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Sample records for rat beta-cell line

  1. Expression of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1 and its role in insulin release from rat pancreatic beta cells.

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    De-Shou Cao

    Full Text Available Several transient receptor potential (TRP channels are expressed in pancreatic beta cells and have been proposed to be involved in insulin secretion. However, the endogenous ligands for these channels are far from clear. Here, we demonstrate the expression of the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1 ion channel in the pancreatic beta cells and its role in insulin release. TRPA1 is an attractive candidate for inducing insulin release because it is calcium permeable and is activated by molecules that are produced during oxidative glycolysis.Immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and Western blot techniques were used to determine the expression of TRPA1 channel. Ca²⁺ fluorescence imaging and electrophysiology (voltage- and current-clamp techniques were used to study the channel properties. TRPA1-mediated insulin release was determined using ELISA.TRPA1 is abundantly expressed in a rat pancreatic beta cell line and freshly isolated rat pancreatic beta cells, but not in pancreatic alpha cells. Activation of TRPA1 by allyl isothiocyanate (AITC, hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE, and cyclopentenone prostaglandins (PGJ₂ and a novel agonist methylglyoxal (MG induces membrane current, depolarization, and Ca²⁺ influx leading to generation of action potentials in a pancreatic beta cell line and primary cultured pancreatic beta cells. Activation of TRPA1 by agonists stimulates insulin release in pancreatic beta cells that can be inhibited by TRPA1 antagonists such as HC030031 or AP-18 and by RNA interference. TRPA1-mediated insulin release is also observed in conditions of voltage-gated Na⁺ and Ca²⁺ channel blockade as well as ATP sensitive potassium (K(ATP channel activation.We propose that endogenous and exogenous ligands of TRPA1 cause Ca²⁺ influx and induce basal insulin release and that TRPA1-mediated depolarization acts synergistically with K(ATP channel blockade to facilitate insulin release.

  2. Proliferation of sorted human and rat beta cells

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    Parnaud, G; Bosco, D; Berney, T

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether purified beta cells can replicate in vitro and whether this is enhanced by extracellular matrix (ECM) and growth factors.......The aim of the study was to determine whether purified beta cells can replicate in vitro and whether this is enhanced by extracellular matrix (ECM) and growth factors....

  3. Beta-cell lines derived from transgenic mice expressing a hybrid insulin gene-oncogene

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    Efrat, S; Linde, S; Kofod, Hans

    1988-01-01

    Three pancreatic beta-cell lines have been established from insulinomas derived from transgenic mice carrying a hybrid insulin-promoted simian virus 40 tumor antigen gene. The beta tumor cell (beta TC) lines maintain the features of differentiated beta cells for about 50 passages in culture. The ...... both to immortalize a rare cell type and to provide a selection for the maintenance of its differentiated phenotype....

  4. A human beta cell line with drug inducible excision of immortalizing transgenes

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    Benazra, Marion; Lecomte, Marie-José; Colace, Claire; Müller, Andreas; Machado, Cécile; Pechberty, Severine; Bricout-Neveu, Emilie; Grenier-Godard, Maud; Solimena, Michele; Scharfmann, Raphaël; Czernichow, Paul; Ravassard, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Access to immortalized human pancreatic beta cell lines that are phenotypically close to genuine adult beta cells, represent a major tool to better understand human beta cell physiology and develop new therapeutics for Diabetes. Here we derived a new conditionally immortalized human beta cell line, EndoC-βH3 in which immortalizing transgene can be efficiently removed by simple addition of tamoxifen. Methods We used lentiviral mediated gene transfer to stably integrate a tamoxifen inducible form of CRE (CRE-ERT2) into the recently developed conditionally immortalized EndoC βH2 line. The resulting EndoC-βH3 line was characterized before and after tamoxifen treatment for cell proliferation, insulin content and insulin secretion. Results We showed that EndoC-βH3 expressing CRE-ERT2 can be massively amplified in culture. We established an optimized tamoxifen treatment to efficiently excise the immortalizing transgenes resulting in proliferation arrest. In addition, insulin expression raised by 12 fold and insulin content increased by 23 fold reaching 2 μg of insulin per million cells. Such massive increase was accompanied by enhanced insulin secretion upon glucose stimulation. We further observed that tamoxifen treated cells maintained a stable function for 5 weeks in culture. Conclusions EndoC βH3 cell line represents a powerful tool that allows, using a simple and efficient procedure, the massive production of functional non-proliferative human beta cells. Such cells are close to genuine human beta cells and maintain a stable phenotype for 5 weeks in culture. PMID:26909308

  5. Reduced Expression of the Liver/Beta-Cell Glucose Transporter Isoform in Glucose-Insensitive Pancreatic Beta Cells of Diabetic Rats

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    Thorens, Bernard; Weir, Gordon C.; Leahy, John L.; Lodish, Harvey F.; Bonner-Weir, Susan

    1990-09-01

    Rats injected with a single dose of streptozocin at 2 days of age develop non-insulin-dependent diabetes 6 weeks later. The pancreatic beta islet cells of these diabetic rats display a loss of glucose-induced insulin secretion while maintaining sensitivity to other secretagogues such as arginine. We analyzed the level of expression of the liver/beta-cell glucose transporter isoform in diabetic islets by immunofluorescence staining of pancreas sections and by Western blotting of islet lysates. Islets from diabetic animals have a reduced expression of this beta-cell-specific glucose transporter isoform and the extent of reduction is correlated with the severity of hyperglycemia. In contrast, expression of this transporter isoform in liver is minimally modified by the diabetes. Thus a decreased expression of the liver/beta-cell glucose transporter isoform in beta cells is associated with the impaired glucose sensing characteristic of diabetic islets; our data suggest that this glucose transporter may be part of the beta-cell glucose sensor.

  6. PARP-1 and YY1 are important novel regulators of CXCL12 gene transcription in rat pancreatic beta cells.

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    Jelena Marković

    Full Text Available Despite significant progress, the molecular mechanisms responsible for pancreatic beta cell depletion and development of diabetes remain poorly defined. At present, there is no preventive measure against diabetes. The positive impact of CXCL12 expression on the pancreatic beta cell prosurvival phenotype initiated this study. Our aim was to provide novel insight into the regulation of rat CXCL12 gene (Cxcl12 transcription. The roles of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 and transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1 in Cxcl12 transcription were studied by examining their in vitro and in vivo binding affinities for the Cxcl12 promoter in a pancreatic beta cell line by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. The regulatory activities of PARP-1 and YY1 were assessed in transfection experiments using a reporter vector with a Cxcl12 promoter sequence driving luciferase gene expression. Experimental evidence for PARP-1 and YY1 revealed their trans-acting potential, wherein PARP-1 displayed an inhibitory, and YY1 a strong activating effect on Cxcl12 transcription. Streptozotocin (STZ-induced general toxicity in pancreatic beta cells was followed by changes in Cxcl12 promoter regulation. PARP-1 binding to the Cxcl12 promoter during basal and in STZ-compromised conditions led us to conclude that PARP-1 regulates constitutive Cxcl12 expression. During the early stage of oxidative stress, YY1 exhibited less affinity toward the Cxcl12 promoter while PARP-1 displayed strong binding. These interactions were accompanied by Cxcl12 downregulation. In the later stages of oxidative stress and intensive pancreatic beta cell injury, YY1 was highly expressed and firmly bound to Cxcl12 promoter in contrast to PARP-1. These interactions resulted in higher Cxcl12 expression. The observed ability of PARP-1 to downregulate, and of YY1 to upregulate Cxcl12 promoter activity anticipates corresponding effects in the natural context where the

  7. Characterization of stimulus-secretion coupling in the human pancreatic EndoC-βH1 beta cell line.

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    Lotta E Andersson

    Full Text Available Studies on beta cell metabolism are often conducted in rodent beta cell lines due to the lack of stable human beta cell lines. Recently, a human cell line, EndoC-βH1, was generated. Here we investigate stimulus-secretion coupling in this cell line, and compare it with that in the rat beta cell line, INS-1 832/13, and human islets.Cells were exposed to glucose and pyruvate. Insulin secretion and content (radioimmunoassay, gene expression (Gene Chip array, metabolite levels (GC/MS, respiration (Seahorse XF24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer, glucose utilization (radiometric, lactate release (enzymatic colorimetric, ATP levels (enzymatic bioluminescence and plasma membrane potential and cytoplasmic Ca2+ responses (microfluorometry were measured. Metabolite levels, respiration and insulin secretion were examined in human islets.Glucose increased insulin release, glucose utilization, raised ATP production and respiratory rates in both lines, and pyruvate increased insulin secretion and respiration. EndoC-βH1 cells exhibited higher insulin secretion, while plasma membrane depolarization was attenuated, and neither glucose nor pyruvate induced oscillations in intracellular calcium concentration or plasma membrane potential. Metabolite profiling revealed that glycolytic and TCA-cycle intermediate levels increased in response to glucose in both cell lines, but responses were weaker in EndoC-βH1 cells, similar to those observed in human islets. Respiration in EndoC-βH1 cells was more similar to that in human islets than in INS-1 832/13 cells.Functions associated with early stimulus-secretion coupling, with the exception of plasma membrane potential and Ca2+ oscillations, were similar in the two cell lines; insulin secretion, respiration and metabolite responses were similar in EndoC-βH1 cells and human islets. While both cell lines are suitable in vitro models, with the caveat of replicating key findings in isolated islets, EndoC-βH1 cells have the

  8. Oxidative Metabolism Genes Are Not Responsive to Oxidative Stress in Rodent Beta Cell Lines

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    Faer Morrison

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered expression of oxidative metabolism genes has been described in the skeletal muscle of individuals with type 2 diabetes. Pancreatic beta cells contain low levels of antioxidant enzymes and are particularly susceptible to oxidative stress. In this study, we explored the effect of hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress on a panel of oxidative metabolism genes in a rodent beta cell line. We exposed INS-1 rodent beta cells to low (5.6 mmol/L, ambient (11 mmol/L, and high (28 mmol/L glucose conditions for 48 hours. Increases in oxidative stress were measured using the fluorescent probe dihydrorhodamine 123. We then measured the expression levels of a panel of 90 oxidative metabolism genes by real-time PCR. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS production was evident in INS-1 cells after 48 hours (P<0.05. TLDA analysis revealed a significant (P<0.05 upregulation of 16 of the 90 genes under hyperglycemic conditions, although these expression differences did not reflect differences in ROS. We conclude that although altered glycemia may influence the expression of some oxidative metabolism genes, this effect is probably not mediated by increased ROS production. The alterations to the expression of oxidative metabolism genes previously observed in human diabetic skeletal muscle do not appear to be mirrored in rodent pancreatic beta cells.

  9. Co-culture of clonal beta cells with GLP-1 and glucagon-secreting cell line impacts on beta cell insulin secretion, proliferation and susceptibility to cytotoxins.

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    Green, Alastair D; Vasu, Srividya; Moffett, R Charlotte; Flatt, Peter R

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the direct effects on insulin releasing MIN6 cells of chronic exposure to GLP-1, glucagon or a combination of both peptides secreted from GLUTag L-cell and αTC1.9 alpha-cell lines in co-culture. MIN6, GLUTag and αTC1.9 cell lines exhibited high cellular hormone content and release of insulin, GLP-1 and glucagon, respectively. Co-culture of MIN6 cells with GLUTag cells significantly increased cellular insulin content, beta-cell proliferation, insulin secretory responses to a range of established secretogogues and afforded protection against exposure cytotoxic concentrations of glucose, lipid, streptozotocin or cytokines. Benefits of co-culture of MIN6 cells with αTC1.9 alphacells were limited to enhanced beta-cell proliferation with marginal positive actions on both insulin secretion and cellular protection. In contrast, co-culture of MIN6 with GLUTag cells plus αTC1.9 cells, markedly enhanced both insulin secretory responses and protection against beta-cell toxins compared with co-culture with GLUTag cells alone. These data indicate important long-term effects of conjoint GLP-1 and glucagon exposure on beta-cell function. This illustrates the possible functional significance of alpha-cell GLP-1 production as well as direct beneficial effects of dual agonism at beta-cell GLP-1 and glucagon receptors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société française de biochimie et biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  10. Trans fatty acids increase nitric oxide levels and pancreatic beta-cell necrosis in rats

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    Kusmiyati Tjahjono DK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The prevalence of diabetes in Indonesia is increasing due to various factors, including life style changes such as trans fatty acid (TFA intake. High TFA intake is known to be related to blood lipid profile changes resulting in cardiovascular disorders. This study was to identify the effect of TFA on nitric oxide (NO production and on necrosis of pancreatic beta cells. Methods A study of randomized pre-test post–test design with control group. Thirty Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups, i.e. group K (control, group P1 receiving a diet with 5% TFA, and P2 receiving 10% TFA. The intervention was performed for 8 weeks. NO level and pancreatic beta-cell necrosis were analyzed using Pearson’s chi square test. Results After 4 weeks of treatment there was no change in NO levels in group K, but increased NO in P2 (2.6-3.8 ìM. At 8 weeks after treatment, NO levels in groups P1 and P2 increased to 2.6-3.4 ìM and 4.2-14.3 ìM, respectively, while in group K only 2 rats had increased NO levels of 2.8-2.9 ìM. With Pearson’s chi-square test, there was a signifant difference in the proportions of necrotic pancreatic beta cells after 4 weeks and 8 weeks (p=0.000. No necrosis of beta cells was found in group K, mild necrosis in group P1 (1-25% and moderate necrosis in group P2 (26-50%. Conclusion TFA consumption significantly increases NO levels in Sprague Dawley rats and also results in moderate grades of necrosis of pancreatic beta cells.

  11. Trans fatty acids increase nitric oxide levels and pancreatic beta-cell necrosis in rats

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    Kusmiyati Tjahjono DK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The prevalence of diabetes in Indonesia is increasing due to various factors, including life style changes such as trans fatty acid (TFA intake. High TFA intake is known to be related to blood lipid profile changes resulting in cardiovascular disorders. This study was to identify the effect of TFA on nitric oxide (NO production and on necrosis of pancreatic beta cells. METHODS A study of randomized pre-test post–test design with control group. Thirty Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups, i.e. group K (control, group P1 receiving a diet with 5% TFA, and P2 receiving 10% TFA. The intervention was performed for 8 weeks. NO level and pancreatic beta-cell necrosis were analyzed using Pearson’s chi square test. RESULTS After 4 weeks of treatment there was no change in NO levels in group K, but increased NO in P2 (2.6-3.8 ìM. At 8 weeks after treatment, NO levels in groups P1 and P2 increased to 2.6-3.4 ìM and 4.2-14.3 ìM, respectively, while in group K only 2 rats had increased NO levels of 2.8-2.9 ìM. With Pearson’s chi-square test, there was a signifant difference in the proportions of necrotic pancreatic beta cells after 4 weeks and 8 weeks (p= 0.000. No necrosis of beta cells was found in group K, mild necrosis in group P1 (1-25% and moderate necrosis in group P2 (26-50%. CONCLUSION TFA consumption significantly increases NO levels in Sprague Dawley rats and also results in moderate grades of necrosis of pancreatic beta cells

  12. Increased androgen levels in rats impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function.

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    Wang, Hongdong; Wang, Xiaping; Zhu, Yunxia; Chen, Fang; Sun, Yujie; Han, Xiao

    2015-11-01

    Although insulin resistance is recognized to contribute to the reproductive and metabolic phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), pancreatic beta cell dysfunction plays an essential role in the progression from PCOS to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the role of insulin secretory abnormalities in PCOS has received little attention. In addition, the precise changes in beta cells and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we therefore attempted to elucidate potential mechanisms involved in beta cell alterations in a rat model of PCOS. Glucose-induced insulin secretion was measured in islets isolated from DHT-treated and control rats. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR), ATP production, and mitochondrial copy number were assayed to evaluate mitochondrial function. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is significantly decreased in islets from DHT-treated rats. On the other hand, significant reductions are observed in the expression levels of several key genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and in mitochondrial OCR and ATP production in DHT-treated rat islets. Meanwhile, we found that androgens can directly impair beta cell function by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction in vitro in an androgen receptor dependent manner. For the first time, our study demonstrates that increased androgens in female rats can impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion partly through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function. This work has significance for hyperandrogenic women with PCOS: excess activation of the androgen receptor by androgens may provoke beta cell dysfunction via mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Maternal Rat Diabetes Mellitus Deleteriously Affects Insulin Sensitivity and Beta-Cell Function in the Offspring

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    Abdel-Baset M. Aref

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to assess the effect of maternal diabetes in rats on serum glucose and insulin concentrations, insulin resistance, histological architecture of pancreas and glycogen content in liver of offspring. The pregnant rat females were allocated into two main groups: normal control group and streptozotocin-induced diabetic group. After birth, the surviving offspring were subjected to biochemical and histological examination immediately after delivery and at the end of the 1st and 2nd postnatal weeks. In comparison with the offspring of normal control dams, the fasting serum glucose level of offspring of diabetic mothers was significantly increased at the end of the 1st and 2nd postnatal weeks. Serum insulin level of offspring of diabetic dams was significantly higher at birth and decreased significantly during the following 2 postnatal weeks, while in normal rat offspring, it was significantly increased with progress of time. HOMA Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR was significantly increased in the offspring of diabetic dams at birth and after 1 week than in normal rat offspring, while HOMA insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS was significantly decreased. HOMA beta-cell function was significantly decreased at all-time intervals in offspring of diabetic dams. At birth, islets of Langerhans as well as beta cells in offspring of diabetic dams were hypertrophied. The cells constituting islets seemed to have a high division rate. However, beta-cells were degenerated during the following 2 post-natal weeks and smaller insulin secreting cells predominated. Vacuolation and necrosis of the islets of Langerhans were also observed throughout the experimental period. The carbohydrate content in liver of offspring of diabetic dams was at all-time intervals lower than that in control. The granule distribution was more random. Overall, the preexisting maternal diabetes leads to glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and impaired insulin sensitivity and

  14. Profile of blood glucose and ultrastucture of beta cells pancreatic islet in alloxan compound induced rats

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    I Nyoman Suarsana

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is marked by elevated levels of blood glucose, and progressive changes of the structure of pancreatic islet histopathology. The objective of this research was to analyse the glucose level and histophatological feature in pancreatic islet in alloxan compound induced rats. A total of ten male Spraque Dawley rats of 2 months old were used in this study. The rats were divided into two groups: (1 negative control group (K-, and (2 positif induced alloxan group (diabetic group =DM. The rats were induced by a single dose intraperitonial injection of alloxan compound 120 mg/kg of body weight. The treatment was conducted for 28 days. Blood glucose levels of rats were analysed at 0, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days following treatment. At the end of the experiment, rats were sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Pancreas was collected for analysis of histopathological study by Immunohistochemical technique, and ultrastructural study using transmission electron microscope (TEM. The result showed that Langerhans islet of diabetic rat (rat of DM group showed a marked reduction of size, number of Langerhans islet of diabetic rat decrease, and characterized by hyperglycemic condition. By using TEM, beta cells of DM group showed the rupture of mitochondrial membrane, the lost of cisternal structure of inner membrane of mitocondria, reduction of insulin secretory granules, linkage between cells acinar with free Langerhans islet, and the caryopicnotic of nucleus.

  15. Strain-dependent differences in sensitivity of rat beta-cells to interleukin 1 beta in vitro and in vivo

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    Reimers, J I; Andersen, H U; Mauricio, D

    1996-01-01

    /kg) or vehicle for 5 days. All the strains investigated were susceptible to IL-1 beta-induced changes in body weight, food intake, temperature, and plasma glucagon and corticosterone. However, IL-1 beta induced hyperglycemia and impairment of beta-cell glucose responsiveness in WK/Mol and LS/Mol rats...

  16. Effects of low intensity laser acupoint irradiation on inhibiting islet beta-cell apoptosis in rats with type 2 diabetes

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    Xiong, Guoxin; Xiong, Leilei; Li, Xinzhong

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the effects of low intensity semiconductor laser acupoint irradiation on inhibiting islet beta-cell apoptosis in rats with type 2 diabetes, a method using a high-fat diet and low-dose intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin established a type 2 diabetes mellitus rat model. Model rats were randomly divided into a laser acupoint irradiation group, rosiglitazone control group, and placebo group; each group had 10 rats. In addition, 10 normal male rats were selected for the normal control group. The Housanli, Neiting and Yishu acupoints of the rats in the laser acupoint irradiation group were irradiated with a 10 mW semiconductor laser; each point was irradiated for 15 min, once every 2 d over 28 d, for a total of 14 episodes of irradiation. The rosiglitazone group rats were given rosiglitazone (0.2 mg kg-1) intragastrically; the placebo group rats were given 0.9% brine (0.2 mg kg-1) intragastrically, once daily, for four consecutive weeks. The change of fasting blood glucose was determined before and after each treatment. The islet beta-cell apoptosis was determined. The islet beta-cell apoptosis rates of the laser acupoint irradiation group and the rosiglitazone group were significantly lower than the rate of the placebo group. Even though the rate was lower in the laser acupoint irradiation group than in the rosiglitazone group, there was no significant difference between them. It is shown that acupoint irradiation with a semiconductor laser can effectively inhibit islet beta-cell apoptosis in rats with type 2 diabetes.

  17. Central infusion of leptin improves insulin resistance and suppresses beta-cell function, but not beta-cell mass, primarily through the sympathetic nervous system in a type 2 diabetic rat model.

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    Park, Sunmin; Ahn, Il Sung; Kim, Da Sol

    2010-06-05

    We investigated whether hypothalamic leptin alters beta-cell function and mass directly via the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) or indirectly as the result of altered insulin resistant states. The 90% pancreatectomized male Sprague Dawley rats had sympathectomy into the pancreas by applying phenol into the descending aorta (SNSX) or its sham operation (Sham). Each group was divided into two sections, receiving either leptin at 300ng/kgbw/h or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) via intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion for 3h as a short-term study. After finishing the infusion study, ICV leptin (3mug/kg bw/day) or ICV aCSF (control) was infused in rats fed 30 energy % fat diets by osmotic pump for 4weeks. At the end of the long-term study, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and islet morphometry were analyzed. Acute ICV leptin administration in Sham rats, but not in SNSX rats, suppressed the first- and second-phase insulin secretion at hyperglycemic clamp by about 48% compared to the control. Regardless of SNSX, the 4-week administration of ICV leptin improved glucose tolerance during oral glucose tolerance tests and insulin sensitivity at hyperglycemic clamp, compared to the control, while it suppressed second-phase insulin secretion in Sham rats but not in SNSX rats. However, the pancreatic beta-cell area and mass were not affected by leptin and SNSX, though ICV leptin decreased individual beta-cell size and concomitantly increased beta-cell apoptosis in Sham rats. Leptin directly decreases insulin secretion capacity mainly through the activation of SNS without modulating pancreatic beta-cell mass.

  18. Metabolomic and proteomic analysis of a clonal insulin-producing beta-cell line (INS-1 832/13).

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    Fernandez, Céline; Fransson, Ulrika; Hallgard, Elna; Spégel, Peter; Holm, Cecilia; Krogh, Morten; Wårell, Kristofer; James, Peter; Mulder, Hindrik

    2008-01-01

    Metabolites generated from fuel metabolism in pancreatic beta-cells control exocytosis of insulin, a process which fails in type 2 diabetes. To identify and quantify these metabolites, global and unbiased analysis of cellular metabolism is required. To this end, polar metabolites, extracted from the clonal 832/13 beta-cell line cultured at 2.8 and 16.7 mM glucose for 48 h, were derivatized followed by identification and quantification, using gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometry (MS). After culture at 16.7 mM glucose for 48 h, 832/13 beta-cells exhibited a phenotype reminiscent of glucotoxicity with decreased content and secretion of insulin. The metabolomic analysis revealed alterations in the levels of 7 metabolites derived from glycolysis, the TCA cycle and pentose phosphate shunt, and 4 amino acids. Principal component analysis of the metabolite data showed two clusters, corresponding to the cells cultured at 2.8 and 16.7 mM glucose, respectively. Concurrent changes in protein expression were analyzed by 2-D gel electrophoresis followed by LC-MS/MS. The identities of 86 spots corresponding to 75 unique proteins that were significantly different in 832/13 beta-cells cultured at 16.7 mM glucose were established. Only 5 of these were found to be metabolic enzymes that could be involved in the metabolomic alterations observed. Anticipated changes in metabolite levels in cells exposed to increased glucose were observed, while changes in enzyme levels were much less profound. This suggests that substrate availability, allosteric regulation, and/or post-translational modifications are more important determinants of metabolite levels than enzyme expression at the protein level.

  19. Increased secretion of insulin and proliferation of islet {beta}-cells in rats with mesenteric lymph duct ligation

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    Nagino, Ko; Yokozawa, Junji; Sasaki, Yu; Matsuda, Akiko; Takeda, Hiroaki [Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Kawata, Sumio, E-mail: Sumio_Kawata@pref.hyogo.lg.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Hyogo Prefectural Nishinomiya Hospital, 13-9 Rokutanji-cho, Nishinomiya 662-0918 (Japan)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin secretion was increased during the OGTT or IVGTT in mesenteric lymph duct-ligated rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferation of islet {beta}-cells was upregulated in lymph duct-ligated rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mesenteric lymph duct flow has a role in glucose metabolism. -- Abstract: Background and aims: It has been suggested that intestinal lymph flow plays an important role in insulin secretion and glucose metabolism after meals. In this study, we investigated the influence of ligation of the mesenteric lymph duct on glucose metabolism and islet {beta}-cells in rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (10 weeks old) were divided into two groups: one underwent ligation of the mesenteric lymph duct above the cistern (ligation group), and the other underwent a sham operation (sham group). After 1 and 2 weeks, fasting plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, triglyceride, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and the active form of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) were measured. At 2 weeks after the operation, the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) were performed. After the rats had been sacrificed, the insulin content of the pancreas was measured and the proliferation of {beta}-cells was assessed immunohistochemically using antibodies against insulin and Ki-67. Results: During the OGTT, the ligation group showed a significant decrease in the plasma glucose concentration at 120 min (p < 0.05) and a significant increase in the plasma insulin concentration by more than 2-fold at 15 min (p < 0.01). On the other hand, the plasma GIP concentration was significantly decreased at 60 min (p < 0.01) in the ligated group, while the active form of GLP-1 showed a significantly higher level at 90 min (1.7-fold; p < 0.05) and 120 min (2.5-fold; p < 0.01). During the IVGTT, the plasma insulin concentration in the ligation group was significantly higher at 2

  20. Fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure in Wistar rats causes progressive pancreatic mitochondrial damage and beta cell dysfunction.

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    Jennifer E Bruin

    Full Text Available Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT is currently recommended as a safe smoking cessation aid for pregnant women. However, fetal and neonatal nicotine exposure in rats causes mitochondrial-mediated beta cell apoptosis at weaning, and adult-onset dysglycemia, which we hypothesize is related to progressive mitochondrial dysfunction in the pancreas. Therefore in this study we examined the effect of fetal and neonatal exposure to nicotine on pancreatic mitochondrial structure and function during postnatal development. Female Wistar rats were given saline (vehicle control or nicotine bitartrate (1 mg/kg/d via subcutaneous injection for 2 weeks prior to mating until weaning. At 3-4, 15 and 26 weeks of age, oral glucose tolerance tests were performed, and pancreas tissue was collected for electron microscopy, enzyme activity assays and islet isolation. Following nicotine exposure mitochondrial structural abnormalities were observed beginning at 3 weeks and worsened with advancing age. Importantly the appearance of these structural defects in nicotine-exposed animals preceded the onset of glucose intolerance. Nicotine exposure also resulted in significantly reduced pancreatic respiratory chain enzyme activity, degranulation of beta cells, elevated islet oxidative stress and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion compared to saline controls at 26 weeks of age. Taken together, these data suggest that maternal nicotine use during pregnancy results in postnatal mitochondrial dysfunction that may explain, in part, the dysglycemia observed in the offspring from this animal model. These results clearly indicate that further investigation into the safety of NRT use during pregnancy is warranted.

  1. Elevated androgen levels induce hyperinsulinemia through increase in Ins1 transcription in pancreatic beta cells in female rats.

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    Mishra, Jay S; More, Amar S; Kumar, Sathish

    2018-01-22

    Hyperandrogenism is associated with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in adult females. We tested whether androgens dysregulate pancreatic beta cell function to induce hyperinsulinemia through transcriptional regulation of insulin gene (Ins) in the islets. Adult female Wistar rats implanted with dihydrotestosterone (DHT; 7.5-mg, 90-d release) or placebo pellets were examined after 10 weeks. DHT exposure increased plasma DHT levels by 2-fold similar to that in polycystic ovary syndrome in women. DHT exposure induced hyperinsulinemia with increased HOMA-IR index in fasting state and glucose intolerance and exaggerated insulin responses following glucose tolerance test. DHT females had no change in islet number, size and beta cell proliferation/apoptosis but exhibited significant mitochondrial dysfunction (higher ADP/ATP ratio, decreased mtDNA copy number, increased reactive oxygen production and downregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis) and enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Ins expression was increased in DHT islets. In vitro incubation of control islets with DHT dose-dependently stimulated Ins transcription. Analysis of Ins1 gene revealed a putative androgen responsive element in the promoter. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation assays showed that androgen receptors bind to this element in response to DHT stimulation. Furthermore, reporter assays showed that the promoter element is highly responsive to androgens. Insulin stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle was decreased with associated decrease in IRβ expression in DHT females. Our studies identified a novel androgen-mediated mechanism for the control of Ins expression via transcriptional regulation providing a molecular mechanism linking elevated androgens and hyperinsulemia. Decreased IRβ expression in the skeletal muscles may contribute, in part, to glucose intolerance in this model. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for the Study of

  2. Mechanisms of pancreatic beta-cell growth and regeneration

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    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1989-01-01

    Information about the mechanism of beta-cell growth and regeneration may be obtained by studies of insulinoma cells. In the present study the growth and function of the rat insulinoma cell lines RINm5F and 5AH were evaluated by addition of serum, hormones, and growth factors. It was found...... of insulin mRNA content showed that the insulinoma cells only contained about 2% of that of normal rat beta-cells. These results are discussed in relation to the role of growth factors, oncogenes, and differentiation in the growth and regeneration of beta-cells....... that transferrin is the only obligatory factor whereas growth hormone, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, and TRH had modulating effects. A heat-labile heparin binding serum factor which stimulated thymidine incorporation but not cell proliferation was demonstrated in human serum. Measurements...

  3. Urtica Dioica Distillate Regenerates Pancreatic Beta Cells in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohari, Ali; Noorafshan, Ali; Akmali, Masoumeh; Zamani-Garmsiri, Fahimeh; Seghatoleslam, Atefeh

    2018-01-01

    Background Urtica dioica is known as an anti-hyperglycemic plant. Urtica dioica distillate (UD) is a traditional Iranian drink, locally known as “aragh gazaneh”. In spite of its widespread consumption in Iran, according to traditional Iranian medicine, there is no scientific report on the usefulness of UD for diabetic patients. This survey was designed to evaluate its protective effects for the recovery from diabetes by determining the serum insulin, blood glucose, volume of pancreatic islets, and the number and volume of β-cells in diabetic rats. Methods A total of 48 Sprague-Dawley male rats (200-250 g) were randomly distributed into 6 groups (n=8), including non-diabetic plus distilled water (DW), non-diabetic plus UD, diabetic plus DW, diabetic plus UD, diabetic plus insulin, and diabetic plus glibenclamide. DW, UD, and glibenclamide were administered via intragastric gavage and insulin was injected subcutaneously. After four weeks of experiments, blood samples were collected for serum insulin and blood glucose assay. Pancreas was also evaluated using stereological method. The SPSS software was used for statistical analysis. Kruskal-Wallis, repeated measurements, and Mann-Whitney U test were applied for comparisons between the groups. Results The treatment of diabetic rats with UD reduced the blood glucose dramatically (P<0.001) and increased serum insulin levels significantly (P=0.03) in comparison to the diabetic plus DW rats. Treatment with UD did not affect the mean β-cell volumes in the diabetic rats when compared to the diabetic plus DW rats, but the islet volumes and β-cell numbers were significantly recovered. Conclusion UD treatment in diabetic rats improves hyperglycemia by partially restoring plasma insulin levels. The data suggest that UD prevents islet atrophy and/or regenerate pancreatic β-cells. PMID:29749986

  4. Clusters of conserved beta cell marker genes for assessment of beta cell phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Geert A; Jiang, Lei; Hellemans, Karine H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a gene expression blueprint of pancreatic beta cells conserved from rodents to humans and to evaluate its applicability to assess shifts in the beta cell differentiated state. Genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of isolated beta cells were compared to those...... of a large panel of other tissue and cell types, and transcripts with beta cell-abundant and -selective expression were identified. Iteration of this analysis in mouse, rat and human tissues generated a panel of conserved beta cell biomarkers. This panel was then used to compare isolated versus laser capture...

  5. Positron emission tomography study on pancreatic somatostatin receptors in normal and diabetic rats with 68Ga-DOTA-octreotide: a potential PET tracer for beta cell mass measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, Takeo; Hasegawa, Koki; Nishimura, Mie; Kanayama, Yousuke; Wada, Yasuhiro; Hayashinaka, Emi; Cui, Yilong; Kataoka, Yosky; Senda, Michio; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2013-12-06

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, and the loss or dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells has been reported before the appearance of clinical symptoms and hyperglycemia. To evaluate beta cell mass (BCM) for improving the detection and treatment of DM at earlier stages, we focused on somatostatin receptors that are highly expressed in the pancreatic beta cells, and developed a positron emission tomography (PET) probe derived from octreotide, a metabolically stable somatostatin analog. Octreotide was conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), a chelating agent, and labeled with (68)Gallium ((68)Ga). After intravenous injection of (68)Ga-DOTA-octreotide, a 90-min emission scan of the abdomen was performed in normal and DM model rats. The PET studies showed that (68)Ga-DOTA-octreotide radioactivity was highly accumulated in the pancreas of normal rats and that the pancreatic accumulation was significantly reduced in the rats administered with an excess amount of unlabeled octreotide or after treatment with streptozotocin, which was used for the chemical induction of DM in rats. These results were in good agreement with the ex vivo biodistribution data. These results indicated that the pancreatic accumulation of (68)Ga-DOTA-octreotide represented specific binding to the somatostatin receptors and reflected BCM. Therefore, PET imaging with (68)Ga-DOTA-octreotide could be a potential tool for evaluating BCM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Activation of the transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein by glucose leads to increased pancreatic beta cell differentiation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soggia, A; Flosseau, K; Ravassard, P; Szinnai, G; Scharfmann, R; Guillemain, G

    2012-10-01

    Pancreatic cell development is a tightly controlled process. Although information is available regarding the mesodermal signals that control pancreatic development, little is known about the role of environmental factors such as nutrients, including glucose, on pancreatic development. We previously showed that glucose and its metabolism through the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP) promote pancreatic endocrine cell differentiation. Here, we analysed the role of the transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) in this process. This transcription factor is activated by glucose, and has been recently described as a target of the HBP. We used an in vitro bioassay in which pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cells develop from rat embryonic pancreas in a way that mimics in vivo pancreatic development. Using this model, gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments were undertaken. ChREBP was produced in the endocrine lineage during pancreatic development, its abundance increasing with differentiation. When rat embryonic pancreases were cultured in the presence of glucose or xylitol, the production of ChREBP targets was induced. Concomitantly, beta cell differentiation was enhanced. On the other hand, when embryonic pancreases were cultured with inhibitors decreasing ChREBP activity or an adenovirus producing a dominant-negative ChREBP, beta cell differentiation was reduced, indicating that ChREBP activity was necessary for proper beta cell differentiation. Interestingly, adenovirus producing a dominant-negative ChREBP also reduced the positive effect of N-acetylglucosamine, a substrate of the HBP acting on beta cell differentiation. Our work supports the idea that glucose, through the transcription factor ChREBP, controls beta cell differentiation from pancreatic progenitors.

  7. Glucose, other secretagogues, and nerve growth factor stimulate mitogen-activated protein kinase in the insulin-secreting beta-cell line, INS-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Sekine, N; Roche, E

    1995-01-01

    The signaling pathways whereby glucose and hormonal secretagogues regulate insulin-secretory function, gene transcription, and proliferation of pancreatic beta-cells are not well defined. We show that in the glucose-responsive beta-cell line INS-1, major secretagogue-stimulated signaling pathways...... converge to activate 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. Thus, glucose-induced insulin secretion was found to be associated with a small stimulatory effect on 44-kDa MAP kinase, which was synergistically enhanced by increased levels of intracellular cAMP and by the hormonal secretagogues......-1. Phorbol ester, an activator of protein kinase C, stimulated 44-kDa MAP kinase by both Ca(2+)-dependent and -independent pathways. Nerve growth factor, independently of changes in cytosolic Ca2+, efficiently stimulated 44-kDa MAP kinase without causing insulin release, indicating that activation...

  8. A novel dual-color reporter for identifying insulin-producing beta-cells and classifying heterogeneity of insulinoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Sook Lee

    Full Text Available Many research studies use immortalized cell lines as surrogates for primary beta- cells. We describe the production and use of a novel "indirect" dual-fluorescent reporter system that leads to mutually exclusive expression of EGFP in insulin-producing (INS(+ beta-cells or mCherry in non-beta-cells. Our system uses the human insulin promoter to initiate a Cre-mediated shift in reporter color within a single transgene construct and is useful for FACS selection of cells from single cultures for further analysis. Application of our reporter to presumably clonal HIT-T15 insulinoma cells, as well as other presumably clonal lines, indicates that these cultures are in fact heterogeneous with respect to INS(+ phenotype. Our strategy could be easily applied to other cell- or tissue-specific promoters. We anticipate its utility for FACS purification of INS(+ and glucose-responsive beta-like-cells from primary human islet cell isolates or in vitro differentiated pluripotent stem cells.

  9. Clusters of conserved beta cell marker genes for assessment of beta cell phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Geert A; Jiang, Lei; Hellemans, Karine H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a gene expression blueprint of pancreatic beta cells conserved from rodents to humans and to evaluate its applicability to assess shifts in the beta cell differentiated state. Genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of isolated beta cells were compared to those...... of a large panel of other tissue and cell types, and transcripts with beta cell-abundant and -selective expression were identified. Iteration of this analysis in mouse, rat and human tissues generated a panel of conserved beta cell biomarkers. This panel was then used to compare isolated versus laser capture...... microdissected beta cells, monitor adaptations of the beta cell phenotype to fasting, and retrieve possible conserved transcriptional regulators....

  10. The potential role of SOCS-3 in the interleukin-1beta-induced desensitization of insulin signaling in pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emanuelli, Brice; Glondu, Murielle; Filloux, Chantal

    2004-01-01

    insulin signaling is required for the optimal beta-cell function, we assessed the effect of IL-1beta on the insulin pathway in a rat pancreatic beta-cell line. We show that IL-1beta decreases insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR) and insulin receptor substrate (IRS...

  11. Foodborne cereulide causes beta-cell dysfunction and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Vangoitsenhoven

    Full Text Available To study the effects of cereulide, a food toxin often found at low concentrations in take-away meals, on beta-cell survival and function.Cell death was quantified by Hoechst/Propidium Iodide in mouse (MIN6 and rat (INS-1E beta-cell lines, whole mouse islets and control cell lines (HepG2 and COS-1. Beta-cell function was studied by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS. Mechanisms of toxicity were evaluated in MIN6 cells by mRNA profiling, electron microscopy and mitochondrial function tests.24 h exposure to 5 ng/ml cereulide rendered almost all MIN6, INS-1E and pancreatic islets apoptotic, whereas cell death did not increase in the control cell lines. In MIN6 cells and murine islets, GSIS capacity was lost following 24 h exposure to 0.5 ng/ml cereulide (P<0.05. Cereulide exposure induced markers of mitochondrial stress including Puma (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis, P<0.05 and general pro-apoptotic signals as Chop (CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein. Mitochondria appeared swollen upon transmission electron microscopy, basal respiration rate was reduced by 52% (P<0.05 and reactive oxygen species increased by more than twofold (P<0.05 following 24 h exposure to 0.25 and 0.50 ng/ml cereulide, respectively.Cereulide causes apoptotic beta-cell death at low concentrations and impairs beta-cell function at even lower concentrations, with mitochondrial dysfunction underlying these defects. Thus, exposure to cereulide even at concentrations too low to cause systemic effects appears deleterious to the beta-cell.

  12. The EndoC-βH1 cell line is a valid model of human beta cells and applicable for screenings to identify novel drug target candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsonkova, Violeta Georgieva; Sand, Fredrik Wolfhagen; Wolf, Xenia Asbæk; Grunnet, Lars Groth; Kirstine Ringgaard, Anna; Ingvorsen, Camilla; Winkel, Louise; Kalisz, Mark; Dalgaard, Kevin; Bruun, Christine; Fels, Johannes Josef; Helgstrand, Charlotte; Hastrup, Sven; Öberg, Fredrik Kryh; Vernet, Erik; Sandrini, Michael Paolo Bastner; Shaw, Allan Christian; Jessen, Carsten; Grønborg, Mads; Hald, Jacob; Willenbrock, Hanni; Madsen, Dennis; Wernersson, Rasmus; Hansson, Lena; Jensen, Jan Nygaard; Plesner, Annette; Alanentalo, Tomas; Petersen, Maja Borup Kjær; Grapin-Botton, Anne; Honoré, Christian; Ahnfelt-Rønne, Jonas; Hecksher-Sørensen, Jacob; Ravassard, Philippe; Madsen, Ole D; Rescan, Claude; Frogne, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    To characterize the EndoC-βH1 cell line as a model for human beta cells and evaluate its beta cell functionality, focusing on insulin secretion, proliferation, apoptosis and ER stress, with the objective to assess its potential as a screening platform for identification of novel anti-diabetic drug candidates. EndoC-βH1 was transplanted into mice for validation of in vivo functionality. Insulin secretion was evaluated in cells cultured as monolayer and as pseudoislets, as well as in diabetic mice. Cytokine induced apoptosis, glucolipotoxicity, and ER stress responses were assessed. Beta cell relevant mRNA and protein expression were investigated by qPCR and antibody staining. Hundreds of proteins or peptides were tested for their effect on insulin secretion and proliferation. Transplantation of EndoC-βH1 cells restored normoglycemia in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice. Both in vitro and in vivo, we observed a clear insulin response to glucose, and, in vitro, we found a significant increase in insulin secretion from EndoC-βH1 pseudoislets compared to monolayer cultures for both glucose and incretins. Apoptosis and ER stress were inducible in the cells and caspase 3/7 activity was elevated in response to cytokines, but not affected by the saturated fatty acid palmitate. By screening of various proteins and peptides, we found Bombesin (BB) receptor agonists and Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptides (PACAP) to significantly induce insulin secretion and the proteins SerpinA6, STC1, and APOH to significantly stimulate proliferation. ER stress was readily induced by Tunicamycin and resulted in a reduction of insulin mRNA. Somatostatin (SST) was found to be expressed by 1% of the cells and manipulation of the SST receptors was found to significantly affect insulin secretion. Overall, the EndoC-βH1 cells strongly resemble human islet beta cells in terms of glucose and incretin stimulated insulin secretion capabilities. The cell line has an active

  13. The EndoC-βH1 cell line is a valid model of human beta cells and applicable for screenings to identify novel drug target candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Georgieva Tsonkova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To characterize the EndoC-βH1 cell line as a model for human beta cells and evaluate its beta cell functionality, focusing on insulin secretion, proliferation, apoptosis and ER stress, with the objective to assess its potential as a screening platform for identification of novel anti-diabetic drug candidates. Methods: EndoC-βH1 was transplanted into mice for validation of in vivo functionality. Insulin secretion was evaluated in cells cultured as monolayer and as pseudoislets, as well as in diabetic mice. Cytokine induced apoptosis, glucolipotoxicity, and ER stress responses were assessed. Beta cell relevant mRNA and protein expression were investigated by qPCR and antibody staining. Hundreds of proteins or peptides were tested for their effect on insulin secretion and proliferation. Results: Transplantation of EndoC-βH1 cells restored normoglycemia in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice. Both in vitro and in vivo, we observed a clear insulin response to glucose, and, in vitro, we found a significant increase in insulin secretion from EndoC-βH1 pseudoislets compared to monolayer cultures for both glucose and incretins.Apoptosis and ER stress were inducible in the cells and caspase 3/7 activity was elevated in response to cytokines, but not affected by the saturated fatty acid palmitate.By screening of various proteins and peptides, we found Bombesin (BB receptor agonists and Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptides (PACAP to significantly induce insulin secretion and the proteins SerpinA6, STC1, and APOH to significantly stimulate proliferation.ER stress was readily induced by Tunicamycin and resulted in a reduction of insulin mRNA. Somatostatin (SST was found to be expressed by 1% of the cells and manipulation of the SST receptors was found to significantly affect insulin secretion. Conclusions: Overall, the EndoC-βH1 cells strongly resemble human islet beta cells in terms of glucose and incretin stimulated

  14. The dissociation of tumor-induced weight loss from hypoglycemia in a transplantable pluripotent rat islet tumor results in the segregation of stable alpha- and beta-cell tumor phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, O D; Karlsen, C; Nielsen, E

    1993-01-01

    in NEDH rats resulted in stable hypoglycemic insulinoma tumor lines, such as MSL-G2-IN. Occasionally, hypoglycemia as well as severe weight loss were observed in the early tumor passages of MSL-G and the subclone, NHI-5B, which carry the transfected neomycin and human insulin genes as unique clonal...... markers. By selective transplantation, it was possible to segregate stable anorectic normoglycemic tumor lines, MSL-G-AN and NHI-5B-AN, from both clones. These tumors cause an abrupt onset of anorexia when they reach a size of 400-500 mg (loss parallels...... a common clonal origin of pluripotent MSL cells, thus supporting the existence of a cell lineage relationship between islet alpha- and beta-cell during ontogeny; and 2) that our glucagonomas release an anorexigenic substance(s) of unknown nature that causes a severe weight loss comparable to that reported...

  15. Repetitive in vivo treatment with human recombinant interleukin-1 beta modifies beta-cell function in normal rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wogensen, L D; Reimers, J; Nerup, J

    1992-01-01

    It is unknown whether interleukin-1 exerts a bimodal effect on Beta-cell function in vivo, and whether interleukin-1 has a diabetogenic action in normal animals. We therefore studied: (a) acute effects 2 h after an intraperitoneal bolus injection of 4 micrograms of recombinant human interleukin-1...

  16. Glucagon-like peptide-1 counteracts the detrimental effects of Advanced Glycation End-Products in the pancreatic beta cell line HIT-T 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puddu, A.; Storace, D.; Durante, A.; Odetti, P.; Viviani, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → GLP-1 prevents AGEs-induced cell death. → GLP-1 prevents AGEs-induced oxidative stress. → GLP-1 ameliorated AGEs-induced cell dysfunction. → GLP-1 attenuates AGEs-induced RAGE increment. → GLP-1 counteracts AGEs-induced pancreatic cell death and dysfunction. -- Abstract: Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs), a group of compounds resulting from the non-enzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with the free amino group of proteins, are implicated in diabetic complications. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T 15 to high concentrations of AGEs significantly decreases cell proliferation and insulin secretion, and affects transcription factors regulating insulin gene transcription. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that increases proinsulin biosynthesis, stimulates insulin secretion, and improves pancreatic beta-cell viability. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of GLP-1 on the function and viability of HIT-T 15 cells cultured with AGEs. HIT-T 15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs alone, or supplemented with 10 nmol/l GLP-1. Cell viability, insulin secretion, redox balance, and expression of the AGEs receptor (RAGE) were then determined. The results showed that GLP-1 protected beta cell against AGEs-induced cell death preventing both apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, addition of GLP-1 to the AGEs culture medium restored the redox balance, improved the responsiveness to glucose, and attenuated AGEs-induced RAGE expression. These findings provide evidence that GLP-1 protects beta cells from the dangerous effects of AGEs.

  17. Histone deacetylases 1 and 3 but not 2 mediate cytokine-induced beta cell apoptosis in INS-1 cells and dispersed primary islets from rats and are differentially regulated in the islets of type 1 diabetic children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundh, M; Christensen, D P; Damgaard Nielsen, M

    2012-01-01

    onset, HDAC1 was upregulated in beta cells whereas HDAC2 and -3 were downregulated in comparison with five paediatric controls. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: These data demonstrate non-redundant functions of islet class I HDACs and suggest that targeting HDAC1 and HDAC3 would provide optimal protection......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are promising pharmacological targets in cancer and autoimmune diseases. All 11 classical HDACs (HDAC1-11) are found in the pancreatic beta cell, and HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) protect beta cells from inflammatory insults. We investigated which HDACs...... of HDAC1, -2 and -3 rescued INS-1 cells from inflammatory damage. Small hairpin RNAs against HDAC1 and -3, but not HDAC2, reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced beta cell apoptosis in INS-1 and primary rat islets. The protective properties of specific HDAC knock-down correlated with attenuated cytokine...

  18. Enhanced Glucose Tolerance and Pancreatic Beta Cell Function by Low Dose Aspirin in Hyperglycemic Insulin-Resistant Type 2 Diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layla Amiri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Type 2 diabetes is the most common metabolic disorder, characterized by insulin resistance and pancreatic islet beta-cell failure. The most common complications associated with type 2 diabetes are hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, increased inflammatory and reduced insulin response. Aspirin (ASA and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs have been associated with the prevention of diabetes, obesity and related cardiovascular disorders. Aspirin has been used in many clinical and experimental trials for the prevention of diabetes and associated complications. Methods: In this study, five month old Goto-Kakizaki (GK rats, which showed signs of mild hyperglycemia (fasting blood glucose 80-95 mg/dl vs 55-60 mg/dl Wistar control rats were used. Two subgroups of GK and Wistar control rats were injected intraperitoneally with 100 mg aspirin/kg body weight/ day for 5 weeks. Animals were sacrificed and blood and tissues were collected after performing glucose tolerance (2 h post 2g IP glucose ingestion tests in experimental and control groups. Results: Aspirin caused a moderate decrease in hyperglycemia. However, we observed a significant improvement in glucose tolerance after ASA treatment in GK rats compared to the nondiabetic Wistar rats. Also, the ASA treated GK rats exhibited a significant decrease in insulinemia. ASA treatment also caused a marked reduction in the pro-inflammatory prostaglandin, PGE2, which was significantly higher in GK rats. On the other hand, no significant organ toxicity was observed after ASA treatment at this dose and time period. However, the total cholesterol and lipoprotein levels were significantly increased in GK rats, which decreased after ASA treatment. Immunofluorescence staining for insulin/glucagon secreting pancreatic cells showed improved beta-cell structural and functional integrity in ASA-treated rats which was also confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis

  19. The Preotective effects of Okra Powder (Abelmoschus esculentus on Histological and Histochemical Changes of Pancreatic Beta Cells and Liver Tissue of Diabetic Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeim Erfani Majd

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Since Abelmoschus esculentus plant has many medical benefits, the present study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effects of Okra Powder (Abelmoschus esculentus against high-fat diet fed-streptozotocin (HFD/STZ-induced diabetic rats. Methods: In this experimental study, 25 Wistar Albino female rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: I: control group; II: healthy rats receiving A. esculentus (200 mg/kg; III (HFD/STZ group: Rats fed with high-fat diet (HFD (60% fat for 4 weeks and then injected low-dose STZ (35 mg/kg; IV: diabetic rats receiving A. esculentus (200mg/kg and V: diabetic rats receiving metformin (200 mg/kg. At the end of experiment, biochemical parameters, including Fasting Blood Glucose (FBG, insulin levels, Homa-IR index, ALT, AST and lipid profile were measured. Pancreas and Liver samples were removed, and 5-6 µ sections were prepared and stained by H&E and aldehyde fuchsin staining. Results: All the biochemical parameters, except HDL-C and insulin, were increased in diabetic rats, while these parameters were decreased in Okra supplementation group compared to diabetic rats (p<0.05. Furthermore, Okra improved the histological impairments of pancreas and liver, including vacuolization, and decrease of β-cells as well as hypertrophy and vacuolization of hepatocytes in diabetic rats. Conclusion: Okra powder improved biochemical parameters, liver structure and restoration of beta cells of pancreas in diabetic rats. Thus, it can be considered a complementary therapy to improve diabetic patients.

  20. Insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function in the offspring of type 2 diabetic patients: impact of line of inheritance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Natali, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    What defects in glucose metabolism are present in offspring of type 2 diabetic patients (FHD(+) with a positive family history of diabetes) and to what extent they depend on line of inheritance are uncertain.

  1. In vitro proliferation of adult human beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Rutti

    Full Text Available A decrease in functional beta-cell mass is a key feature of type 2 diabetes. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 analogues induce proliferation of rodent beta-cells. However, the proliferative capacity of human beta-cells and its modulation by GLP-1 analogues remain to be fully investigated. We therefore sought to quantify adult human beta-cell proliferation in vitro and whether this is affected by the GLP-1 analogue liraglutide.Human islets from 7 adult cadaveric organ donors were dispersed into single cells. Beta-cells were purified by FACS. Non-sorted cells and the beta-cell enriched ("beta-cells" population were plated on extracellular matrix from rat (804G and human bladder carcinoma cells (HTB9 or bovine corneal endothelial ECM (BCEC. Cells were maintained in culture+/-liraglutide for 4 days in the presence of BrdU.Rare human beta-cell proliferation could be observed either in the purified beta-cell population (0.051±0.020%; 22 beta-cells proliferating out of 84'283 beta-cells counted or in the non-sorted cell population (0.055±0.011%; 104 proliferating beta-cells out of 232'826 beta-cells counted, independently of the matrix or the culture conditions. Liraglutide increased human beta-cell proliferation on BCEC in the non-sorted cell population (0.082±0.034% proliferating beta-cells vs. 0.017±0.008% in control, p<0.05.These results indicate that adult human beta-cell proliferation can occur in vitro but remains an extremely rare event with these donors and particular culture conditions. Liraglutide increases beta-cell proliferation only in the non-sorted cell population and only on BCEC. However, it cannot be excluded that human beta-cells may proliferate to a greater extent in situ in response to natural stimuli.

  2. Beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with a compensatory increase in beta cell mass. It is well established that somatolactogenic hormones contribute to the expansion both indirectly by their insulin antagonistic effects and directly by their mitogenic effects on the beta cells via receptors for prolactin...... and growth hormone expressed in rodent beta cells. However, the beta cell expansion in human pregnancy seems to occur by neogenesis of beta cells from putative progenitor cells rather than by proliferation of existing beta cells. Claes Hellerström has pioneered the research on beta cell growth for decades...... in the expansion of the beta cell mass in human pregnancy, and the relative roles of endocrine factors and nutrients....

  3. The effect of smoking cessation pharmacotherapies on pancreatic beta cell function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woynillowicz, Amanda K.; Raha, Sandeep; Nicholson, Catherine J.; Holloway, Alison C.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of our study was to evaluate whether drugs currently used for smoking cessation (i.e., nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline [a partial agonist at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR)] and bupropion [which acts in part as a nAChR antagonist]) can affect beta cell function and determine the mechanism(s) of this effect. INS-1E cells, a rat beta cell line, were treated with nicotine, varenicline and bupropion to determine their effects on beta cell function, mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity and cellular/oxidative stress. Treatment of INS-1E cells with equimolar concentrations (1 μM) of three test compounds resulted in an ablation of normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by the cells. This disruption of normal beta cell function was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction since all three compounds tested significantly decreased the activity of mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity. These results raise the possibility that the currently available smoking cessation pharmacotherapies may also have adverse effects on beta cell function and thus glycemic control in vivo. Therefore whether or not the use of nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline and bupropion can cause endocrine changes which are consistent with impaired pancreatic function warrants further investigation. -- Highlights: ► Smoking cessation drugs have the potential to disrupt beta cell function in vitro. ► The effects of nicotine, varenicline and bupropion are similar. ► The impaired beta cell function is mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction. ► If similar effects are seen in vivo, these drugs may increase the risk of diabetes.

  4. The effect of smoking cessation pharmacotherapies on pancreatic beta cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woynillowicz, Amanda K. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Raha, Sandeep [Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Nicholson, Catherine J. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Holloway, Alison C., E-mail: hollow@mcmaster.ca [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8N 3Z5 (Canada)

    2012-11-15

    The goal of our study was to evaluate whether drugs currently used for smoking cessation (i.e., nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline [a partial agonist at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR)] and bupropion [which acts in part as a nAChR antagonist]) can affect beta cell function and determine the mechanism(s) of this effect. INS-1E cells, a rat beta cell line, were treated with nicotine, varenicline and bupropion to determine their effects on beta cell function, mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity and cellular/oxidative stress. Treatment of INS-1E cells with equimolar concentrations (1 μM) of three test compounds resulted in an ablation of normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by the cells. This disruption of normal beta cell function was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction since all three compounds tested significantly decreased the activity of mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity. These results raise the possibility that the currently available smoking cessation pharmacotherapies may also have adverse effects on beta cell function and thus glycemic control in vivo. Therefore whether or not the use of nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline and bupropion can cause endocrine changes which are consistent with impaired pancreatic function warrants further investigation. -- Highlights: ► Smoking cessation drugs have the potential to disrupt beta cell function in vitro. ► The effects of nicotine, varenicline and bupropion are similar. ► The impaired beta cell function is mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction. ► If similar effects are seen in vivo, these drugs may increase the risk of diabetes.

  5. Positron emission tomography study on pancreatic somatostatin receptors in normal and diabetic rats with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide: A potential PET tracer for beta cell mass measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Takeo [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Division of Molecular Imaging, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, 2-2 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Hasegawa, Koki; Nishimura, Mie; Kanayama, Yousuke; Wada, Yasuhiro; Hayashinaka, Emi; Cui, Yilong; Kataoka, Yosky [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Senda, Michio [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Division of Molecular Imaging, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, 2-2 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Watanabe, Yasuyoshi, E-mail: yywata@riken.jp [Division of Bio-function Dynamics Imaging, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, 6-7-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan)

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •PET images showed high uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide in the normal pancreas. •{sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide specifically binds to somatostatin receptors in the pancreas. •The pancreatic uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide was decreased in the diabetic rats. •{sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide could be a candidate PET probe to measure the beta cell mass. -- Abstract: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, and the loss or dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells has been reported before the appearance of clinical symptoms and hyperglycemia. To evaluate beta cell mass (BCM) for improving the detection and treatment of DM at earlier stages, we focused on somatostatin receptors that are highly expressed in the pancreatic beta cells, and developed a positron emission tomography (PET) probe derived from octreotide, a metabolically stable somatostatin analog. Octreotide was conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), a chelating agent, and labeled with {sup 68}Gallium ({sup 68}Ga). After intravenous injection of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide, a 90-min emission scan of the abdomen was performed in normal and DM model rats. The PET studies showed that {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide radioactivity was highly accumulated in the pancreas of normal rats and that the pancreatic accumulation was significantly reduced in the rats administered with an excess amount of unlabeled octreotide or after treatment with streptozotocin, which was used for the chemical induction of DM in rats. These results were in good agreement with the ex vivo biodistribution data. These results indicated that the pancreatic accumulation of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide represented specific binding to the somatostatin receptors and reflected BCM. Therefore, PET imaging with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide could be a potential tool for evaluating BCM.

  6. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  7. Effects of ethanol on pancreatic beta-cell death: interaction with glucose and fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembele, Korami; Nguyen, K Hoa; Hernandez, Tiffany A; Nyomba, B L Grégoire

    2009-04-01

    Western lifestyle plays an important role in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes by causing insulin resistance and pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction, a prerequisite for the development of diabetes. High fat diet and alcohol are major components of the western diet. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of ethanol and fatty acids on beta-cell survival and metabolism. We treated the rat beta-cell line RINm5F with ethanol, a mixture of palmitic and oleic acids, or both. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined by (5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate) (CM-H2DCFDA) fluorescence assay, and mitochondrial activity was assessed by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay and by determining ATP production. Cell viability was assessed with a cell counter and trypan blue exclusion, and the mode of cell death by Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide staining. With both ethanol and fatty acid treatments, MTT reduction and ATP production decreased, whereas ROS production increased. Ethanol treatment had no effect on cell number, whereas fatty acid treatment reduced the cell number. Cell incubation with ethanol, fatty acids, or both increased the number of Hoechst 33342-positive nuclei. However, the majority of nuclei from fatty acid-treated cells were stained with propidium iodide, indicating a loss of plasma membrane integrity. We conclude that both ethanol and fatty acids generate cellular oxidative stress, and affect mitochondrial function in RINm5F beta-cells. However, ethanol causes beta-cell death by apoptosis, whereas fatty acids cause cell death predominantly by necrosis. It is not known whether these results are applicable to human beta-cells.

  8. Restitution of defective glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in diabetic GK rat by acetylcholine uncovers paradoxical stimulatory effect of beta-cell muscarinic receptor activation on cAMP production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolz, Manuel; Bailbé, Danielle; Giroix, Marie-Hélène; Calderari, Sophie; Gangnerau, Marie-Noelle; Serradas, Patricia; Rickenbach, Katharina; Irminger, Jean-Claude; Portha, Bernard

    2005-11-01

    Because acetylcholine (ACh) is a recognized potentiator of glucose-stimulated insulin release in the normal beta-cell, we have studied ACh's effect on islets of the Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat, a spontaneous model of type 2 diabetes. We first verified that ACh was able to restore the insulin secretory glucose competence of the GK beta-cell. Then, we demonstrated that in GK islets 1) ACh elicited a first-phase insulin release at low glucose, whereas it had no effect in Wistar; 2) total phospholipase C activity, ACh-induced inositol phosphate production, and intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) elevation were normal; 3) ACh triggered insulin release, even in the presence of thapsigargin, which induced a reduction of the ACh-induced [Ca2+]i response (suggesting that ACh produces amplification signals that augment the efficacy of elevated [Ca2+]i on GK exocytosis); 4) inhibition of protein kinase C did not affect [Ca2+]i nor the insulin release responses to ACh; and 5) inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinases (PKAs), adenylyl cyclases, or cAMP generation, while not affecting the [Ca2+]i response, significantly lowered the insulinotropic response to ACh (at low and high glucose). In conclusion, ACh acts mainly through activation of the cAMP/PKA pathway to potently enhance Ca2+-stimulated insulin release in the GK beta-cell and, in doing so, normalizes its defective glucose responsiveness.

  9. Suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS)-3 protects beta cells against IL-1beta-mediated toxicity through inhibition of multiple nuclear factor-kappaB-regulated proapoptotic pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Allan Ertman; Heding, P E; Frobøse, H

    2004-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine IL-1beta induces apoptosis in pancreatic beta cells via pathways dependent on nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), mitogen-activated protein kinase, and protein kinase C. We recently showed suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS)-3 to be a natural negative feedback reg...... regulator of IL-1beta- and IFN-gamma-mediated signalling in rat islets and beta cell lines, preventing their deleterious effects. However, the mechanisms underlying SOCS-3 inhibition of IL-1beta signalling and prevention against apoptosis remain unknown....

  10. D-saccharic acid-1,4-lactone ameliorates alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus and oxidative stress in rats through inhibiting pancreatic beta-cells from apoptosis via mitochondrial dependent pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Semantee [Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Jadavpur University, 188, Raja S C Mullick Road, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Manna, Prasenjit [Division of Molecular Medicine, Bose Institute, P-1/12, CIT Scheme VII M, Kolkata-700054 (India); Gachhui, Ratan [Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Jadavpur University, 188, Raja S C Mullick Road, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Sil, Parames C., E-mail: parames@bosemain.boseinst.ac.in [Division of Molecular Medicine, Bose Institute, P-1/12, CIT Scheme VII M, Kolkata-700054 (India)

    2011-12-15

    Oxidative stress plays a vital role in diabetic complications. To suppress the oxidative stress mediated damage in diabetic pathophysiology, a special focus has been given on naturally occurring antioxidants present in normal diet. D-saccharic acid 1,4-lactone (DSL), a derivative of D-glucaric acid, is present in many dietary plants and is known for its detoxifying and antioxidant properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the beneficial role of DSL against alloxan (ALX) induced diabetes in the pancreas tissue of Swiss albino rats. A dose-dependent study for DSL (20-120 mg/kg body weight) was carried out to find the effective dose of the compound in ALX-induced diabetic rats. ALX exposure elevated the blood glucose, glycosylated Hb, decreased the plasma insulin and disturbed the intra-cellular antioxidant machineries whereas oral administration of DSL at a dose of 80 mg/kg body weight restored these alterations close to normal. Investigating the mechanism of the protective activity of DSL we observed that it prevented the pancreatic {beta}-cell apoptosis via mitochondria-dependent pathway. Results showed decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced cytochrome c release in the cytosol and reciprocal regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins in the diabetic rats. These events were also found to be associated with increased level of Apaf-1, caspase 9, and caspase 3 that ultimately led to pancreatic {beta}-cell apoptosis. DSL treatment, however, counteracted these changes. In conclusion, DSL possesses the capability of ameliorating the oxidative stress in ALX-induced diabetes and thus could be a promising approach in lessening diabetic complications. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress is suggested as a key event in the pathogenesis of diabetes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer D-saccharic acid 1,4-lactone (DSL) reduces the alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DSL normalizes cellular antioxidant machineries

  11. Implications for the offspring of circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nalla, Amarnadh; Ringholm, Lene; Søstrup, Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    is able to stimulate proliferation of rat beta cells. We have identified several circulating factors that may contribute to beta cell adaptation to pregnancy. Further studies are needed to elucidate their possible role in glucose homeostasis in the mother and her offspring.......OBJECTIVE: Several studies have shown an increase in beta cell mass during pregnancy. Somatolactogenic hormones are known to stimulate the proliferation of existing beta cells in rodents whereas the mechanism in humans is still unclear. We hypothesize that in addition to somatolactogenic hormones...... there are other circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation to pregnancy. This study aimed at screening for potential pregnancy-associated circulating beta cell growth factors. SAMPLES: Serum samples from nonpregnant and pregnant women. METHODS: The effect of serum from pregnant women...

  12. Beta Cell Workshop 2013 Kyoto

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, R Scott; Madsen, Ole D; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2013-01-01

    The very modern Kyoto International Conference Center provided the site for the 8th workshop on Beta cells on April 23-26, 2013. The preceding workshops were held in Boston, USA (1991); Kyoto, Japan (1994); Helsingør, Denmark (1997); Helsinki, Finland (2003); El Perello, Spain (2006); Peebles...

  13. Pancreatic Beta-Cell Purification by Altering FAD and NAD(PH Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. de Vos

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Isolation of primary beta cells from other cells within in the pancreatic islets is of importance for many fields of islet research. However, up to now, no satisfactory method has been developed that gained high numbers of viable beta cells, without considerable alpha-cell contamination. In this study, we investigated whether rat beta cells can be isolated from nonbeta endocrine cells by manipulating the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(PH autofluorescence. Beta cells were isolated from dispersed islets by flow cytometry, based on their high FAD and NAD(PH fluorescence. To improve beta cell yield and purity, the cellular FAD and NAD(PH contents were altered by preincubation in culture media containing varying amounts of D-glucose and amino acids. Manipulation of the cellular FAD and NAD(PH fluorescence improves beta cell yield and purity after sorting. This method is also a fast and reliable method to measure beta cell functional viability. A conceivable application is assessing beta cell viability before transplantation.

  14. Chaperones ameliorate beta cell dysfunction associated with human islet amyloid polypeptide overexpression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Cadavez

    Full Text Available In type 2 diabetes, beta-cell dysfunction is thought to be due to several causes, one being the formation of toxic protein aggregates called islet amyloid, formed by accumulations of misfolded human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP. The process of hIAPP misfolding and aggregation is one of the factors that may activate the unfolded protein response (UPR, perturbing endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis. Molecular chaperones have been described to be important in regulating ER response to ER stress. In the present work, we evaluate the role of chaperones in a stressed cellular model of hIAPP overexpression. A rat pancreatic beta-cell line expressing hIAPP exposed to thapsigargin or treated with high glucose and palmitic acid, both of which are known ER stress inducers, showed an increase in ER stress genes when compared to INS1E cells expressing rat IAPP or INS1E control cells. Treatment with molecular chaperone glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78, also known as BiP or protein disulfite isomerase (PDI, and chemical chaperones taurine-conjugated ursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA or 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA, alleviated ER stress and increased insulin secretion in hIAPP-expressing cells. Our results suggest that the overexpression of hIAPP induces a stronger response of ER stress markers. Moreover, endogenous and chemical chaperones are able to ameliorate induced ER stress and increase insulin secretion, suggesting that improving chaperone capacity can play an important role in improving beta-cell function in type 2 diabetes.

  15. Antiobesity effects of the beta-cell hormone amylin in diet-induced obese rats: effects on food intake, body weight, composition, energy expenditure, and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Jonathan D; Hughes, Heather; Kendall, Eric; Baron, Alain D; Anderson, Christen M

    2006-12-01

    Effects of amylin and pair feeding (PF) on body weight and metabolic parameters were characterized in diet-induced obesity-prone rats. Peripherally administered rat amylin (300 microg/kg.d, 22d) reduced food intake and slowed weight gain: approximately 10% (Pcontrols; VEH), amylin did not. During wk 1, amylin and PF reduced 24-h respiratory quotient (mean+/-se, 0.82+/-0.0, 0.81+/-0.0, respectively; PEnergy expenditure (EE mean+/-se) tended to be reduced by PF (5.67+/-0.1 kcal/h.kg) and maintained by amylin (5.86+/-0.1 kcal/h.kg) relative to VEH (5.77+/-0.0 kcal/h.kg). By wk 3, respiratory quotient no longer differed; however, EE increased with amylin treatment (5.74+/-0.09 kcal/.kg; Pmetabolic effects.

  16. Tissue-specific expression of transfected human insulin genes in pluripotent clonal rat insulinoma lines induced during passage in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, O.D.; Andersen, L.C.; Michelsen, B.; Owerbach, D.; Larsson, L.I.; Lernmark, A.; Steiner, D.F. (Hagedorn Research Laboratory, Gentofte (Denmark))

    1988-09-01

    The pluripotent rat islet tumor cell line MSL-G2 expresses primarily glucagon or cholecystokinin and not insulin in vitro but changes phenotype completely after prolonged in vivo cultivation to yield small-sized hypoglycemic tumors composed almost entirely of insulin-producing beta cells. When a genomic DNA fragment containing the coding and upstream regulatory regions of the human insulin gene was stably transfected into MSL-G2 cells no measurable amounts of insulin or insulin mRNA were detected in vitro. However, successive transplantation of two transfected clones resulted in hypoglycemic tumors that efficiently coexpressed human and rat insulin as determined by human C-peptide-specific immunoreagents. These results demonstrate that cis-acting tissue-specific insulin gene enhancer elements are conserved between rat and human insulin genes. The authors propose that the in vivo differentiation of MSL-G2 cells and transfected subclones into insulin-producing cells reflects processes of natural beta-cell ontogeny leading to insulin gene expression.

