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Sample records for raster image spectroscopy

  1. Determination of Dynamics of Plant Plasma Membrane Proteins with Fluorescence Recovery and Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laňková, Martina; Humpolíčková, Jana; Vosolsobě, Stanislav; Cit, Zdeněk; Lacek, Jozef; Čovan, Martin; Čovanová, Milada; Hof, Martin; Petrášek, Jan

    2016-04-01

    A number of fluorescence microscopy techniques are described to study dynamics of fluorescently labeled proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and whole organelles. However, for studies of plant plasma membrane (PM) proteins, the number of these techniques is still limited because of the high complexity of processes that determine the dynamics of PM proteins and the existence of cell wall. Here, we report on the usage of raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) for studies of integral PM proteins in suspension-cultured tobacco cells and show its potential in comparison with the more widely used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method. For RICS, a set of microscopy images is obtained by single-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence fluctuations are subsequently correlated between individual pixels and the information on protein mobility are extracted using a model that considers processes generating the fluctuations such as diffusion and chemical binding reactions. As we show here using an example of two integral PM transporters of the plant hormone auxin, RICS uncovered their distinct short-distance lateral mobility within the PM that is dependent on cytoskeleton and sterol composition of the PM. RICS, which is routinely accessible on modern CLSM instruments, thus represents a valuable approach for studies of dynamics of PM proteins in plants.

  2. Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) for measuring fast protein dynamics and concentrations with a commercial laser scanning confocal microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C M; Dalal, R B; Hebert, B; Digman, M A; Horwitz, A R; Gratton, E

    2008-01-01

    Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) is a new and novel technique for measuring molecular dynamics and concentrations from fluorescence confocal images. The RICS technique extracts information about molecular dynamics and concentrations from images of living cells taken on commercial confocal systems. Here we develop guidelines for performing the RICS analysis on an analogue commercial laser scanning confocal microscope. Guidelines for typical instrument settings, image acquisition settings and analogue detector characterization are presented. Using appropriate instrument/acquisition parameters, diffusion coefficients and concentrations can be determined, even for highly dynamic dye molecules in solution. Standard curves presented herein demonstrate the ability to detect protein concentrations as low as approximately 2 nM. Additionally, cellular measurements give accurate values for the diffusion of paxillin-enhanced-green fluorescent protein (EGFP), an adhesion adaptor molecule, in the cytosol of the cell and also show slower paxillin dynamics near adhesions where paxillin interacts with immobile adhesion components. Methods are presented to account for bright immobile structures within the cell that dominate spatial correlation functions; allowing the extraction of fast protein dynamics within and near these structures. A running average algorithm is also presented to address slow cellular movement or movement of cellular features such as adhesions. Finally, methods to determine protein concentration in the presence of immobile structures within the cell are presented. A table is presented giving guidelines for instrument and imaging setting when performing RICS on the Olympus FV300 confocal and these guidelines are a starting point for performing the analysis on other commercial confocal systems.

  3. Raster image correlation spectroscopy as a novel tool for the quantitative assessment of protein diffusional behaviour in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrang, Zahra; Pluen, Alain; Zindy, Egor; Clarke, David

    2012-06-01

    The application of raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) as a tool for the characterisation of protein diffusion was assessed using a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), as a function of formulation and denaturing conditions. RICS results were also validated against dynamic light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Results from this study demonstrate correlation between outputs obtained from the three experimental techniques. Ionic strength independency was observed at pH 7, and a reduction in the corresponding diffusion coefficients was noted at pH 4.5 for 1 µM BSA-Alexa Fluor 488. Conversely, at pH 5.2, higher-concentration samples exhibited ionic strength dependency. Buffer composition, sample pretreatment, thermal denaturation and freeze-thaw cycling were also found to influence RICS output, with a reduction in the diffusion coefficient and the number of particles observed for both pH values. In conclusion, RICS analysis of images acquired using a commercial confocal microscope offers a potential scope for application to both quantitative and qualitative characterisation of macromolecular behaviour in solution. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Investigation of Optimal Integrated Circuit Raster Image Vectorization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonas Jasevičius

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Visual analysis of integrated circuit layer requires raster image vectorization stage to extract layer topology data to CAD tools. In this paper vectorization problems of raster IC layer images are presented. Various line extraction from raster images algorithms and their properties are discussed. Optimal raster image vectorization method was developed which allows utilization of common vectorization algorithms to achieve the best possible extracted vector data match with perfect manual vectorization results. To develop the optimal method, vectorized data quality dependence on initial raster image skeleton filter selection was assessed.Article in Lithuanian

  5. Water Stratification Raster Images for the Gulf of Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geodatabase contains seasonal water stratification raster images for the Gulf of Maine. They were created by interpolating water density (sigma t) values at 0...

  6. Water Density Raster Images for the Gulf of Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geodatabase contains water density raster images for the Gulf of Maine that were interpolated from water density (sigma t or kilograms/ meters cubed) point data...

  7. Electron beam throughput from raster to imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zywno, Marek

    2016-12-01

    Two architectures of electron beam tools are presented: single beam MEBES Exara designed and built by Etec Systems for mask writing, and the Reflected E-Beam Lithography tool (REBL), designed and built by KLA-Tencor under a DARPA Agreement No. HR0011-07-9-0007. Both tools have implemented technologies not used before to achieve their goals. The MEBES X, renamed Exara for marketing purposes, used an air bearing stage running in vacuum to achieve smooth continuous scanning. The REBL used 2 dimensional imaging to distribute charge to a 4k pixel swath to achieve writing times on the order of 1 wafer per hour, scalable to throughput approaching optical projection tools. Three stage architectures were designed for continuous scanning of wafers: linear maglev, rotary maglev, and dual linear maglev.

  8. Conversion of raster coded images to polygonal data structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    A method is presented for converting polygons coded in raster data structures into conventional vector structures to allow the output of scanner-based data collection systems to be input directly to conventional geographic information systems. The method relies on topological principles to (1) uniquely label each polygon in the image and produce an output image in which each pixel is described by the label of the polygon to which it belongs; (2) create line segment components of polygon boundaries, with nodes labeled and the two adjacent polygons identified; and (3) traverse the polygon boundaries by connecting the appropriate adjacent line segments. The conversion capability makes it possible to design systems which automatically convert to the data structure most appropriate for a particular application.

  9. Automated extraction of chemical structure information from digital raster images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shedden Kerby A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To search for chemical structures in research articles, diagrams or text representing molecules need to be translated to a standard chemical file format compatible with cheminformatic search engines. Nevertheless, chemical information contained in research articles is often referenced as analog diagrams of chemical structures embedded in digital raster images. To automate analog-to-digital conversion of chemical structure diagrams in scientific research articles, several software systems have been developed. But their algorithmic performance and utility in cheminformatic research have not been investigated. Results This paper aims to provide critical reviews for these systems and also report our recent development of ChemReader – a fully automated tool for extracting chemical structure diagrams in research articles and converting them into standard, searchable chemical file formats. Basic algorithms for recognizing lines and letters representing bonds and atoms in chemical structure diagrams can be independently run in sequence from a graphical user interface-and the algorithm parameters can be readily changed-to facilitate additional development specifically tailored to a chemical database annotation scheme. Compared with existing software programs such as OSRA, Kekule, and CLiDE, our results indicate that ChemReader outperforms other software systems on several sets of sample images from diverse sources in terms of the rate of correct outputs and the accuracy on extracting molecular substructure patterns. Conclusion The availability of ChemReader as a cheminformatic tool for extracting chemical structure information from digital raster images allows research and development groups to enrich their chemical structure databases by annotating the entries with published research articles. Based on its stable performance and high accuracy, ChemReader may be sufficiently accurate for annotating the chemical database with links

  10. Monthly Composite Raster Images for Sea Surface Temperature in the Gulf of Maine for Stellwagen Bank NMS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This personal geodatabase contains raster images of sea surface temperature (SST) in the Gulf of Maine. These raster images are monthly composites, and were...

  11. IBIS - A geographic information system based on digital image processing and image raster datatype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, N. A.; Zobrist, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    IBIS (Image Based Information System) is a geographic information system which makes use of digital image processing techniques to interface existing geocoded data sets and information management systems with thematic maps and remotely sensed imagery. The basic premise is that geocoded data sets can be referenced to a raster scan that is equivalent to a grid cell data set. The first applications (St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, and Los Angeles County) have been restricted to the design of a land resource inventory and analysis system. It is thought that the algorithms and the hardware interfaces developed will be readily applicable to other Landsat imagery.

  12. The potential of XML encoding in geomatics converting raster images to XML and SVG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Byron; Tsoulos, Lysandros

    2006-03-01

    The evolution of open standards and especially those pertaining to the family of XML technologies, have a considerable impact on the way the Geomatics community addresses the acquisition, storage, analysis and display of spatial data. The most recent version of the GML specification enables the merging of vector and raster data into a single "open" format. The notion of "coverage" as described in GML 3.0 can be the equivalent of a raster multi-band dataset. In addition, vector data storage is also described in detail through the GML Schemas and XML itself can store the values of a raster dataset, as values of a multi-table dataset. Under these circumstances an issue that must be addressed is the transformation of raster data into XML format and their subsequent visualization through SVG. The objective of this paper is to give an overview of the steps that can be followed in order to embody open standards and XML technologies in the raster domain. The last part of the work refers to a case study that suggests a step by step methodology to accomplish classification, an important function in Cartography and Remote Sensing, using the XML-encoded images.

  13. Analysis of engineering drawings and raster map images

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, Thomas C

    2013-01-01

    Presents up-to-date methods and algorithms for the automated analysis of engineering drawings and digital cartographic maps Discusses automatic engineering drawing and map analysis techniques Covers detailed accounts of the use of unsupervised segmentation algorithms to map images

  14. Digital Raster Graphics (DRG) Lambert

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Digital Raster Graphic-Lambert (DRG-Lam) is a raster image of a scanned USGS topographic map with the collar information clipped out, georeferenced to the...

  15. Digital Raster Graphics

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital raster graphic (DRG) is a scanned image of a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) topographic map. The scanned image includes all map collar information. The...

  16. A Python-Based Open Source System for Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA Utilizing Raster Attribute Tables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Clewley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A modular system for performing Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA, using entirely open source (General Public License compatible software, is presented based around representing objects as raster clumps and storing attributes as a raster attribute table (RAT. The system utilizes a number of libraries, developed by the authors: The Remote Sensing and GIS Library (RSGISLib, the Raster I/O Simplification (RIOS Python Library, the KEA image format and TuiView image viewer. All libraries are accessed through Python, providing a common interface on which to build processing chains. Three examples are presented, to demonstrate the capabilities of the system: (1 classification of mangrove extent and change in French Guiana; (2 a generic scheme for the classification of the UN-FAO land cover classification system (LCCS and their subsequent translation to habitat categories; and (3 a national-scale segmentation for Australia. The system presented provides similar functionality to existing GEOBIA packages, but is more flexible, due to its modular environment, capable of handling complex classification processes and applying them to larger datasets.

  17. Mineral mapping and applications of imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R.N.; Boardman, J.; Mustard, J.; Kruse, F.; Ong, C.; Pieters, C.; Swayze, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    Spectroscopy is a tool that has been used for decades to identify, understand, and quantify solid, liquid, or gaseous materials, especially in the laboratory. In disciplines ranging from astronomy to chemistry, spectroscopic measurements are used to detect absorption and emission features due to specific chemical bonds, and detailed analyses are used to determine the abundance and physical state of the detected absorbing/emitting species. Spectroscopic measurements have a long history in the study of the Earth and planets. Up to the 1990s remote spectroscopic measurements of Earth and planets were dominated by multispectral imaging experiments that collect high-quality images in a few, usually broad, spectral bands or with point spectrometers that obtained good spectral resolution but at only a few spatial positions. However, a new generation of sensors is now available that combines imaging with spectroscopy to create the new discipline of imaging spectroscopy. Imaging spectrometers acquire data with enough spectral range, resolution, and sampling at every pixel in a raster image so that individual absorption features can be identified and spatially mapped (Goetz et al., 1985).

  18. Optical imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, David J

    2009-01-01

    An essential reference for optical sensor system design This is the first text to present an integrated view of the optical and mathematical analysis tools necessary to understand computational optical system design. It presents the foundations of computational optical sensor design with a focus entirely on digital imaging and spectroscopy. It systematically covers: Coded aperture and tomographic imaging Sampling and transformations in optical systems, including wavelets and generalized sampling techniques essential to digital system analysis Geometric, wave, and statis

  19. Digital Raster Graphics (DRG) UTM NAD 83 County

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Digital Raster Graphic (DRG) is a raster image of a scanned USGS topographic map including the collar information, georeferenced to the UTM grid and tiled by...

  20. Digital Raster Graphics (DRG) UTM NAD 83 Clipped

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Digital Raster Graphic (DRG) is a raster image of a scanned USGS topographic map including the collar information, georeferenced to the UTM grid. For display...

  1. Digital Raster Graphics (DRG) UTM NAD 27 Clipped

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Digital Raster Graphic (DRG) is a raster image of a scanned USGS topographic map including the collar information, georeferenced to the UTM grid. For display...

  2. Coherent Raman dual-comb spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ideguchi, Takuro; Holzner, Simon; Bernhardt, Birgitta; Guelachvili, Guy; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    2014-11-01

    The invention of the optical frequency comb technique has revolutionized the field of precision spectroscopy, providing a way to measure the absolute frequency of any optical transition. Since, frequency combs have become common equipment for frequency metrology. In the last decade, novel applications for the optical frequency comb have been demonstrated beyond its original purpose. Broadband molecular spectroscopy is one of those. One such technique of molecular spectroscopy with frequency combs, dual-comb Fourier transform spectroscopy provides short measurement times with resolution and accuracy. Two laser frequency combs with slightly different repetition frequencies generate pairs of pulses with a linearly-scanned delay between pulses in a pair. The system without moving parts mimics a fast scanning Fourier transform interferometer. The measurement speed may be several orders of magnitude faster than that of a Michelson-based Fourier transform spectrometer, which opens up new opportunities for broadband molecular spectroscopy. Recently, dual-comb spectroscopy has been extended to nonlinear phenomena. A broadband Raman spectrum of molecular fingerprints may be measured within a few tens of microseconds with coherent Raman dual-comb spectroscopy. Raster scanning the sample leads to hyperspectral images. This rapid and broadband label-free vibrational spectroscopy and imaging technique might provide new diagnostic methods in a variety of scientific and industrial fields.

  3. Harvesting geographic features from heterogeneous raster maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yao-Yi

    2010-11-01

    Raster maps offer a great deal of geospatial information and are easily accessible compared to other geospatial data. However, harvesting geographic features locked in heterogeneous raster maps to obtain the geospatial information is challenging. This is because of the varying image quality of raster maps (e.g., scanned maps with poor image quality and computer-generated maps with good image quality), the overlapping geographic features in maps, and the typical lack of metadata (e.g., map geocoordinates, map source, and original vector data). Previous work on map processing is typically limited to a specific type of map and often relies on intensive manual work. In contrast, this thesis investigates a general approach that does not rely on any prior knowledge and requires minimal user effort to process heterogeneous raster maps. This approach includes automatic and supervised techniques to process raster maps for separating individual layers of geographic features from the maps and recognizing geographic features in the separated layers (i.e., detecting road intersections, generating and vectorizing road geometry, and recognizing text labels). The automatic technique eliminates user intervention by exploiting common map properties of how road lines and text labels are drawn in raster maps. For example, the road lines are elongated linear objects and the characters are small connected-objects. The supervised technique utilizes labels of road and text areas to handle complex raster maps, or maps with poor image quality, and can process a variety of raster maps with minimal user input. The results show that the general approach can handle raster maps with varying map complexity, color usage, and image quality. By matching extracted road intersections to another geospatial dataset, we can identify the geocoordinates of a raster map and further align the raster map, separated feature layers from the map, and recognized features from the layers with the geospatial

  4. Terahertz Spectroscopy and Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Zeitler, Axel; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    "This book presents the current state of knowledge in the field of terahertz spectroscopy, providing a comprehensive source of information for beginners and experienced researchers alike whose interests lie in this area. The book aims to explain the fundamental physics that underpins terahertz  technology and to describe its key applications. Highlights of scientific research in the field of terahertz science are also outlined in some chapters, providing an overview as well as giving an insight into future directions for research.  Over the past decade terahertz spectroscopy has developed into one of the most rapidly growing areas of its kind, gaining an important impact across a wide range of scientific disciplines. Due to substantial advances in femtosecond laser technology, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) has established itself as the dominant spectroscopic technique for experimental scientists interested in measurements at this frequency range. In solids and liquids THz radiation is in reso...

  5. Quantitative multi-element mapping of ancient glass using a simple and robust LA-ICP-MS rastering procedure in combination with image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selih, Vid S; van Elteren, Johannes T

    2011-08-01

    The surface of two glass artefacts in mosaic style, probably fragments of conglomerate glass bowls dating back two millennia, was investigated by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). By rastering with the laser beam over a selected area of the surface of the glass artefacts, elemental oxide maps were generated. Quantification of the elemental oxides in the maps was achieved using a so-called sum normalization procedure, summating the elements-54 in total-as their oxides to 100% (w/w), without using an internal standard and applying only one external standard (NIST SRM glass 610). This results in a robust mapping procedure which automatically corrects for drift and defocusing issues. Sum normalization was applied to each pixel in the map separately and required a custom source code to process all the data in the tens of thousands of pixels to generate the elemental oxide concentration maps. The digital element maps generated upon rastering of the two glass artefacts are very compelling and are an excellent entry point to gain detailed insight into their fabrication and provenance using image analysis software for retrieval of localized elemental oxide concentrations and correlations.

  6. Coastal Imaging Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    offshore . This analysis was applied to two data sets (an image that contains one band and an image that is a composite of the full hyperspectral...showed more the subtle variability offshore was not detectable in images with limited spectral information. Figure 12 A graph of the maximum ground...distance offshore . This graph is zoomed in version of graph 3 and illustrates the agreement in maximum ground sample distance between the low and high

  7. Photoacoustic imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lihong

    2009-01-01

    Photoacoustics promises to revolutionize medical imaging and may well make as dramatic a contribution to modern medicine as the discovery of the x-ray itself once did. Combining electromagnetic and ultrasonic waves synergistically, photoacoustics can provide deep speckle-free imaging with high electromagnetic contrast at high ultrasonic resolution and without any health risk. While photoacoustic imaging is probably the fastest growing biomedical imaging technology, this book is the first comprehensive volume in this emerging field covering both the physics and the remarkable noninvasive applic

  8. Imaging spectroscopy for characterisation of grass swards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, A.G.T.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords: Imaging spectroscopy, imaging spectrometry, remote sensing, reflection, reflectance, grass sward, white clover, recognition, characterisation, ground cover, growth monitoring, stress detection, heterogeneity quantificationThe potential of imaging spectroscopy as a tool for characterisation

  9. Raster graphics display library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsrud, Anders; Stephenson, Michael B.

    1987-01-01

    The Raster Graphics Display Library (RGDL) is a high level subroutine package that give the advanced raster graphics display capabilities needed. The RGDL uses FORTRAN source code routines to build subroutines modular enough to use as stand-alone routines in a black box type of environment. Six examples are presented which will teach the use of RGDL in the fastest, most complete way possible. Routines within the display library that are used to produce raster graphics are presented in alphabetical order, each on a separate page. Each user-callable routine is described by function and calling parameters. All common blocks that are used in the display library are listed and the use of each variable within each common block is discussed. A reference on the include files that are necessary to compile the display library is contained. Each include file and its purpose are listed. The link map for MOVIE.BYU version 6, a general purpose computer graphics display system that uses RGDL software, is also contained.

  10. Speeding up the Raster Scanning Methods used in theX-Ray Fluorescence Imaging of the Ancient Greek Text of Archimedes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Manisha; /Norfolk State U.

    2006-08-24

    Progress has been made at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) toward deciphering the remaining 10-20% of ancient Greek text contained in the Archimedes palimpsest. The text is known to contain valuable works by the mathematician, including the ''Method of Mechanical Theorems, the Equilibrium of Planes, On Floating Bodies'', and several diagrams as well. The only surviving copy of the text was recycled into a prayer book in the Middle Ages. The ink used to write on the goat skin parchment is partly composed of iron, which is visible by x-ray radiation. To image the palimpsest pages, the parchment is framed and placed in a stage that moves according to the raster method. When an x-ray beam strikes the parchment, the iron in the ink is detected by a germanium detector. The resulting signal is converted to a gray-scale image on the imaging program, Rasplot. It is extremely important that each line of data is perfectly aligned with the line that came before it because the image is scanned in two directions. The objectives of this experiment were to determine the best parameters for producing well-aligned images and to reduce the scanning time. Imaging half a page of parchment during previous beam time for this project was achieved in thirty hours. Equations were produced to evaluate count time, shutter time, and the number of pixels in this experiment. On Beamline 6-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL), actual scanning time was reduced by one fourth. The remaining pages were successfully imaged and sent to ancient Greek experts for translation.

  11. Access to Cloud Raster Data Using GDAL, MRF and LERC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, L.; Gao, P.

    2015-12-01

    One of the main obstacles to a fully enabled web GIS platform is the access to raster data. This is because the rasters used in GIS tend to be much larger than the common image rasters. Compressed raster formats that support tiling, as well as web access to tiled data are common technologies that address these issues. The NASA originated open source OnEarth tile server and the Meta Raster Format (MRF) are steps in the right direction, a basis for both local and web based rasters. Esri has taken this technology even further, making MRF a low level raster caching format and adding a very fast data compression mechanism called Limited Error Raster Compression (LERC). The on-demand Landsat 8 and NAIP mosaic services have served as real world implementation prototypes and have shown the value of this approach to the GIS community. While continuously in service for more than two years, the Landsat 8 service has been re-implemented multiple times, adapting to the changing cloudscape. The initial architecture converted every incoming scene from GeoTiff to MRF with LERC, reducing the average response time from about eight seconds to less than two. Recently, it was re-implemented to use the Landsat on Amazon Web Services (AWS), and to use MRF with LERC as a local dynamic cache. Recently, a python application called OptimizeRasters has been developed, which can convert and copy the data to and from cloud storage, while at the same time applying these technologies.

  12. 1:100k Digital Raster Graphic - Collars Removed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — A digital raster graphic (DRG) is a scanned image of an U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) standard series topographic map, including all map collar information. The...

  13. GAP Land Cover - Tiled Raster

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This raster dataset is a detailed (1-acre minimum), hierarchically organized vegetation cover map produced by computer classification of combined two-season pairs of...

  14. Rasdaman for Big Spatial Raster Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, F.; Huang, Q.; Scheele, C. J.; Yang, C. P.; Yu, M.; Liu, K.

    2015-12-01

    Spatial raster data have grown exponentially over the past decade. Recent advancements on data acquisition technology, such as remote sensing, have allowed us to collect massive observation data of various spatial resolution and domain coverage. The volume, velocity, and variety of such spatial data, along with the computational intensive nature of spatial queries, pose grand challenge to the storage technologies for effective big data management. While high performance computing platforms (e.g., cloud computing) can be used to solve the computing-intensive issues in big data analysis, data has to be managed in a way that is suitable for distributed parallel processing. Recently, rasdaman (raster data manager) has emerged as a scalable and cost-effective database solution to store and retrieve massive multi-dimensional arrays, such as sensor, image, and statistics data. Within this paper, the pros and cons of using rasdaman to manage and query spatial raster data will be examined and compared with other common approaches, including file-based systems, relational databases (e.g., PostgreSQL/PostGIS), and NoSQL databases (e.g., MongoDB and Hive). Earth Observing System (EOS) data collected from NASA's Atmospheric Scientific Data Center (ASDC) will be used and stored in these selected database systems, and a set of spatial and non-spatial queries will be designed to benchmark their performance on retrieving large-scale, multi-dimensional arrays of EOS data. Lessons learnt from using rasdaman will be discussed as well.

  15. THE DESIGN OF A HIGH PERFORMANCE EARTH IMAGERY AND RASTER DATA MANAGEMENT AND PROCESSING PLATFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Xie

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the general requirements and specific characteristics of both geospatial raster database management system and raster data processing platform from a domain-specific perspective as well as from a computing point of view. It also discusses the need of tight integration between the database system and the processing system. These requirements resulted in Oracle Spatial GeoRaster, a global scale and high performance earth imagery and raster data management and processing platform. The rationale, design, implementation, and benefits of Oracle Spatial GeoRaster are described. Basically, as a database management system, GeoRaster defines an integrated raster data model, supports image compression, data manipulation, general and spatial indices, content and context based queries and updates, versioning, concurrency, security, replication, standby, backup and recovery, multitenancy, and ETL. It provides high scalability using computer and storage clustering. As a raster data processing platform, GeoRaster provides basic operations, image processing, raster analytics, and data distribution featuring high performance computing (HPC. Specifically, HPC features include locality computing, concurrent processing, parallel processing, and in-memory computing. In addition, the APIs and the plug-in architecture are discussed.

  16. The Design of a High Performance Earth Imagery and Raster Data Management and Processing Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qingyun

    2016-06-01

    This paper summarizes the general requirements and specific characteristics of both geospatial raster database management system and raster data processing platform from a domain-specific perspective as well as from a computing point of view. It also discusses the need of tight integration between the database system and the processing system. These requirements resulted in Oracle Spatial GeoRaster, a global scale and high performance earth imagery and raster data management and processing platform. The rationale, design, implementation, and benefits of Oracle Spatial GeoRaster are described. Basically, as a database management system, GeoRaster defines an integrated raster data model, supports image compression, data manipulation, general and spatial indices, content and context based queries and updates, versioning, concurrency, security, replication, standby, backup and recovery, multitenancy, and ETL. It provides high scalability using computer and storage clustering. As a raster data processing platform, GeoRaster provides basic operations, image processing, raster analytics, and data distribution featuring high performance computing (HPC). Specifically, HPC features include locality computing, concurrent processing, parallel processing, and in-memory computing. In addition, the APIs and the plug-in architecture are discussed.

  17. Circuit enhances vertical resolution in raster scanning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsovsky, W. H.; Greenwood, J. R.; Holley, O. M.

    1968-01-01

    Circuit enhances vertical resolution in electron beam, raster scanning systems exhibiting aperture distortion in the vertical direction. A sensitized area /image/ produces a video output when the scan beam nears it, which causes vertical elongation in the reconstructed images of all sensitized areas on the surface.

  18. IR nanoscale spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Eamonn; Yarrow, Fiona; Rice, James H.

    2011-10-01

    Sub diffraction limited infrared absorption imaging was applied to hemoglobin by coupling IR optics with an atomic force microscope. Comparisons between the AFM topography and IR absorption images of micron sized hemoglobin features are presented, along with nanoscale IR spectroscopic analysis of the metalloprotein.

  19. Review of optical breast imaging and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosenick, Dirk; Rinneberg, Herbert; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Taroni, Paola

    2016-09-01

    Diffuse optical imaging and spectroscopy of the female breast is an area of active research. We review the present status of this field and discuss the broad range of methodologies and applications. Starting with a brief overview on breast physiology, the remodeling of vasculature and extracellular matrix caused by solid tumors is highlighted that is relevant for contrast in optical imaging. Then, the various instrumental techniques and the related methods of data analysis and image generation are described and compared including multimodality instrumentation, fluorescence mammography, broadband spectroscopy, and diffuse correlation spectroscopy. We review the clinical results on functional properties of malignant and benign breast lesions compared to host tissue and discuss the various methods to improve contrast between healthy and diseased tissue, such as enhanced spectroscopic information, dynamic variations of functional properties, pharmacokinetics of extrinsic contrast agents, including the enhanced permeability and retention effect. We discuss research on monitoring neoadjuvant chemotherapy and on breast cancer risk assessment as potential clinical applications of optical breast imaging and spectroscopy. Moreover, we consider new experimental approaches, such as photoacoustic imaging and long-wavelength tissue spectroscopy.

  20. NOAA Seamless Raster Navigational Charts (RNC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Seamless Raster Chart Server provides a seamless collarless mosaic of the NOAA Raster Navigational Charts (RNC). The RNC are a collection of approximately...

  1. Imaging spectroscopy for scene analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Robles-Kelly, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This book presents a detailed analysis of spectral imaging, describing how it can be used for the purposes of material identification, object recognition and scene understanding. The opportunities and challenges of combining spatial and spectral information are explored in depth, as are a wide range of applications. Features: discusses spectral image acquisition by hyperspectral cameras, and the process of spectral image formation; examines models of surface reflectance, the recovery of photometric invariants, and the estimation of the illuminant power spectrum from spectral imagery; describes

  2. Mixed raster content segmentation, compression, transmission

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlidis, George

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the main concepts in handling digital images of mixed content, traditionally referenced as mixed raster content (MRC), in two main parts. The first includes introductory chapters covering the scientific and technical background aspects, whereas the second presents a set of research and development approaches to tackle key issues in MRC segmentation, compression and transmission. The book starts with a review of color theory and the mechanism of color vision in humans. In turn, the second chapter reviews data coding and compression methods so as to set the background and demonstrate the complexity involved in dealing with MRC. Chapter three addresses the segmentation of images through an extensive literature review, which highlights the various approaches used to tackle MRC segmentation. The second part of the book focuses on the segmentation of color images for optimized compression, including multi-layered decomposition and representation of MRC and the processes that can be employed to op...

  3. Study of Raster Metafile Formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Transfer Standards Virtual Device Metafile (VI)M) Metafiles Raster Reformatting System (RRS) - 20. ABSTRACT (CEm s ot neon and Idenr by block num6).. This...z44 AAAA1 i 6 8 A it* ai. A Ao a,4 -I I V- 40.044 d6 .4. aN. " m 16 uu mus UM 0 0 W 100 o 00 boIs . lw 00 0 ~6 .4 .4. ’. A ..u 1 A U m "I 1 .a 0. a4 NM

  4. Atomic Force Microscope for Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, W. T.; Hecht, M. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Akiyama, T.; Gautsch, S.; deRooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Niedermann, Ph.; Howald, L.; Mueller, D.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed, built, and tested an atomic force microscope (AFM) for extraterrestrial applications incorporating a micromachined tip array to allow for probe replacement. It is part of a microscopy station originally intended for NASA's 2001 Mars lander to identify the size, distribution, and shape of Martian dust and soil particles. As well as imaging topographically down to nanometer resolution, this instrument can be used to reveal chemical information and perform infrared and Raman spectroscopy at unprecedented resolution.

  5. Plate tectonic raster reconstruction in GPlates

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel method implemented in the GPlates plate tectonic reconstruction software to interactively reconstruct arbitrarily high-resolution raster data to past geological times using a rotation model. The approach is based on the projection of geo-referenced raster data into a cube map followed by a reverse projection onto rotated tectonic plates on the surface of the globe. This decouples the rendering of a geo-referenced raster from its reconstruction, providing ...

  6. Estimating radiological background using imaging spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Jordan, David V.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

    2014-06-13

    Optical imaging spectroscopy is investigated as a method to estimate radiological background by spectral identification of soils, sediments, rocks, minerals and building materials derived from natural materials and assigning tabulated radiological emission values to these materials. Radiological airborne surveys are undertaken by local, state and federal agencies to identify the presence of radiological materials out of regulatory compliance. Detection performance in such surveys is determined by (among other factors) the uncertainty in the radiation background; increased knowledge of the expected radiation background will improve the ability to detect low-activity radiological materials. Radiological background due to naturally occurring radiological materials (NORM) can be estimated by reference to previous survey results, use of global 40K, 238U, and 232Th (KUT) values, reference to existing USGS radiation background maps, or by a moving average of the data as it is acquired. Each of these methods has its drawbacks: previous survey results may not include recent changes, the global average provides only a zero-order estimate, the USGS background radiation map resolutions are coarse and are accurate only to 1 km – 25 km sampling intervals depending on locale, and a moving average may essentially low pass filter the data to obscure small changes in radiation counts. Imaging spectroscopy from airborne or spaceborne platforms can offer higher resolution identification of materials and background, as well as provide imaging context information. AVIRIS hyperspectral image data is analyzed using commercial exploitation software to determine the usefulness of imaging spectroscopy to identify qualitative radiological background emissions when compared to airborne radiological survey data.

  7. Parallel image registration method for snapshot Fourier transform imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Shuaishuai; Lin, Jie; Zhu, Feijia; Jin, Peng

    2017-08-01

    A fast and precise registration method for multi-image snapshot Fourier transform imaging spectroscopy is proposed. This method accomplishes registration of an image array using the positional relationship between homologous points in the subimages, which are obtained offline by preregistration. Through the preregistration process, the registration problem is converted to the problem of using a registration matrix to interpolate subimages. Therefore, the hardware interpolation of graphics processing unit (GPU) texture memory, which has speed advantages for its parallel computing, can be used to significantly enhance computational efficiency. Compared to a central processing unit, GPU performance showed ˜27 times acceleration in registration efficiency.

  8. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), part A

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial by containing quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers Fluorescence Fluctuation SpectroscopyContains chapters on such topics as Time-integrated fluorescence cumulant analysis, Pulsed Interleaved Excitation, and raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the fieldCovers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopyContains chapte

  9. Teaching Raster GIS Operations with Spreadsheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raubal, Martin; Gaupmann, Bernhard; Kuhn, Werner

    1997-01-01

    Defines raster technology in its relationship to geographic information systems and notes that it is typically used with the application of remote sensing techniques and scanning devices. Discusses the role of spreadsheets in a raster model, and describes a general approach based on spreadsheets. Includes six computer-generated illustrations. (MJP)

  10. Hyperspectral imaging for dermal hemoglobin spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Peter J.; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    1999-10-01

    It has been shown previously that images collected at selected wavelengths in a sufficiently narrow bandwidth can be used to produce maps of the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in the dermis. A four-wavelength algorithm has been developed based on a two-layer model of the skin, in which the blood is contained in the lower layer (dermis), while the upper layer attenuates some of the reflection and adds a clutter term. In the present work, the algorithm is compared analytically to simpler algorithms using three wavelengths and based on a single-layer model. It is shown through Monte-Carlo models that, for typical skin, the single-layer model is adequate to analyze data from fiber-optical reflectance spectroscopy, but the two-layer model produces better results for imaging systems. Although the model does not address the full complexity of reflectance of a two-layer skin, it has proven to be sufficient to recover the oxygen saturation, and perhaps other medically relevant information. The algorithm is demonstrated on a suction blister, where the epidermis is removed to reveal the underlying dermis. Applications for this imaging modality exist in dermatology, in surgery, and in developing treatment plans for various diseases.

  11. Imaging molecular geometry with electron momentum spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Enliang; Shan, Xu; Tian, Qiguo; Yang, Jing; Gong, Maomao; Tang, Yaguo; Niu, Shanshan; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-12-01

    Electron momentum spectroscopy is a unique tool for imaging orbital-specific electron density of molecule in momentum space. However, the molecular geometry information is usually veiled due to the single-centered character of momentum space wavefunction of molecular orbital (MO). Here we demonstrate the retrieval of interatomic distances from the multicenter interference effect revealed in the ratios of electron momentum profiles between two MOs with symmetric and anti-symmetric characters. A very sensitive dependence of the oscillation period on interatomic distance is observed, which is used to determine F-F distance in CF4 and O-O distance in CO2 with sub-Ångström precision. Thus, using one spectrometer, and in one measurement, the electron density distributions of MOs and the molecular geometry information can be obtained simultaneously. Our approach provides a new robust tool for imaging molecules with high precision and has potential to apply to ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics if combined with ultrashort electron pulses in the future.

  12. The Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission

    CERN Document Server

    André, Philippe; Banday, Anthony; Barbosa, Domingos; Barreiro, Belen; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Battistelli, Elia; Battye, Richard; Bendo, George; Benoȋt, Alain; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Béthermin, Matthieu; Bielewicz, Pawel; Bonaldi, Anna; Bouchet, François; Boulanger, François; Brand, Jan; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Camus, Philippe; Casas, Francisco; Casasola, Viviana; Castex, Guillaume; Challinor, Anthony; Chluba, Jens; Chon, Gayoung; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Comis, Barbara; Cuttaia, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; Da Silva, Antonio; Davis, Richard; de Avillez, Miguel; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Petris, Marco; de Rosa, Adriano; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Désert, François-Xavier; Dickinson, Clive; Diego, Jose Maria; Dunkley, Joanna; Enßlin, Torsten; Errard, Josquin; Falgarone, Edith; Ferreira, Pedro; Ferrière, Katia; Finelli, Fabio; Fletcher, Andrew; Fosalba, Pablo; Fuller, Gary; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; García-Bellido, Juan; Ghribi, Adnan; Giard, Martin; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grainge, Keith; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Hall, Alex; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Haverkorn, Marijke; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Herranz, Diego; Jackson, Mark; Jaffe, Andrew; Khatri, Rishi; Kunz, Martin; Lamagna, Luca; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Leahy, Paddy; Lesgourgues, Julien; Liguori, Michele; Liuzzo, Elisabetta; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Macias-Perez, Juan; Maffei, Bruno; Maino, Davide; Mangilli, Anna; Martinez-Gonzalez, Enrique; Martins, Carlos J.A.P.; Masi, Silvia; Massardi, Marcella; Matarrese, Sabino; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Mennella, Aniello; Mignano, Arturo; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Monfardini, Alessandro; Murphy, Anthony; Naselsky, Pavel; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Noviello, Fabio; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Paci, Francesco; Pagano, Luca; Paladino, Rosita; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Paoletti, Daniela; Peiris, Hiranya; Perrotta, Francesca; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michel; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Ricciardi, Sara; Roman, Matthieu; Rosset, Cyrille; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Shellard, Paul; Silk, Joseph; Starobinsky, Alexei; Stompor, Radek; Sunyaev, Rashid; Tartari, Andrea; Terenzi, Luca; Toffolatti, Luigi; Tomasi, Maurizio; Trappe, Neil; Tristram, Matthieu; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucci, Marco; Van de Weijgaert, Rien; Van Tent, Bartjan; Verde, Licia; Vielva, Patricio; Wandelt, Ben; Watson, Robert; Withington, Stafford; Cabrera, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in May 2013 as a large-class mission for investigating within the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision program a set of important scientific questions that require high resolution, high sensitivity, full-sky observations of the sky emission at wavelengths ranging from millimeter-wave to the far-infrared. PRISM's main objective is to explore the distant universe, probing cosmic history from very early times until now as well as the structures, distribution of matter, and velocity flows throughout our Hubble volume. PRISM will survey the full sky in a large number of frequency bands in both intensity and polarization and will measure the absolute spectrum of sky emission more than three orders of magnitude better than COBE FIRAS. The aim of this Extended White Paper is to provide a more detailed overview of the highlights of the new science that will be made possible by PRISM

  13. Motility Contrast Imaging and Tissue Dynamics Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, David D.; An, Ran; Turek, John

    Motion is the defining physiological characteristic of living matter. If we are interested in how things function, then the way they move is most informative. Motion provides an endogenous and functional suite of biomarkers that are sensitive to subtle changes that occur under applied pharmacological doses or cellular stresses. This chapter reviews the application of biodynamic imaging to measure cellular dynamics in three-dimensional tissue culture for drug screening applications. Nanoscale and microscale motions are detected through statistical fluctuations in dynamic speckle across an ensemble of cells within each resolution voxel. Tissue dynamics spectroscopy generates drug-response spectrograms that serve as phenotypic fingerprints of drug action and can differentiate responses from heterogeneous regions of tumor tissue.

  14. POTENTIAL OF AIRBORNE IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY AT CZECHGLOBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hanuš

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystems, their services, structures and functions are affected by complex environmental processes, which are both natural and human-induced and globally changing. In order to understand how ecosystems behave in globally changing environment, it is important to monitor the current status of ecosystems and their structural and functional changes in time and space. An essential tool allowing monitoring of ecosystems is remote sensing (RS. Many ecosystems variables are being translated into a spectral response recorded by RS instruments. It is however important to understand the complexity and synergies of the key ecosystem variables influencing the reflected signal. This can be achieved by analysing high resolution RS data from multiple sources acquired simultaneously from the same platform. Such a system has been recently built at CzechGlobe - Global Change Research Institute (The Czech Academy of Sciences. CzechGlobe has been significantly extending its research infrastructure in the last years, which allows advanced monitoring of ecosystem changes at hierarchical levels spanning from molecules to entire ecosystems. One of the CzechGlobe components is a laboratory of imaging spectroscopy. The laboratory is now operating a new platform for advanced remote sensing observations called FLIS (Flying Laboratory of Imaging Spectroscopy. FLIS consists of an airborne carrier equipped with passive RS systems. The core instrument of FLIS is a hyperspectral imaging system provided by Itres Ltd. The hyperspectral system consists of three spectroradiometers (CASI 1500, SASI 600 and TASI 600 that cover the reflective spectral range from 380 to 2450 nm, as well as the thermal range from 8 to 11.5 μm. The airborne platform is prepared for mounting of full-waveform laser scanner Riegl-Q780 as well, however a laser scanner is not a permanent part of FLIS. In 2014 the installation of the hyperspectral scanners was completed and the first flights were carried out

  15. Potential of Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy at Czechglobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanuš, J.; Fabiánek, T.; Fajmon, L.

    2016-06-01

    Ecosystems, their services, structures and functions are affected by complex environmental processes, which are both natural and human-induced and globally changing. In order to understand how ecosystems behave in globally changing environment, it is important to monitor the current status of ecosystems and their structural and functional changes in time and space. An essential tool allowing monitoring of ecosystems is remote sensing (RS). Many ecosystems variables are being translated into a spectral response recorded by RS instruments. It is however important to understand the complexity and synergies of the key ecosystem variables influencing the reflected signal. This can be achieved by analysing high resolution RS data from multiple sources acquired simultaneously from the same platform. Such a system has been recently built at CzechGlobe - Global Change Research Institute (The Czech Academy of Sciences). CzechGlobe has been significantly extending its research infrastructure in the last years, which allows advanced monitoring of ecosystem changes at hierarchical levels spanning from molecules to entire ecosystems. One of the CzechGlobe components is a laboratory of imaging spectroscopy. The laboratory is now operating a new platform for advanced remote sensing observations called FLIS (Flying Laboratory of Imaging Spectroscopy). FLIS consists of an airborne carrier equipped with passive RS systems. The core instrument of FLIS is a hyperspectral imaging system provided by Itres Ltd. The hyperspectral system consists of three spectroradiometers (CASI 1500, SASI 600 and TASI 600) that cover the reflective spectral range from 380 to 2450 nm, as well as the thermal range from 8 to 11.5 μm. The airborne platform is prepared for mounting of full-waveform laser scanner Riegl-Q780 as well, however a laser scanner is not a permanent part of FLIS. In 2014 the installation of the hyperspectral scanners was completed and the first flights were carried out with all

  16. Plate tectonic raster reconstruction in GPlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cannon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a novel method implemented in the GPlates plate tectonic reconstruction software to interactively reconstruct arbitrarily high-resolution raster data to past geological times using a rotation model. The approach is based on the projection of geo-referenced raster data into a cube map followed by a reverse projection onto rotated tectonic plates on the surface of the globe. This decouples the rendering of a geo-referenced raster from its reconstruction, providing a number of benefits including a simple implementation and the ability to combine rasters with different geo-referencing or inbuilt raster projections. The cube map projection is accelerated by graphics hardware in a wide variety of computer systems manufactured over the last decade. Furthermore, by integrating a multi-resolution tile partitioning into the cube map we can provide on-demand tile streaming, level-of-detail rendering and hierarchical visibility culling enabling researchers to visually explore essentially unlimited resolution geophysical raster data attached to tectonic plates and reconstructed through geological time. This capability forms the basis for interactively building and improving plate reconstructions in an iterative fashion, particularly for tectonically complex regions.

  17. Design and evaluation of a device for fast multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yankelevich, Diego R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, 3101 Kemper Hall, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Ma, Dinglong; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Sun, Yinghua; Bec, Julien; Marcu, Laura, E-mail: lmarcu@ucdavis.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Elson, Daniel S. [Hamlyn Centre for Robotic Surgery, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    The application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to in vivo tissue diagnosis requires a method for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay profiles in multiple spectral bands. This study focusses on development of a clinically compatible fiber-optic based multispectral TRFS (ms-TRFS) system together with validation of its accuracy and precision for fluorescence lifetime measurements. It also presents the expansion of this technique into an imaging spectroscopy method. A tandem array of dichroic beamsplitters and filters was used to record TRFS decay profiles at four distinct spectral bands where biological tissue typically presents fluorescence emission maxima, namely, 390, 452, 542, and 629 nm. Each emission channel was temporally separated by using transmission delays through 200 μm diameter multimode optical fibers of 1, 10, 19, and 28 m lengths. A Laguerre-expansion deconvolution algorithm was used to compensate for modal dispersion inherent to large diameter optical fibers and the finite bandwidth of detectors and digitizers. The system was found to be highly efficient and fast requiring a few nano-Joule of laser pulse energy and <1 ms per point measurement, respectively, for the detection of tissue autofluorescent components. Organic and biological chromophores with lifetimes that spanned a 0.8–7 ns range were used for system validation, and the measured lifetimes from the organic fluorophores deviated by less than 10% from values reported in the literature. Multi-spectral lifetime images of organic dye solutions contained in glass capillary tubes were recorded by raster scanning the single fiber probe in a 2D plane to validate the system as an imaging tool. The lifetime measurement variability was measured indicating that the system provides reproducible results with a standard deviation smaller than 50 ps. The ms-TRFS is a compact apparatus that makes possible the fast, accurate, and precise multispectral time-resolved fluorescence

  18. Time-resolved spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Britton

    1995-05-01

    In response to the conference organizer's request, I am presenting a summary of the current status of medical optical imaging and spectroscopy. This is a topic which is advancing rapidly and on which there have been a number of conferences recently, and yet there has not been presented an overview of the field and some idea of what the advantages and disadvantages of the photon diffusion technology may be. Thus, this paper emphasizes diffusion waves for spectroscopy and imaging deep within the tissue and, at the same time, for providing specificity information of both absorption and scattering. In achieving this goal, I will not be able to cite all of the advantages of technologies that view the superficial layers of skin, retina, etc., on the one hand, nor those that measure the photons that have been scattered minimally on the transit between input and output. One of the main reasons for this is that specificity of the optical methods requires all of the information available: absorption and scattering of intrinsic signals naturally in the tissue, and of extrinsic signal due to contrast agents that have been artificially lodged in strategic tissue volumes. Since this paper is essentially the transcript of a lecture, it is not proposed as a topic review and does not contain full-scale bibliographic references, some of which may be found in a recent review elsewhere. This paper highlights what we all might accomplish in order to bring to bear with maximal effectiveness the optical method for altering the outcome of medical problems. I have not emphasized the mathematics of photon diffusion so well represented by the papers of this symposium volume. The achievable goals of the optical methods are to speed detection, improve diagnosis, guide therapy, and what appears in the minds of most, contribute to the improvement of medical economics. In order to fulfill these objectives, we will in the end have to demonstrate by lengthy and expensive clinical studies that the

  19. Towards 3D raster GIS: On developing a raster engine for spatial DBMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zlatanova, S.; Nourian Ghadikolaee, P.; Goncalves, R.; Vo, A.V.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) raster are simple representations, which have long been used for modelling continuous phenomena such as geological and medical objects. However, they can result in large data sets when high resolution is used, which poses challenges to algorithms for vector-to-raster conversio

  20. Autofluorescence spectroscopy and imaging for cancer detection in the larynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kan; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2009-11-01

    Autofluorescence imaging has shown high sensitivity for early diagnosis and detection of cancer in humans. However, it has a limitation in diagnostic specificity due to high false positive rates. In this work, we apply an integrated fluorescence spectroscopy and endoscopic imaging technique for real-time tissue measurements. The results show that the combined autofluorescence imaging and spectroscopy has the potential for improving laryngeal cancer diagnosis and detection.

  1. A Dark-field Scanning In Situ Spectroscopy Platform for Broadband Imaging of Resected Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Laughney, Ashley M.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    A dark-field geometry spectral imaging system is presented to raster-scan thick tissue samples in situ in 1.5cm square sections, recovering full spectra from each 100 microns diameter pixel. This spot size provides adequate resolution for wide field scanning, while also facilitating scatter imaging without requiring sophisticated light-tissue transport modeling. The system is demonstrated showing accurate estimation of localized scatter parameters and the potential to recover absorption-based contrast from broadband reflectance data measured from 480nm up to 750nm in tissue phantoms. Results obtained from xenograft pancreas tumors show the ability to quantitatively image changes in localized scatter response in this fast imaging geometry. The polychromatic raster scan design allows the rapid scanning necessary for use in surgical/clinical applications where timely decisions are required about tissue pathology. PMID:21593932

  2. GPU-accelerated raster map reprojection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Sloup

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Reprojecting raster maps from one projection to another is an essential part of many cartographic processes (map comparison, overlays, data presentation, ... and reducing the required computational time is desirable and often significantly decreases overall processing costs.The raster reprojection process operates per-pixel and is, therefore, a good candidate for GPU-based parallelization where the large number of processors can lead to a very high degree of parallelism.We have created an experimental implementation of the raster reprojection with GPU-based parallelization (using OpenCL API.During the evaluation, we compared the performance of our implementation to the optimized GDAL and showed that there is a class of problems where GPU-based parallelization can lead to more than sevenfold speedup.

  3. Spring Season Habitat Suitability Index raster

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster represents a continuous surface of sage-grouse habitat suitability index (HSI, created using ArcGIS 10.2.2) values for Nevada during spring, which is a...

  4. Intraoperative raster photogrammetry--the PAR Corneal Topography System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belin, M W

    1993-01-01

    The PAR Corneal Topography System (CTS) is a computer-driven corneal imaging system that uses close-range raster photogrammetry to measure and produce a topographic map of the corneal surface. The CTS determines distortion in a projected two-dimensional grid. Unlike Placido-disc-based videokeratoscopes, the PAR CTS produces a true topographic map (elevation map) and requires neither a smooth reflective surface nor precise spatial alignment for accurate imaging. Because the system uses two noncoaxial optical paths, it can be integrated into other optical devices. A modified CTS was integrated into an experimental erbium: YAG photoablative laser. The CTS successfully imaged corneas before, after, and during laser photoablation. Its ability to image nonreflective surfaces and to be integrated into other optical systems may make it suitable for intraoperative refractive monitoring.

  5. Advances in Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Breast Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S; Vogel, A J; Gandjbakhche, A H

    2006-01-03

    A review is presented of recent advances in optical imaging and spectroscopy and the use of light for addressing breast cancer issues. Spectroscopic techniques offer the means to characterize tissue components and obtain functional information in real time. Three-dimensional optical imaging of the breast using various illumination and signal collection schemes in combination with image reconstruction algorithms may provide a new tool for cancer detection and monitoring of treatment.

  6. Biophotonics: Spectroscopy, Imaging, Sensing, and Manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, Baldassare Di

    2011-01-01

    This volume describes an impressive array of the current photonic-related technologies being used in the investigation of biological systems. The topics include various types of microscopy (fluorescence correlation microscopy, two-photon microscopy), sensitive detection of biological molecules, nano-surgery techniques, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, nano-plasmonics, terahertz spectroscopy, and photosynthetic energy conversion. The emphasis is on the physical principles behind each technique, and on examining the advantages and limitations of each.The book begins with an overview by Paras Prasad, a leader in the field of biophotonics, of several important optical techniques currently used for studying biological systems. In the subsequent chapters these techniques are discussed in depth, providing the reader with a detailed understanding of the basic physical principles at work. An excellent treatment of terahertz spectroscopy demonstrates how photonics is being extended beyond the visible region. Rec...

  7. Mapping Foliar Traits Across Biomes Using Imaging Spectroscopy: A Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, P. A.; Singh, A.; Wang, Z.

    2016-12-01

    One of the great promises of imaging spectroscopy - also known as hyperspectral remote sensing - is the ability to map the spatial variation in foliar functional traits, such as nitrogen concentration, pigments, leaf structure, photosynthetic capacity and secondary biochemistry, that drive terrestrial ecosystem processes. A remote-sensing approach enables characterization of within- and between-biome variations that may be crucial to understanding ecosystem responses to pests, pathogens and environmental change. We provide a synthesis of the foliar traits that can be mapped from imaging spectroscopy, as well as an overview of both the major applications of trait maps derived from hyperspectral imagery and current gaps in our knowledge and capacity. Specifically, we make the case that a global imaging spectroscopy mission will provide unique and urgent measurements necessary to understand the response of agricultural and natural systems to rapid global changes. Finally, we present a quantitative framework to utilize imaging spectroscopy to characterize spatial and temporal variation in foliar traits within and between biomes. From this we can infer the dynamics of vegetation function across ecosystems, especially in transition zones and environmentally sensitive systems. Eventual launch of a global imaging spectroscopy mission will enable collection of narrowband VSWIR measurements that will help close major gaps in our understanding of biogeochemical cycles and improve representation of vegetated biomes in Earth system process models.

  8. Connected components labeling for giga-cell multi-categorical rasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzel, Pawel; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    2013-09-01

    Labeling of connected components in an image or a raster of non-imagery data is a fundamental operation in fields of pattern recognition and machine intelligence. The bulk of effort devoted to designing efficient connected components labeling (CCL) algorithms concentrated on the domain of binary images where labeling is required for a computer to recognize objects. In contrast, in the Geographical Information Science (GIS) a CCL algorithm is mostly applied to multi-categorical rasters in order to either convert a raster to a shapefile, or for statistical characterization of individual clumps. Recently, it has become necessary to label connected components in very large, giga-cell size, multi-categorical rasters but performance of existing CCL algorithms lacks sufficient speed to accomplish such task. In this paper we present a modification to the popular two-scan CCL algorithm that enables labeling of giga-cell size, multi-categorical rasters. Our approach is to apply a divide-and-conquer technique coupled with parallel processing to a standard two-scan algorithm. For specificity, we have developed a variant of a standard CCL algorithm implemented as r.clump in GRASS GIS. We have established optimal values of data blocks (stemming from the divide-and-conquer technique) and optimal number of computational threads (stemming from parallel processing) for a new algorithm called r.clump3p. The performance of the new algorithm was tested on a series of rasters up to 160 Mcells in size; for largest size test raster a speed up over the original algorithm is 74 times. Finally, we have applied the new algorithm to the National Land Cover Dataset 2006 raster with 1.6×1010 cells. Labeling this raster took 39 h using two-processors, 16 cores computer and resulted in 221,718,501 clumps. Estimated speed up over the original algorithm is 450 times. The r.clump3p works within the GRASS environment and is available in the public domain.

  9. Computational optical biomedical spectroscopy and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Musa, Sarhan M

    2015-01-01

    Applications of Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging in Personal Care Studies; Guojin Zhang, Roger L. McMullen, Richard Mendelsohn, and Osama M. MusaFluorescence Bioimaging with Applications to Chemistry; Ufana Riaz and S.M. AshrafNew Trends in Immunohistochemical, Genome, and Metabolomics Imaging; G. Livanos, Aditi Deshpande, C. Narayan, Ying Na, T. Quang, T. Farrahi, R. Koglin, Suman Shrestha, M. Zervakis, and George C. GiakosDeveloping a Comprehensive Taxonomy for Human Cell Types; Richard Conroy and Vinay PaiFunctional Near-Infrared S

  10. Raster Vs. Point Cloud LiDAR Data Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ashmawy, N.; Shaker, A.

    2014-09-01

    Airborne Laser Scanning systems with light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology is one of the fast and accurate 3D point data acquisition techniques. Generating accurate digital terrain and/or surface models (DTM/DSM) is the main application of collecting LiDAR range data. Recently, LiDAR range and intensity data have been used for land cover classification applications. Data range and Intensity, (strength of the backscattered signals measured by the LiDAR systems), are affected by the flying height, the ground elevation, scanning angle and the physical characteristics of the objects surface. These effects may lead to uneven distribution of point cloud or some gaps that may affect the classification process. Researchers have investigated the conversion of LiDAR range point data to raster image for terrain modelling. Interpolation techniques have been used to achieve the best representation of surfaces, and to fill the gaps between the LiDAR footprints. Interpolation methods are also investigated to generate LiDAR range and intensity image data for land cover classification applications. In this paper, different approach has been followed to classifying the LiDAR data (range and intensity) for land cover mapping. The methodology relies on the classification of the point cloud data based on their range and intensity and then converted the classified points into raster image. The gaps in the data are filled based on the classes of the nearest neighbour. Land cover maps are produced using two approaches using: (a) the conventional raster image data based on point interpolation; and (b) the proposed point data classification. A study area covering an urban district in Burnaby, British Colombia, Canada, is selected to compare the results of the two approaches. Five different land cover classes can be distinguished in that area: buildings, roads and parking areas, trees, low vegetation (grass), and bare soil. The results show that an improvement of around 10 % in the

  11. Multicolor Graphic Picture With Original Ring Raster Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Ziljak Vujic

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with graphics and color rastering using new raster forms as well as raster combinations in vector anda pixel graphics, with combining both graphics in the same document. The unwanted increase or decrease of color coverage depends most of all on the fringe volume length bordering the raster element. The idea of this research work is to find a form alters in the least extent the raster element fringe volume in respect to its increase or decrease. The innovation in this research work is not only in the fact that the raster element's volume is altered in the minimal degree, but also that it does not change at all with the covering capacity increase or decrease. The solution led in the direction of creating such a raster element that has at least two independent shells where one increases in size together with the raster element increase, and the other one decreases when the raster element size increases. We have named this raster form as the ring form due to its similarity with a classical smooth ring.

  12. Recent applications of ATR FTIR spectroscopy and imaging to proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassford, Stefanie E; Byrne, Bernadette; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2013-12-01

    Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is a label-free, non-destructive analytical technique that can be used extensively to study a wide variety of different molecules in a range of different conditions. The aim of this review is to discuss and highlight the recent advances in the applications of ATR FTIR spectroscopic imaging to proteins. It briefly covers the basic principles of ATR FTIR spectroscopy and ATR FTIR spectroscopic imaging as well as their advantages to the study of proteins compared to other techniques and other forms of FTIR spectroscopy. It will then go on to examine the advances that have been made within the field over the last several years, particularly the use of ATR FTIR spectroscopy for the understanding and development of protein interaction with surfaces. Additionally, the growing potential of Surface Enhanced Infrared Spectroscopy (SEIRAS) within this area of applications will be discussed. The review includes the applications of ATR FTIR imaging to protein crystallisation and for high-throughput studies, highlighting the future potential of the technology within the field of protein structural studies and beyond.

  13. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  14. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  15. Potential of imaging spectroscopy as tool for pasture management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, A.G.T.; Lokhorst, C.; Hendriks, M.M.W.B.; Kornet, J.G.; Kasper, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    The use of imaging spectroscopy to predict the herbage mass of dry matter (DM), DM content of herbage and crude fibre, ash, total sugars and mineral (N, P, K, S, Ca, Mg, Mn, Zn and Fe) concentrations was evaluated. The experimental system used measured reflectance between 404 and 1650 nm at high spa

  16. Correlation of proton MR spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irwan, R; Sijens, PE; Potze, JH; Oudkerk, M

    2005-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-1-MRS) provides indices of neuronal damage. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) relates to water diffusivity and fiber tract orientation. A method to compare H-1-MRS and DTI findings was developed, tested on phantom and applied on normal brain. Point-resolved spe

  17. Hydrothermal Processes in the Archean - New Insights from Imaging Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenbeek, F.J.A. van

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this research was to gain new insights in fossil hydrothermal systems using airborne imaging spectroscopy. Fossil submarine hydrothermal systems in Archean greenstone belts and other geologic terranes are important because of their relationship with volcanic massive sulfide (VMS) mineral

  18. Hydrothermal Processes in the Archean - New Insights from Imaging Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenbeek, F.J.A. van

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this research was to gain new insights in fossil hydrothermal systems using airborne imaging spectroscopy. Fossil submarine hydrothermal systems in Archean greenstone belts and other geologic terranes are important because of their relationship with volcanic massive sulfide (VMS) mineral

  19. Anion photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of glyoxal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Tian; Dixon, Andrew R.; Sanov, Andrei

    2016-09-01

    We report a photoelectron imaging study of the radical-anion of glyoxal. The 532 nm photoelectron spectrum provides the first direct spectroscopic determination of the adiabatic electron affinity of glyoxal, EA = 1.10 ± 0.02 eV. This assignment is supported by a Franck-Condon simulation of the experimental spectrum that successfully reproduces the observed spectral features. The vertical detachment energy of the radical-anion is determined as VDE = 1.30 ± 0.04 eV. The reported EA and VDE values are attributed to the most stable (C2h symmetry) isomers of the neutral and the anion.

  20. Galileo infrared imaging spectroscopy measurements at venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R.W.; Baines, K.H.; Encrenaz, Th.; Taylor, F.W.; Drossart, P.; Kamp, L.W.; Pollack, James B.; Lellouch, E.; Collard, A.D.; Calcutt, S.B.; Grinspoon, D.; Weissman, P.R.; Smythe, W.D.; Ocampo, A.C.; Danielson, G.E.; Fanale, F.P.; Johnson, T.V.; Kieffer, H.H.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    During the 1990 Galileo Venus flyby, the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer investigated the night-side atmosphere of Venus in the spectral range 0.7 to 5.2 micrometers. Multispectral images at high spatial resolution indicate substantial cloud opacity variations in the lower cloud levels, centered at 50 kilometers altitude. Zonal and meridional winds were derived for this level and are consistent with motion of the upper branch of a Hadley cell. Northern and southern hemisphere clouds appear to be markedly different. Spectral profiles were used to derive lower atmosphere abundances of water vapor and other species.

  1. Imaging Spectroscopy for Extrasolar Planet Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Sparks, W B; Sparks, William B.; Ford, Holland C.

    2002-01-01

    Coronagraphic imaging in combination with moderate to high spectral resolution may prove more effective in both detecting extrasolar planets and characterizing them than a standard coronagraphic imaging approach. We envisage an integral-field spectrograph coupled to a coronagraph to produce a 3D datacube. For the idealised case where the spectrum of the star is well-known and unchanging across the field, we discuss the utility of cross-correlation to seek the extrasolar planet signal, and describe a mathematical approach to completely eliminate stray light from the host star (although not its Poisson noise). For the case where the PSF is dominated by diffraction and scattering effects, and comprises a multitude of speckles within an Airy pattern typical of a space-based observation, we turn the wavelength dependence of the PSF to advantage and present a general way to eliminate the contribution from the star while preserving both the flux and spectrum of the extrasolar planet. We call this method `spectral de...

  2. UV Imaging Spectroscopy of the Saturn System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, L. W.

    2014-12-01

    Highlights of the UVIS investigation on Cassini include the discovery of a neutral oxygen cloud surrounding Saturn and the determination that Saturn's magnetosphere is dominated by neutrals. Later, UVIS observed and measured the cause of these phenomena: that the icy moon Enceladus is erupting water molecules at about 200kg/sec from fissures in its south polar terrain. These eruptions also carry a fraction of small solid ice grains that are sufficient to produce Saturn's ethereal E ring. The morphology of the jets of vapor in the Enceladus plume imply supersonic flow velocities that loft the grains carried in the jets, consistent with theoretical models. UV occultations and spectroscopy define the constituents of Titan's upper atmosphere and explain its dayside and nightside emissions. UVIS sees Saturn's auroral oval evolve and has detected Enceladus' footprint. Self-Gravity Wakes in Saturn's rings were detected by comparing ring occultations with Voyager results and with multiple Cassini UVIS occultations at a range of viewing aspects. We developed a simple 'granola-bar model' to explain our observations and the azimuthal brightness asymmetry observed from the Earth and previous space missions. UVIS has detected numerous small structures in the rings: kittens, propellers and other embedded objects. Some are as small as meters across from UVIS 'tracking' occultations. Features preferentially form where the rings are stirred by resonances and nearby passing moons. This more active ring system seen by Cassini may explain bright haloes in the rings; how the ring system can recycle ring material so that the rings are much older than inferred from Voyager; and provide implications of how planets may form. Future observations will provide the best resolution on active features like edges of the rings, ring haloes and propeller bands.

