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Sample records for ras promotes cell

  1. The inflammatory cytokine TNFα cooperates with Ras in elevating metastasis and turns WT-Ras to a tumor-promoting entity in MCF-7 cells

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    Leibovich-Rivkin, Tal; Liubomirski, Yulia; Meshel, Tsipi; Abashidze, Anastasia; Brisker, Daphna; Solomon, Hilla; Rotter, Varda; Weil, Miguel; Ben-Baruch, Adit

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we determined the relative contribution of two processes to breast cancer progression: (1) Intrinsic events, such as activation of the Ras pathway and down-regulation of p53; (2) The inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β, shown in our published studies to be highly expressed in tumors of >80% of breast cancer patients with recurrent disease. Using MCF-7 human breast tumor cells originally expressing WT-Ras and WT-p53, we determined the impact of the above-mentioned elements and cooperativity between them on the expression of CXCL8 (ELISA, qRT-PCR), a member of a “cancer-related chemokine cluster” that we have previously identified. Then, we determined the mechanisms involved (Ras-binding-domain assays, Western blot, luciferase), and tested the impact of Ras + TNFα on angiogenicity (chorioallantoic membrane assays) and on tumor growth at the mammary fat pad of mice and on metastasis, in vivo. Using Ras G12V that recapitulates multiple stimulations induced by receptor tyrosine kinases, we found that Ras G12V alone induced CXCL8 expression at the mRNA and protein levels, whereas down-regulation of p53 did not. TNFα and IL-1β potently induced CXCL8 expression and synergized with Ras G12V , together leading to amplified CXCL8 expression. Testing the impact of WT-Ras, which is the common form in breast cancer patients, we found that WT-Ras was not active in promoting CXCL8; however, TNFα has induced the activation of WT-Ras: joining these two elements has led to cooperative induction of CXCL8 expression, via the activation of MEK, NF-κB and AP-1. Importantly, TNFα has led to increased expression of WT-Ras in an active GTP-bound form, with properties similar to those of Ras G12V . Jointly, TNFα + Ras activities have given rise to increased angiogenesis and to elevated tumor cell dissemination to lymph nodes. TNFα cooperates with Ras in promoting the metastatic phenotype of MCF-7 breast tumor cells, and turns WT-Ras into a tumor

  2. The cell cycle regulator ecdysoneless cooperates with H-Ras to promote oncogenic transformation of human mammary epithelial cells.

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    Bele, Aditya; Mirza, Sameer; Zhang, Ying; Ahmad Mir, Riyaz; Lin, Simon; Kim, Jun Hyun; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah Basavaraju; West, William; Qiu, Fang; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian ortholog of Drosophila ecdysoneless (Ecd) gene product regulates Rb-E2F interaction and is required for cell cycle progression. Ecd is overexpressed in breast cancer and its overexpression predicts shorter survival in patients with ErbB2-positive tumors. Here, we demonstrate Ecd knock down (KD) in human mammary epithelial cells (hMECs) induces growth arrest, similar to the impact of Ecd Knock out (KO) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Furthermore, whole-genome mRNA expression analysis of control vs. Ecd KD in hMECs demonstrated that several of the top 40 genes that were down-regulated were E2F target genes. To address the role of Ecd in mammary oncogenesis, we overexpressed Ecd and/or mutant H-Ras in hTERT-immortalized hMECs. Cell cycle analyses revealed hMECs overexpressing Ecd+Ras showed incomplete arrest in G1 phase upon growth factor deprivation, and more rapid cell cycle progression in growth factor-containing medium. Analyses of cell migration, invasion, acinar structures in 3-D Matrigel and anchorage-independent growth demonstrated that Ecd+Ras-overexpressing cells exhibit substantially more dramatic transformed phenotype as compared to cells expressing vector, Ras or Ecd. Under conditions of nutrient deprivation, Ecd+Ras-overexpressing hMECs exhibited better survival, with substantial upregulation of the autophagy marker LC3 both at the mRNA and protein levels. Significantly, while hMECs expressing Ecd or mutant Ras alone did not form tumors in NOD/SCID mice, Ecd+Ras-overexpressing hMECs formed tumors, clearly demonstrating oncogenic cooperation between Ecd and mutant Ras. Collectively, we demonstrate an important co-oncogenic role of Ecd in the progression of mammary oncogenesis through promoting cell survival.

  3. Ras promotes cell survival by antagonizing both JNK and Hid signals in the Drosophila eye.

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    Wu, Yue; Zhuang, Yuan; Han, Min; Xu, Tian; Deng, Kejing

    2009-10-20

    Programmed cell death, or apoptosis, is a fundamental physiological process during normal development or in pathological conditions. The activation of apoptosis can be elicited by numerous signalling pathways. Ras is known to mediate anti-apoptotic signals by inhibiting Hid activity in the Drosophila eye. Here we report the isolation of a new loss-of-function ras allele, rasKP, which causes excessive apoptosis in the Drosophila eye. This new function is likely to be mediated through the JNK pathway since the inhibition of JNK signalling can significantly suppress rasKP-induced apoptosis, whereas the removal of hid only weakly suppresses the phenotype. Furthermore, the reduction of JNK signalling together with the expression of the baculovirus caspase inhibitor p35, which blocks Hid activity, strongly suppresses the rasKP cell death. In addition, we find a strong correlation between rasKP-induced apoptosis in the eye disc and the activation of JNK signalling. In the Drosophila eye, Ras may protect cells from apoptosis by inhibiting both JNK and Hid activities. Surprisingly, reducing Ras activity in the wing, however, does not cause apoptosis but rather affects cell and organ size. Thus, in addition to its requirement for cell viability, Ras appears to mediate different biological roles depending on the developmental context and on the level of its expression.

  4. Suppression of survivin expression in glioblastoma cells by the Ras inhibitor farnesylthiosalicylic acid promotes caspase-dependent apoptosis.

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    Blum, Roy; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Rechavi, Gideon; Kloog, Yoel

    2006-09-01

    The Ras inhibitor farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS) has been shown to induce apoptosis in glioblastoma multiforme, but its mechanism of action was unknown. We show that FTS or dominant-negative Ras, by deregulating extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt signaling, decreases survivin gene transcripts in U87 glioblastoma multiforme, leading to disappearance of survivin protein and cell death. FTS affected both Ras-controlled regulators of survivin transcription and Ras-regulated survival signals. Thus, Ras inhibition by FTS resulted in release of the survivin "brake" on apoptosis and in activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway: dephosphorylation of Bad, activation of Bax, release of cytochrome c, and caspase activation. FTS-induced apoptosis of U87 cells was strongly attenuated by forced expression of survivin or by caspase inhibitors. These results show that resistance to apoptosis in glioblastoma multiforme can be abolished by a single Ras inhibitor, which targets both survivin, a critical inhibitor of apoptosis, and the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic machinery.

  5. Upstream CREs participate in the basal activity of minute virus of mice promoter P4 and in its stimulation in ras-transformed cells.

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    Perros, M; Deleu, L; Vanacker, J M; Kherrouche, Z; Spruyt, N; Faisst, S; Rommelaere, J

    1995-01-01

    The activity of the P4 promoter of the parvovirus minute virus of mice (prototype strain MVMp) is stimulated in ras-transformed FREJ4 cells compared with the parental FR3T3 line. This activation may participate in the oncolytic effect of parvoviruses, given that P4 drives a transcriptional unit encoding cytotoxic nonstructural proteins. Our results suggest that the higher transcriptional activity of promoter P4 in FREJ4 cells is mediated at least in part by upstream CRE elements. Accordingly, mutations in the CRE motifs impair P4 function more strongly in the FREJ4 derivative than in its FR3T3 parent. Further evidence that these elements contribute to hyperactivity of the P4 promoter in the ras transformant is the fact that they form distinct complexes with proteins from FREJ4 and FR3T3 cell extracts. This difference can be abolished by treating the FREJ4 cell extracts with cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) or treating original cultures with a PKA activator. These findings can be linked with two previously reported features of ras-transformed cells: the activation of a PKA-inhibited protein kinase cascade and the reduction of PKA-induced protein phosphorylation. In keeping with these facts, P4-directed gene expression can be up- or downmodulated in vivo by exposing cells to known inhibitors or activators of PKA, respectively. PMID:7636996

  6. C/EBPβ represses p53 to promote cell survival downstream of DNA damage independent of oncogenic Ras and p19Arf

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    Ewing, SJ; Zhu, S; Zhu, F; House, JS; Smart, RC

    2013-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-β (C/EBPβ) is a mediator of cell survival and tumorigenesis. When C/EBPβ−/− mice are treated with carcinogens that produce oncogenic Ras mutations in keratinocytes, they respond with abnormally elevated keratinocyte apoptosis and a block in skin tumorigenesis. Although this aberrant carcinogen-induced apoptosis results from abnormal upregulation of p53, it is not known whether upregulated p53 results from oncogenic Ras and its ability to induce p19Arf and/or activate DNA-damage response pathways or from direct carcinogen-induced DNA damage. We report that p19Arf is dramatically elevated in C/EBPβ−/− epidermis and that C/EBPβ represses a p19Arf promoter reporter. To determine whether p19Arf is responsible for the proapoptotic phenotype in C/EBPβ−/− mice, C/EBPβ−/−;p19Arf−/− mice were generated. C/EBPβ−/−;p19Arf−/− mice responded to carcinogen treatment with increased p53 and apoptosis, indicating p19Arf is not essential. To ascertain whether oncogenic Ras activation induces aberrant p53 and apoptosis in C/EBPβ−/− epidermis, we generated K14-ER:Ras; C/EBPβ−/− mice. Oncogenic Ras activation induced by 4-hydroxytamoxifen did not produce increased p53 or apoptosis. Finally, when C/EBPβ−/− mice were treated with differing types of DNA-damaging agents, including alkylating chemotherapeutic agents, they displayed aberrant levels of p53 and apoptosis. These results indicate that C/EBPβ represses p53 to promote cell survival downstream of DNA damage and suggest that inhibition of C/EBPβ may be a target for cancer cotherapy to increase the efficacy of alkylating chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:18636078

  7. Syndecan-2 promotes perineural invasion and cooperates with K-ras to induce an invasive pancreatic cancer cell phenotype

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    De Oliveira Tiago

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have identified syndecan-2 as a protein potentially involved in perineural invasion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells. Methods Syndecan-2 (SDC-2 expression was analyzed in human normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and PDAC tissues. Functional in vitro assays were carried out to determine its role in invasion, migration and signaling. Results SDC-2 was expressed in the majority of the tested pancreatic cancer cell lines while it was upregulated in nerve-invasive PDAC cell clones. There were 2 distinct expression patterns of SDC-2 in PDAC tissue samples: SDC-2 positivity in the cancer cell cytoplasm and a peritumoral expression. Though SDC-2 silencing (using specific siRNA oligonucleotides did not affect anchorage-dependent growth, it significantly reduced cell motility and invasiveness in the pancreatic cancer cell lines T3M4 and Su8686. On the transcriptional level, migration-and invasion-associated genes were down-regulated following SDC-2 RNAi. Furthermore, SDC-2 silencing reduced K-ras activity, phosphorylation of Src and - further downstream - phosphorylation of ERK2 while levels of the putative SDC-2 signal transducer p120GAP remained unaltered. Conclusion SDC-2 is a novel (perineural invasion-associated gene in PDAC which cooperates with K-ras to induce a more invasive phenotype.

  8. Ras proteins have multiple functions in vegetative cells of Dictyostelium.

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    Bolourani, Parvin; Spiegelman, George; Weeks, Gerald

    2010-11-01

    During the aggregation of Dictyostelium cells, signaling through RasG is more important in regulating cyclic AMP (cAMP) chemotaxis, whereas signaling through RasC is more important in regulating the cAMP relay. However, RasC is capable of substituting for RasG for chemotaxis, since rasG⁻ cells are only partially deficient in chemotaxis, whereas rasC⁻/rasG⁻ cells are totally incapable of chemotaxis. In this study we have examined the possible functional overlap between RasG and RasC in vegetative cells by comparing the vegetative cell properties of rasG⁻, rasC⁻, and rasC⁻/rasG⁻ cells. In addition, since RasD, a protein not normally found in vegetative cells, is expressed in vegetative rasG⁻ and rasC⁻/rasG⁻ cells and appears to partially compensate for the absence of RasG, we have also examined the possible functional overlap between RasG and RasD by comparing the properties of rasG⁻ and rasC⁻/rasG⁻ cells with those of the mutant cells expressing higher levels of RasD. The results of these two lines of investigation show that RasD is capable of totally substituting for RasG for cytokinesis and growth in suspension, whereas RasC is without effect. In contrast, for chemotaxis to folate, RasC is capable of partially substituting for RasG, but RasD is totally without effect. Finally, neither RasC nor RasD is able to substitute for the role that RasG plays in regulating actin distribution and random motility. These specificity studies therefore delineate three distinct and none-overlapping functions for RasG in vegetative cells.

  9. Ras and Rheb Signaling in Survival and Cell Death

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    Ehrkamp, Anja; Herrmann, Christian; Stoll, Raphael; Heumann, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    One of the most obvious hallmarks of cancer is uncontrolled proliferation of cells partly due to independence of growth factor supply. A major component of mitogenic signaling is Ras, a small GTPase. It was the first identified human protooncogene and is known since more than three decades to promote cellular proliferation and growth. Ras was shown to support growth factor-independent survival during development and to protect from chemical or mechanical lesion-induced neuronal degeneration in postmitotic neurons. In contrast, for specific patho-physiological cases and cellular systems it has been shown that Ras may also promote cell death. Proteins from the Ras association family (Rassf, especially Rassf1 and Rassf5) are tumor suppressors that are activated by Ras-GTP, triggering apoptosis via e.g., activation of mammalian sterile 20-like (MST1) kinase. In contrast to Ras, their expression is suppressed in many types of tumours, which makes Rassf proteins an exciting model for understanding the divergent effects of Ras activity. It seems likely that the outcome of Ras signaling depends on the balance between the activation of its various downstream effectors, thus determining cellular fate towards either proliferation or apoptosis. Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) is a protein from the Ras superfamily that is also known to promote proliferation, growth, and regeneration through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) pathway. However, recent evidences indicate that the Rheb-mTor pathway may switch its function from a pro-growth into a cell death pathway, depending on the cellular situation. In contrast to Ras signaling, for Rheb, the cellular context is likely to modulate the whole Rheb-mTor pathway towards cellular death or survival, respectively

  10. Ras and Rheb Signaling in Survival and Cell Death

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    Ehrkamp, Anja [Molecular Neurobiochemistry, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Herrmann, Christian [Department of Physical Chemistry1, Protein Interaction, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Stoll, Raphael [Biomolecular NMR, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Heumann, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.heumann@rub.de [Molecular Neurobiochemistry, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-05-28

    One of the most obvious hallmarks of cancer is uncontrolled proliferation of cells partly due to independence of growth factor supply. A major component of mitogenic signaling is Ras, a small GTPase. It was the first identified human protooncogene and is known since more than three decades to promote cellular proliferation and growth. Ras was shown to support growth factor-independent survival during development and to protect from chemical or mechanical lesion-induced neuronal degeneration in postmitotic neurons. In contrast, for specific patho-physiological cases and cellular systems it has been shown that Ras may also promote cell death. Proteins from the Ras association family (Rassf, especially Rassf1 and Rassf5) are tumor suppressors that are activated by Ras-GTP, triggering apoptosis via e.g., activation of mammalian sterile 20-like (MST1) kinase. In contrast to Ras, their expression is suppressed in many types of tumours, which makes Rassf proteins an exciting model for understanding the divergent effects of Ras activity. It seems likely that the outcome of Ras signaling depends on the balance between the activation of its various downstream effectors, thus determining cellular fate towards either proliferation or apoptosis. Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) is a protein from the Ras superfamily that is also known to promote proliferation, growth, and regeneration through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) pathway. However, recent evidences indicate that the Rheb-mTor pathway may switch its function from a pro-growth into a cell death pathway, depending on the cellular situation. In contrast to Ras signaling, for Rheb, the cellular context is likely to modulate the whole Rheb-mTor pathway towards cellular death or survival, respectively.

  11. miR-654-5p Targets GRAP to Promote Proliferation, Metastasis, and Chemoresistance of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Through Ras/MAPK Signaling.

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    Lu, Meng; Wang, Chengyong; Chen, Weihui; Mao, Chuanqing; Wang, Jin

    2018-04-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is characterized by rapid local migration and invasion. This study was aimed at clarifying the effect of miR-654-5p on progression of OSCC. miR-654-5p promoted proliferation, metastasis, and chemoresistance of OSCC in vitro and in vivo. Consistently, miR-654-5p was upregulated in late-stage OSCC and was correlated with poor prognosis of OSCC patients. Furthermore, miR-654-5p was mechanistically verified to target Grb-2-related adaptor protein (GRAP), accompanied by the activation of Ras/MAPK signaling and the facilitation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in OSCC cells. GRAP was downregulated in T1-2 stage versus T3-4 stage head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSC) and was negatively correlated with tumor-node-metastases (TNM) stage in HNSC patients based on The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) analysis. In addition, GRAP was positively correlated with good prognosis in HNSC patients. Our findings suggest that the miR-654-5p/GRAP/Ras/Erk signaling pathway in OSCC cells might contribute to the underlying mechanism through which miR-654-5p participates in the regulation of OSCC progression. miR-654-5p, as a potential biomarker for the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of OSCC, may be an effective anticancer target for the treatment of OSCC.

  12. K-RAS and N-RAS mutations in testicular germ cell tumors

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    Bekir Muhammet Hacioglu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Testicular cancer is a relatively rare tumor type, accounting for approximately 1% of all cancers in men. However, among men aged between 15 and 40 years, testicular cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy. Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs are classified as seminoma and non-seminoma. The RAS oncogene controls several cellular functions, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and differentiation. Thus, RAS signaling is important for normal germ cell development. Mutations of the Kirsten RAS (K-RAS gene are present in over 20% of all cancers. RAS gene mutations have also been reported in TGCTs. We investigated K-RAS and N-RAS mutations in seminoma and non-seminoma TGCT patients. A total of 24 (55% pure seminoma cases and 19 (45% non-seminoma cases were included in the study. K-RAS and N-RAS analyses were performed in our molecular pathology laboratory, using K-RAS and N-RAS Pyro Kit 24 V1 (Qiagen. In total, a RAS mutation was present in 12 patients (27%: 7 seminoma (29% and 5 non-seminoma cases (26% [p = 0.55]. A K-RAS mutation was present in 4 pure seminoma tumors (16% and 3 non-seminoma tumors (15% [p = 0.63], and an N-RAS mutation was observed in 4 seminoma tumors (16% and 3 non-seminoma tumors (15% [p = 0.63]. Both, K-RAS and N-RAS mutations were present in two patients: one with seminoma tumor and the other with non-seminoma tumor. To date, no approved targeted therapy is available for the treatment of TGCTs. The analysis of K-RAS and N-RAS mutations in these tumors may provide more treatment options, especially in platinum-resistant tumors.

  13. RasGRP1 confers the phorbol ester-sensitive phenotype to EL4 lymphoma cells.

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    Han, Shujie; Knoepp, Stewart M; Hallman, Mark A; Meier, Kathryn E

    2007-01-01

    The murine EL4 lymphoma cell line exists in variants that are either sensitive or resistant to the tumor promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). In sensitive EL4 cells, PMA causes robust Erk mitogen-activated protein kinase activation that results in growth arrest. In resistant cells, PMA induces minimal Erk activation, without growth arrest. PMA stimulates IL-2 production in sensitive, but not resistant, cells. The role of RasGRP1, a PMA-activated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras, in EL4 phenotype was examined. Endogenous RasGRP1 protein is expressed at much higher levels in sensitive than in resistant cells. PMA-induced Ras activation is observed in sensitive cells but not in resistant cells lacking Ras-GRP1. PMA induces down-regulation of RasGRP1 protein in sensitive cells but increases RasGRP1 in resistant cells. Transfection of RasGRP1 into resistant cells enhances PMA-induced Erk activation. In the reverse experiment, introduction of small interfering RNA (siRNA) for RasGRP1 suppresses PMA-induced Ras and Erk activations in sensitive cells. Sensitive cells incubated with siRNA for RasGRP1 exhibit the PMA-resistant phenotype, in that they are able to proliferate in the presence of PMA and do not secrete IL-2 when stimulated with PMA. These studies indicate that the PMA-sensitive phenotype, as previously defined for the EL4 cell line, is conferred by endogenous expression of RasGRP1 protein.

  14. Evidence implicating the Ras pathway in multiple CD28 costimulatory functions in CD4+ T cells.

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    Sujit V Janardhan

    Full Text Available CD28 costimulation is a critical event in the full activation of CD4(+ T cells that augments cytokine gene transcription, promotes cytokine mRNA stability, prevents induction of anergy, increases cellular metabolism, and increases cell survival. However, despite extensive biochemical analysis of the signaling events downstream of CD28, molecular pathways sufficient to functionally replace the diverse aspects of CD28-mediated costimulation in normal T cells have not been identified. Ras/MAPK signaling is a critical pathway downstream of T cell receptor stimulation, but its role in CD28-mediated costimulation has been controversial. We observed that physiologic CD28 costimulation caused a relocalization of the RasGEF RasGRP to the T cell-APC interface by confocal microscopy. In whole cell biochemical analysis, CD28 cross-linking with either anti-CD28 antibody or B7.1-Ig augmented TCR-induced Ras activation. To determine whether Ras signaling was sufficient to functionally mimic CD28 costimulation, we utilized an adenoviral vector encoding constitutively active H-Ras (61L to transduce normal, Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR transgenic CD4(+ T cells. Like costimulation via CD28, active Ras induced AKT, JNK and ERK phosphorylation. In addition, constitutive Ras signaling mimicked the ability of CD28 to costimulate IL-2 protein secretion, prevent anergy induction, increase glucose uptake, and promote cell survival. Importantly, we also found that active Ras mimicked the mechanism by which CD28 costimulates IL-2 production: by increasing IL-2 gene transcription, and promoting IL-2 mRNA stability. Finally, active Ras was able to induce IL-2 production when combined with ionomycin stimulation in a MEK-1-dependent fashion. Our results are consistent with a central role for Ras signaling in CD28-mediated costimulation.

  15. Mitochondrial clearance by the STK38 kinase supports oncogenic Ras-induced cell transformation

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    Bettoun, Audrey; Surdez, Didier; Vallerand, David; Gundogdu, Ramazan; Sharif, Ahmad A.D.; Gomez, Marta; Cascone, Ilaria; Meunier, Brigitte; White, Michael A.; Codogno, Patrice; Parrini, Maria Carla; Camonis, Jacques H.; Hergovich, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic Ras signalling occurs frequently in many human cancers. However, no effective targeted therapies are currently available to treat patients suffering from Ras-driven tumours. Therefore, it is imperative to identify downstream effectors of Ras signalling that potentially represent promising new therapeutic options. Particularly, considering that autophagy inhibition can impair the survival of Ras-transformed cells in tissue culture and mouse models, an understanding of factors regulating the balance between autophagy and apoptosis in Ras-transformed human cells is needed. Here, we report critical roles of the STK38 protein kinase in oncogenic Ras transformation. STK38 knockdown impaired anoikis resistance, anchorage-independent soft agar growth, and in vivo xenograft growth of Ras-transformed human cells. Mechanistically, STK38 supports Ras-driven transformation through promoting detachment-induced autophagy. Even more importantly, upon cell detachment STK38 is required to sustain the removal of damaged mitochondria by mitophagy, a selective autophagic process, to prevent excessive mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production that can negatively affect cancer cell survival. Significantly, knockdown of PINK1 or Parkin, two positive regulators of mitophagy, also impaired anoikis resistance and anchorage-independent growth of Ras-transformed human cells, while knockdown of USP30, a negative regulator of PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy, restored anchorage-independent growth of STK38-depleted Ras-transformed human cells. Therefore, our findings collectively reveal novel molecular players that determine whether Ras-transformed human cells die or survive upon cell detachment, which potentially could be exploited for the development of novel strategies to target Ras-transformed cells. PMID:27283898

  16. Regulation of Ras exchange factors and cellular localization of Ras activation by lipid messengers in T cells

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    Jesse E. Jun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ras-MAPK signaling pathway is highly conserved throughout evolution and is activated downstream of a wide range of receptor stimuli. Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs catalyze GTP loading of Ras and play a pivotal role in regulating receptor-ligand induced Ras activity. In T cells, three families of functionally important RasGEFs are expressed: RasGRF, RasGRP, and SOS-family GEFs.Early on it was recognized that Ras activation is critical for T cell development and that the RasGEFs play an important role herein. More recent work has revealed that nuances in Ras activation appear to significantly impact T cell development and selection. These nuances include distinct biochemical patterns of analog versus digital Ras activation, differences in cellular localization of Ras activation, and intricate interplays between the RasGEFs during distinct T cell developmental stages as revealed by various new mouse models. In many instances, the exact nature of these nuances in Ras activation or how these may result from fine-tuning of the RasGEFs is not understood.One large group of biomolecules critically involved in the control of Ras-GEFs´functions are lipid second messengers. Multiple, yet distinct lipid products are generated following T cell receptor (TCR stimulation and bind to different domains in the RasGRP and SOS RasGEFs to facilitate the activation of the membrane-anchored Ras GTPases. In this review we highlight how different lipid-based elements are generated by various enzymes downstream of the TCR and other receptors and how these dynamic and interrelated lipid products may fine-tune Ras activation by RasGEFs in developing T cells.

  17. The K-Ras 4A isoform promotes apoptosis but does not affect either lifespan or spontaneous tumor incidence in aging mice

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    Plowman, Sarah J.; Arends, Mark J.; Brownstein, David G.; Luo Feijun; Devenney, Paul S.; Rose, Lorraine; Ritchie, Ann-Marie; Berry, Rachel L.; Harrison, David J.; Hooper, Martin L.; Patek, Charles E.

    2006-01-01

    Ras proteins function as molecular switches in signal transduction pathways, and, here, we examined the effects of the K-ras4A and 4B splice variants on cell function by comparing wild-type embryonic stem (ES) cells with K-ras tmΔ4A/tmΔ4A (exon 4A knock-out) ES cells which express K-ras4B only and K-ras -/- (exons 1-3 knock-out) ES cells which express neither splice variant, and intestinal epithelium from wild-type and K-ras tmΔ4A/tmΔ4A mice. RT-qPCR analysis found that K-ras4B expression was reduced in K-ras tmΔ4A/tmΔ4A ES cells but unaffected in small intestine. K-Ras deficiency did not affect ES cell growth, and K-Ras4A deficiency did not affect intestinal epithelial proliferation. K-ras tmΔ4A/tmΔ4A and K-ras -/- ES cells showed a reduced capacity for differentiation following LIF withdrawal, and K-ras -/- cells were least differentiated. K-Ras4A deficiency inhibited etoposide-induced apoptosis in ES cells and intestinal epithelial cells. However, K-ras tmΔ4A/tmΔ4A ES cells were more resistant to etoposide-induced apoptosis than K-ras -/- cells. The results indicate that (1) K-Ras4A promotes apoptosis while K-Ras4B inhibits it, and (2) K-Ras4B, and possibly K-Ras4A, promotes differentiation. The findings raise the possibility that alteration of the K-Ras4A/4B isoform ratio modulates tumorigenesis by differentially affecting stem cell survival and/or differentiation. However, K-Ras4A deficiency did not affect life expectancy or spontaneous overall tumor incidence in aging mice

  18. The regulation of ras-raf signaling pathway on G1 phase of the irradiated cells

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    Guo Dehuang; Dong Bo; Liu Nongle; Wen Gengyun; Luo Qingliang; Mao Bingzhi

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the way of ras-raf signaling pathway which regulate the G 1 phase in irradiated KG-1 cells. Methods: Blocked the GM-CSF signaling pathway by transfected DN-ras and then momentary transfected cyclin D1 into irradiated KG-1 cells, the effects of cyclin D1 on G 1 phase was examined. Results: The irradiated KG-1 cells transfected DN-ras can't recover form G 1 phase arrest even though the GM-CSF was given,momentary transfected cyclin D1 promote the irradiated KG-1 cells from G 1 arrest. Conclusion: Activation of ras-raf signaling pathway regulate the cell cycle of the irradiated KG-1 cells through promotion the expression of the cyclin D1

  19. R-Ras regulates migration through an interaction with filamin A in melanoma cells.

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    Joanna E Gawecka

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Changes in cell adhesion and migration in the tumor microenvironment are key in the initiation and progression of metastasis. R-Ras is one of several small GTPases that regulate cell adhesion and migration on the extracellular matrix, however the mechanism has not been completely elucidated. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach we sought to identify novel R-Ras binding proteins that might mediate its effects on integrins.We identified Filamin A (FLNa as a candidate interacting protein. FLNa is an actin-binding scaffold protein that also binds to integrin beta1, beta2 and beta7 tails and is associated with diverse cell processes including cell migration. Indeed, M2 melanoma cells require FLNa for motility. We further show that R-Ras and FLNa interact in co-immunoprecipitations and pull-down assays. Deletion of FLNa repeat 3 (FLNaDelta3 abrogated this interaction. In M2 melanoma cells active R-Ras co-localized with FLNa but did not co-localize with FLNa lacking repeat 3. Thus, activated R-Ras binds repeat 3 of FLNa. The functional consequence of this interaction was that active R-Ras and FLNa coordinately increased cell migration. In contrast, co-expression of R-Ras and FLNaDelta3 had a significantly reduced effect on migration. While there was enhancement of integrin activation and fibronectin matrix assembly, cell adhesion was not altered. Finally, siRNA knockdown of endogenous R-Ras impaired FLNa-dependent fibronectin matrix assembly.These data support a model in which R-Ras functionally associates with FLNa and thereby regulates integrin-dependent migration. Thus in melanoma cells R-Ras and FLNa may cooperatively promote metastasis by enhancing cell migration.

  20. RAS/ERK modulates TGFbeta-regulated PTEN expression in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells.

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    Chow, Jimmy Y C; Quach, Khai T; Cabrera, Betty L; Cabral, Jennifer A; Beck, Stayce E; Carethers, John M

    2007-11-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is rarely mutated in pancreatic cancers, but its regulation by transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta might mediate growth suppression and other oncogenic actions. Here, we examined the role of TGFbeta and the effects of oncogenic K-RAS/ERK upon PTEN expression in the absence of SMAD4. We utilized two SMAD4-null pancreatic cell lines, CAPAN-1 (K-RAS mutant) and BxPc-3 (WT-K-RAS), both of which express TGFbeta surface receptors. Cells were treated with TGFbeta1 and separated into cytosolic/nuclear fractions for western blotting with phospho-SMAD2, SMAD 2, 4 phospho-ATP-dependent tyrosine kinases (Akt), Akt and PTEN antibodies. PTEN mRNA levels were assessed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The MEK1 inhibitor, PD98059, was used to block the downstream action of oncogenic K-RAS/ERK, as was a dominant-negative (DN) K-RAS construct. TGFbeta increased phospho-SMAD2 in both cytosolic and nuclear fractions. PD98059 treatment further increased phospho-SMAD2 in the nucleus of both pancreatic cell lines, and DN-K-RAS further improved SMAD translocation in K-RAS mutant CAPAN cells. TGFbeta treatment significantly suppressed PTEN protein levels concomitant with activation of Akt by 48 h through transcriptional reduction of PTEN mRNA that was evident by 6 h. TGFbeta-induced PTEN suppression was reversed by PD98059 and DN-K-RAS compared with treatments without TGFbeta. TGFbeta-induced PTEN expression was inversely related to cellular proliferation. Thus, oncogenic K-RAS/ERK in pancreatic adenocarcinoma facilitates TGFbeta-induced transcriptional down-regulation of the tumor suppressor PTEN in a SMAD4-independent manner and could constitute a signaling switch mechanism from growth suppression to growth promotion in pancreatic cancers.

  1. RasGRP3 regulates the migration of glioma cells via interaction with Arp3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae Kyung; Finniss, Susan; Cazacu, Simona; Xiang, Cunli; Poisson, Laila M.; Blumberg, Peter M.; Brodie, Chaya

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), the most aggressive primary brain tumors, are highly infiltrative. Although GBM express high Ras activity and Ras proteins have been implicated in gliomagenesis, Ras-activating mutations are not frequent in these tumors. RasGRP3, an important signaling protein responsive to diacylglycerol (DAG), increases Ras activation. Here, we examined the expression and functions of RasGRP3 in GBM and glioma cells. RasGRP3 expression was upregulated in GBM specimens and glioma stem cells compared with normal brains and neural stem cells, respectively. RasGRP3 activated Ras and Rap1 in glioma cells and increased cell migration and invasion partially via Ras activation. Using pull-down assay and mass spectroscopy we identified the actin-related protein, Arp3, as a novel interacting protein of RasGRP3. The interaction of RasGRP3 and Arp3 was validated by immunofluorescence staining and co-immunoprecipitation, and PMA, which activates RasGRP3 and induces its translocation to the peri-nuclear region, increased the association of Arp3 and RasGRP3. Arp3 was upregulated in GBM, regulated cell spreading and migration and its silencing partially decreased these effects of RasGRP3 in glioma cells. In summary, RasGRP3 acts as an important integrating signaling protein of the DAG and Ras signaling pathways and actin polymerization and represents an important therapeutic target in GBM. PMID:25682201

  2. Mutated N-ras does not induce p19 arf in CO25 cell line | Saleh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mouse cell line (CO25) used in this study was transfected with a glucocorticoid inducible mutated human N-ras oncogene under transcriptional control of the steroid-sensitive promoter of the mouse mammary tumors virus long terminal repeat MMTV-LTR. This study was aimed to investigate the expression of p19arf and ...

  3. Radiosensitivity and ras oncogene expression in preneoplastic rat tracheal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, D.G.; Wuensch, S.A.; Kelly, G.

    1988-01-01

    The sensitivity of preneoplastic rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cells to the cytotoxic effects of high- and low-LET radiation, and the modulating effect of the viral ras oncogene on this sensitivity were determined. Two lines of preneoplastic RTE cells have the same responsiveness to high-LET radiation, but differ in their responsiveness to a transfected ras oncogene and in their sensitivities to low-LET radiation. Cells that respond to ras by becoming neoplastic are more resistant to the cytotoxic effects of low-LET radiation than cells that are not transformable by ras. The radiosensitivity of ras-responsive cells was not altered by transfection with ras. However, transfection of ras-non responsive cells with ras decreased their sensitivity to low-LET radiation. These data suggest that the ability of cells to repair radiation damage changes as they progress to neoplasia. (author)

  4. Transformation by Oncogenic Ras Expands the Early Genomic Response to Transforming Growth Factor β in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl E. Allen

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A substantial body of evidence implicates TGFβ as a tumor promoter in epithelial cells that have become resistant to its tumor suppressor activity. To better understand early, genome-wide TGFβ responses in cells resistant to growth inhibition by TGFβ, we used microarray analysis in a well-defined cell culture system of sensitive and resistant intestinal epithelial cells. TGFβ-regulated gene expression in TGFβ-growth-sensitive, nontransformed rat intestinal epithelial cells (RIE-1 was compared to expression in TGFβ-growth-resistant RIE cells stably transformed by oncogenic Ras(12V. Treatment of RIE-1 cells with 2 ng/ml TGFβ1 for 1 hour increased the expression of eight gene sequences by 2.6-fold or more, whereas eight were down regulated 2.6-fold. In RIE-Ras(12V cells, 42 gene sequences were upregulated and only 3 were down-regulated. Comparison of RIE and RIE-Ras(12V identified 37 gene sequences as unique, Ras-dependent genomic targets of TGFβ1. TGFβ-regulation of connective tissue growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor, two genes up-regulated in RIE-Ras cells and previously implicated in tumor promotion, was independently confirmed and further characterized by Northern analysis. Our data indicate that overexpression of oncogenic Ras in intestinal epithelial cells confers a significantly expanded repertoire of robust, early transcriptional responses to TGFβ via signaling pathways yet to be fully elucidated but including the canonical Raf-1/MAPK/Erk pathway. Loss of sensitivity to growth inhibition by TGFβ does not abrogate TGFβ signaling and actually expands the early transcriptional response to TGFβ1. Expression of some of these genes may confer to Ras-transformed cells characteristics favorable for tumor promotion.

  5. Ha-ras oncogene expression directed by a milk protein gene promoter: tissue specificity, hormonal regulation, and tumor induction in transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andres, A.C.; Schoenenberger, C.A.; Groner, B.; Henninghausen, L.; LeMeur, M.; Gelinger, P.

    1987-01-01

    The activated human Ha-ras oncogene was subjected to the control of the promoter region of the murine whey acidic protein (Wap) gene, which is expressed in mammary epithelial cells in response to lactogenic hormones. The Wap-ras gene was stably introduced into the mouse germ line of five transgenic mice (one male and four females). Wap-ras expression was observed in the mammary glands of lactating females in two lines derived from female founders. The tissue-directed and hormone-dependent Wap expression was conferred on the Ha-ras oncogene. The signals governing Wap expression are located within 2.5 kilobases of 5' flanking sequence. The other two lines derived from female founders did not express the chimeric gene. In the line derived from the male founder the Wap-ras gene is integrated into the Y chromosome. Expression was found in the salivary gland of male animals only. After a long latency, Wap-ras-expressing mice developed tumors. The tumors arose in tissues expressing Wap-ras - i.e., mammary or salivary glands. Compared to the corresponding nonmalignant tissues, Wap-ras expression was enhanced in the tumors

  6. Activated H-Ras regulates hematopoietic cell survival by modulating Survivin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Seiji; Pelus, Louis M.

    2004-01-01

    Survivin expression and Ras activation are regulated by hematopoietic growth factors. We investigated whether activated Ras could circumvent growth factor-regulated Survivin expression and if a Ras/Survivin axis mediates growth factor independent survival and proliferation in hematopoietic cells. Survivin expression is up-regulated by IL-3 in Ba/F3 and CD34 + cells and inhibited by the Ras inhibitor, farnesylthiosalicylic acid. Over-expression of constitutively activated H-Ras (CA-Ras) in Ba/F3 cells blocked down-modulation of Survivin expression, G 0 /G 1 arrest, and apoptosis induced by IL-3 withdrawal, while dominant-negative (DN) H-Ras down-regulated Survivin. Survivin disruption by DN T34A Survivin blocked CA-Ras-induced IL-3-independent cell survival and proliferation; however, it did not affect CA-Ras-mediated enhancement of S-phase, indicating that the anti-apoptotic activity of CA-Ras is Survivin dependent while its S-phase enhancing effect is not. These results indicate that CA-Ras modulates Survivin expression independent of hematopoietic growth factors and that a CA-Ras/Survivin axis regulates survival and proliferation of transformed hematopoietic cells

  7. Oncogenic K-Ras Activates p38 to Maintain Colorectal Cancer Cell Proliferation during MEK Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winan J. van Houdt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colon carcinomas frequently contain activating mutations in the K-ras proto-oncogene. K-ras itself is a poor drug target and drug development efforts have mostly focused on components of the classical Ras-activated MEK/ERK pathway. Here we have studied whether endogenous oncogenic K-ras affects the dependency of colorectal tumor cells on MEK/ERK signaling.

  8. TIMP-1 stimulates proliferation of human aortic smooth muscle cells and Ras effector pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, Takemi; Akahane, Manabu; Shah, Amy; Thorgeirsson, Unnur P.

    2004-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) is a multifunctional protein, which is found in most tissues and body fluids. Here, we demonstrated that recombinant TIMP-1 but not the synthetic matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, GM6001, stimulated proliferation of human aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMC) in a dose-dependent manner. The mitogenic effect was associated with activation of Ras, increased phosphorylation of ERK, and stimulation of cyclin D1 expression. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway was also involved since the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, abolished the TIMP-1-mediated growth stimulation. These data suggest that TIMP-1 activates Ras, which then turns on the ERK and PI3K signaling pathways to promote cell cycle progression of the AoSMC

  9. Depletion of Pokemon gene inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell growth through inhibition of H-ras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan-Le; Tian, De-An; Xu, Xiang-Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Pokemon is a transcription repressor which plays a critical role in cell transformation and malignancy. However, little is known about its effect on the development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of Pokemon in human HCC tissues and the biological behavior of Pokemon in HCC cells in which it is overexpressed. We also explored the expression of potential downstream cofactors of Pokemon. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to investigate the expression of Pokemon in tissues of 30 HCC patients. We then examined cell proliferation or apoptosis and β-catenin or H-ras expression in Pokemon-depleted HepG(2) cells using DNA vector-based RNA interference technology. Pokemon was markedly expressed in 22/30 (73.3%) HCC tissues, with expression levels higher than in adjacent normal liver tissues (p Pokemon inhibited proliferation of HepG(2) or induced apoptosis. Also, H-ras expression decreased to a large extent. Pokemon exerts its oncogenic activity in the development of HCC by promoting cancer cell growth and reducing apoptosis, and the effect may be mediated by H-ras. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Constitutively active RAS signaling reduces 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D-mediated gene transcription in intestinal epithelial cells by reducing vitamin D receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSmet, Marsha L; Fleet, James C

    2017-10-01

    High vitamin D status is associated with reduced colon cancer risk but these studies ignore the diversity in the molecular etiology of colon cancer. RAS activating mutations are common in colon cancer and they activate pro-proliferative signaling pathways. We examined the impact of RAS activating mutations on 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH) 2 D)-mediated gene expression in cultured colon and intestinal cell lines. Transient transfection of Caco-2 cells with a constitutively active mutant K-RAS (G12 V) significantly reduced 1,25(OH) 2 D-induced activity of both a human 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 24 hydroxyase (CYP24A1) promoter-luciferase and an artificial 3X vitamin D response element (VDRE) promoter-luciferase reporter gene. Young Adult Mouse Colon (YAMC) and Rat Intestinal Epithelial (RIE) cell lines with stable expression of mutant H-RAS had suppressed 1,25(OH) 2 D-mediated induction of CYP24A1 mRNA. The RAS effects were associated with lower Vitamin D receptor (VDR) mRNA and protein levels in YAMC and RIE cells and they could be partially reversed by VDR overexpression. RAS-mediated suppression of VDR levels was not due to either reduced VDR mRNA stability or increased VDR gene methylation. However, chromatin accessibility to the VDR gene at the proximal promoter (-300bp), an enhancer region at -6kb, and an enhancer region located in exon 3 was significantly reduced in RAS transformed YAMC cells (YAMC-RAS). These data show that constitutively active RAS signaling suppresses 1,25(OH) 2 D-mediated gene transcription in colon epithelial cells by reducing VDR gene transcription but the mechanism for this suppression is not yet known. These data suggest that cancers with RAS-activating mutations may be less responsive to vitamin D mediated treatment or chemoprevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Andrographolide Sensitizes Ras-Transformed Cells to Radiation in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Shih-Kai; Hung, Ling-Chien; Kuo, Cheng-Deng

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Increasing the sensitivity of tumor cells to radiation is a major goal of radiotherapy. The present study investigated the radiosensitizing effects of andrographolide and examined the molecular mechanisms of andrographolide-mediated radiosensitization. Methods and Materials: An H-ras-transformed rat kidney epithelial (RK3E) cell line was used to measure the radiosensitizing effects of andrographolide in clonogenic assays, 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H tetrazolium bromide assays, and a xenograft tumor growth model. The mechanism of andrographolide-sensitized cell death was analyzed using annexin V staining, caspase 3 activity assays, and terminal transferase uridyl nick end labeling assays. The roles of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and Akt in andrographolide-mediated sensitization were examined using reporter assays, electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and Western blotting. Results: Concurrent andrographolide treatment (10 μM, 3 h) sensitized Ras-transformed cells to radiation in vitro (sensitizer enhancement ratio, 1.73). Andrographolide plus radiation (one dose of 300 mg/kg peritumor andrographolide and one dose of 6 Gy radiation) resulted in significant tumor growth delay (27 ± 2.5 days) compared with radiation alone (22 ± 1.5 days; p <.05). Radiation induced apoptotic markers (e.g., caspase-3, membrane reversion, DNA fragmentation), and andrographolide treatment did not promote radiation-induced apoptosis. However, the protein level of activated Akt was significantly reduced by andrographolide. NF-κB activity was elevated in irradiated Ras-transformed cells, and andrographolide treatment significantly reduced radiation-induced NF-κB activity. Conclusion: Andrographolide sensitized Ras-transformed cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. Andrographolide-mediated radiosensitization was associated with downregulation of Akt and NF-κB activity. These observations indicate that andrographolide is a novel radiosensitizing agent

  12. Primary murine CD4+ T cells fail to acquire the ability to produce effector cytokines when active Ras is present during Th1/Th2 differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit V Janardhan

    Full Text Available Constitutive Ras signaling has been shown to augment IL-2 production, reverse anergy, and functionally replace many aspects of CD28 co-stimulation in CD4+ T cells. These data raise the possibility that introduction of active Ras into primary T cells might result in improved functionality in pathologic situations of T cell dysfunction, such as cancer or chronic viral infection. To test the biologic effects of active Ras in primary T cells, CD4+ T cells from Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor Transgenic mice were transduced with an adenovirus encoding active Ras. As expected, active Ras augmented IL-2 production in naive CD4+ T cells. However, when cells were cultured for 4 days under conditions to promote effector cell differentiation, active Ras inhibited the ability of CD4+ T cells to acquire a Th1 or Th2 effector cytokine profile. This differentiation defect was not due to deficient STAT4 or STAT6 activation by IL-12 or IL-4, respectively, nor was it associated with deficient induction of T-bet and GATA-3 expression. Impaired effector cytokine production in active Ras-transduced cells was associated with deficient demethylation of the IL-4 gene locus. Our results indicate that, despite augmenting acute activation of naïve T cells, constitutive Ras signaling inhibits the ability of CD4+ T cells to properly differentiate into Th1/Th2 effector cytokine-producing cells, in part by interfering with epigenetic modification of effector gene loci. Alternative strategies to potentiate Ras pathway signaling in T cells in a more regulated fashion should be considered as a therapeutic approach to improve immune responses in vivo.

  13. Oncogenic RAS enables DNA damage- and p53-dependent differentiation of acute myeloid leukemia cells in response to chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Meyer

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a clonal disease originating from myeloid progenitor cells with a heterogeneous genetic background. High-dose cytarabine is used as the standard consolidation chemotherapy. Oncogenic RAS mutations are frequently observed in AML, and are associated with beneficial response to cytarabine. Why AML-patients with oncogenic RAS benefit most from high-dose cytarabine post-remission therapy is not well understood. Here we used bone marrow cells expressing a conditional MLL-ENL-ER oncogene to investigate the interaction of oncogenic RAS and chemotherapeutic agents. We show that oncogenic RAS synergizes with cytotoxic agents such as cytarabine in activation of DNA damage checkpoints, resulting in a p53-dependent genetic program that reduces clonogenicity and increases myeloid differentiation. Our data can explain the beneficial effects observed for AML patients with oncogenic RAS treated with higher dosages of cytarabine and suggest that induction of p53-dependent differentiation, e.g. by interfering with Mdm2-mediated degradation, may be a rational approach to increase cure rate in response to chemotherapy. The data also support the notion that the therapeutic success of cytotoxic drugs may depend on their ability to promote the differentiation of tumor-initiating cells.

  14. Novel molecular targets for kRAS downregulation: promoter G-quadruplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    proteins studied. 6. Products: • Publications, conference papers , and presentations o Journal Publications • Morgan, RK; Batra, H; Gaerig, VC; Hockings, J... papers , and presentations • Batra, H; Brooks, TA. Binding and function of regulatory proteins to the kRAS promoter: a role in pancreatic cancer. 6th...development due to difficulties with delivery and excessive albumin binding, and antisoma’s G-rich phosphodiester oligonucleotide AS1411, a DNA aptamer with

  15. Programmed Cell-to-Cell Variability in Ras Activity Triggers Emergent Behaviors during Mammary Epithelial Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Liu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Variability in signaling pathway activation between neighboring epithelial cells can arise from local differences in the microenvironment, noisy gene expression, or acquired genetic changes. To investigate the consequences of this cell-to-cell variability in signaling pathway activation on coordinated multicellular processes such as morphogenesis, we use DNA-programmed assembly to construct three-dimensional MCF10A microtissues that are mosaic for low-level expression of activated H-Ras. We find two emergent behaviors in mosaic microtissues: cells with activated H-Ras are basally extruded or lead motile multicellular protrusions that direct the collective motility of their wild-type neighbors. Remarkably, these behaviors are not observed in homogeneous microtissues in which all cells express the activated Ras protein, indicating that heterogeneity in Ras activity, rather than the total amount of Ras activity, is critical for these processes. Our results directly demonstrate that cell-to-cell variability in pathway activation within local populations of epithelial cells can drive emergent behaviors during epithelial morphogenesis.