  17. Tissue-specific expression of transfected human insulin genes in pluripotent clonal rat insulinoma lines induced during passage in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, O.D.; Andersen, L.C.; Michelsen, B.; Owerbach, D.; Larsson, L.I.; Lernmark, A.; Steiner, D.F.

    1988-01-01

    The pluripotent rat islet tumor cell line MSL-G2 expresses primarily glucagon or cholecystokinin and not insulin in vitro but changes phenotype completely after prolonged in vivo cultivation to yield small-sized hypoglycemic tumors composed almost entirely of insulin-producing beta cells. When a genomic DNA fragment containing the coding and upstream regulatory regions of the human insulin gene was stably transfected into MSL-G2 cells no measurable amounts of insulin or insulin mRNA were detected in vitro. However, successive transplantation of two transfected clones resulted in hypoglycemic tumors that efficiently coexpressed human and rat insulin as determined by human C-peptide-specific immunoreagents. These results demonstrate that cis-acting tissue-specific insulin gene enhancer elements are conserved between rat and human insulin genes. The authors propose that the in vivo differentiation of MSL-G2 cells and transfected subclones into insulin-producing cells reflects processes of natural beta-cell ontogeny leading to insulin gene expression

  18. Nkx6.1 decline accompanies mitochondrial DNA reduction but subtle nucleoid size decrease in pancreatic islet beta-cells of diabetic Goto Kakizaki rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špaček, Tomáš; Pavluch, Vojtěch; Alán, Lukáš; Capková, Nikola; Engstová, Hana; Dlasková, Andrea; Berková, Z.; Saudek, F.; Ježek, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, Nov 15 (2017), č. článku 15674. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-02033S; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-06666S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : GK rat * superresolution fluorescence * microscopy reveals * binding-protein * insulin -release Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  19. Osteocalcin protects pancreatic beta cell function and survival under high glucose conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kover, Karen, E-mail: kkover@cmh.edu [Division of Endocrine/Diabetes, Children' s Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Yan, Yun; Tong, Pei Ying; Watkins, Dara; Li, Xiaoyu [Division of Endocrine/Diabetes, Children' s Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Tasch, James; Hager, Melissa [Kansas City University Medical Biosciences, Kansas City, MO (United States); Clements, Mark; Moore, Wayne V. [Division of Endocrine/Diabetes, Children' s Mercy Hospital & Clinics, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States)

    2015-06-19

    Diabetes is characterized by progressive beta cell dysfunction and loss due in part to oxidative stress that occurs from gluco/lipotoxicity. Treatments that directly protect beta cell function and survival in the diabetic milieu are of particular interest. A growing body of evidence suggests that osteocalcin, an abundant non-collagenous protein of bone, supports beta cell function and proliferation. Based on previous gene expression data by microarray, we hypothesized that osteocalcin protects beta cells from glucose-induced oxidative stress. To test our hypothesis we cultured isolated rat islets and INS-1E cells in the presence of normal, high, or high glucose ± osteocalcin for up to 72 h. Oxidative stress and viability/mitochondrial function were measured by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} assay and Alamar Blue assay, respectively. Caspase 3/7 activity was also measured as a marker of apoptosis. A functional test, glucose stimulated insulin release, was conducted and expression of genes/protein was measured by qRT-PCR/western blot/ELISA. Osteocalcin treatment significantly reduced high glucose-induced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels while maintaining viability/mitochondrial function. Osteocalcin also significantly improved glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin content in rat islets after 48 h of high glucose exposure compared to untreated islets. As expected sustained high glucose down-regulated gene/protein expression of INS1 and BCL2 while increasing TXNIP expression. Interestingly, osteocalcin treatment reversed the effects of high glucose on gene/protein expression. We conclude that osteocalcin can protect beta cells from the negative effects of glucose-induced oxidative stress, in part, by reducing TXNIP expression, thereby preserving beta cell function and survival. - Highlights: • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced oxidative stress in beta cells. • Osteocalcin preserves beta cell function and survival under stress conditions. • Osteocalcin reduces glucose

  20. Osteocalcin protects pancreatic beta cell function and survival under high glucose conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kover, Karen; Yan, Yun; Tong, Pei Ying; Watkins, Dara; Li, Xiaoyu; Tasch, James; Hager, Melissa; Clements, Mark; Moore, Wayne V.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by progressive beta cell dysfunction and loss due in part to oxidative stress that occurs from gluco/lipotoxicity. Treatments that directly protect beta cell function and survival in the diabetic milieu are of particular interest. A growing body of evidence suggests that osteocalcin, an abundant non-collagenous protein of bone, supports beta cell function and proliferation. Based on previous gene expression data by microarray, we hypothesized that osteocalcin protects beta cells from glucose-induced oxidative stress. To test our hypothesis we cultured isolated rat islets and INS-1E cells in the presence of normal, high, or high glucose ± osteocalcin for up to 72 h. Oxidative stress and viability/mitochondrial function were measured by H 2 O 2 assay and Alamar Blue assay, respectively. Caspase 3/7 activity was also measured as a marker of apoptosis. A functional test, glucose stimulated insulin release, was conducted and expression of genes/protein was measured by qRT-PCR/western blot/ELISA. Osteocalcin treatment significantly reduced high glucose-induced H 2 O 2 levels while maintaining viability/mitochondrial function. Osteocalcin also significantly improved glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin content in rat islets after 48 h of high glucose exposure compared to untreated islets. As expected sustained high glucose down-regulated gene/protein expression of INS1 and BCL2 while increasing TXNIP expression. Interestingly, osteocalcin treatment reversed the effects of high glucose on gene/protein expression. We conclude that osteocalcin can protect beta cells from the negative effects of glucose-induced oxidative stress, in part, by reducing TXNIP expression, thereby preserving beta cell function and survival. - Highlights: • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced oxidative stress in beta cells. • Osteocalcin preserves beta cell function and survival under stress conditions. • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced TXNIP

  1. Microculture system for studying monolayers of functional beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobersen, M J; Scharff, J E; Notkins, A L

    1980-04-01

    A method is described for growing monolayers of newborn rat beta-cells in microculture trays. After disruption of the pancreas with collagenase, islets were isolated by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation, trypsinized to obtain individual cells, and plated in 96-well tissue culture trays. The cells were incubated for the first 3 days in growth medium containing 0.1 mM 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine to promote monolayer formation. The cultures could be maintained in a functional state, as defined by their responsiveness to known modulators of insulin secretion, for at least 2 weeks. As few as 1 X 10(3) islet cells/well gave results that were reproducible within +/- 10%. It is suggested that the microculture system for islet cells might prove to be a rapid and reproducible screening technique for studying drugs, viruses, or other agents that affect beta-cell function.

  2. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK mediates nutrient regulation of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maayan Shaked

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP regulates critical biological processes including inflammation, stress and apoptosis. TXNIP is upregulated by glucose and is a critical mediator of hyperglycemia-induced beta-cell apoptosis in diabetes. In contrast, the saturated long-chain fatty acid palmitate, although toxic to the beta-cell, inhibits TXNIP expression. The mechanisms involved in the opposing effects of glucose and fatty acids on TXNIP expression are unknown. We found that both palmitate and oleate inhibited TXNIP in a rat beta-cell line and islets. Palmitate inhibition of TXNIP was independent of fatty acid beta-oxidation or esterification. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK has an important role in cellular energy sensing and control of metabolic homeostasis; therefore we investigated its involvement in nutrient regulation of TXNIP. As expected, glucose inhibited whereas palmitate stimulated AMPK. Pharmacologic activators of AMPK mimicked fatty acids by inhibiting TXNIP. AMPK knockdown increased TXNIP expression in presence of high glucose with and without palmitate, indicating that nutrient (glucose and fatty acids effects on TXNIP are mediated in part via modulation of AMPK activity. TXNIP is transcriptionally regulated by carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP. Palmitate inhibited glucose-stimulated ChREBP nuclear entry and recruitment to the Txnip promoter, thereby inhibiting Txnip transcription. We conclude that AMPK is an important regulator of Txnip transcription via modulation of ChREBP activity. The divergent effects of glucose and fatty acids on TXNIP expression result in part from their opposing effects on AMPK activity. In light of the important role of TXNIP in beta-cell apoptosis, its inhibition by fatty acids can be regarded as an adaptive/protective response to glucolipotoxicity. The finding that AMPK mediates nutrient regulation of TXNIP may have important implications for the pathophysiology and treatment

  3. Beta cell proliferation and growth factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis; Svensson, C; Møldrup, Annette

    1999-01-01

    Formation of new beta cells can take place by two pathways: replication of already differentiated beta cells or neogenesis from putative islet stem cells. Under physiological conditions both processes are most pronounced during the fetal and neonatal development of the pancreas. In adulthood little...... increase in the beta cell number seems to occur. In pregnancy, however, a marked hyperplasia of the beta cells is observed both in rodents and man. Increased mitotic activity has been seen both in vivo and in vitro in islets exposed to placental lactogen (PL), prolactin (PRL) and growth hormone (GH...... and activation of the tyrosine kinase JAK2 and the transcription factors STAT1 and 3. The activation of the insulin gene however also requires the distal part of the receptor and activation of calcium uptake and STAT5. In order to identify putative autocrine growth factors or targets for growth factors we have...

  4. Beta Cell Mass Restoration in Alloxan-Diabetic Mice Treated with EGF and Gastrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imane Song

    Full Text Available One week of treatment with EGF and gastrin (EGF/G was shown to restore normoglycemia and to induce islet regeneration in mice treated with the diabetogenic agent alloxan. The mechanisms underlying this regeneration are not fully understood. We performed genetic lineage tracing experiments to evaluate the contribution of beta cell neogenesis in this model. One day after alloxan administration, mice received EGF/G treatment for one week. The treatment could not prevent the initial alloxan-induced beta cell mass destruction, however it did reverse glycemia to control levels within one day, suggesting improved peripheral glucose uptake. In vitro experiments with C2C12 cell line showed that EGF could stimulate glucose uptake with an efficacy comparable to that of insulin. Subsequently, EGF/G treatment stimulated a 3-fold increase in beta cell mass, which was partially driven by neogenesis and beta cell proliferation as assessed by beta cell lineage tracing and BrdU-labeling experiments, respectively. Acinar cell lineage tracing failed to show an important contribution of acinar cells to the newly formed beta cells. No appearance of transitional cells co-expressing insulin and glucagon, a hallmark for alpha-to-beta cell conversion, was found, suggesting that alpha cells did not significantly contribute to the regeneration. An important fraction of the beta cells significantly lost insulin positivity after alloxan administration, which was restored to normal after one week of EGF/G treatment. Alloxan-only mice showed more pronounced beta cell neogenesis and proliferation, even though beta cell mass remained significantly depleted, suggesting ongoing beta cell death in that group. After one week, macrophage infiltration was significantly reduced in EGF/G-treated group compared to the alloxan-only group. Our results suggest that EGF/G-induced beta cell regeneration in alloxan-diabetic mice is driven by beta cell neogenesis, proliferation and recovery of

  5. The dissociation of tumor-induced weight loss from hypoglycemia in a transplantable pluripotent rat islet tumor results in the segregation of stable alpha- and beta-cell tumor phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, O D; Karlsen, C; Nielsen, E

    1993-01-01

    that of starved rats until death results from cachexia. After tumor resection, animals immediately resume normal feeding behavior. Comparative studies of hormone release and mRNA content in anorectic lines, MSL-G-AN and NHI-5B-AN, vs. those in the insulinoma line, MSL-G2-IN, revealed selective glucagon gene...... in animals carrying tumor necrosis factor-producing experimental tumors....... markers. By selective transplantation, it was possible to segregate stable anorectic normoglycemic tumor lines, MSL-G-AN and NHI-5B-AN, from both clones. These tumors cause an abrupt onset of anorexia when they reach a size of 400-500 mg (

  6. Proton microprobe analysis of pancreatic. beta. cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindh, U [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Gustaf Werner Inst.; Juntti-Berggren, L; Berggren, P O; Hellman, B [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1985-01-01

    Freeze-dried pancreas sections from obese hyperglycemic mice were subjected to proton bombardment and the elemental contents in the ..beta.. cells and the exocrine part were obtained from the characteristic X-rays emitted. Quantitative data were provided for 18 different elements. The mole ratio between K and Na exceeded 10, implying that neither the sample preparation nor the irradiation had induced significant diffuse changes. With the demonstration of this high K/Na ratio it seems likely that also the ..beta.. cells are equipped with an efficient Na/sup +//K/sup +/ pump. The ..beta.. cells contained about 70 mmoles Cl per litre cell water. Observed amounts of Ca and Mg were equivalent to those previously recorded by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy. The significant role of Zn for the storage of insulin was emphasized by the demonstration of 3 times as much of this element in the ..beta.. cells as compared with the exocrine pancreas. In addition, the sensitivity of the proton microprobe enabled measurements of various trace elements such as Rb, Cr, Cu, Al and Pb not previously demonstrated in the pancreatic ..beta.. cells.

  7. Characterization of the distal promoter of the human pyruvate carboxylase gene in pancreatic beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansaya Thonpho

    Full Text Available Pyruvate carboxylase (PC is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in many biosynthetic pathways in various tissues including glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In the present study, we identify promoter usage of the human PC gene in pancreatic beta cells. The data show that in the human, two alternative promoters, proximal and distal, are responsible for the production of multiple mRNA isoforms as in the rat and mouse. RT-PCR analysis performed with cDNA prepared from human liver and islets showed that the distal promoter, but not the proximal promoter, of the human PC gene is active in pancreatic beta cells. A 1108 bp fragment of the human PC distal promoter was cloned and analyzed. It contains no TATA box but possesses two CCAAT boxes, and other putative transcription factor binding sites, similar to those of the distal promoter of rat PC gene. To localize the positive regulatory region in the human PC distal promoter, 5'-truncated and the 25-bp and 15-bp internal deletion mutants of the human PC distal promoter were generated and used in transient transfections in INS-1 832/13 insulinoma and HEK293T (kidney cell lines. The results indicated that positions -340 to -315 of the human PC distal promoter serve as (an activator element(s for cell-specific transcription factor, while the CCAAT box at -71/-67, a binding site for nuclear factor Y (NF-Y, as well as a GC box at -54/-39 of the human PC distal promoter act as activator sequences for basal transcription.

  8. Islet-selectivity of G-protein coupled receptor ligands evaluated for PET imaging of pancreatic {beta}-cell mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, Gary W., E-mail: gary.cline@yale.edu [Yale University School of Medicine (United States); Zhao, Xiaojian [Yale University School of Medicine (United States); Jakowski, Amy B.; Soeller, Walter C.; Treadway, Judith L. [Pfizer Global Research and Development, Pfizer Inc., Groton CT (United States)

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} We screened G-protein coupled receptors for imaging pancreatic. {yields} Database mining and immunohistochemistry identified GPCRs enriched in {beta}-cells. {yields} In vitro and in vivo assays were used to determine exocrine vs endocrine specificity. {yields} GPCR candidates for imaging of {beta}-cell mass are Prokineticin-1R, mGluR5, and GLP-1R. -- Abstract: A critical unmet need exists for methods to quantitatively measure endogenous pancreatic {beta}-cell mass (BCM) for the clinical evaluation of therapies to prevent or reverse loss of BCM and diabetes progression. Our objective was to identify G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are expressed with a high degree of specificity to islet {beta}-cells for receptor-targeted imaging of BCM. GPCRs enriched in pancreatic islets relative to pancreas acinar and hepatic tissue were identified using a database screen. Islet-specific expression was confirmed by human pancreas immunohistochemistry (IHC). In vitro selectivity assessment was determined from the binding and uptake of radiolabeled ligands to the rat insulinoma INS-1 832/13 cell line and isolated rat islets relative to the exocrine pancreas cell-type, PANC-1. Tail-vein injections of radioligands into rats were used to determine favorable image criteria of in vivo biodistribution to the pancreas relative to other internal organs (i.e., liver, spleen, stomach, and lungs). Database and IHC screening identified four candidate receptors for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation for PET imaging of BCM: prokineticin-1 receptor (PK-1R), metabotropic glutamate receptor type-5 (mGluR5), neuropeptide Y-2 receptor (NPY-2R), and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R). In vitro specificity ratios gave the following receptor rank order: PK-1R > GLP-1R > NPY-2R > mGluR5. The biodistribution rank order of selectivity to the pancreas was found to be PK-1R > VMAT2 {approx} GLP-1R > mGluR5. Favorable islet selectivity and biodistribution

  9. Redox Homeostasis in Pancreatic beta Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Petr; Dlasková, Andrea; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, č. 2012 (2012), s. 932838 ISSN 1942-0900 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346; GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/10/P204 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : beta cells * reactive oxygen species homeostasis * mitochondria Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 3.393, year: 2012

  10. Effect of iron on pancreatic beta cell function and insulin resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Increase in total body iron store has been reported in the aetiology and development of diabetes mellitus. The effect of iron supplementation in female with respect to the incidence of diabetes mellitus was investigated on the pancreatic beta cell function and insulin resistance in normal female rats. Methods: ...

  11. Genetic models rule out a major role of beta cell glycogen in the control of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir-Coll, Joan; Duran, Jordi; Slebe, Felipe; García-Rocha, Mar; Gomis, Ramon; Gasa, Rosa; Guinovart, Joan J

    2016-05-01

    Glycogen accumulation occurs in beta cells of diabetic patients and has been proposed to partly mediate glucotoxicity-induced beta cell dysfunction. However, the role of glycogen metabolism in beta cell function and its contribution to diabetes pathophysiology remain poorly understood. We investigated the function of beta cell glycogen by studying glucose homeostasis in mice with (1) defective glycogen synthesis in the pancreas; and (2) excessive glycogen accumulation in beta cells. Conditional deletion of the Gys1 gene and overexpression of protein targeting to glycogen (PTG) was accomplished by Cre-lox recombination using pancreas-specific Cre lines. Glucose homeostasis was assessed by determining fasting glycaemia, insulinaemia and glucose tolerance. Beta cell mass was determined by morphometry. Glycogen was detected histologically by periodic acid-Schiff's reagent staining. Isolated islets were used for the determination of glycogen and insulin content, insulin secretion, immunoblots and gene expression assays. Gys1 knockout (Gys1 (KO)) mice did not exhibit differences in glucose tolerance or basal glycaemia and insulinaemia relative to controls. Insulin secretion and gene expression in isolated islets was also indistinguishable between Gys1 (KO) and controls. Conversely, despite effective glycogen overaccumulation in islets, mice with PTG overexpression (PTG(OE)) presented similar glucose tolerance to controls. However, under fasting conditions they exhibited lower glycaemia and higher insulinaemia. Importantly, neither young nor aged PTG(OE) mice showed differences in beta cell mass relative to age-matched controls. Finally, a high-fat diet did not reveal a beta cell-autonomous phenotype in either model. Glycogen metabolism is not required for the maintenance of beta cell function. Glycogen accumulation in beta cells alone is not sufficient to trigger the dysfunction or loss of these cells, or progression to diabetes.

  12. EX4 stabilizes and activates Nrf2 via PKCδ, contributing to the prevention of oxidative stress-induced pancreatic beta cell damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi-Hwi; Kim, Eung-Hwi [College of Pharmacy, Gachon Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, Gachon University, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hye Seung [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Dongki [Department of Physiology, Gachon University College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Eun-Young, E-mail: parkey@mokpo.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Natural Medicine Research Institute, Mokpo National University, Muan-gun, Jeonnam (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Hee-Sook, E-mail: hsjun@gachon.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Gachon Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, Gachon University, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, Yeonsu-ku, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Oxidative stress in pancreatic beta cells can inhibit insulin secretion and promote apoptotic cell death. Exendin-4 (EX4), a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, can suppress beta cell apoptosis, improve beta cell function and protect against oxidative damage. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms for antioxidative effects of EX4 in pancreatic beta cells. INS-1 cells, a rat insulinoma cell line, were pretreated with EX4 and exposed to palmitate or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and glutathione and insulin secretion were measured. The mRNA and protein expression levels of antioxidant genes were examined. The level of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), its binding to antioxidant response element (ARE), and its ubiquination in the presence of EX4 were determined. The Nrf2 signaling pathway was determined using rottlerin (protein kinase [PK]Cδ inhibitor), H89 (PKA inhibitor) and LY294002 (phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase [PI3K] inhibitor). EX4 treatment decreased ROS production, recovered cellular glutathione levels and insulin secretion in the presence of oxidative stress in INS-1 cells. The expression levels of glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit and heme oxygenase-1 were increased by EX4 treatment. EX4 promoted Nrf2 translocation, ARE binding activity and enhanced stabilization of Nrf2 by inhibition of ubiquitination. Knockdown of Nrf2 abolished the effect of EX4 on increased insulin secretion. Inhibition of PKCδ attenuated Nrf2 translocation and antioxidative gene expression by EX4 treatment. We suggest that EX4 activates and stabilizes Nrf2 through PKCδ activation, contributing to the increase of antioxidant gene expression and consequently improving beta cell function in the presence of oxidative stress. - Highlights: • EX4 protects against oxidative stress-induced pancreatic beta cell dysfunction. • EX4 increases antioxidant gene expression. • Antioxidative effect of EX4 is

  13. EX4 stabilizes and activates Nrf2 via PKCδ, contributing to the prevention of oxidative stress-induced pancreatic beta cell damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi-Hwi; Kim, Eung-Hwi; Jung, Hye Seung; Yang, Dongki; Park, Eun-Young; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress in pancreatic beta cells can inhibit insulin secretion and promote apoptotic cell death. Exendin-4 (EX4), a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, can suppress beta cell apoptosis, improve beta cell function and protect against oxidative damage. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms for antioxidative effects of EX4 in pancreatic beta cells. INS-1 cells, a rat insulinoma cell line, were pretreated with EX4 and exposed to palmitate or H 2 O 2 . Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and glutathione and insulin secretion were measured. The mRNA and protein expression levels of antioxidant genes were examined. The level of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), its binding to antioxidant response element (ARE), and its ubiquination in the presence of EX4 were determined. The Nrf2 signaling pathway was determined using rottlerin (protein kinase [PK]Cδ inhibitor), H89 (PKA inhibitor) and LY294002 (phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase [PI3K] inhibitor). EX4 treatment decreased ROS production, recovered cellular glutathione levels and insulin secretion in the presence of oxidative stress in INS-1 cells. The expression levels of glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit and heme oxygenase-1 were increased by EX4 treatment. EX4 promoted Nrf2 translocation, ARE binding activity and enhanced stabilization of Nrf2 by inhibition of ubiquitination. Knockdown of Nrf2 abolished the effect of EX4 on increased insulin secretion. Inhibition of PKCδ attenuated Nrf2 translocation and antioxidative gene expression by EX4 treatment. We suggest that EX4 activates and stabilizes Nrf2 through PKCδ activation, contributing to the increase of antioxidant gene expression and consequently improving beta cell function in the presence of oxidative stress. - Highlights: • EX4 protects against oxidative stress-induced pancreatic beta cell dysfunction. • EX4 increases antioxidant gene expression. • Antioxidative effect of EX4 is mediated by

  14. Characterization of a Commercial Silicon Beta Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foxe, Michael P.; Hayes, James C.; Mayer, Michael F.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Sivels, Ciara B.; Suarez, Rey

    2016-01-01

    Silicon detectors are of interest for the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) due to their enhanced energy resolution compared to plastic scintillators beta cells. Previous work developing a figure-of-merit (FOM) for comparison of beta cells suggests that the minimum detectable activity (MDA) could be reduced by a factor of two to three with the use of silicon detectors. Silicon beta cells have been developed by CEA (France) and Lares Ltd. (Russia), with the PIPSBox developed by CEA being commercially available from Canberra for approximately $35k, but there is still uncertainty about the reproducibility of the capabilities in the field. PNNL is developing a high-resolution beta-gamma detector system in the shallow underground laboratory, which will utilize and characterize the operation of the PIPSBox detector. Throughout this report, we examine the capabilities of the PIPSBox as developed by CEA. The lessons learned through the testing and use of the PIPSBox will allow PNNL to strategically develop a silicon detector optimized to better suit the communities needs in the future.

  15. Inflammatory stress of pancreatic beta cells drives release of extracellular heat-shock protein 90α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña, Gail J; Pérez, Liliana; Guindon, Lynette; Deffit, Sarah N; Evans-Molina, Carmella; Thurmond, Debbie C; Blum, Janice S

    2017-06-01

    A major obstacle in predicting and preventing the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) in at-risk individuals is the lack of well-established early biomarkers indicative of ongoing beta cell stress during the pre-clinical phase of disease. Recently, serum levels of the α cytoplasmic isoform of heat-shock protein 90 (hsp90) were shown to be elevated in individuals with new-onset T1D. We therefore hypothesized that hsp90α could be released from beta cells in response to cellular stress and inflammation associated with the earliest stages of T1D. Here, human beta cell lines and cadaveric islets released hsp90α in response to stress induced by treatment with a combination of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1β, tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ. Mechanistically, hsp90α release was found to be driven by cytokine-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), a pathway that can eventually lead to beta cell apoptosis. Cytokine-induced beta cell hsp90α release and JNK activation were significantly reduced by pre-treating cells with the endoplasmic reticulum stress-mitigating chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid. The hsp90α release by cells may therefore be a sensitive indicator of stress during inflammation and a useful tool in assessing therapeutic mitigation of cytokine-induced cell damage linked to autoimmunity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The effect of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 on GH signaling in beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, Sif G; Hansen, Johnny A; Lindberg, Karen

    2002-01-01

    GH is an important regulator of cell growth and metabolism. In the pancreas, GH stimulates mitogenesis as well as insulin production in beta-cells. The cellular effects of GH are exerted mainly through activation of the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway...... stable transfection of the beta-cell lines with plasmids expressing SOCS-3 under the control of an inducible promoter, a time- and dose-dependent expression of SOCS-3 in the cells was obtained. EMSA showed that SOCS-3 is able to inhibit GH-induced DNA binding of both STAT3 and STAT5 in RIN-5AH cells...

  17. [Factors causing damage and destruction of beta-cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anděl, Michal; Němcová, Vlasta; Pavlíková, Nela; Urbanová, Jana; Cecháková, Marie; Havlová, Andrea; Straková, Radka; Večeřová, Livia; Mandys, Václav; Kovář, Jan; Heneberg, Petr; Trnka, Jan; Polák, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Insulin secretion in patients with manifested diabetes mellitus tends to disappear months to decades after the diagnosis, which is a clear sign of a gradual loss of pancreatic islet beta-cells. In our sample of 30 type 2 diabetic patients, whose disease manifested between 30 and 45 years of age, about a half have retained or even increased insulin secretion 30 years later, while the other half exhibit a much diminished or lost insulin secretion. Factors that can damage or destroy beta-cells can be divided into the following groups: Metabolic factors: hyperglycemia and glucotoxicity, lipotoxicity, hypoxia, reactive oxygen species; Pharmacological factors: antimicrobial medication pentamidine, SSRI antidepressants; Factors related to impaired insulin secretion: MODY type diabetes; Environmental toxic factors: rat poison Vacor, streptozotocin, polychlorinated and polybrominated hydrocarbons; Disorders of the exocrine pancreas: tumor infiltration, fibrous infiltration, chronic pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis; Infections, inflammation, autoimmunity, viral factors: Coxsackie viruses, H1N1 influenza, enteroviruses. We are currently working on finding other factors leading to beta-cell damage, studying their effect on apoptosis and necrosis and looking for possible protective factors to prevent this damage. We our increasing knowledge about the mechanisms of beta-cell damage and destruction we come ever closer to suggest measures for their prevention. In this review we offer a brief and simplified summary of some of the findings related to this area.Key words: pancreatic islet beta-cells of Langerhans - factors damaging or destroying beta-cells - insulin secretion.

  18. Establishment of cell lines with rat spermatogonial stem cell characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pelt, Ans M. M.; Roepers-Gajadien, Hermien L.; Gademan, Iris S.; Creemers, Laura B.; de Rooij, Dirk G.; van Dissel-Emiliani, Federica M. F.

    2002-01-01

    Spermatogonial cell lines were established by transfecting a mixed population of purified rat A(s) (stem cells), A(pr) and A(al) spermatogonia with SV40 large T antigen. Two cell lines were characterized and found to express Hsp90alpha and oct-4, specific markers for germ cells and A spermatogonia,

  19. Glucose activates prenyltransferases in pancreatic islet {beta}-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goalstone, Marc [Department of Medicine, University of Colorado, VA Medical Center, Denver, CO 80220 (United States); Kamath, Vasudeva [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wayne State University, VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Kowluru, Anjaneyulu, E-mail: akowluru@med.wayne.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wayne State University, VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates small G-proteins [e.g., Cdc42 and Rac1] in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion [GSIS] in the islet {beta}-cell. These signaling proteins undergo post-translational modifications [e.g., prenylation] at their C-terminal cysteine residue and appear to be essential for the transport and fusion of insulin-containing secretory granules with the plasma membrane and the exocytotic secretion of insulin. However, potential regulation of the prenylating enzymes by physiological insulin secretogues [e.g., glucose] has not been investigated thus far. Herein, we report immunological localization, sub-cellular distribution and regulation of farnesyltransferases [FTases] and geranylgeranyltransferase [GGTase] by glucose in insulin-secreting INS 832/13 {beta}-cells and normal rat islets. Our findings suggest that an insulinotropic concentration of glucose [20 mM] markedly stimulated the expression of the {alpha}-subunits of FTase/GGTase-1, but not the {beta}-subunits of FTase or GGTase-1 without significantly affecting the predominantly cytosolic distribution of these holoenzymes in INS 832/13 cells and rodent islets. Under these conditions, glucose significantly stimulated [2.5- to 4.0-fold over basal] the activities of both FTase and GGTase-1 in both cell types. Together, these findings provide the first evidence to suggest that GSIS involves activation of the endogenous islet prenyltransferases by glucose, culminating in the activation of their respective G-protein substrates, which is necessary for cytoskeletal rearrangement, vesicular transport, fusion and secretion of insulin.

  20. Visualizing pancreatic {beta}-cell mass with [{sup 11}C]DTBZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Norman Ray [Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Souza, Fabiola [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Witkowski, Piotr [Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Maffei, Antonella [Institute of Genetics and Biophysics ' Adriano Buzzati-Traverso' , CNR, Naples 80131 (Italy); Raffo, Anthony [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Herron, Alan [Center for Comparative Medicine and The Department of Pathology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Kilbourn, Michael [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0638 (United States); Jurewicz, Agata [Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Herold, Kevan [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Liu, Eric [Diabetes Branch, NIDDK, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20854 (United States); Hardy, Mark Adam [Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Van Heertum, Ronald [Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Harris, Paul Emerson [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical School, New York, NY 10032 (United States)]. E-mail: peh1@columbia.edu

    2006-10-15

    {beta}-Cell mass (BCM) influences the total amount of insulin secreted, varies by individual and by the degree of insulin resistance, and is affected by physiologic and pathologic conditions. The islets of Langerhans, however, appear to have a reserve capacity of insulin secretion and, overall, assessments of insulin and blood glucose levels remain poor measures of BCM, {beta}-cell function and progression of diabetes. Thus, novel noninvasive determinations of BCM are needed to provide a quantitative endpoint for novel therapies of diabetes, islet regeneration and transplantation. Built on previous gene expression studies, we tested the hypothesis that the targeting of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2), which is expressed by {beta} cells, with [{sup 11}C]dihydrotetrabenazine ([{sup 11}C]DTBZ), a radioligand specific for VMAT2, and the use of positron emission tomography (PET) can provide a measure of BCM. In this report, we demonstrate decreased radioligand uptake within the pancreas of Lewis rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes relative to their euglycemic historical controls. These studies suggest that quantitation of VMAT2 expression in {beta} cells with the use of [{sup 11}C]DTBZ and PET represents a method for noninvasive longitudinal estimates of changes in BCM that may be useful in the study and treatment of diabetes.

  1. Vanadyl Sulfate Treatment Stimulates Proliferation and Regeneration of Beta Cells in Pancreatic Islets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Missaoui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effects of vanadium sulfate (VOSO4 treatment at 5 and 10 mg/kg for 30 days on endocrine pancreas activity and histology in nondiabetic and STZ-induced diabetic rats. In diabetic group, blood glucose levels significantly increased while insulinemia level markedly decreased. At the end of treatment, VOSO4 at a dose of 10 mg/Kg normalized blood glucose level in diabetic group, restored insulinemia, and significantly improved insulin sensitivity. VOSO4 also increased in a dose-dependent manner the number of insulin immunopositive beta cells in pancreatic islets of nondiabetic rats. Furthermore, in the STZ-diabetic group, the decrease in the number of insulin immunopositive beta cells was corrected to reach the control level mainly with the higher dose of vanadium. Therefore, VOSO4 treatment normalized plasma glucose and insulin levels and improved insulin sensitivity in STZ-experimental diabetes and induced beta cells proliferation and/or regeneration in normal or diabetic rats.

  2. Effects of the hypoglycaemic drugs repaglinide and glibenclamide on ATP-sensitive potassium-channels and cytosolic calcium levels in beta TC3 cells and rat pancreatic beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromada, J; Dissing, S; Kofod, Hans

    1995-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the action of the hypoglycaemic drugs repaglinide and glibenclamide in cultured newborn rat islet cells and mouse beta TC3 cells. In cell-attached membrane patches of newborn rat islet cells repaglinide (10 nmol/l) and glibenclamide (20 nmol/l) decrease the open pro...

  3. Immature transformed rat islet beta-cells differentially express C-peptides derived from the genes coding for insulin I and II as well as a transfected human insulin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, N; Petersen, J S; Andersen, L C

    1992-01-01

    is induced in the transformed heterogeneous rat islet cell clone, NHI-6F, by transient in vivo passage. During this process a transfected human insulin gene is coactivated with the endogenous nonallelic rat insulin I and II genes. Newly established cultures from NHI-6F insulinomas having a high frequency...

  4. The islet beta-cell: fuel responsive and vulnerable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Christopher J; Prentki, Marc

    2008-10-01

    The pancreatic beta-cell senses blood nutrient levels and is modulated by neurohormonal signals so that it secretes insulin according to the need of the organism. Nutrient sensing involves marked metabolic activation, resulting in the production of coupling signals that promote insulin biosynthesis and secretion. The beta-cell's high capacity for nutrient sensing, however, necessitates reduced protection to nutrient toxicity. This potentially explains why in susceptible individuals, chronic fuel surfeit results in beta-cell failure and type 2 diabetes. Here we discuss recent insights into first, the biochemical basis of beta-cell signaling in response to glucose, amino acids and fatty acids, and second, beta-cell nutrient detoxification. We emphasize the emerging role of glycerolipid/fatty acid cycling in these processes.

  5. Progress in molecular nuclear medicine imaging of pancreatic beta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Haifei; Yin Hongyan; Liu Shuai; Zhang Yifan

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common and frequently occurring disease which seriously threaten the health of human beings. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes respectively results from being destroyed and insufficient beta-cell mass. The associated symptoms appear until 50%-60% decrease of beta-cell mass. Because pancreas is deeply located in the body, with few beta-cell mass, the current methods of clinical diagnosis are invasive and late. So diagnosis of metabolism disease of beta-cell early non-invasively becomes more and more popular, imaging diagnosis of diabetes mellitus becomes the focus of researches, but how to estimate the mass of beta-cell still an important subject in imaging technology. (authors)

  6. Chronology of endocrine differentiation and beta-cell neogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatsuka, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic and incurable disease, which results from absolute or relative insulin insufficiency. Therefore, pancreatic beta cells, which are the only type of cell that expresses insulin, is considered to be a potential target for the cure of diabetes. Although the findings regarding beta-cell neogenesis during pancreas development have been exploited to induce insulin-producing cells from non-beta cells, there are still many hurdles towards generating fully functional beta cells that can produce high levels of insulin and respond to physiological signals. To overcome these problems, a solid understanding of pancreas development and beta-cell formation is required, and several mouse models have been developed to reveal the unique features of each endocrine cell type at distinct developmental time points. Here I review our understanding of pancreas development and endocrine differentiation focusing on recent progresses in improving temporal cell labeling in vivo.

  7. Transgenic overexpression of active calcineurin in beta-cells results in decreased beta-cell mass and hyperglycemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Bernal-Mizrachi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Glucose modulates beta-cell mass and function through an initial depolarization and Ca(2+ influx, which then triggers a number of growth regulating signaling pathways. One of the most important downstream effectors in Ca(2+ signaling is the calcium/Calmodulin activated serine threonine phosphatase, calcineurin. Recent evidence suggests that calcineurin/NFAT is essential for beta-cell proliferation, and that in its absence loss of beta-cells results in diabetes. We hypothesized that in contrast, activation of calcineurin might result in expansion of beta-cell mass and resistance to diabetes.To determine the role of activation of calcineurin signaling in the regulation of pancreatic beta-cell mass and proliferation, we created mice that expressed a constitutively active form of calcineurin under the insulin gene promoter (caCn(RIP. To our surprise, these mice exhibited glucose intolerance. In vitro studies demonstrated that while the second phase of Insulin secretion is enhanced, the overall insulin secretory response was conserved. Islet morphometric studies demonstrated decreased beta-cell mass suggesting that this was a major component responsible for altered Insulin secretion and glucose intolerance in caCn(RIP mice. The reduced beta-cell mass was accompanied by decreased proliferation and enhanced apoptosis.Our studies identify calcineurin as an important factor in controlling glucose homeostasis and indicate that chronic depolarization leading to increased calcineurin activity may contribute, along with other genetic and environmental factors, to beta-cell dysfunction and diabetes.

  8. In silico identification of NF-kappaB-regulated genes in pancreatic beta-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eizirik Decio L

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic beta-cells are the target of an autoimmune attack in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. This is mediated in part by cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-1β and interferon (IFN-γ. These cytokines modify the expression of hundreds of genes, leading to beta-cell dysfunction and death by apoptosis. Several of these cytokine-induced genes are potentially regulated by the IL-1β-activated transcription factor (TF nuclear factor (NF-κB, and previous studies by our group have shown that cytokine-induced NF-κB activation is pro-apoptotic in beta-cells. To identify NF-κB-regulated gene networks in beta-cells we presently used a discriminant analysis-based approach to predict NF-κB responding genes on the basis of putative regulatory elements. Results The performance of linear and quadratic discriminant analysis (LDA, QDA in identifying NF-κB-responding genes was examined on a dataset of 240 positive and negative examples of NF-κB regulation, using stratified cross-validation with an internal leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV loop for automated feature selection and noise reduction. LDA performed slightly better than QDA, achieving 61% sensitivity, 91% specificity and 87% positive predictive value, and allowing the identification of 231, 251 and 580 NF-κB putative target genes in insulin-producing INS-1E cells, primary rat beta-cells and human pancreatic islets, respectively. Predicted NF-κB targets had a significant enrichment in genes regulated by cytokines (IL-1β or IL-1β + IFN-γ and double stranded RNA (dsRNA, as compared to genes not regulated by these NF-κB-dependent stimuli. We increased the confidence of the predictions by selecting only evolutionary stable genes, i.e. genes with homologs predicted as NF-κB targets in rat, mouse, human and chimpanzee. Conclusion The present in silico analysis allowed us to identify novel regulatory targets of NF-κB using a supervised classification method based on

  9. Phosphorylation events implicating p38 and PI3K mediate tungstate-effects in MIN6 beta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piquer, Sandra; Barcelo-Batllori, Silvia; Julia, Marta; Marzo, Nuria; Nadal, Belen; Guinovart, Joan J.; Gomis, Ramon

    2007-01-01

    Oral administration of sodium tungstate is an effective treatment for diabetes in animal models. Several lines of evidence indicate the pancreatic beta cell as one of the targets of tungstate action. Here, we examined the molecular mechanism by which this compound exerts its effects on the beta cell line MIN6. Tungstate treatment induced phosphorylation and subsequent activation of p38 and PI3K which in turn are implicated in tungstate PDX-1 nuclear localization and activation. Although no effect was observed in glucose-induced insulin secretion we found that tungstate activates basal insulin release, a process driven, at least in part, by activation of p38. These results show a direct involvement of p38 and PI3K phosphorylation in the mechanism of action of tungstate in the beta cell

  10. Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens in pancreatic allograft recipients with preexisting beta cell autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujtaba, Muhammad Ahmad; Fridell, Jonathan; Book, Benita; Faiz, Sara; Sharfuddin, Asif; Wiebke, Eric; Rigby, Mark; Taber, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens and its relevance in the presence of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in pancreatic allograft recipients is not well known. Thirty-three patients requiring a pancreas transplant were enrolled in an IRB approved study. They underwent prospective monitoring for DSA and beta cell autoantibody (BCAA) levels to GAD65, insulinoma-associated antigen 2 (IA-2), insulin (micro-IAA [mIAA]), and islet-specific zinc transporter isoform-8 (ZnT8). Twenty-five (75.7%) had pre-transplant BCAA. Twenty had a single antibody (mIAA n = 15, GAD65 n = 5); five had two or more BCAA (GAD65 + mIAA n = 2, GAD65 + mIAA+IA-2 n = 2, GA65 + mIAA+IA-2 + ZnT8 = 1). No changes in GAD65 (p > 0.29), IA-2 (>0.16), and ZnT8 (p > 0.07) were observed between pre-transplant and post-transplant at 6 or 12 months. A decrease in mIAA from pre- to post-6 months (p BCAA was observed at one yr. Seven (21.0%) developed de novo DSA. The incidence of DSA was 24% in patients with BCAA vs. 25% in patients without BCAA (p = 0.69). Pancreatic allograft function of patients with vs. without BCAA, and with and without BCAA + DSA was comparable until last follow-up (three yr). Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens by pancreas transplant may not lead to increased levels or development of new BCAA or pancreatic allograft dysfunction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. On the coherent behavior of pancreatic beta cell clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loppini, Alessandro, E-mail: a.loppini@unicampus.it [Nonlinear Physics and Mathematical Modeling Lab, University Campus Bio-Medico, Via A. del Portillo 21, I-00128 Rome (Italy); Capolupo, Antonio, E-mail: capolupo@sa.infn.it [Physics Department, University of Salerno, Fisciano, 84084 (Italy); Cherubini, Christian, E-mail: c.cherubini@unicampus.it [Nonlinear Physics and Mathematical Modeling Lab, University Campus Bio-Medico, Via A. del Portillo 21, I-00128 Rome (Italy); International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, University Campus Bio-Medico, Via A. del Portillo 21, I-00128, Rome (Italy); Gizzi, Alessio, E-mail: a.gizzi@unicampus.it [Nonlinear Physics and Mathematical Modeling Lab, University Campus Bio-Medico, Via A. del Portillo 21, I-00128 Rome (Italy); Bertolaso, Marta, E-mail: m.bertolaso@unicampus.it [Faculty of Engineering and Institute of Philosophy of Scientific and Technological Practice, University Campus Bio-Medico, Via A. del Portillo 21, I-00128 Rome (Italy); Filippi, Simonetta, E-mail: s.filippi@unicampus.it [Nonlinear Physics and Mathematical Modeling Lab, University Campus Bio-Medico, Via A. del Portillo 21, I-00128 Rome (Italy); International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, University Campus Bio-Medico, Via A. del Portillo 21, I-00128, Rome (Italy); Vitiello, Giuseppe, E-mail: vitiello@sa.infn.it [Physics Department, University of Salerno, Fisciano, 84084 (Italy)

    2014-09-12

    Beta cells in pancreas represent an example of coupled biological oscillators which via communication pathways, are able to synchronize their electrical activity, giving rise to pulsatile insulin release. In this work we numerically analyze scale free self-similarity features of membrane voltage signal power density spectrum, through a stochastic dynamical model for beta cells in the islets of Langerhans fine tuned on mouse experimental data. Adopting the algebraic approach of coherent state formalism, we show how coherent molecular domains can arise from proper functional conditions leading to a parallelism with “phase transition” phenomena of field theory. - Highlights: • Beta cells in pancreas are coupled oscillators able to synchronize their activity. • We analyze scale free self-similarity features for beta cells. • We adopt the algebraic approach of coherent state formalism. • We show that coherent molecular domains arise from functional conditions.

  12. Early-Life Origins of Type 2 Diabetes: Fetal Programming of the Beta-Cell Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Portha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A substantial body of evidence suggests that an abnormal intrauterine milieu elicited by maternal metabolic disturbances as diverse as undernutrition, placental insufficiency, diabetes or obesity, may program susceptibility in the fetus to later develop chronic degenerative diseases, such as obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. This paper examines the developmental programming of glucose intolerance/diabetes by disturbed intrauterine metabolic condition experimentally obtained in various rodent models of maternal protein restriction, caloric restriction, overnutrition or diabetes, with a focus on the alteration of the developing beta-cell mass. In most of the cases, whatever the type of initial maternal metabolic stress, the beta-cell adaptive growth which normally occurs during gestation, does not take place in the pregnant offspring and this results in the development of gestational diabetes. Therefore gestational diabetes turns to be the ultimate insult targeting the offspring beta-cell mass and propagates diabetes risk to the next generation again. The aetiology and the transmission of spontaneous diabetes as encountered in the GK/Par rat model of type 2 diabetes, are discussed in such a perspective. This review also discusses the non-genomic mechanisms involved in the installation of the programmed effect as well as in its intergenerational transmission.

  13. Building Cre Knockin Rat Lines Using CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuanwu; Zhang, Lianfeng; Huang, Xingxu

    2017-01-01

    Conditional gene inactivation strategy helps researchers to study the gene functions that are critical in embryogenesis or in defined tissues of adulthood. The Cre/loxP system is widely used for conditional gene inactivation/activation in cells or organisms. Cre knockin animal lines are essential for gene expression or inactivation in a spatially and temporally restricted manner. However, to generate a Cre knockin line by traditional approach is laborious. Recently, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) has been proven as a simple and efficient genome-editing tool. We have used CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate rat strains that carry Cre genes in different targeted gene loci by direct delivery of gRNAs/Cas9/donors into fertilized eggs. Here, we described a stepwise procedure for the generation of Cre knockin rat, including target site selection, RNA preparation, the construction of the template donor, pronuclear injection, and the genotyping of precise Cre insertion in F 0 rats. Taken together, the establishment of Cre knockin line can be achieved within 6 weeks.

  14. D-saccharic acid-1,4-lactone ameliorates alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus and oxidative stress in rats through inhibiting pancreatic beta-cells from apoptosis via mitochondrial dependent pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Semantee; Manna, Prasenjit; Gachhui, Ratan; Sil, Parames C.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a vital role in diabetic complications. To suppress the oxidative stress mediated damage in diabetic pathophysiology, a special focus has been given on naturally occurring antioxidants present in normal diet. D-saccharic acid 1,4-lactone (DSL), a derivative of D-glucaric acid, is present in many dietary plants and is known for its detoxifying and antioxidant properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the beneficial role of DSL against alloxan (ALX) induced diabetes in the pancreas tissue of Swiss albino rats. A dose-dependent study for DSL (20–120 mg/kg body weight) was carried out to find the effective dose of the compound in ALX-induced diabetic rats. ALX exposure elevated the blood glucose, glycosylated Hb, decreased the plasma insulin and disturbed the intra-cellular antioxidant machineries whereas oral administration of DSL at a dose of 80 mg/kg body weight restored these alterations close to normal. Investigating the mechanism of the protective activity of DSL we observed that it prevented the pancreatic β-cell apoptosis via mitochondria-dependent pathway. Results showed decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced cytochrome c release in the cytosol and reciprocal regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins in the diabetic rats. These events were also found to be associated with increased level of Apaf-1, caspase 9, and caspase 3 that ultimately led to pancreatic β-cell apoptosis. DSL treatment, however, counteracted these changes. In conclusion, DSL possesses the capability of ameliorating the oxidative stress in ALX-induced diabetes and thus could be a promising approach in lessening diabetic complications. Highlights: ► Oxidative stress is suggested as a key event in the pathogenesis of diabetes. ► D-saccharic acid 1,4-lactone (DSL) reduces the alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus. ► DSL normalizes cellular antioxidant machineries disturbed due to alloxan toxicity. ► DSL inhibits pancreatic β-cells apoptosis

  15. Establishment and characterization of rat portal myofibroblast cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Fausther

    Full Text Available The major sources of scar-forming myofibroblasts during liver fibrosis are activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC and portal fibroblasts (PF. In contrast to well-characterized HSC, PF remain understudied and poorly defined. This is largely due to the facts that isolation of rodent PF for functional studies is technically challenging and that PF cell lines had not been established. To address this, we have generated two polyclonal portal myofibroblast cell lines, RGF and RGF-N2. RGF and RGF-N2 were established from primary PF isolated from adult rat livers that underwent culture activation and subsequent SV40-mediated immortalization. Specifically, Ntpdase2/Cd39l1-sorted primary PF were used to generate the RGF-N2 cell line. Both cell lines were functionally characterized by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, immunoblot and bromodeoxyuridine-based proliferation assay. First, immortalized RGF and RGF-N2 cells are positive for phenotypic myofibroblast markers alpha smooth muscle actin, type I collagen alpha-1, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1, PF-specific markers elastin, type XV collagen alpha-1 and Ntpdase2/Cd39l1, and mesenchymal cell marker ecto-5'-nucleotidase/Cd73, while negative for HSC-specific markers desmin and lecithin retinol acyltransferase. Second, both RGF and RGF-N2 cell lines are readily transfectable using standard methods. Finally, RGF and RGF-N2 cells attenuate the growth of Mz-ChA-1 cholangiocarcinoma cells in co-culture, as previously demonstrated for primary PF. Immortalized rat portal myofibroblast RGF and RGF-N2 cell lines express typical markers of activated PF-derived myofibroblasts, are suitable for DNA transfection, and can effectively inhibit cholangiocyte proliferation. Both RGF and RGF-N2 cell lines represent novel in vitro cellular models for the functional studies of portal (myofibroblasts and their contribution to the progression of liver fibrosis.

  16. Sirt1 regulates insulin secretion by repressing UCP2 in pancreatic beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bordone

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Sir2 and insulin/IGF-1 are the major pathways that impinge upon aging in lower organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans a possible genetic link between Sir2 and the insulin/IGF-1 pathway has been reported. Here we investigate such a link in mammals. We show that Sirt1 positively regulates insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells. Sirt1 represses the uncoupling protein (UCP gene UCP2 by binding directly to the UCP2 promoter. In beta cell lines in which Sirt1 is reduced by SiRNA, UCP2 levels are elevated and insulin secretion is blunted. The up-regulation of UCP2 is associated with a failure of cells to increase ATP levels after glucose stimulation. Knockdown of UCP2 restores the ability to secrete insulin in cells with reduced Sirt1, showing that UCP2 causes the defect in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Food deprivation induces UCP2 in mouse pancreas, which may occur via a reduction in NAD (a derivative of niacin levels in the pancreas and down-regulation of Sirt1. Sirt1 knockout mice display constitutively high UCP2 expression. Our findings show that Sirt1 regulates UCP2 in beta cells to affect insulin secretion.

  17. Intracellular serotonin modulates insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells by protein serotonylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Paulmann

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available While serotonin (5-HT co-localization with insulin in granules of pancreatic beta-cells was demonstrated more than three decades ago, its physiological role in the etiology of diabetes is still unclear. We combined biochemical and electrophysiological analyses of mice selectively deficient in peripheral tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph1-/- and 5-HT to show that intracellular 5-HT regulates insulin secretion. We found that these mice are diabetic and have an impaired insulin secretion due to the lack of 5-HT in the pancreas. The pharmacological restoration of peripheral 5-HT levels rescued the impaired insulin secretion in vivo. These findings were further evidenced by patch clamp experiments with isolated Tph1-/- beta-cells, which clearly showed that the secretory defect is downstream of Ca(2+-signaling and can be rescued by direct intracellular application of 5-HT via the clamp pipette. In elucidating the underlying mechanism further, we demonstrate the covalent coupling of 5-HT by transglutaminases during insulin exocytosis to two key players in insulin secretion, the small GTPases Rab3a and Rab27a. This renders them constitutively active in a receptor-independent signaling mechanism we have recently termed serotonylation. Concordantly, an inhibition of such activating serotonylation in beta-cells abates insulin secretion. We also observed inactivation of serotonylated Rab3a by enhanced proteasomal degradation, which is in line with the inactivation of other serotonylated GTPases. Our results demonstrate that 5-HT regulates insulin secretion by serotonylation of GTPases within pancreatic beta-cells and suggest that intracellular 5-HT functions in various microenvironments via this mechanism in concert with the known receptor-mediated signaling.

  18. Glucocorticoids Inhibit Basal and Hormone-Induced Serotonin Synthesis in Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moina Hasni Ebou

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a major complication of chronic Glucocorticoids (GCs treatment. GCs induce insulin resistance and also inhibit insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. Yet, a full understanding of this negative regulation remains to be deciphered. In the present study, we investigated whether GCs could inhibit serotonin synthesis in beta cell since this neurotransmitter has been shown to be involved in the regulation of insulin secretion. To this aim, serotonin synthesis was evaluated in vitro after treatment with GCs of either islets from CD1 mice or MIN6 cells, a beta-cell line. We also explored the effect of GCs on the stimulation of serotonin synthesis by several hormones such as prolactin and GLP 1. We finally studied this regulation in islet in two in vivo models: mice treated with GCs and with liraglutide, a GLP1 analog, and mice deleted for the glucocorticoid receptor in the pancreas. We showed in isolated islets and MIN6 cells that GCs decreased expression and activity of the two key enzymes of serotonin synthesis, Tryptophan Hydroxylase 1 (Tph1 and 2 (Tph2, leading to reduced serotonin contents. GCs also blocked the induction of serotonin synthesis by prolactin or by a previously unknown serotonin activator, the GLP-1 analog exendin-4. In vivo, activation of the Glucagon-like-Peptide-1 receptor with liraglutide during 4 weeks increased islet serotonin contents and GCs treatment prevented this increase. Finally, islets from mice deleted for the GR in the pancreas displayed an increased expression of Tph1 and Tph2 and a strong increased serotonin content per islet. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an original inhibition of serotonin synthesis by GCs, both in basal condition and after stimulation by prolactin or activators of the GLP-1 receptor. This regulation may contribute to the deleterious effects of GCs on beta cells.

  19. Cytokines interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha regulate different transcriptional and alternative splicing networks in primary beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortis, Fernanda; Naamane, Najib; Flamez, Daisy

    2010-01-01

    by the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta + interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha + IFN-gamma in primary rat beta-cells. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Fluorescence-activated cell sorter-purified rat beta-cells were exposed to IL-1beta + IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha + IFN-gamma for 6 or 24 h......-cells, with temporal differences in the number of genes modulated by IL-1beta + IFNgamma or TNF-alpha + IFN-gamma. These cytokine combinations induced differential expression of inflammatory response genes, which is related to differential induction of IFN regulatory factor-7. Both treatments decreased the expression...... of genes involved in the maintenance of beta-cell phenotype and growth/regeneration. Cytokines induced hypoxia-inducible factor-alpha, which in this context has a proapoptotic role. Cytokines also modified the expression of >20 genes involved in RNA splicing, and exon array analysis showed cytokine...

  20. The physiology of rodent beta-cells in pancreas slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupnik, M

    2009-01-01

    Beta-cells in pancreatic islets form complex syncytia. Sufficient cell-to-cell electrical coupling seems to ensure coordinated depolarization pattern and insulin release that can be further modulated by rich innervation. The complex structure and coordinated action develop after birth during fast proliferation of the endocrine tissue. These emergent properties can be lost due to various reasons later in life and can lead to glucose intolerance and diabetes mellitus. Pancreas slice is a novel method of choice to study the physiology of beta-cells still embedded in their normal cellulo-social context. I present major advantages, list drawbacks and provide an overview on recent advances in our understanding of the physiology of beta-cells using the pancreas slice approach.

  1. Dynamics and Synchrony of Pancreatic beta-cells and Islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2006-01-01

    description of these processes and their interactions would provide important input in the search for a better treatment of the disease. The thesis describes several aspects of mathematical modeling of beta-cells relevant for the understanding of glucose stimulated insulin secretion. It consists...... and the synchronized behavior of many coupled beta-cells as well as to the synchrony of islets. Rather than developing new biophysical models, the thesis investigates existing models, their integration and simplifications, and analyzed the corresponding dynamics, in order to use these models for investigating...

  2. Generation and characterization of rat liver stem cell lines and their engraftment in a rat model of liver failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijk, Ewart W.; Rasmussen, Shauna; Blokzijl, Francis; Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; Toonen, Pim; Begthel, Harry; Clevers, Hans; Geurts, Aron M.; Cuppen, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    The rat is an important model for liver regeneration. However, there is no in vitro culture system that can capture the massive proliferation that can be observed after partial hepatectomy in rats. We here describe the generation of rat liver stem cell lines. Rat liver stem cells, which grow as cystic organoids, were characterized by high expression of the stem cell marker Lgr5, by the expression of liver progenitor and duct markers, and by low expression of hepatocyte markers, oval cell markers, and stellate cell markers. Prolonged cultures of rat liver organoids depended on high levels of WNT-signalling and the inhibition of BMP-signaling. Upon transplantation of clonal lines to a Fah−/− Il2rg−/− rat model of liver failure, the rat liver stem cells engrafted into the host liver where they differentiated into areas with FAH and Albumin positive hepatocytes. Rat liver stem cell lines hold potential as consistent reliable cell sources for pharmacological, toxicological or metabolic studies. In addition, rat liver stem cell lines may contribute to the development of regenerative medicine in liver disease. To our knowledge, the here described liver stem cell lines represent the first organoid culture system in the rat. PMID:26915950

  3. IKKβ inhibition prevents fat-induced beta cell dysfunction in vitro and in vivo in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivovic, Aleksandar; Oprescu, Andrei I; Koulajian, Khajag; Mori, Yusaku; Eversley, Judith A; Zhang, Liling; Nino-Fong, Rodolfo; Lewis, Gary F; Donath, Marc Y; Karin, Michael; Wheeler, Michael B; Ehses, Jan; Volchuk, Allen; Chan, Catherine B; Giacca, Adria

    2017-10-01

    We have previously shown that oxidative stress plays a causal role in beta cell dysfunction induced by fat. Here, we address whether the proinflammatory kinase inhibitor of (nuclear factor) κB kinase β (IKKβ), which is activated by oxidative stress, is also implicated. Fat (oleate or olive oil) was infused intravenously in Wistar rats for 48 h with or without the IKKβ inhibitor salicylate. Thereafter, beta cell function was evaluated in vivo using hyperglycaemic clamps or ex vivo in islets isolated from fat-treated rats. We also exposed rat islets to oleate in culture, with or without salicylate and 4(2'-aminoethyl)amino-1,8-dimethylimidazo(1,2-a)quinoxaline; BMS-345541 (BMS, another inhibitor of IKKβ) and evaluated beta cell function in vitro. Furthermore, oleate was infused in mice treated with BMS and in beta cell-specific Ikkb-null mice. 48 h infusion of fat impaired beta-cell function in vivo, assessed using the disposition index (DI), in rats (saline: 1.41 ± 0.13; oleate: 0.95 ± 0.11; olive oil [OLO]: 0.87 ± 0.15; p < 0.01 for both fats vs saline) and in mice (saline: 2.51 ± 0.39; oleate: 1.20 ± 0.19; p < 0.01 vs saline) and ex vivo (i.e., insulin secretion, units are pmol insulin islet -1  h -1 ) in rat islets (saline: 1.51 ± 0.13; oleate: 1.03 ± 0.10; OLO: 0.91 ± 0.13; p < 0.001 for both fats vs saline) and the dysfunction was prevented by co-infusion of salicylate in rats (oleate + salicylate: 1.30 ± 0.09; OLO + salicylate: 1.33 ± 0.23) or BMS in mice (oleate + BMS: 2.25 ± 0.42) in vivo and by salicylate in rat islets ex vivo (oleate + salicylate: 1.74 ± 0.31; OLO + salicylate: 1.54 ± 0.29). In cultured islets, 48 h exposure to oleate impaired beta-cell function ([in pmol insulin islet -1  h -1 ] control: 0.66 ± 0.12; oleate: 0.23 ± 0.03; p < 0.01 vs saline), an effect prevented by both inhibitors (oleate + salicylate: 0.98 ± 0.08; oleate + BMS: 0.50 ± 0.02). Genetic

  4. Insulin-like growth factors and pancreas beta cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haeften, T.W. van; Twickler, M.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) have been implicated in normal growth, and especially foetal pancreas beta-cell development. As low birth weight has been implicated in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes, much research has evolved into the importance of IGF and their

  5. Insulin-like growth factors and pancreas beta cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haeften, T. W.; Twickler, TB

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) have been implicated in normal growth, and especially foetal pancreas beta-cell development. As low birth weight has been implicated in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes, much research has evolved into the importance of IGF and their signalling

  6. Imaging the Beta-cell mass: why and how

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saudek, Frantisek; Brogren, Carl-Henrik; Manohar, Srirang

    2008-01-01

    is called dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ), antibodies to zinc transporter (ZnT-8) and the monoclonal antibody IC2. While DTBZ and antibodies to ZnT-8 showed binding activities to more than beta-cells, the anti-IC2 monoclonal antibody showed binding properties exclusively to insulin-producing beta...

  7. Insulin-like growth factors and pancreas beta cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haeften, T. W.; Twickler, Th B.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) have been implicated in normal growth, and especially foetal pancreas beta-cell development. As low birth weight has been implicated in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes, much research has evolved into the importance of IGF and their

  8. Pancreatic beta-cell overexpression of the glucagon receptor gene results in enhanced beta-cell function and mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelling, Richard W; Vuguin, Patricia M; Du, Xiu Quan

    2009-01-01

    in vivo, we generated mice overexpressing the Gcgr specifically on pancreatic beta-cells (RIP-Gcgr). In vivo and in vitro insulin secretion in response to glucagon and glucose was increased 1.7- to 3.9-fold in RIP-Gcgr mice compared with controls. Consistent with the observed increase in insulin release...

  9. Immune-mediated beta-cell destruction in vitro and in vivo-A pivotal role for galectin-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Allan E; Størling, Zenia M; Sparre, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Pro-apoptotic cytokines are toxic to the pancreatic beta-cells and have been associated with the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Proteome analysis of IL-1beta exposed isolated rat islets identified galectin-3 (gal-3) as the most up-regulated protein. Here analysis of human and rat islets a....... In summary, combined proteome-transcriptome-genome and functional analyses identify gal-3 as a candidate gene/protein in T1D susceptibility that may prove valuable in future intervention/prevention strategies....

  10. Effect of prolonged exposure to sublethal concentrations of DDT and DDE on protein expression in human pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlikova, Nela; Smetana, Pavel; Halada, Petr; Kovar, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Pollution of the environment represents one of less explored potential reasons for the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. One of the most prevalent organochlorine pollutants remains the pesticide DDT and its degradation product DDE. Despite some epidemiologic correlations between levels of DDT and DDE in human organism and the prevalence of diabetes, there is almost no information about the exact targets of these compounds inside pancreatic beta cells. To detect functional areas of pancreatic beta cells that could be affected by exposure to DDT and DDE, we analyzed changes in protein expression in the NES2Y human pancreatic beta cell line exposed to three sublethal concentrations (0.1 μM, 1 μM, 10 μM) of DDT and DDE for 1 month. Protein separation and identification was achieved using high-resolution 2D-electrophoresis, computer analysis and mass spectrometry. With these techniques, four proteins were found downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDT: three cytoskeletal proteins (cytokeratin 8, cytokeratin 18 and actin) and one protein involved in glycolysis (alpha-enolase). Two proteins were downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDE: cytokeratin 18 and heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (HNRH1). These changes correlate with previously described effects of other stress conditions (e.g. exposure to palmitate, hyperglycemia, imidazoline derivative, and cytokines) on protein expression in pancreatic beta cells. We conclude that cytoskeletal proteins and their processing, glucose metabolism, and mRNA processing may represent targets affected by exposure to conditions hostile to pancreatic beta cells, including exposure to DDT and DDE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Figure-of-Merit for Beta Cell Detector Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxe, Michael P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miller, Brian W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Suarez, Rey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-02

    In order to decrease the minimum detectable activities (MDAs) of beta-gamma radioxenon detectors, it is important to increase the ability to resolve the individual isotopes. One proposed method for doing this is to increase the energy resolution of the beta cell through the use of silicon detectors. While silicon detectors can improve the energy resolution, it is accompanied with a decrease in detection efficiency compared to plastic scintillator beta cells. Due to the uncertainty on the impact of the competing variables, we have developed a figure-of-merit (FOM) capable of determining the impact of detector parameters on the MDAs. By utilizing the FOM to analyze different detectors, we are able to directly compare current and future detectors and estimate their impact on the radioxenon MDAs.

  12. Beta-Cell Replacement: Pancreas and Islet Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niclauss, Nadja; Meier, Raphael; Bédat, Benoît; Berishvili, Ekaterine; Berney, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas and islet transplantation are 2 types of beta-cell replacement therapies for type 1 diabetes mellitus. Since 1966, when pancreas transplantation was first performed, it has evolved to become a highly efficient procedure with high success rates, thanks to advances in surgical technique and immunosuppression. Pancreas transplantation is mostly performed as simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation in patients with end-stage nephropathy secondary to diabetes. In spite of its efficiency, pancreas transplantation is still a major surgical procedure burdened by high morbidity, which called for the development of less invasive and hazardous ways of replacing beta-cell function in the past. Islet transplantation was developed in the 1970s as a minimally invasive procedure with initially poor outcomes. However, since the report of the 'Edmonton protocol' in 2000, the functional results of islet transplantation have substantially and constantly improved and are about to match those of whole pancreas transplantation. Islet transplantation is primarily performed alone in nonuremic patients with severe hypoglycemia. Both pancreas transplantation and islet transplantation are able to abolish hypoglycemia and to prevent or slow down the development of secondary complications of diabetes. Pancreas transplantation and islet transplantation should be seen as two complementary, rather than competing, therapeutic approaches for beta-cell replacement that are able to optimize organ donor use and patient care. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Effect of prolonged exposure to sublethal concentrations of DDT and DDE on protein expression in human pancreatic beta cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlikova, Nela, E-mail: nela.pavlikova@lf3.cuni.cz [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Smetana, Pavel [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Halada, Petr [Laboratory of Molecular Structure Characterization, Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Kovar, Jan [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-15

    Pollution of the environment represents one of less explored potential reasons for the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. One of the most prevalent organochlorine pollutants remains the pesticide DDT and its degradation product DDE. Despite some epidemiologic correlations between levels of DDT and DDE in human organism and the prevalence of diabetes, there is almost no information about the exact targets of these compounds inside pancreatic beta cells. To detect functional areas of pancreatic beta cells that could be affected by exposure to DDT and DDE, we analyzed changes in protein expression in the NES2Y human pancreatic beta cell line exposed to three sublethal concentrations (0.1 μM, 1 μM, 10 μM) of DDT and DDE for 1 month. Protein separation and identification was achieved using high-resolution 2D-electrophoresis, computer analysis and mass spectrometry. With these techniques, four proteins were found downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDT: three cytoskeletal proteins (cytokeratin 8, cytokeratin 18 and actin) and one protein involved in glycolysis (alpha-enolase). Two proteins were downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDE: cytokeratin 18 and heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (HNRH1). These changes correlate with previously described effects of other stress conditions (e.g. exposure to palmitate, hyperglycemia, imidazoline derivative, and cytokines) on protein expression in pancreatic beta cells. We conclude that cytoskeletal proteins and their processing, glucose metabolism, and mRNA processing may represent targets affected by exposure to conditions hostile to pancreatic beta cells, including exposure to DDT and DDE. - Highlights: • Epidemiologic studies connect pollution with incidence of diabetes mellitus. • We explored the effect of DDT and DDE on protein expression in the NES2Y pancreatic beta cell line. • One month exposure to three sublethal concentrations of DDT and DDE was employed. • Expression of alpha-enolase, actin

  14. Effect of prolonged exposure to sublethal concentrations of DDT and DDE on protein expression in human pancreatic beta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlikova, Nela; Smetana, Pavel; Halada, Petr; Kovar, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Pollution of the environment represents one of less explored potential reasons for the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. One of the most prevalent organochlorine pollutants remains the pesticide DDT and its degradation product DDE. Despite some epidemiologic correlations between levels of DDT and DDE in human organism and the prevalence of diabetes, there is almost no information about the exact targets of these compounds inside pancreatic beta cells. To detect functional areas of pancreatic beta cells that could be affected by exposure to DDT and DDE, we analyzed changes in protein expression in the NES2Y human pancreatic beta cell line exposed to three sublethal concentrations (0.1 μM, 1 μM, 10 μM) of DDT and DDE for 1 month. Protein separation and identification was achieved using high-resolution 2D-electrophoresis, computer analysis and mass spectrometry. With these techniques, four proteins were found downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDT: three cytoskeletal proteins (cytokeratin 8, cytokeratin 18 and actin) and one protein involved in glycolysis (alpha-enolase). Two proteins were downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDE: cytokeratin 18 and heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (HNRH1). These changes correlate with previously described effects of other stress conditions (e.g. exposure to palmitate, hyperglycemia, imidazoline derivative, and cytokines) on protein expression in pancreatic beta cells. We conclude that cytoskeletal proteins and their processing, glucose metabolism, and mRNA processing may represent targets affected by exposure to conditions hostile to pancreatic beta cells, including exposure to DDT and DDE. - Highlights: • Epidemiologic studies connect pollution with incidence of diabetes mellitus. • We explored the effect of DDT and DDE on protein expression in the NES2Y pancreatic beta cell line. • One month exposure to three sublethal concentrations of DDT and DDE was employed. • Expression of alpha-enolase, actin

  15. Phenotypic and gene expression changes between low (glucose-responsive) and High (glucose non-responsive) MIN-6 beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O´Driscoll, L.; Gammell, p.; McKierman, E.

    2006-01-01

    The long-term potential to routinely use replacement beta cells/islets as cell therapy for type 1 diabetes relies on our ability to culture such cells/islets, in vitro, while maintaining their functional status. Previous beta cell studies, by ourselves and other researchers, have indicated...... that the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) phenotype is relatively unstable, in long-term culture. This study aimed to investigate phenotypic and gene expression changes associated with this loss of GSIS, using the MIN-6 cell line as model. Phenotypic differences between MIN-6(L, low passage) and MIN-6(H......, high passage) were determined by ELISA (assessing GSIS and cellular (pro)insulin content), proliferation assays, phase contrast light microscopy and analysis of alkaline phosphatase expression. Differential mRNA expression was investigated using microarray, bioinformatics and real-time PCR technologies...