  3. Planning JWST NIRSpec MSA spectroscopy using NIRCam pre-images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Tracy L.; Ubeda, Leonardo; Kassin, Susan A.; Gilbert, Karoline; Karakla, Diane M.; Reid, I. N.; Blair, William P.; Keyes, Charles D.; Soderblom, D. R.; Peña-Guerrero, Maria A.

    2016-07-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) is the work-horse spectrograph at 1-5microns for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). A showcase observing mode of NIRSpec is the multi-object spectroscopy with the Micro-Shutter Arrays (MSAs), which consist of a quarter million tiny configurable shutters that are 0. ''20×0. ''46 in size. The NIRSpec MSA shutters can be opened in adjacent rows to create flexible and positionable spectroscopy slits on prime science targets of interest. Because of the very small shutter width, the NIRSpec MSA spectral data quality will benefit significantly from accurate astrometric knowledge of the positions of planned science sources. Images acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have the optimal relative astrometric accuracy for planning NIRSpec observations of 5-10 milli-arcseconds (mas). However, some science fields of interest might have no HST images, galactic fields can have moderate proper motions at the 5mas level or greater, and extragalactic images with HST may have inadequate source information at NIRSpec wavelengths beyond 2 microns. Thus, optimal NIRSpec spectroscopy planning may require pre-imaging observations with the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) on JWST to accurately establish source positions for alignment with the NIRSpec MSAs. We describe operational philosophies and programmatic considerations for acquiring JWST NIRCam pre-image observations for NIRSpec MSA spectroscopic planning within the same JWST observing Cycle.

  4. Waveguide volume probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to a probe for use within the field of nuclear magnetic resonance, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). One embodiment relates to an RF probe for magnetic resonance imaging and/or spectroscopy comprising a conductive...... non-magnetic hollow waveguide having an internal volume and at least one open end, one or more capacitors and at least a first conductive non-magnetic wire, wherein said first conductive wire connects at least one of said one or more capacitors to opposite walls of one open end of the waveguide...... and wherein said first conductive wire and said one or more capacitors are located outside of said internal volume, wherein the internal volume of the hollow waveguide defines an imaging volume or sample volume....

  5. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue.

  6. Lessons and key results from 30 years of imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert O.

    2014-09-01

    Spectroscopy was first used in 1814 by Joseph von Fraunhofer as a scientific method for discovery, and to develop and test scientific hypotheses. From this beginning, spectroscopy evolved to a broadly used analytical tool for both science and applications. In the 1970's, technology began to enable a class of instruments that measure spectra for every point in an image. The first airborne imaging spectrometer developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory flew in 1982. Subsequently, a wide range of imaging spectrometers have been developed, many at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, for airborne and space platforms and they have participated in NASA mission throughout the solar system. A key lesson over this time period has been the broad applicability of imaging spectrometers to pursue a range of science and application objectives wherever there is relevant signal in the spectral range from the ultra violet to the thermal infrared. As with all optical imaging instruments, imaging spectrometers have spectral, radiometric and spatial characteristics and related requirements. Of these, uniformity, radiometric precision, and calibration have been identified as critically important for the science and application utility of imaging spectrometer instruments. These key requirements are enabling for the most advanced imaging spectrometer algorithms that retrieve parameters with units and quantifiable uncertainties. The current trend in imaging spectrometer instrumentation is for broader spectral coverage and wider swath while improving uniformity, precision, and calibration. A companion emphasis is for lower mass, power and volume, with instruments taking advantage of the latest detector, optical, electronics and computational technologies. The number of imaging spectrometers in use is increasing every year and this trend is on track to continue.

  7. Volumetric three-dimensional display system with rasterization hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favalora, Gregg E.; Dorval, Rick K.; Hall, Deirdre M.; Giovinco, Michael; Napoli, Joshua

    2001-06-01

    An 8-color multiplanar volumetric display is being developed by Actuality Systems, Inc. It will be capable of utilizing an image volume greater than 90 million voxels, which we believe is the greatest utilizable voxel set of any volumetric display constructed to date. The display is designed to be used for molecular visualization, mechanical CAD, e-commerce, entertainment, and medical imaging. As such, it contains a new graphics processing architecture, novel high-performance line- drawing algorithms, and an API similar to a current standard. Three-dimensional imagery is created by projecting a series of 2-D bitmaps ('image slices') onto a diffuse screen that rotates at 600 rpm. Persistence of vision fuses the slices into a volume-filling 3-D image. A modified three-panel Texas Instruments projector provides slices at approximately 4 kHz, resulting in 8-color 3-D imagery comprised of roughly 200 radially-disposed slices which are updated at 20 Hz. Each slice has a resolution of 768 by 768 pixels, subtending 10 inches. An unusual off-axis projection scheme incorporating tilted rotating optics is used to maintain good focus across the projection screen. The display electronics includes a custom rasterization architecture which converts the user's 3- D geometry data into image slices, as well as 6 Gbits of DDR SDRAM graphics memory.

  8. Plant species discrimination using emissive thermal infrared imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Gilles; Gerhards, Max; Schlerf, Martin; Hecker, Christoph; Udelhoven, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Discrimination of plant species in the optical reflective domain is somewhat limited by the similarity of their reflectance spectra. Spectral characteristics in the visible to shortwave infrared (VSWIR) consist of combination bands and overtones of primary absorption bands, situated in the Thermal Infrared (TIR) region and therefore resulting in broad spectral features. TIR spectroscopy is assumed to have a large potential for providing complementary information to VSWIR spectroscopy. So far, in the TIR, plants were often considered featureless. Recently and following advances in sensor technology, plant species were discriminated based on specific emissivity signatures by Ullah et al. (2012) using directional-hemispherical reflectance (DHR) measurements in the laboratory. Here we examine if an accurate discrimination of plant species is equally possible using emissive thermal infrared imaging spectroscopy, an explicit spatial technique that is faster and more flexible than non-imaging measurements. Hyperspectral thermal infrared images were acquired in the 7.8⿿11.56 μm range at 40 nm spectral resolution (@10 μm) using a TIR imaging spectrometer (Telops HyperCam-LW) on seven plants each, of eight different species. The images were radiometrically calibrated and subjected to temperature and emissivity separation using a spectral smoothness approach. First, retrieved emissivity spectra were compared to laboratory reference spectra and then subjected to species discrimination using a random forest classifier. Second, classification results obtained with emissivity spectra were compared to those obtained with VSWIR reflectance spectra that had been acquired from the same leaf samples. In general, the mean emissivity spectra measured by the TIR imaging spectrometer showed very good agreement with the reference spectra (average Nash-Sutcliffe-Efficiency Index = 0.64). In species discrimination, the resulting accuracies for emissivity spectra are highly dependent on

  9. Experimental determination of chosen document elements parameters from raster graphics sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Rybička

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Visual appearance of documents and their formal quality is considered to be as important as the content quality. Formal and typographical quality of documents can be evaluated by an automated system that processes raster images of documents. A document is described by a formal model that treats a page as an object and also as a set of elements, whereas page elements include text and graphic object. All elements are described by their parameters depending on elements’ type. For future evaluation, mainly text objects are important. This paper describes the experimental determination of chosen document elements parameters from raster images. Techniques for image processing are used, where an image is represented as a matrix of dots and parameter values are extracted. Algorithms for parameter extraction from raster images were designed and were aimed mainly at typographical parameters like indentation, alignment, font size or spacing. Algorithms were tested on a set of 100 images of paragraphs or pages and provide very good results. Extracted parameters can be directly used for typographical quality evaluation.

  10. Single-atom detection of light elements: Imaging or spectroscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senga, Ryosuke; Suenaga, Kazu

    2017-09-01

    Single-atom imaging and spectroscopy at a lower accelerating voltage (~60kV) has been largely facilitated by the development of aberration correctors for transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/ scanning TEM (STEM). Such an STEM condition will reduce beam damage and has therefore been demonstrated capable of detecting individual atoms of light elements including B, C, and N in mono-layered materials. However, other light elements such as Li, O, or F are still difficult to visualise as individual atoms by using conventional STEM/TEM imaging because their extremely weak contrast can be often smeared out by the other atoms nearby. In this paper, we demonstrate the successful detection of these 'hardly visible' atoms in the spectroscopy mode. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Terahertz spectroscopy and imaging – Modern techniques and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Cooke, David; Koch, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three decades a new spectroscopic technique with unique possibilities has emerged. Based on coherent and time-resolved detection of the electric field of ultrashort radiation bursts in the far-infrared, this technique has become known as terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS)....... of research, where THz spectroscopic techniques have proven to be useful research tools, and the potential for industrial applications of THz spectroscopic and imaging techniques are discussed....

  12. Height drift correction in non-raster atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, Travis R.; Ziegler, Dominik; Brune, Christoph; Chen, Alex; Farnham, Rodrigo; Huynh, Nen; Chang, Jen-Mei; Bertozzi, Andrea L.; Ashby, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel method to detect and correct drift in non-raster scanning probe microscopy. In conventional raster scanning drift is usually corrected by subtracting a fitted polynomial from each scan line, but sample tilt or large topographic features can result in severe artifacts. Our method u

  13. Technical Report on Raster field test at a Water Board

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriezekolk, Eelco

    2016-01-01

    Risk assessment of unavailability of telecommunication services is an important part of an organisation’s business continuity management. We developed the Raster method to enable organisations to assess their telecommunication service unavailability risks. To validate Raster in practice we conducted

  14. Testing reliability of raster - report of experiment with Kerckhoffs students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriezekolk, Eelco

    2014-01-01

    We are working on the development of an availability risk assessment method for telecommunication services, called Raster. From previous research we know that Raster can produce assessments with reasonable effort, but we have not yet shown that its results are reliable (repeatable) and accurate (cor

  15. Mapping Variation in Vegetation Functioning with Imaging Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, P. A.; Couture, J. J.; Kruger, E. L.; Serbin, S.; Singh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Imaging spectroscopy (otherwise known as hyperspectral remote sensing) offers the potential to characterize the spatial and temporal variation in biophysical and biochemical properties of vegetation that can be costly or logistically difficult to measure comprehensively using traditional methods. A number of recent studies have illustrated the capacity for imaging spectroscopy data, such as from NASA's AVIRIS sensor, to empirically estimate functional traits related to foliar chemistry and physiology (Singh et al. 2015, Serbin et al. 2015). Here, we present analyses that illustrate the implications of those studies to characterize within-field or -stand variability in ecosystem functioning. In agricultural ecosystems, within-field photosynthetic capacity can vary by 30-50%, likely due to within-field variations in water availability and soil fertility. In general, the variability of foliar traits is lower in forests than agriculture, but can still be significant. Finally, we demonstrate that functional trait variability at the stand scale is strongly related to vegetation diversity. These results have two significant implications: 1) reliance on a small number of field samples to broadly estimate functional traits likely underestimates variability in those traits, and 2) if trait estimations from imaging spectroscopy are reliable, such data offer the opportunity to greatly increase the density of measurements we can use to predict ecosystem function.

  16. Telepathology and imaging spectroscopy as a new modality in histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, S G; Müller, G; Lerner, J M; Naber, R D

    1999-01-01

    Telemedicine started in the late 1950's by transmitting data on patients' pulse and heart rates. In the 1980's it expanded to radiology and orthopedics. The technology is now expanding to other specialties that can digitally gather patient data. Telepathology comprises the transmission of microscopic images via telecommunication network. Image compression and multiplexing technologies enabled high-resolution telepathology as well as real-time video consultations over international telephone lines. Organ transplantation has become a viable treatment and offers new life to an increasing number of patients suffering from chronic end stage diseases and from irreversible organ failure. Rejection is still a major problem in kidney, liver, and heart transplantation. To gain further insight into the complex interactions within the components of the immune system, it has become increasingly necessary to develop rapid and simple methods to monitor the status of the immune system in patients. Clinical signs suggest organ rejection and abnormal laboratory test results, but only histological signs on biopsy specimens are adequately specific. The financial cost of organ transplant makes it imperative to develop tools for the early identification and treatment of organ rejection. An increasingly sensitive and accurate way of localizing key structures and abnormalities is through spectroscopy of either H&E stained samples or with a fluorescent tag (fluorophore) or by relying on natural fluorescence. The system is based on a unique Prism and Mirror Imaging Spectroscopy System ("PARISS), spectrometer originally designed and implemented for remote Earth monitoring from space and aircraft and astronomical imaging spectroscopy. Compact and lightweight both the mirror and prism are presently constructed in inexpensive glass but can also be injection molded in plastic. Any number of vendors anywhere in the world can produce all parts of the assembly. This greatly enhances the chances of

  17. Transmittance spectroscopy and transmitted multispectral imaging to map covered paints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Cosentino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transmitted spectroscopy and transmitted multispectral imaging in the 400-900 nm range have been applied for the mapping and tentative identification of paints covered by a white preparation as in the case of a ground laid for reusing a canvas for another painting. These methods can be applied to polychrome works of art, as long as their support and new preparation are sufficiently translucent. This work presents the transmittance spectra acquired from a test board consisting of a prepared canvas with swatches of 54 pigments covered with titanium white and the multispectral images realized with transmitted light to map covered paints on a mock-up painting. It was observed that 18 out of 54 historical pigments provide characteristic transmittance spectra even underneath a titanium white preparation layer and that transmitted light multispectral imaging can map hidden paint layers.

  18. Infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Andrew V; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2017-01-16

    Infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging, are robust, label free and inherently non-destructive methods with a high chemical specificity and sensitivity that are frequently employed in forensic science research and practices. This review aims to discuss the applications and recent developments of these methodologies in this field. Furthermore, the use of recently emerged Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging in transmission, external reflection and Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) modes are summarised with relevance and potential for forensic science applications. This spectroscopic imaging approach provides the opportunity to obtain the chemical composition of fingermarks and information about possible contaminants deposited at a crime scene. Research that demonstrates the great potential of these techniques for analysis of fingerprint residues, explosive materials and counterfeit drugs will be reviewed. The implications of this research for the examination of different materials are considered, along with an outlook of possible future research avenues for the application of vibrational spectroscopic methods to the analysis of forensic samples.

  19. Fiber-optic raster scanning two-photon endomicroscope using a tubular piezoelectric actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Dukho; Yoo, Hongki; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2014-06-01

    A nonresonant, fiber-optic raster scanning endomicroscope was developed using a quarter-tubular piezoelectric (PZT) actuator. A fiber lever mechanism was utilized to enhance the small actuation range of the tubular PZT actuator and to increase its field-of-view. Finite element method simulation of the endoscopic probe was conducted for various conditions to maximize its scanning range. After fabricating the probe using a double clad fiber, we obtained two-photon fluorescence images using raster beam scanning of the fiber. The outer diameter of the probe was 3.5 mm and its rigid distal length was 30 mm including a high numerical aperture gradient index lens. These features are sufficient for input into the instrumental channel of a commercial colonoscope or gastroscope to obtain high resolution images in vivo.

  20. High-speed atomic force microscopy: imaging and force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghiaian, Frédéric; Rico, Felix; Colom, Adai; Casuso, Ignacio; Scheuring, Simon

    2014-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the type of scanning probe microscopy that is probably best adapted for imaging biological samples in physiological conditions with submolecular lateral and vertical resolution. In addition, AFM is a method of choice to study the mechanical unfolding of proteins or for cellular force spectroscopy. In spite of 28 years of successful use in biological sciences, AFM is far from enjoying the same popularity as electron and fluorescence microscopy. The advent of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM), about 10 years ago, has provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of membrane proteins and molecular machines from the single-molecule to the cellular level. HS-AFM imaging at nanometer-resolution and sub-second frame rate may open novel research fields depicting dynamic events at the single bio-molecule level. As such, HS-AFM is complementary to other structural and cellular biology techniques, and hopefully will gain acceptance from researchers from various fields. In this review we describe some of the most recent reports of dynamic bio-molecular imaging by HS-AFM, as well as the advent of high-speed force spectroscopy (HS-FS) for single protein unfolding.

  1. Molecular aspects of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, C

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a well known diagnostic tool in radiology that produces unsurpassed images of the human body, in particular of soft tissue. However, the medical community is often not aware that MRI is an important yet limited segment of magnetic resonance (MR) or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as this method is called in basic science. The tremendous morphological information of MR images sometimes conceal the fact that MR signals in general contain much more information, especially on processes on the molecular level. NMR is successfully used in physics, chemistry, and biology to explore and characterize chemical reactions, molecular conformations, biochemical pathways, solid state material, and many other applications that elucidate invisible characteristics of matter and tissue. In medical applications, knowledge of the molecular background of MRI and in particular MR spectroscopy (MRS) is an inevitable basis to understand molecular phenomenon leading to macroscopic effects visible in diagnostic images or spectra. This review shall provide the necessary background to comprehend molecular aspects of magnetic resonance applications in medicine. An introduction into the physical basics aims at an understanding of some of the molecular mechanisms without extended mathematical treatment. The MR typical terminology is explained such that reading of original MR publications could be facilitated for non-MR experts. Applications in MRI and MRS are intended to illustrate the consequences of molecular effects on images and spectra.

  2. The Auroral Planetary Imaging and Spectroscopy (APIS) service

    CERN Document Server

    Lamy, Laurent; Henry, Florence; Sidaner, Pierre Le

    2015-01-01

    The Auroral Planetary Imaging and Spectroscopy (APIS) service, accessible online, provides an open and interactive access to processed auroral observations of the outer planets and their satellites. Such observations are of interest for a wide community at the interface between planetology and magnetospheric and heliospheric physics. APIS consists of (i) a high level database, built from planetary auroral observations acquired by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) since 1997 with its mostly used Far-UltraViolet spectro-imagers, (ii) a dedicated search interface aimed at browsing efficiently this database through relevant conditional search criteria and (iii) the ability to interactively work with the data online through plotting tools developed by the Virtual Observatory (VO) community, such as Aladin and Specview. This service is VO compliant and can therefore also been queried by external search tools of the VO community. The diversity of available data and the capability to sort them out by relevant physical...

  3. Imaging infrared spectroscopy for fixation-free liver tumor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, James V.; Chen, Zhaomin; Li, Ran; Butke, Ryan; Miller, Barrie; Hitchcock, Charles L.; Allen, Heather C.; Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.

    2014-03-01

    Infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy of human liver tissue slices has been used to identify and characterize a liver metastasis of breast origin (mucinous carcinoma) which was surgically removed from a consenting patient and frozen without formalin fixation or dehydration procedures, so that lipids and water remain in the tissues. Previously, a set of IR metrics was determined for tumors in fixation-free liver tissues facilitating a k-means cluster analysis differentiating tumor from nontumor. Different and more in depth aspects of these results are examined in this work including three metric color imaging, differencing for lipid identification, and a new technique to simultaneously fit band lineshapes and their 2nd derivatives in order to better characterize protein changes.

  4. Functional Imaging of Tissue Morphology with Polarized Light Scattering Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, Vadim

    2001-03-01

    We report a new imaging technique to study the morphology of living epithelial cells in vivo. The method is based on light scattering spectroscopy with polarized light (PLSS) and makes it possible to distinguish between single backscattering from epithelial cell nuclei and multiply scattered light. The spectrum of the single backscattering component is further analyzed to provide quantitative histological information about the epithelial cells such as the size distribution, refractive index, and chromatin content of the cell nuclei. The measurement of cell nuclear morphology is crucial for detection and diagnosis of cancerous and precancerous conditions in many human tissues. The method was successfully applied to image precancerous regions of several tissues. Clinical studies in five organs (esophagus, colon, bladder, oral cavity, and uterine cervix) showed the generality and efficacy of the technique.

  5. Measuring cloud thermodynamic phase with shortwave infrared imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David R.; McCubbin, Ian; Gao, Bo Cai; Green, Robert O.; Matthews, Alyssa A.; Mei, Fan; Meyer, Kerry G.; Platnick, Steven; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason; Wilcox, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Shortwave Infrared imaging spectroscopy enables accurate remote mapping of cloud thermodynamic phase at high spatial resolution. We describe a measurement strategy to exploit signatures of liquid and ice absorption in cloud top apparent reflectance spectra from 1.4 to 1.8 μm. This signal is generally insensitive to confounding factors such as solar angles, view angles, and surface albedo. We first evaluate the approach in simulation and then apply it to airborne data acquired in the Calwater-2/ACAPEX campaign of Winter 2015. Here NASA's "Classic" Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-C) remotely observed diverse cloud formations while the U.S. Department of Energy ARM Aerial Facility G-1 aircraft measured cloud integral and microphysical properties in situ. The coincident measurements demonstrate good separation of the thermodynamic phases for relatively homogeneous clouds.

  6. Measuring cloud thermodynamic phase with shortwave infrared imaging spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California USA; McCubbin, Ian [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California USA; Desert Research Institute, Reno Nevada USA; Gao, Bo Cai [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington District of Columbia USA; Green, Robert O. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California USA; Matthews, Alyssa A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Mei, Fan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Meyer, Kerry G. [Goddard Earth Science Technology and Research, Universities Space Research Association, Columbia Maryland USA; NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenland Maryland USA; Platnick, Steven [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenland Maryland USA; Schmid, Beat [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Tomlinson, Jason [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Wilcox, Eric [Desert Research Institute, Reno Nevada USA

    2016-08-12

    Shortwave Infrared imaging spectroscopy enables accurate remote mapping of cloud thermodynamic phase at high spatial resolution. We describe a measurement strategy to exploit signatures of liquid and ice absorption in cloud top apparent reflectance spectra from 1.4 to 1.8 μm. This signal is generally insensitive to confounding factors such as solar angles, view angles, and surface albedo. We first evaluate the approach in simulation and then apply it to airborne data acquired in the Calwater-2/ACAPEX campaign of Winter 2015. Here NASA’s “Classic” Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-C) remotely observed diverse cloud formations while the U.S. Department of Energy ARM Aerial Facility G-1 aircraft measured cloud integral and microphysical properties in situ. Finally, the coincident measurements demonstrate good separation of the thermodynamic phases for relatively homogeneous clouds.

  7. Nondestructive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy using dielectric focusing probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hejase, Jose A.; Shane, Steven S.; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet [Terahertz Systems Laboratory (TeSLa) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    A tool for interrogating objects over a wide band of frequencies with subwavelength resolution at small standoff distances (near field region) in the transmission mode using a single source and detector measurement setup in the millimeter wave band is presented. The design utilizes optics like principles for guiding electromagnetic millimeter waves from large cross-sectional areas to considerably smaller sub-wavelength areas. While plano-convex lenses can be used to focus waves to a fine resolution, they usually require a large stand-off distance thus resulting in alignment and spacing issues. The design procedure and simulation analysis of the focusing probes are presented in this study along with experimental verification of performance and imaging and spectroscopy examples. Nondestructive evaluation will find benefit from such an apparatus including biological tissue imaging, electronic package integrity testing, composite dielectric structure evaluation for defects and microfluidic sensing.

  8. ROE Wet Sulfate Deposition Raster 2011-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet sulfate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 2011 to 2013. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  9. ROE Wet Sulfate Deposition Raster 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet sulfate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  10. LandSat-Based Land Use-Land Cover (Raster)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Raster-based land cover data set derived from 30 meter resolution Thematic Mapper satellite imagery. Classification is divided into 16 classes with source imagery...

  11. USGS 24k Digital Raster Graphic (DRG) Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Metadata for the scanned USGS 24k Topograpic Map Series (also known as 24k Digital Raster Graphic). Each scanned map is represented by a polygon in the layer and the...

  12. Fishing Revenue-Intensity Raster Database, 2007-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These revenue-intensity rasters were built as part of an effort to improve upon the spatial precision of self-reported Vessel Trip Report (VTR) fishing locations....

  13. Correlation of proton MR spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwan, Roy; Sijens, Paul E; Potze, Jan-Hendrik; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2005-10-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) provides indices of neuronal damage. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) relates to water diffusivity and fiber tract orientation. A method to compare (1)H-MRS and DTI findings was developed, tested on phantom and applied on normal brain. Point-resolved spectroscopy (T(R)/T(E)=1500/135) was used for chemical shift imaging of a supraventricular volume of interest of 8 x 8 x 2 cm(3) (64 voxels). In DTI, a segmental spin-echo sequence (T(R)/T(E)=5500/91) was used and slices were stacked to reproduce the slab used in MRS. The spatial distributions of choline and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) correlated to mean fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for the inner 6 x 6=36 voxels defined in MRS, most notably NAA and ADC value (r=-.70, P<.00001; correlation across four subjects, 144 data pairs). This is the first association of neuron metabolite contents in volunteers with structure as indicated by DTI.

  14. The Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicholas E.; Bookbinder, Jay; Petre, Robert; Smith, Randall; Ptak, Andrew; Tananbaum, Harvey; Garcia, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Following recommendations from the 2010 "New Worlds, New Horizons" (NWNH) report, the Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO) concept streamlines the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) mission to concentrate on the science objectives that are enabled by high-resolution spectroscopic capabilities. AXSIO will trace orbits close to the event horizon of black holes, measure black hole spin for tens of supermassive black holes (SMBH), use spectroscopy to characterize outflows and the environment of AGN during their peak activity, observe 5MBH out to redshift z=6, map bulk motions and turbulence in galaxy clusters, find the missing baryons in the cosmic web using background quasars, and observe the process of cosmic feedback where black holes and supernovae inject energy on galactic and intergalactic scales. These measurements are enabled by a 0.9 sq m collecting area at 1.25 keV, a micro calorimeter array providing high-resolution spectroscopic imaging and a deployable high efficiency grating spectrometer. AXSIO delivers a 30-fold increase in effective area for high resolution spectroscopy. The key simplifications are guided by recommendations in the NWNH panel report include a reduction in focal length from 20m to 10m, eliminating the extendable optical bench, and a reduction in the instrument complement from six to two, avoiding a movable instrument platform. A focus on spectroscopic science allows the spatial resolution requirement to be relaxed to 10 arc sec (with a 5 arc sec goal). These simplifications decrease the total mission cost to under the $2B cost to NASA recommended by NWNH. AXSIO will be available to the entire astronomical community with observing allocations based on peer-review.

  15. Broadband infrared imaging spectroscopy for standoff detection of trace explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendziora, Christopher A.; Furstenberg, Robert; Papantonakis, Michael; Nguyen, Viet; McGill, R. Andrew

    2016-05-01

    This manuscript describes advancements toward a mobile platform for standoff detection of trace explosives on relevant substrates using broadband infrared spectroscopic imaging. In conjunction with this, we are developing a technology for detection based on photo-thermal infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS). PT-IRIS leverages one or more IR quantum cascade lasers (QCL), tuned to strong absorption bands in the analytes and directed to illuminate an area on a surface of interest. An IR focal plane array is used to image the surface thermal emission upon laser illumination. The PT-IRIS signal is processed as a hyperspectral image cube comprised of spatial, spectral and temporal dimensions as vectors within a detection algorithm. Here we describe methods to increase both sensitivity to trace explosives and selectivity between different analyte types by exploiting a broader spectral range than in previous configurations. Previously we demonstrated PT-IRIS at several meters of standoff distance indoors and in field tests, while operating the lasers below the infrared eye-safe intensity limit (100 mW/cm2). Sensitivity to explosive traces as small as a single 10 μm diameter particle (~1 ng) has been demonstrated.

  16. Fast generation of multiple resolution instances of raster data sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arge, Lars; Haverkort, Herman; Tsirogiannis, Constantinos

    2012-01-01

    of this problem. Given a raster G of √N × √N cells we first consider the problem of computing for every 2 ≤ μ ≤ √N a raster Gμ of √N/μ × √N/μ cells such that each cell of Gμ stores the average of the values of μ×μ cells of G. We describe an algorithm that solves this problem in (N) time when the handled data fit...... in the main memory of the computer. We also provide two algorithms that solve this problem in external memory, that is when the input raster is larger than the main memory. The first external algorithm is very easy to implement and requires O(sort(N)) data block transfers from/to the external memory......In many GIS applications it is important to study the characteristics of a raster data set at multiple resolutions. Often this is done by generating several coarser resolution rasters from a fine resolution raster. In this paper we describe efficient algorithms for different variants...

  17. Raster Data Partitioning for Supporting Distributed GIS Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Thai, B.; Olasz, A.

    2015-08-01

    . A proof of concept implementation have been made for raster data partitioning, distribution and processing. The first results on performance have been compared against commercial software ERDAS IMAGINE 2011 and 2014. Partitioning methods heavily depend on application areas, therefore we may consider data partitioning as a preprocessing step before applying processing services on data. As a proof of concept we have implemented a simple tile-based partitioning method splitting an image into smaller grids (NxM tiles) and comparing the processing time to existing methods by NDVI calculation. The concept is demonstrated using own development open source processing framework.

  18. Formats and Network Protocols for Browser Access to 2D Raster Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, L.

    2015-12-01

    Tiled web maps in browsers are a major success story, forming the foundation of many current web applications. Enabling tiled data access is the next logical step, and is likely to meet with similar success. Many ad-hoc approaches have already started to appear, and something similar is explored within the Open Geospatial Consortium. One of the main obstacles in making browser data access a reality is the lack of a well-known data format. This obstacle also represents an opportunity to analyze the requirements and possible candidates, applying lessons learned from web tiled image services and protocols. Similar to the image counterpart, a web tile raster data format needs to have good intrinsic compression and be able to handle high byte count data types including floating point. An overview of a possible solution to the format problem, a 2D data raster compression algorithm called Limited Error Raster Compression (LERC) will be presented. In addition to the format, best practices for high request rate HTTP services also need to be followed. In particular, content delivery network (CDN) caching suitability needs to be part of any design, not an after-thought. Last but not least, HTML 5 browsers will certainly be part of any solution since they provide improved access to binary data, as well as more powerful ways to view and interact with the data in the browser. In a simple but relevant application, digital elevation model (DEM) raster data is served as LERC compressed data tiles which are used to generate terrain by a HTML5 scene viewer.

  19. Imaging FTS: A Different Approach to Integral Field Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Drissen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging Fourier transform spectroscopy (iFTS is a promising, although technically very challenging, option for wide-field hyperspectral imagery. We present in this paper an introduction to the iFTS concept and its advantages and drawbacks, as well as examples of data obtained with a prototype iFTS, SpIOMM, attached to the 1.6 m telescope of the Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic: emission line ratios in the spiral galaxy NGC 628 and absorption line indices in the giant elliptical M87. We conclude by introducing SpIOMM's successor, SITELLE, which will be installed at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope in 2014.

  20. Mineral Mapping with Imaging Spectroscopy: The Ray Mine, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Roger N.; Vance, J. Sam; Livo, K. Eric; Green, Robert O.

    1998-01-01

    Mineral maps generated for the Ray Mine, Arizona were analyzed to determine if imaging spectroscopy can provide accurate information for environmental management of active and abandoned mine regions. The Ray Mine, owned by the ASARCO Corporation, covers an area of 5700 acres and is situated in Pinal County, Arizona about 70 miles north of Tucson near Hayden, Arizona. This open-pit mine has been a major source of copper since 1911, producing an estimated 4.5 million tons of copper since its inception. Until 1955 mining was accomplished by underground block caving and shrinkage stope methods. (excavation by working in stepped series usually employed in a vertical or steeply inclined orebody) In 1955, the mine was completely converted to open pit method mining with the bulk of the production from sulfide ore using recovery by concentrating and smelting. Beginning in 1969 a significant production contribution has been from the leaching and solvent extraction-electrowinnowing method of silicate and oxide ores. Published reserves in the deposit as of 1992 are 1.1 billion tons at 0.6 percent copper. The Environmental Protection Agency, in conjunction with ASARCO, and NASA/JPL obtained AVIRIS data over the mine in 1997 as part of the EPA Advanced Measurement Initiative (AMI) (Tom Mace, Principal Investigator). This AVIRIS data set is being used to compare and contrast the accuracy and environmental monitoring capabilities of remote sensing technologies: visible-near-IR imaging spectroscopy, multispectral visible and, near-IR sensors, thermal instruments, and radar platforms. The goal of this effort is to determine if these various technologies provide useful information for envirorunental management of active and abandoned mine sites in the arid western United States. This paper focuses on the analysis of AVIRIS data for assessing the impact of the Ray Mine on Mineral Creek. Mineral Creek flows to the Gila River. This paper discusses our preliminary AVIRIS mineral mapping

  1. Commercial perspective in THz spectroscopy, sensing and imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyé, Clémentine; Taoudi, Sarah; Cochard, Jacques; d'Humières, Benoît

    2017-02-01

    For their ability to be transmitted by materials opaque in the visible and IR ranges (clothes, plastic, …), for being non-ionizing, for providing sub-mm resolution imaging, for the specific signatures of numerous materials, Terahertz waves - ranging from 200 GHz to 10 THz - have been raising the interest of industrials for about fifteen years. This study focuses on the penetration of THz technologies into the industrial applications driving the THz market growth at short and long term: Non Destructive testing (NDT), Defense and Security, Biomedical. For 15 years, Terahertz technologies have been continuously tested on a wide variety of applications. Thanks to these ongoing feasibility studies, manufacturers and end-users gained a deeper knowledge about the abilities and the limitations of the different Terahertz systems (Time-Domain spectroscopy, Frequency-Domain spectroscopy, Time-Domain reflectometry, etc). The demand from end-users is more qualified and is segmented as follows: 1. Detection of objects and defects on large areas 2. Thickness measurement on large areas 3. Chemical and Structural characterization of small objects and defects on small areas (2D) or volumes (3D) Each of these 3 functions leads to a specific family of THz systems with distinct requirements in terms of performance and cost: 1. Detection: cheap and compact imaging systems. 2. Thickness measurement: cost-effective and high speed systems. 3. Characterization: high resolution, high reliability and real-time sensing systems. This article will present the existing and incoming THz systems and components addressing each function. Terahertz technologies are currently finding their place on the market, outside research and scientific applications. The objective of this article is to identify the industrial applications where THz techniques will be adopted and to provide market growth perspectives.

  2. SOLARNET & LAIME: Imaging & Spectroscopy in the Far Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damé, Luc; Koutchmy, Serge

    SOLARNET is a medium size high resolution solar physics mission proposed to CNES and ESA for a new start in 2007 and a possible launch in 2012 (CNES) or later (ESA Cosmic Vision framework: 2015-2016). Partnerships with India and China are under discussion, and several European contributions are considered. At the center of the SOLARNET mission is a 3-telescope interferometer of 1 meter baseline capable to provide 40 times the best ever spatial resolution achieved in Space with previous, current or even planned solar missions: 20 mas - 20 km on the Sun in the FUV. The interferometer is associated to an on-axis Subtractive Double Monochromator coupled to an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer capable of high spectral (0.01 nm) and high temporal resolutions (50 ms) on a field of view of 40 arcsec and covering the FUV and UV spectral domains (from 117.5 to 400 nm). This will allow to access process scales of magnetic reconnection, dissipation, emerging flux and much more, from the chromosphere to the low corona with emphasis on the transition zone where the magnetic confinement is expected to be maximum. A whole new chapter of the physics of solar magnetic field structuring, evolution and mapping from the photosphere to the high atmosphere will be opened. The interferometer is completed by instruments providing larger field of view and higher temperature (EUV-XUV coronal imaging & spectroscopy) to define the context and extension of the solar phenomena. The 3-telescope interferometer design results of an extensive laboratory demonstration program of interferometric imaging of extended objects. We will review the scientific program of SOLARNET, describe the interferometer concept and design, present the results of the breadboard and give a short overview of the mission aspects. In a different category, LAIME, the Lyman Alpha Imaging-Monitor Experiment, is a remarkably simple (no mechanisms) and compact full Sun imager to be flown with TESIS on the CORONAS

  3. A program for handling map projections of small-scale geospatial raster data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Michael P.; Steinwand, Daniel R.; Trent, Jason R.; Buehler, Robert A.; Mattli, David M.; Yamamoto, Kristina H.

    2012-01-01

    Scientists routinely accomplish small-scale geospatial modeling using raster datasets of global extent. Such use often requires the projection of global raster datasets onto a map or the reprojection from a given map projection associated with a dataset. The distortion characteristics of these projection transformations can have significant effects on modeling results. Distortions associated with the reprojection of global data are generally greater than distortions associated with reprojections of larger-scale, localized areas. The accuracy of areas in projected raster datasets of global extent is dependent on spatial resolution. To address these problems of projection and the associated resampling that accompanies it, methods for framing the transformation space, direct point-to-point transformations rather than gridded transformation spaces, a solution to the wrap-around problem, and an approach to alternative resampling methods are presented. The implementations of these methods are provided in an open-source software package called MapImage (or mapIMG, for short), which is designed to function on a variety of computer architectures.

  4. Raster-scanning serial protein crystallography using micro- and nano-focused synchrotron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coquelle, Nicolas [Université Grenoble Alpes, IBS, 38044 Grenoble (France); CNRS, IBS, 38044 Grenoble (France); CEA, IBS, 38044 Grenoble (France); Brewster, Aaron S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kapp, Ulrike; Shilova, Anastasya; Weinhausen, Britta [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Burghammer, Manfred, E-mail: burgham@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Ghent University, Ghent B-9000 (Belgium); Colletier, Jacques-Philippe, E-mail: burgham@esrf.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, IBS, 38044 Grenoble (France); CNRS, IBS, 38044 Grenoble (France); CEA, IBS, 38044 Grenoble (France)

    2015-05-01

    A raster scanning serial protein crystallography approach is presented, that consumes as low ∼200–700 nl of sedimented crystals. New serial data pre-analysis software, NanoPeakCell, is introduced. High-resolution structural information was obtained from lysozyme microcrystals (20 µm in the largest dimension) using raster-scanning serial protein crystallography on micro- and nano-focused beamlines at the ESRF. Data were collected at room temperature (RT) from crystals sandwiched between two silicon nitride wafers, thereby preventing their drying, while limiting background scattering and sample consumption. In order to identify crystal hits, new multi-processing and GUI-driven Python-based pre-analysis software was developed, named NanoPeakCell, that was able to read data from a variety of crystallographic image formats. Further data processing was carried out using CrystFEL, and the resultant structures were refined to 1.7 Å resolution. The data demonstrate the feasibility of RT raster-scanning serial micro- and nano-protein crystallography at synchrotrons and validate it as an alternative approach for the collection of high-resolution structural data from micro-sized crystals. Advantages of the proposed approach are its thriftiness, its handling-free nature, the reduced amount of sample required, the adjustable hit rate, the high indexing rate and the minimization of background scattering.

  5. Thermoacoustic imaging and spectroscopy for enhanced cancer diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Daniel Ryan

    in vivo with a signal-to-noise ratio of greater than 25 dB. This technique has great potential for improved early cancer detection and individualized cancer treatment through advanced pharmacokinetic monitoring of therapeutic agents. Finally, the fourth chapter presents significant improvements made to enhance breast cancer detection with thermoacoustic (TA) imaging. In a breast cancer simulating phantom, the initial demonstration of TA spectroscopy (TAS) is used to detect and discriminate relative water / fat composition based solely on the sample's intrinsic spectral absorption. The slope of the TA signal was highly correlated with that of the absorption coefficient (R 2 = 0.98, p enhance the magnitude of the TA signal (8 dB larger than water), and also demonstrate unique absorption spectra. Finally, short microwave pulses (Δt ≥ 10 ns) are achieved through novel microwave hardware, and used to generate high-frequency TA signals. In conclusion, this section presents advancements made to the sensitivity, contrast, and resolution of TA imaging. Overall, this dissertation presents enhancements made to the diagnostic capabilities of PA and TA imaging for improved detection and characterization of cancer.

  6. OPTIMIZATION OF RADIATION PROTECTION BY ELIMINATING WEEDS OUT RASTER DIGITAL RADIOGRAPHY OF THE CHEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Kamyshanskaja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of the possibility of eliminating the raster digital radiography. On stationary digital x-ray machine produced 117 x-ray images of the test object and x-rays of the chest cavity with the gridand without him several patients-volunteers. Proven ability to eliminate grid digital radiography by digital processing of images, made without the grid that reduces dose radiation exposure of the patient more than in 3 times. «Virtual» grids enough improve the diagnostic quality of the photo to eliminate the pathology.

  7. RAMAN spectroscopy imaging improves the diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Julietta V.; Graziani, Valerio; Fosca, Marco; Taffon, Chiara; Rocchia, Massimiliano; Crucitti, Pierfilippo; Pozzilli, Paolo; Onetti Muda, Andrea; Caricato, Marco; Crescenzi, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Recent investigations strongly suggest that Raman spectroscopy (RS) can be used as a clinical tool in cancer diagnosis to improve diagnostic accuracy. In this study, we evaluated the efficiency of Raman imaging microscopy to discriminate between healthy and neoplastic thyroid tissue, by analyzing main variants of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (PTC), the most common type of thyroid cancer. We performed Raman imaging of large tissue areas (from 100 × 100 μm2 up to 1 × 1 mm2), collecting 38 maps containing about 9000 Raman spectra. Multivariate statistical methods, including Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), were applied to translate Raman spectra differences between healthy and PTC tissues into diagnostically useful information for a reliable tissue classification. Our study is the first demonstration of specific biochemical features of the PTC profile, characterized by significant presence of carotenoids with respect to the healthy tissue. Moreover, this is the first evidence of Raman spectra differentiation between classical and follicular variant of PTC, discriminated by LDA with high efficiency. The combined histological and Raman microscopy analyses allow clear-cut integration of morphological and biochemical observations, with dramatic improvement of efficiency and reliability in the differential diagnosis of neoplastic thyroid nodules, paving the way to integrative findings for tumorigenesis and novel therapeutic strategies.

  8. RAMAN spectroscopy imaging improves the diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Julietta V.; Graziani, Valerio; Fosca, Marco; Taffon, Chiara; Rocchia, Massimiliano; Crucitti, Pierfilippo; Pozzilli, Paolo; Onetti Muda, Andrea; Caricato, Marco; Crescenzi, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent investigations strongly suggest that Raman spectroscopy (RS) can be used as a clinical tool in cancer diagnosis to improve diagnostic accuracy. In this study, we evaluated the efficiency of Raman imaging microscopy to discriminate between healthy and neoplastic thyroid tissue, by analyzing main variants of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (PTC), the most common type of thyroid cancer. We performed Raman imaging of large tissue areas (from 100 × 100 μm2 up to 1 × 1 mm2), collecting 38 maps containing about 9000 Raman spectra. Multivariate statistical methods, including Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), were applied to translate Raman spectra differences between healthy and PTC tissues into diagnostically useful information for a reliable tissue classification. Our study is the first demonstration of specific biochemical features of the PTC profile, characterized by significant presence of carotenoids with respect to the healthy tissue. Moreover, this is the first evidence of Raman spectra differentiation between classical and follicular variant of PTC, discriminated by LDA with high efficiency. The combined histological and Raman microscopy analyses allow clear-cut integration of morphological and biochemical observations, with dramatic improvement of efficiency and reliability in the differential diagnosis of neoplastic thyroid nodules, paving the way to integrative findings for tumorigenesis and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27725756

  9. Using imaging spectroscopy to map acidic mine waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swayze, G.A.; Smith, K.S.; Clark, R.N.; Sutley, S.J.; Pearson, R.M.; Vance, J.S.; Hageman, P.L.; Briggs, P.H.; Meier, A.L.; Singleton, M.J.; Roth, S.

    2000-01-01

    The process of pyrite oxidation at the surface of mine waste may produce acidic water that is gradually neutralized as it drains away from the waste, depositing different Fe-bearing secondary minerals in roughly concentric zones that emanate from mine-waste piles. These Fe-bearing minerals are indicators of the geochemical conditions under which they form. Airborne and orbital imaging spectrometers can be used to map these mineral zones because each of these Fe-bearing secondary minerals is spectrally unique. In this way, imaging spectroscopy can be used to rapidly screen entire mining districts for potential sources of surface acid drainage and to detect acid producing minerals in mine waste or unmined rock outcrops. Spectral data from the AVIRIS instrument were used to evaluate mine waste at the California Gulch Superfund Site near Leadville, CO. Laboratory leach tests of surface samples show that leachate pH is most acidic and metals most mobile in samples from the inner jarosite zone and that leachate pH is near-neutral and metals least mobile in samples from the outer goethite zone.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy at ultra high fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuberger, Thomas

    2009-06-23

    The goal of the work presented in this thesis was to explore the possibilities and limitations of MRI / MRS using an ultra high field of 17.6 tesla. A broad range of specific applications and MR methods, from MRI to MRSI and MRS were investigated. The main foci were on sodium magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of rodents, magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the mouse brain, and the detection of small amounts of iron labeled stem cells in the rat brain using MRI Sodium spectroscopic imaging was explored since it benefits tremendously from the high magnetic field. Due to the intrinsically low signal in vivo, originating from the low concentrations and short transverse relaxation times, only limited results have been achieved by other researchers until now. Results in the literature include studies conducted on large animals such as dogs to animals as small as rats. No studies performed on mice have been reported, despite the fact that the mouse is the most important laboratory animal due to the ready availability of transgenic strains. Hence, this study concentrated on sodium MRSI of small rodents, mostly mice (brain, heart, and kidney), and in the case of the brain on young rats. The second part of this work concentrated on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the rodent brain. Due to the high magnetic field strength not only the increasing signal but also the extended spectral resolution was advantageous for such kind of studies. The difficulties/limitations of ultra high field MRS were also investigated. In the last part of the presented work detection limits of iron labeled stem cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging were explored. The studies provided very useful benchmarks for future researchers in terms of the number of labeled stem cells that are required for high-field MRI studies. Overall this work has shown many of the benefits and the areas that need special attention of ultra high fields in MR. Three topics in MRI, MRS and MRSI were

  11. TOPOLOGICAL STRUCTURING OF RASTER-SCANNED LINE MAP DATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegeas, Robin G.; Pearsall, Richard A.

    1984-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey has a requirement for the collection of large amounts of digital map data from existing graphic map separates. Prototype production techniques have been developed to capture line data from the map separates using a raster-scanning input device. After minimal editing in raster form, the data are converted to 'unstructured' vector form. In order to be processed further, the line data must be topologically structured (nodes identified and start-node, end-node, area-left, and area-right tags associated with each line-segment chain). This paper describes the techniques which have been developed at the U. S. Geological Survey to topologically structure the raster-scanned line map data.

  12. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy: ushering in a new age of enlightenment for cellular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, David M; Ross, Justin A; Albanesi, Joseph P

    2009-09-01

    Originally developed for applications in physics and physical chemistry, fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy is becoming widely used in cell biology. This review traces the development of the method and describes some of the more important applications. Specifically, the methods discussed include fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), scanning FCS, dual color cross-correlation FCS, the photon counting histogram and fluorescence intensity distribution analysis approaches, the raster scanning image correlation spectroscopy method, and the Number and Brightness technique. The physical principles underlying these approaches will be delineated, and each of the methods will be illustrated using examples from the literature.

  13. Discovering Hidden Painted Images: Subsurface Imaging Using Microscale Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botteon, Alessandra; Conti, Claudia; Realini, Marco; Colombo, Chiara; Matousek, Pavel

    2017-01-03

    We demonstrate for the first time the mapping capability of micro-spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (micro-SORS). The technique enables to form noninvasive images of thin sublayers through highly turbid overlayers. The approach is conceptually demonstrated on recovering overpainted images in situations where conventional Raman microscopy was unable to visualize the sublayer. The specimens mimic real situations encountered in Cultural Heritage that deal, for example, with hidden paintings vandalized with graffiti or covered by superimposed painted layers or whitewash. Additionally, using a letter as a hidden image, we demonstrated the micro-SORS potential to reconstruct also a hidden writing covered, for example, with paper sheets that cannot be easily removed. Potential applications could also include other disciplines such as polymers, biological, catalytic, and forensic sciences where thin, highly turbid layers mask chemically distinct subsurface structures.

  14. Impact Assessment of Large Scale Floods Using Imaging Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, D.; Goodwell, A. E.; Umar, M.; Greenberg, J.; Kumar, P.; Darmody, R.; Garvey, J. E.; Jacobson, R. B.; Berretta, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Lower Mississippi River experienced an extreme flood event during April-May 2011 due to springtime snowmelt and excessive rainfall. In order to protect the city of Cairo the US Army Corps of Engineers breached a two mile long levee on the Birds Point New Madrid (BPNM) floodway inundating about 527 sq. kms of farmland. The entire operation was coordinated with a number of data collection activities in terms of stage and discharge measurements at inflow and outflow points and various other locations in the floodway. Subsequently LiDAR, Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) flights and soil sample were collected after the floodwaters receded. IKONOS and Worldview 2 images show large plumes of sediments originating in the O'Bryan's ridge of the BPNM floodway and extending to more than 20 km downstream. We postulate imaging spectroscopy will enable us to identify various surface constituents and help us in characterizing a flooding event of such a large spatial extent in extensive detail. This has not been explored before. In this study we have used AVIRIS remote sensing data to explore and quantify the landscape characteristics of the floodway using different indices and spectral signatures of materials. Atmospherically corrected surface reflectance values were obtained from the AVIRIS at sensor radiance values using ATCOR 4 incorporating the MODTRAN radiative transfer model. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and moisture stress index values computed from the AVIRIS data shows strong signals of high moisture stress and very low NDVI values in the zones of heavy scouring such as O Bryan's ridge and it is possible to spatially map those locations even in absence of topographic data. This is further substantiated by the available post flood topographic LiDAR data. Laboratory physical and chemical characterization of soil samples and their GIS analyses indicate soils most vulnerable to erosion were along a straight flow path from the

  15. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging characteristics of cerebral Blastomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay A Vachhani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blastomycosis is a dimorphic fungus that is endemic to the midwest and southwestern United States. Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS is thought to only represent 5-10% of cases of disseminated Blastomycosis. Case Description: A 54-year-old Caucasian female presented to the Neurosurgery service with a 1-day history of progressive right sided hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated a 2 × 4 cm heterogeneous intracranial mass lesion involving the left motor cortex and extending into the ipsilateral parietal lobe. Single-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS over the enhancing area demonstrated diminished N-acetyl aspartate (NAA to creatine ratio (1.10, normal choline to NAA ratio (0.82, normal choline to creatine ratio (0.9, and a diminished myoinositol to creatine ratio (0.39. There appeared to be peaks between 3.6 and 3.8 ppm over the enhancing area that were not present in the contralateral normal brain and thought to represent a "trehalose" peak. Due to worsening symptoms and uncertain preoperative diagnosis, the patient underwent a left fronto-parietal craniotomy for open surgical biopsy with possible resection approximately one month after presentation. Pathological analysis confirmed the diagnosis of Blastomycosis. Conclusion: We present the second documented case of intracranial Blastomycosis with MRS imaging. There appears to be a characteristic peak between 3.6 and 3.8 ppm that is thought to represent a "trehalose" peak. This peak is rather specific to fungi and can be helpful in differentiating fungal abscesses from pyogenic abscesses and malignant neoplasms.

  16. Lacunarity analysis of raster datasets and 1D, 2D, and 3D point patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Pinliang

    2009-10-01

    Spatial scale plays an important role in many fields. As a scale-dependent measure for spatial heterogeneity, lacunarity describes the distribution of gaps within a set at multiple scales. In Earth science, environmental science, and ecology, lacunarity has been increasingly used for multiscale modeling of spatial patterns. This paper presents the development and implementation of a geographic information system (GIS) software extension for lacunarity analysis of raster datasets and 1D, 2D, and 3D point patterns. Depending on the application requirement, lacunarity analysis can be performed in two modes: global mode or local mode. The extension works for: (1) binary (1-bit) and grey-scale datasets in any raster format supported by ArcGIS and (2) 1D, 2D, and 3D point datasets as shapefiles or geodatabase feature classes. For more effective measurement of lacunarity for different patterns or processes in raster datasets, the extension allows users to define an area of interest (AOI) in four different ways, including using a polygon in an existing feature layer. Additionally, directionality can be taken into account when grey-scale datasets are used for local lacunarity analysis. The methodology and graphical user interface (GUI) are described. The application of the extension is demonstrated using both simulated and real datasets, including Brodatz texture images, a Spaceborne Imaging Radar (SIR-C) image, simulated 1D points on a drainage network, and 3D random and clustered point patterns. The options of lacunarity analysis and the effects of polyline arrangement on lacunarity of 1D points are also discussed. Results from sample data suggest that the lacunarity analysis extension can be used for efficient modeling of spatial patterns at multiple scales.

  17. GRIPS - Gamma-Ray Imaging, Polarimetry and Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Greiner, J; Aharonian, F; Ajello, M; Balasz, L G; Barbiellini, G; Bellazzini, R; Bishop, S; Bisnovatij-Kogan, G S; Boggs, S; Bykov, A; DiCocco, G; Diehl, R; Elsässer, D; Foley, S; Fransson, C; Gehrels, N; Hanlon, L; Hartmann, D; Hermsen, W; Hillebrandt, W; Hudec, R; Iyudin, A; Jose, J; Kadler, M; Kanbach, G; Klamra, W; Kiener, J; Klose, S; Kreykenbohm, I; Kuiper, L M; Kylafis, N; Labanti, C; Langanke, K; Langer, N; Larsson, S; Leibundgut, B; Laux, U; Longo, F; Maeda, K; Marcinkowski, R; Marisaldi, M; McBreen, B; McBreen, S; Meszaros, A; Nomoto, K; Pearce, M; Peer, A; Pian, E; Prantzos, N; Raffelt, G; Reimer, O; Rhode, W; Ryde, F; Schmidt, C; Silk, J; Shustov, B M; Strong, A; Tanvir, N; Thielemann, F -K; Tibolla, O; Tierney, D; Trümper, J; Varshalovich, D A; Wilms, J; Wrochna, G; Zdziarski, A; Zoglauer, A

    2011-01-01

    We propose to perform a continuously scanning all-sky survey from 200 keV to 80 MeV achieving a sensitivity which is better by a factor of 40 or more compared to the previous missions in this energy range. The Gamma-Ray Imaging, Polarimetry and Spectroscopy (GRIPS) mission addresses fundamental questions in ESA's Cosmic Vision plan. Among the major themes of the strategic plan, GRIPS has its focus on the evolving, violent Universe, exploring a unique energy window. We propose to investigate $\\gamma$-ray bursts and blazars, the mechanisms behind supernova explosions, nucleosynthesis and spallation, the enigmatic origin of positrons in our Galaxy, and the nature of radiation processes and particle acceleration in extreme cosmic sources including pulsars and magnetars. The natural energy scale for these non-thermal processes is of the order of MeV. Although they can be partially and indirectly studied using other methods, only the proposed GRIPS measurements will provide direct access to their primary photons. G...

  18. Mapping potentialy asbestos-bearing rocks using imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swayze, G.A.; Kokaly, R.F.; Higgins, C.T.; Clinkenbeard, J.P.; Clark, R.N.; Lowers, H.A.; Sutley, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Rock and soil that may contain naturally occurring asbestos (NOA), a known human carcinogen, were mapped in the Sierra Nevada, California, using the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) to determine if these materials could be uniquely identified with spectroscopy. Such information can be used to prepare or refine maps of areas that may contain minerals that can be asbestiform, such as serpentine and tremolite-actinolite, which were the focus of this study. Although thick vegetation can conceal underlying rock and soil, use of linear-mixture spectra calculated from spectra of dry grass and serpentine allowed detection of serpentine in some parts of the study area with up to ???80% dry-grass cover. Chaparral vegetation, which was dominantly, but not exclusively, found in areas underlain by serpentinized ultramafic rocks, was also mapped. Overall, field checking at 201 sites indicated highly accurate identification by AVIRIS of mineral (94%) and vegetation (89%) categories. Practical applications of AVIRIS to mapping areas that may contain NOA include locating roads that are surfaced with serpentine aggregate, identifying sites that may require enhanced dust control or other safety measures, and filling gaps in geologic mapping where field access is limited. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  19. Development of Imaging Fourier-Transform Spectroscopy for the Characterization of Turbulent Jet Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-18

    DEVELOPMENT OF IMAGING FOURIER -TRANSFORM SPECTROSCOPY FOR THE CHARACTERIZATION OF TURBULENT JET FLAMES DISSERTATION Jacob L. Harley, Captain, USAF...work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENP-DS-14-S-13 DEVELOPMENT OF IMAGING FOURIER -TRANSFORM...DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT-ENP-DS-14-S-13 DEVELOPMENT OF IMAGING FOURIER -TRANSFORM SPECTROSCOPY FOR THE CHARACTERIZATION OF TURBULENT JET FLAMES Jacob L

  20. Raster was Yesterday : Using Vector Engines to Process Geophysical Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Armin; Tsetskhladze, Gocha

    2013-01-01

    Tools for the processing of raster data are well developed, but noisy data still pose considerable challenges. If anomalies are broken up into isolated individual readings, for example due to high noise levels, it may still be possible for a human interpreter to recognize the isolated readings as be

  1. IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY AND LIGHT DETECTION AND RANGING DATA FUSION FOR URBAN FEATURES EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Idrees

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents our findings on the fusion of Imaging Spectroscopy (IS and LiDAR data for urban feature extraction. We carried out necessary preprocessing of the hyperspectral image. Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF transforms was used for ordering hyperspectral bands according to their noise. Thereafter, we employed Optimum Index Factor (OIF to statistically select the three most appropriate bands combination from MNF result. The composite image was classified using unsupervised classification (k-mean algorithm and the accuracy of the classification assessed. Digital Surface Model (DSM and LiDAR intensity were generated from the LiDAR point cloud. The LiDAR intensity was filtered to remove the noise. Hue Saturation Intensity (HSI fusion algorithm was used to fuse the imaging spectroscopy and DSM as well as imaging spectroscopy and filtered intensity. The fusion of imaging spectroscopy and DSM was found to be better than that of imaging spectroscopy and LiDAR intensity quantitatively. The three datasets (imaging spectrocopy, DSM and Lidar intensity fused data were classified into four classes: building, pavement, trees and grass using unsupervised classification and the accuracy of the classification assessed. The result of the study shows that fusion of imaging spectroscopy and LiDAR data improved the visual identification of surface features. Also, the classification accuracy improved from an overall accuracy of 84.6% for the imaging spectroscopy data to 90.2% for the DSM fused data. Similarly, the Kappa Coefficient increased from 0.71 to 0.82. on the other hand, classification of the fused LiDAR intensity and imaging spectroscopy data perform poorly quantitatively with overall accuracy of 27.8% and kappa coefficient of 0.0988.

  2. A novel fast-neutron detector concept for energy-selective imaging and imaging spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortesi, M.; Prasser, H.-M. [Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI 5234 (Switzerland); Mechanical Engineering Department, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich 8092 (Switzerland); Dangendorf, V. [Ion and Neutron Radiation Department, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig 38116 (Germany); Zboray, R. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich 8092 (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    We present and discuss the operational principle of a new fast-neutron detector concept suitable for either energy-selective imaging or for imaging spectroscopy. The detector is comprised of a series of energy-selective stacks of converter foils immersed in a noble-gas based mixture, coupled to a position-sensitive charge readout. Each foil in the various stacks is made of two layers of different thicknesses, fastened together: a hydrogen-rich (plastic) layer for neutron-to-proton conversion, and a hydrogen-free coating to selectively stop/absorb the recoil protons below a certain energy cut-off. The neutron-induced recoil protons, that escape the converter foils, release ionization electrons in the gas gaps between consecutive foils. The electrons are then drifted towards and localized by a position-sensitive charge amplification and readout stage. Comparison of the images detected by stacks with different energy cut-offs allows energy-selective imaging. Neutron energy spectrometry is realized by analyzing the responses of a sufficient large number of stacks of different energy response and unfolding techniques. In this paper, we present the results of computer simulation studies and discuss the expected performance of the new detector concept. Potential applications in various fields are also briefly discussed, in particularly, the application of energy-selective fast-neutron imaging for nuclear safeguards application, with the aim of determining the plutonium content in Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels.

  3. Estimating Prediction Uncertainty from Geographical Information System Raster Processing: A User's Manual for the Raster Error Propagation Tool (REPTool)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurdak, Jason J.; Qi, Sharon L.; Geisler, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Raster Error Propagation Tool (REPTool) is a custom tool for use with the Environmental System Research Institute (ESRI) ArcGIS Desktop application to estimate error propagation and prediction uncertainty in raster processing operations and geospatial modeling. REPTool is designed to introduce concepts of error and uncertainty in geospatial data and modeling and provide users of ArcGIS Desktop a geoprocessing tool and methodology to consider how error affects geospatial model output. Similar to other geoprocessing tools available in ArcGIS Desktop, REPTool can be run from a dialog window, from the ArcMap command line, or from a Python script. REPTool consists of public-domain, Python-based packages that implement Latin Hypercube Sampling within a probabilistic framework to track error propagation in geospatial models and quantitatively estimate the uncertainty of the model output. Users may specify error for each input raster or model coefficient represented in the geospatial model. The error for the input rasters may be specified as either spatially invariant or spatially variable across the spatial domain. Users may specify model output as a distribution of uncertainty for each raster cell. REPTool uses the Relative Variance Contribution method to quantify the relative error contribution from the two primary components in the geospatial model - errors in the model input data and coefficients of the model variables. REPTool is appropriate for many types of geospatial processing operations, modeling applications, and related research questions, including applications that consider spatially invariant or spatially variable error in geospatial data.

  4. Food Safety Evaluation Based on Near Infrared Spectroscopy and Imaging: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaping; Ying, Yibin

    2016-08-17

    In recent years, due to the increasing consciousness of food safety and human health, much progress has been made in developing rapid and nondestructive techniques for the evaluation of food hazards, food authentication, and traceability. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and imaging techniques have gained wide acceptance in many fields because of their advantages over other analytical techniques. Following a brief introduction of NIR spectroscopy and imaging basics, this review mainly focuses on recent NIR spectroscopy and imaging applications for food safety evaluation, including (1) chemical hazards detection; (2) microbiological hazards detection; (3) physical hazards detection; (4) new technology-induced food safety concerns; and (5) food traceability. The review shows NIR spectroscopy and imaging to be effective tools that will play indispensable roles for food safety evaluation. In addition, on-line/real-time applications of these techniques promise to be a huge growth field in the near future.

  5. US Participation in the Solar Orbiter Multi Element Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy (METIS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Multi Element Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy, METIS, investigation has been conceived to perform off-limb and near-Sun coronagraphy and is motivated by...

  6. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Compact Micro-Imaging Spectrometer (CMIS): Investigation of Imaging Spectroscopy and Its Application to Mars Geology and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staten, Paul W.

    2005-01-01

    Future missions to Mars will attempt to answer questions about Mars' geological and biological history. The goal of the CMIS project is to design, construct, and test a capable, multi-spectral micro-imaging spectrometer use in such missions. A breadboard instrument has been constructed with a micro-imaging camera and Several multi-wavelength LED illumination rings. Test samples have been chosen for their interest to spectroscopists, geologists and astrobiologists. Preliminary analysis has demonstrated the advantages of isotropic illumination and micro-imaging spectroscopy over spot spectroscopy.