  16. Dual knockdown of N-ras and epiregulin synergistically suppressed the growth of human hepatoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Meng; He, Hong-wei; Sun, Huan-xing; Ren, Kai-huan [Department of Oncology, Institute of Medicinal Biotechnology, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100050 (China); Shao, Rong-guang, E-mail: shaor@bbn.cn [Department of Oncology, Institute of Medicinal Biotechnology, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100050 (China)

    2009-09-18

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major challenge because of its resistance to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Multi-targeted therapy might be a new option for HCC treatment. Our previous study showed that N-ras gene was activated in HCC and was inhibited by RNA interference. In the present study, we investigated the alternation of gene expression by microarray in N-Ras-siRNA-treated HepG2 cells. The results revealed that the EREG gene, encoding epiregulin, was dramatically up-regulated in response to silence of N-ras. We speculated that the up-regulation of epiregulin was involved in the compensatory mechanism of N-ras knockdown for cell growth. Therefore, we evaluated whether dual silence of N-ras and epiregulin display a greater suppression of cell growth. The results confirmed that dual knockdown of N-ras and epiregulin synergistically inhibited cell growth. Our results also showed that dual knockdown of N-ras and epiregulin significantly induced cell arrest at G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, Western blot assay showed that dual knockdown of N-ras and epiregulin markedly reduced the phosphorylations of ERK1/2, Akt and Rb, and inhibited the expression of cyclin D1. Our findings imply that multi-targeted silence of oncogenes might be an effective treatment for HCC.

  17. Identification of H-Ras-Specific Motif for the Activation of Invasive Signaling Program in Human Breast Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Young Yong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression and/or activation of H-Ras are often associated with tumor aggressiveness in breast cancer. Previously, we showed that H-Ras, but not N-Ras, induces MCF10A human breast epithelial cell invasion and migration, whereas both H-Ras and N-Ras induce cell proliferation and phenotypic transformation. In an attempt to determine the sequence requirement directing the divergent phenotype induced by H-Ras and N-Ras with a focus on the induction of human breast cell invasion, we investigated the structural and functional relationships between H-Ras and N-Ras using domain-swap and site-directed mutagenesis approaches. Here, we report that the hypervariable region (HVR, consisting of amino acids 166 to 189 in H-Ras, determines the invasive/migratory signaling program as shown by the exchange of invasive phenotype by swapping HVR sequences between H-Ras and N-Ras. We also demonstrate that the H-Ras-specific additional palmitoylation site at Cys184 is not responsible for the signaling events that distinguish between H-Ras and N-Ras. Importantly, this work identifies the C-terminal HVR, especially the flexible linker domain with two consecutive proline residues Pro173 and Pro174, as a critical domain that contributes to activation of H-Ras and its invasive potential in human breast epithelial cells. The present study sheds light on the structural basis for the Ras isoform-specific invasive program of breast epithelial cells, providing information for the development of agents that specifically target invasion-related H-Ras pathways in human cancer.

  18. Gain-of-function mutant p53 but not p53 deletion promotes head and neck cancer progression in response to oncogenic K-ras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acin, Sergio; Li, Zhongyou; Mejia, Olga; Roop, Dennis R; El-Naggar, Adel K; Caulin, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in p53 occur in over 50% of the human head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (SCCHN). The majority of these mutations result in the expression of mutant forms of p53, rather than deletions in the p53 gene. Some p53 mutants are associated with poor prognosis in SCCHN patients. However, the molecular mechanisms that determine the poor outcome of cancers carrying p53 mutations are unknown. Here, we generated a mouse model for SCCHN and found that activation of the endogenous p53 gain-of-function mutation p53R172H, but not deletion of p53, cooperates with oncogenic K-ras during SCCHN initiation, accelerates oral tumour growth, and promotes progression to carcinoma. Mechanistically, expression profiling of the tumours that developed in these mice and studies using cell lines derived from these tumours determined that mutant p53 induces the expression of genes involved in mitosis, including cyclin B1 and cyclin A, and accelerates entry in mitosis. Additionally, we discovered that this oncogenic function of mutant p53 was dependent on K-ras because the expression of cyclin B1 and cyclin A decreased, and entry in mitosis was delayed, after suppressing K-ras expression in oral tumour cells that express p53R172H. The presence of double-strand breaks in the tumours suggests that oncogene-dependent DNA damage resulting from K-ras activation promotes the oncogenic function of mutant p53. Accordingly, DNA damage induced by doxorubicin also induced increased expression of cyclin B1 and cyclin A in cells that express p53R172H. These findings represent strong in vivo evidence for an oncogenic function of endogenous p53 gain-of-function mutations in SCCHN and provide a mechanistic explanation for the genetic interaction between oncogenic K-ras and mutant p53. PMID:21952947

  19. Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotypes Reveal Cell-Nonautonomous Functions of Oncogenic RAS and the p53 Tumor Suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copp& #233; , Jean-Philippe; Patil, Christopher; Rodier, Francis; Sun, Yu; Munoz, Denise; Goldstein, Joshua; Nelson, Peter; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2008-10-24

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cell proliferation, essentially permanently, in response to oncogenic stimuli, including genotoxic stress. We modified the use of antibody arrays to provide a quantitative assessment of factors secreted by senescent cells. We show that human cells induced to senesce by genotoxic stress secrete myriad factors associated with inflammation and malignancy. This senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) developed slowly over several days and only after DNA damage of sufficient magnitude to induce senescence. Remarkably similar SASPs developed in normal fibroblasts, normal epithelial cells, and epithelial tumor cells after genotoxic stress in culture, and in epithelial tumor cells in vivo after treatment of prostate cancer patients with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. In cultured premalignant epithelial cells, SASPs induced an epithelial-mesenchyme transition and invasiveness, hallmarks of malignancy, by a paracrine mechanism that depended largely on the SASP factors interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Strikingly, two manipulations markedly amplified, and accelerated development of, the SASPs: oncogenic RAS expression, which causes genotoxic stress and senescence in normal cells, and functional loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Both loss of p53 and gain of oncogenic RAS also exacerbated the promalignant paracrine activities of the SASPs. Our findings define a central feature of genotoxic stress-induced senescence. Moreover, they suggest a cell-nonautonomous mechanism by which p53 can restrain, and oncogenic RAS can promote, the development of age-related cancer by altering the tissue microenvironment.

  20. RAS/ERK modulates TGFβ-regulated PTEN expression in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Jimmy Y.C.; Quach, Khai T.; Cabrera, Betty L.; Cabral, Jennifer A.; Beck, Stayce E.; Carethers, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is rarely mutated in pancreatic cancers, but its regulation by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β might mediate growth suppression and other oncogenic actions. Here, we examined the role of TGFβ and the effects of oncogenic K-RAS/ERK upon PTEN expression in the absence of SMAD4. We utilized two SMAD4-null pancreatic cell lines, CAPAN-1 (K-RAS mutant) and BxPc-3 (WT-K-RAS), both of which express TGFβ surface receptors. Cells were t...

  1. Genetic Validation of Cell Proliferation via Ras-Independent Activation of the Raf/Mek/Erk Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Carmen G; Simón-Carrasco, Lucía; Jacob, Harrys K C; Drosten, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Signaling transmitted by the Ras family of small GTPases (H-, N-, and K-Ras) is essential for proliferation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). However, constitutive activation of the downstream Raf/Mek/Erk pathway can bypass the requirement for Ras proteins and allow cells to proliferate in the absence of the three Ras isoforms. Here we describe a protocol for a colony formation assay that permits evaluating the role of candidate proteins that are positive or negative regulators of cell proliferation mediated via Ras-independent Raf/Mek/Erk pathway activation. K-Ras lox (H-Ras -/- , N-Ras -/- , K-Ras lox/lox , RERT ert/ert ) MEFs are infected with retro- or lentiviral vectors expressing wild-type or constitutively activated candidate cDNAs, shRNAs, or sgRNAs in combination with Cas9 to ascertain the possibility of candidate proteins to function either as an activator or inhibitor of Ras-independent Raf/Mek/Erk activation. These cells are then seeded in the absence or presence of 4-Hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT), which activates the resident CreERT2 alleles resulting in elimination of the conditional K-Ras alleles and ultimately generating Rasless cells. Colony formation in the presence of 4-OHT indicates cell proliferation via Ras-independent Raf/Mek/Erk activation.

  2. Alphavirus production is inhibited in neurofibromin 1-deficient cells through activated RAS signalling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolokoltsova, Olga A.; Domina, Aaron M.; Kolokoltsov, Andrey A.; Davey, Robert A.; Weaver, Scott C.; Watowich, Stanley J.

    2008-01-01

    Virus-host interactions essential for alphavirus pathogenesis are poorly understood. To address this shortcoming, we coupled retrovirus insertional mutagenesis and a cell survival selection strategy to generate clonal cell lines broadly resistant to Sindbis virus (SINV) and other alphaviruses. Resistant cells had significantly impaired SINV production relative to wild-type (WT) cells, although virus binding and fusion events were similar in both sets of cells. Analysis of the retroviral integration sites identified the neurofibromin 1 (NF1) gene as disrupted in alphavirus-resistant cell lines. Subsequent analysis indicated that expression of NF1 was significantly reduced in alphavirus-resistant cells. Importantly, independent down-regulation of NF1 expression in WT HEK 293 cells decreased virus production and increased cell viability during SINV infection, relative to infected WT cells. Additionally, we observed hyperactive RAS signalling in the resistant HEK 293 cells, which was anticipated because NF1 is a negative regulator of RAS. Expression of constitutively active RAS (HRAS-G12V) in a WT HEK 293 cell line resulted in a marked delay in virus production, compared with infected cells transfected with parental plasmid or dominant-negative RAS (HRAS-S17N). This work highlights novel host cell determinants required for alphavirus pathogenesis and suggests that RAS signalling may play an important role in neuronal susceptibility to SINV infection

  3. Increased p21ras activity in human fibroblasts transduced with survivin enhances cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temme, Achim; Diestelkoetter-Bachert, Petra; Schmitz, Marc; Morgenroth, Agnieszka; Weigle, Bernd; Rieger, Michael A.; Kiessling, Andrea; Rieber, E. Peter

    2005-01-01

    Survivin is critically involved in mitosis and when overexpressed enhances the activity of the Aurora B kinase, a serine-threonine kinase belonging to the family of oncogenic Aurora/IpI1p-related kinases. Both proteins interact with Ras GTPase-activating protein suggesting an impact on the Ras pathway. This study aimed at defining the role of survivin in proliferation and potential transformation of cells. When survivin was overexpressed in normal human lung fibroblasts, the characteristic track lanes of fibroblasts were disturbed and the rate of cell proliferation was increased. An enhanced level of p21 ras mRNA and protein expression and concomitant rise in levels of activated p21 ras were observed. Despite increased proliferation cell survival remained dependent on serum and cells were not able to form colonies in soft agar assays. These data suggest that overexpression of survivin increases cell growth but, despite the increase in active p21 ras , is not sufficient to transform primary cells. Yet, in addition to its anti-apoptotic function it might contribute to the accelerated growth of tumour cells by increasing p21 ras activity

  4. The Ras GTPase-activating protein Rasal3 supports survival of naive T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryunosuke Muro

    Full Text Available The Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway is crucial for T cell receptor (TCR signaling in the development and function of T cells. The significance of various modulators of the Ras-MAPK pathway in T cells, however, remains to be fully understood. Ras-activating protein-like 3 (Rasal3 is an uncharacterized member of the SynGAP family that contains a conserved Ras GTPase-activating protein (GAP domain, and is predominantly expressed in the T cell lineage. In the current study, we investigated the function and physiological roles of Rasal3. Our results showed that Rasal3 possesses RasGAP activity, but not Rap1GAP activity, and represses TCR-stimulated ERK phosphorylation in a T cell line. In systemic Rasal3-deficient mice, T cell development in the thymus including positive selection, negative selection, and β-selection was unaffected. However, the number of naive, but not effector memory CD4 and CD8 T cell in the periphery was significantly reduced in Rasal3-deficient mice, and associated with a marked increase in apoptosis of these cells. Indeed, survival of Rasal3 deficient naive CD4 T cells in vivo by adoptive transfer was significantly impaired, whereas IL-7-dependent survival of naive CD4 T cells in vitro was unaltered. Collectively, Rasal3 is required for in vivo survival of peripheral naive T cells, contributing to the maintenance of optimal T cell numbers.

  5. Crosstalk between Bcl-2 family and Ras family small GTPases: potential cell fate regulation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jia; Pervaiz, Shazib

    2013-01-01

    Cell fate regulation is a function of diverse cell signaling pathways that promote cell survival and or inhibit cell death execution. In this regard, the role of the Bcl-2 family in maintaining a tight balance between cell death and cell proliferation has been extensively studied. The conventional dogma links cell fate regulation by the Bcl-2 family to its effect on mitochondrial permeabilization and apoptosis amplification. However, recent evidence provide a novel mechanism for death regulation by the Bcl-2 family via modulating cellular redox metabolism. For example overexpression of Bcl-2 has been shown to contribute to a pro-oxidant intracellular milieu and down-regulation of cellular superoxide levels enhanced death sensitivity of Bcl-2 overexpressing cells. Interestingly, gene knockdown of the small GTPase Rac1 or pharmacological inhibition of its activity also reverted death phenotype in Bcl-2 expressing cells. This appears to be a function of an interaction between Bcl-2 and Rac1. Similar functional associations have been described between the Bcl-2 family and other members of the Ras superfamily. These interactions at the mitochondria provide novel opportunities for strategic therapeutic targeting of drug-resistant cancers.

  6. Hydrogen Peroxide Toxicity Induces Ras Signaling in Human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cultured Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirapa Chetsawang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that overproduction of reactive oxygen species occurs after brain injury and mediates neuronal cells degeneration. In the present study, we examined the role of Ras signaling on hydrogen peroxide-induced neuronal cells degeneration in dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced cell viability in SH-SY5Y cultured cells. An inhibitor of the enzyme that catalyzes the farnesylation of Ras proteins, FTI-277, and a competitive inhibitor of GTP-binding proteins, GDP-beta-S significantly decreased hydrogen peroxide-induced reduction in cell viability in SH-SY5Y cultured cells. The results of this study might indicate that a Ras-dependent signaling pathway plays a role in hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity in neuronal cells.

  7. Beta1 integrin promotes but is not essential for metastasis of ras-myc transformed fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brakebusch, C; Wennerberg, K; Krell, H W

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the role of beta1 integrin during tumor metastasis, we established a ras-myc transformed fibroblastoid cell line with a disrupted beta1 integrin gene on both alleles (GERM 11). Stable transfection of this cell line with an expression vector encoding beta1A integrin resulted in beta1A......, tumors induced by the high expressing clones 1A10 and 2F2 were markedly smaller, suggesting an inverse correlation of tumor growth and beta1 integrin expression. The metastasis potential of all three beta1 integrin-expressing GERM 11 sublines tested was significantly higher than that of the beta1......-deficient GERM 11 cells. GERM 116 tumors led in all animals to severe metastasis in lung and liver, while GERM 11 tumors induced only a few metastatic foci in the lung. Stroma of both tumors contained nidogen and high amounts of tenascin C, but only a few very low levels of fibronectin, laminin-1...

  8. Oncogenic N-Ras Stimulates SRF-Mediated Transactivation via H3 Acetylation at Lysine 9

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    Sun-Ju Yi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transduction pathways regulate the gene expression by altering chromatin dynamics in response to mitogens. Ras proteins are key regulators linking extracellular stimuli to a diverse range of biological responses associated with gene regulation. In mammals, the three ras genes encode four Ras protein isoforms: H-Ras, K-Ras4A, K-Ras4B, and N-Ras. Although emerging evidence suggests that Ras isoforms differentially regulate gene expressions and are functionally nonredundant, the mechanisms underlying Ras specificity and Ras signaling effects on gene expression remain unclear. Here, we show that oncogenic N-Ras acts as the most potent regulator of SRF-, NF-κB-, and AP-1-dependent transcription. N-Ras-RGL2 axis is a distinct signaling pathway for SRF target gene expression such as Egr1 and JunB, as RGL2 Ras binding domain (RBD significantly impaired oncogenic N-Ras-induced SRE activation. By monitoring the effect of Ras isoforms upon the change of global histone modifications in oncogenic Ras-overexpressed cells, we discovered that oncogenic N-Ras elevates H3K9ac/H3K23ac levels globally in the chromatin context. Importantly, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays revealed that H3K9ac is significantly enriched at the promoter and coding regions of Egr1 and JunB. Collectively, our findings define an undocumented role of N-Ras in modulating of H3 acetylation and in gene regulation.

  9. RAS signaling and anti-RAS therapy: lessons learned from genetically engineered mouse models, human cancer cells, and patient-related studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bingliang

    2016-01-01

    Activating mutations of oncogenic RAS genes are frequently detected in human cancers. The studies in genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) reveal that Kras-activating mutations predispose mice to early onset tumors in the lung, pancreas, and gastrointestinal tract. Nevertheless, most of these tumors do not have metastatic phenotypes. Metastasis occurs when tumors acquire additional genetic changes in other cancer driver genes. Studies on clinical specimens also demonstrated that KRAS mutations are present in premalignant tissues and that most of KRAS mutant human cancers have co-mutations in other cancer driver genes, including TP53, STK11, CDKN2A, and KMT2C in lung cancer; APC, TP53, and PIK3CA in colon cancer; and TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, and MED12 in pancreatic cancer. Extensive efforts have been devoted to develop therapeutic agents that target enzymes involved in RAS posttranslational modifications, that inhibit downstream effectors of RAS signaling pathways, and that kill RAS mutant cancer cells through synthetic lethality. Recent clinical studies have revealed that sorafenib, a pan-RAF and VEGFR inhibitor, has impressive benefits for KRAS mutant lung cancer patients. Combination therapy of MEK inhibitors with either docetaxel, AKT inhibitors, or PI3K inhibitors also led to improved clinical responses in some KRAS mutant cancer patients. This review discusses knowledge gained from GEMMs, human cancer cells, and patient-related studies on RAS-mediated tumorigenesis and anti-RAS therapy. Emerging evidence demonstrates that RAS mutant cancers are heterogeneous because of the presence of different mutant alleles and/or co-mutations in other cancer driver genes. Effective subclassifications of RAS mutant cancers may be necessary to improve patients' outcomes through personalized precision medicine. © The Author 2015. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

  10. Active Erk Regulates Microtubule Stability in H-ras-Transformed Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene E. Harrison

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that activated erk regulates cell functions, at least in part, by mechanisms that do not require gene transcription. Here we show that the map kinase, erk, decorates microtubules (MTs and mitotic spindles in both parental and mutant active rastransfected 10T1 /2 fibroblasts and MCF10A breast epithelial cells. Approximately 20% of total cellular erk decorated MTs in both cell lines. A greater proportion of activated erk was associated with MTs in the presence of mutant active H-ras than in parental cells. Activation of erk by the ras pathway coincided with a decrease in the stability of MT, as detected by a stability marker. The MKK1 inhibitor, PD98059 and transfection of a dominant negative MKK1 blocked ras-induced instability of MTs but did not modify the association of erk with MTs or affect MT stability of the parental cells. These results indicate that the subset of active erk kinase that associates with MTs contributes to their instability in the presence of a mutant active ras. The MT-associated subset of active erk likely contributes to the enhanced invasive and proliferative abilities of cells containing mutant active H-ras.

  11. Promoter methylation of RASSF1A and DAPK and mutations of K-ras, p53, and EGFR in lung tumors from smokers and never-smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yang; Gao, Weimin; Siegfried, Jill M; Weissfeld, Joel L; Luketich, James D; Keohavong, Phouthone

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that some characteristics of lung cancer among never-smokers significantly differ from those of smokers. Aberrant promoter methylation and mutations in some oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes are frequent in lung tumors from smokers but rare in those from never-smokers. In this study, we analyzed promoter methylation in the ras-association domain isoform A (RASSF1A) and the death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) genes in lung tumors from patients with primarily non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) from the Western Pennsylvania region. We compare the results with the smoking status of the patients and the mutation status of the K-ras, p53, and EGFR genes determined previously on these same lung tumors. Promoter methylation of the RASSF1A and DAPK genes was analyzed by using a modified two-stage methylation-specific PCR. Data on mutations of K-ras, p53, and EGFR were obtained from our previous studies. The RASSF1A gene promoter methylation was found in tumors from 46.7% (57/122) of the patients and was not significantly different between smokers and never-smokers, but was associated significantly in multiple variable analysis with tumor histology (p = 0.031) and marginally with tumor stage (p = 0.063). The DAPK gene promoter methylation frequency in these tumors was 32.8% (40/122) and did not differ according to the patients' smoking status, tumor histology, or tumor stage. Multivariate analysis adjusted for age, gender, smoking status, tumor histology and stage showed that the frequency of promoter methylation of the RASSF1A or DAPK genes did not correlate with the frequency of mutations of the K-ras, p53, and EGFR gene. Our results showed that RASSF1A and DAPK genes' promoter methylation occurred frequently in lung tumors, although the prevalence of this alteration in these genes was not associated with the smoking status of the patients or the occurrence of mutations in the K-ras, p53 and EGFR genes, suggesting each of

  12. Glucotoxicity promotes aberrant activation and mislocalization of Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 [Rac1] and metabolic dysfunction in pancreatic islet β-cells: reversal of such metabolic defects by metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidwan, Sartaj; Chekuri, Anil; Hynds, DiAnna L; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu

    2017-11-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that long-term exposure of insulin-secreting pancreatic β-cells to hyperglycemic (HG; glucotoxic) conditions promotes oxidative stress, which, in turn, leads to stress kinase activation, mitochondrial dysfunction, loss of nuclear structure and integrity and cell apoptosis. Original observations from our laboratory have proposed that Rac1 plays a key regulatory role in the generation of oxidative stress and downstream signaling events culminating in the onset of dysfunction of pancreatic β-cells under the duress of metabolic stress. However, precise molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the metabolic roles of hyperactive Rac1 remain less understood. Using pharmacological and molecular biological approaches, we now report mistargetting of biologically-active Rac1 [GTP-bound conformation] to the nuclear compartment in clonal INS-1 cells, normal rat islets and human islets under HG conditions. Our findings also suggest that such a signaling step is independent of post-translational prenylation of Rac1. Evidence is also presented to highlight novel roles for sustained activation of Rac1 in HG-induced expression of Cluster of Differentiation 36 [CD36], a fatty acid transporter protein, which is implicated in cell apoptosis. Finally, our findings suggest that metformin, a biguanide anti-diabetic drug, at a clinically relevant concentration, prevents β-cell defects [Rac1 activation, nuclear association, CD36 expression, stress kinase and caspase-3 activation, and loss in metabolic viability] under the duress of glucotoxicity. Potential implications of these findings in the context of novel and direct regulation of islet β-cell function by metformin are discussed.

  13. Ras Signaling Regulates Stem Cells and Amelogenesis in the Mouse Incisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X; Goodwin, A F; Tian, H; Jheon, A H; Klein, O D

    2017-11-01

    The role of Ras signaling during tooth development is poorly understood. Ras proteins-which are activated by many upstream pathways, including receptor tyrosine kinase cascades-signal through multiple effectors, such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and PI3K pathways. Here, we utilized the mouse incisor as a model to study how the MAPK and PI3K pathways regulate dental epithelial stem cells and amelogenesis. The rodent incisor-which grows continuously throughout the life of the animal due to the presence of epithelial and mesenchymal stem cells-provides a model for the study of ectodermal organ renewal and regeneration. Utilizing models of Ras dysregulation as well as inhibitors of the MAPK and PI3K pathways, we found that MAPK and PI3K regulate dental epithelial stem cell activity, transit-amplifying cell proliferation, and enamel formation in the mouse incisor.

  14. Loss of p53 induces cell proliferation via Ras-independent activation of the Raf/Mek/Erk signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosten, Matthias; Sum, Eleanor Y. M.; Lechuga, Carmen G.; Simón-Carrasco, Lucía; Jacob, Harrys K. C.; García-Medina, Raquel; Huang, Sidong; Beijersbergen, Roderick L.; Bernards, Rene; Barbacid, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    The Ras family of small GTPases constitutes a central node in the transmission of mitogenic stimuli to the cell cycle machinery. The ultimate receptor of these mitogenic signals is the retinoblastoma (Rb) family of pocket proteins, whose inactivation is a required step to license cell proliferation. However, little is known regarding the molecular events that connect Ras signaling with the cell cycle. Here, we provide genetic evidence to illustrate that the p53/p21 Cdk-interacting protein 1 (Cip1)/Rb axis is an essential component of the Ras signaling pathway. Indeed, knockdown of p53, p21Cip1, or Rb restores proliferative properties in cells arrested by ablation of the three Ras loci, H-, N- and K-Ras. Ras signaling selectively inactivates p53-mediated induction of p21Cip1 expression by inhibiting acetylation of specific lysine residues in the p53 DNA binding domain. Proliferation of cells lacking both Ras proteins and p53 can be prevented by reexpression of the human p53 ortholog, provided that it retains an active DNA binding domain and an intact lysine residue at position 164. These results unveil a previously unidentified role for p53 in preventing cell proliferation under unfavorable mitogenic conditions. Moreover, we provide evidence that cells lacking Ras and p53 proteins owe their proliferative properties to the unexpected retroactivation of the Raf/Mek/Erk cascade by a Ras-independent mechanism. PMID:25288756

  15. Active ras triggers death in glioblastoma cells through hyperstimulation of macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overmeyer, Jean H; Kaul, Aparna; Johnson, Erin E; Maltese, William A

    2008-06-01

    Expression of activated Ras in glioblastoma cells induces accumulation of large phase-lucent cytoplasmic vacuoles, followed by cell death. This was previously described as autophagic cell death. However, unlike autophagosomes, the Ras-induced vacuoles are not bounded by a double membrane and do not sequester organelles or cytoplasm. Moreover, they are not acidic and do not contain the autophagosomal membrane protein LC3-II. Here we show that the vacuoles are enlarged macropinosomes. They rapidly incorporate extracellular fluid-phase tracers but do not sequester transferrin or the endosomal protein EEA1. Ultimately, the cells expressing activated Ras detach from the substratum and rupture, coincident with the displacement of cytoplasm with huge macropinosome-derived vacuoles. These changes are accompanied by caspase activation, but the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor carbobenzoxy-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone does not prevent cell death. Moreover, the majority of degenerating cells do not exhibit chromatin condensation typical of apoptosis. These observations provide evidence for a necrosis-like form of cell death initiated by dysregulation of macropinocytosis, which we have dubbed "methuosis." An activated form of the Rac1 GTPase induces a similar form of cell death, suggesting that Ras acts through Rac-dependent signaling pathways to hyperstimulate macropinocytosis in glioblastoma. Further study of these signaling pathways may lead to the identification of other chemical and physiologic triggers for this unusual form of cell death.

  16. Subcellular Distribution of S-Nitrosylated H-Ras in Differentiated and Undifferentiated PC12 Cells during Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbakadze, Tamar; Goloshvili, Galina; Narmania, Nana; Zhuravliova, Elene; Mikeladze, David

    2017-10-01

    Hypoxia or exposure to excessive reactive oxygen or nitrogen species could induce S-nitrosylation of various target proteins, including GTPases of the Ras-superfamily. Under hypoxic conditions, the Ras-protein is translocated to the cytosol and interacts with the Golgi complex, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria. The mobility/translocation of Ras depend on the cells oxidative status. However, the importance of relocated Snitrosylated- H-Ras (NO-H-Ras) in proliferation/differentiation processes is not completely understood. We have determined the content of soluble- and membrane-bound-NO-HRas in differentiated (D) and undifferentiated (ND) rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. In our experimental study, we analyzed NO-H-Ras levels under hypoxic/normoxic conditions in membrane and soluble fractions of ND and D PC12 cells with/without nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) treatment. Cells were analyzed by the S-nitrosylated kit, immunoprecipitation, and Western blot. We assessed the action of NO-H-Ras on oxidative metabolism of isolated mitochondria by determining mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide generation via the scopoletin oxidation method and ATPproduction as estimated by the luminometric method. Hypoxia did not influence nitrosylation of soluble H-Ras in ND PC12 cells. Under hypoxic conditions, the nitrosylation of soluble-H-Ras greatly decreased in D PC12 cells. SNP didn't change the levels of nitrosylation of soluble-H-Ras, in either hypoxic or normoxic conditions. On the other hand, hypoxia, per se, did not affect the nitrosylation of membrane-bound-H-Ras in D and ND PC12 cells. SNP-dependent nitrosylation of membrane-bound-H-Ras greatly increased in D PC12 cells. Both unmodified normal and mutated H-Ras enhanced the mitochondrial synthesis of ATP, whereas the stimulatory effects on ATP synthesis were eliminated after S-nitrosylation of H-Ras. According to the results, it may be proposed that hypoxia can decrease S

  17. EphB4 promotes or suppresses Ras/MEK/ERK pathway in a context-dependent manner: Implications for EphB4 as a cancer target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhan; Carrasco, Rosa; Kinneer, Krista; Sabol, Darrin; Jallal, Bahija; Coats, Steve; Tice, David A

    2012-06-01

    EphB4 is a member of the Eph receptor tyrosine kinase family shown to act in neuronal guidance and mediate venal/arterial separation. In contrast to these more established roles, EphB4's function in cancer is much less clear. Here we illustrate both tumor promoting as well as suppressing roles of EphB4, by showing that its activation resulted in inhibition of the Ras/ERK pathway in endothelial cells but activation of the same pathway in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. This was true if EphB4 was stimulated with EphrinB2, its natural ligand, or an agonistic monoclonal antibody for EphB4. Correspondingly, EphB4 activation stimulated MCF7 growth while inhibiting HUVEC cell proliferation. The reason for these dramatic differences is due to functional coupling of EphB4 to different downstream effectors. Reduction of p120 RasGAP in HUVEC cells attenuated the inhibitory effect of EphB4 activation on the ERK pathway, whereas knockdown of PP2A in MCF7 cells attenuated EphB4 activation of the ERK pathway. This represents the first time a functional coupling between Eph receptor and PP2A has been demonstrated leading to activation of an oncogenic pathway. Our study illustrates the caveats and potential challenges of targeting EphB4 for cancer therapy due to the conflicting effects on cancer cell and endothelial cell compartments.

  18. Aurora-A overexpression enhances cell-aggregation of Ha-ras transformants through the MEK/ERK signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, Ya-Shih; Lee, Jenq-Chang; Huang, Chi-Ying F; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of Aurora-A and mutant Ras (Ras V12 ) together has been detected in human bladder cancer tissue. However, it is not clear whether this phenomenon is a general event or not. Although crosstalk between Aurora-A and Ras signaling pathways has been reported, the role of these two genes acting together in tumorigenesis remains unclear. Real-time PCR and sequence analysis were utilized to identify Ha- and Ki-ras mutation (Gly -> Val). Immunohistochemistry staining was used to measure the level of Aurora-A expression in bladder and colon cancer specimens. To reveal the effect of overexpression of the above two genes on cellular responses, mouse NIH3T3 fibroblast derived cell lines over-expressing either Ras V12 and wild-type Aurora-A (designated WT) or Ras V12 and kinase-inactivated Aurora-A (KD) were established. MTT and focus formation assays were conducted to measure proliferation rate and focus formation capability of the cells. Small interfering RNA, pharmacological inhibitors and dominant negative genes were used to dissect the signaling pathways involved. Overexpression of wild-type Aurora-A and mutation of Ras V12 were detected in human bladder and colon cancer tissues. Wild-type Aurora-A induces focus formation and aggregation of the Ras V12 transformants. Aurora-A activates Ral A and the phosphorylation of AKT as well as enhances the phosphorylation of MEK, ERK of WT cells. Finally, the Ras/MEK/ERK signaling pathway is responsible for Aurora-A induced aggregation of the Ras V12 transformants. Wild-type-Aurora-A enhances focus formation and aggregation of the Ras V12 transformants and the latter occurs through modulating the Ras/MEK/ERK signaling pathway

  19. EGFR/Ras Signaling Controls Drosophila Intestinal Stem Cell Proliferation via Capicua-Regulated Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinhua Jin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial renewal in the Drosophila intestine is orchestrated by Intestinal Stem Cells (ISCs. Following damage or stress the intestinal epithelium produces ligands that activate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in ISCs. This promotes their growth and division and, thereby, epithelial regeneration. Here we demonstrate that the HMG-box transcriptional repressor, Capicua (Cic, mediates these functions of EGFR signaling. Depleting Cic in ISCs activated them for division, whereas overexpressed Cic inhibited ISC proliferation and midgut regeneration. Epistasis tests showed that Cic acted as an essential downstream effector of EGFR/Ras signaling, and immunofluorescence showed that Cic's nuclear localization was regulated by EGFR signaling. ISC-specific mRNA expression profiling and DNA binding mapping using DamID indicated that Cic represses cell proliferation via direct targets including string (Cdc25, Cyclin E, and the ETS domain transcription factors Ets21C and Pointed (pnt. pnt was required for ISC over-proliferation following Cic depletion, and ectopic pnt restored ISC proliferation even in the presence of overexpressed dominant-active Cic. These studies identify Cic, Pnt, and Ets21C as critical downstream effectors of EGFR signaling in Drosophila ISCs.

  20. Induction of non-apoptotic programmed cell death by oncogenic RAS in human epithelial cells and its suppression by MYC overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendo, Kasumi; Yugawa, Takashi; Nakahara, Tomomi; Ohno, Shin-Ichi; Goshima, Naoki; Arakawa, Hirofumi; Kiyono, Tohru

    2018-02-09

    Oncogenic mutations of RAS genes, found in about 30% of human cancers, are considered to play important roles in cancer development. However, oncogenic RAS can also induce senescence in mouse and human normal fibroblasts. In some cell lines, oncogenic RAS has been reported to induce non-apoptotic programed cell death (PCD). Here, we investigated effects of oncogenic RAS expression in several types of normal human epithelial cells. Oncogenic RAS but not wild-type RAS stimulated macropinocytosis with accumulation of large-phase lucent vacuoles in the cytoplasm, subsequently leading to cell death which was indistinguishable from a recently proposed new type of PCD, methuosis. A RAC1 inhibitor suppressed accumulation of macropinosomes and overexpression of MYC attenuated oncogenic RAS-induced such accumulation, cell cycle arrest and cell death. MYC suppression or rapamycin treatment in some cancer cell lines harbouring oncogenic mutations in RAS genes induced cell death with accumulation of macropinosomes. These results suggest that this type of non-apoptotic PCD is a tumour-suppressing mechanism acting against oncogenic RAS mutations in normal human epithelial cells, which can be overcome by MYC overexpression, raising the possibility that its induction might be a novel approach to treatment of RAS-mutated human cancers. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. Rasfonin, a novel 2-pyrone derivative, induces ras-mutated Panc-1 pancreatic tumor cell death in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Z; Li, L; Li, Y; Zhou, W; Cheng, J; Liu, F; Zheng, P; Zhang, Y; Che, Y

    2014-05-22

    Rasfonin is a novel 2-pyrone derivative reported to induce apoptosis in ras-dependent cells. In this study, its effects on ras-mutated pancreatic cancer cells were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Two human pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1 (mutated K-ras) and BxPC-3 (wild-type K-ras) were selected to test the effects of rasfonin on cell proliferation, clone formation, migration and invasion in vitro. Immunoblotting was used to detect the expressions of EGFR-Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK signaling pathway proteins. Ras activity was measured using a pull-down ELISA kit and guanine exchange factor (GEF)/GTPase-activating proteins (GAP) activity was measured by [(3)H]-GDP radiometric ligand binding. For an in vivo study, CD1 nude mice bearing Panc-1 cells were treated with rasfonin or Salirasib (FTS). We found that rasfonin suppressed proliferation more strongly in Panc-1 cells (IC50=5.5 μM) than BxPC-3 cells (IC50=10 μM) in vitro. Clone formation, migration and invasion by Panc-1 cells were also reduced by rasfonin. Rasfonin had little effect on the farnesylation of Ras, but it strongly downregulated Ras activity and consequently phosphorylation of c-Raf/MEK/ERK. Further experiments indicated that rasfonin reduced Son of sevenless (Sos1) expression but did not alter GEF and GAP activities. The in vivo experiments also revealed that rasfonin (30 mg/kg) delayed the growth of xenograft tumors originating from Panc-1 cells. Tumor weight was ultimately decreased after 20 days of treatment of rasfonin. Rasfonin is a robust inhibitor of pancreatic cancers with the K-ras mutation. The reduction of Sos1 expression and the consequently depressed Ras-MAPK activity could be important in its anticancer activity.

  2. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and K-RAS status in two cohorts of squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Damme, Nancy; Pauwels, Patrick; Peeters, Marc; Deron, Philippe; Van Roy, Nadine; Demetter, Pieter; Bols, Alain; Dorpe, Jo Van; Baert, Filip; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Speleman, Franki

    2010-01-01

    With the availability of effective anti-EGFR therapies for various solid malignancies, such as non-cell small lung cancer, colorectal cancer and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, the knowledge of EGFR and K-RAS status becomes clinically important. The aim of this study was to analyse EGFR expression, EGFR gene copy number and EGFR and K-RAS mutations in two cohorts of squamous cell carcinomas, specifically anal canal and tonsil carcinomas. Formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from anal and tonsil carcinoma were used. EGFR protein expression and EGFR gene copy number were analysed by means of immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The somatic status of the EGFR gene was investigated by PCR using primers specific for exons 18 through 21. For the K-RAS gene, PCR was performed using exon 2 specific primers. EGFR immunoreactivity was present in 36/43 (83.7%) of anal canal and in 20/24 (83.3%) of tonsil squamous cell carcinomas. EGFR amplification was absent in anal canal tumours (0/23), but could be identified in 4 of 24 tonsil tumours. From 38 anal canal specimens, 26 specimens were successfully analysed for exon 18, 30 for exon 19, 34 for exon 20 and 30 for exon 21. No EGFR mutations were found in the investigated samples. Thirty samples were sequenced for K-RAS exon 2 and no mutation was identified. From 24 tonsil specimens, 22 were successfully analysed for exon 18 and all 24 specimens for exon 19, 20 and 21. No EGFR mutations were found. Twenty-two samples were sequenced for K-RAS exon 2 and one mutation c.53C > A was identified. EGFR mutations were absent from squamous cell carcinoma of the anus and tonsils, but EGFR protein expression was detected in the majority of the cases. EGFR amplification was seen in tonsil but not in anal canal carcinomas. In our investigated panel, only one mutation in the K-RAS gene of a tonsil squamous cell carcinoma was identified. This indicates that EGFR and K-RAS mutation analysis is not

  3. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and K-RAS status in two cohorts of squamous cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Laethem Jean-Luc

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the availability of effective anti-EGFR therapies for various solid malignancies, such as non-cell small lung cancer, colorectal cancer and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, the knowledge of EGFR and K-RAS status becomes clinically important. The aim of this study was to analyse EGFR expression, EGFR gene copy number and EGFR and K-RAS mutations in two cohorts of squamous cell carcinomas, specifically anal canal and tonsil carcinomas. Methods Formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from anal and tonsil carcinoma were used. EGFR protein expression and EGFR gene copy number were analysed by means of immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The somatic status of the EGFR gene was investigated by PCR using primers specific for exons 18 through 21. For the K-RAS gene, PCR was performed using exon 2 specific primers. Results EGFR immunoreactivity was present in 36/43 (83.7% of anal canal and in 20/24 (83.3% of tonsil squamous cell carcinomas. EGFR amplification was absent in anal canal tumours (0/23, but could be identified in 4 of 24 tonsil tumours. From 38 anal canal specimens, 26 specimens were successfully analysed for exon 18, 30 for exon 19, 34 for exon 20 and 30 for exon 21. No EGFR mutations were found in the investigated samples. Thirty samples were sequenced for K-RAS exon 2 and no mutation was identified. From 24 tonsil specimens, 22 were successfully analysed for exon 18 and all 24 specimens for exon 19, 20 and 21. No EGFR mutations were found. Twenty-two samples were sequenced for K-RAS exon 2 and one mutation c.53C > A was identified. Conclusion EGFR mutations were absent from squamous cell carcinoma of the anus and tonsils, but EGFR protein expression was detected in the majority of the cases. EGFR amplification was seen in tonsil but not in anal canal carcinomas. In our investigated panel, only one mutation in the K-RAS gene of a tonsil squamous cell carcinoma was identified

  4. Ras-Induced and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1 and 2 Phosphorylation-Dependent Isomerization of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (PTP)-PEST by PIN1 Promotes FAK Dephosphorylation by PTP-PEST ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanhua; Yang, Weiwei; Xia, Yan; Hawke, David; Liu, David X.; Lu, Zhimin

    2011-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-PEST is a critical regulator of cell adhesion and migration. However, the mechanism by which PTP-PEST is regulated in response to oncogenic signaling to dephosphorylate its substrates remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that activated Ras induces extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2-dependent phosphorylation of PTP-PEST at S571, which recruits PIN1 to bind to PTP-PEST. Isomerization of the phosphorylated PTP-PEST by PIN1 increases the interaction between PTP-PEST and FAK, which leads to the dephosphorylation of FAK Y397 and the promotion of migration, invasion, and metastasis of v-H-Ras-transformed cells. These findings uncover an important mechanism for the regulation of PTP-PEST in activated Ras-induced tumor progression. PMID:21876001

  5. Downregulation of tropomyosin-1 in squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus, the role of Ras signaling and methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Maryam; Jazii, Ferdous Rastgar; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Moghanibashi, Mohamad-Mehdi

    2012-10-01

    Tropomyosins (TMs) are a family of cytoskeletal proteins that bind to and stabilize actin microfilaments. Non-muscle cells express multiple isoforms of TMs including three high molecular weight (HMW) isoforms: TM1, TM2, and TM3. While reports have indicated downregulation of TMs in transformed cells and several human cancers, nevertheless, little is known about the underlying mechanism of TMs suppression. In present study the expression of HMW TMs was investigated in squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus (SCCE), relative to primary cell cultures of normal esophagus by western blotting and real-time RT-PCR. Our results showed that TM1, TM2, and TM3 were significantly downregulated in cell line of SCCE. Moreover, mRNA level of TPM1 and TPM2 were markedly decreased by 93% and 96%, in tumor cell line relative to esophagus normal epithelial cells. Therefore, downregulation of TMs could play an important role in tumorigenesis of esophageal cancer. To asses the mechanism of TM downregulation in esophageal cancer, the role of Ras dependent signaling and promoter hypermethylation were investigated. We found that inhibition of two Ras effectory downstream pathways; MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt leads to significant increased expression of TM1 protein and both TPM1 and TPM2 mRNAs. In addition, methyltransferase inhibition significantly upregulated TM1, suggesting the prominent contribution of promoter hypermethylation in TM1 downregulation in esophageal cancer. These data indicate that downregulation of HMW TMs occurs basically in SCCE and the activation of MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt pathways as well as the epigenetic mechanism of promoter hypermethylation play important role in TM1 suppression in SCCE. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Cytogenetic characterization and H-ras associated transformation of immortalized human mammary epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larivee Siobhan

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Immortalization is a key step in malignant transformation, but immortalization alone is insufficient for transformation. Human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC transformation is a complex process that requires additional genetic changes beyond immortalization and can be accomplished in vitro by accumulation of genetic changes and expression of H-ras. Methods HMEC were immortalized by serial passaging and transduction with the catalytic subunit of the human telomerase gene (hTERT. The immortalized cells were passaged in vitro and studied by a combination of G- banding and Spectral Karyotyping (SKY. H-ras transduced, hTERT immortalized cells were cloned in soft agar and injected into nude mice. Extensive analysis was performed on the tumors that developed in nude mice, including immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Results Immortal HMEC alone were not tumorigenic in γ-irradiated nude mice and could not grow in soft agar. Late passage hTERT immortalized HMEC from a donor transduced with a retroviral vector containing the mutant, autoactive, human H-ras61L gene acquired anchorage independent growth properties and the capacity for tumorigenic growth in vivo. The tumors that developed in the nude mice were poorly differentiated epithelial carcinomas that continued to overexpress ras. These cells were resistant to doxorubicin mediated G1/S phase arrest but were sensitive to treatment with a farnesyltransferase inhibitor. Conclusion Some of the cytogenetic changes are similar to what is observed in premalignant and malignant breast lesions. Despite these changes, late passage immortal HMEC are not tumorigenic and could only be transformed with overexpression of a mutant H-ras oncogene.

  7. Regulation of an H-ras-related transcript by parathyroid hormone in rat osteosarcoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D. K.; Weaver, W. R.; Clohisy, J. C.; Brakenhoff, K. D.; Kahn, A. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1992-01-01

    The rat osteosarcoma cell line UMR 106-01 is a commonly used model system for the study of osteoblast function. However, it also expresses a phenotype characteristic of transformed cells. To test whether the latter could be accounted for by aberrant oncogene expression, we probed Northern blots of UMR and other osteoblastic cells with a panel of oncogene probes. These blots, when probed with a cDNA specific for v-H-ras, revealed a 7.0-kilobase (kb) H-ras-related transcript (designated HRRT) in UMR 106-01 cells that was not expressed in other osteoblastic cells. Osteoblast-enriched calvarial cells expressed the typical 1.1-kb H-ras mRNA, which was absent in UMR cells. Additionally, Western blots of lysates of UMR cells documented the presence of three proteins immunologically related to H-rasp21. To determine whether HRRT represented a recombinant retrovirus product, Northern blots were probed with a cDNA specific for the highly conserved gag-pol region of Moloney murine leukemia virus. These blots showed parallel cross-reactivity with an apparently identical transcript of 7.0 kb. The 7.0-kb transcripts detected by both v-H-ras and gag-pol probes declined to the same extent after treatment with concentrations of PTH known to inhibit proliferation of these cells. PTH regulated the abundance of HRRT in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with greatest repression of the transcript after 8 h of treatment with 10(-8) M PTH. The decrease in HRRT could not be completely accounted for by changes in transcriptional activity, as determined by nuclear run-on assays.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  8. Specific repression of mutant K-RAS by 10-23 DNAzyme: Sensitizing cancer cell to anti-cancer therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S.-H.; Wang, T.-H.; Au, L.-C.

    2009-01-01

    Point mutations of the Ras family are frequently found in human cancers at a prevalence rate of 30%. The most common mutation K-Ras(G12V), required for tumor proliferation, survival, and metastasis due to its constitutively active GTPase activity, has provided an ideal target for cancer therapy. 10-23 DNAzyme, an oligodeoxyribonucleotide-based ribonuclease consisting of a 15-nucleotide catalytical domain flanked by two target-specific complementary arms, has been shown to effectively cleave the target mRNA at purine-pyrimidine dinucleotide. Taking advantage of this specific property, 10-23 DNAzyme was designed to cleave mRNA of K-Ras(G12V)(GGU → GUU) at the GU dinucleotide while left the wild-type (WT) K-Ras mRNA intact. The K-Ras(G12V)-specific 10-23 DNAzyme was able to reduce K-Ras(G12V) at both mRNA and protein levels in SW480 cell carrying homozygous K-Ras(G12V). No effect was observed on the WT K-Ras in HEK cells. Although K-Ras(G12V)-specific DNAzymes alone did not inhibit proliferation of SW480 or HEK cells, pre-treatment of this DNAzyme sensitized the K-Ras(G12V) mutant cells to anti-cancer agents such as doxorubicin and radiation. These results offer a potential of using allele-specific 10-23 DNAzyme in combination with other cancer therapies to achieve better effectiveness on cancer treatment.

  9. Induction of Non-Apoptotic Cell Death by Activated Ras Requires Inverse Regulation of Rac1 and Arf6

    OpenAIRE

    Bhanot, Haymanti; Young, Ashley M.; Overmeyer, Jean H.; Maltese, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Methuosis is a unique form of non-apoptotic cell death triggered by alterations in the trafficking of clathrin-independent endosomes, ultimately leading to extreme vacuolization and rupture of the cell. Methuosis can be induced in glioblastoma cells by expression of constitutively active Ras. This study identifies the small GTPases, Rac1 and Arf6, and the Arf6 GTPase-activating-protein, GIT1, as key downstream components of the signaling pathway underlying Ras-induced methuosis. The extent to...