  16. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng, E-mail: oxyccc@163.com

    2015-12-04

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. - Highlights: • TLX overexpression in MIN6 cell causes significant expression changes of 225 genes. • TLX overexpression promotes MIN6 cell proliferation and decreases cell apoptosis. • TLX overexpression does not cause impairment of insulin secretion.

  17. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. - Highlights: • TLX overexpression in MIN6 cell causes significant expression changes of 225 genes. • TLX overexpression promotes MIN6 cell proliferation and decreases cell apoptosis. • TLX overexpression does not cause impairment of insulin secretion.

  18. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional somatostatin receptors on a rat pancreatic acinar cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viguerie, N.; Tahiri-Jouti, N.; Esteve, J.P.; Clerc, P.; Logsdon, C.; Svoboda, M.; Susini, C.; Vaysse, N.; Ribet, A.

    1988-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors from a rat pancreatic acinar cell line, AR4-2J, were characterized biochemically, structurally, and functionally. Binding of 125 I-[Tyr 11 ]Somatostatin to AR4-2J cells was saturable, exhibiting a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a maximal binding capacity of 258 ± 20 fmol/10 6 cells. Somatostatin receptor structure was analyzed by covalently cross-linking 125 I-[Tyr 11 ]somatostatin to its plasma membrane receptors. Gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of cross-linked proteins revealed a peptide containing the somatostatin receptor. Somatostatin inhibited vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-stimulated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) formation in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration of somatostatin that caused half-maximal inhibition of cAMP formation was close to the receptor affinity for somatostatin. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of AR4-2J cells prevented somatostatin inhibition of VIP-stimulated cAMP formation as well as somatostatin binding. The authors conclude that AR4-2J cells exhibit functional somatostatin receptors that retain both specificity and affinity of the pancreatic acinar cell somatostatin receptors and act via the pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding protein N i to inhibit adenylate cyclase

  20. Lack of TXNIP protects against mitochondria-mediated apoptosis but not against fatty acid-induced ER stress-mediated beta-cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junqin; Fontes, Ghislaine; Saxena, Geetu; Poitout, Vincent; Shalev, Anath

    2010-02-01

    We have previously shown that lack of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) protects against diabetes and glucotoxicity-induced beta-cell apoptosis. Because the role of TXNIP in lipotoxicity is unknown, the goal of the present study was to determine whether TXNIP expression is regulated by fatty acids and whether TXNIP deficiency also protects beta-cells against lipoapoptosis. RESARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: To determine the effects of fatty acids on beta-cell TXNIP expression, INS-1 cells and isolated islets were incubated with/without palmitate and rats underwent cyclic infusions of glucose and/or Intralipid prior to islet isolation and analysis by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting. Using primary wild-type and TXNIP-deficient islets, we then assessed the effects of palmitate on apoptosis (transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling [TUNEL]), mitochondrial death pathway (cytochrome c release), and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress (binding protein [BiP], C/EBP homologous protein [CHOP]). Effects of TXNIP deficiency were also tested in the context of staurosporine (mitochondrial damage) or thapsigargin (ER stress). Glucose elicited a dramatic increase in islet TXNIP expression both in vitro and in vivo, whereas fatty acids had no such effect and, when combined with glucose, even abolished the glucose effect. We also found that TXNIP deficiency does not effectively protect against palmitate or thapsigargin-induced beta-cell apoptosis, but specifically prevents staurosporine- or glucose-induced toxicity. Our results demonstrate that unlike glucose, fatty acids do not induce beta-cell expression of proapoptotic TXNIP. They further reveal that TXNIP deficiency specifically inhibits the mitochondrial death pathway underlying beta-cell glucotoxicity, whereas it has very few protective effects against ER stress-mediated lipoapoptosis.

  1. Role of MicroRNAs in Islet Beta-Cell Compensation and Failure during Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Plaisance

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cell function and mass are markedly adaptive to compensate for the changes in insulin requirement observed during several situations such as pregnancy, obesity, glucocorticoids excess, or administration. This requires a beta-cell compensation which is achieved through a gain of beta-cell mass and function. Elucidating the physiological mechanisms that promote functional beta-cell mass expansion and that protect cells against death, is a key therapeutic target for diabetes. In this respect, several recent studies have emphasized the instrumental role of microRNAs in the control of beta-cell function. MicroRNAs are negative regulators of gene expression, and are pivotal for the control of beta-cell proliferation, function, and survival. On the one hand, changes in specific microRNA levels have been associated with beta-cell compensation and are triggered by hormones or bioactive peptides that promote beta-cell survival and function. Conversely, modifications in the expression of other specific microRNAs contribute to beta-cell dysfunction and death elicited by diabetogenic factors including, cytokines, chronic hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and oxidized LDL. This review underlines the importance of targeting the microRNA network for future innovative therapies aiming at preventing the beta-cell decline in diabetes.

  2. Workshop on programming beta cell development, impairment and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, Scott; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2012-01-01

    Helsingør, the city of Hamlet in Denmark, provided the site for the workshop "Programming Beta Cell Development, Impairment and Regeneration" on October 23-26th, 2011. The same location has held two EASD Islet study group meetings, while the previous three workshops were held in Helsinki, Finland...... (2003), El Perello, Spain (2006) and Peebles, Scotland (2009). The meeting drew 190 attendees from 12 different countries. There were 37 main oral presentations, and 68 posters covered virtually all aspects of the pancreas and provided a dynamic snapshot of the most interesting areas of current...

  3. Identification of rat Rosa26 locus enables generation of knock-in rat lines ubiquitously expressing tdTomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Kato-Itoh, Megumi; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Tamura, Chihiro; Sanbo, Makoto; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2012-11-01

    Recent discovery of a method for derivation and culture of germline-competent rat pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) enables generation of transgenic rats or knock-out rats via genetic modification of such PSCs. This opens the way to use rats, as is routine in mice, for analyses of gene functions or physiological features. In mouse or human, one widely used technique to express a gene of interest stably and ubiquitously is to insert that gene into the Rosa26 locus via gene targeting of PSCs. Rosa26 knock-in mice conditionally expressing a reporter or a toxin gene have contributed to tracing or ablation of specific cell lineages. We successfully identified a rat orthologue of the mouse Rosa26 locus. Insertion of tdTomato, a variant of red fluorescent protein, into the Rosa26 locus of PSCs of various rat strains allows ubiquitous expression of tdTomato. Through germline transmission of one Rosa26-tdTomato knock-in embryonic stem cell line, we also obtained tdTomato knock-in rats. These expressed tdTomato ubiquitously throughout their bodies, which indicates that the rat Rosa26 locus conserves functions of its orthologues in mouse and human. The new tools described here (targeting vectors, knock-in PSCs, and rats) should be useful for a variety of research using rats.

  4. The Fas pathway is involved in pancreatic beta cell secretory function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumann, Desiree M; Maedler, Kathrin; Franklin, Isobel

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cell mass and function increase in conditions of enhanced insulin demand such as obesity. Failure to adapt leads to diabetes. The molecular mechanisms controlling this adaptive process are unclear. Fas is a death receptor involved in beta cell apoptosis or proliferation, depending...... on the activity of the caspase-8 inhibitor FLIP. Here we show that the Fas pathway also regulates beta cell secretory function. We observed impaired glucose tolerance in Fas-deficient mice due to a delayed and decreased insulin secretory pattern. Expression of PDX-1, a beta cell-specific transcription factor...... regulating insulin gene expression and mitochondrial metabolism, was decreased in Fas-deficient beta cells. As a consequence, insulin and ATP production were severely reduced and only partly compensated for by increased beta cell mass. Up-regulation of FLIP enhanced NF-kappaB activity via NF...

  5. Semi-automated digital measurement as the method of choice for beta cell mass analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violette Coppens

    Full Text Available Pancreas injury by partial duct ligation (PDL activates beta cell differentiation and proliferation in adult mouse pancreas but remains controversial regarding the anticipated increase in beta cell volume. Several reports unable to show beta cell volume augmentation in PDL pancreas used automated digital image analysis software. We hypothesized that fully automatic beta cell morphometry without manual micrograph artifact remediation introduces bias and therefore might be responsible for reported discrepancies and controversy. However, our present results prove that standard digital image processing with automatic thresholding is sufficiently robust albeit less sensitive and less adequate to demonstrate a significant increase in beta cell volume in PDL versus Sham-operated pancreas. We therefore conclude that other confounding factors such as quality of surgery, selection of samples based on relative abundance of the transcription factor Neurogenin 3 (Ngn3 and tissue processing give rise to inter-laboratory inconsistencies in beta cell volume quantification in PDL pancreas.

  6. Ins1 Cre knock-in mice for beta cell-specific gene recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Thorens Bernard; Tarussio David; Maestro Miguel Angel; Maestro Miguel Angel; Rovira Meritxell; Rovira Meritxell; Heikkilä Eija; Ferrer Jorge; Ferrer Jorge; Ferrer Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Pancreatic beta cells play a central role in the control of glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin to stimulate glucose uptake by peripheral tissues. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that control beta cell function and plasticity has critical implications for the pathophysiology and therapy of major forms of diabetes. Selective gene inactivation in pancreatic beta cells, using the Cre-lox system, is a powerful approach to assess the role of particular genes in beta cel...

  7. Generation of Transplantable Beta Cells for Patient-Specific Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Islet cell transplantation offers a potential cure for type 1 diabetes, but it is challenged by insufficient donor tissue and side effects of current immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, alternative sources of insulin-producing cells and isletfriendly immunosuppression are required to increase the efficiency and safety of this procedure. Beta cells can be transdifferentiated from precursors or another heterologous (non-beta-cell source. Recent advances in beta cell regeneration from somatic cells such as fibroblasts could circumvent the usage of immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, generation of patient-specific beta cells provides the potential of an evolutionary treatment for patients with diabetes.

  8. Activation of transmembrane bile acid receptor TGR5 stimulates insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta} cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Divya P.; Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Mahavadi, Sunila [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Mirshahi, Faridoddin [Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Grider, John R. [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Murthy, Karnam S., E-mail: skarnam@vcu.edu [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Sanyal, Arun J., E-mail: asanyal@mcvh-vcu.edu [Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G protein coupled receptor TGR5 is expressed in mouse and human islets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 is coupled to activation of Gs and Ca{sup 2+} release via cAMP/Epac/PLC-{epsilon} pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of TGR5 by bile salts and selective ligands causes insulin secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 could be a potential therapeutic target to treat diabetes. -- Abstract: Bile acids act as signaling molecules and stimulate the G protein coupled receptor, TGR5, in addition to nuclear farnesoid X receptor to regulate lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Bile acid induced activation of TGR5 in the enteroendocrine cells promotes glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, which has insulinotropic effect in the pancreatic {beta} cells. In the present study, we have identified the expression of TGR5 in pancreatic {beta} cell line MIN6 and also in mouse and human pancreatic islets. TGR5 selective ligands, oleanolic acid (OA) and INT-777 selectively activated G{alpha}{sub s} and caused an increase in intracellular cAMP and Ca{sup 2+}. OA and INT-777 also increased phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and the increase was blocked by NF449 (a selective G{alpha}{sub s} inhibitor) or (U73122) (PI hydrolysis inhibitor). OA, INT-777 and lithocholic acid increased insulin release in MIN6 and human islets and the increase was inhibited by treatment with NF449, (U73122) or BAPTA-AM (chelator of calcium), but not with myristoylated PKI (PKA inhibitor), suggesting that the release is dependent on G{sub s}/cAMP/Ca{sup 2+} pathway. 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, a cAMP analog, which activates Epac, but not PKA also stimulated PI hydrolysis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the TGR5 expressed in the pancreatic {beta} cells regulates insulin secretion and highlights the importance of ongoing therapeutic strategies targeting TGR5 in the control of glucose homeostasis.

  9. The putative imidazoline receptor agonist, harmane, promotes intracellular calcium mobilisation in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Paul E; Hills, Claire E; Rogers, Gareth J; Garland, Patrick; Farley, Sophia R; Morgan, Noel G

    2004-10-06

    beta-Carbolines (including harmane and pinoline) stimulate insulin secretion by a mechanism that may involve interaction with imidazoline I(3)-receptors but which also appears to be mediated by actions that are additional to imidazoline receptor agonism. Using the MIN6 beta-cell line, we now show that both the imidazoline I(3)-receptor agonist, efaroxan, and the beta-carboline, harmane, directly elevate cytosolic Ca(2+) and increase insulin secretion but that these responses display different characteristics. In the case of efaroxan, the increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) was readily reversible, whereas, with harmane, the effect persisted beyond removal of the agonist and resulted in the development of a repetitive train of Ca(2+)-oscillations whose frequency, but not amplitude, was concentration-dependent. Initiation of the Ca(2+)-oscillations by harmane was independent of extracellular calcium but was sensitive to both dantrolene and high levels (20 mM) of caffeine, suggesting the involvement of ryanodine receptor-gated Ca(2+)-release. The expression of ryanodine receptor-1 and ryanodine receptor-2 mRNA in MIN6 cells was confirmed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and, since low concentrations of caffeine (1 mM) or thimerosal (10 microM) stimulated increases in [Ca(2+)](i), we conclude that ryanodine receptors are functional in these cells. Furthermore, the increase in insulin secretion induced by harmane was attenuated by dantrolene, consistent with the involvement of ryanodine receptors in mediating this response. By contrast, the smaller insulin secretory response to efaroxan was unaffected by dantrolene. Harmane-evoked changes in cytosolic Ca(2+) were maintained by nifedipine-sensitive Ca(2+)-influx, suggesting the involvement of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+)-channels. Taken together, these data imply that harmane may interact with ryanodine receptors to generate sustained Ca(2+)-oscillations in pancreatic beta-cells and that this effect

  10. Lysine deacetylase inhibition prevents diabetes by chromatin-independent immunoregulation and beta-cell protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christensen, D.P.; Gysemans, C.; Lundh, M.; Dahllof, M.S.; Noesgaard, D.; Schmidt, S.F.; Mandrup, S; Birkbak, N.; Workman, C.T.; Piemonti, L.; Blaabjerg, L.; Monzani, V.; Fossati, G.; Mascagni, P.; Paraskevas, S.; Aikin, R.A.; Billestrup, N.; Grunnet, L.G.; Dinarello, C.A.; Mathieu, C.; Mandrup-Poulsen, T.

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is due to destruction of pancreatic beta-cells. Lysine deacetylase inhibitors (KDACi) protect beta-cells from inflammatory destruction in vitro and are promising immunomodulators. Here we demonstrate that the clinically well-tolerated KDACi vorinostat and givinostat revert diabetes

  11. Regulation of pancreatic beta-cell mass and proliferation by SOCS-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, K; Rønn, S G; Tornehave, D

    2005-01-01

    Growth hormone and prolactin are important growth factors for pancreatic beta-cells. The effects exerted by these hormones on proliferation and on insulin synthesis and secretion in beta-cells are largely mediated through the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (ST...

  12. What are the potential benefits of clinical beta-cell imaging in diabetes mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göke, Burkhard

    2010-05-01

    Previously, studies of the endocrine pancreatic beta-cell were mainly performed ex vivo by morphological means. This data supported the analysis of pathophysiological changes in the pancreatic islet during insults such as diabetes mellitus. Metabolic testing of the pancreatic islet by assaying hormone parameters such als plasma insulin or C-peptide combined with more or less sophisticated calculations allowed conclusions about states of insulin resistance or secretory failure. It also allowed certain correlations of endocrine function with beta-cell mass. Today, with firmer pathophysiological concepts about beta-cell failure, modern protocols of islet transplantation, and drugs on the market coming with promises of preservation or even expansion of beta-cell mass in diabetes mellitus it has become very attractive to search for tools measuring beta-cell mass, if possible even repeatingly in the same organism in vivo. From a clinical point of view, the potential of pancreatic beta-cell mass imaging technologies is looked upon with high expectations. Methodologically, the decisive question is whether it is likely that future beta-cell imaging will provide significant advantages over the metabolic methods already in hand. With new in vivo tools, studies of beta-cell mass and function may offer even new approaches stratifying patients to anti-diabetic therapies.

  13. Serum adipokines as biomarkers of beta-cell function in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Minh Nguyet; Kolb, Hubert; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the adipokines adiponectin, leptin and resistin as serum biomarkers of beta-cell function in patients with type 1 diabetes.......We investigated the adipokines adiponectin, leptin and resistin as serum biomarkers of beta-cell function in patients with type 1 diabetes....

  14. Lysine deacetylases are produced in pancreatic beta cells and are differentially regulated by proinflammatory cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundh, M; Christensen, D P; Rasmussen, D N

    2010-01-01

    Cytokine-induced beta cell toxicity is abrogated by non-selective inhibitors of lysine deacetylases (KDACs). The KDAC family consists of 11 members, namely histone deacetylases HDAC1 to HDAC11, but it is not known which KDAC members play a role in cytokine-mediated beta cell death. The aim...

  15. Do post-translational beta cell protein modifications trigger type 1 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Størling, Joachim; Overgaard, Anne Julie; Brorsson, Caroline Anna

    2013-01-01

    beta cell-specific neo-epitopes. We suggest that the current paradigm of type 1 diabetes as a classical autoimmune disease should be reconsidered since the immune response may not be directed against native beta cell proteins. A modified model for the pathogenetic events taking place in islets leading...... diabetes exists in the published literature. Furthermore, we report that cytokines change the expression levels of several genes encoding proteins involved in PTM processes in human islets, and that there are type 1 diabetes-associated polymorphisms in a number of these. In conclusion, data from...... the literature and presented experimental data support the notion that PTM of beta cell proteins may be involved in triggering beta cell destruction in type 1 diabetes. If the beta cell antigens recognised by the immune system foremost come from modified proteins rather than native ones, the concept of type 1...

  16. Dysregulation of Dicer1 in Beta Cells Impairs Islet Architecture and Glucose Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitai D. Mandelbaum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs play important roles in pancreas development and in regulation of insulin expression in the adult. Here we show that loss of miRNAs activity in beta-cells during embryonic development results in lower beta-cell mass and in impaired glucose tolerance. Dicer1-null cells initially constitute a significant portion of the total beta-cell population. However, during postnatal development, Dicer1-null cells are depleted. Furthermore, wild-type beta cells are repopulating the islets in complex compensatory dynamics. Because loss of Dicer1 is also associated with changes in the distribution of membranous E-cadherin, we hypothesized that E-cadherin activity may play a role in beta cell survival or islet architecture. However, genetic loss of E-cadherin function does not impair islet architecture, suggesting that miRNAs likely function through other or redundant effectors in the endocrine pancreas.

  17. Enhancing pancreatic Beta-cell regeneration in vivo with pioglitazone and alogliptin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yin

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cells retain limited ability to regenerate and proliferate after various physiologic triggers. Identifying therapies that are able to enhance beta-cell regeneration may therefore be useful for the treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.In this study we investigated endogenous and transplanted beta-cell regeneration by serially quantifying changes in bioluminescence from beta-cells from transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase under the control of the mouse insulin I promoter. We tested the ability of pioglitazone and alogliptin, two drugs developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, to enhance beta-cell regeneration, and also defined the effect of the immunosuppression with rapamycin and tacrolimus on transplanted islet beta mass.Pioglitazone is a stimulator of nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma while alogliptin is a selective dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor. Pioglitazone alone, or in combination with alogliptin, enhanced endogenous beta-cell regeneration in streptozotocin-treated mice, while alogliptin alone had modest effects. In a model of syngeneic islet transplantation, immunosuppression with rapamycin and tacrolimus induced an early loss of beta-cell mass, while treatment with insulin implants to maintain normoglycemia and pioglitazone plus alogliptin was able to partially promote beta-cell mass recovery.These data highlight the utility of bioluminescence for serially quantifying functional beta-cell mass in living mice. They also demonstrate the ability of pioglitazone, used either alone or in combination with alogliptin, to enhance regeneration of endogenous islet beta-cells as well as transplanted islets into recipients treated with rapamycin and tacrolimus.

  18. Acquisition, Maintenance and Relapse-Like Alcohol Drinking: Lessons from the UChB Rat Line

    OpenAIRE

    Israel, Yedy; Karahanian, Eduardo; Ezquer, Fernando; Morales, Paola; Ezquer, Marcelo; Rivera-Meza, Mario; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Quintanilla, María E.

    2017-01-01

    This review article addresses the biological factors that influence: (i) the acquisition of alcohol intake; (ii) the maintenance of chronic alcohol intake; and (iii) alcohol relapse-like drinking behavior in animals bred for their high-ethanol intake. Data from several rat strains/lines strongly suggest that catalase-mediated brain oxidation of ethanol into acetaldehyde is an absolute requirement (up 80%?95%) for rats to display ethanol?s reinforcing effects and to initiate chronic ethanol in...

  19. Pancreatic beta cells express two autoantigenic forms of glutamic acid decarboxylase, a 65-kDa hydrophilic form and a 64-kDa amphiphilic form which can be both membrane-bound and soluble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christgau, S; Schierbeck, H; Aanstoot, H J

    1991-01-01

    The 64-kDa pancreatic beta-cell autoantigen, which is a target of autoantibodies associated with early as well as progressive stages of beta-cell destruction, resulting in insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) in humans, has been identified as the gamma-aminobutyric acid-synthesizing enzyme glutamic...... acid decarboxylase. We have identified two autoantigenic forms of this protein in rat pancreatic beta-cells, a Mr 65,000 (GAD65) hydrophilic and soluble form of pI 6.9-7.1 and a Mr 64,000 (GAD64) component of pI 6.7. GAD64 is more abundant than GAD65 and has three distinct forms with regard to cellular...

  20. Diabetic beta-cells can achieve self-protection against oxidative stress through an adaptive up-regulation of their antioxidant defenses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Lacraz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress (OS, through excessive and/or chronic reactive oxygen species (ROS, is a mediator of diabetes-related damages in various tissues including pancreatic beta-cells. Here, we have evaluated islet OS status and beta-cell response to ROS using the GK/Par rat as a model of type 2 diabetes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Localization of OS markers was performed on whole pancreases. Using islets isolated from 7-day-old or 2.5-month-old male GK/Par and Wistar control rats, 1 gene expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR; 2 insulin secretion rate was measured; 3 ROS accumulation and mitochondrial polarization were assessed by fluorescence methods; 4 antioxidant contents were quantified by HPLC. After diabetes onset, OS markers targeted mostly peri-islet vascular and inflammatory areas, and not islet cells. GK/Par islets revealed in fact protected against OS, because they maintained basal ROS accumulation similar or even lower than Wistar islets. Remarkably, GK/Par insulin secretion also exhibited strong resistance to the toxic effect of exogenous H(2O(2 or endogenous ROS exposure. Such adaptation was associated to both high glutathione content and overexpression (mRNA and/or protein levels of a large set of genes encoding antioxidant proteins as well as UCP2. Finally, we showed that such a phenotype was not innate but spontaneously acquired after diabetes onset, as the result of an adaptive response to the diabetic environment. CONCLUSIONS: The GK/Par model illustrates the effectiveness of adaptive response to OS by beta-cells to achieve self-tolerance. It remains to be determined to what extend such islet antioxidant defenses upregulation might contribute to GK/Par beta-cell secretory dysfunction.

  1. Progenitor potential of nkx6.1-expressing cells throughout zebrafish life and during beta cell regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaye, Aurélie P; Bergemann, David; Tarifeño-Saldivia, Estefania; Flasse, Lydie C; Von Berg, Virginie; Peers, Bernard; Voz, Marianne L; Manfroid, Isabelle

    2015-09-02

    In contrast to mammals, the zebrafish has the remarkable capacity to regenerate its pancreatic beta cells very efficiently. Understanding the mechanisms of regeneration in the zebrafish and the differences with mammals will be fundamental to discovering molecules able to stimulate the regeneration process in mammals. To identify the pancreatic cells able to give rise to new beta cells in the zebrafish, we generated new transgenic lines allowing the tracing of multipotent pancreatic progenitors and endocrine precursors. Using novel bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic nkx6.1 and ascl1b reporter lines, we established that nkx6.1-positive cells give rise to all the pancreatic cell types and ascl1b-positive cells give rise to all the endocrine cell types in the zebrafish embryo. These two genes are initially co-expressed in the pancreatic primordium and their domains segregate, not as a result of mutual repression, but through the opposite effects of Notch signaling, maintaining nkx6.1 expression while repressing ascl1b in progenitors. In the adult zebrafish, nkx6.1 expression persists exclusively in the ductal tree at the tip of which its expression coincides with Notch active signaling in centroacinar/terminal end duct cells. Tracing these cells reveals that they are able to differentiate into other ductal cells and into insulin-expressing cells in normal (non-diabetic) animals. This capacity of ductal cells to generate endocrine cells is supported by the detection of ascl1b in the nkx6.1:GFP ductal cell transcriptome. This transcriptome also reveals, besides actors of the Notch and Wnt pathways, several novel markers such as id2a. Finally, we show that beta cell ablation in the adult zebrafish triggers proliferation of ductal cells and their differentiation into insulin-expressing cells. We have shown that, in the zebrafish embryo, nkx6.1+ cells are bona fide multipotent pancreatic progenitors, while ascl1b+ cells represent committed endocrine precursors. In

  2. Cocoa Phenolic Extract Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bravo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in most plant foods, including green tea, grapes or cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of a cocoa phenolic extract (CPE containing mainly flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability and oxidative status were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5–20 μg/mL CPE for 20 h evoked no cell damage and did not alter ROS production. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h increased ROS and carbonyl groups content and decreased reduced glutathione level. Pre-treatment of cells with CPE significantly prevented the t-BOOH-induced ROS and carbonyl groups and returned antioxidant defences to adequate levels. Thus, Ins-1E cells treated with CPE showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of surviving machineries in the CPE-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult.

  3. Pancreatic beta-cell lipotoxicity induced by overexpression of hormone-sensitive lipase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winzell, Maria Sörhede; Svensson, Håkan; Enerbäck, Sven

    2003-01-01

    Lipid perturbations associated with triglyceride overstorage in beta-cells impair insulin secretion, a process termed lipotoxicity. To assess the role of hormone-sensitive lipase, which is expressed and enzymatically active in beta-cells, in the development of lipotoxicity, we generated transgenic...... mice overexpressing hormone-sensitive lipase specifically in beta-cells. Transgenic mice developed glucose intolerance and severely blunted glucose-stimulated insulin secretion when challenged with a high-fat diet. As expected, both lipase activity and forskolin-stimulated lipolysis was increased...

  4. Characterization of rat lines with normotensive and hypertensive status using genomic fingerprinting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adarichev, V A; Korokhov, N P; Ostapchuk, Ia V; Dymshits, G M; Markel', A L; Ostaptchouk, Jana

    1996-01-01

    The properties of normotensive and hypertensive rat lines were investigated by the DNA fingerprinting method using a multilocus micro-satellite (CAC)5 probe. The HaeIII and HinfI restriction endonucleases were found to be the most informative enzymes in this case. The high genetic homogeneity of the

  5. Effect of aerobic exercise on Pancreas Beta-cells function in adult obese males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Eizadi

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: Aerobic exercise training increases beta cells function and decreases FBS in obese men. These findings support the hypothesis that regular physical activity postpones the occurrence of type 2 diabetes in adult obese subjects.

  6. Evaluation of beta-cell secretory capacity using glucagon-like peptide 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina; Nielsen, Mette Toft; Krarup, T

    2000-01-01

    Beta-cell secretory capacity is often evaluated with a glucagon test or a meal test. However, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is the most insulinotropic hormone known, and the effect is preserved in type 2 diabetic patients.......Beta-cell secretory capacity is often evaluated with a glucagon test or a meal test. However, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is the most insulinotropic hormone known, and the effect is preserved in type 2 diabetic patients....

  7. Targeting Cellular Calcium Homeostasis to Prevent Cytokine-Mediated Beta Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Amy L; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Lavagnino, Zeno; Spears, Larry D; Abreu, Damien; Mahadevan, Jana; Yagi, Takuya; Semenkovich, Clay F; Piston, David W; Urano, Fumihiko

    2017-07-17

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines are important mediators of islet inflammation, leading to beta cell death in type 1 diabetes. Although alterations in both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and cytosolic free calcium levels are known to play a role in cytokine-mediated beta cell death, there are currently no treatments targeting cellular calcium homeostasis to combat type 1 diabetes. Here we show that modulation of cellular calcium homeostasis can mitigate cytokine- and ER stress-mediated beta cell death. The calcium modulating compounds, dantrolene and sitagliptin, both prevent cytokine and ER stress-induced activation of the pro-apoptotic calcium-dependent enzyme, calpain, and partly suppress beta cell death in INS1E cells and human primary islets. These agents are also able to restore cytokine-mediated suppression of functional ER calcium release. In addition, sitagliptin preserves function of the ER calcium pump, sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase (SERCA), and decreases levels of the pro-apoptotic protein thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP). Supporting the role of TXNIP in cytokine-mediated cell death, knock down of TXNIP in INS1-E cells prevents cytokine-mediated beta cell death. Our findings demonstrate that modulation of dynamic cellular calcium homeostasis and TXNIP suppression present viable pharmacologic targets to prevent cytokine-mediated beta cell loss in diabetes.

  8. Regulation of Pancreatic Beta Cell Stimulus-Secretion Coupling by microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan L. S. Esguerra

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased blood glucose after a meal is countered by the subsequent increased release of the hypoglycemic hormone insulin from the pancreatic beta cells. The cascade of molecular events encompassing the initial sensing and transport of glucose into the beta cell, culminating with the exocytosis of the insulin large dense core granules (LDCVs is termed “stimulus-secretion coupling.” Impairment in any of the relevant processes leads to insufficient insulin release, which contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D. The fate of the beta cell, when exposed to environmental triggers of the disease, is determined by the possibility to adapt to the new situation by regulation of gene expression. As established factors of post-transcriptional regulation, microRNAs (miRNAs are well-recognized mediators of beta cell plasticity and adaptation. Here, we put focus on the importance of comprehending the transcriptional regulation of miRNAs, and how miRNAs are implicated in stimulus-secretion coupling, specifically those influencing the late stages of insulin secretion. We suggest that efficient beta cell adaptation requires an optimal balance between transcriptional regulation of miRNAs themselves, and miRNA-dependent gene regulation. The increased knowledge of the beta cell transcriptional network inclusive of non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs is essential in identifying novel targets for the treatment of T2D.

  9. CRFR1 is expressed on pancreatic beta cells, promotes beta cell proliferation, and potentiates insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huising, Mark O; van der Meulen, Talitha; Vaughan, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), originally characterized as the principal neuroregulator of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, has broad central and peripheral distribution and actions. We demonstrate the presence of CRF receptor type 1 (CRFR1) on primary beta cells and show that acti...

  10. Chronic suppression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 in beta-cells impairs insulin secretion via inhibition of glucose rather than lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnebaum, Sarah M; Joseph, Jamie W; Ilkayeva, Olga; Burgess, Shawn C; Lu, Danhong; Becker, Thomas C; Sherry, A Dean; Newgard, Christopher B

    2008-05-23

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) currently is being investigated as a target for treatment of obesity-associated dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. To investigate the effects of ACC1 inhibition on insulin secretion, three small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes targeting ACC1 (siACC1) were transfected into the INS-1-derived cell line, 832/13; the most efficacious duplex was also cloned into an adenovirus and used to transduce isolated rat islets. Delivery of the siACC1 duplexes decreased ACC1 mRNA by 60-80% in 832/13 cells and islets and enzyme activity by 46% compared with cells treated with a non-targeted siRNA. Delivery of siACC1 decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) by 70% in 832/13 cells and by 33% in islets. Surprisingly, siACC1 treatment decreased glucose oxidation by 49%, and the ATP:ADP ratio by 52%, accompanied by clear decreases in pyruvate cycling activity and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Exposure of siACC1-treated cells to the pyruvate cycling substrate dimethylmalate restored GSIS to normal without recovery of the depressed ATP:ADP ratio. In siACC1-treated cells, glucokinase protein levels were decreased by 25%, which correlated with a 36% decrease in glycogen synthesis and a 33% decrease in glycolytic flux. Furthermore, acute addition of the ACC1 inhibitor 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA) to beta-cells suppressed [(14)C]glucose incorporation into lipids but had no effect on GSIS, whereas chronic TOFA administration suppressed GSIS and glucose metabolism. In sum, chronic, but not acute, suppression of ACC1 activity impairs GSIS via inhibition of glucose rather than lipid metabolism. These findings raise concerns about the use of ACC inhibitors for diabetes therapy.

  11. Abnormal G1 arrest in the cell lines from LEC strain rats after X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, M.; Uehara, K.; Kirisawa, R.; Endoh, D.; Arai, S.; Okui, T.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of X-irradiation of cell lines from LEC and WKAH strain rats on a progression o cell cycle was investigated. When WKAH rat ells were exposed to 5 Gy of X-rays and their cell cycle distribution was determined by a flow cytometer, the proportion of S-phase cells decrease and that of G2/M-phase cells in creased at 8 hr post-irradiation. At 18 and 24 hr post-irradiation, approximately 80% of the cells appeared in the G1 phase. On the contrary, the proportion of S-phase cells increased and that of G1-phase cells decreased in LEC rats during 8-24 hr post-irradiation, compared with that at 0 hr post-irradiation. Thus, radiation-induced delay in the progression from the G1 phase to S phase (G1 arrest) was observed inWKAH rat cells but not in LEC rat cells. In the case of WKAH rat cells, the intensities of the bands of p53 protein increased at 1 and 2 hr after X-irradiation at 5 Gy, compared with those of un-irradiated cells and at 0 hr post-irradiation. In contrast, the intensities of the bands were faint and did not significantly increase in LEC rat ells during 0-6 hr incubation after X-irradiation. Present results suggested that the radioresistant DNA synthesis in LEC rat cells is thought to be due to the abnormal G1 arrest following X-irradiation

  12. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Hypoxia in Pancreatic Beta-Cell Dysfunction in Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Philipp A; Rutter, Guy A

    2017-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a frequent precursor of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), a disease that currently affects ∼8% of the adult population worldwide. Pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction and loss are central to the disease process, although understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms is still fragmentary. Recent Advances: Oversupply of nutrients, including glucose and fatty acids, and the subsequent overstimulation of beta cells, are believed to be an important contributor to insulin secretory failure in T2D. Hypoxia has also recently been implicated in beta-cell damage. Accumulating evidence points to a role for oxidative stress in both processes. Although the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) results from enhanced mitochondrial respiration during stimulation with glucose and other fuels, the expression of antioxidant defense genes is unusually low (or disallowed) in beta cells. Not all subjects with metabolic syndrome and hyperglycemia go on to develop full-blown diabetes, implying an important role in disease risk for gene-environment interactions. Possession of common risk alleles at the SLC30A8 locus, encoding the beta-cell granule zinc transporter ZnT8, may affect cytosolic Zn 2+ concentrations and thus susceptibility to hypoxia and oxidative stress. Loss of normal beta-cell function, rather than total mass, is increasingly considered to be the major driver for impaired insulin secretion in diabetes. Better understanding of the role of oxidative changes, its modulation by genes involved in disease risk, and effects on beta-cell identity may facilitate the development of new therapeutic strategies to this disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 501-518.

  13. Sustained beta-cell dysfunction but normalized islet mass in aged thrombospondin-1 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Johan Drott

    Full Text Available Pancreatic islet endothelial cells have in recent years been shown to support beta-cell mass and function by paracrine interactions. Recently, we identified an islets endothelial-specific glycoprotein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1, that showed to be of importance for islet angiogenesis and beta-cell function in young mice. The present study aimed to investigate long-term consequences for islet morphology and beta-cell function of TSP-1 deficiency. Islet and beta-cell mass were observed increased at 10-12 weeks of age in TSP-1 deficient mice, but were normalized before 16 weeks of age when compared to wild-type controls. Islet vascularity was normal in 10-12 and 16-week-old TSP-1 deficient animals, whereas islets of one-year-old animals lacking TSP-1 were hypervascular. Beta-cell dysfunction in TSP-1 deficient animals was present at similar magnitudes between 10-12 and 52 weeks of age, as evaluated by glucose tolerance tests. The insulin secretion capacity in vivo of islets in one-year-old TSP-1 deficient animals was only ∼15% of that in wild-type animals. Using a transplantation model, we reconstituted TSP-1 in adult TSP-deficient islets. In contrast to neonatal TSP-1 deficient islets that we previously reported to regain function after TSP-1 reconstitution, adult islets failed to recover. We conclude that TSP-1 deficiency in islets causes changing vascular and endocrine morphological alterations postnatally, but is coupled to a chronic beta-cell dysfunction. The beta-cell dysfunction induced by TSP-1 deficiency is irreversible if not substituted early in life.

  14. Recombinase-driver rat lines: tools, techniques, and optogenetic application to dopamine-mediated reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Ilana B; Steinberg, Elizabeth E; Lee, Soo Yeun; Davidson, Thomas J; Zalocusky, Kelly A; Brodsky, Matthew; Yizhar, Ofer; Cho, Saemi L; Gong, Shiaoching; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Stuber, Garret D; Tye, Kay M; Janak, Patricia H; Deisseroth, Karl

    2011-12-08

    Currently there is no general approach for achieving specific optogenetic control of genetically defined cell types in rats, which provide a powerful experimental system for numerous established neurophysiological and behavioral paradigms. To overcome this challenge we have generated genetically restricted recombinase-driver rat lines suitable for driving gene expression in specific cell types, expressing Cre recombinase under the control of large genomic regulatory regions (200-300 kb). Multiple tyrosine hydroxylase (Th)::Cre and choline acetyltransferase (Chat)::Cre lines were produced that exhibited specific opsin expression in targeted cell types. We additionally developed methods for utilizing optogenetic tools in freely moving rats and leveraged these technologies to clarify the causal relationship between dopamine (DA) neuron firing and positive reinforcement, observing that optical stimulation of DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of Th::Cre rats is sufficient to support vigorous intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). These studies complement existing targeting approaches by extending the generalizability of optogenetics to traditionally non-genetically-tractable but vital animal models. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Activation of PPAR{delta} up-regulates fatty acid oxidation and energy uncoupling genes of mitochondria and reduces palmitate-induced apoptosis in pancreatic {beta}-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Jun; Jiang, Li; Lue, Qingguo; Ke, Linqiu [Department of Endocrinology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, 37 Guoxue Lane, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Li, Xiaoyu [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, No. 14, 3rd Section, Renmin South Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Tong, Nanwei, E-mail: buddyjun@hotmail.com [Department of Endocrinology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, 37 Guoxue Lane, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2010-01-15

    Recent evidence indicates that decreased oxidative capacity, lipotoxicity, and mitochondrial aberrations contribute to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {delta} (PPAR{delta}) activation on lipid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta}-cells. After HIT-T15 cells (a {beta}-cell line) were exposed to high concentrations of palmitate and GW501516 (GW; a selective agonist of PPAR{delta}), we found that administration of GW increased the expression of PPAR{delta} mRNA. GW-induced activation of PPAR{delta} up-regulated carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD), pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4), and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2); alleviated mitochondrial swelling; attenuated apoptosis; and reduced basal insulin secretion induced by increased palmitate in HIT cells. These results suggest that activation of PPAR{delta} plays an important role in protecting pancreatic {beta}-cells against aberrations caused by lipotoxicity in metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

  16. Cdk5 inhibitory peptide (CIP inhibits Cdk5/p25 activity induced by high glucose in pancreatic beta cells and recovers insulin secretion from p25 damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Li Zheng

    Full Text Available Cdk5/p25 hyperactivity has been demonstrated to lead to neuron apoptosis and degenerations. Chronic exposure to high glucose (HG results in hyperactivity of Cdk5 and reduced insulin secretion. Here, we set out to determine whether abnormal upregulation of Cdk5/p25 activity may be induced in a pancreatic beta cell line, Min6 cells. We first confirmed that p25 were induced in overexpressed p35 cells treated with HG and increased time course dependence. Next, we showed that no p25 was detected under short time HG stimulation (4-12 hrs, however was detectable in the long exposure in HG cells (24 hrs and 48 hrs. Cdk5 activity in the above cells was much higher than low glucose treated cells and resulted in more than 50% inhibition of insulin secretion. We confirmed these results by overexpression of p25 in Min6 cells. As in cortical neurons, CIP, a small peptide, inhibited Cdk5/p25 activity and restored insulin secretion. The same results were detected in co-infection of dominant negative Cdk5 (DNCdk5 with p25. CIP also reduced beta cells apoptosis induced by Cdk5/p25. These studies indicate that Cdk5/p25 hyperactivation deregulates insulin secretion and induces cell death in pancreatic beta cells and suggests that CIP may serve as a therapeutic agent for type 2 diabetes.

  17. Influence and timing of arrival of murine neural crest on pancreatic beta cell development and maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Jennifer L; Mundell, Nathan A; Frist, Audrey Y; LeGrone, Alison W; Kim, Thomas; Musser, Melissa A; Walter, Teagan J; Labosky, Patricia A

    2011-01-15

    Interactions between cells from the ectoderm and mesoderm influence development of the endodermally-derived pancreas. While much is known about how mesoderm regulates pancreatic development, relatively little is understood about how and when the ectodermally-derived neural crest regulates pancreatic development and specifically, beta cell maturation. A previous study demonstrated that signals from the neural crest regulate beta cell proliferation and ultimately, beta cell mass. Here, we expand on that work to describe timing of neural crest arrival at the developing pancreatic bud and extend our knowledge of the non-cell autonomous role for neural crest derivatives in the process of beta cell maturation. We demonstrated that murine neural crest entered the pancreatic mesenchyme between the 26 and 27 somite stages (approximately 10.0 dpc) and became intermingled with pancreatic progenitors as the epithelium branched into the surrounding mesenchyme. Using a neural crest-specific deletion of the Forkhead transcription factor Foxd3, we ablated neural crest cells that migrate to the pancreatic primordium. Consistent with previous data, in the absence of Foxd3, and therefore the absence of neural crest cells, proliferation of insulin-expressing cells and insulin-positive area are increased. Analysis of endocrine cell gene expression in the absence of neural crest demonstrated that, although the number of insulin-expressing cells was increased, beta cell maturation was significantly impaired. Decreased MafA and Pdx1 expression illustrated the defect in beta cell maturation; we discovered that without neural crest, there was a reduction in the percentage of insulin-positive cells that co-expressed Glut2 and Pdx1 compared to controls. In addition, transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed decreased numbers of characteristic insulin granules and the presence of abnormal granules in insulin-expressing cells from mutant embryos. Together, these data demonstrate that

  18. A Simple Matter of Life and Death—The Trials of Postnatal Beta-Cell Mass Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tarabra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cells, which secrete the hormone insulin, are the key arbiters of glucose homeostasis. Defective beta-cell numbers and/or function underlie essentially all major forms of diabetes and must be restored if diabetes is to be cured. Thus, the identification of the molecular regulators of beta-cell mass and a better understanding of the processes of beta-cell differentiation and proliferation may provide further insight for the development of new therapeutic targets for diabetes. This review will focus on the principal hormones and nutrients, as well as downstream signalling pathways regulating beta-cell mass in the adult. Furthermore, we will also address more recently appreciated regulators of beta-cell mass, such as microRNAs.

  19. High fat programming of beta cell compensation, exhaustion, death and dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Marlon E

    2015-03-01

    Programming refers to events during critical developmental windows that shape progeny health outcomes. Fetal programming refers to the effects of intrauterine (in utero) events. Lactational programming refers to the effects of events during suckling (weaning). Developmental programming refers to the effects of events during both fetal and lactational life. Postnatal programming refers to the effects of events either from birth (lactational life) to adolescence or from weaning (end of lactation) to adolescence. Islets are most plastic during the early life course; hence programming during fetal and lactational life is most potent. High fat (HF) programming is the maintenance on a HF diet (HFD) during critical developmental life stages that alters progeny metabolism and physiology. HF programming induces variable diabetogenic phenotypes dependent on the timing and duration of the dietary insult. Maternal obesity reinforces HF programming effects in progeny. HF programming, through acute hyperglycemia, initiates beta cell compensation. However, HF programming eventually leads to chronic hyperglycemia that triggers beta cell exhaustion, death and dysfunction. In HF programming, beta cell dysfunction often co-presents with insulin resistance. Balanced, healthy nutrition during developmental windows is critical for preserving beta cell structure and function. Thus early positive nutritional interventions that coincide with the development of beta cells may reduce the overwhelming burden of diabetes and metabolic disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. ROS signaling, oxidative stress and Nrf2 in pancreatic beta-cell function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pi Jingbo; Zhang Qiang; Fu Jingqi; Woods, Courtney G.; Hou Yongyong; Corkey, Barbara E.; Collins, Sheila; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the emerging evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from glucose metabolism, such as H 2 O 2 , act as metabolic signaling molecules for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in pancreatic beta-cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the potential inhibitory role of endogenous antioxidants, which rise in response to oxidative stress, in glucose-triggered ROS and GSIS. We propose that cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress challenge, such as nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant induction, plays paradoxical roles in pancreatic beta-cell function. On the one hand, induction of antioxidant enzymes protects beta-cells from oxidative damage and possible cell death, thus minimizing oxidative damage-related impairment of insulin secretion. On the other hand, the induction of antioxidant enzymes by Nrf2 activation blunts glucose-triggered ROS signaling, thus resulting in reduced GSIS. These two premises are potentially relevant to impairment of beta-cells occurring in the late and early stage of Type 2 diabetes, respectively. In addition, we summarized our recent findings that persistent oxidative stress due to absence of uncoupling protein 2 activates cellular adaptive response which is associated with impaired pancreatic beta-cell function.

  1. Role of growth factors in control of pancreatic beta cell mass: focus on betatrophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitsky, Lynne L; Ardestani, Goli; Rhoads, David B

    2014-08-01

    Betatrophin is a newly described hormone, which potently stimulates beta cell replication in mice. This discovery has engendered great hope that it could prove clinically important in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Betatrophin, a 198-amino acid protein secreted by liver and adipose tissue, stimulates growth of pancreatic beta cell mass in insulin-resistant mice. Betatrophin has previously been named RIFL, lipasin, and ANGPLT8, and its salutory effects on lipid metabolism have been described in mouse and human studies. Serum betatrophin levels in humans correlate with improved adipose tissue lipid storage and lower serum triglyceride levels in the fed state, but do not correlate with insulin resistance or carbohydrate tolerance in humans. Betatrophin has not yet been shown to have an effect on beta cell replication in human pancreatic islets. Many endocrine and paracrine factors, of which betatrophin is the newest described, increase beta cell mass in murine models. None of these factors, including betatrophin, have displayed the same activity in clinical studies. This may reflect a profound species difference in beta cell regeneration pathways in mice and humans.

  2. Polymorphisms within novel risk loci for type 2 diabetes determine beta-cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Staiger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes arises when insulin resistance-induced compensatory insulin secretion exhausts. Insulin resistance and/or beta-cell dysfunction result from the interaction of environmental factors (high-caloric diet and reduced physical activity with a predisposing polygenic background. Very recently, genetic variations within four novel genetic loci (SLC30A8, HHEX, EXT2, and LOC387761 were reported to be more frequent in subjects with type 2 diabetes than in healthy controls. However, associations of these variations with insulin resistance and/or beta-cell dysfunction were not assessed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By genotyping of 921 metabolically characterized German subjects for the reported candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, we show that the major alleles of the SLC30A8 SNP rs13266634 and the HHEX SNP rs7923837 associate with reduced insulin secretion stimulated by orally or intravenously administered glucose, but not with insulin resistance. In contrast, the other reported type 2 diabetes candidate SNPs within the EXT2 and LOC387761 loci did not associate with insulin resistance or beta-cell dysfunction, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The HHEX and SLC30A8 genes encode for proteins that were shown to be required for organogenesis of the ventral pancreas and for insulin maturation/storage, respectively. Therefore, the major alleles of type 2 diabetes candidate SNPs within these genetic loci represent crucial alleles for beta-cell dysfunction and, thus, might confer increased susceptibility of beta-cells towards adverse environmental factors.

  3. New Therapeutic Approaches to Prevent or Delay Beta-Cell Failure in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionica Floriana Elvira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: The most recent estimates of International Diabetes Federation indicate that 382 million people have diabetes, and the incidence of this disease is increasing. While in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM beta-cell death is autoimmunemediated, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM results from an interaction between genetic and environmental factors that impair beta-cell function and insulin action. Many people with T2DM remain unaware of their illness for a long time because symptoms may take years to appear or be recognized, while the body is affected by excess blood glucose. These patients are often diagnosed only when diabetes complications have already developed. The aim of this article was to perform a review based on literature data on therapeutic modalities to prevent/delay beta cell function decline. Material and Methods: We searched MEDLINE from 2000 to the present to identify the therapeutic approaches to prevent or delay beta-cell failure in patients with T2DM. Results and conclusions: Several common polymorphisms in genes linked to monogenic forms of diabetes appear to influence the response to T2DM pharmacotherapy. Recent studies report the role of the G protein coupled receptor 40 (GPR40, also known as Free Fatty Acids Receptor 1 (FFAR1 in the regulation of beta-cell function- CNX-011-67 (a GPR40 agonist has the potential to provide good and durable glycemic control in T2DM patients.

  4. Impact of fetal and neonatal environment on beta cell function and development of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens H; Haase, Tobias N; Jaksch, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    on the beta cells in both the mother and the fetus and how various conditions like diabetes, obesity, overnutrition and undernutrition during and after pregnancy may influence the ability of the offspring to adapt to changes in insulin demand later in life. The influence of environmental factors including...... that the intrauterine environment during pregnancy has an impact on the gene expression that may persist until adulthood and cause metabolic diseases like obesity and type 2 diabetes. As the pancreatic beta cells are crucial in the regulation of metabolism this article will describe the influence of normal pregnancy...... nutrients and gut microbiota on appetite regulation, mitochondrial activity and the immune system that may affect beta cell growth and function directly and indirectly is discussed. The possible role of epigenetic changes in the transgenerational transmission of the adverse programming may be the most...

  5. Tissue-specific methylation of human insulin gene and PCR assay for monitoring beta cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed I Husseiny

    Full Text Available The onset of metabolic dysregulation in type 1 diabetes (T1D occurs after autoimmune destruction of the majority of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. We previously demonstrated that the DNA encoding the insulin gene is uniquely unmethylated in these cells and then developed a methylation-specific PCR (MSP assay to identify circulating beta cell DNA in streptozotocin-treated mice prior to the rise in blood glucose. The current study extends to autoimmune non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and humans, showing in NOD mice that beta cell death occurs six weeks before the rise in blood sugar and coincides with the onset of islet infiltration by immune cells, demonstrating the utility of MSP for monitoring T1D. We previously reported unique patterns of methylation of the human insulin gene, and now extend this to other human tissues. The methylation patterns of the human insulin promoter, intron 1, exon 2, and intron 2 were determined in several normal human tissues. Similar to our previous report, the human insulin promoter was unmethylated in beta cells, but methylated in all other tissues tested. In contrast, intron 1, exon 2 and intron 2 did not exhibit any tissue-specific DNA methylation pattern. Subsequently, a human MSP assay was developed based on the methylation pattern of the insulin promoter and human islet DNA was successfully detected in circulation of T1D patients after islet transplantation therapy. Signal levels of normal controls and pre-transplant samples were shown to be similar, but increased dramatically after islet transplantation. In plasma the signal declines with time but in whole blood remains elevated for at least two weeks, indicating that association of beta cell DNA with blood cells prolongs the signal. This assay provides an effective method to monitor beta cell destruction in early T1D and in islet transplantation therapy.

  6. Insulin-producing cells generated from dedifferentiated human pancreatic beta cells expanded in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger A Russ

    Full Text Available Expansion of beta cells from the limited number of adult human islet donors is an attractive prospect for increasing cell availability for cell therapy of diabetes. However, attempts at expanding human islet cells in tissue culture result in loss of beta-cell phenotype. Using a lineage-tracing approach we provided evidence for massive proliferation of beta-cell-derived (BCD cells within these cultures. Expansion involves dedifferentiation resembling epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Epigenetic analyses indicate that key beta-cell genes maintain open chromatin structure in expanded BCD cells, although they are not transcribed. Here we investigated whether BCD cells can be redifferentiated into beta-like cells.Redifferentiation conditions were screened by following activation of an insulin-DsRed2 reporter gene. Redifferentiated cells were characterized for gene expression, insulin content and secretion assays, and presence of secretory vesicles by electron microscopy. BCD cells were induced to redifferentiate by a combination of soluble factors. The redifferentiated cells expressed beta-cell genes, stored insulin in typical secretory vesicles, and released it in response to glucose. The redifferentiation process involved mesenchymal-epithelial transition, as judged by changes in gene expression. Moreover, inhibition of the EMT effector SLUG (SNAI2 using shRNA resulted in stimulation of redifferentiation. Lineage-traced cells also gave rise at a low rate to cells expressing other islet hormones, suggesting transition of BCD cells through an islet progenitor-like stage during redifferentiation.These findings demonstrate for the first time that expanded dedifferentiated beta cells can be induced to redifferentiate in culture. The findings suggest that ex-vivo expansion of adult human islet cells is a promising approach for generation of insulin-producing cells for transplantation, as well as basic research, toxicology studies, and drug

  7. Determination of Insulin Resistance and Beta Cell Function in Healthy Obese and Non-obese Individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazmi, A.; Sattar, A.; Tariq, K. M.; Najamussahar; Hashim, R.; Almani, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine insulin resistance and beta cell function in healthy obese and nonobese individuals of the local population. Study Design: Case control study. Place and Duration of Study: AFIP Rawalpindi in collaboration with department of medicine military hospital(MH) Rawalpindi, from Aug 2008 to Mar 2009. Methods: Eighty obese(n=40) and non-obese(n=40) subjects were selected by non-probability convenience sampling. Plasma insulin, glucose, and serum total cholestrol were estimated in fasting state. Insulin resistance was calculated by HOMA-IR and beta cell function by HOMA- equation. Results: Significant differences were observed between obese and non-obese individuals regarding insulin resistance, beta cell function, and BMI and serum total cholesterol. Mean insulin resistance in obese group was found to be 11.1 +- 5.1(range 7.0-16.2) and in non-obese group it was 0.9+-0.4 (range 0.5-1.3). This difference was highly significant (p=0.001). There was a highly significant difference between the two groups in term of beta cell function with mean rank 60.1 for obese group and 20.9 non obese groups (Asym sig. 2 tailed 0.000). Also the correlation (r = 0.064) between insulin resistance and beta cell function in obese group is highly significant (p = 0.000). Mean serum leptin levels were lower (6.3 ng/ml) in non-obese, and high (57.2 ng/ml) in the obese group. Conclusions: Insulin resistance is found higher in obese individuals. Beta cell function is significantly different between obese and non-obese groups. (author)

  8. Chronic antidiabetic sulfonylureas in vivo: reversible effects on mouse pancreatic beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sara Remedi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cell ATP-sensitive potassium (K ATP channels are critical links between nutrient metabolism and insulin secretion. In humans, reduced or absent beta-cell K ATP channel activity resulting from loss-of-function K ATP mutations induces insulin hypersecretion. Mice with reduced K ATP channel activity also demonstrate hyperinsulinism, but mice with complete loss of K ATP channels (K ATP knockout mice show an unexpected insulin undersecretory phenotype. Therefore we have proposed an "inverse U" hypothesis to explain the response to enhanced excitability, in which excessive hyperexcitability drives beta-cells to insulin secretory failure without cell death. Many patients with type 2 diabetes treated with antidiabetic sulfonylureas (which inhibit K ATP activity and thereby enhance insulin secretion show long-term insulin secretory failure, which we further suggest might reflect a similar progression.To test the above hypotheses, and to mechanistically investigate the consequences of prolonged hyperexcitability in vivo, we used a novel approach of implanting mice with slow-release sulfonylurea (glibenclamide pellets, to chronically inhibit beta-cell K ATP channels. Glibenclamide-implanted wild-type mice became progressively and consistently diabetic, with significantly (p < 0.05 reduced insulin secretion in response to glucose. After 1 wk of treatment, these mice were as glucose intolerant as adult K ATP knockout mice, and reduction of secretory capacity in freshly isolated islets from implanted animals was as significant (p < 0.05 as those from K ATP knockout animals. However, secretory capacity was fully restored in islets from sulfonylurea-treated mice within hours of drug washout and in vivo within 1 mo after glibenclamide treatment was terminated. Pancreatic immunostaining showed normal islet size and alpha-/beta-cell distribution within the islet, and TUNEL staining showed no evidence of apoptosis.These results demonstrate that

  9. Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortijo, Cedric; Gouzi, Mathieu; Tissir, Fadel

    2012-01-01

    glucose clearance. Loss of Celsr2 and 3 leads to a reduction of Jun phosphorylation in progenitors, which, in turn, reduces beta cell differentiation from endocrine progenitors. These results highlight the importance of the PCP pathway in cell differentiation in vertebrates. In addition, they reveal.......5 synchronously to apicobasal polarization of pancreas progenitors. Loss of function of the two PCP core components Celsr2 and Celsr3 shows that they control the differentiation of endocrine cells from polarized progenitors, with a prevalent effect on insulin-producing beta cells. This results in a decreased...

  10. Behavioural profiles of two Wistar rat lines selectively bred for high or low anxiety-related behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebsch, G; Montkowski, A; Holsboer, F; Landgraf, R

    1998-08-01

    Over the past years, two breeding lines, derived originally from outbred Wistar rats, have been established that differ markedly and consistently in their anxiety-related behaviour in the elevated plus-maze. At the age of ten weeks, rats were tested once on the elevated plus-maze and the males and females displaying the most anxious and the least anxious behaviour were sib-mated to start a new generation of the high anxiety-related behaviour (HAB) and the low anxiety-related behaviour (LAB) lines, respectively. The resulting difference in emotionality between these two lines was also evident in an open field test and correlated with differences in the forced swim test. In the open field, the HAB rats tended to be less active and explored the central zone of the open field much less than the LAB animals. In the forced swim test, HAB rats started floating earlier, spent significantly more time in this immobile posture and struggled less than LAB rats. However, in an olfactory-cued social discrimination task there was no difference between male and female animals from either line. The overall performance in these various behavioural tests suggests that selective breeding has resulted in rat lines not only differing markedly in their innate anxiety-related behaviour in the plus-maze, but also in other stress-related behavioural performances, suggesting a close link between the emotional evaluation of a novel and stressful situation and an individual's coping strategy.

  11. Intermittent fasting preserves beta-cell mass in obesity-induced diabetes via the autophagy-lysosome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyan; Javaheri, Ali; Godar, Rebecca J; Murphy, John; Ma, Xiucui; Rohatgi, Nidhi; Mahadevan, Jana; Hyrc, Krzysztof; Saftig, Paul; Marshall, Connie; McDaniel, Michael L; Remedi, Maria S; Razani, Babak; Urano, Fumihiko; Diwan, Abhinav

    2017-01-01

    Obesity-induced diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and progressive beta cell failure. In islets of mice with obesity-induced diabetes, we observe increased beta cell death and impaired autophagic flux. We hypothesized that intermittent fasting, a clinically sustainable therapeutic strategy, stimulates autophagic flux to ameliorate obesity-induced diabetes. Our data show that despite continued high-fat intake, intermittent fasting restores autophagic flux in islets and improves glucose tolerance by enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, beta cell survival, and nuclear expression of NEUROG3, a marker of pancreatic regeneration. In contrast, intermittent fasting does not rescue beta-cell death or induce NEUROG3 expression in obese mice with lysosomal dysfunction secondary to deficiency of the lysosomal membrane protein, LAMP2 or haplo-insufficiency of BECN1/Beclin 1, a protein critical for autophagosome formation. Moreover, intermittent fasting is sufficient to provoke beta cell death in nonobese lamp2 null mice, attesting to a critical role for lysosome function in beta cell homeostasis under fasting conditions. Beta cells in intermittently-fasted LAMP2- or BECN1-deficient mice exhibit markers of autophagic failure with accumulation of damaged mitochondria and upregulation of oxidative stress. Thus, intermittent fasting preserves organelle quality via the autophagy-lysosome pathway to enhance beta cell survival and stimulates markers of regeneration in obesity-induced diabetes.

  12. A standardized method for in vivo mouse pancreas imaging and semiquantitative beta cell mass measurement by dual isotope SPECT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathijs, I.; Xavier, C.; Peleman, C.; Caveliers, V.; Brom, M.; Gotthardt, M.; Herrera, P.L.; Lahoutte, T.; Bouwens, L.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: In order to evaluate future beta cell tracers in vivo, we aimed to develop a standardized in vivo method allowing semiquantitative measurement of a prospective beta cell tracer within the pancreas. PROCEDURES: 2-[(123)I]Iodo-L-phenylalanine ([(123)I]IPA) and

  13. Cell specificity of the cytoplasmic Ca2+ response to tolbutamide is impaired in beta-cells from hyperglycemic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Larsson-Nyrén, Gerd; Lindström, Per

    2006-01-01

    We recently reported that the timing and magnitude of the nutrient-induced Ca(2+) response are specific and reproducible for each isolated beta-cell. We have now used tolbutamide and arginine to test if the cell specificity exists also for the response to non-nutrient stimulation of beta-cells an...

  14. Timing of Ca2+ response in pancreatic beta-cells is related to mitochondrial mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, N; Abedi, G; Larsson-Nyrén, G

    2006-01-01

    timing are disturbed in beta-cells from hyperglycemic mice and one of the causes is likely to be an altered mitochondrial metabolism. Mitochondria play a key role in the control of nutrient-induced insulin secretion. Here, we used confocal microscopy with the fluorescent probe MitoTracker Red CMXRos...

  15. Dual role of proapoptotic BAD in insulin secretion and beta cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danial, Nika N; Walensky, Loren D; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Choi, Cheol Soo; Fisher, Jill K; Molina, Anthony J A; Datta, Sandeep Robert; Pitter, Kenneth L; Bird, Gregory H; Wikstrom, Jakob D; Deeney, Jude T; Robertson, Kirsten; Morash, Joel; Kulkarni, Ameya; Neschen, Susanne; Kim, Sheene; Greenberg, Michael E; Corkey, Barbara E; Shirihai, Orian S; Shulman, Gerald I; Lowell, Bradford B; Korsmeyer, Stanley J

    2008-02-01

    The proapoptotic BCL-2 family member BAD resides in a glucokinase-containing complex that regulates glucose-driven mitochondrial respiration. Here, we present genetic evidence of a physiologic role for BAD in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by beta cells. This novel function of BAD is specifically dependent upon the phosphorylation of its BH3 sequence, previously defined as an essential death domain. We highlight the pharmacologic relevance of phosphorylated BAD BH3 by using cell-permeable, hydrocarbon-stapled BAD BH3 helices that target glucokinase, restore glucose-driven mitochondrial respiration and correct the insulin secretory response in Bad-deficient islets. Our studies uncover an alternative target and function for the BAD BH3 domain and emphasize the therapeutic potential of phosphorylated BAD BH3 mimetics in selectively restoring beta cell function. Furthermore, we show that BAD regulates the physiologic adaptation of beta cell mass during high-fat feeding. Our findings provide genetic proof of the bifunctional activities of BAD in both beta cell survival and insulin secretion.

  16. Beta cell imaging - a key tool in optimized diabetes prevention and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gotthardt, M.; Eizirik, D.L.; Cnop, M.; Brom, M.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is 382 million worldwide, and is expected to rise to 592 million in 2035 (http://www.idf.org/diabetesatlas); 2.5-15\\% of national annual healthcare budgets are related to diabetes care, potentially increasing to 40\\% in high-prevalence countries. Beta cell dysfunction and

  17. MicroRNAs as regulators of beta-cell function and dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osmai, Mirwais; Osmai, Yama; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner

    2016-01-01

    , recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are important regulators of the islet transcriptome, controlling apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation, as well as regulating unique islet and beta-cell functions and pathways such as insulin expression, processing and secretion. Furthermore, a large...

  18. Growth hormone is a growth factor for the differentiated pancreatic beta-cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, S; Welinder, B S; Billestrup, N

    1989-01-01

    The regulation of the growth of the pancreatic beta-cell is poorly understood. There are previous indications of a role of GH in the growth and insulin production of the pancreatic islets. In the present study we present evidence for a direct long-term effect of GH on proliferation and insulin...

  19. Cytokines and beta-cell biology: from concept to clinical translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donath, M.Y.; Storling, J.; Berchtold, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    The tale of cytokines and the beta-cell is a long story, starting with in vitro discovery in 1984, evolving via descriptive and phenomenological studies to detailed mapping of the signalling pathways, gene- and protein expression patterns, molecular and biochemical effector mechanisms to in vivo...

  20. Imaging of beta-Cell Mass and Insulitis in Insulin-Dependent (Type 1) Diabetes Mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; de Vries, Erik F. J.; Di Girolamo, Marco; Quintero, Ana M.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Signore, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease with a complex multifactorial etiology and a poorly understood pathogenesis. Genetic and environmental factors cause an autoimmune reaction against pancreatic beta-cells, called insulitis, confirmed in pancreatic samples obtained at

  1. PDX1, Neurogenin-3, and MAFA: critical transcription regulators for beta cell development and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaxi Zhu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transcription factors regulate gene expression through binding to specific enhancer sequences. Pancreas/duodenum homeobox protein 1 (PDX1, Neurogenin-3 (NEUROG3, and V-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A (MAFA are transcription factors critical for beta cell development and maturation. NEUROG3 is expressed in endocrine progenitor cells and controls islet differentiation and regeneration. PDX1 is essential for the development of pancreatic exocrine and endocrine cells including beta cells. PDX1 also binds to the regulatory elements and increases insulin gene transcription. Likewise, MAFA binds to the enhancer/promoter region of the insulin gene and drives insulin expression in response to glucose. In addition to those natural roles in beta cell development and maturation, ectopic expression of PDX1, NEUROG3, and/or MAFA has been successfully used to reprogram various cell types into insulin-producing cells in vitro and in vivo, such as pancreatic exocrine cells, hepatocytes, and pluripotent stem cells. Here, we review biological properties of PDX1, NEUROG3, and MAFA, and their applications and limitations for beta cell regenerative approaches. The primary source literature for this review was acquired using a PubMed search for articles published between 1990 and 2017. Search terms include diabetes, insulin, trans-differentiation, stem cells, and regenerative medicine.

  2. Rac1-NADPH oxidase signaling promotes CD36 activation under glucotoxic conditions in pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elumalai, Suma; Karunakaran, Udayakumar; Lee, In Kyu; Moon, Jun Sung; Won, Kyu Chang

    2017-04-01

    We recently reported that cluster determinant 36 (CD36), a fatty acid transporter, plays a pivotal role in glucotoxicity-induced β-cell dysfunction. However, little is known about how glucotoxicity influences CD36 expression. Emerging evidence suggests that the small GTPase Rac1 is involved in the pathogenesis of beta cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes (T2D). The primary objective of the current study was to determine the role of Rac1 in CD36 activation and its impact on β-cell dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. To address this question, we subjected INS-1 cells and human beta cells (1.1B4) to high glucose conditions (30mM) in the presence or absence of Rac1 inhibition either by NSC23766 (Rac1 GTPase inhibitor) or small interfering RNA. High glucose exposure in INS-1 and human beta cells (1.1b4) resulted in the activation of Rac1 and induced cell apoptosis. Rac1 activation mediates NADPH oxidase (NOX) activation leading to elevated ROS production in both cells. Activation of the Rac1-NOX complex by high glucose levels enhanced CD36 expression in INS-1 and human 1.1b4 beta cell membrane fractions. The inhibition of Rac1 by NSC23766 inhibited NADPH oxidase activity and ROS generation induced by high glucose concentrations in INS-1 & human 1.1b4 beta cells. Inhibition of Rac1-NOX complex activation by NSC23766 significantly reduced CD36 expression in INS-1 and human 1.1b4 beta cell membrane fractions. In addition, Rac1 inhibition by NSC23766 significantly reduced high glucose-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, NADPH oxidase inhibition by VAS2870 also attenuated high glucose-induced ROS generation and cell apoptosis. These results suggest that Rac1-NADPH oxidase dependent CD36 expression contributes to high glucose-induced beta cell dysfunction and cell death. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Beta cell 5'-shifted isomiRs are candidate regulatory hubs in type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette Baran-Gale

    Full Text Available Next-generation deep sequencing of small RNAs has unveiled the complexity of the microRNA (miRNA transcriptome, which is in large part due to the diversity of miRNA sequence variants ("isomiRs". Changes to a miRNA's seed sequence (nucleotides 2-8, including shifted start positions, can redirect targeting to a dramatically different set of RNAs and alter biological function. We performed deep sequencing of small RNA from mouse insulinoma (MIN6 cells (widely used as a surrogate for the study of pancreatic beta cells and developed a bioinformatic analysis pipeline to profile isomiR diversity. Additionally, we applied the pipeline to recently published small RNA-seq data from primary human beta cells and whole islets and compared the miRNA profiles with that of MIN6. We found that: (1 the miRNA expression profile in MIN6 cells is highly correlated with those of primary human beta cells and whole islets; (2 miRNA loci can generate multiple highly expressed isomiRs with different 5'-start positions (5'-isomiRs; (3 isomiRs with shifted start positions (5'-shifted isomiRs are highly expressed, and can be as abundant as their unshifted counterparts (5'-reference miRNAs. Finally, we identified 10 beta cell miRNA families as candidate regulatory hubs in a type 2 diabetes (T2D gene network. The most significant candidate hub was miR-29, which we demonstrated regulates the mRNA levels of several genes critical to beta cell function and implicated in T2D. Three of the candidate miRNA hubs were novel 5'-shifted isomiRs: miR-375+1, miR-375-1 and miR-183-5p+1. We showed by in silico target prediction and in vitro transfection studies that both miR-375+1 and miR-375-1 are likely to target an overlapping, but distinct suite of beta cell genes compared to canonical miR-375. In summary, this study characterizes the isomiR profile in beta cells for the first time, and also highlights the potential functional relevance of 5'-shifted isomiRs to T2D.

