was effective in reducing the cerebral injury during CPB. Reduction in calcium overload may be a potential mechanism in such process.

  4. Methylphenidate administration to juvenile rats alters brain areas involved in cognition, motivated behaviors, appetite, and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jason D; Punsoni, Michael; Tabori, Nora E; Melton, Jay T; Fanslow, Victoria; Ward, Mary J; Zupan, Bojana; Menzer, David; Rice, Jackson; Drake, Carrie T; Romeo, Russell D; Brake, Wayne G; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Milner, Teresa A

    2007-07-04

    Thousands of children receive methylphenidate (MPH; Ritalin) for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), yet the long-term neurochemical consequences of MPH treatment are unknown. To mimic clinical Ritalin treatment in children, male rats were injected with MPH (5 mg/kg) or vehicle twice daily from postnatal day 7 (PND7)-PND35. At the end of administration (PND35) or in adulthood (PND135), brain sections from littermate pairs were immunocytochemically labeled for neurotransmitters and cytological markers in 16 regions implicated in MPH effects and/or ADHD etiology. At PND35, the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of rats given MPH showed 55% greater immunoreactivity (-ir) for the catecholamine marker tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), 60% more Nissl-stained cells, and 40% less norepinephrine transporter (NET)-ir density. In hippocampal dentate gyrus, MPH-receiving rats showed a 51% decrease in NET-ir density and a 61% expanded distribution of the new-cell marker PSA-NCAM (polysialylated form of neural cell adhesion molecule). In medial striatum, TH-ir decreased by 21%, and in hypothalamus neuropeptide Y-ir increased by 10% in MPH-exposed rats. At PND135, MPH-exposed rats exhibited decreased anxiety in the elevated plus-maze and a trend for decreased TH-ir in the mPFC. Neither PND35 nor PND135 rats showed major structural differences with MPH exposure. These findings suggest that developmental exposure to high therapeutic doses of MPH has short-term effects on select neurotransmitters in brain regions involved in motivated behaviors, cognition, appetite, and stress. Although the observed neuroanatomical changes largely resolve with time, chronic modulation of young brains with MPH may exert effects on brain neurochemistry that modify some behaviors even in adulthood.

  5. Protective role of Cynodon dactylon in ameliorating the aluminium-induced neurotoxicity in rat brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumathi, Thangarajan; Shobana, Chandrasekar; Kumari, Balasubramanian Rathina; Nandhini, Devarajulu Nisha

    2011-12-01

    Cynodon dactylon (Poaceae) is a creeping grass used as a traditional ayurvedic medicine in India. Aluminium-induced neurotoxicity is well known and different salts of aluminium have been reported to accelerate damage to biomolecules like lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether the aqueous extract of C. dactylon (AECD) could potentially prevent aluminium-induced neurotoxicity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of the rat brain. Male albino rats were administered with AlCl(3) at a dose of 4.2 mg/kg/day i.p. for 4 weeks. Experimental rats were given C. dactylon extract in two different doses of 300 mg and 750 mg/keg/day orally 1 h prior to the AlCl(3) administration for 4 weeks. At the end of the experiments, antioxidant status and activities of ATPases in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of rat brain were measured. Aluminium administration significantly decreased the level of GSH and the activities of SOD, GPx, GST, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, and Mg(2+) ATPase and increased the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in all the brain regions when compared with control rats. Pre-treatment with AECD at a dose of 750 mg/kg b.w increased the antioxidant status and activities of membrane-bound enzymes (Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and Mg(2+) ATPase) and also decreased the level of LPO significantly, when compared with aluminium-induced rats. The results of this study indicated that AECD has potential to protect the various brain regions from aluminium-induced neurotoxicity.

  6. Neuroplasticity Changes of Rat Brain by Musical Stimuli during Fetal Period

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    Siamak Sheikhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Fetal development of the central nervous system is an important and sensitive stage which is affected by many external and internal stimuli. This study aimed to investigate effect of musical stimuli on fetal rat brain. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, twelve female Wistar rats were selected and evenly assigned to control and musical groups. The females were mated with a male rat of the same genotype. Musical group was exposed to classic music with 60 dB power for 90 minutes twice per day from 2nd to 20th day of gestation. The control rats were handled similar to the musical group, but were not exposed to music. Before parturition, all the dams were anesthetized, and their blood samples were obtained and used for corticosterone (COS measurement. They were transcardially perfused by electron microscope (EM fixative agent. The fetal brains were extracted intact and used for slice preparation. Horizontal slices were made for electron microscope preparation, and images were taken and analyzed in terms of cell density and morphological changes. Results: EM observation indicated significant morphological difference in cellular and intercellular spaces between the two groups. Music-treated fetuses had significantly higher cell density in parietal cortex and music-treated dams had lower COS level. Conclusion: It was concluded that prenatal music would have a great impact on neuroplasticity of fetal rat brain, at least indirectly. Although the rat fetuses cannot hear until birth, music-induced reduction in COS blood level of dams might be the reason for neuroplasticity of fetal brain.

  7. Effect of transporter inhibition on the distribution of cefadroxil in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaomei; Loryan, Irena; Payan, Maryam; Keep, Richard F; Smith, David E; Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta

    2014-01-01

    Cefadroxil, a cephalosporin antibiotic, is a substrate for several membrane transporters including peptide transporter 2 (PEPT2), organic anion transporters (OATs), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs), and organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs). These transporters are expressed at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), and/or brain cells. The effect of these transporters on cefadroxil distribution in brain is unknown, especially in the extracellular and intracellular fluids within brain. Intracerebral microdialysis was used to measure unbound concentrations of cefadroxil in rat blood, striatum extracellular fluid (ECF) and lateral ventricle cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The distribution of cefadroxil in brain was compared in the absence and presence of probenecid, an inhibitor of OATs, MRPs and OATPs, where both drugs were administered intravenously. The effect of PEPT2 inhibition by intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion of Ala-Ala, a substrate of PEPT2, on cefadroxil levels in brain was also evaluated. In addition, using an in vitro brain slice method, the distribution of cefadroxil in brain intracellular fluid (ICF) was studied in the absence and presence of transport inhibitors (probenecid for OATs, MRPs and OATPs; Ala-Ala and glycylsarcosine for PEPT2). The ratio of unbound cefadroxil AUC in brain ECF to blood (Kp,uu,ECF) was ~2.5-fold greater during probenecid treatment. In contrast, the ratio of cefadroxil AUC in CSF to blood (Kp,uu,CSF) did not change significantly during probenecid infusion. Icv infusion of Ala-Ala did not change cefadroxil levels in brain ECF, CSF or blood. In the brain slice study, Ala-Ala and glycylsarcosine decreased the unbound volume of distribution of cefadroxil in brain (Vu,brain), indicating a reduction in cefadroxil accumulation in brain cells. In contrast, probenecid increased cefadroxil accumulation in brain cells, as indicated by a greater value for Vu,brain. Transporters

  8. The feeding behavior of cross-intestine parabiotic rats are modulated by brain histamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism in which signals to regulate food intake are transmitted from the gastro-intestinal system to the brain, we analyzed changes in hypothalamic neuronal histamine using cross-intestine parabiotic rats. Pairs of weight matched Lewis rats were sewn together in such a way as to form a common abdominal cavity. The small intestines of rats were transected and reconnected so that food eaten by one rat passed through a segment of its partner's intestine before returning to the intestine of the first rat. Concentrations of neuronal histamine were measured in microdissected hypothalami using radioimmnoassay. Sustained alteration of food intake were observed in both rats, one rat eating an average of 2.2 times (SE 0.15) as much as the other, without development of any significant difference in body weight after seven weeks. We found significant increase in hypothalamic neuronal histamine concentrations in the arcuate and tublomamelary nuclei of the hypophagic rats.These results are supportive of the theory that histamine acts in response to signals from the gut to regulate food intake.

  9. The Ketogenic Diet Suppresses the Cathepsin E Expression Induced by Kainic Acid in the Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Hojeong; Kim, Yoon-Kyoung; Park, Sang-Kyu; Kang, Dong-Won

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The ketogenic diet has long been used to treat epilepsy, but its mechanism is not yet clearly understood. To explore the potential mechanism, we analyzed the changes in gene expression induced by the ketogenic diet in the rat kainic acid (KA) epilepsy model. Materials and Methods KA-administered rats were fed the ketogenic diet or a normal diet for 4 weeks, and microarray analysis was performed with their brain tissues. The effects of the ketogenic diet on cathepsin E messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression were analyzed in KA-administered and normal saline-administered groups with semi-quantitative and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Brain tissues were dissected into 8 regions to compare differential effects of the ketogenic diet on cathepsin E mRNA expression. Immunohistochemistry with an anti-cathepsin E antibody was performed on slides of hippocampus obtained from whole brain paraffin blocks. Results The microarray data and subsequent RT-PCR experiments showed that KA increased the mRNA expression of cathepsin E, known to be related to neuronal cell death, in most brain areas except the brain stem, and these increases of cathepsin E mRNA expression were suppressed by the ketogenic diet. The expression of cathepsin E mRNA in the control group, however, was not significantly affected by the ketogenic diet. The change in cathepsin E mRNA expression was greatest in the hippocampus. The protein level of cathepsin E in the hippocampus of KA-administered rat was elevated in immunohistochemistry and the ketogenic diet suppressed this increase. Conclusion Our results showed that KA administration increased cathepsin E expression in the rat brain and its increase was suppressed by the ketogenic diet. PMID:20635438

  10. Neuron-astrocyte interactions, pyruvate carboxylation and the pentose phosphate pathway in the neonatal rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morken, Tora Sund; Brekke, Eva; Håberg, Asta; Widerøe, Marius; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Glucose and acetate metabolism and the synthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters, anaplerosis, glutamate-glutamine cycling and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) have been extensively investigated in the adult, but not the neonatal rat brain. To do this, 7 day postnatal (P7) rats were injected with [1-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]acetate and sacrificed 5, 10, 15, 30 and 45 min later. Adult rats were injected and sacrificed after 15 min. To analyse pyruvate carboxylation and PPP activity during development, P7 rats received [1,2-(13)C]glucose and were sacrificed 30 min later. Brain extracts were analysed using (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Numerous differences in metabolism were found between the neonatal and adult brain. The neonatal brain contained lower levels of glutamate, aspartate and N-acetylaspartate but similar levels of GABA and glutamine per mg tissue. Metabolism of [1-(13)C]glucose at the acetyl CoA stage was reduced much more than that of [1,2-(13)C]acetate. The transfer of glutamate from neurons to astrocytes was much lower while transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to glutamatergic neurons was relatively higher. However, transport of glutamine from astrocytes to GABAergic neurons was lower. Using [1,2-(13)C]glucose it could be shown that despite much lower pyruvate carboxylation, relatively more pyruvate from glycolysis was directed towards anaplerosis than pyruvate dehydrogenation in astrocytes. Moreover, the ratio of PPP/glucose-metabolism was higher. These findings indicate that only the part of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that transfers glutamine from astrocytes to neurons is operating in the neonatal brain and that compared to adults, relatively more glucose is prioritised to PPP and pyruvate carboxylation. Our results may have implications for the capacity to protect the neonatal brain against excitotoxicity and oxidative stress.

  11. Adenosine transport systems on dissociated brain cells from mouse, guinea-pig, and rat

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    Johnston, M.E.; Geiger, J.D. (Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada))

    1990-09-01

    The kinetics and sodium dependence of adenosine transport were determined using an inhibitor-stop method on dissociated cell body preparations obtained from mouse, guinea-pig and rat brain. Transport affinity (KT) values for the high affinity adenosine transport systems KT(H) were significantly different between these three species; mean +/- SEM values were 0.34 +/- 0.1 in mouse, 0.9 +/- 0.2 in rat, and 1.5 +/- 0.5 microM in guinea-pig. The KT values for the low affinity transport system KT(L) were not different between the three species. Brain cells from rat displayed a significantly greater maximal capacity to accumulate (3H)adenosine (Vmax) than did mouse or guinea-pig for the high affinity system, or than did mouse for the low affinity system. When sodium chloride was replaced in the transport medium with choline chloride, the KT(H) values for guinea-pig and rat were both increased by approximately 100%; only in rat did the change reach statistical significance. The sodium-dependence of adenosine transport in mouse brain was clearly absent. The differences between KT(H) values in mouse and those in guinea-pig or rat were accentuated in the absence of sodium. The differences in kinetic values, ionic requirements, and pharmacological characteristics between adenosine transporters in CNS tissues of mouse, guinea-pig and rat may help account for some of the variability noted among species in terms of their physiological responses to adenosine.