  8. Imaging charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the TEXTOR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J [Plasma Research Laboratory, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Jaspers, R [Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lischtschenko, O; Delabie, E [FOM Institute for Plasma Physics ' Rijnhuizen' , Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Chung, J [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    We describe the application of a simple spatial-heterodyne coherence-imaging filter for 2D Doppler imaging of charge exchange recombination (CXR) emission from a heating beam in the TEXTOR tokamak. Results obtained by the CXR imaging system are found to be consistent with measurements obtained using a standard multi-channel spectrometer-based system. We describe the system, indicate possible enhancements and future applications for imaging CXRS.

  9. Imaging charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the TEXTOR tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J.; Jaspers, R.; Lischtschenko, O.; Delabie, E.; Chung, J.

    2010-12-01

    We describe the application of a simple spatial-heterodyne coherence-imaging filter for 2D Doppler imaging of charge exchange recombination (CXR) emission from a heating beam in the TEXTOR tokamak. Results obtained by the CXR imaging system are found to be consistent with measurements obtained using a standard multi-channel spectrometer-based system. We describe the system, indicate possible enhancements and future applications for imaging CXRS.

  10. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  11. Method of Storing Raster Image in Run Lengths Having Variable Numbers of Bytes and Medium with Raster Image Thus Stored

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The invention implements a run-length file format with improved space-sav qualities. The file starts with a header in ASCII format and includes information such as...

  12. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  13. Raster-scanning serial protein crystallography using micro- and nano-focused synchrotron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquelle, Nicolas; Brewster, Aaron S; Kapp, Ulrike; Shilova, Anastasya; Weinhausen, Britta; Burghammer, Manfred; Colletier, Jacques Philippe

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution structural information was obtained from lysozyme microcrystals (20 µm in the largest dimension) using raster-scanning serial protein crystallography on micro- and nano-focused beamlines at the ESRF. Data were collected at room temperature (RT) from crystals sandwiched between two silicon nitride wafers, thereby preventing their drying, while limiting background scattering and sample consumption. In order to identify crystal hits, new multi-processing and GUI-driven Python-based pre-analysis software was developed, named NanoPeakCell, that was able to read data from a variety of crystallographic image formats. Further data processing was carried out using CrystFEL, and the resultant structures were refined to 1.7 Å resolution. The data demonstrate the feasibility of RT raster-scanning serial micro- and nano-protein crystallography at synchrotrons and validate it as an alternative approach for the collection of high-resolution structural data from micro-sized crystals. Advantages of the proposed approach are its thriftiness, its handling-free nature, the reduced amount of sample required, the adjustable hit rate, the high indexing rate and the minimization of background scattering.

  14. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and imaging of artificial RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Bernd M.; Hoffmann, Matthias; Helm, Hanspeter

    2005-01-01

    We use terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to measure the far-infrared dielectric function of two artificial RNA single strands, composed of polyadenylic acid (poly-A) and polycytidylic acid (poly-C). We find a significant difference in the absorption between the two types of RNA strands...... in the absorption spectra....

  15. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and imaging of artificial RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Bernd M.; Hoffmann, Matthias; Helm, Hanspeter

    2005-01-01

    We use terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to measure the far-infrared dielectric function of two artificial RNA single strands, composed of polyadenylic acid (poly-A) and polycytidylic acid (poly-C). We find a significant difference in the absorption between the two types of RNA strands...

  16. BOREAS TGB-5 Fire History of Manitoba 1980 to 1991 in Raster Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, Brian J.; Zepp, Richard; Knapp, David; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Trace Gas Biogeochemistry (BOREAS TGB-5) team collected several data sets related to the effects of fire on the exchange of trace gases between the surface and the atmosphere. This raster format data set covers the province of Manitoba between 1980 and 1991. The data were gridded into the Albers Equal-Area Conic (AEAC) projection from the original vector data. The original vector data were produced by Forestry Canada from hand-drawn boundaries of fires on photocopies of 1:250,000-scale maps. The locational accuracy of the data is considered fair to poor. When the locations of some fire boundaries were compared to Landsat TM images, they were found to be off by as much as a few kilometers. This problem should be kept in mind when using these data. The data are stored in binary, image format files.

  17. High precision, medium flux rate CZT spectroscopy for coherent scatter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Joel A.; Hassan, Mehadi; Brady, David J.; Iniewski, Kris

    2016-05-01

    CZT detectors are primary candidates for many next-generation X-ray imaging systems. These detectors are typically operated in either a high precision, low flux spectroscopy mode or a low precision, high flux photon counting mode. We demonstrate a new detector configuration that enables operation in a high precision, medium flux spectroscopy mode, which opens the potential for a variety of new applications in medical imaging, non-destructive testing and baggage scanning. In particular, we describe the requirements of a coded aperture coherent scattering X-ray system that can perform fast imaging with accurate material discrimination.

  18. Medulloblastoma: correlation among findings of conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonte, Mariana Vieira de Melo da; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia; Lucato, Leandro Tavares; Reed, Umbertina Conti; Leite, Claudia da Costa [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Inst. de Radiologia]. E-mail: mvmfonte@uol.com.br; Costa, Maria Olivia Rodrigues; Amaral, Raquel Portugal Guimaraes [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Reed, Umbertina Conti [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Neurologia; Rosemberg, Sergio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Patologia

    2008-11-15

    To correlate imaging findings of medulloblastomas at conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, comparing them with data in the literature. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging studies of nine pediatric patients with histologically confirmed medulloblastomas (eight desmoplastic medulloblastoma, and one giant cell medulloblastoma) were retrospectively reviewed, considering demographics as well as tumors characteristics such as localization, morphology, signal intensity, contrast-enhancement, dissemination, and diffusion-weighted imaging and spectroscopy findings. In most of cases the tumors were centered in the cerebellar vermis (77.8%), predominantly solid (88.9%), hypointense on T 1-weighted images and intermediate/hyperintense on T 2-FLAIR-weighted images, with heterogeneous enhancement (100%), tumor dissemination/extension (77.8%) and limited water molecule mobility (100%). Proton spectroscopy acquired with STEAM technique (n = 6) demonstrated decreased Na a / Cr ratio (83.3%) and increased Co/Cr (100%) and ml/Cr (66.7%) ratios; and with PRESS technique (n = 7) demonstrated lactate peak (57.1%). Macroscopic magnetic resonance imaging findings in association with biochemical features of medulloblastomas have been useful in the differentiation among the most frequent posterior fossa tumors. (author)

  19. Combining satellite photographs and raster lidar data for channel connectivity in tidal marshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Hodges, Ben

    2017-04-01

    High resolution airborne lidar is capable of providing topographic detail down to the 1 x 1 m scale or finer over large tidal marshes of a river delta. Such data sets can be challenging to develop and ground-truth due to the inherent complexities of the environment, the relatively small changes in elevation throughout a marsh, and practical difficulties in accessing the variety of flooded, dry, and muddy regions. Standard lidar point-cloud processing techniques (as typically applied in large lidar data collection program) have a tendency to mis-identify narrow channels and water connectivity in a marsh, which makes it difficult to directly use such data for modeling marsh flows. Unfortunately, it is not always practical, or even possible, to access the point cloud and re-analyze the raw lidar data when discrepancies have been found in a raster work product. Faced with this problem in preparing a model of the Trinity River delta (Texas, USA), we developed an approach to integrating analysis of a lidar-based raster with satellite images. Our primary goal was to identify the clear land/water boundaries needed to identify channelization in the available rasterized lidar data. The channel extraction method uses pixelized satellite photographs that are stretched/distorted with image-processing techniques to match identifiable control features in both lidar and photographic data sets. A kmeans clustering algorithm was applied cluster pixels based on their colors, which is effective in separating land and water in a satellite photograph. The clustered image was matched to the lidar data such that the combination shows the channel network. In effect, we are able to use the fact that the satellite photograph is higher resolution than the lidar data, and thus provides connectivity in the clustering at a finer scale. The principal limitation of the method is the where the satellite image and lidar suffer from similar problems For example, vegetation overhanging a narrow

  20. A dark-field scanning spectroscopy platform for localized scatter and fluorescence imaging of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Laughney, Ashley M.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-03-01

    Tissue ultra-structure and molecular composition provide native contrast mechanisms for discriminating across pathologically distinct tissue-types. Multi-modality optical probe designs combined with spatially confined sampling techniques have been shown to be sensitive to this type of contrast but their extension to imaging has only been realized recently. A modular scanning spectroscopy platform has been developed to allow imaging localized morphology and molecular contrast measures in breast cancer surgical specimens. A custom designed dark-field telecentric scanning spectroscopy system forms the core of this imaging platform. The system allows imaging localized elastic scatter and fluorescence measures over fields of up to 15 mm x 15 mm at 100 microns resolution in tissue. Results from intralipid and blood phantom measurements demonstrate the ability of the system to quantify localized scatter parameters despite significant changes in local absorption. A co-registered fluorescence spectroscopy mode is also demonstrated in a protophorphyrin-IX phantom.

  1. Unraveling pathology in juvenile Alexander disease: serial quantitative MR imaging and spectroscopy of white matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voorn, J.P. van der [VU University Medical Center, Department of Child Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pouwels, Petra J.W. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Salomons, Gajja S. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Clinical Chemistry (Metabolic Unit), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Knaap, Marjo S. van der [VU University Medical Center, Department of Child Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-10-15

    Alexander disease is a rare disorder of the central nervous system with characteristic symmetric white matter abnormalities with frontal predominance on magnetic resonance (MR) images. Histopathology shows a lack of myelin in the affected white matter, variably interpreted as hypomyelination or demyelination. To increase our insight into the nature of the pathology leading to the MR imaging findings in Alexander disease, we applied serial MR imaging, spectroscopy, magnetization transfer (MT) imaging (MTI), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in six patients with juvenile Alexander disease. The MR imaging protocol comprised T1- and T2-weighted spin echo images and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. Fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and MT ratio (MTR) maps were generated, and MR spectroscopy concentrations were quantified for several metabolites. MR imaging showed similar cerebral white matter abnormalities in all patients, with only minor increase on prolonged follow-up, despite sometimes serious clinical progression. MR spectroscopy showed highly elevated levels of myo-inositol, lactate, and choline-containing compounds and decreased total N-acetyl-aspartate and N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate levels in the abnormal white matter. High values of ADC were observed, and both FA and MTR were attenuated. The sequential MR imaging findings in Alexander disease provide strong evidence against active demyelination as sole explanation for the underlying pathology. An alternative explanation for our spectroscopic, DTI, and MTI findings - which would suggest demyelination - could be hyperplasia and hypertrophy of astrocytes, as seen in low grade gliomas. (orig.)

  2. Terahertz Spectroscopy and Brewster Angle Reflection Imaging of Acoustic Tiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Kilcullen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A Brewster angle reflection imaging apparatus is demonstrated which is capable of detecting hidden water-filled voids in a rubber tile sample. This imaging application simulates a real-world hull inspection problem for Royal Canadian Navy Victoria-class submarines. The tile samples represent a challenging imaging application due to their large refractive index and absorption coefficient. With a rubber transmission window at approximately 80 GHz, terahertz (THz sensing methods have shown promise for probing these structures in the laboratory. Operating at Brewster’s angle allows for the typically strong front surface reflection to be minimized while also conveniently making the method insensitive to air-filled voids. Using a broadband THz time-domain waveform imaging system (THz-TDS, we demonstrate satisfactory imaging and detection of water-filled voids without complicated signal processing. Optical properties of the tile samples at low THz frequencies are also reported.

  3. Near infrared spectroscopic imaging assessment of cartilage composition: Validation with mid infrared imaging spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukuru, Uday P; Hanifi, Arash; McGoverin, Cushla M; Devlin, Sean; Lelkes, Peter I; Pleshko, Nancy

    2016-07-05

    Disease or injury to articular cartilage results in loss of extracellular matrix components which can lead to the development of osteoarthritis (OA). To better understand the process of disease development, there is a need for evaluation of changes in cartilage composition without the requirement of extensive sample preparation. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is a chemical investigative technique based on molecular vibrations that is increasingly used as an assessment tool for studying cartilage composition. However, the assignment of specific molecular vibrations to absorbance bands in the NIR spectrum of cartilage, which arise from overtones and combinations of primary absorbances in the mid infrared (MIR) spectral region, has been challenging. In contrast, MIR spectroscopic assessment of cartilage is well-established, with many studies validating the assignment of specific bands present in MIR spectra to specific molecular vibrations. In the current study, NIR imaging spectroscopic data were obtained for compositional analysis of tissues that served as an in vitro model of OA. MIR spectroscopic data obtained from the identical tissue regions were used as the gold-standard for collagen and proteoglycan (PG) content. MIR spectroscopy in transmittance mode typically requires a much shorter pathlength through the sample (≤10 microns thick) compared to NIR spectroscopy (millimeters). Thus, this study first addressed the linearity of small absorbance bands in the MIR region with increasing tissue thickness, suitable for obtaining a signal in both the MIR and NIR regions. It was found that the linearity of specific, small MIR absorbance bands attributable to the collagen and PG components of cartilage (at 1336 and 856 cm(-1), respectively) are maintained through a thickness of 60 μm, which was also suitable for NIR data collection. MIR and NIR spectral data were then collected from 60 μm thick samples of cartilage degraded with chondroitinase ABC as a model

  4. The EnMAP Spaceborne Imaging Spectroscopy Mission for Earth Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Guanter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Imaging spectroscopy, also known as hyperspectral remote sensing, is based on the characterization of Earth surface materials and processes through spectrally-resolved measurements of the light interacting with matter. The potential of imaging spectroscopy for Earth remote sensing has been demonstrated since the 1980s. However, most of the developments and applications in imaging spectroscopy have largely relied on airborne spectrometers, as the amount and quality of space-based imaging spectroscopy data remain relatively low to date. The upcoming Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program (EnMAP German imaging spectroscopy mission is intended to fill this gap. An overview of the main characteristics and current status of the mission is provided in this contribution. The core payload of EnMAP consists of a dual-spectrometer instrument measuring in the optical spectral range between 420 and 2450 nm with a spectral sampling distance varying between 5 and 12 nm and a reference signal-to-noise ratio of 400:1 in the visible and near-infrared and 180:1 in the shortwave-infrared parts of the spectrum. EnMAP images will cover a 30 km-wide area in the across-track direction with a ground sampling distance of 30 m. An across-track tilted observation capability will enable a target revisit time of up to four days at the Equator and better at high latitudes. EnMAP will contribute to the development and exploitation of spaceborne imaging spectroscopy applications by making high-quality data freely available to scientific users worldwide.

  5. Emission Line Imaging and Spectroscopy of Distant Galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zabl, Johannes Florian

    determinations even at lowest masses and highest redshifts. Finally, emission lines can be used in the first place to select large samples of galaxies at well defined redshifts through narrowband (NB) surveys, as the presence of a line in the NB filter raises the flux compared to that expected from the continuum...... for the gas surrounding a galaxy. Around some objects the extended Ly αemission is so strong that it can be detected for individual objects. In this thesis extremely deep VLT/XSHOOTER rest-frame far-UV spectroscopy is presented for Himiko, a gigantic Ly α emitter at redshift z = 6.6 or a time when...

  6. New approach to imaging spectroscopy using diffractive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Massie, Mark A.

    1997-10-01

    Over the past several years, Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) has developed several hyperspectral imagers using diffractive optics as the dispersive media. This new approach has been patented and demonstrated in numerous field tests. PAT has developed hyperspectral cameras in the visible, mid-wave IR and is currently under contrast to the Air Force to develop a dual band hyperspectral lens for simultaneous spectral imaging in both the mid-wave and long- wave IR. The development of these cameras over the years have been sponsored by internal research and development, contracts from the Air Force Phillips Lab., Air Force Wright Labs Armament Division, BMDO and by the Office of Naval Research. Numerous papers have been presented in the past describing the performance of these various hyperspectral cameras. The purpose of this paper is to describe the theory behind the image multi-spectral sensing (IMSS) used in these hyperspectral cameras. IMSS utilizes a very simple optical design that enables a robust and low cost hyper-spectral imaging instrument. The IMSS is a dispersive spectrometer using a single diffractive optical element for both imaging and dispersion. The lens is tuned for a single wavelength giving maximum diffraction efficiency at that wavelength and high efficiency throughout the spectral band-pass of the camera. The diffractive optics disperse the light along the optical axis as opposed to perpendicular to the axis in conventional dispersive spectrometers. A detector array is used as the sensing medium and the spectral images are rad out electronically. POst processing is used to reduce spectral cross talk and to spatially sharpen the spectral images.

  7. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: general dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify the findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.

  8. Multipixel characterization of imaging CZT detectors for hard x-ray imaging and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadawale, Santosh V.; Hong, Jae Sub; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Williams, Peter; Zhang, Minhua; Bellm, Eric C.; Narita, Tomohiko; Craig, William W.; Parker, Bradford H.; Stahle, Carl M.; Yan, Feng

    2004-10-01

    We report our in-depth study of Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) crystals to determine an optimum pixel and guard band configuration for Hard X-ray imaging and spectroscopy. We tested 20x20x5mm crystals with 8x8 pixels on a 2.46mm pitch. We have studied different types of cathode / anode contacts and different pixel pad sizes. We present the measurements of leakage current as well as spectral response for each pixel. Our I-V measurement setup is custom designed to allow automated measurements of the I-V curves sequentially for all 64 pixels, whereas the radiation properties measurement setup allows for interchangeable crystals with the same XAIM3.2 ASIC readout from IDEAS. We have tested multiple crystals of each type, and each crystal in different positions to measure the variation between individual crystals and variation among the ASIC channels. We also compare the same crystals with and without a grounded guard band deposited on the crystal side walls vs. a floating guard band and compare results to simulations. This study was carried out to find the optimum CZT crystal configuration for prototype detectors for the proposed Black-Hole Finder mission, EXIST.

  9. Multipixel characterization of imaging CZT detectors for hard X-ray imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Vadawale, S V; Grindlay, J; Williams, P; Zhang, M; Bellm, E C; Narita, T; Craig, W; Parker, B; Stahle, C; Yan, F; Yan, Feng

    2004-01-01

    We report our in-depth study of Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) crystals to determine an optimum pixel and guard band configuration for Hard X-ray imaging and spectroscopy. We tested 20x20x5mm crystals with 8x8 pixels on a 2.46mm pitch. We have studied different types of cathode / anode contacts and different pixel pad sizes. We present the measurements of leakage current as well as spectral response for each pixel. Our I-V measurement setup is custom designed to allow automated measurements of the I-V curves sequentially for all 64 pixels, whereas the radiation properties measurement setup allows for interchangeable crystals with the same XAIM3.2 ASIC readout from IDEAS. We have tested multiple crystals of each type, and each crystal in different positions to measure the variation between individual crystals and variation among the ASIC channels. We also compare the same crystals with and without a grounded guard band deposited on the crystal side walls vs. a floating guard band and compare results to simulations. This study...

  10. Possibility of Systematic Study of Supernova Explosions by Nuclear Imaging Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Takada, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    An all-sky monitor with nuclear imaging spectroscopy is a promising tool for the systematic study of supernova explosions. In particular, progenitor scenarios of type-Ia supernovae, which are not yet well understood, can be resolved using light curves in the nuclear gamma-ray band. Here we report an expected result of an all-sky monitor with imaging spectroscopy using electron-tracking Compton camera, which will enable us to observe nuclear gamma-ray lines from type-Ia supernovae.

  11. Alien plant monitoring with ultralight airborne imaging spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Calviño-Cancela

    Full Text Available Effective management of invasive plants requires a precise determination of their distribution. Remote sensing techniques constitute a promising alternative to field surveys and hyperspectral sensors (also known as imaging spectrometers, with a large number of spectral bands and high spectral resolution are especially suitable when very similar categories are to be distinguished (e.g. plant species. A main priority in the development of this technology is to lower its cost and simplify its use, so that its demonstrated aptitude for many environmental applications can be truly realized. With this aim, we have developed a system for hyperspectral imaging (200 spectral bands in the 380-1000 nm range and circa 3 nm spectral resolution operated on board ultralight aircraft (namely a gyrocopter, which allows a drastic reduction of the running costs and operational complexity of image acquisition, and also increases the spatial resolution of the images (circa 5-8 pixels/m(2 at circa 65 km/h and 300 m height. The detection system proved useful for the species tested (Acacia melanoxylon, Oxalis pes-caprae, and Carpobrotus aff. edulis and acinaciformis, with user's and producer's accuracy always exceeding 90%. The detection accuracy reported corresponds to patches down to 0.125 m(2 (50% of pixels 0.5 × 0.5 m in size, a very small size for many plant species, making it very effective for initial stages of invasive plant spread. In addition, its low operating costs, similar to those of a 4WD ground vehicle, facilitate frequent image acquisition. Acquired images constitute a permanent record of the status of the study area, with great amount of information that can be analyzed in the future for other purposes, thus greatly facilitating the monitoring of natural areas at detailed spatial and temporal scales for improved management.

  12. Alien Plant Monitoring with Ultralight Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calviño-Cancela, María; Méndez-Rial, Roi; Reguera-Salgado, Javier; Martín-Herrero, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of invasive plants requires a precise determination of their distribution. Remote sensing techniques constitute a promising alternative to field surveys and hyperspectral sensors (also known as imaging spectrometers, with a large number of spectral bands and high spectral resolution) are especially suitable when very similar categories are to be distinguished (e.g. plant species). A main priority in the development of this technology is to lower its cost and simplify its use, so that its demonstrated aptitude for many environmental applications can be truly realized. With this aim, we have developed a system for hyperspectral imaging (200 spectral bands in the 380–1000 nm range and circa 3 nm spectral resolution) operated on board ultralight aircraft (namely a gyrocopter), which allows a drastic reduction of the running costs and operational complexity of image acquisition, and also increases the spatial resolution of the images (circa 5–8 pixels/m2 at circa 65 km/h and 300 m height). The detection system proved useful for the species tested (Acacia melanoxylon, Oxalis pes-caprae, and Carpobrotus aff. edulis and acinaciformis), with user’s and producer’s accuracy always exceeding 90%. The detection accuracy reported corresponds to patches down to 0.125 m2 (50% of pixels 0.5×0.5 m in size), a very small size for many plant species, making it very effective for initial stages of invasive plant spread. In addition, its low operating costs, similar to those of a 4WD ground vehicle, facilitate frequent image acquisition. Acquired images constitute a permanent record of the status of the study area, with great amount of information that can be analyzed in the future for other purposes, thus greatly facilitating the monitoring of natural areas at detailed spatial and temporal scales for improved management. PMID:25010601

  13. Density measurements using coherence imaging spectroscopy based on Stark broadeninga)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischtschenko, O.; Bystrov, K.; De Temmerman, G.; Howard, J.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; König, R.

    2010-10-01

    A coherence imaging camera has been set up at Pilot-PSI. The system is to be used for imaging the plasma density through the Stark effect broadening of the Hγ line. Local density values are then obtained by the Abel inversion of the measured interferometric fringe contrast. This report will present the instrument setup and proof-of-principle demonstration. The inverted spatial electron density profiles obtained near the cascaded arc source of Pilot-PSI in discharges with axial magnetic field of B=0.4 T are compared with an independent measurement of electron density by Thomson scattering and good agreement is found.

  14. Density measurements using coherence imaging spectroscopy based on Stark broadening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lischtschenko, O.; Bystrov, K.; De Temmerman, G. [Association EURATOM-FOM, FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Howard, J. [Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Jaspers, R. J. E. [Fusion Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, Postbus 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Koenig, R. [EURATOM Association, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, TI Greifswald, Wendelsteinstr.1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    A coherence imaging camera has been set up at Pilot-PSI. The system is to be used for imaging the plasma density through the Stark effect broadening of the H{sub {gamma}} line. Local density values are then obtained by the Abel inversion of the measured interferometric fringe contrast. This report will present the instrument setup and proof-of-principle demonstration. The inverted spatial electron density profiles obtained near the cascaded arc source of Pilot-PSI in discharges with axial magnetic field of B=0.4 T are compared with an independent measurement of electron density by Thomson scattering and good agreement is found.

  15. Visible and infrared reflectance imaging spectroscopy of paintings: pigment mapping and improved infrared reflectography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, John K.; Zeibel, Jason G.; Thoury, Mathieu; Littleton, Roy; Morales, Kathryn M.; Palmer, Michael; de la Rie, E. René

    2009-07-01

    Reflectance imaging spectroscopy, the collection of images in narrow spectral bands, has been developed for remote sensing of the Earth. In this paper we present findings on the use of imaging spectroscopy to identify and map artist pigments as well as to improve the visualization of preparatory sketches. Two novel hyperspectral cameras, one operating from the visible to near-infrared (VNIR) and the other in the shortwave infrared (SWIR), have been used to collect diffuse reflectance spectral image cubes on a variety of paintings. The resulting image cubes (VNIR 417 to 973 nm, 240 bands, and SWIR 970 to 1650 nm, 85 bands) were calibrated to reflectance and the resulting spectra compared with results from a fiber optics reflectance spectrometer (350 to 2500 nm). The results show good agreement between the spectra acquired with the hyperspectral cameras and those from the fiber reflectance spectrometer. For example, the primary blue pigments and their distribution in Picasso's Harlequin Musician (1924) are identified from the reflectance spectra and agree with results from X-ray fluorescence data and dispersed sample analysis. False color infrared reflectograms, obtained from the SWIR hyperspectral images, of extensively reworked paintings such as Picasso's The Tragedy (1903) are found to give improved visualization of changes made by the artist. These results show that including the NIR and SWIR spectral regions along with the visible provides for a more robust identification and mapping of artist pigments than using visible imaging spectroscopy alone.

  16. Aerosol mapping over land with imaging spectroscopy using spectral autocorrelation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bojinski, S.; Schlapfer, D.; Schaepman, M.E.; Keller, J.; Itten, K.I.

    2004-01-01

    A new method for aerosol retrieval over land is proposed that makes explicit use of the contiguous, high-resolution spectral coverage of imaging spectrometers. The method is labelled Aerosol Retrieval by Interrelated Abundances (ARIA) and is based on unmixing of the short-wave infrared sensor signal

  17. A Method for Qualitative Mapping of Thick Oil Spills Using Imaging Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Leifer, Ira; Livo, K. Erik; Lundeen, Sarah; Eastwood, Michael; Green, Robert O.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Hoefen, Todd; Sarture, Charles; McCubbin, Ian; Roberts, Dar; Steele, Denis; Ryan, Thomas; Dominguez, Roseanne; Pearson, Neil; ,

    2010-01-01

    A method is described to create qualitative images of thick oil in oil spills on water using near-infrared imaging spectroscopy data. The method uses simple 'three-point-band depths' computed for each pixel in an imaging spectrometer image cube using the organic absorption features due to chemical bonds in aliphatic hydrocarbons at 1.2, 1.7, and 2.3 microns. The method is not quantitative because sub-pixel mixing and layering effects are not considered, which are necessary to make a quantitative volume estimate of oil.

  18. Emission Line Imaging and Spectroscopy of Distant Galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zabl, Johannes Florian

    determinations even at lowest masses and highest redshifts. Finally, emission lines can be used in the first place to select large samples of galaxies at well defined redshifts through narrowband (NB) surveys, as the presence of a line in the NB filter raises the flux compared to that expected from the continuum...... applied a novel NB measurement method to a sample of UltraVISTA NB118 H α emitters, and demonstrate that this technique allows to recover more accurate fluxes. Additionally, the method allows to determine more accurate redshifts. Contemporary NB surveys have a strong focus on searches for Ly α emitters...... for the gas surrounding a galaxy. Around some objects the extended Ly αemission is so strong that it can be detected for individual objects. In this thesis extremely deep VLT/XSHOOTER rest-frame far-UV spectroscopy is presented for Himiko, a gigantic Ly α emitter at redshift z = 6.6 or a time when...

  19. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  20. Design Through Integration of On-Board Calibration Device with Imaging Spectroscopy Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of the Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy (AVIRIS) project is to "identify, measure, and monitor constituents of the Earth's surface and atmosphere based on molecular absorption and particle scattering signatures." The project designs, builds, and tests various imaging spectroscopy instruments that use On-Board Calibration devices (OBC) to check the accuracy of the data collected by the spectrometers. The imaging instrument records the spectral signatures of light collected during flight. To verify the data is correct, the OBC shines light which is collected by the imaging spectrometer and compared against previous calibration data to track spectral response changes in the instrument. The spectral data has the calibration applied to it based on the readings from the OBC data in order to ensure accuracy.

  1. Waveguide image-slicers for ultrahigh resolution spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckert, Erik; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Woche, Manfred; Eberhardt, Ramona; Tünnermann, Andreas; Andersen, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Waveguide image-slicer prototypes with resolutions up to 310.000 for the fiber fed PEPSI echelle spectrograph at the LBT and single waveguide thicknesses of down to 30 μm have been manufactured. The waveguides were macroscopically prepared, stacked up to an order of 7 and thinned back to square stack cross sections. A high filling ratio was achieved by realizing homogenous adhesive gaps of 4.6 μm, using index matching adhesives for TIR within the waveguides. The image-slicer stacks can be used in immersion mode and are miniaturized to be implemented in a set of four, measurements indicate an overall efficiency of above 80% for them.

  2. High Resolution Velocity Map Imaging Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Beryllium Oxide Anion, BeO-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermer, Amanda Reed; Mascaritolo, Kyle; Heaven, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The photodetachment spectrum of BeO- has been studied using high resolution velocity map imaging photoelectron spectroscopy. The vibrational contours were imaged and compared with Franck-Condon simulations for the ground and excited states of the neutral. The electron affinity of BeO was measured for the first time, and anisotropies of several transitions were determined. Experimental findings are compared to high level ab initio calculations.

  3. Evaluation of optical imaging and spectroscopy approaches for cardiac tissue depth assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, B; Matthews, D; Chernomordik, V; Gandjbakhche, A; Lane, S; Demos, S G

    2008-02-13

    NIR light scattering from ex vivo porcine cardiac tissue was investigated to understand how imaging or point measurement approaches may assist development of methods for tissue depth assessment. Our results indicate an increase of average image intensity as thickness increases up to approximately 2 mm. In a dual fiber spectroscopy configuration, sensitivity up to approximately 3 mm with an increase to 6 mm when spectral ratio between selected wavelengths was obtained. Preliminary Monte Carlo results provided reasonable fit to the experimental data.

  4. MR diffusion imaging and 1H spectroscopy in a child with medulloblastoma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, M. [Max-Planck-Institute of Psychiatry, Muenchen (Germany). NMR Study Group; Eidenschink, A.; Mueller-Weihrich, S. [Technical Univ. of Muenchen, (Germany). Childrens' Hospital; Auer, D.P. [Max-Planck-Institute of Psychiatry, Muenchen (Germany). NMR Study Group

    2000-01-01

    We report on a child with a metastasising medulloblastoma which was assessed by MR diffusion imaging and 1H MR spectroscopy (MRS). Reduced mean apparent diffusion coefficients and a high amount of taurine could be demonstrated. This is the first reported case of high taurine in medulloblastoma in vivo and confirms earlier in vitro findings. It is suggested that the changes on diffusion imaging, possibly reflecting the small-cell histology of the tumour and high taurine in MRS, are indicative of medulloblastoma.

  5. Cell Imaging by Spontaneous and Amplified Raman Spectroscopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Rusciano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy (RS is a powerful, noninvasive optical technique able to detect vibrational modes of chemical bonds. The high chemical specificity due to its fingerprinting character and the minimal requests for sample preparation have rendered it nowadays very popular in the analysis of biosystems for diagnostic purposes. In this paper, we first discuss the main advantages of spontaneous RS by describing the study of a single protozoan (Acanthamoeba, which plays an important role in a severe ophthalmological disease (Acanthamoeba keratitis. Later on, we point out that the weak signals that originated from Raman scattering do not allow probing optically thin samples, such as cellular membrane. Experimental approaches able to overcome this drawback are based on the use of metallic nanostructures, which lead to a huge amplification of the Raman yields thanks to the excitation of localized surface plasmon resonances. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS and tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS are examples of such innovative techniques, in which metallic nanostructures are assembled on a flat surface or on the tip of a scanning probe microscope, respectively. Herein, we provide a couple of examples (red blood cells and bacterial spores aimed at studying cell membranes with these techniques.

  6. PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission): an extended white paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    André, Philippe; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Banday, Anthony; Barbosa, Domingos; Barreiro, Belen; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Battistelli, Elia; Battye, Richard; Bendo, George; Benoît, Alain; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Béthermin, Matthieu; Bielewicz, Pawel; Bonaldi, Anna; Bouchet, François; Boulanger, François; Brand, Jan; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Camus, Philippe; Casas, Francisco; Casasola, Viviana; Castex, Guillaume; Challinor, Anthony; Chluba, Jens; Chon, Gayoung; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Comis, Barbara; Cuttaia, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; Da Silva, Antonio; Davis, Richard; de Avillez, Miguel; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Petris, Marco; de Rosa, Adriano; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Désert, François-Xavier; Dickinson, Clive; Diego, Jose Maria; Dunkley, Joanna; Enßlin, Torsten; Errard, Josquin; Falgarone, Edith; Ferreira, Pedro; Ferrière, Katia; Finelli, Fabio; Fletcher, Andrew; Fosalba, Pablo; Fuller, Gary; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; García-Bellido, Juan; Ghribi, Adnan; Giard, Martin; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grainge, Keith; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Hall, Alex; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Haverkorn, Marijke; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Herranz, Diego; Jackson, Mark; Jaffe, Andrew; Khatri, Rishi; Kunz, Martin; Lamagna, Luca; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Leahy, Paddy; Lesgourgues, Julien; Liguori, Michele; Liuzzo, Elisabetta; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Macias-Perez, Juan; Maffei, Bruno; Maino, Davide; Mangilli, Anna; Martinez-Gonzalez, Enrique; Martins, Carlos J. A. P.; Masi, Silvia; Massardi, Marcella; Matarrese, Sabino; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Mennella, Aniello; Mignano, Arturo; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Monfardini, Alessandro; Murphy, Anthony; Naselsky, Pavel; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Noviello, Fabio; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Paci, Francesco; Pagano, Luca; Paladino, Rosita; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Paoletti, Daniela; Peiris, Hiranya; Perrotta, Francesca; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michel; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Ricciardi, Sara; Roman, Matthieu; Rosset, Cyrille; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Shellard, Paul; Silk, Joseph; Starobinsky, Alexei; Stompor, Radek; Sunyaev, Rashid; Tartari, Andrea; Terenzi, Luca; Toffolatti, Luigi; Tomasi, Maurizio; Trappe, Neil; Tristram, Matthieu; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucci, Marco; Van de Weijgaert, Rien; Van Tent, Bartjan; Verde, Licia; Vielva, Patricio; Wandelt, Ben; Watson, Robert; Withington, Stafford

    2014-01-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in May 2013 as a large-class mission for investigating within the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision program a set of important scientific questions that require high resolution, high sensitivity, full-sky observations

  7. Soil organic carbon mapping of partially vegetated agricultural fields with imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartholomeus, H.; Kooistra, L.; Stevens, A.; Leeuwen, van M.; Wesemael, van B.; Ben-Dor, E.; Tychon, B.

    2011-01-01

    Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) is one of the key soil properties, but the large spatial variation makes continuous mapping a complex task. Imaging spectroscopy has proven to be an useful technique for mapping of soil properties, but the applicability decreases rapidly when fields are partially covered

  8. Prediction of soil properties using imaging spectroscopy: Considering fractional vegetation cover to improve accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domingues Franceschini, Marston; Demattê, J.A.M.; Silva Terra, Da F.; Vicente, L.; Bartholomeus, H.M.; Souza Filho, De C.

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopic techniques have become attractive to assess soil properties because they are fast, require little labor and may reduce the amount of laboratory waste produced when compared to conventional methods. Imaging spectroscopy (IS) can have further advantages compared to laboratory or field pr

  9. Imaging Spectroscopy for On-Farm Measurement of Grassland Yield and Quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, A.G.T.; Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Hoving, I.E.; Stienezen, M.W.J.; Evert, van F.K.; Meuleman, J.

    2006-01-01

    Grassland management has a large influence on the operating cost and environmental impact of dairy farms and requires accurate, detailed, and timely information about the yield and quality of grass. Our objective was to evaluate imaging spectroscopy as a means to obtain accurate, detailed, and rapid

  10. Early detection of drought stress in grass swards with imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, A.G.T.; Ketelaars, J.J.M.H.

    2003-01-01

    The potential of an experimental imaging spectroscopy system with high spatial (0.28-1.45 mm2) and spectral (5-13 nm) resolution was explored for early detection of drought stress in grass. A climate chamber experiment was conducted with nine Lolium perenne L. mini swards with drought stress treatme

  11. Determining iron content in Mediterranean soils in partly vegetated areas, using spectral reflectance and imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartholomeus, H.; Epema, G.F.; Schaepman, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    The possibility of quantifying iron content in the topsoil of the slopes of the El Hacho Mountain complex in Southern Spain using imaging spectroscopy is investigated. Laboratory, field and airborne spectrometer (ROSIS) data are acquired, in combination with soil samples, which are analysed for dith

  12. MR spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging of the brain in Sjogren-Larsson syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijens, P. E.; Westerlaan, H. E.; de Groot, J. C.; Boon, M.; Potze, J. H.; van Spronsen, F. J.; Lunsing, R. J.; Oudkerk, M.

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is reported for the first time in a patient with Sjogren-Larsson syndrome, an autosomal recessive neurocutaneous disorder. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) revealed normal levels of choline, creatine and N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and the characteristic lipid signal

  13. Soil organic carbon mapping of partially vegetated agricultural fields with imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartholomeus, H.; Kooistra, L.; Stevens, A.; Leeuwen, van M.; Wesemael, van B.; Ben-Dor, E.; Tychon, B.

    2011-01-01

    Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) is one of the key soil properties, but the large spatial variation makes continuous mapping a complex task. Imaging spectroscopy has proven to be an useful technique for mapping of soil properties, but the applicability decreases rapidly when fields are partially covered wi

  14. Pulsed terahertz spectroscopy and imaging applied to inspection of explosives and inflammable liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Yamaguchi, Mariko; Miyamaru, Fumiaki; Tani, Masahiko; Hangyo, Masanori; Ikeda, Takeshi; Matsushita, Akira; Koide, Kenji; Tatsuno, Michiaki; Manami, Yukio

    We carried out applied researches on the pulsed terahertz spectroscopy and the terahertz imaging to detect the C-4 explosive hidden in a mail and inflammable liquids stored in plastic bottles. We confirm that THz techniques are quite efficient at contactless and nondestructive inspection of hazardous materials used in terrorist activities.

  15. PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission): an extended white paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    André, Philippe; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Banday, Anthony; Barbosa, Domingos; Barreiro, Belen; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Battistelli, Elia; Battye, Richard; Bendo, George; Benoît, Alain; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Béthermin, Matthieu; Bielewicz, Pawel; Bonaldi, Anna; Bouchet, François; Boulanger, François; Brand, Jan; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Camus, Philippe; Casas, Francisco; Casasola, Viviana; Castex, Guillaume; Challinor, Anthony; Chluba, Jens; Chon, Gayoung; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Comis, Barbara; Cuttaia, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; Da Silva, Antonio; Davis, Richard; de Avillez, Miguel; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Petris, Marco; de Rosa, Adriano; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Désert, François-Xavier; Dickinson, Clive; Diego, Jose Maria; Dunkley, Joanna; Enßlin, Torsten; Errard, Josquin; Falgarone, Edith; Ferreira, Pedro; Ferrière, Katia; Finelli, Fabio; Fletcher, Andrew; Fosalba, Pablo; Fuller, Gary; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; García-Bellido, Juan; Ghribi, Adnan; Giard, Martin; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grainge, Keith; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Hall, Alex; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Haverkorn, Marijke; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Herranz, Diego; Jackson, Mark; Jaffe, Andrew; Khatri, Rishi; Kunz, Martin; Lamagna, Luca; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Leahy, Paddy; Lesgourgues, Julien; Liguori, Michele; Liuzzo, Elisabetta; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Macias-Perez, Juan; Maffei, Bruno; Maino, Davide; Mangilli, Anna; Martinez-Gonzalez, Enrique; Martins, Carlos J. A. P.; Masi, Silvia; Massardi, Marcella; Matarrese, Sabino; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Mennella, Aniello; Mignano, Arturo; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Monfardini, Alessandro; Murphy, Anthony; Naselsky, Pavel; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Noviello, Fabio; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Paci, Francesco; Pagano, Luca; Paladino, Rosita; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Paoletti, Daniela; Peiris, Hiranya; Perrotta, Francesca; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michel; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Ricciardi, Sara; Roman, Matthieu; Rosset, Cyrille; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Shellard, Paul; Silk, Joseph; Starobinsky, Alexei; Stompor, Radek; Sunyaev, Rashid; Tartari, Andrea; Terenzi, Luca; Toffolatti, Luigi; Tomasi, Maurizio; Trappe, Neil; Tristram, Matthieu; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucci, Marco; Van de Weijgaert, Rien; Van Tent, Bartjan; Verde, Licia; Vielva, Patricio; Wandelt, Ben; Watson, Robert; Withington, Stafford

    2014-01-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in May 2013 as a large-class mission for investigating within the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision program a set of important scientific questions that require high resolution, high sensitivity, full-sky observations

  16. Soil organic carbon mapping of partially vegetated agricultural fields with imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartholomeus, H.; Kooistra, L.; Stevens, A.; Leeuwen, van M.; Wesemael, van B.; Ben-Dor, E.; Tychon, B.

    2011-01-01

    Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) is one of the key soil properties, but the large spatial variation makes continuous mapping a complex task. Imaging spectroscopy has proven to be an useful technique for mapping of soil properties, but the applicability decreases rapidly when fields are partially covered wi

  17. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy of Polydopamine Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrówczyński, Radosław; Coy, L Emerson; Scheibe, Błażej; Czechowski, Tomasz; Augustyniak-Jabłokow, Maria; Jurga, Stefan; Tadyszak, Krzysztof

    2015-08-13

    A thorough investigation of biomimetic polydopamine (PDA) by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is shown. In addition, temperature dependent spectroscopic EPR data are presented in the range 3.8-300 K. Small discrepancies in magnetic susceptibility behavior are observed between previously reported melanin samples. These variations were attributed to thermally acitivated processes. More importantly, EPR spatial-spatial 2D imaging of polydopamine radicals on a phantom is presented for the first time. In consequence, a new possible application of polydopamine as EPR imagining marker is addressed.

  18. Estimating Canopy Nitrogen Concentration in Sugarcane Using Field Imaging Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Souris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The retrieval of nutrient concentration in sugarcane through hyperspectral remote sensing is widely known to be affected by canopy architecture. The goal of this research was to develop an estimation model that could explain the nitrogen variations in sugarcane with combined cultivars. Reflectance spectra were measured over the sugarcane canopy using a field spectroradiometer. The models were calibrated by a vegetation index and multiple linear regression. The original reflectance was transformed into a First-Derivative Spectrum (FDS and two absorption features. The results indicated that the sensitive spectral wavelengths for quantifying nitrogen content existed mainly in the visible, red edge and far near-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Normalized Differential Index (NDI based on FDS(750/700 and Ratio Spectral Index (RVI based on FDS(724/700 are best suited for characterizing the nitrogen concentration. The modified estimation model, generated by the Stepwise Multiple Linear Regression (SMLR technique from FDS centered at 410, 426, 720, 754, and 1,216 nm, yielded the highest correlation coefficient value of 0.86 and Root Mean Square Error of the Estimate (RMSE value of 0.033%N (n = 90 with nitrogen concentration in sugarcane. The results of this research demonstrated that the estimation model developed by SMLR yielded a higher correlation coefficient with nitrogen content than the model computed by narrow vegetation indices. The strong correlation between measured and estimated nitrogen concentration indicated that the methods proposed in this study could be used for the reliable diagnosis of nitrogen quantity in sugarcane. Finally, the success of the field spectroscopy used for estimating the nutrient quality of sugarcane allowed an additional experiment using the polar orbiting hyperspectral data for the timely determination of crop nutrient status in rangelands without any requirement of prior

  19. An equal area conversion model for rasterization of vector polygons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU ChengHu; OU Yang; YANG Liao; QIN Biao

    2007-01-01

    Vector-raster conversion is one of the classic research topics in the field of Geographical Information Systems (GIS). The algorithms commonly used in GIS are devoted to maintaining the vector polygons' shape characteristics, but neglect the gain and loss of a polygon's area, which is another important attribute. This paper proposes an equal-area conversion model based on an area compensation optimization principle. According to the topological relationship among polygons and boundary grids, a neighborhood compensation principle was adopted to assign the attributes of boundary grids and a global optimization algorithm was developed to minimize area distortion in the whole data set. Two experiments were designed and the results indicated that this algorithm not only guaranteed the area error is as small as possible, but also has the advantage as being adaptive to polygon shape and spatial structure.

  20. TESIS experiment on EUV imaging spectroscopy of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, S. V.; Bogachev, S. A.; Zhitnik, I. A.; Pertsov, A. A.; Ignatiev, A. P.; Mitrofanov, A. M.; Slemzin, V. A.; Shestov, S. V.; Sukhodrev, N. K.; Bugaenko, O. I.

    2009-03-01

    TESIS is a set of solar imaging instruments in development by the Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Science, to be launched aboard the Russian spacecraft CORONAS-PHOTON in December 2008. The main goal of TESIS is to provide complex observations of solar active phenomena from the transition region to the inner and outer solar corona with high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution in the EUV and Soft X-ray spectral bands. TESIS includes five unique space instruments: the MgXII Imaging Spectroheliometer (MISH) with spherical bent crystal mirror, for observations of the Sun in the monochromatic MgXII 8.42 Å line; the EUV Spectoheliometer (EUSH) with grazing incidence difraction grating, for the registration of the full solar disc in monochromatic lines of the spectral band 280-330 Å; two Full-disk EUV Telescopes (FET) with multilayer mirrors covering the band 130-136 and 290-320 Å; and the Solar EUV Coronagraph (SEC), based on the Ritchey-Chretien scheme, to observe the inner and outer solar corona from 0.2 to 4 solar radii in spectral band 290-320 Å. TESIS experiment will start at the rising phase of the 24th cycle of solar activity. With the advanced capabilities of its instruments, TESIS will help better understand the physics of solar flares and high-energy phenomena and provide new data on parameters of solar plasma in the temperature range 10-10K. This paper gives a brief description of the experiment, its equipment, and its scientific objectives.

  1. Fast computation of categorical richness on raster data sets and related problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Berg, Mark; Tsirogiannis, Constantinos; Wilkinson, Bryan T.

    2015-01-01

    In many scientific fields, it is common to encounter raster data sets consisting of categorical data, such as soil type or land usage of a terrain. A problem that arises in the presence of such data is the following: given a raster G of n cells storing categorical data, compute for every cell c...

  2. ARCTIS — A MATLAB® Toolbox for Archaeological Imaging Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Atzberger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Imaging spectroscopy acquires imagery in hundreds or more narrow contiguous spectral bands. This offers unprecedented information for archaeological research. To extract the maximum of useful archaeological information from it, however, a number of problems have to be solved. Major problems relate to data redundancy and the visualization of the large amount of data. This makes data mining approaches necessary, as well as efficient data visualization tools. Additional problems relate to data quality. Indeed, the upwelling electromagnetic radiation is recorded in small spectral bands that are only about ten nanometers wide. The signal received by the sensor is, thus quite low compared to sensor noise and possible atmospheric perturbations. The often small, instantaneous field of view (IFOV—essential for archaeologically relevant imaging spectrometer datasets—further limits the useful signal stemming from the ground. The combination of both effects makes radiometric smoothing techniques mandatory. The present study details the functionality of a MATLAB®-based toolbox, called ARCTIS (ARChaeological Toolbox for Imaging Spectroscopy, for filtering, enhancing, analyzing, and visualizing imaging spectrometer datasets. The toolbox addresses the above-mentioned problems. Its Graphical User Interface (GUI is designed to allow non-experts in remote sensing to extract a wealth of information from imaging spectroscopy for archaeological research. ARCTIS will be released under creative commons license, free of charge, via website (http://luftbildarchiv.univie.ac.at.

  3. Regional spectroscopy of paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissue using pulsed terahertz transmission imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Tyler; El-Shenawee, Magda; Campbell, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    This work seeks to obtain the properties of paraffin-embedded breast cancer tumor tissues using transmission imaging and spectroscopy. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded breast tumors are first sectioned into slices of 20 μm and 30 μm and placed between two tsurupica slides. The slides are then scanned in a pulsed terahertz system using transmission imaging. The tissue regions in adjacent pathology section are compared to the transmission imaging scan in order to define a region of points over which to average the electrical properties results from the scan.

  4. Simultaneous Imaging and Spectroscopy of Detonation Interaction in Reactive and Energetic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephanie; Clemenson, Michael; Glumac, Nick

    2017-01-01

    A dual framing camera system was coupled with custom-designed ultrafast imaging spectrometer optics to yield simultaneous imaging and imaging spectroscopy of extremely short detonation interaction events in reactive materials. For short exposures of 100 ns or less, spectral resolutions of 2.4 Å are achievable, allowing for time-resolved identification of key intermediate species evolving from prompt reaction. Under some circumstances, emission can be fit to a local emission temperature, assuming the optically thin limit. Applications to reactive metal systems involving aluminum, magnesium, titanium, boron, and silicon are demonstrated.

  5. MR diffusion imaging and MR spectroscopy of maple syrup urine disease during acute metabolic decompensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan, Wajanat; Wang, Zhiyue J. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Zimmerman, Robert A. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Berry, Gerard T.; Kaplan, Paige B.; Kaye, Edward M. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of amino acid metabolism, which affects the brain tissue resulting in impairment or death if untreated. Imaging studies have shown reversible brain edema during acute metabolic decompensation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and spectroscopy findings during metabolic decompensation and to assess the value of these findings in the prediction of patient outcome. Six patients with the diagnosis of MSUD underwent conventional MR imaging with DWI during acute presentation with metabolic decompensation. Spectroscopy with long TE was performed in four of the six patients. Follow-up examinations were performed after clinical and metabolic recovery. DWI demonstrated marked restriction of proton diffusion compatible with cytotoxic or intramyelinic sheath edema in the brainstem, basal ganglia, thalami, cerebellar and periventricular white matter and the cerebral cortex. This was accompanied by the presence of an abnormal branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and branched-chain alpha-keto acids (BCKA) peak at 0.9 ppm as well as elevated lactate on proton spectroscopy in all four patients. The changes in all six patients were reversed with treatment without evidence of volume loss or persistent tissue damage. The presence of cytotoxic or intramyelinic edema as evidenced by restricted water diffusion on DWI, with the presence of lactate on spectroscopy, could imply imminent cell death. However, in the context of metabolic decompensation in MSUD, it appears that changes in cell osmolarity and metabolism can reverse completely after metabolic correction. (orig.)

  6. Unique Spectroscopy and Imaging of Mars with JWST

    CERN Document Server

    Villanueva, Geronimo L; Clancy, Todd R; Encrenaz, Therese; Fouchet, Thierry; Hartogh, Paul; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Lopez-Valverde, Miguel A; Mumma, Michael J; Novak, Robert E; Smith, Michael D; Vandaele, Ann-Carine; Wolff, Michael J; Ferruit, Pierre; Milam, Stefanie N

    2015-01-01

    In this document, we summarize the main capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for performing observations of Mars. The distinctive vantage point of JWST at the Sun-Earth Lagrange point (L2) will allow sampling the full observable disk, permitting the study of short-term phenomena, diurnal processes (across the East-West axis) and latitudinal processes between the hemispheres (including seasonal effects) with excellent spatial resolutions (0.07 arcsec at 2 {\\mu}m). Spectroscopic observations will be achievable in the 0.7-5 {\\mu}m spectral region with NIRSpec at a maximum resolving power of 2700, and with 8000 in the 1-1.25 {\\mu}m range. Imaging will be attainable with NIRCam at 4.3 {\\mu}m and with two narrow filters near 2 {\\mu}m, while the nightside will be accessible with several filters in the 0.5 to 2 {\\mu}m. Such a powerful suite of instruments will be a major asset for the exploration and characterization of Mars. Some science cases include the mapping of the water D/H ratio, investigatio...

  7. LOFAR tied-array imaging and spectroscopy of solar S bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Morosan, D E; Zucca, P; O'Flannagain, A; Fallows, R; Reid, H; Magdalenic, J; Mann, G; Bisi, M M; Kerdraon, A; Konovalenko, A A; MacKinnon, A L; Rucker, H O; Thide, B; Vocks, C; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brouw, W N; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; de Geus, E; Eisloffel, J; Falcke, H; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Griessmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Karastergiou, A; Kondratiev, V I; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Munk, H; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Scaife, A M M; Sluman, J; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; Vermeulen, R; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    Context. The Sun is an active source of radio emission that is often associated with energetic phenomena ranging from nanoflares to coronal mass ejections (CMEs). At low radio frequencies (<100 MHz), numerous millisecond duration radio bursts have been reported, such as radio spikes or solar S bursts (where S stands for short). To date, these have neither been studied extensively nor imaged because of the instrumental limitations of previous radio telescopes. Aims. Here, Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) observations were used to study the spectral and spatial characteristics of a multitude of S bursts, as well as their origin and possible emission mechanisms. Methods. We used 170 simultaneous tied-array beams for spectroscopy and imaging of S bursts. Since S bursts have short timescales and fine frequency structures, high cadence (~50 ms) tied-array images were used instead of standard interferometric imaging, that is currently limited to one image per second. Results. On 9 July 2013, over 3000 S bursts were ob...

  8. X-ray imaging and spectroscopy using low cost COTS CMOS sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, David W., E-mail: d.w.lane@cranfield.ac.uk [Department of Engineering and Applied Science, Cranfield University, Shrivenham, Swindon SN6 8LA (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01

    Whilst commercial X-ray sensor arrays are capable of both imaging and spectroscopy they are currently expensive and this can limit their widespread use. This study examines the use of very low cost CMOS sensors for X-ray imaging and spectroscopy based on the commercial off the shelf (COTS) technology used in cellular telephones, PC multimedia and children's toys. Some examples of imaging using a 'webcam' and a modified OmniVision OV7411 sensor are presented, as well as a simple energy dispersive X-ray detector based on an OmniVision OV7221 sensor. In each case X-ray sensitivity was enabled by replacing the sensor's front glass window with a 5 {mu}m thick aluminium foil, with X-rays detected as an increase in a pixel's dark current due to the generation of additional electron-hole pairs within its active region. The exposure control and data processing requirements for imaging and spectroscopy are discussed. The modified OV7221 sensor was found to have a linear X-ray energy calibration and a resolution of approximately 510 eV.

  9. Charge-coupled device imaging spectroscopy of Mars. I - Instrumentation and data reduction/analysis procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James F., III; Lucey, Paul G.; Mccord, Thomas B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the collection, reduction, and analysis of 0.4-1.0-micron Mars imaging spectroscopy data obtained during the 1988 and 1990 oppositions from Mauna Kea Observatory and provides a general outline for the acquisition and analysis of similar imaging spectroscopy data sets. The U.H. 2.24-m Wide Field Grism CCD Spectrograph was used to collect 13 3D image cubes covering 90 percent of the planet south of 50 deg N in the 0.4-0.8 micron region and covering 55 percent of the planet south of 50 deg N in the 0.5-1.0 micron region. Spectra extracted from these image cubes reveal the detailed character of the Martian near-UV to visible spectrum. Images at red wavelengths reveal the 'classical' albedo markings at 100-500 km spatial resolution while images at blue wavelengths show little surface feature contrast and are dominated by condensate clouds/hazes and polar ice.

  10. Nanostructured surfaces for surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petefish, Joseph W.

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has achieved widespread recognition as a sensitive, label-free, and versatile optical method for monitoring changes in refractive index at a metal-dielectric interface. Refractive index deviations of 10-6 RIU are resolvable using SPR, and the method can be used in real-time or ex-situ. Instruments based on carboxymethyl dextran coated SPR chips have achieved commercial success in biological detection, while SPR sensors can also be found in other fields as varied as food safety and gas sensing. Chapter 1 provides a physical background of SPR sensing. A brief history of the technology is presented, and publication data are included that demonstrate the large and growing interest in surface plasmons. Numerous applications of SPR sensors are listed to illustrate the broad appeal of the method. Surface plasmons (SPs) and surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) are formally defined, and important parameters governing their spatial behavior are derived from Maxwell's equations and appropriate boundary conditions. Physical requirements for exciting SPs with incident light are discussed, and SPR imaging is used to illustrate the operating principle of SPR-based detection. Angle-tunable surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) of polymer vibrational modes via grating-coupled SPR is demonstrated in Chapter 2. Over 10-fold enhancement of C-H stretching modes was found relative to the absorbance of the same film in the absence of plasmon excitation. Modeling results are used to support and explain experimental observations. Improvements to the grating coupler SEIRA platform in Chapter 2 are explored in Chapters 3 and 4. Chapter 3 displays data for two sets of multipitch gratings: one set with broadly distributed resonances with the potential for multiband IR enhancement and the other with finely spaced, overlapping resonances to form a broadband IR enhancement device. Diffraction gratings having multiple periods were fabricated using a Lloyd

  11. 太赫兹波谱与成像技术%Terahertz spectroscopy and imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭澜涛; 牧凯军; 邓朝; 张振伟; 张存林

    2013-01-01

    太赫兹波谱与成像是太赫兹科学与技术的重要内容,在生物、物理、化学、安检、航空航天等领域有重要的应用前景,是近年来的研究热点.首先简单介绍了太赫兹时域光谱、时间分辨光谱和超连续谱等波谱技术,并列举了相关波谱技术对爆炸物识别和对半导体材料超快载流子动力学的研究结果.讨论了时域扫描成像、实时焦平面成像、连续波成像和被动成像等太赫兹成像技术.相应地分别给出了利用上述技术对葵花籽、玩具手枪、航天泡沫和人体的成像研究结果.%Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy and imaging, as the focus of THz science and technology, can be applied in many fields, such as biology, physics, chemistry, safety check, aerospace, etc.And now they are becoming international attractive field especially in recent years.Firstly, the THz time domain spectroscopy, time resolved THz spectroscopy and THz supercontinuum technology were discussed briefly.Results for characteristic identification of explosives and research on dynamics of ultra-fast charge carrier by using different THz spectroscopy were presented.Meanwhile, the THz time domain scan imaging, real time focal plane imaging, continuous wave imaging, and passive THz imaging technologies were introduced respectively.In application study, research on sunflower seeds by using THz time domain scan imaging technology, plastic cap gun covered by canvas using real time focal plane imaging technology, aerospace foam and pistol model by using continuous wave imaging technology, human body by using passive THz imaging technology were all presented correspondingly.

  12. Metabolomic imaging of prostate cancer with magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spur, Eva-Margarete [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Decelle, Emily A.; Cheng, Leo L. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Metabolomic imaging of prostate cancer (PCa) aims to improve in vivo imaging capability so that PCa tumors can be localized noninvasively to guide biopsy and evaluated for aggressiveness prior to prostatectomy, as well as to assess and monitor PCa growth in patients with asymptomatic PCa newly diagnosed by biopsy. Metabolomics studies global variations of metabolites with which malignancy conditions can be evaluated by profiling the entire measurable metabolome, instead of focusing only on certain metabolites or isolated metabolic pathways. At present, PCa metabolomics is mainly studied by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and mass spectrometry (MS). With MRS imaging, the anatomic image, obtained from magnetic resonance imaging, is mapped with values of disease condition-specific metabolomic profiles calculated from MRS of each location. For example, imaging of removed whole prostates has demonstrated the ability of metabolomic profiles to differentiate cancerous foci from histologically benign regions. Additionally, MS metabolomic imaging of prostate biopsies has uncovered metabolomic expression patterns that could discriminate between PCa and benign tissue. Metabolomic imaging offers the potential to identify cancer lesions to guide prostate biopsy and evaluate PCa aggressiveness noninvasively in vivo, or ex vivo to increase the power of pathology analysis. Potentially, this imaging ability could be applied not only to PCa, but also to different tissues and organs to evaluate other human malignancies and metabolic diseases. (orig.)

  13. Excitation and Imaging of Resonant Optical Modes of Au Triangular Nano-Antennas Using Cathodoluminescence Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Anil; Mabon, James C; Chow, Edmond; Fang, Nicholas X

    2010-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging spectroscopy is an important technique to understand resonant behavior of optical nanoantennas. We report high-resolution CL spectroscopy of triangular gold nanoantennas designed with near-vacuum effective index and very small metal-substrate interface. This design helped in addressing issues related to background luminescence and shifting of dipole modes beyond visible spectrum. Spatial and spectral investigations of various plasmonic modes are reported. Out-of-plane dipole modes excited with vertically illuminated electron beam showed high-contrast tip illumination in panchromatic imaging. By tilting the nanostructures during fabrication, in-plane dipole modes of antennas were excited. Finite-difference time-domain simulations for electron and optical excitations of different modes showed excellent agreement with experimental results. Our approach of efficiently exciting antenna modes by using low index substrates is confirmed both with experiments and numerical simulations....

  14. From single-molecule spectroscopy to super-resolution imaging of the neuron: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Romain F.; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S.; van de Linde, Sebastian; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2016-06-01

    For more than 20 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has been providing invaluable insights into nature at the molecular level. The field has received a powerful boost with the development of the technique into super-resolution imaging methods, ca. 10 years ago, which overcome the limitations imposed by optical diffraction. Today, single molecule super-resolution imaging is routinely used in the study of macromolecular function and structure in the cell. Concomitantly, computational methods have been developed that provide information on numbers and positions of molecules at the nanometer-scale. In this overview, we outline the technical developments that have led to the emergence of localization microscopy techniques from single-molecule spectroscopy. We then provide a comprehensive review on the application of the technique in the field of neuroscience research.

  15. Application of terahertz spectroscopy imaging for discrimination of transgenic rice seeds with chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Liu, Changhong; Hu, Xiaohua; Yang, Jianbo; Zheng, Lei

    2016-11-01

    Discrimination of genetically modified organisms is increasingly demanded by legislation and consumers worldwide. The feasibility of a non-destructive discrimination of transgenic rice seeds from its non-transgenic counterparts was examined by terahertz spectroscopy imaging system combined with chemometrics. Principal component analysis (PCA), least squares support vector machines (LS-SVM), PCA-back propagation neural network (PCA-BPNN), and random forest (RF) models with the first and second derivative and standard normal variate transformation (SNV) pre-treatments were applied to classify rice seeds based on genotype. The results demonstrated that differences between non-transgenic and transgenic rice seeds did exist, and an excellent classification (accuracy was 96.67% in the prediction set) could be achieved using the RF model combined with the first derivative pre-treatment. The results indicated that THz spectroscopy imaging together with chemometrics would be a promising technique to identify transgenic rice seeds with high efficiency and without any sample preparation.

  16. Simultaneous ion luminescence imaging and spectroscopy of individual aerosol particles with external proton or helium microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kada, Wataru, E-mail: kada.wataru@gunma-u.ac.jp [Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Satoh, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Akihito; Koka, Masashi; Kamiya, Tomihiro [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    Simultaneous microscopic imaging and spectroscopy of individual aerosol particles were performed with an external microbeam. Visible luminescence induced by the external microbeam was successfully used as a probe to detect organic contaminants in the targets. Combined ion luminescence (IL)/particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of the aerosol targets revealed microscopic chemical and elemental composition distributions under ambient atmospheric conditions. The simple confocal micro-optics for the IL spectroscopy and microscopic imaging were sufficiently sensitive for detecting these molecules at sub-parts per million concentrations and at a wavelength resolution of less than 5 nm. The IL spectra were monitored to prevent severe damage to the samples. Furthermore, our IL system has the advantage that it is simple to add to a conventional micro-PIXE system.