  4. Hypoglycemic and beta cell protective effects of andrographolide analogue for diabetes treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larrick James W

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While all anti-diabetic agents can decrease blood glucose level directly or indirectly, few are able to protect and preserve both pancreatic beta cell mass and their insulin-secreting functions. Thus, there is an urgent need to find an agent or combination of agents that can lower blood glucose and preserve pancreatic beta cells at the same time. Herein, we report a dual-functional andrographolide-lipoic acid conjugate (AL-1. The anti-diabetic and beta cell protective activities of this novel andrographolide-lipoic acid conjugate were investigated. Methods In alloxan-treated mice (a model of type 1 diabetes, drugs were administered orally once daily for 6 days post-alloxan treatment. Fasting blood glucose and serum insulin were determined. Pathologic and immunohistochemical analysis of pancreatic islets were performed. Translocation of glucose transporter subtype 4 in soleus muscle was detected by western blot. In RIN-m cells in vitro, the effect of AL-1 on H2O2-induced damage and reactive oxidative species production stimulated by high glucose and glibenclamide were measured. Inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB activation induced by IL-1β and IFN-γ was investigated. Results In alloxan-induced diabetic mouse model, AL-1 lowered blood glucose, increased insulin and prevented loss of beta cells and their dysfunction, stimulated glucose transport protein subtype 4 (GLUT4 membrane translocation in soleus muscles. Pretreatment of RIN-m cells with AL-1 prevented H2O2-induced cellular damage, quenched glucose and glibenclamide-stimulated reactive oxidative species production, and inhibited cytokine-stimulated NF-κB activation. Conclusion We have demonstrated that AL-1 had both hypoglycemic and beta cell protective effects which translated into antioxidant and NF-κB inhibitory activity. AL-1 is a potential new anti-diabetic agent.

  5. Hypothyroidism in utero stimulates pancreatic beta cell proliferation and hyperinsulinaemia in the ovine fetus during late gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Shelley E; De Blasio, Miles J; Davis, Melissa A; Kelly, Amy C; Davenport, Hailey M; Wooding, F B Peter; Blache, Dominique; Meredith, David; Anderson, Miranda; Fowden, Abigail L; Limesand, Sean W; Forhead, Alison J

    2017-06-01

    Thyroid hormones are important regulators of growth and maturation before birth, although the extent to which their actions are mediated by insulin and the development of pancreatic beta cell mass is unknown. Hypothyroidism in fetal sheep induced by removal of the thyroid gland caused asymmetric organ growth, increased pancreatic beta cell mass and proliferation, and was associated with increased circulating concentrations of insulin and leptin. In isolated fetal sheep islets studied in vitro, thyroid hormones inhibited beta cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, while high concentrations of insulin and leptin stimulated proliferation. The developing pancreatic beta cell is therefore sensitive to thyroid hormone, insulin and leptin before birth, with possible consequences for pancreatic function in fetal and later life. The findings of this study highlight the importance of thyroid hormones during pregnancy for normal development of the fetal pancreas. Development of pancreatic beta cell mass before birth is essential for normal growth of the fetus and for long-term control of carbohydrate metabolism in postnatal life. Thyroid hormones are also important regulators of fetal growth, and the present study tested the hypotheses that thyroid hormones promote beta cell proliferation in the fetal ovine pancreatic islets, and that growth retardation in hypothyroid fetal sheep is associated with reductions in pancreatic beta cell mass and circulating insulin concentration in utero. Organ growth and pancreatic islet cell proliferation and mass were examined in sheep fetuses following removal of the thyroid gland in utero. The effects of triiodothyronine (T 3 ), insulin and leptin on beta cell proliferation rates were determined in isolated fetal ovine pancreatic islets in vitro. Hypothyroidism in the sheep fetus resulted in an asymmetric pattern of organ growth, pancreatic beta cell hyperplasia, and elevated plasma insulin and leptin concentrations. In pancreatic

  6. Early peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma regulated genes involved in expansion of pancreatic beta cell mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivas Yurena

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progression towards type 2 diabetes depends on the allostatic response of pancreatic beta cells to synthesise and secrete enough insulin to compensate for insulin resistance. The endocrine pancreas is a plastic tissue able to expand or regress in response to the requirements imposed by physiological and pathophysiological states associated to insulin resistance such as pregnancy, obesity or ageing, but the mechanisms mediating beta cell mass expansion in these scenarios are not well defined. We have recently shown that ob/ob mice with genetic ablation of PPARγ2, a mouse model known as the POKO mouse failed to expand its beta cell mass. This phenotype contrasted with the appropriate expansion of the beta cell mass observed in their obese littermate ob/ob mice. Thus, comparison of these models islets particularly at early ages could provide some new insights on early PPARγ dependent transcriptional responses involved in the process of beta cell mass expansion Results Here we have investigated PPARγ dependent transcriptional responses occurring during the early stages of beta cell adaptation to insulin resistance in wild type, ob/ob, PPARγ2 KO and POKO mice. We have identified genes known to regulate both the rate of proliferation and the survival signals of beta cells. Moreover we have also identified new pathways induced in ob/ob islets that remained unchanged in POKO islets, suggesting an important role for PPARγ in maintenance/activation of mechanisms essential for the continued function of the beta cell. Conclusions Our data suggest that the expansion of beta cell mass observed in ob/ob islets is associated with the activation of an immune response that fails to occur in POKO islets. We have also indentified other PPARγ dependent differentially regulated pathways including cholesterol biosynthesis, apoptosis through TGF-β signaling and decreased oxidative phosphorylation.

  7. Beneficial Effect of Jojoba Seed Extracts on Hyperglycemia-Induced Oxidative Stress in RINm5f Beta Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhadj, Sahla; Hentati, Olfa; Hamdaoui, Ghaith; Fakhreddine, Khaskhoussi; Maillard, Elisa; Dal, Stéphanie; Sigrist, Séverine

    2018-03-20

    Hyperglycemia occurs during diabetes and insulin resistance. It causes oxidative stress by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, leading to cellular damage. Polyphenols play a central role in defense against oxidative stress. In our study, we investigated the antioxidant properties of simmondsin, a pure molecule present in jojoba seeds, and of the aqueous extract of jojoba seeds on fructose-induced oxidative stress in RINm5f beta cells. The exposure of RINm5f beta cells to fructose triggered the loss of cell viability (-48%, p jojoba seed extract makes jojoba a powerful agent to prevent the destruction of RINm5f beta cells induced by hyperglycemia.

  8. Characterization of GLP-1 effects on beta-cell function after meal ingestion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrén, Bo; Holst, Jens Juul; Mari, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is an incretin that augments insulin secretion after meal intake and is developed for treatment of type 2 diabetes. As a novel therapeutic agent, characteristics of its beta-cell effects are important to establish. Previously, beta-cell effects of GLP-1...... have been characterized in humans during graded intravenous infusions of glucose, whereas its effects after more physiological stimuli, like meal intake, are not known. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Eight women (aged 69 years, fasting glucose 3.7-10.3 mmol/l, BMI 22.4-43.9 kg/m(2)) who had fasted...... meal augments insulin secretion in humans by a dose...

  9. Targeting dysfunctional beta-cell signaling for the potential treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Rachel J; Kimple, Michelle E

    2018-03-01

    Since its discovery and purification by Frederick Banting in 1921, exogenous insulin has remained almost the sole therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus. While insulin alleviates the primary dysfunction of the disease, many other aspects of the pathophysiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus are unaffected. Research aimed towards the discovery of novel type 1 diabetes mellitus therapeutics targeting different cell signaling pathways is gaining momentum. The focus of these efforts has been almost entirely on the impact of immunomodulatory drugs, particularly those that have already received FDA-approval for other autoimmune diseases. However, these drugs can often have severe side effects, while also putting already immunocompromised individuals at an increased risk for other infections. Potential therapeutic targets in the insulin-producing beta-cell have been largely ignored by the type 1 diabetes mellitus field, save the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor. While there is preliminary evidence to support the clinical exploration of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor-based drugs as type 1 diabetes mellitus adjuvant therapeutics, there is a vast space for other putative therapeutic targets to be explored. The alpha subunit of the heterotrimeric G z protein (Gα z ) has been shown to promote beta-cell inflammation, dysfunction, death, and failure to replicate in the context of diabetes in a number of mouse models. Genetic loss of Gα z or inhibition of the Gα z signaling pathway through dietary interventions is protective against the development of insulitis and hyperglycemia. The multifaceted effects of Gα z in regards to beta-cell health in the context of diabetes make it an ideal therapeutic target for further study. It is our belief that a low-risk, effective therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus will involve a multidimensional approach targeting a number of regulatory systems, not the least of which is the insulin-producing beta-cell. Impact statement The expanding

  10. Glucose-induced lipogenesis in pancreatic beta-cells is dependent on SREBP-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandberg, Maria B; Fridriksson, Jakob; Madsen, Lise

    2005-01-01

    High concentrations of glucose induce de novo fatty acid synthesis in pancreatic beta-cells and chronic exposure of elevated glucose and fatty acids synergize to induce accumulation of triglycerides, a phenomenon termed glucolipotoxicity. Here we investigate the role of sterol-regulatory element......, de novo fatty acid synthesis and lipid accumulation are induced primarily through sterol-regulatory elements (SREs) and not E-Boxes. Adenoviral expression of a dominant negative SREBP compromises glucose induction of some lipogenic genes and significantly reduces glucose-induction of de novo fatty...... acid synthesis. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that SREBP activity is necessary for full glucose induction of de novo fatty acid synthesis in pancreatic beta-cells....

  11. The Importance of REST for Development and Function of Beta Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, David; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2017-01-01

    that are crucial for both neuronal and pancreatic endocrine function, through the recruitment of multiple transcriptional and epigenetic co-regulators. REST targets include genes encoding transcription factors, proteins involved in exocytosis, synaptic transmission or ion channeling, and non-coding RNAs. REST......Beta cells are defined by the genes they express, many of which are specific to this cell type, and ensure a specific set of functions. Beta cells are also defined by a set of genes they should not express (in order to function properly), and these genes have been called forbidden genes. Among...... these, the transcriptional repressor RE-1 Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is expressed in most cells of the body, excluding most populations of neurons, as well as pancreatic beta and alpha cells. In the cell types where it is expressed, REST represses the expression of hundreds of genes...

  12. Iron phosphate nanoparticles for food fortification: Biological effects in rats and human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Moos, Lea M; Schneider, Mirjam; Hilty, Florentine M; Hilbe, Monika; Arnold, Myrtha; Ziegler, Nathalie; Mato, Diogo Sales; Winkler, Hans; Tarik, Mohamed; Ludwig, Christian; Naegeli, Hanspeter; Langhans, Wolfgang; Zimmermann, Michael B; Sturla, Shana J; Trantakis, Ioannis A

    2017-05-01

    Nanotechnology offers new opportunities for providing health benefits in foods. Food fortification with iron phosphate nanoparticles (FePO 4 NPs) is a promising new approach to reducing iron deficiency because FePO 4 NPs combine high bioavailability with superior sensory performance in difficult to fortify foods. However, their safety remains largely untested. We fed rats for 90 days diets containing FePO 4 NPs at doses at which iron sulfate (FeSO 4 ), a commonly used food fortificant, has been shown to induce adverse effects. Feeding did not result in signs of toxicity, including oxidative stress, organ damage, excess iron accumulation in organs or histological changes. These safety data were corroborated by evidence that NPs were taken up by human gastrointestinal cell lines without reducing cell viability or inducing oxidative stress. Our findings suggest FePO 4 NPs appear to be as safe for ingestion as FeSO 4 .

  13. Dual role of proapoptotic BAD in insulin secretion and beta cell survival

    OpenAIRE

    Danial, Nika N.; Walensky, Loren D.; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Choi, Cheol Soo; Fisher, Jill K.; Molina, Anthony J. A.; Datta, Sandeep Robert; Pitter, Kenneth L.; Bird, Gregory H.; Wikstrom, Jakob D.; Deeney, Jude T.; Robertson, Kirsten; Morash, Joel; Kulkarni, Ameya; Neschen, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    The proapoptotic BCL-2 family member BAD resides in a glucokinase-containing complex that regulates glucose-driven mitochondrial respiration. Here, we present genetic evidence of a physiologic role for BAD in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by beta cells. This novel function of BAD is specifically dependent upon the phosphorylation of its BH3 sequence, previously defined as an essential death domain. We highlight the pharmacologic relevance of phosphorylated BAD BH3 by using cell-permeab...

  14. Reference intervals for glucose, beta-cell polypeptides and counterregulatory factors during prolonged fasting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Wildner-Christensen, M; Eshøj, O

    2001-01-01

    To establish reference intervals for the pancreatic beta-cell response and the counterregulatory hormone response to prolonged fasting, we studied 33 healthy subjects (16 males, 17 females) during a 72-h fast. Glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and proinsulin levels decreased (P ... of counterregulatory factors increased during the fast [P fasting (P ... decreased from the second to third day of fasting (P = 0.03). Males had higher glucose and glucagon levels and lower FFA levels during the fast (P

  15. Exposure to cobalt causes transcriptomic and proteomic changes in two rat liver derived cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G Permenter

    Full Text Available Cobalt is a transition group metal present in trace amounts in the human diet, but in larger doses it can be acutely toxic or cause adverse health effects in chronic exposures. Its use in many industrial processes and alloys worldwide presents opportunities for occupational exposures, including military personnel. While the toxic effects of cobalt have been widely studied, the exact mechanisms of toxicity remain unclear. In order to further elucidate these mechanisms and identify potential biomarkers of exposure or effect, we exposed two rat liver-derived cell lines, H4-II-E-C3 and MH1C1, to two concentrations of cobalt chloride. We examined changes in gene expression using DNA microarrays in both cell lines and examined changes in cytoplasmic protein abundance in MH1C1 cells using mass spectrometry. We chose to closely examine differentially expressed genes and proteins changing in abundance in both cell lines in order to remove cell line specific effects. We identified enriched pathways, networks, and biological functions using commercial bioinformatic tools and manual annotation. Many of the genes, proteins, and pathways modulated by exposure to cobalt appear to be due to an induction of a hypoxic-like response and oxidative stress. Genes that may be differentially expressed due to a hypoxic-like response are involved in Hif-1α signaling, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and other energy metabolism related processes. Gene expression changes linked to oxidative stress are also known to be involved in the NRF2-mediated response, protein degradation, and glutathione production. Using microarray and mass spectrometry analysis, we were able to identify modulated genes and proteins, further elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity of cobalt, and identify biomarkers of exposure and effect in vitro, thus providing targets for focused in vivo studies.

  16. Characterization of a mutant rat kangaroo cell line with alterations in the cell cycle and DNA repair

    OpenAIRE

    Miyaji, E.N.; Johnson, R.T.; Downes, C.S.; Eveno, E.; Mezzina, M.; Sarasin, A.; Menck, C.F.M.

    2000-01-01

    Using a positive selection system for isolating DNA replication and repair related mutants, we isolated a clone from a rat kangaroo cell line (PtK2) that has increased sensitivity to UV light. Characterization of this clone indicated normal post-replication repair after UV irradiation, and normal removal rates of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproducts by excision repair. However, this cell line has decreased ability to make early incisions on damaged DNA, po...

  17. Calcium Co-regulates Oxidative Metabolism and ATP Synthase-dependent Respiration in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Umberto; Thevenet, Jonathan; Hermant, Aurelie; Dioum, Elhadji; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial energy metabolism is essential for glucose-induced calcium signaling and, therefore, insulin granule exocytosis in pancreatic beta cells. Calcium signals are sensed by mitochondria acting in concert with mitochondrial substrates for the full activation of the organelle. Here we have studied glucose-induced calcium signaling and energy metabolism in INS-1E insulinoma cells and human islet beta cells. In insulin secreting cells a surprisingly large fraction of total respiration under resting conditions is ATP synthase-independent. We observe that ATP synthase-dependent respiration is markedly increased after glucose stimulation. Glucose also causes a very rapid elevation of oxidative metabolism as was followed by NAD(P)H autofluorescence. However, neither the rate of the glucose-induced increase nor the new steady-state NAD(P)H levels are significantly affected by calcium. Our findings challenge the current view, which has focused mainly on calcium-sensitive dehydrogenases as the target for the activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. We propose a model of tight calcium-dependent regulation of oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in beta cell mitochondria. Coordinated activation of matrix dehydrogenases and respiratory chain activity by calcium allows the respiratory rate to change severalfold with only small or no alterations of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio. PMID:24554722

  18. Imatinib prevents beta cell death in vitro but does not improve islet transplantation outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Aileen J F; Griffiths, Lisa A; Persaud, Shanta J; Jones, Peter M; Howell, Simon L; Welsh, Nils

    2016-05-01

    Introduction Improving islet transplantation outcome could not only bring benefits to individual patients but also widen the patient pool to which this life-changing treatment is available. Imatinib has previously been shown to protect beta cells from apoptosis in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models. The aim of this study was to investigate whether imatinib could be used to improve islet transplantation outcome. Methods Islets were isolated from C57Bl/6 mice and pre-cultured with imatinib prior to exposure to streptozotocin and cytokines in vitro. Cell viability and glucose-induced insulin secretion were measured. For transplantation experiments, islets were pre-cultured with imatinib for either 72 h or 24 h prior to transplantation into streptozotocin-diabetic C57Bl/6 mice. In one experimental series mice were also administered imatinib after islet transplantation. Results Imatinib partially protected islets from beta cell death in vitro. However, pre-culturing islets in imatinib or administering the drug to the mice in the days following islet transplantation did not improve blood glucose concentrations more than control-cultured islets. Conclusion Although imatinib protected against beta cell death from cytokines and streptozotocin in vitro, it did not significantly improve syngeneic islet transplantation outcome.

  19. Arthritis by autoreactive T cell lines obtained from rats after injection of intestinal bacterial cell wall fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Klasen (Ina); J. Kool (Jeanette); M.J. Melief (Marie-José); I. Loeve (I.); W.B. van den Berg (Wim); A.J. Severijnen; M.P.H. Hazenberg (Maarten)

    1992-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ T cell lines (B13, B19) were isolated from the lymph nodes of Lewis rats 12 days after an arthritogenic injection of cell wall fragments of Eubacterium aerofaciens (ECW), a major resident of the human intestinal flora. These cell wall fragments consist of

  20. SIRT6-mediated transcriptional suppression of Txnip is critical for pancreatic beta cell function and survival in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Kunhua; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Zhao; Nipper, Michael; Zhu, Zhenxin; Leighton, Jake; Xu, Kexin; Musi, Nicolas; Wang, Pei

    2018-04-01

    Better understanding of how genetic and epigenetic components control beta cell differentiation and function is key to the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches to prevent beta cell dysfunction and failure in the progression of type 2 diabetes. Our goal was to elucidate the role of histone deacetylase sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) in beta cell development and homeostasis. Sirt6 endocrine progenitor cell conditional knockout and beta cell-specific knockout mice were generated using the Cre-loxP system. Mice were assayed for islet morphology, glucose tolerance, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and susceptibility to streptozotocin. Transcriptional regulatory functions of SIRT6 in primary islets were evaluated by RNA-Seq analysis. Reverse transcription-quantitative (RT-q)PCR and immunoblot were used to verify and investigate the gene expression changes. Chromatin occupancies of SIRT6, H3K9Ac, H3K56Ac and active RNA polymerase II were evaluated by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Deletion of Sirt6 in pancreatic endocrine progenitor cells did not affect endocrine morphology, beta cell mass or insulin production but did result in glucose intolerance and defective glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in mice. Conditional deletion of Sirt6 in adult beta cells reproduced the insulin secretion defect. Loss of Sirt6 resulted in aberrant upregulation of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) in beta cells. SIRT6 deficiency led to increased acetylation of histone H3 lysine residue at 9 (H3K9Ac), acetylation of histone H3 lysine residue at 56 (H3K56Ac) and active RNA polymerase II at the promoter region of Txnip. SIRT6-deficient beta cells exhibited a time-dependent increase in H3K9Ac, H3K56Ac and TXNIP levels. Finally, beta cell-specific SIRT6-deficient mice showed increased sensitivity to streptozotocin. Our results reveal that SIRT6 suppresses Txnip expression in beta cells via deacetylation of histone H3 and plays a critical role in maintaining beta cell function and viability

  1. CISH has no non-redundant functions in glucose homeostasis or beta cell proliferation during pregnancy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Rieck, Sebastian; Le Lay, John; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2013-11-01

    Increased beta cell proliferation during pregnancy is mediated by the Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (JAK2/STAT5) signalling pathway in response to increased lactogen levels. Activation of the pathway leads to transcriptional upregulation of Cish (encoding cytokine-inducible SH2 domain-containing protein), a member of the suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) family of genes, forming a negative-feedback loop. Here, we examined whether conditional gene ablation of Cish in the pancreas improves beta cell proliferation and beta cell function during pregnancy in mice. We derived mice with a novel, conditional loxP allele for Cish. Pancreas-specific ablation of Cish was achieved by crossing Cish (loxP/loxP) mice with Pdx1-Cre (Early) mice. Beta cell proliferation was quantified by BrdU labelling. Glucose homeostasis was examined with glucose tolerance tests and determination of plasma insulin levels. The expression of other Socs genes and target genes of p-STAT5 related to beta cell function and beta cell proliferation was determined by quantitative PCR. There was no difference in beta cell proliferation or glucose homeostasis between the Cish mutant group and the control group. The p-STAT5 protein level was the same in Cish mutant and control mice. Socs2 gene expression was higher in Cish mutant than control mice at pregnancy day 9.5. The expression of other Socs genes was the same between control and mutant mice. Our results show that CISH has no non-redundant functions in beta cell proliferation or glucose homeostasis during pregnancy in mice. Socs2 might compensate for the loss of Cish during pregnancy.

  2. Islet autoantibodies and residual beta cell function in type 1 diabetes children followed for 3-6 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Sand; Vaziri-Sani, Fariba; Maziarz, M

    2012-01-01

    To test if islet autoantibodies at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and after 3-6 years with T1D predict residual beta-cell function (RBF) after 3-6 years with T1D.......To test if islet autoantibodies at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and after 3-6 years with T1D predict residual beta-cell function (RBF) after 3-6 years with T1D....

  3. Chronic ethanol tolerance as a result of free-choice drinking in alcohol-preferring rats of the WHP line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyr, Wanda; Taracha, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    The development of tolerance to alcohol with chronic consumption is an important criterion for an animal model of alcoholism and may be an important component of the genetic predisposition to alcoholism. The aim of this study was to determine whether the selectively bred Warsaw High Preferring (WHP) line of alcohol-preferring rats would develop behavioral and metabolic tolerance during the free-choice drinking of ethanol. Chronic tolerance to ethanol-induced sedation was tested. The loss of righting reflex (LRR) paradigm was used to record sleep duration in WHP rats. Ethanol (EtOH)-naive WHP rats received a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 5.0 g ethanol/kg body weight (b.w.), and sleep duration was measured. Subsequently, rats had access to a 10% ethanol solution under a free-choice condition with water and food for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of the free-choice intake of ethanol, the rats received another single i.p. injection of 5.0 g ethanol/kg b.w., and sleep duration was reassessed. The blood alcohol content (BAC) for each rat was determined after an i.p. injection of 5 g/kg of ethanol in naive rats and again after chronic alcohol drinking at the time of recovery of the righting reflex (RR). The results showed that the mean ethanol intake was 9.14 g/kg/24 h, and both sleep duration and BAC were decreased after chronic ethanol intake. In conclusion, WHP rats exposed to alcohol by free-choice drinking across 12 weeks exhibited increased alcohol elimination rates. Studies have demonstrated that WHP rats after chronic free-choice drinking (12 weeks) of alcohol develop metabolic tolerance. Behavioral tolerance to ethanol was demonstrated by reduced sleep duration, but this decrease in sleep duration was not significant.

  4. Acquisition, Maintenance and Relapse-Like Alcohol Drinking: Lessons from the UChB Rat Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Yedy; Karahanian, Eduardo; Ezquer, Fernando; Morales, Paola; Ezquer, Marcelo; Rivera-Meza, Mario; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Quintanilla, María E.

    2017-01-01

    This review article addresses the biological factors that influence: (i) the acquisition of alcohol intake; (ii) the maintenance of chronic alcohol intake; and (iii) alcohol relapse-like drinking behavior in animals bred for their high-ethanol intake. Data from several rat strains/lines strongly suggest that catalase-mediated brain oxidation of ethanol into acetaldehyde is an absolute requirement (up 80%–95%) for rats to display ethanol’s reinforcing effects and to initiate chronic ethanol intake. Acetaldehyde binds non-enzymatically to dopamine forming salsolinol, a compound that is self-administered. In UChB rats, salsolinol: (a) generates marked sensitization to the motivational effects of ethanol; and (b) strongly promotes binge-like drinking. The specificity of salsolinol actions is shown by the finding that only the R-salsolinol enantiomer but not S-salsolinol accounted for the latter effects. Inhibition of brain acetaldehyde synthesis does not influence the maintenance of chronic ethanol intake. However, a prolonged ethanol withdrawal partly returns the requirement for acetaldehyde synthesis/levels both on chronic ethanol intake and on alcohol relapse-like drinking. Chronic ethanol intake, involving the action of lipopolysaccharide diffusing from the gut, and likely oxygen radical generated upon catechol/salsolinol oxidation, leads to oxidative stress and neuro-inflammation, known to potentiate each other. Data show that the administration of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) a strong antioxidant inhibits chronic ethanol maintenance by 60%–70%, without inhibiting its initial intake. Intra-cerebroventricular administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), known to release anti-inflammatory cytokines, to elevate superoxide dismutase levels and to reverse ethanol-induced hippocampal injury and cognitive deficits, also inhibited chronic ethanol maintenance; further, relapse-like ethanol drinking was inhibited up to 85% for 40 days following intracerebral stem cell

  5. Glucose acutely reduces cytosolic and mitochondrial H2O2 in rat pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deglasse, Jean-Philippe; Roma, Leticia Prates; Pastor-Flores, Daniel; Gilon, Patrick; Dick, Tobias P; Jonas, Jean-Christophe

    2018-05-14

    Whether H2O2 contributes to the glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion by pancreatic β-cells is highly controversial. We used two H2O2-sensitive probes, roGFP2-Orp1 and HyPer with its pH-control SypHer, to test the acute effects of glucose, monomethylsuccinate, leucine with glutamine, and α-ketoisocaproate, on β-cell cytosolic and mitochondrial H2O2 concentrations. We then tested the effects of low H2O2 and menadione concentrations on insulin secretion. RoGFP2-Orp1 was more sensitive than HyPer to H2O2 (response at 2-5 vs. 10µM) and less pH-sensitive. Under control conditions, stimulation with glucose reduced mitochondrial roGFP2-Orp1 oxidation without affecting cytosolic roGFP2-Orp1 and HyPer fluorescence ratios, except for the pH-dependent effects on HyPer. However, stimulation with glucose decreased the oxidation of both cytosolic probes by 15µM exogenous H2O2. The glucose effects were not affected by overexpression of catalase, mitochondrial catalase or superoxide dismutase 1 and 2. They followed the increase in NAD(P)H autofluorescence, were maximal at 5mM glucose in the cytosol and 10mM glucose in the mitochondria, and were partly mimicked by the other nutrients. Exogenous H2O2 (1-15µM) did not affect insulin secretion. By contrast, menadione (1-5µM) did not increase basal insulin secretion but reduced the stimulation of insulin secretion by 20mM glucose. Subcellular changes in β-cell H2O2 levels are better monitored with roGFP2-Orp1 than HyPer/SypHer. Nutrients acutely lower mitochondrial H2O2 levels in β-cells and promote degradation of exogenously supplied H2O2 in both cytosolic and mitochondrial compartments. The glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion occurs independently of a detectable increase in β-cell cytosolic or mitochondrial H2O2 levels.

  6. Lactate overrides central nervous but not beta-cell glucose sensing in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Sebastian M; Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Hallschmid, Manfred; Oltmanns, Kerstin M; Peters, Achim; Born, Jan; Schultes, Bernd

    2008-12-01

    Lactate has been shown to serve as an alternative energy substrate in the central nervous system and to interact with hypothalamic glucose sensors. On the background of marked similarities between central nervous and beta-cell glucose sensing, we examined whether lactate also interacts with pancreatic glucose-sensing mechanisms in vivo. The effects of intravenously infused lactate vs placebo (saline) on central nervous and pancreatic glucose sensing were assessed during euglycemic and hypoglycemic clamp experiments in 10 healthy men. The release of neuroendocrine counterregulatory hormones during hypoglycemia was considered to reflect central nervous glucose sensing, whereas endogenous insulin secretion as assessed by serum C-peptide levels served as an indicator of pancreatic beta-cell glucose sensing. Lactate infusion blunted the counterregulatory hormonal responses to hypoglycemia, in particular, the release of epinephrine (P = .007) and growth hormone (P = .004), so that higher glucose infusion rates (P = .012) were required to maintain the target blood glucose levels. In contrast, the decrease in C-peptide concentrations during the hypoglycemic clamp remained completely unaffected by lactate (P = .60). During euglycemic clamp conditions, lactate infusion did not affect the concentrations of C-peptide and of counterregulatory hormones, with the exception of norepinephrine levels that were lower during lactate than saline infusion (P = .049) independently of the glycemic condition. Data indicate that glucose sensing of beta-cells is specific to glucose, whereas glucose sensing at the central nervous level can be overridden by lactate, reflecting the brain's ability to rely on lactate as an alternative major energy source.

  7. Multilayer network representation of membrane potential and cytosolic calcium concentration dynamics in beta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosak, Marko; Dolenšek, Jurij; Markovič, Rene; Slak Rupnik, Marjan; Marhl, Marko; Stožer, Andraž

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Physiological processes within and among pancreatic beta cells are very complex. • We analyze the simultaneous recordings of membrane potential and calcium dynamics. • We represent the interaction patterns among beta cells as a multilayer network. • The nature of the intracellular dynamics is found to rely on the network structure. - Abstract: Modern theory of networks has been recognized as a very successful methodological concept for the description and analysis of complex systems. However, some complex systems are more complex than others. For instance, several real-life systems are constituted by interdependent subsystems and their elements are subjected to different types of interactions that can also change with time. Recently, the multilayer network formalism has been proposed as a general theoretical framework for the description and analysis of such multi-dimensional complex systems and is acquiring more and more prominence in terms of a new research direction. In the present study, we use this methodology for the description of functional connectivity patterns and signal propagation between pancreatic beta cells in an islet of Langerhans at the levels of membrane potential (MP) and cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca"2"+]_c) dynamics to study the extent of overlap in the two networks and to clarify whether time lags between the two signals in individual cells are in any way dependent on the role these cells play in the functional networks. The two corresponding network layers are constructed on the basis of signal directions and pairwise correlations, whereas the interlayer connections represent the time lag between both measured signals. Our results confirm our previous finding that both MP and [Ca"2"+]_c change spread across an islet in the form of a depolarization and a [Ca"2"+]_c wave, respectively. Both types of waves follow nearly the same path and the networks in both layers have a similar but not entirely the same structure

  8. Antioxidant and regulatory role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP2 in pancreatic beta-cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Petr; Olejár, Tomáš; Smolková, Katarína; Ježek, Jan; Dlasková, Andrea; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Zelenka, Jaroslav; Špaček, Tomáš; Engstová, Hana; Reguera Pajuelo, David; Jabůrek, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, Suppl.1 (2014), S73-S91 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/12/1247; GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/10/P204; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondria * uncoupling protein UCP2 * pancreatic beta-cells * reactive oxygen species * glucose-stimulated insulin secretion Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  9. Use of digitonin permeabilization for characterization of calcium incorporated into. beta. cells in response to glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesslen, N [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1985-01-01

    ..beta.. cell-rich pancreatic islets were used to characterize /sup 45/Ca uptake into pools with different sensitivities to permeabilization with digitonin. The plasma and secretory granule membranes were among the membranes most sensitive to digitonin treatment whereas the mitochondria were more resistant. Most of the /sup 45/Ca incorporated in response to glucose was found in a fraction released after exposure to a high concentration of digitonin. The results suggest that glucose promotes active sequestration of calcium in mitochondria and that the uptake of /sup 45/Ca in the secretory granules in secondary to a raised cytosolic Ca/sup 2 +/ activity.

  10. LINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minas Bakalchev

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The perception of elements in a system often creates their interdependence, interconditionality, and suppression. The lines from a basic geometrical element have become the model of a reductive world based on isolation according to certain criteria such as function, structure, and social organization. Their traces are experienced in the contemporary world as fragments or ruins of a system of domination of an assumed hierarchical unity. How can one release oneself from such dependence or determinism? How can the lines become less “systematic” and forms more autonomous, and less reductive? How is a form released from modernistic determinism on the new controversial ground? How can these elements or forms of representation become forms of action in the present complex world? In this paper, the meaning of lines through the ideas of Le Corbusier, Leonidov, Picasso, and Hitchcock is presented. Spatial research was made through a series of examples arising from the projects of the architectural studio “Residential Transformations”, which was a backbone for mapping the possibilities ranging from playfulness to exactness, as tactics of transformation in the different contexts of the contemporary world.

  11. Identification of a growth hormone-responsive STAT5-binding element in the rat insulin 1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galsgaard, E D; Gouilleux, F; Groner, B

    1996-01-01

    promoter activity 2-fold, and this stimulation was abolished by introduction of a block mutation in a gamma-interferon-activated sequence (GAS)-like element (GLE) with the sequence 5'-TTCTGGGAA-3' located in the rat insulin 1 enhancer at position -330 to -322. This element, termed Ins-GLE, was able...... transfected with STAT5 and GH receptor cDNAs, it was found that expression of STAT5 was necessary for GH induction of these two DNA-binding complexes. These results suggest that GH stimulates insulin 1 promoter activity by inducing the binding of STAT5 to Ins-GLE.......GH and PRL stimulate both proliferation and insulin production in pancreatic beta-cells as well as in the rat insulinoma cell line RIN-5AH, We report here that human GH increases insulin mRNA levels in RIN-5AH cells via both somatogenic and lactogenic receptors. GH stimulated the rat insulin 1...

  12. Effects of currently used pesticides in the AhR-CALUX assay: comparison between the human TV101L and the rat H4IIE cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, M.; Laier, Peter; Vinggaard, Anne

    2003-01-01

    TV101L hepatoma cell lines. In comparison the results indicated that the rat H4IIE cell line is more sensitive than the human TV101L for detection of TCDD inducing AhR-CALUX activity. The pesticides iprodione, chlorpyrifos and prochloraz showed dose-dependent AhR agonistic effects in both cell lines...

  13. The time has come to test the beta cell preserving effects of exercise in patients with new onset type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narendran, Parth; Solomon, Thomas; Kennedy, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is characterised by immune-mediated destruction of insulin-producing beta cells. Significant beta cell function is usually present at the time of diagnosis with type 1 diabetes, and preservation of this function has important clinical benefits. The last 30 years have seen a number...... for physical exercise as a therapy for the preservation of beta cell function in patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. We highlight possible mechanisms by which exercise could preserve beta cell function and then present evidence from other models of diabetes that demonstrate that exercise preserves...... beta cell function. We conclude by proposing that there is now a need for studies to explore whether exercise can preserve beta cell in patients newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes....

  14. Involvement of interleukin 1 and interleukin 1 antagonist in pancreatic beta-cell destruction in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup-Poulsen, T; Zumsteg, U; Reimers, J

    1993-01-01

    In this review we propose that the balance between the action of interleukin 1 (IL-1) and its natural antagonist IL-1ra on the level of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cell may play a decisive role in the pathogenesis of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). We argue that IL-1...... potentiated by other cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha, interferon gamma) is an important effector molecule involved in both early and late events in the immune-mediated process that leads to beta-cell destruction and IDDM. We also point out that surprisingly high molar excesses of IL-1ra over IL-1...... are necessary to block the action of IL-1 on islet beta-cells compared to islet alpha-cells in vitro and in animals. We suggest that the selectivity of beta-cell destruction in IDDM may be conferred on several levels: (1) homing of beta-cell antigen specific T cells, (2) targeted delivery of cytokines...

  15. T Cell-Mediated Beta Cell Destruction: Autoimmunity and Alloimmunity in the Context of Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L. Burrack

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D results from destruction of pancreatic beta cells by T cells of the immune system. Despite improvements in insulin analogs and continuous blood glucose level monitoring, there is no cure for T1D, and some individuals develop life-threatening complications. Pancreas and islet transplantation have been attractive therapeutic approaches; however, transplants containing insulin-producing cells are vulnerable to both recurrent autoimmunity and conventional allograft rejection. Current immune suppression treatments subdue the immune system, but not without complications. Ideally a successful approach would target only the destructive immune cells and leave the remaining immune system intact to fight foreign pathogens. This review discusses the autoimmune diabetes disease process, diabetic complications that warrant a transplant, and alloimmunity. First, we describe the current understanding of autoimmune destruction of beta cells including the roles of CD4 and CD8 T cells and several possibilities for antigen-specific tolerance induction. Second, we outline diabetic complications necessitating beta cell replacement. Third, we discuss transplant recognition, potential sources for beta cell replacement, and tolerance-promoting therapies under development. We hypothesize that a better understanding of autoreactive T cell targets during disease pathogenesis and alloimmunity following transplant destruction could enhance attempts to re-establish tolerance to beta cells.

  16. Analysis of the effect of diabetes type 2 duration on beta cell secretory function and insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Ljiljana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes type 2 is a chronic metabolic disorder. Pathogenesis of diabetes type 2 results from the impaired insulin secretion, impaired insulin action and increased endogenous glucose production. Diabetes evolves through several phases characterized by qualitative and quantitative changes of beta cell secretory function. The aim of our study was to analyze the impact of diabetes duration on beta cell secretory function and insulin resistance. The results indicated significant negative correlation of diabetes duration and fasting insulinemia, as well as beta cell secretory function assessed by HOMA β index. Our study also found significant negative correlation of diabetes duration and insulin resistance assessed by HOMA IR index. Significant positive correlation was established between beta cell secretory capacity (fasting insulinemia and HOMA β and insulin resistance assessed by HOMA IR index, independently of diabetes duration. These results indicate that: beta cell secretory capacity, assessed by HOMA β index, significantly decreases with diabetes duration. In parallel with decrease of fasting insulinemia, reduction of insulin resistance assessed by HOMA IR index was found as well.

  17. LGR5 and Nanog identify stem cell signature of pancreas beta cells which initiate pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsterdam, Abraham; Raanan, Calanit; Schreiber, Letizia; Polin, Nava; Givol, David

    2013-04-05

    Pancreas cancer, is the fourth leading cause of cancer death but its cell of origin is controversial. We compared the localization of stem cells in normal and cancerous pancreas using antibodies to the stem cell markers Nanog and LGR5. Here we show, for the first time, that LGR5 is expressed in normal pancreas, exclusively in the islets of Langerhans and it is co-localized, surprisingly, with Nanog and insulin in clusters of beta cells. In cancerous pancreas Nanog and LGR5 are expressed in the remaining islets and in all ductal cancer cells. We observed insulin staining among the ductal cancer cells, but not in metastases. This indicates that the islet's beta cells, expressing LGR5 and Nanog markers are the initiating cells of pancreas cancer, which migrated from the islets to form the ductal cancerous tissue, probably after mutation and de-differentiation. This discovery may facilitate treatment of this devastating cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Cortijo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Planar cell polarity (PCP refers to the collective orientation of cells within the epithelial plane. We show that progenitor cells forming the ducts of the embryonic pancreas express PCP proteins and exhibit an active PCP pathway. Planar polarity proteins are acquired at embryonic day 11.5 synchronously to apicobasal polarization of pancreas progenitors. Loss of function of the two PCP core components Celsr2 and Celsr3 shows that they control the differentiation of endocrine cells from polarized progenitors, with a prevalent effect on insulin-producing beta cells. This results in a decreased glucose clearance. Loss of Celsr2 and 3 leads to a reduction of Jun phosphorylation in progenitors, which, in turn, reduces beta cell differentiation from endocrine progenitors. These results highlight the importance of the PCP pathway in cell differentiation in vertebrates. In addition, they reveal that tridimensional organization and collective communication of cells are needed in the pancreatic epithelium in order to generate appropriate numbers of endocrine cells.

  19. Effect on pancreatic beta cells and nerve cells by low let x-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwang Hun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungbuk National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kgu Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Daegu health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Cultured pancreatic beta cells and nerve cells, it is given normal condition of 10% FBS (fetal bovine serum), 11.1 mM glucose and hyperglycemia condition of 1% FBS, 30 mM glucose. For low LET X-ray irradiated with 0.5 Gy/hr dose-rate(total dose: 0.5 to 5 Gy). Survival rates were measured by MTT assay. When non irradiated, differentiated in the pancreatic beta cells experiment is hyperglycemia conditions survival rate compared to normal conditions survival rate seemed a small reduction. However increasing the total dose of X-ray, the survival rate of normal conditions decreased slightly compared to the survival rate of hyperglycemia conditions, the synergistic effect was drastically reduced. When non irradiated, undifferentiated in the nerve cells experiment is hyperglycemia conditions survival rate compared to normal conditions survival rate seemed a large reduction. As the cumulative dose of X-ray normal conditions and hyperglycemia were all relatively rapid cell death. But the rate of decreased survivals by almost parallel to the reduction proceed and it didn't show synergistic effect.

  20. The Role of Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity in Insulin Sensitivity, Beta Cell Function, and Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lou Rose Malamug

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection, for example, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, has been thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Our aim was to determine the role of H. pylori infection in glucose metabolism in an American cohort. We examined data from 4,136 non-Hispanic white (NHW, non-Hispanic black (NHB, and Mexican Americans (MA aged 18 and over from the NHANES 1999-2000 cohort. We calculated the odds ratios for states of glucose tolerance based on the H. pylori status. We calculated and compared homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and beta cell function (HOMA-B in subjects without diabetes based on the H. pylori status. The results were adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI, poverty index, education, alcohol consumption, tobacco use, and physical activity. The H. pylori status was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance. After adjustment for age and BMI and also adjustment for all covariates, no difference was found in either HOMA-IR or HOMA-B in all ethnic and gender groups except for a marginally significant difference in HOMA-IR in NHB females. H. pylori infection was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance, nor plays a major role in insulin resistance or beta cell dysfunction.

  1. Effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation depend on treatment dose, treatment duration and meal contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Masayuki; Ebato, Chie; Mita, Tomoya; Hirose, Takahisa; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Fujitani, Yoshio; Watada, Hirotaka

    2009-01-01

    Beta-cell proliferation is regulated by various metabolic demands including peripheral insulin resistance, obesity, and hyperglycemia. In addition to enhancement of glucose-induced insulin secretion, agonists for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) stimulate proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of beta-cells, thereby probably preserve beta-cell mass. To evaluate the beta-cell preserving actions of GLP-1R agonists, we assessed the acute and chronic effects of exendin-4 on beta-cell proliferation, mass and glucose tolerance in C57BL/6J mice under various conditions. Short-term administration of high-dose exendin-4 transiently stimulated beta-cell proliferation. Comparative transcriptomic analysis showed upregulation of IGF-1 receptor and its downstream effectors in islets. Treatment of mice with exendin-4 daily for 4 weeks (long-term administration) and feeding high-fat diet resulted in significant inhibition of weight gain and improvement of glucose tolerance with reduced insulin secretion and beta-cell mass. These findings suggest that long-term GLP-1 treatment results in insulin sensitization of peripheral organs, rather than enhancement of beta-cell proliferation and function, particularly when animals are fed high-fat diet. Thus, the effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation largely depend on treatment dose, duration of treatment and meal contents. While GLP-1 enhances proliferation of beta-cells in some diabetic mice models, our results suggest that GLP-1 stimulates beta-cell growth only when expansion of beta-cell mass is required to meet metabolic demands.

  2. Effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation depend on treatment dose, treatment duration and meal contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Masayuki; Ebato, Chie; Mita, Tomoya [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Hirose, Takahisa [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kawamori, Ryuzo [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Beta Cell Biology and Regeneration, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sportology Center, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Fujitani, Yoshio, E-mail: fujitani@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Watada, Hirotaka, E-mail: hwatada@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sportology Center, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-12-18

    Beta-cell proliferation is regulated by various metabolic demands including peripheral insulin resistance, obesity, and hyperglycemia. In addition to enhancement of glucose-induced insulin secretion, agonists for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) stimulate proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of beta-cells, thereby probably preserve beta-cell mass. To evaluate the beta-cell preserving actions of GLP-1R agonists, we assessed the acute and chronic effects of exendin-4 on beta-cell proliferation, mass and glucose tolerance in C57BL/6J mice under various conditions. Short-term administration of high-dose exendin-4 transiently stimulated beta-cell proliferation. Comparative transcriptomic analysis showed upregulation of IGF-1 receptor and its downstream effectors in islets. Treatment of mice with exendin-4 daily for 4 weeks (long-term administration) and feeding high-fat diet resulted in significant inhibition of weight gain and improvement of glucose tolerance with reduced insulin secretion and beta-cell mass. These findings suggest that long-term GLP-1 treatment results in insulin sensitization of peripheral organs, rather than enhancement of beta-cell proliferation and function, particularly when animals are fed high-fat diet. Thus, the effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation largely depend on treatment dose, duration of treatment and meal contents. While GLP-1 enhances proliferation of beta-cells in some diabetic mice models, our results suggest that GLP-1 stimulates beta-cell growth only when expansion of beta-cell mass is required to meet metabolic demands.

  3. The zinc transporter ZNT3 co-localizes with insulin in INS-1E pancreatic beta cells and influences cell survival, insulin secretion capacity, and ZNT8 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smidt, Kamille; Larsen, Agnete; Brønden, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Zinc trafficking in pancreatic beta cells is tightly regulated by zinc transporting (ZNTs) proteins. The role of different ZNTs in the beta cells is currently being clarified. ZNT8 transports zinc into insulin granules and is critical for a correct insulin crystallization and storage in the granu......Zinc trafficking in pancreatic beta cells is tightly regulated by zinc transporting (ZNTs) proteins. The role of different ZNTs in the beta cells is currently being clarified. ZNT8 transports zinc into insulin granules and is critical for a correct insulin crystallization and storage...

  4. The ectopic expression of Pax4 in the mouse pancreas converts progenitor cells into alpha and subsequently beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collombat, Patrick; Xu, Xiaobo; Ravassard, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported that the loss of Arx and/or Pax4 gene activity leads to a shift in the fate of the different endocrine cell subtypes in the mouse pancreas, without affecting the total endocrine cell numbers. Here, we conditionally and ectopically express Pax4 using different cell......-specific promoters and demonstrate that Pax4 forces endocrine precursor cells, as well as mature alpha cells, to adopt a beta cell destiny. This results in a glucagon deficiency that provokes a compensatory and continuous glucagon+ cell neogenesis requiring the re-expression of the proendocrine gene Ngn3. However......, the newly formed alpha cells fail to correct the hypoglucagonemia since they subsequently acquire a beta cell phenotype upon Pax4 ectopic expression. Notably, this cycle of neogenesis and redifferentiation caused by ectopic expression of Pax4 in alpha cells is capable of restoring a functional beta cell...

  5. The long-acting GLP-1 derivative NN2211 ameliorates glycemia and increases beta-cell mass in diabetic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolin, Bidda; Larsen, Marianne O; Gotfredsen, Carsten F

    2002-01-01

    in food intake, there were no significant differences between NN2211 and vehicle treatment, and body weight was not affected. Histological examination revealed that beta-cell proliferation and mass were not increased significantly in ob/ob mice with NN2211, although there was a strong tendency...... for increased proliferation. In db/db mice, exendin-4 and NN2211 decreased blood glucose compared with vehicle, but NN2211 had a longer duration of action. Food intake was lowered only on day 1 with both compounds, and body weight was unaffected. beta-Cell proliferation rate and mass were significantly...

  6. Pancreatic Transdifferentiation and Glucose-Regulated Production of Human Insulin in the H4IIE Rat Liver Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binhai Ren

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the limitations of current treatment regimes, gene therapy is a promising strategy being explored to correct blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In the current study, we used a retroviral vector to deliver either the human insulin gene alone, the rat NeuroD1 gene alone, or the human insulin gene and rat NeuroD1 genes together, to the rat liver cell line, H4IIE, to determine if storage of insulin and pancreatic transdifferentiation occurred. Stable clones were selected and expanded into cell lines: H4IIEins (insulin gene alone, H4IIE/ND (NeuroD1 gene alone, and H4IIEins/ND (insulin and NeuroD1 genes. The H4IIEins cells did not store insulin; however, H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells stored 65.5 ± 5.6 and 1475.4 ± 171.8 pmol/insulin/5 × 106 cells, respectively. Additionally, several β cell transcription factors and pancreatic hormones were expressed in both H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells. Electron microscopy revealed insulin storage vesicles in the H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cell lines. Regulated secretion of insulin to glucose (0–20 mmol/L was seen in the H4IIEins/ND cell line. The H4IIEins/ND cells were transplanted into diabetic immunoincompetent mice, resulting in normalization of blood glucose. This data shows that the expression of NeuroD1 and insulin in liver cells may be a useful strategy for inducing islet neogenesis and reversing diabetes.

  7. Study of beta-cell function (by HOMA model) in metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, M K; Dutta, M K; Mahalle, Namita

    2011-07-01

    The clustering of cardiovascular risk factors is termed the metabolic syndrome (MS), which strongly predict risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Many studies implicate insulin resistance (IR) in the development of diabetes, but ignore the contribution of beta-cell dysfunction. Hence, we studied beta-cell function, as assessed by HOMA model, in subjects with MS. We studied 50 subjects with MS diagnosed by IDF criteria and 24 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Clinical evaluation included anthropometry, body fat analysis by bioimpedance, biochemical, and insulin measurement. IR and secretion were calculated by HOMA model. Subjects with MS had more IR (HOMA-IR) than controls (3.35 ± 3.14 vs. 1.76 ± 0.53, P = 0.029) and secreted less insulin (HOMA-S) than controls (66.80 ± 69.66 vs. 144.27 ± 101.61, P = 0.0003), although plasma insulin levels were comparable in both groups (10.7 ± 10.2 vs. 8.2 ± 2.38, P = 0.44). HOMA-IR and HOMA-S were related with number of metabolic abnormalities. HOMA-IR was positively associated with body mass index, waist hip ratio, body fat mass, and percent body fat. HOMA-S was negatively associated with waist hip ratio, fasting plasma glucose and total cholesterol and positively with basal metabolic rate. Percent body fat was an independent predictor of HOMA-IR and waist hip ratio of HOMA-S in multiple regression analysis. Subjects with MS have increased IR and decreased insulin secretion compared with healthy controls. Lifestyle measures have been shown to improve IR, insulin secretion, and various components and effects of MS. Hence, there is an urgent need for public health measures to prevent ongoing epidemic of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  8. The species origin of the cellular microenvironment influences markers of beta cell fate and function in EndoC-βH1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, N; Richardson, S; Beall, C; Harries, L W

    2017-12-15

    Interaction between islet cell subtypes and the extracellular matrix influences beta-cell function in mammals. The tissue architecture of rodent islets is very different to that of human islets; cell-to-cell communication and interaction with the extracellular matrix may vary between species. In this work, we have compared the responses of the human EndoC-βH1 cell line to non-human and human-derived growth matrices in terms of growth morphology, gene expression and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). EndoC-βH1 cells demonstrated a greater tendency to form cell clusters when cultured in a human microenvironment and exhibited reduced alpha cell markers at the mRNA level; mean expression difference - 0.23 and - 0.51; p = 0.009 and 0.002 for the Aristaless-related homeobox (ARX) and Glucagon (GCG) genes respectively. No differences were noted in the protein expression of mature beta cell markers such as Pdx1 and NeuroD1 were noted in EndoC-βH1 cells grown in a human microenvironment but cells were however more sensitive to glucose (4.3-fold increase in insulin secretion following glucose challenge compared with a 1.9-fold increase in cells grown in a non-human microenvironment; p = 0.0003). Our data suggests that the tissue origin of the cellular microenvironment has effects on the function of EndoC-βH1 cells in vitro, and the use of a more human-like culture microenvironment may bring benefits in terms of increased physiological relevance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Reparative regeneration of rat skin under influence of hollow cathode lamp (HCL) with manganese and copper line spectrum emission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nikova, V I; Izvol'skaia, M S; Voronova, S N; Sharipova, M M; Rukin, E M; Zakharova, L A

    2010-01-01

    Influence of local light exposure by hollow cathode lamp with typical manganese and copper (HCL-Mn, Cu) line emission spectrum on posttraumatic regeneration rate of rat skin has been investigated. We performed the comparative analysis of the morphology and the differentiation ability of rat skin on the 15th and 24th days after full-thickness skin wound had been inflicted on rat dorsums. On the 15th day after injury, the experimental group (daily 30 s exposure for two weeks) showed scab loss, re-epithelialization, and hair regrowth, in contrast to the control rats, where scabs were still observed on the 24th day. Histological analysis revealed that in contrast to the control group the treatment with HCL-Mn, Cu resulted in the increased number of hair follicles and sebaceous glands, the decreased number of blood vessels and horizontal orientation of collagen fibers. The immunohistochemistry for OX-62 revealed that the number of dermal dendritic cells in the experimental groups was maximal on the 15th day, and then decreased to the 24th day after injury. The number of dermal dendritic cells was significantly lower in the control group. The immunohistochemistry for pan-keratins in the control animals revealed a high number of cells expressing different types of keratins, distributed in the main part of the epidermis on the 15th day after surgery, whereas in the experimental group the number of such cells was significantly lower and the cells were concentrated more close to the external part of the epidermis. The number of cells stained for keratin 19 was higher in the experimental group on the 15th day after surgery, whereas this number decreased in this group on the 24th day after surgery as compared to the control group. Thus, typical manganese and copper line spectrum emission emitted by hollow cathode lamp stimulates innate immunity, accelerates restoration of derma, skin epithelium and other skin derivates, and stimulates wound healing in general.

  10. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 inhibits insulin secretion from rodent beta cells through regulation of calbindin1 expression and reduced voltage-dependent calcium currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gitte L.; Jacobsen, Maria L. B.; Wendt, Anna

    2015-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Type 2 diabetes is characterised by progressive loss of pancreatic beta cell mass and function. Therefore, it is of therapeutic interest to identify factors with the potential to improve beta cell proliferation and insulin secretion. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) expression...

  11. Beta-cell function, incretin effect, and incretin hormones in obese youth along the span of glucose tolerance from normal to prediabetes to Type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using the hyperglycemic and euglycemic clamp, we demonstrated impaired Beta-cell function in obese youth with increasing dysglycemia. Herein we describe oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-modeled Beta-cell function and incretin effect in obese adolescents spanning the range of glucose tolerance. Bet...

  12. High normal fasting glucose level in obese youth: a marker for insulin resistance and beta cell dysregulation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Malley, G

    2010-06-01

    A high but normal fasting plasma glucose level in adults is a risk factor for future development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether normal fasting plasma glucose levels (<5.60 mmol\\/l) are associated with decreases in insulin sensitivity and beta cell function, as well as an adverse cardiovascular profile in obese youth.

  13. Pathway decision-making strategies for generating pancreatic beta-cells: systems biology or hit and miss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jan

    2007-08-01

    Method selection strategies to achieve beta-cell differentiation from human embryonic stem cells are reviewed. Expectations are high for an embryonic stem cell derived cellular replacement method to cure diabetes, and recent observations indicate that mature beta-cells can be derived from human embryonic stem cells. In terms of the translational setting, however, we are not there yet; conversion of embryonic stem cells to fully mature beta-cells is not effective and does not provide an exclusive beta-cell population as the end-product. Studies emphasize that expecting development of a 'magic media bullet' that promotes endocrine fate is rather optimistic; consecutive administration of signaling inducers, carefully provided to mimic normal development, is more likely to succeed. To accomplish this task we need better understanding of the extracellular signaling pathways that drive progressive endodermal fate choices throughout development. Knowledge of cell-intrinsic control of fate assignments in pancreas is growing rapidly. Nevertheless, insufficient information regarding morphogen codes that operate in endoderm and pancreas is hindering development of better, directed differentiation schema of uncommitted embryonic stem cells toward endodermal, pancreatic, and subsequent endocrine specific fates. A systematic approach to defining morphogen codes in developing endoderm and pancreas appears timely and justified.

  14. The ectopic expression of Pax4 in the mouse pancreas converts progenitor cells into alpha and subsequently beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collombat, Patrick; Xu, Xiaobo; Ravassard, Philippe; Sosa-Pineda, Beatriz; Dussaud, Sébastien; Billestrup, Nils; Madsen, Ole D; Serup, Palle; Heimberg, Harry; Mansouri, Ahmed

    2009-08-07

    We have previously reported that the loss of Arx and/or Pax4 gene activity leads to a shift in the fate of the different endocrine cell subtypes in the mouse pancreas, without affecting the total endocrine cell numbers. Here, we conditionally and ectopically express Pax4 using different cell-specific promoters and demonstrate that Pax4 forces endocrine precursor cells, as well as mature alpha cells, to adopt a beta cell destiny. This results in a glucagon deficiency that provokes a compensatory and continuous glucagon+ cell neogenesis requiring the re-expression of the proendocrine gene Ngn3. However, the newly formed alpha cells fail to correct the hypoglucagonemia since they subsequently acquire a beta cell phenotype upon Pax4 ectopic expression. Notably, this cycle of neogenesis and redifferentiation caused by ectopic expression of Pax4 in alpha cells is capable of restoring a functional beta cell mass and curing diabetes in animals that have been chemically depleted of beta cells.

  15. Characterization of membrane-shed micro-vesicles from cytokine-stimulated beta-cells using proteomics strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmisano, Giuseppe; Jensen, Soren Skov; Le Bihan, Marie Catherine

    2012-01-01

    specific sites of protein phosphorylation and sialylated glycosylation in proteins associated with micro-vesicles from beta-cells. Using pathway analysis software we were able to map the most distinctive changes between micro-vesicles generated during growth and after cytokine stimulation to several cell...

  16. Pancreatic beta cell function increases in a linear dose-response manner following exercise training in adults with prediabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malin, Steven K; Solomon, Thomas; Blaszczak, Alecia

    2013-01-01

    While some studies suggest that a linear dose-response relationship exists between exercise and insulin sensitivity, the exercise dose required to enhance pancreatic beta-cell function is unknown. Thirty-five older, obese adults with prediabetes underwent a progressive 12-week supervised exercise...

  17. Inter-domain tagging implicates caveolin-1 in insulin receptor trafficking and Erk signaling bias in pancreatic beta-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Boothe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The role and mechanisms of insulin receptor internalization remain incompletely understood. Previous trafficking studies of insulin receptors involved fluorescent protein tagging at their termini, manipulations that may be expected to result in dysfunctional receptors. Our objective was to determine the trafficking route and molecular mechanisms of functional tagged insulin receptors and endogenous insulin receptors in pancreatic beta-cells. Methods: We generated functional insulin receptors tagged with pH-resistant fluorescent proteins between domains. Confocal, TIRF and STED imaging revealed a trafficking pattern of inter-domain tagged insulin receptors and endogenous insulin receptors detected with antibodies. Results: Surprisingly, interdomain-tagged and endogenous insulin receptors in beta-cells bypassed classical Rab5a- or Rab7-mediated endocytic routes. Instead, we found that removal of insulin receptors from the plasma membrane involved tyrosine-phosphorylated caveolin-1, prior to trafficking within flotillin-1-positive structures to lysosomes. Multiple methods of inhibiting caveolin-1 significantly reduced Erk activation in vitro or in vivo, while leaving Akt signaling mostly intact. Conclusions: We conclude that phosphorylated caveolin-1 plays a role in insulin receptor internalization towards lysosomes through flotillin-1-positive structures and that caveolin-1 helps bias physiological beta-cell insulin signaling towards Erk activation. Author Video: Author Video Watch what authors say about their articles Keywords: Insulin receptor internalization, Insulin resistance, Pancreatic islet beta-cells, Autocrine insulin signaling

  18. Alkali pH directly activates ATP-sensitive K+ channels and inhibits insulin secretion in beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning Fox, Jocelyn E; Karaman, Gunce; Wheeler, Michael B

    2006-11-17

    Glucose stimulation of pancreatic beta-cells is reported to lead to sustained alkalization, while extracellular application of weak bases is reported to inhibit electrical activity and decrease insulin secretion. We hypothesize that beta-cell K(ATP) channel activity is modulated by alkaline pH. Using the excised patch-clamp technique, we demonstrate a direct stimulatory action of alkali pH on recombinant SUR1/Kir6.2 channels due to increased open probability. Bath application of alkali pH similarly activates native islet beta-cell K(ATP) channels, leading to an inhibition of action potentials, and hyperpolarization of membrane potential. In situ pancreatic perfusion confirms that these cellular effects of alkali pH are observable at a functional level, resulting in decreases in both phase 1 and phase 2 glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Our data are the first to report a stimulatory effect of a range of alkali pH on K(ATP) channel activity and link this to downstream effects on islet beta-cell function.

  19. Do immunotherapy and beta cell replacement play a synergistic role in the treatment of type 1 diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-Sheng; Warnock, Garth L; Tu, Han-Jun; Ao, Ziliang; He, Zehua; Lu, Hong; Dai, Long-Jun

    2009-10-07

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the result of the autoimmune response against pancreatic insulin-producing ss-cells. Its ultimate consequence is beta-cell insufficiency-mediated dysregulation of blood glucose control. In terms of T1D treatment, immunotherapy addresses the cause of T1D, mainly through re-setting the balance between autoimmunity and regulatory mechanisms. Regulatory T cells play an important role in this immune intervention. An alternative T1D treatment is beta-cell replacement, which can reverse the consequence of the disease by replacing destroyed beta-cells in the diabetic pancreas. The applicable insulin-producing cells can be directly obtained from islet transplantation or generated from other cell sources such as autologous adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. In this review, we summarize the recent research progress and analyze the possible advantages and disadvantages of these two therapeutic options especially focusing on the potential synergistic effect on T1D treatment. Exploring the optimal combination of immunotherapy and beta-cell replacement will pave the way to the most effective cure for this devastating disease.

  20. Rising Intracellular Zinc by Membrane Depolarization and Glucose in Insulin-Secreting Clonal HIT-T15 Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira G. Slepchenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn2+ appears to be intimately involved in insulin metabolism since insulin secretion is correlated with zinc secretion in response to glucose stimulation, but little is known about the regulation of zinc homeostasis in pancreatic beta-cells. This study set out to identify the intracellular zinc transient by imaging free cytosolic zinc in HIT-T15 beta-cells with fluorescent zinc indicators. We observed that membrane depolarization by KCl (30–60 mM was able to induce a rapid increase in cytosolic concentration of zinc. Multiple zinc transients of similar magnitude were elicited during repeated stimulations. The amplitude of zinc responses was not affected by the removal of extracellular calcium or zinc. However, the half-time of the rising slope was significantly slower after removing extracellular zinc with zinc chelator CaEDTA, suggesting that extracellular zinc affect the initial rising phase of zinc response. Glucose (10 mM induced substantial and progressive increases in intracellular zinc concentration in a similar way as KCl, with variation in the onset and the duration of zinc mobilization. It is known that the depolarization of beta-cell membrane is coupled with the secretion of insulin. Rising intracellular zinc concentration may act as a critical signaling factor in insulin metabolism of pancreatic beta-cells.

  1. Rising intracellular zinc by membrane depolarization and glucose in insulin-secreting clonal HIT-T15 beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepchenko, Kira G; Li, Yang V

    2012-01-01

    Zinc (Zn(2+)) appears to be intimately involved in insulin metabolism since insulin secretion is correlated with zinc secretion in response to glucose stimulation, but little is known about the regulation of zinc homeostasis in pancreatic beta-cells. This study set out to identify the intracellular zinc transient by imaging free cytosolic zinc in HIT-T15 beta-cells with fluorescent zinc indicators. We observed that membrane depolarization by KCl (30-60 mM) was able to induce a rapid increase in cytosolic concentration of zinc. Multiple zinc transients of similar magnitude were elicited during repeated stimulations. The amplitude of zinc responses was not affected by the removal of extracellular calcium or zinc. However, the half-time of the rising slope was significantly slower after removing extracellular zinc with zinc chelator CaEDTA, suggesting that extracellular zinc affect the initial rising phase of zinc response. Glucose (10 mM) induced substantial and progressive increases in intracellular zinc concentration in a similar way as KCl, with variation in the onset and the duration of zinc mobilization. It is known that the depolarization of beta-cell membrane is coupled with the secretion of insulin. Rising intracellular zinc concentration may act as a critical signaling factor in insulin metabolism of pancreatic beta-cells.

  2. [Effect of selenium deficiency on the F344 inbred line offspring rats' neuro-behavior, ability of learning and memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Liang-Li; Tian, Dong-Ping; Su, Min; Shen, Xiu-Na; Gao, Yuxia

    2006-01-01

    To establish the selenium (Se) deficient animal model on F344 inbred line rats and observe the effects of a long-term Se-deficiency on the offspring's neuro-behavior, abilities of learning and memory. Feeding F344 inbred line rats on Se-deficient diet to establish Se-deficient animal model. For the offspring, the body weight, physiological indexes nervous reflections for growth and development were monitored during the early postnatal period. The Se-deficient diet contained less than 0.01 mg/kg and the glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in blood of the Se-deficient group rats is lower than the Se-normal group after feeding on Se-deficient diet for 4 weeks. For the offspring, the birth weight and the body weight of Se-deficient group were obviously lower than the Se-normal group before weaning. Se-deficient offspring rats differed from Se-normal controls in lower scores in surface righting reflex (RR) test at postnatal 4th day after delivery, cliff avoidance test at postnatal 7th day and auditory acuity trial at postnatal 10th day respectively. But these differences disappear after a few days in the same tests. In addition, no significant differences between two groups in suspending test and walking ability test at postnatal 12th and 14th day. In open field test, Se-deficient male offspring stayed less time in the middle grid and moved less. In Morris water maze test, the Se-deficient offspring spent more time to find the hidden platform at the 6th and 9th training tests in the place navigation trial. Furthermore, the Se-deficient group spent less time in target quadrant when giving the spatial probe trial. A Se-deficient animal model have been established on F344 inbred line rats successfully. A long-term Se deficiency could retard the development of the offspring in uterus and after delivery. Se deficiency also decreased the offspring's abilities of spatial learning and memory in Morris water maze test and resulted in the male offspring's nervousness to new

  3. Proinsulin maturation disorder is a contributor to the defect of subsequent conversion to insulin in {beta}-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jie, E-mail: jie.wang2@osumc.edu [Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Osei, Kwame [Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Primary proinsulin maturation disorder is inherent in Ins2{sup +/Akita} islets/{beta}-cells. {yields} A consequence is the inefficient conversion of proinsulin to insulin. {yields} Post-translational defects occur as well in the involved PC1/3 and PC2 convertases. {yields} Proinsulin maturation chaos results in defects in the following conversion process. {yields} A link of the proinsulin maturation disorder and hyperproinsulinemia is suggested. -- Abstract: Disproportionate hyperproinsulinemia is an indicator of {beta}-cell dysfunction in diabetes and the basis underlying this abnormality remains obscure. Recently, we have found proinsulin is an aggregation-prone molecule inherent with a low relative folding rate and maintains a homeostatic balance of natively and plentiful non-natively folded states (i.e., proinsulin homeostasis, PIHO) in normal {beta}-cells as a result of the integration of maturation and disposal processes. PIHO is susceptible to environmental and genetic influences. Perturbation of PIHO produces a number of toxic consequences with known association to {beta}-cell failure in diabetes. To explore whether the perturbation of PIHO has a link to disproportionate hyperproinsulinemia, we investigated proinsulin conversion and the involved prohormone convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) and 2 (PC2) in mouse Ins2{sup +/Akita} islets/{beta}-cells that preserve a primary PIHO disorder due to a mutation (C96Y) in the insulin 2 (Ins2) gene. Our metabolic-labeling studies found an increased ratio of proinsulin to insulin in the cellular or released proteins of Ins2{sup +/Akita} islets. Histological, metabolic-labeling, and RT-PCR analyses revealed decreases of the PC1/3 and PC2 immunoreactivities in the {beta}-cells of Ins2{sup +/Akita} islets in spite of no declines of these two convertases at the transcriptional and translational levels. Immunoblot analyses in cloned Ins2{sup +/Akita} {beta}-cells further confirmed the increased ratio of proinsulin

  4. Stevioside improves pancreatic beta-cell function during glucotoxicity via regulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianguo; Jeppesen, Per Bendix; Nordentoft, Iver; Hermansen, Kjeld

    2007-06-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia is detrimental to pancreatic beta-cells, causing impaired insulin secretion and beta-cell turnover. The characteristic secretory defects are increased basal insulin secretion (BIS) and a selective loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Several recent studies support the view that the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) plays a pivotal role for GSIS. We have shown that stevioside (SVS) enhances insulin secretion and ACC gene expression. Whether glucotoxicity influences ACC and whether this action can be counteracted by SVS are not known. To investigate this, we exposed isolated mouse islets as well as clonal INS-1E beta-cells for 48 h to 27 or 16.7 mM glucose, respectively. We found that 48-h exposure to high glucose impairs GSIS from mouse islets and INS-1E cells, an effect that is partly counteracted by SVS. The ACC dephosphorylation inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA, 10(-8) M), and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR, 10(-4) M), an activator of 5'-AMP protein kinase that phosphorylates ACC, eliminated the beneficial effect of SVS. 5-Tetrade-cyloxy-2-furancarboxylic acid (TOFA), the specific ACC inhibitor, blocked the effect of SVS as well. During glucotoxity, ACC gene expression, ACC protein, and phosphorylated ACC protein were increased in INS-1E beta-cells. SVS pretreatment further increased ACC gene expression with strikingly elevated ACC activity and increased glucose uptake accompanied by enhanced GSIS. Our studies show that glucose is a potent stimulator of ACC and that SVS to some extent counteracts glucotoxicity via increased ACC activity. SVS possesses the potential to alleviate negative effects of glucotoxicity in beta-cells via a unique mechanism of action.