  12. Concentrations of Nitric Oxide in Rat Brain Tissues after Diffuse Brain Injury and Neuroprotection by the Selective Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor Aminoguanidine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-bao Wang; Shao-wu Ou; Guang-yu Li; Yun-hui Liu

    2005-01-01

    @@ To investigate the effects of nitric oxide (NO) and the selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG) on trauma, we explored the concentrations of nitric oxide in rat brain tissues at different time stamps after diffuse brain injury (DBI) with or without AG treatment.

  13. The effect of butylphthalide on the brain edema, blood-brain barrier of rats after focal cerebral infarction and the expression of Rho A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinyang; Wen, Qingping; Wu, Yue; Li, Baozhu; Gao, Peng

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effect of butylphthalide on the brain edema, blood-brain barrier of rats of rats after focal cerebral infarction and the expression of Rho A. A total of 195 sprague-dawley male rats were randomly divided into control group, model group, and butylphthalide group (40 mg/kg, once a day, by gavage). The model was made by photochemical method. After surgery 3, 12, 24, 72, and 144 h, brain water content was done to see the effect of butylphthalide for the cerebral edema. Evans blue extravasation method was done to see the changes in blood-brain barrier immunohistochemistry, and Western blot was done to see the expression of Rho A around the infarction. Compared with the control group, the brain water content of model group and butylphthalide group rats was increased, the permeability of blood-brain barrier of model group and butylphthalide group rats was increased, and the Rho A protein of model group and butylphthalide group rats was increased. Compared with the model group, the brain water content of butylphthalide group rats was induced (73.67 ± 0.67 vs 74.14 ± 0.46; 74.89 ± 0.57 vs 75.61 ± 0.52; 77.49 ± 0.34 vs 79.33 ± 0.49; 76.31 ± 0.56 vs 78.01 ± 0.48; 72.36 ± 0.44 vs 73.12 ± 0.73; P edema, protect the blood-brain barrier, and decrease the expression of Rho A around the infarction.

  14. Direct nose-brain transport of benzoylecgonine following intranasal administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, H H; Anavy, N; Villalobos, A

    2001-11-01

    In our previous research, cocaine applied intranasally in rats diffused or was transported directly from the nasal cavity to the brain. However, the direct nose-brain cocaine transport only contributes to an initial increase in the relative cocaine brain exposure. In this study, we have determined the nose-brain transport of a polar metabolite of cocaine, benzoylecgonine, to help understand factors affecting drug transport via this novel pathway. The nasal cavity of male Sprague-Dawley rats was isolated to prevent drainage of nasally applied dosing solution to non-nasal regions. Benzoylecgonine was then administered, either by intranasal administration or by intravenous (iv) injection. At different times postdose, blood and tissues from different regions of the brain were collected from groups of rats (n = 4 for each collection time) and benzoylecgonine concentrations in these samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Benzoylecgonine concentrations in plasma were at maximal levels immediately after iv dosing and declined as a function of time. Following intranasal administration, benzoylecgonine concentrations in plasma reached maximal levels between 15 and 30 min after dosing and declined as a function of time. To allow comparison of brain benzoylecgonine content after iv and intranasal administration, brain benzoylecgonine contents were normalized by plasma benzoylecgonine concentrations. The ratios of the area under the benzoylecgonine concentration-time curve (AUC) between the olfactory bulb and plasma following intranasal administration were 10-100 times higher than those obtained after iv dosing. The olfactory tract-to-plasma benzoylecgonine AUC ratios after intranasal administration were significantly higher than those after iv dosing up to 120 min following dosing. The brain tissue-to-plasma AUC ratios in cerebellum, brain stem, and cerebral cortex after intranasal administration were significantly higher than the corresponding ratios

  15. Incorporation of radioactive polyunsaturated fatty acids into liver and brain of developing rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, A J

    1975-03-01

    The incorporation of radioactivity from orally administered linoleic acid-1-14C, linolenic acid-1-14C, arachidonic acid-3H8, and docosahexaenoic acid-14C into the liver and brain lipids of suckling rats was studied. In both tissues, 22 hr after dosing, 2 distinct levels of incorporation were observed: a low uptake (from 18:2-1-14C and 18:3-1-14C) and a high uptake (from 20:4-3H8 and 22:6-14C). In adult rats, the incorporation of radioactivity into brain lipids from 18:2-1-14C and 20:4-3H was considerably lower than the incorporation into the brains of the young rats. In the livers of the suckling rats, the activity from the 18 carbon acids was associated mostly with the triglyceride fraction, whereas the activity from the 20:4-3H8 and 22:6-14C was concentrated in the phospholipid fraction. In the brain lipids, the activity from the different fatty apid fatty acids, some of the activity in the 18:2-1-14C and 18:3-1-14C experiments was associated with 20 and 22 carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids; however, radioactivity from orally administered 20:4-3H8 and 22:6-14C was incorporated intact into the tissue phospholipid to a much greater extent compared with the incorporation of radioactivity into 20:4 and 22:6 in the experiments where 18:2-1-14C and 18:3-1-14C, respectively, were administered. Possible reasons for these differences are discussed. Rat milk contains a wide spectrum of polyunsaturated fatty acids, including linoleate, linolenate, arachidonate, and docosahexaenoate. During the suckling period in the rat, there is a rapid deposition of 20:4 and 22:6 in the brain. The results of the present experiments suggested that dietary 20:4 and 22:6 were important sources of brain 20:4 and 22:6 in the developing rat.

  16. Dexmedetomidine and ketamine show distinct patterns of cell degeneration and apoptosis in the developing rat neonatal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancaro, Carlo; Segal, B Scott; Sikes, Robert W; Almeer, Zainab; Schumann, Roman; Azocar, Ruben J; Marchand, James E

    2016-12-01

    Early exposure to common anesthetic and sedative agents causes widespread brain cell degeneration and apoptosis in the developing rat brain, associated with persistent learning deficits in rats. This study was designed to determine whether the α2 adrenergic receptor agonist, dexmedetomidine, produces brain cell degeneration and apoptosis in postnatal day-7 rats in the same brain areas when compared to ketamine. Systemic saline, ketamine 20 mg/kg, or dexmedetomidine at 30 or 45 μg/kg were given six times to postnatal day 7 rats (n  =  6/group) every 90 min. Twenty-four hours after the initial injection, brain regions were processed and analyzed for cell degeneration using the silver stain and for apoptosis using activated caspase-3 immunohistochemistry. Exposure to ketamine resulted in significant cellular degeneration and apoptosis in limbic brain regions, but nonsignificant changes in primary sensory brain regions. In contrast, dexmedetomidine produced significant cellular degeneration and apoptosis in primary sensory brain regions, but nonsignificant changes in limbic regions. These data show that ketamine and dexmedetomidine result in anatomically distinct patterns of cell degeneration and apoptosis in the brains of 7-day-old rat pups. The meaning and the clinical significance of these findings remain to be established.

  17. Protective effects of N-acetylcysteine on brain-dead rat liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shui-Jun Zhang; Ting-Wu Ma; Xiu-Xian Ma; Jian-Jun Gou; Ji-Hua Shi; Wen-Zhi Guo

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain-dead donors have been the main sources in organ transplantation. But many studies show that brain-death affects the organ's function after transplantation. This study was undertaken to investigate liver injury after brain-death in rats and the protective effects of N-acetyleysteine (NAC) on liver injury. METHODS: A total of 30 Wistar rats were randomized into 3 groups: normal control group (C), brain-dead group (B), and NAC pretreatment group (N). At 4 hours after the establishment of a brain-dead model, serum was collected to determine the levels of ALT, AST, TNF-α and hyaluronic acid (HA). Hepatic tissue was obtained for electron microscopic examination. RESULTS:At 4 hours, the levels of ALT, AST, TNF-α, and HA in group N were signiifcantly higher than those in group C, but these parameters were signiifcantly lower than those in group B. Electron microscopy showed activated Kupffer cells, denuded sinusoidal endothelial cells (SECs), and widened fenestration in group B, but eliminated activation of Kupffer cells and intact SECs in group N. CONCLUSION: Brain death can cause liver injury, and N-acetyleysteine can protect the liver from the injury.

  18. Effects of Moxibustion Pretreating on SOD and MDA in the Rat of Global Brain Ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Jin-shuang; LI Li-ping; ZHU Xian-min

    2008-01-01

    objective;To probe into the mechanism of moxibustion preconditioning in preventive brain-protecting effect.Methods;The global brain ischemia rat model was developed by blocking 4 artenes.Seventy-eight Wistarmale rats were randomly divided into 5 groups;a nomal control group,a sham-operation group,a brain ischemia group,a brain ischemia preconditioning group,a moxibustion pretreating group.The brains in the 5groups were taken at 24 h,48h,and 72h after operation respectively Superoxide dismulase(SOD)activity was determined with xanthine oxidase method and malondialdehyde(MDA)content with thiobarbituric acid method.Results;After the operation,in the moxibustion preconditioning group,SOD activity significantly increased,especially 24h after moxibustion preconditioning;and MDA content decreased,with a very significant difference as compared with that of the cerebral ischemia group(P<0.01).Conclusion;Moxibustion preconditioning protects the ischemic and anoxic brain tissue by increasing the activity of endogenous antioxidase.

  19. Response of regional brain glutamate transaminases of rat to aluminum in protein malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Prasunpriya; Chatterjee, Ajay K

    2002-01-01

    Background The mechanism of aluminum-induced neurotoxicity is not clear. The involvement of glutamate in the aluminium-induced neurocomplications has been suggested. Brain glutamate levels also found to be altered in protein malnutrition. Alterations in glutamate levels as well as glutamate-α-decarboxylase in different regions of rat brain has been reported in response to aluminum exposure. Thus the study of glutamate metabolising enzymes in different brain regions of rats maintained on either normal or restricted protein diet may be of importance for understanding the neurotoxicity properties of aluminium. Results Dietary protein restrictions does not have an significant impact on regional aluminum content of the brain. The interaction of aluminum intoxication and protein restriction is significant in the thalamic area and the midbrain-hippocampal region in cases of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase. In the case of gluatmate pyruvate transaminase, this interaction is significant only in thalamic area. Conclusion The metabolism of amino acids, as indicated by activities of specific transaminases, of brain is altered in response to aluminum exposure. These alterations are region specific and are dependent on dietary protein intake or manipulation of the brain amino acid homeostasis. PMID:12197946

  20. Response of regional brain glutamate transaminases of rat to aluminum in protein malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee Ajay K

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanism of aluminum-induced neurotoxicity is not clear. The involvement of glutamate in the aluminium-induced neurocomplications has been suggested. Brain glutamate levels also found to be altered in protein malnutrition. Alterations in glutamate levels as well as glutamate-α-decarboxylase in different regions of rat brain has been reported in response to aluminum exposure. Thus the study of glutamate metabolising enzymes in different brain regions of rats maintained on either normal or restricted protein diet may be of importance for understanding the neurotoxicity properties of aluminium. Results Dietary protein restrictions does not have an significant impact on regional aluminum content of the brain. The interaction of aluminum intoxication and protein restriction is significant in the thalamic area and the midbrain-hippocampal region in cases of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase. In the case of gluatmate pyruvate transaminase, this interaction is significant only in thalamic area. Conclusion The metabolism of amino acids, as indicated by activities of specific transaminases, of brain is altered in response to aluminum exposure. These alterations are region specific and are dependent on dietary protein intake or manipulation of the brain amino acid homeostasis.

  1. A model of posttraumatic epilepsy induced by lateral fluid-percussion brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharatishvili, I; Nissinen, J P; McIntosh, T K; Pitkänen, A

    2006-06-30

    Although traumatic brain injury is a major cause of symptomatic epilepsy, the mechanism by which it leads to recurrent seizures is unknown. An animal model of posttraumatic epilepsy that reliably reproduces the clinical sequelae of human traumatic brain injury is essential to identify the molecular and cellular substrates of posttraumatic epileptogenesis, and perform preclinical screening of new antiepileptogenic compounds. We studied the electrophysiologic, behavioral, and structural features of posttraumatic epilepsy induced by severe, non-penetrating lateral fluid-percussion brain injury in rats. Data from two independent experiments indicated that 43% to 50% of injured animals developed epilepsy, with a latency period between 7 weeks to 1 year. Mean seizure frequency was 0.3+/-0.2 seizures per day and mean seizure duration was 113+/-46 s. Behavioral seizure severity increased over time in the majority of animals. Secondarily-generalized seizures comprised an average of 66+/-37% of all seizures. Mossy fiber sprouting was increased in the ipsilateral hippocampus of animals with posttraumatic epilepsy compared with those subjected to traumatic brain injury without epilepsy. Stereologic cell counts indicated a loss of dentate hilar neurons ipsilaterally following traumatic brain injury. Our data suggest that posttraumatic epilepsy occurs with a frequency of 40% to 50% after severe non-penetrating fluid-percussion brain injury in rats, and that the lateral fluid percussion model can serve as a clinically-relevant tool for pathophysiologic and preclinical studies.