  17. Application of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and imaging in drug delivery research - chances and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempe, Sabine; Metz, Hendrik; Mäder, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique to study chemical species with unpaired electrons. Since its discovery in 1944, it has been widely used in a number of research fields such as physics, chemistry, biology and material and food science. This review is focused on its application in drug delivery research. EPR permits the direct measurement of microviscosity and micropolarity inside drug delivery systems (DDS), the detection of microacidity, phase transitions and the characterization of colloidal drug carriers. Additional information about the spatial distribution can be obtained by EPR imaging. The chances and also the challenges of in vitro and in vivo EPR spectroscopy and imaging in the field of drug delivery are discussed.

  18. Designing Raster Cells as the Basis for Developing Personal Graphic Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Z. Vujić

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Continuous work in creating new designer solutions points towards the need to create personal routines as personalcommunication in the relation comprising design, algorithms, and original computer graphics. This paper showsprocedures for developing a control language for creating graphic designs with individual raster elements (screeningelement obtaint by halftoning. Personal commands should set routines in a language understood by the printer andthe designer. The PostScript basis is used because we mix vector and pixel graphics in the same program stream, aswell as different colour systems, and our own raster forms. The printing raster is set with the target of special designmulti-use, and this includes the field of security graphics and art computer reproduction. Each raster form assumesmodifications, creating their raster family. The raster cell content is transformed with PostScript, allowing the settingof basic values, angle and liniature for each pixel separately. Raster cells are mixed in multi-colour graphics to thelevel of individual designs with variable values of parameters determining them.

  19. In vivo imaging of a stable paramagnetic probe by pulsed-radiofrequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murugesan; Cook; Devasahayam

    1997-01-01

    Imaging of free radicals by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using time domain acquisition as in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has not been attempted because of the short spin-spin relaxation times, typically under 1 μs, of most biologically relevant paramagnetic species...... to minimize motional artifacts from cardiac and lung motion that cause significant problems in frequency-domain spectral acquisition, such as in continuous wave (cw) EPR techniques...

  20. Terahertz imaging and spectroscopy of large-area single-layer graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Tomaino, J. L.; Jameson, A. D.; Kevek, J. W.; Paul, M. J.; van der Zande, A. M.; Barton, R. A.; McEuen, P. L.; Minot, E. D.; Lee, Yun-Shik

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate terahertz (THz) imaging and spectroscopy of a 15x15-mm^2 single-layer graphene film on Si using broadband THz pulses. The THz images clearly map out the THz carrier dynamics of the graphene-on-Si sample, allowing us to measure sheet conductivity with sub-mm resolution without fabricating electrodes. The THz carrier dynamics are dominated by intraband transitions and the THz-induced electron motion is characterized by a flat spectral response. A theoretical analysis based on the...

  1. Velocity-Map Imaging Spectroscopy of the Ge^-, Sn^-, and Pb^- Negative Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartkunchand, Kiattichart; Carpenter, Kyle; Davis, Vernon; Neill, Paul; Thompson, Jeffrey; Covington, Aaron

    2012-06-01

    Photoelectrons ejected from collisions between laser-produced photons and fast-moving beams of negaitve ions have been studied using the technique of Velocity-Map Imaging (VMI) spectroscopy. Digital images produced by the VMI spectrometer have been used to determine photoelectron kinetic energy spectra, as well as photoelectron angular distributions for select isoelectronic Group 14 anions. Analysis of these data are helping to clarify detailed structural properties of these ions with increasing Z and is providing dynamical information on the photon-ion collision systems.

  2. MR imaging of glioblastoma in children: usefulness of diffusion/perfusion-weighted MRI and MR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yun-Woo; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Roh, Hong Gee; Cho, Jae Min [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Irwon-dong, Kangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea); Shin, Hyung-Jin [Department of Neurosurgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Irwon-dong, Kangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea)

    2003-12-01

    Glioblastoma is relatively uncommon in childhood and maybe difficult to differentiate from other brain tumors such as primitive neuroectodermal tumor, ependymoma, or benign astrocytoma. To describe the characteristic MR features in children with glioblastoma and to evaluate the usefulness of diffusion and perfusion MR imaging and MR spectroscopy in pediatric glioblastoma. MR imaging in 11 children (12 tumors) with biopsy-proven glioblastoma was reviewed retrospectively. In one patient, there was a recurrent glioblastoma. We reviewed CT and MRI imaging for tumor location, density/signal intensity, and enhancement pattern. Routine MR imaging was performed with a 1.5-T scanner. In six patients, diffusion-weighted MR images (DWIs) were obtained with a single-shot spin echo EPI technique with two gradient steps, and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were calculated. Using the gradient EPI technique, perfusion-weighted MR images (PWIs) were obtained in four patients from the data of dynamic MR images. The maximum relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) ratio was calculated between the tumor and contralateral white matter in two cases. In three patients, proton MR spectroscopy was performed using a single voxel technique with either STEAM or PRESS sequences. The locations of the tumor were the thalamus and basal ganglia (n=8), deep white matter (n=3), and brain stem (n=1). Intratumoral hemorrhage was seen in four tumors. The tumors showed high-signal intensity or DWIs, having a wide range of ADC values of 0.53-1.30 (mean {+-}SD=1.011{+-}0.29). The maximum rCBV ratios of glioblastoma were 10.2 and 8.5 in two cases. MR spectroscopy showed decreased N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and increased choline in three cases. The MR findings of glioblastoma in children were: a diffusely infiltrative mass with hemorrhage involving the deep cerebral white matter, thalami, and basal ganglia. Diffusion/perfusion MR imaging and MR spectroscopy are very helpful in diagnosing glioblastoma

  3. Infrared near-field imaging and spectroscopy based on thermal or synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peragut, Florian; De Wilde, Yannick, E-mail: yannick.dewilde@espci.fr [ESPCI ParisTech, PSL Research University, CNRS, Institut Langevin, 1 rue Jussieu, F-75005, Paris (France); Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale [Société Civile Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, St-Aubin BP48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-06-23

    We demonstrate the coupling of a scattering near-field scanning optical microscope combined with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The set-up operates using either the near-field thermal emission from the sample itself, which is proportional to the electromagnetic local density of states, or with an external infrared synchrotron source, which is broadband and highly brilliant. We perform imaging and spectroscopy measurements with sub-wavelength spatial resolution in the mid-infrared range on surfaces made of silicon carbide and gold and demonstrate the capabilities of the two configurations for super-resolved near-field mid-infrared hyperspectral imaging and that the simple use of a properly chosen bandpass filter on the detector allows one to image the spatial distribution of materials with sub-wavelength resolution by studying the contrast in the near-field images.

  4. Spectral characterization of acousto-optic filters used in imaging spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi; Glenar, David A; Hillman, John J

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to improve the study of the characteristics of noncollinear acoustooptic tunable filters (AOTFs) used in imaging spectroscopy. Three filters were characterized and the results compared with tuning models to verify that device operation can be reliably predicted in advance. All these devices use tellurium dioxide as the interaction medium and have large geometric apertures for spectroscopic imaging applications in the spectral range 0.5-3.5 microm. The device characteristics that we studied were compared with the results of AOTF models, and the spectral and angular dependence of acoustic frequency and bandpass width for both output polarization states were confirmed by measurements. One of the AOTFs was used as a dispersive element coupled to external imaging optics. We summarize measurements of the basic spectral and imaging characteristics in this configuration.

  5. A broadband x-ray imaging spectroscopy with high-angular resolution: the FORCE mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Koji; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Okajima, Takashi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Matsumoto, Hironori; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Zhang, William W.

    2016-07-01

    We are proposing FORCE (Focusing On Relativistic universe and Cosmic Evolution) as a future Japan-lead Xray observatory to be launched in the mid 2020s. Hitomi (ASTRO-H) possesses a suite of sensitive instruments enabling the highest energy-resolution spectroscopy in soft X-ray band, a broadband X-ray imaging spectroscopy in soft and hard X-ray bands, and further high energy coverage up to soft gamma-ray band. FORCE is the direct successor to the broadband X-ray imaging spectroscopy aspect of Hitomi (ASTRO-H) with significantly higher angular resolution. The current design of FORCE defines energy band pass of 1-80 keV with angular resolution of black holes" in various mass-scales: "buried supermassive black holes (SMBHs)" (> 104 M⊙) residing in the center of galaxies in a cosmological distance, "intermediate-mass black holes" (102-104 M⊙) acting as the possible seeds from which SMBHs grow, and "orphan stellar-mass black holes" (mirror and wide-band X-ray detector. The focal length is currently planned to be 10 m. The silicon mirror with multi-layer coating is our primary choice to achieve lightweight, good angular optics. The detector is a descendant of hard X-ray imager onboard Hitomi (ASTRO-H) replacing its silicon strip detector with SOI-CMOS silicon pixel detector, allowing an extension of the low energy threshold down to 1 keV or even less.

  6. A special JMR issue: Methodological advances in EPR spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Since about five decades, EPR spectroscopy provides important insights into the electronic structure of metalloproteins and transition-metal based catalysts. Somewhat later this spectroscopy was also applied to the study of electron transfer processes, often in radical enzymes. The study of diamagnetic proteins and nucleic acids with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) techniques became really popular in the 1990s and early in the new millennium. The same applies to applications of pulsed EPR techniques to metalloproteins, although the pioneering work in this field by Mims and Peisach dates back to the early 1970s. Pulsed dipolar spectroscopy for the measurement of distance distributions in the nanometer range has become the major EPR-based tool in structural biology during the past 15 years and is still expanding its scope. EPR (or ESR) imaging may appear to be overshadowed by (nuclear) MRI, as it has not yet found clinical application. However, development of EPR-based imaging modalities has recently gained much momentum as they can provide information that is inaccessible by any established imaging technology.

  7. Surface modification of ceramic and metallic alloy substrates by laser raster-scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Grez, Jorge Andres

    This work describes the feasibility of continuous wave laser-raster scan-processing under controlled atmospheric conditions as employed in three distinct surface modification processes: (a) surface roughness reduction of indirect-Selective Laser Sintered 420 martensitic stainless steel-40 wt. % bronze infiltrated surfaces; (b) Si-Cr-Hf-C coating consolidation over 3D carbon-carbon composites cylinders; (c) dendritic solidification structures of Mar-M 247 confined powder precursor grown from polycrystalline Alloy 718 substrates. A heat transfer model was developed to illustrate that the aspect ratio of the laser scanned pattern and the density of scanning lines play a significant role in determining peak surface temperature, heating and cooling rates and melt resident times. Comprehensive characterization of the surface of the processed specimens was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), optical metallography, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and, in certain cases, tactile profilometry. In Process (a), it was observed that a 24% to 37% roughness Ra reduction could be accomplished from the as-received value of 2.50+/-0.10 microns for laser energy densities ranging from 350 to 500 J/cm2. In Process (b), complete reactive wetting of carbon-carbon composite cylinders surface was achieved by laser melting a Si-Cr-Hf-C slurry. Coatings showed good thermal stability at 1000°C in argon, and, when tested in air, a percent weight reduction rate of -6.5 wt.%/hr was achieved. A soda-glass overcoat applied over the coated specimens by conventional means revealed a percent weight reduction rate between -1.4 to -2.2 wt.%/hr. Finally, in Process (c), microstructure of the Mar-M 247 single layer deposits, 1 mm in height, grown on Alloy 718 polycrystalline sheets, resulted in a sound metallurgical bond, low porosity, and uniform thickness. Polycrystalline dendrites grew preferentially along the [001] direction from the substrate up to 400

  8. A New Model for Automatic Raster-to-Vector Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham E. ElDeeb

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing need for automatic digitizing, or so called automated raster to vector conversion (ARVC for maps. The benefit of ARVC is the production of maps that consume less space and are easy to search for or retrieve information from. In addition, ARVC is the fundamental step to reusing old maps at higher level of recognition. In this paper, a new model for an ARVC is developed. The proposed model converts the “paper maps” into electronic formats for Geographic Information Systems (GIS and evaluates the performance of the conversion process. To overcome the limitations of existing commercial vectorization software packages, the proposed model is customized to separate textual information, usually the cause of problems in the automatic conversion process, from the delimiting graphics of the map. The model retains the coordinates of the textual information for a later merge with the map after the conversion process. The propose model also addresses the localization problems in ARVC through the knowledge-supported intelligent vectorization system that is designed specifically to improve the accuracy and speed of the vectorization process. Finally, the model has beenimplemented on a symmetric multiprocessing (SMP architecture, in order to achieve higher speed up and performance.

  9. Modelling raster-based monthly water balance components for Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmen, C.

    2000-11-01

    The terrestrial runoff component is a comparatively small but sensitive and thus significant quantity in the global energy and water cycle at the interface between landmass and atmosphere. As opposed to soil moisture and evapotranspiration which critically determine water vapour fluxes and thus water and energy transport, it can be measured as an integrated quantity over a large area, i.e. the river basin. This peculiarity makes terrestrial runoff ideally suited for the calibration, verification and validation of general circulation models (GCMs). Gauging stations are not homogeneously distributed in space. Moreover, time series are not necessarily continuously measured nor do they in general have overlapping time periods. To overcome this problems with regard to regular grid spacing used in GCMs, different methods can be applied to transform irregular data to regular so called gridded runoff fields. The present work aims to directly compute the gridded components of the monthly water balance (including gridded runoff fields) for Europe by application of the well-established raster-based macro-scale water balance model WABIMON used at the Federal Institute of Hydrology, Germany. Model calibration and validation is performed by separated examination of 29 representative European catchments. Results indicate a general applicability of the model delivering reliable overall patterns and integrated quantities on a monthly basis. For time steps less then too weeks further research and structural improvements of the model are suggested. (orig.)

  10. NETWORK DETECTION IN RASTER DATA USING MARKED POINT PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schmidt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new approach for the automatic detection of network structures in raster data. The model for the network structure is represented by a graph whose nodes and edges correspond to junction-points and to connecting line segments, respectively; nodes and edges are further described by certain parameters. We embed this model in the probabilistic framework of marked point processes and determine the most probable configuration of objects by stochastic sampling. That is, different graph configurations are constructed randomly by modifying the graph entity parameters, by adding and removing nodes and edges to/ from the current graph configuration. Each configuration is then evaluated based on the probabilities of the changes and an energy function describing the conformity with a predefined model. By using the Reversible Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler, a global optimum of the energy function is determined. We apply our method to the detection of river and tidal channel networks in digital terrain models. In comparison to our previous work, we introduce constraints concerning the flow direction of water into the energy function. Our goal is to analyse the influence of different parameter settings on the results of network detection in both, synthetic and real data. Our results show the general potential of our method for the detection of river networks in different types of terrain.

  11. GAP Land Cover - Image

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This raster dataset is a simple image of the original detailed (1-acre minimum), hierarchically organized vegetation cover map produced by computer classification of...

  12. Imaging features in conventional MRI, spectroscopy and diffusion weighted images of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Benjamin; Klose, Uwe; Lindig, Tobias; Biskup, Saskia; Nägele, Thomas; Schöls, Ludger; Karle, Kathrin N

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) is a rare autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations within the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) gene. While a small number of reports on imaging findings in routine MRI exist, reported imaging findings in DWI and spectroscopy are scarce, and limited to not genetically proven case reports. We assessed MRI including DWI and MR spectroscopy in six patients with HDLS and two asymptomatic mutation carriers. A total of 13 MRIs were evaluated and a score of the white-matter lesion (WML) load was calculated. The course of MR abnormalities was followed for 6-19 months in four patients and 95 months in one carrier. MRI revealed widespread white-matter lesions of patchy or confluent pattern especially in the frontal and occipital lobe. The pyramidal tract was less affected than the surrounding tissue in all symptomatic patients on conventional T2WI. Three of four cases with DWI showed small dots of diffusion restriction within WML. Spectroscopy showed increased levels of mIns, Cho and lactate while NAA was decreased. Asymptomatic mutation carriers had, for the age of the patients, unusually pronounced unspecific WMLs. No diffusion restriction or alterations in metabolite levels could be detected in asymptomatic mutation carriers. Microbleeds were not found in any patient. Diffusion restriction seems to be a typical imaging pattern visible in patients with active disease progression in HDLS. Spectroscopic findings and the absence of microbleeds differ clearly from reported findings in CADASIL and subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy. While the distribution and character of WMLs in asymptomatic cases remain unspecific they are likely to represent subclinical markers of HDLS.

  13. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging and 31P spectroscopy of large human brain tumours at 1.5 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Achten, E

    1988-01-01

    31P MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours is one feature of magnetic resonance imaging. Eight patients with large superficial brain tumours and eight healthy volunteers were examined with 31P spectroscopy using an 8 cm surface coil for volume selection. Seven frequencies were resolved in our spe...

  14. Broadband x-ray imaging and spectroscopy of the crab nebula and pulsar with NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristin K.; Reynolds, Stephen; Harrison, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    We present broadband (3-78 keV) NuSTAR X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of the Crab nebula and pulsar. We show that while the phase-averaged and spatially integrated nebula + pulsar spectrum is a power law in this energy band, spatially resolved spectroscopy of the nebula finds a break at ~9 keV in...

  15. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging and 31P spectroscopy of large human brain tumours at 1.5 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Achten, E;

    1988-01-01

    31P MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours is one feature of magnetic resonance imaging. Eight patients with large superficial brain tumours and eight healthy volunteers were examined with 31P spectroscopy using an 8 cm surface coil for volume selection. Seven frequencies were resolved in our spe...

  16. Challenge for spectroscopic tomography of biomembrane using imaging type two-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2010-02-01

    We propose an image-producing Fourier spectroscopic technology that enables two-dimensional spectroscopic images to be obtained within the focusing plane alone. This technology incorporates auto-correlational phase-shift interferometry that uses only object light generated by the bright points that optically make up the object. We are currently involved in studies of non-invasive technologies used to measure blood components such as glucose and lipids, which are measured for use in daily living. Previous studies have investigated non-invasive technologies that measure blood glucose levels by utilizing near-infrared light that permeates the skin well. It has been confirmed that subtle changes in the concentration of a glucose solution, a sample used to measure the glucose level, can be measured by analyzing the spectroscopic characteristics of near-infrared light; however, when applied to a biomembrane, technology such as this is incapable of precisely measuring the glucose level because light diffusion within the skin disturbs the measurement. Our proposed technology enables two-dimensional spectroscopy to a limited depth below the skin covered by the measurement. Specifically, our technology concentrates only on the vascular territory near the skin surface, which is only minimally affected by light diffusion, as discussed previously; the spectroscopic characteristics of this territory are obtained and the glucose level can be measured with good sensitivity. In this paper we propose an image-producing Fourier spectroscopy method that is used as the measuring technology in producing a three-dimensional spectroscopic image.

  17. Hypothalamic metabolic compartmentation during appetite regulation as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca eLizarbe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We review the role of neuroglial compartmentation and transcellular neurotransmitter cycling during hypothalamic appetite regulation as detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Spectroscopy (MRS methods. We address first the neurochemical basis of neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus and the orexigenic and anorexigenic feed-back loops that control appetite. Then we examine the main Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy strategies that have been used to investigate appetite regulation. Manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI, Blood oxygenation level dependent contrast (BOLD and Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI have revealed Mn2+accumulations, augmented oxygen consumptions and astrocytic swelling in the hypothalamus under fasting conditions, respectively. High field 1H magnetic resonance in vivo, showed increased hypothalamic myo-inositol concentrations as compared to other cerebral structures. 1H and 13C high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS revealed increased neuroglial oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, as well as increased hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions under orexigenic stimulation. We propose here an integrative interpretation of all these findings suggesting that the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite is supported by important ionic and metabolic transcellular fluxes which begin at the tripartite orexigenic clefts and become extended spatially in the hypothalamus through astrocytic networks, becoming eventually MRI and MRS detectable.

  18. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging, and Photocontrol: Foundations for Super-Resolution Microscopy (Nobel Lecture).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerner, W E William E

    2015-07-06

    The initial steps toward optical detection and spectroscopy of single molecules in condensed matter arose out of the study of inhomogeneously broadened optical absorption profiles of molecular impurities in solids at low temperatures. Spectral signatures relating to the fluctuations of the number of molecules in resonance led to the attainment of the single-molecule limit in 1989 using frequency-modulation laser spectroscopy. In the early 90s, many fascinating physical effects were observed for individual molecules, and the imaging of single molecules as well as observations of spectral diffusion, optical switching and the ability to select different single molecules in the same focal volume simply by tuning the pumping laser frequency provided important forerunners of the later super-resolution microscopy with single molecules. In the room temperature regime, imaging of single copies of the green fluorescent protein also uncovered surprises, especially the blinking and photoinduced recovery of emitters, which stimulated further development of photoswitchable fluorescent protein labels. Because each single fluorophore acts a light source roughly 1 nm in size, microscopic observation and localization of individual fluorophores is a key ingredient to imaging beyond the optical diffraction limit. Combining this with active control of the number of emitting molecules in the pumped volume led to the super-resolution imaging of Eric Betzig and others, a new frontier for optical microscopy beyond the diffraction limit. The background leading up to these observations is described and current developments are summarized.

  19. Nobel Lecture: Single-molecule spectroscopy, imaging, and photocontrol: Foundations for super-resolution microscopy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerner, W. E. William E.

    2015-10-01

    The initial steps toward optical detection and spectroscopy of single molecules in condensed matter arose out of the study of inhomogeneously broadened optical absorption profiles of molecular impurities in solids at low temperatures. Spectral signatures relating to the fluctuations of the number of molecules in resonance led to the attainment of the single-molecule limit in 1989 using frequency-modulation laser spectroscopy. In the early 1990s, many fascinating physical effects were observed for individual molecules, and the imaging of single molecules as well as observations of spectral diffusion, optical switching and the ability to select different single molecules in the same focal volume simply by tuning the pumping laser frequency provided important forerunners of the later super-resolution microscopy with single molecules. In the room-temperature regime, imaging of single copies of the green fluorescent protein also uncovered surprises, especially the blinking and photoinduced recovery of emitters, which stimulated further development of photoswitchable fluorescent protein labels. Because each single fluorophore acts as a light source roughly 1 nm in size, microscopic observation and localization of individual fluorophores is a key ingredient to imaging beyond the optical diffraction limit. Combining this with active control of the number of emitting molecules in the pumped volume led to the super-resolution imaging of Eric Betzig and others, a new frontier for optical microscopy beyond the diffraction limit. The background leading up to these observations is described and selected current developments are summarized.

  20. Topographic Digital Raster Graphics, USGS DRG's; reprojected to state plane, Published in 2006, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Topographic Digital Raster Graphics dataset, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2006. It is described as 'USGS DRG's; reprojected...

  1. Raster Dataset Model of the Mahogany Bed Structure in the Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — An ESRI GRID raster data model of the Mahogany bed structure was needed to perform overburden calculations in the Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado as part of a 2009...

  2. Raster Dataset Model of Overburden Above the Mahogany Zone in the Piceance Basin, Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — An ESRI GRID raster data model of the overburden material above the Mahogany Zone was needed to perform calculations in the Piceance Basin, Colorado as part of a...

  3. Raster Dataset Model of Overburden Above the Mahogany Bed in the Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — An ESRI GRID raster data model of the overburden material above the Mahogany bed was needed to perform calculations in the Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado as part of...

  4. Raster Dataset Model of Nahcolite Resources in the Piceance Basin, Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — ESRI GRID raster datasets were created to display and quantify nahcolite resources for eight oil shale zones in the Piceance Basin, Colorado as part of a 2009...

  5. Gulf of Maine - Control Points Used to Validate the Accuracies of the Interpolated Water Density Rasters

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This feature dataset contains the control points used to validate the accuracies of the interpolated water density rasters for the Gulf of Maine. These control...

  6. Raster Dataset Model of the Mahogany Zone Structure in the Piceance Basin, Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — An ESRI GRID raster data model of the Mahogany Zone structure was needed to perform overburden calculations in the Piceance Basin, Colorado as part of a 2009...

  7. NMR imaging and spectroscopy of the mammalian central nervous system after heavy ion radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, T.

    1984-09-01

    NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopic, and histopathologic techniques were used to study the proton relaxation time and related biochemical changes in the central nervous system after helium beam in vivo irradiation of the rodent brain. The spectroscopic observations reported in this dissertation were made possible by development of methods for measuring the NMR parameters of the rodent brain in vivo and in vitro. The methods include (1) depth selective spectroscopy using an optimization of rf pulse energy based on a priori knowledge of N-acetyl aspartate and lipid spectra of the normal brain, (2) phase-encoded proton spectroscopy of the living rodent using a surface coil, and (3) dual aqueous and organic tissue extraction technique for spectroscopy. Radiation induced increases were observed in lipid and p-choline peaks of the proton spectrum, in vivo. Proton NMR spectroscopy measurements on brain extracts (aqueous and organic solvents) were made to observe chemical changes that could not be seen in vivo. Radiation-induced changes were observed in lactate, GABA, glutamate, and p-choline peak areas of the aqueous fraction spectra. In the organic fraction, decreases were observed in peak area ratios of the terminal-methyl peaks, the N-methyl groups of choline, and at a peak at 2.84 ppM (phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidyl serine resonances) relative to TMS. With histology and Evans blue injections, blood-brain barrier alternations were seen as early as 4 days after irradiation. 83 references, 53 figures.

  8. Monitoring of live cell cultures during apoptosis by phase imaging and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharikova, Anna; Saide, George; Sfakis, Lauren; Park, Jun Yong; Desta, Habben; Maloney, Maxwell C.; Castracane, James; Mahajan, Supriya D.; Khmaladze, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    Non-invasive live cell measurements are an important tool in biomedical research. We present a combined digital holography/Raman spectroscopy technique to study live cell cultures during apoptosis. Digital holographic microscopy records an interference pattern between object and reference waves, so that the computationally reconstructed holographic image contains both amplitude and phase information about the sample. When the phase is mapped across the sample and converted into height information for each pixel, a three dimensional image is obtained. The measurement of live cell cultures by digital holographic microscopy yields information about cell shape and volume, changes to which are reflective of alterations in cell cycle and initiation of cell death mechanisms. Raman spectroscopy, on the other hand, is sensitive to rotational and vibrational molecular transitions, as well as intermolecular vibrations. Therefore, Raman spectroscopy provides complementary information about cells, such as protein, lipid and nucleic acid content, and, particularly, the spectral signatures associated with structural changes in molecules. The cell cultures are kept in the temperature-controlled environmental chamber during the experiment, which allows monitoring over multiple cell cycles. The DHM system combines a visible (red) laser source with conventional microscope base, and LabVIEW-run data processing. We analyzed and compared cell culture information obtained by these two methods.

  9. Advances in Contactless Silicon Defect and Impurity Diagnostics Based on Lifetime Spectroscopy and Infrared Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Schmidt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a review of some recent developments in the field of contactless silicon wafer characterization techniques based on lifetime spectroscopy and infrared imaging. In the first part of the contribution, we outline the status of different lifetime spectroscopy approaches suitable for the identification of impurities in silicon and discuss—in more detail—the technique of temperature- and injection-dependent lifetime spectroscopy. The second part of the paper focuses on the application of infrared cameras to analyze spatial inhomogeneities in silicon wafers. By measuring the infrared signal absorbed or emitted from light-generated free excess carriers, high-resolution recombination lifetime mappings can be generated within seconds to minutes. In addition, mappings of non-recombination-active trapping centers can be deduced from injection-dependent infrared lifetime images. The trap density has been demonstrated to be an important additional parameter in the characterization and assessment of solar-grade multicrystalline silicon wafers, as areas of increased trap density tend to deteriorate during solar cell processing.

  10. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-07-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications.

  11. BIGRE: a low cross-talk integral field unit tailored for extrasolar planets imaging spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Antichi, Jacopo; Gratton, Raffaele G; Mesa, Dino; Claudi, Riccardo U; Giro, Enrico; Boccaletti, Anthony; Mouillet, David; Puget, Pascal; Beuzit, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    Integral field spectroscopy (IFS) represents a powerful technique for the detection and characterization of extrasolar planets through high contrast imaging, since it allows to obtain simultaneously a large number of monochromatic images. These can be used to calibrate and then to reduce the impact of speckles, once their chromatic dependence is taken into account. The main concern in designing integral field spectrographs for high contrast imaging is the impact of the diffraction effects and the non-common path aberrations together with an efficient use of the detector pixels. We focus our attention on integral field spectrographs based on lenslet-arrays, discussing the main features of these designs: the conditions of appropriate spatial and spectral sampling of the resulting spectrograph's slit functions and their related cross-talk terms when the system works at the diffraction limit. We present a new scheme for the integral field unit (IFU) based on a dual-lenslet device (BIGRE), that solves some of the ...

  12. Optical coherence tomography – near infrared spectroscopy system and catheter for intravascular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fard, Ali M.; Vacas-Jacques, Paulino; Hamidi, Ehsan; Wang, Hao; Carruth, Robert W.; Gardecki, Joseph A.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2013-01-01

    Owing to its superior resolution, intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is a promising tool for imaging the microstructure of coronary artery walls. However, IVOCT does not identify chemicals and molecules in the tissue, which is required for a more complete understanding and accurate diagnosis of coronary disease. Here we present a dual-modality imaging system and catheter that uniquely combines IVOCT with diffuse near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in a single dual-modality imaging device for simultaneous acquisition of microstructural and compositional information. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, the device has been used to visualize co-incident microstructural and spectroscopic information obtained from a diseased cadaver human coronary artery. PMID:24514658

  13. Commissioning and modification of the low temperature scanning polarization microscope (TTSPM) and imaging of the local magnetic flux density distribution in superconducting niobium samples; Inbetriebnahme und Modifikation eines Tieftemperatur-Raster-Polarisations-Mikroskops (TTRPM) und Abbildung der lokalen Flussdichteverteilung in supraleitenden Niob-Proben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenzweig, Matthias Sebastian Peter

    2014-07-11

    }). Indeed, it has been possible to image the magnetization reversal process and thus the formation (or destruction) and the migration of an ''Interfacial Domain Wall'' (IDW) in such a Fe{sub 1-x}Tb{sub x}/ vertical stroke Co/Pt vertical stroke {sub n}-heterostructure. Part II of the dissertation is about the magneto-optical imaging of superconducting Niobium coplanar microwave resonators as well as of a Niobium single crystal. By means of the magneto-optical images of the resonators, important findings about magnetic hysteresis effects in such coplanar microwave resonators could be achieved. It was also possible to confirm the results of transmission spectroscopy experiments on those coplanar resonators, which were performed in a previous dissertation of Daniel Bothner. Additionally, it was possible to show that initially inserted Abrikosov vortices can be almost completely removed from the coplanar resonators again by properly cycling the magnetic field. On the basis of magneto-optical images of a 2 mm thick Niobium single crystal, it was possible to observe dendritic avalanches in a superconducting bulk material for the first time. Here, the dendritic avalanches only appear in a very narrow temperature interval of about a tenth of a Kelvin below the critical temperature T{sub c} of the Niobium single crystal. Below this threshold temperature the magnetic flux penetrates nearly homogeneously into the single crystal. The observed dendritic avalanches in the bulk single crystal near T{sub c} have features which are identical to those seen in thin films at low temperatures caused by thermomagnetic instability. Therefore, one can conclude that the dendritic avalanches in the single crystal are formed in a thin superconducting layer at the surface of the single crystal, which can be formed under certain conditions near T{sub c}.

  14. AFM-IR: Technology and Applications in Nanoscale Infrared Spectroscopy and Chemical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazzi, Alexandre; Prater, Craig B

    2016-12-13

    Atomic force microscopy-based infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) is a rapidly emerging technique that provides chemical analysis and compositional mapping with spatial resolution far below conventional optical diffraction limits. AFM-IR works by using the tip of an AFM probe to locally detect thermal expansion in a sample resulting from absorption of infrared radiation. AFM-IR thus can provide the spatial resolution of AFM in combination with the chemical analysis and compositional imaging capabilities of infrared spectroscopy. This article briefly reviews the development and underlying technology of AFM-IR, including recent advances, and then surveys a wide range of applications and investigations using AFM-IR. AFM-IR applications that will be discussed include those in polymers, life sciences, photonics, solar cells, semiconductors, pharmaceuticals, and cultural heritage. In the Supporting Information , the authors provide a theoretical section that reviews the physics underlying the AFM-IR measurement and detection mechanisms.

  15. Image-guided optical spectroscopy in diagnosis of osteoarthritis by combining spectral and spatial a-priori information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhen; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Huizhu; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-02-01

    A multi-modality imaging approach and instrument that integrate optical imaging system and near-infrared spectroscopy into an x-ray tomosynthesis setup have been employed to perform a clinical study of image-guided spectroscopy on osteoarthritis (OA) in the finger joints. The multiwavelength spectroscopy of the joints using x-ray-guided spatial constraints provides 3D images of oxygen saturation and water content with high resolution and improved quantitative capability. Based on the recovered quantitative results from 18 healthy volunteers and 22 patients, we observed that oxygen saturation and water content were significant discriminators for differentiation of healthy joints from diseased ones. The recovered images appear to show that the OA joints have high water values and decreased oxygen saturation.

  16. Distributed read-out imaging devices for x-ray imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Roland H.; Martin, Didier D.; Kozorezov, A. G.; Verhoeve, Peter; Rando, Nicola; Peacock, Anthony J.; Brammertz, G.; Krumrey, Michael K.; Goldie, D. J.; Venn, R.

    2000-07-01

    We present an experimental study of the performance of Distributed Read-Out Imaging Devices (DROIDs), 1- and 2-D photon-counting imaging spectrometers, based on Ta/Al-based STJs placed on a Ta absorber. Results obtained with highly collimated illumination with 10 keV X-ray photons clearly demonstrate the imaging capabilities of 2-D DROIDs. The derived spatial FWHM resolution is 7 micrometers for a 200 X 200 micrometers 2 absorber. With a 1-D DROID we have measured an intrinsic energy resolution of 15 eV FWHM for 6 keV photons. At high energies (E > 6 keV) the resolution is limited by spatial fluctuations in the qp recombination rate.

  17. Probe-Scale Mission Concepts for Direct Imaging and Spectroscopy of Nearby Exoplanet Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; Seager, Sara; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Warfield, Keith; Dekens, Frank G.; Blackwood, Gary; Exo-S Science; Technology Definition Team, Exo-C Science; Technology Definition Team, JPL Probe Study Design Teams

    2015-01-01

    Two mission concepts are now under study for detecting visible light from exoplanets orbiting nearby stars through high-contrast imaging and for characterizing them through spectroscopy. Exo-S uses a starshade (external occulter) that flies in front of a telescope to block out the central starlight; Exo-C uses a coronagraph with an internal occulter to accomplish the suppression of starlight. Both concepts have the objective of taking optical spectra of nearby exoplanets in reflected light, searching for previously undetected planets, and imaging structure in circumstellar debris disks.The concepts are being developed by two NASA-selected community-led Science and Technology Definition Teams (STDTs), supported by study design teams from NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program. In addition to developing concepts with an estimated cost ~1B, the Teams are identifying key enabling technologies needed for their designs. These concepts complement existing NASA missions that do exoplanet science (such as transit spectroscopy and debris disk imaging with HST and Spitzer) or are under development or active study (TESS, JWST, WFIRST-AFTA).Final Reports from the two studies will be published in early 2015. This poster serves as an introduction to a series of posters featuring the two studies. At the conclusion of the studies in early 2015, NASA will evaluate them for further technology development and possible development as flight missions. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  18. Imaging spectroscopy links aspen genotype with below-ground processes at landscape scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madritch, Michael D; Kingdon, Clayton C; Singh, Aditya; Mock, Karen E; Lindroth, Richard L; Townsend, Philip A

    2014-01-01

    Fine-scale biodiversity is increasingly recognized as important to ecosystem-level processes. Remote sensing technologies have great potential to estimate both biodiversity and ecosystem function over large spatial scales. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of imaging spectroscopy to discriminate among genotypes of Populus tremuloides (trembling aspen), one of the most genetically diverse and widespread forest species in North America. We combine imaging spectroscopy (AVIRIS) data with genetic, phytochemical, microbial and biogeochemical data to determine how intraspecific plant genetic variation influences below-ground processes at landscape scales. We demonstrate that both canopy chemistry and below-ground processes vary over large spatial scales (continental) according to aspen genotype. Imaging spectrometer data distinguish aspen genotypes through variation in canopy spectral signature. In addition, foliar spectral variation correlates well with variation in canopy chemistry, especially condensed tannins. Variation in aspen canopy chemistry, in turn, is correlated with variation in below-ground processes. Variation in spectra also correlates well with variation in soil traits. These findings indicate that forest tree species can create spatial mosaics of ecosystem functioning across large spatial scales and that these patterns can be quantified via remote sensing techniques. Moreover, they demonstrate the utility of using optical properties as proxies for fine-scale measurements of biodiversity over large spatial scales.

  19. A nested phosphorus and proton coil array for brain magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan; Lakshmanan, Karthik; Madelin, Guillaume; Parasoglou, Prodromos

    2016-01-01

    A dual-nuclei radiofrequency coil array was constructed for phosphorus and proton magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of the human brain at 7T. An eight-channel transceive degenerate birdcage phosphorus module was implemented to provide whole-brain coverage and significant sensitivity improvement over a standard dual-tuned loop coil. A nested eight-channel proton module provided adequate sensitivity for anatomical localization without substantially sacrificing performance on the phosphorus module. The developed array enabled phosphorus spectroscopy, a saturation transfer technique to calculate the global creatine kinase forward reaction rate, and single-metabolite whole-brain imaging with 1.4cm nominal isotropic resolution in 15min (2.3cm actual resolution), while additionally enabling 1mm isotropic proton imaging. This study demonstrates that a multi-channel array can be utilized for phosphorus and proton applications with improved coverage and/or sensitivity over traditional single-channel coils. The efficient multi-channel coil array, time-efficient pulse sequences, and the enhanced signal strength available at ultra-high fields can be combined to allow volumetric assessment of the brain and could provide new insights into the underlying energy metabolism impairment in several neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, as well as mental disorders such as schizophrenia.

  20. Drought stress and carbon uptake in an Amazon forest measured with spaceborne imaging spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, Gregory P; Nepstad, Daniel; Cardinot, Gina; Ray, David

    2004-04-20

    Amazônia contains vast stores of carbon in high-diversity ecosystems, yet this region undergoes major changes in precipitation affecting land use, carbon dynamics, and climate. The extent and structural complexity of Amazon forests impedes ground studies of ecosystem functions such as net primary production (NPP), water cycling, and carbon sequestration. Traditional modeling and remote-sensing approaches are not well suited to tropical forest studies, because (i) biophysical mechanisms determining drought effects on canopy water and carbon dynamics are poorly known, and (ii) remote-sensing metrics of canopy greenness may be insensitive to small changes in leaf area accompanying drought. New spaceborne imaging spectroscopy may detect drought stress in tropical forests, helping to monitor forest physiology and constrain carbon models. We combined a forest drought experiment in Amazônia with spaceborne imaging spectrometer measurements of this area. With field data on rainfall, soil water, and leaf and canopy responses, we tested whether spaceborne hyperspectral observations quantify differences in canopy water and NPP resulting from drought stress. We found that hyperspectral metrics of canopy water content and light-use efficiency are highly sensitive to drought. Using these observations, forest NPP was estimated with greater sensitivity to drought conditions than with traditional combinations of modeling, remote-sensing, and field measurements. Spaceborne imaging spectroscopy will increase the accuracy of ecological studies in humid tropical forests.

  1. Forest point processes for the automatic extraction of networks in raster data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Alena; Lafarge, Florent; Brenner, Claus; Rottensteiner, Franz; Heipke, Christian

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a new stochastic approach for the automatic detection of network structures in raster data. We represent a network as a set of trees with acyclic planar graphs. We embed this model in the probabilistic framework of spatial point processes and determine the most probable configuration of trees by stochastic sampling. That is, different configurations are constructed randomly by modifying the graph parameters and by adding or removing nodes and edges to/ from the current trees. Each configuration is evaluated based on the probabilities for these changes and an energy function describing the conformity with a predefined model. By using the Reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler, an approximation of the global optimum of the energy function is iteratively reached. Although our main target application is the extraction of rivers and tidal channels in digital terrain models, experiments with other types of networks in images show the transferability to further applications. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations demonstrate the competitiveness of our approach with respect to existing algorithms.

  2. Delineating Individual Trees from Lidar Data: A Comparison of Vector- and Raster-based Segmentation Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggi Kelly

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Light detection and ranging (lidar data is increasingly being used for ecosystem monitoring across geographic scales. This work concentrates on delineating individual trees in topographically-complex, mixed conifer forest across the California’s Sierra Nevada. We delineated individual trees using vector data and a 3D lidar point cloud segmentation algorithm, and using raster data with an object-based image analysis (OBIA of a canopy height model (CHM. The two approaches are compared to each other and to ground reference data. We used high density (9 pulses/m2, discreet lidar data and WorldView-2 imagery to delineate individual trees, and to classify them by species or species types. We also identified a new method to correct artifacts in a high-resolution CHM. Our main focus was to determine the difference between the two types of approaches and to identify the one that produces more realistic results. We compared the delineations via tree detection, tree heights, and the shape of the generated polygons. The tree height agreement was high between the two approaches and the ground data (r2: 0.93–0.96. Tree detection rates increased for more dominant trees (8–100 percent. The two approaches delineated tree boundaries that differed in shape: the lidar-approach produced fewer, more complex, and larger polygons that more closely resembled real forest structure.

  3. Halftone biasing OPC technology: an approach for achieving fine bias control on raster-scan systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kent H.; Chen, J. Fung; Socha, Robert J.; Laidig, Thomas L.; Wampler, Kurt E.; Van Den Broeke, Douglas J.; Dusa, Mircea V.; Caldwell, Roger F.

    1999-08-01

    As the semiconductor roadmap continues to require imaging of smaller features on wafers, we continue to explore new approaches in OPC strategies to enhance existing technology. Advanced reticle design, intended for printing sub-wavelength features, requires the support of very fine-increment biases on semi-densely-pitched lines, where the CD correction requires only a fraction of the spot size of an e-beam system. Halftone biasing, a new OPC strategy, has been proposed to support these biases on a raster-scan e-beam system without the need for a reduced address unit and the consequent write time penalty. The manufacturability and inspectability of halftone-biased lines are explored, using an OPC characterization reticle. Pattern fidelity is examined using both optical and SEM tools. Printed DUV resist line edge profiles are compared for both halftone and non-halftone feature edges. Halftone biasing was applied to an SRAM-type simulation reticle, to examine its impact on data volume, write time reduction, and printing performance.

  4. CRF-PEPICO: Double velocity map imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy for reaction kinetics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztáray, Bálint; Voronova, Krisztina; Torma, Krisztián G.; Covert, Kyle J.; Bodi, Andras; Hemberger, Patrick; Gerber, Thomas; Osborn, David L.

    2017-07-01

    Photoelectron photoion coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy could become a powerful tool for the time-resolved study of multi-channel gas phase chemical reactions. Toward this goal, we have designed and tested electron and ion optics that form the core of a new PEPICO spectrometer, utilizing simultaneous velocity map imaging for both cations and electrons, while also achieving good cation mass resolution through space focusing. These optics are combined with a side-sampled, slow-flow chemical reactor for photolytic initiation of gas-phase chemical reactions. Together with a recent advance that dramatically increases the dynamic range in PEPICO spectroscopy [D. L. Osborn et al., J. Chem. Phys. 145, 164202 (2016)], the design described here demonstrates a complete prototype spectrometer and reactor interface to carry out time-resolved experiments. Combining dual velocity map imaging with cation space focusing yields tightly focused photoion images for translationally cold neutrals, while offering good mass resolution for thermal samples as well. The flexible optics design incorporates linear electric fields in the ionization region, surrounded by dual curved electric fields for velocity map imaging of ions and electrons. Furthermore, the design allows for a long extraction stage, which makes this the first PEPICO experiment to combine ion imaging with the unimolecular dissociation rate constant measurements of cations to detect and account for kinetic shifts. Four examples are shown to illustrate some capabilities of this new design. We recorded the threshold photoelectron spectrum of the propargyl and the iodomethyl radicals. While the former agrees well with a literature threshold photoelectron spectrum, we have succeeded in resolving the previously unobserved vibrational structure in the latter. We have also measured the bimolecular rate constant of the CH2I + O2 reaction and observed its product, the smallest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO. Finally, the second

  5. Environmental Filtering of Forest Canopy Functional Traits Determined from Imaging Spectroscopy 139618

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, G. P.

    2016-12-01

    Forests play a vital role in the functioning of the biosphere, yet little is known about functional properties of forest canopies that contribute to biospheric processes. Forest canopy functional traits - the chemical and physical properties of the foliage mediating carbon update, nutrient use, and water relations - are of particular interest because they link tree physiology to biogeochemical and hydrological cycles. Measuring forest canopy functional traits has been a slow, laborious, and usually spatially biased process. Forest functional traits are difficult to assess because spatial and temporal variation often exceeds our ability to adequately utilize field-based approaches, and traditional satellite observations do not easily reveal functionally-relevant differences or changes. Using high-fidelity imaging spectroscopy, it is possible to measure, map and monitor a growing suite of forest canopy functional traits, including water content, multiple nutrients, photosynthetic pigments, and defense compounds. In combination, these traits describe a large proportion of tree physiology, and the interaction with abiotic and biotic drivers. Using airborne imaging spectroscopy from the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, combined with maps of geophysical, climatic and land-use factors, we have determined the relative importance of these environmental filters in determining forest canopy functional traits over large areas such as the Peruvian Amazon, California, and Borneo. Results indicate consistency in the critical role of certain environmental factors that geographically sort forest canopy functional traits, with multiple secondary factors shifting their contribution among forest types. Mapping and monitoring a suite of forest functional traits is now possible at sub-continental scales using airborne high-fidelity imaging spectroscopy. Taking this new scientific knowledge and capability global will require an Earth observing mission with 15-16 day revisit and a spatial

  6. Imaging spectroscopy: Earth and planetary remote sensing with the USGS Tetracorder and expert systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R.N.; Swayze, G.A.; Livo, K.E.; Kokaly, R.F.; Sutley, S.J.; Dalton, J.B.; McDougal, R.R.; Gent, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is a tool that can be used to spectrally identify and spatially map materials based on their specific chemical bonds. Spectroscopic analysis requires significantly more sophistication than has been employed in conventional broadband remote sensing analysis. We describe a new system that is effective at material identification and mapping: a set of algorithms within an expert system decision-making framework that we call Tetracorder. The expertise in the system has been derived from scientific knowledge of spectral identification. The expert system rules are implemented in a decision tree where multiple algorithms are applied to spectral analysis, additional expert rules and algorithms can be applied based on initial results, and more decisions are made until spectral analysis is complete. Because certain spectral features are indicative of specific chemical bonds in materials, the system can accurately identify and map those materials. In this paper we describe the framework of the decision making process used for spectral identification, describe specific spectral feature analysis algorithms, and give examples of what analyses and types of maps are possible with imaging spectroscopy data. We also present the expert system rules that describe which diagnostic spectral features are used in the decision making process for a set of spectra of minerals and other common materials. We demonstrate the applications of Tetracorder to identify and map surface minerals, to detect sources of acid rock drainage, and to map vegetation species, ice, melting snow, water, and water pollution, all with one set of expert system rules. Mineral mapping can aid in geologic mapping and fault detection and can provide a better understanding of weathering, mineralization, hydrothermal alteration, and other geologic processes. Environmental site assessment, such as mapping source areas of acid mine drainage, has resulted in the acceleration of site cleanup, saving

  7. New approach towards imaging -DNA using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shirshendu Dey; Sushama Pethkar; Suguna D Adyanthaya; Murali Sastry; C V Dharmadhikari

    2008-06-01

    A new methodology to anchor -DNA to silanized -Si(111) surface using Langmuir Blodget trough was developed. The -Si (111) was silanized by treating it with low molecular weight octyltrichlorosilane in toluene. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) image of -DNA on octyltrichlorosilane deposited Si substrate shows areas exhibiting arrayed structures of 700 nm length and 40 nm spacing. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) at different stages depict a broad distribution of defect states in the bandgap region of -Si(111) which presumably facilitates tunneling through otherwise insulating DNA layer.

  8. Detection of citrus canker and Huanglongbing using fluorescence imaging spectroscopy and support vector machine technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterich, Caio Bruno; Felipe de Oliveira Neves, Ruan; Belasque, José; Marcassa, Luis Gustavo

    2016-01-10

    Citrus canker and Huanglongbing (HLB) are citrus diseases that represent a serious threat to the citrus production worldwide and may cause large economic losses. In this work, we combined fluorescence imaging spectroscopy (FIS) and a machine learning technique to discriminate between these diseases and other ordinary citrus conditions that may be present at citrus orchards, such as citrus scab and zinc deficiency. Our classification results are highly accurate when discriminating citrus canker from citrus scab (97.8%), and HLB from zinc deficiency (95%). These results show that it is possible to accurately identify citrus diseases that present similar symptoms.

  9. Multi-anode microchannel arrays - New detectors for imaging and spectroscopy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy, J. G.; Bybee, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Consideration is given to the construction and operation of multi-anode microchannel array detector systems having formats as large as 256 x 1024 pixels. Such arrays are being developed for imaging and spectroscopy at soft X-ray, ultraviolet and visible wavelengths from balloons, sounding rockets and space probes. Both discrete-anode and coincidence-anode arrays are described. Two types of photocathode structures are evaluated: an opaque photocathode deposited directly on the curved-channel MCP and an activated cathode deposited on a proximity-focused mesh. Future work will include sensitivity optimization in the different wavelength regions and the development of detector tubes with semitransparent proximity-focused photocathodes.

  10. Imaging spectroscopy: Earth and planetary remote sensing with the USGS Tetracorder and expert systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Livo, K. Eric; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Sutley, Steve J.; Dalton, J. Brad; McDougal, Robert R.; Gent, Carol A.

    2003-12-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is a tool that can be used to spectrally identify and spatially map materials based on their specific chemical bonds. Spectroscopic analysis requires significantly more sophistication than has been employed in conventional broadband remote sensing analysis. We describe a new system that is effective at material identification and mapping: a set of algorithms within an expert system decision-making framework that we call Tetracorder. The expertise in the system has been derived from scientific knowledge of spectral identification. The expert system rules are implemented in a decision tree where multiple algorithms are applied to spectral analysis, additional expert rules and algorithms can be applied based on initial results, and more decisions are made until spectral analysis is complete. Because certain spectral features are indicative of specific chemical bonds in materials, the system can accurately identify and map those materials. In this paper we describe the framework of the decision making process used for spectral identification, describe specific spectral feature analysis algorithms, and give examples of what analyses and types of maps are possible with imaging spectroscopy data. We also present the expert system rules that describe which diagnostic spectral features are used in the decision making process for a set of spectra of minerals and other common materials. We demonstrate the applications of Tetracorder to identify and map surface minerals, to detect sources of acid rock drainage, and to map vegetation species, ice, melting snow, water, and water pollution, all with one set of expert system rules. Mineral mapping can aid in geologic mapping and fault detection and can provide a better understanding of weathering, mineralization, hydrothermal alteration, and other geologic processes. Environmental site assessment, such as mapping source areas of acid mine drainage, has resulted in the acceleration of site cleanup, saving

  11. Optimization of Monochromated TEM for Ultimate Resolution Imaging and Ultrahigh Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Lopatin, Sergei

    2017-09-01

    The performance of a monochromated transmission electron microscope with Wien type monochromator is optimized to achieve an extremely narrow energy spread of electron beam and an ultrahigh energy resolution with spectroscopy. The energy spread in the beam is improved by almost an order of magnitude as compared to specified values. The optimization involves both the monochromator and the electron energy loss detection system. We demonstrate boosted capability of optimized systems with respect to ultra-low loss EELS and sub-angstrom resolution imaging (in a combination with spherical aberration correction).

  12. Proton MR spectroscopy in patients with pyogenic brain abscess: MR spectroscopic imaging versus single-voxel spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Shuo-Hsiu, E-mail: gerwuver@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chou, Ming-Chung, E-mail: mcchou@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Ko, Cheng-Wen, E-mail: chengwen.ko@gmail.com [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hsu, Shu-Shong, E-mail: sshsu59@yahoo.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Huey-Shyan, E-mail: sc035@fy.edu.tw [Program of Health-Business Administration, School of Nursing, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Fu, Jui-Hsun, E-mail: fujuihsun@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Po-Chin, E-mail: hiscore6@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Pan, Huay-Ben, E-mail: panhb@vghks.gov.tw [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lai, Ping-Hong, E-mail: pinghonglai@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China); School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Single-voxel spectroscopy (SVS) has been the gold standard technique to diagnose the pyogenic abssess. Two-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is able to provide spatial distribution of metabolic concentration, and is potentially more suitable for differential diagnosis between abscess and necrotic tumors. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the equivalence of MRSI and SVS in the detection of the metabolites in pyogenic brain abscesses. Materials and methods: Forty-two patients with pyogenic abscesses were studied by using both SVS and MRSI methods. Two neuroradiologists reviewed the MRS data independently. A κ value was calculated to express inter-reader agreement of the abscesses metabolites, and a correlation coefficient was calculated to show the similarity of two spectra. After consensus judgment of two readers, the binary value of metabolites of pyogenic abscesses (presence or absence) was compared between SVS and MRSI. Results: The consistency of spectral interpretation of the two readers was very good (κ ranged from 0.95 to 1), and the similarity of two spectra was also very high (cc = 0.9 ± 0.05). After consensus judgment of two readers, the sensitivities of MRSI ranged from 91% (acetate) to 100% (amino acids, succinate, lactate, lipid), and the specificities of MRSI were 100% for detecting all metabolites with SVS as reference. Conclusion: SVS and MRSI provide similar metabolites in the cavity of pyogenic brain abscess. With additional metabolic information of cavity wall and contralateral normal-appearing brain tissue, MRSI would be a more suitable technique to differentiate abscesses from necrotic tumors.

  13. Molecular constituents of colorectal cancer metastatic to the liver by imaging infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, James V.; Chen, Zhaomin; Li, Ran; Nystrom, Steven V.; Butke, Ryan; Miller, Barrie; Hitchcock, Charles L.; Allen, Heather C.; Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.

    2015-03-01

    Infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy of human liver tissue slices has been used to identify and characterize liver metastasis of colorectal origin which was surgically removed from a consenting patient and frozen without formalin fixation or dehydration procedures, so that lipids and water remain in the tissues. First, a k-means clustering analysis, using metrics from the IR spectra, identified groups within the image. The groups were identified as tumor or nontumor regions by comparing to an H and E stain of the same sample after IR imaging. Then, calibrant IR spectra of protein, several fats, glycogen, and polyvinyl alcohol were isolated by differencing spectra from different regions or groups in the image space. Finally, inner products (or scores) of the IR spectra at each pixel in the image with each of the various calibrants were calculated showing how the calibrant molecules vary in tumor and nontumor regions. In this particular case, glycogen and protein changes enable separation of tumor and nontumor regions as shown with a contour plot of the glycogen scores versus the protein scores.

  14. Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons with an imaging camera and its implications to spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Wanchun; Hoffbauer, M A; Makela, M; Morris, C L; Tang, Z; Adamek, E R; Callahan, N B; Clayton, S M; Cude-Woods, C; Currie, S; Dees, E B; Ding, X; Geltenbort, P; Hickerson, K P; Holley, A T; Ito, T M; Leung, K K; Liu, C -Y; Morley, D J; Ramsey, J C; Pattie,, R W; Salvat, D J; Saunders, A; Seestrom, S J; Sharapov, E I; Sjue, S K; Wexler, J; Womack, T L; Young, A R; Zeck, B A; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-01-01

    Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is demonstrated using an imaging charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. A spatial resolution less than 15 $\\mu$m has been achieved, which through the relation $\\delta E = m_0g \\delta x$, converts to UCN energy resolution below 2 pico-electron volts. The symbols $\\delta E$, $\\delta x$, $m_0$ and $g$ are for energy resolution, spatial resolution, the neutron rest mass and gravitational acceleration respectively. A multilayer surface convertor described previously is used to capture UCNs and emits visible light for CCD imaging. Particle identification and noise rejection are discussed through light intensity profile analysis. This method allows new types of UCN spectroscopy and various applications.

  15. Analysis of thermal degradation of organic light-emitting diodes with infrared imaging and impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Kiyeol; Cho, Kyoungah; Kim, Sangsig

    2013-12-02

    We propose a route to examine the thermal degradation of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with infrared (IR) imaging and impedance spectroscopy. Four different OLEDs with tris (8-hydroxyquinolinato) aluminum are prepared in this study for the analysis of thermal degradation. Our comparison of the thermal and electrical characteristics of these OLEDs reveals that the real-time temperatures of these OLEDs obtained from the IR images clearly correlate with the electrical properties and lifetimes. The OLED with poor electrical properties shows a fairly high temperature during the operation and a considerably short lifetime. Based on the correlation of the real-time temperature and the performance of the OLEDs, the impedance results suggest different thermal degradation mechanisms for each of the OLEDs. The analysis method suggested in this study will be helpful in developing OLEDs with higher efficiency and longer lifetime.

  16. Perfusion MR imaging and proton MR spectroscopy in a case of dysembryroplastic neuroepithelial tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang; LI Kun-cheng; CHEN Li; LU De-hong; ZHANG Guo-jun; LI Yong-jie

    2005-01-01

    @@ Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNTs), which were first described by Daumas-Duport in 1988, are one of rare benign tumors usually associated with medically intractable seizures which date from childhood.1 The clinical, pathologic and neuroradiologic findings of DNT have been described.2 Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology allow the acquisition of cerebral microcirculation parameters by perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) and brain metabolic indices by MR spectroscopy (MRS). Several studies have shown the utility of PWI and MRS can improve the diagnostic accuracy of brain tumor,3 we combine the two techniques to evaluate a case with DNT and suggest that wider application of these techniques is warranted.

  17. Structure and dynamics of fluorescently labeled complex fluids by fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassman; Knowles; Marcus

    2000-12-01

    We present a method of Fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy (FICS) that performs phase-sensitive measurements of modulated optical signals from fluorescently labeled complex fluids. FICS experiments probe the time-dependent trajectory of a spatial Fourier component of the fluid particle density at a specified wave number k, and provide a direct route to the intermediate scattering function. The FICS approach overcomes signal sensitivity problems associated with dynamic light scattering, while offering a means to acquire time-dependent information about spatial distributions of fluorescent particles, superior in efficiency to direct imaging methods. We describe the instrumental setup necessary to perform FICS experiments, and outline the theory that establishes the connection between FICS observables and statistical mechanical quantities describing liquid state dynamics. Test measurements on monolayer suspensions of rhodamine labeled polystyrene spheres are detailed.

  18. THz reflection spectroscopy of C-4 explosive and its detection through interferometric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Amartya; Bandyopadhyay, Aparajita; Barat, Robert B.; Gary, Dale E.; Federici, John F.

    2006-02-01

    In recent times, Terahertz (1 THz = 10 12 cycles/sec and 300 μm in wavelength) spectroscopy has become a promising technique for spectroscopic identification of different materials having contemporary interest. In this study we report a direct measurement of reflection spectra of the explosive C-4, which shows significant absorption around 0.8 THz, using THz time domain spectroscopic techniques. A contrast in reflection of around 8% has also been observed between the neighboring frequencies of 0.7 THz and 0.9 THz. The spectral data have been used to create realistic synthetic images for use in simulations of interferometric detection in a stand-off THz imaging system. The results obtained are analyzed using Artificial Neural Networks for positive identification of the agents with an interferometric array of few linear detectors in near field mode.

  19. Preliminary study on diffuse axonal injury by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy histopathology imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tiantong; He, Guanglong; Zhang, Xiang; Chang, Lin; Zhang, Haidong; Ripple, Mary G; Fowler, David R; Li, Ling

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the application of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for detecting diffuse axonal injury (DAI) in a mouse model. Brain tissues from DAI mouse model were prepared with H&E, silver, and β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) immunohistochemistry stains and were also studied with FTIR. The infrared spectrum images showed high absorption of amide II in the subcortical white matter of the experimental mouse brain, while there was no obvious expression of amide II in the control mouse brain. The areas with high absorption of amide II were in the same distribution as the DAI region confirmed by the silver and β-APP studies. The result suggests that high absorption of amide II correlates with axonal injury. The use of FTIR imaging allows the biochemical changes associated with DAI pathologies to be detected in the tissues, thus providing an important adjunct method to the current conventional pathological diagnostic techniques.

  20. Usability of multiangular imaging spectroscopy data for analysis of vegetation canopy shadow fraction in boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiet, Vincent; Perheentupa, Viljami; Mõttus, Matti; Hernández-Clemente, Rocío

    2016-04-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is a remote sensing technology which records continuous spectral data at a very high (better than 10 nm) resolution. Such spectral images can be used to monitor, for example, the photosynthetic activity of vegetation. Photosynthetic activity is dependent on varying light conditions and varies within the canopy. To measure this variation we need very high spatial resolution data with resolution better than the dominating canopy element size (e.g., tree crown in a forest canopy). This is useful, e.g., for detecting photosynthetic downregulation and thus plant stress. Canopy illumination conditions are often quantified using the shadow fraction: the fraction of visible foliage which is not sunlit. Shadow fraction is known to depend on view angle (e.g., hot spot images have very low shadow fraction). Hence, multiple observation angles potentially increase the range of shadow fraction in the imagery in high spatial resolution imaging spectroscopy data. To investigate the potential of multi-angle imaging spectroscopy in investigating canopy processes which vary with shadow fraction, we obtained a unique multiangular airborne imaging spectroscopy data for the Hyytiälä forest research station located in Finland (61° 50'N, 24° 17'E) in July 2015. The main tree species are Norway spruce (Picea abies L. karst), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh., Betula pendula Roth). We used an airborne hyperspectral sensor AISA Eagle II (Specim - Spectral Imaging Ltd., Finland) mounted on a tilting platform. The tilting platform allowed us to measure at nadir and approximately 35 degrees off-nadir. The hyperspectral sensor has a 37.5 degrees field of view (FOV), 0.6m pixel size, 128 spectral bands with an average spectral bandwidth of 4.6nm and is sensitive in the 400-1000 nm spectral region. The airborne data was radiometrically, atmospherically and geometrically processed using the Parge and Atcor software (Re Se applications Schl

  1. The potential role of magnetic resonance spectroscopy in image-guided radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Lin Nguyen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS is a non-invasive technique to detect metabolites within the normal and tumoral tissues. The ability of MRS to diagnose areas of high metabolic activity linked to tumor cell proliferation is particularly useful for radiotherapy treatment planning because of better gross tumor volume (GTV delineation. The GTV may be targeted with higher radiation dose, potentially improving local control without excessive irradiation to the normal adjacent tissues. Prostate cancer and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM are two tumor models that are associated with a heterogeneous tumor distribution. Preliminary studies suggest that the integration of MRS into radiotherapy planning for these tumors is feasible and safe. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT by virtue of daily tumor imaging and steep dose gradient may allow for tumor dose escalation with the simultaneous integrated boost technique (SIB and potentially decrease the complications rates in patients with GBM and prostate cancers.