  10. Oncogenic ras-driven cancer cell vesiculation leads to emission of double-stranded DNA capable of interacting with target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Audemard, Eric; Montermini, Laura; Meehan, Brian; Rak, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Oncogenic H-ras stimulates emission of extracellular vesicles containing double-stranded DNA. • Vesicle-associated extracellular DNA contains mutant N-ras sequences. • Vesicles mediate intercellular transfer of mutant H-ras DNA to normal fibroblasts where it remains for several weeks. • Fibroblasts exposed to vesicles containing H-ras DNA exhibit increased proliferation. - Abstract: Cell free DNA is often regarded as a source of genetic cancer biomarkers, but the related mechanisms of DNA release, composition and biological activity remain unclear. Here we show that rat epithelial cell transformation by the human H-ras oncogene leads to an increase in production of small, exosomal-like extracellular vesicles by viable cancer cells. These EVs contain chromatin-associated double-stranded DNA fragments covering the entire host genome, including full-length H-ras. Oncogenic N-ras and SV40LT sequences were also found in EVs emitted from spontaneous mouse brain tumor cells. Disruption of acidic sphingomyelinase and the p53/Rb pathway did not block emission of EV-related oncogenic DNA. Exposure of non-transformed RAT-1 cells to EVs containing mutant H-ras DNA led to the uptake and retention of this material for an extended (30 days) but transient period of time, and stimulated cell proliferation. Thus, our study suggests that H-ras-mediated transformation stimulates vesicular emission of this histone-bound oncogene, which may interact with non-transformed cells

  11. Oncogenic ras-driven cancer cell vesiculation leads to emission of double-stranded DNA capable of interacting with target cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa [Montreal Children’s Hospital, Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Audemard, Eric [McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Montermini, Laura; Meehan, Brian [Montreal Children’s Hospital, Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Rak, Janusz, E-mail: janusz.rak@mcgill.ca [Montreal Children’s Hospital, Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • Oncogenic H-ras stimulates emission of extracellular vesicles containing double-stranded DNA. • Vesicle-associated extracellular DNA contains mutant N-ras sequences. • Vesicles mediate intercellular transfer of mutant H-ras DNA to normal fibroblasts where it remains for several weeks. • Fibroblasts exposed to vesicles containing H-ras DNA exhibit increased proliferation. - Abstract: Cell free DNA is often regarded as a source of genetic cancer biomarkers, but the related mechanisms of DNA release, composition and biological activity remain unclear. Here we show that rat epithelial cell transformation by the human H-ras oncogene leads to an increase in production of small, exosomal-like extracellular vesicles by viable cancer cells. These EVs contain chromatin-associated double-stranded DNA fragments covering the entire host genome, including full-length H-ras. Oncogenic N-ras and SV40LT sequences were also found in EVs emitted from spontaneous mouse brain tumor cells. Disruption of acidic sphingomyelinase and the p53/Rb pathway did not block emission of EV-related oncogenic DNA. Exposure of non-transformed RAT-1 cells to EVs containing mutant H-ras DNA led to the uptake and retention of this material for an extended (30 days) but transient period of time, and stimulated cell proliferation. Thus, our study suggests that H-ras-mediated transformation stimulates vesicular emission of this histone-bound oncogene, which may interact with non-transformed cells.

  12. K-Ras and β-catenin mutations cooperate with Fgfr3 mutations in mice to promote tumorigenesis in the skin and lung, but not in the bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Ahmad

    2011-07-01

    The human fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 gene is frequently mutated in superficial urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC. To test the functional significance of FGFR3 activating mutations as a ‘driver’ of UCC, we targeted the expression of mutated Fgfr3 to the murine urothelium using Cre-loxP recombination driven by the uroplakin II promoter. The introduction of the Fgfr3 mutations resulted in no obvious effect on tumorigenesis up to 18 months of age. Furthermore, even when the Fgfr3 mutations were introduced together with K-Ras or β-catenin (Ctnnb1 activating mutations, no urothelial dysplasia or UCC was observed. Interestingly, however, owing to a sporadic ectopic Cre recombinase expression in the skin and lung of these mice, Fgfr3 mutation caused papilloma and promoted lung tumorigenesis in cooperation with K-Ras and β-catenin activation, respectively. These results indicate that activation of FGFR3 can cooperate with other mutations to drive tumorigenesis in a context-dependent manner, and support the hypothesis that activation of FGFR3 signaling contributes to human cancer.

  13. RSK is a principal effector of the RAS-ERK pathway for eliciting a coordinate promotile/invasive gene program and phenotype in epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doehn, Ulrik; Hauge, Camilla; Frank, Scott R

    2009-01-01

    The RAS-stimulated RAF-MEK-ERK pathway confers epithelial cells with critical motile and invasive capacities during development, tissue regeneration, and carcinoma progression, often via promoting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Many mechanisms by which ERK exerts this control remain...... elusive. We demonstrate that the ERK-activated kinase RSK is necessary to induce mesenchymal motility and invasive capacities in nontransformed epithelial and carcinoma cells. RSK is sufficient to induce certain motile responses. Expression profiling analysis revealed that a primary role of RSK...... to stimulate motility and invasion. These findings uncover a mechanism whereby the RAS-ERK pathway controls epithelial cell motility by identifying RSK as a key effector, from which emanate multiple highly coordinate transcription-dependent mechanisms for stimulation of motility and invasive properties....

  14. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Protein Synthesis Inhibitors as H-Ras-Nanocluster-Increasing Tumor Growth Inducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najumudeen, Arafath K; Posada, Itziar M D; Lectez, Benoit; Zhou, Yong; Landor, Sebastian K-J; Fallarero, Adyary; Vuorela, Pia; Hancock, John; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    Ras isoforms H-, N-, and K-ras are each mutated in specific cancer types at varying frequencies and have different activities in cell fate control. On the plasma membrane, Ras proteins are laterally segregated into isoform-specific nanoscale signaling hubs, termed nanoclusters. As Ras nanoclusters are required for Ras signaling, chemical modulators of nanoclusters represent ideal candidates for the specific modulation of Ras activity in cancer drug development. We therefore conducted a chemical screen with commercial and in-house natural product libraries using a cell-based H-ras-nanoclustering FRET assay. Next to established Ras inhibitors, such as a statin and farnesyl-transferase inhibitor, we surprisingly identified five protein synthesis inhibitors as positive regulators. Using commonly employed cycloheximide as a representative compound, we show that protein synthesis inhibition increased nanoclustering and effector recruitment specifically of active H-ras but not of K-ras. Consistent with these data, cycloheximide treatment activated both Erk and Akt kinases and specifically promoted H-rasG12V-induced, but not K-rasG12V-induced, PC12 cell differentiation. Intriguingly, cycloheximide increased the number of mammospheres, which are enriched for cancer stem cells. Depletion of H-ras in combination with cycloheximide significantly reduced mammosphere formation, suggesting an exquisite synthetic lethality. The potential of cycloheximide to promote tumor cell growth was also reflected in its ability to increase breast cancer cell tumors grown in ovo. These results illustrate the possibility of identifying Ras-isoform-specific modulators using nanocluster-directed screening. They also suggest an unexpected feedback from protein synthesis inhibition to Ras signaling, which might present a vulnerability in certain tumor cell types.

  15. Defined spatiotemporal features of RAS-ERK signals dictate cell fate in MCF-7 mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Ana; Casar, Berta; Colón-Bolea, Paula; Agudo-Ibáñez, Lorena; Crespo, Piero

    2016-06-15

    Signals conveyed through the RAS-ERK pathway are essential for the determination of cell fate. It is well established that signal variability is achieved in the different microenvironments in which signals unfold. It is also known that signal duration is critical for decisions concerning cell commitment. However, it is unclear how RAS-ERK signals integrate time and space in order to elicit a given biological response. To investigate this, we used MCF-7 cells, in which EGF-induced transient ERK activation triggers proliferation, whereas sustained ERK activation in response to heregulin leads to adipocytic differentiation. We found that both proliferative and differentiating signals emanate exclusively from plasma membrane-disordered microdomains. Of interest, the EGF signal can be transformed into a differentiating stimulus by HRAS overexpression, which prolongs ERK activation, but only if HRAS localizes at disordered membrane. On the other hand, HRAS signals emanating from the Golgi complex induce apoptosis and can prevent heregulin-induced differentiation. Our results indicate that within the same cellular context, RAS can exert different, even antagonistic, effects, depending on its sublocalization. Thus cell destiny is defined by the ability of a stimulus to activate RAS at the appropriate sublocalization for an adequate period while avoiding switching on opposing RAS signals. © 2016 Herrero et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  16. RASAL3, a novel hematopoietic RasGAP protein, regulates the number and functions of NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Suguru; Kawamura, Toshihiko; Higuchi, Masaya; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Yoshita-Takahashi, Manami; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Kanda, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Hiroki; Jiang, Shuying; Naito, Makoto; Yoshizaki, Takumi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Fujii, Masahiro

    2015-05-01

    Ras GTPase-activating proteins negatively regulate the Ras/Erk signaling pathway, thereby playing crucial roles in the proliferation, function, and development of various types of cells. In this study, we identified a novel Ras GTPase-activating proteins protein, RASAL3, which is predominantly expressed in cells of hematopoietic lineages, including NKT, B, and T cells. We established systemic RASAL3-deficient mice, and the mice exhibited a severe decrease in NKT cells in the liver at 8 weeks of age. The treatment of RASAL3-deficient mice with α-GalCer, a specific agonist for NKT cells, induced liver damage, but the level was less severe than that in RASAL3-competent mice, and the attenuated liver damage was accompanied by a reduced production of interleukin-4 and interferon-γ from NKT cells. RASAL3-deficient NKT cells treated with α-GalCer in vitro presented augmented Erk phosphorylation, suggesting that there is dysregulated Ras signaling in the NKT cells of RASAL3-deficient mice. Taken together, these results suggest that RASAL3 plays an important role in the expansion and functions of NKT cells in the liver by negatively regulating Ras/Erk signaling, and might be a therapeutic target for NKT-associated diseases. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. [miR-143 inhibits cell proliferation through targeted regulating the expression of K-ras gene in HeLa cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, H X; Cui, H K; Pan, Y; Hu, R L; Zhu, L H; Wang, S J

    2016-12-23

    Objective: To explore the effect of microRNA miR-143 on the proliferation of cervical cancer HeLa cells through targeted regulating the expression of K-ras gene. Methods: The luciferase report carrier containing wild type 3'-UTR of K-ras gene (K-ras-wt) or mutated 3'-UTR of the K-ras (K-ras-mut) were co-transfected with iR-143 mimic into the HeLa cells respectively, and the targeting effect of miR-143 in the transfectants was verified by the dual luciferase report system. HeLa cells were also transfected with miR-143 mimic (miR-143 mimic group), mimic control (negative control group), and miR-143 mimic plus K-ras gene (miR-143 mimic+ K-ras group), respectively. The expression of miR-143 in the transfected HeLa cells was detected by real-time PCR (RT-PCR), and the expression of K-ras protein was detected by Western blot. The cell proliferation activity of each group was examined by MTT assay. In addition, human cervical cancer tissue samples ( n =5) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia tissue samples ( n =5) were also examined for the expression of miR-143 and K-ras protein by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Results: The luciferase report assay showed that co-transfection with miR-143 mimic decreased the luciferase activity of the K-ras-wt significantly, but did not inhibit the luciferase activity of the K-ras-mut. The expression of miR-143 in the HeLa cells transfected with miR-143 mimic was significantly higher than that in the HeLa cells transfected with the mimic control (3.31±0.45 vs 0.97±0.22, P cell proliferative activity of the miR-143 mimic group was significantly lower than that of the negative control group ( P cell proliferative activity of the miR-143 mimic+ K-ras group was also significantly lower than the control group ( P HeLa cells through targeted regulating the expression of K-ras gene. In human cervical cancer tissues of a small sample set, the expression of miR-143 is downregulated, and the expression of K-ras is upregulated.

  18. RAS - Screens & Assays - Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RAS Drug Discovery group aims to develop assays that will reveal aspects of RAS biology upon which cancer cells depend. Successful assay formats are made available for high-throughput screening programs to yield potentially effective drug compounds.

  19. Black Rice Anthocyanins Suppress Metastasis of Breast Cancer Cells by Targeting RAS/RAF/MAPK Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang-Yan; Zhou, Jie; Luo, Li-Ping; Han, Bin; Li, Fei; Chen, Jing-Yao; Zhu, Yan-Feng; Chen, Wei; Yu, Xiao-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) drives the biology of 30% of breast cancer cases. As a transducer of HER2 signaling, RAS/RAF/MAPK pathway plays a pivotal role in the development of breast cancer. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanisms underlying the chemopreventive effects of black rice anthocyanins (BRACs) extract and identified their molecular targets in HER2(+) breast cancer cells. Treatment of MDA-MB-453 cells (HER2(+)) with BRACs inhibited cell migration and invasion, suppressed the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (RAF), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and downregulated the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9. BRACs also weakened the interactions of HER2 with RAF, MEK, and JNK proteins, respectively, and decreased the mRNA expression of raf, mek, and jnk. Further, we found combined treatment with BRACs and RAF, MEK, or JNK inhibitors could enhance the antimetastatic activity, compared with that of each treatment. Transient transfection with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) specific for raf, mek, and jnk inhibited their mRNA expression in MDA-MB-453 cells. Moreover, cotreatment with BRACs and siRNA induces a more remarkable inhibitory effect than that by either substance alone. In summary, our study suggested that BRACs suppress metastasis in breast cancer cells by targeting the RAS/RAF/MAPK pathway.

  20. Induction of nonapoptotic cell death by activated Ras requires inverse regulation of Rac1 and Arf6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanot, Haymanti; Young, Ashley M; Overmeyer, Jean H; Maltese, William A

    2010-10-01

    Methuosis is a unique form of nonapoptotic cell death triggered by alterations in the trafficking of clathrin-independent endosomes, ultimately leading to extreme vacuolization and rupture of the cell. Methuosis can be induced in glioblastoma cells by expression of constitutively active Ras. This study identifies the small GTPases, Rac1 and Arf6, and the Arf6 GTPase-activating protein, GIT1, as key downstream components of the signaling pathway underlying Ras-induced methuosis. The extent to which graded expression of active H-Ras(G12V) triggers cytoplasmic vacuolization correlates with the amount of endogenous Rac1 in the active GTP state. Blocking Rac1 activation with the specific Rac inhibitor, EHT 1864, or coexpression of dominant-negative Rac1(T17N), prevents the accumulation of vacuoles induced by H-Ras(G12V). Coincident with Rac1 activation, H-Ras(G12V) causes a decrease in the amount of active Arf6, a GTPase that functions in the recycling of clathrin-independent endosomes. The effect of H-Ras(G12V) on Arf6 is blocked by EHT 1864, indicating that the decrease in Arf6-GTP is directly linked to the activation of Rac1. Constitutively active Rac1(G12V) interacts with GIT1 in immunoprecipitation assays. Ablation of GIT1 by short hairpin RNA prevents the decrease in active Arf6, inhibits vacuolization, and prevents loss of cell viability in cells expressing Rac1(G12V). Together, the results suggest that perturbations of endosome morphology associated with Ras-induced methuosis are due to downstream activation of Rac1 combined with reciprocal inactivation of Arf6. The latter seems to be mediated through Rac1 stimulation of GIT1. Further insights into this pathway could suggest opportunities for the induction of methuosis in cancers that are resistant to apoptotic cell death.

  1. Induction of Non-Apoptotic Cell Death by Activated Ras Requires Inverse Regulation of Rac1 and Arf6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanot, Haymanti; Young, Ashley M.; Overmeyer, Jean H.; Maltese, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Methuosis is a unique form of non-apoptotic cell death triggered by alterations in the trafficking of clathrin-independent endosomes, ultimately leading to extreme vacuolization and rupture of the cell. Methuosis can be induced in glioblastoma cells by expression of constitutively active Ras. This study identifies the small GTPases, Rac1 and Arf6, and the Arf6 GTPase-activating-protein, GIT1, as key downstream components of the signaling pathway underlying Ras-induced methuosis. The extent to which graded expression of active H-Ras(G12V) triggers cytoplasmic vacuolization correlates with the amount of endogenous Rac1 in the active GTP state. Blocking Rac1 activation with the specific Rac inhibitor, EHT 1864, or co-expression of dominant-negative Rac1(T17N), prevents the accumulation of vacuoles induced by H-Ras(G12V). Coincident with Rac1 activation, H-Ras(G12V) causes a decrease in the amount of active Arf6, a GTPase that functions in recycling of clathrin-independent endosomes. The effect of H-Ras(G12V) on Arf6 is blocked by EHT 1864, indicating that the decrease in Arf6-GTP is directly linked to activation of Rac1. Constitutively active Rac1(G12V) interacts with GIT1 in immunoprecipitation assays. Ablation of GIT1 by shRNA prevents the decrease in active Arf6, inhibits vacuolization, and prevents loss of cell viability in cells expressing Rac1(G12V). Together the results suggest that perturbations of endosome morphology associated with Ras-induced methuosis are due to downstream activation of Rac1, combined with reciprocal inactivation of Arf6. The latter appears to be mediated through Rac1 stimulation of GIT1. Further insights into this pathway could suggest opportunities for induction of methuosis in cancers that are resistant to apoptotic cell death. PMID:20713492

  2. CD99 triggering induces methuosis of Ewing sarcoma cells through IGF-1R/RAS/Rac1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, Maria Cristina; Terracciano, Mario; Mancarella, Caterina; Sciandra, Marika; Guerzoni, Clara; Pasello, Michela; Grilli, Andrea; Zini, Nicoletta; Picci, Piero; Colombo, Mario P; Morrione, Andrea; Scotlandi, Katia

    2016-11-29

    CD99 is a cell surface molecule that has emerged as a novel target for Ewing sarcoma (EWS), an aggressive pediatric bone cancer. This report provides the first evidence of methuosis in EWS, a non-apoptotic form of cell death induced by an antibody directed against the CD99 molecule. Upon mAb triggering, CD99 induces an IGF-1R/RAS/Rac1 complex, which is internalized into RAB5-positive endocytic vacuoles. This complex is then dissociated, with the IGF-1R recycling to the cell membrane while CD99 and RAS/Rac1 are sorted into immature LAMP-1-positive vacuoles, whose excessive accumulation provokes methuosis. This process, which is not detected in CD99-expressing normal mesenchymal cells, is inhibited by disruption of the IGF-1R signaling, whereas enhanced by IGF-1 stimulation. Induction of IGF-1R/RAS/Rac1 was also observed in the EWS xenografts that respond to anti-CD99 mAb, further supporting the role of the IGF/RAS/Rac1 axis in the hyperstimulation of macropinocytosis and selective death of EWS cells. Thus, we describe a vulnerability of EWS cells, including those resistant to standard chemotherapy, to a treatment with anti-CD99 mAb, which requires IGF-1R/RAS signaling but bypasses the need for their direct targeting. Overall, we propose CD99 targeting as new opportunity to treat EWS patients resistant to canonical apoptosis-inducing agents.

  3. RAS Insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Heimbrook, now CEO of the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, played a major role in a large pharma as it tried to develop an anti-RAS drug. Lessons from that failure inform the RAS Initiative today.

  4. Inhibition of RAS in diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoub R

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Rabi Yacoub, Kirk N Campbell Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Diabetic kidney disease (DKD is a progressive proteinuric renal disorder in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is a common cause of end-stage kidney disease worldwide, particularly in developed countries. Therapeutic targeting of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS is the most validated clinical strategy for slowing disease progression. DKD is paradoxically a low systematic renin state with an increased intrarenal RAS activity implicated in its pathogenesis. Angiotensin II (AngII, the main peptide of RAS, is not only a vasoactive peptide but functions as a growth factor, activating interstitial fibroblasts and mesangial and tubular cells, while promoting the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. AngII also promotes podocyte injury through increased calcium influx and the generation of reactive oxygen species. Blockade of the RAS using either angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers can attenuate progressive glomerulosclerosis in animal models, and slows disease progression in humans with DKD. In this review, we summarize the role of intrarenal RAS activation in the pathogenesis and progression of DKD and the rationale for RAS inhibition in this population. Keywords: renin–angiotensin system, diabetic kidney disease, angiotensin II, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers

  5. High-density growth arrest in Ras-transformed cells: low Cdk kinase activities in spite of absence of p27Kip Cdk-complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Willumsen, Berthe Marie

    2005-01-01

    The ras oncogene transforms immortalized, contact-inhibited non-malignant murine fibroblasts into cells that are focus forming, exhibit increased saturation density, and are malignant in suitable hosts. Here, we examined changes in cell cycle control complexes as normal and Ras-transformed cells...

  6. Exploring environmental causes of altered ras effects: fragmentation plus integration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Miquel; Ayude, Daniel; Alguacil, Juan; Jariod, Manuel

    2003-02-01

    Mutations in ras genes are the most common abnormality of oncogenes in human cancer and a major example of activation by point mutation. Experimental and epidemiological studies support the notion that Ki-ras activation and expression may be chemically related. We discuss the potential role of several environmental compounds in the induction or promotion of ras mutations in humans, with a focus on exocrine pancreatic cancer, the human tumor with the highest prevalence at diagnosis of Ki-ras mutations. Organochlorine compounds, organic solvents, and coffee compounds may play an indirect role in causing Ki-ras mutations, rather than as direct inducers of the mutations. Although for some organochlorine compounds the induction of point mutations in ras oncogenes cannot be excluded, it seems more likely that the effects of these compounds are mediated through nongenomic or indirectly genotoxic mechanisms of action. Organic solvents also may act via enzymatic induction of ras mutagens or by providing a proliferation advantage to ras-mutated cell clones. In exocrine pancreatic cancer, caffeine, other coffee compounds, or other factors with which coffee drinking is associated could modulate Ki-ras activation by interfering with DNA repair, cell-cycle checkpoints, and apoptosis. Asbestos, cigarette smoking, and some dietary factors also may be involved in the initiation or the promotion of Ki-ras mutations in lung and colon cancers. Further development of the mechanistic scenarios proposed here could contribute to a meaningful integration of biological, clinical, and environmental knowledge on the causes of altered ras effects. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. A family affair: A Ral-exocyst-centered network links Ras, Rac, Rho signaling to control cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Giulia; Biondini, Marco; Camonis, Jacques; Parrini, Maria Carla

    2017-05-12

    Cell migration is central to many developmental, physiologic and pathological processes, including cancer progression. The Ral GTPases (RalA and RalB) which act down-stream the Ras oncogenes, are key players in the coordination between membrane trafficking and actin polymerization. A major direct effector of Ral, the exocyst complex, works in polarized exocytosis and is at the center of multiple protein-protein interactions that support cell migration by promoting protrusion formation, front-rear polarization, and extra-cellular matrix degradation. In this review we describe the recent advancements in deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying this role of Ral via exocyst on cell migration. Among others, we will discuss the recently identified cross-talk between Ral and Rac1 pathways: exocyst binds to a negative regulator (the RacGAP SH3BP1) and to the major effector (the Wave Regulatory Complex, WRC) of Rac1, the master regulator of protrusions. Next challenge will be to better characterize the dynamics in space and in time of these molecular interplays, to better understand the pleiotropic functions of Ral in both normal and cancer cells.

  8. v-Ha-ras oncogene insertion: A model for tumor progression of human small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabry, M.; Nakagawa, Toshitaro; Nelkin, B.D.; McDowell, E.; Gesell, M.; Eggleston, J.C.; Casero, R.A. Jr.; Baylin, S.B.

    1988-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) manifests a range of phenotypes in culture that may be important in understanding its relationship to non-SCLCs and to tumor progression events in patients. Most SCLC-derived cell lines, termed classic SCLC lines, have properties similar to SCLC tumors in patients. To delineate further the relationships between these phenotypes and the molecular events involved, the authors inserted the v-Ha-ras gene in SCLC cell lines with (biochemical variant) and without (classic) an amplified c-myc gene. These two SCLC subtypes had markedly different phenotypic responses to similar levels of expression of v-Ha-ras RNA. No biochemical or morphologic changes were observed in classic SCLC cells. In contrast, in biochemical variant SCLC cells, v-Ha-ras expression induced features typical of large cell undifferentiated lung carcinoma. Expression of v-Ha-ras in biochemical variant SCLC cells directly demonstrates that important transitions can occur between phenotypes of human lung cancer cells and that these may play a critical role in tumor progression events in patients. The finding provide a model system to study molecular events involved in tumor progression steps within a series of related tumor types

  9. Blocking anaplerotic entry of glutamine into the TCA cycle sensitizes K-Ras mutant cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqcena, M; Mukhopadhyay, S; Hosny, C; Alhamed, A; Chatterjee, A; Foster, D A

    2015-05-14

    Cancer cells undergo a metabolic transformation that allows for increased anabolic demands, wherein glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates are shunted away for the synthesis of biological molecules required for cell growth and division. One of the key shunts is the exit of citrate from the mitochondria and the TCA cycle for the generation of cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A that can be used for fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. With the loss of mitochondrial citrate, cancer cells rely on the 'conditionally essential' amino acid glutamine (Q) as an anaplerotic carbon source for TCA cycle intermediates. Although Q deprivation causes G1 cell cycle arrest in non-transformed cells, its impact on the cancer cell cycle is not well characterized. We report here a correlation between bypass of the Q-dependent G1 checkpoint and cancer cells harboring K-Ras mutations. Instead of arresting in G1 in response to Q-deprivation, K-Ras-driven cancer cells arrest in either S- or G2/M-phase. Inhibition of K-Ras effector pathways was able to revert cells to G1 arrest upon Q deprivation. Blocking anaplerotic utilization of Q mimicked Q deprivation--causing S- and G2/M-phase arrest in K-Ras mutant cancer cells. Significantly, Q deprivation or suppression of anaplerotic Q utilization created synthetic lethality to the cell cycle phase-specific cytotoxic drugs, capecitabine and paclitaxel. These data suggest that disabling of the G1 Q checkpoint could represent a novel vulnerability of cancer cells harboring K-Ras and possibly other mutations that disable the Q-dependent checkpoint.

  10. Promoter trans-activation of protooncogenes c-fos and c-myc, but not c-Ha-ras, by products of adenovirus early region 1A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sassone-Corsi, P.; Borrelli, E.

    1987-01-01

    The E1A (early region 1A) oncogene products of adenovirus type 2 trans-activate the other early viral transcription units, as well as some cellular promoters. Using a short-term cotransfection assay in murine NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, we show that c-fos and c-myc promoter activities are stimulated by the E1A proteins, whereas c-Ha-ras transcription is not affected. The product of E1A 13S mRNA is responsible for the trans-activation, whereas the 12S mRNA product has no effect. Analysis of the c-fos promoter sequences required for the E1A stimulation shows that responsive sequences are located between positions -402 and -240 upstream of the transcription initiation site. This same region also contains the c-fos serum-responsive element. Furthermore, transcription of the endogenous c-fos gene in HeLa cells is increased after E1A transfection

  11. Acquired resistance to cetuximab is associated with the overexpression of Ras family members and the loss of radiosensitization in head and neck cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saki, Mohammad; Toulany, Mahmoud; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cetuximab in combination with radiation therapy is used to treat patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In the present study, the mechanism of acquired resistance to cetuximab in HNSCC cells was investigated in vitro. Material and methods: The HNSCC cell lines UT5 and SAS and UT5 cells with acquired resistance to cetuximab (UT5R9) were used. The radiotoxicity potentials of cetuximab and inhibitors of PI3K, MAPK and farnesylation were tested using a clonogenic survival assay. Western blotting was used to evaluate protein expression. The levels of EGFR ligands were detected by ELISA. Results: Cetuximab inhibited proliferation and induced radiosensitization in UT5 cells but not in SAS cells. In comparison with UT5 cells, cetuximab-resistant SAS cells markedly overexpressed the K-Ras, H-Ras and N-Ras proteins, as detected by Western blotting. Resistance in UT5R9 cells was associated with the overexpression of the K-Ras, H-Ras and N-Ras proteins as well as an increase in the autocrine production of the EGFR ligands amphiregulin and transforming growth factor α (TGFα). UT5R9 cells were significantly more radioresistant than UT5 cells. Radioresistant UT5R9 cells were not radiosensitized by cetuximab, but knocking down H-RAS and N-RAS with siRNA and targeting Ras farnesylation using the farnesyltransferase inhibitor lonafarnib induced radiosensitization in these cells. Targeting PI3K and MEK revealed that the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the MAPK/ERK pathway is associated with radioresistance in UT5R9 cells. Conclusion: Targeting Ras and PI3K activity improves the outcome of irradiation in cetuximab-resistant HNSCC cell lines in vitro

  12. Low proliferation and high apoptosis of osteoblastic cells on hydrophobic surface are associated with defective Ras signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Eun-Ju; Kim, Hong-Hee; Huh, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-Ae; Seung Ko, Jea; Chung, Chong-Pyoung; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2005-01-01

    The hydrophobic (HPB) nature of most polymeric biomaterials has been a major obstacle in using those materials in vivo due to low compatibility with cells. However, there is little knowledge of the molecular detail to explain how surface hydrophobicity affects cell responses. In this study, we compared the proliferation and apoptosis of human osteoblastic MG63 cells adhered to hydrophilic (HPL) and hydrophobic surfaces. On the hydrophobic surface, less formation of focal contacts and actin stress fibers, a delay in cell cycle progression, and an increase in apoptosis were observed. By using fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) as a model growth factor, we also investigated intracellular signaling pathways on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The activation of Ras, Akt, and ERK by FGF1 was impaired in MG63 cells on the hydrophobic surface. The overexpression of constitutively active form of Ras and Akt rescued those cells from apoptosis and recovered cell cycle progression. Furthermore, their overexpression also restored the actin cytoskeletal organization on the hydrophobic surface. Finally, the proliferative, antiapoptotic, and cytoskeletal effects of constitutively active Ras in MG63 cells on the hydrophobic surface were blocked by wortmannin and PD98059 that inhibit Akt and ERK activation, respectively. Therefore, our results suggest that the activation of Ras and its downstream molecules Akt and ERK to an appropriate level is one of crucial elements in the determination of osteoblast cell responses. The Ras pathway may represent a cell biological target that should be considered for successful surface modification of biomaterials to induce adequate cell responses in the bone tissue

  13. Atorvastatin inhibits insulin synthesis by inhibiting the Ras/Raf/ERK/CREB pathway in INS-1 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongxi; Li, Yu; Sun, Bei; Hou, Ningning; Yang, Juhong; Zheng, Miaoyan; Xu, Jie; Wang, Jingyu; Zhang, Yi; Zeng, Xianwei; Shan, Chunyan; Chang, Bai; Chen, Liming; Chang, Baocheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Backround: Type 2 diabetes has become a global epidemic disease. Atorvastatin has become a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. However, increasing evidence showed that statins can dose-dependently increase the risk of diabetes mellitus. The mechanism is not clear. Objective: The Ras complex pathway (Ras/Raf/extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK]/cAMP response element-binding protein [CREB]) is the major pathway that regulates the gene transcription. Except for the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis by inhibiting the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-COA) reductase, statins can also downregulate the phosphorylation of a series of downstream substrates including the key proteins of the Ras complex pathway, therefore may inhibit the insulin syntheses in pancreatic beta cells. In our study, we investigated the inhibitory effect and the underlying mechanism of atorvastatin on insulin synthesis in rat islets. Methods: Islets were isolated from Wistar rats and cultured in Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI)-1640 medium. The insulin content in the medium was measured by radioimmunoassay before and after the treatment of 50 μM atorvastatin. Effect of atorvastatin on the expression of insulin message Ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in pancreatic islet beta cells was also detected using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Western blotting was used to explore the possible role of the Ras complex pathway (Ras/Raf/ERK/CREB) in atorvastatin-inhibited insulin synthesis. The effects of atorvastatin on the binding of nuclear transcription factor p-CREB with CRE in INS-1 cells were examined via chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Results: Compared with the control group, the insulin level decreased by 27.1% at 24 hours after atorvastatin treatment. Atorvastatin inhibited insulin synthesis by decreasing insulin mRNA expression of pancreatic islet beta cells. The activities of Ras, Raf-1, and p-CREB in the Ras complex

  14. Obesity Suppresses Cell-Competition-Mediated Apical Elimination of RasV12-Transformed Cells from Epithelial Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Ayana; Nagatake, Takahiro; Egami, Riku; Gu, Guoqiang; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Ikeda, Wataru; Nakatani, Tomoya; Kunisawa, Jun; Fujita, Yasuyuki

    2018-04-24

    Recent studies have revealed that newly emerging transformed cells are often eliminated from epithelial tissues via cell competition with the surrounding normal epithelial cells. This cancer preventive phenomenon is termed epithelial defense against cancer (EDAC). However, it remains largely unknown whether and how EDAC is diminished during carcinogenesis. In this study, using a cell competition mouse model, we show that high-fat diet (HFD) feeding substantially attenuates the frequency of apical elimination of RasV12-transformed cells from intestinal and pancreatic epithelia. This process involves both lipid metabolism and chronic inflammation. Furthermore, aspirin treatment significantly facilitates eradication of transformed cells from the epithelial tissues in HFD-fed mice. Thus, our work demonstrates that obesity can profoundly influence competitive interaction between normal and transformed cells, providing insights into cell competition and cancer preventive medicine. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lipoprotein-biomimetic nanostructure enables efficient targeting delivery of siRNA to Ras-activated glioblastoma cells via macropinocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jia-Lin; Jiang, Gan; Song, Qing-Xiang; Gu, Xiao; Hu, Meng; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Song, Hua-Hua; Chen, Le-Pei; Lin, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Di; Chen, Jun; Feng, Jun-Feng; Qiu, Yong-Ming; Jiang, Ji-Yao; Jiang, Xin-Guo; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Gao, Xiao-Ling

    2017-05-01

    Hyperactivated Ras regulates many oncogenic pathways in several malignant human cancers including glioblastoma and it is an attractive target for cancer therapies. Ras activation in cancer cells drives protein internalization via macropinocytosis as a key nutrient-gaining process. By utilizing this unique endocytosis pathway, here we create a biologically inspired nanostructure that can induce cancer cells to `drink drugs' for targeting activating transcription factor-5 (ATF5), an overexpressed anti-apoptotic transcription factor in glioblastoma. Apolipoprotein E3-reconstituted high-density lipoprotein is used to encapsulate the siRNA-loaded calcium phosphate core and facilitate it to penetrate the blood-brain barrier, thus targeting the glioblastoma cells in a macropinocytosis-dependent manner. The nanostructure carrying ATF5 siRNA exerts remarkable RNA-interfering efficiency, increases glioblastoma cell apoptosis and inhibits tumour cell growth both in vitro and in xenograft tumour models. This strategy of targeting the macropinocytosis caused by Ras activation provides a nanoparticle-based approach for precision therapy in glioblastoma and other Ras-activated cancers.

  16. Oncogenic Ras-Induced Morphologic Change Is through MEK/ERK Signaling Pathway to Downregulate Stat3 at a Posttranslational Level in NIH3T3 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-Heng Yeh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ras is a key regulator of the MAP kinase-signaling cascade and may cause morphologic change of Ras-transformed cells. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 can be activated by cytokine stimulation. In this study, we unravel that Ha-rasV12 overexpression can downregulate the expression of Stat3 protein at a posttranslational level in NIH3T3 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Stat3 expression downregulated by Ha-rasV12 overexpression is through proteosome degradation and not through a mTOR/p70S6K-related signaling pathway. The suppression of Stat3 accompanied by the morphologic change induced by Ha-rasV12 was through mitogen extracellular kinase (MEK/extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK signaling pathway. Microtubule disruption is involved in Ha-rasV12-induced morphologic change, which could be reversed by overexpression of Stat3. Taken together, we are the first to demonstrate that Stat3 protein plays a critical role in Ha-rasV12-induced morphologic change. Oncogenic Ras-triggered morphologic change is through the activation of MEK/ERK to posttranslationally downregulate Stat3 expression. Our finding may shed light on developing novel therapeutic strategies against Ras-related tumorigenesis.

  17. Genetic and proteomic evidence for roles of Drosophila SUMO in cell cycle control, Ras signaling, and early pattern formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghua Nie

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMO is a protein modifier that is vital for multicellular development. Here we present the first system-wide analysis, combining multiple approaches, to correlate the sumoylated proteome (SUMO-ome in a multicellular organism with the developmental roles of SUMO. Using mass-spectrometry-based protein identification, we found over 140 largely novel SUMO conjugates in the early Drosophila embryo. Enriched functional groups include proteins involved in Ras signaling, cell cycle, and pattern formation. In support of the functional significance of these findings, sumo germline clone embryos exhibited phenotypes indicative of defects in these same three processes. Our cell culture and immunolocalization studies further substantiate roles for SUMO in Ras signaling and cell cycle regulation. For example, we found that SUMO is required for efficient Ras-mediated MAP kinase activation upstream or at the level of Ras activation. We further found that SUMO is dynamically localized during mitosis to the condensed chromosomes, and later also to the midbody. Polo kinase, a SUMO substrate found in our screen, partially colocalizes with SUMO at both sites. These studies show that SUMO coordinates multiple regulatory processes during oogenesis and early embryogenesis. In addition, our database of sumoylated proteins provides a valuable resource for those studying the roles of SUMO in development.

  18. Transcriptional Profile of Ki-Ras-Induced Transformation of Thyroid Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visconti, Roberta; Federico, Antonella; Coppola, Valeria

    2007-01-01

    Abstract In the last years, an increasing number of experiments has provided compelling evidence for a casual role of Ras protein mutations, resulting in their constitutive activation, in thyroid carcinogenesis. However, despite the clear involvement of Ras proteins in thyroid carcinogenesis, the...

  19. Ras Activity Oscillates in the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus and Modulates Circadian Clock Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serchov, Tsvetan; Jilg, Antje; Wolf, Christian T; Radtke, Ina; Stehle, Jörg H; Heumann, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    Circadian rhythms, generated in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), are synchronized to the environmental day-night changes by photic input. The activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1,2) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-mediated transcription play a critical role in this photoentrainment. The small GTPase Ras is one of the major upstream regulators of the ERK1,2/CREB pathway. In contrast to the well-described role of Ras in structural and functional synaptic plasticity in the adult mouse brain, the physiological regulation of Ras by photic sensory input is yet unknown. Here, we describe for the first time a circadian rhythm of Ras activity in the mouse SCN. Using synRas transgenic mice, expressing constitutively activated V12-Ha-Ras selectively in neurons, we demonstrate that enhanced Ras activation causes shortening of the circadian period length. We found upregulated expression and decreased inhibitory phosphorylation of the circadian period length modulator, glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK3β), in the SCN of synRas mice. Conversely, downregulation of Ras activity by blocking its function with an antibody in oscillating cell cultures reduced protein levels and increased phosphorylation of GSK3β and lengthened the period of BMAL1 promoter-driven luciferase activity. Furthermore, enhanced Ras activity in synRas mice resulted in a potentiation of light-induced phase delays at early subjective night, and increased photic induction of pERK1,2/pCREB and c-Fos. In contrast, at late subjective night, photic activation of Ras/ERK1,2/CREB in synRas mice was not sufficient to stimulate c-Fos protein expression and phase advance the clock. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Ras activity fine tunes the period length and modulates photoentrainment of the circadian clock.

  20. Antitumour effects of combined radio- and parvovirotherapy in N-Ras-positive tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelova, A.; Galabov, A.; Rommelaere, J.; Raykov, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Many innovative approaches have attempted to challenge the dominant position of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy as the major therapeutic modalities to treat cancer. However, only recently some new agents have appeared that achieve effects comparable to the ones of these established treatments. A novel class of such therapeutics consists of oncolytic viruses with several main representatives, namely adeno-, herpes, reo- and parvovirus. The latter class of anticancer agents has proven to be quite effective in many preclinical models and is now considered for a phase I clinical trial in patients with glioma and pancreatic cancer. An important question to be answered is whether virotherapy can be combined with standard treatments to achieve an enhanced antitumor effect still at a low level of toxicity. Here we present data concerning the application of irradiation together with H-1PV parvovirus infection comparing their toxic effects on normal and Ras -transformed fibroblasts. This proved to be a potent combination achieving high level of synergistic toxicity on transformed cells at doses, which did not affect the viability of normal human fibroblasts. This strategy holds promise to become a part of the clinical treatment of radioresistant tumours. (authors)

  1. Inactivation of the DNA repair gene O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase by promoter hypermethylation is associated with G to A mutations in K-ras in colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteller, M; Toyota, M; Sanchez-Cespedes, M; Capella, G; Peinado, M A; Watkins, D N; Issa, J P; Sidransky, D; Baylin, S B; Herman, J G

    2000-05-01

    O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is a DNA repair protein that removes mutagenic and cytotoxic adducts from the O6 position of guanine. O6-methylguanine mispairs with thymine during replication, and if the adduct is not removed, this results in conversion from a guanine-cytosine pair to an adenine-thymine pair. In vitro assays show that MGMT expression avoids G to A mutations and MGMT transgenic mice are protected against G to A transitions at ras genes. We have recently demonstrated that the MGMT gene is silenced by promoter methylation in many human tumors, including colorectal carcinomas. To study the relevance of defective MGMT function by aberrant methylation in relation to the presence of K-ras mutations, we studied 244 colorectal tumor samples for MGMT promoter hypermethylation and K-ras mutational status. Our results show a clear association between the inactivation of MGMT by promoter hypermethylation and the appearance of G to A mutations at K-ras: 71% (36 of 51) of the tumors displaying this particular type of mutation had abnormal MGMT methylation, whereas only 32% (12 of 37) of those with other K-ras mutations not involving G to A transitions and 35% (55 of 156) of the tumors without K-ras mutations demonstrated MGMT methylation (P = 0.002). In addition, MGMT loss associated with hypermethylation was observed in the small adenomas, including those that do not yet contain K-ras mutations. Hypermethylation of other genes such as p16INK4a and p14ARF was not associated with either MGMT hypermethylation or K-ras mutation. Our data suggest that epigenetic silencing of MGMT by promoter hypermethylation may lead to a particular genetic change in human cancer, specifically G to A transitions in the K-ras oncogene.

  2. CD99 triggering induces methuosis of Ewing sarcoma cells through IGF-1R/RAS/Rac1 signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Manara, Maria Cristina; Terracciano, Mario; Mancarella, Caterina; Sciandra, Marika; Guerzoni, Clara; Pasello, Michela; Grilli, Andrea; Zini, Nicoletta; Picci, Piero; Colombo, Mario P.; Morrione, Andrea; Scotlandi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    CD99 is a cell surface molecule that has emerged as a novel target for Ewing sarcoma (EWS), an aggressive pediatric bone cancer. This report provides the first evidence of methuosis in EWS, a non-apoptotic form of cell death induced by an antibody directed against the CD99 molecule. Upon mAb triggering, CD99 induces an IGF-1R/RAS/Rac1 complex, which is internalized into RAB5-positive endocytic vacuoles. This complex is then dissociated, with the IGF-1R recycling to the cell membrane while CD9...

  3. Specific regulation of point-mutated K-ras-immortalized cell proliferation by a photodynamic antisense strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Maiko; Yamayoshi, Asako; Kato, Kiyoko; Kobori, Akio; Wake, Norio; Murakami, Akira

    2010-02-01

    It has been reported that point mutations in genes are responsible for various cancers, and the selective regulation of gene expression is an important factor in developing new types of anticancer drugs. To develop effective drugs for the regulation of point-mutated genes, we focused on photoreactive antisense oligonucleotides. Previously, we reported that photoreactive oligonucleotides containing 2'-O-psoralenylmethoxyethyl adenosine (2'-Ps-eom) showed drastic photoreactivity in a strictly sequence-specific manner. Here, we demonstrated the specific gene regulatory effects of 2'-Ps-eom on [(12)Val]K-ras mutant (GGT --> GTT). Photo-cross-linking between target mRNAs and 2'-Ps-eom was sequence-specific, and the effect was UVA irradiation-dependent. Furthermore, 2'-Ps-eom was able to inhibit K-ras-immortalized cell proliferation (K12V) but not Vco cells that have the wild-type K-ras gene. These results suggest that the 2'-Ps-eom will be a powerful nucleic acid drug to inhibit the expression of disease-causing point mutation genes, and has great therapeutic potential in the treatment of cancer.

  4. H-Ras activation promotes cytoplasmic accumulation and phosphoinositide 3-OH kinase association of beta-catenin in epidermal keratinocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espada, J; Pérez-Moreno, M; Braga, V M

    1999-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying downregulation of the cadherin/catenin complexes and beta-catenin signaling during tumor progression are not fully understood. We have analyzed the effect of oncogenic H-Ras on E-cadherin/catenin complex formation/stabilization and beta-catenin distribution in epidermal ...

  5. Exploiting the bad eating habits of Ras-driven cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Eileen

    2013-10-01

    Oncogenic Ras promotes glucose fermentation and glutamine use to supply central carbon metabolism, but how and why have only emerged recently. Ras-mediated metabolic reprogramming generates building blocks for growth and promotes antioxidant defense. To fuel metabolic pathways, Ras scavenges extracellular proteins and lipids. To bolster metabolism and mitigate stress, Ras activates cellular self-cannibalization and recycling of proteins and organelles by autophagy. Targeting these distinct features of Ras-driven cancers provides novel approaches to cancer therapy.

  6. Bioinformatics of non small cell lung cancer and the ras proto-oncogene

    CERN Document Server

    Kashyap, Amita; Babu M, Naresh

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is initiated by activation of oncogenes or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Mutations in the K-ras proto-oncogene are responsible for 10–30% of adenocarcinomas. Clinical Findings point to a wide variety of other cancers contributing to lung cancer incidence. Such a scenario makes identification of lung cancer difficult and thus identifying its mechanisms can contribute to the society. Identifying unique conserved patterns common to contributing proto-oncogenes may further be a boon to Pharmacogenomics and pharmacoinformatics. This calls for ab initio/de novo drug discovery that in turn will require a comprehensive in silico approach of Sequence, Domain, Phylogenetic and Structural analysis of the receptors, ligand screening and optimization and detailed Docking studies. This brief involves extensive role of the RAS subfamily that includes a set of proteins, which cause an over expression of cancer-causing genes like M-ras and initiate tumour formation in lungs. SNP Studies and Structure based ...

  7. Caveolin-1 down-regulation is required for Wnt5a-Frizzled 2 signalling in Ha-RasV12 -induced cell transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Kuan; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Chiou, Yu-Wei; Wu, Ching-Lung; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2018-05-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav1) is down-regulated during MK4 (MDCK cells harbouring inducible Ha-Ras V12 gene) transformation by Ha-Ras V12 . Cav1 overexpression abrogates the Ha-Ras V12 -driven transformation of MK4 cells; however, the targeted down-regulation of Cav1 is not sufficient to mimic this transformation. Cav1-silenced cells, including MK4/shCav1 cells and MDCK/shCav1 cells, showed an increased cell area and discontinuous junction-related proteins staining. Cellular and mechanical transformations were completed when MDCK/shCav1 cells were treated with medium conditioned by MK4 cells treated with IPTG (MK4+I-CM) but not with medium conditioned by MK4 cells. Nanoparticle tracking analysis showed that Ha-Ras V12 -inducing MK4 cells increased exosome-like microvesicles release compared with their normal counterparts. The cellular and mechanical transformation activities of MK4+I-CM were abolished after heat treatment and exosome depletion and were copied by exosomes derived from MK4+I-CM (MK4+I-EXs). Wnt5a, a downstream product of Ha-Ras V12 , was markedly secreted by MK4+I-CM and MK4+I-EXs. Suppression of Wnt5a expression and secretion using the porcupine inhibitor C59 or Wnt5a siRNA inhibited the Ha-Ras V12 - and MK4+I-CM-induced transformation of MK4 cells and MDCK/shCav1 cells, respectively. Cav1 down-regulation, either by Ha-Ras V12 or targeted shRNA, increased frizzled-2 (Fzd2) protein levels without affecting its mRNA levels, suggesting a novel role of Cav1 in negatively regulating Fzd2 expression. Additionally, silencing Cav1 facilitated the internalization of MK4+I-EXs in MDCK cells. These data suggest that Cav1-dependent repression of Fzd2 and exosome uptake is potentially relevant to its antitransformation activity, which hinders the activation of Ha-Ras V12 -Wnt5a-Stat3 pathway. Altogether, these results suggest that both decreasing Cav1 and increasing exosomal Wnt5a must be implemented during Ha-Ras V12 -driven cell transformation. © 2018 The Authors

  8. [Regulation of [12Asp]K-ras4B on transcriptional activity of estrogen receptor in endometrial carcinoma HEC-1A cell lines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Li-ming; Wei, Li-hui; Xu, Ming-xu; Wang, Jian-liu; Zhong, Ying-cheng; Li, Xiao-ping; Tu, Zheng; Sun, Peng-ming; Ma, Da-long

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the effect of mutant-type [(12)Asp]K-ras4B gene on the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta and their transcriptional activity as a transcription factor in endometrial carcinoma HEC-1A cell line. (1) Effect of [(12)Asp]K-ras4B on the expression of ER alpha and beta were determined using Western blot assay. (2) Eukaryotic expression plasmid pGL3-luciferase-ERE containing luciferase report gene and estrogen receptor element (ERE) was constructed, and co-transfected into NIH3T3 and HEC-1A cell lines with pEGFP-N1 to examine the effect of [(12)Asp]K-ras4B on ER transcription that is regulated by estradiol. In addition, they were transfected into pSV5-HER0 (containing full length wide type ERalpha cDNA) and pCMV-rafS621A (inhibiting raf kinase) plasmids to test the effect of [(12)Asp]K-ras4B/raf signal pathway on transcriptional activity of ER proteins. (1) Protein level of ERs expressed in pcDI transfected control cells was low while it was increased for 3.6-fold (97 +/- 25, 349 +/- 67, P ras4B NIH3T3 cells after transfection. (2) In pcDI-[(12)Asp]K-ras4B NIH3T3 cells, the ratios for ERalpha and and ERbeta levels before transfection of rafS621A plasmids to that after the transfection, were 2.4:1 (724 +/- 45, 310 +/- 46, P HEC-1A cells, these ratios were 2.1:1 (566 +/- 22, 279 +/- 30, P ras4B NIH3T3 cells, 19-fold (141 +/- 39, 2644 +/- 331, P HEC-1A cells, respectively, when compared with those in the absence of E(2). (4) In pSV5-HER0 transfected pcDI-[(12)Asp] K-ras4B NIH3T3 cells and HEC-1A cells, compared to the untransfected cells, the ER transcriptional activity in the transfected cells increased markedly. The luciferase activity was increased for 8-fold (1048 +/- 91, 8099 +/- 452, P HEC-1A cells and pcDI-[(12)Asp]K-ras4B NIH3T3 cells. The ratio of luciferase activities in pcDI-[(12)Asp]K-ras4B NIH3T3 and HEC-1A cells, before and after transfection was 7.8:1 (1184 +/- 168, 152 +/- 27, P ras4B can enhance the expression of ERalpha and

  9. Prostaglandin E2 blocks menadione-induced apoptosis through the Ras/Raf/Erk signaling pathway in promonocytic leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Hyun-Seok; Shehzad, Adeeb; Lee, Young Sup

    2012-04-01

    Altered oxidative stress has long been observed in cancer cells, and this biochemical property of cancer cells represents a specific vulnerability that can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. The major role of an elevated oxidative stress for the efficacy of molecular targeted drugs is under investigation. Menadione is considered an attractive model for the study of oxidative stress, which can induce apoptosis in human leukemia HL-60 cell lines. Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) via its receptors not only promotes cell survival but also reverses apoptosis and promotes cancer progression. Here, we present evidence for the biological role of PGE(2) as a protective agent of oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in monocytic cells. Pretreatment of HL-60 cells with PGE(2) markedly ameliorated the menadione-induced apoptosis and inhibited the degradation of PARP and lamin B. The EP(2) receptor antagonist AH6809 abrogated the inhibitory effect of PGE(2), suggesting the role of the EP(2)/cAMP system. The PKA inhibitor H89 also reversed apoptosis and decreased the PKA activity that was elevated 10-fold by PGE(2). The treatment of HL-60 cells with NAC or zinc chloride showed a similar protective effect as with PGE(2) on menadione-treated cells. Furthermore, PGE(2) activated the Ras/Raf/MEK pathway, which in turn initiated ERK activation, and ultimately protected menadione-induced apoptosis. These results imply that PGE(2) via cell survival pathways may protect oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in monocytic cells. This study warrants further pre-clinical investigation as well as application towards leukemia clinics.