  2. Amphetamine affects the behavioral outcome of lateral fluid percussion brain injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, R M; Dose, J M; Dhillon, H S; Carbary, T; Kraemer, P J

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the effects of (D)-amphetamine, methoxamine (an al-adrenergic receptor agonist), and prazosin (an al-adrenergic receptor antagonist) on the behavioral outcome of lateral fluid percussion brain injury. Rats trained to perform a beam walking task were subjected to brain injury of moderate severity (2.1-2.2 atm). At 10 min after injury, rats were treated with amphetamine, methoxamine or prazosin at two different dose levels. Amphetamine-treated animals displayed significantly lower impairment in beam walking ability from days 1 to 5 after brain injury. Neither methoxamine nor prazosin significantly affected the impairment in beam walking ability from day 1 to day 7 after injury. However, prazosin treatment at both dose levels increased the post-injury mortality and the incidences of failure to recovery from hemiplegia. Amphetamine-treatment at 4 mg/kg, but not at 2 mg/kg, improved the spatial learning abilities of the injured animals. Neither methoxamine nor prazosin affected the spatial learning abilities. These results indicate that amphetamine facilitated beam walking recovery and improved cognitive function after concussive fluid percussion injury. Although the methoxamine experiments suggest that the norepinephrine-α1-adrenergic receptor system may not be involved in the pathophysiology of fluid percussion brain injury, our results with amphetamine (beneficial effects) and prazosin (deleterious effects) and the results observed in other models of brain injury point out that further investigations are necessary to understand the role of a1-adrenergic receptors in brain injury.

  3. In vivo and in vitro assessment of brain bioenergetics in aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vančová, Ol'ga; Bačiak, Ladislav; Kašparová, Svatava; Kucharská, Jarmila; Palacios, Hector H; Horecký, Jaromír; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2010-11-01

    Brain energy disorders can be present in aged men and animals. To this respect, the mitochondrial and free radical theory of aging postulates that age-associated brain energy disorders are caused by an imbalance between pro- and anti-oxidants that can result in oxidative stress. Our study was designed to investigate brain energy metabolism and the activity of endogenous antioxidants during their lifespan in male Wistar rats. In vivo brain bioenergetics were measured using ³¹P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and in vitro by polarographic analysis of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. When compared to the young controls, a significant decrease of age-dependent mitochondrial respiration and adenosine-3-phosphate (ATP) production measured in vitro correlated with significant reduction of forward creatine kinase reaction (kfor) and with an increase in phosphocreatine (PCr)/ATP, PCr/Pi and PME/ATP ratio measured in vivo. The levels of enzymatic antioxidants catalase, GPx and GST significantly decreased in the brain tissue as well as in the peripheral blood of aged rats. We suppose that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative inactivation of endogenous enzymes may participate in age-related disorders of brain energy metabolism.

  4. Zingiber officinale Mitigates Brain Damage and Improves Memory Impairment in Focal Cerebral Ischemic Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintanaporn Wattanathorn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemia is known to produce brain damage and related behavioral deficits including memory. Recently, accumulating lines of evidence showed that dietary enrichment with nutritional antioxidants could reduce brain damage and improve cognitive function. In this study, possible protective effect of Zingiber officinale, a medicinal plant reputed for neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress-related brain damage, on brain damage and memory deficit induced by focal cerebral ischemia was elucidated. Male adult Wistar rats were administrated an alcoholic extract of ginger rhizome orally 14 days before and 21 days after the permanent occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (MCAO. Cognitive function assessment was performed at 7, 14, and 21 days after MCAO using the Morris water maze test. The brain infarct volume and density of neurons in hippocampus were also determined. Furthermore, the level of malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px in cerebral cortex, striatum, and hippocampus was also quantified at the end of experiment. The results showed that cognitive function and neurons density in hippocampus of rats receiving ginger rhizome extract were improved while the brain infarct volume was decreased. The cognitive enhancing effect and neuroprotective effect occurred partly via the antioxidant activity of the extract. In conclusion, our study demonstrated the beneficial effect of ginger rhizome to protect against focal cerebral ischemia.

  5. Malnutrition during brain growth spurt alters the effect of fluoxetine on aggressive behavior in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto-Medeiros, J M; Feitoza, E G; Magalhaes, K; Cabral-Filho, J E; Manhaes-De-Castro, F M; De-Castro, C M; Manhaes-De-Castro, R

    2004-02-01

    Malnutrition effect during the suckling period on aggressive behavior was investigated in adult rats treated and not treated with fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Sixty-four Wistar male rats were allocated in two groups, according to their mothers' diet during lactation. The well-nourished group was fed by mothers receiving a 23% protein diet; the malnourished one by mothers receiving a 8% protein diet. Following weaning, all rats received the 23% protein diet. On the 90th day after birth, each nutritional group was divided into two subgroups, one receiving a single daily injection of fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) and the other of a saline solution (0.9% NaCl) for 14 days. Treatment with Fluoxetine reduced aggressive response in well-nourished but not in malnourished rats. These findings suggest that the serotoninergic system was affected by malnutrition during the critical period of brain development, and persisted even after a long period of nutritional recovery.

  6. ALA-PDT of glioma cell micro-clusters in BD-IX rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Angell-Petersen, Even; Spetalen, Signe; Carper, Stephen W.; Ziegler, Sarah A.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2006-02-01

    A significant contributory factor to the poor prognosis of patients with glioblastoma multiforme is the inability of conventional treatments to eradicate infiltrating glioma cells. A syngeneic rat brain tumor model is used to investigate the effects of aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) on small clusters of tumor cells sequestered in normal brain. The intrinsic sensitivity of rat glioma cells to PDT was investigated by exposing ALA-incubated cells to a range of radiant exposures and irradiances using 635 nm light. Biodistribution studies were undertaken on tumor-bearing animals in order to determine the tumor selectivity of the photosensitizer following systemic administration (i.p.) of ALA. Effects of ALA-PDT on normal brain and gross tumor were evaluated using histopathology. Effects of PDT on isolated glioma cells in normal brain were investigated by treating animals 48 h after tumor cell implantation: a time when the micro-clusters of cells are protected by an intact blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Rat glioma cells in monolayer are susceptible to ALA-PDT - lower irradiances are more effective than higher ones. Fluorescence microscopy of frozen tissue sections showed that photosensitizer is produced with better than 200:1 tumor-to-normal tissue selectivity following i.p. ALA administration. ALA-PDT resulted in significant damage to both gross tumor and normal brain, however, the treatment failed to prolong survival of animals with newly implanted glioma cells compared to non-treated controls if the drug was delivered either i.p. or directly into the brain. In contrast, animals inoculated with tumor cells pre-incubated in vitro with ALA showed a significant survival advantage in response to PDT.

  7. Multidimensional MRI-CT atlas of the naked mole-rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko eSeki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Naked mole-rats have a variety of distinctive features such as the organisation of a hierarchical society (known as eusociality, extraordinary longevity, and cancer resistance; thus, it would be worthwhile investigating these animals in detail. One important task is the preparation of a brain atlas database that provide comprehensive information containing multidimensional data with various image contrasts, which can be achievable using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Advanced MRI techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, which generates high contrast images of fibre structures, can characterise unique morphological properties in addition to conventional MRI. To obtain high spatial resolution images, MR histology, DTI, and X-ray computed tomography (CT were performed on the fixed adult brain. Skull and brain structures were segmented as well as reconstructed in stereotaxic coordinates. Data were also acquired for the neonatal brain to allow developmental changes to be observed. Moreover, in vivo imaging of naked mole-rats was established as an evaluation tool of live animals. The data obtained comprised three-dimensional (3D images with high tissue contrast as well as stereotaxic coordinates. Developmental differences in the visual system were highlighted in particular by DTI. Although it was difficult to delineate optic nerves in the mature adult brain, parts of them could be distinguished in the immature neonatal brain. From observation of cortical thickness, possibility of high somatosensory system development replaced to the visual system was indicated. 3D visualisation of brain structures in the atlas as well as the establishment of in vivo imaging would promote neuroimaging researches towards detection of novel characteristics of eusocial naked mole-rats.

  8. Melatonin reduces traumatic brain injury-induced oxidative stress in the cerebral cortex and blood of rats

    OpenAIRE

    Şenol, Nilgün; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Free radicals induced by traumatic brain injury have deleterious effects on the function and antioxidant vitamin levels of several organ systems including the brain. Melatonin possesses antioxidant effect on the brain by maintaining antioxidant enzyme and vitamin levels. We investigated the effects of melatonin on antioxidant ability in the cerebral cortex and blood of traumatic brain injury rats. Results showed that the cerebral cortex β-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, reduced glutathione, a...

  9. Enhanced Expression of Aquaporin-9 in Rat Brain Edema Induced by Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaili WANG; Runming JIN; Peichao TIAN; Zhihong ZHUO

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the role of AQP9 in brain edema,the expression of AQP9 in an infectious rat brain edema model induced by the injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was examined.Immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that the expressions of AQP9 mRNA and protein at all observed intervals were significantly increased in LPS-treated animals in comparison with the control animals.Time-course analysis showed that the first signs of blood-brain barrier disruption and the increase of brain water content in LPS-treated animals were evident 6 h after LPS injection,with maximum value appearing at 12 h,which coincided with the expression profiles of AQP9 mRNA and protein in LPS-treated animals.The further correlation analysis revealed strong positive correlations among the brain water content,the disruption of the blood-brain barrier and the enhanced expressions of AQP9 mRNA and protein in LPS-treated animals.These results suggested that the regulation of AQP9 expression may play important roles in water movement and in brain metabolic homeostasis associated with the pathophysiology of brain edema induced by LPS injection.

  10. Effects of Acute Lithium Treatment on Brain Levels of Inflammatory Mediators in Poststroke Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Boyko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Few therapeutic options with proven efficacy are available for the treatment of this disabling disease. Lithium is the gold standard treatment for bipolar disorder. Moreover, lithium has been shown to exhibit neuroprotective effects and therapeutic efficacy as a treatment of other neurological disorders. This study was undertaken to examine the effects of lithium on brain inflammatory mediators levels, fever, and mortality in postischemic stroke rats. Ischemic stroke was induced by occlusion of the mid cerebral artery (MCAO. Pretreatment with a single dose of lithium at 2 hours before MCAO induction significantly reduced the elevation in interleukin- (IL- 6 and prostaglandin E2 levels in brain of post-MCAO rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. On the other hand, lithium did not affect the elevation in IL-1α, IL-10, IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels in brain of post-MCAO rats. Moreover, pretreatment with lithium did not alter post-MCAO fever and mortality. These results suggest that acute pretreatment with a single dose of lithium did not markedly affect post-MCAO morbidity and mortality in rats.

  11. Quantitative autoradiographic assessment of sup 55 Fe-RBC distribution in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, S.Z.; Nakata, H.; Tajima, A.; Gruber, K.; Acuff, V.; Patlak, C.; Fenstermacher, J. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (USA))

    1990-11-01

    A simple in vivo technique of labeling erythrocytes (RBCs) with {sup 55}Fe was developed for quantitative autoradiography (QAR). This procedure involved injecting 5-6 ml of ({sup 55}Fe)ferrous citrate solution (1 mCi/ml) intraperitoneally into donor rats. The number of labeled RBCs reached a maximum at around 7 days and declined very slowly thereafter. Labeled RBCs were harvested from donor rats and used for RBC volume measurement in awake rats. Brain radioactivity was assayed by QAR, which yielded spatial resolution of greater than 50 microns. Tight nearly irreversible binding of {sup 55}Fe to RBCs was found in vivo and in vitro. More than 99.5% of the {sup 55}Fe in the blood of donor rats was bound to RBCs. Because of this, labeled blood can be taken from donors and injected into recipients without further preparation. The tissue absorption of {sup 55}Fe emissions was the same in gray and white matter. Microvascular RBC volumes measured with {sup 55}Fe-labeled RBCs agreed with those assayed with {sup 51}Cr-labeled RBCs for many, but not all, brain areas. In conclusion, {sup 55}Fe-RBCs can be readily prepared by this technique and accurately quantitated in brain tissue by QAR.