  2. Taking advantage of hyperspectral imaging classification of urinary stones against conventional infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Francisco; Lumbreras, Felipe; Serrat, Joan; Siener, Roswitha; Serranti, Silvia; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; López-Mesas, Montserrat; Valiente, Manuel

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of urinary stones is mandatory for the best management of the disease after the stone passage in order to prevent further stone episodes. Thus the use of an appropriate methodology for an individualized stone analysis becomes a key factor for giving the patient the most suitable treatment. A recently developed hyperspectral imaging methodology, based on pixel-to-pixel analysis of near-infrared spectral images, is compared to the reference technique in stone analysis, infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The developed classification model yields >90% correct classification rate when compared to IR and is able to precisely locate stone components within the structure of the stone with a 15 µm resolution. Due to the little sample pretreatment, low analysis time, good performance of the model, and the automation of the measurements, they become analyst independent; this methodology can be considered to become a routine analysis for clinical laboratories.

  3. The role of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy in hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Mark J W; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D

    2010-03-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a diverse manifestation of acute and chronic liver failure, ranging from cognitive impairment, only detectable on psychometric evaluation through to confusion, coma and death from cerebral oedema. While there is widespread acceptance of its importance, there is little consensus on how best to diagnose and monitor HE. Clinical descriptions, psychometric testing, electroencephalography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (and lately, MR spectroscopy) have all been proposed. MR techniques, in contrast to other modalities, have the benefit of objectivity and of being able to interrogate the brain directly with respect to changes in brain size, function and the metabolic disturbances thought to underlie HE, particularly in the context of astrocyte swelling. Modern clinical MRI scanners with multinuclear MR spectroscopy capabilities and brain mapping software can demonstrate structural and functional cellular changes using volumetric MRI, magnetization transfer MRI, diffusion-weighting MRI, functional MRI with oxygenation measurements and in vivo and in vitro (1)H and (31)P MR spectroscopy. This review describes the relative merits of these techniques and provides guidance on the directions for future research and translation into clinical practice.

  4. First On-Site True Gamma-Ray Imaging-Spectroscopy of Contamination near Fukushima Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomono, Dai; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Takada, Atsushi; Komura, Shotaro; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Oda, Makoto; Tanimori, Toru

    2017-01-01

    We have developed an Electron Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC), which provides a well-defined Point Spread Function (PSF) by reconstructing a direction of each gamma as a point and realizes simultaneous measurement of brightness and spectrum of MeV gamma-rays for the first time. Here, we present the results of our on-site pilot gamma-imaging-spectroscopy with ETCC at three contaminated locations in the vicinity of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants in Japan in 2014. The obtained distribution of brightness (or emissivity) with remote-sensing observations is unambiguously converted into the dose distribution. We confirm that the dose distribution is consistent with the one taken by conventional mapping measurements with a dosimeter physically placed at each grid point. Furthermore, its imaging spectroscopy, boosted by Compton-edge-free spectra, reveals complex radioactive features in a quantitative manner around each individual target point in the background-dominated environment. Notably, we successfully identify a “micro hot spot” of residual caesium contamination even in an already decontaminated area. These results show that the ETCC performs exactly as the geometrical optics predicts, demonstrates its versatility in the field radiation measurement, and reveals potentials for application in many fields, including the nuclear industry, medical field, and astronomy. PMID:28155883

  5. First On-Site True Gamma-Ray Imaging-Spectroscopy of Contamination near Fukushima Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomono, Dai; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Takada, Atsushi; Komura, Shotaro; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Oda, Makoto; Tanimori, Toru

    2017-02-01

    We have developed an Electron Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC), which provides a well-defined Point Spread Function (PSF) by reconstructing a direction of each gamma as a point and realizes simultaneous measurement of brightness and spectrum of MeV gamma-rays for the first time. Here, we present the results of our on-site pilot gamma-imaging-spectroscopy with ETCC at three contaminated locations in the vicinity of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants in Japan in 2014. The obtained distribution of brightness (or emissivity) with remote-sensing observations is unambiguously converted into the dose distribution. We confirm that the dose distribution is consistent with the one taken by conventional mapping measurements with a dosimeter physically placed at each grid point. Furthermore, its imaging spectroscopy, boosted by Compton-edge-free spectra, reveals complex radioactive features in a quantitative manner around each individual target point in the background-dominated environment. Notably, we successfully identify a “micro hot spot” of residual caesium contamination even in an already decontaminated area. These results show that the ETCC performs exactly as the geometrical optics predicts, demonstrates its versatility in the field radiation measurement, and reveals potentials for application in many fields, including the nuclear industry, medical field, and astronomy.

  6. Near-field imaging and spectroscopy of plasmonic cavities (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbane, Deirdre

    2016-09-01

    Photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) is an attractive and advantageous technique in the field of plasmonics. Whilst surface plasmons are excited at the metal dielectric interface by light, it is the near-field photoelectron distribution that is imaged, with optical diffraction limit is overcome. Additionally parallel acquisitioning makes time-resolved (TR) PEEM1 possible. PEEM therefore allows us to investigate light-matter interactions in localized, propagating and hybridized surface plasmons leading to advances in fundamental research and technological applications. In addition to near-field imaging it is also possible to perform near-field spectroscopy. A tunable short pulse optical parametric oscillator (OPO) light source can be combined with PEEM. We demonstrate this technique with arrays of whispering gallery mode (WGM) cavities2 fabricated with focused ion beam milling (FIB) on gold surfaces. Characteristic spectral peaks and near-field mode distributions result from the coherent excitation of different plasmon resonances. This near-field interference of modes allows us to control the emission from these WGM cavities3. Additionally recent advances in ultrafast near-field microscopy and spectroscopy will be discussed. [1] M. Bauer, C. Wiemann, J. Lange, D. Bayer, M. Rohmer and M. Aeschlimann, Appl. Phys. A 88 473 (2007) [2] E. J. Vesseur, F. J. García de Abajo and A. Polman Nano Letters 9 3147 (2009) [3] P. Melchior, D. Kilbane, E. J. Vesseur, A. Polman and M. Aeschlimann Optics Express 23, 31619 (2015)

  7. High-throughput optical imaging and spectroscopy of individual carbon nanotubes in devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kaihui; Hong, Xiaoping; Zhou, Qin; Jin, Chenhao; Li, Jinghua; Zhou, Weiwei; Liu, Jie; Wang, Enge; Zettl, Alex; Wang, Feng

    2013-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes are uniquely identified by a pair of chirality indices (n,m), which dictate the physical structures and electronic properties of each species. Carbon nanotube research is currently facing two outstanding challenges: achieving chirality-controlled growth and understanding chirality-dependent device physics. Addressing these challenges requires, respectively, high-throughput determination of the nanotube chirality distribution on growth substrates and in situ characterization of the nanotube electronic structure in operating devices. Direct optical imaging and spectroscopy techniques are well suited for both goals, but their implementation at the single nanotube level has remained a challenge due to the small nanotube signal and unavoidable environment background. Here, we report high-throughput real-time optical imaging and broadband in situ spectroscopy of individual carbon nanotubes on various substrates and in field-effect transistor devices using polarization-based microscopy combined with supercontinuum laser illumination. Our technique enables the complete chirality profiling of hundreds of individual carbon nanotubes, both semiconducting and metallic, on a growth substrate. In devices, we observe that high-order nanotube optical resonances are dramatically broadened by electrostatic doping, an unexpected behaviour that points to strong interband electron-electron scattering processes that could dominate ultrafast dynamics of excited states in carbon nanotubes.

  8. Large-format distributed read-out imaging devices for X-ray imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Roland; Kozorezov, A.; Martin, D.; Brammertz, G.; Verhoeve, P.; Peacock, A.; Scholze, F.; Goldie, D. J.

    2002-02-01

    We present an experimental study of the performance of Distributed Read-Out Imaging Devices (DROIDs), based on two Ta/Al-based superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) placed on either side of a Ta absorber strip. We focus our discussion on the prospects of building large-format photon-counting imaging spectrometers for applications at optical, UV and soft X-ray energies. Tunnel-limited spectroscopic resolutions have already been demonstrated for optical photons. With a 20×100 μm2 absorber we have measured an intrinsic energy resolution of 2 eV FWHM for 500 eV photons. This demonstrates that at soft X-ray energies resolutions close to the tunnel limit are also feasible for this type of detectors. A detailed analysis of pulse-shapes with numerical models allows us to assess the main parameters that determine the performance of these detectors. Extrapolation of these models indicates that it is possible to extend the length of the absorber to 1.5 mm, without a serious degradation of the detector's performance. .

  9. Large-format distributed readout imaging devices for x-ray imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Roland H.; Kozorezov, Alex G.; Martin, Didier D.; Brammertz, G.; Verhoeve, Peter; Peacock, Anthony J.; Scholze, Frank; Goldie, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the performance of one-dimensional Distributed Read-Out Imaging Devices (DROIDs), based on two Ta/Al-based STJs placed on either side of a Ta absorber strip. We focus our discussion on the prospects of building large-format photon-counting imaging spectrometers for applications at soft X-ray energies. Tunnel-limited spectroscopical resolutions have already been demonstrated for optical photons. With a 20 x 100 micrometers 2 absorber we have measured an intrinsic energy resolution of 2.1 eV FWHM for 500 eV photons. This demonstrates that at soft X-ray energies resolutions close to the tunnel limit are also feasible for these type of detectors. A detailed analysis of pulse-shapes with analytical models allows us to assess the main parameters that determine the performance of these detectors. In particular, we discuss the dependence of the quasiparticle diffusion constant on the temperature of the absorber. Extrapolation of these models indicates that it is possible to extend the length of the absorber to 1.5 mm, without a serious degradation of the detector's performance.

  10. Metabolic imaging of human kidney triglyceride content: reproducibility of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiaan Hammer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the feasibility of renal proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for quantification of triglyceride content and to compare spectral quality and reproducibility without and with respiratory motion compensation in vivo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Institutional Review Board of our institution approved the study protocol, and written informed consent was obtained. After technical optimization, a total of 20 healthy volunteers underwent renal proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the renal cortex both without and with respiratory motion compensation and volume tracking. After the first session the subjects were repositioned and the protocol was repeated to assess reproducibility. Spectral quality (linewidth of the water signal and triglyceride content were quantified. Bland-Altman analyses and a test by Pitman were performed. RESULTS: Linewidth changed from 11.5±0.4 Hz to 10.7±0.4 Hz (all data pooled, p<0.05, without and with respiratory motion compensation respectively. Mean % triglyceride content in the first and second session without respiratory motion compensation were respectively 0.58±0.12% and 0.51±0.14% (P = NS. Mean % triglyceride content in the first and second session with respiratory motion compensation were respectively 0.44±0.10% and 0.43±0.10% (P = NS between sessions and P = NS compared to measurements with respiratory motion compensation. Bland-Altman analyses showed narrower limits of agreement and a significant difference in the correlated variances (correlation of -0.59, P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Metabolic imaging of the human kidney using renal proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a feasible tool to assess cortical triglyceride content in humans in vivo and the use of respiratory motion compensation significantly improves spectral quality and reproducibility. Therefore, respiratory motion compensation seems a necessity for metabolic imaging of renal triglyceride content in vivo.

  11. Electron spectroscopy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    The Surface Science Laboratories at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) are equipped with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) facilities. These techniques provide information from the uppermost atomic layers of a sample, and are thus truly surface sensitive. XPS provides both elemental and chemical state information without restriction on the type of material that can be analyzed. The sample is placed into an ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber and irradiated with x-rays which cause the ejection of photoelectrons from the sample surface. Since x-rays do not normally cause charging problems or beam damage, XPS is applicable to a wide range of samples including metals, polymers, catalysts, and fibers. AES uses a beam of high energy electrons as a surface probe. Following electronic rearrangements within excited atoms by this probe, Auger electrons characteristic of each element present are emitted from the sample. The main advantage of electron induced AES is that the electron beam can be focused down to a small diameter and localized analysis can be carried out. On the rastering of this beam synchronously with a video display using established scanning electron microscopy techniques, physical images and chemical distribution maps of the surface can be produced. Thus very small features, such as electronic circuit elements or corrosion pits in metals, can be investigated. Facilities are available on both XPS and AES instruments for depth-profiling of materials, using a beam of argon ions to sputter away consecutive layers of material to reveal sub-surface (and even semi-bulk) analyses.

  12. In-vivo optical detection of cancer using chlorin e6 – polyvinylpyrrolidone induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Soo Khee; Bhuvaneswari Ramaswamy; Thong Patricia SP; Chin William WL; Heng Paul WS; Olivo Malini

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Photosensitizer based fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy is fast becoming a promising approach for cancer detection. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) formulated in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a potential exogenous fluorophore for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopic detection of human cancer tissue xenografted in preclinical models as well as in a patient. Methods Fluorescence imaging was performed on MGH human...

  13. Terahertz spectroscopy and imaging for cultural heritage management: state of art and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Non-invasive diagnostic tools able to provide information on the materials and preservation state of artworks are crucial to help conservators, archaeologists and anthropologists to plan and carry out their tasks properly. In this frame, technological solutions exploiting Terahertz (THz) radiation, i.e., working at frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 10 THz, are currently deserving huge attention as complementary techniques to classical analysis methodologies based on electromagnetic radiations from X-rays to mid infrared [1]. The main advantage offered by THz spectroscopy and imaging systems is referred to their capability of providing information useful to determine the construction modality, the history life and the conservation state of artworks as well as to identify previous restoration actions [1,2]. In particular, unlike mid- and near-infrared spectroscopy, which provides fingerprint absorption spectra depending on the intramolecular behavior, THz spectroscopy is related to the structure of the molecules of the investigated object. Hence, it can discriminate, for instance, the different materials mixed in a paint [1,2]. Moreover, THz radiation is able to penetrate several materials which are opaque to both visible and infrared materials, such as varnish, paint, plaster, paper, wood, plastic, and so on. Accordingly, it is useful to detect hidden objects and characterize the inner structure of the artwork under test even in the direction of the depth, while avoiding core drillings. In this frame, THz systems allow us to discriminate different layers of materials present in artworks like paints, to obtain images providing information on the construction technique as well as to discover risk factors affecting the preservation state, such as non-visible cracks, hidden molds and air gaps between the paint layer and underlying structure. Furthermore, adopting a no-ionizing radiation, THz systems offer the not trivial benefit of negligible long term risks to the

  14. Quantitative endoscopic imaging elastic scattering spectroscopy: model system/tissue phantom validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsley, E. H.; Farkas, D. L.

    2008-02-01

    We have designed and built an imaging elastic scattering spectroscopy endoscopic instrument for the purpose of detecting cancer in vivo. As part of our testing and validation of the system, known targets representing potential disease states of interest were constructed using polystyrene beads of known average diameter and TiO II crystals embedded in a two-layer agarose gel. Final construction geometry was verified using a dissection microscope. The phantoms were then imaged using the endoscopic probe at a known incident angle, and the results compared to model predictions. The mathematical model that was used combines classic ray-tracing optics with Mie scattering to predict the images that would be observed by the probe at a given physical distance from a Mie-regime scattering media. This model was used generate the expected observed response for a broad range of parameter values, and these results were then used as a library to fit the observed data from the phantoms. Compared against the theoretical library, the best matching signal correlated well with known phantom material dimensions. These results lead us to believe that imaging elastic scattering can be useful in detection/diagnosis, but further refinement of the device will be necessary to detect the weak signals in a real clinical setting.

  15. Brain oxygen saturation assessment in neonates using T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderliesten, Thomas; De Vis, Jill B; Lemmers, Petra Ma; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Groenendaal, Floris; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon Jnl; Petersen, Esben T

    2017-03-01

    Although near-infrared spectroscopy is increasingly being used to monitor cerebral oxygenation in neonates, it has a limited penetration depth. The T2-prepared Blood Imaging of Oxygen Saturation (T2-BIOS) magnetic resonance sequence provides an oxygen saturation estimate on a voxel-by-voxel basis, without needing a respiratory calibration experiment. In 15 neonates, oxygen saturation measured by T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation and near-infrared spectroscopy were compared. In addition, these measures were compared to cerebral blood flow and venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. A strong linear relation was found between the oxygen saturation measured by magnetic resonance imaging and the oxygen saturation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy ( R(2 )= 0.64, p infrared spectroscopy oxygen saturation, and magnetic resonance imaging measures of frontal cerebral blood flow, whole brain cerebral blood flow and venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus ( R(2 )= 0.71, 0.50, 0.65; p infrared spectroscopy and T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation, confirming the validity of using of these techniques for determining cerebral oxygenation.

  16. LOFAR tied-array imaging and spectroscopy of solar S bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morosan, D. E.; Gallagher, P. T.; Zucca, P.; O'Flannagain, A.; Fallows, R.; Reid, H.; Magdalenić, J.; Mann, G.; Bisi, M. M.; Kerdraon, A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; MacKinnon, A. L.; Rucker, H. O.; Thidé, B.; Vocks, C.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brouw, W. N.; Butcher, H. R.; Ciardi, B.; de Geus, E.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Gunst, A. W.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hoeft, M.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; McKean, J. P.; Munk, H.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Sluman, J.; Tasse, C.; Toribio, M. C.; Vermeulen, R.; Zarka, P.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The Sun is an active source of radio emission that is often associated with energetic phenomena ranging from nanoflares to coronal mass ejections (CMEs). At low radio frequencies (<100 MHz), numerous millisecond duration radio bursts have been reported, such as radio spikes or solar S bursts (where S stands for short). To date, these have neither been studied extensively nor imaged because of the instrumental limitations of previous radio telescopes. Aims: Here, LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) observations were used to study the spectral and spatial characteristics of a multitude of S bursts, as well as their origin and possible emission mechanisms. Methods: We used 170 simultaneous tied-array beams for spectroscopy and imaging of S bursts. Since S bursts have short timescales and fine frequency structures, high cadence (~50 ms) tied-array images were used instead of standard interferometric imaging, that is currently limited to one image per second. Results: On 9 July 2013, over 3000 S bursts were observed over a time period of ~8 h. S bursts were found to appear as groups of short-lived (<1 s) and narrow-bandwidth (~2.5 MHz) features, the majority drifting at ~3.5 MHz s-1 and a wide range of circular polarisation degrees (2-8 times more polarised than the accompanying Type III bursts). Extrapolation of the photospheric magnetic field using the potential field source surface (PFSS) model suggests that S bursts are associated with a trans-equatorial loop system that connects an active region in the southern hemisphere to a bipolar region of plage in the northern hemisphere. Conclusions: We have identified polarised, short-lived solar radio bursts that have never been imaged before. They are observed at a height and frequency range where plasma emission is the dominant emission mechanism, however, they possess some of the characteristics of electron-cyclotron maser emission. A movie associated to Fig. 3 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Constructing Virtual Forest Scenes for Assessment of Sub-pixel Vegetation Structure From Imaging Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerace, A. D.; Yao, W.; van Aardt, J. A.; Romanczyk, P.; Kelbe, D.; van Leeuwen, M.; Kampe, T. U.

    2015-12-01

    Assessment of vegetation structure via remote sensing modalities has a long history for a range of sensor platforms. Imaging spectroscopy, while often used for biochemical measurements, also applies to structural assessment in that the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI), for instance, will provide an opportunity to monitor the global ecosystem. Establishing the linkage between HyspIRI data and sub-pixel vegetation structural variation therefore is of keen interest to the remote sensing and ecology communities. NASA's AVIRIS-C was used to collect airborne data during the 2013-2015 time frame, while ground truth data were limited to 2013 due to time-consuming and labor-intensive nature of field data collection. We augmented the available field data with a first-principles, physics-based simulation approach to refine our field efforts and to maintain larger control over within-pixel variation and associated assessments. Three virtual scenes were constructed for the study, corresponding to the actual vegetation structure of the NEON's Pacific Southwest site (Fresno, CA). They presented three typical forest types: oak savanna, dense coniferous forest, and conifer manzanita mixed forest. Airborne spectrometer and a field leaf area index sensor were simulated over these scenes using the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) Model, a synthetic image generation model. After verifying the geometrical parameters and physical model with those replicative senses, more scenes could be constructed by changing one or more vegetation structural parameters, such as forest density, tree species, size, location, and within-pixel distribution. We constructed regression models of leaf area index (LAI, R2=0.92) and forest density(R2=0.97) with narrow-band vegetation indices through simulation. Those models can be used to improve the HyspIRI's suitability for consistent global vegetation structural assessments. The virtual scene and model can also be used in

  18. In-vivo optical detection of cancer using chlorin e6 – polyvinylpyrrolidone induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Khee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photosensitizer based fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy is fast becoming a promising approach for cancer detection. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6 formulated in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP as a potential exogenous fluorophore for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopic detection of human cancer tissue xenografted in preclinical models as well as in a patient. Methods Fluorescence imaging was performed on MGH human bladder tumor xenografted on both the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM and the murine model using a fluorescence endoscopy imaging system. In addition, fiber optic based fluorescence spectroscopy was performed on tumors and various normal organs in the same mice to validate the macroscopic images. In one patient, fluorescence imaging was performed on angiosarcoma lesions and normal skin in conjunction with fluorescence spectroscopy to validate Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence visual assessment of the lesions. Results Margins of tumor xenografts in the CAM model were clearly outlined under fluorescence imaging. Ce6-PVP-induced fluorescence imaging yielded a specificity of 83% on the CAM model. In mice, fluorescence intensity of Ce6-PVP was higher in bladder tumor compared to adjacent muscle and normal bladder. Clinical results confirmed that fluorescence imaging clearly captured the fluorescence of Ce6-PVP in angiosarcoma lesions and good correlation was found between fluorescence imaging and spectral measurement in the patient. Conclusion Combination of Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy could allow for optical detection and discrimination between cancer and the surrounding normal tissues. Ce6-PVP seems to be a promising fluorophore for fluorescence diagnosis of cancer.

  19. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging and 31P spectroscopy of large human brain tumours at 1.5 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Achten, E

    1988-01-01

    31P MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours is one feature of magnetic resonance imaging. Eight patients with large superficial brain tumours and eight healthy volunteers were examined with 31P spectroscopy using an 8 cm surface coil for volume selection. Seven frequencies were resolved in our...... and after chemotherapy. The spectra showed considerable changes during chemotherapy. It is concluded that 31P spectroscopy using surface coils is of limited value for tumour characterization, but may add useful information in monitoring the effect of chemotherapy....

  20. Simultaneous UV Imaging and Raman Spectroscopy for the Measurement of Solvent-Mediated Phase Transformations During Dissolution Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Jesper; Wu, Jian; Naelapää, Kaisa

    2014-01-01

    The current work reports the simultaneous use of UV imaging and Raman spectroscopy for detailed characterization of drug dissolution behavior including solid-state phase transformations during dissolution. The dissolution of drug substances from compacts of sodium naproxen in 0.1 HCl as well...... as theophylline anhydrate and monohydrate in water was studied utilizing a flow-through setup. The decreases in dissolution rates with time observed by UV imaging were associated with concomitant solid form changes detected by Raman spectroscopy. Sodium naproxen and theophylline anhydrate were observed to convert...... of UV imaging and Raman spectroscopy offers a detailed characterization of drug dissolution behavior in a time-effective and sample-sparing manner. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:1149-1156, 2014....

  1. On the sensitivity of thermophotonic lock-in imaging and polarized Raman spectroscopy to early dental caries diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Nima; Mandelis, Andreas; Dehghany, Mehdi; Michaelian, Kirk H.; Amaechi, Bennet T.

    2012-02-01

    Dental caries is the leading cause of tooth loss, which can promptly be prevented if detected in early stages of progression. Unfortunately, conventional diagnostic modalities currently used in dentistry lack the sensitivity to detect early caries. The authors' intention is to compare the ability of polarized Raman spectroscopy and thermophotonic imaging to make early caries diagnosis. Extracted human teeth with no visible stain or defects were artificially demineralized in accordance to a well-known protocol in dentistry for simulated early caries development at several demineralization stages. Samples were then inspected using polarized Raman spectroscopy and thermophotonic imaging. The sensitivities of these two diagnostic modalities are compared, and the results are verified using transverse micro-radiography. It was found that compared to polarized Raman spectroscopy, thermophotonic imaging exhibits superior sensitivity to very early stages of demineralization.

  2. Development of a raster electronics system for expanding the APT proton beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapelle, S.; Hubbard, E.L.; Smith, T.L. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Schulze, M.E.; Shafer, R.E. [General Atomics, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1998-12-31

    A 1700 MeV, 100 mA proton linear accelerator is being designed for Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT). A beam expansion system is required to uniformly irradiate a 19 x 190 cm tritium production target. This paper describes a beam expansion system consisting of eight ferrite dipole magnets to raster the beam in the x- and y-planes and also describes the salient features of the design of the electronics that are unique to the expander. Eight Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT)-based modulators drive the raster magnets with triangular current waveforms that are synchronized using phase-locked loops (PLLs) and voltage controlled crystal oscillators (VCXOs). Fault detection circuitry shuts down the beam before the target can be damaged by a failure of the raster system. Test data are presented for the prototype system.

  3. Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors: magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ai-hong; CHEN Li; LI Yong-jie; ZHANG Guo-jun; LI Kun-cheng; WANG Yu-ping

    2009-01-01

    Background Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNT) is a rare benign neoplasm of the central nervous system affecting young people. A correct preoperative diagnosis is helpful for planning surgical strategies and improving prognosis. The purpose of this study was to characterize DNTs using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and to analyze the value of these two techniques in the diagnosis of DNTs.Methods MR images of 13 patients with DNTs were reviewed retrospectively; and five of the patients also underwent MRS. Tumors were confirmed by surgery. The distribution, extension and signal features of the lesions were assessed,and the MRS results were analyzed.Results All tumors were supratentorial. The cortex was the main area involved, with nine tumors located in the temporal lobe, three in the frontal lobe, and one on the boundary between the temporal and occipital lobes. All cases had decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted MR images and increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. On fluid attenuated inversion recovery weighted images, the hyperintense "ring sign" and internal septation of the lesion were seen in 9 cases. Eight tumors had well-demarcated borders. Peritumoral edema or mass effect was absent in all cases. A contrast enhancement examination was performed in 9 cases. Contrast enhancement was absent in five cases, and four cases showed significant enhancement. The MRS showed a low N-acetylaspartate peak and a lack of elevated choline-containing component (Cho) or Cho-Cr ratio (Cho/Cr) in five patients.Conclusions The MRI findings of DNTs were stereotypical. The combination of MRI and MRS techniques were helpful in making a correct presurgical diagnosis.

  4. Characterisation of historic plastics using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and pulsed imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorelli, Gianluca; Trafela, Tanja; Taday, Phillip F; Portieri, Alessia; Lowe, David; Fukunaga, Kaori; Strlič, Matija

    2012-05-01

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy and 3D THz pulsed imaging have been explored with regard to polymer materials, both commodity and historic polymers. A systematic spectroscopic study of a wide range of different polymer materials showed significant differences in their spectra. Polyolefins and polystyrenes generally exhibit lower absorption than other examined polymers, various cellulose derivates, poly(vinyl chloride), poly(methyl methacrylate), polyamide, hard rubber and phenol formaldehyde resin, the last of these exhibiting the most intense absorption over the entire range, 0.15-4.2 THz. It was also examined how the presence of plasticisers in poly(vinyl chloride), the presence of fillers in polypropylene, and the degree of branching in polyethylene and polystyrene affect the spectra; inorganic fillers in polypropylene affected the absorption most. With 3D THz pulsed imaging, features in polymer objects were explored, appearing either as integral parts of the material (coatings and pores in foams) or as a consequence of physical deterioration (cracks, delamination). All of these features of various complexities can be successfully imaged in 3D. Terahertz technology is thus shown to have significant potential for both chemical and structural characterisation of polymers, which will be of interest to heritage science, but also to the polymer industry and development of analytical technologies in general.

  5. Hypothalamic metabolic compartmentation during appetite regulation as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarbe, Blanca; Benitez, Ania; Peláez Brioso, Gerardo A.; Sánchez-Montañés, Manuel; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    We review the role of neuroglial compartmentation and transcellular neurotransmitter cycling during hypothalamic appetite regulation as detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Spectroscopy (MRS) methods. We address first the neurochemical basis of neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus and the orexigenic and anorexigenic feed-back loops that control appetite. Then we examine the main MRI and MRS strategies that have been used to investigate appetite regulation. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), Blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast (BOLD), and Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) have revealed Mn2+ accumulations, augmented oxygen consumptions, and astrocytic swelling in the hypothalamus under fasting conditions, respectively. High field 1H magnetic resonance in vivo, showed increased hypothalamic myo-inositol concentrations as compared to other cerebral structures. 1H and 13C high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) revealed increased neuroglial oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, as well as increased hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions under orexigenic stimulation. We propose here an integrative interpretation of all these findings suggesting that the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite is supported by important ionic and metabolic transcellular fluxes which begin at the tripartite orexigenic clefts and become extended spatially in the hypothalamus through astrocytic networks becoming eventually MRI and MRS detectable. PMID:23781199

  6. Multi-elemental imaging of paraffin-embedded human samples by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncayo, S.; Trichard, F.; Busser, B.; Sabatier-Vincent, M.; Pelascini, F.; Pinel, N.; Templier, I.; Charles, J.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2017-07-01

    Chemical elements play central roles for physiological homeostasis in human cells, and their dysregulation might lead to a certain number of pathologies. Novel imaging techniques that improve the work of pathologists for tissue analysis and diagnostics are continuously sought. We report the use of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) to perform multi-elemental images of human paraffin-embedded skin samples on the entire biopsy scale in a complementary and compatible way with microscope histopathological examination. A specific instrumental configuration is proposed in order to detect most of the elements of medical interest (i.e. P, Al, Mg, Na, Zn, Si, Fe, and Cu). As an example of medical application, we selected and analysed skin biopsies, including healthy skin tissue, cutaneous metastasis of melanoma, Merkel-cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Clear distinctions in the distribution of chemical elements are observed from the different samples investigated. This study demonstrates the high complementarity of LIBS elemental imaging with conventional histopathology, opening new opportunities for any medical application involving metals.

  7. The first X-ray imaging spectroscopy of quiescent solar active regions with NuSTAR

    CERN Document Server

    Hannah, I G; Smith, D M; Glesener, L; Krucker, S; Hudson, H S; Madsen, K K; Marsh, A; White, S M; Caspi, A; Shih, A Y; Harrison, F A; Stern, D; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Hailey, C J; Zhang, W W

    2016-01-01

    We present the first observations of quiescent active regions (ARs) using NuSTAR, a focusing hard X-ray telescope capable of studying faint solar emission from high temperature and non-thermal sources. We analyze the first directly imaged and spectrally resolved X-rays above 2~keV from non-flaring ARs, observed near the west limb on 2014 November 1. The NuSTAR X-ray images match bright features seen in extreme ultraviolet and soft X-rays. The NuSTAR imaging spectroscopy is consistent with isothermal emission of temperatures $3.1-4.4$~MK and emission measures $1-8\\times 10^{46}$~cm$^{-3}$. We do not observe emission above 5~MK but our short effective exposure times restrict the spectral dynamic range. With few counts above 6~keV, we can place constraints on the presence of an additional hotter component between 5 and 12~MK of $\\sim 10^{46}$cm$^{-3}$ and $\\sim 10^{43}$ cm$^{-3}$, respectively, at least an order of magnitude stricter than previous limits. With longer duration observations and a weakening solar c...

  8. Heroin-induced leukoencephalopathy: characterization using MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging, and MR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offiah, C. [Department of Neuroradiology, St Bartholomew' s and the London Hospitals NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Hall, E. [Department of Neuroradiology, St Bartholomew' s and the London Hospitals NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: curtis.offiah@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk

    2008-02-15

    Aim: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of heroin-induced leukoencephalopathy or 'chasing the dragon syndrome' and, in particular, the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) features. Material and methods: Six patients with a clinical or histopathological diagnosis of heroin-induced leukoencephalopathy were identified and MRI examinations, including DWI and single-voxel MRS, reviewed. Results: Cerebellar white matter was involved in all six cases demonstrating similar symmetrical distribution with sparing of the dentate nuclei. Brain stem signal change was evident in five of the six patients imaged. Supratentorial brain parenchymal involvement, as well as brain stem involvement, correlated anatomically with corticospinal tract distribution. None of the areas of signal abnormality were restricted on DWI. Of those patients subjected to MRS, the areas of parenchymal damage demonstrated reduced N-acetylaspartate, reduced choline, and elevated lactate. Conclusion: Heroin-induced leukoencephalopathy results in characteristic and highly specific signal abnormalities on MRI, which can greatly aid diagnosis. DWI and MRS findings can be explained by known reported neuropathological descriptions in this condition and can be used to support a proposed mechanism for the benefit of current recommended drug treatment regimes.

  9. Surface Investigation of Photo-Degraded Wood by Colour Monitoring, Infrared Spectroscopy, and Hyperspectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Agresti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation is to study the changes occurring on the surface of poplar wood exposed to artificial irradiation in a Solar Box. Colour changes were monitored with a reflectance spectrophotometer. Surface chemical modifications were evaluated by measuring the infrared spectra. Hyperspectral imaging was also applied to study the surface wood changes in the visible-near infrared and the short wave infrared wavelength ranges. The data obtained from the different techniques were compared to find the possible correlations in order to evaluate the applicability of the Hyperspectral imaging to investigate wood modifications in a non-invasive modality. The study of colour changes showed an important variation due to photo-irradiation which is the greatest change occurring within the first 24 hours. Infrared spectroscopy revealed that lignin degrades mainly in the first 48 hours. Concerning Hyperspectral imaging, the spectral features in the visible-near infrared range are mainly linked to the spectral shape, whereas in the short wave infrared cellulose and lignin affect shape and reflectance levels. The proposed approach showed that a correlation can be established between colour variation and wood degradation in the visible-near infrared range; furthermore in the short wave infrared region surface chemical changes can be assessed.

  10. iRaster: a novel information visualization tool to explore spatiotemporal patterns in multiple spike trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, J; Stuart, L; Sernagor, E; Borisyuk, R

    2010-12-15

    Over the last few years, simultaneous recordings of multiple spike trains have become widely used by neuroscientists. Therefore, it is important to develop new tools for analysing multiple spike trains in order to gain new insight into the function of neural systems. This paper describes how techniques from the field of visual analytics can be used to reveal specific patterns of neural activity. An interactive raster plot called iRaster has been developed. This software incorporates a selection of statistical procedures for visualization and flexible manipulations with multiple spike trains. For example, there are several procedures for the re-ordering of spike trains which can be used to unmask activity propagation, spiking synchronization, and many other important features of multiple spike train activity. Additionally, iRaster includes a rate representation of neural activity, a combined representation of rate and spikes, spike train removal and time interval removal. Furthermore, it provides multiple coordinated views, time and spike train zooming windows, a fisheye lens distortion, and dissemination facilities. iRaster is a user friendly, interactive, flexible tool which supports a broad range of visual representations. This tool has been successfully used to analyse both synthetic and experimentally recorded datasets. In this paper, the main features of iRaster are described and its performance and effectiveness are demonstrated using various types of data including experimental multi-electrode array recordings from the ganglion cell layer in mouse retina. iRaster is part of an ongoing research project called VISA (Visualization of Inter-Spike Associations) at the Visualization Lab in the University of Plymouth. The overall aim of the VISA project is to provide neuroscientists with the ability to freely explore and analyse their data. The software is freely available from the Visualization Lab website (see www.plymouth.ac.uk/infovis).

  11. A New Method of Embedded Fourth Order with Four Stages to Study Raster CNN Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. Ponalagusamy; S. Senthilkumar

    2009-01-01

    A new Runge-Kutta (PK) fourth order with four stages embedded method with error control is presented in this paper for raster simulation in cellular neural network (CNN) environment. Through versatile algorithm, single layer/raster CNN array is implemented by incorporating the proposed technique. Simulation results have been obtained, and comparison has also been carried out to show the efficiency of the proposed numerical integration algorithm. The analytic expressions for local truncation error and global truncation error are derived. It is seen that the RK-embedded root mean square outperforms the RK-embedded Heronian mean and RK-embedded harmonic mean.

  12. Highly multiplexible thermal kinetic inductance detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulbricht, Gerhard, E-mail: ulbricht@physics.ucsb.edu; Mazin, Benjamin A.; Szypryt, Paul; Walter, Alex B.; Bockstiegel, Clint [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Bumble, Bruce [NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-06-22

    For X-ray imaging spectroscopy, high spatial resolution over a large field of view is often as important as high energy resolution, but current X-ray detectors do not provide both in the same device. Thermal Kinetic Inductance Detectors (TKIDs) are being developed as they offer a feasible way to combine the energy resolution of transition edge sensors with pixel counts approaching CCDs and thus promise significant improvements for many X-ray spectroscopy applications. TKIDs are a variation of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) and share their multiplexibility: working MKID arrays with 2024 pixels have recently been demonstrated and much bigger arrays are under development. In this work, we present a TKID prototype, which is able to achieve an energy resolution of 75 eV at 5.9 keV, even though its general design still has to be optimized. We further describe TKID fabrication, characterization, multiplexing, and working principle and demonstrate the necessity of a data fitting algorithm in order to extract photon energies. With further design optimizations, we expect to be able to improve our TKID energy resolution to less than 10 eV at 5.9 keV.

  13. Soft X-ray spectroscopy of nanoparticles by velocity map imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostko, O.; Xu, B.; Jacobs, M. I.; Ahmed, M.

    2017-07-01

    Velocity map imaging (VMI), a technique traditionally used to study chemical dynamics in the gas phase, is applied here to study X-ray photoemission from aerosol nanoparticles. Soft X-rays from the Advanced Light Source synchrotron, probe a beam of nanoparticles, and the resulting photoelectrons are velocity mapped to obtain their kinetic energy distributions. A new design of the VMI spectrometer is described. The spectrometer is benchmarked by measuring vacuum ultraviolet photoemission from gas phase xenon and squalene nanoparticles followed by measurements using soft X-rays. It is demonstrated that the photoelectron distribution from X-ray irradiated squalene nanoparticles is dominated by secondary electrons. By scanning the photon energies and measuring the intensities of these secondary electrons, a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectrum is obtained. The NEXAFS technique is used to obtain spectra of aqueous nanoparticles at the oxygen K edge. By varying the position of the aqueous nanoparticle beam relative to the incident X-ray beam, evidence is presented such that the VMI technique allows for NEXAFS spectroscopy of water in different physical states. Finally, we discuss the possibility of applying VMI methods to probe liquids and solids via X-ray spectroscopy.

  14. AAT Imaging and Microslit Spectroscopy in the Southern Hubble Deep Field

    CERN Document Server

    Glazebrook, K; Mann, R G; Monbleau, D; Oliver, S; Verma, A; Boyle, Brian; Glazebrook, Karl; Mann, Robert G.; Monbleau, Davienne; Oliver, Sebastian; Verma, Aprajita

    2006-01-01

    We present a deep photometric (B- and R-band) catalog and an associated spectroscopic redshift survey conducted in the vicinity of the Hubble Deep Field South. The spectroscopy yields 53 extragalactic redshifts in the range 0images complete to R<24 and spectroscopy is 50% complete at R=23. There is now strong evidence for a rich cluster at z\\simeq 0.58 flanking the WFPC2 field which is consistent with a known absorber of the bright QSO in this field. We find that photometric redshifts of z<1 galaxies in this field based on HST data are accurate to \\sigma_z/(1+z)=0.03 (albeit with small number statistics). The observations were carried out as a community service for Hubble Deep Field science, to demonstrate the first use of the `nod & shuffle' technique with a classical multi-object spectrograph and to test the use of `microslits' for ultra-high mu...

  15. Highly Multiplexible Thermal Kinetic Inductance Detectors for X-Ray Imaging Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ulbricht, Gerhard; Szypryt, Paul; Walter, Alex B; Bockstiegel, Clint; Bumble, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    For X-ray imaging spectroscopy, high spatial resolution over a large field of view is often as important as high energy resolution, but current X-ray detectors do not provide both in the same device. Thermal Kinetic Inductance Detectors (TKIDs) are being developed as they offer a feasible way to combine the energy resolution of transition edge sensors with pixel counts approaching CCDs and thus promise significant improvements for many X-ray spectroscopy applications. TKIDs are a variation of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) and share their multiplexibility: working MKID arrays with 2024 pixels have recently been demonstrated and much bigger arrays are under development. In this work, we present our first working TKID prototypes which are able to achieve an energy resolution of 75 eV at 5.9 keV, even though their general design still has to be optimized. We further describe TKID fabrication, characterization, multiplexing and working principle and demonstrate the necessity of a data fitting algo...

  16. Real-time imaging, spectroscopy, and structural investigation of cathodic plasma electrolytic oxidation of molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojadinović, Stevan, E-mail: sstevan@ff.bg.ac.rs; Tadić, Nenad; Šišović, Nikola M.; Vasilić, Rastko [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-06-21

    In this paper, the results of the investigation of cathodic plasma electrolytic oxidation (CPEO) of molybdenum at 160 V in a mixed solution of borax, water, and ethylene glycol are presented. Real-time imaging and optical emission spectroscopy were used for the characterization of the CPEO. During the process, vapor envelope is formed around the cathode and strong electric field within the envelope caused the generation of plasma discharges. The spectral line shape analysis of hydrogen Balmer line H{sub β} (486.13 nm) shows that plasma discharges are characterized by the electron number density of about 1.4 × 10{sup 21 }m{sup −3}. The electron temperature of 15 000 K was estimated by measuring molybdenum atomic lines intensity. Surface morphology, chemical, and phase composition of coatings formed by CPEO were characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. The elemental components of CPEO coatings are Mo and O and the predominant crystalline form is MoO{sub 3}.

  17. In-situ Multimodal Imaging and Spectroscopy of Mg Electrodeposition at Electrode-Electrolyte Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yimin A.; Yin, Zuwei; Farmand, Maryam; Yu, Young-Sang; Shapiro, David A.; Liao, Hong-Gang; Liang, Wen-I; Chu, Ying-Hao; Zheng, Haimei

    2017-01-01

    We report the study of Mg cathodic electrochemical deposition on Ti and Au electrode using a multimodal approach by examining the sample area in-situ using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Magnesium Aluminum Chloride Complex was synthesized and utilized as electrolyte, where non-reversible features during in situ charging-discharging cycles were observed. During charging, a uniform Mg film was deposited on the electrode, which is consistent with the intrinsic non-dendritic nature of Mg deposition in Mg ion batteries. The Mg thin film was not dissolvable during the following discharge process. We found that such Mg thin film is hexacoordinated Mg compounds by in-situ STXM and XAS. This study provides insights on the non-reversibility issue and failure mechanism of Mg ion batteries. Also, our method provides a novel generic method to understand the in situ battery chemistry without any further sample processing, which can preserve the original nature of battery materials or electrodeposited materials. This multimodal in situ imaging and spectroscopy provides many opportunities to attack complex problems that span orders of magnitude in length and time scale, which can be applied to a broad range of the energy storage systems. PMID:28186175

  18. Direct Imaging and Spectroscopy of a Young Extrasolar Kuiper Belt in the Nearest OB Association

    CERN Document Server

    Currie, Thayne; Kuchner, Marc J; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Kenyon, Scott J; Thalmann, Christian; Carson, Joseph; Debes, John H

    2015-01-01

    We describe the discovery of a bright, young Kuiper belt-like debris disk around HD 115600, a $\\sim$ 1.4--1.5 M$_\\mathrm{\\odot}$, $\\sim$ 15 Myr old member of the Sco-Cen OB Association. Our H-band coronagraphy/integral field spectroscopy from the \\textit{Gemini Planet Imager} shows the ring has a (luminosity scaled) semi major axis of ($\\sim$ 22 AU) $\\sim$ 48 AU, similar to the current Kuiper belt. The disk appears to have neutral scattering dust, is eccentric (e $\\sim$ 0.1--0.2), and could be sculpted by analogues to the outer solar system planets. Spectroscopy of the disk ansae reveal a slightly blue to gray disk color, consistent with major Kuiper belt chemical constituents, where water-ice is a very plausible dominant constituent. Besides being the first object discovered with the next generation of extreme adaptive optics systems (i.e. SCExAO, GPI, SPHERE), HD 115600's debris ring and planetary system provides a key reference point for the early evolution of the solar system, the structure and compositio...

  19. Fluorescence imaging and time-resolved spectroscopy of steroid using confocal synchrotron radiation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, Hans C.; van der Oord, C. J. R.; Levine, Yehudi K.; Munro, Ian H.; Jones, Gareth R.; Shaw, D. A.; Rommerts, Fokko F.

    1994-08-01

    The Confocal Synchrotron Radiation Microscope at Daresbury was used in a study of the transport and distribution of the steroid Coumestrol in single Leydig cells. The broad spectrum of synchrotron radiation in combination with UV compatible microscope optics affords the extension of confocal microscopy from the visible to the UV region down to about 200 nm. Consequently fluorescent molecules with absorption bands in the UV can be imaged. In addition the pulsed nature of the light source allows us to perform time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy experiments on microscopic volumes. Coumestrol is a naturally fluorescing plant steroid exhibiting estrogenic activity. In physiological environments it has an absorption peak in the UV at 340 nm and it emits around 440 nm. First results indicate that the Coumestrol transport through the cell membrane is diffusion limited. The weak fluorescence observed in the nuclei of the Leydig cells may be due to fluorescence quenching arising from the interaction of the Coumesterol with nuclear components. However, micro-volume time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy experiments on cell nuclei have revealed the same decay behavior for Coumesterol in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of the cells.

  20. DIRECT IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF A YOUNG EXTRASOLAR KUIPER BELT IN THE NEAREST OB ASSOCIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Currie, Thayne [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Subaru Telescope, Hilo, HI (United States); Lisse, Carey M. [Applied Physics Laboratory, The Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD (United States); Kuchner, Marc [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Institute for Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Kenyon, Scott J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Thalmann, Christian [ETH-Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Carson, Joseph [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The College of Charleston, Charleston, SC (United States); Debes, John [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-07-01

    We describe the discovery of a bright, young Kuiper belt–like debris disk around HD 115600, a ∼1.4–1.5 M{sub ⊙}, ∼15 Myr old member of the Sco–Cen OB Association. Our H-band coronagraphy/integral field spectroscopy from the Gemini Planet Imager shows the ring has a (luminosity-scaled) semimajor axis of (∼22 AU) ∼ 48 AU, similar to the current Kuiper belt. The disk appears to have neutral-scattering dust, is eccentric (e ∼ 0.1–0.2), and could be sculpted by analogs to the outer solar system planets. Spectroscopy of the disk ansae reveal a slightly blue to gray disk color, consistent with major Kuiper belt chemical constituents, where water ice is a very plausible dominant constituent. Besides being the first object discovered with the next generation of extreme adaptive optics systems (i.e., SCExAO, GPI, SPHERE), HD 115600's debris ring and planetary system provide a key reference point for the early evolution of the solar system, the structure, and composition of the Kuiper belt and the interaction between debris disks and planets.

  1. Design and evaluation of a device for fast multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankelevich, Diego R; Ma, Dinglong; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Sun, Yinghua; Bec, Julien; Elson, Daniel S; Marcu, Laura

    2014-03-01

    The application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to in vivo tissue diagnosis requires a method for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay profiles in multiple spectral bands. This study focusses on development of a clinically compatible fiber-optic based multispectral TRFS (ms-TRFS) system together with validation of its accuracy and precision for fluorescence lifetime measurements. It also presents the expansion of this technique into an imaging spectroscopy method. A tandem array of dichroic beamsplitters and filters was used to record TRFS decay profiles at four distinct spectral bands where biological tissue typically presents fluorescence emission maxima, namely, 390, 452, 542, and 629 nm. Each emission channel was temporally separated by using transmission delays through 200 μm diameter multimode optical fibers of 1, 10, 19, and 28 m lengths. A Laguerre-expansion deconvolution algorithm was used to compensate for modal dispersion inherent to large diameter optical fibers and the finite bandwidth of detectors and digitizers. The system was found to be highly efficient and fast requiring a few nano-Joule of laser pulse energy and time-resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements of low quantum efficiency sub-nanosecond fluorophores.

  2. Keck/Deimos Spectroscopy of a GALEX UV Selecte Sample from the Medium Imaging Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Mallery, Ryan P; Salim, Samir; Small, Todd; Charlot, Stephane; Seibert, Mark; Wyder, Ted; Barlow, Tom A; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G; Martin, D Christopher; Morissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G; Schiminovivich, David; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Heckman, Timothy M; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry F; Milliard, Bruno; Szalay, Alexander S; Welsh, Barry Y; Yi, Suk Young

    2007-01-01

    We report results from a pilot program to obtain spectroscopy for objects detected in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Medium Imaging Survey (MIS). Our study examines the properties of galaxies detected by GALEX fainter than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic survey. This is the first study to extend the techinques of Salim et al. 2005 to estimate stellar masses, star formation rates (SFR) and the b (star formation history) parameter for star-forming galaxies out to z~0.7. We obtain redshifts for 50 GALEX MIS sources reaching NUV=23.9 (AB mag), having counterparts in the SDSS Data Release 4 (DR4). Of our sample, 43 are starforming galaxies with z<0.7, 3 have emission line ratios indicative of AGN with z<0.7, and 4 objects with z~1 are QSOs, 3 of which are not previously cataloged. We compare our sample to a much larger sample of ~50,000 matched GALEX/SDSS galaxies with SDSS spectroscopy; while our survey is shallow, the optical counterparts to our sources reach ~3 magnitudes fainter ...

  3. Elemental characterisation of melanin in feathers via synchrotron X-ray imaging and absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nicholas P.; van Veelen, Arjen; Anné, Jennifer; Manning, Phillip L.; Bergmann, Uwe; Sellers, William I.; Egerton, Victoria M.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Ito, Shosuke; Wogelius, Roy A.

    2016-09-01

    Melanin is a critical component of biological systems, but the exact chemistry of melanin is still imprecisely known. This is partly due to melanin’s complex heterogeneous nature and partly because many studies use synthetic analogues and/or pigments extracted from their natural biological setting, which may display important differences from endogenous pigments. Here we demonstrate how synchrotron X-ray analyses can non-destructively characterise the elements associated with melanin pigment in situ within extant feathers. Elemental imaging shows that the distributions of Ca, Cu and Zn are almost exclusively controlled by melanin pigment distribution. X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that the atomic coordination of zinc and sulfur is different within eumelanised regions compared to pheomelanised regions. This not only impacts our fundamental understanding of pigmentation in extant organisms but also provides a significant contribution to the evidence-based colour palette available for reconstructing the appearance of fossil organisms.

  4. Imaging electron dynamics with time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Popova-Gorelova, Daria; Santra, Robin

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically study how time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy can be applied for imaging coherent electron dynamics in molecules. We consider a process in which a pump pulse triggers coherent electronic dynamics in a molecule by creating a valence electron hole. An ultrashort extreme ultraviolet (XUV) probe pulse creates a second electron hole in the molecule. Information about the electron dynamics is accessed by analyzing angular distributions of photoemission probabilities at a fixed photoelectron energy. We demonstrate that a rigorous theoretical analysis, which takes into account the indistinguishability of transitions induced by the ultrashort, broadband probe pulse and electron hole correlation effects, is necessary for the interpretation of time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra. We show how a Fourier analysis of time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra from a molecule can be applied to follow its electron dynamics by considering photoelectron distributions from an indol...

  5. Neonatal hypoglycaemic encephalopathy: diffusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Yeon; Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Lim, Keun Ho; Kim, Sang Tae [Asan Institute for Life Science, NMR Laboratory, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Ki Soo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Neonatology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2006-02-01

    We report two infants with neonatal hypoglycaemic encephalopathy who were evaluated with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) as well as conventional MR. As in conventional MR, DWI and proton MRS revealed a predominance of abnormalities in the parieto-occipital lobes and underlying white matter including the splenium of the corpus callosum. In the acute phase of the disease, lesions on DWI showed restricted water diffusion and on DWI the characteristic lesions seemed to be more readily discernible than on conventional MRI. In the chronic phase, DWI demonstrated increased water diffusion in the affected areas showing atrophy on conventional MRI. Proton MRS revealed an increased lactate-lipid peak and a decreased NAA peak in the involved areas. DWI and proton MRS findings appear helpful in evaluating the extent and the presence of neuronal damage early in the course of neonatal hypoglycaemic encephalopathy. (orig.)

  6. Serial proton MR spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging in infantile Balo's concentric sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreha-Kulaczewski, Steffi F.; Gaertner, Jutta [Georg August University, Department of Pediatrics and Pediatric Neurology, Goettingen (Germany); Helms, Gunther; Dechent, Peter [Georg August University, MR-Research in Neurology and Psychiatry, Goettingen (Germany); Hofer, Sabine [Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH am Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biophysikalische Chemie, Goettingen (Germany)]|[Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience, Goettingen (Germany); Frahm, Jens [Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH am Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biophysikalische Chemie, Goettingen (Germany)

    2009-02-15

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) yield different parameters for characterizing the evolution of a demyelinating white matter disease. The purpose was to elucidate biochemical and microstructural changes in Balo's concentric sclerosis lesions and to correlate the findings with the clinical course. Localized short-echo time MRS and DTI were performed over 6 years in a left occipital lesion of a female patient (age at onset 13.8 years) with Balo's concentric sclerosis. A right homonym hemianopsia persisted. Metabolite patterns were in line with initial active demyelination followed by gliosis and partial recovery of neuroaxonal metabolites. Fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity of tissue water remained severely altered. Fiber tracking confirmed a disruption in the geniculo-calcarine tract as well as involvement of the corpus callosum. MRS and DTI depict complementary parameters, but DTI seems to correlate better with clinical symptoms. (orig.)

  7. X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging as Multiscale Probes of Intercalation Phenomena in Cathode Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrocks, Gregory A.; De Jesus, Luis R.; Andrews, Justin L.; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2017-09-01

    Intercalation phenomena are at the heart of modern electrochemical energy storage. Nevertheless, as out-of-equilibrium processes involving concomitant mass and charge transport, such phenomena can be difficult to engineer in a predictive manner. The rational design of electrode architectures requires mechanistic understanding of physical phenomena spanning multiple length scales, from atomistic distortions and electron localization at individual transition metal centers to phase inhomogeneities and intercalation gradients in individual particles and concentration variances across ensembles of particles. In this review article, we discuss the importance of the electronic structure in mediating electrochemical storage and mesoscale heterogeneity. In particular, we discuss x-ray spectroscopy and imaging probes of electronic and atomistic structure as well as statistical regression methods that allow for monitoring of the evolution of the electronic structure as a function of intercalation. The layered α-phase of V2O5 is used as a model system to develop fundamental ideas on the origins of mesoscale heterogeneity.

  8. Modelling plant species distribution in alpine grasslands using airborne imaging spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottier, Julien; Malenovský, Zbyněk; Psomas, Achilleas; Homolová, Lucie; Schaepman, Michael E; Choler, Philippe; Thuiller, Wilfried; Guisan, Antoine; Zimmermann, Niklaus E

    2014-07-01

    Remote sensing using airborne imaging spectroscopy (AIS) is known to retrieve fundamental optical properties of ecosystems. However, the value of these properties for predicting plant species distribution remains unclear. Here, we assess whether such data can add value to topographic variables for predicting plant distributions in French and Swiss alpine grasslands. We fitted statistical models with high spectral and spatial resolution reflectance data and tested four optical indices sensitive to leaf chlorophyll content, leaf water content and leaf area index. We found moderate added-value of AIS data for predicting alpine plant species distribution. Contrary to expectations, differences between species distribution models (SDMs) were not linked to their local abundance or phylogenetic/functional similarity. Moreover, spectral signatures of species were found to be partly site-specific. We discuss current limits of AIS-based SDMs, highlighting issues of scale and informational content of AIS data. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Imaging spectroscopy based strategies for ceramic glass contaminants removal in glass recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    The presence of ceramic glass contaminants in glass recycling plants reduces production quality and increases production costs. The problem of ceramic glass inspection is related to the fact that its detectable physical and pictorial properties are quite similar to those of glass. As a consequence, at the sorting plant scale, ceramic glass looks like normal glass and is detectable only by specialized personnel. In this paper an innovative approach for ceramic glass recognition, based on imaging spectroscopy, is proposed and investigated. In order to define suitable inspection strategies for the separation between useful (glass) and polluting (ceramic glass) materials, reference samples of glass and ceramic glass presenting different colors, thicknesses, shapes and manufacturing processes have been selected. Reflectance spectra have been obtained using two equipment covering the visible and near infrared wavelength ranges (400-1000 and 1000-1700 nm). Results showed as recognition of glass and ceramic glass is possible using selected wavelength ratios, in both visible and near infrared fields.

  10. Airborne laser-guided imaging spectroscopy to map forest trait diversity and guide conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, G P; Martin, R E; Knapp, D E; Tupayachi, R; Anderson, C B; Sinca, F; Vaughn, N R; Llactayo, W

    2017-01-27

    Functional biogeography may bridge a gap between field-based biodiversity information and satellite-based Earth system studies, thereby supporting conservation plans to protect more species and their contributions to ecosystem functioning. We used airborne laser-guided imaging spectroscopy with environmental modeling to derive large-scale, multivariate forest canopy functional trait maps of the Peruvian Andes-to-Amazon biodiversity hotspot. Seven mapped canopy traits revealed functional variation in a geospatial pattern explained by geology, topography, hydrology, and climate. Clustering of canopy traits yielded a map of forest beta functional diversity for land-use analysis. Up to 53% of each mapped, functionally distinct forest presents an opportunity for new conservation action. Mapping functional diversity advances our understanding of the biosphere to conserve more biodiversity in the face of land use and climate change. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Elemental characterisation of melanin in feathers via synchrotron X-ray imaging and absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nicholas P.; van Veelen, Arjen; Anné, Jennifer; Manning, Phillip L.; Bergmann, Uwe; Sellers, William I.; Egerton, Victoria M.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Ito, Shosuke; Wogelius, Roy A.

    2016-01-01

    Melanin is a critical component of biological systems, but the exact chemistry of melanin is still imprecisely known. This is partly due to melanin’s complex heterogeneous nature and partly because many studies use synthetic analogues and/or pigments extracted from their natural biological setting, which may display important differences from endogenous pigments. Here we demonstrate how synchrotron X-ray analyses can non-destructively characterise the elements associated with melanin pigment in situ within extant feathers. Elemental imaging shows that the distributions of Ca, Cu and Zn are almost exclusively controlled by melanin pigment distribution. X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that the atomic coordination of zinc and sulfur is different within eumelanised regions compared to pheomelanised regions. This not only impacts our fundamental understanding of pigmentation in extant organisms but also provides a significant contribution to the evidence-based colour palette available for reconstructing the appearance of fossil organisms. PMID:27658854

  12. Three Dimensional Structure Of A Complex Bipolar Jet: Transition Region Imaging-spectroscopy With MOSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lewis; Kankelborg, C. C.; Longcope, D.

    2007-05-01

    We report on an interesting transient brightening observed in He II 304 Å above a flux-canceling magnetic bipole during the MOSES (Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph) sounding rocket flight, Feb. 8, 2006. The event resembles a bipolar jet and has characteristics of a transition region explosive event, but it is not a simple, linear structure at some angle to the line-of-sight. The jets curve away from the axis of a compact, bright core, and are not collinear. We observe transverse sky-plane motions and infer line-of-sight doppler shifts along the length of the jets, as well as non-thermal line broadening in the bright core, demonstrating the utility of simultaneous imaging-spectroscopy provided by MOSES. This work is supported by NASA LCAS and the Montana Space Grant Consortium.

  13. The study of blue LED to induce fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging for oral carcinoma detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Longjiang; Hu, Yuanting

    2009-07-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging diagnosis of malignant lesions provides us with a new method to diagnose diseases in precancerous stage. Early diagnosis of disease has significant importance in cancer treatment, because most cancers can be cured well in precancerous, especially when the diffusion of cancer is limited in a restricted region. In this study, Golden hamster models were applied to 5% 9, 10 dimethyl-1, 2-benzanthracene (DMBA) to induce hamster buccal cheek pouch carcinoma three times a week. Rose Bengal, which has been used in clinican for years and avoids visible side-effect to human was chosen as photosensitizer. 405 nm blue LED was used to induce the fluorescence of photosensitizer. After topical application of photosensitizer, characteristic red emission fluorescence peak was observed around 600nm. Similar, normal oral cavity has special luminescence around 480nm. Fluorescence spectroscopy technology is based on analysing emission peaks of photosensitizer in the areas of oral carcinoma, moreover, red-to-green (IR/IG) intensity ratio is also applied as a diagnostic algorithm. A CCD which is connected with a computer is used to take pictures at carcinoma areas through different filters. Fluorescence images from normal hamster buccal cheek pouch are compared with those from carcinogen-induced models of carcinoma, and morphological differences between normal and lesion tissue can be distinguished. The pictures are analyzed by Matlab and shown on the screen of computer. This paper demonstrates that Rose Bengal could be used as photosensitizer to detect oral carcinoma, and blue LED as excitation source could not only have a good effect to diagnose oral carcinoma, but also decrease cost greatly.

  14. Coral Reef Color: Remote and In-Situ Imaging Spectroscopy of Reef Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Coral reefs are threatened at local to global scales by a litany of anthropogenic impacts, including overfishing, coastal development, marine and watershed pollution, rising ocean temperatures, and ocean acidification. However, available data for the primary indicator of coral reef condition — proportional cover of living coral — are surprisingly sparse and show patterns that contradict the prevailing understanding of how environment impacts reef condition. Remote sensing is the only available tool for acquiring synoptic, uniform data on reef condition at regional to global scales. Discrimination between coral and other reef benthos relies on narrow wavebands afforded by imaging spectroscopy. The same spectral information allows non-invasive quantification of photosynthetic pigment composition, which shows unexpected phenological trends. There is also potential to link biodiversity with optical diversity, though there has been no effort in that direction. Imaging spectroscopy underlies the light-use efficiency model for reef primary production by quantifying light capture, which in turn indicates biochemical capacity for CO2 assimilation. Reef calcification is strongly correlated with primary production, suggesting the possibility for an optics-based model of that aspect of reef function, as well. By scaling these spectral models for use with remote sensing, we can vastly improve our understanding of reef structure, function, and overall condition across regional to global scales. By analyzing those remote sensing products against ancillary environmental data, we can construct secondary models to predict reef futures in the era of global change. This final point is the objective of CORAL (COral Reef Airborne Laboratory), a three-year project funded under NASA's Earth Venture Suborbital-2 program to investigate the relationship between coral reef condition at the ecosystem scale and various nominal biogeophysical forcing parameters.

  15. Spectroscopy and high-resolution imaging of the gravitational lens SDSS J1206+4332

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnello, Adriano; Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Suyu, Sherry H.; Treu, Tommaso; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Mason, Charlotte; Bradač, Maruša; Auger, Matthew W.

    2016-06-01

    We present spectroscopy and laser guide star adaptive optics (LGSAO) images of the doubly imaged lensed quasar SDSS J1206+4332. We revise the deflector redshift proposed previously to zd = 0.745, and measure for the first time its velocity dispersion σ = (290 ± 30) km s-1. The LGSAO data show the lensed quasar host galaxy stretching over the astroid caustic thus forming an extra pair of merging images, which was previously thought to be an unrelated galaxy in seeing limited data. Owing to the peculiar geometry, the lens acts as a natural coronagraph on the broad-line region of the quasar so that only narrow C III]emission is found in the fold arc. We use the data to reconstruct the source structure and deflector potential, including nearby perturbers. We reconstruct the point-spread function (PSF) from the quasar images themselves, since no additional point source is present in the field of view. From gravitational lensing and stellar dynamics, we find the slope of the total mass density profile to be γ' = -log ρ/log r = 1.93 ± 0.09. We discuss the potential of SDSS J1206+4332 for measuring a time-delay distance (and thus H0 and other cosmological parameters), or as a standard ruler, in combination with the time-delay published by the COSMOGRAIL collaboration. We conclude that this system is very promising for cosmography. However, in order to achieve competitive precision and accuracy, an independent characterization of the PSF is needed. Spatially resolved kinematics of the deflector would reduce the uncertainties further. Both are within the reach of current observational facilities.