  10. Role of mTOR, Bad, and Survivin in RasGAP Fragment N-Mediated Cell Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiang-Yan; Widmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Partial cleavage of p120 RasGAP by caspase-3 in stressed cells generates an N-terminal fragment, called fragment N, which activates an anti-apoptotic Akt-dependent survival response. Akt regulates several effectors but which of these mediate fragment N-dependent cell protection has not been defined yet. Here we have investigated the role of mTORC1, Bad, and survivin in the capacity of fragment N to protect cells from apoptosis. Neither rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, nor silencing of raptor, a subunit of the mTORC1 complex, altered the ability of fragment N from inhibiting cisplatin- and Fas ligand-induced death. Cells lacking Bad, despite displaying a stronger resistance to apoptosis, were still protected by fragment N against cisplatin-induced death. Fragment N was also able to protect cells from Fas ligand-induced death in conditions where Bad plays no role in apoptosis regulation. Fragment N expression in cells did neither modulate survivin mRNA nor its protein expression. Moreover, the expression of cytoplasmic survivin, known to exert anti-apoptotic actions in cells, still occurred in UV-B-irradiated epidermis of mouse expressing a caspase-3-resistant RasGAP mutant that cannot produce fragment N. Additionally, survivin function in cell cycle progression was not affected by fragment N. These results indicate that, taken individually, mTOR, Bad, or Survivin are not required for fragment N to protect cells from cell death. We conclude that downstream targets of Akt other than mTORC1, Bad, or survivin mediate fragment N-induced protection or that several Akt effectors can compensate for each other to induce the pro-survival fragment N-dependent response. PMID:23826368

  11. Mevalonates, Ras and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    White, Michael

    2001-01-01

    .... This selective inhibition appears to be a consequence of expression of oncogenic Ras. Here we are evaluating the ability of Fmev to selectively interfere with proliferation of breast cancer cells...

  12. Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade attenuates growth and metastatic potential of renal cell carcinoma in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Wedson F; Naves, Marcelo A; Ravanini, Juliana N; Schor, Nestor; Teixeira, Vicente P C

    2015-09-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most frequent type of cancer among renal neoplasms in adults and responds poorly to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. There is evidence that blockade of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) might have antineoplastic effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of RAS blockade on RCC in a murine model. Murine renal cancer cells (Renca) were injected (1 × 10(5)) into the subcapsular space of the left kidney of BALB/c mice (8 wk of age). The animals were divided into 4 groups: a control group (no treatment), angiotensin-receptor blockers group (losartan 100mg/kg/d), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (captopril 10mg/kg/d), and angiotensin-receptor blockers +angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (losartan 100mg/kg/d +captopril 10mg/kg/d). The animals received the drugs by gavage for 21 days after inoculation, beginning 2 days before tumor induction, and were then euthanized. After killing the animals, the kidneys and lungs were removed, weighed, and processed for histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses. Angiogenesis and vascular microvessels were assessed with the antibodies anti-vascular endothelial growth factor and anti-CD34. Angiotensin II-inoculated animals developed renal tumors. Treated animals presented smaller tumors, regardless of the therapeutic regimen, and far fewer lung metastases in both quantity and dimension compared with the controls. The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and CD34 were significantly decreased in renal tumors of treated animals compared with the controls. Our findings suggest that blockade of RAS decreases tumor proliferation and metastatic capacity of RCC in this experimental model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhibition of the Ras-ERK pathway in mitotic COS7 cells is due to the inability of EGFR/Raf to transduce EGF signaling to downstream proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huaiping; Zhang, Tianying; Yi, Yongqing; Ma, Yue

    2016-06-01

    Although previous studies have shown that Ras-ERK signaling in mitosis is closed due to the inhibition of signal transduction, the events involved in the molecular mechanisms are still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in mitotic COS7 cells. The results demonstrated that treatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF) failed to increase the endocytosis of EGF-EGFR (EGF receptor) complexes in mitotic COS7 cells, although a large amount of endosomes were found in asynchronous COS7 cells. Clathrin expression levels in mitotic COS7 cells were inhibited whereas caveolin expression levels in mitotic COS7 cells were almost unaffected. Y1068 and Y1086 residues of EGFR in the mitotic COS7 cells were activated. However, Grb2 and Shc in the mitotic COS7 cells did not bind to activated EGFR. Ras activity was inhibited in the mitotic COS7 cells whereas its downstream protein, Raf, was obviously phosphorylated by EGF in mitosis. Treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) also increased the phosphorylation levels of Raf in the mitotic COS7 cells. Nevertheless, Raf phosphorylation in mitosis was significantly inhibited by AG1478. Lastly, activation of EGF-mediated MEK and ERK in the mitotic COS7 cells was obviously inhibited. In summary, our results suggest that the Ras-ERK pathway is inhibited in mitotic COS7 cells which may be the dual result of the difficulty in the transduction of EGF signaling by EGFR or Raf to downstream proteins.

  14. Novel approach to abuse the hyperactive K-Ras pathway for adenoviral gene therapy of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumov, Inna; Kazanov, Dina; Lisiansky, Victoria; Starr, Alex; Aroch, Ilan; Shapira, Shiran; Kraus, Sarah; Arber, Nadir

    2012-01-01

    Background: Functional activation of oncogenic K-Ras signaling pathway plays an important role in the early events of colorectal carcinogenesis (CRC). K-Ras proto-oncogene is involved in 35–40% of CRC cases. Mutations in the Ras gene trigger the transduction of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals, even in the absence of extra cellular stimuli. The objective of the current study was to use a gene-targeting approach to kill human CRC cells selectively harboring mutated K-Ras. Results: A recombinant adenovirus that carries a lethal gene, PUMA, under the control of a Ras responsive promoter (Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA) was used selectively to target CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, DLD1 and RIE-Ras) that possess a hyperactive Ras pathway while using HT29 and RIE cells as a control that harbors wild type Ras and exhibit very low Ras activity. Control vector, without the Ras responsive promoter elements was used to assess the specificity of our “gene therapy” approach. Both adenoviral vectors were assed in vitro and in xenograft model in vivo. Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA showed high potency to induce ∼ 50% apoptosis in vitro, to abolish completely tumor formation by infecting cells with the Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA prior xenografting them in nude mice and high ability to suppress by ∼ 35% tumor progression in vivo in already established tumors. Conclusions: Selective targeting of CRC cells with the activated Ras pathway may be a novel and effective therapy in CRC. The high potency of this adenoviral vector may help to overcome an undetectable micro metastasis that is the major hurdle in challenging with CRC.

  15. Novel approach to abuse the hyperactive K-Ras pathway for adenoviral gene therapy of colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumov, Inna [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Kazanov, Dina [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Lisiansky, Victoria [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Starr, Alex [Lung and Allergy Institute, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Aroch, Ilan; Shapira, Shiran; Kraus, Sarah [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Arber, Nadir, E-mail: narber@post.tau.ac.il [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Department of Gastroenterology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2012-01-15

    Background: Functional activation of oncogenic K-Ras signaling pathway plays an important role in the early events of colorectal carcinogenesis (CRC). K-Ras proto-oncogene is involved in 35-40% of CRC cases. Mutations in the Ras gene trigger the transduction of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals, even in the absence of extra cellular stimuli. The objective of the current study was to use a gene-targeting approach to kill human CRC cells selectively harboring mutated K-Ras. Results: A recombinant adenovirus that carries a lethal gene, PUMA, under the control of a Ras responsive promoter (Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA) was used selectively to target CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, DLD1 and RIE-Ras) that possess a hyperactive Ras pathway while using HT29 and RIE cells as a control that harbors wild type Ras and exhibit very low Ras activity. Control vector, without the Ras responsive promoter elements was used to assess the specificity of our 'gene therapy' approach. Both adenoviral vectors were assed in vitro and in xenograft model in vivo. Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA showed high potency to induce {approx} 50% apoptosis in vitro, to abolish completely tumor formation by infecting cells with the Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA prior xenografting them in nude mice and high ability to suppress by {approx} 35% tumor progression in vivo in already established tumors. Conclusions: Selective targeting of CRC cells with the activated Ras pathway may be a novel and effective therapy in CRC. The high potency of this adenoviral vector may help to overcome an undetectable micro metastasis that is the major hurdle in challenging with CRC.

  16. Characterization of mutations and loss of heterozygosity of p53 and K-ras2 in pancreatic cancer cell lines by immobilized polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards Jeremy

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of known mutations in a cell population is important for clinical applications and basic cancer research. In this work an immobilized form of the polymerase chain reaction, referred to as polony technology, was used to detect mutations as well as gene deletions, resulting in loss of heterozygosity (LOH, in cancer cell lines. Specifically, the mutational hotspots in p53, namely codons 175, 245, 248, 249, 273, and 282, and K-ras2, codons 12, 13 and 61, were genotyped in the pancreatic cell line, Panc-1. In addition LOH analysis was also performed for these same two genes in Panc-1 by quantifying the relative gene copy number of p53 and K-ras2. Results Using polony technology, Panc-1 was determined to possess only one copy of p53, which possessed a mutation in codon 273, and two copies of K-ras2, one wildtype and one with a mutation in codon 12. To further demonstrate the general approach of this method, polonies were also used to detect K-ras2 mutations in the pancreatic cell lines, AsPc-1 and CAPAN-1. Conclusions In conclusion, we have developed an assay that can detect mutations in hotspots of p53 and K-ras2 as well as diagnose LOH in these same genes.

  17. The use of computerized video time lapse to study cell death in rat embryo cells transfected with c-ha-ras or c-myc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrester, H.B.; Vidair, C.A.; Dewey, W.C.; Ling, C.C.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Individual rat embryo fibroblasts that had been transfected with the c-myc (REC:myc) or c-Ha ras (REC:ras) oncogene were followed after irradiation using a computer video time lapse (CVTL) system in order to quantify the lethal events that resulted in loss of clonogenic survival after irradiation. By followed the cells for 2 to 3 generations before irradiation we were able to determine where they were in the cell cycle at the time of irradiation for cell cycle analysis. After irradiation, the individual cells and their progeny were followed in multiple fields for 5-6 days Then, pedigrees for individual irradiated cells were determined by noting the times of divisions fusions, and cell death. After X-irradiation, the clonogenic survival values for these two cell lines are similar. However, by using computerized video time lapse (CVTL) to follow individual cells we found that the loss of clonogenic survival was due to two different processes, cell death and a senescent-like process. The loss of clonogenic survival of x-irradiated (9.5 and 4 Gy) REC:myc cells was attributed almost entirely to the cells dying by apoptosis (∼99 and 90%). In contrast, approximately 60% of the x-irradiated (9.5 Gy) non-clonogenic REC:ras cells died by apoptosis (with a very small amount of necrosis), and the other 40% underwent a senescent-type process in which some of the cells and their progeny stopped dividing but remained as viable cells throughout 140 hours of observation. Both processes usually occurred after the cells had divided and continued to occur in the cells' progeny for up to five divisions after irradiation. The mode of cell death in the progeny of a non-clonogenic cell can be determined only by using CVTL and can not be determined by conventional clonogenic survival experiments. Also, only by following the individual cells and their progeny can the true amount of apoptosis be determined. The cumulative percentage of apoptosis scored in whole populations

  18. Loss of RASSF1A Expression in Colorectal Cancer and Its Association with K-ras Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The RAS-association domain family 1 A (RASSF1A is a classical member of RAS effectors regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis. Loss of RASSF1A expression may shift the balance towards a growth-promoting effect without the necessity of activating K-ras mutations. Its potential association with K-ras mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC is unclear. Methods. RASSF1A expression was examined in normal mucosa, adenoma, and tumor tissues of colon and rectum, respectively. We examined the association of RASSF1A expression, mutations of K-ras, and EGFR status in 76 primary CRCs. The relationship between clinicopathological characteristics and RASSF1A expression was also analyzed. Results. RASSF1A expression level decreased progressively in normal mucosa, adenoma and, tumor tissues, and the loss of RASSF1A expression occurred more frequently in tumor tissues. Of 76 primary CRCs, loss of RASSF1A expression and/or K-ras mutations were detected in 77% cases. Loss of RASSF1A expression was more frequent in K-ras wild-type than in mutation cases (63% versus 32%, . Conclusions. Our study indicates that loss of RASSF1A may be involved in pathogenesis of CRC, its expression was found predominantly in K-ras wild-type CRCs, suggesting that it may be another way of affecting RAS signaling, in addition to K-ras mutations.

  19. Heterogeneity in radiosensitivity within esophageal cell line CaEs-17 and amplification of H-ras gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shunbao; Guo Lei; Niu Wenzhe

    1997-01-01

    Ten clones were picked from cultured colonies of CaEs-17 cell line and developed to a subcell line. The values of SF 2 were measured for each subcell line. Two radioresistant subcell lines, clone 7 and clone 10 were established. According to survival curve assay, for wild type, the value of D 0 was 1.57 Gy, D Q was 1.07 Gy, N was 1.96, SF 2 was 0.41. For clone 7, the value of D 0 was 1.64 Gy, D Q was 1.85 Gy, N was 3.07, SF 2 was 0.53. For clone 10, the value of D 0 was 1.58 Gy, D Q was 2.04 Gy, N was 3.63, SF 2 was 0.61. Clone 7 and clone 10 have much higher values of D Q and N than those of wild type. There was amplification of H-ras gene in clone 10 after 2 Gy irradiation. The amplification of H-ras gene in clone 10 after 2 Gy irradiation might be involved in hetero geneity of CaEs-17 cell line

  20. Peripheral blood cells from children with RASopathies show enhanced spontaneous colonies growth in vitro and hyperactive RAS signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaipa, G; Bugarin, C; Cianci, P; Sarno, J; Bonaccorso, P; Biondi, A; Selicorni, A

    2015-01-01

    Germline mutations in genes coding for molecules involved in the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK pathway are the hallmarks of a newly classified family of autosomal dominant syndromes termed RASopathies. Myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs), in particular, juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, can lead to potentially severe complications in children with Noonan syndrome (NS). We studied 27 children with NS or other RASopathies and 35 age-matched children as control subjects. Peripheral blood (PB) cells from these patients were studied for in vitro colony-forming units (CFUs) activity, as well as for intracellular phosphosignaling. Higher spontaneous growth of both burst-forming units-erythroid (BFU-E) and CFU-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) colonies from RAS-mutated patients were observed as compared with control subjects. We also observed a significantly higher amount of GM-colony-stimulating factor-induced p-ERK in children with RASopathies. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that PB cells isolated from children suffering from NS or other RASopathies without MPD display enhanced BFU-E and CFU-GM colony formation in vitro. The biological significance of these findings clearly awaits further studies. Collectively, our data provide a basis for further investigating of only partially characterized hematological alterations present in children suffering from RASopathies, and may provide new markers for progression toward malignant MPD in these patients

  1. TW-01, a piperazinedione-derived compound, inhibits Ras-mediated cell proliferation and angioplasty-induced vascular restenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chao-Feng [The Ph.D. Program for Cancer Biology and Drug Discovery, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicine, MacKay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, MacKay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Huang, Han-Li [The Ph.D. Program for Cancer Biology and Drug Discovery, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Peng, Chieh-Yu [Chinese Medicine Research and Development Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yu-Ching [The Center of Translational Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Ph.D. Program for Biotechnology in Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Hui-Po [College of Pharmacy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Teng, Che-Ming [College of Pharmacy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Pharmacological Institute, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Pan, Shiow-Lin, E-mail: slpan@tmu.edu.tw [The Ph.D. Program for Cancer Biology and Drug Discovery, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 10031, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and restenosis. This study investigated piperazinedione derived compound TW-01-mediated inhibitory effects on VSMC proliferation and intimal hyperplasia. Methods: Cell proliferation was determined using [{sup 3}H]-thymidine incorporation and MTT assay; cell cycle distribution was measured using flow cytometry; proteins and mRNA expression were determined using western blotting and RT-PCR analyses; DNA binding activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), as measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA); in vivo effects of TW-01 were determined using balloon angioplasty in the rat. Results: TW-01 significantly inhibited cell proliferation. At the concentrations used, no cytotoxic effects were observed. Three predominant signaling pathways were inhibited by TW-01: (a) extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and its downstream effectors of c-fos, c-jun, and c-myc; (b) DNA binding activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB); and, (c) Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) and cell cycle progression. Furthermore, TW-01 also inhibited Ras activation, a shared upstream event of each of these signaling cascades. In vascular injury studies, oral administration of TW-01 significantly suppressed intimal hyperplasia induced by balloon angioplasty. Conclusion: The present study suggests that TW-01 might be a potential candidate for atherosclerosis treatment. - Highlights: • TW-01significantly inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. • TW-01 inhibits ERK, Akt and Ras pathway and DNA binding activity of NF-κB. • TW-01 significantly suppresses intimal hyperplasia induced by balloon angioplasty. • TW-01 might be a potential candidate for atherosclerosis treatment.

  2. TW-01, a piperazinedione-derived compound, inhibits Ras-mediated cell proliferation and angioplasty-induced vascular restenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chao-Feng; Huang, Han-Li; Peng, Chieh-Yu; Lee, Yu-Ching; Wang, Hui-Po; Teng, Che-Ming; Pan, Shiow-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and restenosis. This study investigated piperazinedione derived compound TW-01-mediated inhibitory effects on VSMC proliferation and intimal hyperplasia. Methods: Cell proliferation was determined using [ 3 H]-thymidine incorporation and MTT assay; cell cycle distribution was measured using flow cytometry; proteins and mRNA expression were determined using western blotting and RT-PCR analyses; DNA binding activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), as measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA); in vivo effects of TW-01 were determined using balloon angioplasty in the rat. Results: TW-01 significantly inhibited cell proliferation. At the concentrations used, no cytotoxic effects were observed. Three predominant signaling pathways were inhibited by TW-01: (a) extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and its downstream effectors of c-fos, c-jun, and c-myc; (b) DNA binding activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB); and, (c) Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) and cell cycle progression. Furthermore, TW-01 also inhibited Ras activation, a shared upstream event of each of these signaling cascades. In vascular injury studies, oral administration of TW-01 significantly suppressed intimal hyperplasia induced by balloon angioplasty. Conclusion: The present study suggests that TW-01 might be a potential candidate for atherosclerosis treatment. - Highlights: • TW-01significantly inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. • TW-01 inhibits ERK, Akt and Ras pathway and DNA binding activity of NF-κB. • TW-01 significantly suppresses intimal hyperplasia induced by balloon angioplasty. • TW-01 might be a potential candidate for atherosclerosis treatment.

  3. The RAS Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI established the RAS Initiative to explore innovative approaches for attacking the proteins encoded by mutant forms of RAS genes and to ultimately create effective, new therapies for RAS-related cancers.

  4. Nitric oxide induces thioredoxin-1 nuclear translocation: Possible association with the p21Ras survival pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Roberto J.; Masutani, H.; Yodoi, J.; Debbas, V.; Laurindo, Francisco R.; Stern, A.; Monteiro, Hugo P.

    2006-01-01

    One of the major redox-regulating molecules with thiol reducing activity is thioredoxin-1 (TRX-1). TRX-1 is a multifunctional protein that exists in the extracellular millieu, cytoplasm, and nucleus, and has a distinct role in each environment. It is well known that TRX-1 promptly migrates to the nuclear compartment in cells exposed to oxidants. However, the intracellular location of TRX-1 in cells exposed to nitrosothiols has not been investigated. Here, we demonstrated that the exposure of HeLa cells to increasing concentrations of the nitrosothiol S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) promoted TRX-1 nuclear accumulation. The SNAP-induced TRX-1 translocation to the nucleus was inhibited by FPTIII, a selective inhibitor of p21Ras. Furthermore, TRX-1 migration was attenuated in cells stably transfected with NO insensitive p21Ras (p21 RasC118S ). Downstream to p21Ras, the MAP Kinases ERK1/2 were activated by SNAP under conditions that promote TRX-1 nuclear translocation. Inhibition of MEK prevented SNAP-stimulated ERK1/2 activation and TRX-1 nuclear migration. In addition, cells treated with p21Ras or MEK inhibitor showed increased susceptibility to cell death induced by SNAP. In conclusion, our observations suggest that the nuclear translocation of TRX-1 is induced by SNAP involving p21Ras survival pathway

  5. Reduction of metastasis, cell invasion, and adhesion in mouse osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920-induced blockade of the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Ogaki, Mitsuhiko; Yanae, Masashi; Nishida, Shozo

    2012-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most common primary malignant bone tumors in children and adolescents. Some patients continue to have a poor prognosis, because of the metastatic disease. YM529/ONO-5920 is a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate that has been used for the treatment of osteoporosis. YM529/ONO-5920 has recently been reported to induce apoptosis in various tumors including osteosarcoma. However, the mode of metastasis suppression in osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920 is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor cell migration, invasion, adhesion, or metastasis in the LM8 mouse osteosarcoma cell line. We found that YM529/ONO-5920 significantly inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion at concentrations that did not have antiproliferative effects on LM8 cells. YM529/ONO-5920 also inhibited the mRNA expression and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In addition, YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and the serine/threonine protein kinase B (Akt) by the inhibition of Ras prenylation. Moreover, U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, also inhibited LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis, as well as the mRNA expression and protein activities of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP. The results indicated that YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis. These findings suggest that YM529/ONO-5920 has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis in osteosarcoma. -- Highlights: ► We investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor metastasis in osteosarcoma. ► YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion. ► YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed Ras signalings. ► YM529/ONO-5920

  6. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK-2) mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control of Ras-associated tumor suppressor protein, RASSF2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, Gita; Mahalingam, S.

    2009-01-01

    Ras GTPase controls the normal cell growth through binding with an array of effector molecules, such as Raf and PI3-kinase in a GTP-dependent manner. RASSF2, a member of the Ras association domain family, is known to be involved in the suppression of cell growth and is frequently down-regulated in various tumor tissues by promoter hypermethylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that RASSF2 shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm by a signal-mediated process and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B. Amino acids between 240 to 260 in the C-terminus of RASSF2 harbor a functional nuclear export signal (NES), which is necessary and sufficient for efficient export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. Substitution of conserved Ile254, Val257 and Leu259 within the minimal NES impaired RASSF2 export from the nucleus. In addition, wild type but not the nuclear export defective RASSF2 mutant interacts with export receptor, CRM-1 and exported from the nucleus. Surprisingly, we observed nucleolar localization for the nuclear export defective mutant suggesting the possibility that RASSF2 may localize in different cellular compartments transiently in a cell cycle dependent manner and the observed nuclear localization for wild type protein may be due to faster export kinetics from the nucleolus. Furthermore, our data suggest that RASSF2 is specifically phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK-2 and the inhibitors of MAPK pathway impair the phosphorylation and subsequently block the export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. These data clearly suggest that ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of RASSF2. Interestingly, nuclear import defective mutant of RASSF2 failed to induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and apoptosis suggesting that RASSF2 regulates cell growth in a nuclear localization dependent manner. Collectively, these data provided evidence for the first time that MAPK/ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation regulates

  7. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK-2) mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control of Ras-associated tumor suppressor protein, RASSF2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Gita [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India); Mahalingam, S., E-mail: mahalingam@iitm.ac.in [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India); Department of Biotechnology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Cell Biology, Indian Institute of Technology-Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2009-10-01

    Ras GTPase controls the normal cell growth through binding with an array of effector molecules, such as Raf and PI3-kinase in a GTP-dependent manner. RASSF2, a member of the Ras association domain family, is known to be involved in the suppression of cell growth and is frequently down-regulated in various tumor tissues by promoter hypermethylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that RASSF2 shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm by a signal-mediated process and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B. Amino acids between 240 to 260 in the C-terminus of RASSF2 harbor a functional nuclear export signal (NES), which is necessary and sufficient for efficient export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. Substitution of conserved Ile254, Val257 and Leu259 within the minimal NES impaired RASSF2 export from the nucleus. In addition, wild type but not the nuclear export defective RASSF2 mutant interacts with export receptor, CRM-1 and exported from the nucleus. Surprisingly, we observed nucleolar localization for the nuclear export defective mutant suggesting the possibility that RASSF2 may localize in different cellular compartments transiently in a cell cycle dependent manner and the observed nuclear localization for wild type protein may be due to faster export kinetics from the nucleolus. Furthermore, our data suggest that RASSF2 is specifically phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK-2 and the inhibitors of MAPK pathway impair the phosphorylation and subsequently block the export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. These data clearly suggest that ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of RASSF2. Interestingly, nuclear import defective mutant of RASSF2 failed to induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and apoptosis suggesting that RASSF2 regulates cell growth in a nuclear localization dependent manner. Collectively, these data provided evidence for the first time that MAPK/ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation regulates

  8. Multistep carcinogenesis of normal human fibroblasts. Human fibroblasts immortalized by repeated treatment with Co-60 gamma rays were transformed into tumorigenic cells with Ha-ras oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namba, M; Nishitani, K; Fukushima, F; Kimoto, T

    1988-01-01

    Two normal mortal human fibroblast cell strains were transformed into immortal cell lines, SUSM-1 and KMST-6, by treatment with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) and Co-60 gamma rays, respectively. These immortalized cell lines showed morphological changes of cells and remarkable chromosome aberrations, but neither of them grew in soft agar or formed tumors in nude mice. The immortal cell line, KMST-6, was then converted into neoplastic cells by treatment with Harvey murine sarcoma virus (Ha-MSV) or the c-Ha-ras oncogene derived from a human lung carcinoma. These neoplastically transformed cells acquired anchorage-independent growth potential and developed tumors when transplanted into nude mice. All the tumors grew progressively without regression until the animals died of tumors. In addition, the tumors were transplantable into other nude mice. Normal human fibroblasts, on the other hand, were not transformed into either immortal or tumorigenic cells by treatment with Ha-MSV or c-Ha-ras alone. Our present data indicate that (1) the chemical carcinogen, 4NQO, or gamma rays worked as an initiator of carcinogenesis in normal human cells, giving rise to immortality, and (2) the ras gene played a role in the progression of the immortally transformed cells to more malignant cells showing anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity. In other words, the immortalization process of human cells seems to be a pivotal or rate-limiting step in the carcinogenesis of human cells.

  9. Codon 61 mutations in the c-Harvey-ras gene in mouse skin tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene plus okadaic acid class tumor promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiki, H; Suganuma, M; Yoshizawa, S; Kanazawa, H; Sugimura, T; Manam, S; Kahn, S M; Jiang, W; Hoshina, S; Weinstein, I B

    1989-01-01

    Three okadaic acid class tumor promoters, okadaic acid, dinophysistoxin-1, and calyculin A, have potent tumor-promoting activity in two-stage carcinogenesis experiments on mouse skin. DNA isolated from tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) and each of these tumor promoters revealed the same mutation at the second nucleotide of codon 61 (CAA----CTA) in the c-Ha-ras gene, determined by the polymerase chain reaction procedure and DNA sequencing. Three potent 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-type tumor promoters, TPA, teleocidin, and aplysiatoxin, showed the same effects. These results provide strong evidence that this mutation in the c-Ha-ras gene is due to a direct effect of DMBA rather than a selective effect of specific tumor promoters.

  10. Multiple fractions of gamma rays do not induce overexpression of c-myc or c-Ki-ras oncogenes in human cervical carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmak, M.; Soric, J.; Matulic, M.

    1993-01-01

    Multiple fractions of gamma rays (0.5 Gy daily, 30 fractions) had previously been found to change the sensitivity of human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells to anticancer drugs. Preirradiated cells became resistant to cisplatin, methotrexate and vincristine but retained the same sensitivity to gamma rays and ultraviolet light. Some mechanisms involved in the resistance of preirradiated cells to cisplatin and vincristine were determined, i.e. the increased levels of metallothioneins and increased expression of plasma membrane P glycoprotein. As recent reports indicated that the resistance to cisplatin and ionizing radiation may involve the expression of oncogenes, the problem was studied whether multiple fractions of gamma rays can change the expression of c-myc and c-Ki-ras oncogenes in HeLa cells and whether there is a correlation between the expression of these oncogenes and the sensitivity of preirradiated cells to cisplatin and gamma rays. The expression of c-myc and c-Ki-ras oncogenes was examined using the DNA dot blot, the RNA dot blot and Northern blot analysis. The results show that preirradiation induced neither amplification nor elevated expression of c-myc and c-Ki-ras oncogenes. Furthermore, there is no correlation between the expression of c-myc and c-Ki-ras oncogenes and the acquired resistance to cisplatin. (author) 3 figs., 32 refs

  11. BMP suppresses PTEN expression via RAS/ERK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Stayce E; Carethers, John M

    2007-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), a member of the transforming growth factor beta family, classically utilizes the SMAD signaling pathway for its growth suppressive effects,and loss of this signaling cascade may accelerate cell growth. In the colon cancer predisposition syndrome Juvenile Polyposis, as well as in the late progression stages of nonsyndromic colorectal cancers, SMAD4 function is typically abrogated. Here, we utilized the SMAD4-null SW480 colon cancer cell line to examine BMPs effect on a potential target gene, PTEN, and how its expression might be regulated. Initial treatment of the SMAD4-null cells with BMP resulted in mild growth suppression, but with prolonged exposure to BMP, the cells become growth stimulatory, which coincided with observed decreases in transcription and translation of PTEN, and with corresponding increases in phospho-AKT protein levels. BMP-induced PTEN suppression was mediated via the RAS/ERK pathway, as pharmacologic inhibition of RAS/ERK, or interference with protein function in the cytosol by DN-RAS prevented BMP-induced growth promotion and changes in PTEN levels, as did treatment with noggin, a BMP ligand inhibitor. Thus, BMP downregulates PTEN via RAS/ERK in a SMAD4-null environment that contributes to cell growth, and constitutes a SMAD4-independent but BMP-responsive signaling pathway.

  12. Coupling between p210bcr-abl and Shc and Grb2 adaptor proteins in hematopoietic cells permits growth factor receptor-independent link to ras activation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauchi, T; Boswell, H S; Leibowitz, D; Broxmeyer, H E

    1994-01-01

    Enforced expression of p210bcr-abl transforms interleukin 3 (IL-3)-dependent hematopoietic cell lines to growth factor-independent proliferation. It has been demonstrated that nonreceptor tyrosine kinase oncogenes may couple to the p21ras pathway to exert their transforming effect. In particular, p210bcr-abl was recently found to effect p21ras activation in hematopoietic cells. In this context, experiments were performed to evaluate a protein signaling pathway by which p210bcr-abl might regulate p21ras. It was asked whether Shc p46/p52, a protein containing a src-homology region 2 (SH2) domain, and known to function upstream from p21ras, might form specific complexes with p210bcr-abl and thus, possibly alter p21ras activity by coupling to the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (Sos/CDC25) through the Grb2 protein-Sos complex. This latter complex has been previously demonstrated to occur ubiquitously. We found that p210bcr-abl formed a specific complex with Shc and with Grb2 in three different murine cell lines transfected with a p210bcr-abl expression vector. There appeared to be a higher order complex containing Shc, Grb2, and bcr-abl proteins. In contrast to p210bcr-abl transformed cells, in which there was constitutive tight association between Grb2 and Shc, binding between Grb2 and Shc was Steel factor (SLF)-dependent in a SLF-responsive, nontransformed parental cell line. The SLF-dependent association between Grb2 and Shc in nontransformed cells involved formation of a complex of Grb2 with c-kit receptor after SLF treatment. Thus, p210bcr-abl appears to function in a hematopoietic p21ras activation pathway to allow growth factor-independent coupling between Grb2, which exists in a complex with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (Sos), and p21ras. Shc may not be required for Grb2-c-kit interaction, because it fails to bind strongly to c-kit.

  13. A gene expression signature of RAS pathway dependence predicts response to PI3K and RAS pathway inhibitors and expands the population of RAS pathway activated tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loboda, Andrey; Nebozhyn, Michael; Klinghoffer, Rich; Frazier, Jason; Chastain, Michael; Arthur, William; Roberts, Brian; Zhang, Theresa; Chenard, Melissa; Haines, Brian; Andersen, Jannik; Nagashima, Kumiko; Paweletz, Cloud; Lynch, Bethany; Feldman, Igor; Dai, Hongyue; Huang, Pearl; Watters, James

    2010-06-30

    Hyperactivation of the Ras signaling pathway is a driver of many cancers, and RAS pathway activation can predict response to targeted therapies. Therefore, optimal methods for measuring Ras pathway activation are critical. The main focus of our work was to develop a gene expression signature that is predictive of RAS pathway dependence. We used the coherent expression of RAS pathway-related genes across multiple datasets to derive a RAS pathway gene expression signature and generate RAS pathway activation scores in pre-clinical cancer models and human tumors. We then related this signature to KRAS mutation status and drug response data in pre-clinical and clinical datasets. The RAS signature score is predictive of KRAS mutation status in lung tumors and cell lines with high (> 90%) sensitivity but relatively low (50%) specificity due to samples that have apparent RAS pathway activation in the absence of a KRAS mutation. In lung and breast cancer cell line panels, the RAS pathway signature score correlates with pMEK and pERK expression, and predicts resistance to AKT inhibition and sensitivity to MEK inhibition within both KRAS mutant and KRAS wild-type groups. The RAS pathway signature is upregulated in breast cancer cell lines that have acquired resistance to AKT inhibition, and is downregulated by inhibition of MEK. In lung cancer cell lines knockdown of KRAS using siRNA demonstrates that the RAS pathway signature is a better measure of dependence on RAS compared to KRAS mutation status. In human tumors, the RAS pathway signature is elevated in ER negative breast tumors and lung adenocarcinomas, and predicts resistance to cetuximab in metastatic colorectal cancer. These data demonstrate that the RAS pathway signature is superior to KRAS mutation status for the prediction of dependence on RAS signaling, can predict response to PI3K and RAS pathway inhibitors, and is likely to have the most clinical utility in lung and breast tumors.

  14. A gene expression signature of RAS pathway dependence predicts response to PI3K and RAS pathway inhibitors and expands the population of RAS pathway activated tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweletz Cloud

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperactivation of the Ras signaling pathway is a driver of many cancers, and RAS pathway activation can predict response to targeted therapies. Therefore, optimal methods for measuring Ras pathway activation are critical. The main focus of our work was to develop a gene expression signature that is predictive of RAS pathway dependence. Methods We used the coherent expression of RAS pathway-related genes across multiple datasets to derive a RAS pathway gene expression signature and generate RAS pathway activation scores in pre-clinical cancer models and human tumors. We then related this signature to KRAS mutation status and drug response data in pre-clinical and clinical datasets. Results The RAS signature score is predictive of KRAS mutation status in lung tumors and cell lines with high (> 90% sensitivity but relatively low (50% specificity due to samples that have apparent RAS pathway activation in the absence of a KRAS mutation. In lung and breast cancer cell line panels, the RAS pathway signature score correlates with pMEK and pERK expression, and predicts resistance to AKT inhibition and sensitivity to MEK inhibition within both KRAS mutant and KRAS wild-type groups. The RAS pathway signature is upregulated in breast cancer cell lines that have acquired resistance to AKT inhibition, and is downregulated by inhibition of MEK. In lung cancer cell lines knockdown of KRAS using siRNA demonstrates that the RAS pathway signature is a better measure of dependence on RAS compared to KRAS mutation status. In human tumors, the RAS pathway signature is elevated in ER negative breast tumors and lung adenocarcinomas, and predicts resistance to cetuximab in metastatic colorectal cancer. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the RAS pathway signature is superior to KRAS mutation status for the prediction of dependence on RAS signaling, can predict response to PI3K and RAS pathway inhibitors, and is likely to have the most clinical

  15. Inhibitors of Ras-SOS Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaoyong; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Nussinov, Ruth

    2016-04-19

    Activating Ras mutations are found in about 30 % of human cancers. Ras activation is regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors, such as the son of sevenless (SOS), which form protein-protein interactions (PPIs) with Ras and catalyze the exchange of GDP by GTP. This is the rate-limiting step in Ras activation. However, Ras surfaces lack any evident suitable pockets where a molecule might bind tightly, rendering Ras proteins still 'undruggable' for over 30 years. Among the alternative approaches is the design of inhibitors that target the Ras-SOS PPI interface, a strategy that is gaining increasing recognition for treating Ras mutant cancers. Herein we focus on data that has accumulated over the past few years pertaining to the design of small-molecule modulators or peptide mimetics aimed at the interface of the Ras-SOS PPI. We emphasize, however, that even if such Ras-SOS therapeutics are potent, drug resistance may emerge. To counteract this development, we propose "pathway drug cocktails", that is, drug combinations aimed at parallel (or compensatory) pathways. A repertoire of classified cancer, cell/tissue, and pathway/protein combinations would be beneficial toward this goal. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. PKI-587 and sorafenib targeting PI3K/AKT/mTOR and Ras/Raf/MAPK pathways synergistically inhibit HCC cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedaly, Roberto; Angulo, Paul; Hundley, Jonathan; Daily, Michael F; Chen, Changguo; Evers, B Mark

    2012-08-01

    Deregulated Ras/Raf/MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathways are found in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study aimed to test the inhibitory effects of PKI-587 and sorafenib as single agents or in combination on HCC (Huh7 cell line) proliferation. (3)H-thymidine incorporation and MTT assay were used to assess Huh7 cell proliferation. Phosphorylation of the key enzymes in the Ras/Raf/MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways was detected by Western blot. We found that PKI-587 is a more potent PI3K/mTOR inhibitor than PI-103. Combination of PKI-587 and sorafenib was a more effective inhibitor of Huh7 proliferation than the combination of PI-103 and sorafenib. Combination of PKI-587 and sorafenib synergistically inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated Huh7 proliferation compared with monodrug therapy. EGF increased phosphorylation of Ras/Raf downstream signaling proteins MEK and ERK; EGF-stimulated activation was inhibited by sorafenib. However, sorafenib, as a single agent, increased AKT (Ser473) phosphorylation. EGF-stimulated AKT (ser473) activation was inhibited by PKI-587. PKI-587 is a potent inhibitor of AKT (Ser473), mTOR (Ser2448), and S6K (Thr389) phosphorylation; in contrast, rapamycin stimulated mTOR complex 2 substrate AKT(Ser473) phosphorylation although it inhibited mTOR complex 1 substrate S6K phosphorylation. PKI-587, as a single agent, stimulated MEK and ERK phosphorylation. However, when PKI-587 and sorafenib were used in combination, they inhibited all the tested kinases in the Ras/Raf /MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways. The combination of PKI-587 and sorafenib has the advantage over monodrug therapy on inhibition of HCC cell proliferation by blocking both PI3K/AKT/mTOR and Ras/Raf/MAPK signaling pathways. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Propiconazole-enhanced hepatic cell proliferation is associated with dysregulation of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway leading to activation of Erk1/2 through Ras farnesylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Lynea A.; Moore, Tanya; Nesnow, Stephen, E-mail: nesnow.stephen@epa.gov

    2012-04-15

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide designed to inhibit CYP51, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ergosterol in fungi and is widely used in agriculture to prevent fungal growth. Metabolomic studies in mice revealed that propiconazole increased levels of hepatic cholesterol metabolites and bile acids, and transcriptomic studies revealed that genes within the cholesterol biosynthesis, cholesterol metabolism and bile acid biosyntheses pathways were up-regulated. Hepatic cell proliferation was also increased by propiconazole. AML12 immortalized hepatocytes were used to study propiconazole's effects on cell proliferation focusing on the dysregulation of cholesterol biosynthesis and resulting effects on Ras farnesylation and Erk1/2 activation as a primary pathway. Mevalonate, a key intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, increases cell proliferation in several cancer cell lines and tumors in vivo and serves as the precursor for isoprenoids (e.g. farnesyl pyrophosphate) which are crucial in the farnesylation of the Ras protein by farnesyl transferase. Farnesylation targets Ras to the cell membrane where it is involved in signal transduction, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. In our studies, mevalonic acid lactone (MVAL), a source of mevalonic acid, increased cell proliferation in AML12 cells which was reduced by farnesyl transferase inhibitors (L-744,832 or manumycin) or simvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, indicating that this cell system responded to alterations in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Cell proliferation in AML12 cells was increased by propiconazole which was reversed by co-incubation with L-744,832 or simvastatin. Increasing concentrations of exogenous cholesterol muted the proliferative effects of propiconazole and the inhibitory effects of L-733,832, results ascribed to reduced stimulation of the endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Western blot analysis of subcellular

  18. Wogonin suppresses melanoma cell B16-F10 invasion and migration by inhibiting Ras-medicated pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Zhao

    Full Text Available The patients diagnosed with melanoma have a bad prognosis for early regional invasion and distant metastases. Wogonin (5,7-dihydroxy-8-methoxyflavone is one of the active components of flavonoids that extracts from Scutellariae radix. Several previous studies reported that wogonin possesses antitumor effect against leukemia, gastrointestinal cancer and breast cancer. In this study, we used melanoma cell B16-F10 to further investigate the anti-invasive and anti-migratory activity of wogonin. Our date showed that wogonin caused suppression of cell migration, adhesion, invasion and actin remodeling by inhibiting the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and Rac1 in vitro. Wogonin also reduced the number of the tumor nodules on the whole surface of the lung in vivo. Furthermore, the examination of mechanism revealed that wogonin inhibited Extracellular Regulated protein Kinases and Protein Kinase B pathways, which are both medicated by Ras. Insulin-like growth factor-1-induced or tumor necrosis factor-α-induced invasion was also inhibited by wogonin. Therefore, the inhibitory mechanism of melanoma cell invasion by wogonin might be elucidated.

  19. In vitro modeling of human pancreatic duct epithelial cell transformation defines gene expression changes induced by K-ras oncogenic activation in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jiaying; Niu, Jiangong; Li, Ming; Chiao, Paul J; Tsao, Ming-Sound

    2005-06-15

    Genetic analysis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and their putative precursor lesions, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanIN), has shown a multistep molecular paradigm for duct cell carcinogenesis. Mutational activation or inactivation of the K-ras, p16(INK4A), Smad4, and p53 genes occur at progressive and high frequencies in these lesions. Oncogenic activation of the K-ras gene occurs in >90% of pancreatic ductal carcinoma and is found early in the PanIN-carcinoma sequence, but its functional roles remain poorly understood. We show here that the expression of K-ras(G12V) oncogene in a near diploid HPV16-E6E7 gene immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial cell line originally derived from normal pancreas induced the formation of carcinoma in 50% of severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with these cells. A tumor cell line established from one of these tumors formed ductal cancer when implanted orthotopically. These cells also showed increased activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase, AKT, and nuclear factor-kappaB pathways. Microarray expression profiling studies identified 584 genes whose expression seemed specifically up-regulated by the K-ras oncogene expression. Forty-two of these genes have been reported previously as differentially overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cell lines or primary tumors. Real-time PCR confirmed the overexpression of a large number of these genes. Immunohistochemistry done on tissue microarrays constructed from PanIN and pancreatic cancer samples showed laminin beta3 overexpression starting in high-grade PanINs and occurring in >90% of pancreatic ductal carcinoma. The in vitro modeling of human pancreatic duct epithelial cell transformation may provide mechanistic insights on gene expression changes that occur during multistage pancreatic duct cell carcinogenesis.

  20. Genetic and Molecular Analysis of Suppressors of Ras Mutations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eastburn, Dennis

    2000-01-01

    .... The study of Caenorhabditis elegans and other model systems has demonstrated that Ras is part of a conserved Ras/MAPK signaling pathway involved in many aspects of development and cell regulation. The C...

  1. The Regulation of Lactogenic Differentiation in Mammary Epithelial Cells by Ras-Dependent and -Independent Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-06

    Lynch, 2002). In normal cells, programmed cell 19 death controls excessive proliferation. Most cancer cells, however, have devised methods for...also phosphorylates and inactivates caspase 9, a cell death -promoting protease. Phosphorylation of another Akt target, FKHR1, prevents its nuclear...Cancer Res 50:4204–4208. Gao J, Horseman N. 1999. Prolactin-independent modulation of the beta-casein response element by Erk2 Map kinase. Cell

  2. Ras-dva is a novel Pit-1- and glucocorticoid-regulated gene in the embryonic anterior pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellestad, Laura E; Porter, Tom E

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids play a role in functional differentiation of pituitary somatotrophs and lactotrophs during embryogenesis. Ras-dva was identified as a gene regulated by anterior neural fold protein-1/homeobox expressed in embryonic stem cells-1, a transcription factor known to be critical in pituitary development, and has an expression profile in the chicken embryonic pituitary gland that is consistent with in vivo regulation by glucocorticoids. The objective of this study was to characterize expression and regulation of ras-dva mRNA in the developing chicken anterior pituitary. Pituitary ras-dva mRNA levels increased during embryogenesis to a maximum on embryonic day (e) 18 and then decreased and remained low or undetectable after hatch. Ras-dva expression was highly enriched in the pituitary gland on e18 relative to other tissues examined. Glucocorticoid treatment of pituitary cells from mid- and late-stage embryos rapidly increased ras-dva mRNA, suggesting it may be a direct transcriptional target of glucocorticoids. A reporter construct driven by 4 kb of the chicken ras-dva 5'-flanking region, containing six putative pituitary-specific transcription factor-1 (Pit-1) binding sites and two potential glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding sites, was highly activated in embryonic pituitary cells and up-regulated by corticosterone. Mutagenesis of the most proximal Pit-1 site decreased promoter activity in chicken e11 pituitary cells, indicating regulation of ras-dva by Pit-1. However, mutating putative GR binding sites did not substantially reduce induction of ras-dva promoter activity by corticosterone, suggesting additional DNA elements within the 5'-flanking region are responsible for glucocorticoid regulation. We have identified ras-dva as a glucocorticoid-regulated gene that is likely expressed in cells of the Pit-1 lineage within the developing anterior pituitary gland.