  5. Adult Human Pancreatic Islet Beta-Cells Display Limited Turnover and Long Lifespan as Determined by In-Vivo Thymidine Analog Incorporation and Radiocarbon Dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perl, S; Kushner, J A; Buchholz, B A; Meeker, A K; Stein, G M; Hsieh, M; Kirby, M; Pechhold, S; Liu, E H; Harlan, D M; Tisdale, J F

    2010-03-15

    Diabetes mellitus results from an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin producing pancreatic beta-cells. The adult human beta-cell's turnover rate remains unknown. We employed novel techniques to examine adult human islet beta-cell turnover and longevity in vivo. Subjects enrolled in NIH clinical trials received thymidine analogues [iododeoxyuridine (IdU) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)] 8-days to 4-years prior to death. Archival autopsy samples from ten patients (aged 17-74 years) were employed to assess beta-cell turnover by scoring nuclear analog labeling within insulin staining cells. Human adult beta-cell longevity was determined by estimating the cells genomic DNA integration of atmospheric carbon-14 ({sup 14}C). DNA was purified from pancreatic islets isolated from cadaveric donors; whole islet prep DNA was obtained from a 15 year old donor, and purified beta-cell DNA was obtained from two donors (age 48 and 80 years). {sup 14}C levels were then determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Cellular 'birth date' was determined by comparing the subject's DNA {sup 14}C content relative to a well-established {sup 14}C atmospheric prevalence curve. In the two subjects less than age 20 years, 1-2% of the beta-cell nuclei co-stained for BrdU/IdU. No beta-cell nuclei co-stained in the eight patients more than 30 years old. Consistent with the BrdU/IdU turnover data, beta-cell DNA {sup 14}C content indicated the cells 'birth date' occurred within the subject's first 30 years of life. Under typical circumstances, adult human beta-cells and their cellular precursors are established by young adulthood.

  6. Characterization of a mutant rat kangaroo cell line with alterations in the cell cycle and DNA repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyaji E.N.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a positive selection system for isolating DNA replication and repair related mutants, we isolated a clone from a rat kangaroo cell line (PtK2 that has increased sensitivity to UV light. Characterization of this clone indicated normal post-replication repair after UV irradiation, and normal removal rates of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine(6-4pyrimidone photoproducts by excision repair. However, this cell line has decreased ability to make early incisions on damaged DNA, possibly indicating a defect in preferential repair of actively transcribed genes, and a slower cell proliferation rate, including a longer S-phase. This phenotype reinforces the present notion that control of key mechanisms in cell metabolism, such as cell cycle control, repair, transcription and cell death, can be linked.

  7. Neuropeptide s alters anxiety but not depression-like behaviors in the flinders sensitive line rats, a genetic animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathe, A.; Wegener, Gregers; Finger, B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Neuropeptide S (NPS) and its receptor (NPSR) have been implicated in the mediation of anxiolytic-like behavior in rodents. However, little knowledge is available to what extent the NPS system is involved in depression-related behaviors. The aim of the present work was to characterize...... the effects of centrally administered NPS on depression- and anxiety-related behaviors, using a well validated animal model of depression, the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats and their controls the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL). Methods: Male and female were tested. Seven days following insertion....... In selected animals effect of NPS on home cage activity was explored. Finally, brains from separate groups of naive animals were harvested; hippocampi, amygdalae and PVN punched out, and mRNA transcripts measured with the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (rt-qPCR). Results: The most salient...

  8. Involvement of aberrant DNA methylation on reduced expression of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 gene in rat tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Shimizu, Kyoko; Onishi, Mariko; Sugata, Eriko; Fujii, Hiromasa; Mori, Toshio; Honoki, Kanya; Fukushima, Nobuyuki

    2006-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that stimulates cell proliferation, migration, and protects cells from apoptosis. It interacts with specific G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. Recently, it has been reported that alterations of LPA receptor expression might be important in the malignant transformation of tumor cells. Therefore, to assess an involvement of DNA methylation in reduced expression of the LPA receptor-1 (lpa1) gene, we investigated the expression of the lpa1 gene and its DNA methylation patterns in rat tumor cell lines. Both rat brain-derived neuroblastoma B103 and liver-derived hepatoma RH7777 cells used in this study indicated no expression of lpa1. For the analysis of methylation status, bisulfite sequencing was performed with B103 and RH7777 cells, comparing with other lpa1 expressed cells and normal tissues of brain and liver. The lpa1 expressed cells and tissues were all unmethylated in this region of lpa1. In contrast, both B103 and RH7777 cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expression of the lpa1. Treatment with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine induced expression of lpa1 gene in B103 and RH7777 cells after 24 h. In RH7777 cells treated with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine, stress fiber formation was also observed in response to LPA in RH7777 cells, but not in untreated RH7777 cells. These results suggest that aberrant DNA methylation of the lpa1 gene may be involved in its reduced expression in rat tumor cells

  9. Differential ACE expression among tissues in allele-specific Wistar rat lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamilic, Jelena; Lely, A. Titia; van Goor, Harry; Buikema, Hendrik; Tent, Hilde; Navis, Gerjan J.; Korstanje, Ron

    In humans, the insertion/deletion polymorphism in the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene accounts for half of the variance in plasma ACE activity. The deletion allele is associated with high plasma ACE activity, cardiovascular disease, and renal disease. In rat, a similar association is found

  10. Morphological and functional rescue in RCS rats after RPE cell line transplantation at a later stage of degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaomei; Lu, Bin; Girman, Sergej; Holmes, Toby; Bischoff, Nicolas; Lund, Raymond D

    2008-01-01

    It is well documented that grafting of cells in the subretinal space of Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats limits deterioration of vision and loss of photoreceptors if performed early in postnatal life. What is unclear is whether cells introduced later, when photoreceptor degeneration is already advanced, can still be effective. This possibility was examined in the present study, using the human retinal pigment epithelial cell line, ARPE-19. Dystrophic RCS rats (postnatal day [P] 60) received subretinal injection of ARPE-19 cells (2 x 10(5)/3 microL/eye). Spatial frequency was measured by recording optomotor responses at P100 and P150, and luminance threshold responses were recorded from the superior colliculus at P150. Retinas were stained with cresyl violet, retinal cell-specific markers, and a human nuclear marker. Control animals were injected with medium alone. Animals comparably treated with grafts at P21 were available for comparison. All animals were treated with immunosuppression. Later grafts preserved both spatial frequency and threshold responses over the control and delayed photoreceptor degeneration. There were two to three layers of rescued photoreceptors even at P150, compared with a scattered single layer in sham and untreated control retinas. Retinal cell marker staining showed an orderly array of the inner retinal lamination. The morphology of the second-order neurons was better preserved around the grafted area than in regions distant from graft. Sham injection had little effect in rescuing the photoreceptors. RPE cell line transplants delivered later in the course of degeneration can preserve not only the photoreceptors and inner retinal lamination but also visual function in RCS rats. However, early intervention can achieve better rescue.

  11. A Phox2b BAC Transgenic Rat Line Useful for Understanding Respiratory Rhythm Generator Neural Circuitry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Ikeda

    Full Text Available The key role of the respiratory neural center is respiratory rhythm generation to maintain homeostasis through the control of arterial blood pCO2/pH and pO2 levels. The neuronal network responsible for respiratory rhythm generation in neonatal rat resides in the ventral side of the medulla and is composed of two groups; the parafacial respiratory group (pFRG and the pre-Bötzinger complex group (preBötC. The pFRG partially overlaps in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN, which was originally identified in adult cats and rats. Part of the pre-inspiratory (Pre-I neurons in the RTN/pFRG serves as central chemoreceptor neurons and the CO2 sensitive Pre-I neurons express homeobox gene Phox2b. Phox2b encodes a transcription factor and is essential for the development of the sensory-motor visceral circuits. Mutations in human PHOX2B cause congenital hypoventilation syndrome, which is characterized by blunted ventilatory response to hypercapnia. Here we describe the generation of a novel transgenic (Tg rat harboring fluorescently labeled Pre-I neurons in the RTN/pFRG. In addition, the Tg rat showed fluorescent signals in autonomic enteric neurons and carotid bodies. Because the Tg rat expresses inducible Cre recombinase in PHOX2B-positive cells during development, it is a potentially powerful tool for dissecting the entire picture of the respiratory neural network during development and for identifying the CO2/O2 sensor molecules in the adult central and peripheral nervous systems.

  12. Genetically heterogeneous and selected lines of rats: behavioral and reproductive comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satinder, K P

    1980-03-01

    Avoidance learning, open-field, and reproductive behaviors of a genetically heterogeneous stock (derived from a four-way cross of selected lines) were compared with the corresponding behaviors of the parental lines. The heterogeneous stock showed heterosis on the body development, fertility rate, litter size at birth and at weaning, and directional dominance on the avoidance learning and open-field measures.

  13. The Cytotoxic Role of Intermittent High Glucose on Apoptosis and Cell Viability in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Glucose fluctuations are both strong predictor of diabetic complications and crucial factor for beta cell damages. Here we investigated the effect of intermittent high glucose (IHG on both cell apoptosis and proliferation activity in INS-1 cells and the potential mechanisms. Methods. Cells were treated with normal glucose (5.5 mmol/L, constant high glucose (CHG (25 mmol/L, and IHG (rotation per 24 h in 11.1 or 25 mmol/L for 7 days. Reactive oxygen species (ROS, xanthine oxidase (XOD level, apoptosis, cell viability, cell cycle, and expression of cyclinD1, p21, p27, and Skp2 were determined. Results. We found that IHG induced more significant apoptosis than CHG and normal glucose; intracellular ROS and XOD levels were more markedly increased in cells exposed to IHG. Cells treated with IHG showed significant decreased cell viability and increased cell proportion in G0/G1 phase. Cell cycle related proteins such as cyclinD1 and Skp2 were decreased significantly, but expressions of p27 and p21 were increased markedly. Conclusions. This study suggested that IHG plays a more toxic effect including both apoptosis-inducing and antiproliferative effects on INS-1 cells. Excessive activation of cellular stress and regulation of cyclins might be potential mechanism of impairment in INS-1 cells induced by IHG.

  14. GTP- and GDP-Dependent Rab27a Effectors in Pancreatic Beta-Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Mami; Ishizaki, Toshimasa; Kimura, Toshihide

    2015-01-01

    Small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) participate in a wide variety of cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and intracellular transport. Conventionally, only the guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP)-bound small GTPase interacts with effector proteins, and the resulting downstream signals control specific cellular functions. Therefore, the GTP-bound form is regarded as active, and the focus has been on searching for proteins that bind the GTP form to look for their effectors. The Rab family small GTPase Rab27a is highly expressed in some secretory cells and is involved in the control of membrane traffic. The present study reviews recent progress in our understanding of the roles of Rab27a and its effectors in pancreatic beta-cells. In the basal state, GTP-bound Rab27a controls insulin secretion at pre-exocytic stages via its GTP-dependent effectors. We previously identified novel guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-bound Rab27-interacting proteins. Interestingly, GDP-bound Rab27a controls endocytosis of the secretory membrane via its interaction with these proteins. We also demonstrated that the insulin secretagogue glucose converts Rab27a from its GTP- to GDP-bound forms. Thus, GTP- and GDP-bound Rab27a regulate pre-exocytic and endocytic stages in membrane traffic, respectively. Since the physiological importance of GDP-bound GTPases has been largely overlooked, we consider that the investigation of GDP-dependent effectors for other GTPases is necessary for further understanding of cellular function.

  15. Longitudinal Changes in Insulin Resistance, Beta-Cell Function and Glucose Regulation Status in Prediabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chul-Hee; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Eun-Hee; Bae, Sung-Jin; Choe, Jaewon; Park, Joong-Yeol

    2018-01-01

    The changes in insulin resistance and insulin secretion and their association with changes in glucose regulation status in Asians with prediabetes remain uncertain. We included Korean adults (aged 20-79 years) with prediabetes who underwent routine medical check-ups at a mean interval of 5 years. Prediabetes was defined as fasting plasma glucose (FPG) 5.6-6.9mmol/l or HbA1c 5.7-6.4% (39-46mmol/mol). Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and beta-cell function (HOMA-%B) indices were assessed by homeostasis model assessment. Incident diabetes was defined as FPG ≥ 7.0mmol/l, HbA1c ≥ 6.5% (48mmol/mol), or initiation of antidiabetic medications. Among the 7,208 participants with prediabetes, 4,410 (61.2%) remained as prediabetes (control group), 2,123 (29.5%) reverted to normal glucose regulation (regressors), and 675 (9.4%) progressed to type 2 diabetes (progressors) after 5 years. Compared with the control group, the progressors had higher baseline HOMA-IR (2.48 ± 1.45 versus 2.06 ± 1.20, P prediabetes, longitudinal change in insulin resistance was the predominant factor in Koreans. Copyright © 2018 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Oxidative Stress Type Influences the Properties of Antioxidants Containing Polyphenols in RINm5F Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Auberval

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro methods currently used to screen bioactive compounds focus on the use of a single model of oxidative stress. However, this simplistic view may lead to conflicting results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant properties of two natural extracts (a mix of red wine polyphenols (RWPs and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG with three models of oxidative stress induced with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, a mixture of hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase (HX/XO, or streptozotocin (STZ in RINm5F beta cells. We employed multiple approaches to validate their potential as therapeutic treatment options, including cell viability, reactive oxygen species production, and antioxidant enzymes expression. All three oxidative stresses induced a decrease in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis, whereas the level of ROS production was variable depending on the type of stress. The highest level of ROS was found for the HX/XO-induced stress, an increase that was reflected by higher expression antioxidant enzymes. Further, both antioxidant compounds presented beneficial effects during oxidative stress, but EGCG appeared to be a more efficient antioxidant. These data indicate that the efficiency of natural antioxidants is dependent on both the nature of the compound and the type of oxidative stress generated.

  17. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of the effects of Urtica dioica and swimming activity on diabetic factors and pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbari, Abbas; Azarbayjani, Mohammad Ali; Yusof, Ashril; Halim Mokhtar, Abdul; Akbarzadeh, Samad; Ibrahim, Mohamed Yousif; Tarverdizadeh, Bahman; Farzadinia, Parviz; Hajiaghaee, Reza; Dehghan, Firouzeh

    2016-03-15

    Urtica dioica (UD) has been identified as a traditional herbal medicine. This study aimed to investigate the effect of UD extract and swimming activity on diabetic parameters through in vivo and in vitro experiments. Adult WKY male rats were randomly distributed in nine groups: intact control, diabetic control, diabetic + 625 mg/kg, 1.25 g/kg UD, diabetic + 100 mg/kg Metformin, diabetic + swimming, diabetic + swimming 625 mg/kg, 1.25 g/kg UD, and diabetic +100 mg/kg Metformin + swimming. The hearts of the animals were punctured, and blood samples were collected for biochemical analysis. The entire pancreas was exposed for histologic examination. The effect of UD on insulin secretion by RIN-5F cells in 6.25 or 12.5 mM glucose dose was examined. Glucose uptake by cultured L6 myotubes was determined. The serum glucose concentration decreased, the insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity significantly increased in treated groups. These changes were more pronounced in the group that received UD extract and swimming training. Regeneration and less beta cell damage of Langerhans islets were observed in the treated groups. UD treatment increased insulin secretion in the RIN-5F cells and glucose uptake in the L6 myotubes cells. Swimming exercises accompanied by consuming UD aqueous extracts effectively improved diabetic parameters, repaired pancreatic tissues in streptozotocin-induced diabetics in vivo, and increased glucose uptake or insulin in UD-treated cells in vitro.

  18. *NO and oxyradical metabolism in new cell lines of rat brain capillary endothelial cells forming the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasig, I E; Giese, H; Schroeter, M L; Sporbert, A; Utepbergenov, D I; Buchwalow, I B; Neubert, K; Schönfelder, G; Freyer, D; Schimke, I; Siems, W E; Paul, M; Haseloff, R F; Blasig, R

    2001-09-01

    To investigate the relevance of *NO and oxyradicals in the blood-brain barrier (BBB), differentiated and well-proliferating brain capillary endothelial cells (BCEC) are required. Therefore, rat BCEC (rBCEC) were transfected with immortalizing genes. The resulting lines exhibited endothelial characteristics (factor VIII, angiotensin-converting enzyme, high prostacyclin/thromboxane release rates) and BBB markers (gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, alkaline phosphatase). The control line rBCEC2 (mock transfected) revealed fibroblastoid morphology, less factor VIII, reduced gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, weak radical defence, low prostanoid metabolism, and limited proliferation. Lines transfected with immortalizing genes (especially rBCEC4, polyoma virus large T antigen) conserved primary properties: epitheloid morphology, subcultivation with high proliferation rate under pure culture conditions, and powerful defence against reactive oxygen species (Mn-, Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione) effectively controlling radical metabolism. Only 100 microM H2O2 overcame this defence and stimulated the formation of eicosanoids similarly as in primary cells. Some BBB markers were expressed to a lower degree; however, cocultivation with astrocytes intensified these markers (e.g., alkaline phosphatase) and paraendothelial tightness, indicating induction of BBB properties. Inducible NO synthase was induced by a cytokine plus lipopolysaccharide mixture in all lines and primary cells, resulting in *NO release. Comparing the cell lines obtained, rBCEC4 are stable immortalized and reveal the best conservation of properties from primary cells, including enzymes producing or decomposing reactive species. These cells can be subcultivated in large amounts and, hence, they are suitable to study the role of radical metabolism in the BBB and in the cerebral microvasculature. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. Measuring phospholipase D activity in insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and insulin-responsive muscle cells and adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzolli, Rosanna; Huang, Ping; Teng, Shuzhi; Hughes, William E

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is an enzyme producing phosphatidic acid and choline through hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine. The enzyme has been identified as a member of a variety of signal transduction cascades and as a key regulator of numerous intracellular vesicle trafficking processes. A role for PLD in regulating glucose homeostasis is emerging as the enzyme has recently been identified in events regulating exocytosis of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells and also in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake through controlling GLUT4 vesicle exocytosis in muscle and adipose tissue. We present methodologies for assessing cellular PLD activity in secretagogue-stimulated insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and also insulin-stimulated adipocyte and muscle cells, two of the principal insulin-responsive cell types controlling blood glucose levels.

  20. Impaired beta cell sensitivity to incretins in type 2 diabetes is insufficiently compensated by higher incretin response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tura, A.; Bagger, J. I.; Ferrannini, E.

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims The incretin effect is impaired in type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the underlying mechanisms are only partially understood. We investigated the relationships between the time course of the incretin effect and that of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon......-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs), thereby estimating incretin sensitivity of the beta cell, and its associated factors. Methods and results Eight patients with T2D and eight matched subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) received 25, 75, and 125 g OGTTs and corresponding...... was correlated with that of both GIP and GLP-1 in each subject (median r = 0.67 in NGT and 0.45 in T2D). We calculated an individual beta cell sensitivity to incretins (SINCR) using a weighted average of GIP and GLP-1 (pooled incretin concentration, PIC), as the slope of the relationship between PINCR and PIC...

  1. Insulin resistance and beta-cell function in different ethnic groups in Kenya: the role of abdominal fat distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, D.L.; Faurholt-Jepsen, D.; Faerch, K.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the pathophysiology of diabetes in Africans. Thus, we assessed whether insulin resistance and beta-cell function differed by ethnicity in Kenya and whether differences were modified by abdominal fat distribution. A cross-sectional study in 1,087 rural Luo (n = 361), Kamba (n...... to the Luo and Kamba, respectively. Adjustments of SAT (range 0.1–7.1 cm) and VAT (range 1.5–14.2 cm) largely explained these inter-group differences with the Maasai having the highest combined abdominal fat accumulation. The Maasai had the highest insulin resistance and secretion, but the lowest relative...... beta-cell function compared to the Luo and Kamba. These differences were primarily explained by abdominal fat distribution....

  2. Role of transcription factor KLF11 and its diabetes-associated gene variants in pancreatic beta cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neve, Bernadette; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Ashkenazi-Katalan, Vered

    2005-01-01

    in beta cells. Genetic analysis of the KLF11 gene revealed two rare variants (Ala347Ser and Thr220Met) that segregate with diabetes in families with early-onset type 2 diabetes, and significantly impair its transcriptional activity. In addition, analysis of 1,696 type 2 diabetes mellitus and 1......,776 normoglycemic subjects show a frequent polymorphic Gln62Arg variant that significantly associates with type 2 diabetes mellitus in North European populations (OR = 1.29, P = 0.00033). Moreover, this variant alters the corepressor mSin3A-binding activity of KLF11, impairs the activation of the insulin promoter...... and shows lower levels of insulin expression in pancreatic beta cells. In addition, subjects carrying the Gln62Arg allele show decreased plasma insulin after an oral glucose challenge. Interestingly, all three nonsynonymous KLF11 variants show increased repression of the catalase 1 promoter, suggesting...

  3. Pancreas-Specific Sirt1-Deficiency in Mice Compromises Beta-Cell Function without Development of Hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Andreia V; Bensellam, Mohammed; Wauters, Elke; Rees, Maxine; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Mawson, Amanda; Ly, Le Quan; Biankin, Andrew V; Wu, Jianmin; Laybutt, D Ross; Rooman, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) has been reported to be a critical positive regulator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells. The effects on islet cells and blood glucose levels when Sirt1 is deleted specifically in the pancreas are still unclear. This study examined islet glucose responsiveness, blood glucose levels, pancreatic islet histology and gene expression in Pdx1Cre; Sirt1ex4F/F mice that have loss of function and loss of expression of Sirt1 specifically in the pancreas. We found that in the Pdx1Cre; Sirt1ex4F/F mice, the relative insulin positive area and the islet size distribution were unchanged. However, beta-cells were functionally impaired, presenting with lower glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. This defect was not due to a reduced expression of insulin but was associated with a decreased expression of the glucose transporter Slc2a2/Glut2 and of the Glucagon like peptide-1 receptor (Glp1r) as well as a marked down regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones that participate in the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) pathway. Counter intuitively, the Sirt1-deficient mice did not develop hyperglycemia. Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) cells were the only other islet cells affected, with reduced numbers in the Sirt1-deficient pancreas. This study provides new mechanistic insights showing that beta-cell function in Sirt1-deficient pancreas is affected due to altered glucose sensing and deregulation of the UPR pathway. Interestingly, we uncovered a context in which impaired beta-cell function is not accompanied by increased glycemia. This points to a unique compensatory mechanism. Given the reduction in PP, investigation of its role in the control of blood glucose is warranted.

  4. Pancreas-Specific Sirt1-Deficiency in Mice Compromises Beta-Cell Function without Development of Hyperglycemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia V Pinho

    Full Text Available Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1 has been reported to be a critical positive regulator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells. The effects on islet cells and blood glucose levels when Sirt1 is deleted specifically in the pancreas are still unclear.This study examined islet glucose responsiveness, blood glucose levels, pancreatic islet histology and gene expression in Pdx1Cre; Sirt1ex4F/F mice that have loss of function and loss of expression of Sirt1 specifically in the pancreas.We found that in the Pdx1Cre; Sirt1ex4F/F mice, the relative insulin positive area and the islet size distribution were unchanged. However, beta-cells were functionally impaired, presenting with lower glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. This defect was not due to a reduced expression of insulin but was associated with a decreased expression of the glucose transporter Slc2a2/Glut2 and of the Glucagon like peptide-1 receptor (Glp1r as well as a marked down regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperones that participate in the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR pathway. Counter intuitively, the Sirt1-deficient mice did not develop hyperglycemia. Pancreatic polypeptide (PP cells were the only other islet cells affected, with reduced numbers in the Sirt1-deficient pancreas.This study provides new mechanistic insights showing that beta-cell function in Sirt1-deficient pancreas is affected due to altered glucose sensing and deregulation of the UPR pathway. Interestingly, we uncovered a context in which impaired beta-cell function is not accompanied by increased glycemia. This points to a unique compensatory mechanism. Given the reduction in PP, investigation of its role in the control of blood glucose is warranted.

  5. Role of transcription factor KLF11 and its diabetes-associated gene variants in pancreatic beta cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neve, Bernadette; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.; Ashkenazi-Katalan, Vered; Dina, Christian; Hamid, Yasmin H.; Joly, Erik; Vaillant, Emmanuel; Benmezroua, Yamina; Durand, Emmanuelle; Bakaher, Nicolas; Delannoy, Valerie; Vaxillaire, Martine; Cook, Tiffany; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Jansen, Hans; Charles, Marie-Aline; Clément, Karine; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Helbecque, Nicole; Charpentier, Guillaume; Prentki, Marc; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Urrutia, Raul; Melloul, Danielle; Froguel, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    KLF11 (TIEG2) is a pancreas-enriched transcription factor that has elicited significant attention because of its role as negative regulator of exocrine cell growth in vitro and in vivo. However, its functional role in the endocrine pancreas remains to be established. Here, we report, for the first time, to our knowledge, the characterization of KLF11 as a glucose-inducible regulator of the insulin gene. A combination of random oligonucleotide binding, EMSA, luciferase reporter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays shows that KLF11 binds to the insulin promoter and regulates its activity in beta cells. Genetic analysis of the KLF11 gene revealed two rare variants (Ala347Ser and Thr220Met) that segregate with diabetes in families with early-onset type 2 diabetes, and significantly impair its transcriptional activity. In addition, analysis of 1,696 type 2 diabetes mellitus and 1,776 normoglycemic subjects show a frequent polymorphic Gln62Arg variant that significantly associates with type 2 diabetes mellitus in North European populations (OR = 1.29, P = 0.00033). Moreover, this variant alters the corepressor mSin3A-binding activity of KLF11, impairs the activation of the insulin promoter and shows lower levels of insulin expression in pancreatic beta cells. In addition, subjects carrying the Gln62Arg allele show decreased plasma insulin after an oral glucose challenge. Interestingly, all three nonsynonymous KLF11 variants show increased repression of the catalase 1 promoter, suggesting a role in free radical clearance that may render beta cells more sensitive to oxidative stress. Thus, both functional and genetic analyses reveal that KLF11 plays a role in the regulation of pancreatic beta cell physiology, and its variants may contribute to the development of diabetes. PMID:15774581

  6. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in pancreatic beta cells during the compensatory islet hyperplasia in prediabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschio, D.A.; Oliveira, R.B.; Santos, M.R.; Carvalho, C.P.F.; Barbosa-Sampaio, H.C.L.; Collares-Buzato, C.B.

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, also known as the canonical Wnt pathway, plays a role in cell proliferation and differentiation in several tissues/organs. It has been recently described in humans a relationship between type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and mutation in the gene encoding the transcription factor TCF7L2 associated to the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In the present study, we demonstrated that hyperplastic pancreatic islets from prediabetic mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 60 d displayed nuclear translocation of active β-catenin associated with significant increases in protein content and gene expression of β-catenin as well as of cyclins D1, D2 and c-Myc (target genes of the Wnt pathway) but not of Tcf7l2 (the transcription factor). Meanwhile, these alterations were not observed in pancreatic islets from 30 d HFD-fed mice, that do not display significant beta cell hyperplasia. These data suggest that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is activated in pancreatic islets during prediabetes and may play a role in the induction of the compensatory beta cell hyperplasia observed at early phase of T2DM. - Highlights: • Exposure to high-fat diet for 60 days induced prediabetes and beta cell mass expansion. • Hyperplastic pancreatic islets displayed nuclear translocation of active β-catenin. • Hyperplastic islets showed increased expression of target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. • Wnt/β-catenin pathway is activated during compensatory beta cell hyperplasia in mice.

  7. Drp1 guarding of the mitochondrial network is important for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Florian; Schultz, Julia; Waterstradt, Rica; Baltrusch, Simone, E-mail: simone.baltrusch@med.uni-rostock.de

    2016-06-10

    Mitochondria form a tubular network in mammalian cells, and the mitochondrial life cycle is determined by fission, fusion and autophagy. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) has a pivotal role in these processes because it alone is able to constrict mitochondria. However, the regulation and function of Drp1 have been shown to vary between cell types. Mitochondrial morphology affects mitochondrial metabolism and function. In pancreatic beta cells mitochondrial metabolism is a key component of the glucose-induced cascade of insulin secretion. The goal of the present study was to investigate the action of Drp1 in pancreatic beta cells. For this purpose Drp1 was down-regulated by means of shDrp1 in insulin-secreting INS1 cells and mouse pancreatic islets. In INS1 cells reduced Drp1 expression resulted in diminished expression of proteins regulating mitochondrial fusion, namely mitofusin 1 and 2, and optic atrophy protein 1. Diminished mitochondrial dynamics can therefore be assumed. After down-regulation of Drp1 in INS1 cells and spread mouse islets the initially homogenous mitochondrial network characterised by a moderate level of interconnections shifted towards high heterogeneity with elongated, clustered and looped mitochondria. These morphological changes were found to correlate directly with functional alterations. Mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP generation were significantly reduced in INS1 cells after Drp1down-regulation. Finally, a significant loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was demonstrated in INS1 cells and mouse pancreatic islets. In conclusion, Drp1 expression is important in pancreatic beta cells to maintain the regulation of insulin secretion. -- Highlights: •Down-regulation of Drp1 in INS1 cells reduces mitochondrial fusion protein expression. •Mitochondrial membrane potential in INS1 cells is diminished after Drp1 down-regulation. •Mitochondria become elongated after down-regulation of Drp1 in beta cells. •Down-regulation of

  8. Beneficial Effect of Jojoba Seed Extracts on Hyperglycemia-Induced Oxidative Stress in RINm5f Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahla Belhadj

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia occurs during diabetes and insulin resistance. It causes oxidative stress by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, leading to cellular damage. Polyphenols play a central role in defense against oxidative stress. In our study, we investigated the antioxidant properties of simmondsin, a pure molecule present in jojoba seeds, and of the aqueous extract of jojoba seeds on fructose-induced oxidative stress in RINm5f beta cells. The exposure of RINm5f beta cells to fructose triggered the loss of cell viability (−48%, p < 0.001 and disruption of insulin secretion (p < 0.001 associated with of reactive oxygen species (ROS production and a modulation of pro-oxidant and antioxidant signaling pathway. Cell pre-treatments with extracts considerably increased cell viability (+86% p < 0.001 for simmondsin and +74% (p < 0.001 for aqueous extract and insulin secretion. The extracts also markedly decreased ROS (−69% (p < 0.001 for simmondsin and −59% (p < 0.001 for aqueous extract and caspase-3 activation and improved antioxidant defense, inhibiting p22phox and increasing nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2 levels (+70%, p < 0.001 for aqueous extract. Simmondsin had no impact on Nrf2 levels. The richness and diversity of molecules present in jojoba seed extract makes jojoba a powerful agent to prevent the destruction of RINm5f beta cells induced by hyperglycemia.

  9. EPConDB: a web resource for gene expression related to pancreatic development, beta-cell function and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarelli, Joan M; Brestelli, John; Gorski, Regina K; Liu, Junmin; Manduchi, Elisabetta; Pinney, Deborah F; Schug, Jonathan; White, Peter; Kaestner, Klaus H; Stoeckert, Christian J

    2007-01-01

    EPConDB (http://www.cbil.upenn.edu/EPConDB) is a public web site that supports research in diabetes, pancreatic development and beta-cell function by providing information about genes expressed in cells of the pancreas. EPConDB displays expression profiles for individual genes and information about transcripts, promoter elements and transcription factor binding sites. Gene expression results are obtained from studies examining tissue expression, pancreatic development and growth, differentiation of insulin-producing cells, islet or beta-cell injury, and genetic models of impaired beta-cell function. The expression datasets are derived using different microarray platforms, including the BCBC PancChips and Affymetrix gene expression arrays. Other datasets include semi-quantitative RT-PCR and MPSS expression studies. For selected microarray studies, lists of differentially expressed genes, derived from PaGE analysis, are displayed on the site. EPConDB provides database queries and tools to examine the relationship between a gene, its transcriptional regulation, protein function and expression in pancreatic tissues.

  10. Nuclear import of glucokinase in pancreatic beta-cells is mediated by a nuclear localization signal and modulated by SUMOylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Bente Berg; Fjeld, Karianne; Solheim, Marie Holm; Shirakawa, Jun; Zhang, Enming; Keindl, Magdalena; Hu, Jiang; Lindqvist, Andreas; Døskeland, Anne; Mellgren, Gunnar; Flatmark, Torgeir; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Wierup, Nils; Aukrust, Ingvild; Bjørkhaug, Lise

    2017-10-15

    The localization of glucokinase in pancreatic beta-cell nuclei is a controversial issue. Although previous reports suggest such a localization, the mechanism for its import has so far not been identified. Using immunofluorescence, subcellular fractionation and mass spectrometry, we present evidence in support of glucokinase localization in beta-cell nuclei of human and mouse pancreatic sections, as well as in human and mouse isolated islets, and murine MIN6 cells. We have identified a conserved, seven-residue nuclear localization signal ( 30 LKKVMRR 36 ) in the human enzyme. Substituting the residues KK 31,32 and RR 35,36 with AA led to a loss of its nuclear localization in transfected cells. Furthermore, our data indicates that SUMOylation of glucokinase modulates its nuclear import, while high glucose concentrations do not significantly alter the enzyme nuclear/cytosolic ratio. Thus, for the first time, we provide data in support of a nuclear import of glucokinase mediated by a redundant mechanism, involving a nuclear localization signal, and which is modulated by its SUMOylation. These findings add new knowledge to the functional role of glucokinase in the pancreatic beta-cell. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Neuropeptide S alters anxiety, but not depression-like behaviour in Flinders Sensitive Line rats: a genetic animal model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Gregers; Finger, Beate C; Elfving, Betina; Keller, Kirsten; Liebenberg, Nico; Fischer, Christina W; Singewald, Nicolas; Slattery, David A; Neumann, Inga D; Mathé, Aleksander A

    2012-04-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) and its receptor (NPSR) have been implicated in the mediation of anxiolytic-like behaviour in rodents. However, little knowledge is available regarding the NPS system in depression-related behaviours, and whether NPS also exerts anxiolytic effects in an animal model of psychopathology. Therefore, the aim of this work was to characterize the effects of NPS on depression- and anxiety-related parameters, using male and female rats in a well-validated animal model of depression: the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL), their controls, the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL), and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. We found that FSL showed greater immobility in the forced swim test (FST) than FRL, confirming their phenotype. However, NPS did not affect depression-related behaviour in any rat line. No significant differences in baseline anxiety levels between the FSL and FRL strains were observed, but FSL and FRL rats displayed less anxiety-like behaviour compared to SD rats. NPS decreased anxiety-like behaviour on the elevated plus-maze in all strains. The expression of the NPSR in the amygdala, periventricular hypothalamic nucleus, and hippocampus was equal in all male strains, although a trend towards reduced expression within the amygdala was observed in FSL rats compared to SD rats. In conclusion, NPS had a marked anxiolytic effect in FSL, FRL and SD rats, but did not modify the depression-related behaviour in any strain, in spite of the significant differences in innate level between the strains. These findings suggest that NPS specifically modifies anxiety behaviour but cannot overcome/reverse a genetically mediated depression phenotype.

  12. Design and optimization of beta-cell temperature sensor based on 63Ni–Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghasemi Nejad, Gholam Reza; Rahmani, Faezeh; Abaeiani, Gholam Reza

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical study of the use of a beta-cell as a temperature sensor using MCNP4C Monte Carlo code is presented in this paper. Nickel-63 and silicon were selected as the beta source and semiconductor material, respectively. The maximum open-circuit voltage (V OC ) is equal to 0.445 V with doping concentrations of N A =4×10 18 #/cm 3 and N D =8×10 19 #/cm 3 in the base and the emitter region, respectively, which, depending on the source activity, enables measurement in a wide range of temperature. The effects of the activity and its change over time on V OC were also studied. The results demonstrated that V OC exhibited smaller changes for higher activities. The temperature sensitivity of this sensor ranges from −2.42 mV/K to −3.41 mV/K for source activities from 100 mCi to 0.001 mCi, respectively, so the optimal activity can be determined according to the desired temperature range and sensitivity. - Highlights: • A silicon p–n junction using 63 Ni is used as a temperature sensor. • The rate of electron–hole generation in silicon was simulated using Monte Carlo MCNP4c code. • The effects of the structural properties of the semiconductor, such as doping concentration and the thickness of the emitter, on the sensitivity and temperature range were studied. • The source thickness and the effect of the activity and its change over time on V OC were investigated at various temperatures

  13. Relationship Between Beta Cell Dysfunction and Severity of Disease Among Critically Ill Children: A STROBE-Compliant Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping-Ping; Lu, Xiu-Lan; Xiao, Zheng-Hui; Qiu, Jun; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2016-05-01

    Although beta cell dysfunction has been proved to predict prognosis among humans and animals, its prediction on severity of disease remains unclear among children. The present study was aimed to examine the relationship between beta cell dysfunction and severity of disease among critically ill children.This prospective study included 1146 critically ill children, who were admitted to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of Hunan Children's Hospital from November 2011 to August 2013. Information on characteristics, laboratory tests, and prognostic outcomes was collected. Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-β, evaluating beta cell function, was used to divide all participants into 4 groups: HOMA-β = 100% (group I, n = 339), 80% ≤ HOMA-β multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), mechanical ventilation (MV) and mortality. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the risk of developing poor outcomes among patients in different HOMA-β groups, with group I as the reference group.Among 1146 children, incidence of HOMA-β decrement of HOMA-β (P < 0.01). C-reactive protein and procalcitonin levels, rather than white blood cell, were significantly different among 4 groups (P < 0.01). In addition, the worst SOFA score and the worst PRISMIII score increased with declined HOMA-β. For example, the worst SOFA score in group I, II, III, and IV was 1.55 ± 1.85, 1.71 ± 1.93, 1.92 ± 1.63, and 2.18 ± 1.77, respectively. Furthermore, patients with declined HOMA-β had higher risk of developing septic shock, MODS, MV, and mortality, even after adjusting age, gender, myocardial injury, and lung injury. For instance, compared with group I, the multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for developing septic shock was 2.17 (0.59, 8.02), 2.94 (2.18, 6.46), and 2.76 (1.18, 6.46) among patients in group II, III, and IV, respectively.Beta cell dysfunction reflected the severity of disease among critically ill children

  14. **-Postprandial pancreatic ["1"1C]methionine uptake after pancreaticoduodenectomy mirrors basal beta cell function and insulin release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, Emanuel; Kazianka, Lukas; Breuer, Robert; Miholic, Johannes; Hacker, Marcus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Mitterhauser, Markus; Stimpfl, Thomas; Reiter, Birgit; Karanikas, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    [S-methyl-"1"1C]-L-methionine (["1"1C]MET) uptake in the pancreas might be a central indicator of beta cell function. Since gastric emptying was recently shown to influence glycemic control in subjects after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD, the surgical treatment of neoplasms of the pancreas head), we looked for imaginable relationships between gastric emptying, pre- and postprandial insulin concentrations, and ["1"1C]MET uptake. Nineteen tumor-free survivors after PD (age mean ± SD: 61 ± 8.7 yrs.; 10 male, 9 female) and 10 healthy controls (age: 27 ± 8.7 yrs.; 7 male, 3 female) were given a mixed test meal. One gram of paracetamol was ingested with the meal to evaluate the speed of gastric emptying. Insulin, glucose, and paracetamol plasma concentrations were measured before and over 180 minutes after ingestion. Beta cell function was calculated from fasting glucose and insulin plasma concentrations. Simultaneously, 800 MBq of ["1"1C]MET were administered and the activity (maximum tissue standardized uptake values [SUVmax]) over the pancreas was measured at 15, 30, and 60 minutes after injection. Total integrated SUVmax (area under the curve [AUC]) and incremental SUVmax were calculated. The uptake of ["1"1C]MET in the pancreas was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in controls compared to the PD group. Gastric emptying was significantly slower in controls compared to pancreatectomy subjects (p < 0.0001). Paracetamol AUC_3_0 correlated with the SUVmax increment between 15 and 30 minutes (R"2 = 0.27, p = 0.0263), suggesting a relationship between gastric emptying and the uptake of ["1"1C]MET. Total integrated SUVmax correlated with insulin AUC_6_0 (R"2 = 0.66,p < 0.0001) in patients after PD. Multivariate regression analysis revealed insulin AUC_6_0 and beta cell function, calculated from the fasting insulin to glucose ratio, as independent predictors of "1"1C-methionine uptake, i.e. total integrated SUVmax, in patients after PD (R"2 = 0.78, p < 0.0001). Postprandial

  15. **-Postprandial pancreatic [{sup 11}C]methionine uptake after pancreaticoduodenectomy mirrors basal beta cell function and insulin release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, Emanuel; Kazianka, Lukas; Breuer, Robert; Miholic, Johannes [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Hacker, Marcus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Mitterhauser, Markus [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Stimpfl, Thomas; Reiter, Birgit [Medical University of Vienna, Clinical Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Forensic Toxicology, Vienna (Austria); Karanikas, Georgios [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Divisional Head PET-PET/CT (Nuclear Medicine), Vienna (Austria)

    2017-03-15

    [S-methyl-{sup 11}C]-L-methionine ([{sup 11}C]MET) uptake in the pancreas might be a central indicator of beta cell function. Since gastric emptying was recently shown to influence glycemic control in subjects after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD, the surgical treatment of neoplasms of the pancreas head), we looked for imaginable relationships between gastric emptying, pre- and postprandial insulin concentrations, and [{sup 11}C]MET uptake. Nineteen tumor-free survivors after PD (age mean ± SD: 61 ± 8.7 yrs.; 10 male, 9 female) and 10 healthy controls (age: 27 ± 8.7 yrs.; 7 male, 3 female) were given a mixed test meal. One gram of paracetamol was ingested with the meal to evaluate the speed of gastric emptying. Insulin, glucose, and paracetamol plasma concentrations were measured before and over 180 minutes after ingestion. Beta cell function was calculated from fasting glucose and insulin plasma concentrations. Simultaneously, 800 MBq of [{sup 11}C]MET were administered and the activity (maximum tissue standardized uptake values [SUVmax]) over the pancreas was measured at 15, 30, and 60 minutes after injection. Total integrated SUVmax (area under the curve [AUC]) and incremental SUVmax were calculated. The uptake of [{sup 11}C]MET in the pancreas was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in controls compared to the PD group. Gastric emptying was significantly slower in controls compared to pancreatectomy subjects (p < 0.0001). Paracetamol AUC{sub 30} correlated with the SUVmax increment between 15 and 30 minutes (R{sup 2} = 0.27, p = 0.0263), suggesting a relationship between gastric emptying and the uptake of [{sup 11}C]MET. Total integrated SUVmax correlated with insulin AUC{sub 60} (R{sup 2} = 0.66,p < 0.0001) in patients after PD. Multivariate regression analysis revealed insulin AUC{sub 60} and beta cell function, calculated from the fasting insulin to glucose ratio, as independent predictors of {sup 11}C-methionine uptake, i.e. total integrated SUVmax, in

  16. Minor long-term changes in weight have beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, A M; Hendel, Helle Westergren; Rasmussen, M H

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term effect of changes in body composition induced by weight loss on insulin sensitivity (SI), non-insulin mediated glucose disposal, glucose effectiveness (SG)and beta-cell function.......To evaluate the long-term effect of changes in body composition induced by weight loss on insulin sensitivity (SI), non-insulin mediated glucose disposal, glucose effectiveness (SG)and beta-cell function....

  17. [Associations of insulin resistance and pancreatic beta-cell function with plasma glucose level in type 2 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian, Xiaoping; Sun, Gaisheng; Dou, Chunmei; Hou, Hongbo; Fan, Xiuping; Yu, Hongmei; Ma, Ling; He, Bingxian

    2002-06-10

    To investigate the influence of insulin resistance and pancreatic beta-cell function on plasma glucose level in type 2 diabetes so as to provide theoretical basis for reasonable selection of hypoglycemic agents. The plasma non-specific insulin (NSINS), true insulin (TI) and glucose in eight-one type 2 diabetics, 38 males and 43 females, with a mean age of 53 years, were examined 0, 30, 60 and 120 minutes after they had 75 grams of instant noodles. The patients were divided into two groups according to their fasting plasma glucose (FPG): group A (FPG = 8.89 mmol/L). The insulin resistance was evaluated by HOMA-IR, the beta-cell function was evaluated by HOMA-beta formula and the formula deltaI(30)/deltaG(30) = (deltaI(30)-deltaI(0))/(deltaG(30)-deltaG(0)). The insulin area under curve (INSAUC) was evaluated by the formula INSAUC=FINS/2+INS(30)+INS(60)+INS(120)/2. The mean FPG was 6.23 mmol/L in group A and 12.6 mmol/L in group B. PG2H was 11.7 mmol/L in group A and 19.2 mmol/L in group B. The TI levels in group B at 0, 30, 60, 120 min during standard meal test were significantly higher than those in group A: 6.15 +/- 1.06 vs 4.77 +/- 1.06, 9.76 +/- 1.1 vs 5.88 +/- 1.1,14.68 +/- 1.11 vs 6.87 +/- 1.1 and 17.13 +/- 1.12 vs 8.0 +/- 1.1 microU/dl (all P< 0.01). The NSINS showed the same trend. The insulin resistance in group B was 1.5 times that in group A. With the insulin resistance adjusted, the beta cell function in group A was 5 to 6 times that in group B. The INSAUC in group A was 1.66 times larger than that in group B, especially the INSAUC for true insulin (2 times larger). The contribution of insulin resistance and beta cell function to PG2H was half by half in group A and 1:8 in group B. beta cell function calculated by insulin (Homa-beta) explained 41% of the plasma glucose changes in group A and 54% of the plasma glucose changes in group B. The contribution of insulin deficiency to plasma glocose was 3.3.times that of insulin resistance in group A and was 9

  18. Exploring a post-traumatic stress disorder paradigm in Flinders sensitive line rats to model treatment-resistant depression I: bio-behavioural validation and response to imipramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Sarel Jacobus; Harvey, Brian Herbert

    2017-08-01

    Co-morbid depression with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is often treatment resistant. In developing a preclinical model of treatment-resistant depression (TRD), we combined animal models of depression and PTSD to produce an animal with more severe as well as treatment-resistant depressive-like behaviours. Male Flinders sensitive line (FSL) rats, a genetic animal model of depression, were exposed to a stress re-stress model of PTSD [time-dependent sensitisation (TDS)] and compared with stress-naive controls. Seven days after TDS stress, depressive-like and coping behaviours as well as hippocampal and cortical noradrenaline (NA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA) levels were analysed. Response to sub-chronic imipramine treatment (IMI; 10 mg/kg s.c.×7 days) was subsequently studied. FSL rats demonstrated bio-behavioural characteristics of depression. Exposure to TDS stress in FSL rats correlated negatively with weight gain, while demonstrating reduced swimming behaviour and increased immobility versus unstressed FSL rats. IMI significantly reversed depressive-like (immobility) behaviour and enhanced active coping behaviour (swimming and climbing) in FSL rats. The latter was significantly attenuated in FSL rats exposed to TDS versus unstressed FSL rats. IMI reversed reduced 5HIAA levels in unstressed FSL rats, whereas exposure to TDS negated this effect. Lowered NA levels in FSL rats were sustained after TDS with IMI significantly reversing this in the hippocampus. Combining a gene-X-environment model of depression with a PTSD paradigm produces exaggerated depressive-like symptoms that display an attenuated response to antidepressant treatment. This work confirms combining FSL rats with TDS exposure as a putative animal model of TRD.

  19. Ubiquitin fold modifier 1 (UFM1 and its target UFBP1 protect pancreatic beta cells from ER stress-induced apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katleen Lemaire

    Full Text Available UFM1 is a member of the ubiquitin like protein family. While the enzymatic cascade of UFM1 conjugation has been elucidated in recent years, the biological function remains largely unknown. In this report we demonstrate that the recently identified C20orf116, which we name UFM1-binding protein 1 containing a PCI domain (UFBP1, and CDK5RAP3 interact with UFM1. Components of the UFM1 conjugation pathway (UFM1, UFBP1, UFL1 and CDK5RAP3 are highly expressed in pancreatic islets of Langerhans and some other secretory tissues. Co-localization of UFM1 with UFBP1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER depends on UFBP1. We demonstrate that ER stress, which is common in secretory cells, induces expression of Ufm1, Ufbp1 and Ufl1 in the beta-cell line INS-1E. siRNA-mediated Ufm1 or Ufbp1 knockdown enhances apoptosis upon ER stress. Silencing the E3 enzyme UFL1, results in similar outcomes, suggesting that UFM1-UFBP1 conjugation is required to prevent ER stress-induced apoptosis. Together, our data suggest that UFM1-UFBP1 participate in preventing ER stress-induced apoptosis in protein secretory cells.

  20. Chemical and biological insights into uranium-induced apoptosis of rat hepatic cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fang; You, Yong [University of South China, College of Hunan Province, Key Laboratory of Tumor Cellular and Molecular Pathology, Hengyang (China); Du, Ke-Jie [University of South China, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hengyang (China); Fang, Zhen [Anhui Normal University, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Wuhu (China); Wen, Ge-Bo [University of South China, College of Hunan Province, Key Laboratory of Tumor Cellular and Molecular Pathology, Hengyang (China); University of South China, Laboratory of Protein Structure and Function, Hengyang (China); Lin, Ying-Wu [University of South China, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hengyang (China); University of South China, Laboratory of Protein Structure and Function, Hengyang (China)

    2015-05-15

    Uranium release into the environment is a threat to human health, and the mechanisms of cytotoxicity caused by uranium are not well-understood. To improve our understanding in this respect, we herein evaluated the effects of uranium exposure on normal rat hepatic BRL cells. As revealed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope analysis, uranyl nitrate was found to be transformed into uranyl phosphate particles in the medium and taken up by BRL cells in an endocytotic uptake manner, which presumably initiates apoptosis of the cell, although soluble uranyl ion may also be toxic. The apoptosis of BRL cells upon uranium exposure was also confirmed by both the acridine orange and ethidium bromide double staining assay and the Annexin V/propidium iodide double staining assay. Further studies revealed that uranium induced the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the uranium-induced apoptosis was found to be associated with the activation of caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9, indicating both a mitochondria-dependent signaling pathway and a death receptor pathway by a crosstalk. This study provides new chemical and biological insights into the mechanism of uranium toxicity toward hepatic cells, which will help seek approaches for biological remediation of uranium. (orig.)

  1. Mechanism of palytoxin-induced [3H]norepinephrine release from a rat pheochromocytoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi, M.; Takahashi, M.; Ohizumi, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Palytoxin, isolated from the zoanthid Palytoha species, is one of the most potent marine toxins. Palytoxin caused a release of [ 3 H]norepinephrine from clonal rat pheochromocytoma cells in a concentration-dependent manner. This releasing action of palytoxin was markedly inhibited or abolished by Co 2+ or Ca 2+ -free medium, but was not modified by tetrodotoxin. The release of [ 3 H]norepinephrine induced by a low concentration of palytoxin was abolished in sodium-free medium and increased as the external Na+ concentrations were increased, but the release induced by a high concentration was unaffected by varying the concentration of external Na + . The release of [ 3 H]norepinephrine induced by both concentrations of palytoxin increased with increasing Ca 2+ concentrations. Palytoxin caused a concentration-dependent increase in 22 Na and 45 Ca influxes into pheochromocytoma cells. The palytoxin-induced 45 Ca influx was markedly inhibited by Co 2+ , whereas the palytoxin-induced 22 Na influx was not affected by tetrodotoxin. These results suggest that in pheochromocytoma cells the [ 3 H]norepinephrine release induced by lower concentrations of palytoxin is primarily brought about by increasing tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na + permeability across the cell membrane, whereas that induced by higher concentrations is mainly caused by a direct increase in Ca 2+ influx into them

  2. A rat osteogenic cell line (UMR 106-01) synthesizes a highly sulfated form of bone sialoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midura, R J; McQuillan, D J; Benham, K J; Fisher, L W; Hascall, V C

    1990-03-25

    The rat osteosarcoma cell line (UMR 106-01) synthesizes and secretes relatively large amounts of a sulfated glycoprotein into its culture medium (approximately 240 ng/10(6) cells/day). This glycoprotein was purified, and amino-terminal sequence analysis identified it as bone sialoprotein (BSP). [35S]Sulfate, [3H]glucosamine, and [3H]tyrosine were used as metabolic precursors to label the BSP. Sulfate esters were found on N- and O-linked oligosaccharides and on tyrosine residues, with about half of the total tyrosines in the BSP being sulfated. The proportion of 35S activity in tyrosine-O-sulfate (approximately 70%) was greater than that in N-linked (approximately 20%) and O-linked (approximately 10%) oligosaccharides. From the deduced amino acid sequence for rat BSP (Oldberg, A., Franzén, A., and Heinegård, D. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 19430-19432), the results indicate that on average approximately 12 tyrosine residues, approximately 3 N-linked, and approximately 2 O-linked oligosaccharides are sulfated/molecule. The carboxyl-terminal quarter of the BSP probably contains most, if not all, of the sulfated tyrosine residues because this region of the polypeptide contains the necessary requirements for tyrosine sulfation. Oligosaccharide analyses indicated that for every N-linked oligosaccharide on the BSP, there are also approximately 2 hexa-, approximately 5 tetra-, and approximately 2 trisaccharides O-linked to serine and threonine residues. On average, the BSP synthesized by UMR 106-01 cells would contain a total of approximately 3 N-linked and approximately 25 of the above O-linked oligosaccharides. This large number of oligosaccharides is in agreement with the known carbohydrate content (approximately 50%) of the BSP.

  3. A rat osteogenic cell line (UMR 106-01) synthesizes a highly sulfated form of bone sialoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midura, R.J.; McQuillan, D.J.; Benham, K.J.; Fisher, L.W.; Hascall, V.C.

    1990-01-01

    The rat osteosarcoma cell line (UMR 106-01) synthesizes and secretes relatively large amounts of a sulfated glycoprotein into its culture medium (approximately 240 ng/10(6) cells/day). This glycoprotein was purified, and amino-terminal sequence analysis identified it as bone sialoprotein (BSP). [35S]Sulfate, [3H]glucosamine, and [3H]tyrosine were used as metabolic precursors to label the BSP. Sulfate esters were found on N- and O-linked oligosaccharides and on tyrosine residues, with about half of the total tyrosines in the BSP being sulfated. The proportion of 35S activity in tyrosine-O-sulfate (approximately 70%) was greater than that in N-linked (approximately 20%) and O-linked (approximately 10%) oligosaccharides. From the deduced amino acid sequence for rat BSP, the results indicate that on average approximately 12 tyrosine residues, approximately 3 N-linked, and approximately 2 O-linked oligosaccharides are sulfated/molecule. The carboxyl-terminal quarter of the BSP probably contains most, if not all, of the sulfated tyrosine residues because this region of the polypeptide contains the necessary requirements for tyrosine sulfation. Oligosaccharide analyses indicated that for every N-linked oligosaccharide on the BSP, there are also approximately 2 hexa-, approximately 5 tetra-, and approximately 2 trisaccharides O-linked to serine and threonine residues. On average, the BSP synthesized by UMR 106-01 cells would contain a total of approximately 3 N-linked and approximately 25 of the above O-linked oligosaccharides. This large number of oligosaccharides is in agreement with the known carbohydrate content (approximately 50%) of the BSP.A

  4. A novel rat fibrosarcoma cell line from transformed bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with maintained in vitro and in vivo stemness properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Meng-Yu; Nestvold, Janne; Rekdal, Øystein; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Fodstad, Øystein

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests a possible relationship between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and sarcoma. MSCs are hypothesized to be the cells initiating sarcomagenesis, and cancer stem cells (CSCs) sharing features of MSCs have been identified in sarcomas. Here, we report on the characteristics of a bone marrow-derived rat mesenchymal stem cell line that spontaneously transformed in long-term culture. The rat transformed mesenchymal stem cells (rTMSCs) produced soft-tissue fibrosarcomas in immunocompromised mice and immunocompetent rats. In vitro, the rTMSCs displayed increased proliferation capacity compared to the untransformed cell line. The transformed MSCs maintained the mesenchymal phenotype by expression of the stem cell marker CD 90 and the lack of hematopoietic and endothelial markers. Cytogenetic analysis detected trisomy 6 in the rTMSCs. Side population (SP) isolation and tumorsphere cultivation of the transformed cells confirmed the presence of CSCs among the rTMSCs. Importantly, the rTMSCs retained their differentiation capacity towards osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. This transformed MSC-based cell line may be valuable in examining the balance in a mixed cell population between cancer stem cell properties and the ability to differentiate to specific non-transformed cell populations. Moreover, it may also be a useful tool to evaluate the efficacy of novel targeted immunotherapies in vivo. - Highlights: • Spontaneously transformed rat MSCs (rTMSCs) share characteristics with normal MSCs. • rTMSCs possess a side population, enriched with tumorigenic cells. • rTMSCs model fibrosarcoma in vivo.

  5. A novel rat fibrosarcoma cell line from transformed bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with maintained in vitro and in vivo stemness properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Meng-Yu [Department of Cell Therapy, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Nestvold, Janne, E-mail: j.m.nestvold@medisin.uio.no [Department of Molecular Medicine, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo (Norway); Rekdal, Øystein [Department of Medical Biology, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø (Norway); Kvalheim, Gunnar [Department of Cell Therapy, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Fodstad, Øystein [Department of Tumor Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    2017-03-15

    Increasing evidence suggests a possible relationship between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and sarcoma. MSCs are hypothesized to be the cells initiating sarcomagenesis, and cancer stem cells (CSCs) sharing features of MSCs have been identified in sarcomas. Here, we report on the characteristics of a bone marrow-derived rat mesenchymal stem cell line that spontaneously transformed in long-term culture. The rat transformed mesenchymal stem cells (rTMSCs) produced soft-tissue fibrosarcomas in immunocompromised mice and immunocompetent rats. In vitro, the rTMSCs displayed increased proliferation capacity compared to the untransformed cell line. The transformed MSCs maintained the mesenchymal phenotype by expression of the stem cell marker CD 90 and the lack of hematopoietic and endothelial markers. Cytogenetic analysis detected trisomy 6 in the rTMSCs. Side population (SP) isolation and tumorsphere cultivation of the transformed cells confirmed the presence of CSCs among the rTMSCs. Importantly, the rTMSCs retained their differentiation capacity towards osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. This transformed MSC-based cell line may be valuable in examining the balance in a mixed cell population between cancer stem cell properties and the ability to differentiate to specific non-transformed cell populations. Moreover, it may also be a useful tool to evaluate the efficacy of novel targeted immunotherapies in vivo. - Highlights: • Spontaneously transformed rat MSCs (rTMSCs) share characteristics with normal MSCs. • rTMSCs possess a side population, enriched with tumorigenic cells. • rTMSCs model fibrosarcoma in vivo.

  6. Reactive hypoglycemia in lean young women with PCOS and correlations with insulin sensitivity and with beta cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuntas, Yuksel; Bilir, Muammer; Ucak, Sema; Gundogdu, Sadi

    2005-04-01

    Reactive hypoglycemia (RH), which is a postprandial hypoglycemic state, occurs within 2-5 h after food intake. It is classified as idiopathic, alimentary, or diabetic reactive hypoglycemia. We studied the incidence of reactive hypoglycemia and looked for any correlations between it and the presence of insulin sensitivity and/or beta cell function in young lean polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients. This study was designed as a cross-sectional study in 64 lean young women with PCOS (BMI lean young women with PCOS. DHEA-S and PRL levels were found to be lower in subjects with RH (P 0.05, respectively). Beta cell function indices such as the insulinogenic index (at 120 min), CIR (at 120 min) and HOMA beta cell index were found to be insignificantly higher in the RH group than the nonreactive hypoglycemia (NRH) group. The 4 h glucose level, but not the 3 h glucose level, was significantly correlated with insulin resistance indices, such as fasting insulin level, HOMA-IR, Quicky index, and FIRI in the RH group. Significantly decreased DHEA-S levels were an interesting finding. In conclusion, there is an urgent need to investigate RH in lean young women with PCOS. Our results indicate that more definite insulin resistance occurs in subjects with RH in the fourth hour of the OGTT than those with RH in the third hour. In addition, RH in the fourth hour together with a low DHEA-S level may be predictive of future diabetes in young women with PCOS even when they are not obese.

  7. Maternal obesity accelerates fetal pancreatic beta-cell but not alpha-cell development in sheep: prenatal consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Stephen P; Zhang, Liren; Zhu, Meijun; Miller, Myrna M; Smith, Derek T; Hess, Bret W; Moss, Gary E; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Nijland, Mark J

    2009-09-01

    Maternal obesity affects offspring weight, body composition, and organ function, increasing diabetes and metabolic syndrome risk. We determined effects of maternal obesity and a high-energy diet on fetal pancreatic development. Sixty days prior to breeding, ewes were assigned to control [100% of National Research Council (NRC) recommendations] or obesogenic (OB; 150% NRC) diets. At 75 days gestation, OB ewes exhibited elevated insulin-to-glucose ratios at rest and during a glucose tolerance test, demonstrating insulin resistance compared with control ewes. In fetal studies, ewes ate their respective diets from 60 days before to 75 days after conception when animals were euthanized under general anesthesia. OB and control ewes increased in body weight by approximately 43% and approximately 6%, respectively, from diet initiation until necropsy. Although all organs were heavier in fetuses from OB ewes, only pancreatic weight increased as a percentage of fetal weight. Blood glucose, insulin, and cortisol were elevated in OB ewes and fetuses on day 75. Insulin-positive cells per unit pancreatic area were 50% greater in fetuses from OB ewes as a result of increased beta-cell mitoses rather than decreased programmed cell death. Lambs of OB ewes were born earlier but weighed the same as control lambs; however, their crown-to-rump length was reduced, and their fat mass was increased. We conclude that increased systemic insulin in fetuses from OB ewes results from increased glucose exposure and/or cortisol-induced accelerated fetal beta-cell maturation and may contribute to premature beta-cell function loss and predisposition to obesity and metabolic disease in offspring.

  8. Biotin uptake by mouse and human pancreatic beta cells/islets: a regulated, lipopolysaccharide-sensitive carrier-mediated process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Sekar, Thillai V.

    2014-01-01

    Biotin is essential for the normal function of pancreatic beta cells. These cells obtain biotin from their surroundings via transport across their cell membrane. Little is known about the uptake mechanism involved, how it is regulated, and how it is affected by internal and external factors. We addressed these issues using the mouse-derived pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells and freshly isolated mouse and human primary pancreatic beta cells as models. The results showed biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells occurs via a Na+-dependent, carrier-mediated process, that is sensitive to desthiobiotin, as well as to pantothenic acid and lipoate; the process is also saturable as a function of concentration (apparent Km = 22.24 ± 5.5 μM). These cells express the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT), whose knockdown (with doxycycline-inducible shRNA) led to a sever inhibition in biotin uptake. Similarly, uptake of biotin by mouse and human primary pancreatic islets is Na+-dependent and carrier-mediated, and both cell types express SMVT. Biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells is also adaptively regulated (via transcriptional mechanism) by extracellular substrate level. Chronic treatment of pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) leads to inhibition in biotin uptake. This inhibition is mediated via a Toll-Like receptor 4-mediated process and involves a decrease in membrane expression of SMVT. These findings show, for the first time, that pancreatic beta cells/islets take up biotin via a specific and regulated carrier-mediated process, and that the process is sensitive to the effect of LPS. PMID:24904078

  9. In vivo and in vitro characterization of [18F]-FE-(+)-DTBZ as a tracer for beta-cell mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, Olof; Jahan, Mahabuba; Johnstroem, Peter; Korsgren, Olle; Sundin, Anders; Halldin, Christer; Johansson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The positron emission tomography (PET) tracer 9-[ 18 F]fluoroethyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine ([ 18 F]-FE-(+)-DTBZ) is a potential candidate for quantifying beta-cell mass in vivo. The purpose was to investigate in vitro and in vivo utility of this tracer for the assessment of beta-cell mass. Methods: Three pigs were intravenously administered [ 18 F]-FE-(+)-DTBZ and examined by PET/computed tomography. Binding parameters were estimated by kinetic modeling. In vitro k D and B max were determined by saturation binding studies of endocrine and exocrine human tissue homogenates. In vitro pancreatic uptake was determined by tissue autoradiography with pancreases from patients with types 1 (T1DM) and 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and healthy controls. Results: [ 18 F]-FE-(+)-DTBZ had a k D of 3.5±1.0 nM, a B max of 382±108 fmol/mg protein and a specificity of 89±1.8% in islet homogenates. The total exocrine uptake was lower and 65% was nondisplaceable. No uptake difference was observed in pancreatic tissue slices from patients with T1DM, T2DM or healthy controls. The in vivo porcine pancreatic uptake reached a peak of standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.8 with a low distribution volume ratio in all animals. Moderate to high tracer uptake was identified in the bile system and in bone. Conclusions: [ 18 F]-FE-(+)-DTBZ binds to vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) with high specificity in pure islet tissue in vitro. However, there is high nondisplaceable binding to exocrine tissue. In addition, in vivo tracer metabolism and dehalogenation result in severe underestimation of porcine pancreatic VMAT2 expression and BCM. The results do not support [ 18 F]-FE-(+)-DTBZ as a suitable tracer for in vivo beta-cell imaging.

  10. Arsenic exposure and calpain-10 polymorphisms impair the function of pancreatic beta-cells in humans: a pilot study of risk factors for T2DM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Díaz-Villaseñor

    Full Text Available The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is increasing worldwide and diverse environmental and genetic risk factors are well recognized. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the calpain-10 gene (CAPN-10, which encodes a protein involved in the secretion and action of insulin, and chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs through drinking water have been independently associated with an increase in the risk for T2DM. In the present work we evaluated if CAPN-10 SNPs and iAs exposure jointly contribute to the outcome of T2DM. Insulin secretion (beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity were evaluated indirectly through validated indexes (HOMA2 in subjects with and without T2DM who have been exposed to a gradient of iAs in their drinking water in northern Mexico. The results were analyzed taking into account the presence of the risk factor SNPs SNP-43 and -44 in CAPN-10. Subjects with T2DM had significantly lower beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity. An inverse association was found between beta-cell function and iAs exposure, the association being more pronounced in subjects with T2DM. Subjects without T2DM who were carriers of the at-risk genotype SNP-43 or -44, also had significantly lower beta-cell function. The association of SNP-43 with beta-cell function was dependent on iAs exposure, age, gender and BMI, whereas the association with SNP-44 was independent of all of these factors. Chronic exposure to iAs seems to be a risk factor for T2DM in humans through the reduction of beta-cell function, with an enhanced effect seen in the presence of the at-risk genotype of SNP-43 in CAPN-10. Carriers of CAPN-10 SNP-44 have also shown reduced beta-cell function.

  11. High Glucose Aggravates the Detrimental Effects of Pancreatic Stellate Cells on Beta-Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. We here assess the effects of PSCs on β-cell function and apoptosis in vivo and in vitro. Materials and Methods. PSCs were transplanted into Wistar and Goto-Kakizaki (GK rats. Sixteen weeks after transplantation, β-cell function, apoptosis, and islet fibrosis were assessed. In vitro the effects of PSCs conditioned medium (PSCs-CM and/or high concentration of glucose on INS-1 cell function was assessed by measuring insulin secretion, INS-1 cell survival, apoptosis, and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress associated CHOP expression. Results. PSCs transplantation exacerbated the impaired β-cell function in GK rats, but had no significant effects in Wistar rats. In vitro, PSCs-CM caused impaired INS-1 cell viability and insulin secretion and increased apoptosis, which were more pronounced in the presence of high glucose. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates that PSCs induce β-cell failure in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Regulates the Expression of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 in Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, J; Imachi, H; Iwama, H; Zhang, H; Murao, K

    2016-05-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) in pancreatic beta cells influences insulin secretion and cholesterol homeostasis. The present study investigates whether insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), which mediates stimulation of ABCA1 gene expression, could also interfere with the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) cascade.ABCA1 expression was examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blot analysis, and a reporter gene assay in rat insulin-secreting INS-1 cells incubated with IGF-1. The binding of forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) protein to the ABCA1 promoter was assessed by a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. ABCA1 protein levels increased in response to rising concentrations of IGF-1. Real-time PCR analysis showed a significant increase in ABCA1 mRNA expression. However, both effects were suppressed after silencing the IGF-1 receptor. In parallel with its effect on endogenous ABCA1 mRNA levels, IGF-1 induced the activity of a reporter construct containing the ABCA1 promoter, while it was abrogated by LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI3-K. Constitutively active Akt stimulated activity of the ABCA1 promoter, and a dominant-negative mutant of Akt or mutagenesis of the FoxO1 response element in the ABCA1 promoter abolished the ability of IGF-1 to stimulate promoter activity. A ChIP assay showed that FoxO1 mediated its transcriptional activity by directly binding to the ABCA1 promoter region. The knockdown of FoxO1 disrupted the effect of IGF-1 on ABCA1 expression. Furthermore, IGF-1 promoted cholesterol efflux and reduced the pancreatic lipotoxicity. These results demonstrate that the PI3-K/Akt/FoxO1 pathway contributes to the regulation of ABCA1 expression in response to IGF-1 stimulation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. On-line analysis of biosignals for the automation of total and specific sleep deprivation in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ENNIO A VIVALDI

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A computer-based system that automates sleep studies, including sleep deprivation paradigms, is described. The system allows for total or REM-specific sleep deprivation and is based on a reliable, fast-responding, on-line state detection algorithm linked to a dependable intervention device. Behavioral state detection is achieved by dimensión reduction of short-term EEG power spectrum. Interventions are made by serial outputs to servomotors that move a cage with different patterns and variable intensity. The system can adapt itself to individual characteristics and to changes in recording conditions. Customized protocols can be designed by defining the states or stages to be deprived, including scheduling temporal patterns. A detailed analysis of the relevant signáis during and after deprivation is readily available. Data is presented from two experimental designs in rats. One consisted of specific REM-sleep short-term deprivation and the other of 10-hour total sleep deprivation. An outline of conceptual and practical considerations involved in the automation of laboratory set-ups oriented to biosignal analysis is provided. Careful monitoring of sleep EEG variables during sleep deprivation suggests peculiarities of brain functioning in that condition. A corollary is that sleep deprivation should not be considered to be merely a forced prolonged wakefulness.