  12. Increased angiotensin II receptors in brain nuclei of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutkind, J.S.; Kurihara, M.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1988-09-01

    We analyzed angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors by in vitro autoradiography in selective brain nuclei of control, salt-treated (1% NaCl in drinking water), deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-treated (DOCA pivalate, 25 mg/kg sc weekly), and DOCA-salt-treated (DOCA + salt treatments) uninephrectomized male Wistar-Kyoto rats. After 4 wk of treatment, only the DOCA-salt group developed hypertension. ANG II binding increased in median preoptic nucleus and subfornical organ of salt- and DOCA-treated rats. DOCA-treated rats also showed increased ANG II binding in paraventricular nucleus. DOCA-salt-treated rats showed higher ANG II binding in nucleus of the solitary tract and area postrema, as well as in the areas mentioned before. Although salt and/or DOCA treatments alone increased ANG II receptors in some brain nuclei, after combined DOCA-salt treatment there was significantly higher ANG II binding in all areas, except the median preoptic nucleus. These results suggest that increased ANG II receptors in selected brain areas may play a role in the pathophysiology of mineralocorticoid-salt experimental hypertension.

  13. Na+ K(+)-ATPase activity in response to exogenous dehydroepiandrosterone administration in aging rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Asia; Mishra, Monika; Baquer, N Z; Sharma, Deepak

    2008-12-01

    Influence of exogenously administered dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on the activity of Na+ K+ ATPase was investigated in synaptosomal fraction from cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus and medulla regions of brain of 12 and 22 months old rats. DHEA was administered daily at the dose of 30 mg/kg/body wt, intraperitonially (ip) in both the age groups of rats for 1 month. Results showed that Na+ K+ ATPase activity, increased in DHEA treated rats in both the age groups. In terms of per cent increase, 22 months old animals showed significant increase in Na+ K+ ATPase activity in the synaptosomal fraction of all the four brain regions than in 12 months old DHEA-treated rats. This showed that exogenous DHEA modulated the activity of Na+ K+ ATPase and also protected the age-related loss of membrane integrity and functions. It was concluded that exogenous DHEA might be beneficial in terms of neuroprotection against age-related loss of Na+ K+ ATPase mediated brain functions like learning and memory.

  14. Curcumin Mediated Attenuation of Carbofuran Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Ashish; Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Sharma, Bechan

    2016-01-01

    The indiscriminate use of carbofuran to improve crop productivity causes adverse effects in nontargets including mammalian systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate carbofuran induced oxidative stress in rat brain stem and its attenuation by curcumin, a herbal product. Out of 6 groups of rats, 2 groups received two different doses of carbofuran, that is, 15 and 30% of LD50, respectively, for 30 days. Out of these, 2 groups receiving same doses of carbofuran were pretreated with curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight). The levels of antioxidants, TBARS, GSH, SOD, catalase, and GST were determined in rat brain stem. The 2 remaining groups served as placebo and curcumin treated, respectively. The data suggested that carbofuran at different doses caused significant alterations in the levels of TBARS and GSH in dose dependent manner. The TBARS and GSH contents were elevated. The activities of SOD, catalase, and GST were significantly inhibited at both doses of carbofuran. The ratio of P/A was also found to be sharply increased. The pretreatment of curcumin exhibited significant protection from carbofuran induced toxicity. The results suggested that carbofuran at sublethal doses was able to induce oxidative stress in rat brain which could be attenuated by curcumin. PMID:27213055

  15. Curcumin Mediated Attenuation of Carbofuran Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Jaiswal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The indiscriminate use of carbofuran to improve crop productivity causes adverse effects in nontargets including mammalian systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate carbofuran induced oxidative stress in rat brain stem and its attenuation by curcumin, a herbal product. Out of 6 groups of rats, 2 groups received two different doses of carbofuran, that is, 15 and 30% of LD50, respectively, for 30 days. Out of these, 2 groups receiving same doses of carbofuran were pretreated with curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight. The levels of antioxidants, TBARS, GSH, SOD, catalase, and GST were determined in rat brain stem. The 2 remaining groups served as placebo and curcumin treated, respectively. The data suggested that carbofuran at different doses caused significant alterations in the levels of TBARS and GSH in dose dependent manner. The TBARS and GSH contents were elevated. The activities of SOD, catalase, and GST were significantly inhibited at both doses of carbofuran. The ratio of P/A was also found to be sharply increased. The pretreatment of curcumin exhibited significant protection from carbofuran induced toxicity. The results suggested that carbofuran at sublethal doses was able to induce oxidative stress in rat brain which could be attenuated by curcumin.

  16. [Protective effect of salidroside against high altitude hypoxia-induced brain injury in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoru; Zhang, Xiangnan; Li, Dan; Li, Bin; Wang, Jiye; Meng, Shanshan; Luo, Wenjing; Zhang, Wenbin

    2015-10-01

    To observe the protective effect of salidroside against brain injury in rats exposed to hypobaric hypoxia, and investigate the molecular mechanism of salidroside in the prevention of hypobaric hypoxia-induced brain injury. Rats were placed in experiment module simulating 6000 m altitude to establish acute hypobaric hypoxia-induced brain injury models. Their respiratory frequency was observed and recorded. Cell apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) was detected by TUNEL assay; the expressions of Ras homolog family member A (RhoA), phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) and phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) were detected by Western blotting. After acute exposure to 6000 m altitude, the respiratory frequency of the rats increased remarkably. The simulation of hypobaric hypoxia induced cell apoptosis in hippocampal DG region, and salidroside intervention inhibited the process of cell apoptosis. The expressions of RhoA, p-ERK, p-JNK decreased after hypobaric hypoxia exposure. Salidroside intervention reversed RhoA expression and raised the levels of p-ERK and p-JNK. Acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia can induce cell apoptosis in rat hippocampal DG, and salidroside can protect the cells from the exposure-induced apoptosis.

  17. Sodium butyrate reverses the inhibition of Krebs cycle enzymes induced by amphetamine in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valvassori, Samira S; Calixto, Karen V; Budni, Josiane; Resende, Wilson R; Varela, Roger B; de Freitas, Karolina V; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing interest in the possibility that mitochondrial impairment may play an important role in bipolar disorder (BD). The Krebs cycle is the central point of oxidative metabolism, providing carbon for biosynthesis and reducing agents for generation of ATP. Recently, studies have suggested that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors may have antimanic effects. The present study aims to investigate the effects of sodium butyrate (SB), a HDAC inhibitor, on Krebs cycle enzymes activity in the brain of rats subjected to an animal model of mania induced by D-amphetamine (D-AMPH). Wistar rats were first given D-AMPH or saline (Sal) for 14 days, and then, between days 8 and 14, rats were treated with SB or Sal. The citrate synthase (CS), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) were evaluated in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of rats. The D-AMPH administration inhibited Krebs cycle enzymes activity in all analyzed brain structures and SB reversed D-AMPH-induced dysfunction analyzed in all brain regions. These findings suggest that Krebs cycle enzymes' inhibition can be an important link for the mitochondrial dysfunction seen in BD and SB exerts protective effects against the D-AMPH-induced Krebs cycle enzymes' dysfunction.

  18. Preliminary observation of genes specifically expressed in brain tissues during stroke-like episodes in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xian-mei; ZHAO Bin; ZHU Shan-jun; ZHU Zhi-ming; ZHANG Qian; HUI Ru-tai

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To observe the difference of gene expressions of brain tissues during apoplectic episodes and those of normal brain in Wistar rats in order to study the pathological mechanism of apoplexy. Methods: A rat model of hypertension was established with the administration of cold stimulus and high salt intake as the environmental risk factors.Apoplexy occurred in the rats because of hypertension. Suppression subtractive hybridization(SSH) was used to identify and analyze the differential genes specifically expressed in cerebral tissues of stoke group and control rats. Results: A total of 226 genes out of the 228 were usable and analyzed. The average length of the 226 genes was (286.6±120.3) bp with a range from 50 bp to 619 bp. And 126 clones out of the 226 showed a sequence with significant identity to the known genes; 78 clones demonstrated homogenous sequences to the existing ESTs ofdbEST, but no one of the 78 showed sequence with identity to that of known genes; and remaining 22 were novel transrcipts exhibiting no similarity to any known sequences. All the clones which were highly homogenous to the known genes were categorized on the basis of their function. It was found that 26.5% of the mitochodrial genes in brain tissues underwent changes after apoplexy and the changes showed a twofold relationship of cause and effect. Conclusion: Environmental factors are able to induce changes of gene expression, which may increase the sensitivity to apoplectic stroke.

  19. A multidimensional magnetic resonance histology atlas of the Wistar rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G Allan; Calabrese, Evan; Badea, Alexandra; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2012-09-01

    We have produced a multidimensional atlas of the adult Wistar rat brain based on magnetic resonance histology (MRH). This MR atlas has been carefully aligned with the widely used Paxinos-Watson atlas based on optical sections to allow comparisons between histochemical and immuno-marker data, and the use of the Paxinos-Watson abbreviation set. Our MR atlas attempts to make a seamless connection with the advantageous features of the Paxinos-Watson atlas, and to extend the utility of the data through the unique capabilities of MR histology: a) ability to view the brain in the skull with limited distortion from shrinkage or sectioning; b) isotropic spatial resolution, which permits sectioning along any arbitrary axis without loss of detail; c) three-dimensional (3D) images preserving spatial relationships; and d) widely varied contrast dependent on the unique properties of water protons. 3D diffusion tensor images (DTI) at what we believe to be the highest resolution ever attained in the rat provide unique insight into white matter structures and connectivity. The 3D isotropic data allow registration of multiple data sets into a common reference space to provide average atlases not possible with conventional histology. The resulting multidimensional atlas that combines Paxinos-Watson with multidimensional MRH images from multiple specimens provides a new, comprehensive view of the neuroanatomy of the rat and offers a collaborative platform for future rat brain studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A statistical parametric mapping toolbox used for voxel-wise analysis of FDG-PET images of rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binbin Nie

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: PET (positron emission tomography imaging researches of functional metabolism using fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG of animal brain are important in neuroscience studies. FDG-PET imaging studies are often performed on groups of rats, so it is desirable to establish an objective voxel-based statistical methodology for group data analysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study establishes a statistical parametric mapping (SPM toolbox (plug-ins named spmratIHEP for voxel-wise analysis of FDG-PET images of rat brain, in which an FDG-PET template and an intracranial mask image of rat brain in Paxinos & Watson space were constructed, and the default settings were modified according to features of rat brain. Compared to previous studies, our constructed rat brain template comprises not only the cerebrum and cerebellum, but also the whole olfactory bulb which made the later cognitive studies much more exhaustive. And with an intracranial mask image in the template space, the brain tissues of individuals could be extracted automatically. Moreover, an atlas space is used for anatomically labeling the functional findings in the Paxinos & Watson space. In order to standardize the template image with the atlas accurately, a synthetic FDG-PET image with six main anatomy structures is constructed from the atlas, which performs as a target image in the co-registration. RESULTS: The spatial normalization procedure is evaluated, by which the individual rat brain images could be standardized into the Paxinos & Watson space successfully and the intracranial tissues could also be extracted accurately. The practical usability of this toolbox is evaluated using FDG-PET functional images from rats with left side middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in comparison to normal control rats. And the two-sample t-test statistical result is almost related to the left side MCA. CONCLUSION: We established a toolbox of SPM8 named spmratIHEP for voxel-wise analysis of FDG

  1. Fertility, aging and the brain neuroendocrinological studies in female rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, A.N.

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that fertility decreases in female mammals with advancing age. In women this decrease already starts around the age of 30 and shows a large variation between individuals. The aim of this thesis was to elucidate changes in the reproductive system, especially in the brain, that may un

  2. Tenoxicam modulates antioxidant redox system and lipid peroxidation in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naziroğlu, Mustafa; Uğuz, Abdulhadi Cihangir; Gokçimen, Alpaslan; Bülbül, Metin; Karatopuk, Dilek Ulusoy; Türker, Yasin; Cerçi, Celal

    2008-09-01

    We investigated effects of two doses of Tenoxicam, a type 2 cyclooxygenase inhibitor, administration on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant redox system in cortex of the brain in rats. Twenty-two male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups. First group was used as control. 10 and 20 mg/kg body weight Tenoxicam were intramuscularly administrated to rats constituting the second and third groups for 10 days, respectively. Both dose of Tenoxicam administration resulted in significant increase in the glutathione peroxidase activity, reduced glutathione and vitamins C and E of cortex of the brain. The lipid peroxidation levels in the cortex of the brain were significantly decreased by the administration. Vitamin A and beta-carotene concentration was not affected by the administration. There was no statistical difference in all values between 10 and 20 mg Tenoxicam administrated groups. In conclusion, treatment of brain with 10 and 20 mg Tenoxicam has protective effects on the oxidative stress by inhibiting free radical and supporting antioxidant redox system.