  3. Molecular interaction between K-Ras and H-REV107 in the Ras signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chang Woo; Jeong, Mi Suk; Jang, Se Bok

    2017-09-16

    Ras proteins are small GTPases that serve as master moderators of a large number of signaling pathways involved in various cellular processes. Activating mutations in Ras are found in about one-third of cancers. H-REV107, a K-Ras binding protein, plays an important role in determining K-Ras function. H-REV107 is a member of the HREV107 family of class II tumor suppressor genes and a growth inhibitory Ras target gene that suppresses cellular growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Expression of H-REV107 was strongly reduced in about 50% of human carcinoma cell lines. However, the specific molecular mechanism by which H-REV107 inhibits Ras is still unknown. In the present study, we suggest that H-REV107 forms a strong complex with activating oncogenic mutation Q61H K-Ras from various biochemical binding assays and modeled structures. In addition, the interaction sites between K-Ras and H-REV107 were predicted based on homology modeling. Here, we found that some structure-based mutants of the K-Ras disrupted the complex formation with H-REV107. Finally, a novel molecular mechanism describing K-Ras and H-REV107 binding is suggested and insights into new K-Ras effector target drugs are provided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. k-RAS mutations in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with TKIs among smokers and non-smokers: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Gui Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study : Recent studies have suggested that k-RAS mutations are related to the response to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitions (TKIs in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treatment. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the relationship between smoking history and k-RAS mutations in NSCLC treated with TKIs. Material and methods : We searched MEDLINE and Web of Science up to 15 March 2014. The pooled relative risk (RR was estimated by using fixed effect model or random effect model, according to heterogeneity between studies. We also carried out power analyses. Results : We identified 12 studies with 1193 patients, including 196 patients (16.4% with k-RAS mutations. The pooled k-RAS mutations incidence was 22.8% (174/764 in patients with smoke expose vs. 5.4% (23/429 in those with no smoke exposure. The pooled RR was 2.991 (95% CI: 1.884–4.746; Z = 4.65, p = 0.000. No publication bias was found (Begg’s test: z = 1.09, p = 0.274 and Egger’s test: t = 1.38, p = 0.201. In subgroup analyses, the pooled RR was 3.336 (95% CI: 1.925–5.779; Z = 4.30, p = 0.000 in the Caucasian subgroup, while in the Asian subgroup the pooled RR was 2.093 (95% CI: 0.909–4.822; Z = 1.73, p = 0.083, but the sample size was underpowered (0.465. Conclusions : The current meta-analysis found that smoking was related to increased incidence of k-RAS mutations in non-small cell lung cancer treated with TKIs. This may be further evidence that smoking will lead to a worse prognosis in NSCLC patients treated with TKIs.

  5. RAS Initiative - Community Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Through community and technical collaborations, workshops and symposia, and the distribution of reference reagents, the RAS Initiative seeks to increase the sharing of knowledge and resources essential to defeating cancers caused by mutant RAS genes.

  6. RAS Initiative - Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI RAS Initiative has organized multiple events with outside experts to discuss how the latest scientific and technological breakthroughs can be applied to discover vulnerabilities in RAS-driven cancers.

  7. About the RAS Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RAS Initiative, a "hub and spoke" model, connects researchers to better understand and target the more than 30% of cancers driven by mutations in RAS genes. Includes oversight and contact information.

  8. Genetic alterations in Ki-ras and Ha-ras genes in Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibromas and head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Malheiros Coutinho

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available CONETXT: Ras gene mutations have been associated to a wide range of human solid tumors. Members of the ras gene family (Ki-ras, Ha-ras and N-ras are structurally related and code for a protein (p21 known to play an important role in the regulation of normal signal transduction and cell growth. The frequency of ras mutations is different from one type of tumor to another, suggesting that point mutations might be carcinogen-specific. OBJECTIVES: To study the occurrence of Ki-ras and Ha-ras mutations. We also studied the relative level of Ha-ras mRNA in 32 of the head and neck tumors. DESIGN: Case series. SETTING: University referral unit. PARTICIPANTS: 60 head and neck tumors and in 28 Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibromas (JNA. DIAGNOSTIC TEST: Using PCR-SSCP we examined the occurrence of Ki-ras and Ha-ras mutations. The relative level of Ha-ras mRNA was examined by Northern blot analysis. RESULTS: None of the head and neck tumors or JNA samples showed evidence of mutations within codons 12, 13, 59 and 61 of Ki-ras or Ha-ras genes. However, 17 (53% of the tumors where gene expression could be examined exhibited increased levels of Ha-ras mRNA compared with the normal tissue derived from the same patient. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate for the first time that mutations of Ki-ras and Ha-ras genes are not associated with the development of JNA and confirm previous reports indicating that activating ras mutations are absent or rarely involved in head and neck tumors from western world patients. Furthermore, our findings suggest that overexpression of Ha-ras, rather than mutations, might be an important factor in the development and progression of head and neck tumors.

  9. RAS - Target Identification - Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RAS Informatics lab group develops tools to track and analyze “big data” from the RAS Initiative, as well as analyzes data from external projects. By integrating internal and external data, this group helps improve understanding of RAS-driven cancers.

  10. Change of mitotic cycle and DNA repair in embryonic cells of rat, immortalized by E1 A oncogene and transformated by E1 A and c-Ha-Ras oncogenes under ionizing radiation action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirillova, T.V.

    1997-01-01

    Comparison investigation into the repair of mitotic cycle and the reunion of DN single- and double-strand breaks in gamma-ray irradiated initial E1 A oncogene immortalized and E1 A and c-Ha-Ras oncogene transformed (mutant form) lines of rat embryonic fibroblasts was carried out. Possible involvement of Ras gene product in DNA repair speed governing and absence of tumor suppression function of p 53 protein in the embryonic and E1 A oncogene immortalized cells of rat fibroblast, as well as, presence of the mentioned function of p 53 protein in E1 A and c-Ha-Ras oncogene transformed cells were studied [ru

  11. Ras-MAPK signaling in differentiating SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Olsson, Anna-Karin

    2000-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a malignant childhood cancer, originating from sympathetic neuroblasts of the peripheral nervous system. Neuroblastoma is a heterogenous group of tumours, while some are highly malignant others can spontaneosly mature into a more benign form or regress. Less than half of the patients survive and this statistics has improved only modestly over the past 20 years. SH-SY5Y is a human neuroblastoma cell line established from a highly malignant tumour. The cells have retained a ca...

  12. BRAF and RAS oncogenes regulate Rho GTPase pathways to mediate migration and invasion properties in human colon cancer cells: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirasawa Senji

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer is a common disease that involves genetic alterations, such as inactivation of tumour suppressor genes and activation of oncogenes. Among them are RAS and BRAF mutations, which rarely coexist in the same tumour. Individual members of the Rho (Ras homology GTPases contribute with distinct roles in tumour cell morphology, invasion and metastasis. The aim of this study is to dissect cell migration and invasion pathways that are utilised by BRAFV600E as compared to KRASG12V and HRASG12V oncoproteins. In particular, the role of RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A, Rac1 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 and Cdc42 (cell division cycle 42 in cancer progression induced by each of the three oncogenes is described. Methods Colon adenocarcinoma cells with endogenous as well as ectopically expressed or silenced oncogenic mutations of BRAFV600E, KRASG12V and HRASG12V were employed. Signalling pathways and Rho GTPases were inhibited with specific kinase inhibitors and siRNAs. Cell motility and invasion properties were correlated with cytoskeletal properties and Rho GTPase activities. Results Evidence presented here indicate that BRAFV600E significantly induces cell migration and invasion properties in vitro in colon cancer cells, at least in part through activation of RhoA GTPase. The relationship established between BRAFV600E and RhoA activation is mediated by the MEK-ERK pathway. In parallel, KRASG12V enhances the ability of colon adenocarcinoma cells Caco-2 to migrate and invade through filopodia formation and PI3K-dependent Cdc42 activation. Ultimately increased cell migration and invasion, mediated by Rac1, along with the mesenchymal morphology obtained through the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT were the main characteristics rendered by HRASG12V in Caco-2 cells. Moreover, BRAF and KRAS oncogenes are shown to cooperate with the TGFβ-1 pathway to provide cells with additional transforming

  13. Ras p21 and other Gn proteins are detected in mammalian cell lines by [gamma-35S]GTP gamma S binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comerford, J.G.; Gibson, J.R.; Dawson, A.P.; Gibson, I.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of guanine nucleotide binding proteins in mouse and human cell lines was investigated using [gamma- 35 S]GTP gamma S and [gamma-32P]GTP. Cell lysate polypeptides were separated by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transferred to nitrocellulose. Incubation of the nitrocellulose blots with [gamma- 35 S]GTP gamma S identified 9 distinct GTP-binding polypeptides in all lysates. One of these is the ras oncogene product, p21, as demonstrated by subsequent immunochemical staining of the nitrocellulose blots. We have shown that this procedure provides a sensitive method for detection of p21 in culture cell lines

  14. High-throughput screening identifies small molecules that bind to the RAS:SOS:RAS complex and perturb RAS signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Michael C; Howes, Jennifer E; Sun, Qi; Little, Andrew J; Camper, DeMarco V; Abbott, Jason R; Phan, Jason; Lee, Taekyu; Waterson, Alex G; Rossanese, Olivia W; Fesik, Stephen W

    2018-05-01

    K-RAS is mutated in approximately 30% of human cancers, resulting in increased RAS signaling and tumor growth. Thus, RAS is a highly validated therapeutic target, especially in tumors of the pancreas, lung and colon. Although directly targeting RAS has proven to be challenging, it may be possible to target other proteins involved in RAS signaling, such as the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Son of Sevenless (SOS). We have previously reported on the discovery of small molecules that bind to SOS1, activate SOS-mediated nucleotide exchange on RAS, and paradoxically inhibit ERK phosphorylation (Burns et al., PNAS, 2014). Here, we describe the discovery of additional, structurally diverse small molecules that also bind to SOS1 in the same pocket and elicit similar biological effects. We tested >160,000 compounds in a fluorescence-based assay to assess their effects on SOS-mediated nucleotide exchange. X-Ray structures revealed that these small molecules bind to the CDC25 domain of SOS1. Compounds that elicited high levels of nucleotide exchange activity in vitro increased RAS-GTP levels in cells, and inhibited phospho ERK levels at higher treatment concentrations. The identification of structurally diverse SOS1 binding ligands may assist in the discovery of new molecules designed to target RAS-driven tumors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prenatal Exposure to LPS Alters The Intrarenal RAS in Offspring, Which Is Ameliorated by Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xian-Fei; Sun, Mou; Guan, Fang-Xia; Guo, Li-Na; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Wan, You-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Juan; Yu, Yan-Wu; Ma, Shan-Shan; Yao, Hai-Mu; Yao, Rui; Zhang, Rui-Fang; Sun, Tong-Wen; Kan, Quan-Cheng

    2017-11-06

    Prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure causes hypertension in rat offspring through an unknown mechanism. Here, we investigated the role of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in hypertension induced by prenatal LPS exposure and also explored whether adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) can ameliorate the effects of prenatal LPS exposure in rat offspring. Sixty-four pregnant rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 16 in each), namely, a control group and an LPS group, which were intraperitoneally injected with vehicle and 0.79 mg/kg LPS, respectively, on the 8th, 10th, and 12th days of gestation; an ADSCs group, which was intravenously injected with 1.8 × 107 ADSCs on the 8th, 10th, and 12th days of gestation; and an LPS + ADSCs group, which received a combination of the treatments administered to the LPS and ADSCs groups. Prenatal LPS exposure increased blood pressure, Ang II expression, Ang II-positive, monocyte and lymphocyte, apoptotic cells in the kidney, and induced renal histological changes in offspring; however, the LPS and control groups did not differ significantly with respect to plasma renin activity levels, Ang II levels, or renal function. ADSCs treatment attenuated the blood pressure and also ameliorated the other effects of LPS-treated adult offspring. Prenatal exposure to LPS activates the intrarenal RAS but not the circulating RAS and thus induces increases in blood pressure in adult offspring; however, ADSCs treatment attenuates the blood pressure increases resulting from LPS exposure and also ameliorates the other phenotypic changes induced by LPS treatment by inhibiting intrarenal RAS activation. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2017. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Aplasia Ras homologue member Ⅰ overexpression inhibits tumor growth and induces apoptosis through inhibition of PI3K/Akt survival pathways in human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Kaishan; Wang, Shuanke; Yang, Yong; Kang, Xuewen; Wang, Jing; Han, Hua

    2015-09-01

    Aplasia Ras homologue member Ⅰ (ARHI), an imprinted tumor-suppressor gene, is downregulated in various types of cancer. However, the expression, function and specific mechanisms of ARHI in human osteosarcoma (OS) cells remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of ARHI on OS cell proliferation and apoptosis and its associated mechanism. In the study, ARHI mRNA and protein levels were markedly downregulated in OS cells compared with the human osteoblast precursor cell line hFOB1.19. By generating stable transfectants, ARHI was overexpressed in OS cells that had low levels of ARHI. Overexpression of ARHI inhibited cell viability and proliferation and induced apoptosis. However, caspase‑3 activity was not changed by ARHI overexpression. In addition, phosphorylated Akt protein expression decreased in the ARHI overexpression group compared to that in the control vector group. The knockdown of ARHI also resulted in the promotion of cell proliferation and the attenuation of apoptosis in MG‑63 cells. Additionally, ARHI silencing increased the level of p‑Akt. The present results indicate that ARHI inhibits OS cell proliferation and may have a key role in the development of OS.

  17. Genetic analysis of Ras genes in epidermal development and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosten, Matthias; Lechuga, Carmen G; Barbacid, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes are tightly controlled to ensure proper development and homeostasis of the epidermis. The Ras family of small GTPases has emerged as a central node in the coordination of cell proliferation in the epidermis. Recent genetic evidence from mouse models has revealed that the intensity of Ras signaling modulates the proliferative capacity of epidermal keratinocytes. Interfering with Ras signaling either by combined elimination of the 3 Ras genes from the basal layer of the epidermis or by overexpression of dominant-negative Ras isoforms caused epidermal thinning due to hypoproliferation of keratinocytes. In contrast, overexpression of oncogenic Ras mutants in different epidermal cell layers led to hyperproliferative phenotypes including the development of papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Here, we discuss the value of loss- and gain-of-function studies in mouse models to assess the role of Ras signaling in the control of epidermal proliferation. PMID:24150175

  18. A comparative investigation of DNA strand breaks, sister chromatid exchanges and K-ras gene mutations induced by cadmium salts in cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouron, Silvana Andrea; Grillo, Claudia Alejandra; Dulout, Fernando Noel; Golijow, Carlos Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic heavy metal of continuing occupational and environmental concern with a wide variety of adverse effects. Several studies have shown that cadmium produces DNA strand breaks, DNA-protein cross-links, oxidative DNA damage, chromosomal aberrations, dysregulation of gene expression resulting in enhanced proliferation, depressed apoptosis and/or altered DNA repair. This study was undertaken to investigate the ability of cadmium chloride (CdCl 2 ) and cadmium sulphate (CdSO 4 ) to induce point mutations in codon 12 of the K-ras protooncogene assessed by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphisms (PCR-SSCP) and RFLP-enriched PCR methods. Also their genotoxic effects were analyzed by the comet assay and sister chromatid exchanges test. The human lung fibroblast cell line MRC-5 was used for the experiments. Sister chromatid exchanges assay (SCEs) frequencies were significantly increased in cells exposed to cadmium salts in relation to controls (p < 0.001). Despite the slow increment observed in the three comet parameters considered when cells were treated with cadmium chloride, significant differences between groups were only found in the variable comet moment (CM) (p < 0.005). On the other hand, when cells were exposed to cadmium sulphate, the Kruskal-Wallis test showed highly significant differences between groups for migration, tail moment and comet moment parameters (p < 0.001). Nevertheless, a null or weak point mutation induction in K-ras protooncogene was detected using polymerase chain reaction-low ionic strength-single strand conformation polymorphisms (PCR-LIS-SSCP) and RFLP-enriched PCR methods when cells were treated with cadmium salts. Thus, inorganic cadmium produces genotoxicity in human lung fibroblast MRC-5 cells, in the absence of significant point mutation of the K-ras gene

  19. Collagen Promotes Higher Adhesion, Survival and Proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinnapaka Somaiah

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC can differentiate into several cell types and are desirable candidates for cell therapy and tissue engineering. However, due to poor cell survival, proliferation and differentiation in the patient, the therapy outcomes have not been satisfactory. Although several studies have been done to understand the conditions that promote proliferation, differentiation and migration of MSC in vitro and in vivo, still there is no clear understanding on the effect of non-cellular bio molecules. Of the many factors that influence the cell behavior, the immediate cell microenvironment plays a major role. In this context, we studied the effect of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins in controlling cell survival, proliferation, migration and directed MSC differentiation. We found that collagen promoted cell proliferation, cell survival under stress and promoted high cell adhesion to the cell culture surface. Increased osteogenic differentiation accompanied by high active RHOA (Ras homology gene family member A levels was exhibited by MSC cultured on collagen. In conclusion, our study shows that collagen will be a suitable matrix for large scale production of MSC with high survival rate and to obtain high osteogenic differentiation for therapy.

  20. Mitotic Stress Is an Integral Part of the Oncogene-Induced Senescence Program that Promotes Multinucleation and Cell Cycle Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Dikovskaya

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS is a tumor suppression mechanism that blocks cell proliferation in response to oncogenic signaling. OIS is frequently accompanied by multinucleation; however, the origin of this is unknown. Here, we show that multinucleate OIS cells originate mostly from failed mitosis. Prior to senescence, mutant H-RasV12 activation in primary human fibroblasts compromised mitosis, concordant with abnormal expression of mitotic genes functionally linked to the observed mitotic spindle and chromatin defects. Simultaneously, H-RasV12 activation enhanced survival of cells with damaged mitoses, culminating in extended mitotic arrest and aberrant exit from mitosis via mitotic slippage. ERK-dependent transcriptional upregulation of Mcl1 was, at least in part, responsible for enhanced survival and slippage of cells with mitotic defects. Importantly, mitotic slippage and oncogene signaling cooperatively induced senescence and key senescence effectors p21 and p16. In summary, activated Ras coordinately triggers mitotic disruption and enhanced cell survival to promote formation of multinucleate senescent cells.

  1. TRPC6 channel-mediated neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells and hippocampal neurons involves activation of RAS/MEK/ERK, PI3K, and CAMKIV signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Jeanine H; Schuwald, Anita M; Sillani, Giacomo; Ye, Lian; Müller, Walter E; Leuner, Kristina

    2013-11-01

    The non-selective cationic transient receptor canonical 6 (TRPC6) channels are involved in synaptic plasticity changes ranging from dendritic growth, spine morphology changes and increase in excitatory synapses. We previously showed that the TRPC6 activator hyperforin, the active antidepressant component of St. John's wort, induces neuritic outgrowth and spine morphology changes in PC12 cells and hippocampal CA1 neurons. However, the signaling cascade that transmits the hyperforin-induced transient rise in intracellular calcium into neuritic outgrowth is not yet fully understood. Several signaling pathways are involved in calcium transient-mediated changes in synaptic plasticity, ranging from calmodulin-mediated Ras-induced signaling cascades comprising the mitogen-activated protein kinase, PI3K signal transduction pathways as well as Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMKII) and CAMKIV. We show that several mechanisms are involved in TRPC6-mediated synaptic plasticity changes in PC12 cells and primary hippocampal neurons. Influx of calcium via TRPC6 channels activates different pathways including Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinases, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B, and CAMKIV in both cell types, leading to cAMP-response element binding protein phosphorylation. These findings are interesting not only in terms of the downstream targets of TRPC6 channels but also because of their potential to facilitate further understanding of St. John's wort extract-mediated antidepressant activity. Alterations in synaptic plasticity are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of depression. Beside several other proteins, TRPC6 channels regulate synaptic plasticity. This study demonstrates that different pathways including Ras/MEK/ERK, PI3K/Akt, and CAMKIV are involved in the improvement of synaptic plasticity by the TRPC6 activator hyperforin, the antidepressant active constituent of St. John

  2. Neural cell adhesion molecule-stimulated neurite outgrowth depends on activation of protein kinase C and the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolkova, K; Novitskaya, V; Pedersen, N

    2000-01-01

    , inhibitors of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase p59(fyn), PLC, PKC and MEK and an activator of PKC, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). MEK2 transfection rescued cells treated with all inhibitors. The same was found for PMA treatment, except when cells concomitantly were treated with the MEK inhibitor....... Arachidonic acid rescued cells treated with antibodies to the FGF receptor or the PLC inhibitor, but not cells in which the activity of PKC, p59(fyn), FAK, Ras, or MEK was inhibited. Interaction of NCAM with a synthetic NCAM peptide ligand, known to induce neurite outgrowth, was shown to stimulate...... phosphorylation of the MAP kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1 and ERK2. The MAP kinase activation was sustained, because ERK1 and ERK2 were phosphorylated in PC12-E2 cells and primary hippocampal neurons even after 24 hr of cultivation on NCAM-expressing fibroblasts. Based on these results, we...

  3. Aliphatic acetogenin constituents of avocado fruits inhibit human oral cancer cell proliferation by targeting the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Ambrosio, Steven M. [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Han, Chunhua [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Pan, Li; Douglas Kinghorn, A. [Division of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Ding, Haiming, E-mail: ding.29@osu.edu [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} The aliphatic acetogenins [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-enyl acetate] (1) and [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-ynyl acetate] (2) isolated from avocado fruit inhibit phosphorylation of c-RAF (Ser338) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204). {yields} Aliphatic acetogenin 2, but not 1, prevents EGF-induced activation of EGFR (Tyr1173). {yields} Combination of both aliphatic acetogenins synergistically inhibits c-RAF (Ser338) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) phosphorylation and human oral cancer cell proliferation. {yields} The potential anticancer activity of avocado fruits is due to a combination of specific aliphatic acetogenins targeting two key components of the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 cancer pathway. {yields} Providing a double hit on a critical cancer pathway such as EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 by phytochemicals like those found in avocado fruit could lead to more effective approach toward cancer prevention. -- Abstract: Avocado (Persea americana) fruits are consumed as part of the human diet and extracts have shown growth inhibitory effects in various types of human cancer cells, although the effectiveness of individual components and their underlying mechanism are poorly understood. Using activity-guided fractionation of the flesh of avocado fruits, a chloroform-soluble extract (D003) was identified that exhibited high efficacy towards premalignant and malignant human oral cancer cell lines. From this extract, two aliphatic acetogenins of previously known structure were isolated, compounds 1 [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-enyl acetate] and 2 [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-ynyl acetate]. In this study, we show for the first time that the growth inhibitory efficacy of this chloroform extract is due to blocking the phosphorylation of EGFR (Tyr1173), c-RAF (Ser338), and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) in the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 cancer pathway. Compounds 1 and 2 both inhibited phosphorylation of c-RAF (Ser338) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204). Compound 2, but not

  4. Aliphatic acetogenin constituents of avocado fruits inhibit human oral cancer cell proliferation by targeting the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ambrosio, Steven M.; Han, Chunhua; Pan, Li; Douglas Kinghorn, A.; Ding, Haiming

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The aliphatic acetogenins [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-enyl acetate] (1) and [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-ynyl acetate] (2) isolated from avocado fruit inhibit phosphorylation of c-RAF (Ser338) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204). → Aliphatic acetogenin 2, but not 1, prevents EGF-induced activation of EGFR (Tyr1173). → Combination of both aliphatic acetogenins synergistically inhibits c-RAF (Ser338) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) phosphorylation and human oral cancer cell proliferation. → The potential anticancer activity of avocado fruits is due to a combination of specific aliphatic acetogenins targeting two key components of the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 cancer pathway. → Providing a double hit on a critical cancer pathway such as EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 by phytochemicals like those found in avocado fruit could lead to more effective approach toward cancer prevention. -- Abstract: Avocado (Persea americana) fruits are consumed as part of the human diet and extracts have shown growth inhibitory effects in various types of human cancer cells, although the effectiveness of individual components and their underlying mechanism are poorly understood. Using activity-guided fractionation of the flesh of avocado fruits, a chloroform-soluble extract (D003) was identified that exhibited high efficacy towards premalignant and malignant human oral cancer cell lines. From this extract, two aliphatic acetogenins of previously known structure were isolated, compounds 1 [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-enyl acetate] and 2 [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-ynyl acetate]. In this study, we show for the first time that the growth inhibitory efficacy of this chloroform extract is due to blocking the phosphorylation of EGFR (Tyr1173), c-RAF (Ser338), and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) in the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 cancer pathway. Compounds 1 and 2 both inhibited phosphorylation of c-RAF (Ser338) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204). Compound 2, but not compound 1, prevented EGF

  5. β2-adrenoceptor blockage induces G1/S phase arrest and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells via Ras/Akt/NFκB pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Dong

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking and stress, pancreatic cancer (PanCa risk factors, stimulate nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK and catecholamines production respectively. NNK and catecholamine bind the β-adrenoceptors and induce PanCa cell proliferation; and we have previously suggested that β-adrenergic antagonists may suppress proliferation and invasion and stimulate apoptosis in PanCa. To clarify the mechanism of apoptosis induced by β2-adrenergic antagonist, we hypothesize that blockage of the β2-adrenoceptor could induce G1/S phase arrest and apoptosis and Ras may be a key player in PanCa cells. Results The β1 and β2-adrenoceptor proteins were detected on the cell surface of PanCa cells from pancreatic carcinoma specimen samples by immunohistochemistry. The β2-adrenergic antagonist ICI118,551 significantly induced G1/S phase arrest and apoptosis compared with the β1-adrenergic antagonist metoprolol, which was determined by the flow cytometry assay. β2-adrenergic antagonist therapy significantly suppressed the expression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, Akt, Bcl-2, cyclin D1, and cyclin E and induced the activation of caspase-3, caspase-9 and Bax by Western blotting. Additionally, the β2-adrenergic antagonist reduced the activation of NFκB in vitro cultured PanCa cells. Conclusions The blockage of β2-adrenoceptor markedly induced PanCa cells to arrest at G1/S phase and consequently resulted in cell death, which is possibly due to that the blockage of β2-adrenoceptor inhibited NFκB, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and Akt pathways. Therefore, their upstream molecule Ras may be a key factor in the β2-adrenoceptor antagonist induced G1/S phase arrest and apoptosis in PanCa cells. The new pathway discovered in this study may provide an effective therapeutic strategy for PanCa.

  6. The Expression, Purification, and Characterization of a Ras Oncogene (Bras2 in Silkworm (Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengbing Lv

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ras oncogene of silkworm pupae (Bras2 may belong to the Ras superfamily. It shares 77% of its amino acid identity with teratocarcinoma oncogene 21 (TC21 related ras viral oncogene homolog-2 (R-Ras2 and possesses an identical core effector region. The mRNA of Bombyx mori Bras2 has 1412 bp. The open reading frame contains 603 bp, which encodes 200 amino acid residues. This recombinant BmBras2 protein was subsequently used as an antigen to raise a rabbit polyclonal antibody. Western blotting and real-time PCR analyses showed that BmBras2 was expressed during four developmental stages. The BmBras2 expression level was the highest in the pupae and was low in other life cycle stages. BmBras2 was expressed in all eight tested tissues, and it was highly expressed in the head, intestine, and epidermis. Subcellular localization studies indicated that BmBras2 was predominantly localized in the nuclei of Bm5 cells, although cytoplasmic staining was also observed to a lesser extent. A cell proliferation assay showed that rBmBras2 could stimulate the proliferation of hepatoma cells. The higher BmBras2 expression levels in the pupal stage, tissue expression patterns, and a cell proliferation assay indicated that BmBras2 promotes cell division and proliferation, most likely by influencing cell signal transduction.

  7. The Expression, Purification, and Characterization of a Ras Oncogene (Bras2) in Silkworm (Bombyx mori).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zhengbing; Wang, Tao; Zhuang, Wenhua; Wang, Dan; Chen, Jian; Nie, Zuoming; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Wenping; Wang, Lisha; Wang, Deming; Wu, Xiangfu; Li, Jun; Qian, Lian; Zhang, Yaozhou

    2013-01-01

    The Ras oncogene of silkworm pupae (Bras2) may belong to the Ras superfamily. It shares 77% of its amino acid identity with teratocarcinoma oncogene 21 (TC21) related ras viral oncogene homolog-2 (R-Ras2) and possesses an identical core effector region. The mRNA of Bombyx mori Bras2 has 1412 bp. The open reading frame contains 603 bp, which encodes 200 amino acid residues. This recombinant BmBras2 protein was subsequently used as an antigen to raise a rabbit polyclonal antibody. Western blotting and real-time PCR analyses showed that BmBras2 was expressed during four developmental stages. The BmBras2 expression level was the highest in the pupae and was low in other life cycle stages. BmBras2 was expressed in all eight tested tissues, and it was highly expressed in the head, intestine, and epidermis. Subcellular localization studies indicated that BmBras2 was predominantly localized in the nuclei of Bm5 cells, although cytoplasmic staining was also observed to a lesser extent. A cell proliferation assay showed that rBmBras2 could stimulate the proliferation of hepatoma cells. The higher BmBras2 expression levels in the pupal stage, tissue expression patterns, and a cell proliferation assay indicated that BmBras2 promotes cell division and proliferation, most likely by influencing cell signal transduction.

  8. Human Mut T Homolog 1 (MTH1): a roadblock for the tumor-suppressive effects of oncogenic RAS-induced ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Priyamvada

    2012-01-01

    Oncogenic RAS-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) trigger barriers to cell transformation and cancer progression through tumor-suppressive responses such as cellular senescence or cell death. We have recently shown that oncogenic RAS-induced DNA damage and attendant premature senescence can be prevented by overexpressing human MutT Homolog 1 (MTH1), the major mammalian detoxifier of the oxidized DNA precursor, 8-oxo-dGTP. Paradoxically, RAS-induced ROS are also able to participate in tumor progression via transformative processes such as mitogenic signaling, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), anoikis inhibition, and PI3K/Akt-mediated survival signaling. Here we provide a preliminary insight into the influence of MTH1 levels on the EMT phenotype and Akt activation in RAS-transformed HMLE breast epithelial cells. Within this context, we will discuss the implications of MTH1 upregulation in oncogenic RAS-sustaining cells as a beneficial adaptive change that inhibits ROS-mediated cell senescence and participates in the maintenance of ROS-associated tumor-promoting mechanisms. Accordingly, targeting MTH1 in RAS-transformed tumor cells will not only induce proliferative defects but also potentially enhance therapeutic cytotoxicity by shifting cellular response away from pro-survival mechanisms.

  9. MiR-206 functions as a tumor suppressor and directly targets K-Ras in human oral squamous cell carcinoma [Retraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin FO

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Editor-in-Chief and Publisher of OncoTargets and Therapy have been alerted to unacceptable levels of duplication with another published paper: Zhang D, Ni Z, Xu X, and Xiao J. MiR-32 Functions as a Tumor Suppressor and Directly Targets EZH2 in Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma. Medical Science Monitor. 20:2527–2535, 2014.Accordingly, we retract Lin FO, Yao LJ, Xiao J, Liu DF, and Ni ZY. MiR-206 functions as a tumor suppressor and directly targets K-Ras in human oral squamous cell carcinoma. OncoTargets and Therapy. 2014;7:1583–1591.This Retraction relates to 

  10. EMT-induced stemness and tumorigenicity are fueled by the EGFR/Ras pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Chih-Cheng Voon

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed that differentiated epithelial cells would acquire stem cell-like and tumorigenic properties following an Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT. However, the signaling pathways that participate in this novel mechanism of tumorigenesis have not been fully characterized. In Runx3 (-/- p53 (-/- murine gastric epithelial (GIF-14 cells, EMT-induced plasticity is reflected in the expression of the embryonal proto-oncogene Hmga2 and Lgr5, an exclusive gastrointestinal stem cell marker. Here, we report the concurrent activation of an EGFR/Ras gene expression signature during TGF-β1-induced EMT in GIF-14 cells. Amongst the altered genes was the induction of Egfr, which corresponded with a delayed sensitization to EGF treatment in GIF-14. Co-treatment with TGF-β1 and EGF or the expression of exogenous KRas led to increased Hmga2 or Lgr5 expression, sphere initiation and colony formation in soft agar assay. Interestingly, the gain in cellular plasticity/tumorigenicity was not accompanied by increased EMT. This uncoupling of EMT and the induction of plasticity reveals an involvement of distinct signaling cues, whereby the EGFR/Ras pathway specifically promotes stemness and tumorigenicity in EMT-altered GIF-14 cells. These data show that the EGFR/Ras pathway requisite for the sustenance of gastric stem cells in vivo and in vitro is involved in the genesis and promotion of EMT-induced tumor-initiating cells.

  11. An orthosteric inhibitor of the RAS-SOS interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Seth; Joy, Stephen T; Arora, Paramjit S; Bar-Sagi, Dafna

    2013-01-01

    Rat sarcoma (RAS) proteins are signaling nodes that transduce extracellular cues into precise alterations in cellular physiology by engaging effector pathways. RAS signaling thus regulates diverse cell processes including proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival. Owing to this central role in governing mitogenic signals, RAS pathway components are often dysregulated in human diseases. Targeted therapy of RAS pathways has generally not been successful, largely because of the robust biochemistry of the targets and their multifaceted network of molecular regulators. The rate-limiting step of RAS activation is Son of Sevenless (SOS)-mediated nucleotide exchange involving a single evolutionarily conserved catalytic helix from SOS. Structure function data of this mechanism provided a strong platform to design an SOS-derived, helically constrained peptide mimic as an inhibitor of the RAS-SOS interaction. In this chapter, we review RAS-SOS signaling dynamics and present evidence supporting the novel paradigm of inhibiting their interaction as a therapeutic strategy. We then describe a method of generating helically constrained peptide mimics of protein surfaces, which we have employed to inhibit the RAS-SOS active site interaction. The biochemical and functional properties of this SOS mimic support the premise that inhibition of RAS-nucleotide exchange can effectively block RAS activation and downstream signaling. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The C-terminus of H-Ras as a target for the covalent binding of reactive compounds modulating Ras-dependent pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara L Oeste

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ras proteins are crucial players in differentiation and oncogenesis and constitute important drug targets. The localization and activity of Ras proteins are highly dependent on posttranslational modifications at their C-termini. In addition to an isoprenylated cysteine, H-Ras, but not other Ras proteins, possesses two cysteine residues (C181 and C184 in the C-terminal hypervariable domain that act as palmitoylation sites in cells. Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (cyPG are reactive lipidic mediators that covalently bind to H-Ras and activate H-Ras dependent pathways. Dienone cyPG, such as 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14-PGJ(2 (15d-PGJ(2 and Δ(12-PGJ(2 selectively bind to the H-Ras hypervariable domain. Here we show that these cyPG bind simultaneously C181 and C184 of H-Ras, thus potentially altering the conformational tendencies of the hypervariable domain. Based on these results, we have explored the capacity of several bifunctional cysteine reactive small molecules to bind to the hypervariable domain of H-Ras proteins. Interestingly, phenylarsine oxide (PAO, a widely used tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, and dibromobimane, a cross-linking agent used for cysteine mapping, effectively bind H-Ras hypervariable domain. The interaction of PAO with H-Ras takes place in vitro and in cells and blocks modification of H-Ras by 15d-PGJ(2. Moreover, PAO treatment selectively alters H-Ras membrane partition and the pattern of H-Ras activation in cells, from the plasma membrane to endomembranes. These results identify H-Ras as a novel target for PAO. More importantly, these observations reveal that small molecules or reactive intermediates interacting with spatially vicinal cysteines induce intramolecular cross-linking of H-Ras C-terminus potentially contributing to the modulation of Ras-dependent pathways.

  13. Aliphatic acetogenin constituents of avocado fruits inhibit human oral cancer cell proliferation by targeting the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Ambrosio, Steven M.; Han, Chunhua; Pan, Li; Kinghorn, A. Douglas; Ding, Haiming

    2011-01-01

    Avocado (Persea americana) fruits are consumed as part of the human diet and extracts have shown growth inhibitory effects in various types of human cancer cells, although the effectiveness of individual components and their underlying mechanism are poorly understood. Using activity-guided fractionation of the flesh of avocado fruits, a chloroform-soluble extract (D003), was identified that exhibited high efficacy towards premalignant and malignant human oral cancer cell lines. From this extract, two aliphatic acetogenins of previously known structure were isolated, compounds 1 [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-enyl acetate] and 2 [(2S,4S)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-ynyl acetate]. In this study, we show for the first time that the growth inhibitory efficacy of this chloroform extract is due to blocking the phosphorylation of EGFR (Tyr1173), c-RAF (Ser338), and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) in the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 cancer pathway. Compound 1 and 2 both inhibited phosphorylation of c-RAF (Ser338) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204). Compound 2, but not compound 1, prevented EGF-induced activation of EGFR (Tyr1173). When compounds 1 and 2 were combined they synergistically inhibited c-RAF (Ser338) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) phosphorylation, and human oral cancer cell proliferation. The present data suggest that the potential anticancer activity of avocado fruits is due to a combination of specific aliphatic acetogenins that target two key components of the EGFR/RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 cancer pathway. PMID:21596018

  14. New insights into RAS biology reinvigorate interest in mathematical modeling of RAS signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Keesha E; Rukhlenko, Oleksii S; Posner, Richard G; Hlavacek, William S; Kholodenko, Boris N

    2018-03-05

    RAS is the most frequently mutated gene across human cancers, but developing inhibitors of mutant RAS has proven to be challenging. Given the difficulties of targeting RAS directly, drugs that impact the other components of pathways where mutant RAS operates may potentially be effective. However, the system-level features, including different localizations of RAS isoforms, competition between downstream effectors, and interlocking feedback and feed-forward loops, must be understood to fully grasp the opportunities and limitations of inhibiting specific targets. Mathematical modeling can help us discern the system-level impacts of these features in normal and cancer cells. New technologies enable the acquisition of experimental data that will facilitate development of realistic models of oncogenic RAS behavior. In light of the wealth of empirical data accumulated over decades of study and the advancement of experimental methods for gathering new data, modelers now have the opportunity to advance progress toward realization of targeted treatment for mutant RAS-driven cancers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Butyltins (BTs) on Mitogen-Activated-Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase (MAP3K) and Ras Activity in Human Natural Killer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celada, Lindsay J.; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2013-01-01

    Butyltins (BTs) contaminate the environment and are found in human blood. BTs, tributyltin (TBT) and dibutyltin (DBT), diminish the cytotoxic function and levels of key proteins of human natural killer (NK) cells. NK cells are an initial immune defense against tumors, virally-infected cells and antibody-coated cells and thus critical to human health. The signaling pathways that regulate NK cell functions include mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Studies have shown that exposure to BTs leads to the activation of specific MAPKs and MAPK kinases (MAP2Ks) in human NK cells. MAP2K kinases (MAP3Ks) are upstream activators of MAP2Ks, which then activate MAPKs. The current study examined if BT-induced activation of MAP3Ks was responsible for MAP2K and thus, MAPK activation. This study examines the effects of TBT and DBT on the total levels of two MAP3Ks, c-Raf and ASK1, as well as activating and inhibitory phosphorylation sites on these MAP3Ks. In addition, the immediate upstream activator of c-Raf, Ras, was examined for BT-induced alterations. Our results show significant activation of the MAP3K, c-Raf, in human NK cells within 10 minutes of TBT exposure and the MAP3K, ASK1, after one hour exposures to TBT. In addition, our results suggest that both TBT and DBT are impacting the regulation of c-Raf. PMID:24038145

  16. RasC is required for optimal activation of adenylyl cyclase and Akt/PKB during aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, C J; Spiegelman, G B; Weeks, G

    2001-08-15

    Disruption of Dictyostelium rasC, encoding a Ras subfamily protein, generated cells incapable of aggregation. While rasC expression is enriched in a cell type-specific manner during post-aggregative development, the defect in rasC(-) cells is restricted to aggregation and fully corrected by application of exogenous cAMP pulses. cAMP is not produced in rasC(-) cells stimulated by 2'-deoxy-cAMP, but is produced in response to GTPgammaS in cell lysates, indicating that G-protein-coupled cAMP receptor activation of adenylyl cyclase is regulated by RasC. However, cAMP-induced ERK2 phosphorylation is unaffected in rasC(-) cells, indicating that RasC is not an upstream activator of the mitogen-activated protein kinase required for cAMP relay. rasC(-) cells also exhibit reduced chemotaxis to cAMP during early development and delayed response to periodic cAMP stimuli produced by wild-type cells in chimeric mixtures. Furthermore, cAMP-induced Akt/PKB phosphorylation through a phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent pathway is dramatically reduced in rasC(-) cells, suggesting that G-protein-coupled serpentine receptor activation of PI3K is regulated by RasC. Cells lacking the RasGEF, AleA, exhibit similar defects as rasC(-) cells, suggesting that AleA may activate RasC.

  17. Evidence that phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C is a key molecule mediating insulin-induced enhancement of gene expression from human cytomegalovirus promoter in CHO cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yingpei; Katakura, Yoshinori; Seto, Perry; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    1997-01-01

    The signal transduction from insulin to its receptors and Ras has been extensively studied, while little has been reported beyond these steps. We found that the expression of human interleukin 6 gene under the control of immediate early gene promoter of human cytomegalovirus was enhanced by insulin sitmulation in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The induction effect of insulin was not significantly affected by inhibitors or activators of conventional protein kinase C, cAMP dependent protein kinas...

  18. What makes Ras an efficient molecular switch: a computational, biophysical, and structural study of Ras-GDP interactions with mutants of Raf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filchtinski, Daniel; Sharabi, Oz; Rüppel, Alma; Vetter, Ingrid R; Herrmann, Christian; Shifman, Julia M

    2010-06-11

    Ras is a small GTP-binding protein that is an essential molecular switch for a wide variety of signaling pathways including the control of cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis. In the GTP-bound state, Ras can interact with its effectors, triggering various signaling cascades in the cell. In the GDP-bound state, Ras looses its ability to bind to known effectors. The interaction of the GTP-bound Ras (Ras(GTP)) with its effectors has been studied intensively. However, very little is known about the much weaker interaction between the GDP-bound Ras (Ras(GDP)) and Ras effectors. We investigated the factors underlying the nucleotide-dependent differences in Ras interactions with one of its effectors, Raf kinase. Using computational protein design, we generated mutants of the Ras-binding domain of Raf kinase (Raf) that stabilize the complex with Ras(GDP). Most of our designed mutations narrow the gap between the affinity of Raf for Ras(GTP) and Ras(GDP), producing the desired shift in binding specificity towards Ras(GDP). A combination of our best designed mutation, N71R, with another mutation, A85K, yielded a Raf mutant with a 100-fold improvement in affinity towards Ras(GDP). The Raf A85K and Raf N71R/A85K mutants were used to obtain the first high-resolution structures of Ras(GDP) bound to its effector. Surprisingly, these structures reveal that the loop on Ras previously termed the switch I region in the Ras(GDP).Raf mutant complex is found in a conformation similar to that of Ras(GTP) and not Ras(GDP). Moreover, the structures indicate an increased mobility of the switch I region. This greater flexibility compared to the same loop in Ras(GTP) is likely to explain the natural low affinity of Raf and other Ras effectors to Ras(GDP). Our findings demonstrate that an accurate balance between a rigid, high-affinity conformation and conformational flexibility is required to create an efficient and stringent molecular switch. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd

  19. The ras1 function of Schizosaccharomyces pombe mediates pheromone-induced transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O; Davey, William John; Egel, R

    1992-01-01

    Loss of ras1+ function renders fission yeast cells unable to undergo morphological changes in response to mating pheromones, whereas cells carrying activated mutations in ras1 are hyper-responsive. This has led to the suggestion that the ras1 gene product plays a role in mating pheromone signal...

  20. Effects of mutant human Ki-rasG12C gene dosage on murine lung tumorigenesis and signaling to its downstream effectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dance-Barnes, Stephanie T.; Kock, Nancy D.; Floyd, Heather S.; Moore, Joseph E.; Mosley, Libyadda J.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Pettenati, Mark J.; Miller, Mark Steven

    2008-01-01

    Studies in cell culture have suggested that the level of RAS expression can influence the transformation of cells and the signaling pathways stimulated by mutant RAS expression. However, the levels of RAS expression in vivo appear to be subject to feedback regulation, limiting the total amount of RAS protein that can be expressed. We utilized a bitransgenic mouse lung tumor model that expressed the human Ki-ras G12C allele in a tetracycline-inducible, lung-specific manner. Treatment for 12 months with 500 μg/ml of doxycycline (DOX) allowed for maximal expression of the human Ki-ras G12C allele in the lung, and resulted in the development of focal hyperplasia and adenomas. We determined if different levels of mutant RAS expression would influence the phenotype of the lung lesions. Treatment with 25, 100 and 500 μg/ml of DOX resulted in dose-dependent increases in transgene expression and tumor multiplicity. Microscopic analysis of the lungs of mice treated with the 25 μg/ml dose of DOX revealed infrequent foci of hyperplasia, whereas mice treated with the 100 and 500 μg/ml doses exhibited numerous hyperplastic foci and also adenomas. Immunohistochemical and RNA analysis of the downstream effector pathways demonstrated that different levels of mutant RAS transgene expression resulted in differences in the expression and/or phosphorylation of specific signaling molecules. Our results suggest that the molecular alterations driving tumorigenesis may differ at different levels of mutant Ki-ras G12C expression, and this should be taken into consideration when inducible transgene systems are utilized to promote tumorigenesis in mouse models

  1. Zonation of heme synthesis enzymes in mouse liver and their regulation by β-catenin and Ha-ras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeuning, Albert; Schwarz, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) hemoproteins play an important role in hepatic biotransformation. Recently, β-catenin and Ha-ras signaling have been identified as players controlling transcription of various CYP genes in mouse liver. The aim of the present study was to analyze the role of β-catenin and Ha-ras in the regulation of heme synthesis. Heme synthesis-related gene expression was analyzed in normal liver, in transgenic mice expressing activated β-catenin or Ha-ras, and in hepatomas. Regulation of the aminolevulinate dehydratase promoter was studied in vitro. Elevated expression of mRNAs and proteins involved in heme biosynthesis was linked to β-catenin activation in perivenous hepatocytes, in transgenic hepatocytes, and in hepatocellular tumors. Stimulation of the aminolevulinate dehydratase promoter by β-catenin was independent of the β-catenin/T-cell-specific transcription factor dimer. By contrast, activation of Ha-ras repressed heme synthesis-related gene expression. The present data suggest that β-catenin enhances the expression of both CYPs and heme synthesis-related genes, thus coordinating the availability of CYP apoprotein and its prosthetic group heme. The reciprocal regulation of heme synthesis by β-catenin and Ha-ras-dependent signaling supports our previous hypothesis that antagonistic action of these pathways plays a major role in the control of zonal gene expression in healthy mouse liver and aberrant expression patterns in hepatocellular tumors.

  2. Morus alba Leaf Lectin (MLL) Sensitizes MCF-7 Cells to Anoikis by Inhibiting Fibronectin Mediated Integrin-FAK Signaling through Ras and Activation of P38 MAPK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranya, Jayaram; Shilpa, Ganesan; Raghu, Kozhiparambil G.; Priya, Sulochana

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are a unique class of carbohydrate binding proteins/glycoproteins, and many of them possess anticancer properties. They can induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, inhibit protein synthesis, telomerase activity and angiogenesis in cancer cells. In the present study, we have demonstrated the effect of Morus alba leaf lectin (MLL) on anoikis induction in MCF-7 cells. Anoikis induction in cancer cells has a significant role in preventing early stage metastasis. MLL treatment in monolayers of MCF-7 cells caused significant detachment of cells in a time and concentration dependent manner. The detached cells failed to re-adhere and grew even to culture plates coated with different matrix proteins. DNA fragmentation, membrane integrity studies, annexin V staining, caspase 9 activation and upregulation of Bax/Bad confirmed that the detached cells underwent apoptosis. Upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) caused a decrease in fibronectin (FN) production which facilitated the cells to detach by blocking the FN mediated downstream signaling. On treatment with MLL, we have observed downregulation of integrin expression, decreased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), loss in FAK-integrin interaction and active Ras. MLL treatment downregulated the levels of phosphorylated Akt and PI3K. Also, we have studied the effect of MLL on two stress activated protein kinases p38 MAPK and JNK. p38 MAPK activation was found to be elevated, but there was no change in the level of JNK. Thus our study substantiated the possible antimetastatic effect of MLL by inducing anoikis in MCF-7 cells by activation of caspase 9 and proapoptotic Bax/Bad by blockage of FN mediated integrin/FAK signaling and partly by activation of p38 MAPK. PMID:28223935

  3. The human T-lymphotropic virus type I tax gene can cooperate with the ras oncogene to induce neoplastic transformation of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzatti, R; Vogel, J; Jay, G

    1990-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have linked infection by the human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) with the development of adult T-cell leukemia. The low penetrance of the virus and the long latency for disease manifestation are factors that obscure the role of HTLV-I infection in oncogenesis. We have used an in vitro transformation assay system to determine directly whether the HTLV-I tax gene has transformation potential. Transfection of the tax gene alone into early-passage rat embryo fibroblasts did not induce morphological alterations. However, cotransfection of tax with the selectable marker plasmid pRSVneo gave rise to G418-resistant colonies that could be established as immortalized cell lines. Cotransfection of tax with the ras oncogene into rat embryo fibroblasts gave rise to foci of transformed cells that were highly tumorigenic in nude mice. These data represent a direct demonstration of the oncogenic potential of the tax gene in nonlymphoid cells and establish HTLV-I as a transforming virus.