  14. Intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation and segregation in a rat fibroblast cell line transfected with a human insulin receptor gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, J.R.; Olefsky, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The cellular processing of insulin and insulin receptors was studied using a rat fibroblast cell line that had been transfected with a normal human insulin receptor gene, expressing approximately 500 times the normal number of native fibroblasts insulin receptors. These cells bind and internalize insulin normally. Biochemically assays based on the selective precipitation by polyethylene glycol of intact insulin-receptor complexes but not of free intracellular insulin were developed to study the time course of intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation. Fibroblasts were incubated with radiolabeled insulin at 4 0 C, and internalization of insulin-receptor complexes was initiated by warming the cells to 37 0 C. Within 2 min, 90% of the internalized radioactivity was composed of intact insulin-receptor complexes. The dissociation of insulin from internalized insulin-receptor complexes was markedly inhibited by monensin and chloroquine. Furthermore, chloroquine markedly increased the number of cross-linkable intracellular insulin-receptor complexes, as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography. These findings suggest that acidification of intracellular vesicles is responsible for insulin-receptor dissociation. Physical segregation of dissociated intracellular insulin from its receptor was monitored. The results are consistent with the view that segregation of insulin and receptor occurs 5-10 min after initiation of dissociation. These studies demonstrate the intracellular itinerary of insulin-receptor complexes, including internalization, dissociation of insulin from the internalized receptor within an acidified compartment, segregation of insulin from the receptor, and subsequent ligand degradation

  15. Effect of long-term transfusion therapy on the glycometabolic status and pancreatic beta cell function in patients with beta Thalassemia major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalakshi G Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is a major complication of iron overload in patients with beta thalassemia major. Design: This is a descriptive study conducted in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital to analyze beta cell function and insulin resistance, and their relation to iron overload status in beta thalassemia major. Fasting glucose, two-hour post load glucose, fasting insulin, alanine amino transaminase (ALT, and ferritin were used as outcome measures. The homeostatic model assessment (HOMA model was used to calculate the beta cell function and insulin resistance index. Results: Of the 30 cases, 20% had impaired fasting glucose, 3.3% had impaired glucose tolerance, and none had diabetes. Fasting glucose was not significant between the cases and controls (P = 0.113. Fasting insulin (P = 0.001, ferritin (P = 0.001, and ALT (P = 0.001 levels were significantly high in the cases. Insulin resistance index was significantly higher in the cases (P = 0.001 as also the beta cell function (P = 0.001. With increase in age and the number of units transfused there is a decline in beta cell function, fasting insulin, and insulin resistance after attaining the maximum level. This suggests that initial insulin resistance is followed by insulin depletion due to loss of beta cell function, leading to diabetes mellitus. Conclusion: Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT and insulin resistance precede the onset of insulin-dependent diabetes and adequate chelation therapy is essential for delaying the onset or for prevention of diabetes.

  16. High-fat, carbohydrate-free diet markedly aggravates obesity but prevents beta-cell loss and diabetes in the obese, diabetes-susceptible db/db strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhashemi, Farshad; Kluth, Oliver; Scherneck, Stephan; Vogel, Heike; Kluge, Reinhart; Schurmann, Annette; Joost, Hans-Georg; Neschen, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    We have previously reported that a high-fat, carbohydrate-free diet prevents diabetes and beta-cell destruction in the New Zealand Obese (NZO) mouse strain. Here we investigated the effect of diets with and without carbohydrates on obesity and development of beta-cell failure in a second mouse model of type 2 diabetes, the db/db mouse. When kept on a carbohydrate-containing standard (SD; with (w/w) 5.1, 58.3, and 17.6% fat, carbohydrates and protein, respectively) or high-fat diet (HFD; 14.6, 46.7 and 17.1%), db/db mice developed severe diabetes (blood glucose >20 mmol/l, weight loss, polydipsia and polyurea) associated with a selective loss of pancreatic beta-cells, reduced GLUT2 expression in the remaining beta-cells, and reduced plasma insulin levels. In contrast, db/db mice kept on a high-fat, carbohydrate-free diet (CFD; with 30.2 and 26.4% (w/w) fat or protein) did not develop diabetes and exhibited near-normal, hyperplastic islets in spite of a morbid obesity (fat content >60%) associated with hyperinsulinaemia. These data indicate that in genetically different mouse models of obesity-associated diabetes, obesity and dietary fat are not sufficient, and dietary carbohydrates are required, for beta-cell destruction.

  17. The enteroinsular axis and endocrine pancreatic function in chronic alcohol consumers: evidence for early beta-cell hypofunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patto, R J; Russo, E K; Borges, D R; Neves, M M

    1993-09-01

    Chronic alcohol consumers may have, as judged by functional criteria, exocrine as well as endocrine pancreatic dysfunction, the latter represented by a decreased insulin response to an oral glucose load. To investigate whether this decreased insulin response was due to an ethanol-induced beta-cell dysfunction or to an ethanol-induced dysfunction of the enteroinsular axis, we determined glucose, insulin, and C-peptide plasma concentrations following an oral and an intravenous glucose load in 16 healthy volunteer nonalcohol consumers and in 10 chronic alcohol consumers. In each group, total integrated response for glucose did not significantly change whether glucose was given orally or intravenously, indicating isoglycemic glucose loads. The total integrated response values for insulin in the alcoholic group following both glucose loads as well as C-peptide plasma concentrations were significantly lower than in the control group. Moreover, in both groups the insulin TIR values following the oral glucose load were significantly greater than the values obtained following the intravenous glucose load, indicating an incretin effect. These results indicate that the decreased insulin response observed in alcoholics was not caused by a dysfunction of the enteroinsular axis because it also occurred following an intravenous glucose load, but by an ethanol-induced beta-cell dysfunction because C-peptide and insulin were proportionally decreased in this group.

  18. Relationship of Soluble RAGE with Insulin Resistance and Beta Cell Function during Development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Kumar Biswas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined whether circulating levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE alter in prediabetes and correlate with insulin resistance (IR and beta cell function in prediabetes and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Subjects without previous history of diabetes were recruited and grouped as control, prediabetes, and newly diagnosed T2DM. The control subjects (n=40 and people with prediabetes (n=52 and diabetes (n=66 were similar in terms of age, sex, BMI, systolic and diastolic BP, and fasting insulin level. HOMA-IR was found significantly higher in people with diabetes than control subjects (p<0.001 and people with prediabetes (p=0.005; and HOMA-%B was found significantly deteriorated in people with diabetes (p<0.001 compared to control subjects and people with prediabetes. However, serum sRAGE levels did not show any significant alteration in people with prediabetes compared to control subjects. Moreover, univariate and multivariate analyses did not identify any significant correlation and statistical association of sRAGE with HOMA-IR and HOMA-%B in people with prediabetes and newly diagnosed T2DM. Our data suggest that serum sRAGE levels do not alter in people with prediabetes compared to control subjects and do not correlate or associate with IR and beta cell function during development of T2DM.

  19. Fetal pancreatic beta-cell function in pregnancies complicated by maternal diabetes mellitus: relationship to fetal acidemia and macrosomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvesen, D R; Brudenell, J M; Proudler, A J; Crook, D; Nicolaides, K H

    1993-05-01

    Our purpose was to investigate the relationship between fetal pancreatic beta-cell function and fetal acidemia and macrosomia in pregnancies complicated by maternal diabetes mellitus. A cross-sectional study at the Harris Birthright Research Centre for Fetal Medicine, London, was performed. In 32 pregnancies complicated by maternal diabetes mellitus cordocentesis was performed at 36 to 39 weeks' gestation for the measurement of umbilical venous blood pH, PO2, PCO2, lactate, and glucose concentration; plasma insulin immunoreactivity; and insulin/glucose ratio. A reference range for plasma insulin and insulin/glucose ratio was constructed by studying fetal blood samples from 80 women who did not have diabetes mellitus. Mean umbilical venous blood pH was significantly lower and plasma insulin immunoreactivity and insulin/glucose ratio were significantly higher than the appropriate normal mean for gestation. There were significant associations between (1) maternal and fetal blood glucose concentrations (r = 0.95, p < 0.0001), (2) fetal blood glucose and plasma insulin immunoreactivity (r = 0.57, p < 0.01), (3) fetal plasma insulin immunoreactivity and blood pH (r = -0.39, p < 0.05), and (4) fetal insulin/glucose ratio and degree of macrosomia (r = 0.76, p < 0.0001). Fetal pancreatic beta-cell hyperplasia is implicated in the pathogenesis of both fetal acidemia and macrosomia.

  20. Circulating microRNA levels predict residual beta cell function and glycaemic control in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samandari, Nasim; Mirza, Aashiq H; Nielsen, Lotte B

    2017-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We aimed to identify circulating microRNA (miRNA) that predicts clinical progression in a cohort of 123 children with new-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: Plasma samples were prospectively obtained at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 60 months after diagnosis from a subset of 40 children......RNAs revealed significant enrichment for pathways related to gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor and angiogenesis pathways. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The miRNA hsa-miR-197-3p at 3 months was the strongest predictor of residual beta cell function 1 year after diagnosis in children with type 1 diabetes...... from the Danish Remission Phase Cohort, and profiled for miRNAs. At the same time points, meal-stimulated C-peptide and HbA1c levels were measured and insulin-dose adjusted HbA1c (IDAA1c) calculated. miRNAs that at 3 months after diagnosis predicted residual beta cell function and glycaemic control...

  1. Effects of glucose, insulin, and supernatant from pancreatic beta-cells on brain-pancreas relative protein in rat hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Yan-Hua; Westenbroek, Christel; Tie, Lu; Liu, Ai-Hua; Yu, He-Ming; Ter Horst, Gert J.; Li, Xue-Jun

    2006-01-01

    Brain-pancreas relative protein (BPRP) is a novel protein that mainly expresses in brain and pancreas. In our previous study, we found that various stressors significantly decreased the expression of BPRP in pancreas in vivo, accompanied by changes in insulin and glucose levels, and that expression

  2. Defective glucose and lipid metabolism in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy involve liver, muscle tissue and pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Dela, Flemming

    2005-01-01

    .01. Disposition index (i.e. first-phase insulin response to intravenous glucose multiplied by incremental glucose disposal) was reduced by 46% (P = 0.05) in LIPO compared with the combined groups of NONLIPO and NAIVE, indicating an impaired adaptation of beta-cell function to insulin resistance in LIPO...... of glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism and beta-cell function in lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients. METHODS: [3-3H]glucose was applied during euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamps in association with indirect calorimetry in 43 normoglycaemic HIV-infected patients (18 lipodystrophic patients on HAART (LIPO......), 18 patients without lipodystrophy on HAART (NONLIPO) and seven patients who were naive to antiretroviral therapy (NAIVE) respectively). beta-cell function was evaluated by an intravenous glucose tolerance test. RESULTS: Compared with NONLIPO and NAIVE separately, LIPO displayed markedly reduced ratio...

  3. Human beta-cell precursors mature into functional insulin-producing cells in an immunoisolation device: implications for diabetes cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hee; Hao, Ergeng; Savinov, Alexei Y; Geron, Ifat; Strongin, Alex Y; Itkin-Ansari, Pamela

    2009-04-15

    Islet transplantation is limited by the need for chronic immunosuppression and the paucity of donor tissue. As new sources of human beta-cells are developed (e.g., stem cell-derived tissue), transplanting them in a durable device could obviate the need for immunosuppression, while also protecting the patient from any risk of tumorigenicity. Here, we studied (1) the survival and function of encapsulated human beta-cells and their progenitors and (2) the engraftment of encapsulated murine beta-cells in allo- and autoimmune settings. Human islets and human fetal pancreatic islet-like cell clusters were encapsulated in polytetrafluorethylene devices (TheraCyte) and transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Graft survival and function was measured by immunohistochemistry, circulating human C-peptide levels, and blood glucose levels. Bioluminescent imaging was used to monitor encapsulated neonatal murine islets. Encapsulated human islet-like cell clusters survived, replicated, and acquired a level of glucose responsive insulin secretion sufficient to ameliorate hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. Bioluminescent imaging of encapsulated murine neonatal islets revealed a dynamic process of cell death followed by regrowth, resulting in robust long-term allograft survival. Further, in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type I diabetes, encapsulated primary beta-cells ameliorated diabetes without stimulating a detectable T-cell response. We demonstrate for the first time that human beta-cells function is compatible with encapsulation in a durable, immunoprotective device. Moreover, our study suggests that encapsulation of beta-cells before terminal differentiation will be a successful approach for new cell-based therapies for diabetes, such as those derived from stem cells.

  4. Development of biomarker specific of pancreatic beta cells (incretin radiolabelled) for image of beta functional mass in diabetic and obese: study in animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Increased prevalence of obesity worldwide, has become a vast concern, stimulating investigations focusing prevention and therapy of this condition. The association of type 2 diabetes or insulin resistance aggravates the prognosis of obesity. Even patients successfully submitted to bariatric or metabolic surgery, may not be cured of diabetes, as improvement of circulating values of glucose and insulin not necessarily reflects recovery of pancreatic beta cell mass. There is no consensus about how to estimate beta cell mass in vivo. Available tools suffer from low sensitivity and specificity, often being as well cumbersome and expensive. Radiolabeled incretins, such as glucagon-like-peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogs, seem to be promising options for the measurement of beta cell mass in diabetes and insulinoma. The objective of this study was the development of two conjugates of GLP-1 analog, radiolabeled with 99m Technetium, as a noninvasive imaging method for the estimation of pancreatic beta cell mass, in the presence of obesity. Animal models were selected, including hyperlipidic diet-induced obesity, diet restricted obesity, and as controls, alloxan diabetes. Results indicated that both radiotracers achieved over 97% radiochemical yield. The most successful product was 99m Tc-HYNIC-βAla-Exendin-4. Low beta cell mass uptake occurred in diet-induced obesity. Diet-restricted obesity, with substantial shedding of excess body weight, was followed by remarkable decrease of fasting blood glucose, however beta cell mass uptake was only mildly improved. Future studies are recommended in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dieting, including bariatric and metabolic operations. (author)

  5. Choline transport via choline transporter-like protein 1 in conditionally immortalized rat syncytiotrophoblast cell lines TR-TBT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, N-Y; Choi, H-M; Kang, Y-S

    2009-04-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient for phospholipids and acetylcholine biosynthesis in normal development of fetus. In the present study, we investigated the functional characteristics of choline transport system and inhibitory effect of cationic drugs on choline transport in rat conditionally immortalized syncytiotrophoblast cell line (TR-TBT). Choline transport was weakly Na(+) dependent and significantly influenced by extracellular pH and by membrane depolarization. The transport process of choline is saturable with Michaelis-Menten constants (K(m)) of 68microM and 130microM in TR-TBT 18d-1 and TR-TBT 18d-2 respectively. Choline uptake in the cells was inhibited by unlabeled choline and hemicholinium-3 as well as various organic cations including guanidine, amiloride and acetylcholine. However, the prototypical organic cation tetraethylammonium and cimetidine showed very little inhibitory effect of choline uptake in TR-TBT cells. RT-PCR revealed that choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1) and organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) are expressed in TR-TBT cells. The transport properties of choline in TR-TBT cells were similar or identical to that of CTL1 but not OCT2. CTL1 was also detected in human placenta. In addition, several cationic drugs such as diphenhydramine and verapamil competitively inhibited choline uptake in TR-TBT 18d-1 with K(i) of 115microM and 55microM, respectively. Our results suggest that choline transport system, which has intermediate affinity and weakly Na(+) dependent, in TR-TBT seems to occur through a CTL1 and this system may have relevance with the uptake of pharmacologically important organic cation drugs.

  6. Selective destruction of mouse islet beta cells by human T lymphocytes in a newly-established humanized type 1 diabetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yong, E-mail: yongzhao@uic.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Guo, Chengshan; Hwang, David; Lin, Brian; Dingeldein, Michael; Mihailescu, Dan; Sam, Susan; Sidhwani, Seema [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Zhang, Yongkang [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Jain, Sumit [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Skidgel, Randal A. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Prabhakar, Bellur S. [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Mazzone, Theodore [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Holterman, Mark J. [Department of Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Establish a human immune-mediated type 1 diabetic model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. {yields} Using the irradiated diabetic NOD mouse spleen mononuclear cells as trigger. {yields} The islet {beta} cells were selectively destroyed by infiltrated human T cells. {yields} The model can facilitate translational research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. -- Abstract: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by a T cell-mediated autoimmune response that leads to the loss of insulin-producing {beta} cells. The optimal preclinical testing of promising therapies would be aided by a humanized immune-mediated T1D model. We develop this model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. The selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta} cells was mediated by human T lymphocytes after an initial trigger was supplied by the injection of irradiated spleen mononuclear cells (SMC) from diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. This resulted in severe insulitis, a marked loss of total {beta}-cell mass, and other related phenotypes of T1D. The migration of human T cells to pancreatic islets was controlled by the {beta} cell-produced highly conserved chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4, as demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments using antibody to CXCR4. The specificity of humanized T cell-mediated immune responses against islet {beta} cells was generated by the local inflammatory microenvironment in pancreatic islets including human CD4{sup +} T cell infiltration and clonal expansion, and the mouse islet {beta}-cell-derived CD1d-mediated human iNKT activation. The selective destruction of mouse islet {beta} cells by a human T cell-mediated immune response in this humanized T1D model can mimic those observed in T1D patients. This model can provide a valuable tool for translational research into T1D.

  7. Islet immunity and beta cell reserve of indigenous Black South Africans with ketoacidosis at initial diagnosis of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpebegh, Chukwuma; Longo-Mbenza, Benjamin; Blanco-Blanco, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Islet immunity and beta cell reserve status were utilized to classify persons with ketoacidosis as the initial manifestation of diabetes. The clinical features of the various diabetes classes were also characterized. Prospective cross sectional study. Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital, Mthatha, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Indigenous Black South Africans with ketoacidosis as the initial manifestation of diabetes. Islet immunity and beta cell reserve were respectively assessed using serum anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD) antibody and serum C-peptide after 1 mg of intravenous glucagon. Serum anti-GAD 65 antibody > or = 5 units/L and or = 0.5 ng/mL and < 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. The proportions of patients with A+beta-, A+beta+, A-beta- and A-beta+ and their clinical characteristics were determined. Of the 38 males and 33 females who participated in the study, patients were categorized in various classes: A-beta+, 46.5% (n=33/ 71); A-beta-, 26.8% (n=19/71); A+beta-, 22.5% (n=16/71); and A+beta+, 4.2% (n=3/71). The ages of the various classes were: 41.8 +/- 13.8 years for A-beta+ (n=33); 36.5 +/- 14.6 years for A-beta- (n=19); and 20.6 +/- 7.1 years for the combination of A+beta- with A+beta+ (n=19) (P<.0001, P<.0001 for the combination of A+beta- and A+beta+ vs A-beta+, P=.001 for the combination of A+beta- and A+beta+ vs A-beta-and P=.2 for A-beta- vs A-beta+. The clinical features of type 2 diabetes were most prevalent in A-beta+ class while the A+beta- and A+beta+ groups had the clinical profile of type 1A diabetes. Most of the indigenous Black South African patients with ketoacidosis as the initial manifestation of diabetes had islet immunity, beta cell reserve status and clinical profiles of type 2 diabetes.

  8. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor vildagliptin improves beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity in subjects with impaired fasting glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utzschneider, Kristina M; Tong, Jenny; Montgomery, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of treatment with the dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor vildagliptin on insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function in subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 22 subjects with IFG (11 female and 11 male, mean +/- SD...... age 59.6 +/- 11.5 years) were treated orally with 100 mg vildagliptin once daily in a single-blind study. Subjects received placebo for 2 weeks (run-in) followed by vildagliptin for 6 weeks (treatment) and then placebo for 2 weeks (washout). A frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test....... RESULTS: Fasting plasma glucose did not change after 6 weeks of vildagliptin treatment. With treatment, mean +/- SEM AIR(g) increased from 224 +/- 44 to 286 +/- 52 pmol/l (P

  9. Non-invasive phenotyping and drug testing in single cardiomyocytes or beta-cells by calcium imaging and optogenetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Fen Chang

    Full Text Available Identification of drug induced electrical instability of the heart curtails development, and introduction, of potentially proarrhythmic drugs. This problem usually requires complimentary contact based approaches such as patch-clamp electrophysiology combined with field stimulation electrodes to observe and control the cell. This produces data with high signal to noise but requires direct physical contact generally preventing high-throughput, or prolonged, phenotyping of single cells or tissues. Combining genetically encoded optogenetic control and spectrally compatible calcium indicator tools into a single adenoviral vector allows the analogous capability for cell control with simultaneous cellular phenotyping without the need for contact. This combination can be applied to single rodent primary adult cardiomyocytes, and human stem cell derived cardiomyocytes, enabling contactless small molecule evaluation for inhibitors of sodium, potassium and calcium channels suggesting it may be useful for early toxicity work. In pancreatic beta-cells it reveals the effects of glucose and the KATP inhibitor gliclazide.

  10. The beta-cell response to glucagon and mixed meal stimulation in non-insulin dependent diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjessing, H J; Damsgaard, E M; Matzen, L E

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlations of the C-peptide and insulin responses after stimulation with glucagon intravenously as well as the 24-h urinary excretion of C-peptide to the C-peptide response to a standard mixed meal in 30 patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes...... plasma C-peptide (r = 0.55, p less than 0.01). The C-peptide and insulin responses after meal stimulation correlated modestly inversely with HbA1. In conclusion, measurement of C-peptide in fasting state, as well as measurements of C-peptide and insulin after glucagon stimulation, only modestly predict...... the C-peptide response to physiologic stimulation in NIDDM. Twenty-four-hour urinary C-peptide excretion does not predict this response. Patients with NIDDM seem to show a better metabolic control if they have a more pronounced beta-cell response to physiologic stimulation....

  11. A Ratiometric Sensor for Imaging Insulin Secretion in Single beta Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schifferer, M.; Yushchenko, Dmytro A.; Stein, F.; Bolbat, A.; Schultz, C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 4 (2017), s. 525-531 ISSN 2451-9448 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : zinc transporter ZnT8 * line MIN6 * glucose homeostasis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2451945617300624

  12. Iron Regulation of Pancreatic Beta-Cell Functions and Oxidative Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backe, Marie Balslev; Moen, Ingrid Wahl; Ellervik, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Dietary advice is the cornerstone in first-line treatment of metabolic diseases. Nutritional interventions directed at these clinical conditions mainly aim to (a) improve insulin resistance by reducing energy-dense macronutrient intake to obtain weight loss and (b) reduce fluctuations in insulin...

  13. Elevated systemic glutamic acid level in the non-obese diabetic mouse is Idd linked and induces beta cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Viqar Showkat; Lejon, Kristina

    2017-02-01

    Although type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T-cell-mediated disease in the effector stage, the mechanism behind the initial beta cell assault is less understood. Metabolomic differences, including elevated levels of glutamic acid, have been observed in patients with T1D before disease onset, as well as in pre-diabetic non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Increased levels of glutamic acid damage both neurons and beta cells, implying that this could contribute to the initial events of T1D pathogenesis. We investigated the underlying genetic factors and consequences of the increased levels of glutamic acid in NOD mice. Serum glutamic acid levels from a (NOD×B6)F 2 cohort (n = 182) were measured. By genome-wide and Idd region targeted microsatellite mapping, genetic association was detected for six regions including Idd2, Idd4 and Idd22. In silico analysis of potential enzymes and transporters located in and around the mapped regions that are involved in glutamic acid metabolism consisted of alanine aminotransferase, glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, aldehyde dehydrogenase 18 family, alutamyl-prolyl-tRNA synthetase, glutamic acid transporters GLAST and EAAC1. Increased EAAC1 protein expression was observed in lysates from livers of NOD mice compared with B6 mice. Functional consequence of the elevated glutamic acid level in NOD mice was tested by culturing NOD. Rag2 -/- Langerhans' islets with glutamic acid. Induction of apoptosis of the islets was detected upon glutamic acid challenge using TUNEL assay. Our results support the notion that a dysregulated metabolome could contribute to the initiation of T1D. We suggest that targeting of the increased glutamic acid in pre-diabetic patients could be used as a potential therapy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Compartmentalization of GABA synthesis by GAD67 differs between pancreatic beta cells and neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanaani, Jamil; Cianciaruso, Chiara; Phelps, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    of the two non-allelic isoforms GAD65 and GAD67 to vesicular membranes is important for rapid delivery and accumulation of GABA for regulated secretion. While the membrane anchoring and trafficking of GAD65 are mediated by intrinsic hydrophobic modifications, GAD67 remains hydrophilic, and yet is targeted...... to vesicular membrane pathways and synaptic clusters in neurons by both a GAD65-dependent and a distinct GAD65-independent mechanism. Herein we have investigated the membrane association and targeting of GAD67 and GAD65 in monolayer cultures of primary rat, human, and mouse islets and in insulinoma cells. GAD......65 is primarily detected in Golgi membranes and in peripheral vesicles distinct from insulin vesicles in β-cells. In the absence of GAD65, GAD67 is in contrast primarily cytosolic in β-cells; its co-expression with GAD65 is necessary for targeting to Golgi membranes and vesicular compartments. Thus...

  15. Adverse effects of reduced oxygen tension on the proliferative capacity of rat kidney and insulin-secreting cell lines involve DNA damage and stress responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianhua; Jones, R. Huw; Tarry-Adkins, Jane; Smith, Noel H.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    Standard cell culture conditions do not reflect the physiological environment in terms of oxygen tension (20% vs 3%). The effects of lowering oxygen tension on cell proliferation in culture can be beneficial as well as detrimental depending on the cell line studied, but the molecular mechanism underlying such effects is not fully understood. We observed that the proliferative capacity of the rat cell lines NRK and INS-1 was inhibited when cultured under 3% oxygen as compared to 20% oxygen. Suppression of proliferation in NRK cells was accompanied by induction of DNA double strand breaks whereas in INS-1 cells it was accompanied by up-regulation of p53 and p27. Although Sirt1 was up-regulated in both cell lines by 3% oxygen the effects on antioxidant enzymes (MnSOD, CuZnSOD and catalase) were cell line specific. Marked up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was detected in both NRK and INS-1 cells when cultured in 3% oxygen. HO-1 expression can be readily induced by exposure to hydrogen peroxide in culture. These results suggest that reduced oxygen tension suppresses the proliferative capacity of these two cell lines through a stress response that is similar to an oxidative stress response but the molecular events that lead to the reduced cell proliferation are cell line specific

  16. Beta cell function following 1 year vildagliptin or placebo treatment and after 12 week washout in drug-naive patients with type 2 diabetes and mild hyperglycaemia: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foley, J.E.; Bunck, M.C.M.; Moller-Goede, D.L.; Poelma, M.; Nijpels, G.; Eekhoff, E.M.; Schweizer, A.; Heine, R.J.; Diamant, M.

    2011-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Traditional blood glucose lowering agents do not prevent the progressive loss of beta cell function in patients with type 2 diabetes. The dipeptidylpeptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor vildagliptin improves beta cell function both acutely and chronically (up to 2 years). Whether this effect

  17. Bridging the gap between protein carboxyl methylation and phospholipid methylation to understand glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from the pancreatic beta cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowluru, Anjaneyulu

    2008-01-15

    Recent findings have implicated post-translational modifications at C-terminal cysteines [e.g., methylation] of specific proteins [e.g., G-proteins] in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion [GSIS]. Furthermore, methylation at the C-terminal leucine of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A [PP2Ac] has also been shown to be relevant for GSIS. In addition to these two classes of protein methyl transferases, a novel class of glucose-activated phospholipid methyl transferases have also been identified in the beta cell. These enzymes catalyze three successive methylations of phosphatidylethanolamine to yield phosphatidylcholine. The "newly formed" phosphatidylcholine is felt to induce alterations in the membrane fluidity, which might favor vesicular fusion with the plasma membrane for the exocytosis of insulin. The objectives of this commentary are to: (i) review the existing evidence on the regulation, by glucose and other insulin secretagogues, of post-translational carboxylmethylation [CML] of specific proteins in the beta cell; (ii) discuss the experimental evidence, which implicates regulation, by glucose and other insulin secretagogues, of phosphatidylethanolamine methylation in the islet beta cell; (iii) propose a model for potential cross-talk between the protein and lipid methylation pathways in the regulation of GSIS and (iv) highlight potential avenues for future research, including the development of specific pharmacological inhibitors to further decipher regulatory roles for these methylation reactions in islet beta cell function.

  18. Restoring Mitochondrial Function: A Small Molecule-mediated Approach to Enhance Glucose Stimulated Insulin Secretion in Cholesterol Accumulated Pancreatic beta cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asalla, Suman; Girada, Shravan Babu; Kuna, Ramya S.; Chowdhury, Debabrata; Kandagatla, Bhaskar; Oruganti, Srinivas; Bhadra, Utpal; Bhadra, Manika Pal; Kalivendi, Shasi Vardhan; Rao, Swetha Pavani; Row, Anupama; Ibrahim, A.; Ghosh, Partha Pratim; Mitra, Prasenjit

    2016-06-01

    Dyslipidemia, particularly the elevated serum cholesterol levels, aggravate the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. In the present study we explored the relationship between fasting blood sugar and serum lipid parameters in human volunteers which revealed a significant linear effect of serum cholesterol on fasting blood glucose. Short term feeding of cholesterol enriched diet to rodent model resulted in elevated serum cholesterol levels, cholesterol accumulation in pancreatic islets and hyperinsulinemia with modest increase in plasma glucose level. To explore the mechanism, we treated cultured BRIN-BD11 pancreatic beta cells with soluble cholesterol. Our data shows that cholesterol treatment of cultured pancreatic beta cells enhances total cellular cholesterol. While one hour cholesterol exposure enhances insulin exocytosis, overnight cholesterol accumulation in cultured pancreatic beta cells affects cellular respiration, and inhibits Glucose stimulated insulin secretion. We further report that (E)-4-Chloro-2-(1-(2-(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl) hydrazono) ethyl) phenol (small molecule M1) prevents the cholesterol mediated blunting of cellular respiration and potentiates Glucose stimulated insulin secretion which was abolished in pancreatic beta cells on cholesterol accumulation.

  19. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin, inhibits pancreatic beta cell apoptosis in association with its effects suppressing endoplasmic reticulum stress in db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan-ju; Guo, Xin; Li, Chun-jun; Li, Dai-qing; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Yiping; Kong, Yan; Guo, Hang; Liu, De-min; Chen, Li-ming

    2015-02-01

    Vildagliptin promotes beta cell survival by inhibiting cell apoptosis. It has been suggested that chronic ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress triggers beta cell apoptosis. The objective of the study is to explore whether the pro-survival effect of vildagliptin is associated with attenuation of endoplasmic reticulum stress in islets of db/db mice. Vildagliptin was orally administered to db/db mice for 6 weeks, followed by evaluation of beta cell apoptosis by caspase3 activity and TUNEL staining method. Endoplasmic reticulum stress markers were determined with quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analysis. After 6 weeks of treatment, vildagliptin treatment increased plasma active GLP-1 levels (22.63±1.19 vs. 11.69±0.44, Pvildagliptin treatment down-regulated several genes related to endoplasmic reticulum stress including TRIB3 (tribbles homolog 3) (15.9±0.4 vs. 33.3±1.7, ×10⁻³, PVildagliptin promoted beta cell survival in db/db mice in association with down-regulating markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress including TRIB3, ATF-4 as well as CHOP. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Differences in beta-cell function and insulin secretion in Black vs. White obese adolescents: Do incretin hormones play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black youth are at higher risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D) than their White peers. Previously we demonstrated that for the same degree of insulin sensitivity, Black youth have an upregulated beta-cell function and insulin hypersecretion, in response to intravenous (IV) glucose, compared with Whites. T...

  1. Pancreatic beta cells from db/db mice show cell-specific [Ca2+]i and NADH responses to glucose but not to alpha-ketoisocaproic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Larsson-Nyrén, Gerd; Lindström, Per

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We recently showed that timing and magnitude of the glucose-induced cytoplasmic calcium [Ca2+]i response are reproducible and specific for the individual beta cell. We now wanted to identify which step(s) of stimulus-secretion coupling determine the cell specificity of the [Ca2+]i resp...

  2. Exposure to the viral by-product dsRNA or Coxsackievirus B5 triggers pancreatic beta cell apoptosis via a Bim / Mcl-1 imbalance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maikel L Colli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The rise in type 1 diabetes (T1D incidence in recent decades is probably related to modifications in environmental factors. Viruses are among the putative environmental triggers of T1D. The mechanisms regulating beta cell responses to viruses, however, remain to be defined. We have presently clarified the signaling pathways leading to beta cell apoptosis following exposure to the viral mimetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA and a diabetogenic enterovirus (Coxsackievirus B5. Internal dsRNA induces cell death via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. In this process, activation of the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR promotes eIF2α phosphorylation and protein synthesis inhibition, leading to downregulation of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1. Mcl-1 decrease results in the release of the BH3-only protein Bim, which activates the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Indeed, Bim knockdown prevented both dsRNA- and Coxsackievirus B5-induced beta cell death, and counteracted the proapoptotic effects of Mcl-1 silencing. These observations indicate that the balance between Mcl-1 and Bim is a key factor regulating beta cell survival during diabetogenic viral infections.

  3. STAT5 activity in pancreatic beta-cells influences the severity of diabetes in animal models of type 1 and 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackerott, Malene; Møldrup, Annette; Thams, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cell growth and survival and insulin production are stimulated by growth hormone and prolactin through activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)5. To assess the role of STAT5 activity in beta-cells in vivo, we generated transgen...... and type 2 diabetes....... reduced beta-cell proliferation at 6 months of age. The inhibitory effect of high-fat diet or leptin on insulin secretion was diminished in isolated islets from RIP-DNSTAT5 mice compared with wild-type islets. Upon multiple low-dose streptozotocin treatment, RIP-DNSTAT5 mice exhibited higher plasma...... of glucose tolerance, whereas RIP-CASTAT5 mice were more glucose tolerant and less hyperleptinemic than wild-type mice. Although the pancreatic insulin content and relative beta-cell area were increased in high-fat diet-fed RIP-DNSTAT5 mice compared with wild-type or RIP-CASTAT5 mice, RIP-DNSTAT5 mice showed...

  4. Peripheral insulin resistance rather than beta cell dysfunction accounts for geographical differences in impaired fasting blood glucose among sub-Saharan African individuals : findings from the RODAM study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeks, Karlijn A C; Stronks, Karien; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Addo, Juliet; Bahendeka, Silver; Beune, Erik; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Danquah, Ina; Galbete, Cecilia; Henneman, Peter; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Osei, Kwame; Schulze, Matthias B; Spranger, Joachim; Smeeth, Liam; Agyemang, Charles

    2017-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction account for differences in impaired fasting blood glucose (IFBG) levels in sub-Saharan African individuals living in different locations in Europe and Africa. We also aimed to

  5. Peripheral insulin resistance rather than beta cell dysfunction accounts for geographical differences in impaired fasting blood glucose among sub-Saharan African individuals: findings from the RODAM study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeks, Karlijn A. C.; Stronks, Karien; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Addo, Juliet; Bahendeka, Silver; Beune, Erik; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Danquah, Ina; Galbete, Cecilia; Henneman, Peter; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Mockenhaupt, Frank P.; Osei, Kwame; Schulze, Matthias B.; Spranger, Joachim; Smeeth, Liam; Agyemang, Charles

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction account for differences in impaired fasting blood glucose (IFBG) levels in sub-Saharan African individuals living in different locations in Europe and Africa. We also aimed to identify determinants

  6. Cytosolic triglycerides and oxidative stress in central obesity : the missing link between excessive atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, and beta-cell failure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, SJL; IJzerman, RG; Teerlink, T; Westerhoff, HV; Gans, ROB; Heine, RJ

    Central obesity is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here we present a hypothesis that may explain the excess atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction and progressive beta-cell failure. Central obesity is associated with increased cytosolic

  7. PDZ domain-binding motif of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax oncoprotein augments the transforming activity in a rat fibroblast cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Akira; Higuchi, Masaya; Niinuma, Akiko; Ohashi, Minako; Fukushi, Masaya; Oie, Masayasu; Akiyama, Tetsu; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Gejyo, Fumitake; Fujii, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    While human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is associated with the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), HTLV-2 has not been reported to be associated with such malignant leukemias. HTLV-1 Tax1 oncoprotein transforms a rat fibroblast cell line (Rat-1) to form multiple large colonies in soft agar, and this activity is much greater than that of HTLV-2 Tax2. We have demonstrated here that the increased number of transformed colonies induced by Tax1 relative to Tax2 was mediated by a PDZ domain-binding motif (PBM) in Tax1, which is absent in Tax2. Tax1 PBM mediated the interaction of Tax1 with the discs large (Dlg) tumor suppressor containing PDZ domains, and the interaction correlated well with the transforming activities of Tax1 and the mutants. Through this interaction, Tax1 altered the subcellular localization of Dlg from the detergent-soluble to the detergent-insoluble fraction in a fibroblast cell line as well as in HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines. These results suggest that the interaction of Tax1 with PDZ domain protein(s) is critically involved in the transforming activity of Tax1, the activity of which may be a crucial factor in malignant transformation of HTLV-1-infected cells in vivo

  8. Arrest in ciliated cell expansion on the bronchial lining of adult rats caused by chronic exposure to industrial noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Maria Joao R.; Pereira, Antonio S.; Ferreira, Paula G.; Guimara-tilde es, Laura; Freitas, Diamantino; Carvalho, Antonio P.O.; Grande, Nuno R.; Aguas, Artur P.

    2005-01-01

    Workers chronically exposed to high-intensity/low-frequency noise at textile plants show increased frequency of respiratory infections. This phenomenon prompted the herein investigation on the cytology of the bronchial epithelium of Wistar rats submitted to textile noise. Workplace noise from a cotton-mill room of a textile factory was recorded and reproduced in a sound-insulated animal room. The Wistar rats were submitted to a weekly schedule of noise treatment that was similar to that of the textile workers (8h/day, 5 days/week). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to compare the fine morphology of the inner surface of the bronchi in noise-exposed and control rats. SEM quantitative cytology revealed that exposure to noise for 5-7 months caused inhibition in the natural expansion of the area occupied by ciliated cells on the bronchial epithelium as adult rats grow older. This difference between noise-exposed and age-matched control rats was statistically significant (P0.05) and documents that the cytology of the rat bronchial epithelium is mildly altered by noise exposure. The decrease in the area of bronchial cilia may impair the mucociliar clearance of the respiratory airways and, thus, increase vulnerability to respiratory infection

  9. Association of NEFA composition with insulin sensitivity and beta cell function in the Prospective Metabolism and Islet Cell Evaluation (PROMISE) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Luke W; Harris, Stewart B; Retnakaran, Ravi; Giacca, Adria; Liu, Zhen; Bazinet, Richard P; Hanley, Anthony J

    2018-04-01

    Our aim was to determine the longitudinal associations of individual NEFA with the pathogenesis of diabetes, specifically with differences in insulin sensitivity and beta cell function over 6 years in a cohort of individuals who are at risk for diabetes. In the Prospective Metabolism and Islet Cell Evaluation (PROMISE) longitudinal cohort, 477 participants had serum NEFA measured at the baseline visit and completed an OGTT at three time points over 6 years. Outcome variables were calculated using the OGTT values. At each visit, insulin sensitivity was assessed using the HOMA2 of insulin sensitivity (HOMA2-%S) and the Matsuda index, while beta cell function was assessed using the insulinogenic index over HOMA-IR (IGI/IR) and the insulin secretion-sensitivity index-2 (ISSI-2). Generalised estimating equations were used, adjusting for time, waist, sex, ethnicity, baseline age, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and physical activity. NEFA were analysed as both concentrations (nmol/ml) and proportions (mol%) of the total fraction. Participants' (73% female, 70% with European ancestry) insulin sensitivity and beta cell function declined by 14-21% over 6 years of follow-up. In unadjusted models, several NEFA (e.g. 18:1 n-7, 22:4 n-6) were associated with lower insulin sensitivity, however, nearly all of these associations were attenuated in fully adjusted models. In adjusted models, total NEFA, 16:0, 18:1 n-9 and 18:2 n-6 (as concentrations) were associated with 3.7-8.0% lower IGI/IR and ISSI-2, while only 20:5 n-3 (as mol%) was associated with 7.7% higher HOMA2-%S. Total NEFA concentration was a strong predictor of lower beta cell function over 6 years. Our results suggest that the association with beta cell function is due to the absolute size of the serum NEFA fraction, rather than the specific fatty acid composition.

  10. Clinical characteristics and beta cell function in Chinese patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus with different levels of serum triglyceride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shuang; Zhou, Huan; Han, Tingting; Li, Yangxue; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Wei; Hu, Yaomin

    2015-04-29

    To explore clinical characteristics and beta cell function in Chinese patients with newly diagnosed drug naive type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with different levels of serum triglyceride (TG). Patients with newly diagnosed T2DM (n = 624) were enrolled and divided into different groups according to levels of serum TG. All patients underwent oral glucose tolerance tests and insulin releasing tests. Demographic data, lipid profiles, glucose levels, and insulin profiles were compared between different groups. Basic insulin secretion function index (homeostasis model assessment for beta cell function index, HOMA-β), modified beta cell function index (MBCI), glucose disposition indices (DI), and early insulin secretion function index (insulinogenic index, IGI) were used to evaluate the beta cell function. Patients of newly diagnosed T2DM with hypertriglyceridemia were younger, fatter and had worse lipid profiles, glucose profiles, and high insulin levels than those with normal TG. There is no difference in early phase insulin secretion among groups of newly diagnosed T2DM patients with different TG levels. The basal beta cell function (HOMA-β and MBCI) initially increased along rising TG levels and then decreased as the TG levels rose further. The insulin sensitivity was relatively high in patients with a low level of TG and low with a high level of TG. Hypertriglyceridemia influences clinical characteristics and β cell function of Chinese patients with newly diagnosed T2DM. A better management of dyslipidemia may, to some extent, reduce the effect of lipotoxicity, thereby improving glucose homeostasis in patients with newly diagnosed T2DM.

  11. Feasibility of dual reporter gene in rat myoblast cell line using human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, You La; Ahn, Sohn Joo; Choi, Chang Ik; Lee, Sang Woo; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jae Tae [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    To develop a non-invasive combined imaging method of gamma camera and optical imaging to assess rat myoblast cell line, H9c2, we constructed retrovirus containing hNIS and EGFP gene, and transfected to rat myoblast cell and monitored hNIS and EGFP expression. Rat myoblast cell line, H9C2, was transfected with hNIS and EGFP gene using retrovirus (H9C2-NG). The expression of hNIS and EGFP gene was determined by RT-PCR and fluorescence microscopy, respectively. The uptake and efflux of I-125 were measured in the transfected and wild type cell lines. Each cell line was injected to 4 flank sites (H9c2: 1X107 or 2X107, H9C2-NG: 1X107 or 2X107) in nude mouse. Scintigraphic image was performed at 3h, 1 day after H9C2 and H9C2-NG cell inoculation. We performed gamma camera and animal PET imaging to evaluate NIS expression. Also, GFP image obtained using optical imaging system. The expression of hNIS and EGFP gene was confirmed by RT-PCR. In iodide uptake, H9C2-NG cells accumulated 274.52.2 pmol/ mg protein at 30 min. But wild type cell line did not uptake iodide. In fluorescent microscopy, H9C2-NG cells were highly fluorescent than that of H9C2 cells. In iodide efflux study, 50% of radioactivity flowed out during the first 10min. Scintigraphy showed increased uptake of Tc-99m in H9c2-NG than in H9C2 for 1 day. Also, H9C2-NG cells showed high signal-to-background fluorescent spots in animal body. In this study, NIS and EGFP reporter gene were successfully transfected by a retrovirus in myoblast cell line, and the transfected cell can be easily visualized in vivo. These results suggest that NIS and EGFP gene has an excellent feasibility as a reporter gene, and it can be used to monitor cell trafficking for monitoring.

  12. Synthesis of dihydropyrimidin-2-one/thione library and cytotoxic activity against the human U138-MG and Rat C6 glioma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canto, Romulo F.S.; Eifler-Lima, Vera Lucia; Bernardi, Andressa; Battastini, Ana Maria O.; Russowsky, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Two series of 4-aryl-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-(thio)ones including monastrol (1a), have been synthesized by an environment-friendly methodology based on the combined use of citric acid or oxalic acid and TEOF (triethylorthoformate). The library was evaluated as inhibitor of cell proliferation on two glioma cell lines (human-U138-MG and Rat-C6). The compounds derived from thiourea 1f and 1d were more cytotoxic than monastrol. The compound derived from urea 2d showed the highest cytotoxic activity among the analyzed compounds. (author)

  13. Levels of betatrophin decrease during pregnancy despite increased insulin resistance, beta-cell function and triglyceride levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, A; Maciulewski, R; Siewko, K; Popławska-Kita, A; Lipińska, D; Kozłowska, G; Górska, M; Szelachowska, M

    2016-12-01

    Evidence in support of an association between betatrophin and insulin resistance (IR) is mounting, with studies demonstrating that betatrophin is elevated in patients with type 2 diabetes, obesity and gestational diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of betatrophin in IR and physiological proliferation of beta cells during pregnancy in healthy women. Eighty healthy pregnant women were examined at each trimester [T1 (first), T2 (second), T3 (third)], with a subgroup (n=45) that was also examined at 3 months postpartum (3MPP). The controls comprised 30 non-pregnant healthy women (HW) of reproductive age. Also measured were levels of betatrophin (ELISA), glucose (enzymatic method with hexokinase), insulin (IRMA), C-peptide (EASIA) and HbA 1c (HPLC), while HOMA-IR and HOMA-β scores were calculated. Betatrophin concentration was highest at T1, and differed significantly from T2 and T3 (1.84 [Q 1 =1.16, Q 3 =2.67]ng/mL vs 1.46 [Q 1 =0.96, Q 3 =2.21]ng/mL; Pindex scores increased during gestation, peaking at T3 (2.3 [Q 1 =1.66, Q 3 =2.72] and 227.7 [Q 1 =185.49, Q 3 =326.31], respectively) and returning to levels similar to those of HW at 3MPP (1.53 [Q 1 =1.12, Q 3 =2.41] and 88.86 [Q 1 =62.73, Q 3 =130.45] vs 1.35 [Q 1 =1.02, Q 3 =1.62] and 92.5 [Q 1 =74.20, Q 3 =111.47], respectively). Concentrations of betatrophin decrease during pregnancy, suggesting that the hormone does not play a significant role in the expansion of beta-cell mass and IR during pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of a Rat Primary Cell-Based Blood-Brain Barrier Model With Epithelial and Brain Endothelial Cell Lines: Gene Expression and Drug Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szilvia Veszelka

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Cell culture-based blood-brain barrier (BBB models are useful tools for screening of CNS drug candidates. Cell sources for BBB models include primary brain endothelial cells or immortalized brain endothelial cell lines. Despite their well-known differences, epithelial cell lines are also used as surrogate models for testing neuropharmaceuticals. The aim of the present study was to compare the expression of selected BBB related genes including tight junction proteins, solute carriers (SLC, ABC transporters, metabolic enzymes and to describe the paracellular properties of nine different culture models. To establish a primary BBB model rat brain capillary endothelial cells were co-cultured with rat pericytes and astrocytes (EPA. As other BBB and surrogate models four brain endothelial cells lines, rat GP8 and RBE4 cells, and human hCMEC/D3 cells with or without lithium treatment (D3 and D3L, and four epithelial cell lines, native human intestinal Caco-2 and high P-glycoprotein expressing vinblastine-selected VB-Caco-2 cells, native MDCK and MDR1 transfected MDCK canine kidney cells were used. To test transporter functionality, the permeability of 12 molecules, glucopyranose, valproate, baclofen, gabapentin, probenecid, salicylate, rosuvastatin, pravastatin, atorvastatin, tacrine, donepezil, was also measured in the EPA and epithelial models. Among the junctional protein genes, the expression level of occludin was high in all models except the GP8 and RBE4 cells, and each model expressed a unique claudin pattern. Major BBB efflux (P-glycoprotein or ABCB1 and influx transporters (GLUT-1, LAT-1 were present in all models at mRNA levels. The transcript of BCRP (ABCG2 was not expressed in MDCK, GP8 and RBE4 cells. The absence of gene expression of important BBB efflux and influx transporters BCRP, MRP6, -9, MCT6, -8, PHT2, OATPs in one or both types of epithelial models suggests that Caco-2 or MDCK models are not suitable to test drug candidates which

  15. On-line analysis of middle latency auditory evoked potentials (MLAEP) for monitoring depth of anaesthesia in laboratory rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E W; Nygaard, M; Henneberg, S W

    1998-01-01

    In laboratory animals as well as in human beings a depth of anaesthesia, where the subject has no pain or recall of events from the surgery, should be provided. Haemodynamic parameters such as heart rate and blood pressure are not a guarantee for an optimal depth of anaesthesia, especially when...... and decreasing gradually to a level between 50 and 20 as the rat was anaesthetised. Nine rats were anaesthetised and included in the study. Four doses of Hypnorm vet. and Dormicum were given as a total, each with 5 minutes interval. Clinical signs of the level of anaesthesia were observed simultaneously...

  16. Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Kondrashov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to perform a chemical analysis of both Alibernet red wine and an alcohol-free Alibernet red wine extract (AWE and to investigate the effects of AWE on nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species production as well as blood pressure development in normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs. Total antioxidant capacity together with total phenolic and selected mineral content was measured in wine and AWE. Young 6-week-old male WKY and SHR were treated with AWE (24,2 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks. Total NOS and SOD activities, eNOS and SOD1 protein expressions, and superoxide production were determined in the tissues. Both antioxidant capacity and phenolic content were significantly higher in AWE compared to wine. The AWE increased NOS activity in the left ventricle, aorta, and kidney of SHR, while it did not change NOS activity in WKY rats. Similarly, increased SOD activity in the plasma and left ventricle was observed in SHR only. There were no changes in eNOS and SOD1 expressions. In conclusion, phenolics and minerals included in AWE may contribute directly to increased NOS and SOD activities of SHR. Nevertheless, 3 weeks of AWE treatment failed to affect blood pressure of SHR.

  17. Improved function and proliferation of adult human beta cells engrafted in diabetic immunodeficient NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice treated with alogliptin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurczyk A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Agata Jurczyk,1 Philip diIorio,1 Dean Brostowin,1 Linda Leehy,1 Chaoxing Yang,1 Fumihiko Urano,2 David M Harlan,3 Leonard D Shultz,4 Dale L Greiner,1 Rita Bortell1 1Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, 2Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, 3Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, 4The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA Purpose: Dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors are known to increase insulin secretion and beta cell proliferation in rodents. To investigate the effects on human beta cells in vivo, we utilize immunodeficient mice transplanted with human islets. The study goal was to determine the efficacy of alogliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, to enhance human beta cell function and proliferation in an in vivo context using diabetic immunodeficient mice engrafted with human pancreatic islets. Methods: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG mice were transplanted with adult human islets in three separate trials. Transplanted mice were treated daily by gavage with alogliptin (30 mg/kg/day or vehicle control. Islet graft function was compared using glucose tolerance tests and non-fasting plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide; beta cell proliferation was determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation. Results: Glucose tolerance tests were significantly improved by alogliptin treatment for mice transplanted with islets from two of the three human islet donors. Islet-engrafted mice treated with alogliptin also had significantly higher plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide compared to vehicle controls. The percentage of insulin+BrdU+ cells in human islet grafts from alogliptin-treated mice was approximately 10-fold more than from vehicle control mice, consistent with a significant increase in human beta cell proliferation. Conclusion: Human islet-engrafted immunodeficient mice

  18. Uptake of Eudragit Retard L (Eudragit® RL Nanoparticles by Human THP-1 Cell Line and Its Effects on Hematology and Erythrocyte Damage in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosaad A. Abdel-Wahhab

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to prepare Eudragit Retard L (Eudragit RL nanoparticles (ENPs and to determine their properties, their uptake by the human THP-1 cell line in vitro and their effect on the hematological parameters and erythrocyte damage in rats. ENPs showed an average size of 329.0 ± 18.5 nm, a positive zeta potential value of +57.5 ± 5.47 mV and nearly spherical shape with a smooth surface. THP-1 cell lines could phagocyte ENPs after 2 h of incubation. In the in vivo study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed orally or intraperitoneally (IP with a single dose of ENP (50 mg/kg body weight. Blood samples were collected after 4 h, 48 h, one week and three weeks for hematological and erythrocytes analysis. ENPs induced significant hematological disturbances in platelets, red blood cell (RBC total and differential counts of white blood cells (WBCs after 4 h, 48 h and one week. ENP increased met-Hb and Co-Hb derivatives and decreased met-Hb reductase activity. These parameters were comparable to the control after three weeks when administrated orally. It could be concluded that the route of administration has a major effect on the induction of hematological disturbances and should be considered when ENPs are applied for drug delivery systems.

  19. The lining of the gut in the developing rat embryo. Its relation to the hypoblast (primary endoderm) and the notochord

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, W. H.; Spliet, W. G.; Langemeyer, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    A light microscopical study of the morphogenesis of the gut in the rat embryo was undertaken to provide a careful map of temporal changes in the topographical relations of the (definitive) endoderm, the notochord and the hypoblast (primary endoderm). The borderline between the (definitive) endoderm

  20. Simvastatin decreases steroid production in the H295R cell line and decreases steroids and FSH in female rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anna Guldvang; Hansen, Cecilie Hurup; Weisser, Johan J

    2015-01-01

    .10-0.13μM for SV and from 0.019-0.055μM for SVA. In rats, SV decreased progestagens in ovaries, brain and plasma, and plasma FSH in the M (72.4% decrease) and H group (76.6% decrease). Because progestagens and gonadotropins are major players in fertility, administration of SV might exert negative effects...

  1. Characterization of Phospholipids in Insulin Secretory Granules and Mitochondria in Pancreatic Beta Cells and Their Changes with Glucose Stimulation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Michael J.; Ade, Lacmbouh; Ntambi, James M.; Ansari, Israr-Ul H.; Stoker, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    The lipid composition of insulin secretory granules (ISG) has never previously been thoroughly characterized. We characterized the phospholipid composition of ISG and mitochondria in pancreatic beta cells without and with glucose stimulation. The phospholipid/protein ratios of most phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids were higher in ISG than in whole cells and in mitochondria. The concentrations of negatively charged phospholipids, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylinositol in ISG were 5-fold higher than in the whole cell. In ISG phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and sphingomyelin, fatty acids 12:0 and 14:0 were high, as were phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol containing 18-carbon unsaturated FA. With glucose stimulation, the concentration of many ISG phosphatidylserines and phosphatidylinositols increased; unsaturated fatty acids in phosphatidylserine increased; and most phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, and lysophosphatidylcholines were unchanged. Unsaturation and shorter fatty acid length in phospholipids facilitate curvature and fluidity of membranes, which favors fusion of membranes. Recent evidence suggests that negatively charged phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine, act as coupling factors enhancing the interaction of positively charged regions in SNARE proteins in synaptic or secretory vesicle membrane lipid bilayers with positively charged regions in SNARE proteins in the plasma membrane lipid bilayer to facilitate docking of vesicles to the plasma membrane during exocytosis. The results indicate that ISG phospholipids are in a dynamic state and are consistent with the idea that changes in ISG phospholipids facilitate fusion of ISG with the plasma membrane-enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin exocytosis. PMID:25762724

  2. Characterization of phospholipids in insulin secretory granules and mitochondria in pancreatic beta cells and their changes with glucose stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Michael J; Ade, Lacmbouh; Ntambi, James M; Ansari, Israr-Ul H; Stoker, Scott W

    2015-04-24

    The lipid composition of insulin secretory granules (ISG) has never previously been thoroughly characterized. We characterized the phospholipid composition of ISG and mitochondria in pancreatic beta cells without and with glucose stimulation. The phospholipid/protein ratios of most phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids were higher in ISG than in whole cells and in mitochondria. The concentrations of negatively charged phospholipids, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylinositol in ISG were 5-fold higher than in the whole cell. In ISG phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and sphingomyelin, fatty acids 12:0 and 14:0 were high, as were phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol containing 18-carbon unsaturated FA. With glucose stimulation, the concentration of many ISG phosphatidylserines and phosphatidylinositols increased; unsaturated fatty acids in phosphatidylserine increased; and most phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, and lysophosphatidylcholines were unchanged. Unsaturation and shorter fatty acid length in phospholipids facilitate curvature and fluidity of membranes, which favors fusion of membranes. Recent evidence suggests that negatively charged phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine, act as coupling factors enhancing the interaction of positively charged regions in SNARE proteins in synaptic or secretory vesicle membrane lipid bilayers with positively charged regions in SNARE proteins in the plasma membrane lipid bilayer to facilitate docking of vesicles to the plasma membrane during exocytosis. The results indicate that ISG phospholipids are in a dynamic state and are consistent with the idea that changes in ISG phospholipids facilitate fusion of ISG with the plasma membrane-enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin exocytosis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. DPP-4 inhibitor des-F-sitagliptin treatment increased insulin exocytosis from db/db mice {beta} cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamatsu, Shinya, E-mail: shinya@ks.kyorin-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan); Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Nakamichi, Yoko; Aoyagi, Kyota; Nishiwaki, Chiyono [Department of Biochemistry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Anti-diabetic new drug, DPP-4 inhibitor, can affect the insulin exocytosis. {yields} DPP-4 inhibitor treatment altered syntaxin 1 expression. {yields} Treatment of db/db mice with DPP-4 inhibitor increased insulin release. -- Abstract: Incretin promotes insulin secretion acutely. Recently, orally-administered DPP-4 inhibitors represent a new class of anti-hyperglycemic agents. Indeed, inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-4), sitagliptin, has just begun to be widely used as therapeutics for type 2 diabetes. However, the effects of sitagliptin-treatment on insulin exocytosis from single {beta}-cells are yet unknown. We therefore investigated how sitagliptin-treatment in db/db mice affects insulin exocytosis by treating db/db mice with des-F-sitagliptin for 2 weeks. Perfusion studies showed that 2 weeks-sitagliptin treatment potentiated insulin secretion. We then analyzed insulin granule motion and SNARE protein, syntaxin 1, by TIRF imaging system. TIRF imaging of insulin exocytosis showed the increased number of docked insulin granules and increased fusion events from them during first-phase release. In accord with insulin exocytosis data, des-F-sitagliptin-treatment increased the number of syntaxin 1 clusters on the plasma membrane. Thus, our data demonstrated that 2-weeks des-F-sitagliptin-treatment increased the fusion events of insulin granules, probably via increased number of docked insulin granules and that of syntaxin 1 clusters.

  4. Interactions between the metabolism of L-leucine and D-glucose in the pancreatic. beta. -cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gylfe, E; Sehlin, J [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Histology

    1976-01-01

    ..beta..-cell-rich pancreatic islets microdissected from obese-hyperglycemic mice were used to study interactions between the metabolism of L-leucine and D-glucose. L-leucine reduced the islet content of aspartic acid whereas D-glucose, when added to L-leucine-incubated islets, increased the contents of aspartic acid and ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid (GABA). D-glucose also increased the incorporation of L-leucine carbon into aspartic acid, GABA and glutamic acid, suggesting stimulation of a malate shuttle mechanism. When expressed per mole of the individual amino acids, the incorporation of L-leucine carbon into GABA was 2.5 - 4 times higher than into glutamic acid indicating intracellular compartmentation of the latter amino acid. Both L-leucine and D-leucine stimulated /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from /sup 14/C-labelled D-glucose. L-leucine did not affect /sup 3/H/sub 2/O production from tritiated D-glucose. The present data do not indicate a role of other amino acids or D-glucose in L-leucine-stimulated insulin release.

  5. Photochemical (PUVA) treatment of isolated rat islets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, S.; Wilke, B.; Kloeting, I.

    1984-01-01

    Isolated rat islets were irradiated with long-wave ultraviolet light alone or in combination with the photosensitizer 8-methoxypsoralen. The influence on specific beta cell functions was determined with the aim to find out experimental conditions which allow the use of such islets for transplantation. Short-term effects: Ultraviolet light affected [ 3 H]leucine incorporation into (pro)insulin (5 J/cm 2 : 53.8 %, 10 J/cm 2 : 41.0 % of the controls) and insulin release was slightly reduced. 8-methoxypsoralen enhanced the irradiation effect. Long-term effects: A restoration of irradiation-affected beta cell function was detected after 5 days of culture unless the dose exceeded 2 J/cm 2 (0.1 μM 8-methoxypsoralen) or 1 J/cm 2 (1 μM 8-methoxypsoralen). After functional restoration islets were used for transplantation experiments. (author)

  6. Photochemical (PUVA) treatment of isolated rat islets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, S; Wilke, B; Kloeting, I [Zentralinstitut fuer Diabetes, Karlsburg (German Democratic Republic)

    1984-05-01

    Isolated rat islets were irradiated with long-wave ultraviolet light alone or in combination with the photosensitizer 8-methoxypsoralen. The influence on specific beta cell functions was determined with the aim to find out experimental conditions which allow the use of such islets for transplantation. Short-term effects: Ultraviolet light affected (/sup 3/H)leucine incorporation into (pro)insulin (5 J/cm/sup 2/ : 53.8 %, 10 J/cm/sup 2/ : 41.0 % of the controls) and insulin release was slightly reduced. 8-methoxypsoralen enhanced the irradiation effect. Long-term effects: A restoration of irradiation-affected beta cell function was detected after 5 days of culture unless the dose exceeded 2 J/cm/sup 2/ (0.1 ..mu..M 8-methoxypsoralen) or 1 J/cm/sup 2/ (1 ..mu..M 8-methoxypsoralen). After functional restoration islets were used for transplantation experiments.

  7. Effect of atorvastatin on pancreatic Beta-cell function and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Aman; Singh, Surender; Tandon, Nikhil; Gupta, Nandita; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Statins are commonly used for the management of dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. We hypothesized that atorvastatin could modulate the beta-cell function by altering the levels of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic lipoproteins and could also have an effect on insulin resistance. The aim of the present pilot study was to assess the effect of atorvastatin 10 mg on pancreatic beta-cell function and insulin resistance in patients with hyperlipidemia and type 2 diabetes by using the homeostasis model assessment-2 (HOMA2) index. Fifty-one type 2 diabetes patients receiving oral antidiabetes drugs, not taking statins, with baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol between 2.6 mmol/L and 4.1 mmol/L were included. Forty-three patients (21 in placebo group and 22 in atorvastatin group) completed the study and were taken up for final analysis. Fasting blood samples were obtained at baseline and at 12 weeks to determine levels of blood glucose, lipid profile, insulin, C-peptide and glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C). Atorvastatin nonsignificantly increased fasting serum insulin (+14.29%, p=0.18), accompanied by marginal nonsignificant increases in fasting plasma glucose and A1C. There was a decrease in HOMA2 percent beta-cell function (-2.9%, p=0.72) and increase in HOMA2 insulin resistance (+14%, p=0.16) in the atorvastatin group as compared with baseline, but the difference was not statistically significant. Atorvastatin in the dose used failed to produce significant change in pancreatic beta-cell function and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes patients as assessed by the HOMA2 index. The possible explanations include absence of lipotoxicity at prevailing levels of dyslipidemia at baseline or inadequacy of statin dose used in the study. (Clinical Trials Registry-India: CTRI/2008/091/000099). Copyright © 2014 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Defective glucose and lipid metabolism in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy involve liver, muscle tissue and pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Dela, Flemming

    2005-01-01

    ), 18 patients without lipodystrophy on HAART (NONLIPO) and seven patients who were naive to antiretroviral therapy (NAIVE) respectively). beta-cell function was evaluated by an intravenous glucose tolerance test. RESULTS: Compared with NONLIPO and NAIVE separately, LIPO displayed markedly reduced ratio...... of limb to trunk fat (RLF; > 34%, P 40%, P disposal (>50%, P 50%, P ... acids (P disposal (r = 0.71) and incremental exogenous glucose storage (r = 0.40), all P

  9. Improved pancreatic beta-cell function in type 2 diabetic patients after lifestyle-induced weight loss is related to glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas; Haus, Jacob M; Kelly, Karen R

    2010-01-01

    Restoration of insulin secretion is critical for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Exercise and diet can alter glucose-induced insulin responses, but whether this is due to changes in beta-cell function per se is not clear. The mechanisms by which lifestyle intervention may modify insulin secretion...... in type 2 diabetes have also not been examined but may involve the incretin axis....

  10. Iodine and tri-iodo-thyronine reduce the incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus in the autoimmune prone BB rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartoft-Nielsen, Marie-Louise; Rasmussen, Aase Krogh; Bock, Troels

    2009-01-01

    iodine (NaI) or thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) neonatally or with tri-iodo-thyronine (T3) during adolescence. At the age of 19 weeks the incidence of T1DM and the degree of insulitis were evaluated. The influence of T3 treatment on the beta cell mass was evaluated in Wistar rats by unbiased...

  11. Vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitor, improves model-assessed beta-cell function in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mari, A; Sallas, W M; He, Y L

    2005-01-01

    in diabetic patients, suggesting that more sophisticated measures are necessary to ascertain the influence of vildagliptin on beta-cell function. METHODS: This study examined the effects of 28-d treatment with vildagliptin (100 mg, twice daily; n = 9) vs. placebo (n = 11) on beta-cell function in diabetic...... and other factors. RESULTS: Vildagliptin significantly increased the insulin secretory rate at 7 mmol/liter glucose (secretory tone), calculated from the dose response; the difference in least squares mean (deltaLSM) was 101 +/- 51 pmol.min(-1).m(-2) (P = 0.002). The slope of the beta-cell dose response......, the derivative component, and the potentiation factor were not affected. Vildagliptin also significantly decreased mean prandial glucose (deltaLSM, -1.2 +/- 0.4 mmol/liter; P = 0.01) and glucagon (deltaLSM, -10.7 +/- 4.8 ng/liter; P = 0.03) levels and increased plasma levels of intact GLP-1 (deltaLSM, +10...

  12. A Plant-Based Dietary Intervention Improves Beta-Cell Function and Insulin Resistance in Overweight Adults: A 16-Week Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahleova, Hana; Tura, Andrea; Hill, Martin; Holubkov, Richard; Barnard, Neal D

    2018-02-09

    The aim of this study was to test the effect of a plant-based dietary intervention on beta-cell function in overweight adults with no history of diabetes. Participants ( n = 75) were randomized to follow a low-fat plant-based diet ( n = 38) or to make no diet changes ( n = 37) for 16 weeks. At baseline and 16 weeks, beta-cell function was quantified with a mathematical model. Using a standard meal test, insulin secretory rate was calculated by C-peptide deconvolution. The Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA-IR) index was used to assess insulin resistance while fasting. A marked increase in meal-stimulated insulin secretion was observed in the intervention group compared with controls (interaction between group and time, Gxt, p effect -1.0 (95% CI, -1.2 to -0.8); Gxt, p = 0.004). Changes in HOMA-IR correlated positively with changes in body mass index (BMI) and visceral fat volume ( r = 0.34; p = 0.009 and r = 0.42; p = 0.001, respectively). The latter remained significant after adjustment for changes in BMI ( r = 0.41; p = 0.002). Changes in glucose-induced insulin secretion correlated negatively with BMI changes ( r = -0.25; p = 0.04), but not with changes in visceral fat. Beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity were significantly improved through a low-fat plant-based diet in overweight adults.

  13. Vitamin D fails to prevent serum starvation- or staurosporine-induced apoptosis in human and rat osteosarcoma-derived cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witasp, Erika; Gustafsson, Ann-Catrin; Cotgreave, Ian; Lind, Monica; Fadeel, Bengt

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 , the active form of vitamin D 3 , may increase the survival of bone-forming osteoblasts through an inhibition of apoptosis. On the other hand, vitamin D 3 has also been shown to trigger apoptosis in human cancer cells, including osteosarcoma-derived cell lines. In the present study, we show that 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 induces a time- and dose-dependent loss of cell viability in the rat osteosarcoma cell line, UMR-106, and the human osteosarcoma cell line, TE-85. We were unable, however, to detect nuclear condensation, phosphatidylserine externalization, or other typical signs of apoptosis in this model. Moreover, 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 failed to protect against apoptosis induced by serum starvation or incubation with the protein kinase inhibitor, staurosporine. These in vitro findings are thus at variance with several previous reports in the literature and suggest that induction of or protection against apoptosis of bone-derived cells may not be a primary function of vitamin D 3

  14. A comparative study on pathological features of transgenic rat lines expressing either three or four repeat misfolded tau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valachova, Bernadeta; Brezovakova, Veronika; Bugos, Ondrej; Jadhav, Santosh; Smolek, Tomas; Novak, Petr; Zilka, Norbert

    2018-08-01

    Human tauopathies represent a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by distinct clinical features, typical histopathological structures, and defined ratio(s) of three-repeat and four-repeat tau isoforms within pathological aggregates. How the optional microtubule-binding repeat of tau influences this differentiation of pathologies is understudied. We have previously generated and characterized transgenic rodent models expressing human truncated tau aa151-391 with either three (SHR24) or four microtubule-binding repeats (SHR72). Here, we compare the behavioral and neuropathological hallmarks of these two transgenic lines using a battery of tests for sensorimotor, cognitive, and neurological functions over the age range of 3.5-15 months. Progression of sensorimotor and neurological deficits was similar in both transgenic lines; however, the lifespan of transgenic line SHR72 expressing truncated four-repeat tau was markedly shorter than SHR24. Moreover, the expression of three or four-repeat tau induced distinct neurofibrillary pathology in these lines. Transgenic lines displayed different distribution of tau pathology and different type of neurofibrillary tangles. Our results suggest that three- and four-repeat isoforms of tau may display different modes of action in the diseased brain. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Limitations of the HOMA-B score for assessment of beta-cell functionality in interventional trials-results from the PIOglim study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfützner, Andreas; Derwahl, Michael; Jacob, Stephan; Hohberg, Cloth; Blümner, Ernst; Lehmann, Ute; Fuchs, Winfried; Forst, Thomas

    2010-08-01

    Drugs with unspecific stimulating effects on beta-cell secretion increase the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-B score, indicating improved beta-cell "function." We investigated whether the beta-cell protection provided by adding pioglitazone (PIO) to glimepiride (GLIM) in comparison to up-titrating the GLIM dose alone is reflected by appropriate changes in several measures of beta-cell function, including HOMA-B score. This double-blind, parallel prospective 6-month study was performed with 82 patients (47 men, 35 women; age, 61 +/- 9 years; duration of disease, 5.3 +/- 4.4 years; body mass index, 32.6 +/- 6.0 kg/m(2); hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c], 7.3 +/- 0.7%) with GLIM monotherapy (1-3 mg). They were randomized to receive a GLIM + PIO combination with up-titration (2 mg + 30 mg/4 mg + 30 mg/4 mg + 4 mg) or to remain on GLIM (up-titration 4/5/6 mg). Observation parameters determined at baseline and end point included HOMA-B, HOMA-IR, HbA1c, glucose, insulin, and intact proinsulin. There was a slight increase in the HOMA-B score in the GLIM group but not in the GLIM + PIO arm (baseline/end point: for GLIM, 71 +/- 48/88 +/- 64; for PIO + GLIM, 74 +/- 56/69 +/- 52). Improvements in the other observation parameters were predominantly detected in the PIO + GLIM group (HbA1c, 7.20 +/- 0.61%/6.36 +/- 0.90%; HOMA-IR, 7.0 +/- 4.5/4.1 +/- 2.1; intact proinsulin, 12.4 +/- 10.3/7.6 +/- 4.8 pmol/L [all P HOMA-IR, 7.4 +/- 4.5/7.5 +/- 4.3 [not significant]; intact proinsulin, 17.3 +/- 21.6/16.3 +/- 15.5 pmol/L [not significant]). The PIO + GLIM combination led to overall improvement of laboratory biomarkers for beta-cell function, except for HOMA-B. Glimepiride up-titration had no such effects but increased the HOMA-B score. HOMA-B seems to provide misleading results when used as a diagnostic tool in patients treated with sulfonylurea drugs. A corrective term for consideration of proinsulin in the HOMA-B equation may address this limitation.