  16. Ex vivo optical coherence tomography and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy imaging of murine gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Lida; Tumlinson, Alexandre R.; Wade, Norman; Besselsen, David; Utzinger, Urs; Gerner, Eugene; Barton, Jennifer

    2005-04-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIF) have separately been found to have clinical potential in identifying human gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies, yet their diagnostic capability in mouse models of human disease is unknown. We combine the two modalities to survey the GI tract of a variety of mouse strains and sample dysplasias and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) of the small and large intestine. Segments of duodenum and lower colon 2.5 cm in length and the entire esophagus from 10 mice each of two colon cancer models (ApcMin and AOM treated A/J) and two IBD models (Il-2 and Il-10) and 5 mice each of their respective controls were excised. OCT images and LIF spectra were obtained simultaneously from each tissue sample within 1 hour of extraction. Histology was used to classify tissue regions as normal, Peyer"s patch, dysplasia, adenoma, or IBD. Features in corresponding regions of OCT images were analyzed. Spectra from each of these categories were averaged and compared via the student's t-test. Features in OCT images correlated to histology in both normal and diseased tissue samples. In the diseased samples, OCT was able to identify early stages of mild colitis and dysplasia. In the sample of IBD, the LIF spectra displayed unique peaks at 635nm and 670nm, which were attributed to increased porphyrin production in the proliferating bacteria of the disease. These peaks have the potential to act as a diagnostic for IBD. OCT and LIF appear to be useful and complementary modalities for imaging mouse models.

  17. Near-infrared nano-imaging spectroscopy using a phase change mask method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yu; Kanazawa, Shohei; Saiki, Toshiharu

    2014-11-01

    We propose a technique that employs an optical mask layer of a phase-change material, e.g. GeSbTe, which is widely used for rewritable optical recording media, for realizing highly sensitive near-field imaging spectroscopy of single semiconductor quantum constituents at optical telecommunication wavelengths. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have shown great promise as efficient single photon emitters and entangled photon sources, making them attractive for quantum communication and quantum information processing applications. Self-assembled InAs QDs on InP substrate are promising as near-infrared (NIR) single photon and entangled photon emitters. In order to clarify and control the optical properties of QDs for telecommunication devices, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy studies of single QDs with high spatial resolution at NIR wavelength is necessary. The most useful technique to attain this is by using near-field scanning optical miscroscopy (NSOM). However, NSOM has a lower PL collection efficiency at NIR wavelength than at visible wavelength [1]. This problem inhibits NIR-PL spectroscopy based on NSOM to be practically realized. Therefore, we deveopled a method to overcome the low NIR-PL spectroscopy by using a nanoaperture on an optical mask layer of phase-change material (PCM) [2]. Due to the large optical contrast between the crystalline and amorphous phases of the phase-change material at visible wavelengths and its high transparency at NIR wavelengths, an amorphous nanoaperture can be used to realize imaging spectroscopy with a high spatial resolution and a high collection efficiency (Fig. 1). We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method by performing numerical simulations and PL measurements of InAs/InP QDs.jmicro;63/suppl_1/i10-a/DFU089F1F1DFU089F1Fig. 1.Schematic illustration of phase change mask method PCM mask effect has also the potential to be applied in emission energy control of QDs. One of the main problems for realization of

  18. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy and Near Infrared Imaging for Prostate Cancer Detection: Receptor-targeted and Native Biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang

    Optical spectroscopy and imaging using near-infrared (NIR) light provides powerful tools for non-invasive detection of cancer in tissue. Optical techniques are capable of quantitative reconstructions maps of tissue absorption and scattering properties, thus can map in vivo the differences in the content of certain marker chromophores and/or fluorophores in normal and cancerous tissues (for example: water, tryptophan, collagen and NADH contents). Potential clinical applications of optical spectroscopy and imaging include functional tumor detection and photothermal therapeutics. Optical spectroscopy and imaging apply contrasts from intrinsic tissue chromophores such as water, collagen and NADH, and extrinsic optical contrast agents such as Indocyanine Green (ICG) to distinguish disease tissue from the normal one. Fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging also gives high sensitivity and specificity for biomedical diagnosis. Recent developments on specific-targeting fluorophores such as small receptor-targeted dye-peptide conjugate contrast agent offer high contrast between normal and cancerous tissues hence provide promising future for early tumour detection. This thesis focus on a study to distinguish the cancerous prostate tissue from the normal prostate tissues with enhancement of specific receptor-targeted prostate cancer contrast agents using optical spectroscopy and imaging techniques. The scattering and absorption coefficients, and anisotropy factor of cancerous and normal prostate tissues were investigated first as the basis for the biomedical diagnostic and optical imaging. Understanding the receptors over-expressed prostate cancer cells and molecular target mechanism of ligand, two small ICG-derivative dye-peptides, namely Cypate-Bombesin Peptide Analogue Conjugate (Cybesin) and Cypate-Octreotate Peptide Conjugate (Cytate), were applied to study their clinical potential for human prostate cancer detection. In this work, the steady-state and time

  19. Intracranial yolk sac tumor in an adult patient: MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging and 1H MR spectroscopy features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mačvanski Marija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Yolk sac tumors represent only 5%-7% of intracranial germ cell tumors, which comprise about 1% of all primary brain tumors in adults. Literature data about nonspecific imaging characteristics of these tumors are scant. We presented magnetic resonance imaging findings with diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of this rare type of tumor in an adult patient. Case report. A 55-year-old man with progressive left side weakness, headache, dizziness and ataxia, underwent preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. After surgical resection and histological analysis, the final diagnosis of yolk sac tumor was established. Retrospective imaging analysis were performed in order to determine imaging and biochemical parameters that could be useful in the diagnostic evaluation of this tumor type. Conclusion. Though the imaging features of yolk sac tumor are not specific, morphoanatomical and metabolic imaging could offer the information that provides new insights into this tumor that may facilitate further therapeutic decision process and potentially provides better information regarding the disease prognosis.

  20. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optical polarization imaging of in-vivo biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Núñez, A.; Castillejos, Y.; García-Torales, G.; Martínez-Ponce, G.

    2013-11-01

    A number of optical techniques have been reported in the scientific literature as accomplishable methodologies to diagnose diseases in biological tissue, for instance, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and optical polarization imaging (OPI). The skin is the largest organ in the body and consists of three primary layers, namely, the epidermis (the outermost layer exposed to the world), the dermis, and the hypodermis. The epidermis changes from to site to site, mainly because of difference in hydration. A lower water content increase light scattering and reduce the penetration depth of radiation. In this work, two hairless mice have been selected to evaluate their skin features by using DRS and OPI. Four areas of the specimen body were chosen to realize the comparison: back, abdomen, tail, and head. From DRS, it was possible to distinguish the skin nature because of different blood irrigation at dermis. In the other hand, OPI shows pseudo-depolarizing regions in the measured Mueller images related to a spatially varying propagation of the scattered light. This provides information about the cell size in the irradiated skin.

  1. FTIR Spectroscopy on Basic Materials in THz Region for Compact FEL-Based Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Cha, H J; Lee, B C; Park, S H

    2005-01-01

    We are making experiments on THz(terahertz) imaging using a compact high power FEL (free-electron laser) which is operating as a users facility at KAERI. The wavelength range of output pulses is 100~1200 μm, which corresponds to 0.3~3 THz in the frequency region. We should select the optimum wavelength for the constituents of specimens to realize the imaging based on the THz FEL. A FTIR (Fourier-transform infrared) spectrometer was modified to measure the optical constants of the specimens in THz region. A polyester film of which thickness is 3.7 μm was used as a beam splitter of the spectrometer. In the case of normal incidence, the transmittance of the film was measured to be more than 90%, and the estimated loss by absorption was approximately 2% at the FEL frequency of 3 THz. Several tens of nanometer-thick-silver was coated on the polyester film to balance both transmission and reflection of THz waves in the beam splitter. We investigated FTIR spectroscopy on air, vapor and liquid water...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: An In Vivo Molecular Imaging Biomarker for Parkinson’s Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosella Ciurleo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta which leads to dysfunction of cerebral pathways critical for the control of movements. The diagnosis of PD is based on motor symptoms, such as bradykinesia, akinesia, muscular rigidity, postural instability, and resting tremor, which are evident only after the degeneration of a significant number of dopaminergic neurons. Currently, a marker for early diagnosis of PD is still not available. Consequently, also the development of disease-modifying therapies is a challenge. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a quantitative imaging technique that allows in vivo measurement of certain neurometabolites and may produce biomarkers that reflect metabolic dysfunctions and irreversible neuronal damage. This review summarizes the abnormalities of cerebral metabolites found in MRS studies performed in patients with PD and other forms of parkinsonism. In addition, we discuss the potential role of MRS as in vivo molecular imaging biomarker for early diagnosis of PD and for monitoring the efficacy of therapeutic interventions.

  3. Chemical shift imaging and localised magnetic resonance spectroscopy in full-term asphyxiated neonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brissaud, Olivier [Children' s Hospital, Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Bordeaux (France); Chateil, Jean-Francois; Bordessoules, Martine; Brun, Muriel [Children' s Hospital, Radiology Unit, Bordeaux (France)

    2005-10-01

    Diagnosis of brain lesions after birth anoxia-ischemia is essential for appropriate management. Clinical evaluation is not sufficient. MRI has been proven to provide useful information. To compare abnormalities observed with MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), localised magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and chemical shift imaging (CSI) and correlate these findings with the clinical outcome. Fourteen full-term neonates with birth asphyxia were studied. MRI, MRS and CSI were performed within the first 4 days of life. Lesions observed with DWI were correlated with outcome, but the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) did improve diagnostic confidence. The mean value of Lac/Cr for the neonates with a favourable outcome was statically lower than for those who died (0.22 vs 1.04; P = 0.01). The same results were observed for the Lac/NAA ratio (0.21 vs 1.23; P = 0.01). Data obtained with localised MRS and CSI were correlated for the ratio N-acetyl-aspartate/choline, but not for the other metabolites. No correlation was found between the ADC values and the metabolite ratios. Combination of these techniques could be helpful in our understanding of the physiopathological events occurring in neonates with asphyxia. (orig.)

  4. A nonferrous instrumental joystick device for recording behavioral responses during magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, S E; Dobrosielski, M; Chiu, T M; Woods, B T; Teoh, S K; Mendelson, J H

    1993-12-01

    A nonferrous joystick device was developed to permit subjects to continuously report ethanol-induced alterations in subjective mood states while undergoing a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) procedure. The device utilizes air pressure (supplied by a small compressor) that is directed to a series of tubes that terminate in a hand-held unit. The hand-held unit easily fits inside the magnet and resembles a standard computer game joystick except that the ends of the air hoses replace the buttons. The control unit contains three pressure transducers, which are triggered when the tubes are occluded by the subject, activating different pens on an event marker located 6 m from the whole body imager. The unit is safe to use inside a 1.5-Tesla magnetic field and does not disrupt the MRI and MRS recording procedures. Subjective reports of ethanol-induced euphoria and intoxication paralleled the MRS detection of ethanol in the brain. This device could prove to be useful in numerous behavioral studies involving whole-body MRI and MRS.

  5. Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging to Detect and Quantify Adipose Tissue Browning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinish, U. S; Wong, Chi Lok; Sriram, Sandhya; Ong, Wee Kiat; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Sugii, Shigeki; Olivo, Malini

    2017-01-01

    Adipose (fat) tissue is a complex metabolic organ that is highly active and essential. In contrast to white adipose tissue (WAT), brown adipose tissue (BAT) is deemed metabolically beneficial because of its ability to burn calories through heat production. The conversion of WAT-resident adipocytes to “beige” or “brown-like” adipocytes has recently attracted attention. However, it typically takes a few days to analyze and confirm this browning of WAT through conventional molecular, biochemical, or histological methods. Moreover, accurate quantification of the overall browning process is not possible by any of these methods. In this context, we report the novel application of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and multispectral imaging (MSI) to detect and quantify the browning process in mice. We successfully demonstrated the time-dependent increase in browning of WAT, following its induction through β-adrenergic agonist injections. The results from these optical techniques were confirmed with those of standard molecular and biochemical assays, which measure gene and protein expression levels of UCP1 and PGC-1α, as well as with histological examinations. We envision that the reported optical methods can be developed into a fast, real time, cost effective and easy to implement imaging approach for quantification of the browning process in adipose tissue. PMID:28145475

  6. Diffusion-weighted imaging-guided MR spectroscopy in breast lesions using readout-segmented echo-planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Kun; Chai, Weimin; Zhan, Ying; Luo, Xianfu; Yan, Fuhua [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai (China); Fu, Caixia [Siemens MRI Center, Siemens Shenzhen Magnetic Resonance Ltd, Shenzhen (China); Shen, Kunwei [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    To investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)-guided magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) using readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (RS-EPI) to characterise breast lesions. A total of 258 patients with 258 suspicious breast lesions larger than 1 cm in diameter were examined using DWI-guided, single-voxel MRS with RS-EPI. The mean total choline-containing compound (tCho) signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and concentration were used for the interpretation of MRS data. T-tests, χ{sup 2}-tests, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses and Pearson correlations were conducted for statistical analysis. Histologically, 183 lesions were malignant, and 75 lesions were benign. Both the mean tCho SNR and concentration of malignant lesions were higher than those of benign lesions (6.23 ± 3.30 AU/mL vs. 1.26 ± 1.75 AU/mL and 3.17 ± 2.03 mmol/kg vs. 0.86 ± 0.83 mmol/kg, respectively; P < 0.0001). For a tCho SNR of 2.0 AU/mL and a concentration of 1.76 mmol/kg, the corresponding areas under the ROC curves were 0.93 and 0.90, respectively. The mean tCho SNR and concentration negatively correlated with apparent diffusion coefficients calculated from RS-EPI, with correlation coefficients of -0.54 and -0.48, respectively. DWI-guided MRS using RS-EPI is feasible and accurate for characterising breast lesions. (orig.)

  7. Multimodal Imaging and Spectroscopy Fiber-bundle Microendoscopy Platform for Non-invasive, In Vivo Tissue Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greening, Gage J; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Muldoon, Timothy J

    2016-10-17

    Recent fiber-bundle microendoscopy techniques enable non-invasive analysis of in vivo tissue using either imaging techniques or a combination of spectroscopy techniques. Combining imaging and spectroscopy techniques into a single optical probe may provide a more complete analysis of tissue health. In this article, two dissimilar modalities are combined, high-resolution fluorescence microendoscopy imaging and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, into a single optical probe. High-resolution fluorescence microendoscopy imaging is a technique used to visualize apical tissue micro-architecture and, although mostly a qualitative technique, has demonstrated effective real-time differentiation between neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissue. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is a technique which can extract tissue physiological parameters including local hemoglobin concentration, melanin concentration, and oxygen saturation. This article describes the specifications required to construct the fiber-optic probe, how to build the instrumentation, and then demonstrates the technique on in vivo human skin. This work revealed that tissue micro-architecture, specifically apical skin keratinocytes, can be co-registered with its associated physiological parameters. The instrumentation and fiber-bundle probe presented here can be optimized as either a handheld or endoscopically-compatible device for use in a variety of organ systems. Additional clinical research is needed to test the viability of this technique for different epithelial disease states.

  8. Easy measurement of diffusion coefficients of EGFP-tagged plasma membrane proteins using k-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Koffman, Jennifer Skaarup; Marlar, Saw

    2014-01-01

    Lateral diffusion and compartmentalization of plasma membrane proteins are tightly regulated in cells and thus, studying these processes will reveal new insights to plasma membrane protein function and regulation. Recently, k-Space Image Correlation Spectroscopy (kICS)1 was developed to enable ro...

  9. Physical structure of the proto-planetary nebula CRL618.I. optical long split spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, C. S.; Sahai, R.; Gil de Paz, A.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present optical long-slit spectroscopy and imaging of the protoplanetary nebula CRL 618. The optical lobes of CRL 618 consist of shock-excited gas, which emits many recombination and forbidden lines, and dust, which scatters light from the innermost regions.

  10. Diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain in a patient with Sturge-Weber syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijens, P. E.; Gieteling, E. W.; Meiners, L. C.; Sival, D. A.; Potze, J. H.; Irwan, R.; Oudkerk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Quantitative brain MR spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were used to characterize one patient with Sturge-Weber syndrome. Choline increases and N-acetylaspartate decreases were observed in pathologic frontal gray matter tissue compared to contralateral unaffected brain tissue wit

  11. Rasterizing geological models for parallel finite difference simulation using seismic simulation as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehner, Björn; Hellwig, Olaf; Linke, Maik; Görz, Ines; Buske, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    3D geological underground models are often presented by vector data, such as triangulated networks representing boundaries of geological bodies and geological structures. Since models are to be used for numerical simulations based on the finite difference method, they have to be converted into a representation discretizing the full volume of the model into hexahedral cells. Often the simulations require a high grid resolution and are done using parallel computing. The storage of such a high-resolution raster model would require a large amount of storage space and it is difficult to create such a model using the standard geomodelling packages. Since the raster representation is only required for the calculation, but not for the geometry description, we present an algorithm and concept for rasterizing geological models on the fly for the use in finite difference codes that are parallelized by domain decomposition. As a proof of concept we implemented a rasterizer library and integrated it into seismic simulation software that is run as parallel code on a UNIX cluster using the Message Passing Interface. We can thus run the simulation with realistic and complicated surface-based geological models that are created using 3D geomodelling software, instead of using a simplified representation of the geological subsurface using mathematical functions or geometric primitives. We tested this set-up using an example model that we provide along with the implemented library.

  12. Digital Geological Model (DGM): a 3D raster model of the subsurface of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunnink, J.L.; Maljers, D.; Gessel, S.F. van; Menkovic, A.; Hummelman, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    A 3D geological raster model has been constructed of the onshore of the Netherlands. The model displays geological units for the upper 500 m in 3D in an internally consistent way. The units are based on the lithostratigraphical classification of the Netherlands. This classification is used to interp

  13. Compensation for Target Motion in Magnetic Raster Scanning System at GSI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Conformal radiation therapy methods including the magnetic raster scanning used at GSI yield a very high dose inside tumor volume while drastically reducing the dose contribution to surrounding healthy tissue.This is achieved by delivering a previously calculated dose to every single volume element(voxel)of the tumor and

  14. Molecular imaging of neutropilin-1 receptor using photoacoustic spectroscopy in breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Cao, Minsong; Liu, Bo; Miller, Kathy D.; Guo, Lili

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Our purpose is to develop and test a molecular probe that can detect the expression of neutropilin-1 receptor (NPR-1) in vivo using fluorescence imaging and photoacoustic spectroscopy. Introduction: NPR-1 is expressed on endothelial cells and some breast cancer cells, and binds to vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF165, a growth factor associated with pathological tumor angiogenesis. This receptor is coexpressed with VEGFR2 and shown to enhance the binding of VEGF165; therefore, it has the potential to be used as a marker of angiogenic activity and targeted for therapy. Material and Methods: A peptide specific to NPR-1 receptor was synthesized and conjugated to a NIR fluorochrome (IRDye800CW) and was intravenously injected into mice with breast tumors (MCF7VEGF). Probe kinetics was monitored in vivo via near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) within an optical imager for up to 72 hours within the tumor and compared to other organs (liver, muscle) for binding specificity. A multivariate fitting algorithm was used to spectrally deconvolve the IRDye800CW from endogenous hemoglobin signature (hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation). Results: Dynamics of the NIR fluorescence signal within the first hour after injection indicates specific binding compared to muscle, with an average tumor-to-muscle ration of 2.00 (+/- 0.27). Spectral analysis clearly indentified the presence of the NPR-1 probe. Based on calibration data, the average tumor concentration from both NIRF and PCT-S was measured to be ~200-300nM. Conclusion: These preliminary results show the capability of PCT to image an exogenous probe in vivo in addition to its hemoglobin state.

  15. The CORONAS-Photon/TESIS experiment on EUV imaging spectroscopy of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, S.; Zhitnik, I.; Bogachev, S.; Bugaenko, O.; Ignat'ev, A.; Mitrofanov, A.; Perzov, A.; Shestov, S.; Slemzin, V.; Suhodrev, N.

    The new experiment TESIS is developent for russian CORONAS-Photon mission launch is planned on the end of 2007 The experiment is aimed on the study of activity of the Sun in the phases of minimum rise and maximum of 24 th cycle of Solar activity by the method of XUV imaging spectroscopy The method is based on the registration full-Sun monochromatic images with high spatial and temporal resolution The scientific tasks of the experiment are i Investigation dynamic processes in corona flares CME etc with high spatial up to 1 and temporal up to 1 second resolution ii determination of the main plasma parameters like plasma electron and ion density and temperature differential emission measure etc iii study of the processes of appearance and development large scale long-life magnetic structures in the solar corona study of the fluency of this structures on the global activity of the corona iv study of the mechanisms of energy accumulation and release in the solar flares and mechanisms of transformation of this energy into the heating of the plasma and kinematics energy To get the information for this studies the TESIS will register full-Sun images in narrow spectral intervals and the monochromatic lines of HeII SiXI FeXXI-FeXXIII MgXII ions The instrument includes 5 independent channels 2 telescopes for 304 and 132 A wide-field 2 5 degrees coronograph 280-330A and 8 42 A spectroheliographs The detailed description of the TESIS experiment and the instrument is presented

  16. Differentiation of intracranial tuberculomas and high grade gliomas using proton MR spectroscopy and diffusion MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Juan, E-mail: pengjuan1209@126.com [Department of Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, No. 1 Youyi Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China); Ouyang, Yu, E-mail: 1957ouyangyu@sina.com [Department of Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, No. 1 Youyi Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China); Fang, Wei-Dong, E-mail: fwd9707@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, No. 1 Youyi Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China); Luo, Tian-You, E-mail: ltychy@sina.com [Department of Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, No. 1 Youyi Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China); Li, Yong-Mei, E-mail: lymzhang70@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, No. 1 Youyi Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China); Lv, Fa-Jin, E-mail: fajinlv@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, No. 1 Youyi Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China); Zhang, Zhi-Wei, E-mail: jintianzzw@163.com [Department of Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, No. 1 Youyi Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China); Li, Xin-You, E-mail: lixinyou666@163.com [Department of Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, No. 1 Youyi Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether proton MR spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) and diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging can be used to differentiate intracranial tuberculomas from high grade gliomas (HGGs). Materials and methods: A total of 41 patients (19 with intracranial tuberculomas and 22 with HGGs) were examined in our study. {sup 1}H MRS and DW imaging were performed at a 1.5T MR scanner before operation or treatment. Concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), choline (Cho), and lipid and lactate (LL) in the contrast-enhancing rim of each lesion were expressed as metabolite ratios and were normalized to the contralateral hemisphere. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was also calculated. The metabolite ratios and ADC values in the enhancing rim of intracranial tuberculomas and HGGs were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Diagnostic accuracy was compared using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: Significant differences were found in the maximum Cho/Cr (P = 0.015), Cho/NAA (P = 0.001) and Cho/Cho-n ratios (P = 0.002), and minimum ADC value (P < 0.001) between the intracranial tuberculomas and HGGs. Diagnostic accuracy was higher by minimum ADC value than maximum Cho/Cr, Cho/NAA and Cho/Cho-n ratios (93.8% versus 75.7%, 80.8% and 78.1%). Conclusion: These results suggest a promising role for {sup 1}H MRS and DW imaging in the differentiation between the intracranial tuberculomas and HGGs.

  17. Ablation plume structure and dynamics in ambient gas observed by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyabe, M.; Oba, M.; Iimura, H.; Akaoka, K.; Khumaeni, A.; Kato, M.; Wakaida, I.

    2015-08-01

    The dynamic behavior of an ablation plume in ambient gas has been investigated by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy. The second harmonic beam from an Nd:YAG laser (0.5–6 J/cm{sup 2}) was focused on a sintered oxide pellet or a metal chip of gadolinium. The produced plume was subsequently intersected with a sheet-shaped UV beam from a dye laser so that time-resolved fluorescence images were acquired with an intensified CCD camera at various delay times. The obtained cross-sectional images of the plume indicate that the ablated ground state atoms and ions of gadolinium accumulate in a hemispherical contact layer between the plume and the ambient gas, and a cavity containing a smaller density of ablated species is formed near the center of the plume. At earlier expansion stage, another luminous component also expands in the cavity so that it coalesces into the hemispherical layer. The splitting and coalescence for atomic plume occur later than those for ionic plume. Furthermore, the hemispherical layer of neutral atoms appears later than that of ions; however, the locations of the layers are nearly identical. This coincidence of the appearance locations of the layers strongly suggests that the neutral atoms in the hemispherical layer are produced as a consequence of three-body recombination of ions through collisions with gas atoms. The obtained knowledge regarding plume expansion dynamics and detailed plume structure is useful for optimizing the experimental conditions for ablation-based spectroscopic analysis. - Highlights: • Ablated ground-state species accumulated in a thin hemispherical boundary layer • Inside the layer, a cavity containing a small density of ablated species was formed. • The hemispherical layers of atoms and ions appeared at a nearly identical location. • The measured intensity peak variation was in good agreement with a model prediction. • We ascribed the dominant process for forming the layer to a three

  18. Tomographic imaging of reacting flows in 3D by laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, J.; Martin, P. A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes the development of an infrared laser absorption tomography system for the 3D volumetric imaging of chemical species and temperature in reacting flows. The system is based on high-resolution near-infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) for the measurement of water vapour above twin, mixed fuel gas burners arranged with an asymmetrical output. Four parallel laser beams pass through the sample region and are rotated rapidly in a plane to produce a wide range of projection angles. A rotation of 180° with 0.5° sampling was achieved in 3.6 s. The effects of changes to the burner fuel flow were monitored in real time for the 2D distributions. The monitoring plane was then moved vertically relative to the burners enabling a stack of 2D images to be produced which were then interpolated to form a 3D volumetric image of the temperature and water concentrations above the burners. The optical transmission of each beam was rapidly scanned around 1392 nm and the spectrum was fitted to find the integrated absorbance of the water transitions and although several are probed in each scan, two of these transitions possess opposite temperature dependencies. The projections of the integrated absorbances at each angle form the sinogram from which the 2D image of integrated absorbance of each line can be reconstructed by the direct Fourier reconstruction based on the Fourier slice theorem. The ratio of the integrated absorbances of the two lines can then be related to temperature alone in a method termed, two-line thermometry. The 2D temperature distribution obtained was validated for pattern and accuracy by thermocouple measurements. With the reconstructed temperature distribution, the temperature-dependent line strengths could be determined and subsequently the concentration distribution of water across the 2D plane whilst variations in burner condition were carried out. These results show that the measurement system based on TDLAS can be

  19. Cerenkov ring imaging and spectroscopy of charged KSTAR interactions at 11 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, P.F.

    1988-11-01

    The physics and technology of this new Cerenkov detector are discussed, including materials studies, construction techniques, and resolution measurements. Sources of resolution error are individually identified and measured where possible. The results of all studied indicate that the measurement resolution is understood. This work has led to the adoption of a large scale ring imaging detector as part of a new high energy physics spectrometer, the SLD, at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Results from an amplitude analysis of strange meson final states in K/sup /minus//p ..-->.. /ovr K/sub 0//..pi../sup /minus//p interactions are presented. The data derive from a 4 event/nb exposure of the LASS (large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid) spectrometer to an 11 GeV/c K/sup /minus// beam. The data sample consists of /approximately/100,000 vents distributed over the Dalitz plot of the channel. The process is observed to be dominated by the production and decay of natural spin-parity (J/sup P/ = 1/sup /minus//,2/sup +/,3/sup /minus//,/hor ellipsis/) strange meson states. The data can be understood in terms of a simple model in which the resonant /ovr K*/sup -// are produced predominantly via natural parity exchange in the t channel. The leading K*(890), K/sub 2/*(1430), and K*(1780) resonances are clearly observed and measured, and the underlying spectroscopy is also extracted. Indications of higher mass resonance production are also shown. The observed properties of these states are used to confront current models of quark spectroscopy in strange meson systems. 94 refs., 96 figs., 23 tabs.

  20. Cultural heritage and archaeology materials studied by synchrotron spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Loïc; Robinet, Laurianne; Thoury, Mathieu; Janssens, Koen; Cohen, Serge X.; Schöder, Sebastian

    2012-02-01

    The use of synchrotron radiation techniques to study cultural heritage and archaeological materials has undergone a steep increase over the past 10-15 years. The range of materials studied is very broad and encompasses painting materials, stone, glass, ceramics, metals, cellulosic and wooden materials, and a cluster of organic-based materials, in phase with the diversity observed at archaeological sites, museums, historical buildings, etc. Main areas of investigation are: (1) the study of the alteration and corrosion processes, for which the unique non-destructive speciation capabilities of X-ray absorption have proved very beneficial, (2) the understanding of the technologies and identification of the raw materials used to produce archaeological artefacts and art objects and, to a lesser extent, (3) the investigation of current or novel stabilisation, conservation and restoration practices. In terms of the synchrotron methods used, the main focus so far has been on X-ray techniques, primarily X-ray fluorescence, absorption and diffraction, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. We review here the use of these techniques from recent works published in the field demonstrating the breadth of applications and future potential offered by third generation synchrotron techniques. New developments in imaging and advanced spectroscopy, included in the UV/visible and IR ranges, could even broaden the variety of materials studied, in particular by fostering more studies on organic and complex organic-inorganic mixtures, while new support activities at synchrotron facilities might facilitate transfer of knowledge between synchrotron specialists and users from archaeology and cultural heritage sciences.

  1. Utility of FT-IR imaging spectroscopy in estimating differences between the quality of bovine blastocysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiecheć, A.; Opiela, J.; Lipiec, E.; Kwiatek, W. M.

    2013-10-01

    This study was conducted to verify whether the FT-IR spectroscopy and Focal Plane Array (FPA) imaging can be successfully applied to estimate the quality of bovine blastocysts (on the basis of the concentration of nucleic acids and amides). The FT-IR spectra of inner cell mass from blastocysts of three different culture systems were examined. The spectral changes between blastocysts were analyzed in DNA (spectral range of 1240-950 cm-1) and protein amides (1800-1400 cm-1). Blastocyst 1 (BL1-HA) was developed from the fertilized oocyte cultured with low concentration of hialuronian (HA), Blastocyst 2 and 3 were developed from the oocytes cultured in standard conditions. Cleavage stage blastocyst 2 (BL2-SOF) has been cultured in SOF medium while blastocyst 3 (BL3-VERO) was cultured in co-culture with VERO cells. The multivariate statistical analysis (Hierarchical Cluster Analysis - HCA and Principal Component Analysis - PCA) of single cells spectra showed high similarity of cells forming the inner cell mass within single blastocyst. The main variance between the three examined blastocysts was related to amides bands. Differences in the intensities of the amides' peaks between the bovine blastocysts derived from different culture systems indicated that specific proteins reflecting the appearance of a new phenotype were produced. However, for the three blastocysts, the α-helix typical peak was twice more intensive than the β-sheet typical peak suggesting that the differentiation processes had been started. Taking into account the quantitative and qualitative composition of the protein into examined blastocysts, it can be assumed, that the quality of the BL1-HA turned out much more similar to BL3-VERO than to BL2-SOF. FT-IR spectroscopy can be successfully applied in reproductive biology research for quality estimation of oocytes and embryos at varied stages of their development. Moreover this technique proved to be particularly useful when the quantity of the

  2. AXSIS: Exploring the frontiers in attosecond X-ray science, imaging and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kärtner, F.X., E-mail: franz.kaertner@cfel.de [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ahr, F. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Hamburg (Germany); Calendron, A.-L. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Çankaya, H. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Carbajo, S. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Chang, G.; Cirmi, G. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Dörner, K. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Dorda, U. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Fallahi, A. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Hartin, A. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Hemmer, M. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2016-09-01

    X-ray crystallography is one of the main methods to determine atomic-resolution 3D images of the whole spectrum of molecules ranging from small inorganic clusters to large protein complexes consisting of hundred-thousands of atoms that constitute the macromolecular machinery of life. Life is not static, and unravelling the structure and dynamics of the most important reactions in chemistry and biology is essential to uncover their mechanism. Many of these reactions, including photosynthesis which drives our biosphere, are light induced and occur on ultrafast timescales. These have been studied with high time resolution primarily by optical spectroscopy, enabled by ultrafast laser technology, but they reduce the vast complexity of the process to a few reaction coordinates. In the AXSIS project at CFEL in Hamburg, funded by the European Research Council, we develop the new method of attosecond serial X-ray crystallography and spectroscopy, to give a full description of ultrafast processes atomically resolved in real space and on the electronic energy landscape, from co-measurement of X-ray and optical spectra, and X-ray diffraction. This technique will revolutionize our understanding of structure and function at the atomic and molecular level and thereby unravel fundamental processes in chemistry and biology like energy conversion processes. For that purpose, we develop a compact, fully coherent, THz-driven attosecond X-ray source based on coherent inverse Compton scattering off a free-electron crystal, to outrun radiation damage effects due to the necessary high X-ray irradiance required to acquire diffraction signals. This highly synergistic project starts from a completely clean slate rather than conforming to the specifications of a large free-electron laser (FEL) user facility, to optimize the entire instrumentation towards fundamental measurements of the mechanism of light absorption and excitation energy transfer. A multidisciplinary team formed by laser

  3. AXSIS: Exploring the frontiers in attosecond X-ray science, imaging and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärtner, F. X.; Ahr, F.; Calendron, A.-L.; Çankaya, H.; Carbajo, S.; Chang, G.; Cirmi, G.; Dörner, K.; Dorda, U.; Fallahi, A.; Hartin, A.; Hemmer, M.; Hobbs, R.; Hua, Y.; Huang, W. R.; Letrun, R.; Matlis, N.; Mazalova, V.; Mücke, O. D.; Nanni, E.; Putnam, W.; Ravi, K.; Reichert, F.; Sarrou, I.; Wu, X.; Yahaghi, A.; Ye, H.; Zapata, L.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Miller, R. J. D.; Berggren, K. K.; Graafsma, H.; Meents, A.; Assmann, R. W.; Chapman, H. N.; Fromme, P.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray crystallography is one of the main methods to determine atomic-resolution 3D images of the whole spectrum of molecules ranging from small inorganic clusters to large protein complexes consisting of hundred-thousands of atoms that constitute the macromolecular machinery of life. Life is not static, and unravelling the structure and dynamics of the most important reactions in chemistry and biology is essential to uncover their mechanism. Many of these reactions, including photosynthesis which drives our biosphere, are light induced and occur on ultrafast timescales. These have been studied with high time resolution primarily by optical spectroscopy, enabled by ultrafast laser technology, but they reduce the vast complexity of the process to a few reaction coordinates. In the AXSIS project at CFEL in Hamburg, funded by the European Research Council, we develop the new method of attosecond serial X-ray crystallography and spectroscopy, to give a full description of ultrafast processes atomically resolved in real space and on the electronic energy landscape, from co-measurement of X-ray and optical spectra, and X-ray diffraction. This technique will revolutionize our understanding of structure and function at the atomic and molecular level and thereby unravel fundamental processes in chemistry and biology like energy conversion processes. For that purpose, we develop a compact, fully coherent, THz-driven attosecond X-ray source based on coherent inverse Compton scattering off a free-electron crystal, to outrun radiation damage effects due to the necessary high X-ray irradiance required to acquire diffraction signals. This highly synergistic project starts from a completely clean slate rather than conforming to the specifications of a large free-electron laser (FEL) user facility, to optimize the entire instrumentation towards fundamental measurements of the mechanism of light absorption and excitation energy transfer. A multidisciplinary team formed by laser

  4. Aerodynamic roughness length estimation with lidar and imaging spectroscopy in a shrub-dominated dryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aihua; Zhao, Wenguang; Mitchell, Jessica J; Glenn, Nancy F; Germino, Matthew; Sankey, Joel B.; Allen, Richard G

    2017-01-01

    The aerodynamic roughness length (Z0 m) serves an important role in the flux exchange between the land surface and atmosphere. In this study, airborne lidar (ALS), terrestrial lidar (TLS), and imaging spectroscopy data were integrated to develop and test two approaches to estimate Z0 m over a shrub dominated dryland study area in south-central Idaho, USA. Sensitivity of the two parameterization methods to estimate Z0 m was analyzed. The comparison of eddy covariance-derived Z0 m and remote sensing-derived Z0 m showed that the accuracy of the estimated Z0 m heavily depends on the estimation model and the representation of shrub (e.g., Artemisia tridentata subsp. wyomingensis) height in the models. The geometrical method (RA1994) led to 9 percent (~0.5 cm) and 25% (~1.1 cm) errors at site 1 and site 2, respectively, which performed better than the height variability-based method (MR1994) with bias error of 20 percent and 48 percent at site 1 and site 2, respectively. The RA1994 model resulted in a larger range of Z0 m than the MR1994 method. We also found that the mean, median and 75th percentiles of heights (H75) from ALS provides the best Z0 m estimates in the MR1994 model, while the mean, median, and MLD (Median Absolute Deviation from Median Height), as well as AAD (Mean Absolute Deviation from Mean Height) heights from ALS provides the best Z0 m estimates in the RA1994 model. In addition, the fractional cover of shrub and grass, distinguished with ALS and imaging spectroscopy data, provided the opportunity to estimate the frontal area index at the pixel-level to assess the influence of grass and shrub on Z0m estimates in the RA1994 method. Results indicate that grass had little effect on Z0 m in the RA1994 method. The Z0 m estimations were tightly coupled with vegetation height and its local variance for the shrubs. Overall, the results demonstrate that the use of height and fractional cover from remote sensing data are promising

  5. Mapping of egg yolk and animal skin glue paint binders in Early Renaissance paintings using near infrared reflectance imaging spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Kathryn A; Lomax, Suzanne; Zeibel, Jason G; Miliani, Costanza; Ricciardi, Paola; Hoenigswald, Ann; Loew, Murray; Delaney, John K

    2013-09-07

    In situ chemical imaging techniques are being developed to provide information on the spatial distribution of artists' pigments used in polychrome works of art such as paintings. The new methods include reflectance imaging spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence mapping. Results from these new methods have extended the knowledge obtained from site-specific chemical analyses widely in use. While these mapping methods have aided in determining the distribution of pigments, there is a growing interest to develop methods capable of identifying and mapping organic paint binders as well. Near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been extensively used in the remote sensing field as well as in the chemical industry to detect organic compounds. NIR spectroscopy provides a rapid method to assay organics by utilizing vibrational overtones and combination bands of fundamental absorptions that occur in the mid-IR. Here we explore the utility of NIR reflectance imaging spectroscopy to map organic binders in situ by examining a series of panel paintings known to have been painted using distemper (animal skin glue) and tempera (egg yolk) binders as determined by amino acid analysis of samples taken from multiple sites on the panels. In this report we demonstrate the success in identifying and mapping these binders by NIR reflectance imaging spectroscopy in situ. Three of the four panel paintings from Cosimo Tura's The Annunciation with Saint Francis and Saint Louis of Toulouse (ca. 1475) are imaged using a highly sensitive, line-scanning hyperspectral imaging camera. The results show an animal skin glue binder was used for the blue skies and blue robe of the Virgin Mary, and egg yolk tempera was used for the red robes and brown landscape. The mapping results show evidence for the use of both egg yolk and animal skin glue in the faces of the figures. The strongest absorption associated with lipidic egg yolk features visually correlates with areas that appear to have white

  6. High Resolution Imaging Spectroscopy for Characterizing Soil Properties over Large Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, D.; Kumar, P.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative mapping of high resolution surface soil texture (percentage sand, silt and clay), soil organic matter and chemical constituents are important for understanding infiltration, runoff and other surficial hydrologic processes at different scales. The Visible Near Infrared Analysis (VNIRA) method, which is a combination of imaging spectroscopy and laboratory chemical analysis with an underlying statistical model, has been established for the quantification of soil properties from imaging spectrometer data. In this study we characterize the feasibility of quantifying soil properties over large areas with the aim that these methods may be extended to space-borne sensors such as HyspIRI. Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) is a space-borne NASA mission concept having 10nm contiguous bands in the VSWIR region (380nm to 2500nm) of the electromagnetic spectra. High resolution (7.6m) Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data collected by NASA immediately after the massive 2011 Mississippi River floods at the Birds Point New Madrid (BPNM) floodway, coupled with in situ samples obtained at the time of the flight, is used to generate HyspIRI like data at 60m resolution. The VNIRA method is applied in a data-mining framework for quantification of the different soil textural properties and chemical constituents. The empirical models are further used for creating quantitative maps of the soil properties for the entire BPNM floodway. These maps are compared with the fine resolution AVIRIS maps of the same area for the different legacy landscape features and spatial correlations with the underlying topography immediately disturbed by the flooding event. The scales of variation in the soil constituents captured by the fine resolution data are also compared to the scales of variation captured by coarser resolution data. This study further explores the issues of applicability, challenges (such as the sensitivity of NDVI from mixed neighborhood pixels

  7. Investigation of photon counting pixel detectors for X-ray spectroscopy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talla, Patrick Takoukam

    2011-04-07

    important for quality assurance and constancy checks in hospitals. The second part of the thesis is about the imaging properties of the Medipix detectors. Images of samples (cash card, human bone) were taken with the Medipix3 chip in Single Pixel Mode (equivalent to the counting mode of the Medipix2 detector) and in Charge Summing Mode. The images in Single Pixel Mode were sharper than the ones taken in Charge Summing Mode. The latter show high granularity. This is due to high pixel-to-pixel variation in threshold in Charge Summing Mode. A redesign of the Medipix3 detector is proposed in order to correct for this problem. The determination of the spatial resolution confirms that Single Pixel Mode is better for imaging. Energy resolved material reconstruction was also performed with Medipix3 programmed in Single Pixel Mode and Charge Summing Mode. The combination method was applied to determine the concentration of elements in a compound object. The Downhill Simplex and Simulated Annealing methods were used to minimize the likelihood function delivered by the combination method. In a first step, the reconstruction method was tested using simulated data. The results of the reconstruction show that the reconstruction is better in Charge Summing Mode than in Single Pixel Mode. The method of material reconstruction was also applied with success to data taken with the Medipix3 detector programmed in Single Pixel Mode. In summary, the Medipix detectors were successfully used in spectroscopy and imaging. An improvement of Charge Summing Mode of Medipix3 is necessary in order to reach at least the same image quality as in Single Pixel Mode. (orig.)

  8. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy: Insights from Combined Recording Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Scarapicchia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a widely available, non-invasive technique that offers excellent spatial resolution, it remains limited by practical constraints imposed by the scanner environment. More recently, functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS has emerged as an alternative hemodynamic-based approach that possesses a number of strengths where fMRI is limited, most notably in portability and higher tolerance for motion. To date, fNIRS has shown promise in its ability to shed light on the functioning of the human brain in populations and contexts previously inaccessible to fMRI. Notable contributions include infant neuroimaging studies and studies examining full-body behaviors, such as exercise. However, much like fMRI, fNIRS has technical constraints that have limited its application to clinical settings, including a lower spatial resolution and limited depth of recording. Thus, by combining fMRI and fNIRS in such a way that the two methods complement each other, a multimodal imaging approach may allow for more complex research paradigms than is feasible with either technique alone. In light of these issues, the purpose of the current review is to: (1 provide an overview of fMRI and fNIRS and their associated strengths and limitations; (2 review existing combined fMRI-fNIRS recording studies; and (3 discuss how their combined use in future research practices may aid in advancing modern investigations of human brain function.

  9. Investigation of brain injury using in vivo multinuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chew, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Spectroscopy (MRS) are becoming increasingly important tools to the fields of biochemistry, physiology, and medicine. MRI and MRS studies offer one the opportunity to obtain anatomic images and biochemical information non-invasively and non-destructively, thus making serial repeated measurements possible on the same experimental subject. To investigate brain injury, the non-invasiveness finally allows one to follow the time course of evolution of injury and its effects on the brains metabolism. Although MRI and MRS offer exciting opportunities, much work is needed to overcome the initial problems of signal localization from a specified region of interest. Also, the potential utility of multinuclear (i.e. {sup 13}C, {sup 19}F, {sup 23}Na...) MRI and MRS studies, in assessing brain injury, is yet to be determined. This thesis attacks the aforementioned problems with a series of studies both on phantoms and in vivo. Experiments were performed to determine optimal localization schemes for use in MRS of the brain to overcome the initial problems encountered with MRS studies. The feasibility and utility of multinuclear MRI and MRS was determined in vivo involving {sup 13}C, {sup 19}F, and {sup 23}Na nuclei. The results of these studies have proven that acceptable signal localization for MRS studies is achievable and is not a hindrance for future MRS studies. Also, multinuclear studies have shown that it is feasible to obtain MRI or MRS data from less abundant nuclei and that the information obtained does or can provide useful insights into brain metabolism in pathologic states.

  10. Image stack alignment in full-field X-ray absorption spectroscopy using SIFT_PyOCL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paleo, Pierre; Pouyet, Emeline; Kieffer, Jérôme

    2014-03-01

    Full-field X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments allow the acquisition of millions of spectra within minutes. However, the construction of the hyperspectral image requires an image alignment procedure with sub-pixel precision. While the image correlation algorithm has originally been used for image re-alignment using translations, the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm (which is by design robust versus rotation, illumination change, translation and scaling) presents an additional advantage: the alignment can be limited to a region of interest of any arbitrary shape. In this context, a Python module, named SIFT_PyOCL, has been developed. It implements a parallel version of the SIFT algorithm in OpenCL, providing high-speed image registration and alignment both on processors and graphics cards. The performance of the algorithm allows online processing of large datasets.

  11. Wide-field time-resolved luminescence imaging and spectroscopy to decipher obliterated documents in forensic science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Mototsugu; Akiba, Norimitsu; Kurosawa, Kenji; Kuroki, Kenro; Akao, Yoshinori; Higashikawa, Yoshiyasu

    2016-01-01

    We applied a wide-field time-resolved luminescence (TRL) method with a pulsed laser and a gated intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) for deciphering obliterated documents for use in forensic science. The TRL method can nondestructively measure the dynamics of luminescence, including fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetimes, which prove to be useful parameters for image detection. First, we measured the TRL spectra of four brands of black porous-tip pen inks on paper to estimate their luminescence lifetimes. Next, we acquired the TRL images of 12 obliterated documents at various delay times and gate times of the ICCD. The obliterated contents were revealed in the TRL images because of the difference in the luminescence lifetimes of the inks. This method requires no pretreatment, is nondestructive, and has the advantage of wide-field imaging, which makes it is easy to control the gate timing. This demonstration proves that TRL imaging and spectroscopy are powerful tools for forensic document examination.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging and {sup 1}H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarchielli, P.; Gallai, V. [Neurological Clinic, Policlinico Monte Luce, Perugia (Italy); Pelliccioli, G.P.; Chiarini, P. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Azienda Ospedaliera, Perugia (Italy); Tarducci, R.; Presciutti, O.; Gobbi, G. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliera, Perugia (Italy)

    2001-03-01

    We aimed to increase confidence in the combined use of MRI and proton MR spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS) in diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We investigated 12 patients with ALS, seven definite and five probable, taking into account clinical measures of motor neuron function. On T2-weighted images we found high signal in the corticospinal tract in six and low signal in the primary motor cortex in seven of the 12 patients. Atrophy of the precentral gyrus was apparent in all the patients apart from one with probable ALS. Absolute quantification of cerebral metabolites using {sup 1}H-MRS demonstrated a significantly lower mean concentration of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in the precentral gyrus of patients with probable and definite ALS (8.5 {+-} 0.62) than in control subjects (10.4 {+-} 0.71; P < 0.001). NAA concentration in primary motor cortex correlated with Norris scale scores (r = 0.30; P < 0.0001) but not with the ALS Functional Rating Scale score or disease duration. Significantly lower levels of NAA were detected in patients with low signal in the motor cortex than in those without (P < 0.01). Mean choline (Cho) and creatine (Cr) values did not differ between patients with ALS and controls. (orig.)

  13. Characterization of potential mineralization in Afghanistan: four permissive areas identified using imaging spectroscopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Berger, Byron R.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey and Department of Defense Task Force for Business and Stability Operations natural resources revitalization activities in Afghanistan, four permissive areas for mineralization, Bamyan 1, Farah 1, Ghazni 1, and Ghazni 2, have been identified using imaging spectroscopy data. To support economic development, the areas of potential mineralization were selected on the occurrence of selected mineral assemblages mapped using the HyMap™ data (kaolinite, jarosite, hydrated silica, chlorite, epidote, iron-bearing carbonate, buddingtonite, dickite, and alunite) that may be indicative of past mineralization processes in areas with limited or no previous mineral resource studies. Approximately 30 sites were initially determined to be candidates for areas of potential mineralization. Additional criteria and material used to refine the selection and prioritization process included existing geologic maps, Landsat Thematic Mapper data, and published literature. The HyMapTM data were interpreted in the context of the regional geologic and tectonic setting and used the presence of alteration mineral assemblages to identify areas with the potential for undiscovered mineral resources. Further field-sampling, mapping, and supporting geochemical analyses are necessary to fully substantiate and verify the specific deposit types in the four areas of potential mineralization.

  14. The role of transition radiation in cathodoluminescence imaging and spectroscopy of thin-foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendis, B.G. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Howkins, A. [Experimental Techniques Centre, Brunel University, Uxbridge UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Stowe, D. [Gatan UK, 25 Nuffield Way, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 1RL (United Kingdom); Major, J.D.; Durose, K. [Stephenson Institute for Renewable Energy, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZF (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    There is renewed interest in cathodoluminescence (CL) in the transmission electron microscope, since it can be combined with low energy loss spectroscopy measurements and can also be used to probe defects, such as grain boundaries and dislocations, at high spatial resolution. Transition radiation (TR), which is emitted when the incident electron crosses the vacuum-specimen interface, is however an important artefact that has received very little attention. The importance of TR is demonstrated on a wedge shaped CdTe specimen of varying thickness. For small specimen thicknesses (<250 nm) grain boundaries are not visible in the panchromatic CL image. Grain boundary contrast is produced by electron–hole recombination within the foil, and a large fraction of that light is lost to multiple-beam interference, so that thicker specimens are required before the grain boundary signal is above the TR background. This is undesirable for high spatial resolution. Furthermore, the CL spectrum contains additional features due to TR which are not part of the ‘bulk’ specimen. Strategies to minimise the effects of TR are also discussed. - Highlights: • Grain boundary cathodoluminescence contrast is anomalously low in the TEM. • This is due to transition radiation (TR) generated at the vacuum-specimen interface. • Thick foils are required for the recombination luminescence to suppress TR. • This is undesirable for high spatial resolution analysis of grain boundaries. • Strategies to minimise TR are also discussed.

  15. Brain changes detected by functional magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy in patients with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Kun; Fan, Yi-Hong; Xu, Li; Xu, Mao-Sheng

    2017-05-28

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, non-specific granulomatous inflammatory disorder that commonly affects the small intestine and is a phenotype of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). CD is prone to relapse, and its incidence displays a persistent increase in developing countries. However, the pathogenesis of CD is poorly understood, with some studies emphasizing the link between CD and the intestinal microbiota. Specifically, studies point to the brain-gut-enteric microbiota axis as a key player in the occurrence and development of CD. Furthermore, investigations have shown white-matter lesions and neurologic deficits in patients with IBD. Based on these findings, brain activity changes in CD patients have been detected by blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI). BOLD-fMRI functions by detecting a local increase in relative blood oxygenation that results from neurotransmitter activity and thus reflects local neuronal firing rates. Therefore, biochemical concentrations of neurotransmitters or metabolites may change in corresponding brain regions of CD patients. To further study this phenomenon, brain changes of CD patients can be detected non-invasively, effectively and accurately by BOLD-fMRI combined with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). This approach can further shed light on the mechanisms of the occurrence and development of neurological CD. Overall, this paper reviews the current status and prospects on fMRI and MRS for evaluation of patients with CD based on the brain-gut-enteric microbiota axis.

  16. Advances in Mineral Dust Source Composition Measurement with Imaging Spectroscopy at the Salton Sea, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R. O.; Realmuto, V. J.; Thompson, D. R.; Mahowald, N. M.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Miller, R. L.; Clark, R. N.; Swayze, G. A.; Okin, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust emitted from the Earth's surface is a principal contributor to direct radiative forcing over the arid regions, where shifts in climate have a significant impact on agriculture, precipitation, and desert encroachment around the globe. Dust particles contribute to both positive and negative forcing, depending on the composition of the particles. Particle composition is a function of the surface mineralogy of dust source regions, but poor knowledge of surface mineralogy on regional to global scales limits the skill of Earth System models to predict shifts in regional climate around the globe. Earth System models include the source, emission, transport and deposition phases of the dust cycle. In addition to direct radiative forcing contributions, mineral dust impacts include indirect radiative forcing, modification of the albedo and melting rates of snow and ice, kinetics of tropospheric photochemistry, formation and deposition of acidic aerosols, supply of nutrients to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, and impact on human health and safety. We demonstrate the ability to map mineral dust source composition in the Salton Sea dust source region with imaging spectroscopy measurements acquired as part of the NASA HyspIRI preparatory airborne campaign. These new spectroscopically derived compositional measurements provide a six orders of magnitude improvement over current atlases for this dust source region and provide a pathfinder example for a remote measurement approach to address this critical dust composition gap for global Earth System models.

  17. Quality control of the paracetamol drug by chemometrics and imaging spectroscopy in the near infrared region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptistao, Mariana; Rocha, Werickson Fortunato de Carvalho; Poppi, Ronei Jesus

    2011-09-01

    In this work, it was used imaging spectroscopy and chemometric tools for the development and analysis of paracetamol and excipients in pharmaceutical formulations. It was also built concentration maps to study the distribution of the drug in the tablets surface. Multivariate models based on PLS regression were developed for paracetamol and excipients concentrations prediction. For the construction of the models it was used 31 samples in the tablet form containing the active principle in a concentration range of 30.0-90.0% (w/w) and errors below to 5% were obtained for validation samples. Finally, the study of the distribution in the drug was performed through the distribution maps of concentration of active principle and excipients. The analysis of maps showed the complementarity between the active principle and excipients in the tablets. The region with a high concentration of a constituent must have, necessarily, absence or low concentration of the other one. Thus, an alternative method for the paracetamol drug quality monitoring is presented.

  18. New Frontiers for Massive Star Winds: Imaging and Spectroscopy with the James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneborn, George

    2007-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large, infrared-optimized space telescope scheduled for launch in 2013. JWST will find the first stars and galaxies that formed in the early universe, connecting the Big Bang to our own Milky Way galaxy. JWST will peer through dusty clouds to see stars forming planetary systems, connecting the Milky Way to our own Solar System. JWST's instruments are designed to work primarily in the infrared range of 1 - 28 microns, with some capability in the visible range. JWST will have a large mirror, 6.5 meters in diameter, and will be diffraction-limited at 2 microns (0.1 arcsec resolution). JWST will be placed in an L2 orbit about 1.5 million km from the Earth. The instruments will provide imaging, coronography, and multi-object and integral-field spectroscopy across the full 1 - 28 micron wavelength range. The breakthrough capabilities of JWST will enable new studies of massive star winds from the Milky Way to the early universe.

  19. Discrete magic angle turning system, apparatus, and process for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian Zhi [Richland, WA; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W [Richland, WA; Wind, Robert A [Kennewick, WA

    2009-05-19

    Described are a "Discrete Magic Angle Turning" (DMAT) system, devices, and processes that combine advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) suitable, e.g., for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and/or imaging. In an exemplary system, device, and process, samples are rotated in a clockwise direction followed by an anticlockwise direction of exactly the same amount. Rotation proceeds through an angle that is typically greater than about 240 degrees but less than or equal to about 360 degrees at constant speed for a time applicable to the evolution dimension. Back and forth rotation can be synchronized and repeated with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. The design permits tubes to be inserted into the sample container without introducing plumbing interferences, further allowing control over such conditions as temperature, pressure, flow conditions, and feed compositions, thus permitting true in-situ investigations to be carried out.

  20. Herschel-SPIRE Imaging Spectroscopy of Molecular Gas in M82

    CERN Document Server

    Kamenetzky, J; Rangwala, N; Maloney, P; Bradford, M; Wilson, C D; Bendo, G J; Baes, M; Boselli, A; Cooray, A; Isaak, K G; Lebouteiller, V; Madden, S; Panuzzo, P; Schirm, M R P; Spinoglio, L; Wu, R

    2012-01-01

    We present new Herschel-SPIRE imaging spectroscopy (194-671 microns) of the bright starburst galaxy M82. Covering the CO ladder from J=4-3 to J=13-12, spectra were obtained at multiple positions for a fully sampled ~ 3 x 3 arcminute map, including a longer exposure at the central position. We present measurements of 12CO, 13CO, [CI], [NII], HCN, and HCO+ in emission, along with OH+, H2O+ and HF in absorption and H2O in both emission and absorption, with discussion. We use a radiative transfer code and Bayesian likelihood analysis to model the temperature, density, column density, and filling factor of multiple components of molecular gas traced by 12CO and 13CO, adding further evidence to the high-J lines tracing a much warmer (~ 500 K), less massive component than the low-J lines. The addition of 13CO (and [CI]) is new and indicates that [CI] may be tracing different gas than 12CO. No temperature/density gradients can be inferred from the map, indicating that the single-pointing spectrum is descriptive of th...

  1. Current and future applications of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of the brain in hepatic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VP Bob Grover; M Alex Dresner; Daniel M Forton; Serena Counsell; David J Larkman; Nayna Patel; Howard C Thomas; Simon D Taylor-Robinson

    2006-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common neuropsychiatric abnormality, which complicates the course of patients with liver disease and results from hepatocellular failure and/or portosystemic shunting.The manifestations of HE are widely variable and involve a spectrum from mild subclinical disturbance to deep coma. Research interest has focused on the role of circulating gut-derived toxins, particularly ammonia, the development of brain swelling and changes in cerebral neurotransmitter systems that lead to global CNS depression and disordered function. Until recently the direct investigation of cerebral function has been difficult in man. However, new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide a non-invasive means of assessment of changes in brain volume (coregistered MRI) and impaired brain function (fMRI), while proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) detects changes in brain biochemistry, including direct measurement of cerebral osmolytes, such as myoinositol, glutamate and glutamine which govern processes intrinsic to cellular homeostasis, including the accumulation of intracellular water. The concentrations of these intracellular osmolytes alter with hyperammonaemia. MRS-detected metabolite abnormalities correlate with the severity of neuropsychiatric impairment and since MR spectra return towards normal after treatment, the technique may be of use in objective patient monitoring and in assessing the effectiveness of various treatment regimens.

  2. Thermal removal from near-infrared imaging spectroscopy data of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R.N.; Pieters, C.M.; Green, R.O.; Boardman, J.W.; Petro, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    In the near-infrared from about 2 ??m to beyond 3 ??m, the light from the Moon is a combination of reflected sunlight and emitted thermal emission. There are multiple complexities in separating the two signals, including knowledge of the local solar incidence angle due to topography, phase angle dependencies, emissivity, and instrument calibration. Thermal emission adds to apparent reflectance, and because the emission's contribution increases over the reflected sunlight with increasing wavelength, absorption bands in the lunar reflectance spectra can be modified. In particular, the shape of the 2 ??m pyroxene band can be distorted by thermal emission, changing spectrally determined pyroxene composition and abundance. Because of the thermal emission contribution, water and hydroxyl absorptions are reduced in strength, lowering apparent abundances. It is important to quantify and remove the thermal emission for these reasons. We developed a method for deriving the temperature and emissivity from spectra of the lunar surface and removing the thermal emission in the near infrared. The method is fast enough that it can be applied to imaging spectroscopy data on the Moon. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Imaging Brain Function with Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy in Unconstrained Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana B. Balardin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the neural correlates of motor and cognitive processes under naturalistic experimentation is challenging due to the movement constraints of traditional brain imaging technologies. The recent advent of portable technologies that are less sensitive to motion artifacts such as Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS have been made possible the study of brain function in freely-moving participants. In this paper, we describe a series of proof-of-concept experiments examining the potential of fNIRS in assessing the neural correlates of cognitive and motor processes in unconstrained environments. We show illustrative applications for practicing a sport (i.e., table tennis, playing a musical instrument (i.e., piano and violin alone or in duo and performing daily activities for many hours (i.e., continuous monitoring. Our results expand upon previous research on the feasibility and robustness of fNIRS to monitor brain hemodynamic changes in different real life settings. We believe that these preliminary results showing the flexibility and robustness of fNIRS measurements may contribute by inspiring future work in the field of applied neuroscience.

  4. Biological effects and physical safety aspects of NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment is made of the biological effects and physical hazards of static and time-varying fields associated with the NMR devices that are being used for clinical imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of interaction and the bioeffects of these fields. Additional topics that are discussed include: (1) physical effects on pacemakers and metallic implants such as aneurysm clips, (2) human health studies related to the effects of exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, and (3) extant guidelines for limiting exposure of patients and medical personnel to the fields produced by NMR devices. On the basis of information available at the present time, it is concluded that the fields associated with the current generation of NMR devices do not pose a significant health risk in themselves. However, rigorous guidelines must be followed to avoid the physical interaction of these fields with metallic implants and medical electronic devices. 476 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Infrared spectroscopy and nano-imaging of the insulator-to-metal transition in vanadium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazilbash, M. M.; Brehm, M.; Andreev, G. O.; Frenzel, A.; Ho, P.-C.; Chae, Byung-Gyu; Kim, Bong-Jun; Yun, Sun Jin; Kim, Hyun-Tak; Balatsky, A. V.; Shpyrko, O. G.; Maple, M. B.; Keilmann, F.; Basov, D. N.

    2009-02-01

    We present a detailed infrared study of the insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) in vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin films. Conventional infrared spectroscopy was employed to investigate the IMT in the far field. Scanning near-field infrared microscopy directly revealed the percolative IMT with increasing temperature. We confirmed that the phase transition is also percolative with cooling across the IMT. We present extensive near-field infrared images of phase coexistence in the IMT regime in VO2 . We find that the coexisting insulating and metallic regions at a fixed temperature are static on the time scale of our measurements. A distinctive approach for analyzing the far-field and near-field infrared data within the Bruggeman effective medium theory was employed to extract the optical constants of the incipient metallic puddles at the onset of the IMT. We found divergent effective carrier mass in the metallic puddles that demonstrates the importance of electronic correlations to the IMT in VO2 . We employ the extended dipole model for a quantitative analysis of the observed near-field infrared amplitude contrast and compare the results with those obtained with the basic dipole model.

  6. Near-infrared spectroscopy of image clarity perception in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, J. E.; Habak, C.; Doti, Rafael; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2014-09-01

    The perception of blur in humans is intrinsic to our visual system, and dioptric power can improve clarity in many cases. This was evaluated experimentally to establish the best correction with dioptric power shifts. We used Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) to measure Oxy-, Deoxy- and Total-hemoglobin concentration changes in the brain while viewing images and reading a Snellen chart. Participants were tested with their usual correction (no diopter power shift (0 D)), with a 0.25 diopter power shift (0.25 D), and with a 0.5 diopter power shift (0.5 D). The concept of Approximate Entropy (AE) was applied to quantify the regularity of these hemoglobin time series of finite length. AE computations are based on the likelihood that similar templates in a time series remain similar on the next incremental comparison, so that time series with large AE have high irregular fluctuation. We found that the dioptric power shift eliciting the highest AE indicates the clearest visual condition for subjects. This technique may impact the current way in which ophthalmic lenses are prescribed.