  4. [Carcinogenesis and its mechanism of mutant-type[12Asp]K-ras4B gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Li-ming; Wei, Li-hui; Zhang, Ying-mei; Wang, Jian-liu; Wang, Ying; Chen, Ying; Ma, Da-long

    2002-01-01

    Ras gene plays an important role in the extra- and intra-cellular signal transduction pathway. It mediates series cascade reactions, and eventually actives transcriptional factors in nucleus. It is unknown on the mechanism of carcinogenesis of Ras gene in endometrial carcinoma, though K-ras mutant is very common in endometrial atypical hyperplasia and carcinoma. On basis of discovering the mutation in 12th codon of K-ras in endometrial carcinoma cell line, HEC-1A, we explored the carcinogenesis and molecular mechanism of mutant-type [12Asp] K-ras4B gene. (1) Full-length [12Asp]K-ras4B cDNA was amplified with RT-PCR, then inserted into pcDI eukaryotic expressive vector. (2) Morphological change, growth kinetics in vitro and tumorigencity in nude mice in vivo after-before transfection were observed. (3) To test the cell growth kinetics by methyl thiazolium tetrazolium (MTT) and [3H]thymidine incorporation method. (1) The authors have successfully constructed eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDI-[12Asp] K-ras4B; (2) To confirm that [12Asp] K-ras4B mutant can trigger the neoplastic transformation of NIH3T3 cells by test in vitro and in vivo. (3) After pMCV-RasN17 plasmid, a Ras mutant were transfected into pcDI-[12Asp] K-ras4B cells, the growth of this cell were restrained significantly in comparison with control group. (4) These findings indicate the expression of RafS621A resulted in remarkable inhibition in proliferation of pcDI-[12Asp]K-ras4B cell (P ras4B cell growth (P ras4B gene alone is able to cause neoplastic transformation in NIH3T3 cells in vitro and in vivo. (2) [12Asp]K-ras4B-induced NIH3T3 cells neoplastic transformation required Raf signaling pathway.

  5. Ras activation by SOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Lars; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Lin, Wan-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the small guanosine triphosphatase H-Ras by the exchange factor Son of Sevenless (SOS) is an important hub for signal transduction. Multiple layers of regulation, through protein and membrane interactions, govern activity of SOS. We characterized the specific activity of individual ...

  6. Ras and relatives--job sharing and networking keep an old family together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Annette; Ehrhardt, Götz R A; Guo, Xuecui; Schrader, John W

    2002-10-01

    Many members of the Ras superfamily of GTPases have been implicated in the regulation of hematopoietic cells, with roles in growth, survival, differentiation, cytokine production, chemotaxis, vesicle-trafficking, and phagocytosis. The well-known p21 Ras proteins H-Ras, N-Ras, K-Ras 4A, and K-Ras 4B are also frequently mutated in human cancer and leukemia. Besides the four p21 Ras proteins, the Ras subfamily of the Ras superfamily includes R-Ras, TC21 (R-Ras2), M-Ras (R-Ras3), Rap1A, Rap1B, Rap2A, Rap2B, RalA, and RalB. They exhibit remarkable overall amino acid identities, especially in the regions interacting with the guanine nucleotide exchange factors that catalyze their activation. In addition, there is considerable sharing of various downstream effectors through which they transmit signals and of GTPase activating proteins that downregulate their activity, resulting in overlap in their regulation and effector function. Relatively little is known about the physiological functions of individual Ras family members, although the presence of well-conserved orthologs in Caenorhabditis elegans suggests that their individual roles are both specific and vital. The structural and functional similarities have meant that commonly used research tools fail to discriminate between the different family members, and functions previously attributed to one family member may be shared with other members of the Ras family. Here we discuss similarities and differences in activation, effector usage, and functions of different members of the Ras subfamily. We also review the possibility that the differential localization of Ras proteins in different parts of the cell membrane may govern their responses to activation of cell surface receptors.

  7. Sublethal irradiation promotes invasiveness of neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweigerer, Lothar; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Schmidberger, Heinz; Hecht, Monica

    2005-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most frequent extracranial solid tumour of childhood. Despite multiple clinical efforts, clinical outcome has remained poor. Neuroblastoma is considered to be radiosensitive, but some clinical studies including the German trial NB90 failed to show a clinical benefit of radiation therapy. The mechanisms underlying this apparent discrepancy are still unclear. We have therefore investigated the effects of radiation on neuroblastoma cell behaviour in vitro. We show that sublethal doses of irradiation up-regulated the expression of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor c-Met in some neuroblastoma cell lines. The increase in HGF/c-Met expression was correlated with enhanced invasiveness and activation of proteases degrading the extracellular matrix. Thus, irradiation at sublethal doses may promote the metastatic dissemination of neuroblastoma cells through activating the HGF/c-Met pathway and triggering matrix degradation

  8. Combined ginger extract & Gelam honey modulate Ras/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathway genes in colon cancer HT29 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Analhuda Abdullah; Sani, Nur Fathiah Abdul; Murad, Noor Azian; Makpol, Suzana; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan; Yusof, Yasmin Anum Mohd

    2015-04-01

    The interconnected Ras/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathways play a central role in colorectal tumorigenesis, and they are targets for elucidating mechanisms involved in attempts to induce colon cancer cell death. Both ginger (Zingiber officinale) and honey have been shown to exhibit anti-tumor and anti-inflammation properties against many types of cancer, including colorectal cancer. However, there are currently no reports showing the combined effect of these two dietary compounds in cancer growth inhibition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the synergistic effect of crude ginger extract and Gelam honey in combination as potential cancer chemopreventive agents against the colorectal cancer cell line HT29. The cells were divided into 4 groups: the first group represents HT29 cells without treatment, the second and third groups were cells treated singly with either ginger or Gelam honey, respectively, and the last group represents cells treated with ginger and Gelam honey combined. The results of MTS assay showed that the IC50 of ginger and Gelam honey alone were 5.2 mg/ml and 80 mg/ml, respectively, whereas the IC50 of the combination treatment was 3 mg/ml of ginger plus 27 mg/ml of Gelam honey with a combination index of ginger and Gelam honey treatment was associated with the stimulation of early apoptosis (upregulation of caspase 9 and IκB genes) accompanied by downregulation of the KRAS, ERK, AKT, Bcl-xL, NFkB (p65) genes in a synergistic manner. In conclusion, the combination of ginger and Gelam honey may be an effective chemopreventive and therapeutic strategy for inducing the death of colon cancer cells.

  9. DA-Raf-Mediated Suppression of the Ras--ERK Pathway Is Essential for TGF-β1-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Alveolar Epithelial Type 2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe-Takano, Haruko; Takano, Kazunori; Hatano, Masahiko; Tokuhisa, Takeshi; Endo, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Myofibroblasts play critical roles in the development of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis by depositing components of extracellular matrix. One source of lung myofibroblasts is thought to be alveolar epithelial type 2 cells that undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Rat RLE-6TN alveolar epithelial type 2 cells treated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) are converted into myofibroblasts through EMT. TGF-β induces both canonical Smad signaling and non-canonical signaling, including the Ras-induced ERK pathway (Raf-MEK-ERK). However, the signaling mechanisms regulating TGF-β1-induced EMT are not fully understood. Here, we show that the Ras-ERK pathway negatively regulates TGF-β1-induced EMT in RLE-6TN cells and that DA-Raf1 (DA-Raf), a splicing isoform of A-Raf and a dominant-negative antagonist of the Ras-ERK pathway, plays an essential role in EMT. Stimulation of the cells with fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), which activated the ERK pathway, prominently suppressed TGF-β1-induced EMT. An inhibitor of MEK, but not an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, rescued the TGF-β1-treated cells from the suppression of EMT by FGF2. Overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of a component of the Ras-ERK pathway, i.e., H-Ras, B-Raf, or MEK1, interfered with EMT. Knockdown of DA-Raf expression with siRNAs facilitated the activity of MEK and ERK, which were only weakly and transiently activated by TGF-β1. Although DA-Raf knockdown abrogated TGF-β1-induced EMT, the abrogation of EMT was reversed by the addition of the MEK inhibitor. Furthermore, DA-Raf knockdown impaired the TGF-β1-induced nuclear translocation of Smad2, which mediates the transcription required for EMT. These results imply that intrinsic DA-Raf exerts essential functions for EMT by antagonizing the TGF-β1-induced Ras-ERK pathway in RLE-6TN cells.

  10. H-ras oncogene-transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (TBE-1) secrete a single metalloprotease capable of degrading basement membrane collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, I.E.; Wilhelm, S.M.; Eisen, A.Z.

    1988-01-01

    H-ras transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (TBE-1) secrete a single major extracellular matrix metalloprotease which is not found in the normal parental cells. The enzyme is secreted in a latent form which can be activated to catalyze the cleavage of the basement membrane macromolecule type IV collagen. The substrates in their order of preference are: gelatin, type IV collagen, type V collagen, fibronectin, and type VII collagen; but the enzyme does not cleave the interstitial collagens or laminin. This protease is identical to gelatinase isolated from normal human skin explants, normal human skin fibroblasts, and SV40-transformed human lung fibroblasts. Based on this ability to initiate the degradation of type IV collagen in a pepsin-resistant portion of the molecule, it will be referred to as type IV collagenase. This enzyme is most likely the human analog of type IV collagenase detected in several rodent tumors. Type IV collagenase consists of three domains. Type IV collagenase represents the third member of a newly recognized gene family coding for secreted extracellular matrix metalloproteases, which includes interstitial fibroblast collagenase and stromelysin

  11. ERK mediated upregulation of death receptor 5 overcomes the lack of p53 functionality in the diaminothiazole DAT1 induced apoptosis in colon cancer models: efficiency of DAT1 in Ras-Raf mutated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamkachy, Reshma; Kumar, Rohith; Rajasekharan, K N; Sengupta, Suparna

    2016-03-08

    p53 is a tumour suppressor protein that plays a key role in many steps of apoptosis, and malfunctioning of this transcription factor leads to tumorigenesis. Prognosis of many tumours also depends upon the p53 status. Most of the clinically used anticancer compounds activate p53 dependent pathway of apoptosis and hence require p53 for their mechanism of action. Further, Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK axis is an important signaling pathway activated in many cancers. Dependence of diaminothiazoles, compounds that have gained importance recently due to their anticancer and anti angiogenic activities, were tested in cancer models with varying p53 or Ras/Raf mutational status. In this study we have used p53 mutated and knock out colon cancer cells and xenograft tumours to study the role of p53 in apoptosis mediated by diaminothiazoles. Colon cancer cell lines with varying mutational status for Ras or Raf were also used. We have also examined the toxicity and in vivo efficacy of a lead diaminothiazole 4-Amino-5-benzoyl-2-(4-methoxy phenylamino)thiazole (DAT1) in colon cancer xenografts. We have found that DAT1 is active in both in vitro and in vivo models with nonfunctional p53. Earlier studies have shown that extrinsic pathway plays major role in DAT1 mediated apoptosis. In this study, we have found that DAT1 is causing p53 independent upregulation of the death receptor 5 by activating the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway both in wild type and p53 suppressed colon cancer cells. These findings are also confirmed by the in vivo results. Further, DAT1 is more efficient to induce apoptosis in colon cancer cells with mutated Ras or Raf. Minimal toxicity in both acute and subacute studies along with the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of DAT1 in cancers with both wild type and nonfunctional p53 place it as a highly beneficial candidate for cancer chemotherapy. Besides, efficiency in cancer cells with mutations in the Ras oncoprotein or its downstream kinase Raf raise interest in

  12. Overexpression of K-p21Ras play a prominent role in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng-bo; Zhou, Xin-liang; Yang, Ju-lun

    2018-06-01

    The proto-oncogene ras product, p21Ras, has been found overexpression in many human tumors. However, the subtypes of overexpressed p21Ras still remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate overexpressed isoforms of p21Ras and their roles in the progress of lung cancer. Method: The expression of total p21Ras in normal lung tissues and lung cancers was determined by immunohistochemically staining with monoclonal antibody (Mab) KGHR-1 which could recognize and broad spectrum reaction with the (K/H/N) ras protein. Then, the isoforms of p21Ras was examined by specific Mab for each p21Ras subtypes. Results: Low expression of total p21Ras was found in 26.67% (8/30) of normal lung tissues, and 81.31% (87/107) of adenocarcinoma harbored overexpressed total p21Ras. Besides, 70.00% (35/50) of squamous cell carcinoma were detected overexpressed total p21Ras. In addition, 122 lung cancer tissues from overexpression of total p21Ras protein were selected to detect the expression of each subtype. And all the 122 lung cancer tissues were K-p21Ras overexpression. Moreover, there was a statistical significance difference between the expression level of total p21Ras and differentiation, and the same results were observed between the expression level of total p21Ras and lymph node metastasis (P0.05). Conclusions: Overexpression of K-p21Ras plays a prominent role in the progress of lung cancer and it is suggested that the p21Ras could serve as a promising treatment target in lung cancer.

  13. Ran is a potential therapeutic target for cancer cells with molecular changes associated with activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 and Ras/MEK/ERK pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Hiu-Fung; Chan, Ka-Kui; Grills, Claire; Murray, James T.; Platt-Higgins, Angela; Eldin, Osama Sharaf; O’Byrne, Ken; Janne, Pasi; Fennell, Dean A.; Johnston, Patrick G.; Rudland, Philip S.; El-Tanani, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Cancer cells have been shown to be more susceptible to Ran knockdown compared to normal cells. We now investigate whether Ran is a potential therapeutic target of cancers with frequently found mutations that lead to higher Ras/MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 activities. Experimental Design Apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry (PI and Annexin V staining) and MTT assay in cancer cells grown under different conditions after knockdown of Ran.. The correlations between Ran expression and patient survival were examined in breast and lung cancers. Results Cancer cells with their PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 and Ras/MEK/ERK pathways inhibited are less susceptible to Ran silencing-induced apoptosis. KRas mutated, c-Met amplified and Pten-deleted cancer cells are also more susceptible to Ran silencing-induced apoptosis than their wild-type counterparts and this effect is reduced by inhibitors of the PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 and MEK/ERK pathways. Overexpression of Ran in clinical specimens is significantly associated with poor patient outcome in both breast and lung cancers. This association is dramatically enhanced in cancers with increased c-Met or osteopontin expression, or with oncogenic mutations of KRas or PIK3CA, all of which are mutations that potentially correlate with activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 and/or Ras/MEK/ERK pathways. Silencing Ran also results in dysregulation of nucleocytoplasmic transport of transcription factors and downregulation of Mcl-1 expression, at the transcriptional level, which are reversed by inhibitors of the PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 and MEK/ERK pathways. Conclusion Ran is a potential therapeutic target for treatment of cancers with mutations/changes of expression in protooncogenes that lead to activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 and Ras/MEK/ERK pathways. PMID:22090358

  14. SmgGDS is a transient nucleolar protein that protects cells from nucleolar stress and promotes the cell cycle by regulating DREAM complex gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonyo, P; Bergom, C; Brandt, A C; Tsaih, S-W; Sun, Y; Bigley, T M; Lorimer, E L; Terhune, S S; Rui, H; Flister, M J; Long, R M; Williams, C L

    2017-12-14

    The chaperone protein and guanine nucleotide exchange factor SmgGDS (RAP1GDS1) is a key promoter of cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. SmgGDS undergoes nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, suggesting that it has both cytoplasmic and nuclear functions that promote cancer. Previous studies indicate that SmgGDS binds cytoplasmic small GTPases and promotes their trafficking to the plasma membrane. In contrast, little is known about the functions of SmgGDS in the nucleus, or how these nuclear functions might benefit cancer cells. Here we show unique nuclear localization and regulation of gene transcription pathways by SmgGDS. Strikingly, SmgGDS depletion significantly reduces expression of over 600 gene products that are targets of the DREAM complex, which is a transcription factor complex that regulates expression of proteins controlling the cell cycle. The cell cycle regulators E2F1, MYC, MYBL2 (B-Myb) and FOXM1 are among the DREAM targets that are diminished by SmgGDS depletion. E2F1 is well known to promote G1 cell cycle progression, and the loss of E2F1 in SmgGDS-depleted cells provides an explanation for previous reports that SmgGDS depletion characteristically causes a G1 cell cycle arrest. We show that SmgGDS localizes in nucleoli, and that RNAi-mediated depletion of SmgGDS in cancer cells disrupts nucleolar morphology, signifying nucleolar stress. We show that nucleolar SmgGDS interacts with the RNA polymerase I transcription factor upstream binding factor (UBF). The RNAi-mediated depletion of UBF diminishes nucleolar localization of SmgGDS and promotes proteasome-mediated degradation of SmgGDS, indicating that nucleolar sequestration of SmgGDS by UBF stabilizes SmgGDS protein. The ability of SmgGDS to interact with UBF and localize in the nucleolus is diminished by expressing DiRas1 or DiRas2, which are small GTPases that bind SmgGDS and act as tumor suppressors. Taken together, our results support a novel nuclear role for SmgGDS in protecting malignant

  15. PI3K: A Crucial Piece in the RAS Signaling Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krygowska, Agata Adelajda; Castellano, Esther

    2018-06-01

    RAS proteins are key signaling switches essential for control of proliferation, differentiation, and survival of eukaryotic cells. RAS proteins are mutated in 30% of human cancers. In addition, mutations in upstream or downstream signaling components also contribute to oncogenic activation of the pathway. RAS proteins exert their functions through activation of several signaling pathways and dissecting the contributions of these effectors in normal cells and in cancer is an ongoing challenge. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge about how RAS regulates type I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), one of the main RAS effectors. RAS signaling through PI3K is necessary for normal lymphatic vasculature development and for RAS-induced transformation in vitro and in vivo, especially in lung cancer, where it is essential for tumor initiation and necessary for tumor maintenance. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  16. [Effect of ERK1/2 Signaling Pathway Inhibitor PD98059 on the Expression of Ras, BRaf, MEK, ERK1/2 in Marrow Nucleated Red Blood Cells of CMS Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuan-Fang; Ji, Lin-Hua; Feng, Ting-Ting; Liu, Fang; Cui, Sen; Su, Juan

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the effect of ERK1 / 2 signaling pathway inhibitor PD98059 on Ras, Raf, MEK, ERK1, ERK2 expression in order to explore a new way for basic research and clinical treatment of the chronic mountain sickness(CMS). Sixteen CMS patients were selected, the bone marrow was collected for isolation of monomuclear cells (MNC), the cells were sorted by using CD71 and CD235a antibody magnetic beads, then positive cells were diveded into 5 groups: blank control, DMSO and PD98059 5, 10 and 20 µmol/L, and were cultured in hypoxid condition for 72 hours. The Ras-GTP levels in supernatant was detected by ELISA, the RT-PCR was used to determine the expression of BRaf, MEK, ERK1, ERK2 mRNA in nucleated red blood cells, and the Western blot method was used to detect expression of BRaf, MEK, ERK1, ERK2 protein. PD98059 had no effect on the level of Ras-GTP in each groups. Compared with the blank control group, the expression levels of BRaf, MEK mRNA in DMSO group were not statistically significant (P values were 0.826, 0.298). Compared with the PD98059 20 mol/L group, the expression level of ERK1/2 mRNA was statistically significant (P=0.001, 0.002). Compared with the blank control group, expression levels of p-BRaf, p-MEK protein in DMSO group were not statistically significant (P=0.370, 0.351). Compared with the PD98059 20 mol/L group, the difference of p-ERK1/2 protein level in other 4 groups were statistically significant (P values were <0.001, 0.007). PD98059 can up-regulate the expressions of ERK1/2 miRNA and p-ERK1/2 protein in bone marrow nucleated red blood cells, the Ras / Raf / MEK / ERK 1/2 pathway is the main signal transduction pathway in regulating bone marrow nucleated red blood cells, suggesting that Ras/Raf /MEK /ERK 1/2 pathway may be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic mountain sickness process.

  17. Processing and fatty acid acylation of RAS1 and RAS2 proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiyama, A.; Tamanoi, F.

    1986-01-01

    The authors demonstrate the pathway for the biosynthesis of RAS1 and RAS2 gene products of Saccharomyces cerevisiae leading to their localization in membranes. The primary translation products of these genes are detected in a soluble fraction. Shortly after synthesis, these precursor molecules are converted to forms that migrate slightly faster than the precursor forms on a NaDodSO 4 /polyacrylamide gel. These processed proteins are further modified by fatty acid acylation, which is detected by [ 3 H]palmitic acid labeling. The acylated derivatives are found exclusively in cell membranes, indicating the translocation of the RAS proteins from cytosol to membranes during maturation process. The attached fatty acids can be released by mild alkaline hydrolysis, suggesting that the linkage between the fatty acid and the protein is an ester bond. The site of the modification by fatty acid is presumably localized to the COOH-terminal portion of the RAS proteins. Fraction of the membranes by sucrose gradient demonstrates that a majority of the fatty-acylated RAS proteins are localized in plasma membrane

  18. H-RAS, K-RAS, and N-RAS gene activation in human bladder cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybojewska, B; Jagiello, A; Jalmuzna, P

    2000-08-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in most developed countries. In this work, 19 bladder cancer specimens, along with their infiltrations of the urinary bladder wall from the same patients, were examined for the presence of H-RAS, K-RAS, and N-RAS activation using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. The H-RAS activation was found in 15 (about 84%) of the 19 bladder cancers studied. The same results were obtained in the infiltrating urinary bladder wall samples. N-RAS gene mutations were observed in all cases (except 1) in which H-RAS gene mutations were detected. The results suggest a strong relationship between H-RAS and N-RAS gene activation in bladder cancer. Changes in the K-RAS gene in bladder cancers seem to be a rare event; this is in agreement with findings of other authors. We found activation of the gene in one specimen of bladder cancer and its infiltration of the urinary bladder wall in the same patient.

  19. Relation between the insulin receptor number in cells, autophosphorylation and insulin-stimulated Ras.GTP formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osterop, A.P.R.M.; Medema, R.H.; Bos, J.L.; Zon, G.C.M. van der; Moller, D.E.; Flier, J.S.; Möller, W.; Maassen, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    We showed previously that upon insulin stimulation of an insulin receptor overexpressing cell linme,o st of the p2lras warsa pidly converted into the GTP bound state (Burgering, B. M. T., Medema, R. H., Maassen, J. A., Van de Wetering, M. L., Van der Eb, A. J., McCormick, F., and Bos, J. L.

  20. Approach for targeting Ras with small molecules that activate SOS-mediated nucleotide exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Michael C; Sun, Qi; Daniels, R Nathan; Camper, DeMarco; Kennedy, J Phillip; Phan, Jason; Olejniczak, Edward T; Lee, Taekyu; Waterson, Alex G; Rossanese, Olivia W; Fesik, Stephen W

    2014-03-04

    Aberrant activation of the small GTPase Ras by oncogenic mutation or constitutively active upstream receptor tyrosine kinases results in the deregulation of cellular signals governing growth and survival in ∼30% of all human cancers. However, the discovery of potent inhibitors of Ras has been difficult to achieve. Here, we report the identification of small molecules that bind to a unique pocket on the Ras:Son of Sevenless (SOS):Ras complex, increase the rate of SOS-catalyzed nucleotide exchange in vitro, and modulate Ras signaling pathways in cells. X-ray crystallography of Ras:SOS:Ras in complex with these molecules reveals that the compounds bind in a hydrophobic pocket in the CDC25 domain of SOS adjacent to the Switch II region of Ras. The structure-activity relationships exhibited by these compounds can be rationalized on the basis of multiple X-ray cocrystal structures. Mutational analyses confirmed the functional relevance of this binding site and showed it to be essential for compound activity. These molecules increase Ras-GTP levels and disrupt MAPK and PI3K signaling in cells at low micromolar concentrations. These small molecules represent tools to study the acute activation of Ras and highlight a pocket on SOS that may be exploited to modulate Ras signaling.

  1. Tetraspanin 1 promotes invasiveness of cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölters, Sebastian; Anacker, Jelena; Jansen, Lars; Beer-Grondke, Katrin; Dürst, Matthias; Rubio, Ignacio

    2013-08-01

    Tetraspanins are a heterogeneous group of 4-transmembrane proteins that segregate into so-called tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs) along with other cell surface proteins such as integrins. TEMs of various types are reportedly involved in the regulation of cell growth, migration and invasion of several tumour cell types, both as suppressors or supporting structures. Tetraspanin 1 (Tspan1, NET-1), a member of the transmembrane 4 superfamily (TM4SF) of tetraspanins, is overexpressed in high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and terminal carcinomas but its precise function in the context of carcinoma of the cervix uteri is not known. Here, we present a comprehensive investigation of the role of tetraspanin 1 in the cervical cancer cell lines SiHa and HeLa. We document that tetraspanin 1 increases the invasive potential of cervical cancer cells, whereas proliferation, growth in soft agar and adhesion are largely unaffected. In line with the latter findings, our data exclude the participation of testraspanin in integrin-mediated activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin and phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) and in EGFR-dependent signalling to the Ras/Erk pathway. In conclusion, our data argue against a role for tetraspanin 1 as a genuine mediator of cell surface receptor signalling but rather document a role for tetraspanin 1 in the control of cervical cancer cell motility and invasion.

  2. [Expressions of Ras and Sos1 in epithelial ovarian cancer tissues and their clinical significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zheng-Hua; Linghu, Hua; Liu, Qian-Fen

    2016-11-20

    To detect the expressions of Ras and Sos1 proteins in human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) tissues and explore their correlation with the clinicopathological features of the patients. The expressions of Ras and Sos1 proteins were detected immunohistochemically in 62 EOC tissues, 5 borderline ovarian cancer tissues, 15 benign epithelial ovarian neoplasm tissues, and 18 normal ovarian tissues. The EOC tissues showed significantly higher expression levels of both Ras and Sos1 than the other tissues tested (Ptissues, Ras and Sos1 proteins were expressed mostly on the cell membrane and in the cytoplasm. The expression level of Ras was correlated with pathological types of the tumor (Ptissue-specific variation of Ras expression can lend support to a specific diagnosis of ovarian serous adenocarcinoma. The association of Ras and Sos1 protein expression with the tumor-free survival time of the patients awaits further investigation with a larger sample size.

  3. Predictive value of K-ras and PIK3CA in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with EGFR-TKIs: a systemic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jie-Ying; Cheng, Ya-Nan; Han, Lei; Wei, Feng; Yu, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Xin-Wei; Cao, Shui; Yu, Jin-Pu

    2015-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to augment the insufficient data on the impact of mutative EGFR downstream phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways on the clinical efficiency of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Network databases were explored in April, 2015. Papers that investigated the clinical outcomes of NSCLC patients treated with EGFR-TKIs according to the status of K-ras and/or PIK3CA gene mutation were included. A quantitative meta-analysis was conducted using standard statistical methods. Odds ratios (ORs) for objective response rate (ORR) and hazard ratios (HRs) for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated. Mutation in K-ras significantly predicted poor ORR [OR =0.22; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.13-0.35], shorter PFS (HR =1.56; 95% CI, 1.27-1.92), and shorter OS (HR =1.59; 95% CI, 1.33-1.91) in NSCLC patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. Mutant PIK3CA significantly predicted shorter OS (HR =1.83; 95% CI, 1.05-3.20), showed poor ORR (OR =0.70; 95% CI, 0.22-2.18), and shorter PFS (HR =1.79; 95% CI, 0.91-3.53) in NSCLC patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. K-ras mutation adversely affected the clinical response and survival of NSCLC patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. PIK3CA mutation showed similar trends. In addition to EGFR, adding K-ras and PIK3CA as routine gene biomarkers in clinical genetic analysis is valuable to optimize the effectiveness of EGFR-TKI regimens and identify optimal patients who will benefit from EGFR-TKI treatment

  4. CT radiogenomic characterization of EGFR, K-RAS, and ALK mutations in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Stefania; Rampinelli, Cristiano [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Petrella, Francesco; Spaggiari, Lorenzo [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Milan (Italy); Buscarino, Valentina; De Maria, Federica [University of Milan, Department of Health Sciences, Milan (Italy); Raimondi, Sara [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Milan (Italy); Barberis, Massimo; Fumagalli, Caterina [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Pathology, Milan (Italy); Spitaleri, Gianluca; De Marinis, Filippo [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Thoracic Oncology, Milan (Italy); Bellomi, Massimo [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Health Sciences, Milan (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    To assess the association between CT features and EGFR, ALK, KRAS mutations in non-small cell lung cancer. Patients undergoing chest CT and testing for the above gene mutations were included. Qualitative evaluation of CTs included: lobe; lesion diameter; shape; margins; ground-glass opacity; density; cavitation; air bronchogram; pleural thickening; intratumoral necrosis; nodules in tumour lobe; nodules in non-tumour lobes; pleural retraction; location; calcifications; emphysema; fibrosis; pleural contact; pleural effusion. Statistical analysis was performed to assess association of features with each gene mutation. ROC curves for gene mutations were drawn; the corresponding area under the curve was calculated. P-values <0.05 were considered significant. Of 285 patients, 60/280 (21.43 %) were positive for EGFR mutation; 31/270 (11.48 %) for ALK rearrangement; 64/240 (26.67 %) for KRAS mutation. EGFR mutation was associated with air bronchogram, pleural retraction, females, non-smokers, small lesion size, and absence of fibrosis. ALK rearrangements were associated with age and pleural effusion. KRAS mutation was associated with round shape, nodules in non-tumour lobes, and smoking. This study disclosed associations between CT features and alterations of EGFR (air bronchogram, pleural retraction, small lesion size, absence of fibrosis), ALK (pleural effusion) and KRAS (round lesion shape, nodules in non-tumour lobes). (orig.)

  5. Which downstream signal transduction pathway(s) of H-ras are necessary for the cellular response(s) to ionizing radiation? (Results of an astro research fellowship year)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudoltz, Marc S.; Muschel, Ruth J.; McKenna, W. Gillies

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Background: The H-ras oncogene encodes a protein which is an essential component of multiple downstream effector pathways required for induction of proliferation and differentiation. Ras plays a role in the control some of these signal transduction pathways, such as the MAP kinase pathway which controls gene expression and the Rac-Rho pathway which controls cell morphology. Previous work from our laboratory has associated H-ras expression with radiation resistance, a prolonged delay in G2 following exposure to ionizing radiation, and suppression of radiation-induced apoptosis. In addition, H-ras cooperates with myc in transformation. Recent work by White et al. (Cell 80:533-541, 1995) and Joneson et al. (Science 271: 810-812, 1996) describes three mutations in H-ras which were engineered to eliminate different downstream signal transduction pathways of H-ras. T35S contains a serine in place of threonine at amino acid 35 and is defective for ras-induced cytoskeletal changes and initiation of DNA synthesis. E37G contains a glutamic acid in place of glycine at amino acid 37 which eliminates interaction of H-ras with a GDP/GTP exchange factor. C40 contains a substitution of cysteine for tyrosine at amino acid 40 and is defective for H-ras induction of the MAP kinase pathway. We propose that by expressing these mutant H-ras proteins in immortalized cells the downstream pathways of H-ras which regulate the cellular response(s) to ionizing radiation may be determined. Materials and Methods: pHP-5 plasmids encoding these H-ras mutant genes (see White et al.) were transfected by calcium phosphate precipitation into MR4 cells, rat embryo fibroblasts immortalized by expression of v-myc. In this vector, the cDNA for H-ras is placed under the control of a CMV constitutive promoter, and selection is provided by hygromycin. The transfections performed were as follows: V12Ras (no mutation), T35S, E37G, C40, T35S + E37G, and T35S + C40. Twenty four hours after transfection

  6. Fetal liver stromal cells promote hematopoietic cell expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Kun; Hu, Caihong; Zhou, Zhigang; Huang, Lifang; Liu, Wenli; Sun, Hanying

    2009-01-01

    Future application of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in clinical therapies largely depends on their successful expansion in vitro. Fetal liver (FL) is a unique hematopoietic organ in which hematopoietic cells markedly expand in number, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Stromal cells (StroCs) have been suggested to provide a suitable cellular environment for in vitro expansion of HSPCs. In this study, murine StroCs derived from FL at E14.5, with a high level of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Wnt expression, were found to have an increased ability to support the proliferation of HSPCs. This effect was inhibited by blocking Shh signaling. Supplementation with soluble Shh-N promoted the proliferation of hematopoietic cells by activating Wnt signaling. Our findings suggest that FL-derived StroCs support proliferation of HSPCs via Shh inducing an autocrine Wnt signaling loop. The use of FL-derived StroCs and regulation of the Shh pathway might further enhance HPSC expansion.

  7. Analog reactor simulator RAS; Reaktorski analogni simulator RAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radanovic, Lj; Bingulac, S; Popovic, D [The Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1961-07-01

    Analog computer RAS was designed as a nuclear reactor simulator, but it can be simultaneously used for solving a number of other problems. This paper contains a brief description of the simulator parts and their principal characteristics.

  8. Expression microarray meta-analysis identifies genes associated with Ras/MAPK and related pathways in progression of muscle-invasive bladder transition cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Ewald

    Full Text Available The effective detection and management of muscle-invasive bladder Transition Cell Carcinoma (TCC continues to be an urgent clinical challenge. While some differences of gene expression and function in papillary (Ta, superficial (T1 and muscle-invasive (≥T2 bladder cancers have been investigated, the understanding of mechanisms involved in the progression of bladder tumors remains incomplete. Statistical methods of pathway-enrichment, cluster analysis and text-mining can extract and help interpret functional information about gene expression patterns in large sets of genomic data. The public availability of patient-derived expression microarray data allows open access and analysis of large amounts of clinical data. Using these resources, we investigated gene expression differences associated with tumor progression and muscle-invasive TCC. Gene expression was calculated relative to Ta tumors to assess progression-associated differences, revealing a network of genes related to Ras/MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways with increased expression. Further, we identified genes within this network that are similarly expressed in superficial Ta and T1 stages but altered in muscle-invasive T2 tumors, finding 7 genes (COL3A1, COL5A1, COL11A1, FN1, ErbB3, MAPK10 and CDC25C whose expression patterns in muscle-invasive tumors are consistent in 5 to 7 independent outside microarray studies. Further, we found increased expression of the fibrillar collagen proteins COL3A1 and COL5A1 in muscle-invasive tumor samples and metastatic T24 cells. Our results suggest that increased expression of genes involved in mitogenic signaling may support the progression of muscle-invasive bladder tumors that generally lack activating mutations in these pathways, while expression changes of fibrillar collagens, fibronectin and specific signaling proteins are associated with muscle-invasive disease. These results identify potential biomarkers and targets for TCC treatments, and

  9. Mind the GAP: A Novel Tumor-Promoting Mechanism | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    RAS proteins, like light switches, toggle between an “on” conformation where they promote cell growth, survival, and/or the formation of blood vessels (known as angiogenesis) and an “off” conformation in which they are unable to stimulate their target effector proteins. Nearly one-third of human tumors express a mutated RAS gene, which encodes a protein locked permanently in

  10. Hydrostatic pressure promotes the proliferation and osteogenic/chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells: The roles of RhoA and Rac1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Hua Zhao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have shown that hydrostatic pressure can serve as an active regulator for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs. The current work further investigates the roles of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1 in hydrostatic pressure-related effects on BMSCs. Flow cytometry assays showed that the hydrostatic pressure promoted cell cycle initiation in a RhoA- and Rac1-dependent manner. Furthermore, fluorescence assays confirmed that RhoA played a positive and Rac1 displayed a negative role in the hydrostatic pressure-induced F-actin stress fiber assembly. Western blots suggested that RhoA and Rac1 play central roles in the pressure-inhibited ERK phosphorylation, and Rac1 but not RhoA was involved in the pressure-promoted JNK phosphorylation. Finally, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR experiments showed that pressure promoted the expression of osteogenic marker genes in BMSCs at an early stage of osteogenic differentiation through the up-regulation of RhoA activity. Additionally, the PCR results showed that pressure enhanced the expression of chondrogenic marker genes in BMSCs during chondrogenic differentiation via the up-regulation of Rac1 activity. Collectively, our results suggested that RhoA and Rac1 are critical to the pressure-induced proliferation and differentiation, the stress fiber assembly, and MAPK activation in BMSCs.

  11. Hydrostatic pressure promotes the proliferation and osteogenic/chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells: The roles of RhoA and Rac1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yin-Hua; Lv, Xin; Liu, Yan-Li; Zhao, Ying; Li, Qiang; Chen, Yong-Jin; Zhang, Min

    2015-05-01

    Our previous studies have shown that hydrostatic pressure can serve as an active regulator for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). The current work further investigates the roles of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) in hydrostatic pressure-related effects on BMSCs. Flow cytometry assays showed that the hydrostatic pressure promoted cell cycle initiation in a RhoA- and Rac1-dependent manner. Furthermore, fluorescence assays confirmed that RhoA played a positive and Rac1 displayed a negative role in the hydrostatic pressure-induced F-actin stress fiber assembly. Western blots suggested that RhoA and Rac1 play central roles in the pressure-inhibited ERK phosphorylation, and Rac1 but not RhoA was involved in the pressure-promoted JNK phosphorylation. Finally, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments showed that pressure promoted the expression of osteogenic marker genes in BMSCs at an early stage of osteogenic differentiation through the up-regulation of RhoA activity. Additionally, the PCR results showed that pressure enhanced the expression of chondrogenic marker genes in BMSCs during chondrogenic differentiation via the up-regulation of Rac1 activity. Collectively, our results suggested that RhoA and Rac1 are critical to the pressure-induced proliferation and differentiation, the stress fiber assembly, and MAPK activation in BMSCs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Conditioned Medium Promotes Proliferation and Migration of Alveolar Epithelial Cells under Septic Conditions In Vitro via the JNK-P38 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC based therapies may be useful for treating acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. We investigated the impact of human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly-derived MSC (hUC-MSC secreted factors on alveolar epithelial cells under septic conditions and determined the relevant intracellular signaling pathways. Methods: Human alveolar epithelial cells (AEC and primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC were subjected to lipopolysaccharide (LPS with or without the presence of hUC-MSC-conditioned medium (CM. Proliferation and migration of AEC and SAEC were determined via an MTT assay, a wound healing assay and a transwell migration assay (only for AEC. Protein phosphorylation was determined by western blot and the experiments were repeated in presence of small-molecule inhibitors. The hMSC-secretory proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry. Results: MSC-CM enhanced proliferation and migration. Activation of JNK and P38, but not ERK, was required for the proliferation and migration of AEC and SAEC. Pretreatment of AEC or SAEC with SP600125, an inhibitor of JNK1 or SB200358, an inhibitor of P38, significantly reduced cell proliferation and migration. An array of proteins including TGF-beta receptor type-1, TGF-beta receptor type-2, Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 2 which influencing the proliferation and migration of AEC and SAEC were detected in MSC-CM. Conclusion: Our data suggest MSC promote epithelial cell repair through releasing a repertoire of paracrine factors via activation of JNK and P38 MAPK.

  13. RAS signalling in energy metabolism and rare human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dard, L; Bellance, N; Lacombe, D; Rossignol, R

    2018-05-08

    The RAS pathway is a highly conserved cascade of protein-protein interactions and phosphorylation that is at the heart of signalling networks that govern proliferation, differentiation and cell survival. Recent findings indicate that the RAS pathway plays a role in the regulation of energy metabolism via the control of mitochondrial form and function but little is known on the participation of this effect in RAS-related rare human genetic diseases. Germline mutations that hyperactivate the RAS pathway have been discovered and linked to human developmental disorders that are known as RASopathies. Individuals with RASopathies, which are estimated to affect approximately 1/1000 human birth, share many overlapping characteristics, including cardiac malformations, short stature, neurocognitive impairment, craniofacial dysmorphy, cutaneous, musculoskeletal, and ocular abnormalities, hypotonia and a predisposition to developing cancer. Since the identification of the first RASopathy, type 1 neurofibromatosis (NF1), which is caused by the inactivation of neurofibromin 1, several other syndromes have been associated with mutations in the core components of the RAS-MAPK pathway. These syndromes include Noonan syndrome (NS), Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML), which was formerly called LEOPARD syndrome, Costello syndrome (CS), cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFC), Legius syndrome (LS) and capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome (CM-AVM). Here, we review current knowledge about the bioenergetics of the RASopathies and discuss the molecular control of energy homeostasis and mitochondrial physiology by the RAS pathway. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ras oncogenes in oral cancer: the past 20 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan; Tsuchida, Nobuo

    2012-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) of head and neck is associated with high morbidity and mortality in both Western and Asian countries. Several risk factors for the development of oral cancer are very well established, including tobacco chewing, betel quid, smoking, alcohol drinking and human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. Apart from these risk factors, many genetic factors such as oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and regulatory genes are identified to involve in oral carcinogenesis with these risk factors dependent and independent manner. Ras is one of the most frequently genetically deregulated oncogene in oral cancer. In this review, we analyze the past 22years of literature on genetic alterations such as mutations and amplifications of the isoforms of the ras oncogene in oral cancer. Further, we addressed the isoform-specific role of the ras in oral carcinogenesis. We also discussed how targeting the Akt and MEK, downstream effectors of the PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathways, respectively, would probably pave the possible molecular therapeutic target for the ras driven tumorigenesis in oral cancer. Analysis of these ras isoforms may critically enlighten specific role of a particular ras isoform in oral carcinogenesis, enhance prognosis and pave the way for isoform-specific molecular targeted therapy in OSCC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Coordinating ERK signaling via the molecular scaffold Kinase Suppressor of Ras [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Frodyma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Many cancers, including those of the colon, lung, and pancreas, depend upon the signaling pathways induced by mutated and constitutively active Ras. The molecular scaffolds Kinase Suppressor of Ras 1 and 2 (KSR1 and KSR2 play potent roles in promoting Ras-mediated signaling through the Raf/MEK/ERK kinase cascade. Here we summarize the canonical role of KSR in cells, including its central role as a scaffold protein for the Raf/MEK/ERK kinase cascade, its regulation of various cellular pathways mediated through different binding partners, and the phenotypic consequences of KSR1 or KSR2 genetic inactivation. Mammalian KSR proteins have a demonstrated role in cellular and organismal energy balance with implications for cancer and obesity. Targeting KSR1 in cancer using small molecule inhibitors has potential for therapy with reduced toxicity to the patient. RNAi and small molecule screens using KSR1 as a reference standard have the potential to expose and target vulnerabilities in cancer. Interestingly, although KSR1 and KSR2 are similar in structure, KSR2 has a distinct physiological role in regulating energy balance. Although KSR proteins have been studied for two decades, additional analysis is required to elucidate both the regulation of these molecular scaffolds and their potent effect on the spatial and temporal control of ERK activation in health and disease.

  16. Opposite effects of Ha-Ras and Ki-Ras on radiation-induced apoptosis via differential activation of PI3K/Akt and Rac/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.-A.; Kang, C.-M.; Lee, Y.-S.; Lee, S.-J.; Bae, S.-W.; Cho, C.-K.

    2003-01-01

    It has been well known that Ras signaling is involved in various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, distinct cellular functions of Ras isozymes are not fully understood. Here we show the opposing roles of Ha-Ras and Ki-Ras genes in the modulation of cell sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Overexpression of active isoform of Ha-Ras (12V-Ha- Ras) in Rat2 cells increases resistance to the ionizing radiation. Constitutive activation of phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt is detected specifically in 12V-Ha-Ras-overexpressing cells. The specific PI3K inhibitor LY294002 inhibits PI3K/Akt signaling and potentiates the radiation-induced apoptosis, suggesting that activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is involved in the increased radio-resistance in cells overexpressing 12V-Ha-Ras. Overexpression of activated Ki-Ras (12V-Ki-Ras), on the other hand, markedly increases radiation sensitivity. The p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity is selectively enhanced by ionizing radiation in cells overexpressing 12V-Ki-Ras. The specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, PD169316, or dominant-negative p38 MAP kinase decreases radiation-induced cell death. We further show that the mechanism that underlies potentiation of cell death in cells overexpressing 12V-Ki-Ras involves Bax translocation to the mitochondrial membrane. Elevated Bax translocation following ionizing irradiation in 12V-Ki-Ras-overexpressing cells is completely inhibited by PD169316 or dominant-negative p38 MAP kinase. In addition, introduction of cells with RacN17, a dominant negative mutant of Rac, resulted in a marked inhibition of radiation-induced Bax translocation and apoptotic cell death as well as p38 MAP kinase activation. Taken together, these findings explain the opposite effects of Ha-Ras and Ki-Ras on modulation of radio-sensitivity, and suggest that differential activation of PI3K/Akt and Rac/p38 MAP kinase signaling by Ha-Ras and Ki-Ras may

  17. Expression of human kinase suppressor of Ras 2 (hKSR-2) gene in HL60 leukemia cells is directly upregulated by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and is required for optimal cell differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuening; Wang, T.-T.; White, John H.; Studzinski, George P.

    2007-01-01

    Induction of terminal differentiation of neoplastic cells offers potential for a novel approach to cancer therapy. One of the agents being investigated for this purpose in preclinical studies is 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (1,25D), which can convert myeloid leukemia cells into normal monocyte-like cells, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are not fully understood. Here, we report that 1,25D upregulates the expression of hKSR-2, a new member of a small family of proteins that exhibit evolutionarily conserved function of potentiating ras signaling. The upregulation of hKSR-2 is direct, as it occurs in the presence of cycloheximide, and occurs primarily at the transcriptional level, via activation of vitamin D receptor, which acts as a ligand-activated transcription factor. Two VDRE-type motifs identified in the hKSR-2 gene bind VDR-RXR alpha heterodimers present in nuclear extracts of 1,25D-treated HL60 cells, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that these VDRE motifs bind VDR in 1,25D-dependent manner in intact cells, coincident with the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to these motifs. Treatment of the cells with siRNA to hKSR-2 reduced the proportion of the most highly differentiated cells in 1,25D-treated cultures. These results demonstrate that hKSR-2 is a direct target of 1,25D in HL60 cells, and is required for optimal monocytic differentiation

  18. High-Affinity Interaction of the K-Ras4B Hypervariable Region with the Ras Active Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Tanmay S.; Jang, Hyunbum; Khavrutskii, Lyuba; Abraham, Sherwin J.; Banerjee, Avik; Freed, Benjamin C.; Johannessen, Liv; Tarasov, Sergey G.; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth; Tarasova, Nadya I.

    2015-01-01

    Ras proteins are small GTPases that act as signal transducers between cell surface receptors and several intracellular signaling cascades. They contain highly homologous catalytic domains and flexible C-terminal hypervariable regions (HVRs) that differ across Ras isoforms. KRAS is among the most frequently mutated oncogenes in human tumors. Surprisingly, we found that the C-terminal HVR of K-Ras4B, thought to minimally impact the catalytic domain, directly interacts with the active site of the protein. The interaction is almost 100-fold tighter with the GDP-bound than the GTP-bound protein. HVR binding interferes with Ras-Raf interaction, modulates binding to phospholipids, and slightly slows down nucleotide exchange. The data indicate that contrary to previously suggested models of K-Ras4B signaling, HVR plays essential roles in regulation of signaling. High affinity binding of short peptide analogs of HVR to K-Ras active site suggests that targeting this surface with inhibitory synthetic molecules for the therapy of KRAS-dependent tumors is feasible. PMID:26682817

  19. Effects of matrix elasticity and cell density on human mesenchymal stem cells differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ruyue; Li, Julie Yi-Shuan; Yeh, Yiting; Yang, Li; Chien, Shu

    2013-09-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can differentiate into various cell types, including osteogenic and chondrogenic cells. The matrix elasticity and cell seeding density are important factors in hMSCs differentiation. We cultured hMSCs at different seeding densities on polyacrylamide hydrogels with different stiffness corresponding to Young's moduli of 1.6 ± 0.3 and 40 ± 3.6 kPa. The promotion of osteogenic marker expression by hard gel is overridden by a high seeding density. Cell seeding density, however, did not influence the chondrogenic marker expressions induced by soft gel. These findings suggest that interplays between cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions contribute to hMSCs differentiation. The promotion of osteogenic differentiation on hard matrix was shown to be mediated through the Ras pathway. Inhibition of Ras (RasN17) significantly decreased ERK, Smad1/5/8 and AKT activation, and osteogenic markers expression. However, constitutively active Ras (RasV12) had little effect on osteogenic marker expression, suggesting that the Ras pathways are necessary but not sufficient for osteogenesis. Taken together, our results indicate that matrix elasticity and cell density are important microenvironmental cues driving hMSCs proliferation and differentiation. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  20. RasGRP1, but not RasGRP3, is required for efficient thymic β-selection and ERK activation downstream of CXCR4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic P Golec

    Full Text Available T cell development is a highly dynamic process that is driven by interactions between developing thymocytes and the thymic microenvironment. Upon entering the thymus, the earliest thymic progenitors, called CD4(-CD8(- 'double negative' (DN thymocytes, pass through a checkpoint termed "β-selection" before maturing into CD4(+CD8(+ 'double positive' (DP thymocytes. β-selection is an important developmental checkpoint during thymopoiesis where developing DN thymocytes that successfully express the pre-T cell receptor (TCR undergo extensive proliferation and differentiation towards the DP stage. Signals transduced through the pre-TCR, chemokine receptor CXCR4 and Notch are thought to drive β-selection. Additionally, it has long been known that ERK is activated during β-selection; however the pathways regulating ERK activation remain unknown. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of the β-selection events in mice lacking RasGRP1, RasGRP3 and RasGRP1 and 3. We report that RasGRP1 KO and RasGRP1/3 DKO deficient thymi show a partial developmental block at the early DN3 stage of development. Furthermore, DN3 thymocytes from RasGRP1 and RasGRP1/3 double knock-out thymi show significantly reduced proliferation, despite expression of the TCRβ chain. As a result of impaired β-selection, the pool of TCRβ(+ DN4 is significantly diminished, resulting in inefficient DN to DP development. Also, we report that RasGRP1 is required for ERK activation downstream of CXCR4 signaling, which we hypothesize represents a potential mechanism of RasGRP1 regulation of β-selection. Our results demonstrate that RasGRP1 is an important regulator of proliferation and differentiation at the β-selection checkpoint and functions downstream of CXCR4 to activate the Ras/MAPK pathway.