  3. Near-infrared oxymeter prototype for noninvasive analysis of rat brain oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Francesco; Donini, Maurizio; Bandera, Andrea; Heidbreder, Christian; Salvatori, Giorgia; Rovati, Luigi

    2004-09-01

    The feasibility of non-invasive analysis of brain activities was studied in the attempt to overcome the major limitation of actual in vivo methodologies i.e. invasiveness. Optic fibre probes were used as optical head of a novel, highly sensitive near infrared continuous wave spectroscopy (CW-NIR) instrument. This prototype was designed for non-invasive analysis of the two main forms of haemoglobin: oxy-haemoglobin (HbO2) and deoxy-haemoglobin (Hb), chromophores present in biological tissues. It was tested in peripheral tissue (human gastrocnemius muscle) and then reset to perform measurement on rat brain. In animal studies, the optical head was firmly placed using stereotaxic apparatus upon the sagittal line of anaesthetised adult rat's head, without any surgery. Then pharmacological treatments with saline (300μl s.c.) amphetamine (2mg/kg) or nicotine (0.4mg/kg) were performed. Within 10-20 min amphetamine substantially increased HbO2 and reduced Hb control levels. Nicotine produced a rapid initial increase followed by a decrease of HbO2. In contrast to amphetamine, nicotine treatment also reduced Hb and blood volume. These results support the capacity of our CW-NIR prototype to measure non-invasively HbO2 and Hb levels in the rat brain, markers of the degree of tissue oxygenation, index of blood level then of the state of brain metabolism.

  4. Role of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the regulation of brain neuropeptides in normal and diabetic rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolta, Malak G.; Williams, Byron B.; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) alteration on brain dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), beta-endorphin (beta-E), and immunoreactive insulin was studied in Sprague-Dawley diabetic and control rats. Diabetes was induced using alloxan (45 mg/kg), 15 days prior to sacrificing. Both control and diabetic animals were treated with either p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 300 mg/kg) three days prior to sacrificing or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) twice daily for three days. PCPA treatment significantly decreased brain content of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindolel acetic acid, while it caused significant increase and decrease in brain beta-E and insulin levels, respectively, in both normal and diabetic rat. Meanwhile, the administration of fluoxetine resulted in significant increase in brain content of 5-HT, DA, NE and insulin but significant decline of beta-E in diabetic and saline control rats. The results of this experiment indicate that 5-HT may be regulating both beta-E and insulin regardless of the availability of pancreatic insulin.

  5. Chronic treatment with simvastatin upregulates muscarinic M1/4 receptor binding in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Zengin, A; Ying, W; Newell, K A; Wang, P; Yeo, W; Wong, P T-H; Yenari, M A; Huang, X-F

    2008-06-26

    Statins are increasingly being used for the treatment of a variety of conditions beyond their original indication for cholesterol lowering. We previously reported that simvastatin affected the dopaminergic system in the rat brain. This study aims to investigate regional changes of muscarinic M1/4 receptors in the rat brain after 4-week administration of simvastatin (1 or 10 mg/kg/day). M1/4 receptor distribution and alterations in the post-mortem rat brain were detected by [(3)H]pirenzepine binding autoradiography. Simvastatin (1 mg/kg/day) increased [(3)H]pirenzepine binding, predominantly in the prefrontal cortex (171%, Ppirenzepine binding were observed in the examined regions following simvastatin (10 mg/kg/day) treatment. Our results also provide strong evidence that chronic simvastatin administration, especially at a low dosage, up-regulates M1/4 receptor binding, which is likely to be independent of its muscarinic agonist-like effect. Alterations in [(3)H]pirenzepine binding in the examined brain areas may represent the specific regions that mediate the clinical effects of simvastatin treatment on cognition and memory via the muscarinic cholinergic system. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the critical roles of simvastatin in treating neurodegenerative disorders, via muscarinic receptors.

  6. The effects of different hyperbaric oxygen manipulations in rats after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yong-Gang; Lin, Guo-An; Xie, He-Qiu; Pan, Hai-Tao; Huang, Ben-Qing; Liu, Ji-Dong; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Nan; Li, Li; Chen, Jian-Hua

    2014-03-20

    The protective effects of hyperbaric oxygenation following traumatic brain injury have been widely investigated; however, few studies have made systematic comparisons between the different hyperbaric oxygenation manipulations and their corresponding effects. In this study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were observed at 4h, 15d and 75d after traumatic brain injury. The effects of the different hyperbaric oxygenation manipulations on the rats were compared based on morphological, molecular biological and behavioral tests. Our results showed that hyperbaric oxygenation inhibited cell apoptosis in the rat hippocampus and improved their physiological functions. The effects observed in the hyperbaric oxygen-early group were better than the hyperbaric oxygen-delayed group, and the hyperbaric oxygen-early-delayed group demonstrated the best effects among all the groups. Our results showed the hyperbaric oxygenation was recommended early and delayed post-traumatic brain injury and exposure to hyperbaric oxygenation should be prolonged. These findings provide new ideal therapeutic insight for the clinical treatment of traumatic brain injury.

  7. Increased Arousal Levels and Decreased Sleep by Brain Music in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Zhan Fang; Chun-Peng Zhang; Dan Wu; Yang Xia; Yong-Xiu Lai; De-Zhong Yao

    2009-01-01

    More and more studies have been reported on whether music and other types of auditory stimulation would improve the quality of sleep.Many of these studies have found significant results,but others argue that music is not significantly better than the tones or control conditions in improving sleep.For further understanding the relationship between music and sleep or music and arousal,the present study therefore examines the effects of brain music on sleep and arousal by means of biofeedback.The music is from the transformation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) of rats using an algorithm in the Chengdu Brain Music (CBM) system.When the brain music was played back to rats,EEG data were recorded to assess the efficacy of music to induce or improve sleep,or increase arousal levels by sleep staging,etc.Our results demonstrate that exposure to the brain music increases arousal levels and decreases sleep in rats,and the underlying mechanism of decreased non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and REM sleep may be different.

  8. Effect of a chronic GSM 900 MHz exposure on glia in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammari, Mohamed; Brillaud, Elsa; Gamez, Christelle; Lecomte, Anthony; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; de Seze, René

    2008-01-01

    Extension of the mobile phone technology raises concern about the health effects of 900 MHz microwaves on the central nervous system (CNS). In this study we measured GFAP expression using immunocytochemistry method, to evaluate glial evolution 10 days after a chronic exposure (5 days a week for 24 weeks) to GSM signal for 45 min/day at a brain-averaged specific absorption rate (SAR)=1.5 W/kg and for 15 min/day at a SAR=6 W/kg in the following rat brain areas: prefrontal cortex (PfCx), caudate putamen (Cpu), lateral globus pallidus of striatum (LGP), dentate gyrus of hippocampus (DG) and cerebellum cortex (CCx). In comparison to sham or cage control animals, rats exposed to chronic GSM signal at 6 W/kg have increased GFAP stained surface areas in the brain (pGSM at 1.5 W/kg did not increase GFAP expression. Our results indicated that chronic exposure to GSM 900 MHz microwaves (SAR=6 W/kg) may induce persistent astroglia activation in the rat brain (sign of a potential gliosis).

  9. Halofuginone Inhibits Angiogenesis and Growth in Implanted Metastatic Rat Brain Tumor Model-an MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinat Abramovitch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF is a potent inhibitor of collagen type α1(I. In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001. Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001. In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05. Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03. Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  10. Minor Functional Deficits in Basic Response Patterns for Reinforcement after Frontal Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonder Haar, Cole; Winstanley, Catharine A

    2016-10-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major contributor to numerous psychiatric conditions and chronic behavioral dysfunction. Recent studies in experimental brain injury have begun to adopt operant methodologies to assess these deficits, all of which rely on the process of reinforcement. No studies have directly examined how reinforced behaviors are affected by TBI, however. The current study assessed performance under the four most common schedules of reinforcement (fixed ratio, variable ratio, fixed interval, variable interval) and one higher order schedule assessing motivation (progressive ratio) after bilateral, pre-frontal controlled cortical impact injury. TBI-induced differences on the basic schedules were minor, with the exception of the variable ratio, where increased efficacy (more reinforcers, higher response rates, lower interresponse times) at higher requirements was observed as a result of brain injury. Performance on the progressive ratio schedule showed some gross differences between the groups, in that sham rats became more efficient under this schedule while injured rats perseverated in lever pressing. Further, injured rats were specifically impaired at lower response requirements on the progressive ratio. Taken together, these findings indicate that simple reinforced behaviors are mostly unaffected after TBI, except in the case of variable ratio schedules, but the altered performance on the higher-order progressive ratio schedule suggests changes involving motivation or potentially perseveration. These findings validate operant measures of more complex behaviors for brain injury, all of which rely on reinforcement and can be taken into consideration when adapting and developing novel functional assessments.

  11. Rifaximin, but not growth factor 1, reduces brain edema in cirrhotic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gemma (ò)dena; Mireia Miquel; Anna Serafín; Amparo Galan; Rosa Morillas; Ramon Planas; Ramon Bartolí

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To compare rifaximin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 treatment of hyperammonemia and brain edema in cirrhotic rats with portal occlusion.METHODS:Rats with CCl4-induced cirrhosis with ascites plus portal vein occlusion and controls were randomized into six groups:Cirrhosis; Cirrhosis + IGF-1;Cirrhosis + rifaximin; Controls; Controls + IGF-1; and Controls + rifaximin.An oral glutamine-challenge test was performed,and plasma and cerebral ammonia,glucose,bilirubin,transaminases,endotoxemia,brain water content and ileocecal cultures were measured and liver histology was assessed.RESULTS:Rifaximin treatment significantly reduced bacterial overgrowth and endotoxemia compared with cirrhosis groups,and improved some liver function parameters (bilirubin,alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase).These effects were associated with a significant reduction in cerebral water content.Blood and cerebral ammonia levels,and area-underthe-curve values for oral glutamine-challenge tests were similar in rifaximin-treated cirrhotic rats and control group animals.By contrast,IGF-1 administration failed to improve most alterations observed in cirrhosis.CONCLUSION:By reducing gut bacterial overgrowth,only rifaximin was capable of normalizing plasma and brain ammonia and thereby abolishing low-grade brain edema,alterations associated with hepatic encephalopathy.

  12. Possible effects of rosuvastatin on noise-induced oxidative stress in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Alevtina; Koc, Emine Rabia; Sahin, Semsettin; Duzgun, Ulkuhan; Acar, Burcu; Ilhan, Atilla

    2014-01-01

    The problem of noise has recently gained more attention as it has become an integral part of our daily lives. However, its influence has yet to be fully elucidated. Other than being an unpleasant stimulus, noise may cause health disorders through annoyance and stress, including oxidative stress. Rosuvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, may possess antioxidant properties. Based on rat models, our project investigates the effect of rosuvastatin on noise-induced oxidative stress in the brain tissue. Thirty-two male Wistar albino rats were used. The rats were divided into four groups: Noise exposure plus rosuvastatin usage, only noise exposure, only rosuvastatin usage, and control. After the data had been collected, oxidant and antioxidant parameters were analyzed in the cerebral cortex, brain stem, and cerebellum. Results indicated that superoxide dismutase values were significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex, while malondialdehyde values in the brainstem and cerebellum were significantly increased in the group with only noise exposure. Superoxide dismutase values in the brainstem were significantly increased, but nitric oxide values in the cerebellum and brainstem and malondialdehyde values in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex were significantly decreased in the group where only rosuvastatin was used. During noise exposure, the use of rosuvastatin caused significantly increased superoxide dismutase values in the cerebral cortex and brainstem, but significantly reduced malondialdehyde values in the brain stem. Consequently, our data show that brain tissue was affected by oxidative stress due to continued exposure to noise. This noise-induced stress decreases with rosuvastatin therapy.