  7. Quantification of dead vegetation fraction in mixed pastures using AisaFENIX imaging spectroscopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullanagari, R. R.; Kereszturi, G.; Yule, I. J.

    2017-06-01

    New Zealand farming relies heavily on grazed pasture for feeding livestock; therefore it is important to provide high quality palatable grass in order to maintain profitable and sustainable grassland management. The presence of non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV) such as dead vegetation in pastures severely limits the quality and productivity of pastures. Quantifying the fraction of dead vegetation in mixed pastures is a great challenge even with remote sensing approaches. In this study, a high spatial resolution with pixel resolution of 1 m and spectral resolution of 3.5-5.6 nm imaging spectroscopy data from AisaFENIX (380-2500 nm) was used to assess the fraction of dead vegetation component in mixed pastures on a hill country farm in New Zealand. We used different methods to retrieve dead vegetation fraction from the spectra; narrow band vegetation indices, full spectrum based partial least squares (PLS) regression and feature selection based PLS regression. Among all approaches, feature selection based PLS model exhibited better performance in terms of prediction accuracy (R2CV = 0.73, RMSECV = 6.05, RPDCV = 2.25). The results were consistent with validation data, and also performed well on the external test data (R2 = 0.62, RMSE = 8.06, RPD = 2.06). In addition, statistical tests were conducted to ascertain the effect of topographical variables such as slope and aspect on the accumulation of the dead vegetation fraction. Steep slopes (>25°) had a significantly (p tool for mapping the dead vegetation fraction accurately.

  8. Prediction of post-operative necrosis after mastectomy: A pilot study utilizing optical diffusion imaging spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Xian-Jin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Flap necrosis and epidermolysis occurs in 18-30% of all mastectomies. Complications may be prevented by intra-operative detection of ischemia. Currently, no technique enables quantitative valuation of mastectomy skin perfusion. Optical Diffusion Imaging Spectroscopy (ViOptix T.Ox Tissue Oximeter measures the ratio of oxyhemoglobin to deoxyhemoglobin over a 1 × 1 cm area to obtain a non-invasive measurement of perfusion (StO2. Methods This study evaluates the ability of ViOptix T.Ox Tissue Oximeter to predict mastectomy flap necrosis. StO2 measurements were taken at five points before and at completion of dissection in 10 patients. Data collected included: demographics, tumor size, flap length/thickness, co-morbidities, procedure length, and wound complications. Results One patient experienced mastectomy skin flap necrosis. Five patients underwent immediate reconstruction, including the patient with necrosis. Statistically significant factors contributing to necrosis included reduction in medial flap StO2 (p = 0.0189, reduction in inferior flap StO2 (p = 0.003, and flap length (p = 0.009. Conclusion StO2 reductions may be utilized to identify impaired perfusion in mastectomy skin flaps.

  9. Determining Subcanopy Psidium cattleianum Invasion in Hawaiian Forests Using Imaging Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jomar M. Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution airborne imaging spectroscopy represents a promising avenue for mapping the spread of invasive tree species through native forests, but for this technology to be useful to forest managers there are two main technical challenges that must be addressed: (1 mapping a single focal species amongst a diverse array of other tree species; and (2 detecting early outbreaks of invasive plant species that are often hidden beneath the forest canopy. To address these challenges, we investigated the performance of two single-class classification frameworks—Biased Support Vector Machine (BSVM and Mixture Tuned Matched Filtering (MTMF—to estimate the degree of Psidium cattleianum incidence over a range of forest vertical strata (relative canopy density. We demonstrate that both BSVM and MTMF have the ability to detect relative canopy density of a single focal plant species in a vertically stratified forest, but they differ in the degree of user input required. Our results suggest BSVM as a promising method to disentangle spectrally-mixed classifications, as this approach generates decision values from a similarity function (kernel, which optimizes complex comparisons between classes using a dynamic machine learning process.

  10. Scale effect and methods for accuracy evaluation of attribute information loss in rasterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yan; LIAO Shunbao; SUN Jiulin

    2011-01-01

    Rasterization is a conversion process accompanied with information loss,which includes the loss of features' shape,structure,position,attribute and so on.Two chief factors that affect estimating attribute accuracy loss in rasterization are grid cell size and evaluating method.That is,attribute accuracy loss in rasterization has a close relationship with grid cell size; besides,it is also influenced by evaluating methods.Therefore,it is significant to analyze these two influencing factors comprehensively.Taking land cover data of Sichuan at the scale of 1:250,000 in 2005 as a case,in view of data volume and its processing time of the study region,this study selects 16 spatial scales from 600 m to 30 km,uses rasterizing method based on the Rule of Maximum Area (RMA) in ArcGIS and two evaluating methods of attribute accuracy loss,which are Normal Analysis Method (NAM) and a new Method Based on Grid Cell (MBGC),respectively,and analyzes the scale effect of attribute (it is area here) accuracy loss at 16 different scales by these two evaluating methods comparatively.The results show that:(1) At the same scale,average area accuracy loss of the entire study region evaluated by MBGC is significantly larger than the one estimated using NAM.Moreover,this discrepancy between the t.wo is obvious in the range of 1 km to 10 km.When the grid cell is larger than 10 km,average area accuracy losses calculated by the two evaluating methods are stable,even tended to parallel.(2) MBGC can not only estimate RMA rasterization attribute accuracy loss accurately,but can express the spatial distribution of the loss objectively.(3) The suitable scale domain for RMA rasterization of land cover data of Sichuan at the scale of 1:250,000 in 2005 is better equal to or less than 800 m,in which the data volume is favorable and the processing time is not too long,as well as the area accuracy loss is less than 2.5%.

  11. X-ray imaging and imaging spectroscopy of fusion plasmas and light-source experiments with spherical optics and pixel array detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Pablant, N. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Zhang, L.

    2012-10-01

    High resolution (λ/Δλ ~10,000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixelarray detector (PAD) is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature (Ti) and plasma flow-velocityprofiles in magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) plasmas. Meter sized plasmas are diagnosed with cm spatial resolution and 10 ms time resolution. This concept can also be used as a diagnostic of small sources, such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas and targets on x-ray light source beam lines, with spatial resolution of microns. A new concept of using matched pairs of spherically bent crystals for monochromatic stigmatic 2D x-ray imaging of mm sized sources offers the possibility of spatial resolution of microns and large solid angle, relative to that achieved with pinhole imaging. Other potential applications of the 2D imaging schemes include x-ray lithography and x-ray microscopy for biological and materials science research. Measurements from MFE plasmas, as well as laboratory experiments and ray tracing computations validating the 1D imaging spectroscopy and 2D x-ray imaging techniques will be presented.

  12. Imaging spectroscopy algorithms for mapping canopy foliar chemical and morphological traits and their uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aditya; Serbin, Shawn P; McNeil, Brenden E; Kingdon, Clayton C; Townsend, Philip A

    2015-12-01

    A major goal of remote sensing is the development of generalizable algorithms to repeatedly and accurately map ecosystem properties across space and time. Imaging spectroscopy has great potential to map vegetation traits that cannot be retrieved from broadband spectral data, but rarely have such methods been tested across broad regions. Here we illustrate a general approach for estimating key foliar chemical and morphological traits through space and time using NASA's Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-Classic). We apply partial least squares regression (PLSR) to data from 237 field plots within 51 images acquired between 2008 and 2011. Using a series of 500 randomized 50/50 subsets of the original data, we generated spatially explicit maps of seven traits (leaf mass per area (M(area)), percentage nitrogen, carbon, fiber, lignin, and cellulose, and isotopic nitrogen concentration, δ15N) as well as pixel-wise uncertainties in their estimates based on error propagation in the analytical methods. Both M(area) and %N PLSR models had a R2 > 0.85. Root mean square errors (RMSEs) for both variables were less than 9% of the range of data. Fiber and lignin were predicted with R2 > 0.65 and carbon and cellulose with R2 > 0.45. Although R2 of %C and cellulose were lower than M(area) and %N, the measured variability of these constituents (especially %C) was also lower, and their RMSE values were beneath 12% of the range in overall variability. Model performance for δ15N was the lowest (R2 = 0.48, RMSE = 0.95 per thousand), but within 15% of the observed range. The resulting maps of chemical and morphological traits, together with their overall uncertainties, represent a first-of-its-kind approach for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of forest functioning and nutrient cycling across a broad range of temperate and sub-boreal ecosystems. These results offer an alternative to categorical maps of functional or physiognomic types by providing non

  13. Photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of MoC{sup −} and NbN{sup −} diatomic anions: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qing-Yu; Li, Zi-Yu; He, Sheng-Gui, E-mail: shengguihe@iccas.ac.cn, E-mail: chenh@iccas.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Structural Chemistry of Unstable and Stable Species, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Hu, Lianrui; Chen, Hui, E-mail: shengguihe@iccas.ac.cn, E-mail: chenh@iccas.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Ning, Chuan-Gang [Department of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ma, Jia-Bi [Key Laboratory of Cluster Science, The Institute for Chemical Physics, School of Chemistry, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-04-28

    The isoeletronic diatomic MoC{sup −} and NbN{sup −} anions have been prepared by laser ablation and studied by photoelectron imaging spectroscopy combined with quantum chemistry calculations. The photoelectron spectra of NbN{sup −} can be very well assigned on the basis of literature reported optical spectroscopy of NbN. In contrast, the photoelectron spectra of MoC{sup −} are rather complex and the assignments suffered from the presence of many electronically hot bands and limited information from the reported optical spectroscopy of MoC. The electron affinities of NbN and MoC have been determined to be 1.450 ± 0.003 eV and 1.360  ±  0.003 eV, respectively. The good resolution of the imaging spectroscopy provided a chance to resolve the Ω splittings of the X{sup 3}Σ{sup −} (Ω = 0 and 1) state of MoC and the X{sup 4}Σ{sup −} (Ω = 1/2 and 3/2) state of MoC{sup −} for the first time. The spin-orbit splittings of the X{sup 2}Δ state of NbN{sup −} and the a{sup 2}Δ state of MoC{sup −} were also determined. The similarities and differences between the electronic structures of the NbN and MoC systems were discussed.

  14. Synchrotron-based double imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence spectroscopy of radicals produced in a flow tube: OH and OD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Gustavo A.; Tang, Xiaofeng; Gil, Jean-François; Nahon, Laurent [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, St. Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France); Ward, Michael; Batut, Sebastien; Fittschen, Christa [PC2A, Université de Lille 1, UMR CNRS-USTL 8522, Cité Scientifique Bât. C11, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L. [Combustion Research Facility, Mail Stop 9055, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94551-0969 (United States); Loison, Jean-Christophe [ISM, Université Bordeaux 1, CNRS, 351 cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence Cedex (France)

    2015-04-28

    We present a microwave discharge flow tube coupled with a double imaging electron/ion coincidence device and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. The system has been applied to the study of the photoelectron spectroscopy of the well-known radicals OH and OD. The coincidence imaging scheme provides a high selectivity and yields the spectra of the pure radicals, removing the ever-present contributions from excess reactants, background, or secondary products, and therefore obviating the need for a prior knowledge of all possible byproducts. The photoelectron spectra encompassing the X{sup 3}Σ{sup −} ground state of the OH{sup +} and OD{sup +} cations have been extracted and the vibrational constants compared satisfactorily to existing literature values. Future advantages of this approach include measurement of high resolution VUV spectroscopy of radicals, their absolute photoionization cross section, and species/isomer identification in chemical reactions as a function of time.

  15. Synchrotron-based double imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence spectroscopy of radicals produced in a flow tube: OH and OD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Gustavo A.; Tang, Xiaofeng; Gil, Jean-François; Nahon, Laurent; Ward, Michael; Batut, Sebastien; Fittschen, Christa; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Loison, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-01

    We present a microwave discharge flow tube coupled with a double imaging electron/ion coincidence device and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. The system has been applied to the study of the photoelectron spectroscopy of the well-known radicals OH and OD. The coincidence imaging scheme provides a high selectivity and yields the spectra of the pure radicals, removing the ever-present contributions from excess reactants, background, or secondary products, and therefore obviating the need for a prior knowledge of all possible byproducts. The photoelectron spectra encompassing the X3Σ- ground state of the OH+ and OD+ cations have been extracted and the vibrational constants compared satisfactorily to existing literature values. Future advantages of this approach include measurement of high resolution VUV spectroscopy of radicals, their absolute photoionization cross section, and species/isomer identification in chemical reactions as a function of time.

  16. Differentiation of hemangioblastomas from pilocytic astrocytomas using 3-T magnetic resonance perfusion-weighted imaging and MR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    She, D.J.; Xing, Z.; Zeng, Z.; Cao, D.R. [First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Department of Radiology, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Shang, X.Y. [University of California, San Diego, Department of Medicine and the Moores UCSD Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Hemangioblastomas and pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) present similar imaging features on conventional MR imaging, making differential diagnosis a challenge. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging (DSC-PWI) and proton MR spectroscopic imaging in the differentiation of hemangioblastomas and PAs. A 3.0-T MR imaging unit was used to perform DSC-PWI and conventional MR imaging on 14 patients with hemangioblastomas and 22 patients with PAs. Four patients with hemangioblastomas and 10 PA patients also underwent proton MR spectroscopy. Parameters of relative peak height (rPH) and relative percentage of signal intensity recovery (rPSR) were acquired by DSC-PWI and variables of N-acetylaspasrtate (NAA)/creatine (Cr), choline (Cho)/Cr, and lactate-lipid (Lac-Lip)/Cr by MR spectroscopy. The sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of all analyzed parameters at respective cutoff values were determined. Higher rPH but lower rPSR values were detected in hemangioblastomas compared to PAs. The NAA/Cr ratio was significantly lower in hemangioblastomas compared with PAs. The threshold values ≥3.2 for rPH provide sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values of 85.7, 95.5, 92.3, and 91.3 %, respectively, for differentiating hemangioblastomas from PAs. The optimal threshold values were ≤0.9 for rPSR and ≤1.5 for NAA/Cr ratios in tumor. Significantly higher rPH and lower NAA/Cr were seen in patients with hemangioblastomas when compared with PA patients, suggesting that DSC-PWI and proton MR spectroscopy are helpful in the characterization and differentiation of these two types of tumors. (orig.)

  17. Building and Vegetation Rasterization for the Three-dimensional Wind Field (3DWF) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    this report when it is no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator . Army Research Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-5419...be known at every grid point in order to apply the appropriate vertical wind profile. At coarser resolutions, canopy types include coniferous ...Rasterize//ht_lat_long_HR.dat): This is the original input file of a high or low resolution terrain map. g. Enter a path and a new filename including .txt

  18. Study on breakup of liquid ligaments in hypersonic cross flow using laser sheet imaging and infrared light extinction spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regert, T.; Horvath, I.; Buchlin, J.-M.; Masutti, D.; Chazot, O.; Vetrano, M. R.; Lapebie, C.; Le Gallic, C.

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents and discusses the results of tests of breakup phenomenon of liquid water into a hypersonic cross §ow from the surface of a 7 degree half-angle cone model at zero degree angle of incidence. The present work shows the dependence of the liquid phase characteristics on the cross-section area of the injection hole in a Mach 6 cross flow. The results are analyzed qualitatively by imaging, by Interferometric Laser Imaging for Droplet Sizing (ILIDS), and by InfraRed Light Extinction Spectroscopy (IR-LES). Conclusions are drawn concerning the droplet size distribution and the liquid §ow ¦eld characteristics.

  19. Diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain in a patient with Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijens, P E; Gieteling, E W; Meiners, L C; Sival, D A; Potze, J H; Irwan, R; Oudkerk, M

    2006-11-01

    Quantitative brain MR spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were used to characterize one patient with Sturge-Weber syndrome. Choline increases and N-acetylaspartate decreases were observed in pathologic frontal gray matter tissue compared to contralateral unaffected brain tissue without any change in the diffusion tensor imaging parameters (fractional anisotropy, apparent diffusion coefficient). The N-acetylaspartate decreases and/or choline increases observed here and in eight previously described Sturge-Weber patients probably reflect neuronal loss or dysfunction and demyelination as a result of recurrent seizures.

  20. Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the Brain in a Patient with Sturge-Weber Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sijens, P.E.; Gieteling, E.W.; Meiners, L.C.; Sival, D.A.; Potze, J.H.; Irwan, R.; Oudkerk, M. [Univ. Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-11-15

    Quantitative brain MR spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were used to characterize one patient with Sturge-Weber syndrome. Choline increases and N-acetylaspartate decreases were observed in pathologic frontal gray matter tissue compared to contralateral unaffected brain tissue without any change in the diffusion tensor imaging parameters (fractional anisotropy, apparent diffusion coefficient). The N-acetylaspartate decreases and/or choline increases observed here and in eight previously described Sturge-Weber patients probably reflect neuronal loss or dysfunction and demyelination as a result of recurrent seizures.

  1. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia C. Lansåker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  2. Tree-based approach for exploring marine spatial patterns with raster datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaohan; Xue, Cunjin; Su, Fenzhen

    2017-01-01

    From multiple raster datasets to spatial association patterns, the data-mining technique is divided into three subtasks, i.e., raster dataset pretreatment, mining algorithm design, and spatial pattern exploration from the mining results. Comparison with the former two subtasks reveals that the latter remains unresolved. Confronted with the interrelated marine environmental parameters, we propose a Tree-based Approach for eXploring Marine Spatial Patterns with multiple raster datasets called TAXMarSP, which includes two models. One is the Tree-based Cascading Organization Model (TCOM), and the other is the Spatial Neighborhood-based CAlculation Model (SNCAM). TCOM designs the "Spatial node→Pattern node" from top to bottom layers to store the table-formatted frequent patterns. Together with TCOM, SNCAM considers the spatial neighborhood contributions to calculate the pattern-matching degree between the specified marine parameters and the table-formatted frequent patterns and then explores the marine spatial patterns. Using the prevalent quantification Apriori algorithm and a real remote sensing dataset from January 1998 to December 2014, a successful application of TAXMarSP to marine spatial patterns in the Pacific Ocean is described, and the obtained marine spatial patterns present not only the well-known but also new patterns to Earth scientists.

  3. Fast computation of categorical richness on raster data sets and related problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Berg, Mark; Tsirogiannis, Constantinos; Wilkinson, Bryan T.

    2015-01-01

    of millions of cells. The categorical richness problem is related to colored range counting, where the goal is to preprocess a colored point set such that we can efficiently count the number of colors appearing inside a query range. We present a data structure for colored range counting in R^2 for the case......In many scientific fields, it is common to encounter raster data sets consisting of categorical data, such as soil type or land usage of a terrain. A problem that arises in the presence of such data is the following: given a raster G of n cells storing categorical data, compute for every cell c...... that runs in O(n) time and one for circular windows that runs in O((1+K/r)n) time, where K is the number of different categories appearing in G. The algorithms are not only very efficient in theory, but also in practice: our experiments show that our algorithms can handle raster data sets of hundreds...

  4. Easy measurement of diffusion coefficients of EGFP-tagged plasma membrane proteins using k-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Koffman, Jennifer Skaarup; Marlar, Saw

    2014-01-01

    Lateral diffusion and compartmentalization of plasma membrane proteins are tightly regulated in cells and thus, studying these processes will reveal new insights to plasma membrane protein function and regulation. Recently, k-Space Image Correlation Spectroscopy (kICS)1 was developed to enable...... to the correlation function yields the diffusion coefficient. This paper provides a step-by-step guide to the image analysis and measurement of diffusion coefficients via kICS. First, a high frame rate image sequence of a fluorescently labeled plasma membrane protein is acquired using a fluorescence microscope Then...... routine measurements of diffusion coefficients directly from images of fluorescently tagged plasma membrane proteins, that avoided systematic biases introduced by probe photophysics. Although the theoretical basis for the analysis is complex, the method can be implemented by nonexperts using a freely...

  5. A comparison of single particle tracking and temporal image correlation spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of endosome motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, F. W.; Wustner, D.

    2013-01-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) is becoming a standard method to extract transport parameters from time-lapse image sequences of fluorescent vesicles in living cells. Another method to obtain these data is temporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS), but this method is less often used for measu......Single particle tracking (SPT) is becoming a standard method to extract transport parameters from time-lapse image sequences of fluorescent vesicles in living cells. Another method to obtain these data is temporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS), but this method is less often used...... for measurement of intracellular vesicle transport. Here, we present an extensive comparison of SPT and TICS. First we examine the effect of photobleaching, shading and noise on SPT and TICS analysis using simulated image sequences. To this end, we developed a simple photophysical model, which relates spatially...... varying illumination intensity to the bleaching propensity and fluorescence intensity of the moving particles. We found that neither SPT nor TICS are affected by photobleaching per se, but the transport parameters obtained by both methods are sensitive to the signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, the number...

  6. A comparison of single particle tracking and temporal image correlation spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of endosome motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, F. W.; Wustner, D.

    2013-01-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) is becoming a standard method to extract transport parameters from time-lapse image sequences of fluorescent vesicles in living cells. Another method to obtain these data is temporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS), but this method is less often used for measu......Single particle tracking (SPT) is becoming a standard method to extract transport parameters from time-lapse image sequences of fluorescent vesicles in living cells. Another method to obtain these data is temporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS), but this method is less often used...... for measurement of intracellular vesicle transport. Here, we present an extensive comparison of SPT and TICS. First we examine the effect of photobleaching, shading and noise on SPT and TICS analysis using simulated image sequences. To this end, we developed a simple photophysical model, which relates spatially...... varying illumination intensity to the bleaching propensity and fluorescence intensity of the moving particles. We found that neither SPT nor TICS are affected by photobleaching per se, but the transport parameters obtained by both methods are sensitive to the signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, the number...

  7. Simultaneous UV imaging and raman spectroscopy for the measurement of solvent-mediated phase transformations during dissolution testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Jesper; Wu, Jian X; Naelapää, Kaisa; Boetker, Johan P; Jensen, Henrik; Rantanen, Jukka

    2014-04-01

    The current work reports the simultaneous use of UV imaging and Raman spectroscopy for detailed characterization of drug dissolution behavior including solid-state phase transformations during dissolution. The dissolution of drug substances from compacts of sodium naproxen in 0.1 HCl as well as theophylline anhydrate and monohydrate in water was studied utilizing a flow-through setup. The decreases in dissolution rates with time observed by UV imaging were associated with concomitant solid form changes detected by Raman spectroscopy. Sodium naproxen and theophylline anhydrate were observed to convert to the more stable forms (naproxen, and theophylline monohydrate) within approximately 5 min. Interestingly, the new approach revealed that three intermediate forms are involved in the dissolution process prior to the appearance of the neutral naproxen during dissolution in an acidic medium. The combination of UV imaging and Raman spectroscopy offers a detailed characterization of drug dissolution behavior in a time-effective and sample-sparing manner. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  8. A novel non-linear recursive filter design for extracting high rate pulse features in nuclear medicine imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajedi, Salar; Kamal Asl, Alireza; Ay, Mohammad R; Farahani, Mohammad H; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-06-01

    Applications in imaging and spectroscopy rely on pulse processing methods for appropriate data generation. Often, the particular method utilized does not highly impact data quality, whereas in some scenarios, such as in the presence of high count rates or high frequency pulses, this issue merits extra consideration. In the present study, a new approach for pulse processing in nuclear medicine imaging and spectroscopy is introduced and evaluated. The new non-linear recursive filter (NLRF) performs nonlinear processing of the input signal and extracts the main pulse characteristics, having the powerful ability to recover pulses that would ordinarily result in pulse pile-up. The filter design defines sampling frequencies lower than the Nyquist frequency. In the literature, for systems involving NaI(Tl) detectors and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), with a signal bandwidth considered as 15 MHz, the sampling frequency should be at least 30 MHz (the Nyquist rate), whereas in the present work, a sampling rate of 3.3 MHz was shown to yield very promising results. This was obtained by exploiting the known shape feature instead of utilizing a general sampling algorithm. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed filter enhances count rates in spectroscopy. With this filter, the system behaves almost identically as a general pulse detection system with a dead time considerably reduced to the new sampling time (300 ns). Furthermore, because of its unique feature for determining exact event times, the method could prove very useful in time-of-flight PET imaging.

  9. Raster-Based Approach to Solar Pressure Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Theodore W. II

    2013-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed to take advantage of the graphics processing hardware in modern computers to efficiently compute high-fidelity solar pressure forces and torques on spacecraft, taking into account the possibility of self-shading due to the articulation of spacecraft components such as solar arrays. The process is easily extended to compute other results that depend on three-dimensional attitude analysis, such as solar array power generation or free molecular flow drag. The impact of photons upon a spacecraft introduces small forces and moments. The magnitude and direction of the forces depend on the material properties of the spacecraft components being illuminated. The parts of the components being lit depends on the orientation of the craft with respect to the Sun, as well as the gimbal angles for any significant moving external parts (solar arrays, typically). Some components may shield others from the Sun. The purpose of this innovation is to enable high-fidelity computation of solar pressure and power generation effects of illuminated portions of spacecraft, taking self-shading from spacecraft attitude and movable components into account. The key idea in this innovation is to compute results dependent upon complicated geometry by using an image to break the problem into thousands or millions of sub-problems with simple geometry, and then the results from the simpler problems are combined to give high-fidelity results for the full geometry. This process is performed by constructing a 3D model of a spacecraft using an appropriate computer language (OpenGL), and running that model on a modern computer's 3D accelerated video processor. This quickly and accurately generates a view of the model (as shown on a computer screen) that takes rotation and articulation of spacecraft components into account. When this view is interpreted as the spacecraft as seen by the Sun, then only the portions of the craft visible in the view are illuminated. The view as

  10. HERSCHEL-SPIRE IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY OF MOLECULAR GAS IN M82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamenetzky, J.; Glenn, J.; Rangwala, N.; Maloney, P. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Bradford, M. [NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wilson, C. D.; Schirm, M. R. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Bendo, G. J. [UK ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jordell Bank Center for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Baes, M. [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Boselli, A. [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, UMR6110 CNRS, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, 13388 Marseille (France); Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Isaak, K. G. [ESA Astrophysics Missions Division, ESTEC, P.O. Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Lebouteiller, V.; Madden, S.; Panuzzo, P.; Wu, R. [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Spinoglio, L. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    We present new Herschel-SPIRE imaging spectroscopy (194-671 {mu}m) of the bright starburst galaxy M82. Covering the CO ladder from J = 4 {yields} 3 to J = 13 {yields} 12, spectra were obtained at multiple positions for a fully sampled {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 3 arcmin map, including a longer exposure at the central position. We present measurements of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, [C I], [N II], HCN, and HCO{sup +} in emission, along with OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and HF in absorption and H{sub 2}O in both emission and absorption, with discussion. We use a radiative transfer code and Bayesian likelihood analysis to model the temperature, density, column density, and filling factor of multiple components of molecular gas traced by {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO, adding further evidence to the high-J lines tracing a much warmer ({approx}500 K), less massive component than the low-J lines. The addition of {sup 13}CO (and [C I]) is new and indicates that [C I] may be tracing different gas than {sup 12}CO. No temperature/density gradients can be inferred from the map, indicating that the single-pointing spectrum is descriptive of the bulk properties of the galaxy. At such a high temperature, cooling is dominated by molecular hydrogen. Photon-dominated region (PDR) models require higher densities than those indicated by our Bayesian likelihood analysis in order to explain the high-J CO line ratios, though cosmic-ray-enhanced PDR models can do a better job reproducing the emission at lower densities. Shocks and turbulent heating are likely required to explain the bright high-J emission.

  11. Applications of single kernel conventional and hyperspectral imaging near infrared spectroscopy in cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Glen; Manley, Marena

    2014-01-30

    Single kernel (SK) near infrared (NIR) reflectance and transmittance technologies have been developed during the last two decades for a range of cereal grain physical quality and chemical traits as well as detecting and predicting levels of toxins produced by fungi. Challenges during the development of single kernel near infrared (SK-NIR) spectroscopy applications are modifications of existing NIR technology to present single kernels for scanning as well as modifying reference methods for the trait of interest. Numerous applications have been developed, and cover almost all cereals although most have been for key traits including moisture, protein, starch and oil in the globally important food grains, i.e. maize, wheat, rice and barley. An additional benefit in developing SK-NIR applications has been to demonstrate the value in sorting grain infected with a fungus or mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol, fumonisins and aflatoxins. However, there is still a need to develop cost-effective technologies for high-speed sorting which can be used for small grain samples such as those from breeding programmes or commercial sorting; capable of sorting tonnes per hour. Development of SK-NIR technologies also includes standardisation of SK reference methods to analyse single kernels. For protein content, the use of the Dumas method would require minimal standardisation; for starch or oil content, considerable development would be required. SK-NIR, including the use of hyperspectral imaging, will improve our understanding of grain quality and the inherent variation in the range of a trait. In the area of food safety, this technology will benefit farmers, industry and consumers if it enables contaminated grain to be removed from the human food chain. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Prediction of bone loss in elderly female subjects by MR perfusion imaging and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, James F.; Yeung, David K.W. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories (China); Leung, Jason Chi Shun; Leung, Ping C. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Jockey Club Centre for Osteoporosis Care and Control, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin (China); Kwok, Timothy C.Y. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin (China)

    2011-06-15

    To determine whether MR perfusion indices or marrow fat content at baseline can predict areal bone mineral density (BMDa) loss. Repeat dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of the hip was performed in female subjects at 2 years (n = 52) and 4 years (n = 45) following baseline MR perfusion imaging and spectroscopy of the hip. Percentage reduction in femoral neck BMDa at 4 years post-baseline was greater in subjects with below median acetabulum enhancement slope (E{sup slope}) (-5.6 {+-} 1.2 Vs -1.1 {+-} 1.2 (mean {+-} standard error) p = 0.014) or muscle maximum enhancement (E{sup max}) (-5.7 {+-} 1.2 Vs -0.23 {+-} 1.2, p = 0.009) after adjusting for baseline co-variables. Baseline MR parameters correlated with reduction in BMDa at 4 years (acetabulum E{sup slope} r = 0.517, p = 0.0003; muscle E{sup max} r = 0.306, p = 0.043) as well as traditionally applied clinical risk factors. Acetabulum E{sup slope}, femoral neck E{sup max} and marrow fat content at baseline had sensitivities of 89%, 81% and 72% respectively at distinguishing between fast (>1%/annum) (n = 18) and slow (<1%/annum) (n = 27) BMD losers. Elderly female subjects with reduced perfusion indices at baseline had increased femoral neck bone loss at 4 years. Selected perfusion indices and marrow fat content have a moderate to high sensitivity in discriminating between fast and slow bone losers. (orig.)

  13. Methodology for cork plank characterization (Quercus suber L.) by near-infrared spectroscopy and image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prades, Cristina; García-Olmo, Juan; Romero-Prieto, Tomás; García de Ceca, José L.; López-Luque, Rafael

    2010-06-01

    The procedures used today to characterize cork plank for the manufacture of cork bottle stoppers continue to be based on a traditional, manual method that is highly subjective. Furthermore, there is no specific legislation regarding cork classification. The objective of this viability study is to assess the potential of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology for characterizing cork plank according to the following variables: aspect or visual quality, porosity, moisture and geographical origin. In order to calculate the porosity coefficient, an image analysis program was specifically developed in Visual Basic language for a desktop scanner. A set comprising 170 samples from two geographical areas of Andalusia (Spain) was classified into eight quality classes by visual inspection. Spectra were obtained in the transverse and tangential sections of the cork planks using an NIRSystems 6500 SY II reflectance spectrophotometer. The quantitative calibrations showed cross-validation coefficients of determination of 0.47 for visual quality, 0.69 for porosity and 0.66 for moisture. The results obtained using NIRS technology are promising considering the heterogeneity and variability of a natural product such as cork in spite of the fact that the standard error of cross validation (SECV) in the quantitative analysis is greater than the standard error of laboratory (SEL) for the three variables. The qualitative analysis regarding geographical origin achieved very satisfactory results. Applying these methods in industry will permit quality control procedures to be automated, as well as establishing correlations between the different classification systems currently used in the sector. These methods can be implemented in the cork chain of custody certification and will also provide a certainly more objective tool for assessing the economic value of the product.

  14. Principal and independent component analysis of concomitant functional near infrared spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelkanova, Irina; Toronov, Vladislav

    2011-07-01

    Although near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is now widely used both in emerging clinical techniques and in cognitive neuroscience, the development of the apparatuses and signal processing methods for these applications is still a hot research topic. The main unresolved problem in functional NIRS is the separation of functional signals from the contaminations by systemic and local physiological fluctuations. This problem was approached by using various signal processing methods, including blind signal separation techniques. In particular, principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA) were applied to the data acquired at the same wavelength and at multiple sites on the human or animal heads during functional activation. These signal processing procedures resulted in a number of principal or independent components that could be attributed to functional activity but their physiological meaning remained unknown. On the other hand, the best physiological specificity is provided by broadband NIRS. Also, a comparison with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows determining the spatial origin of fNIRS signals. In this study we applied PCA and ICA to broadband NIRS data to distill the components correlating with the breath hold activation paradigm and compared them with the simultaneously acquired fMRI signals. Breath holding was used because it generates blood carbon dioxide (CO2) which increases the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal as CO2 acts as a cerebral vasodilator. Vasodilation causes increased cerebral blood flow which washes deoxyhaemoglobin out of the cerebral capillary bed thus increasing both the cerebral blood volume and oxygenation. Although the original signals were quite diverse, we found very few different components which corresponded to fMRI signals at different locations in the brain and to different physiological chromophores.

  15. Lower leg muscle involvement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: an MR imaging and spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torriani, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Townsend, Elise [MGH Institute of Health Professions and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Thomas, Bijoy J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Ghomi, Reza H. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Tseng, Brian S. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Pediatric Neuromuscular Clinic, Boston, MA (United States); Novartis Institute of Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2012-04-15

    To describe the involvement of lower leg muscles in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by using MR imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) correlated to indices of functional status. Nine boys with DMD (mean age, 11 years) and eight healthy age- and BMI-matched boys (mean age, 13 years) prospectively underwent lower leg MRI, 1H-MRS of tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) for lipid fraction measures, and 31P-MRS for pH and high-energy phosphate measures. DMD subjects were evaluated using the Vignos lower extremity functional rating, and tests including 6 min walk test (6MWT) and 10 m walk. DMD subjects had highest fatty infiltration scores in peroneal muscles, followed by medial gastrocnemius and soleus. Compared to controls, DMD boys showed higher intramuscular fat (P = 0.04), lipid fractions of TA and SOL (P = 0.02 and 0.003, respectively), pH of anterior compartment (P = 0.0003), and lower phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphorus ratio of posterior compartment (P = 0.02). The Vignos rating correlated with TA (r = 0.79, P = 0.01) and SOL (r = 0.71, P = 0.03) lipid fractions. The 6MWT correlated with fatty infiltration scores of SOL (r = -0.76, P = 0.046), medial (r = -0.80, P = 0.03) and lateral (r = -0.84, P = 0.02) gastrocnemius, intramuscular fat (r = -0.80, P = 0.03), and SOL lipid fraction (r = -0.89, P = 0.007). Time to walk 10 m correlated with anterior compartment pH (r = 0.78, P = 0.04). Lower leg muscles of boys with DMD show a distinct involvement pattern and increased adiposity that correlates with functional status. Lower leg MRI and 1H-MRS studies may help to noninvasively demonstrate the severity of muscle involvement. (orig.)

  16. Diffusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy in the characterization of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanya, K.S.; Kovoor, J.M.E.; Jayakumar, P.N.; Ravishankar, S.; Kamble, R.B. [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Department of Neuroimaging and Interventional Radiology, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Panicker, J.; Nagaraja, D. [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Department of Neurology, Bangalore (India)

    2007-02-15

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is usually a monophasic illness characterized by multiple lesions involving gray and white matter. Quantitative MR techniques were used to characterize and stage these lesions. Eight patients (seven males and one female; mean age 19 years, range 5 to 36 years) were studied using conventional MRI (T2- and T1-weighted and FLAIR sequences), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and MRS ratios were calculated for the lesion and for normal-appearing white matter (NAWM). Three patients were imaged in the acute stage (within 7 days of the onset of neurological symptoms) and five in the subacute stage (after 7 days from the onset of symptoms). ADC values in NAWM were in the range 0.7-1.24 x 10{sup -3} mm/s{sup 2} (mean 0.937 {+-} 0.17 mm/s{sup 2}). ADC values of ADEM lesions in the acute stage were in the range 0.37-0.68 x 10{sup -3} mm/s{sup 2} (mean 0.56 {+-} 0.16 mm/s{sup 2}) and 1.01-1.31 x 10{sup -3} mm/s{sup 2} (mean 1.24 {+-} 0.13 mm/s{sup 2}) in the subacute stage. MRS ratios were obtained for all patients. NAA/Cho ratios were in the range 1.1-3.5 (mean 1.93 {+-} 0.86) in the NAWM. NAA/Cho ratios within ADEM lesions in the acute stage were in the range 0.63-1.48 (mean 1.18 {+-} 0.48) and 0.29-0.84 (mean 0.49 {+-} 0.22) in the subacute stage. The ADC values, NAA/Cho and Cho/Cr ratios were significantly different between lesions in the acute and subacute stages (P < 0.001, P < 0.027, P < 0.047, respectively). ADC values were significantly different between lesions in the acute (P < 0.009) and subacute stages (P < 0.005) with NAWM. In addition, NAA/Cho and Cho/Cr ratios were significantly different between lesions in the subacute stage and NAWM (P < 0.006, P < 0.007, respectively). ADEM lesions were characterized in the acute stage by restricted diffusion and in the subacute stage by free diffusion and a decrease in NAA/Cho ratios

  17. A method for quantitative mapping of thick oil spills using imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Leifer, Ira; Livo, K. Eric; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Hoefen, Todd; Lundeen, Sarah; Eastwood, Michael; Green, Robert O.; Pearson, Neil; Sarture, Charles; McCubbin, Ian; Roberts, Dar; Bradley, Eliza; Steele, Denis; Ryan, Thomas; Dominguez, Roseanne; ,

    2010-01-01

    In response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, a method of near-infrared imaging spectroscopic analysis was developed to map the locations of thick oil floating on water. Specifically, this method can be used to derive, in each image pixel, the oil-to-water ratio in oil emulsions, the sub-pixel areal fraction, and its thicknesses and volume within the limits of light penetration into the oil (up to a few millimeters). The method uses the shape of near-infrared (NIR) absorption features and the variations in the spectral continuum due to organic compounds found in oil to identify different oil chemistries, including its weathering state and thickness. The method is insensitive to complicating conditions such as moderate aerosol scattering and reflectance level changes from other conditions, including moderate sun glint. Data for this analysis were collected by the NASA Airborne Visual Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) instrument, which was flown over the oil spill on May 17, 2010. Because of the large extent of the spill, AVIRIS flight lines could cover only a portion of the spill on this relatively calm, nearly cloud-free day. Derived lower limits for oil volumes within the top few millimeters of the ocean surface directly probed with the near-infrared light detected in the AVIRIS scenes were 19,000 (conservative assumptions) to 34,000 (aggressive assumptions) barrels of oil. AVIRIS covered about 30 percent of the core spill area, which consisted of emulsion plumes and oil sheens. Areas of oil sheen but lacking oil emulsion plumes outside of the core spill were not evaluated for oil volume in this study. If the core spill areas not covered by flight lines contained similar amounts of oil and oil-water emulsions, then extrapolation to the entire core spill area defined by a MODIS (Terra) image collected on the same day indicates a minimum of 66,000 to 120,000 barrels of oil was floating on the surface. These estimates are preliminary and

  18. Submillimeter spectroscopy of the Carina Nebula: Observations, operations and upgrades of the South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberst, Thomas Edward

    2009-06-01

    We present the results of a ~ 250 arcmin 2 mapping of the 205 μm [NII] fine- structure line emission over the northern Carina Nebula, including the Car I and Car II HII regions. Spectra were obtained using the South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) at the Antarctic Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO) at South Pole. New upgrades and modifications to the SPIFI instrument are discussed, and full details of SPIFI-AST/RO integration and calibration are provided. At the time of these observations, SPIFI had a spectral resolving power of ~ 4250, a FWHM beam size of ~ 54'', and a noise equivalent power (NEP) referred to the front end of the receiver of ~ 2.5 × 10 -15 W Hz -1/2 (~ 1.4 times the background limit). These data constitute the first ground-based detection of the 205 μm [NII] line, and only the third detection overall since those of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) in the early 1990s. We supplement the 205 μm data with new reductions of far-infrared fine- structure spectra from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) in 63 μm [OI], 122 m [NII], 146 μm [OI], and 158 μm [CII]; the 146 μm [OI] data include 90 raster positions which have not been previously published. Morphological comparisons are made with optical, radio continuum and CO maps. The 122/205 [NII] line ratio is used to probe the density of the low-ionization gas, and the 158/205 [CII]/[NII] line ratio is used to probe the fraction of C + arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs). The [OI] and [CII] lines are used to construct a PDR model of Carina following Kaufman et al. (1999). When the PDR properties are compared with other sources, Carina is found to be more akin to 30 Doradus than galactic star-forming regions such as Orion, M17, or W49. This is consistent with the view of Carina as a more evolved region, where much of the parent molecular cloud has been ionized or swept

  19. GRID Raster Dataset Model of the LaClede Bed Structure in the Green River and Washakie Basins, southwestern Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — An ESRI GRID raster data model of the LaClede bed of the Laney Member of the Eocene Green River Formation structure was needed to perform overburden calculations in...

  20. Raster-based regolith thickness of the Lost Creek Designated Ground Water Basin, Weld, Adams, and Arapahoe Counties, Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of raster-based generalized thickness of regolith (unconsolidated sediments) overlying bedrock in the Lost Creek Designated Ground Water Basin,...

  1. Conception and Implementation of an OGC-Compliant Sensor Observation Service for a Standardized Access to Raster Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juergen Sorg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The target of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC is interoperability of geographic information, which means creating opportunities to access geodata in a consistent, standardized way. In the domain of sensor data, the target will be picked up within the OGC Sensor Web Enablement Initiative and especially reached through the Sensor Observation Service (SOS standard. This one defines a service for a standardized access to time series data and is usually used for in situ sensors (like discharge gauges and climate stations. Although the standard considers raster data, no implementation of the standard for raster data exists presently. In this paper an OGC-compliant Sensor Observation Service for a standardized access to raster data is described. A data model was developed that enables effective storage of the raster data with the corresponding metadata in a database, reading this data in an efficient way, and encoding it with result formats that the SOS-standard provides.

  2. Estimated Depth to Bedrock of Iowa as a 110 meter pixel_32bit Imagine Format Raster Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This raster dataset represents the depth to bedrock from the land surface. It was derived by subtracting a bedrock surface elevation layer from the NED 30 meter...

  3. Miniature spectral imaging device for wide-field quantitative functional imaging of the morphological landscape of breast tumor margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Brandon S; Llopis, Antonio; Palmer, Gregory M; McCachren, Samuel S; Senlik, Ozlem; Miller, David; Brooke, Martin A; Jokerst, Nan M; Geradts, Joseph; Greenup, Rachel; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a portable, breast margin assessment probe leveraging diffuse optical spectroscopy to quantify the morphological landscape of breast tumor margins during breast conserving surgery. The approach presented here leverages a custom-made 16-channel annular photodiode imaging array (arranged in a 4 × 4 grid), a raster-scanning imaging platform with precision pressure control, and compressive sensing with an optimized set of eight wavelengths in the visible spectral range. A scalable Monte-Carlo-based inverse model is used to generate optical property [ ? s ? ( ? ) and ? a ( ? ) ] measures for each of the 16 simultaneously captured diffuse reflectance spectra. Subpixel sampling (0.75 mm) is achieved through incremental x , y raster scanning of the imaging probe, providing detailed optical parameter maps of breast margins over a 2 × 2 ?? cm 2 area in ? 9 ?? min . The morphological landscape of a tumor margin is characterized using optical surrogates for the fat to fibroglandular content ratio, which has demonstrated diagnostic utility in delineating tissue subtypes in the breast.

  4. Miniature spectral imaging device for wide-field quantitative functional imaging of the morphological landscape of breast tumor margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Brandon S.; Llopis, Antonio; Palmer, Gregory M.; McCachren, Samuel S., III; Senlik, Ozlem; Miller, David; Brooke, Martin A.; Jokerst, Nan M.; Geradts, Joseph; Greenup, Rachel; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a portable, breast margin assessment probe leveraging diffuse optical spectroscopy to quantify the morphological landscape of breast tumor margins during breast conserving surgery. The approach presented here leverages a custom-made 16-channel annular photodiode imaging array (arranged in a 4×4 grid), a raster-scanning imaging platform with precision pressure control, and compressive sensing with an optimized set of eight wavelengths in the visible spectral range. A scalable Monte-Carlo-based inverse model is used to generate optical property [μs‧(λ) and μa(λ)] measures for each of the 16 simultaneously captured diffuse reflectance spectra. Subpixel sampling (0.75 mm) is achieved through incremental x, y raster scanning of the imaging probe, providing detailed optical parameter maps of breast margins over a 2×2 cm2 area in ˜9 min. The morphological landscape of a tumor margin is characterized using optical surrogates for the fat to fibroglandular content ratio, which has demonstrated diagnostic utility in delineating tissue subtypes in the breast.

  5. Evaluation of the Bresenham algorithm for image reconstruction with ultrasound computer tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieß, Norbert; Zapf, Michael; Ruiter, Nicole V.

    2011-03-01

    At Karlsruhe Institute of Technology a 3D Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) system is under development for early breast cancer detection. With 3.5 million of acquired raw data and up to one billion voxels for one image, the reconstruction of breast volumes may last for weeks in highest possible resolution. The currently applied backprojection algorithm, based on the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), offers only limited potential for further decrease of the reconstruction time. An alternative reconstruction method could apply signal detected data and rasterizes the backprojected ellipsoids directly. A well-known rasterization algorithm is the Bresenham algorithm, which was originally designed to rasterize lines. In this work an existing Bresenham concept to rasterize circles is extended to comply with the requirements of image reconstruction in USCT: the circle rasterization was adapted to rasterize spheres and extended to floating point parameterization. The evaluation of the algorithm showed that the quality of the rasterization is comparable to the original algorithm. The achieved performance of the circle and sphere rasterization algorithm was 12MVoxel/s and 3.5MVoxel/s. When taking the performance increase due to the reduced A-Scan data into account, an acceleration of factor 28 in comparison to the currently applied algorithm could be reached. For future work the presented rasterization algorithm offers additional potential for further speed up.

  6. Rapid and label-free identification of normal spermatozoa based on image analysis and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan; Chen, Xiwen; Wang, Jing; Chen, Jinhua; Lu, Peng; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    Semen analysis is performed for evaluation of fertility disorders, however it is susceptible to subjectivity of investigators, and lacking of objective criterion for sperm cell quality remains a problem. There is an ongoing debate on which criteria should be employed to define normal spermatozoa. Here, the aim of our study is to evaluate the possibility of label-free and rapid identification of normal sperm cell through the use of image analysis combined with micro-Raman spectroscopy. By using a smooth-surfaced and hydrophobic substrate, spermatozoa smear was rapidly prepared for microscopic imaging and acrosome area can be clearly visualized without any extra stains; then a self-written image analysis program was utilized to segment sperm head and acrosome area and automatically calculates morphological indices. Most important, intensity ratio of 1055 cm(-1) to 1095 cm(-1) from the obtained Raman spectra is found to indicate a potential biomarker for assessing the sperm DNA integrity. Our preliminary study demonstrates that micro-Raman spectroscopy combined with image analysis can be a potentially useful tool for rapid and label-free identification of normal sperm cell by providing both morphological and biochemical information. Copyright © 2014 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Spatial modulation spectroscopy for imaging and quantitative analysis of single dye-doped organic nanoparticles inside cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devadas, Mary Sajini; Devkota, Tuphan; Guha, Samit; Shaw, Scott K.; Smith, Bradley D.; Hartland, Gregory V.

    2015-05-01

    Imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticles in complex biological environments, such as the cell cytosol, is a challenging problem. For metal nanoparticles, Rayleigh scattering methods can be used, but for organic nanoparticles, such as dye-doped polymer beads or lipid nanoparticles, light scattering does not provide good contrast. In this paper, spatial modulation spectroscopy (SMS) is used to image single organic nanoparticles doped with non-fluorescent, near-IR croconaine dye. SMS is a quantitative imaging technique that yields the absolute extinction cross-section of the nanoparticles, which can be used to determine the number of dye molecules per particle. SMS images were recorded for particles within EMT-6 breast cancer cells. The measurements allowed mapping of the nanoparticle location and the amount of dye in a single cell. The results demonstrate how SMS can facilitate efforts to optimize dye-doped nanoparticles for effective photothermal therapy of cancer.Imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticles in complex biological environments, such as the cell cytosol, is a challenging problem. For metal nanoparticles, Rayleigh scattering methods can be used, but for organic nanoparticles, such as dye-doped polymer beads or lipid nanoparticles, light scattering does not provide good contrast. In this paper, spatial modulation spectroscopy (SMS) is used to image single organic nanoparticles doped with non-fluorescent, near-IR croconaine dye. SMS is a quantitative imaging technique that yields the absolute extinction cross-section of the nanoparticles, which can be used to determine the number of dye molecules per particle. SMS images were recorded for particles within EMT-6 breast cancer cells. The measurements allowed mapping of the nanoparticle location and the amount of dye in a single cell. The results demonstrate how SMS can facilitate efforts to optimize dye-doped nanoparticles for effective photothermal therapy of cancer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  8. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gimenez, Y; Busser, B; Trichard, F; Kulesza, A; Laurent, J M; Zaun, V; Lux, F; Benoit, J M; Panczer, G; Dugourd, P; Tillement, O; Pelascini, F; Sancey, L; Motto-Ros, V

    2016-01-01

    .... The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy...

  9. A novel liquid-Xenon detector concept for combined fast-neutrons and gamma imaging and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breskin, A.; Israelashvili, I.; Cortesi, M.; Arazi, L.; Shchemelinin, S.; Chechik, R.; Dangendorf, V.; Bromberger, B.; Vartsky, D.

    2012-06-01

    A new detector concept is presented for combined imaging and spectroscopy of fast-neutrons and gamma rays. It comprises a liquid-Xenon (LXe) converter and scintillator coupled to a UV-sensitive gaseous imaging photomultiplier (GPM). Radiation imaging is obtained by localization of the scintillation-light from LXe with the position-sensitive GPM. The latter comprises a cascade of Thick Gas Electron Multipliers (THGEM), where the first element is coated with a CsI UV-photocathode. We present the concept and provide first model-simulation results of the processes involved and the expected performances of a detector having a LXe-filled capillaries converter. The new detector concept has potential applications in combined fast-neutron and gamma-ray screening of hidden explosives and fissile materials with pulsed sources.

  10. Brain oxygen saturation assessment in neonates using T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation and near-infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alderliesten, Thomas; De Vis, Jill B; Lemmers, Petra Ma

    2017-01-01

    sinus. A strong linear relation was found between the oxygen saturation measured by magnetic resonance imaging and the oxygen saturation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (R(2 )= 0.64, p ..., and magnetic resonance imaging measures of frontal cerebral blood flow, whole brain cerebral blood flow and venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus (R(2 )= 0.71, 0.50, 0.65; p ... saturation in the sagittal sinus (R(2 )= 0.49, p = 0.023), but no significant correlations could be demonstrated with frontal and whole brain cerebral blood flow. These results suggest that measuring oxygen saturation by T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation is feasible, even in neonates. Strong...

  11. 10×10-pixel 606kS/s multi-point fluorescence correlation spectroscopy CMOS image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Keiichiro; Takasawa, Taishi; Bo, Zhang; Seo, Min-Woong; Imai, Kaita; Yamamoto, Jotaro; Kinjo, Masataka; Terakawa, Susumu; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2014-03-01

    To observe molecular transport in a living cell, a high-speed CMOS image sensor for multi-point fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is developed. To achieve low-noise and high-speed simultaneously, a prototype CMOS image sensor is designed based on a complete pixel-parallel architecture and multi-channel pipelined pixel readout. The prototype chip with 10×10 effective pixels is fabricated in 0.18-μm CMOS image sensor technology. The pixel pitch and the photosensitive area are 56μm and 10μm in diameter without a microlens, respectively. In the experiment, the total sampling rate of 606kS/s is achieved. The measured average random noise is 24.9LSB, which is equivalent to about 2.5 electrons in average.

  12. PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission): an extended white paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Philippe; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Banday, Anthony; Barbosa, Domingos; Barreiro, Belen; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Battistelli, Elia; Battye, Richard; Bendo, George; Benoît, Alain; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Béthermin, Matthieu; Bielewicz, Pawel; Bonaldi, Anna; Bouchet, François; Boulanger, François; Brand, Jan; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Camus, Philippe; Casas, Francisco; Casasola, Viviana; Castex, Guillaume; Challinor, Anthony; Chluba, Jens; Chon, Gayoung; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Comis, Barbara; Cuttaia, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; Da Silva, Antonio; Davis, Richard; de Avillez, Miguel; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Petris, Marco; de Rosa, Adriano; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Désert, François-Xavier; Dickinson, Clive; Diego, Jose Maria; Dunkley, Joanna; Enßlin, Torsten; Errard, Josquin; Falgarone, Edith; Ferreira, Pedro; Ferrière, Katia; Finelli, Fabio; Fletcher, Andrew; Fosalba, Pablo; Fuller, Gary; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; García-Bellido, Juan; Ghribi, Adnan; Giard, Martin; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grainge, Keith; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Hall, Alex; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Haverkorn, Marijke; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Herranz, Diego; Jackson, Mark; Jaffe, Andrew; Khatri, Rishi; Kunz, Martin; Lamagna, Luca; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Leahy, Paddy; Lesgourgues, Julien; Liguori, Michele; Liuzzo, Elisabetta; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Macias-Perez, Juan; Maffei, Bruno; Maino, Davide; Mangilli, Anna; Martinez-Gonzalez, Enrique; Martins, Carlos J. A. P.; Masi, Silvia; Massardi, Marcella; Matarrese, Sabino; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Mennella, Aniello; Mignano, Arturo; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Monfardini, Alessandro; Murphy, Anthony; Naselsky, Pavel; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Noviello, Fabio; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Paci, Francesco; Pagano, Luca; Paladino, Rosita; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Paoletti, Daniela; Peiris, Hiranya; Perrotta, Francesca; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michel; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Ricciardi, Sara; Roman, Matthieu; Rosset, Cyrille; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Shellard, Paul; Silk, Joseph; Starobinsky, Alexei; Stompor, Radek; Sunyaev, Rashid; Tartari, Andrea; Terenzi, Luca; Toffolatti, Luigi; Tomasi, Maurizio; Trappe, Neil; Tristram, Matthieu; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucci, Marco; Van de Weijgaert, Rien; Van Tent, Bartjan; Verde, Licia; Vielva, Patricio; Wandelt, Ben; Watson, Robert; Withington, Stafford

    2014-02-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in May 2013 as a large-class mission for investigating within the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision program a set of important scientific questions that require high resolution, high sensitivity, full-sky observations of the sky emission at wavelengths ranging from millimeter-wave to the far-infrared. PRISM's main objective is to explore the distant universe, probing cosmic history from very early times until now as well as the structures, distribution of matter, and velocity flows throughout our Hubble volume. PRISM will survey the full sky in a large number of frequency bands in both intensity and polarization and will measure the absolute spectrum of sky emission more than three orders of magnitude better than COBE FIRAS. The data obtained will allow us to precisely measure the absolute sky brightness and polarization of all the components of the sky emission in the observed frequency range, separating the primordial and extragalactic components cleanly from the galactic and zodiacal light emissions. The aim of this Extended White Paper is to provide a more detailed overview of the highlights of the new science that will be made possible by PRISM, which include: (1) the ultimate galaxy cluster survey using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect, detecting approximately 106 clusters extending to large redshift, including a characterization of the gas temperature of the brightest ones (through the relativistic corrections to the classic SZ template) as well as a peculiar velocity survey using the kinetic SZ effect that comprises our entire Hubble volume; (2) a detailed characterization of the properties and evolution of dusty galaxies, where the most of the star formation in the universe took place, the faintest population of which constitute the diffuse CIB (Cosmic Infrared Background); (3) a characterization of the B modes from primordial gravity waves generated during inflation and

  13. The Main-belt Asteroid and NEO Tour with Imaging and Spectroscopy (MANTIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivkin, A.; Cohen, B. A.; Barnouin, O. S.; Chabot, N. L.; Ernst, C. M.; Klima, R. L.; Helbert, J.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The asteroids preserve information from the earliest times in solar system history, with compositions in the population reflecting the material in the solar nebula and experiencing a wide range of temperatures. Today they experience ongoing processes, some of which are shared with larger bodies but some of which are unique to their size regime. They are critical to humanity's future as potential threats, resource sites, and targets for human visitation. However, over twenty years since the first spacecraft encounters with asteroids, they remain poorly understood. The mission we propose here, the Main-belt Asteroid and NEO Tour with Imaging and Spectroscopy (MANTIS), explores the diversity of asteroids to understand our solar system's past history, its present processes, and future opportunities and hazards. MANTIS addresses many of NASA's highest priorities as laid out in its 2014 Science Plan and provides additional benefit to the Planetary Defense and Human Exploration communities via a low-risk, cost-effective tour of the near-Earth and inner asteroid belt. MANTIS visits the materials that witnessed solar system formation and its earliest history, addressing the NASA goal of exploring and observing the objects in the solar system to understand how they formed and evolve. MANTIS measures OH, water, and organic materials via several complementary techniques, visiting and sampling objects known to have hydrated minerals and addressing the NASA goal of improving our understanding of the origin and evolution of life on Earth. MANTIS studies the geology and geophysics of nine diverse asteroids, with compositions ranging from water-rich to metallic, representatives of both binary and non-binary asteroids, and sizes covering over two orders of magnitude, providing unique information about the chemical and physical processes shaping the asteroids, addressing the NASA goal of advancing the understanding of how the chemical and physical processes in our solar system

  14. Raman spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging: prospective tools for monitoring skeletal cells and skeletal regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Catarina Costa; Tare, Rahul S.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    The use of skeletal stem cells (SSCs) for cell-based therapies is currently one of the most promising areas for skeletal disease treatment and skeletal tissue repair. The ability for controlled modification of SSCs could provide significant therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine, with the prospect to permanently repopulate a host with stem cells and their progeny. Currently, SSC differentiation into the stromal lineages of bone, fat and cartilage is assessed using different approaches that typically require cell fixation or lysis, which are invasive or even destructive. Raman spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy present an exciting alternative for studying biological systems in their natural state, without any perturbation. Here we review the applications of Raman spectroscopy and CARS imaging in stem-cell research, and discuss the potential of these two techniques for evaluating SSCs, skeletal tissues and skeletal regeneration as an exemplar. PMID:27170652

  15. Molecular orbital imaging of the acetone S2 excited state using time-resolved (e, 2e) electron momentum spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Masakazu; Oishi, Keiya; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Zhu, Chaoyuan; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-03-13

    We report a time-resolved (e, 2e) experiment on the deuterated acetone molecule in the S2 Rydberg state with a lifetime of 13.5 ps. The acetone S2 state was prepared by a 195 nm pump laser and probed with electron momentum spectroscopy using a 1.2 keV incident electron beam of 1 ps temporal width. In spite of the low data statistics as well as of the limited time resolution (±35  ps) due to velocity mismatch, the experimental results clearly demonstrate that electron momentum spectroscopy measurements of short-lived transient species are feasible, opening the door to time-resolved orbital imaging in momentum space.

  16. Simultaneous acquisition of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) data and positron emission tomography (PET) images with a prototype MR-compatible, small animal PET imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raylman, Raymond R; Majewski, Stan; Velan, S Sendhil; Lemieux, Susan; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F; Weisenberger, Andrew G

    2007-06-01

    Multi-modality imaging (such as PET-CT) is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET, fused with anatomical images created by MRI, allow the correlation of form with function. Perhaps more exciting than the combination of anatomical MRI with PET, is the melding of PET with MR spectroscopy (MRS). Thus, two aspects of physiology could be combined in novel ways to produce new insights into the physiology of normal and pathological processes. Our team is developing a system to acquire MRI images and MRS spectra, and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype MR-compatible PET system consists of two opposed detector heads (appropriate in size for small animal imaging), operating in coincidence mode with an active field-of-view of ∼14 cm in diameter. Each detector consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a 2-m long fiber optic light guide to a single position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The use of light guides allows these magnetic field-sensitive elements of the PET imager to be positioned outside the strong magnetic field of our 3T MRI scanner. The PET scanner imager was integrated with a 12-cm diameter, 12-leg custom, birdcage coil. Simultaneous MRS spectra and PET images were successfully acquired from a multi-modality phantom consisting of a sphere filled with 17 brain relevant substances and a positron-emitting radionuclide. There were no significant changes in MRI or PET scanner performance when both were present in the MRI magnet bore. This successful initial test demonstrates the potential for using such a multi-modality to obtain complementary MRS and PET data.

  17. Simultaneous acquisition of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) data and positron emission tomography (PET) images with a prototype MR-compatible, small animal PET imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Velan, S. Sendhil; Lemieux, Susan; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2007-06-01

    Multi-modality imaging (such as PET-CT) is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET, fused with anatomical images created by MRI, allow the correlation of form with function. Perhaps more exciting than the combination of anatomical MRI with PET, is the melding of PET with MR spectroscopy (MRS). Thus, two aspects of physiology could be combined in novel ways to produce new insights into the physiology of normal and pathological processes. Our team is developing a system to acquire MRI images and MRS spectra, and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype MR-compatible PET system consists of two opposed detector heads (appropriate in size for small animal imaging), operating in coincidence mode with an active field-of-view of ˜14 cm in diameter. Each detector consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a 2-m long fiber optic light guide to a single position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The use of light guides allows these magnetic field-sensitive elements of the PET imager to be positioned outside the strong magnetic field of our 3T MRI scanner. The PET scanner imager was integrated with a 12-cm diameter, 12-leg custom, birdcage coil. Simultaneous MRS spectra and PET images were successfully acquired from a multi-modality phantom consisting of a sphere filled with 17 brain relevant substances and a positron-emitting radionuclide. There were no significant changes in MRI or PET scanner performance when both were present in the MRI magnet bore. This successful initial test demonstrates the potential for using such a multi-modality to obtain complementary MRS and PET data.