  1. DNA mismatch repair deficiency accelerates lung neoplasm development in K-rasLA1/+ mice: a brief report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downey, Charlene M; Jirik, Frank R

    2015-01-01

    Inherited as well as acquired deficiencies in specific DNA mismatch repair (MMR) components are associated with the development of a wide range of benign and malignant neoplasms. Loss of key members such as MSH2 and MLH1 severely cripples the ability of the cell to recognize and correct such lesions as base:base mismatches and replicative DNA polymerase errors such as slippages at repetitive sequences. Genomic instability resulting from MMR deficiency not only predisposes cells to malignant transformation but may also promote tumor progression. To test the latter, we interbred Msh2 −/− mice with the K-ras LA1/+ transgenic line that spontaneously develops a range of premalignant and malignant lung lesions. Compared to K-ras LA1/+ mice, K-ras LA1/+ ; Msh2 −/− mice developed lung adenomas and adenocarcinomas at an increased frequency and also demonstrated evidence of accelerated adenocarcinoma growth. Since MMR defects have been identified in some human lung cancers, the mutant mice may not only be of preclinical utility but they will also be useful in identifying gene alterations able to act in concert with Kras mutants to promote tumor progression

  2. Src Induces Podoplanin Expression to Promote Cell Migration*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yongquan; Chen, Chen-Shan; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Goldberg, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Nontransformed cells can force tumor cells to assume a normal morphology and phenotype by the process of contact normalization. Transformed cells must escape this process to become invasive and malignant. However, mechanisms underlying contact normalization have not been elucidated. Here, we have identified genes that are affected by contact normalization of Src-transformed cells. Tumor cells must migrate to become invasive and malignant. Src must phosphorylate the adaptor protein Cas (Crk-associated substrate) to promote tumor cell motility. We report here that Src utilizes Cas to induce podoplanin (Pdpn) expression to promote tumor cell migration. Pdpn is a membrane-bound extracellular glycoprotein that associates with endogenous ligands to promote tumor cell migration leading to cancer invasion and metastasis. In fact, Pdpn expression accounted for a major part of the increased migration seen in Src-transformed cells. Moreover, nontransformed cells suppressed Pdpn expression in adjacent Src-transformed cells. Of >39,000 genes, Pdpn was one of only 23 genes found to be induced by transforming Src activity and suppressed by contact normalization of Src-transformed cells. In addition, we found 16 genes suppressed by Src and induced by contact normalization. These genes encode growth factor receptors, adaptor proteins, and products that have not yet been annotated and may play important roles in tumor cell growth and migration. PMID:20123990

  3. Characterization of a novel oncogenic K-ras mutation in colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagi, Kiwamu; Uchibori, Ryosuke; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Kurosawa, Keiko; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Kozu, Tomoko

    2007-01-01

    Activating mutations of RAS are frequently observed in subsets of human cancers, indicating that RAS activation is involved in tumorigenesis. Here, we identified and characterized a novel G to T transversion mutation of the K-ras gene at the third position of codon 19 (TTG) which substituted phenylalanine for leucine in 3 primary colon carcinomas. Biological and biochemical activity was examined using transformed NIH3T3 cells expressing mutant or wild-type K-ras. Transformants harboring the K-ras mutation at codon 19 showed proliferative capacity under serum-starved conditions, less contact inhibition, anchorage-independent growth, tumorigenicity in nude mice and elevation of active Ras-GTP levels. These results indicated that this novel mutation possesses high oncogenic activity

  4. miR-518b Enhances Human Trophoblast Cell Proliferation Through Targeting Rap1b and Activating Ras-MAPK Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific complication defined as newly onset gestational hypertension and proteinuria. Deficiency in placental development is considered as the predominant cause of preeclampsia. Our previous study found that the expression of miR-518b increased significantly in the preeclamptic placentas, indicating the potential participation of this small RNA in the occurrence of preeclampsia. In this study, data analysis using multiple databases predicted Rap1b as a candidate target of miR-518b. An evident decrease in Rap1b expression was observed in preeclamptic placentas when compared with the control placentas, which was negatively correlated with the level of miR-518b. Based on the data of in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showing that Rap1b exhibited similar localization with miR-518b in villous cytotrophoblast cells and column trophoblasts, we further explored their function in regulating trophoblast cell proliferation. In HTR8/SVneo cells, exogenous transfection of miR-518b reduced the expression of Rap1b, and dual-luciferase reporter assay validated Rap1b as the direct target of miR-518b. The small RNA could increase the BrdU incorporation and the ratio of cells at S phase, and enhance the phosphorylation of Raf-1 and ERK1/2. Such growth-promoting effect could be efficiently reversed by Rap1b overexpression. The data indicate that miR-518b can promote trophoblast cell proliferation via Rap1b–Ras–MAPK pathway, and the aberrant upregulation of miR-518b in preeclamptic placenta may contribute to the excessive trophoblast proliferation. The study provides new evidence to further understand the etiology of preeclampsia.

  5. Increasing Stem Cell Dose Promotes Posttransplant Immune Reconstitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Shen, Sylvie; Dolnikov, Alla

    2017-04-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation can provide a successful therapeutic option for patients that have no suitable related donor. UCB transplantation is often limited by the relatively small hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) numbers in UCB especially for adult recipients. Early neutrophil and platelet engraftment correlates with the stem cell numbers in UCB transplant. Compared to other HSC sources, immune reconstitution following UCB transplant is slower and complicated by increased frequency of opportunistic infections. The effect of HSC numbers in UCB transplant on immune reconstitution was not thoroughly examined. Using immunocompromised mice transplanted with purified UCB CD34+ stem cells, we have demonstrated that increasing the numbers of CD34+ cells in the transplant promotes hematopoietic and immune reconstitution. At early stages posttransplant, high stem cell dose generated relatively more B cells, while lower dose generated more myeloid and T cells. Thus, the size of the stem cell graft appears to modulate the differentiation potential of infused stem cells. In addition, increasing stem cell dose in the transplant improved CD8+ T cell development and delayed late memory T cell skewing in expense of naive T cells highlighting the importance of HSC dose to maintain the pool of naive T cells able to develop strong immune responses. Transplantation of ex vivo expanded CD34+ cells did not promote, but rather delayed immune reconstitution suggesting the loss of primitive lymphoid precursor cells during ex vivo expansion.

  6. Regulation of p21ras activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lowy, D R; Zhang, K; DeClue, J E

    1992-01-01

    The ras genes encode GTP/GDP-binding proteins that participate in mediating mitogenic signals from membrane tyrosine kinases to downstream targets. The activity of p21ras is determined by the concentration of GTP-p21ras, which is tightly regulated by a complex array of positive and negative control...... mechanisms. GAP and NF1 can negatively regulate p21ras activity by stimulating hydrolysis of GTP bound to p21ras. Other cellular factors can positively regulate p21ras by stimulating GDP/GTP exchange....

  7. Influence of a ras oncogene on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in murine fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parries, G.; Racker, E.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have examined the effects of transfection of rat-1 fibroblasts with the ras oncogene on the metabolism of phosphatidylinositol (PI). Incubation of [ 3 H]inositol-labeled rat-1 cells with PDGF resulted in a 2- to 3-fold increase in [ 3 H]IP3 levels within 90 s. In the presence of 25 mM Li+, [ 3 H]IP1 levels were increased 8-fold after 30 min. In contrast, incubation of ras-transfected fibroblasts (EJ-2 line) with PDGF had little or no effect on the level of either [ 3 H]IP3 or [ 3 H]IP1. Similar stimulations by PDGF were observed in NIH 3T3 cells, but not in Kirsten virus-transformed or Harvey ras-transfected cell lines. On the other hand, NIH 3T3 cells transfected with v-src responded to PDGF by stimulation of PI turnover similar to the parent cell line. In NIH 3T3 cells transfected with an expression vector containing the v-Ha-ras gene under transcriptional control of the glucocorticoid-inducible mouse mammary tumor virus promoter, the PDGF stimulation of [ 3 H]inositol incorporation into PI was reduced from 10-fold in the absence of dexamethasone to 1.8-fold when the cells were pretreated for 26 h with 2 μM dexamethasone. In the parental 3T3 cells PDGF stimulation was reduced by about 40% in the presence of dexamethasone. In the absence of PDGF the rate of PI turnover (i.e., the kinetics of [ 3 H]IP1 accumulation in the presence of Li+) in EJ-2 cells was similar to that in rat-1 cells. Thus, in the presence of PDGF, the rate of PI turnover in rat-1 cells was several fold higher than in the transfected cells. These results suggest that the ras gene product (p21) may exert an inhibitory effect on PDGF-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism

  8. Mechanisms of membrane binding of small GTPase K-Ras4B farnesylated hypervariable region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyunbum; Abraham, Sherwin J; Chavan, Tanmay S; Hitchinson, Ben; Khavrutskii, Lyuba; Tarasova, Nadya I; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-04-10

    K-Ras4B belongs to a family of small GTPases that regulates cell growth, differentiation and survival. K-ras is frequently mutated in cancer. K-Ras4B association with the plasma membrane through its farnesylated and positively charged C-terminal hypervariable region (HVR) is critical to its oncogenic function. However, the structural mechanisms of membrane association are not fully understood. Here, using confocal microscopy, surface plasmon resonance, and molecular dynamics simulations, we observed that K-Ras4B can be distributed in rigid and loosely packed membrane domains. Its membrane binding domain interaction with phospholipids is driven by membrane fluidity. The farnesyl group spontaneously inserts into the disordered lipid microdomains, whereas the rigid microdomains restrict the farnesyl group penetration. We speculate that the resulting farnesyl protrusion toward the cell interior allows oligomerization of the K-Ras4B membrane binding domain in rigid microdomains. Unlike other Ras isoforms, K-Ras4B HVR contains a single farnesyl modification and positively charged polylysine sequence. The high positive charge not only modulates specific HVR binding to anionic phospholipids but farnesyl membrane orientation. Phosphorylation of Ser-181 prohibits spontaneous farnesyl membrane insertion. The mechanism illuminates the roles of HVR modifications in K-Ras4B targeting microdomains of the plasma membrane and suggests an additional function for HVR in regulation of Ras signaling. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Mechanisms of Membrane Binding of Small GTPase K-Ras4B Farnesylated Hypervariable Region*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyunbum; Abraham, Sherwin J.; Chavan, Tanmay S.; Hitchinson, Ben; Khavrutskii, Lyuba; Tarasova, Nadya I.; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras4B belongs to a family of small GTPases that regulates cell growth, differentiation and survival. K-ras is frequently mutated in cancer. K-Ras4B association with the plasma membrane through its farnesylated and positively charged C-terminal hypervariable region (HVR) is critical to its oncogenic function. However, the structural mechanisms of membrane association are not fully understood. Here, using confocal microscopy, surface plasmon resonance, and molecular dynamics simulations, we observed that K-Ras4B can be distributed in rigid and loosely packed membrane domains. Its membrane binding domain interaction with phospholipids is driven by membrane fluidity. The farnesyl group spontaneously inserts into the disordered lipid microdomains, whereas the rigid microdomains restrict the farnesyl group penetration. We speculate that the resulting farnesyl protrusion toward the cell interior allows oligomerization of the K-Ras4B membrane binding domain in rigid microdomains. Unlike other Ras isoforms, K-Ras4B HVR contains a single farnesyl modification and positively charged polylysine sequence. The high positive charge not only modulates specific HVR binding to anionic phospholipids but farnesyl membrane orientation. Phosphorylation of Ser-181 prohibits spontaneous farnesyl membrane insertion. The mechanism illuminates the roles of HVR modifications in K-Ras4B targeting microdomains of the plasma membrane and suggests an additional function for HVR in regulation of Ras signaling. PMID:25713064

  10. Ras GTPases Modulate Morphogenesis, Sporulation and Cellulase Gene Expression in the Cellulolytic Fungus Trichoderma reesei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiwei; Zhang, Yanmei; Zhong, Yaohua; Qu, Yinbo; Wang, Tianhong

    2012-01-01

    Background The model cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina) is capable of responding to environmental cues to compete for nutrients in its natural saprophytic habitat despite its genome encodes fewer degradative enzymes. Efficient signalling pathways in perception and interpretation of environmental signals are indispensable in this process. Ras GTPases represent a kind of critical signal proteins involved in signal transduction and regulation of gene expression. In T. reesei the genome contains two Ras subfamily small GTPases TrRas1 and TrRas2 homologous to Ras1 and Ras2 from S. cerevisiae, but their functions remain unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we have investigated the roles of GTPases TrRas1 and TrRas2 during fungal morphogenesis and cellulase gene expression. We show that both TrRas1 and TrRas2 play important roles in some cellular processes such as polarized apical growth, hyphal branch formation, sporulation and cAMP level adjustment, while TrRas1 is more dominant in these processes. Strikingly, we find that TrRas2 is involved in modulation of cellulase gene expression. Deletion of TrRas2 results in considerably decreased transcription of cellulolytic genes upon growth on cellulose. Although the strain carrying a constitutively activated TrRas2G16V allele exhibits increased cellulase gene transcription, the cbh1 and cbh2 expression in this mutant still strictly depends on cellulose, indicating TrRas2 does not directly mediate the transmission of the cellulose signal. In addition, our data suggest that the effect of TrRas2 on cellulase gene is exerted through regulation of transcript abundance of cellulase transcription factors such as Xyr1, but the influence is independent of cAMP signalling pathway. Conclusions/Significance Together, these findings elucidate the functions for Ras signalling of T. reesei in cellular morphogenesis, especially in cellulase gene expression, which contribute to deciphering the

  11. Quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis of human fibroblasts transformed by ras oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M J; Maher, V M; McCormick, J J

    1992-11-01

    Quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to compare the cellular protein patterns of a normal foreskin-derived human fibroblasts cell line (LG1) and three immortal derivatives of LG1. One derivative, designated MSU-1.1 VO, was selected for its ability to grow in the absence of serum and is non-tumorigenic in athymic mice. The other two strains were selected for focus-formation following transfection with either Ha-ras or N-ras oncogenes and form high grade malignant tumors. Correspondence and cluster analysis provided a nonbiased estimate of the relative similarity of the different two-dimensional patterns. These techniques separated the gel patterns into three distinct classes: LG1, MSU-1.1 VO, and the ras transformed cell strains. The MSU-1.1 VO cells were more closely related to the parental LG1 than to the ras-transformed cells. The differences between the three classes were primarily quantitative in nature: 16% of the spots demonstrated statistically significant changes (P 2) in the rate of incorporation of radioactive amino acids. The patterns from the two ras-transformed cell strains were similar, and variations in the expression of proteins that occurred between the separate experiments obscured consistent differences between the Ha-ras and N-ras transformed cells. However, while only 9 out of 758 spots were classified as different (1%), correspondence analysis could consistently separate the two ras transformants. One of these spots was five times more intense in the Ha-ras transformed cells than the N-ras.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. The Ras effector RASSF2 is a novel tumor-suppressor gene in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akino, Kimishige; Toyota, Minoru; Suzuki, Hiromu; Mita, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Yasushi; Ohe-Toyota, Mutsumi; Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Hinoda, Yuji; Imai, Kohzoh; Tokino, Takashi

    2005-07-01

    Activation of Ras signaling is a hallmark of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the roles of negative regulators of Ras are not fully understood. Our aim was to address that question by surveying genetic and epigenetic alterations of Ras-Ras effector genes in CRC cells. The expression and methylation status of 6 RASSF family genes were examined using RT-PCR and bisulfite PCR in CRC cell lines and in primary CRCs and colorectal adenomas. Colony formation assays and flow cytometry were used to assess the tumor suppressor activities of RASSF1 and RASSF2. Immunofluorescence microscopy was used to determine the effect of altered RASSF2 expression on cell morphology. Mutations of K- ras , BRAF, and p53 were identified using single-strand conformation analysis and direct sequencing. Aberrant methylation and histone deacetylation of RASSF2 was associated with the gene's silencing in CRC. The activities of RASSF2, which were distinct from those of RASSF1, included induction of morphologic changes and apoptosis; moreover, its ability to prevent cell transformation suggests that RASSF2 acts as a tumor suppressor in CRC. Primary CRCs that showed K- ras /BRAF mutations also frequently showed RASSF2 methylation, and inactivation of RASSF2 enhanced K- ras -induced oncogenic transformation. RASSF2 methylation was also frequently identified in colorectal adenomas. RASSF2 is a novel tumor suppressor gene that regulates Ras signaling and plays a pivotal role in the early stages of colorectal tumorigenesis.

  13. Mutational analysis of a ras catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Papageorge, A G; Kung, H F

    1986-01-01

    localization. We speculate that this latter region interacts with the putative cellular target of ras. The results suggest that transforming ras proteins require membrane localization, guanosine nucleotide binding, and an additional undefined function that may represent interaction with their target....

  14. [Effect of antepartum taurine supplementation in regulating the activity of Rho family factors and promoting the proliferation of neural stem cells in neonatal rats with fetal growth restriction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Wen; Li, Fang; Liu, Jing; Wang, Yan; Fu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    To study the possible effect of antepartum taurine supplementation in regulating the activity of Rho family factors and promoting the proliferation of neural stem cells in neonatal rats with fetal growth restriction (FGR), and to provide a basis for antepartum taurine supplementation to promote brain development in children with FGR. A total of 24 pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, FGR, and taurine (n=8 each ). A rat model of FGR was established by food restriction throughout pregnancy. RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot were used to measure the expression of the specific intracellular markers for neural stem cells fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7), Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 2 (ROCK2), ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA), and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate (Rac). The FGR group had significantly lower OD value of FABP7-positive cells and mRNA and protein expression of FABP7 than the control group, and the taurine group had significantly higher OD value of FABP7-positive cells and mRNA and protein expression of FABP7 than the FGR group (Ptaurine group had significantly higher mRNA expression of RhoA and ROCK2 than the control group and significantly lower expression than the FGR group (Ptaurine group had significantly higher mRNA expression of Rac than the FGR and control groups (Ptaurine group had significantly lower protein expression of RhoA and ROCK2 than the FGR group (Ptaurine supplementation can promote the proliferation of neural stem cells in rats with FGR, and its mechanism may be related to the regulation of the activity of Rho family factors.

  15. Gliadin fragments promote migration of dendritic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chládková, Barbara; Kamanová, Jana; Palová-Jelínková, Lenka; Cinová, Jana; Šebo, Peter; Tučková, Ludmila

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2011), 938-948 ISSN 1582-1838 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/0414; GA ČR GD310/08/H077; GA ČR GA310/08/0447; GA AV ČR IAA500200801; GA AV ČR IAA500200914 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : celiac disease * gliadin * dendritic cell Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 4.125, year: 2011

  16. Assessment of the chemosensitizing activity of TAT-RasGAP317-326 in childhood cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Chevalier

    Full Text Available Although current anti-cancer protocols are reasonably effective, treatment-associated long-term side effects, induced by lack of specificity of the anti-cancer procedures, remain a challenging problem in pediatric oncology. TAT-RasGAP317-326 is a RasGAP-derived cell-permeable peptide that acts as a sensitizer to various anti-cancer treatments in adult tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the effect of TAT-RasGAP317-326 in several childhood cancer cell lines. The RasGAP-derived peptide-induced cell death was analyzed in several neuroblastoma, Ewing sarcoma and leukemia cell lines (as well as in normal lymphocytes. Cell death was evaluated using flow cytometry methods in the absence or in the presence of the peptide in combination with various genotoxins used in the clinics (4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide, etoposide, vincristine and doxorubicin. All tested pediatric tumors, in response to at least one genotoxin, were sensitized by TAT-RasGAP317-326. The RasGAP-derived peptide did not increase cell death of normal lymphocytes, alone or in combination with the majority of the tested chemotherapies. Consequently, TAT-RasGAP317-326 may benefit children with tumors by increasing the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies notably by allowing reductions in anti-cancer drug dosage and the associated drug-induced side effects.

  17. B Cells Promote Th1- Skewed NKT Cell Response by CD1d-TCR Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung Hoon; Park, Se-Ho

    2013-10-01

    CD1d expressing dendritic cells (DCs) are good glyco-lipid antigen presenting cells for NKT cells. However, resting B cells are very weak stimulators for NKT cells. Although α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) loaded B cells can activate NKT cells, it is not well defined whether B cells interfere NKT cell stimulating activity of DCs. Unexpectedly, we found in this study that B cells can promote Th1-skewed NKT cell response, which means a increased level of IFN-γ by NKT cells, concomitant with a decreased level of IL-4, in the circumstance of co-culture of DCs and B Cells. Remarkably, the response promoted by B cells was dependent on CD1d expression of B cells.

  18. Promoter DNA hypermethylation and gene repression in undifferentiated Arabidopsis cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Berdasco

    Full Text Available Maintaining and acquiring the pluripotent cell state in plants is critical to tissue regeneration and vegetative multiplication. Histone-based epigenetic mechanisms are important for regulating this undifferentiated state. Here we report the use of genetic and pharmacological experimental approaches to show that Arabidopsis cell suspensions and calluses specifically repress some genes as a result of promoter DNA hypermethylation. We found that promoters of the MAPK12, GSTU10 and BXL1 genes become hypermethylated in callus cells and that hypermethylation also affects the TTG1, GSTF5, SUVH8, fimbrin and CCD7 genes in cell suspensions. Promoter hypermethylation in undifferentiated cells was associated with histone hypoacetylation and primarily occurred at CpG sites. Accordingly, we found that the process specifically depends on MET1 and DRM2 methyltransferases, as demonstrated with DNA methyltransferase mutants. Our results suggest that promoter DNA methylation may be another important epigenetic mechanism for the establishment and/or maintenance of the undifferentiated state in plant cells.

  19. The nitric oxide-sensitive p21Ras-ERK pathway mediates S-nitrosoglutathione-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujita, Maristela; Batista, Wagner L.; Ogata, Fernando T.; Stern, Arnold; Monteiro, Hugo P.; Arai, Roberto J.

    2008-01-01

    p21Ras protein plays a critical role in cellular signaling that induces either cell cycle progression or apoptosis. Nitric oxide (NO) has been consistently reported to activate p21Ras through the redox sensitive cysteine residue (118). In this study, we demonstrated that the p21Ras-ERK pathway regulates THP-1 monocyte/macrophage apoptosis induced by S-nitrosoglutathione (SNOG). This was apparent from studies in THP-1 cells expressing NO-insensitive p21Ras (p21Ras C118S ) where the pro-apoptotic action of SNOG was almost abrogated. Three major MAP kinase pathways (ERK, JNK, and p38) that are downstream to p21Ras were investigated. It was observed that only the activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinases by SNOG in THP-1 cells was attributable to p21Ras. The inhibition of the ERK pathway by PD98059 markedly attenuated apoptosis in SNOG-treated THP-1 cells, but had a marginal effect on SNOG-treated THP-1 cells expressing NO-insensitive p21Ras. The inhibition of the JNK and p38 pathways by selective inhibitors had no marked effects on the percentage of apoptosis. The induction of p21Waf1 expression by SNOG was observed in THP-1 cells harboring mutant and wild-type p21Ras, however in cells expressing mutant Ras, the expression of p21Waf1 was significantly attenuated. The treatment of THP-1 cells expressing wild-type p21Ras with PD98059 resulted in significant attenuation of p21Waf1 expression. These results indicate that the redox sensitive p21Ras-ERK pathway plays a critical role in sensing and delivering the pro-apoptotic signaling mediated by SNOG

  20. B Cells Promote Th1- Skewed NKT Cell Response by CD1d-TCR Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Jung Hoon; Park, Se-Ho

    2013-01-01

    CD1d expressing dendritic cells (DCs) are good glyco-lipid antigen presenting cells for NKT cells. However, resting B cells are very weak stimulators for NKT cells. Although ?-galactosylceramide (?-GalCer) loaded B cells can activate NKT cells, it is not well defined whether B cells interfere NKT cell stimulating activity of DCs. Unexpectedly, we found in this study that B cells can promote Th1-skewed NKT cell response, which means a increased level of IFN-? by NKT cells, concomitant with a d...

  1. DA-Raf, a dominant-negative antagonist of the Ras-ERK pathway, is a putative tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Emiri; Kawasaki, Osamu; Takahashi, Kazuya; Takano, Kazunori; Endo, Takeshi

    2018-01-01

    Activating mutations of RAS genes, particularly KRAS, are detected with high frequency in human tumors. Mutated Ras proteins constitutively activate the ERK pathway (Raf-MEK-ERK phosphorylation cascade), leading to cellular transformation and tumorigenesis. DA-Raf1 (DA-Raf) is a splicing variant of A-Raf and contains the Ras-binding domain (RBD) but lacks the kinase domain. Accordingly, DA-Raf antagonizes the Ras-ERK pathway in a dominant-negative fashion and suppresses constitutively activated K-Ras-induced cellular transformation. Thus, we have addressed whether DA-Raf serves as a tumor suppressor of Ras-induced tumorigenesis. DA-Raf(R52Q), which is generated from a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the RBD, and DA-Raf(R52W), a mutant detected in a lung cancer, neither bound to active K-Ras nor interfered with the activation of the ERK pathway. They were incapable of suppressing activated K-Ras-induced cellular transformation and tumorigenesis in mice, in which K-Ras-transformed cells were transplanted. Furthermore, although DA-Raf was highly expressed in lung alveolar epithelial type 2 (AE2) cells, its expression was silenced in AE2-derived lung adenocarcinoma cell lines with oncogenic KRAS mutations. These results suggest that DA-Raf represents a tumor suppressor protein against Ras-induced tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. ELK3 promotes the migration and invasion of liver cancer stem cells by targeting HIF-1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon Ho; Hur, Wonhee; Hong, Sung Woo; Kim, Jung-Hee; Kim, Sung Min; Lee, Eun Byul; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2017-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common solid cancer and the third most common cause of cancer-related mortality. HCC develops via a multistep process associated with genetic aberrations that facilitate HCC invasion and migration and promote metastasis. A growing body of evidence indicates that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumorigenesis, cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Despite the extremely small proportion of cancer cells represented by this subpopulation of HCC cells, CSCs play a key role in cancer metastasis and poor prognosis. ELK3 (Net/SAP-2/Erp) is a transcription factor that is activated by the Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. It plays several important roles in various physiological processes, including cell migration, invasion, wound healing, angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. In the present study, we investigated the role of ELK3 in cancer cell invasion and metastasis in CD133+/CD44+ liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs). We isolated LCSCs expressing CD133 and CD44 from Huh7 HCC cells and evaluated their metastatic potential using invasion and migration assays. We found that CD133+/CD44+ cells had increased metastatic potential compared with non-CD133+/CD44+ cells. We also demonstrated that ELK3 expression was upregulated in CD133+/CD44+ cells and that this aberration enhanced cell migration and invasion. In addition, we identified the molecular mechanism by which ELK3 promotes cancer cell migration and invasion. We found that silencing of ELK3 expression in CD133+/CD44+ LCSCs attenuated their metastatic potential by modulating the expression of heat shock-induced factor-1α (HIF-1α). Collectively, the results of the present study demonstrated that ELK3 overexpression promoted metastasis in CD133+/CD44+ cells by regulating HIF-1α expression and that silencing of ELK3 expression attenuated the metastatic potential of CD133+/CD44+ LCSCs. In conclusion, modulation of ELK3 expression may

  3. Purified Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Promote Osteogenic Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, T; Mabuchi, Y; Toriumi, H; Ebine, T; Niibe, K; Houlihan, D D; Morikawa, S; Onizawa, K; Kawana, H; Akazawa, C; Suzuki, N; Nakagawa, T; Okano, H; Matsuzaki, Y

    2016-02-01

    Human dental pulp stem/progenitor cells (hDPSCs) are attractive candidates for regenerative therapy because they can be easily expanded to generate colony-forming unit-fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) on plastic and the large cell numbers required for transplantation. However, isolation based on adherence to plastic inevitably changes the surface marker expression and biological properties of the cells. Consequently, little is currently known about the original phenotypes of tissue precursor cells that give rise to plastic-adherent CFU-Fs. To better understand the in vivo functions and translational therapeutic potential of hDPSCs and other stem cells, selective cell markers must be identified in the progenitor cells. Here, we identified a dental pulp tissue-specific cell population based on the expression profiles of 2 cell-surface markers LNGFR (CD271) and THY-1 (CD90). Prospectively isolated, dental pulp-derived LNGFR(Low+)THY-1(High+) cells represent a highly enriched population of clonogenic cells--notably, the isolated cells exhibited long-term proliferation and multilineage differentiation potential in vitro. The cells also expressed known mesenchymal cell markers and promoted new bone formation to heal critical-size calvarial defects in vivo. These findings suggest that LNGFR(Low+)THY-1(High+) dental pulp-derived cells provide an excellent source of material for bone regenerative strategies. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  4. Scaffold architecture and fibrin gels promote meniscal cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawelec, K. M., E-mail: pawelec.km@gmail.com, E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk; Best, S. M.; Cameron, R. E. [Cambridge Centre for Medical Materials, Materials Science and Metallurgy Department, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Wardale, R. J., E-mail: pawelec.km@gmail.com, E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk [Division of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 2QQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Stability of the knee relies on the meniscus, a complex connective tissue with poor healing ability. Current meniscal tissue engineering is inadequate, as the signals for increasing meniscal cell proliferation have not been established. In this study, collagen scaffold structure, isotropic or aligned, and fibrin gel addition were tested. Metabolic activity was promoted by fibrin addition. Cellular proliferation, however, was significantly increased by both aligned architectures and fibrin addition. None of the constructs impaired collagen type I production or triggered adverse inflammatory responses. It was demonstrated that both fibrin gel addition and optimized scaffold architecture effectively promote meniscal cell proliferation.

  5. Promotion of initiated cells by radiation-induced cell inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, W F; Paretzke, H G

    2008-11-01

    Cells on the way to carcinogenesis can have a growth advantage relative to normal cells. It has been hypothesized that a radiation-induced growth advantage of these initiated cells might be induced by an increased cell replacement probability of initiated cells after inactivation of neighboring cells by radiation. Here Monte Carlo simulations extend this hypothesis for larger clones: The effective clonal expansion rate decreases with clone size. This effect is stronger for the two-dimensional than for the three-dimensional situation. The clones are irregular, far from a circular shape. An exposure-rate dependence of the effective clonal expansion rate could come in part from a minimal recovery time of the initiated cells for symmetric cell division.

  6. Insulin promotes cell migration by regulating PSA-NCAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monzo, Hector J.; Coppieters, Natacha [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Anatomy and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Park, Thomas I.H. [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Dieriks, Birger V.; Faull, Richard L.M. [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Anatomy and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Dragunow, Mike [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Curtis, Maurice A., E-mail: m.curtis@auckland.ac.nz [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Anatomy and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2017-06-01

    Cellular interactions with the extracellular environment are modulated by cell surface polysialic acid (PSA) carried by the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). PSA-NCAM is involved in cellular processes such as differentiation, plasticity, and migration, and is elevated in Alzheimer's disease as well as in metastatic tumour cells. Our previous work demonstrated that insulin enhances the abundance of cell surface PSA by inhibiting PSA-NCAM endocytosis. In the present study we have identified a mechanism for insulin-dependent inhibition of PSA-NCAM turnover affecting cell migration. Insulin enhanced the phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase leading to dissociation of αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters, and promoted cell migration. Our results show that αv-integrin plays a key role in the PSA-NCAM turnover process. αv-integrin knockdown stopped PSA-NCAM from being endocytosed, and αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters co-labelled intracellularly with Rab5, altogether indicating a role for αv-integrin as a carrier for PSA-NCAM during internalisation. Furthermore, inhibition of p-FAK caused dissociation of αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters and counteracted the insulin-induced accumulation of PSA at the cell surface and cell migration was impaired. Our data reveal a functional association between the insulin/p-FAK-dependent regulation of PSA-NCAM turnover and cell migration through the extracellular matrix. Most importantly, they identify a novel mechanism for insulin-stimulated cell migration. - Highlights: • Insulin modulates PSA-NCAM turnover through upregulation of p-FAK. • P-FAK modulates αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clustering. • αv-integrin acts as a carrier for PSA-NCAM endocytosis. • Cell migration is promoted by cell surface PSA. • Insulin promotes PSA-dependent migration in vitro.

  7. Insulin promotes cell migration by regulating PSA-NCAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzo, Hector J.; Coppieters, Natacha; Park, Thomas I.H.; Dieriks, Birger V.; Faull, Richard L.M.; Dragunow, Mike; Curtis, Maurice A.

    2017-01-01

    Cellular interactions with the extracellular environment are modulated by cell surface polysialic acid (PSA) carried by the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). PSA-NCAM is involved in cellular processes such as differentiation, plasticity, and migration, and is elevated in Alzheimer's disease as well as in metastatic tumour cells. Our previous work demonstrated that insulin enhances the abundance of cell surface PSA by inhibiting PSA-NCAM endocytosis. In the present study we have identified a mechanism for insulin-dependent inhibition of PSA-NCAM turnover affecting cell migration. Insulin enhanced the phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase leading to dissociation of αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters, and promoted cell migration. Our results show that αv-integrin plays a key role in the PSA-NCAM turnover process. αv-integrin knockdown stopped PSA-NCAM from being endocytosed, and αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters co-labelled intracellularly with Rab5, altogether indicating a role for αv-integrin as a carrier for PSA-NCAM during internalisation. Furthermore, inhibition of p-FAK caused dissociation of αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters and counteracted the insulin-induced accumulation of PSA at the cell surface and cell migration was impaired. Our data reveal a functional association between the insulin/p-FAK-dependent regulation of PSA-NCAM turnover and cell migration through the extracellular matrix. Most importantly, they identify a novel mechanism for insulin-stimulated cell migration. - Highlights: • Insulin modulates PSA-NCAM turnover through upregulation of p-FAK. • P-FAK modulates αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clustering. • αv-integrin acts as a carrier for PSA-NCAM endocytosis. • Cell migration is promoted by cell surface PSA. • Insulin promotes PSA-dependent migration in vitro.

  8. p21-ras effector domain mutants constructed by "cassette" mutagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stone, J C; Vass, W C; Willumsen, B M

    1988-01-01

    A series of mutations encoding single-amino-acid substitutions within the v-rasH effector domain were constructed, and the ability of the mutants to induce focal transformation of NIH 3T3 cells was studied. The mutations, which spanned codons 32 to 40, were made by a "cassette" mutagenesis...

  9. Tumorigenesis of K-ras mutation in human endometrial carcinoma via upregulation of estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zheng; Gui, Liming; Wang, Jianliu; Li, Xiaoping; Sun, Pengming; Wei, Lihui

    2006-05-01

    To investigate the tumorigenesis of mutant [12Asp]-K-ras in endometrial carcinoma and its relationship with ER. We constructed pcDI-[12Asp]K-ras4B by inserting full-length [12Asp]K-ras4B from human endometrial carcinoma Hec-1A cells, into pcDI vector. Cell proliferation of NIH3T3 after transfection with pcDI-[12Asp]K-ras4B was measured by MTT assay. The cell transformation was determined by colony formation and tumor nodule development. [12Asp]-K-ras4B-NIH3T3 cells were transfected with constitutively active pCMV-RafCAAX and dominant-negative pCMV-RafS621A. Cell growth was measured by MTT assay and [3H]thymidine incorporation. After transfected with pcDI-[12Asp]K-ras4B or pCMV-RafS621A, the cells were harvested for Western blot and reporter assay to determine the expression and transcriptional activity of ERalpha and ERbeta, respectively. [12Asp]-K-ras4B enhanced NIH3T3 cells proliferation after 48 h post-transfection (P ras4B-NIH3T3 cells (13.48%) than pcDI-NIH3T3 (4.26%) or untreated NIH3T3 (2.33%). The pcDI-[12Asp]-K-ras4B-NIH3T3 cells injected to the nude mice Balb/C developed tumor nodules with poor-differentiated cells after 12 days. An increase of ERalpha and ERbeta was observed in pcDI-[12Asp]-K-ras4B-NIH3T3 cells. RafS621A downregulated ERalpha and ERbeta expression. Estrogen induced the ER transcriptional activity by 5-fold in pcDI-NIH3T3 cells, 13-fold in pcDI-[12Asp]K-ras4B-NIH3T3 and 19-fold in HEC-1A. RafS621A suppressed the ER transcriptional activity. K-ras mutation induces tumorigenesis in endometrium, and this malignant transformation involves Raf signaling pathway and ER.

  10. The radiosensitivity of human keratinocytes: influence of activated c-H-ras oncogene expression and tumorigenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, M.S.; Redpath, J.L.; Stanbridge, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    The authors investigated γ-ray sensitivity of several activated c-H-ras (EJ) containing clones established after transfection of the spontaneously immortalized non-tumorigenic human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. The clones were grouped according to tumorigenic potential after subcutaneous injection into nude mice, and fell into three classes: Class I clones A-4 and I-6 are non-tumorigenic and express very low levels of c-H-ras mRNA and no mutated ras protein (p 21 ); Class II clones I-5 and I-7 grow to large (benign) epidermal cysts, express intermediate to high c-H-ras mRNA and variable levels of mutated ras p 21 protein with clone I-5 expressing little and clone I-7 expressing high levels of p 21 ; Class III clones II-3 and II-4 grow to solid squamous cell carcinomas, express high c-H-ras mRNA and high level of mutated p 21 ras protein similar to clone I-7. Comparison of single-hit multitarget or linear-quadratic survival curve parameters, and survival at 2Gy (S 2 ) indicate no general correlation with either activated c-H-ras expression level or tumorigenic potential, and increased radioresistance. (author)

  11. Machine Learning Detects Pan-cancer Ras Pathway Activation in The Cancer Genome Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory P. Way

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Precision oncology uses genomic evidence to match patients with treatment but often fails to identify all patients who may respond. The transcriptome of these “hidden responders” may reveal responsive molecular states. We describe and evaluate a machine-learning approach to classify aberrant pathway activity in tumors, which may aid in hidden responder identification. The algorithm integrates RNA-seq, copy number, and mutations from 33 different cancer types across The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA PanCanAtlas project to predict aberrant molecular states in tumors. Applied to the Ras pathway, the method detects Ras activation across cancer types and identifies phenocopying variants. The model, trained on human tumors, can predict response to MEK inhibitors in wild-type Ras cell lines. We also present data that suggest that multiple hits in the Ras pathway confer increased Ras activity. The transcriptome is underused in precision oncology and, combined with machine learning, can aid in the identification of hidden responders. : Way et al. develop a machine-learning approach using PanCanAtlas data to detect Ras activation in cancer. Integrating mutation, copy number, and expression data, the authors show that their method detects Ras-activating variants in tumors and sensitivity to MEK inhibitors in cell lines. Keywords: Gene expression, machine learning, Ras, NF1, KRAS, NRAS, HRAS, pan-cancer, TCGA, drug sensitivity

  12. Ras signaling in aging and metabolic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Cathy

    2017-12-07

    Aberrant signal transduction downstream of the Ras GTPase has a well-established role in tumorigenesis. Mutations that result in hyperactivation of Ras are responsible for a third of all human cancers. Hence, small molecule inhibitors of the Ras signal transduction cascade have been under intense focus as potential cancer treatments. In both invertebrate and mammalian models, emerging evidence has also implicated components of the Ras signaling pathway in aging and metabolic regulation. Here, I review the current evidence for Ras signaling in these newly discovered roles highlighting the interactions between the Ras pathway and other longevity assurance mechanisms. Defining the role of Ras signaling in maintaining age-related health may have important implications for the development of interventions that could not only increase lifespan but also delay the onset and/or progression of age-related functional decline.

  13. CD147 overexpression promotes tumorigenicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Yu-Le; Liao, Cheng-Gong; Wei, Ding; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Bian, Huijie

    2016-04-01

    CD147 overexpresses in many epithelium-originated tumors and plays an important role in tumor migration and invasion. Most studies aim at the role of CD147 in tumor progression using tumor cell models. However, the influence of abnormal overexpression of CD147 on neoplastic transformation of normal cells is unknown. Here, the role of CD147 in malignant phenotype transformation in CHO cells was investigated. Three CHO cell lines that stably overexpressed CD147 (CHO-CD147), EGFP-CD147 (CHO-EGFP-CD147), and EGFP (CHO-EGFP) were generated by transfection of plasmids containing human CD147, EGFP-human CD147, and EGFP genes into CHO cells. Cell migration and invasion were detected by wound healing and transwell matrix penetration assay. Trypan blue exclusion, MTT, cell cycle analysis, and BrdU cell proliferation assay were used to detect cell viability and cell proliferation. Annexin V-FITC analysis was performed to detect apoptosis. We found that CD147 overexpression promoted the migration and invasion of CHO cells. CD147 accelerated the G1 to S phase transition and enhanced the CHO cell proliferation. Overexpression of CD147 inhibited both early- and late-stages of apoptosis of CHO-CD147 cells, which is caused by serum deprivation. CHO-EGFP-CD147 cells showed an increased anchorage-independent growth compared with CHO-EGFP cells as detected by soft-agar colony formation assay. The tumors formed by CHO-CD147 cells in nude mice were larger and coupled with higher expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Ki-67 than that of CHO cells. In conclusion, human CD147 overexpression induces malignant phenotype in CHO cells. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  14. Vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced neurite remodeling in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells implicates the Cdc42 GTPase and is independent of Ras-ERK pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alleaume, Celine; Eychene, Alain; Harnois, Thomas; Bourmeyster, Nicolas; Constantin, Bruno; Caigneaux, Evelyne; Muller, Jean-Marc; Philippe, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is known to regulate proliferation or differentiation in normal and tumoral cells. SH-SY5Y is a differentiated cell subclone derived from the SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cell line and possess all the components for an autocrine action of VIP. In the present study, we investigated the morphological changes and intracellular signaling pathways occurring upon VIP treatment of SH-SY5Y cells. VIP induced an early remodeling of cell projections: a branched neurite network spread out and prominent varicosities developed along neurites. Although activated by VIP, the Ras/ERK pathway was not required for the remodeling process. In contrast, pull-down experiments revealed a strong Cdc42 activation by VIP while expression of a dominant-negative Cdc42 prevented the VIP-induced neurite changes, suggesting an important role for this small GTPase in the process. These data provide the first evidence for a regulation of the activity of Rho family GTPases by VIP and bring new insights in the signaling pathways implicated in neurite remodeling process induced by VIP in neuroblastoma cells

  15. VEGF promotes tumorigenesis and angiogenesis of human glioblastoma stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Naoki; Soeda, Akio; Inagaki, Akihito; Onodera, Masafumi; Maruyama, Hidekazu; Hara, Akira; Kunisada, Takahiro; Mori, Hideki; Iwama, Toru

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in malignant brain tumors, and these CSCs may play a pivotal role in tumor initiation, growth, and recurrence. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promotes the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and the neurogenesis of neural stem cells. Using CSCs derived from human glioblastomas and a retrovirus expressing VEGF, we examined the effects of VEGF on the properties of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. Although VEGF did not affect the property of CSCs in vitro, the injection of mouse brains with VEGF-expressing CSCs led to the massive expansion of vascular-rich GBM, tumor-associated hemorrhage, and high morbidity, suggesting that VEGF promoted tumorigenesis via angiogenesis. These results revealed that VEGF induced the proliferation of VEC in the vascular-rich tumor environment, the so-called stem cell niche

  16. Sorafenib-induced defective autophagy promotes cell death by necroptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Baltatzis, George; Fonseca, Pedro; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Lennartsson, Lena; Björklund, Ann-Charlotte; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Grandér, Dan; Egevad, Lars; Nilsson, Sten; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2015-11-10

    Autophagy is one of the main cytoprotective mechanisms that cancer cells deploy to withstand the cytotoxic stress and survive the lethal damage induced by anti-cancer drugs. However, under specific conditions, autophagy may, directly or indirectly, induce cell death. In our study, treatment of the Atg5-deficient DU145 prostate cancer cells, with the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sorafenib, induces mitochondrial damage, autophagy and cell death. Molecular inhibition of autophagy by silencing ULK1 and Beclin1 rescues DU145 cells from cell death indicating that, in this setting, autophagy promotes cell death. Re-expression of Atg5 restores the lipidation of LC3 and rescues DU145 and MEF atg5-/- cells from sorafenib-induced cell death. Despite the lack of Atg5 expression and LC3 lipidation, DU145 cells form autophagosomes as demonstrated by transmission and immuno-electron microscopy, and the formation of LC3 positive foci. However, the lack of cellular content in the autophagosomes, the accumulation of long-lived proteins, the presence of GFP-RFP-LC3 positive foci and the accumulated p62 protein levels indicate that these autophagosomes may not be fully functional. DU145 cells treated with sorafenib undergo a caspase-independent cell death that is inhibited by the RIPK1 inhibitor, necrostatin-1. Furthermore, treatment with sorafenib induces the interaction of RIPK1 with p62, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation and a proximity ligation assay. Silencing of p62 decreases the RIPK1 protein levels and renders necrostatin-1 ineffective in blocking sorafenib-induced cell death. In summary, the formation of Atg5-deficient autophagosomes in response to sorafenib promotes the interaction of p62 with RIPK leading to cell death by necroptosis.

  17. Identification of a novel temperature sensitive promoter in cho cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesse Friedemann

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO expression system is the leading production platform for manufacturing biopharmaceuticals for the treatment of numerous human diseases. Efforts to optimize the production process also include the genetic construct encoding the therapeutic gene. Here we report about the successful identification of an endogenous highly active gene promoter obtained from CHO cells which shows conditionally inducible gene expression at reduced temperature. Results Based on CHO microarray expression data abundantly transcribed genes were selected as potential promoter candidates. The S100a6 (calcyclin and its flanking regions were identified from a genomic CHO-K1 lambda-phage library. Computational analyses showed a predicted TSS, a TATA-box and several TFBSs within the 1.5 kb region upstream the ATG start signal. Various constructs were investigated for promoter activity at 37°C and 33°C in transient luciferase reporter gene assays. Most constructs showed expression levels even higher than the SV40 control and on average a more than two-fold increase at lower temperature. We identified the core promoter sequence (222 bp comprising two SP1 sites and could show a further increase in activity by duplication of this minimal sequence. Conclusions This novel CHO promoter permits conditionally high-level gene expression. Upon a shift to 33°C, a two to three-fold increase of basal productivity (already higher than SV40 promoter is achieved. This property is of particular advantage for a process with reduced expression during initial cell growth followed by the production phase at low temperature with a boost in expression. Additionally, production of toxic proteins becomes feasible, since cell metabolism and gene expression do not directly interfere. The CHO S100a6 promoter can be characterized as cold-shock responsive with the potential for improving process performance of mammalian expression systems.

  18. Notch Signaling in Prostate Cancer Cells Promotes Osteoblastic Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this...function and number while inducing osteoblast proliferation. Our results suggest that Notch signaling from cancer cells promotes osteoblastic...Participants and other collaborating organizations: I initiated collaboration with Dr. Evan Keller at University of Michigan to interrogate PCa bone

  19. Sorafenib paradoxically activates the RAS/RAF/ERK pathway in polyclonal human NK cells during expansion and thereby enhances effector functions in a dose- and time-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmeyer, J; Nerreter, T; Dotterweich, J; Einsele, H; Seggewiss-Bernhardt, R

    2018-03-24

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a major role in host immunity against leukaemia and lymphoma. However, clinical trials applying NK cells have not been as efficient as hoped for. Patients treated with rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma (RAF) inhibitors exhibit increased tumour infiltration by immune cells, suggesting that a combination of RAF inhibitors with immunotherapy might be beneficial. As mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) such as raf-1 proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase (CRAF) regulate NK cell functions, we performed an in-vitro investigation on the potential of clinically relevant short-acting tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) as potential adjuvants for NK cell therapy: NK cells from healthy human blood donors were thus treated with sorafenib, sunitinib or the pan-RAF inhibitor ZM336372 during ex-vivo expansion. Functional outcomes assessed after washout of the drugs included cytokine production, degranulation, cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction and signal transduction with/without target cell contact. Paradoxically, sorafenib enhanced NK cell effector functions in a time- and dose-dependent manner by raising the steady-state activation level. Of note, this did not lead to NK cell exhaustion, but enhanced activity against target cells such as K562 or Daudis mediated via the RAS/RAF/extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, but not via protein kinase B (AKT). Our data will pave the path to develop a rationale for the considered use of RAF inhibitors such as sorafenib for pre-activation in NK cell-based adoptive immune therapy. © 2018 British Society for Immunology.