  13. Intranasal brain-derived neurotrophic factor protects brain from ischemic insult via modulating local inflammation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y; Wei, N; Lu, T; Zhu, J; Xu, G; Liu, X

    2011-01-13

    Inflammation plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may protect brain tissues from ischemic injury. In this study, we investigated whether intranasal BDNF exerted neuroprotection against ischemic insult by modulating the local inflammation in rats with ischemic stroke. Rats were subjected to temporary occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery (120 min) and intranasal BDNF or vehicle was adminstrated 2 h after reperfusion. Infarct volume and neuron injury were measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride, Nissl staining and TUNEL assay, respectively. Microglia were detected by immunohistofluorescence. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin10 and mRNAs were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-kappa B was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. BDNF level in brain tissues was markedly raised following intranasal administration. There were more Nissl positive and less TUNEL positive neurons in BDNF group than in control group while intranasal BDNF did not reduce the infarct volume significantly (n=6, 0.27±0.04 vs. 0.24±0.05, P>0.05). BDNF increased the number of activated microglia (OX-42 positive) and phagocytotic microglia (ED1 positive). BDNF suppressed tumor necrosis factor-α and mRNA expression while increasing the interleukin10 and mRNA expression. BDNF also increased DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-kappa B (n=6, 49.78±1.23 vs. 52.89±1.64, PBDNF might protect the brain against ischemic insult by modulating local inflammation via regulation of the levels of cellular, cytokine and transcription factor in the experimental stroke.

  14. Action of peripherally administered cholecystokinin on monoaminergic and GABAergic neurons in the rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaneyuki,Takao

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available In an acute study, cholecystokinin octapeptide sulfate (CCK in doses of 1, 10 or 100 micrograms/kg body weight was injected intraperitoneally into rats just prior to the dark cycle. Rats were sacrificed two hours following the CCK injection. Norepinephrine levels were elevated in the dorsal amygdala of rats injected with 10 micrograms of CCK as well as in the septum of rats injected with 1 and 10 micrograms of CCK. The dopamine level in the septum of rats injected with 1 microgram of CCK as well as the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA level in the lateral hypothalamus of rats injected with 10 micrograms of CCK were also elevated. In a chronic study, CCK (1 microgram/kg body weight/h was subcutaneously infused into rats with Alzet osmotic minipump for seven consecutive days. The daily food consumption did not change during the 7 days of CCK infusion. The dopamine turnover in the striatum accelerated and the GABA level increased. On the contrary, dopamine metabolism in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus decreased. Furthermore, the serotonin level in the substantia nigra decreased. Norepinephrine levels decreased in the nucleus paraventricularis, the locus coeruleus and the substantia nigra. The results suggest that peripherally administered CCK may act on the monoaminergic neurons and GABAergic neurons in the brain.

  15. Erythropoietin can promote survival of cerebral cells by downregulating Bax gene after traumatic brain injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Z

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Traumatic brain injury (TBI is an important cause of adult mortality and morbidity. Erythropoietin (Epo has been shown to promote the viability of cerebral cells by upregulating Bcl-2 gene; however, Epo may exert its antiapoptotic effect via the differential regulation of the expression of genes involved in the apoptotic process. Aim : The present study examined the neuroprotective effect of Epo as a survival factor through the regulation of the Bax. Materials and Methods : Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: Recombinant human EPO treated (rhEPO TBI, vehicle-treated TBI, and sham-operated. Traumatic brain injury was induced by the Feeney free-falling model. Rats were killed 5, 12, 24, 72, 120, or 168 h after TBI. Regulation of Bcl-2 was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence. Results : Bax mRNA and protein levels were lower in the rhEPO-treated rat brains than in the vehicle-treated rat brains. Induction of Bax expression peaked at 24 h and remained stable for 72-120 h in vehicle-treated rat brains, whereas induction of Bax expression was only slightly elevated in rhEPO-treated rat brains. The number of TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling(TUNEL-positive cells in the rhEPO-treated rat brains was far fewer than in the vehicle-treated rat brains. Conclusions : Epo exerts neuroprotective effect against traumatic brain injury via reducing Bax gene expression involved in inhibiting TBI-induced neuronal cell death.

  16. Propofol Inhibits NLRP3 Inflammasome and Attenuates Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Xiao, Wenjing; Wang, Junrui; Wu, Juan; Ren, Jiandong; Hou, Jun; Gu, Jianwen; Fan, Kaihua; Yu, Botao

    2016-12-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that inflammatory response plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of secondary injury following blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). Propofol, a lipid-soluble intravenous anesthetic, has been shown to possess therapeutic benefit during neuroinflammation on various brain injury models. Recent findings have proved that the NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome involved in the process of the inflammatory response following brain trauma, may probably be a promising target in the treatment of bTBI. Rats were randomly divided into six groups (n = 8): normal group; bTBI-12 and 24 h group; bTBI-12 h and bTBI-24 h group treated with propofol; and bTBI treated with control dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) group. The effect of propofol on the expression and activation of NLRP3 inflammasome and the degree of oxidative stress and inflammatory cascades, as well as the brain trauma biomarkers were evaluated in rats suffering from bTBI. The enhanced expressions and activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in the cerebral cortex of bTBI rats were substantially suppressed by the administration of propofol, which was paralleled with the decreased oxidative stress, cytokines production, and the amelioration of cerebral cortex damage. Our results have, for the first time, revealed that over-activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in the cerebral cortex may be involved in the process of neuroinflammation during the secondary injury of bTBI in rats. Propofol might relieve the inflammatory response and attenuate brain injury by inhibiting ROS and reluctant depressing NLRP3 inflammasome activation and pro-inflammatory cytokines maturation.

  17. Differential effects of antipsychotics on expression of antioxidant enzymes and membrane lipid peroxidation in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Vinay; Khan, Mohammad M; Mahadik, Sahebarao P

    2003-01-01

    Typical and atypical antipsychotics significantly differ in their neurotransmitter receptor affinity profiles, and their efficacy and side effects in schizophrenic patients. Typical antipsychotics have been found to increase the oxidative (i.e. free radical-mediated) cellular injury in rats. Since schizophrenia also involves oxidative injury, the understanding of differential effects of these antipsychotics on expression of antioxidant enzymes and oxidative injury may be very critical. The effect of chronic exposure of haloperidol (HAL), a typical antipsychotic, was compared to effects of risperidone (RIS) or clozapine (CLZ) or olanzapine (OLZ), atypical antipsychotics on antioxidant defense enzymes and lipid peroxidation in the rat brain. The levels of antioxidant enzymes and hydroxyalkenals (HAEs) were measured in rat brain cytosol and fatty acids were measured in brain cell membranes. Chronic HAL treatment for both 45 and 90 days significantly decreased manganese-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and catalase (CAT) activity with parallel marked increase in (HAEs), a marker of lipid peroxidation in rat brain. The levels of enzymatic activity very well correlated with the levels of enzyme proteins indicating that the changes were probably in the expression of net protein. However, RIS, CLZ and OLZ treatments did not produce any alterations in the levels of antioxidant enzymes and HAEs, both after 45 and 90 days. There were no alterations in the levels of saturated as well as polyunsaturated fatty acids in brain membranes. These findings indicate that chronic administration of HAL, but none of the studied atypicals induce oxidative stress by persistent changes in the levels of antioxidant enzymes and cause membrane lipid peroxidation.

  18. Brain antioxidant markers, cognitive performance and acetylcholinesterase activity of rats: efficiency of Sonchus asper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Rahmat

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sonchus asper (SA is traditionally used as a folk medicine to treat mental disorders in Pakistan. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of polyphenolic rich methanolic fraction of SA on cognitive performance, brain antioxidant activities and acetylcholinesterase activity in male rats. Methods 30 male Sprague–Dawley rats were equally divided into three groups in this study. Animals of group I (control received saline (vehicle, group II received SA (50 mg/kg body weight (b.w., and group III treated with SA (100 mg/kg b.w., orally in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO for 7 days. The effect of SA was checked on rat cognitive performance, brain antioxidatant and acetylcholinesterase activities. Evaluation of learning and memory was assessed by a step-through a passive avoidance test on day 6 after two habituation trials and an initial acquisition trial on day 5. Antioxidant potential was determined by measuring activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, contents of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS and reduced glutathione (GSH in whole-brain homogenates. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity was determined by the colorimetric method. Results Results showed that 100 mg/kg b.w., SA treated rats exhibited a significant improvement in learning and memory (step-through latency time. SA administration reduced lipid peroxidation products and elevated glutathione levels in the SA100-treated group. Furthermore, salt and detergent soluble AChE activity was significantly decreased in both SA-treated groups. Short-term orally supplementation of SA showed significant cognitive enhancement as well as elevated brain antioxidant enzymes and inhibited AChE activity. Conclusion These findings stress the critical impact of Sonchus asper bioactive components on brain function.

  19. Changes of interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-6 in brain and plasma after brain injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱涛; 姚智; 袁汉娜; 陆伯刚; 杨树源

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of interleukin-1 β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in brain and plasma after brain injury and to assess the relationship between the cytokine levels and injury severity in rats. Methods: A total of 51 male Wistar rats, weighing 280-340 g, were anesthetized with chloral hydrate (400 mg/kg body weight) through intraperitoneal injection and fixed on a stereotaxic instrument. Severe brain injury was created in 16 rats (severe injury group) and moderate brain injury in 18 rats (moderate injury group) by a fluid percussion model, and cytokine levels of IL-1β, TNFα and IL-6 were measured with biological assay. And sham operation was made on the other 17 rats (control group). Results: In the control group, the levels of IL-1β, TNFα and IL-6 were hardly detected in the cortex of the rats, but in the ipsilateral cortex of the rats in both injury groups, they increased obviously at 8 hours after injury. The increasing degree of these cytokines had no significant difference between the two injury groups. The levels of IL-6 in the plasma of all the rats increased slightly, whereas the levels of IL-1β and TNFα were undetectable. Conclusions: The increase of IL-1β, TNFα and IL-6 levels is closely related to brain injury. The increased cytokine levels in the central nervous system are not parallel to those in the peripheral blood. It suggests that inflammatory cytokines play important roles in the secondary neural damage after brain injury.

  20. Functional brain fluorescence plurimetry in rat by implantable concatenated CMOS imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takuma; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Kitsumoto, Chikara; Haruta, Makito; Motoyama, Mayumi; Ohta, Yasumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Ohta, Jun

    2014-03-15

    Measurement of brain activity in multiple areas simultaneously by minimally invasive methods contributes to the study of neuroscience and development of brain machine interfaces. However, this requires compact wearable instruments that do not inhibit natural movements. Application of optical potentiometry with voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye using an implantable image sensor is also useful. However, the increasing number of leads required for the multiple wired sensors to measure larger domains inhibits natural behavior. For imaging broad areas by numerous sensors without excessive wiring, a web-like sensor that can wrap the brain was developed. Kaleidoscopic potentiometry is possible using the imaging system with concatenated sensors by changing the alignment of the sensors. This paper describes organization of the system, evaluation of the system by a fluorescence imaging, and finally, functional brain fluorescence plurimetry by the sensor. The recorded data in rat somatosensory cortex using the developed multiple-area imaging system compared well with electrophysiology results.

  1. Nonparallel changes in brain monoamines of pyridoxine-deficient growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakshinamurti, K; LeBlancq, W D; Herchl, R; Havlicek, V

    1976-11-23

    The effects of a large number of neurotropic drugs have been attributed to changes in the metabolism of 5-hydroxytryptamine. The aromatic amino acid decarboxylase considered to decarboxylate both dihydroxyphenylalanine and 5-hydroxytryptophan requires pyridoxal phosphate as coenzyme. Thus, in pyridoxine deficiency one would expect a decrease of serotonin as well as the catecholamines of the brain. In the present study we have found a very significant decrease in brain serotonin of the pyridoxine-deficient growing rat. However, the brain levels of norepinephrine and dopamine were not altered. This decrease in serotonin does not result from a decrease either in the brain level of trytophan or the activity of tryptophan hydroxylase. Increased degradation of serotonin measured by the levels of its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid is also excluded, thus suggesting the possibility that the decarboxylation of 5-hydroxytryptophan is decreased in pyridoxine deficiency.

  2. Liver irradiation causes distal bystander effects in the rat brain and affects animal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Mychasiuk, Richelle; Muhammad, Arif; Hossain, Shakhawat; Ilnytskyy, Slava; Ghose, Abhijit; Kirkby, Charles; Ghasroddashti, Esmaeel; Kovalchuk, Olga; Kolb, Bryan

    2016-01-26

    Radiation therapy can not only produce effects on targeted organs, but can also influence shielded bystander organs, such as the brain in targeted liver irradiation. The brain is sensitive to radiation exposure, and irradiation causes significant neuro-cognitive deficits, including deficits in attention, concentration, memory, and executive and visuospatial functions. The mechanisms of their occurrence are not understood, although they may be related to the bystander effects.We analyzed the induction, mechanisms, and behavioural repercussions of bystander effects in the brain upon liver irradiation in a well-established rat model.Here, we show for the first time that bystander effects occur in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus regions upon liver irradiation, where they manifest as altered gene expression and somewhat increased levels of γH2AX. We also report that bystander effects in the brain are associated with neuroanatomical and behavioural changes, and are more pronounced in females than in males.