  18. Transport in fuel cells: Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and neutron imaging studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Douglas Scott

    This dissertation focuses on two powerful methods of performing in-situ studies of transport limitations in fuel cells. The first is electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) while the second is neutron imaging. Three fuel cell systems are studied in this work: polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and enzyme fuel cells (EFCs). The first experimental section of this dissertation focuses on application of EIS and neutron imaging to an operating PEMFC. The effects of cathode-side humidity and flow rate, as well as cell temperature and a transient response to cathode-side humidity, were studied for a PEMFC via EIS. It was found that increased air humidity in the cathode resulted in greatly reduced cathode resistance as well as a significant reduction in membrane resistance. The anode resistance was only slightly reduced in this case. Increased air flow rate was observed to have little effect on any resistance in the PEMFC, though slight reductions in both the anode and the cathode were observed. Increased cell temperature resulted in decreased cathode and anode resistances. Finally, the transient response to increased humidity exhibited unstable behavior for both the anode and the cathode resistances and the PEMFC power output. Neutron imaging allowed the calculation of water content throughout the PEMFC, showing a maximum in water content at the cathode gas diffusion layer - membrane interface. The second experimental section of this dissertation delves into the world of microbial fuel cells. Multiple long-term observations of changes in internal resistances were performed and illustrated the reduction in anode resistance as the bacterial community was established. Over this same time period, the cathode resistance was observed to have increased; these two phenomena suggest that the anode improved over time while the cathode suffered from degradation. Increased anode fluid ionic strength and flow rate both led to significant

  19. Study on the ultrafast dynamics of o-xylene cation by combined fs-photoelectron imaging-photofragmentation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuzhu, E-mail: yuzhu.liu@psi.ch; Radi, Peter; Gerber, Thomas; Knopp, Gregor, E-mail: gregor.knopp@psi.ch

    2014-10-17

    Highlights: • Photoelectron imaging and photofragment spectroscopy are combined. • Photoelectron imaging has been measured to characterize the prepared cation states. • Ultrafast signal decay with time constant of 734 (±61) fs has been observed. - Abstract: Ultrafast dynamics of o-xylene cation has been studied by time resolved fs-photofragmentation (PF) spectroscopy in combination with photoelectron imaging (PEI). In the experiment, multiphoton ionization is used to prepare the o-xylene cation characterized by PEI. The ultrafast dynamics of o-xylene ions are measured by monitoring the time dependent parent-ion depletion and the fragment-ion formation, simultaneously. An ultrafast relaxation time of the parent ion of 734 (±61) fs has been observed. The PEI-PF measurements support the interpretation of this relaxation channel to a combination of internal conversion between the two ionic states (D{sub 0} and D{sub 1}) and intramolecular vibrational-energy redistribution process within the D{sub 0} state.

  20. In Vivo Imaging of Tissue Physiological Function using EPR Spectroscopy | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a technique for studying chemical species that have one or more unpaired electrons.  The current invention describes Echo-based Single Point Imaging (ESPI), a novel EPR image formation strategy that allows in vivo imaging of physiological function.  The National Cancer Institute's Radiation Biology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing an in vivo imaging using Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to measure active oxygen species.

  1. Tissue classification in microscope imaging based on a discrete-band spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Gilwon; Kim, Hyejeong

    2011-01-01

    Automatic classification of tissue types has a potential use in endoscopic or microscopic imaging. For this study, the microscope images from composite tissue samples were measured. Different shades of red meat such as beef and pork and bloodless tissues such as chicken breast and fat were chosen to provide with similar and contrasted colors. We applied a partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to classify the tissue type of the image pixels. With the RGB color images that are us...

  2. A simple depression-filling method for raster and irregular elevation datasets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pin-Chun Huang; Kwan Tun Lee

    2015-12-01

    A variety of methods have been developed to process digital elevation models (DEMs) in order to extract morphological properties of land surfaces. Almost all rely on depression filling to facilitate drainage analysis. This study proposes an intuitive and relatively simple depression-filling algorithm, which is readily applicable to raster and irregular datasets. In this study, topographic data of two watershed areas were provided to test the capability of this new algorithm. The results show that the proposed algorithm can accurately identify the locations of depressions and efficiently assign pseudo flow directions across the filled depressions.

  3. The use of MR imaging and spectroscopy of the brain in children investigated for developmental delay: What is the most appropriate imaging strategy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, Paul D. [University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Academic Unit of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Batty, Ruth; Raghavan, Ashok; Connolly, Daniel J.A. [Sheffield Children' s Hospital Trust, Department of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Warren, Daniel; Hart, Anthony [University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Sharrard, Mark [Sheffield Children' s Hospital Trust, Department of Paediatrics, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Mordekar, Santosh R. [Sheffield Children' s Hospital Trust, Department of Paediatric Neurology, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    Developmental delay is a common problem in paediatric practice and many children with developmental delay are referred for MR imaging. Our study was performed as part of a continuing audit process to optimise our MR protocol and case selection. We performed MR imaging and spectroscopy protocol on 157 children with developmental delay. We analysed the effect of these interventions by looking at the overall detection rate of relevant pathology and in particular subgroups of the children. 71% of the children had normal MR imaging, 10% had non-specific findings and 19% had specific abnormalities on MR imaging. The overall risk of having a specific structural abnormality with isolated developmental was 7.5% but if other neurological symptoms/signs were present the risk was 28%. Two children had abnormal spectroscopic findings, one with tuberous sclerosis and the other with absent brain creatine. Case selection for MR imaging is important in children with developmental delay. The best strategies for selecting children for MR are either; not performing MR with developmental delay in one domain only or performing MR with developmental delay in three or four domains or if there are other neurological features. (orig.)

  4. USING IMAGE PROCESSING METHODS WITH RASTER EDITING TOOLS FOR MAPPING EELGRASS DISTRIBUTIONS IN PACIFIC NORHWEST ESTUARIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    False-color near-infrared (CIR) aerial photography of seven Oregon estuaries was acquired at extreme low tides and digitally orthorectified with a ground pixel resolution of 25 cm to provide data for intertidal vegetation mapping. Exposed, semi-exposed and some submerged eelgras...

  5. Time-resolved diffusing wave spectroscopy applied to dynamic heterogeneity imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Cheikh, M; Ettori, D; Tinet, E; Avrillier, S; Tualle, J M; Cheikh, Monia; Nghiem, Ha Lien; Ettori, Dominique; Tinet, Eric; Avrillier, Sigrid; Tualle, Jean-Michel

    2006-01-01

    We report in this paper what is to our knowledge the first observation of a time-resolved diffusing wave spectroscopy signal recorded by transillumination through a thick turbid medium: the DWS signal is measured for a fixed photon transit time, which opens the possibility of improving the spatial resolution. This technique could find biomedical applications, especially in mammography.

  6. Reconstruction strategy for echo planar spectroscopy and its application to partially undersampled imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars Peter Grüner; Schaumburg, K; Paulson, O B

    2000-01-01

    or fewer interleaves per acquisition. The method is of particular interest when large bandwidths are needed (e.g., for high field scanning) and for scanners with limited gradient performance. The unavoidable artifacts resulting from undersampling are demonstrated to be acceptable for spectroscopy with long...

  7. High-resolution three-dimensional compositional imaging by double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavo, C.; Menichetti, L.; Grifoni, E.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Poggialini, F.; Pagnotta, S.; Palleschi, V.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we present a new instrument specifically realized for high-resolution three-dimensional compositional analysis and mapping of materials. The instrument is based on the coupling of a Double-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument with an optical microscope. The compositional mapping of the samples is obtained by scanning the laser beam across the surface of the sample, while the in depth analysis is performed by sending multiple laser pulses on the same point. Depths of analysis of several tens of microns can be obtained. The instrument presented has definite advantages with respect to Laser Ablation-ICP Mass Spectrometry in many applications related to material analysis, biomedicine and environmental diagnostics. An application to the diagnostics of industrial ceramics is presented, demonstrating the feasibility of Double-Pulse LIBS Imaging and its advantages with respect to conventional single-pulse LIBS imaging.

  8. The first X-ray imaging spectroscopy of quiescent solar active regions with NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannah, Iain G.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Smith, David M.;

    2016-01-01

    resolved X-rays above 2 keV from non-flaring ARs, observed near the west limb on 2014 November 1. The NuSTAR X-ray images match bright features seen in extreme ultraviolet and soft X-rays. The NuSTAR imaging spectroscopy is consistent with isothermal emission of temperatures 3.1-4.4 MK and emission...... measures 1-8 × 1046 cm−3. We do not observe emission above 5 MK, but our short effective exposure times restrict the spectral dynamic range. With few counts above 6 keV, we can place constraints on the presence of an additional hotter component between 5 and 12 MK of∼1046 cm−3 and ∼1043cm−3, respectively...

  9. Radio imaging spectroscopy of synchrotron emission associated with a CME on the 14th of August 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Hazel; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Raftery, C.

    2013-07-01

    We present Nancay Radioheliograph observations of a moving type IV solar radio burst which occurred in association with a CME on the 14th of August 2010. The event was well observed at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the SWAP instrument onboard Proba2 and by the LASCO white light coronograph. The burst emission was found to be cospatial with the core of the CME. Using radio imaging spectroscopy we are able to characterize the underlying electron distribution and plasma parameters within the source. Fitted spectra reveal a clear power law component consistent with optically thin synchrotron emission from accelerated electrons trapped in the erupting flux rope. As is often observed in type IV bursts, polarization measurements show the source to be moderately polarized during the peak of the burst, before steadily increasing to around 70% as the brightness temperature of the burst decays.

  10. 6 MeV storage ring dedicated to hard X-ray imaging and far-infrared spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M M Haque; A Moon; T Hirai; H Yamada

    2011-02-01

    The tabletop storage ring, 6 MeV MIRRORCLE, is dedicated to hard X-ray imaging as well as far-infrared (FIR) spectroscopy. In spite of low electron energy, the 6 MeV MIRRORCLE generates hard X-rays ranging from 10 keV up to its electron energy and milliwatt order submillimetre range FIR rays. Bremsstrahlung is the mechanism for the hard X-ray generation. Images produced with 11 × geometrical magnification display a sharply enhanced edge effect when generated using a 25 mm rod electron target. Bright far-infrared is generated in the same way using a conventional synchrotron light source, but with MIRRORCLE the spectral flux is found to be ∼ 1000 times greater than that of a standard thermal source. Partially coherent enhancement is observed in the case of FIR output.

  11. Snapshot linear-Stokes imaging spectropolarimeter using division-of-focal-plane polarimetry and integral field spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Tingkui; Pacheco, Shaun; Chen, Zeyu; Zhang, Chunmin; Liang, Rongguang

    2017-02-13

    In this paper, the design and experimental demonstration of a snapshot linear-Stokes imaging spectropolarimeter (SLSIS) is presented. The SLSIS, which is based on division-of-focal-plane polarimetry with four parallel linear polarization channels and integral field spectroscopy with numerous slit dispersive paths, has no moving parts and provides video-rate Stokes-vector hyperspectral datacubes. It does not need any scanning in the spectral, spatial or polarization dimension and offers significant advantages of rapid reconstruction without heavy computation during post-processing. The principle and the experimental setup of the SLSIS are described in detail. The image registration, Stokes spectral reconstruction and calibration procedures are included, and the system is validated using measurements of tungsten light and a static scene. The SLSIS's snapshot ability to resolve polarization spectral signatures is demonstrated using measurements of a dynamic scene.

  12. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging-compatible optical detectors for in-magnet tissue spectroscopy: photodiodes versus silicon photomultipliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ghussein, Fadi; Jiang, Shudong; Pogue, Brian W; Paulsen, Keith D

    2014-01-01

    Tissue spectroscopy inside the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system adds a significant value by measuring fast vascular hemoglobin responses or completing spectroscopic identification of diagnostically relevant molecules. Advances in this type of spectroscopy instrumentation have largely focused on fiber coupling into and out of the MRI; however, nonmagnetic detectors can now be placed inside the scanner with signal amplification performed remotely to the high field environment for optimized light detection. In this study, the two possible detector options, such as silicon photodiodes (PD) and silicon photomultipliers (SiPM), were systematically examined for dynamic range and wavelength performance. Results show that PDs offer 10⁸(160 dB) dynamic range with sensitivity down to 1 pW, whereas SiPMs have 10⁷(140 dB) dynamic range and sensitivity down to 10 pW. A second major difference is the spectral sensitivity of the two detectors. Here, wavelengths in the 940 nm range are efficiently captured by PDs (but not SiPMs), likely making them the superior choice for broadband spectroscopy guided by MRI.

  13. Power spectrum sensitivity of raster-scanned CMB experiments in the presence of 1/f noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Tom

    2007-09-01

    We investigate the effects of 1/f noise on the ability of a particular class of cosmic microwave background experiments to measure the angular power spectrum of temperature anisotropy. We concentrate on experiments that operate primarily in raster-scan mode and develop formalism that allows us to calculate analytically the effect of 1/f noise on power-spectrum sensitivity for this class of experiments and determine the benefits of raster-scanning at different angles relative to the sky field versus scanning at only a single angle (cross-linking versus not cross-linking). We find that the sensitivity of such experiments in the presence of 1/f noise is not significantly degraded at moderate spatial scales (ℓ˜100) for reasonable values of scan speed and 1/f knee. We further find that the difference between cross-linked and non-cross-linked experiments is small in all cases and that the non-cross-linked experiments are preferred from a raw sensitivity standpoint in the noise-dominated regime—i.e., in experiments in which the instrument noise is greater than the sample variance of the target power spectrum at the scales of interest. This analysis does not take into account systematic effects.

  14. Epidemiological geomatics in evaluation of mine risk education in Afghanistan: introducing population weighted raster maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersson Neil

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Evaluation of mine risk education in Afghanistan used population weighted raster maps as an evaluation tool to assess mine education performance, coverage and costs. A stratified last-stage random cluster sample produced representative data on mine risk and exposure to education. Clusters were weighted by the population they represented, rather than the land area. A "friction surface" hooked the population weight into interpolation of cluster-specific indicators. The resulting population weighted raster contours offer a model of the population effects of landmine risks and risk education. Five indicator levels ordered the evidence from simple description of the population-weighted indicators (level 0, through risk analysis (levels 1–3 to modelling programme investment and local variations (level 4. Using graphic overlay techniques, it was possible to metamorphose the map, portraying the prediction of what might happen over time, based on the causality models developed in the epidemiological analysis. Based on a lattice of local site-specific predictions, each cluster being a small universe, the "average" prediction was immediately interpretable without losing the spatial complexity.

  15. Non-Invasive MRI and Spectroscopy of mdx Mice Reveal Temporal Changes in Dystrophic Muscle Imaging and in Energy Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heier, Christopher R.; Guerron, Alfredo D.; Korotcov, Alexandru; Lin, Stephen; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Fricke, Stanley; Sze, Raymond W.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Wang, Paul; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a genetic disruption of dystrophin protein expression results in repeated muscle injury and chronic inflammation. Magnetic resonance imaging shows promise as a surrogate outcome measure in both DMD and rehabilitation medicine that is capable of predicting clinical benefit years in advance of functional outcome measures. The mdx mouse reproduces the dystrophin deficiency that causes DMD and is routinely used for preclinical drug testing. There is a need to develop sensitive, non-invasive outcome measures in the mdx model that can be readily translatable to human clinical trials. Here we report the use of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy techniques for the non-invasive monitoring of muscle damage in mdx mice. Using these techniques, we studied dystrophic mdx muscle in mice from 6 to 12 weeks of age, examining both the peak disease phase and natural recovery phase of the mdx disease course. T2 and fat-suppressed imaging revealed significant levels of tissue with elevated signal intensity in mdx hindlimb muscles at all ages; spectroscopy revealed a significant deficiency of energy metabolites in 6-week-old mdx mice. As the mdx mice progressed from the peak disease stage to the recovery stage of disease, each of these phenotypes was either eliminated or reduced, and the cross-sectional area of the mdx muscle was significantly increased when compared to that of wild-type mice. Histology indicates that hyper-intense MRI foci correspond to areas of dystrophic lesions containing inflammation as well as regenerating, degenerating and hypertrophied myofibers. Statistical sample size calculations provide several robust measures with the ability to detect intervention effects using small numbers of animals. These data establish a framework for further imaging or preclinical studies, and they support the development of MRI as a sensitive, non-invasive outcome measure for muscular dystrophy. PMID:25390038

  16. Atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy of barium atoms and functional groups on graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boothroyd, C.B., E-mail: ChrisBoothroyd@cantab.net [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Moreno, M.S. [Centro Atómico Bariloche, 8400 – San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Duchamp, M.; Kovács, A. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Monge, N.; Morales, G.M.; Barbero, C.A. [Department of Chemistry, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, X5804BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Dunin-Borkowski, R.E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    We present an atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM) study of the local structure and composition of graphene oxide modified with Ba{sup 2+}. In our experiments, which are carried out at 80 kV, the acquisition of contamination-free high-resolution STEM images is only possible while heating the sample above 400 °C using a highly stable heating holder. Ba atoms are identified spectroscopically in electron energy-loss spectrum images taken at 800 °C and are associated with bright contrast in high-angle annular dark-field STEM images. The spectrum images also show that Ca and O occur together and that Ba is not associated with a significant concentration of O. The electron dose used for spectrum imaging results in beam damage to the specimen, even at elevated temperature. It is also possible to identify Ba atoms in high-resolution TEM images acquired using shorter exposure times at room temperature, thereby allowing the structure of graphene oxide to be studied using complementary TEM and STEM techniques over a wide range of temperatures. - Highlights: • Graphene oxide modified with Ba{sup 2+} was imaged using TEM and STEM at 80 kV. • High-resolution images and spectra were obtained only by heating above 400 °C. • Elemental maps show the distribution of C, Ba, O and Ca on the graphene oxide. • Single Ba atoms were identified in STEM HAADF and HRTEM images.

  17. Study of organic radicals through anion photoelectron velocity-map imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Andrew Robert

    .30(4) eV. The EA of methylglyoxal is determined as ≤ 0.8 eV based on the signal-to-noise ratio of the X 1A ' ← X 2A'' transition, with a VDE = 1.28(4) eV. The EA of the a 3A'' ← X 2A '' and A 1A'' ← X 2A'' transitions are determined as 3.28(3) eV and 3.614(5) eV respectively. The intrinsically short-lived ethylenedione molecule (OCCO) was observed and investigated using anion photoelectron spectroscopy. The adiabatic electron affinity of its 3Sigmag □ ground state is 1.936(8) eV. The vibrational progression with a 417(15) cm-1 frequency observed within the triplet band corresponds to a trans-bending mode. Several dissociative singlet states are also observed, corresponding to two components of the 1Delta g state and the 1Sigmag + state. The experimental results are in agreement with the theory predictions and constitute the first spectroscopic observation and characterization of the elusive ethylenedione molecule. Two glyoxal derivatives related to the ethylenedione anion (OCCO -), ethynediolide (HOCCO-) and glyoxalide (OHCCO-), were studied. These anions provide access to the corresponding neutral reactive intermediates: the HOCCO and OHCCO radicals. In the HOCCO/OHCCO anion photoelectron spectrum, we identify several electronic states of this radical system and determine the adiabatic electron affinity of HOCCO as 1.763(6) eV. This result is compared to the corresponding 1.936(8) eV value for ethylenedione (OCCO). Initial attempts were made to detect and observe the dicyanoacetylene anion, NCCCCN- , by photoelectron imaging. While it is believed the experimental design path of H2+ abstraction from fumaronitrile is sound, no spectral signature can be assigned to NCCCCN -. Calculations targeting the low-lying transitions from the anion indicate that the molecule should have a significantly positive electron affinity and at least the ground state should be accessible with the currently available laser sources. The cluster ion O2(N2O) of the same nominal mass as

  18. Infrared imaging spectroscopy and chemometric tools for in situ analysis of an imiquimod pharmaceutical preparation presented as cream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Renato Lajarim; Poppi, Ronei Jesus

    2014-01-01

    In the present work the homogeneity of a pharmaceutical formulation presented as a cream was studied using infrared imaging spectroscopy and chemometric methodologies such as principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). A cream formulation, presented as an emulsion, was prepared using imiquimod as the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and the excipients: water, vaseline, an emulsifier and a carboxylic acid in order to dissolve the API. After exposure at 45 °C during 3 months to perform accelerated stability test, the presence of some crystals was observed, indicating homogeneity problems in the formulation. PCA exploratory analysis showed that the crystal composition was different from the composition of the emulsion, since the score maps presented crystal structures in the emulsion. MCR-ALS estimated the spectra of the crystals and the emulsion. The crystals presented amine and C-H bands, suggesting that the precipitate was a salt formed by carboxylic acid and imiquimod. These results indicate the potential of infrared imaging spectroscopy in conjunction with chemometric methodologies as an analytical tool to ensure the quality of cream formulations in the pharmaceutical industry.

  19. Near-infrared imaging spectroscopy (NIRIS) and image rank analysis for remote identification of plastics in mixed waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienke, D; Van Den Broek, W; Melssen, W; Buydens, L; Feldhoff, R; Huth-Fehre, T; Kantimm, T; Winter, F; Cammann, K

    1996-03-01

    An infrared camera with focal plane InSb array detector has been applied to the characterization of macroscopic samples of household waste over distances up to two meters. Per waste sample (singelized), a sequence of images was taken at six optical wavelength ranges in the near infrared region (1100 nm - 2500 nm). The obtained three-dimensional data stack served as individual fingerprint per sample. An abstract factor rotation of this stack of six images into a spectroscopical meaningful intermediate six-element vector by Multivariate Image Rank Analysis (MIRA) finally provided a decision limit for the discrimination of plastics and nonplastics. A correct classification of better than 80% has been reached. The experimental NIRIS set-up has been automated so far to allow an on-line identification of a real world waste sample within a few seconds.

  20. Molecular Images in Organic Chemistry: Assessment of Understanding in Aromaticity, Symmetry, Spectroscopy, and Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ealy, Julie B.; Hermanson, Jim

    2006-01-01

    When students take General Chemistry there are substantially fewer molecular images than they will encounter in Organic Chemistry. The molecular images Organic Chemistry students see in their textbooks are ones that use dashes and wedges to represent 2D and semi 3D views, ball and spoke, ball and wire, and structural formulas, to name just a few.…

  1. In vivo high field magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of adult zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabli, Samira

    2009-01-01

    This thesis contains the results of imaging of adult zebrafish by using different MR approaches. We present the first high resolution mMR images of adult zebrafish. To achieve high spatial resolution we used a magnetic field of 9.4T, in combination with strong magnetic field gradients (1000 mT/m) an

  2. Camera, handlens, and microscope optical system for imaging and coupled optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor); Boynton, John (Inventor); Sepulveda, Cesar A. (Inventor); Nunes de Sepulveda, legal representative, Alicia (Inventor); Gursel, Yekta (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An optical system comprising two lens cells, each lens cell comprising multiple lens elements, to provide imaging over a very wide image distance and within a wide range of magnification by changing the distance between the two lens cells. An embodiment also provides scannable laser spectroscopic measurements within the field-of-view of the instrument.

  3. 4D scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy: Single-particle imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortalan, Volkan; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2011-07-20

    We report the development of 4D scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy (ST-UEM). The method was demonstrated in the imaging of silver nanowires and gold nanoparticles. For the wire, the mechanical motion and shape morphological dynamics were imaged, and from the images we obtained the resonance frequency and the dephasing time of the motion. Moreover, we demonstrate here the simultaneous acquisition of dark-field images and electron energy loss spectra from a single gold nanoparticle, which is not possible with conventional methods. The local probing capabilities of ST-UEM open new avenues for probing dynamic processes, from single isolated to embedded nanostructures, without being affected by the heterogeneous processes of ensemble-averaged dynamics. Such methodology promises to have wide-ranging applications in materials science and in single-particle biological imaging.

  4. Insights into the early dissolution events of amlodipine using UV imaging and Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boetker, Johan P; Savolainen, Marja; Koradia, Vishal

    2011-01-01

    Traditional dissolution testing determines drug release to the bulk, but does not enable an understanding of the events happening close to the surface of a solid or a tablet. UV imaging is a new imaging approach that can be used to study the dissolution behavior of chemical compounds. The UV...... imaging instrumentation offers recording of absorbance maps with a high spatial and temporal resolution which facilitates the abundant collection of information regarding the evolving solution concentrations. In this study, UV imaging was used to visualize the dissolution behavior of amlodipine besylate...... (amorphous and dihydrate forms) and amlodipine free base. The dissolution of amlodipine besylate was faster from the amorphous form than from the crystalline forms. The UV imaging investigations suggested that a solvent mediated phase transformation occurred for the amorphous amlodipine besylate...

  5. Adiabatic nanofocusing: Spectroscopy, transport and imaging investigation of the nano world

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    Adiabatic compression plays a fundamental role in the realization of localized enhanced electromagnetic field hot spots, it provides the possibility to focus at nanoscale optical excitation. It differs from the well-known lightning rod effect since it is based on the lossless propagation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) up to a nano-sized metal tip where the energy density is largely enhanced. Here we discuss two important applications of adiabatic compression: Raman and hot electron spectroscopy at nanometric resolution. The underlying phenomena are the conversion of SPPs into photons or hot electrons. New scanning probe spectroscopy techniques along with experimental results are discussed. We foresee that these techniques will play a key role in relating the functional and structural properties of matter at the nanoscale.

  6. Spatially Explicit Estimation of Clay and Organic Carbon Content in Agricultural Soils Using Multi-Annual Imaging Spectroscopy Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Gerighausen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Information on soil clay and organic carbon content on a regional to local scale is vital for a multitude of reasons such as soil conservation, precision agriculture, and possibly also in the context of global environmental change. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of multi-annual hyperspectral images acquired with the HyMap sensor (450–2480 nm during three flight campaigns in 2004, 2005, and 2008 for the prediction of clay and organic carbon content on croplands by means of partial least squares regression (PLSR. Supplementary, laboratory reflectance measurements were acquired under standardized conditions. Laboratory spectroscopy yielded prediction errors between 19.48 and 35.55 g kg−1 for clay and 1.92 and 2.46 g kg−1 for organic carbon. Estimation errors with HyMap image spectra ranged from 15.99 to 23.39 g kg−1 for clay and 1.61 to 2.13 g kg−1 for organic carbon. A comparison of parameter predictions from different years confirmed the predictive ability of the models. BRDF effects increased model errors in the overlap of neighboring flight strips up to 3 times, but an appropriated preprocessing method can mitigate these negative influences. Using multi-annual image data, soil parameter maps could be successively complemented. They are exemplarily shown providing field specific information on prediction accuracy and image data source.

  7. Time-Resolved Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging Using Solid-State Detectors: Characteristics, Present Status, and Research Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayed, Mrwan; Deen, M Jamal

    2017-09-14

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and diffuse optical imaging (DOI) are emerging non-invasive imaging modalities that have wide spread potential applications in many fields, particularly for structural and functional imaging in medicine. In this article, we review time-resolved diffuse optical imaging (TR-DOI) systems using solid-state detectors with a special focus on Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) and Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). These TR-DOI systems can be categorized into two types based on the operation mode of the detector (free-running or time-gated). For the TR-DOI prototypes, the physical concepts, main components, figures-of-merit of detectors, and evaluation parameters are described. The performance of TR-DOI prototypes is evaluated according to the parameters used in common protocols to test DOI systems particularly basic instrumental performance (BIP). In addition, the potential features of SPADs and SiPMs to improve TR-DOI systems and expand their applications in the foreseeable future are discussed. Lastly, research challenges and future developments for TR-DOI are discussed for each component in the prototype separately and also for the entire system.

  8. Proton MR Spectroscopy and Diffusion MR Imaging Monitoring to Predict Tumor Response to Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy for Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Magali; Pinel, Sophie; Auger, Florent; Durieux, Nicolas; Thomassin, Magalie; Thomas, Eloise; Moussaron, Albert; Meng, Dominique; Plénat, François; Amouroux, Marine; Bastogne, Thierry; Frochot, Céline; Tillement, Olivier; Lux, François; Barberi-Heyob, Muriel

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent progress in conventional therapeutic approaches, the vast majority of glioblastoma recur locally, indicating that a more aggressive local therapy is required. Interstitial photodynamic therapy (iPDT) appears as a very promising and complementary approach to conventional therapies. However, an optimal fractionation scheme for iPDT remains the indispensable requirement. To achieve that major goal, we suggested following iPDT tumor response by a non-invasive imaging monitoring. Nude rats bearing intracranial glioblastoma U87MG xenografts were treated by iPDT, just after intravenous injection of AGuIX® nanoparticles, encapsulating PDT and imaging agents. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) allowed us an original longitudinal follow-up of post-treatment effects to discriminate early predictive markers. We successfully used conventional MRI, T2 star (T2*), Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) and MRS to extract relevant profiles on tissue cytoarchitectural alterations, local vascular disruption and metabolic information on brain tumor biology, achieving earlier assessment of tumor response. From one day post-iPDT, DWI and MRS allowed us to identify promising markers such as the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) values, lipids, choline and myoInositol levels that led us to distinguish iPDT responders from non-responders. All these responses give us warning signs well before the tumor escapes and that the growth would be appreciated. PMID:28255341

  9. Multimodal optical imaging and spectroscopy for the intraoperative mapping of nonmelanoma skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomatina, Elena; Muzikansky, Alona; Neel, Victor; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2009-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human malignancy, and its incidence increases yearly. In this contribution we investigate the feasibility of combining multimodal reflectance and fluorescence polarization imaging (RFPI) with spectroscopic analysis of the reflectance images for facilitating intraoperative delineation of BCCs. Twenty fresh thick BCC specimens were obtained within 1 h after Mohs micrographic surgeries. The samples were soaked for up to 2 min in an aqueous 0.2 mg/ml solution of methylene blue, briefly rinsed in saline solution, and imaged. Reflectance images were acquired in the range from 395 to 735 nm, with steps of 10 nm. Fluorescence polarization images were excited at 630 nm and registered in the range between 660 and 750 nm. The results yielded by RFPI were qualitatively compared to each other and to histopathology. From the copolarized reflectance images the spectral responses including the optical densities and their wavelength derivatives were calculated. The differences in the spectral responses of the benign and malignant stained skin structures were assessed. Statistical analysis, i.e., Student's t-test, was employed to verify the significance of the discovered differences. Both reflectance and fluorescence polarization images correlated well with histopathology in all the cases. Reflectance polarization images provided more detailed information on skin morphology, with the appearance of skin structures resembling that of histopathology. Fluorescence polarization images exhibited higher contrast of cancerous tissue as compared to reflectance imaging. The analysis of the optical densities and their wavelength derivatives for tumor and normal tissues has confirmed statistical significance of the differences that can be used for intraoperative cancer delineation. The results of the study indicate that spectral analysis is a useful adjunct to RFPI for facilitating skin cancer delineation.

  10. Nanoscale Optical Imaging and Spectroscopy from Visible to Mid-Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-13

    Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Spectroscopy, nanomaterials , nanophotonics REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR...centrifugation to remove excess polymer. After PAMO coating is completed, C-225, an antibody to epidermal growth factor receptor, was attached as follows. 0.5...hours, and then the medium was removed and washed three times with PBS. The cells were then fixed in 2% formalin and probed with DyLight labeled

  11. Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Crab Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Temim, T; Woodward, C E; Roellig, T L; Smith, N; Rudnick, L R; Polomski, E F; Davidson, K; Yuen, L; Onaka, T; Temim, Tea; Gehrz, Robert D.; Woodward, Charles E.; Roellig, Thomas L.; Smith, Nathan; Rudnick, Lawrence R.; Polomski, Elisha F.; Davidson, Kris; Yuen, Lunming; Onaka, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    We present 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 24, and 70 micron images of the Crab Nebula obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope IRAC and MIPS cameras, Low- and High-resolution Spitzer IRS spectra of selected positions within the nebula, and a near-infrared ground-based image made in the light of [Fe II]1.644 micron. The 8.0 micron image, made with a bandpass that includes [Ar II]7.0 micron, resembles the general morphology of visible H-alpha and near-IR [Fe II] line emission, while the 3.6 and 4.5 micron images are dominated by continuum synchrotron emission. The 24 micron and 70 micron images show enhanced emission that may be due to line emission or the presence of a small amount of warm dust in the nebula on the order of less than 1% of a solar mass. The ratio of the 3.6 and 4.5 micron images reveals a spatial variation in the synchrotron power law index ranging from approximately 0.3 to 0.8 across the nebula. Combining this information with optical and X-ray synchrotron images, we derive a broadband spectrum that re...

  12. SU-E-I-60: Quality Assurance Testing Methods and Customized Phantom for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, K-H; Lee, D-W; Choe, B-Y [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The objectives of this study are to develop an magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI-MRS) fused phantom along with the inserts for metabolite quantification and to conduct quantitative analysis and evaluation of the layered vials of brain-mimicking solution for quality assurance (QA) performance, according to the localization sequence. Methods: The outer cylindrical phantom body is made of acrylic materials. The section other than where the inner vials are located was filled with copper sulfate and diluted with water so as to reduce the T1 relaxation time. Sodium chloride was included to provide conductivity similar to the human body. All measurements of MRI and MRS were made using a 3.0 T scanner (Achiva Tx 3.0 T; Philips Medical Systems, Netherlands). The MRI scan parameters were as follows: (1) spin echo (SE) T1-weighted image: repetition time (TR), 500ms; echo time (TE), 20ms; matrix, 256×256; field of view (FOV), 250mm; gap, 1mm; number of signal averages (NSA), 1; (2) SE T2-weighted image: TR, 2,500 ms; TE, 80 ms; matrix, 256×256; FOV, 250mm; gap, 1mm; NSA, 1; 23 slice images were obtained with slice thickness of 5mm. The water signal of each volume of interest was suppressed by variable pulse power and optimized relaxation delays (VAPOR) applied before the scan. By applying a point-resolved spectroscopy sequence, the MRS scan parameters were as follows: voxel size, 0.8×0.8×0.8 cm{sup 3}; TR, 2,000ms; TE, 35ms; NSA, 128. Results: Using the fused phantom, the results of measuring MRI factors were: geometric distortion, <2% and ±2 mm; image intensity uniformity, 83.09±1.33%; percent-signal ghosting, 0.025±0.004; low-contrast object detectability, 27.85±0.80. In addition, the signal-to-noise ratio of N-acetyl-aspartate was consistently high (42.00±5.66). Conclusion: The MRI-MRS QA factors obtained simultaneously using the phantom can facilitate evaluation of both images and spectra, and provide guidelines for obtaining MRI and MRS QA

  13. Breast cancer detection using Ktrans MRI imaging to guide near infrared spectroscopy tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinchao; Jiang, Shudong; Xu, Junqing; Zhao, Yan; Gui, Jiang; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2017-02-01

    The parametric image of Volume Transfer Coefficient (Ktrans) in MRI has been used to guide image reconstruction of Near-Infrared Spectral Tomography (NIRST). The image reconstruction used direct regularization, in which no segmentation has been involved. A total of 24 patients were involved in this study and the reconstructed results show that the tumor total hemoglobin (HbT) contrast could be used to differentiate the malignant from the benign cases (p-value= 0.018). The addition of the MRI information allows more accurate and definitive HbT values from the NIRST.

  14. Zero quantum NMR imaging and spectroscopy in a low homogeneity magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, L.D.; Norwood, T.J.

    1987-10-27

    This patent describes a method of obtaining zero-quantum coherence resolved images and spectra from a spin system substance in an inhomogeneous or low homogeneity magnetic field which comprises applying to the substance a pulse and spatial encoding sequence.

  15. Visible to Near-IR Imaging Spectroscopy of Mars Using HST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J. F., III; Wolff, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    We have obtained new 530-1030 nm high resolution imaging spectroscopic observations of Mars from the Hubble Space Telescope. Initial results and interpretations concerning ferric and ferrous mineralogy of the Martian surface are presented.

  16. In-Situ / In-Flight Detection of Fluorescent Proteins Using Imaging Spectroscopy Sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposal addresses technologies relevant to NASA's new Vision for Space Explorations in the areas of robotics, teleoperations, and macro and micro imaging...

  17. On-Chip hyperspetral imaging system for portable IR spectroscopy applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hyperspectral middlewave infrared and longwave infrared (MWIR/LWIR) imaging systems capable of obtaining hundreds of narrow band (10-15 nm) spectral information of...

  18. Compact imaging spectrometer combining Fourier transform spectroscopy with a Fabry-Perot interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Marco; Zucco, Massimo

    2009-05-11

    An imaging spectrometer based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer is presented. The Fabry-Perot interferometer scans the mirror distance up to contact and the intensity modulated light signal is transformed using a Fourier Transform based algorithm, as the Michelson based Fourier Transform Spectrometers does. The resulting instrument has the advantage of a compact, high numerical aperture, high luminosity hyperspectral imaging device. Theory of operation is described along with one experimental realization and preliminary results.

  19. Population weighted raster maps can communicate findings of social audits: examples from three continents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Steven

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maps can portray trends, patterns, and spatial differences that might be overlooked in tabular data and are now widely used in health research. Little has been reported about the process of using maps to communicate epidemiological findings. Method Population weighted raster maps show colour changes over the study area. Similar to the rasters of barometric pressure in a weather map, data are the health occurrence – a peak on the map represents a higher value of the indicator in question. The population relevance of each sentinel site, as determined in the stratified last stage random sample, combines with geography (inverse-distance weighting to provide a population-weighted extension of each colour. This transforms the map to show population space rather than simply geographic space. Results Maps allowed discussion of strategies to reduce violence against women in a context of political sensitivity about quoting summary indicator figures. Time-series maps showed planners how experiences of health services had deteriorated despite a reform programme; where in a country HIV risk behaviours were improving; and how knowledge of an economic development programme quickly fell off across a region. Change maps highlighted where indicators were improving and where they were deteriorating. Maps of potential impact of interventions, based on multivariate modelling, displayed how partial and full implementation of programmes could improve outcomes across a country. Scale depends on context. To support local planning, district maps or local government authority maps of health indicators were more useful than national maps; but multinational maps of outcomes were more useful for regional institutions. Mapping was useful to illustrate in which districts enrolment in religious schools – a rare occurrence - was more prevalent. Conclusions Population weighted raster maps can present social audit findings in an accessible and compelling

  20. AstroSat CZT Imager observations of GRB 151006A: timing, spectroscopy, and polarisation study

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, A R; Hingar, M K; Iyyani, S; Khanna, Rakesh; Kutty, A P K; Malkar, J P; Paul, D; Bhalerao, V B; Bhattacharya, D; Dewangan, G C; Pawar, Pramod; Vibhute, A M; Chattopadhyay, T; Mithun, N P S; Vadawale, S V; Vagshette, N; Basak, R; Pradeep, P; Samuel, Essy; Sreekumar, S; Vinod, P; Navalgund, K H; Pandiyan, R; Sarma, K S; Seetha, S; Subbarao, K

    2016-01-01

    AstroSat is a multi-wavelength satellite launched on 2015 September 28. The CZT Imager of AstroSat on its very first day of operation detected a long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) namely GRB 151006A. Using the off-axis imaging and spectral response of the instrument, we demonstrate that CZT Imager can localise this GRB correct to about a few degrees and it can provide, in conjunction with Swift, spectral parameters similar to that obtained from Fermi/GBM. Hence CZT Imager would be a useful addition to the currently operating GRB instruments (Swift and Fermi). Specifically, we argue that the CZT Imager will be most useful for the short hard GRBs by providing localisation for those detected by Fermi and spectral information for those detected only by Swift. We also provide preliminary results on a new exciting capability of this instrument: CZT Imager is able to identify Compton scattered events thereby providing polarisation information for bright GRBs. GRB 151006A, in spite of being relatively faint, shows h...

  1. Triple Fabry-Pérot Imaging Interferometer for High Resolution Solar Spectroscopy using the ATST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, B. M.; Gary, G. A.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2005-05-01

    We present a telecenrically mounted triple Fabry-Pérot imaging interferometer for the NSOs Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST). It consists of three Fabry-Pérot etalons and the feed and imaging optics. This system provides high throughput, flexibility and breadth of operation when compared to other spectroscopic imaging systems. It can operate in four distinct modes: as a spectro-polarimeter, a filter-vector magnetograph, an intermediate-band imager, and broadband high-resolution imager. In the proposed telecentric mount configuration, the transmittance of the etalon system is not a function of position in the field, so that instantaneous spectroscopic measurements can be performed across the entire field of view; however, the transmission peak of the interferometer is broadened. Mitigation of this broadening requires a low F# image at the etalons. Together with the requirement that the field of view be large enough to observe large-scale processes in the solar atmosphere, this limitation dictates that the diameter of the etalons have a large aperture. Specifically, for a spectrographic passband full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of around 2 pm, and entrance pupil diameter of 4 m, and a field of view of 35", the required etalon diameter is around 200 mm. This is beyond the size of current Fabry-Pérot etalons and near the current projected limit of manufacturability. The development of this instrument will bring these large etalons to realization and take Fabry-Pérot imaging interferometry to the next level of operational capability within telescopes of large aperture. This instrument will provide spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution which is not currently available to large aperture solar astronomy, but which is necessary, in conjunction with the new class telescopes, to the continuing discovery of laws that govern the dynamics of the sun and the earth-sun connection. The resolution afforded by higher aperture telescopes and instrumentation will

  2. [Noninvasive medical imaging system for tissue classification using RGB LED and micro-spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bor-Wen; Lin, Yu-Min; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Ying, Shang-Ping

    2013-07-01

    As skin is the exterior organ of human body, cosmetic industry advances year by year. To reveal the details of skin tissue, threedimensional medical imaging is required. Based on the idea of "readout instead of write", a new scheme named spectral classification imaging (SCI) is proposed in the present study to reduce the invasiveness by applying the reflection spectra of the sample points for three-dimensional medical imaging. Broad-band light source and the spectrometer were employed to collect the spectra curves of scanned region, which were classified into several tissue types by their cross-correlations. A colorful tissue tomography can finally be obtained by filling in each image pixel the color indicating the corresponding tissue type. The lateral/longitudinal resolutions and penetration depth were analyzed to characterize the SCI system. The lateral resolution is based on the source's diffraction limit, the longitudinal resolution is by its depth-of-focus, and the penetration depth is equivalent to its skin depth. The imaging results of an amethyst of 0.6 mm (chi-direction) x 0.6 mm (y-direction) with a total of 120 x 120 pixels per frame and a guppy fish of 3.2 mm (chi-direction) x 2.4 mm (y-direction) of 160 x 120 pixels, are presented to show the image quality. The effects of the cross-correlation coefficient and the number of source wavelengths on the imaging results were explored. The value of cross-correlation threshold determines the required time for imaging, the resulted number of tissue groups, and the variety of tissue colors in the imaging result. Owing to its virtual noninvasiveness and easy configuration, the SCI system is highly promising for practical uses. RGB LEDs possess merits of broad bandwidth, low cost, long lifetime, small volume, and are ready to be integrated into a multi-color source module. Replacing the wide-band light source and the spectrometer module with a composite RGB LED with discrete wavelengths and a micro

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Imaging and spectroscopy in Lynx W (Jorgensen+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, I.; Chiboucas, K.; Toft, S.; Bergmann, M.; Zirm, A.; Schiavon, R. P.; Grutzbauch, R.

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based imaging of RX J0848.6+4453 was obtained primarily to show the performance gain provided by replacing the original E2V charge-coupled devices (E2V CCDs) in Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on Gemini North (GMOS-N) with E2V Deep Depletion CCDs (E2V DD CCDs). This replacement was done in 2011 October. Imaging of RX J0848.6+4453 was obtained with the original E2V CCDs in 2011 October (UT 2011 Oct 1 to 2011 Oct 2; Program ID: GN-2011B-DD-3) and repeated with the E2V DD CCDs in 2011 November. The imaging was done in the z' filter. For the observations with the original E2V CCDs the total exposure time was 60 minutes (obtained as 12 five-minute exposures) and the co-added image had an image quality of FWHM=0.52'' measured from point sources in the field. For the E2V DD CCDs a total exposure time of 55 minutes was obtained and the resulting image quality was FWHM=0.51''. Imaging of RX J0848.6+4453 was also obtained with Hubble Space Telescope /Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS using the filters F775W and F850LP) under the program ID 9919. The spectroscopic observations were obtained in multi-object spectroscopic (MOS) mode with GMOS-N (UT 2011 Nov 24 to 2012 Jan 4, Program ID: GN-2011B-DD-5; UT 2013 Mar 9 to 2013 May 18, Program ID: GN-2013A-Q-65). Table10 lists the photometric parameters for the spectroscopic sample as derived from the HST/ACS observations in F850LP and F775W. Tables 11 and 12 list the results from the template fitting and the derived line strengths, respectively. (3 data files).

  4. Systematic evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy techniques for imaging a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease (AβPP/PS1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteras, Noemí; Alquézar, Carolina; Bartolomé, Fernando; Antequera, Desiree; Barrios, Laura; Carro, Eva; Cerdán, Sebastián; Martín-Requero, Angeles

    2012-01-01

    Murine models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) provide means to detect and follow biomarker changes similar to those observed in humans. Non-invasive biomarkers, such as those provided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) methods are highly desirable, however, systematic studies of in vivo MRI/MRS methods to characterize the cerebral morphology and metabolic pattern of these mice remain scarce. We investigated sixteen consecutive slices from the brain of wild-type and AβPP/PS1 mice, obtaining a collection of T2 weighted, diffusion weighted and magnetization transfer weighted images as well as 1H PRESS spectra from the cortical and subcortical areas. Compared to controls, AβPP/PS1 mice show significant regional hyperintensities in T2 weighted images of the cerebral cortex, significant ventricular enlargement, and decreased hippocampal area and fractional magnetization transfer. MRS demonstrated an increase in the ratio of choline (Cho) to creatine (Cr) in the cortical and subcortical areas of the transgenic animals. A logistic regression classifier was implemented considering all parameters investigated, and revealed the most characteristic changes and allowed for the correct classification of control and AβPP/PS1 mice. In summary, the present results provide a useful frame to evaluate optimal MRI/MRS biomarkers for the characterization of AD models, potentially applicable in drug discovery processes, because of their non-invasive and repeatable nature in longitudinal studies.

  5. A multi-analytical investigation of semi-conductor pigments with time-resolved spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, A.; Cesaratto, A.; D'Andrea, C.; Valentini, Gianluca; Comelli, D.

    2013-05-01

    We present the non-invasive study of historical and modern Zn- and Cd-based pigments with time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence multispectral imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Zinc oxide and Zinc sulphide are semiconductors which have been used as white pigments in paintings, and the luminescence of these pigments from trapped states is strongly dependent on the presence of impurities and crystal defects. Cadmium sulphoselenide pigments vary in hue from yellow to deep red based on their composition, and are another class of semiconductor pigments which emit both in the visible and the near infrared. The Fluorescence lifetime of historical and modern pigments has been measured using both an Optical Multichannel Analyser (OMA) coupled with a Nd:YAG nslaser, and a streak camera coupled with a ps-laser for spectrally-resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements. For Znbased pigments we have also employed Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) for the measurement of luminescence. A case study of FLIM applied to the analysis of the painting by Vincent Van Gogh on paper - "Les Bretonnes et le pardon de Pont-Aven" (1888) is presented. Through the integration of complementary, portable and non-invasive spectroscopic techniques, new insights into the optical properties of Zn- and Cd-based pigments have been gained which will inform future analysis of late 19th] and early 20th C. paintings.

  6. Analysis of the Spectral Characteristics of Pure Moxa Stick Burning by Hyperspectral Imaging and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yin-long

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the spectra characteristics (SC) at wavelengths of 400~1000 nm and 2.5~15.5 μm of pure moxa stick (MS) during its 25-minute burning process using new spectral imaging techniques. Spectral images were collected for the burning pure MS at 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 min using hyperspectral imaging (HSI) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for the first time. The results showed that, at wavelengths of 400~1000 nm, the spectral range of the cross section of MS burning was 750~980 nm; the peak position was 860 nm. At wavelengths of 2.5~15.5 μm, the spectral range of the cross section of MS burning was 3.0~4.0 μm; the peak position was approximately 3.5 μm. The radiation spectra of MS burning include litter red and amount of infrared (but mainly near infrared) wavelengths. The temperature, blood perfusion, and oxygen saturation increase of Shenshu (BL23) after moxibustion radiation were observed too. According to mechanism of photobiological effects and moxibustion biological effects, it was inferred that moxibustion effects should be linked with moxibustion SC. This study provided new data and means for physical properties of moxibustion research.

  7. Impact of detector efficiency and energy resolution on gamma-ray background rejection in mobile spectroscopy and imaging systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aucott, Timothy J., E-mail: Timothy.Aucott@SRS.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bandstra, Mark S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Negut, Victor; Curtis, Joseph C. [University of California, Berkeley, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); Meyer, Ross E.; Chivers, Daniel H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Vetter, Kai [University of California, Berkeley, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-21

    The presence of gamma-ray background significantly reduces detection sensitivity when searching for radioactive sources in the field, and the systematic variability in the background will limit the size and energy resolution of systems that can be used effectively. An extensive survey of the background was performed using both sodium iodide and high-purity germanium. By using a bivariate negative binomial model for the measured counts, these measurements can be resampled to simulate the performance of a detector array of arbitrary size and resolution. The response of the system as it moved past a stationary source was modeled for spectroscopic and coded aperture imaging algorithms and used for source injection into the background. The performance of both techniques is shown for various sizes and resolutions, as well as the relative performance for sodium iodide and germanium. It was found that at smaller detector sizes or better energy resolution, spectroscopy has higher detection sensitivity than imaging, while imaging is better suited to larger or poorer resolution detectors.

  8. Detection of trace explosives on relevant substrates using a mobile platform for photothermal infrared imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendziora, Christopher A.; Furstenberg, Robert; Papantonakis, Michael; Nguyen, Viet; Byers, Jeff; McGill, R. Andrew

    2015-05-01

    This manuscript describes the results of recent tests regarding standoff detection of trace explosives on relevant substrates using a mobile platform. We are developing a technology for detection based on photo-thermal infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS). This approach leverages one or more microfabricated IR quantum cascade lasers, tuned to strong absorption bands in the analytes and directed to illuminate an area on a surface of interest. An IR focal plane array is used to image the surface thermal emission upon laser illumination. The PT-IRIS signal is processed as a hyperspectral image cube comprised of spatial, spectral and temporal dimensions as vectors within a detection algorithm. Increased sensitivity to explosives and selectivity between different analyte types is achieved by narrow bandpass IR filters in the collection path. We have previously demonstrated the technique at several meters of stand-off distance indoors and in field tests, while operating the lasers below the infrared eye-safe intensity limit (100 mW/cm2). Sensitivity to explosive traces as small as a single 10 μm diameter particle (~1 ng) has been demonstrated. Analytes tested here include RDX, TNT, ammonium nitrate and sucrose. The substrates tested in this current work include metal, plastics, glass and painted car panels.

  9. Vibrational spectroscopy and microscopic imaging: novel approaches for comparing barrier physical properties in native and human skin equivalents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guo; Zhang, Guojin; Flach, Carol R.; Mendelsohn, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy and imaging have been used to compare barrier properties in human skin, porcine skin, and two human skin equivalents, Epiderm 200X with an enhanced barrier and Epiderm 200 with a normal barrier. Three structural characterizations were performed. First, chain packing and conformational order were compared in isolated human stratum corneum (SC), isolated porcine SC, and in the Epiderm 200X surface layers. The infrared (IR) spectrum of isolated human SC revealed a large proportion of orthorhombically packed lipid chains at physiological temperatures along with a thermotropic phase transition to a state with hexagonally packed chains. In contrast, the lipid phase at physiological temperatures in both porcine SC and in Epiderm 200X, although dominated by conformationally ordered chains, lacked significant levels of orthorhombic subcell packing. Second, confocal Raman imaging of cholesterol bands showed extensive formation of cholesterol-enriched pockets within the human skin equivalents (HSEs). Finally, IR imaging tracked lipid barrier dimensions as well as the spatial disposition of ordered lipids in human SC and Epiderm 200X. These approaches provide a useful set of experiments for exploring structural differences between excised human skin and HSEs, which in turn may provide a rationale for the functional differences observed among these preparations.

  10. Evaluation of Various Spectral Inputs for Estimation of Forest Biochemical and Structural Properties from Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolová, L.; Janoutová, R.; Malenovský, Z.

    2016-06-01

    In this study we evaluated various spectral inputs for retrieval of forest chlorophyll content (Cab) and leaf area index (LAI) from high spectral and spatial resolution airborne imaging spectroscopy data collected for two forest study sites in the Czech Republic (beech forest at Štítná nad Vláří and spruce forest at Bílý Kříž). The retrieval algorithm was based on a machine learning method - support vector regression (SVR). Performance of the four spectral inputs used to train SVR was evaluated: a) all available hyperspectral bands, b) continuum removal (CR) 645 - 710 nm, c) CR 705 - 780 nm, and d) CR 680 - 800 nm. Spectral inputs and corresponding SVR models were first assessed at the level of spectral databases simulated by combined leaf-canopy radiative transfer models PROSPECT and DART. At this stage, SVR models using all spectral inputs provided good performance (RMSE for Cab trained SVRs on airborne hyperspectral images of the spruce site produced unacceptably overestimated values, only the beech site results were analysed. The best performance for the Cab estimation was found for CR bands in range of 645 - 710 nm, whereas CR bands in range of 680 - 800 nm were the most suitable for LAI retrieval. The CR transformation reduced the across-track bidirectional reflectance effect present in airborne images due to large sensor field of view.

  11. Non-linear optical imaging and fibre-based spectroscopy of fresh colon biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchi, R.; Sturiale, A.; Nesi, G.; Kapsokalyvas, D.; Tonelli, F.; Pavone, F. S.

    2012-06-01

    Two-photon fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy is a powerful tool to image human tissues up to 200 microns depth without any exogenously added probe. TPEF can take advantage of the autofluorescence of molecules intrinsically contained in a biological tissue, as such NADH, elastin, collagen, and flavins. Two-photon microscopy has been already successfully used to image several types of tissues, including skin, muscles, tendons, bladder. Nevertheless, its usefulness in imaging colon tissue has not been deeply investigated yet. In this work we have used combined two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF), second harmonic generation microscopy (SHG), fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), and multispectral two-photon emission detection (MTPE) to investigate different kinds of human ex-vivo fresh biopsies of colon. Morphological and spectroscopic analyses allowed to characterize both healthy mucosa, polyp, and colon samples in a good agreement with common routine histology. Even if further analysis, as well as a more significant statistics on a large number of samples would be helpful to discriminate between low, mild, and high grade cancer, our method is a promising tool to be used as diagnostic confirmation of histological results, as well as a diagnostic tool in a multiphoton endoscope or colonoscope to be used in in-vivo imaging applications.

  12. Two-photon imaging and spectroscopy of fresh human colon biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchi, R.; Sturiale, A.; Nesi, G.; Tonelli, F.; Pavone, F. S.

    2012-03-01

    Two-photon fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy is a powerful tool to image human tissues up to 200 microns depth without any exogenously added probe. TPEF can take advantage of the autofluorescence of molecules intrinsically contained in a biological tissue, as such NADH, elastin, collagen, and flavins. Two-photon microscopy has been already successfully used to image several types of tissues, including skin, muscles, tendons, bladder. Nevertheless, its usefulness in imaging colon tissue has not been deeply investigated yet. In this work we have used combined two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF), second harmonic generation microscopy (SHG), fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), and multispectral two-photon emission detection (MTPE) to investigate different kinds of human ex-vivo fresh biopsies of colon. Morphological and spectroscopic analyses allowed to characterize both healthy mucosa, polyp, and colon samples in a good agreement with common routine histology. Even if further analysis, as well as a more significant statistics on a large number of samples would be helpful to discriminate between low, mild, and high grade cancer, our method is a promising tool to be used as diagnostic confirmation of histological results, as well as a diagnostic tool in a multiphoton endoscope or colonoscope to be used in in-vivo imaging applications.

  13. Raster Scanning the Crab Nebula to Produce an Extended VHE Calibration Source

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The Crab Nebula has long been the standard reference point source for very-high-energy (VHE, E $>$100 GeV) gamma-ray observatories such as VERITAS. It has enabled testing and improvement of analysis methods, validation of techniques, and has served as a calibration source. No comparable extended source is known with a high, constant flux and well understood morphology. In order to artificially generate such a source, VERITAS has performed raster scans across the Crab Nebula. By displacing the source within the field-of-view in a known pattern, it is possible to generate an extended calibration source for verification of extended source analysis techniques. The method as well as early results of this novel technique are presented.

  14. Delaminated graphene at silicon carbide facets: atomic scale imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotra, Giuseppe; Ramasse, Quentin M; Deretzis, Ioannis; La Magna, Antonino; Spinella, Corrado; Giannazzo, Filippo

    2013-04-23

    Atomic-resolution structural and spectroscopic characterization techniques (scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy) are combined with nanoscale electrical measurements (conductive atomic force microscopy) to study at the atomic scale the properties of graphene grown epitaxially through the controlled graphitization of a hexagonal SiC(0001) substrate by high temperature annealing. This growth technique is known to result in a pronounced electron-doping (∼10(13) cm(-2)) of graphene, which is thought to originate from an interface carbon buffer layer strongly bound to the substrate. The scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis, carried out at an energy below the knock-on threshold for carbon to ensure no damage is imparted to the film by the electron beam, demonstrates that the buffer layer present on the planar SiC(0001) face delaminates from it on the (112n) facets of SiC surface steps. In addition, electron energy loss spectroscopy reveals that the delaminated layer has a similar electronic configuration to purely sp2-hybridized graphene. These observations are used to explain the local increase of the graphene sheet resistance measured around the surface steps by conductive atomic force microscopy, which we suggest is due to significantly lower substrate-induced doping and a resonant scattering mechanism at the step regions. A first-principles-calibrated theoretical model is proposed to explain the structural instability of the buffer layer on the SiC facets and the resulting delamination.

  15. Microscopy imaging system and method employing stimulated raman spectroscopy as a contrast mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Freudiger, Christian; Min, Wei

    2011-09-27

    A microscopy imaging system includes a first light source for providing a first train of pulses at a first center optical frequency .omega..sub.1, a second light source for providing a second train of pulses at a second center optical frequency .omega..sub.2, a modulator system, an optical detector, and a processor. The modulator system is for modulating a beam property of the second train of pulses at a modulation frequency f of at least 100 kHz. The optical detector is for detecting an integrated intensity of substantially all optical frequency components of the first train of pulses from the common focal volume by blocking the second train of pulses being modulated. The processor is for detecting, a modulation at the modulation frequency f, of the integrated intensity of the optical frequency components of the first train of pulses to provide a pixel of an image for the microscopy imaging system.

  16. High-order harmonic spectroscopy for molecular imaging of polyatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Negro, M; Faccialà, D; De Silvestri, S; Vozzi, C; Stagira, S

    2014-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation is a powerful and sensitive tool for probing atomic and molecular structures, combining in the same measurement an unprecedented attosecond temporal resolution with a high spatial resolution, of the order of the angstrom. Imaging of the outermost molecular orbital by high-order harmonic generation has been limited for a long time to very simple molecules, like nitrogen. Recently we demonstrated a technique that overcame several of the issues that have prevented the extension of molecular orbital tomography to more complex species, showing that molecular imaging can be applied to a triatomic molecule like carbon dioxide. Here we report on the application of such technique to nitrous oxide (N2O) and acetylene (C2H2). This result represents a first step towards the imaging of fragile compounds, a category which includes most of the fundamental biological molecules.

  17. Effects of raster resolution on landslide susceptibility mapping:A case study of Shenzhen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Resolution has been playing a significant role in landslide susceptibility mapping and hazard assessment.Based on geographical information system(GIS) and information model,the effects of raster resolution on landslide susceptibility mapping are studied in a central area of Shenzhen,China.Eight factors are selected to calculate landslide susceptibility with eleven groups of different resolutions(5 to 190 m).It has been found that a finer resolution does not necessarily lead to a higher accuracy of landslide susceptibility mappings,while the result of 90 m-resolution has the best accuracy and the 150 m-resolution has the worst one.The accuracy curve is in a shape of "W" along with resolution decreasing:1) The accuracy decreases from 5 to 70 m;2) and then the best accuracy appears at 90 m,which is almost the same as the mean size of landslides in study area;3) the accuracy decreases again from 110 to 150 m;4) and finally the accuracy increases from 150 to 190 m.The sensitivity analysis indicates that the effects of raster resolution are mainly caused by the resolution impact on landform parameter derivation,while factors like geology and human activity are very insensitive to resolutions.A further study shows that in flat,ridge,and slope foot terrains,the susceptibility mapping result is sensitive to resolution,but in the sloping surface area the sensitivity is much less sensitive to resolution.At last,by choosing study areas with different sizes,it has also been found that the optimal resolutions are variable due to size of study area.But the study area is larger than a threshold,which is 135 km2 in this study,and the optimal resolution is almost fixed.

  18. Oxygen spectroscopy and polarization-dependent imaging contrast (PIC)-mapping of calcium carbonate minerals and biominerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVol, Ross T; Metzler, Rebecca A; Kabalah-Amitai, Lee; Pokroy, Boaz; Politi, Yael; Gal, Assaf; Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Demichelis, Raffaella; Gale, Julian D; Ihli, Johannes; Meldrum, Fiona C; Blonsky, Adam Z; Killian, Christopher E; Salling, C B; Young, Anthony T; Marcus, Matthew A; Scholl, Andreas; Doran, Andrew; Jenkins, Catherine; Bechtel, Hans A; Gilbert, Pupa U P A

    2014-07-17

    X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and spectromicroscopy have been extensively used to characterize biominerals. Using either Ca or C spectra, unique information has been obtained regarding amorphous biominerals and nanocrystal orientations. Building on these results, we demonstrate that recording XANES spectra of calcium carbonate at the oxygen K-edge enables polarization-dependent imaging contrast (PIC) mapping with unprecedented contrast, signal-to-noise ratio, and magnification. O and Ca spectra are presented for six calcium carbonate minerals: aragonite, calcite, vaterite, monohydrocalcite, and both hydrated and anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate. The crystalline minerals reveal excellent agreement of the extent and direction of polarization dependences in simulated and experimental XANES spectra due to X-ray linear dichroism. This effect is particularly strong for aragonite, calcite, and vaterite. In natural biominerals, oxygen PIC-mapping generated high-magnification maps of unprecedented clarity from nacre and prismatic structures and their interface in Mytilus californianus shells. These maps revealed blocky aragonite crystals at the nacre-prismatic boundary and the narrowest calcite needle-prisms. In the tunic spicules of Herdmania momus, O PIC-mapping revealed the size and arrangement of some of the largest vaterite single crystals known. O spectroscopy therefore enables the simultaneous measurement of chemical and orientational information in CaCO3 biominerals and is thus a powerful means for analyzing these and other complex materials. As described here, PIC-mapping and spectroscopy at the O K-edge are methods for gathering valuable data that can be carried out using spectromicroscopy beamlines at most synchrotrons without the expense of additional equipment.

  19. Common-path biodynamic imaging for dynamic fluctuation spectroscopy of 3D living tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Turek, John; Nolte, David D.

    2017-03-01

    Biodynamic imaging is a novel 3D optical imaging technology based on short-coherence digital holography that measures intracellular motions of cells inside their natural microenvironments. Here both common-path and Mach-Zehnder designs are presented. Biological tissues such as tumor spheroids and ex vivo biopsies are used as targets, and backscattered light is collected as signal. Drugs are applied to samples, and their effects are evaluated by identifying biomarkers that capture intracellular dynamics from the reconstructed holograms. Through digital holography and coherence gating, information from different depths of the samples can be extracted, enabling the deep-tissue measurement of the responses to drugs.

  20. TESIS experiment on XUV imaging spectroscopy of the Sun onboard the CORONAS-PHOTON satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, S. V.; Zhitnik, I. A.; Bogachev, S. A.; Shestov, S. V.; Bugaenko, O. I.; Suhodrev, N. K.; Pertsov, A. A.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Ignat'ev, A. P.; Slemzin, V. A.

    We present a brief description of new complex of space telescopes and spectrographs, TESIS, which will be placed aboard the CORONAS-PHOTON satellite. The complex is intended for high-resolution imaging observation of full Sun in the coronal spectral lines and in the spectral lines of the solar transition region. TESIS will be launched at the end of 2007 - early of 2008. About 25 % of the daily TESIS images will be free for use and for downloading from the TESIS data center that is planned to open 2 months before the TESIS launching at http://www.tesis.lebedev.ru