  16. IL-1beta induced protein changes in diabetes prone BB rat islets of Langerhans identified by proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, T; Bjerre-Christensen, Ulla; Mose Larsen, P

    2002-01-01

    of 82 out of 1 815 protein spots detected by two dimensional gel electrophoresis in IL-1beta exposed diabetes prone Bio Breeding (BB-DP) rat islets of Langerhans in vitro. The aim of this study was to identify the proteins in these 82 spots by mass spectrometry and compare these changes with those seen......Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus is characterized by selective destruction of the insulin producing beta cells. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) modulates the beta-cell function, protein synthesis, energy production and causes apoptosis. We have previously shown changes in the expression...

  17. Opioid-receptor (OR) signaling cascades in rat cerebral cortex and model cell lines: the role of plasma membrane structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ujčíková, Hana; Brejchová, Jana; Vošahlíková, Miroslava; Kagan, Dmytro; Dlouhá, Kateřina; Sýkora, Jan; Merta, Ladislav; Drastichová, Z.; Novotný, J.; Ostašov, Pavel; Roubalová, Lenka; Parenti, M.; Hof, Martin; Svoboda, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, Suppl.1 (2014), S165-S176 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/0919; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : GPCR * morphine * mu-OR, delta-OR and kappa-OR * rat brain cortex * adenylyl cyclase I and II * proteomic analysis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  18. Fasting and meal-stimulated residual beta cell function is positively associated with serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and negatively associated with anti-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines in patients with longer term type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Minh-Long; Kolb, H; Battelino, T

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines may promote or inhibit disease progression in type 1 diabetes. We investigated whether systemic proinflammatory, anti-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines associated differently with fasting and meal-stimulated beta cell function in patients with longer term type 1 diabetes.......Cytokines may promote or inhibit disease progression in type 1 diabetes. We investigated whether systemic proinflammatory, anti-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines associated differently with fasting and meal-stimulated beta cell function in patients with longer term type 1 diabetes....

  19. Pannexin-2-deficiency sensitizes pancreatic beta-cells to cytokine-induced apoptosis in vitro and impairs glucose tolerance in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berchtold, Lukas A.; Miani, Michela; Diep, Thi A.

    2017-01-01

    -cells, and β-cell lines. The expression of Panx2, but not Panx1, was downregulated by interleukin-1β (IL-1β) plus interferon-γ (IFNγ), two pro-inflammatory cytokines suggested to contribute to β-cell demise in type 1 diabetes (T1D). siRNA-mediated knockdown (KD) of Panx2 aggravated cytokine-induced apoptosis...... in rat INS-1E cells and primary rat β-cells, suggesting anti-apoptotic properties of Panx2. An anti-apoptotic function of Panx2 was confirmed in isolated islets from Panx2-/- mice and in human EndoC-βH1 cells. Panx2 KD was associated with increased cytokine-induced activation of STAT3 and higher...

  20. GLP-1 Amidation Efficiency Along the Length of the Intestine in Mice, Rats and Pigs and in GLP-1 Secreting Cell Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob Wewer; Windeløv, Johanne Agerlin

    2014-01-01

    and whether this varied with the six different locations. We also analyzed the amidation in 3 GLP-1 secreting cell lines (GLUTag, NCI-H716 and STC-1). To our surprise there were marked differences between the 3 species with respect to the concentration of GLP-1 in gut. In the mouse, concentrations increased...... sites, whereas rats and pigs on average had around 2.5 and 4 times higher levels of amidated compared to non-amidated GLP-1, although the ratio varied depending upon the location. GLUTag, NCI-H716 and STC-1 cells all exhibited partial amidation with 2-4 times higher levels of amidated compared to non...

  1. Beta Cell Breakthroughs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Terms Research & News Recipes & Food Recipe Finder The Healthy Kitchen What Can I Eat? Main Dishes Salads & Sandwiches Breakfast Snacks Sides Dessert I'm Hungry! Body & Mind Well-Being Fitness Weight Loss Blood Glucose & Medications ...

  2. Characterization of rPEPT2-mediated Gly-Sar transport parameters in the rat kidney proximal tubule cell line SKPT-0193 cl.2 cultured in basic growth media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bravo, Silvina A; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Frokjaer, Sven

    2005-01-01

    The rat proximal kidney tubule cell line SKPT-0193 cl.2 (SKPT) expresses the di-/tripeptide transporter PEPT2 (rPEPT2) and has been used to study PEPT2-mediated transport. Traditionally, SKPT cells have been cultured in growth media supplemented with epidermal growth factor (EGF), apotransferrin,...

  3. The influence of maternal islet beta-cell autoantibodies in conjunction with gestational hyperglycemia on neonatal outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Li

    Full Text Available To determine the predictive value of the presence of maternal islet beta-cell autoantibodies with respect to neonatal outcomes.A total of 311 pregnant women with abnormal 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT results were enrolled in this study. Maternal glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies (GADA, islet cell autoantibodies (ICA and insulin autoantibodies (IAA were tested in fasting blood both on the day following the routine OGTT and before delivery. The birth weight, Apgar score, blood glucose and outcomes of each neonate were later evaluated and recorded.1. In this study, 33.9% of the pregnant women with gestational hyperglycemia had detectable levels of one or more types of anti-islet cell antibodies in the third trimester. The proportion of women who produced GADA and/or ICA was significantly higher in the group of women with gestational hyperglycemia than in the control group (P<0.05. The groups similarly differed in the proportion of women who tested positive for any anti-islet cell antibody (P<0.05. 2. Of the patients in our study, those who produced GADA exhibited an increase in uterine and umbilical arterial pulsatility indexes (PIs during the third trimesters compared with the control group (P˂0.05. Additionally, an increased frequency of fetal growth restriction (FGR was observed in the infants of women who produced IAA during pregnancy compared with those without autoantibodies (P˂0.05. 3. The rate of newborn admission to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU was significantly associated with the presence of maternal ICA during the third trimester (OR, 6.36; 95% CI, 1.22-33.26. 4. The incidence of neonatal asphyxia was associated with the presence of maternal GADA in both the second (OR, 10.44; 95% CI, 1.46-74.92 and the third (OR, 8.33; 95% CI, 1.45-47.82 trimesters.Approximately one-third of the women with gestational hyperglycemia produced anti-islet cell antibodies. The incidence of FGR was higher in women with

  4. The flinders sensitive line rats, a genetic model of depression, show abnormal serotonin receptor mRNA expression in the brain that is reversed by 17beta-estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterlund, M K; Overstreet, D H; Hurd, Y L

    1999-12-10

    The possible link between estrogen and serotonin (5-HT) in depression was investigated using a genetic animal model of depression, the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats, in comparison to control Flinders Resistant Line rats. The mRNA levels of the estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta subtypes and the 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptors were analyzed in several limbic-related areas of ovariectomized FSL and FRL rats treated with 17beta-estradiol (0.15 microg/g) or vehicle. The FSL animals were shown to express significantly lower levels of the 5-HT(2A) receptor transcripts in the perirhinal cortex, piriform cortex, and medial anterodorsal amygdala and higher levels in the CA 2-3 region of the hippocampus. The only significant difference between the rat lines in ER mRNA expression was found in the medial posterodorsal amygdala, where the FSL rats showed lower ERalpha expression levels. Overall, estradiol treatment increased 5-HT(2A) and decreased 5-HT(1A) receptor mRNA levels in several of the examined regions of both lines. Thus, in many areas, estradiol was found to regulate the 5-HT receptor mRNA expression in the opposite direction to the alterations found in the FSL rats. These findings further support the implication of 5-HT receptors, in particular the 5-HT(2A) subtype, in the etiology of affective disorders. Moreover, the ability of estradiol to regulate the expression of the 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptor genes might account for the reported influence of gonadal hormones in mood and depression.

  5. Interleukin-1 beta induced transient diabetes mellitus in rats. A model of the initial events in the pathogenesis of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, J I

    1998-01-01

    When aiming at preventing IDDM in man, knowledge of the molecular mechanisms leading to beta cell destruction may facilitate identification of new possible intervention modalities. A model of IDDM pathogenesis in man suggests that cytokines, and IL-1 in particular, are of major importance...... of preventing IDDM in man, the aim af this review was to investigate the effects of rhIL-1 beta on beta-cell function and viability in normal rats. This review discussed 1) the pharmacokinetics of IL-1 beta in rats as the basis for choice of route of administration and dose of rhIL-1 beta, 2) the effects...... and molecular mechanisms of IL-1 beta on temperature and food intake used as control parameters for successful injection of rhIL-1 beta in rats, 3) the effects of one or more injection of IL-1 beta on rat beta cell function, 4) the molecular mechanisms leading to IL-1 beta induced beta cell inhibition in vivo...

  6. The Protective Effect of Aloe Vera on Histological Structure of Endocrine Portion of Pancreas Gland in the Diabetic Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Erfani-Majd

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since aloe vera plant has many medical benefits, the present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of Aloe vera gel on the pancreatic islets and beta cells. Methods: This experimental study consisted of 50 mature male rats aged 2-3 months and weighed 200-250 g, who were randomly divided into five groups (n=10. Group I (control did not receive any treatments, and group II were diabetized via Streptozotocin (IP in 65 mg/kg, whose blood sample was taken after one week. Rats with blood glucose more than 250 mg/dL were considered as diabetic. Group III diabetic rats received the Aloe vera gel daily with dosage of 400 mg/kg, and group IV diabetic rats received insulin in 10 units/rat. Group V involved healthy rats which received only Aloe vera gel. After the last Aloe vera gel administration, blood glucose and body weight of all groups were measured on 15th and 30th days. Animals were euthanized with ether. Then tissues samples were collected from pancreas gland and fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin solution. The 5-6 µ sections were made by paraffin embedding method and stained using haematoxylin-eosin (H&E and Aldehyde fuchsin stains. Ultimately, the histomorphometrical parameters were evaluated. Results: The mean number and size of pancreatic islets and beta cells of Langerhans islets decreased significantly in the diabetic group compared to the control group. The number of beta cells and diameter of langerhans islets increased significantly in the rats treated by Aloe vera gel in comparison to diabetic group at the end of 15th and 30th days. Conclusion: Applying Aloe vera gel seems to improve the renewal and restoration of langerhans islets and beta cells of pancreas gland in the diabetic rat.

  7. Insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function after carbohydrate oral loading in hip replacement surgery: a double-blind, randomised controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljunggren, Stefan; Hahn, Robert G; Nyström, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Surgery initiates a series of physiological stress processes in the body, inducing transient insulin resistance. Preoperative carbohydrate treatment can reduce the latter phenomenon. We investigated the effects of carbohydrate loading on insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function after elective hip replacement. Twenty-three nondiabetic patients (mean age of 68 years) who underwent elective hip replacement surgery participated in this double-blind controlled study. The patients were randomised to a nutrition group, which ingested a carbohydrate-rich fluid (50 kcal/100 ml) (Preop(®)), or a control group (tap water flavoured with lemon) 800 ml + 400 ml before the surgery. The insulin response (beta-cell function) and the insulin sensitivity were measured with an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and a hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic glucose clamp, respectively, one day before and two days after the surgery. Insulin sensitivity decreased by 51% (median; 25-75th percentiles 35-61) after ingesting Preop(®) and by 39% (21-51) after ingesting in the control group (n.s.). The postoperative IVGTT in the nutrition group was followed by a significantly larger area under the curve (AUC) for plasma insulin (+54% versus the preoperative IVGTT) compared to the control group (+7%). This difference was already apparent during the first phase (0-10 min) of insulin secretion (+20 and -21%, respectively; P water prior to the surgery demonstrated a significant but similar decrease in insulin sensitivity. The carbohydrates increased the beta-cell function as a compensatory response to the disposition index, resulting in a smaller reduction in surgery-induced insulin resistance compared to the tap water. The study was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01774084). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  8. Carriers of loss-of-function mutations in EXT display impaired pancreatic beta-cell reserve due to smaller pancreas volume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie J Bernelot Moens

    Full Text Available Exotosin (EXT proteins are involved in the chain elongation step of heparan sulfate (HS biosynthesis, which is intricately involved in organ development. Loss of function mutations (LOF in EXT1 and EXT2 result in hereditary exostoses (HME. Interestingly, HS plays a role in pancreas development and beta-cell function, and genetic variations in EXT2 are associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus. We hypothesized that loss of function of EXT1 or EXT2 in subjects with hereditary multiple exostoses (HME affects pancreatic insulin secretion capacity and development. We performed an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT followed by hyperglycemic clamps to investigate first-phase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS in HME patients and age and gender matched non-affected relatives. Pancreas volume was assessed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. OGTT did not reveal significant differences in glucose disposal, but there was a markedly lower GSIS in HME subjects during hyperglycemic clamp (iAUC HME: 0.72 [0.46-1.16] vs. controls 1.53 [0.69-3.36] nmol·l-1·min-1, p<0.05. Maximal insulin response following arginine challenge was also significantly attenuated (iAUC HME: 7.14 [4.22-10.5] vs. controls 10.2 [7.91-12.70] nmol·l-1·min-1 p<0.05, indicative of an impaired beta-cell reserve. MRI revealed a significantly smaller pancreatic volume in HME subjects (HME: 72.0±15.8 vs. controls 96.5±26.0 cm3 p = 0.04. In conclusion, loss of function of EXT proteins may affect beta-cell mass and insulin secretion capacity in humans, and render subjects at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes when exposed to environmental risk factors.

  9. In vivo and in vitro characterization of [{sup 18}F]-FE-(+)-DTBZ as a tracer for beta-cell mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Olof [Division of Radiology, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University Hospital, 751 87 Uppsala (Sweden)], E-mail: olof.eriksson@radiol.uu.se; Jahan, Mahabuba [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Section of Psychiatry, Karolinska Hospital, 171 76, Stockholm (Sweden); Johnstroem, Peter [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Section of Psychiatry, Karolinska Hospital, 171 76, Stockholm (Sweden); CNS and Pain Control, AstraZeneca R and D, 151 36, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Korsgren, Olle [Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Division of Clinical Immunology, University Hospital, 751 87 Uppsala (Sweden); Sundin, Anders [Division of Radiology, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University Hospital, 751 87 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76, Stockholm (Sweden); Halldin, Christer [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Section of Psychiatry, Karolinska Hospital, 171 76, Stockholm (Sweden); Johansson, Lars [Division of Radiology, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University Hospital, 751 87 Uppsala (Sweden); AstraZeneca R and D, 431 50, Moelndal (Sweden)

    2010-04-15

    Introduction: The positron emission tomography (PET) tracer 9-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine ([{sup 18}F]-FE-(+)-DTBZ) is a potential candidate for quantifying beta-cell mass in vivo. The purpose was to investigate in vitro and in vivo utility of this tracer for the assessment of beta-cell mass. Methods: Three pigs were intravenously administered [{sup 18}F]-FE-(+)-DTBZ and examined by PET/computed tomography. Binding parameters were estimated by kinetic modeling. In vitro k{sub D} and B{sub max} were determined by saturation binding studies of endocrine and exocrine human tissue homogenates. In vitro pancreatic uptake was determined by tissue autoradiography with pancreases from patients with types 1 (T1DM) and 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and healthy controls. Results: [{sup 18}F]-FE-(+)-DTBZ had a k{sub D} of 3.5{+-}1.0 nM, a B{sub max} of 382{+-}108 fmol/mg protein and a specificity of 89{+-}1.8% in islet homogenates. The total exocrine uptake was lower and 65% was nondisplaceable. No uptake difference was observed in pancreatic tissue slices from patients with T1DM, T2DM or healthy controls. The in vivo porcine pancreatic uptake reached a peak of standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.8 with a low distribution volume ratio in all animals. Moderate to high tracer uptake was identified in the bile system and in bone. Conclusions: [{sup 18}F]-FE-(+)-DTBZ binds to vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) with high specificity in pure islet tissue in vitro. However, there is high nondisplaceable binding to exocrine tissue. In addition, in vivo tracer metabolism and dehalogenation result in severe underestimation of porcine pancreatic VMAT2 expression and BCM. The results do not support [{sup 18}F]-FE-(+)-DTBZ as a suitable tracer for in vivo beta-cell imaging.

  10. A Plant-Based Dietary Intervention Improves Beta-Cell Function and Insulin Resistance in Overweight Adults: A 16-Week Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Kahleova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the effect of a plant-based dietary intervention on beta-cell function in overweight adults with no history of diabetes. Participants (n = 75 were randomized to follow a low-fat plant-based diet (n = 38 or to make no diet changes (n = 37 for 16 weeks. At baseline and 16 weeks, beta-cell function was quantified with a mathematical model. Using a standard meal test, insulin secretory rate was calculated by C-peptide deconvolution. The Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA-IR index was used to assess insulin resistance while fasting. A marked increase in meal-stimulated insulin secretion was observed in the intervention group compared with controls (interaction between group and time, Gxt, p < 0.001. HOMA-IR index fell significantly (p < 0.001 in the intervention group (treatment effect −1.0 (95% CI, −1.2 to −0.8; Gxt, p = 0.004. Changes in HOMA-IR correlated positively with changes in body mass index (BMI and visceral fat volume (r = 0.34; p = 0.009 and r = 0.42; p = 0.001, respectively. The latter remained significant after adjustment for changes in BMI (r = 0.41; p = 0.002. Changes in glucose-induced insulin secretion correlated negatively with BMI changes (r = −0.25; p = 0.04, but not with changes in visceral fat. Beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity were significantly improved through a low-fat plant-based diet in overweight adults.

  11. Multiphoton spectral analysis of benzo[a]pyrene uptake and metabolism in a rat liver cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barhoumi, Rola; Mouneimne, Youssef; Ramos, Ernesto; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Safe, Stephen; Parrish, Alan R.; Burghardt, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic analysis of the uptake and metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their metabolites within live cells in real time has the potential to provide novel insights into genotoxic and non-genotoxic mechanisms of cellular injury caused by PAHs. The present work, combining the use of metabolite spectra generated from metabolite standards using multiphoton spectral analysis and an 'advanced unmixing process', identifies and quantifies the uptake, partitioning, and metabolite formation of one of the most important PAHs (benzo[a]pyrene, BaP) in viable cultured rat liver cells over a period of 24 h. The application of the advanced unmixing process resulted in the simultaneous identification of 8 metabolites in live cells at any single time. The accuracy of this unmixing process was verified using specific microsomal epoxide hydrolase inhibitors, glucuronidation and sulfation inhibitors as well as several mixtures of metabolite standards. Our findings prove that the two-photon microscopy imaging surpasses the conventional fluorescence imaging techniques and the unmixing process is a mathematical technique that seems applicable to the analysis of BaP metabolites in living cells especially for analysis of changes of the ultimate carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene-r-7,t-8-dihydrodiol-t-9,10-epoxide. Therefore, the combination of the two-photon acquisition with the unmixing process should provide important insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which BaP and other PAHs alter cellular homeostasis.

  12. cGMP may have trophic effects on beta cell function comparable to those of cAMP, implying a role for high-dose biotin in prevention/treatment of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F

    2006-01-01

    Incretin hormones have trophic effects on beta cell function that can aid prevention and treatment of diabetes. cAMP is the primary mediator of these effects, and has been shown to potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, promote proper beta cells differentiation by increasing expression of the crucial transcription factor PDX-1, and prevent beta cell apoptosis. cGMP's role in beta cell function has received far less scrutiny, but there is emerging evidence that it may have a trophic impact on beta cell function analogous to that of cAMP. An increase in plasma glucose boosts beta cell production of cGMP, which acts as a feed-forward mediator to enhance glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. cGMP also has an anti-apoptotic effect in beta cells, and there is now indirect evidence that it promotes expression of PDX-1. Supraphysiological concentrations of biotin can directly activate guanylate cyclase, and there is limited evidence that high intakes of this vitamin can be therapeutically beneficial in diabetics and in rodent models of diabetes. Beneficial effects of cGMP on muscle insulin sensitivity and on control of hepatic glucose output may contribute to biotin's utility in diabetes. The fact that nitric oxide/cGMP exert a range of favorable effects on vascular health should further encourage exploration of biotin's preventive and therapeutic potential. If an appropriate high-dose biotin regimen could achieve a modest systemic increase in guanylate cyclase activity, without entailing unacceptable side effects or risks, such a regimen might have considerable potential for promoting vascular health and preventing or managing diabetes.

  13. Mixed-meal tolerance test versus glucagon stimulation test for the assessment of beta-cell function in therapeutic trials in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greenbaum, Carla J; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; McGee, Paula Friedenberg

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Beta-cell function in type 1 diabetes clinical trials is commonly measured by C-peptide response to a secretagogue in either a mixed-meal tolerance test (MMTT) or a glucagon stimulation test (GST). The Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet Research Group and the European C-peptide Trial (ECPT) Study...... Group conducted parallel randomized studies to compare the sensitivity, reproducibility, and tolerability of these procedures. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In randomized sequences, 148 TrialNet subjects completed 549 tests with up to 2 MMTT and 2 GST tests on separate days, and 118 ECPT subjects...

  14. The effect of the deterioration of insulin sensitivity on beta-cell function in growth-hormone-deficient adults following 4-month growth hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, A M; Fisker, S; Hilsted, J

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the combined effect of GH treatment on body composition and glucose metabolism, with special focus on beta-cell function in adult GHD patients. In a double-blind placebo-controlled design, 24 GHD adults (18M/6F), were randomized to 4 months treatment...... with biosynthetic GH 2 IU/m2s.c. daily (n =13) or placebo (n =11). At inclusion and 4 months later an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGT) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) whole-body scanning were performed. During the study period, body...

  15. PED/PEA-15 inhibits hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Ins-1E pancreatic beta-cells via PLD-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Fiory

    Full Text Available The small scaffold protein PED/PEA-15 is involved in several different physiologic and pathologic processes, such as cell proliferation and survival, diabetes and cancer. PED/PEA-15 exerts an anti-apoptotic function due to its ability to interfere with both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in different cell types. Recent evidence shows that mice overexpressing PED/PEA-15 present larger pancreatic islets and increased beta-cells mass. In the present work we investigated PED/PEA-15 role in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Ins-1E beta-cells. In pancreatic islets isolated from Tg(PED/PEA-15 mice hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA fragmentation was lower compared to WT islets. TUNEL analysis showed that PED/PEA-15 overexpression increases the viability of Ins-1E beta-cells and enhances their resistance to apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide exposure. The activity of caspase-3 and the cleavage of PARP-1 were markedly reduced in Ins-1E cells overexpressing PED/PEA-15 (Ins-1E(PED/PEA-15. In parallel, we observed a decrease of the mRNA levels of pro-apoptotic genes Bcl-xS and Bad. In contrast, the expression of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-xL was enhanced. Accordingly, DNA fragmentation was higher in control cells compared to Ins-1E(PED/PEA-15 cells. Interestingly, the preincubation with propranolol, an inhibitor of the pathway of PLD-1, a known interactor of PED/PEA-15, responsible for its deleterious effects on glucose tolerance, abolishes the antiapoptotic effects of PED/PEA-15 overexpression in Ins-1E beta-cells. The same results have been obtained by inhibiting PED/PEA-15 interaction with PLD-1 in Ins-1E(PED/PEA-15. These results show that PED/PEA-15 overexpression is sufficient to block hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Ins-1E cells through a PLD-1 mediated mechanism.

  16. A fluorescence assay for measuring acetylcholinesterase activity in rat blood and a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillo, Michael F; Liu, Yitong

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an enzyme responsible for metabolism of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and inhibition of AChE can have therapeutic applications (e.g., drugs for Alzheimer's disease) or neurotoxic consequences (e.g., pesticides). A common absorbance-based AChE activity assay that uses 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) can have limited sensitivity and be prone to interference. Therefore, an alternative assay was developed, in which AChE activity was determined by measuring fluorescence of resorufin produced from coupled enzyme reactions involving acetylcholine and Amplex Red (10-acetyl-3,7-dihydroxyphenoxazine). The Amplex Red assay was used for two separate applications. First, AChE activity was measured in rat whole blood, which is a biomarker for exposure to AChE inhibitor pesticides. Activity was quantified from a 10(5)-fold dilution of whole blood, and there was a linear correlation between Amplex Red and DTNB assays. For the second application, Amplex Red assay was used to measure AChE inhibition potency in a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y), which is important for assessing pharmacological and toxicological potential of AChE inhibitors including drugs, phytochemicals, and pesticides. Five known reversible inhibitors were evaluated (IC50, 7-225 nM), along with irreversible inhibitors chlorpyrifos-oxon (ki=1.01 nM(-1)h(-1)) and paraoxon (ki=0.16 nM(-1)h(-1)). Lastly, in addition to inhibition, AChE reactivation was measured in SH-SY5Y cells incubated with pralidoxime chloride (2-PAM). The Amplex Red assay is a sensitive, specific, and reliable fluorescence method for measuring AChE activity in both rat whole blood and cultured SH-SY5Y cells. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Curcumin protects against cytotoxic and inflammatory effects of quartz particles but causes oxidative DNA damage in a rat lung epithelial cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hui; Berlo, Damien van; Shi Tingming; Speit, Guenter; Knaapen, Ad M.; Borm, Paul J.A.; Albrecht, Catrin; Schins, Roel P.F.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic inhalation of high concentrations of respirable quartz particles has been implicated in various lung diseases including lung fibrosis and cancer. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress is considered a major mechanism of quartz toxicity. Curcumin, a yellow pigment from Curcuma longa, has been considered as nutraceutical because of its strong anti-inflammatory, antitumour and antioxidant properties. The aim of our present study was to investigate whether curcumin can protect lung epithelial cells from the cytotoxic, genotoxic and inflammatory effects associated with quartz (DQ12) exposure. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements using the spin-trap DMPO demonstrated that curcumin reduces hydrogen peroxide-dependent hydroxyl-radical formation by quartz. Curcumin was also found to reduce quartz-induced cytotoxicity and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) mRNA expression in RLE-6TN rat lung epithelial cells (RLE). Curcumin also inhibited the release of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) from RLE cells as observed upon treatment with interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα). However, curcumin failed to protect the RLE cells from oxidative DNA damage induced by quartz, as shown by formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG)-modified comet assay and by immunocytochemistry for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine. In contrast, curcumin was found to be a strong inducer of oxidative DNA damage itself at non-cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory concentrations. In line with this, curcumin also enhanced the mRNA expression of the oxidative stress response gene heme oxygenase-1 (ho-1). Curcumin also caused oxidative DNA damage in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages and A549 human lung epithelial cells. Taken together, these observations indicate that one should be cautious in considering the potential use of curcumin in the prevention or treatment of lung diseases associated with quartz exposure

  18. Role of the mitochondria in immune-mediated apoptotic death of the human pancreatic β cell line βLox5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaíma L Lightfoot

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are indispensable in the life and death of many types of eukaryotic cells. In pancreatic beta cells, mitochondria play an essential role in the secretion of insulin, a hormone that regulates blood glucose levels. Unregulated blood glucose is a hallmark symptom of diabetes. The onset of Type 1 diabetes is preceded by autoimmune-mediated destruction of beta cells. However, the exact role of mitochondria has not been assessed in beta cell death. In this study, we examine the role of mitochondria in both Fas- and proinflammatory cytokine-mediated destruction of the human beta cell line, βLox5. IFNγ primed βLox5 cells for apoptosis by elevating cell surface Fas. Consequently, βLox5 cells were killed by caspase-dependent apoptosis by agonistic activation of Fas, but only after priming with IFNγ. This beta cell line undergoes both apoptotic and necrotic cell death after incubation with the combination of the proinflammatory cytokines IFNγ and TNFα. Additionally, both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms that require proper mitochondrial function are involved. Mitochondrial contributions to βLox5 cell death were analyzed using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA depleted βLox5 cells, or βLox5 ρ(0 cells. βLox5 ρ(0 cells are not sensitive to IFNγ and TNFα killing, indicating a direct role for the mitochondria in cytokine-induced cell death of the parental cell line. However, βLox5 ρ(0 cells are susceptible to Fas killing, implicating caspase-dependent extrinsic apoptotic death is the mechanism by which these human beta cells die after Fas ligation. These data support the hypothesis that immune mediators kill βLox5 cells by both mitochondrial-dependent intrinsic and caspase-dependent extrinsic pathways.

  19. Bisphenol S disrupts estradiol-induced nongenomic signaling in a rat pituitary cell line: effects on cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñas, René; Watson, Cheryl S

    2013-03-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a well-known endocrine disruptor that imperfectly mimics the effects of physiologic estrogens via membrane-bound estrogen receptors (mERα, mERβ, and GPER/GPR30), thereby initiating nongenomic signaling. Bisphenol S (BPS) is an alternative to BPA in plastic consumer products and thermal paper. To characterize the nongenomic activities of BPS, we examined signaling pathways it evoked in GH3/B6/F10 rat pituitary cells alone and together with the physiologic estrogen estradiol (E2). Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)- and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK)-specific phosphorylations were examined for their correlation to three functional responses: proliferation, caspase activation, and prolactin (PRL) release. We detected ERK and JNK phosphorylations by fixed-cell immunoassays, identified the predominant mER initiating the signaling with selective inhibitors, estimated cell numbers by crystal violet assays, measured caspase activity by cleavage of fluorescent caspase substrates, and measured PRL release by radioimmunoassay. BPS phosphoactivated ERK within 2.5 min in a nonmonotonic dose-dependent manner (10-15 to 10-7 M). When combined with 10-9 M E2, the physiologic estrogen's ERK response was attenuated. BPS could not activate JNK, but it greatly enhanced E2-induced JNK activity. BPS induced cell proliferation at low concentrations (femtomolar to nanomolar), similar to E2. Combinations of both estrogens reduced cell numbers below those of the vehicle control and also activated caspases. Earlier activation of caspase 8 versus caspase 9 demonstrated that BPS initiates apoptosis via the extrinsic pathway, consistent with activation via a membrane receptor. BPS also inhibited rapid (≤ 1 min) E2-induced PRL release. BPS, once considered a safe substitute for BPA, disrupts membrane-initiated E2-induced cell signaling, leading to altered cell proliferation, cell death, and PRL release.

  20. Agmatine protects retinal ganglion cells from hypoxia-induced apoptosis in transformed rat retinal ganglion cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Agmatine is an endogenous polyamine formed by the decarboxylation of L-arginine. We investigated the protective effects of agmatine against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of immortalized rat retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5. RGC-5 cells were cultured in a closed hypoxic chamber (5% O2 with or without agmatine. Cell viability was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH assay and apoptosis was examined by annexin V and caspase-3 assays. Expression and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs; JNK, ERK p44/42, and p38 and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB were investigated by Western immunoblot analysis. The effects of agmatine were compared to those of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a well-known protective neurotrophin for retinal ganglion cells. Results After 48 hours of hypoxic culture, the LDH assay showed 52.3% cell loss, which was reduced to 25.6% and 30.1% when agmatine and BDNF were administered, respectively. This observed cell loss was due to apoptotic cell death, as established by annexin V and caspase-3 assays. Although total expression of MAPKs and NF-κB was not influenced by hypoxic injury, phosphorylation of these two proteins was increased. Agmatine reduced phosphorylation of JNK and NF-κB, while BDNF suppressed phosphorylation of ERK and p38. Conclusion Our results show that agmatine has neuroprotective effects against hypoxia-induced retinal ganglion cell damage in RGC-5 cells and that its effects may act through the JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways. Our data suggest that agmatine may lead to a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce retinal ganglion cell injury related to hypoxia.

  1. Agmatine protects retinal ganglion cells from hypoxia-induced apoptosis in transformed rat retinal ganglion cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Samin; Lee, Jong Eun; Kim, Chan Yun; Seong, Gong Je

    2007-01-01

    Background Agmatine is an endogenous polyamine formed by the decarboxylation of L-arginine. We investigated the protective effects of agmatine against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of immortalized rat retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5). RGC-5 cells were cultured in a closed hypoxic chamber (5% O2) with or without agmatine. Cell viability was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay and apoptosis was examined by annexin V and caspase-3 assays. Expression and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs; JNK, ERK p44/42, and p38) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) were investigated by Western immunoblot analysis. The effects of agmatine were compared to those of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a well-known protective neurotrophin for retinal ganglion cells. Results After 48 hours of hypoxic culture, the LDH assay showed 52.3% cell loss, which was reduced to 25.6% and 30.1% when agmatine and BDNF were administered, respectively. This observed cell loss was due to apoptotic cell death, as established by annexin V and caspase-3 assays. Although total expression of MAPKs and NF-κB was not influenced by hypoxic injury, phosphorylation of these two proteins was increased. Agmatine reduced phosphorylation of JNK and NF-κB, while BDNF suppressed phosphorylation of ERK and p38. Conclusion Our results show that agmatine has neuroprotective effects against hypoxia-induced retinal ganglion cell damage in RGC-5 cells and that its effects may act through the JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways. Our data suggest that agmatine may lead to a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce retinal ganglion cell injury related to hypoxia. PMID:17908330

  2. Mixed-meal tolerance test versus glucagon stimulation test for the assessment of beta-cell function in therapeutic trials in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Carla J; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; McGee, Paula Friedenberg; Battelino, Tadej; Haastert, Burkhard; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Pozzilli, Paolo; Lachin, John M; Kolb, Hubert

    2008-10-01

    Beta-cell function in type 1 diabetes clinical trials is commonly measured by C-peptide response to a secretagogue in either a mixed-meal tolerance test (MMTT) or a glucagon stimulation test (GST). The Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet Research Group and the European C-peptide Trial (ECPT) Study Group conducted parallel randomized studies to compare the sensitivity, reproducibility, and tolerability of these procedures. In randomized sequences, 148 TrialNet subjects completed 549 tests with up to 2 MMTT and 2 GST tests on separate days, and 118 ECPT subjects completed 348 tests (up to 3 each) with either two MMTTs or two GSTs. Among individuals with up to 4 years' duration of type 1 diabetes, >85% had measurable stimulated C-peptide values. The MMTT stimulus produced significantly higher concentrations of C-peptide than the GST. Whereas both tests were highly reproducible, the MMTT was significantly more so (R(2) = 0.96 for peak C-peptide response). Overall, the majority of subjects preferred the MMTT, and there were few adverse events. Some older subjects preferred the shorter duration of the GST. Nausea was reported in the majority of GST studies, particularly in the young age-group. The MMTT is preferred for the assessment of beta-cell function in therapeutic trials in type 1 diabetes.

  3. Is serum zinc associated with pancreatic beta cell function and insulin sensitivity in pre-diabetic and normal individuals? Findings from the Hunter Community Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanrin P Vashum

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine if there is a difference in serum zinc concentration between normoglycaemic, pre-diabetic and type-2 diabetic groups and if this is associated with pancreatic beta cell function and insulin sensitivity in the former 2 groups. METHOD: Cross sectional study of a random sample of older community-dwelling men and women in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. Beta cell function, insulin sensitivity and insulin resistance were calculated for normoglycaemic and prediabetes participants using the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA-2 calculator. RESULT: A total of 452 participants were recruited for this study. Approximately 33% (N = 149 had diabetes, 33% (N = 151 had prediabetes and 34% (N = 152 were normoglycaemic. Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA parameters were found to be significantly different between normoglycaemic and prediabetes groups (p<0.001. In adjusted linear regression, higher serum zinc concentration was associated with increased insulin sensitivity (p = 0.01 in the prediabetic group. There was also a significant association between smoking and worse insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSION: Higher serum zinc concentration is associated with increased insulin sensitivity. Longitudinal studies are required to determine if low serum zinc concentration plays a role in progression from pre-diabetes to diabetes.

  4. Dioxin-like activity of brominated dioxins as individual compounds or mixtures in in vitro reporter gene assays with rat and mouse hepatoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, G; Nakamura, M; Michinaka, C; Tue, N M; Handa, H; Takigami, H

    2017-10-01

    In vitro reporter gene assays detecting dioxin-like compounds have been developed and validated since the middle 1990's, and applied to the determination of dioxin-like activities in various samples for their risk management. Data on characterizing the potency of individual brominated dioxins and their activity in mixture with chlorinated dioxins are still limited on the cell-based assay. This study characterized the dioxin-like activities of the 32 brominated dioxins, such as polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polybrominated dibenzofurans (PBDFs), coplanar polybrominated biphenyls, mixed halogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PXDFs), as a sole component or in a mixture by DR-CALUX (dioxin-responsive chemically activated luciferase expression) using the rat hepatoma H4IIE cell line and XDS-CALUX (xenobiotic detection systems-chemically activated luciferase expression) assays using the mouse hepatoma H1L6.1 cell line. The 2,3,7,8-TCDD-relative potencies (REPs) of most of the brominated dioxins were within a factor of 10 of the WHO toxicity equivalency factor (WHO-TEF) for the chlorinated analogues. The REPs of a few PXDFs were an order of magnitude higher than the corresponding WHO-TEFs, indicating their toxicological importance. Results with reconstituted mixtures suggest that the activity of brominated and chlorinated dioxins in both CALUX assays was dose-additive. Thus, obtained results indicated the applicability of the CALUX assays as screening tools of brominated dioxins together with their chlorinated analogues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The BNCT resistant fraction of cancer cells. An in vitro morphologic and cytofluorimetric study on a rat coloncarcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.; Clerici, A.M.; Mazzini, G.

    2006-01-01

    Given the high efficacy of the BNCT treatment, recurrences reasonably depends on the failure of a cell fraction to uptake and retain adequate levels of boronated compounds. Aim of this study is to identify, quantify and characterize the resistant cell fraction relative to the delivered boron concentration. Experiments were performed on the DHD/K12/TRb line by means of cytofluorimetric DNA analysis, plating efficiency and morphologic observations. Cells were incubated with p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) concentrations ranging from 10 to 40 ppm for 18 h. Following neutron exposure, cells were reseeded for subsequent morphologic observations, counting and DNA analysis. Samples of irradiated cells not BPA enriched and non-irradiated cells with and without boron were compared with them. After 24 hs there were no differences among the four conditions, in terms of number of recovered cells, morphology and cell cycle distribution. Starting from 48 hs and up to 7 days BPA irradiated cells showed growth in dimensions, important cell number reduction and multiclonal DNA profile worsening with time. After 9 days normally sized cell clones appeared confirming the presence of a resistant cell fraction able to restore the original cell population after 21 days. The incidence of surviving cells turned out to be in the range 0,026-0,05%. (author)

  6. Peripheral insulin resistance rather than beta cell dysfunction accounts for geographical differences in impaired fasting blood glucose among sub-Saharan African individuals: findings from the RODAM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Karlijn A C; Stronks, Karien; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Addo, Juliet; Bahendeka, Silver; Beune, Erik; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Danquah, Ina; Galbete, Cecilia; Henneman, Peter; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Osei, Kwame; Schulze, Matthias B; Spranger, Joachim; Smeeth, Liam; Agyemang, Charles

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction account for differences in impaired fasting blood glucose (IFBG) levels in sub-Saharan African individuals living in different locations in Europe and Africa. We also aimed to identify determinants associated with insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction among this population. Data from the cross-sectional multicentre Research on Obesity and Diabetes among African Migrants (RODAM) study were analysed. Participants included Ghanaian individuals without diabetes, aged 18-96 years old, who were residing in Amsterdam (n = 1337), Berlin (n = 502), London (n = 961), urban Ghana (n = 1309) and rural Ghana (n = 970). Glucose and insulin were measured in fasting venous blood samples. Anthropometrics were assessed during a physical examination. Questionnaires were used to assess demographics, physical activity, smoking status, alcohol consumption and energy intake. Insulin resistance and beta cell function were determined using homeostatic modelling (HOMA-IR and HOMA-B, respectively). Logistic regression analysis was used to study the contribution of HOMA-IR and inverse HOMA-B (beta cell dysfunction) to geographical differences in IFBG (fasting glucose 5.6-6.9 mmol/l). Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to identify determinants associated with HOMA-IR and inverse HOMA-B. IFBG was more common in individuals residing in urban Ghana (OR 1.41 [95% CI 1.08, 1.84]), Amsterdam (OR 3.44 [95% CI 2.69, 4.39]) and London (OR 1.58 [95% CI 1.20 2.08), but similar in individuals living in Berlin (OR 1.00 [95% CI 0.70, 1.45]), compared with those in rural Ghana (reference population). The attributable risk of IFBG per 1 SD increase in HOMA-IR was 69.3% and in inverse HOMA-B was 11.1%. After adjustment for HOMA-IR, the odds for IFBG reduced to 0.96 (95% CI 0.72, 1.27), 2.52 (95%CI 1.94, 3.26) and 1.02 (95% CI 0.78, 1.38) for individuals in Urban Ghana

  7. Exposure to nickel, chromium, or cadmium causes distinct changes in the gene expression patterns of a rat liver derived cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G Permenter

    Full Text Available Many heavy metals, including nickel (Ni, cadmium (Cd, and chromium (Cr are toxic industrial chemicals with an exposure risk in both occupational and environmental settings that may cause harmful outcomes. While these substances are known to produce adverse health effects leading to disease or health problems, the detailed mechanisms remain unclear. To elucidate the processes involved in the toxicity of nickel, cadmium, and chromium at the molecular level and to perform a comparative analysis, H4-II-E-C3 rat liver-derived cell lines were treated with soluble salts of each metal using concentrations derived from viability assays, and gene expression patterns were determined with DNA microarrays. We identified both common and unique biological responses to exposure to the three metals. Nickel, cadmium, chromium all induced oxidative stress with both similar and unique genes and pathways responding to this stress. Although all three metals are known to be genotoxic, evidence for DNA damage in our study only exists in response to chromium. Nickel induced a hypoxic response as well as inducing genes involved in chromatin structure, perhaps by replacing iron in key proteins. Cadmium distinctly perturbed genes related to endoplasmic reticulum stress and invoked the unfolded protein response leading to apoptosis. With these studies, we have completed the first gene expression comparative analysis of nickel, cadmium, and chromium in H4-II-E-C3 cells.

  8. Biotransformation and oxidative stress responses in rat hepatic cell-line (H4IIE) exposed to racemic ketoprofen (RS-KP) and its enantiomer, dexketoprofen (S(+)-KP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennillo, Elvira; Krøkje, Åse; Pretti, Carlo; Meucci, Valentina; Arukwe, Augustine

    2018-03-30

    Pharmaceuticals such as racemate ketoprofen (RS-KP) and its enantiomer, dexketoprofen (S(+)-KP) are highly detectable non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the aquatic environment and therefore are designated as one of the most emerging groups of pollutants that can affect environmental and human health. The potential impact of these pharmaceuticals was assessed for the first time in vitro using a rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (H4IIE). Cells were exposed to low and high concentrations of these drugs. Cytotoxicity was determined by MTT reduction assay; CYP1A1 transcriptional and enzymatic levels together with canonical oxidative stress responsive markers (GPx, GR, GST and CAT) were also investigated. Cells exposed to RS-KP and S(+)-KP did not show cytotoxicity effect at the concentrations tested. However, this study highlighted differences between RS-KP and S(+)-KP in most of the evaluated markers, showing compound-, concentration- and time-specific effect patterns which suggest a potential stereo-selective toxicity of these drugs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Testicular atrophy and loss of nerve growth factor-immunoreactive germ cell line in rats exposed to n-hexane and a protective effect of simultaneous exposure to toluene or xylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nylen, P; Johnson, A C; Hoeglund, G; Ebendal, T; Eriksdotter-Nilsson, M; Henschen, A; Olson, L; Hansson, T; Kronevi, T; Kvist, U

    1989-07-01

    Testicular and germ cell line morphology in rats were studied 2 weeks, 10 months and 14 months after cessation of a 61-day inhalation exposure to 1000 ppm n-hexane. Androgen biosynthetic capacity of testis, testosterone blood concentration, vas deferens morphology and noradrenaline (NA) concentration, epididymal sperm morphology, and fertility were also studied. Severe testicular atrophy involving the seminiferous tubules with loss of the nerve growth factor (NGF) immunoreactive germ cell line was found. Total loss of the germ cell line was found in a fraction of animals up to 14 months post-exposure, indicating permanent testicular damage. No impairment of androgen synthesis or androgen dependent accessory organs was observed. Simultaneous administration of 1000 ppm n-hexane and 1000 ppm toluene, or 1000 ppm n-hexane and 1000 ppm xylene, did not cause germ cell line alterations or testicular atrophy. Toluene and xylene were thus found to protect from n-hexane induced testicular atrophy. (orig.).

  10. Binding characteristics of 9-fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenzazine (AV-133) to the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, H.-H. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, K.-J. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung University and Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Juang, J.-H. [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Chung Gung University and Chung Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Skovronsky, Daniel M. [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Yen, T.-C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung University and Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Wey, S.-P. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Kung, M.-P. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)], E-mail: kungmp@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2010-05-15

    The vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) is highly expressed in pancreatic {beta}-cells and thus has been proposed to be a potential target for measuring {beta}-cell mass (BCM) by molecular imaging. C-11- and F-18-labeled tetrabenazine derivatives targeting VMAT2 have shown some promising results as potential biomarkers for BCM. In the present study, we examined the binding characteristics of 9-fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenzazine ([{sup 18}F]AV-133), a potential PET tracer for BCM imaging, in rat pancreas and rat brain. Methods: Pancreatic exocrine cells and pancreatic islet cells were isolated and purified from Sprague-Dawley rats. Membrane homogenates, prepared from both pancreatic exocrine and islet cells as well as from brain striatum and hypothalamus regions, were used for in vitro binding studies. In vitro and ex vivo autoradiography studies with [{sup 18}F]AV-133 were performed on rat brain and rat pancreas sections. Immunohistochemistry studies were performed to confirm the distribution of VMAT2 on islet {beta}-cells. Results: Excellent binding affinities of [{sup 18}F]AV-133 were observed in rat striatum and hypothalamus homogenates with K{sub d} values of 0.19 and 0.25 nM, respectively. In contrast to single-site binding observed in rat striatum homogenates, rat islet cell homogenates showed two saturable binding sites (site A: K{sub d}=6.76 nM, B{sub max}=60 fmol/mg protein; site B: K{sub d}=241 nM, B{sub max}=1500 fmol/mg protein). Rat exocrine pancreas homogenates showed only a single low-affinity binding site (K{sub d}=209 nM), which was similar to site B in islet cells. In vitro autoradiography of [{sup 18}F]AV-133 using frozen sections of rat pancreas showed specific labeling of islets, as evidenced by co-localization with anti-insulin antibody. Ex vivo VMAT2 pancreatic autoradiography in the rat, however, was not successful, in contrast to the excellent ex vivo autoradiography of VMAT2 binding sites in the brain. In vivo/ex vivo islet

  11. The GLP-1 analogue liraglutide improves first-phase insulin secretion and maximal beta-cell secretory capacity over 14 weeks of therapy in subjects with Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsbad, Sten; Vilsbøll, Tina; Brock, Birgitte

    Aims: We investigated the clinical effect of liraglutide, a long- acting GLP-1 analogue, on insulin secretion in Type 2 diabetes. Methods: Thirty-nine subjects (28 completed) from a randomised trial received a hyperglycaemic clamp (20 mM) with intravenous arginine stimulation, and an insulin...... group. Conclusion: In subjects with Type 2 diabetes, 14 weeks’ once-daily liraglutide (1.25 and 1.9 mg/day) markedly improves beta-cell function, significantly increases first-phase insulin secretion and maximal beta-cell secretory capacity....

  12. Correlation Between Glycated Hemoglobin and Homa Indices in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Prediction of Beta-Cell Function from Glycated Hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hakeim, Hussein Kadhem; Abdulzahra, Mohammed Saied

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed to determine the most efficient insulin resistance function related to glycemic control expressed as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (T2DM). The other aim is to derive equations for the prediction of beta cell functions containing HbA1c as a parameter in addition to fasting glucose and insulin. T2DM Patients were grouped according to the following: (1) degree of control (good, fair, and poor control) and (2) insulin resistance as observed in obtained data and significant differences revealed by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) of related parameters (insulin resistance = HOMA2IR, beta-cell function = HOMA%B, and insulin sensitivity = HOMA%S) among groups. Correlations and forecasting regression analysis were calculated. HbA1c was found to be correlated with insulin resistance parameters in T2DM subgroups. This correlation was also significantly correlated with HOMA%B and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) in fair and poor control groups. Regression analysis was used to predict the forecasting equations for HOMA%B. The best applicable equations were derived for healthy control (HOMA2%B=-1.76*FBG+5.00*Insulin+4.69*HbA1c+189.84) and poor control groups (HOMA2%B=0.001* FBG+0.5*Insulin-8.67*HbA1c+101.96). These equations could be used to predict β-cell function (HOMA%B) after FBG, insulin and HbA1c values were obtained for healthy and poor control groups. In the good and fair control groups, the applicability of the HOMA model fails to yield appropriate results. Beta-cell function is correlated with QUICKI and HbA1c and could be predicted properly from HbA1c, insulin, and glucose in the healthy and poor control groups. New regression equations were established that involve HbA1c.

  13. Gamma radiation induced alterations in the ultrastructure of pancreatic islet, metabolism and enzymes in wistar rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daoo, J.V.; Suryawanshi, S.A. [Inst. of Science, Bombay (India)

    1992-07-01

    Effects of gamma irradiation (600 rads) on the ultrastructure of pancreatic islet, metabolism and some enzymes in wistar rat, are reported. Electron microscopic observations of endocrine pancreas revealed prominent changes in beta cells while alpha and delta cells were not much affected. Irradiation also inflicted hyperglycemia, increase in liver and muscle glycogen and decrease in insulin level. It has also increased the activity of enzymes but failed to produce significant changes in protein, lipid and mineral metabolism. (auth0008.

  14. Peptide gH625 enters into neuron and astrocyte cell lines and crosses the blood–brain barrier in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiante S

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore Valiante,1,* Annarita Falanga,2,3,* Luisa Cigliano,1 Giuseppina Iachetta,1 Rosa Anna Busiello,1 Valeria La Marca,1 Massimiliano Galdiero,4 Assunta Lombardi,1 Stefania Galdiero1,2 1Department of Biology, 2Department of Pharmacy, 3DFM Scarl, University of Naples Federico II, 4Department of Experimental Medicine, II University of Naples, Naples, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this paper and are considered joint first authors Abstract: Peptide gH625, derived from glycoprotein H of herpes simplex virus type 1, can enter cells efficiently and deliver a cargo. Nanoparticles armed with gH625 are able to cross an in vitro model of the blood–brain barrier (BBB. In the present study, in vitro experiments were performed to investigate whether gH625 can enter and accumulate in neuron and astrocyte cell lines. The ability of gH625 to cross the BBB in vivo was also evaluated. gH625 was administered in vivo to rats and its presence in the liver and in the brain was detected. Within 3.5 hours of intravenous administration, gH625 can be found beyond the BBB in proximity to cell neurites. gH625 has no toxic effects in vivo, since it does not affect the maximal oxidative capacity of the brain or the mitochondrial respiration rate. Our data suggest that gH625, with its ability to cross the BBB, represents a novel nanocarrier system for drug delivery to the central nervous system. These results open up new possibilities for direct delivery of drugs into patients in the field of theranostics and might address the treatment of several human diseases. Keywords: drug delivery, neurons, astrocytes, blood–brain barrier, peptide

  15. Effects of transforming growth factor-beta on growth and differentiation of the continuous rat thyroid follicular cell line, FRTL-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.C. III; Ranganathan, G.; Hay, I.D.; Nelson, R.E.; Jiang, N.S.

    1988-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) has been shown to influence the growth and differentiation of many widely varied cell types in vitro, including some that are endocrinologically active. We have investigated the previously unknown effects of this unique growth factor in the differentiated rat thyroid follicular cell line FRTL-5. The cells demonstrated specific, high affinity binding of TGF beta, and as with other epithelial cells, the growth of these thyroid follicular cells was potently inhibited by addition of TGF beta to the culture medium. TGF beta caused a significant reduction in TSH-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity in the cells. The addition of (Bu)2cAMP along with the growth factor to cultures partially reversed the characteristic morphological changes seen with TGF beta, but did not reverse the growth inhibition. To further investigate the possible mechanisms of the effects of TGF beta on the cells, we measured the influence of the growth factor on [125I]TSH binding. TGF beta did not compete for specific TSH-binding sites; however, exposure of the cells to TGF beta for 12 or more h resulted in a dose-dependent down-regulation of TSH receptors that was fully reversible. While cellular proliferation was potently inhibited by TGF beta, differentiated function, as manifest by iodine-trapping ability, was stimulated by the growth factor. This stimulation of iodine uptake was independent of, and additive to, the stimulatory effects of TSH. Finally, FRTL-5 cells in serum-free medium and in response to TSH were shown to secrete TGF beta-like activity that competed for [125I]TGF beta in a RRA. These studies suggest that TGF beta may represent an autocrine mechanism of controlling the growth response to TSH in thyroid follicular cells, while allowing the continuance of differentiated function

  16. Gluten-free diet increases beta-cell volume and improves glucose tolerance in an animal model of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haupt-Jørgensen, Martin; Buschard, Karsten; Hansen, Axel Kornerup

    2016-01-01

    Background Gluten-free (GF) diet alleviates type 1 diabetes in animal models and possibly in humans. We recently showed that fatty acid-induced insulin secretion is enhanced by enzymatically digested gluten (gliadin) stimulation in INS-1E insulinoma cells. We therefore hypothesized that GF diet...... would induce beta-cell rest and ameliorate type 2 diabetes. Methods C57BL/6JBomTac (B6) mice were fed a high-fat (HF), gluten-free high-fat (GF–HF), standard (STD) or gluten-free (GF) diet for 42 weeks. Results Short-term (6–24 weeks) GF–HF versus HF feeding impaired glucose tolerance and increased...... capacity controls pancreas volume. Thus, long-term GF diets may be beneficial for obese type 2 diabetes patients and trials should be performed....

  17. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) protects against oleate-induced INS-1E beta cell dysfunction by preserving carbohydrate metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigerio, F; Brun, T; Bartley, C

    2009-01-01

    and investigated key metabolic pathways and genes responsible for metabolism-secretion coupling during a culture period of 3 days in the presence of 0.4 mmol/l oleate. RESULTS: In INS-1E cells, the secretory dysfunction primarily induced by oleate was aggravated by silencing of PPARalpha. Conversely, PPARalpha...... enzyme pyruvate carboxylase. PPARalpha overproduction increased both beta-oxidation and fatty acid storage in the form of neutral triacylglycerol, revealing overall induction of lipid metabolism. These observations were substantiated by expression levels of associated genes. CONCLUSIONS....../INTERPRETATION: PPARalpha protected INS-1E beta cells from oleate-induced dysfunction, promoting both preservation of glucose metabolic pathways and fatty acid turnover....

  18. Liraglutide effects on beta-cell, insulin sensitivity and glucose effectiveness in patients with stable coronary artery disease and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anholm, Christian; Kumarathurai, Preman; Pedersen, Lene R.

    2017-01-01

    characteristics were: HbA1c 47 mmol/mol (SD 6), BMI 31.6 kg/m2 (SD 4.8), fasting plasma-glucose 6.9 mmol/L (IQR 6.1; 7.4) and HOMA-IR 4.9 (IQR 3.0; 7.5). Liraglutide treatment improved AIRg by 3-fold, 497 mU × L−1 × min (IQR 342; 626, P ... weight loss of −2.7 kg (−6.7; −0.6) during liraglutide treatment, we found no improvement in HOMA-IR, Si or Sg. Weight loss during liraglutide therapy did not result in a carry-over effect. Conclusion: Liraglutide as add-on to metformin induces a clinically significant improvement in beta-cell function...

  19. Quantification of beta-cell function during IVGTT in Type II and non-diabetic subjects: assessment of insulin secretion by mathematical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, L L; Vølund, A; Madsbad, Sten

    2001-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We compared four methods to assess their accuracy in measuring insulin secretion during an intravenous glucose tolerance test in patients with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus and with varying beta-cell function and matched control subjects. METHODS: Eight control...... subjects and eight Type II diabetic patients underwent an intravenous glucose tolerance test with tolbutamide and an intravenous bolus injection of C-peptide to assess C-peptide kinetics. Insulin secretion rates were determined by the Eaton deconvolution (reference method), the Insulin SECretion method...... (ISEC) based on population kinetic parameters as well as one-compartment and two-compartment versions of the combined model of insulin and C-peptide kinetics. To allow a comparison of the accuracy of the four methods, fasting rates and amounts of insulin secreted during the first phase (0-10 min...

  20. Pancreatic beta-cell function is a stronger predictor of changes in glycemic control after an aerobic exercise intervention than insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas; Malin, Steven K; Karstoft, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), and disposition index (DI) were measured following 12-16-weeks of aerobic exercise training. Regression analyses were used to identify relationships between variables.ResultsFollowing training, 86% of subjects increased VO2max and lost weight. HbA1c, fasting......ContextUnderstanding inter-subject variability in glycemic control following exercise training will help individualize treatment.ObjectiveTo determine whether this variability is related to training-induced changes in insulin sensitivity or pancreatic beta-cell function.Design, Setting....... Training increased first- and second-phase DI in 83% and 74% of subjects. Training-induced changes in glycemic control were related to changes in GSIS (P...

  1. cPLA2alpha-evoked formation of arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids is required for exocytosis in mouse pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Kirstine; Høy, Marianne; Olsen, Hervør L

    2003-01-01

    Using capacitance measurements, we investigated the effects of intracellularly applied recombinant human cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2alpha) and its lipolytic products arachidonic acid and lysophosphatidylcholine on Ca2+-dependent exocytosis in single mouse pancreatic beta-cells. cPLA2alpha...... from 70-80 to 280-300. cPLA2alpha-stimulated exocytosis was antagonized by the specific cPLA2 inhibitor AACOCF3. Ca2+-evoked exocytosis was reduced by 40% in cells treated with AACOCF3 or an antisense oligonucleotide against cPLA2alpha. The action of cPLA2alpha was mimicked by a combination...... of arachidonic acid and lysophosphatidylcholine (470% stimulation) in which each compound alone doubled the exocytotic response. Priming of insulin-containing secretory granules has been reported to involve Cl- uptake through ClC-3 Cl- channels. Accordingly, the stimulatory action of cPLA2alpha was inhibited...

  2. Unprotected daily sun exposure is differently associated with central adiposity and beta-cell dysfunction by gender: The Korean national health and nutrition examination survey (KNHANES) V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohn, Jung Hun [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, In Ho [Department of Dermatology, Hallym University Dongtan Sacred Heart Hospital, Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of); Park, Juri; Ryu, Ohk Hyun; Lee, Seong Jin; Kim, Doo-Man; Ihm, Sung-Hee; Choi, Moon-Gi; Yoo, Hyung Joon [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Eun-Gyoung, E-mail: hegletter@hallym.or.kr [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Background: Ultraviolet irradiation by sun exposure has been associated with both harms and benefits to metabolic health. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether unprotected daily sun exposure is associated with the prevalence of diabetes and explore the underlying mechanism. Methods: We analyzed the Korean National Health and Nutrition Survey V from 2010 to 2011. Participants 19–60 years of age were asked about the average amount of time they had been exposed to direct sunlight per day since the age of 19. We categorized participants into three groups with different levels of lifetime daily sun exposure and explored the association of sun exposure with the prevalence of diabetes. Results: The risk of diabetes was higher in subjects with more than 5 h of unprotected sun exposure per day, with an odds ratio of 2.39 (95% CI 1.75–3.25), compared to those with less than 2 h of sun exposure, and the association remained significant after adjusting for diabetes risk factors. Long-term sun exposure was associated with increased central obesity and the possibility of an increase in visceral adiposity, especially among women, and with decrease in beta cell function and peripheral adiposity or percent body fat in men. Conclusions: Our study provides a cutoff for upper limit of sun exposure and suggests unprotected daily sun exposure for more than 5 h should be avoided to prevent diabetes. Increased central adiposity and decreased beta cell function were observed in women and men, respectively, who had long-term unprotected daily sun exposure. - Highlights: • Sun exposure for more than 5 h per day is associated with diabetes risk. • Insulin resistance associated with visceral adiposity may play a role in women. • Insulin secretory defect may explain diabetes risk in men.

  3. Candidate gene association study in type 2 diabetes indicates a role for genes involved in beta-cell function as well as insulin action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Barroso

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is an increasingly common, serious metabolic disorder with a substantial inherited component. It is characterised by defects in both insulin secretion and action. Progress in identification of specific genetic variants predisposing to the disease has been limited. To complement ongoing positional cloning efforts, we have undertaken a large-scale candidate gene association study. We examined 152 SNPs in 71 candidate genes for association with diabetes status and related phenotypes in 2,134 Caucasians in a case-control study and an independent quantitative trait (QT cohort in the United Kingdom. Polymorphisms in five of 15 genes (33% encoding molecules known to primarily influence pancreatic beta-cell function-ABCC8 (sulphonylurea receptor, KCNJ11 (KIR6.2, SLC2A2 (GLUT2, HNF4A (HNF4alpha, and INS (insulin-significantly altered disease risk, and in three genes, the risk allele, haplotype, or both had a biologically consistent effect on a relevant physiological trait in the QT study. We examined 35 genes predicted to have their major influence on insulin action, and three (9%-INSR, PIK3R1, and SOS1-showed significant associations with diabetes. These results confirm the genetic complexity of Type 2 diabetes and provide evidence that common variants in genes influencing pancreatic beta-cell function may make a significant contribution to the inherited component of this disease. This study additionally demonstrates that the systematic examination of panels of biological candidate genes in large, well-characterised populations can be an effective complement to positional cloning approaches. The absence of large single-gene effects and the detection of multiple small effects accentuate the need for the study of larger populations in order to reliably identify the size of effect we now expect for complex diseases.

  4. Outpatient versus inpatient mixed meal tolerance and arginine stimulation testing yields comparable measures of variability for assessment of beta cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha S. Shankar

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Standard practice to minimize variability in beta cell function (BCF measurement is to test in inpatient (IP settings. IP testing strains trial subjects, investigators, and budgets. Outpatient (OP testing may be a solution although there are few reports on OP BCF testing variability. We compared variability metrics between OP and IP from a standardized mixed meal tolerance test (MMTT and arginine stimulation test (AST in two separate type 2 diabetes (T2DM cohorts (OP, n = 20; IP n = 22 in test-retest design. MMTT variables included: insulin sensitivity (Si; beta cell responsivity (Φtot; and disposition index (DItot = Si* Φtot following 470 kCal meal. AST variables included: acute insulin response to arginine (AIRarg and during hyperglycemia (AIRargMAX. Results: Baseline characteristics were well-matched. Between and within subject variance for each parameter across cohorts, and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC-a measure of reproducibility across parameters were generally comparable for OP to IP. Table summarizes the ICC results for each key parameter and cohort.Test/ParameterOutpatient (95% CIInpatient (95% CIMMTT: Si0.49(0,0.690.28(0,0.60MMTT: Φtot0.65(0.16,0.890.81(0.44,0.93MMTT: DI0.67(0,0.830.36(0,0.69AST: AIR Arg0.96(0.88,0.980.84(0.59,0.94AST: AIR Arg Max0.97(0.90,0.990.95(0.86,0.97AST: ISR0.93(0.77,0.970.93(0.82,0.96In conclusion, the variability (reproducibility of BCF measures from standardized MMTT and AST is comparable between OP and IP settings. These observations have significant implications for complexity and cost of metabolic studies.

  5. Pancreatic beta-cell responses to GLP-1 after near-normalization of blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmar, Meena; Højberg, Patricia V; Deacon, Carolyn F; Hare, Kristine; Holst, Jens J; Madsbad, Sten

    2010-02-25

    This study investigated the effects of strict glycaemic control on beta-cell function in nine obese subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), using graded glucose infusions together with infusions of saline or GLP-1 before (HbA(1)c: 8.0+/-0.4%) and after four weeks of near-normalization of blood glucose (BG) using insulin (mean diurnal BG: 6.4+/-0.3 mmol/l; HbA(1)c: 6.6+/-0.3%). Nine matched healthy subjects acted as controls. In controls, area-under-curve (AUC) for amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin were higher with GLP-1 than saline (PAUC amylin/C-peptide ratio was similar on both days, while AUC proinsulin/C-peptide ratio was higher with GLP-1 (P=0.02). In the patients, amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin AUCs were unaltered by near-normoglycaemia per se. Proinsulin responses to GLP-1 were unchanged, but amylin and C-peptide AUCs increased (PAUC amylin/C-peptide ratios rose to control levels. Near-normoglycaemia tended to reduce AUC proinsulin/C-peptide ratio, which was significant (P=0.04) with GLP-1, but still higher than with saline (P=0.004). In conclusion, amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin responses to glucose were unaffected by four weeks of near-normoglycaemia, whereas GLP-1 increased amylin and C-peptide secretion and amylin/C-peptide ratio. Near-normoglycaemia reduced proinsulin/C-peptide ratio during stimulation with GLP-1, suggesting that strict glycaemic control might ameliorate some of the disturbances in beta-cell function characterizing T2DM. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Unprotected daily sun exposure is differently associated with central adiposity and beta-cell dysfunction by gender: The Korean national health and nutrition examination survey (KNHANES) V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohn, Jung Hun; Kwon, In Ho; Park, Juri; Ryu, Ohk Hyun; Lee, Seong Jin; Kim, Doo-Man; Ihm, Sung-Hee; Choi, Moon-Gi; Yoo, Hyung Joon; Hong, Eun-Gyoung

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ultraviolet irradiation by sun exposure has been associated with both harms and benefits to metabolic health. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether unprotected daily sun exposure is associated with the prevalence of diabetes and explore the underlying mechanism. Methods: We analyzed the Korean National Health and Nutrition Survey V from 2010 to 2011. Participants 19–60 years of age were asked about the average amount of time they had been exposed to direct sunlight per day since the age of 19. We categorized participants into three groups with different levels of lifetime daily sun exposure and explored the association of sun exposure with the prevalence of diabetes. Results: The risk of diabetes was higher in subjects with more than 5 h of unprotected sun exposure per day, with an odds ratio of 2.39 (95% CI 1.75–3.25), compared to those with less than 2 h of sun exposure, and the association remained significant after adjusting for diabetes risk factors. Long-term sun exposure was associated with increased central obesity and the possibility of an increase in visceral adiposity, especially among women, and with decrease in beta cell function and peripheral adiposity or percent body fat in men. Conclusions: Our study provides a cutoff for upper limit of sun exposure and suggests unprotected daily sun exposure for more than 5 h should be avoided to prevent diabetes. Increased central adiposity and decreased beta cell function were observed in women and men, respectively, who had long-term unprotected daily sun exposure. - Highlights: • Sun exposure for more than 5 h per day is associated with diabetes risk. • Insulin resistance associated with visceral adiposity may play a role in women. • Insulin secretory defect may explain diabetes risk in men

  7. Identification of beta cell dysfunction at the pre-symptomatic stage of diabetes mellitus by novel analytical system: liquid biopsy measurements in femtograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapfenbauer, Kurt

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is produced and progresses as a consequence of complex and gradual processes, in which a variety of alterations of the endocrine pancreas, are involved and which mainly result in beta cell failure. Those molecular alterations can be found in the bloodstream, which suggests that we could quantify specific biomarkers in plasma or serum by very sensitive methods before the onset diabetes mellitus is diagnosed. However, classical methods of protein analysis such as electrophoresis, Western blot, ELISA, and liquid chromatography are generally time-consuming, lab-intensive, and not sensitive enough to detect such alteration in a pre-symptomatic state of the disease. A very sensitive and novel analytical detection conjugate system by using the combination of polyfluorophor technology with protein microchip method was developed. This innovative system facilitates the use of a very sensitive microchip assays that measure selected biomarkers in a small sample volume (10 μL) with a much higher sensitivity (92%) compare to common immune assay systems. Further advances of the application of this technology combine the power of miniaturization and faster quantification (around 10 min). The power of this technology offers great promise for point-of-care clinical testing and monitoring of specific biomarkers for diabetes in femtogram level in serum or plasma. In conclusion, the results indicate that the technical performance of this new technology is valid and that the assay is able to quantified PPY-specific antigens in plasma at femtogram levels which can be used for identification of beta cell dysfunction at the pre-symptomatic stage of diabetes mellitus.

  8. Beta-cell specific deletion of Dicer1 leads to defective insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalis, Martins; Bolmeson, Caroline; Esguerra, Jonathan L.S.

    2011-01-01

    -cells specific disruption of the Dicer1 gene using the Cre-lox system controlled by the rat insulin promoter (RIP). In contrast to their normoglycaemic control littermates (RIP-Cre(+/-) Dicer1(¿/wt)), RIP-Cre(+/-)Dicer1(flox/flox) mice (RIP-Cre Dicer1(¿/¿)) developed progressive hyperglycaemia and full...... revealed altered islet morphology, marked decreased ß-cell mass, reduced numbers of granules within the ß-cells and reduced granule docking in adult RIP-Cre Dicer1(¿/¿) mice. ß-cell specific Dicer1 deletion did not appear to disrupt fetal and neonatal ß-cell development as 2-week old RIP-Cre Dicer1...

  9. Glucose- and interleukin-1beta-induced beta-cell apoptosis requires Ca2+ influx and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation and is prevented by a sulfonylurea receptor 1/inwardly rectifying K+ channel 6.2 (SUR/Kir6.2) selective potassium channel opener in human islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maedler, Kathrin; Størling, Joachim; Sturis, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that a progressive decrease in the functional beta-cell mass is the hallmark of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The underlying causes, beta-cell apoptosis and impaired secretory function, seem to be partly mediated by macrophage production of interleukin (IL)-1beta ...

  10. Circulating Levels of MicroRNA from Children with Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes and Healthy Controls: Evidence That miR-25 Associates to Residual Beta-Cell Function and Glycaemic Control during Disease Progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lotte B.; Wang, Cheng; Sorensen, Kaspar

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to identify key miRNAs in circulation, which predict ongoing beta-cell destruction and regeneration in children with newly diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). We compared expression level of sera miRNAs from new onset T1D children and age-matched healthy controls and related the miRN...

  11. Studies of the Ala/Val98 polymorphism of the hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha gene and the relationship to beta-cell function during an OGTT in glucose-tolerant women with and without previous gestational diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, J; Damm, P; Ek, J

    2004-01-01

    In pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) an increased demand for insulin is not met due to beta-cell dysfunction. An Ala/Val polymorphism at codon 98 of the hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha (HNF-1alpha) gene has been associated with decreased serum insulin and C-peptide r...