  3. Protective effects of tetrandrine on brain cells in phenobarbital-dependent and -withdrawn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bin; Fu, Ping; Ye, Yun; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Guojun

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of tetrandrine (Tet) on the brain cells of phenobarbital‑dependant and ‑withdrawn rats, and to explore the underlying mechanisms. A total of 100 rats were randomly divided into five groups: The control group, the phenobarbital‑dependent model group, and Tet‑treated groups of low‑, mid‑ and high‑dosages. Following drug withdrawl, the morphological changes of the frontal lobe cells were examined by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Immunohistochemical staining was applied to detect the expression of apoptosis‑related proteins Bcl‑2 and Bax. Reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction (RT‑PCR) and western blotting methods were applied to detect the mRNA and protein expression levels of Bcl‑2 and Bax, respectively, in the frontal lobe. The results indicated that Tet effectively reduced the withdrawal symptoms, particularly the weight loss, in phenobarbital‑dependent and ‑withdrawn rats. H&E staining revealed that Tet significantly restored the histopathological changes in the addicted rats in a dose‑dependent manner. The immunohistochemical, RT‑PCR, and western blot analyses indicated that Tet treatment significantly increased the Bcl‑2+ brain cells and the mRNA and protein expression levels of Bcl‑2, and decreased the Bax+ cells and the mRNA and protein expression levels of Bax, as well as elevated the ratio of Bcl‑2/Bax, in phenobarbital‑dependent and ‑withdrawn rats. Tet may inhibit apoptosis in these addicted rats, in a dose‑dependent manner. Tet alleviates the phenobarbital withdrawal symptoms and protects the brain cells against apoptosis, which may be a result of the regulation of the mRNA and protein expression levels of Bcl‑2 and Bax.

  4. Brain beta-adrenergic receptor binding in rats with obesity induced by a beef tallow diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, T; Suzuki, M

    1997-01-01

    We have previously reported that compared with safflower oil diet, feeding a beef tallow diet leads to a greater accumulation of body fat by reducing sympathetic activities. The present study examined the effects of dietary fats consisting of different fatty acids on alpha1- and beta-adrenergic receptor binding in the hypothalamus and cerebral cortex. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were meal-fed isoenergetic diets based on safflower oil (rich in n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids) or beef tallow (rich in saturated fatty acids) for 8 weeks. Binding affinities of the beta-adrenergic receptor in the hypothalamus and cortex were significantly lower in the beef tallow diet group, but those of the alpha1-receptor did not differ between the two groups. The polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acid (P/S) ratio and fluidities of plasma membranes in the hypothalamus and cortex were lower in the beef tallow diet group than in the safflower oil diet group. These results suggest that the beef tallow diet decreases membrane fluidity by altering the fatty acid composition of plasma membranes in the hypothalamus and cerebral cortex of rat. Consequently, beta-adrenergic receptor binding affinities in the brain were lower in rats fed the beef tallow diet than in rats fed the safflower oil diet. We recognized that there is possible link between the membrane fluidity and the changes in affinity of beta-adrenoceptors in rat brain.

  5. Expression of the 5-HT receptors in rat brain during memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, A; Manuel-Apolinar, L; Rocha, L; Castillo, E; Castillo, C

    2004-07-09

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system displays more than 14 receptors subtypes on brain areas involved in learning and memory processes, and pharmacological manipulation of specific receptors selectively affects memory formation. In order to begin the search of 5-HT receptors expression during memory formation, in this work, we aimed to determine, by autoradiography (using 3H 5-HT as ligand, 2 nM, specific activity 123 Ci/mmol), 5-HT receptors (5-HTR) expression in passive (untrained) and autoshaping trained (3 sessions) adult (3 months) and old (9 months) male rats. Thus, trained adult rats had better retention than old animals. Raphe nuclei of adult and old trained rats expressed less receptors on medial and dorsal, respectively. Hippocampal CA1 area and dentate gyrus of adult trained rats expressed less 5-HTR, while dentate gyrus of old increased them. Basomedial amygdaloid nucleus in old trained rats expressed more 5-HTR; while in the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus they were augmented in both groups. Training decreased or did not change 5-HTR in caudate-putamen of adult or old animals. The above profile of 5-HTR expression is consistent with previous reports, and suggests that memory formation and aging modulates 5-HTR expression in brain areas relevant to memory systems.

  6. Hyperglycolysis is exacerbated after traumatic brain injury with fentanyl vs. isoflurane anesthesia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statler, Kimberly D; Janesko, Keri L; Melick, John A; Clark, Robert S B; Jenkins, Larry W; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2003-12-19

    Despite common use of narcotics in the clinical management of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), in experimental models rats treated with fentanyl have exhibited worse functional outcome and more CA1 hippocampal death than rats treated with standard isoflurane anesthesia. We hypothesized that greater post-traumatic excitotoxicity, reflected by cerebral glucose utilization (CMRglu), may account for detrimental effects of fentanyl vs. isoflurane. Rats were anesthetized with either isoflurane (1% by inhalation) or fentanyl (10 mcg/kg iv bolus then 50 mcg/kg/h infusion). 14C-deoxyglucose autoradiography was performed 45 min after controlled cortical impact (CCI) to left parietal cortex (n=4 per anesthetic group) or in uninjured rats after 45 min of anesthesia (n=3 per anesthetic group). Uninjured rats treated with fentanyl vs. isoflurane showed 35-45% higher CMRglu in all brain structures (panesthesia. This post-traumatic hyperglycolysis suggests greater excitotoxicity and concurs with reports of worse functional outcome and more CA1 hippocampal death after TBI with fentanyl vs. isoflurane anesthesia.

  7. Glucocorticoids aggravate retrograde memory deficiency associated with traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Zhang, Ke-Li; Yang, Shu-Yuan; Dong, Jing-Fei; Zhang, Jian-Ning

    2009-02-11

    Administration of glucocorticoid to patients with head injury has previously been demonstrated to impair memory. We hypothesize that glucocorticoids promote post-traumatic hippocampal apoptosis, resulting in retrograde memory deficiency associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the present study, we tested this hypothesis by measuring spatial memory deficiency in rats subjected to fluid percussion injury (FPI) and receiving dexamethasone (DXM at 0.5-10 mg/kg) or methylprednisolone (MP at 5-30 mg/kg); we also examined neuronal apoptosis in hippocampus. Adult male Wistar rats were trained for the acquisition of spatial memory, then subjected to FPI and tested for spatial reference memory on post-injury days 7 and 14 using the Morris Water Maze. Brain tissue from injured rats was examined 24 h to 2 weeks after injury. The percent time in the goal quadrant, which measures spatial reference memory, was significantly lower in injured rats receiving either high-dose DXM or MP than in control groups. TUNEL-positive cells in hippocampus were first detected 24 h post-injury, plateauing at 48h. The number of TUNEL-positive cells was significantly higher in injured rats treated with either DXM or MP. The data suggest that glucocorticoid therapy for TBI may increase neuronal apoptosis in hippocampus and, as a result, aggravate retrograde memory deficits induced by TBI.

  8. Protection of Effective Component Group from Xiaoshuan Tongluo on Brain Injury after Chronic Hypoperfusion in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Chu-bing; WANG Hong-qing; TIAN Shuo; GAO Mei; XU Wei-ren; CHEN Ruo-yun; DU Guan-hua

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the protective effects of purified effective component group in extract from Xiaoshuan Tongluo(CGXT)formula on chronic brain ischemia in rats.Methods CGXT 75,150,and 300 mg/kg or vehicle were ig administered daily for four weeks to rats with bilateral common carotid arteries ligation(BCCAL).From the day 24 to 28 after BCCAL,Morris water maze was performed to assess the learning and memory impairment of rats.Four weeks after BCCAL,brain gray and white matter damage were assessed.Results In Morris test,the mean escape latency of rats in the CGXT(150 and 300 mg/kg)groups was significantly shorter than that in the vehicle group.CGXT also attenuated the neuronal damage in hippocampus and cortex and reduced the pathological damage in the optic tract and corpus callosum.Conclusion CGXT could improve learning and memory impairment resulted from BCCAL in rats.These results provide the experimental basis for the clinical use of CGXT in stroke treatment and may help in investigation of multimodal therapy strategies in ischemic cerebrovascular diseases including stroke.

  9. Pericyte abundance affects sucrose permeability in cultures of rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Fiona E; Hacking, Cindy

    2005-07-05

    The blood-brain barrier is a physical and metabolic barrier that restricts diffusion of blood-borne substances into brain. In vitro models of the blood-brain barrier are used to characterize this structure, examine mechanisms of damage and repair and measure permeability of test substances. The core component of in vitro models of the blood-brain barrier is brain microvascular endothelial cells. We cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMEC) from isolated rat cortex microvessels. After 2-14 days in vitro (DIV), immunohistochemistry of these cells showed strong labeling for zona occludens 1 (ZO-1), a tight junction protein expressed in endothelial cells. Pericytes were also present in these cultures, as determined by expression of alpha-actin. The present study was performed to test different cell isolation methods and to compare the resulting cell cultures for abundance of pericytes and for blood-brain barrier function, as assessed by 14C-sucrose flux. Two purification strategies were used. First, microvessels were preabsorbed onto uncoated plastic for 4 h, then unattached microvessels were transferred to coated culture ware. Second, microvessels were incubated with an antibody to platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1; CD31) precoupled to magnetic beads, and a magnetic separation procedure was performed. Our results indicate that immunopurification, but not preadsorption, was an effective method to purify microvessels and reduce pericyte abundance in the resulting cultures. This purification significantly reduced 14C-sucrose fluxes across cell monolayers. These data indicate that pericytes can interfere with the development of blood-brain barrier properties in in vitro models that utilize primary cultures of RBMECs.

  10. Protein aggregation in association with delayed neuronal death in rat model of brain ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengfei GE; Tianfei LUG; Shuanglin FU; Wenchen LI; Chonghao WANG; Chuibing ZHOU; Yinan LUO

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between protein aggregation and delayed neuronal death, we adopted rat models of 20 min ischemia. Brain ischemia was produced using the 2-vessel occlusion (2VO) model in rats Light microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy and Western blot analysis were performed for morphological analysis of neurons, and protein detection. The results showed delayed neuronal death took place at 72 h after ischemia-reperfusion, protein aggregates formed at 4 h after reperfusion and reached the peak at 24 h after reper-fusion, and Western blot analysis was consistent with transmission electronic microscopy. We conclude that protein aggregation is one of the important factors leading to delayed neuronal death.

  11. Contents of myelin-basic protein and S-100 in serum and brain tissue of neonatal rats with intrauterine infection-caused brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojie Li; Hongying Li; Zhihai Lu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The change of the content of myelin basic protein (MBP) in serum and brain tissue is the bio chemical diadynamic index of amyelination. S-100 is a specific and sensitive marker of central nervous system (CNS) injury. Whether or not the content of S-100 and MBP in blood and brain tissue can be used as the quan titative index for early diagnosing the intrauterine infection-caused brain injury still needs investigation. OBJECTIVE: To observe whether or not MBP and S-100 detection can be used as the biochemical indexes for early diagnosing the intrauterine infection-caused brain injury. DESIGN: Randomized controlled animal experiment. SETTING: Laboratory of Pediatric Neuro-rehabilitation, Medical College of Rehabilitation, Jiamusi University. MATERIALS: Sixty female and thirty male common Wistar rats, weighing from 180 to 240 g, were provided by the Experimental Animal Center of Jiamusi University. Reagent: Lipopolysaccharide(LPS, serological type 055: B5, SIGMA Company of USA); MBP enzyme linked immunosobent assay (ELISA) immunoreagent kit (Preclinicai Recombination DNA Laboratory, Chengdu Huaxi Medical Center, Sichuan Province); S-100 ELISA immunoreagent kit ( Department of Physiology, the Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA) and bovine serum albumin(Haitaike Biotechnology Co.,Ltd.).METHODS: This experiment was carried out in the Laboratory of Pediatric Neuro-Rehabilitation, Experimental Animal Center, Department of Pathology and Central Laboratory of Jiamusi University from July 2005 to March 2006. ① Preparation of models and grouping: The female and male rats were placed in one cage at 2: 1 at 17:00 o'clock. Vaginal smear was checked at 8:00 on the next morning. Sperm was found and 0 day of pregnancy was recorded. Pregnant rats were bred in another cage. The pregnant 47 rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: control group (n =10) and experimental group (n =37). The experimental pregnant rats were intraperitoneally injected with LPS

  12. N-Acetylaspartate distribution in rat brain striatum during acute brain ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sager, T.N.; Laursen, H; Fink-Jensen, A

    1999-01-01

    Brain N-acetylaspartate (NAA) can be quantified by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and is used in clinical settings as a marker of neuronal density. It is, however, uncertain whether the change in brain NAA content in acute stroke is reliably measured by 1H-MRS and how NAA......]e increased linearly to 4 mmol/L after 3 hours and this level was maintained for the next 4 h. From the change in in vivo recovery of the interstitial space volume marker [14C]mannitol, the relative amount of NAA distributed in the interstitial space was calculated to be 0.2% of the total brain NAA during...... normal conditions and only 2 to 6% during ischemia. It was concluded that the majority of brain NAA is intracellularly located during ischemia despite large increases of interstitial [NAA]. Thus, MR quantification of NAA during acute ischemia reflects primarily changes in intracellular levels of NAA...

  13. Effect of α-Ketoglutarate on Cyanide-induced Biochemical Alterations in Rat Brain and Liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the biochemical changes in rat brain and liver following acute exposure to a lethal dose of cyanide, and its response to treatment of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) in the absence or presence of sodium thiosulfate (STS). Methods Female rats were administered 2.0 LD50 potassium cyanide (KCN; oral) in the absence or presence of pre-treatment (-10 min), simultaneous treatment (0 min) or post-treatment (+2-3 min) of α-KG (2.0 g/kg, oral) and/or STS (1.0 g/kg,intraperitoneal, -15 min, 0 min or + 2-3 min). At the time of onset of signs and symptoms of KCN toxicity (2-4 min) and at the time of death (5-15 min), various parameters particularly akin to oxidative stress viz. Cytochrome oxidase (CYTOX),superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) in brain, and CYTOX, sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), GSH and GSSG in liver homogenate were measured. Results At both time intervals brain CYTOX, SOD, GPx, and GSH significantly reduced (percent inhibition compared to control) to 24%, 56%, 77%, and 65%, and 44%, 46%, 78%, and 57%, respectively. At the corresponding time points liver CYTOX and GSH reduced to 74% and 63%, and 44% and 68%, respectively. The levels of GSSG in the brain and liver, and hepatic ALP and SDH were unchanged. Pre-treatment and simultaneous treatment of α-KG alone or with STS conferred significant protection on above variables. Post-treatment was effective in restoring the changes in liver but failed to normalize the changes in the brain. Conclusions Oral treatment with α-KG alone or in combination with STS has protective effects on cyanide-induced biochemical alterations in rat brain and liver.

  14. Glucocorticoids Protect Neonatal Rat Brain in Model of Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Benjamin; Conception, Katherine; Li, Yong; Zhang, Lubo

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) resulting from asphyxia in the peripartum period is the most common cause of neonatal brain damage and can result in significant neurologic sequelae, including cerebral palsy. Currently therapeutic hypothermia is the only accepted treatment in addition to supportive care for infants with HIE, however, many additional neuroprotective therapies have been investigated. Of these, glucocorticoids have previously been shown to have neuroprotective effects. HIE is also frequently compounded by infectious inflammatory processes (sepsis) and as such, the infants may be more amenable to treatment with an anti-inflammatory agent. Thus, the present study investigated dexamethasone and hydrocortisone treatment given after hypoxic-ischemic (HI) insult in neonatal rats via intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection and intranasal administration. In addition, we examined the effects of hydrocortisone treatment in HIE after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sensitization in a model of HIE and sepsis. We found that dexamethasone significantly reduced rat brain infarction size when given after HI treatment via ICV injection; however it did not demonstrate any neuroprotective effects when given intranasally. Hydrocortisone after HI insult also significantly reduced brain infarction size when given via ICV injection; and the intranasal administration showed to be protective of brain injury in male rats at a dose of 300 µg. LPS sensitization did significantly increase the brain infarction size compared to controls, and hydrocortisone treatment after LPS sensitization showed a significant decrease in brain infarction size when given via ICV injection, as well as intranasal administration in both genders at a dose of 300 µg. To conclude, these results show that glucocorticoids have significant neuroprotective effects when given after HI injury and that these effects may be even more pronounced when given in circumstances of additional inflammatory injury, such

  15. Stiripentol exhibits higher anticonvulsant properties in the immature than in the mature rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvin, Stéphane; Lecointe, Cécile; Dupuis, Nina; Desnous, Béatrice; Lebon, Sophie; Gressens, Pierre; Dournaud, Pascal

    2013-12-01

    After the first positive experimental data in rodents in the early 1970s demonstrating the anticonvulsant effect of stiripentol (STP), in vitro studies showed that STP acts directly on γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA ) receptors. Chloride influx is higher when these receptors contain an α3 subunit, leading to the hypothesis that STP might exhibit higher efficacy in the immature brain. We explored this issue by studying the efficacy of STP in P21 and P75 rats using the pentylenetetrazol model of acute seizures or the lithium-pilocarpine status epilepticus model. P21 and adult rats received vehicle, 150, 250, or 350 mg/kg of STP, i.p., 1 h before evaluating the anticonvulsant. We also studied the blood and brain levels of STP as well as the expression and the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of the α3 subunit of the GABAA receptors at both ages. STP exhibited anticonvulsant properties in both models at both ages, but STP was more effective in P21 than in P75 rats. This was shown by the significant suppression of seizure or status epilepticus occurrence in P21 with 350 mg/kg STP, whereas the same dose had no significant effect at P75. The blood level, brain level, and blood/brain ratio of STP did not explain these differences between the two age groups. Moreover, the higher anticonvulsant properties in the immature brain were not explained by the mRNA level or protein expression of the GABAA α3 subunit at either age. Stiripentol exhibits higher anticonvulsant properties in the immature than in the mature brain. These findings require further investigation because it might lead to new clinical developments. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  16. PCA and level set based non-rigid image registration for MRI and Paxinos-Watson atlas of rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chao; Liu, Ailing; Ding, Mingyue; Zhou, Chengping

    2007-12-01

    Image registration provides the ability to geometrically align one dataset with another. It is a basic task in a great variety of biomedical imaging applications. This paper introduced a novel three-dimensional registration method for Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) and Paxinos-Watson Atlas of rat brain. For the purpose of adapting to a large range and non-linear deformation between MRI and atlas in higher registration accuracy, based on the segmentation of rat brain, we chose the principle components analysis (PCA) automatically performing the linear registration, and then, a level set based nonlinear registration correcting some small distortions. We implemented this registration method in a rat brain 3D reconstruction and analysis system. Experiments have demonstrated that this method can be successfully applied to registering the low resolution and noise affection MRI with Paxinos-Watson Atlas of rat brain.

  17. Effect of Xingnaojing injection on cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier in rats following traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Miao; SU Wei; XU Qiu-ping; HUANG Wei-dong

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effects of Xingnaojing injection on cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) in rats following traumatic brain injury (TBI).Methods: A total of 108 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were used as subjects and randomly assigned to three groups:sham-operation,TBI and Xingnaojing injection was set up by the improved device of Feeney's weightcontent and BBB permeability expressed as Evans blue content were measured at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days after surgery.Results: In sham-operation group, brain water content and Evans blue content in brain tissue were 78.97%±1.22%and 5.13μg±0.71μg. Following TBI, water content in brain tissue was increased significantly at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days (83.49%±0.54%, 82.74%±0.72%, 80.22%±0.68%, 79.21%±0.60%), being significantly higher than that in sham operation group (P<0.05). Evans blue content was increased in TBI group (16.54 μg±0.60 μg, 14.92μg±0.71μg, 12.44 μg ±0.92μg, 10.14μg±0.52 μg) as compared with sham-operation group(P<0.05). After treatment with Xingnaojing injection, brain water content decreased as compared with TBI group (81.91%±1.04%, 80.38%±0.72%, 79.54%±0.58%,78.60%±0.77%, P<0.05). Xingnaojing injection also reduced the leakage of BBB as compared with TBI group (15.11 μg± 0.63 μg, 13.62 μg±0.85μg, 10.06 μg±0.67 μg, 9.54 μg±0.41 μg,P<0.05).Conclusion: Xingnaojing injection could alleviate cerebral edema following TBI via reducing permeability ofBBB.

  18. Enzymatic transamination of D-kynurenine generates kynurenic acid in rat and human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-de la Cruz, Veronica; Amori, Laura; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V; Wang, Xiao-Dan; Notarangelo, Francesca M; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Schwarcz, Robert

    2012-03-01

    In the mammalian brain, the α7 nicotinic and NMDA receptor antagonist kynurenic acid is synthesized by irreversible enzymatic transamination of the tryptophan metabolite l-kynurenine. d-kynurenine, too, serves as a bioprecursor of kynurenic acid in several organs including the brain, but the conversion is reportedly catalyzed through oxidative deamination by d-amino acid oxidase. Using brain and liver tissue homogenates from rats and humans, and conventional incubation conditions for kynurenine aminotransferases, we show here that kynurenic acid production from d-kynurenine, like the more efficient kynurenic acid synthesis from l-kynurenine, is blocked by the aminotransferase inhibitor amino-oxyacetic acid. In vivo, focal application of 100 μM d-kynurenine by reverse microdialysis led to a steady rise in extracellular kynurenic acid in the rat striatum, causing a 4-fold elevation after 2 h. Attesting to functional significance, this increase was accompanied by a 36% reduction in extracellular dopamine. Both of these effects were duplicated by perfusion of 2 μM l-kynurenine. Co-infusion of amino-oxyacetic acid (2 mM) significantly attenuated the in vivo effects of d-kynurenine and essentially eliminated the effects of l-kynurenine. Thus, enzymatic transamination accounts in part for kynurenic acid synthesis from d-kynurenine in the brain. These results are discussed with regard to implications for brain physiology and pathology.

  19. C/EBPβ Isoforms Expression in the Rat Brain during the Estrous Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Hansberg-Pastor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPβ is a transcription factor expressed in different areas of the brain that regulates the expression of several genes involved in cell differentiation and proliferation. This protein has three isoforms (LAP1, LAP2, and LIP with different transcription activation potential. The role of female sex hormones in the expression pattern of C/EBPβ isoforms in the rat brain has not yet been described. In this study we demonstrate by western blot that the expression of the three C/EBPβ isoforms changes in different brain areas during the estrous cycle. In the cerebellum, LAP2 content diminished on diestrus and proestrus and LIP content diminished on proestrus and estrus days. In the prefrontal cortex, LIP content was higher on proestrus and estrus days. In the hippocampus, LAP isoforms presented a switch on diestrus day, since LAP1 content was the highest while that of LAP2 was the lowest. The LAP2 isoform was the most abundant one in all the three brain areas. The LAP/LIP ratio changed throughout the cycle and was tissue specific. These results suggest that C/EBPβ isoforms expression changes in a tissue-specific manner in the rat brain due to the changes in sex steroid hormone levels presented during the estrous cycle.

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen suppresses hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Lu, Mengru; Li, Qing-Jie; Zhang, Zhuo; Wu, Zheng-Zheng; Li, Jie; Qian, Lai; Xu, Yun; Wang, Zhong-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The optimal therapeutic time-window and protective mechanism of hyperbaric oxygen in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage remain unclear. This study aimed to determine the neuroprotective effects of hyperbaric oxygen. Following hypoxic-ischemic brain damage modeling in neonatal rats, hyperbaric oxygen was administered at 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours and 1 week after hypoxia, respectively, once daily for 1 week. Fourteen days after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage, cell density and apoptosis rate, number of Fas-L+, caspase-8+, and caspase-3+ neuronal cells, levels of nitric oxide, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase in hippocampus were examined. Morris water maze test was conducted 28 days after insult. Significant improvements were found in cell density, rate of apoptosis, oxidative stress markers, FasL, and caspases in rats treated with hyperbaric oxygen within 72 hours compared to hypoxic-ischemic injury. Similarly, time-dependent behavioral amelioration was observed in pups treated with hyperbaric oxygen. Our findings suggest that hyperbaric oxygen protects against hypoxic-ischemic brain damage by inhibiting oxidative stress and FasL-induced apoptosis, and optimal therapeutic time window is within 72 hours after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  1. A template of rat brain based on fMRI T2* imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Zhenghui; WU Yigen; WANG Xiaochuan; WANG Jianzhi; CHEN Feiyan; TANG Xiaowei

    2005-01-01

    The development of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology has made it possible to carry out functional brain imaging experiments in small animals. Usually, group data is requir