  12. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 activation is sufficient to drive transcriptional induction of cyclin D2 gene and proliferation of rat pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, Birgitte N; Richter, Henrijette E; Hansen, Johnny A

    2003-01-01

    in a time-dependent manner by hGH in INS-1 cells. Inhibition of protein synthesis by coincubation with cycloheximide did not affect the hGH-induced increase of cyclin D2 mRNA levels at 4 h. Expression of a dominant negative STAT5 mutant, STAT5aDelta749, partially inhibited cyclin D2 protein levels. INS-1...... cells transiently transfected with a cyclin D2 promoter-reporter construct revealed a 3- to 5-fold increase of transcriptional activity in response to hGH stimulation. Furthermore, coexpression of a constitutive active STAT5 mutant (either CA-STAT5a or CA-STAT5b) was sufficient to drive transactivation...

  13. Characterization of P4 ATPase Phospholipid Translocases (Flippases) in Human and Rat Pancreatic Beta Cells: THEIR GENE SILENCING INHIBITS INSULIN SECRETION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansari, Israr-Ul H.; Longacre, Melissa J.; Paulusma, Coen C.; Stoker, Scott W.; Kendrick, Mindy A.; MacDonald, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The negative charge of phosphatidylserine in lipid bilayers of secretory vesicles and plasma membranes couples the domains of positively charged amino acids of secretory vesicle SNARE proteins with similar domains of plasma membrane SNARE proteins enhancing fusion of the two membranes to promote

  14. Mitochondrial oxidative stress contributes differently to rat pancreatic islet cell apoptosis and insulin secretory defects after prolonged culture in a low non-stimulating glucose concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma, L P; Pascal, S M; Duprez, J; Jonas, J-C

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatic beta cells chronically exposed to low glucose concentrations show signs of oxidative stress, loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and increased apoptosis. Our aim was to confirm the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress in rat islet cell apoptosis under these culture conditions and to evaluate whether its reduction similarly improves survival and GSIS. Apoptosis, oxidative stress-response gene mRNA expression and glucose-induced stimulation of mitochondrial metabolism, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and insulin secretion were measured in male Wistar rat islets cultured for 1 week in RPMI medium containing 5-10 mmol/l glucose with or without manganese(III)tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin (MnTBAP) or N-acetyl-L-: cysteine (NAC). Oxidative stress was measured in islet cell clusters cultured under similar conditions using cytosolic and mitochondrial redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein (roGFP1/mt-roGFP1). Prolonged culture in 5 vs 10 mmol/l glucose increased mt-roGFP1 (but not roGFP1) oxidation followed by beta cell apoptosis and loss of GSIS resulting from reduced insulin content, mitochondrial metabolism, Ca(2+) influx and Ca(2+)-induced secretion. Tolbutamide-induced, but not high K(+)-induced, Ca(2+) influx was also suppressed. Under these conditions, MnTBAP, but not NAC, triggered parallel ~50-70% reductions in mt-roGFP1 oxidation and beta cell apoptosis, but failed to protect against the loss of GSIS despite significant improvement in glucose-induced and tolbutamide-induced Ca(2+) influx. Mitochondrial oxidative stress contributes differently to rat pancreatic islet cell apoptosis and insulin secretory defects during culture in a low glucose concentration. Thus, targeting beta cell survival may not be sufficient to restore insulin secretion when beta cells suffer from prolonged mitochondrial oxidative stress, e.g. in the context of reduced glucose metabolism.

  15. Production of peptide antisera specific for mouse and rat proinsulin C-peptide 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, N; Madsen, O D; Kofod, Hans

    1990-01-01

    for antibody binding to the immunizing antigen. Antisera to C-peptide 2, stained islet beta-cells on mouse and rat, but not monkey pancreas sections in immunocytochemical analysis. Preabsorption to the synthetic C-peptide 2, but not the synthetic mouse and rat C-peptide 1 abolished staining. In conclusion we......Mice and rats have two functional non-allelic insulin genes. By using a synthetic peptide representing a common sequence in mouse and rat C-peptide 2 as antigen, we have produced rabbit antisera specific for an epitope which is not present in mouse or rat C-peptide 1. Long-term immunization did...... not seem to increase the end point titre as tested in direct ELISA. The specificity of the antiserum was determined by competitive ELISA and histochemistry on pancreas sections. Only the synthetic C-peptide 2, but not the homologous synthetic C-peptide 1 from mouse and rat competed efficiently in ELISA...

  16. The type 2 diabetes risk allele of TMEM154-rs6813195 associates with decreased beta cell function in a study of 6,486 Danes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Neergaard Harder

    Full Text Available A trans-ethnic meta-analysis of type 2 diabetes genome-wide association studies has identified seven novel susceptibility variants in or near TMEM154, SSR1/RREB1, FAF1, POU5F1/TCF19, LPP, ARL15 and ABCB9/MPHOSPH9. The aim of our study was to investigate associations between these novel risk variants and type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetic traits in a Danish population-based study with measurements of plasma glucose and serum insulin after an oral glucose tolerance test in order to elaborate on the physiological impact of the variants.Case-control analyses were performed in up to 5,777 patients with type 2 diabetes and 7,956 individuals with normal fasting glucose levels. Quantitative trait analyses were performed in up to 5,744 Inter99 participants naïve to glucose-lowering medication. Significant associations between TMEM154-rs6813195 and the beta cell measures insulinogenic index and disposition index and between FAF1-rs17106184 and 2-hour serum insulin levels were selected for further investigation in additional Danish studies and results were combined in meta-analyses including up to 6,486 Danes.We confirmed associations with type 2 diabetes for five of the seven SNPs (TMEM154-rs6813195, FAF1-rs17106184, POU5F1/TCF19-rs3130501, ARL15-rs702634 and ABCB9/MPHOSPH9-rs4275659. The type 2 diabetes risk C-allele of TMEM154-rs6813195 associated with decreased disposition index (n=5,181, β=-0.042, p=0.012 and insulinogenic index (n=5,181, β=-0.032, p=0.043 in Inter99 and these associations remained significant in meta-analyses including four additional Danish studies (disposition index n=6,486, β=-0.042, p=0.0044; and insulinogenic index n=6,486, β=-0.037, p=0.0094. The type 2 diabetes risk G-allele of FAF1-rs17106184 associated with increased levels of 2-hour serum insulin (n=5,547, β=0.055, p=0.017 in Inter99 and also when combining effects with three additional Danish studies (n=6,260, β=0.062, p=0.0040.Studies of type 2 diabetes intermediary

  17. Stimulation of pancreatic beta-cell replication by incretins involves transcriptional induction of cyclin D1 via multiple signalling pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, Birgitte N; Neubauer, Nicole; Lee, Ying C

    2006-01-01

    pathways leading to mitosis by incretins and cytokines, respectively. The response to both GLP-1 and GIP was completely blocked by the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89. In addition, the phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor wortmannin and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor...... and we have previously demonstrated hGH-induced cyclin D2 expression in the insulinoma cell line, INS-1. GLP-1 time-dependently induced the cyclin D1 mRNA and protein levels in INS-1E, whereas the cyclin D2 levels were unaffected. However, minor effect of GLP-1 stimulation was observed on the cyclin D3 m......RNA levels. Transient transfection of a cyclin D1 promoter-luciferase reporter construct into islet monolayer cells or INS-1 cells revealed approximately a 2-3 fold increase of transcriptional activity in response to GLP-1 and GIP, and a 4-7 fold increase in response to forskolin. However, treatment...

  18. Combination therapy of Nigella sativa and human parathyroid hormone on bone mass, biomechanical behavior and structure in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan, Mehmet Fatih; Kanter, Mehmet; Donmez, Senayi; Kartal, Murat Emre; Buyukbas, Sadik

    2007-01-01

    Extracts of the seeds of Nigella sativa (NS), an annual herbaceous plant of the Ranunculaceae family, have been used for many years for therapeutic purposes, including their potential anti-diabetic properties. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that combined treatment with NS and human parathyroid hormone (hPTH) is more effective than treatment with NS or hPTH alone in improving bone mass, connectivity, biomechanical behaviour and strength in insulin-dependent diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) at a single dose of 50mg/kg. The diabetic rats received NS (2ml/kg/day, i.p.), hPTH (6microg/kg/day, i.p.) or NS and hPTH combined for 4 weeks, starting 8 weeks after STZ injection. The beta-cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans were examined by immunohistochemical methods. In addition, bone sections of femora were processed for histomorphometry and biomechanical analysis. In diabetic rats, the beta-cells were essentially negative for insulin-immunoreactivity. NS treatment (alone or in combination with hPTH) significantly increased the area of insulin immunoreactive beta-cells in diabetic rats; however, hPTH treatment alone only led to a slightly increase in the insulin-immunoreactivity. These results suggest that NS might be used in a similar manner to insulin as a safe and effective therapy for diabetes and might be useful in the treatment of diabetic osteopenia.

  19. Failure to preserve beta-cell function with mycophenolate mofetil and daclizumab combined therapy in patients with new- onset type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Peter A; Quinlan, Scott; Krause-Steinrauf, Heidi; Greenbaum, Carla J; Wilson, Darrell M; Rodriguez, Henry; Schatz, Desmond A; Moran, Antoinette M; Lachin, John M; Skyler, Jay S

    2010-04-01

    This trial tested whether mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) alone or with daclizumab (DZB) could arrest the loss of insulin-producing beta-cells in subjects with new-onset type 1 diabetes. A multi-center, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked trial was initiated by Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet at 13 sites in North America and Europe. Subjects diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and with sufficient C-peptide within 3 months of diagnosis were randomized to either MMF alone, MMF plus DZB, or placebo, and then followed for 2 years. The primary outcome was the geometric mean area under the curve (AUC) C-peptide from the 2-h mixed meal tolerance test. One hundred and twenty-six subjects were randomized and treated during the trial. The geometric mean C-peptide AUC at 2 years was unaffected by MMF alone or MMF plus DZB versus placebo. Adverse events were more frequent in the active therapy groups relative to the control group, but not significantly. Neither MMF alone nor MMF in combination with DZB had an effect on the loss of C-peptide in subjects with new-onset type 1 diabetes. Higher doses or more targeted immunotherapies may be needed to affect the autoimmune process.

  20. Pancreatic Fat Is Associated With Metabolic Syndrome and Visceral Fat but Not Beta-Cell Function or Body Mass Index in Pediatric Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staaf, Johan; Labmayr, Viktor; Paulmichl, Katharina; Manell, Hannes; Cen, Jing; Ciba, Iris; Dahlbom, Marie; Roomp, Kirsten; Anderwald, Christian-Heinz; Meissnitzer, Matthias; Schneider, Reinhard; Forslund, Anders; Widhalm, Kurt; Bergquist, Jonas; Ahlström, Håkan; Bergsten, Peter; Weghuber, Daniel; Kullberg, Joel

    2017-03-01

    Adolescents with obesity have increased risk of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Pancreatic fat has been related to these conditions; however, little is known about associations in pediatric obesity. The present study was designed to explore these associations further. We examined 116 subjects, 90 with obesity. Anthropometry, MetS, blood samples, and oral glucose tolerance tests were assessed using standard techniques. Pancreatic fat fraction (PFF) and other fat depots were quantified using magnetic resonance imaging. The PFF was elevated in subjects with obesity. No association between PFF and body mass index-standard deviation score (BMI-SDS) was found in the obesity subcohort. Pancreatic fat fraction correlated to Insulin Secretion Sensitivity Index-2 and Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance in simple regression; however, when using adjusted regression and correcting for BMI-SDS and other fat compartments, PFF correlated only to visceral adipose tissue and fasting glucose. Highest levels of PFF were found in subjects with obesity and MetS. In adolescents with obesity, PFF is elevated and associated to MetS, fasting glucose, and visceral adipose tissue but not to beta-cell function, glucose tolerance, or BMI-SDS. This study demonstrates that conclusions regarding PFF and its associations depend on the body mass features of the cohort.

  1. Pancreatic beta-cell responses to GLP-1 after near-normalization of blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Meena; Højberg, Patricia V; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2010-01-01

    glucose (BG) using insulin (mean diurnal BG: 6.4+/-0.3 mmol/l; HbA(1)c: 6.6+/-0.3%). Nine matched healthy subjects acted as controls. In controls, area-under-curve (AUC) for amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin were higher with GLP-1 than saline (PAUC amylin/C-peptide ratio was similar on both......This study investigated the effects of strict glycaemic control on beta-cell function in nine obese subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), using graded glucose infusions together with infusions of saline or GLP-1 before (HbA(1)c: 8.0+/-0.4%) and after four weeks of near-normalization of blood...... amylin/C-peptide ratios rose to control levels. Near-normoglycaemia tended to reduce AUC proinsulin/C-peptide ratio, which was significant (P=0.04) with GLP-1, but still higher than with saline (P=0.004). In conclusion, amylin, C-peptide and proinsulin responses to glucose were unaffected by four weeks...

  2. The expression of the beta cell-derived autoimmune ligand for the killer receptor nkp46 is attenuated in type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamutal Gur

    Full Text Available NK cells rapidly kill tumor cells, virus infected cells and even self cells. This is mediated via killer receptors, among which NKp46 (NCR1 in mice is prominent. We have recently demonstrated that in type 1 diabetes (T1D NK cells accumulate in the diseased pancreas and that they manifest a hyporesponsive phenotype. In addition, we found that NKp46 recognizes an unknown ligand expressed by beta cells derived from humans and mice and that blocking of NKp46 activity prevented diabetes development. Here we investigated the properties of the unknown NKp46 ligand. We show that the NKp46 ligand is mainly located in insulin granules and that it is constitutively secreted. Following glucose stimulation the NKp46 ligand translocates to the cell membrane and its secretion decreases. We further demonstrate by using several modalities that the unknown NKp46 ligand is not insulin. Finally, we studied the expression of the NKp46 ligand in type 2 diabetes (T2D using 3 different in vivo models and 2 species; mice and gerbils. We demonstrate that the expression of the NKp46 ligand is decreased in all models of T2D studied, suggesting that NKp46 is not involved in T2D.

  3. Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Exert In Vitro Immunomodulatory and Beta Cell Protective Functions in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Rahavi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative and immunomodulatory properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs might be applied for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM treatment. Thus, we proposed in vitro assessment of adipose tissue-derived MSCs (AT-MSCs immunomodulation on autoimmune response along with beta cell protection in streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice model. MSCs were extracted from abdominal adipose tissue of normal mice and cultured to proliferate. Diabetic mice were prepared by administration of multiple low-doses of streptozotocin. Pancreatic islets were isolated from normal mice and splenocytes prepared from normal and diabetic mice. Proliferation, cytokine production, and insulin secretion assays were performed in coculture experiments. AT-MSCs inhibited splenocytes proliferative response to specific (islet lysate and nonspecific (PHA triggers in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05. Decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-17, and increased secretion of regulatory cytokines such as TGF-β, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13 by stimulated splenocytes were also shown in response to islet lysate or PHA stimulants (P<0.05. Finally, we demonstrated that AT-MSCs could effectively sustain viability as well as insulin secretion potential of pancreatic islets in the presence of reactive splenocytes (P<0.05. In conclusion, it seems that MSCs may provide a new horizon for T1DM cell therapy and islet transplantation in the future.

  4. Garcinia mangostana Linn displays antidepressant-like and pro-cognitive effects in a genetic animal model of depression: a bio-behavioral study in the Flinders Sensitive Line rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberholzer, Inge; Möller, Marisa; Holland, Brendan; Dean, Olivia M; Berk, Michael; Harvey, Brian H

    2018-04-01

    There is abundant evidence for both disorganized redox balance and cognitive deficits in major depressive disorder (MDD). Garcinia mangostana Linn (GM) has anti-oxidant activity. We studied the antidepressant-like and pro-cognitive effects of raw GM rind in Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats, a genetic model of depression, following acute and chronic treatment compared to a reference antidepressant, imipramine (IMI). The chemical composition of the GM extract was analysed for levels of α- and γ-mangostin. The acute dose-dependent effects of GM (50, 150 and 200 mg/kg po), IMI (20 mg/kg po) and vehicle were determined in the forced swim test (FST) in FSL rats, versus Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) control rats. Locomotor testing was conducted using the open field test (OFT). Using the most effective dose above coupled with behavioral testing in the FST and cognitive assessment in the novel object recognition test (nORT), a fixed dose 14-day treatment study of GM was performed and compared to IMI- (20 mg/kg/day) and vehicle-treated animals. Chronic treated animals were also assessed with respect to frontal cortex and hippocampal monoamine levels and accumulation of malondialdehyde. FSL rats showed significant cognitive deficits and depressive-like behavior, with disordered cortico-hippocampal 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) and noradrenaline (NA), as well as elevated hippocampal lipid peroxidation. Acute and chronic IMI treatment evoked pronounced antidepressant-like effects. Raw GM extract contained 117 mg/g and 11 mg/g α- and γ-mangostin, respectively, with acute GM demonstrating antidepressant-like effects at 50 mg/kg/day. Chronic GM (50 mg/kg/d) displayed significant antidepressant- and pro-cognitive effects, while demonstrating parity with IMI. Both behavioral and monoamine assessments suggest a more prominent serotonergic action for GM as opposed to a noradrenergic action for IMI, while both IMI and GM reversed hippocampal lipid peroxidation in

  5. Evaluation of amentoflavone isolated from Cnestis ferruginea Vahl ex DC (Connaraceae) on production of inflammatory mediators in LPS stimulated rat astrocytoma cell line (C6) and THP-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishola, I O; Chaturvedi, J P; Rai, S; Rajasekar, N; Adeyemi, O O; Shukla, R; Narender, T

    2013-03-27

    Cnestisferruginea (CF) Vahl ex DC (Connaraceae) is a shrub widely used in traditional African medicine for the treatment of various psychiatric illness and inflammatory conditions. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of amentoflavone isolated from methanolic root extract of CF on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammatory cascade of events associated to the oxidative and nitrative stress, and TNF-α production in rat astrocytoma cell line (C6) and human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1), respectively. Rat astrocytoma cells (C6) were stimulated with LPS (10μg/ml) alone and in the presence of different concentrations of amentoflavone (0.1-3μg/ml) for 24h incubation period. Nitrite release, reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced-glutathione (GSH) in C6 cells were estimated; while the TNF-α level was estimated in THP-1 cell lysate. In vivo analgesic activity was evaluated using mouse writhing and hot plate tests while the anti-inflammatory effect was investigated using carrageenan-induced oedema test. LPS (10μg/ml) significantly (PTHP-1 cells. Amentoflavone (6.25-50mg/kg) significantly (Ptest. It produced time course significant (P<0.05) decrease in oedema formation in rodents. Findings in this study demonstrate the anti-neuroinflammatory and antinoceptive effects of amentoflavone which may suggest its beneficial roles in neuroinflammation associated disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The mechanism of thioacetamide-induced apoptosis in the L37 albumin-SV40 T-antigen transgenic rat hepatocyte-derived cell line occurs without DNA fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulera, S J; Sattler, C A; Gast, W L; Heath, S; Festerling, T A; Pitot, H C

    1998-10-01

    The hepatotoxicant thioacetamide (TH) has classically been used as a model to study hepatic necrosis; however, recent studies have shown that TH can also induce apoptosis. In this report we demonstrate that 2.68+/-0.54% of the albumin-SV40 T-antigen transgenic rat hepatocytes undergo TH-induced apoptosis, a level comparable to other in vivo models of liver apoptosis. In addition, TH could induce apoptosis and necrosis in the L37 albumin-SV40 T-antigen transgenic rat liver-derived cell line. Examination of dying L37 cells treated with 100 mM TH by electron microscopy revealed distinct morphological characteristics that could be attributed to apoptosis. Quantitation of apoptosis by FACS analysis 24 h after treatment with 100 mM TH revealed that 81.3+/-1.6% of the cells were undergoing apoptosis. In contrast, when L37 cells were treated with 250 mM TH, cells exhibited characteristics consistent with necrotic cell death. DNA fragmentation ladders were produced by growth factor withdrawal-induced apoptosis; however, in 100 mM TH-induced apoptosis, DNA fragmentation ladders were not observed. Analysis of endonuclease activity in L37 cells revealed that the enzymes were not inactivated in the presence of 100 mM TH. The data presented in this report indicate that the L37 cell line could be used to study the mechanism of TH-induced apoptosis that was not mediated through a mechanism requiring DNA fragmentation.

  7. Effect of 6-week course of glucagon-like peptide 1 on glycaemic control, insulin sensitivity, and beta-cell function in type 2 diabetes: a parallel-group study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zander, Mette; Madsbad, Sten; Madsen, Jan Lysgaard

    2002-01-01

    subcutaneous infusion of GLP-1 (n=10) or saline (n=10) for 6 weeks. Before (week 0) and at weeks 1 and 6, they underwent beta-cell function tests (hyperglycaemic clamps), 8 h profiles of plasma glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, and free fatty acids, and appetite and side-effect ratings on 100 mm visual...... analogue scales; at weeks 0 and 6 they also underwent dexascanning, measurement of insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamps), haemoglobin A(1c), and fructosamine. The primary endpoints were haemoglobin A(1c) concentration, 8-h profile of glucose concentration in plasma, and beta......-cell function (defined as the first-phase response to glucose and the maximum insulin secretory capacity of the cell). Analyses were per protocol. FINDINGS: One patient assigned saline was excluded because no veins were accessible. In the remaining nine patients in that group, no significant changes were...

  8. Multinational study in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes: association of age, ketoacidosis, HLA status, and autoantibodies on residual beta-cell function and glycemic control 12 months after diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, H.B.; Swift, P.G.F.; Holl, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    .005), and by stimulated C-peptide (p IA; p = 0.02) and glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA; p = 0.0004) at 1 month. HbA1c at 12 months was predicted by HbA1c at diagnosis (p ... (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Younger age, ketoacidosis at diagnosis, and IA and GADA 1 month after diagnosis were the strongest explanatory factors for residual beta-cell function at 12 months. Glycemic control at 12 months was influenced predominantly by ethnicity, HbA1c at diagnosis, and GADA at 1......Objective: To identify predictors of residual beta-cell function and glycemic control during the first 12 months after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Subjects and Methods: Clinical information and blood samples were collected from 275 children. HbA1c, antibodies, HLA typing and mixed meal...

  9. Demonstration of lactogenic receptors in rat endocrine pancreases by quantitative autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polak, M.; Scharfmann, R.; Ban, E.; Haour, F.; Postel-Vinay, M.C.; Czernichow, P.

    1990-01-01

    A direct effect of growth hormone and/or prolactin on the growth of the pancreatic beta-cell has been proposed. This study assessed the presence of human growth hormone (hGH)-binding sites in male adult rat endocrine pancreas via quantitative autoradiography. The binding of 125I-labeled hGH was evaluated by receptor autoradiography on frozen-pancreas cryostat cut sections. The sections were incubated with 125I-hGH (10(-10) M) for 75 min at room temperature, and nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of excess native hGH (5 X 10(-7) M). The specificity of the binding was assessed in competition experiments with bovine GH and ovine prolactin. The autoradiograms were quantified with a computer-assisted image-processing system. The sections were then stained to visualize the endocrine islets. Nondiabetic control and streptozocin (STZ)-injected rats were used. Our results show that (1) there is specific binding of iodinated hGH in small areas of the pancreas, which appear as the Langerhans islets when the autoradiogram and the stained sections are superimposed; (2) the specificity of hGH binding in rat islets is lactogenic; (3) the density of the hGH-binding sites in the endocrine pancreas is estimated at 4.8 fmol/mg protein, with IC50 ranging from 0.98 to 2.50 nM; and (4) binding sites may be present on the beta-cell, because specific binding disappears in STZ-injected rats. In conclusion, by use of a quantitative autoradiographic technique, we provide evidence for the presence of lactogenic receptors on rat beta-cells

  10. Liver Progenitor Cell Line HepaRG Differentiated in a Bioartificial Liver Effectively Supplies Liver Support to Rats with Acute Liver Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nibourg, Geert A. A.; Chamuleau, Robert A. F. M.; van der Hoeven, Tessa V.; Maas, Martinus A. W.; Ruiter, An F. C.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Oude Elferink, Ronald P. J.; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje

    2012-01-01

    A major roadblock to the application of bioartificial livers is the need for a human liver cell line that displays a high and broad level of hepatic functionality. The human bipotent liver progenitor cell line HepaRG is a promising candidate in this respect, for its potential to differentiate into

  11. Antibody Response to Serpin B13 Induces Adaptive Changes in Mouse Pancreatic Islets and Slows Down the Decline in the Residual Beta Cell Function in Children with Recent Onset of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryvalap, Yury; Lo, Chi-Wen; Manuylova, Ekaterina; Baldzizhar, Raman; Jospe, Nicholas; Czyzyk, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is characterized by a heightened antibody (Ab) response to pancreatic islet self-antigens, which is a biomarker of progressive islet pathology. We recently identified a novel antibody to clade B serpin that reduces islet-associated T cell accumulation and is linked to the delayed onset of T1D. As natural immunity to clade B arises early in life, we hypothesized that it may influence islet development during that time. To test this possibility healthy young Balb/c male mice were injected with serpin B13 mAb or IgG control and examined for the number and cellularity of pancreatic islets by immunofluorescence and FACS. Beta cell proliferation was assessed by measuring nucleotide analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (5-EdU) incorporation into the DNA and islet Reg gene expression was measured by real time PCR. Human studies involved measuring anti-serpin B13 autoantibodies by Luminex. We found that injecting anti-serpin B13 monoclonal Ab enhanced beta cell proliferation and Reg gene expression, induced the generation of ∼80 pancreatic islets per animal, and ultimately led to increase in the beta cell mass. These findings are relevant to human T1D because our analysis of subjects just diagnosed with T1D revealed an association between baseline anti-serpin activity and slower residual beta cell function decline in the first year after the onset of diabetes. Our findings reveal a new role for the anti-serpin immunological response in promoting adaptive changes in the endocrine pancreas and suggests that enhancement of this response could potentially help impede the progression of T1D in humans. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Epidermal growth factor decreases PEPT2 transport capacity and expression in the rat kidney proximal tubule cell line SKPT0193 cl.2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bravo, Silvina A; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Amstrup, Jan

    2004-01-01

    by studies of apical uptake of [14C]glycylsarcosine, rPepT2 mRNA levels, and immunostaining of SKPT cells with a rPEPT2-specific antibody. On the contrary, apical uptake of glucose and lysine was increased in EGF-treated cells, indicating that EGF was not acting generally to decrease apical nutrient uptake...... mechanisms in the proximal tubule cells. Our findings indicate that EGF decreases rPEPT2 expression by lowering transcription of the rat PepT2 gene or by decreasing rat PepT2 mRNA stability. Previous investigators routinely used SKPT cell culture media with a high (10 ng/ml) EGF concentration. Our study...

  13. Immune characterization of the Lewis rats inoculated with K2 sarcoma cell line and newly derived R5-28 malignant cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morávková, Alena; Málek, Ondřej; Pokorná, Eva; Strnádel, Ján; Hradecký, Jan; Horák, Vratislav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 51, - (2005), s. 159-165 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/04/0102 Grant - others:Ústav živočišné fyziologie a genetiky AV ČR(CZ) IAPG/05/16 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : rat sarcoma * malignancy * myeloid cells Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.719, year: 2005

  14. MicroRNA-224 is Readily Detectable in Urine of Individuals with Diabetes Mellitus and is a Potential Indicator of Beta-Cell Demise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siobhán Bacon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miRNA are a class of non-coding, 19–25 nucleotide RNA critical for network-level regulation of gene expression. miRNA serve as paracrine signaling molecules. Using an unbiased array approach, we previously identified elevated levels of miR-224 and miR-103 to be associated with a monogenic form of diabetes; HNF1A-MODY. miR-224 is a novel miRNA in the field of diabetes. We sought to explore the role of miR-224 as a potential biomarker in diabetes, and whether such diabetes-associated-miRNA can also be detected in the urine of patients. Absolute levels of miR-224 and miR-103 were determined in the urine of n = 144 individuals including carriers of a HNF1A mutation, participants with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and normal controls. Expression levels were correlated with clinical and biochemical parameters. miR-224 was significantly elevated in the urine of carriers of a HNF1A mutation and participants with T1DM. miR-103 was highly expressed in urine across all diabetes cohorts when compared to controls. For both miR-224 and-103, we found a significant correlation between serum and urine levels (p < 0.01. We demonstrate that miRNA can be readily detected in the urine independent of clinical indices of renal dysfunction. We surmise that the differential expression levels of miR-224 in both HNF1A-MODY mutation carriers and T1DM may be an attempt to compensate for beta-cell demise.

  15. Characterization of beta cell and incretin function in patients with MODY1 (HNF4A MODY) and MODY3 (HNF1A MODY) in a Swedish patient collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekholm, E; Shaat, N; Holst, J J

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the beta cell and incretin function in patients with HNF4A and HNF1A MODY during a test meal. Clinical characteristics and biochemical data (glucose, proinsulin, insulin, C-peptide, GLP-1 and GIP) during a test meal were compared between MODY patients from eight different families. BMI-matched T2D and healthy subjects were used as two separate control groups. The early phase of insulin secretion was attenuated in HNF4A, HNF1A MODY and T2D (AUC0-30 controls: 558.2 ± 101.2, HNF4A MODY: 93.8 ± 57.0, HNF1A MODY: 170.2 ± 64.5, T2D: 211.2 ± 65.3, P MODY compared to T2D and that tended to be so also in HNF1A MODY (HNF4A MODY: 3.7 ± 1.2, HNF1A MODY: 8.3 ± 3.8 vs. T2D: 26.6 ± 14.3). Patients with HNF4A MODY had similar total GLP-1 and GIP responses as controls (GLP-1 AUC: (control: 823.9 ± 703.8, T2D: 556.4 ± 698.2, HNF4A MODY: 1,257.0 ± 999.3, HNF1A MODY: 697.1 ± 818.4) but with a different secretion pattern. The AUC insulin during the test meal was strongly correlated with the GIP secretion (Correlation coefficient 1.0, P MODY showed an attenuated early phase of insulin secretion similar to T2Ds. AUC insulin during the test meal was strongly correlated with GIP secretion, whereas no such correlation was seen for insulin and GLP-1. Thus, GIP may be a more important factor for insulin secretion than GLP-1 in MODY patients.

  16. Sweet taste receptor expressed in pancreatic beta-cells activates the calcium and cyclic AMP signaling systems and stimulates insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Nakagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sweet taste receptor is expressed in the taste buds and enteroendocrine cells acting as a sugar sensor. We investigated the expression and function of the sweet taste receptor in MIN6 cells and mouse islets. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The expression of the sweet taste receptor was determined by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+ ([Ca(2+](c and cAMP ([cAMP](c were monitored in MIN6 cells using fura-2 and Epac1-camps. Activation of protein kinase C was monitored by measuring translocation of MARCKS-GFP. Insulin was measured by radioimmunoassay. mRNA for T1R2, T1R3, and gustducin was expressed in MIN6 cells. In these cells, artificial sweeteners such as sucralose, succharin, and acesulfame-K increased insulin secretion and augmented secretion induced by glucose. Sucralose increased biphasic increase in [Ca(2+](c. The second sustained phase was blocked by removal of extracellular calcium and addition of nifedipine. An inhibitor of inositol(1, 4, 5-trisphophate receptor, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, blocked both phases of [Ca(2+](c response. The effect of sucralose on [Ca(2+](c was inhibited by gurmarin, an inhibitor of the sweet taste receptor, but not affected by a G(q inhibitor. Sucralose also induced sustained elevation of [cAMP](c, which was only partially inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium and nifedipine. Finally, mouse islets expressed T1R2 and T1R3, and artificial sweeteners stimulated insulin secretion. CONCLUSIONS: Sweet taste receptor is expressed in beta-cells, and activation of this receptor induces insulin secretion by Ca(2+ and cAMP-dependent mechanisms.

  17. NKX6.1 induced pluripotent stem cell reporter lines for isolation and analysis of functionally relevant neuronal and pancreas populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Kumar Gupta

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have reported significant advances in the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells to clinically relevant cell types such as the insulin producing beta-like cells and motor neurons. However, many of the current differentiation protocols lead to heterogeneous cell cultures containing cell types other than the targeted cell fate. Genetically modified human pluripotent stem cells reporting the expression of specific genes are of great value for differentiation protocol optimization and for the purification of relevant cell populations from heterogeneous cell cultures. Here we present the generation of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC lines with a GFP reporter inserted in the endogenous NKX6.1 locus. Characterization of the reporter lines demonstrated faithful GFP labelling of NKX6.1 expression during pancreas and motor neuron differentiation. Cell sorting and gene expression profiling by RNA sequencing revealed that NKX6.1-positive cells from pancreatic differentiations closely resemble human beta cells. Furthermore, functional characterization of the isolated cells demonstrated that glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is mainly confined to the NKX6.1-positive cells. We expect that the NKX6.1-GFP iPSC lines and the results presented here will contribute to the further refinement of differentiation protocols and characterization of hPSC-derived beta cells and motor neurons for disease modelling and cell replacement therapies. Keywords: Human induced pluripotent stem cells, NKX6.1, Reporter cell line, Directed differentiation, hiPSC-derived beta cells

  18. Co-culture of neural crest stem cells (NCSC and insulin producing beta-TC6 cells results in cadherin junctions and protection against cytokine-induced beta-cell death.

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    Anongnad Ngamjariyawat

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Transplantation of pancreatic islets to Type 1 diabetes patients is hampered by inflammatory reactions at the transplantation site leading to dysfunction and death of insulin producing beta-cells. Recently we have shown that co-transplantation of neural crest stem cells (NCSCs together with the islet cells improves transplantation outcome. The aim of the present investigation was to describe in vitro interactions between NCSCs and insulin producing beta-TC6 cells that may mediate protection against cytokine-induced beta-cell death. PROCEDURES: Beta-TC6 and NCSC cells were cultured either alone or together, and either with or without cell culture inserts. The cultures were then exposed to the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IFN-γ for 48 hours followed by analysis of cell death rates (flow cytometry, nitrite production (Griess reagent, protein localization (immunofluorescence and protein phosphorylation (flow cytometry. RESULTS: We observed that beta-TC6 cells co-cultured with NCSCs were protected against cytokine-induced cell death, but not when separated by cell culture inserts. This occurred in parallel with (i augmented production of nitrite from beta-TC6 cells, indicating that increased cell survival allows a sustained production of nitric oxide; (ii NCSC-derived laminin production; (iii decreased phospho-FAK staining in beta-TC6 cell focal adhesions, and (iv decreased beta-TC6 cell phosphorylation of ERK(T202/Y204, FAK(Y397 and FAK(Y576. Furthermore, co-culture also resulted in cadherin and beta-catenin accumulations at the NCSC/beta-TC6 cell junctions. Finally, the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone did not affect cytokine-induced beta-cell death during co-culture with NCSCs. CONCLUSION: In summary, direct contacts, but not soluble factors, promote improved beta-TC6 viability when co-cultured with NCSCs. We hypothesize that cadherin junctions between NCSC and beta-TC6 cells promote powerful signals that maintain beta-cell

  19. 9-AAA inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in human melanoma A375 and rat prostate adenocarcinoma AT-2 and Mat-LyLu cell lines but does not affect the growth and viability of normal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korohoda, Włodzimierz; Hapek, Anna; Pietrzak, Monika; Ryszawy, Damian; Madeja, Zbigniew

    2016-11-01

    The present study found that, similarly to 5-fluorouracil, low concentrations (1-10 µM) of 9-aminoacridine (9-AAA) inhibited the growth of the two rat prostate cancer AT-2 and Mat-LyLu cell lines and the human melanoma A375 cell line. However, at the same concentrations, 9-AAA had no effect on the growth and apoptosis of normal human skin fibroblasts (HSFs). The differences between the cellular responses of the AT-2 and Mat-LyLu cell lines, which differ in malignancy, were found to be relatively small compared with the differences between normal HSFs and the cancer cell lines. Visible effects on the cell growth and survival of tumor cell lines were observed after 24-48 h of treatment with 9-AAA, and increased over time. The inhibition of cancer cell growth was found to be due to the gradually increasing number of cells dying by apoptosis, which was observed using two methods, direct counting and FlowSight analysis. Simultaneously, cell motile activity decreased to the same degree in cancer and normal cells within the first 8 h of incubation in the presence of 9-AAA. The results presented in the current study suggest that short-lasting tests for potential anticancer substances can be insufficient; which may result in cell type-dependent differences in the responses of cells to tested compounds that act with a delay being overlooked. The observed differences in responses between normal human fibroblasts and cancer cells to 9-AAA show the requirement for additional studies to be performed simultaneously on differently reacting cancer and normal cells, to determine the molecular mechanisms responsible for these differences.

  20. Palmitate activates autophagy in INS-1E β-cells and in isolated rat and human pancreatic islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Martino

    Full Text Available We have investigated the in vitro effects of increased levels of glucose and free fatty acids on autophagy activation in pancreatic beta cells. INS-1E cells and isolated rat and human pancreatic islets were incubated for various times (from 2 to 24 h at different concentrations of glucose and/or palmitic acid. Then, cell survival was evaluated and autophagy activation was explored by using various biochemical and morphological techniques. In INS-1E cells as well as in rat and human islets, 0.5 and 1.0 mM palmitate markedly increased autophagic vacuole formation, whereas high glucose was ineffective alone and caused little additional change when combined with palmitate. Furthermore, LC3-II immunofluorescence co-localized with that of cathepsin D, a lysosomal marker, showing that the autophagic flux was not hampered in PA-treated cells. These effects were maintained up to 18-24 h incubation and were associated with a significant decline of cell survival correlated with both palmitate concentration and incubation time. Ultrastructural analysis showed that autophagy activation, as evidenced by the occurrence of many autophagic vacuoles in the cytoplasm of beta cells, was associated with a diffuse and remarkable swelling of the endoplasmic reticulum. Our results indicate that among the metabolic alterations typically associated with type 2 diabetes, high free fatty acids levels could play a role in the activation of autophagy in beta cells, through a mechanism that might involve the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  1. The intrauterine metabolic environment modulates the gene expression pattern in fetal rat islets: prevention by maternal taurine supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reusens, B; Sparre, T; Kalbe, L

    2008-01-01

    in gene expression in fetal islets affected by the LP diet and how taurine may prevent these changes. Methods  Pregnant Wistar rats were fed an LP diet (8% [wt/wt] protein) supplemented or not with taurine in the drinking water or a control diet (20% [wt/wt] protein). At 21.5 days of gestation, fetal......Aims/hypothesis  Events during fetal life may in critical time windows programme tissue development leading to organ dysfunction with potentially harmful consequences in adulthood such as diabetes. In rats, the beta cell mass of progeny from dams fed with a low-protein (LP) diet during gestation...

  2. Intra-peritoneal administration of interleukin-1 beta induces impaired insulin release from the perfused rat pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wogensen, L; Helqvist, S; Pociot, F

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a stimulatory effect of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) on insulin and glucagon release from the perfused rat pancreas, accompanied by selective lysis of 20% of beta-cells as assessed by electronmicroscopy. However, we have not observed an inhibitory action of IL-1...... beta on insulin release from the perfused pancreas as shown for isolated islets. To test whether periodical exposure of the endocrine pancreas to circulating IL-1 beta in vivo affects insulin release from the intact perfused pancreas, rats were treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of 4...

  3. Decreased insulin secretion in pregnant rats fed a low protein diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haijun; Ho, Eric; Balakrishnan, Meena; Yechoor, Vijay; Yallampalli, Chandra

    2017-10-01

    Low protein (LP) diet during pregnancy leads to reduced plasma insulin levels in rodents, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Glucose is the primary insulin secretagogue, and enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in beta cells contributes to compensation for insulin resistance and maintenance of glucose homeostasis during pregnancy. In this study, we hypothesized that plasma insulin levels in pregnant rats fed LP diet are reduced due to disrupted GSIS of pancreatic islets. We first confirmed reduced plasma insulin levels, then investigated in vivo insulin secretion by glucose tolerance test and ex vivo GSIS of pancreatic islets in the presence of glucose at different doses, and KCl, glibenclamide, and L-arginine. Main findings include (1) plasma insulin levels were unaltered on day 10, but significantly reduced on days 14-22 of pregnancy in rats fed LP diet compared to those of control (CT) rats; (2) insulin sensitivity was unchanged, but glucose intolerance was more severe in pregnant rats fed LP diet; (3) GSIS in pancreatic islets was lower in LP rats compared to CT rats in the presence of glucose, KCl, and glibenclamide, and the response to L-arginine was abolished in LP rats; and (4) the total insulin content in pancreatic islets and expression of Ins2 were reduced in LP rats, but expression of Gcg was unaltered. These studies demonstrate that decreased GSIS in beta cells of LP rats contributes to reduced plasma insulin levels, which may lead to placental and fetal growth restriction and programs hypertension and other metabolic diseases in offspring. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for the Study of Reproduction. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Discriminatory ability of simple OGTT-based beta cell function indices for prediction of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes: the CODAM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Biggelaar, Louise J C J; Sep, Simone J S; Eussen, Simone J P M; Mari, Andrea; Ferrannini, Ele; van Greevenbroek, Marleen M J; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Dagnelie, Pieter C

    2017-03-01

    The hyperglycaemic clamp technique and the frequently sampled IVGTT are unsuitable techniques to assess beta cell function (BCF) in large cohorts. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the discriminatory ability of simple OGTT-based BCF indices for prediction of prediabetes (meaning impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance) and type 2 diabetes. Glucose metabolism status was assessed by 2 h 75 g OGTT at baseline (n = 476, mean age 59.2 years, 38.7% women) and after 7 years of follow-up (n = 416) in the Cohort on Diabetes and Atherosclerosis Maastricht (CODAM) study (1999-2009). Baseline plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide values during OGTTs were used to calculate 21 simple indices of BCF. Disposition indices (BCF index × Matsuda index), to compensate for the prevailing level of insulin resistance, were calculated for the BCF indices with the best discriminatory abilities. The discriminatory ability of the BCF indices was estimated by the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (ROC AUC) with an outcome of incident prediabetes (n = 73) or type 2 diabetes (n = 60 and n = 18 cases, respectively, in individuals who were non-diabetic or had normal glucose metabolism at baseline). For incident prediabetes (n = 73), all ROC AUCs were less than 70%, whereas for incident type 2 diabetes, I 30 /I 0 , CP 30 /CP 0 , ΔI 30 /ΔG 30 , ΔCP 30 /ΔG 30 (where I, CP and G are the plasma concentrations of insulin, C-peptide and glucose, respectively, at the times indicated), and corrected insulin response at 30 min had ROC AUCs over 70%. In at-baseline non-diabetic individuals, disposition indices ΔI 30 /ΔG 30 , ΔCP 30 /ΔG 30 and corrected insulin response at 30 min had ROC AUCs of over 80% for incident type 2 diabetes. Moreover, these BCF disposition indices had significantly better discriminatory abilities for incident type 2 diabetes than the Matsuda index alone. BCF indices reflecting early

  5. In vitro and in silico derived relative effect potencies of ah-receptor-mediated effects by PCDD/Fs and PCBs in rat, mouse, and guinea pig CALUX cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanzadeh, Mehdi; van Ede, Karin I; Larsson, Malin; van Duursen, Majorie B M; Poellinger, Lorenz; Lücke-Johansson, Sandra; Machala, Miroslav; Pěnčíková, Kateřina; Vondráček, Jan; van den Berg, Martin; Denison, Michael S; Ringsted, Tine; Andersson, Patrik L

    2014-07-21

    For a better understanding of species-specific relative effect potencies (REPs), responses of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) were assessed. REPs were calculated using chemical-activated luciferase gene expression assays (CALUX) derived from guinea pig, rat, and mouse cell lines. Almost all 20 congeners tested in the rodent cell lines were partial agonists and less efficacious than 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). For this reason, REPs were calculated for each congener using concentrations at which 20% of the maximal TCDD response was reached (REP20TCDD). REP20TCDD values obtained for PCDD/Fs were comparable with their toxic equivalency factors assigned by the World Health Organization (WHO-TEF), while those for PCBs were in general lower than the WHO-TEF values. Moreover, the guinea pig cell line was the most sensitive as indicated by the 20% effect concentrations of TCDD of 1.5, 5.6, and 11.0 pM for guinea pig, rat, and mouse cells, respectively. A similar response pattern was observed using multivariate statistical analysis between the three CALUX assays and the WHO-TEFs. The mouse assay showed minor deviation due to higher relative induction potential for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran and 2,3,4,6,7,8-hexachlorodibenzofuran and lower for 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-heptachlorodibenzofuran and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126). 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzofuran was more than two times more potent in the mouse assay as compared with that of rat and guinea pig cells, while measured REP20TCDD for PCB126 was lower in mouse cells (0.05) as compared with that of the guinea pig (0.2) and rat (0.07). In order to provide REP20TCDD values for all WHO-TEF assigned compounds, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models were developed. The QSAR models showed that specific electronic properties and molecular surface characteristics play important roles in the AhR-mediated response. In silico derived REP20TCDD values were generally consistent with the WHO

  6. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Worsens the Profile of Cardiometabolic Risk Markers and Decrease Indexes of Beta-Cell Function Independently of Insulin Resistance in Nondiabetic Women with a Parental History of Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Sokup

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Women with a history of both parental type 2 diabetes (pt2DM and previous gestational diabetes (pGDM represent a group at high risk of cardiovascular events. We hypothesized that pGDM changes cardiometabolic risk markers levels as well as theirs associations with glucose indices in nondiabetic pt2DM women. Methods. Anthropometric parameters, glucose regulation (OGTT, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, beta-cell function, lipid levels, parameters of endothelial dysfunction, and inflammation were evaluated in 55 women with pt2DM, 40 with both pt2DM and pGDM 2–24 months postpartum, and 35 controls. Results. Prediabetes was diagnosed more frequently in women with both pt2DM and pGDM in comparison with women with only pt2DM (10 versus 8, P=0.04. The pGDM group had higher LDL-cholesterol, sICAM-1, tPa Ag, fibrinogen, and lower beta-cell function after adjustment for HOMA-IR, in comparison with pt2DM group. In pt2DM group postchallenge glucose correlated independently with hsCRP and in pGDM group fasting glucose with HOMA-IR. Conclusions. pGDM exerts a combined effect on cardiometabolic risk markers in women with pt2DM. In these women higher LDL-cholesterol, fibrinogen, sICAM-1, tPa Ag levels and decreased beta cell function are associated with pGDM independently of HOMA-IR index value. Fasting glucose is an important cardiometabolic risk marker and is independently associated with HOMA-IR.

  7. H2O2-Activated Mitochondrial Phospholipase iPLA2 gamma Prevents Lipotoxic Oxidative Stress in Synergy with UCP2, Amplifies Signaling via G-Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR40, and Regulates Insulin Secretion in Pancreatic beta-Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Jan; Dlasková, Andrea; Zelenka, Jaroslav; Jabůrek, Martin; Ježek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 12 (2015), s. 958-972 ISSN 1523-0864 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP303/11/P320; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-02033S; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-06666S; GA ČR GA15-02051S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondrial phospholipase iPLA2 gamma * uncoupling protein UCP2 * G-protein coupled receptor - 40 * glucose-stimulated insulin secretion * pancreatic beta cells Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 7.093, year: 2015

  8. Cardioprotective effects of curcumin-loaded magnetic hydrogel nanocomposite (nanocurcumin) against doxorubicin-induced cardiac toxicity in rat cardiomyocyte cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdari, Mehrdad; Eatemadi, Ali

    2017-06-01

    Curcumin, is a yellow substance extracted from Curcuma longa rhizomes, it is a crystalline compound that has been traditionally applied in culinary practices and medicines in India. The aim of our study is to demonstrate the efficacy of curcumin-loaded magnetic hydrogel nanocomposite in the treatment of heart hypertrophy. 10 rats weighing 150-200 g each were induced with heart failure using 2.5 mg/kg doxorubicin for 2 weeks. The test groups were treated with curcumin-loaded magnetic hydrogel nanocomposite while the control was treated with curcumin alone. malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) enzymes activities were monitored after two weeks of last the dose. In addition, the expression of three heart failure markers; atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), B type natriuretic peptide (BNP), and beta major histocompatibility complex (β-MHC) were observed, it was found that the expression of these markers decreases with an increase in the concentration of curcumin (P Curcumin elevated the decreased level of GPX and SOD, and reduced the elevated level of MDA in cardiac tissue. We suggest this combination to be a potent therapy for heart failure and hypertension in the nearest future.

  9. Process optimization and photostability of silymarin nanostructured lipid carriers: effect on UV-irradiated rat skin and SK-MEL 2 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pooja; Singh, Mahendra; Kanoujia, Jovita; Arya, Malti; Saraf, Shailendra K; Saraf, Shubhini A

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the present work was to formulate a novel stable delivery system which would not only overcome the solubility issue of silymarin, but also help to increase the therapeutic value by better permeation, anticancer action and reduced toxicity. This was envisaged through the recent developments in nanotechnology, combined with the activity of the phytoconstituent silymarin. A 2(3) full factorial design based on three independent variables was used for process optimization of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC). Developed formulations were evaluated on the basis of particle size, morphology, in vitro drug release, photostability and cell line studies. Optimized silymarin-NLC was incorporated into carbopol gel and further assessed for rheological parameters. Stable behaviour in presence of light was proven by photostability testing of formulation. Permeability parameters were significantly higher in NLC as compared to marketed phytosome formulation. The NLC based gel described in this study showed faster onset, and prolonged activity up to 24 h and better action against edema as compared to marketed formulation. In case of anticancer activity of silymarin-NLC against SK-MEL 2 cell lines, silymarin-NLC proved to possess anticancer activity in a dose-dependent manner (10-80 μM) and induced apoptosis at 80 μM in SK-MEL 2 cancer cells. This work documents for the first time that silymarin can be formulated into nanostructured lipoidal carrier system for enhanced permeation, greater stability as well as anticancer activity for skin.

  10. The Effect of Pumpkin on GLP-1 and HOMA-β in Hypercholesterolemic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunarti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: High fat and fructose diet may impair β cell function through oxidative stress that is induced by subsequent hypercholesterolemia. The β cell function is usually quantified by homeostatic model assessment beta-cell function (HOMA-β. Oxidative stress may be decreased by β-carotene from pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of pumpkin powder on glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 level and HOMA-β in rats with high fat and fructose diet.

  11. Sustained glucagon-like peptide 1 expression from encapsulated transduced cells to treat obese diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Moralejo, Daniel; Yanay, Ofer; Kernan, Kelly; Bailey, Adam; Lernmark, Ake; Osborne, William

    2011-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are two prevalent chronic diseases that have become a major public health concern in industrialized countries. T2D is characterized by hyperglycemia and islet beta cell dysfunction. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) promotes β cell proliferation and neogenesis and has a potent insulinotropic effect. Leptin receptor deficient male rats are obese and diabetic and provide a model of T2D. We hypothesized that their treatment by sustained expression of GLP-1 using e...

  12. Expression and Localization of microRNAs in Perinatal Rat Pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Louise; Rosenstierne, Maiken Worsøe; Gaarn, Louise Winkel

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the expression of pancreatic microRNAs (miRNAs) during the period of perinatal beta-cell expansion and maturation in rats, determine the localization of these miRNAs and perform a pathway analysis with predicted target mRNAs expressed in perinatal pancreas. RESEARCH DESIGN...... AND METHODS: RNA was extracted from whole pancreas at embryonic day 20 (E20), on the day of birth (P0) and two days after birth (P2) and hybridized to miRNA microarrays. Differentially expressed miRNAs were verified by northern blotting and their pancreatic localization determined by in situ hybridization...

  13. Proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma alter tight junction structure and function in the rat parotid gland Par-C10 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Olga J; Camden, Jean M; Redman, Robert S; Jones, Jonathan E; Seye, Cheikh I; Erb, Laurie; Weisman, Gary A

    2008-11-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by inflammation and dysfunction of salivary glands, resulting in impaired secretory function. The production of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is elevated in exocrine glands of patients with SS, although little is known about the effects of these cytokines on salivary epithelial cell functions necessary for saliva secretion, including tight junction (TJ) integrity and the establishment of transepithelial ion gradients. The present study demonstrates that chronic exposure of polarized rat parotid gland (Par-C10) epithelial cell monolayers to TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma decreases transepithelial resistance (TER) and anion secretion, as measured by changes in short-circuit current (I(sc)) induced by carbachol, a muscarinic cholinergic receptor agonist, or UTP, a P2Y(2) nucleotide receptor agonist. In contrast, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma had no effect on agonist-induced increases in the intracellular calcium concentration [Ca(2+)](i) in Par-C10 cells. Furthermore, treatment of Par-C10 cell monolayers with TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma increased paracellular permeability to normally impermeant proteins, altered cell and TJ morphology, and downregulated the expression of the TJ protein, claudin-1, but not other TJ proteins expressed in Par-C10 cells. The decreases in TER, agonist-induced transepithelial anion secretion, and claudin-1 expression caused by TNF-alpha, but not IFN-gamma, were reversible by incubation of Par-C10 cell monolayers with cytokine-free medium for 24 h, indicating that IFN-gamma causes irreversible inhibition of cellular activities associated with fluid secretion in salivary glands. Our results suggest that cytokine production is an important contributor to secretory dysfunction in SS by disrupting TJ integrity of salivary epithelium.

  14. The insulinotropic effect of endothelin-1 is mediated by glucagon release from the islet alpha cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, B; Gregersen, S; Kristensen, K

    1999-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The circulating concentrations of endothelin-1 (ET-1), a peptide derived from endothelium, are increased in hypertension and diabetes. Endothelin-1 has recently been shown to be an insulinotropic agent. The mechanism of action of endothelin-1 on the endocrine pancreas has not yet...... been clarified. METHODS: We investigated the action of endothelin-1 on the insulin secretion, the binding of (125)I-ET-1 to beta cells as well as its effects on purified beta and non-beta cells from normal rats. The expression of endothelin receptors in alpha- and beta-cell lines and in normal rat...... from purified beta cells. Endothelin-1-(100 nmol/l) increased, however, both insulin and glucagon secretion from a mixture of purified beta and non-beta cells indicating that alpha cells seem to have a key role for the action of ET-1 on insulin secretion. CONCLUSION/INTERPRETATION: The insulinotropic...

  15. Development of biomarker specific of pancreatic beta cells (incretin radiolabelled) for image of beta functional mass in diabetic and obese: study in animal model; Desenvolvimento de biomarcador específico de células beta pancreáticas (incretina radiomarcada) para imagem da massa beta funcional em diabéticos e obesos: estudo em modelo animal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Daniele

    2017-07-01

    Increased prevalence of obesity worldwide, has become a vast concern, stimulating investigations focusing prevention and therapy of this condition. The association of type 2 diabetes or insulin resistance aggravates the prognosis of obesity. Even patients successfully submitted to bariatric or metabolic surgery, may not be cured of diabetes, as improvement of circulating values of glucose and insulin not necessarily reflects recovery of pancreatic beta cell mass. There is no consensus about how to estimate beta cell mass in vivo. Available tools suffer from low sensitivity and specificity, often being as well cumbersome and expensive. Radiolabeled incretins, such as glucagon-like-peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogs, seem to be promising options for the measurement of beta cell mass in diabetes and insulinoma. The objective of this study was the development of two conjugates of GLP-1 analog, radiolabeled with {sup 99m} Technetium, as a noninvasive imaging method for the estimation of pancreatic beta cell mass, in the presence of obesity. Animal models were selected, including hyperlipidic diet-induced obesity, diet restricted obesity, and as controls, alloxan diabetes. Results indicated that both radiotracers achieved over 97% radiochemical yield. The most successful product was {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-βAla-Exendin-4. Low beta cell mass uptake occurred in diet-induced obesity. Diet-restricted obesity, with substantial shedding of excess body weight, was followed by remarkable decrease of fasting blood glucose, however beta cell mass uptake was only mildly improved. Future studies are recommended in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dieting, including bariatric and metabolic operations. (author)

  16. Generation of insulin-producing cells from rat mesenchymal stem cells using an aminopyrrole derivative XW4.4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Jingfeng; Huang, Wei; Yu, Wanwan; Xiong, Wei; Mula, Ramanjaneya V R; Zou, Hongbin; Yu, Yongping

    2014-02-05

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), a multisystem disease with both biochemical and anatomical/structural consequences, is a major health concern worldwide. Pancreatic islet transplantation provides a promising treatment for T1DM. However, the limited availability of islet tissue or new sources of insulin producing cells (IPCs) that are responsive to glucose hinder this promising approach. Though slow, the development of pancreatic beta-cell lines from rodent or human origin has been steadily progressing. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent, culture-expanded, non-hematopoietic cells that are currently being investigated as a novel cellular therapy. The in vitro differentiation potential of IPCs has raised hopes for a treatment of clinical diseases associated with autoimmunity. We screened for small molecules that induce pancreatic differentiation of IPCs. There are some compounds which showed positive effects on the DTZ staining. The aminopyrrole derivative compound XW4.4 which shows the best activity among them was found to induce pancreatic differentiation of rat MSCs (rMSCs). The in vitro studies indicated that treatment of rMSCs with compound XW4.4 resulted in differentiated cells with characteristics of IPCs including islet-like clusters, spherical, grape-like morphology, insulin secretion, positive for dithizone, glucose stimulation and expression of pancreatic endocrine cell marker genes. The data has also suggested that hepatocyte nuclear factor 3β (HNF 3β) may be involved in pancreatic differentiation of rMSCs when treated with XW4.4. Results indicate that XW4.4 induced rMSCs support the efforts to derive functional IPCs and serve as a means to alleviate limitations surrounding islet cell transplantation in the treatment of T1DM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prolonged survival and improved glycemia in BioBreeding diabetic rats after early sustained exposure to glucagon-like peptide 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanay, Ofer; Moralejo, Daniel; Kernan, Kelly; Brzezinski, Margaret; Fuller, Jessica M; Barton, Randall W; Lernmark, Ake; Osborne, William R

    2010-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) in both humans and BioBreeding (BB) rats is an autoimmune disease that results in complete destruction of islets and insulin dependency for life. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) promotes beta cell proliferation and neogenesis and has a potent insulinotropic effect. We hypothesized that the expression of GLP-1 before disease onset would increase islet mass, delay diabetes and prolong survival of BB rats. Vascular smooth muscle cells retrovirally transduced to secrete GLP-1 were seeded into TheraCyte encapsulation devices, implanted subcutaneously, and rats were monitored for diabetes. In untreated control rats, plasma GLP-1 levels were 34.5-39.5 pmol/l, whereas, in treated rats, plasma levels were elevated, in the range 90-250.4 pmol/l. Hypoglycemia was not detected and this was anticipated from the glucose-regulated action of GLP-1. Diabetes onset (mean + or - SEM) in untreated rats occurred at 56.5 + or - 0.6 days (n = 6) and, in GLP-1-treated rats, was delayed until 76.4 + or - 3.3 days (n = 5) (p 650 mg/dl) and did not survive beyond 11 days. At 5 days after diabetes onset, insulin-secreting islets were absent in untreated rats. By contrast, treated rats maintained weight for up to 143 days of age and showed insulin-secreting beta cells. Sustained GLP-1 expression delivered by encapsulated cells before diabetes onset in BB rats showed an improved clinical outcome, suggesting the potential for treating patients using long lasting GLP-1 analogs.

  18. LEW.1WR1 RATS DEVELOP AUTOIMMUNE DIABETES SPONTANEOUSLY AND IN RESPONSE TO ENVIRONMENTAL PERTURBATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordes, John P.; Leif, Jean H.; Woda, Bruce A.; Flanagan, Joan F.; Greiner, Dale L.; Kislauskis, Edward H.; Tirabassi, Rebecca S.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a new rat model of autoimmune diabetes that arose in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) congenic LEW rat. Spontaneous diabetes in LEW.1WR1 rats (RT1u/u/a) occurs with a cumulative frequency of ∼2% at a median age of 59 days. The disease is characterized by hyperglycemia, glycosuria, ketonuria and polyuria. Both sexes are affected, and islets of acutely diabetic rats are devoid of beta cells whereas alpha and delta cell populations are spared. The peripheral lymphoid phenotype is normal, including the fraction of ART2+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). We tested the hypothesis that the expression of diabetes would be increased by immunological perturbation of innate or adaptive immunity. Treatment of young rats with depleting anti-ART2.1 mAb increased the frequency of diabetes to 50%. Treatment with the toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid increased the frequency of diabetes to 100%. All diabetic rats exhibited end-stage islets. The LEW.1WR1 rat is also susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis but is free of spontaneous thyroiditis. The LEW.1WR1 rat provides a new model for studying autoimmune diabetes and arthritis in an animal with a genetic predisposition to both disorders that can be amplified by environmental perturbation. PMID:16123363

  19. Effects of Chowiseungcheng-tang Extracts on the Preadipocytes Proliferation in 3T3-L1 cell line, Lipolysis of Adipocytes in rat, and Localized Fat Accumulation by extraction methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-eun, Lee

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of Chowiseungcheng-tang extracts on the preadipocytes proliferation in 3T3-L1 cell line, lipolysis of adipocytes in rat’s epididymal adipocytes and localized fat accumulation of porcine by extraction methods(alcohol and water. Methods : Diminish preadipocytes proliferation and promote lipolysis of adipocytes do primary role to reduce obesity. So, we used 3T3-L1 mouse embryo fibroblasts(preadipocytes and rat epididymal adipocytes from Sprague-Dawley rats to investigate the effects of Chowiseungcheng-tang extracts on the preadipocytes proliferation, lipolysis of adipocytes. They were treated with 0.01, 0.1, 1.0㎎/㎖ Chowiseungcheng-tang alcohol and water extracts. And for the purpose of investigating the effects of Chowiseungcheng-tang alcohol and water extracts on the localized fat accumulation, we injected 0.1, 1.0, 10.0㎎/㎖ Chowiseungcheng-tang extracts to porcine fat tissues and observed histological changes of them. Results : Following results were obtained from the preadipocytes proliferation and lipolysis of adipocytes and histological investigation of fat tissues. 1. Chowiseungcheng-tang extracts suppressed preadipocytes proliferation on the high dosage(especially 1.0㎎/㎖, and especially alcohol extracts had better effects. 2. The alcohol extracts of Chowiseungcheng-tang decreased the activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase(GPDH on the concentrations of 0.1, 1.0㎎/㎖. Alcohol extracts had better effects than water extracts. 3. Chowiseungcheng-tang extracts increased lipolysis of adipocytes on the concentrations of 0.1, 1.0㎎/㎖, and especially on the concentration of 1.0㎎/㎖ alcohol extract of Chowiseungcheng-tang had better effect. 4. The water extract of Chowiseungcheng-tang had significant activity to the destruction of porcine fat cell membranes only on the concentration of 10.0㎎/㎖, but alcohol extracts of Chowiseungcheng-tang had it on all

  20. Variability in Zucker diabetic fatty rats: differences in disease progression in hyperglycemic and normoglycemic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang X

    2014-11-01

    faster in hyperglycemic animals. The most marked difference between the two groups of ZDF animals was in insulin output. Although the two ZDF populations had very similar elevated plasma insulin concentrations for the first 10 weeks, after that time, plasma insulin decreased markedly in the animals that became hyperglycemic, whereas it remained high in the normoglycemic ZDF rats. Thus, hyperglycemic ZDF animals exhibit both insulin resistance and progressive beta cell failure, whereas normoglycemic ZDF rats exhibit a lesser degree of insulin resistance that does not progress to beta cell failure. In these respects, the normoglycemic ZDF rats appear to revert back to a phenotype that strongly resembles that of nondiabetic Zucker fatty rats from which they were derived. Keywords: type 2 diabetes, ZDF rats, animal models

  1. High Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans

    2015-01-01

    At just over 10 meters above street level, the High Line extends three kilometers through three districts of Southwestern Manhattan in New York. It consists of simple steel construction, and previously served as an elevated rail line connection between Penn Station on 34th Street and the many....... The High Line project has been carried out as part of an open conversion strategy. The result is a remarkable urban architectural project, which works as a catalyst for the urban development of Western Manhattan. The greater project includes the restoration and reuse of many old industrial buildings...

  2. Polyphenol-rich extract of Syzygium cumini leaf dually improves peripheral insulin sensitivity and pancreatic islet function in monosodium L-glutamate-induced obese rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Rodrigues Sanches

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Syzygium cumini (L. Skeels (Myrtaceae has been traditionally used to treat a number of illnesses. Ethnopharmacological studies have particularly addressed antidiabetic and metabolic-related effects of extracts prepared from its different parts, especially seed and pulp-fruit, however there is a lack of studies on phytochemical profile and biological properties of its leaf. As there is considerable interest in bioactive compounds to treat metabolic syndrome and its clustered risk factors, we sought to characterize the metabolic effects of hydroethanolic extract of S. cumini leaf (HESc on lean and monosodium L-glutamate (MSG-induced obese rats. HPLC-MS/MS characterization of the HESc polyphenolic profile, at 254 nm, identified 15 compounds pertaining to hydrolysable tannin and flavanol subclasses. At 60 days of age, both groups were randomly assigned to receive HESc (500 mg/kg or vehicle for 30 days. At the end of treatment, obese+HESc exhibited significantly lower body weight gain, body mass index, and white adipose tissue mass, compared to obese rats receiving vehicle. Obese rats treated with HESc showed a 2-fold increase in lipolytic activity in the periepididymal fat pad, as well as, brought triglyceride levels in serum, liver and skeletal muscle back to levels close those found in lean animals. Furthermore, HESc also improved hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in obese+HESc rats, which resulted in partial reversal of glucose intolerance, as compared to obese rats. HESc had no effect in lean rats. Assessment of ex vivo glucose-stimulated insulin secretion showed HESc potentiated pancreatic function in islets isolated from both lean and obese rats treated with HESc. In addition, HESc (10 – 1000 ug/mL increased glucose stimulated insulin secretion from both isolated rat islets and INS-1E beta cells. These data demonstrate that S. cumini leaf improved peripheral insulin sensitivity via stimulating/modulating beta cell insulin release

  3. World lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Waser Jürgen; Fuchs Raphael; Ribicic Hrvoje; Schindler Benjamin; Blöschl Günther; Gröller Eduard

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present World Lines as a novel interactive visualization that provides complete control over multiple heterogeneous simulation runs. In many application areas decisions can only be made by exploring alternative scenarios. The goal of the suggested approach is to support users in this decision making process. In this setting the data domain is extended to a set of alternative worlds where only one outcome will actually happen. World Lines integrate simulation visualization and...

  4. The pharmacokinetics, distribution and degradation of human recombinant interleukin 1 beta in normal rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, J; Wogensen, L D; Welinder, B

    1991-01-01

    Based upon in vivo rat experiments it was recently suggested that interleukin 1 in the circulation may be implicated in the initial events of beta-cell destruction leading to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in humans. The aim of the present study was to estimate half-lives of distribut......Based upon in vivo rat experiments it was recently suggested that interleukin 1 in the circulation may be implicated in the initial events of beta-cell destruction leading to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in humans. The aim of the present study was to estimate half......-lives of distribution (T1/2 alpha) and elimination phases (T1/2 beta) of human recombinant interleukin 1 beta (rIL-1 beta), and its tissue distribution and cellular localization by means of mono-labelled, biologically active 125I-rIL-1 beta. After intravenous (i.v.) injection, 125I-rIL-1 beta was eliminated from.......v., intraperitoneal (i.p.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) injections, as demonstrated by high performance size exclusion chromatography, trichloracetic acid precipitation and SDS-PAGE until 5 h after tracer injection. Pre-treatment with 'cold' rIL-1 beta enhanced degradation of a subsequent injection of tracer. The route...

  5. Effects of simvastatin on CAT-1-mediated arginine transport and NO level under high glucose conditions in conditionally immortalized rat inner blood-retinal barrier cell lines (TR-iBRB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tun, Temdara; Kang, Young-Sook

    2017-05-01

    Hyperglycemia causes the breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier by impairing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function. Statins have many pleiotropic effects such as improving endothelial barrier permeability and increasing eNOS mRNA stability. The objective of this study was to determine effect of simvastatin on l-arginine transport and NO production under high-glucose conditions in conditionally immortalized rat retinal capillary endothelial cell line (TR-iBRB). Changes in l-arginine transport uptake and, expression levels of cationic amino acid transporter 1 (CAT-1) and eNOS mRNA were investigated after pre-treatment with simvastatin and NOS inhibitors (l-NMMA and l-NAME) under high-glucose conditions using TR-iBRB, an in vitro model of iBRB. The NO level released from TR-iBRB cells was examined using Griess reagents. Under high glucose conditions, [ 3 H]l-arginine uptake was decreased in TR-iBRB cells. Simvastatin pretreatment elevated [ 3 H]l-arginine uptake, the expression levels of CAT-1 and eNOS mRNA, and NO production under high-glucose conditions. Moreover, the co-treatment with simvastatin and NOS inhibitors reduced [ 3 H]l-arginine uptake compared to pretreatment with simvastatin alone. Our results suggest that, in the presence of high-glucose levels, increased l-arginine uptake due to simvastatin treatment was associated with increased CAT-1 and eNOS mRNA levels, leading to higher NO production in TR-iBRB cells. Thus, simvastatin might be a good modulator for diabetic retinopathy therapy by increasing of the l-arginine uptake and improving endothelial function in retinal capillary endothelial cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impaired insulin secretion in the spontaneous diabetes rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, K; Toyota, T; Kakizaki, M; Kudo, M; Takebe, K; Goto, Y

    1982-08-01

    Dynamics of insulin and glucagon secretion were investigated by using a new model of spontaneous diabetes rats produced by the repetition of selective breeding in our laboratories. The perfusion experiments of the pancreas showed that the early phase of insulin secretion to continuous stimulation with glucose was specifically impaired, although the response of the early phase to arginine was preserved. The glucose-induced insulin secretion in the nineth generation (F8) which had a more remarkably impaired glucose tolerance was more reduced than in the sixth generation (F5). No significant difference of glucagon secretion in response to arginine or norepinephrine was noted between the diabetes rats and control ones. The present data indicate that the defective insulin secretion is a primary derangement in a diabetic state of the spontaneous diabetes rat. This defect in the early phase of glucose-induced insulin secretion suggests the specific impairment of the recognition of glucose by the pancreatic beta-cells. The spontaneous diabetes rats are very useful as a model of disease for investigating pathophysiology of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

  7. Silver linings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultas, Margaret W; Pohlman, Shawn

    2014-01-01