  20. Cellular Adhesion Promotes Prostate Cancer Cells Escape from Dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppender, Nazanin; Larson, Sandy; Lakely, Bryce; Kollath, Lori; Brown, Lisha; Coleman, Ilsa; Coleman, Roger; Nguyen, Holly; Nelson, Peter S; Corey, Eva; Snyder, Linda A; Vessella, Robert L; Morrissey, Colm; Lam, Hung-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Dissemination of prostate cancer (PCa) cells to the bone marrow is an early event in the disease process. In some patients, disseminated tumor cells (DTC) proliferate to form active metastases after a prolonged period of undetectable disease known as tumor dormancy. Identifying mechanisms of PCa dormancy and reactivation remain a challenge partly due to the lack of in vitro models. Here, we characterized in vitro PCa dormancy-reactivation by inducing cells from three patient-derived xenograft (PDX) lines to proliferate through tumor cell contact with each other and with bone marrow stroma. Proliferating PCa cells demonstrated tumor cell-cell contact and integrin clustering by immunofluorescence. Global gene expression analyses on proliferating cells cultured on bone marrow stroma revealed a downregulation of TGFB2 in all of the three proliferating PCa PDX lines when compared to their non-proliferating counterparts. Furthermore, constitutive activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), a downstream effector of integrin-beta1 and TGF-beta2, in non-proliferating cells promoted cell proliferation. This cell proliferation was associated with an upregulation of CDK6 and a downregulation of E2F4. Taken together, our data provide the first clinically relevant in vitro model to support cellular adhesion and downregulation of TGFB2 as a potential mechanism by which PCa cells may escape from dormancy. Targeting the TGF-beta2-associated mechanism could provide novel opportunities to prevent lethal PCa metastasis.

  1. Epac activation sensitizes rat sensory neurons via activation of Ras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, Behzad; Thompson, Eric L.; Nicol, Grant D.; Vasko, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors directly activated by cAMP (Epacs) have emerged as important signaling molecules mediating persistent hypersensitivity in animal models of inflammation, by augmenting the excitability of sensory neurons. Although Epacs activate numerous downstream signaling cascades, the intracellular signaling which mediates Epac-induced sensitization of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that selective activation of Epacs with 8-CPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP-AM (8CPT-AM) increases the number of action potentials (APs) generated by a ramp of depolarizing current and augments the evoked release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from isolated rat sensory neurons. Internal perfusion of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons with GDP-βS, substituted for GTP, blocks the ability of 8CPT-AM to increase AP firing, demonstrating that Epac-induced sensitization is G-protein dependent. Treatment with 8CPT-AM activates the small G-proteins Rap1 and Ras in cultures of sensory neurons. Inhibition of Rap1, by internal perfusion of a Rap1-neutralizing antibody or through a reduction in the expression of the protein using shRNA does not alter the Epac-induced enhancement of AP generation or CGRP release, despite the fact that in most other cell types, Epacs act as Rap-GEFs. In contrast, inhibition of Ras through expression of a dominant negative Ras (DN-Ras) or through internal perfusion of a Ras-neutralizing antibody blocks the increase in AP firing and attenuates the increase in the evoked release of CGRP induced by Epac activation. Thus, in this subpopulation of nociceptive sensory neurons, it is the novel interplay between Epacs and Ras, rather than the canonical Epacs and Rap1 pathway, that is critical for mediating Epac-induced sensitization. PMID:26596174

  2. Epac activation sensitizes rat sensory neurons through activation of Ras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, Behzad; Thompson, Eric L; Nicol, Grant D; Vasko, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors directly activated by cAMP (Epacs) have emerged as important signaling molecules mediating persistent hypersensitivity in animal models of inflammation, by augmenting the excitability of sensory neurons. Although Epacs activate numerous downstream signaling cascades, the intracellular signaling which mediates Epac-induced sensitization of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that selective activation of Epacs with 8-CPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP-AM (8CPT-AM) increases the number of action potentials (APs) generated by a ramp of depolarizing current and augments the evoked release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from isolated rat sensory neurons. Internal perfusion of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons with GDP-βS, substituted for GTP, blocks the ability of 8CPT-AM to increase AP firing, demonstrating that Epac-induced sensitization is G-protein dependent. Treatment with 8CPT-AM activates the small G-proteins Rap1 and Ras in cultures of sensory neurons. Inhibition of Rap1, by internal perfusion of a Rap1-neutralizing antibody or through a reduction in the expression of the protein using shRNA does not alter the Epac-induced enhancement of AP generation or CGRP release, despite the fact that in most other cell types, Epacs act as Rap-GEFs. In contrast, inhibition of Ras through expression of a dominant negative Ras (DN-Ras) or through internal perfusion of a Ras-neutralizing antibody blocks the increase in AP firing and attenuates the increase in the evoked release of CGRP induced by Epac activation. Thus, in this subpopulation of nociceptive sensory neurons, it is the novel interplay between Epacs and Ras, rather than the canonical Epacs and Rap1 pathway, that is critical for mediating Epac-induced sensitization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fascin overexpression promotes neoplastic progression in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam Hunain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fascin is a globular actin cross-linking protein, which plays a major role in forming parallel actin bundles in cell protrusions and is found to be associated with tumor cell invasion and metastasis in various type of cancers including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. Previously, we have demonstrated that fascin regulates actin polymerization and thereby promotes cell motility in K8-depleted OSCC cells. In the present study we have investigated the role of fascin in tumor progression of OSCC. Methods To understand the role of fascin in OSCC development and/or progression, fascin was overexpressed along with vector control in OSCC derived cells AW13516. The phenotype was studied using wound healing, Boyden chamber, cell adhesion, Hanging drop, soft agar and tumorigenicity assays. Further, fascin expression was examined in human OSCC samples (N = 131 using immunohistochemistry and level of its expression was correlated with clinico-pathological parameters of the patients. Results Fascin overexpression in OSCC derived cells led to significant increase in cell migration, cell invasion and MMP-2 activity. In addition these cells demonstrated increased levels of phosphorylated AKT, ERK1/2 and JNK1/2. Our in vitro results were consistent with correlative studies of fascin expression with the clinico-pathological parameters of the OSCC patients. Fascin expression in OSCC showed statistically significant correlation with increased tumor stage (P = 0.041, increased lymph node metastasis (P = 0.001, less differentiation (P = 0.005, increased recurrence (P = 0.038 and shorter survival (P = 0.004 of the patients. Conclusion In conclusion, our results indicate that fascin promotes tumor progression and activates AKT and MAPK pathways in OSCC-derived cells. Further, our correlative studies of fascin expression in OSCC with clinico-pathological parameters of the patients indicate that fascin may prove to be useful in prognostication and

  4. Fascin overexpression promotes neoplastic progression in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Hunain; Kannanl, Sadhna; Gude, Rajiv; Kane, Shubhada; Dalal, Sorab N; Vaidya, Milind M; Bhate, Amruta V; Gangadaran, Prakash; Sawant, Sharda S; Salot, Shimul; Sehgal, Lalit; Dange, Prerana P; Chaukar, Devendra A; D'cruz, Anil K

    2012-01-01

    Fascin is a globular actin cross-linking protein, which plays a major role in forming parallel actin bundles in cell protrusions and is found to be associated with tumor cell invasion and metastasis in various type of cancers including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Previously, we have demonstrated that fascin regulates actin polymerization and thereby promotes cell motility in K8-depleted OSCC cells. In the present study we have investigated the role of fascin in tumor progression of OSCC. To understand the role of fascin in OSCC development and/or progression, fascin was overexpressed along with vector control in OSCC derived cells AW13516. The phenotype was studied using wound healing, Boyden chamber, cell adhesion, Hanging drop, soft agar and tumorigenicity assays. Further, fascin expression was examined in human OSCC samples (N = 131) using immunohistochemistry and level of its expression was correlated with clinico-pathological parameters of the patients. Fascin overexpression in OSCC derived cells led to significant increase in cell migration, cell invasion and MMP-2 activity. In addition these cells demonstrated increased levels of phosphorylated AKT, ERK1/2 and JNK1/2. Our in vitro results were consistent with correlative studies of fascin expression with the clinico-pathological parameters of the OSCC patients. Fascin expression in OSCC showed statistically significant correlation with increased tumor stage (P = 0.041), increased lymph node metastasis (P = 0.001), less differentiation (P = 0.005), increased recurrence (P = 0.038) and shorter survival (P = 0.004) of the patients. In conclusion, our results indicate that fascin promotes tumor progression and activates AKT and MAPK pathways in OSCC-derived cells. Further, our correlative studies of fascin expression in OSCC with clinico-pathological parameters of the patients indicate that fascin may prove to be useful in prognostication and treatment of OSCC

  5. Ginseng Berry Extract Promotes Maturation of Mouse Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available Ginseng extract has been shown to possess certain anti-virus, anti-tumor and immune-activating effects. However, the immunostimulatory effect of ginseng berry extract (GB has been less well characterized. In this study, we investigated the effect of GB on the activation of mouse dendritic cells (DCs in vitro and in vivo. GB treatment induced up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules in bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs. Interestingly, GB induced a higher degree of co-stimulatory molecule up-regulation than ginseng root extract (GR at the same concentrations. Moreover, in vivo administration of GB promoted up-regulation of CD86, MHC class I and MHC class II and production of IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-α in spleen DCs. GB also promoted the generation of Th1 and Tc1 cells. Furthermore, Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88 signaling pathway were essential for DC activation induced by GB. In addition, GB strongly prompted the proliferation of ovalbumin (OVA-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Finally, GB induced DC activation in tumor-bearing mice and the combination of OVA and GB treatment inhibited B16-OVA tumor cell growth in C57BL/6 mice. These results demonstrate that GB is a novel tumor therapeutic vaccine adjuvant by promoting DC and T cell activation.

  6. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Rie; Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  7. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Rie [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Nakano, Ichiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1824 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Seimiya, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hseimiya@jfcr.or.jp [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  8. Injection of an antibody against a p21 c-Ha-ras protein inhibits cleavage in axolotl eggs.

    OpenAIRE

    Baltus, E; Hanocq-Quertier, J; Hanocq, F; Brachet, J

    1988-01-01

    The presence of a ras protein was demonstrated in cleaving axolotl eggs by selective immunoprecipitation with a polyclonal antibody against a peptide encoded by the c-Ha-ras oncogene, cellular homolog of the v-Ha-ras oncogene of Harvey rat sarcoma virus. Injection of this antibody into axolotl oocytes subjected to progesterone treatment does not prevent meiotic maturation. Injection of the same antibody into a blastomere of axolotl eggs at the 2- or 4-cell stage causes cleavage arrest in the ...

  9. The activity of the anti-apoptotic fragment generated by the caspase-3/p120 RasGAP stress-sensing module displays strict Akt isoform specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanli, Güliz; Peltzer, Nieves; Dubuis, Gilles; Widmann, Christian

    2014-12-01

    The caspase-3/p120 RasGAP module acts as a stress sensor that promotes pro-survival or pro-death signaling depending on the intensity and the duration of the stressful stimuli. Partial cleavage of p120 RasGAP generates a fragment, called fragment N, which protects stressed cells by activating Akt signaling. Akt family members regulate many cellular processes including proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis and metabolism. These cellular processes are regulated by three distinct Akt isoforms: Akt1, Akt2 and Akt3. However, which of these isoforms are required for fragment N mediated protection have not been defined. In this study, we investigated the individual contribution of each isoform in fragment N-mediated cell protection against Fas ligand induced cell death. To this end, DLD1 and HCT116 isogenic cell lines lacking specific Akt isoforms were used. It was found that fragment N could activate Akt1 and Akt2 but that only the former could mediate the protective activity of the RasGAP-derived fragment. Even overexpression of Akt2 or Akt3 could not rescue the inability of fragment N to protect cells lacking Akt1. These results demonstrate a strict Akt isoform requirement for the anti-apoptotic activity of fragment N. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. MRAS: A Close but Understudied Member of the RAS Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lucy C; Rodriguez-Viciana, Pablo

    2018-01-08

    MRAS is the closest relative to the classical RAS oncoproteins and shares most regulatory and effector interactions. However, it also has unique functions, including its ability to function as a phosphatase regulatory subunit when in complex with SHOC2 and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). This phosphatase complex regulates a crucial step in the activation cycle of RAF kinases and provides a key coordinate input required for efficient ERK pathway activation and transformation by RAS. MRAS mutations rarely occur in cancer but deregulated expression may play a role in tumorigenesis in some settings. Activating mutations in MRAS (as well as SHOC2 and PP1) do occur in the RASopathy Noonan syndrome, underscoring a key role for MRAS within the RAS-ERK pathway. MRAS also has unique roles in cell migration and differentiation and has properties consistent with a key role in the regulation of cell polarity. Further investigations should shed light on what remains a relatively understudied RAS family member. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  11. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote cell proliferation and invasion of epithelial ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Yijing; Tang, Huijuan; Guo, Yan; Guo, Jing; Huang, Bangxing; Fang, Fang; Cai, Jing, E-mail: caijingmmm@hotmail.com; Wang, Zehua, E-mail: zehuawang@163.net

    2015-09-10

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (ADSC) is an important component of tumor microenvironment. However, whether ADSCs have a hand in ovarian cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the impact of human ADSCs derived from the omentum of normal donors on human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells in vitro and in vivo. Direct and indirect co-culture models including ADSCs and human EOC cell lines were established and the effects of ADSCs on EOC cell proliferation were evaluated by EdU incorporation and flow cytometry. Transwell migration assays and detection of MMPs were performed to assess the invasion activity of EOC cells in vitro. Mouse models were established by intraperitoneal injection of EOC cells with or without concomitant ADSCs to investigate the role of ADSCs in tumor progression in vivo. We found that ADSCs significantly promoted proliferation and invasion of EOC cells in both direct and indirect co-culture assays. In addition, after co-culture with ADSCs, EOC cells secreted higher levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and inhibition of MMP2 and MMP9 partially relieved the tumor-promoting effects of ADSCs in vitro. In mouse xenograft models, we confirmed that ADSCs promoted EOC growth and metastasis and elevated the expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Our findings indicate that omental ADSCs play a promotive role during ovarian cancer progression. - Highlights: • Omental adipose derived stem cells enhanced growth and invasion properties of ovarian cancer cells. • Adipose derived stem cells promoted the growth and metastasis of ovarian cancer in mice models. • Adipose derived stem cells promoted MMPs expression and secretion of ovarian cancer cells. • Elevated MMPs mediated the tumor promoting effects of ADSCs.

  12. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote cell proliferation and invasion of epithelial ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Yijing; Tang, Huijuan; Guo, Yan; Guo, Jing; Huang, Bangxing; Fang, Fang; Cai, Jing; Wang, Zehua

    2015-01-01

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (ADSC) is an important component of tumor microenvironment. However, whether ADSCs have a hand in ovarian cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the impact of human ADSCs derived from the omentum of normal donors on human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells in vitro and in vivo. Direct and indirect co-culture models including ADSCs and human EOC cell lines were established and the effects of ADSCs on EOC cell proliferation were evaluated by EdU incorporation and flow cytometry. Transwell migration assays and detection of MMPs were performed to assess the invasion activity of EOC cells in vitro. Mouse models were established by intraperitoneal injection of EOC cells with or without concomitant ADSCs to investigate the role of ADSCs in tumor progression in vivo. We found that ADSCs significantly promoted proliferation and invasion of EOC cells in both direct and indirect co-culture assays. In addition, after co-culture with ADSCs, EOC cells secreted higher levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and inhibition of MMP2 and MMP9 partially relieved the tumor-promoting effects of ADSCs in vitro. In mouse xenograft models, we confirmed that ADSCs promoted EOC growth and metastasis and elevated the expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Our findings indicate that omental ADSCs play a promotive role during ovarian cancer progression. - Highlights: • Omental adipose derived stem cells enhanced growth and invasion properties of ovarian cancer cells. • Adipose derived stem cells promoted the growth and metastasis of ovarian cancer in mice models. • Adipose derived stem cells promoted MMPs expression and secretion of ovarian cancer cells. • Elevated MMPs mediated the tumor promoting effects of ADSCs

  13. Methylation associated inactivation of RASSF1A and its synergistic effect with activated K-Ras in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jing

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes associated with promoter methylation is considered to be a hallmark of oncogenesis. RASSF1A is a candidate tumor suppressor gene which was found to be inactivated in many human cancers. Although we have had a prelimilary cognition about the function of RASSF1A, the exact mechanisms about how RASSF1A functions in human cancers were largely unknown. Moreover, the effect of mutated K-Ras gene on the function of RASSF1A is lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression profile and methylation status of RASSF1A gene, and to explore its concrete mechanisms as a tumor suppressor gene in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma. Methods We examined the expression profile and methylation status of RASSF1A in two NPC cell lines, 38 primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma and 14 normal nasopharyngeal epithelia using RT-PCR and methylated specific PCR(MSP respectively. 5-aza-dC was then added to confirm the correlation between hypermethylation status and inactivation of RASSF1A. The NPC cell line CNE-2 was transfected with exogenous pcDNA3.1(+/RASSF1A plasmid in the presence or absence of mutated K-Ras by liposome-mediated gene transfer method. Flow cytometry was used to examine the effect of RASSF1A on cell cycle modulation and apoptosis. Meanwhile, trypan blue dye exclusion assays was used to detect the effect of RASSF1A transfection alone and the co-transfection of RASSF1A and K-Ras on cell proliferation. Results Promoter methylation of RASSF1A could be detected in 71.05% (27/38 of NPC samples, but not in normal nasopharyngeal epithelia. RASSF1A expression in NPC primary tumors was lower than that in normal nasopharyngeal epithelial (p p p p Conclusion Expression of RASSF1A is down-regulated in NPC due to the hypermethylation of promoter. Exogenous expression of RASSF1A is able to induce growth inhibition effect and apoptosis in tumor cell lines, and this effect could be enhanced by activated

  14. c-Ha-ras BamHI RFLP in human urothelial tumors and point mutations in hot codons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weismanova, E; Skovraga, M.; Kaluz, S.

    1993-01-01

    High-molecular weights DNAs from 30 bladder and renal cell carcinomas (RCC) were isolated and the c-Ha-ras the c-Ha-ras gene BamHI RFLP was examined. Amplification of c-Ha-ras with normal localization with regard to the size of alleles was found only in the case. One of the normally localized c-Ha-ras allele termed RCC c-H-ras of a length of about 6.6 kbp was cloned and an oncogene-activating point mutation was identified using two restriction enzymes. After comparison of CfrI and Cfr10I cleavage maps of RCC c-Ha-ras to complete nucleotide sequences of EJ/T24 c-Ha-ras oncogene and its normal counterpart, a point mutation was identified within codon 11 or 12. The use of CfrI and Cfr10I is of value for clinical practice in identification of point mutations in c-Ha-ras PCR product in neoplasia accompanied by somatic mutation of c-Ha-ras. The correlation among c-Ha-ras allele, amplification/loss, presence of point mutation and progression of neoplasia is discussed. (author)

  15. Senescent T-Cells Promote Bone Loss in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Fessler

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveT-cells are critical players in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Premature senescence of lymphocytes including the accumulation of senescent CD4+ T-cells is a hallmark feature of RA. Whether T-cell senescence is associated with bone loss in RA patients is elusive so far.MethodsThis includes a prospective study of consecutive patients with RA (n = 107, patients with primary osteopenia/-porosis (n = 75, and healthy individuals (n = 38. Bone mineral density (BMD was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Flow cytometry, magnetic-associated cell sorting, and cell culture experiments were performed to analyze the pro-osteoclastic phenotype and the function of senescent CD4+CD28− T-cells.ResultsPatients with osteopenia/-porosis yielded a higher prevalence of senescent CD4+CD28− T-cells than individuals with normal BMD, in the RA, as well as in the non-RA cohort. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL was expressed at higher levels on CD4+CD28− T-cells as compared to CD28+ T-cells. Stimulation with interleukin-15 led to an up-regulation of RANKL expression, particularly on CD28− T-cells. CD4+CD28− T-cells induced osteoclastogenesis more efficiently than CD28+ T-cells.ConclusionOur data indicate that senescent T-cells promote osteoclastogenesis more efficiently than conventional CD28+ T-cells, which might contribute to the pathogenesis of systemic bone loss in RA and primary osteoporosis.

  16. Activation of CHK1 in Supporting Cells Indirectly Promotes Hair Cell Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Jadali

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The sensory hair cells of the inner ear are exquisitely sensitive to ototoxic insults. Loss of hair cells after exposure to ototoxic agents causes hearing loss. Chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin causes hair cell loss. Cisplatin forms DNA mono-adducts as well as intra- and inter-strand DNA crosslinks. DNA cisplatin adducts are repaired through the DNA damage response. The decision between cell survival and cell death following DNA damage rests on factors that are involved in determining damage tolerance, cell survival and apoptosis. Cisplatin damage on hair cells has been the main focus of many ototoxic studies, yet the effect of cisplatin on supporting cells has been largely ignored. In this study, the effects of DNA damage response in cochlear supporting cells were interrogated. Supporting cells play a major role in the development, maintenance and oto-protection of hair cells. Loss of supporting cells may indirectly affect hair cell survival or maintenance. Activation of the Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase (PI3K signaling was previously shown to promote hair cell survival. To test whether activating PI3K signaling promotes supporting cell survival after cisplatin damage, cochlear explants from the neural subset (NS Cre Pten conditional knockout mice were employed. Deletion of Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN activates PI3K signaling in multiple cell types within the cochlea. Supporting cells lacking PTEN showed increased cell survival after cisplatin damage. Supporting cells lacking PTEN also showed increased phosphorylation of Checkpoint Kinase 1 (CHK1 levels after cisplatin damage. Nearest neighbor analysis showed increased numbers of supporting cells with activated PI3K signaling in close proximity to surviving hair cells in cisplatin damaged cochleae. We propose that increased PI3K signaling promotes supporting cell survival through phosphorylation of CHK1 and increased survival of supporting cells indirectly increases hair cell

  17. An Alu-like RNA promotes cell differentiation and reduces malignancy of human neuroblastoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Castelnuovo Manuele; Massone Sara; Tasso Roberta; Fiorino Gloria; Gatti Monica; Robello Mauro; Gatta Elena; Berger Audrey; Strub Katharina; Florio Tullio; Dieci Giorgio; Cancedda Ranieri; Pagano Aldo

    2010-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a pediatric cancer characterized by remarkable cell heterogeneity within the tumor nodules. Here, we demonstrate that the synthesis of a pol III-transcribed noncoding (nc) RNA (NDM29) strongly restricts NB development by promoting cell differentiation, a drop of malignancy processes, and a dramatic reduction of the tumor initiating cell (TIC) fraction in the NB cell population. Notably, the overexpression of NDM29 also confers to malignant NB cells an unpredicted suscept...

  18. The bovine papillomavirus E5 oncogene can cooperate with ras: identification of p21 amino acids critical for transformation by c-rasH but not v-rasH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Vass, W C; Velu, T J

    1991-01-01

    We have previously used a series of insertion-deletion mutants of the mutationally activated v-rasH gene to identify several regions of the encoded protein that are dispensable for cellular transformation (B. M. Willumsen, A. G. Papageorge, H.-F. Kung, E. Bekesi, T. Robins, M. Johnsen, W. C. Vass...... in their v-rasH forms. We conclude that a region including amino acids 102 and 103 encodes a function that is more critical to c-rasH than to v-rasH. Guanine nucleotide exchange is one function that is compatible with such a phenotype......., and D. R. Lowy, Mol. Cell. Biol. 6:2646-2654, 1986). To determine if some of these amino acids are more important for the biological activity of c-rasH, we have now tested many of the same insertion-deletion mutants in the c-rasH form for their ability to transform NIH 3T3 cells. Since the transforming...

  19. Genistein promotes DNA demethylation of the steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) promoter in endometrial stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsukura, Hiroshi; Aisaki, Ken-ichi; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Matsushima, Yuko; Kanno, Jun; Muramatsu, Masaaki; Sudo, Katsuko; Sato, Noriko

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Genistein (GEN) is a phytoestrogen found in soy products. → GEN demethylated/unsilenced the steroidogenic factor 1 gene in endometrial tissue. → GEN thus altered mRNA expression in uteri of ovariectomized (OVX) mice. → A high-resolution melting assay was used to screen for epigenetic change. → We isolated an endometrial cell clone that was epigenetically modulated by GEN. -- Abstract: It has recently been demonstrated that genistein (GEN), a phytoestrogen in soy products, is an epigenetic modulator in various types of cells; but its effect on endometrium has not yet been determined. We investigated the effects of GEN on mouse uterine cells, in vivo and in vitro. Oral administration of GEN for 1 week induced mild proliferation of the endometrium in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, which was accompanied by the induction of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) gene expression. GEN administration induced demethylation of multiple CpG sites in the SF-1 promoter; these sites are extensively methylated and thus silenced in normal endometrium. The GEN-mediated promoter demethylation occurred predominantly on the luminal side, as opposed to myometrium side, indicating that the epigenetic change was mainly shown in regenerated cells. Primary cultures of endometrial stromal cell colonies were screened for GEN-mediated alterations of DNA methylation by a high-resolution melting (HRM) method. One out of 20 colony-forming cell clones showed GEN-induced demethylation of SF-1. This clone exhibited a high proliferation capacity with continuous colony formation activity through multiple serial clonings. We propose that only a portion of endometrial cells are capable of receiving epigenetic modulation by GEN.

  20. Genistein promotes DNA demethylation of the steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) promoter in endometrial stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsukura, Hiroshi, E-mail: hmatsukura.epi@mri.tmd.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Epidemiology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Aisaki, Ken-ichi; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Matsushima, Yuko; Kanno, Jun [Division of Cellular and Molecular Toxicology, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Muramatsu, Masaaki [Department of Molecular Epidemiology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Sudo, Katsuko [Department of Molecular Epidemiology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Animal Research Center, Tokyo Medical University, 6-1-1 Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8402 (Japan); Sato, Noriko, E-mail: nsato.epi@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Epidemiology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan)

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Genistein (GEN) is a phytoestrogen found in soy products. {yields} GEN demethylated/unsilenced the steroidogenic factor 1 gene in endometrial tissue. {yields} GEN thus altered mRNA expression in uteri of ovariectomized (OVX) mice. {yields} A high-resolution melting assay was used to screen for epigenetic change. {yields} We isolated an endometrial cell clone that was epigenetically modulated by GEN. -- Abstract: It has recently been demonstrated that genistein (GEN), a phytoestrogen in soy products, is an epigenetic modulator in various types of cells; but its effect on endometrium has not yet been determined. We investigated the effects of GEN on mouse uterine cells, in vivo and in vitro. Oral administration of GEN for 1 week induced mild proliferation of the endometrium in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, which was accompanied by the induction of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) gene expression. GEN administration induced demethylation of multiple CpG sites in the SF-1 promoter; these sites are extensively methylated and thus silenced in normal endometrium. The GEN-mediated promoter demethylation occurred predominantly on the luminal side, as opposed to myometrium side, indicating that the epigenetic change was mainly shown in regenerated cells. Primary cultures of endometrial stromal cell colonies were screened for GEN-mediated alterations of DNA methylation by a high-resolution melting (HRM) method. One out of 20 colony-forming cell clones showed GEN-induced demethylation of SF-1. This clone exhibited a high proliferation capacity with continuous colony formation activity through multiple serial clonings. We propose that only a portion of endometrial cells are capable of receiving epigenetic modulation by GEN.

  1. Mechanical Stress Promotes Cisplatin-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Ziko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CisPt is a commonly used platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent. Its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance and multiple side effects, thereby warranting a new approach to improving the pharmacological effect of CisPt. A newly developed mathematical hypothesis suggested that mechanical loading, when coupled with a chemotherapeutic drug such as CisPt and immune cells, would boost tumor cell death. The current study investigated the aforementioned mathematical hypothesis by exposing human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells to CisPt, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mechanical stress individually and in combination. HepG2 cells were also treated with a mixture of CisPt and carnosine with and without mechanical stress to examine one possible mechanism employed by mechanical stress to enhance CisPt effects. Carnosine is a dipeptide that reportedly sequesters platinum-based drugs away from their pharmacological target-site. Mechanical stress was achieved using an orbital shaker that produced 300 rpm with a horizontal circular motion. Our results demonstrated that mechanical stress promoted CisPt-induced death of HepG2 cells (~35% more cell death. Moreover, results showed that CisPt-induced death was compromised when CisPt was left to mix with carnosine 24 hours preceding treatment. Mechanical stress, however, ameliorated cell death (20% more cell death.

  2. Mechanical Stress Promotes Cisplatin-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riad, Sandra; Bougherara, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin (CisPt) is a commonly used platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent. Its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance and multiple side effects, thereby warranting a new approach to improving the pharmacological effect of CisPt. A newly developed mathematical hypothesis suggested that mechanical loading, when coupled with a chemotherapeutic drug such as CisPt and immune cells, would boost tumor cell death. The current study investigated the aforementioned mathematical hypothesis by exposing human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells to CisPt, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mechanical stress individually and in combination. HepG2 cells were also treated with a mixture of CisPt and carnosine with and without mechanical stress to examine one possible mechanism employed by mechanical stress to enhance CisPt effects. Carnosine is a dipeptide that reportedly sequesters platinum-based drugs away from their pharmacological target-site. Mechanical stress was achieved using an orbital shaker that produced 300 rpm with a horizontal circular motion. Our results demonstrated that mechanical stress promoted CisPt-induced death of HepG2 cells (~35% more cell death). Moreover, results showed that CisPt-induced death was compromised when CisPt was left to mix with carnosine 24 hours preceding treatment. Mechanical stress, however, ameliorated cell death (20% more cell death). PMID:25685789

  3. Probiotics promote endocytic allergen degradation in gut epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Chun-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Huang, Shelly; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function. ► The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. ► Antigens transported across A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers conserved antigenicity. ► Probiotic proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Epithelial barrier dysfunction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases; the mechanism is to be further understood. The ubiquitin E3 ligase A20 (A20) plays a role in the endocytic protein degradation in the cells. This study aims to elucidate the role of A20 in the maintenance of gut epithelial barrier function. Methods: Gut epithelial cell line, HT-29 cell, was cultured into monolayers to evaluate the barrier function in transwells. RNA interference was employed to knock down the A20 gene in HT-29 cells to test the role of A20 in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function. Probiotic derived proteins were extracted from the culture supernatants using to enhance the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. Results: The results showed that the knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function in HT-29 monolayers, mainly increased the intracellular permeability. The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Allergens collected from the transwell basal chambers of A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers still conserved functional antigenicity. Treating with probiotic derived proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells and promote the barrier function. Conclusion: A20 plays an important role in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function as shown by HT-29 monolayer. Probiotic derived protein increases the expression of A20 and promote the HT-29 monolayer barrier function.

  4. Probiotics promote endocytic allergen degradation in gut epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chun-Hua [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Liu, Zhi-Qiang [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Huang, Shelly [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Zheng, Peng-Yuan, E-mail: medp7123@126.com [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Yang, Ping-Chang, E-mail: yangp@mcmaster.ca [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antigens transported across A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers conserved antigenicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Probiotic proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Epithelial barrier dysfunction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases; the mechanism is to be further understood. The ubiquitin E3 ligase A20 (A20) plays a role in the endocytic protein degradation in the cells. This study aims to elucidate the role of A20 in the maintenance of gut epithelial barrier function. Methods: Gut epithelial cell line, HT-29 cell, was cultured into monolayers to evaluate the barrier function in transwells. RNA interference was employed to knock down the A20 gene in HT-29 cells to test the role of A20 in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function. Probiotic derived proteins were extracted from the culture supernatants using to enhance the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. Results: The results showed that the knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function in HT-29 monolayers, mainly increased the intracellular permeability. The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Allergens collected from the transwell basal chambers of A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers still conserved functional antigenicity. Treating with probiotic derived proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells and promote the barrier function. Conclusion: A20 plays an important role in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function as shown by HT-29 monolayer. Probiotic derived protein increases the expression of A20 and promote the HT-29 monolayer barrier function.

  5. Using the capital markets in Ras Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voge, B.; Penzer, M.

    1997-01-01

    In December 1996, Ras Laffan Liquefied Natural Gas Company Ltd (Ras Gas) closed a multi-source financing that included an offering of US$1.2bn of bonds. The sponsors of the Ras Gas project overcame a number of obstacles on the road to closing the capital markets offering. This article provides a general overview of capital markets offerings in international project financings and discusses how Ras Gas was able to successfully integrate a capital markets offering into a financing plan which included a commercial bank facility and several export-credit agency facilities. (Author)

  6. Adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP is a central hub for phosphotyrosine-mediated interactions in T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Sylvester

    Full Text Available TCR stimulation leads to an increase in cellular adhesion among other outcomes. The adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein (ADAP is known to be rapidly phosphorylated after T cell stimulation and relays the TCR signal to adhesion molecules of the integrin family. While three tyrosine phosphorylation sites have been characterized biochemically, the binding capabilities and associated functions of several other potential phosphotyrosine motifs remain unclear. Here, we utilize in vitro phosphorylation and mass spectrometry to map novel phosphotyrosine sites in the C-terminal part of human ADAP (486-783. Individual tyrosines were then mutated to phenylalanine and their relevance for cellular adhesion and migration was tested experimentally. Functionally important tyrosine residues include two sites within the folded hSH3 domains of ADAP and two at the C-terminus. Furthermore, using a peptide pulldown approach in combination with stable isotope labeling in cell culture (SILAC we identified SLP-76, PLCgamma, PIK3R1, Nck, CRK, Gads, and RasGAP as phospho-dependent binding partners of a central YDDV motif of ADAP. The phosphorylation-dependent interaction between ADAP and Nck was confirmed by yeast two-hybrid analysis, immunoprecipitation and binary pulldown experiments, indicating that ADAP directly links integrins to modulators of the cytoskeleton independent of SLP-76.

  7. Destabilization of Akt Promotes the Death of Myeloma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Constitutive activation of Akt is believed to be an oncogenic signal in multiple myeloma and is associated with poor patient prognosis and resistance to available treatment. The stability of Akt proteins is regulated by phosphorylating the highly conserved turn motif (TM of these proteins and the chaperone protein HSP90. In this study we investigate the antitumor effects of inhibiting mTORC2 plus HSP90 in myeloma cell lines. We show that chronic exposure of cells to rapamycin can inhibit mTORC2 pathway, and AKT will be destabilized by administration of the HSP90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-geldanamycin (17-AAG. Finally, we show that the rapamycin synergizes with 17-AAG and inhibits myeloma cells growth and promotes cell death to a greater extent than either drug alone. Our studies provide a clinical rationale of use mTOR inhibitors and chaperone protein inhibitors in combination regimens for the treatment of human blood cancers.

  8. Identification of Differentially Expressed K-Ras Transcript Variants in Patients With Leiomyoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfaghari, Nooshin; Shahbazi, Shirin; Torfeh, Mahnaz; Khorasani, Maryam; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Mahdian, Reza

    2017-10-01

    Molecular studies have demonstrated a wide range of gene expression variations in uterine leiomyoma. The rat sarcoma virus/rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma/mitogen-activated protein kinase (RAS/RAF/MAPK) is the crucial cellular pathway in transmitting external signals into nucleus. Deregulation of this pathway contributes to excessive cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. The present study aims to investigate the expression profile of the K-Ras transcripts in tissue samples from patients with leiomyoma. The patients were leiomyoma cases who had no mutation in mediator complex subunit 12 ( MED12) gene. A quantitative approach has been applied to determine the difference in the expression of the 2 main K-Ras messenger RNA (mRNA) variants. The comparison between gene expression levels in leiomyoma and normal myometrium group was performed using relative expression software tool. The expression of K-Ras4B gene was upregulated in leiomyoma group ( P = .016), suggesting the involvement of K-Ras4B in the disease pathogenesis. Pairwise comparison of the K-Ras4B expression between each leiomyoma tissue and its matched adjacent normal myometrium revealed gene upregulation in 68% of the cases. The expression of K-Ras4A mRNA was relatively upregulated in leiomyoma group ( P = .030). In addition, the mean expression of K-Ras4A gene in leiomyoma tissues relative to normal samples was 4.475 (95% confidence interval: 0.10-20.42; standard error: 0.53-12.67). In total, 58% of the cases showed more than 2-fold increase in K-Ras4A gene expression. Our results demonstrated increased expression of both K-Ras mRNA splicing variants in leiomyoma tissue. However, the ultimate result of KRAS expression on leiomyoma development depends on the overall KRAS isoform balance and, consequently, on activated signaling pathways.

  9. The Bisphenol A analogue Bisphenol S binds to K-Ras4B--implications for 'BPA-free' plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöpel, Miriam; Herrmann, Christian; Scherkenbeck, Jürgen; Stoll, Raphael

    2016-02-01

    K-Ras4B is a small GTPase that belongs to the Ras superfamily of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. GTPases function as molecular switches in cells and are key players in intracellular signalling. Ras has been identified as an oncogene and is mutated in more than 20% of human cancers. Here, we report that Bisphenol S binds into a binding pocket of K-Ras4B previously identified for various low molecular weight compounds. Our results advocate for more comprehensive safety studies on the toxicity of Bisphenol S, as it is frequently used for Bisphenol A-free food containers. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. Expression of ras oncogene and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigen in carcinomas of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kyung Ja; Jang, Ja June; Kim, Yong Dae; Ha, Chang Won; Koh, Jae Soo

    1993-01-01

    Consecutive 50 cases of squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix diagnosed in 1992 were subjected to immunohistochemical study for ras oncogene product (p21) and MHC class II (DR) antigen using a microprobe immunostainer. Activated ras and aberrant DR expression were noted in 26 cases (52%) and 11 cases (22%) of cervical squamous cell carcinomas, respectively, without difference among histologic types. The reaction was mainly intracytoplasmic, with granular staining pattern and diffuse distribution. No direct histologic correlation between ras and DR expression was found. Four cases with HPV 16/18 DNA in superficial koilocytotic cells, revealed by in situ hybridization, showed various expression of ras and DR, and these 3 factors histologically did not seem to be affected one another. (Author)

  11. p63 promotes cell survival through fatty acid synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Sabbisetti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that p63, and specifically DeltaNp63, plays a central role in both development and tumorigenesis by promoting epithelial cell survival. However, few studies have addressed the molecular mechanisms through which such important function is exerted. Fatty acid synthase (FASN, a key enzyme that synthesizes long-chain fatty acids and is involved in both embryogenesis and cancer, has been recently proposed as a direct target of p53 family members, including p63 and p73. Here we show that knockdown of either total or DeltaN-specific p63 isoforms in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC9 or immortalized prostate epithelial (iPrEC cells caused a decrease in cell viability by inducing apoptosis without affecting the cell cycle. p63 silencing significantly reduced both the expression and the activity of FASN. Importantly, stable overexpression of either FASN or myristoylated AKT (myr-AKT was able to partially rescue cells from cell death induced by p63 silencing. FASN induced AKT phosphorylation and a significant reduction in cell viability was observed when FASN-overexpressing SCC9 cells were treated with an AKT inhibitor after p63 knockdown, indicating that AKT plays a major role in FASN-mediated survival. Activated AKT did not cause any alteration in the FASN protein levels but induced its activity, suggesting that the rescue from apoptosis documented in the p63-silenced cells expressing myr-AKT cells may be partially mediated by FASN. Finally, we demonstrated that p63 and FASN expression are positively associated in clinical squamous cell carcinoma samples as well as in the developing prostate. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that FASN is a functionally relevant target of p63 and is required for mediating its pro-survival effects.

  12. α-Ketoglutarate Promotes Pancreatic Progenitor-Like Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Song

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A major source of β cell generation is pancreatic progenitor-like cell differentiation. Multiple studies have confirmed that stem cell metabolism plays important roles in self-renewal and proliferation. In the absence of glucose, glutamine provides the energy for cell division and growth. Furthermore, α-ketoglutarate (αKG, a precursor for glutamine synthesis, is sufficient for enabling glutamine-independent cell proliferation. We have demonstrated that αKG contributes to the large-scale proliferation of pancreatic progenitor-like cells that can provide an ample amount of clinically relevant β cells. We compared the mRNA expression of a subset of genes, the abundance of ATP, reactive oxide species, mitochondrial number, and the colony-forming frequency between mouse pancreatic CD133+ and CD133− cells. We employed Real-Time PCR, immunostaining and passage assays to investigate self-renewal and proliferation of pancreatic progenitor-like cells in a 3D culture system in the presence and absence of αKG. The energy metabolism of CD133+ cells was more prone to oxidative phosphorylation. However, in the 3D culture system, when αKG was supplemented to the culture medium, the proliferation of the pancreatic progenitor-like cells was significantly elevated. We confirmed that the presence of αKG correlated with the up-regulation of Ten-Eleven Translocation (Tet. αKG can promote the proliferation of pancreatic progenitor-like cells via the up-regulation of Tet.

  13. α-Ketoglutarate Promotes Pancreatic Progenitor-Like Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jing; Ma, Dongshen; Xing, Yun; Tang, Shanshan; Alahdal, Murad; Guo, Jiamin; Pan, Yi; Zhang, Yanfeng; Shen, Yumeng; Wu, Qiong; Lu, Zhou; Jin, Liang

    2018-03-22

    A major source of β cell generation is pancreatic progenitor-like cell differentiation. Multiple studies have confirmed that stem cell metabolism plays important roles in self-renewal and proliferation. In the absence of glucose, glutamine provides the energy for cell division and growth. Furthermore, α-ketoglutarate (αKG), a precursor for glutamine synthesis, is sufficient for enabling glutamine-independent cell proliferation. We have demonstrated that αKG contributes to the large-scale proliferation of pancreatic progenitor-like cells that can provide an ample amount of clinically relevant β cells. We compared the mRNA expression of a subset of genes, the abundance of ATP, reactive oxide species, mitochondrial number, and the colony-forming frequency between mouse pancreatic CD133⁺ and CD133 - cells. We employed Real-Time PCR, immunostaining and passage assays to investigate self-renewal and proliferation of pancreatic progenitor-like cells in a 3D culture system in the presence and absence of αKG. The energy metabolism of CD133⁺ cells was more prone to oxidative phosphorylation. However, in the 3D culture system, when αKG was supplemented to the culture medium, the proliferation of the pancreatic progenitor-like cells was significantly elevated. We confirmed that the presence of αKG correlated with the up-regulation of Ten-Eleven Translocation (Tet). αKG can promote the proliferation of pancreatic progenitor-like cells via the up-regulation of Tet.

  14. Small GTPase R-Ras participates in neural tube formation in zebrafish embryonic spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohata, Shinya; Uga, Hideko; Okamoto, Hitoshi; Katada, Toshiaki

    2018-06-27

    Ras related (R-Ras), a small GTPase, is involved in the maintenance of apico-basal polarity in neuroepithelial cells of the zebrafish hindbrain, axonal collapse in cultured murine hippocampal neurons, and maturation of blood vessels in adult mice. However, the role of R-Ras in neural tube formation remains unknown. Using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (AMOs), we found that in the spinal cord of zebrafish embryos, the lumen was formed bilaterally in rras morphants, whereas it was formed at the midline in control embryos. As AMO can cause off-target effects, we generated rras mutant zebrafish lines using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Although these rras mutant embryos did not have a bilateral lumen in the spinal cord, the following findings suggest that the phenotype is unlikely due to an off-target effect of rras AMO: 1) The rras morphant phenotype was rescued by an injection of AMO-resistant rras mRNA, and 2) a bilaterally segregated spinal cord was not observed in rras mutant embryos injected with rras AMO. The results suggest that the function of other ras family genes may be redundant in rras mutants. Previous research reported a bilaterally formed lumen in the spinal cord of zebrafish embryos with a mutation in a planar cell polarity (PCP) gene, van gogh-like 2 (vangl2). In the present study, in cultured cells, R-Ras was co-immunoprecipitated with Vangl2 but not with another PCP regulator, Pricke1. Interestingly, the interaction between R-Ras and Vangl2 was stronger in guanine-nucleotide free point mutants of R-Ras than in wild-type or constitutively active (GTP-bound) forms of R-Ras. R-Ras may regulate neural tube formation in cooperation with Vangl2 in the developing zebrafish spinal cord. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Th17 cell-mediated immune responses promote mast cell proliferation by triggering stem cell factor in keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kyung-Ah; Park, Minhwa; Kim, Yu-Hee; Woo, So-Youn

    2017-01-01

    Although mast cells are traditionally thought to function as effector cells in allergic responses, they have increasingly been recognized as important regulators of various immune responses. Mast cells mature locally; thus, tissue-specific influences are important for promoting mast cell accumulation and survival in the skin and the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we determined the effects of keratinocytes on mast cell accumulation during Th17-mediated skin inflammation. We observed increases in dermal mast cells in imiquimod-induced psoriatic dermatitis in mice accompanied by the expression of epidermal stem cell factor (SCF), a critical mast cell growth factor. Similar to mouse epidermal keratinocytes, SCF was highly expressed in the human HaCaT keratinocyte cell line following stimulation with IL−17. Further, keratinocytes promoted mast cell proliferation following stimulation with IL−17 in vitro. However, the effects of keratinocytes on mast cells were significantly diminished in the presence of anti−CD117 (stem cell factor receptor) blocking antibodies. Taken together, our results revealed that the Th17-mediated inflammatory environment promotes mast cell accumulation through keratinocyte-derived SCF. - Highlights: • Psoriasis-like skin inflammation increase dermal mast cells. • Keratinocyte produce stem cell factor in psoriasis-like skin inflammation. • Keratinocyte promote mast cell proliferation by stem cell factor dependent manner

  16. Monitoring Ras Interactions with the Nucleotide Exchange Factor Son of Sevenless (Sos) Using Site-specific NMR Reporter Signals and Intrinsic Fluorescence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Flavell, Liz; Bobby, Romel; Breeze, Alexander L.; Embrey, Kevin J.; Golovanov, Alexander P.

    2016-01-01

    The activity of Ras is controlled by the interconversion between GTP- and GDP-bound forms partly regulated by the binding of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Son of Sevenless (Sos). The details of Sos binding, leading to nucleotide exchange and subsequent dissociation of the complex, are not completely understood. Here, we used uniformly 15N-labeled Ras as well as [13C]methyl-Met,Ile-labeled Sos for observing site-specific details of Ras-Sos interactions in solution. Binding of various forms of Ras (loaded with GDP and mimics of GTP or nucleotide-free) at the allosteric and catalytic sites of Sos was comprehensively characterized by monitoring signal perturbations in the NMR spectra. The overall affinity of binding between these protein variants as well as their selected functional mutants was also investigated using intrinsic fluorescence. The data support a positive feedback activation of Sos by Ras·GTP with Ras·GTP binding as a substrate for the catalytic site of activated Sos more weakly than Ras·GDP, suggesting that Sos should actively promote unidirectional GDP → GTP exchange on Ras in preference of passive homonucleotide exchange. Ras·GDP weakly binds to the catalytic but not to the allosteric site of Sos. This confirms that Ras·GDP cannot properly activate Sos at the allosteric site. The novel site-specific assay described may be useful for design of drugs aimed at perturbing Ras-Sos interactions. PMID:26565026

  17. Possible involvement of MSX-2 homeoprotein in v-ras-induced transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, C; Akiyama, N; Kitayama, H; Takai, S; Noda, M

    1997-04-01

    A truncated MSX-2 homeoprotein was found to induce flat reversion when expressed in v-Ki-ras-transformed NIH3T3 cells. Although the expression of endogenous MSX-2 gene is low in most of the normal adult tissues examined, it is frequently activated in carcinoma-derived cell lines. Likewise, the gene is inactive in untransformed cells but is transcriptionally activated after transformation by v-Ki-ras oncogene, suggesting that the intact MSX-2 may play a positive, rather than suppressive, role in cell transformation. To test this possibility, we isolated a full-length human MSX-2 cDNA and tested its activities in two cell systems: fibroblast and myoblast. In NIH3T3 fibroblasts, although the gene by itself failed to confer a transformed phenotype, antisense MSX-2 cDNA as well as truncated MSX-2 cDNA interfered with the transforming activities of both v-Ki-ras and v-raf oncogene. In C2C12 myoblasts, MSX-2 was found to suppress MyoD gene expression, as do activated ras oncogenes, under certain culture conditions, and truncated MSX-2 cDNA was found to inhibit the activities of both MSX-2 and ras in this system as well. Our findings not only suggest that the truncated version MSX-2 may act as a dominant suppressor of intact MSX-2 but also raise the possibility that MSX-2 gene may be an important downstream target for the Ras signaling pathways.

  18. Inhibition of the Ras-Net (Elk-3) pathway by a novel pyrazole that affects microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylyk, Christine; Zheng, Hong; Castell, Christelle; Debussche, Laurent; Multon, Marie-Christine; Wasylyk, Bohdan

    2008-03-01

    Net (Elk-3/SAP-2/Erp) is a transcription factor that is phosphorylated and activated by the Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) signaling pathway and is involved in wound healing, angiogenesis, and tumor growth. In a cell-based screen for small molecule inhibitors of Ras activation of Net transcriptional activity, we identified a novel pyrazole, XRP44X. XRP44X inhibits fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2)-induced Net phosphorylation by the Ras-Erk signaling upstream from Ras. It also binds to the colchicine-binding site of tubulin, depolymerizes microtubules, stimulates cell membrane blebbing, and affects the morphology of the actin skeleton. Interestingly, Combretastin-A4, which produces similar effects on the cytoskeleton, also inhibits FGF-2 Ras-Net signaling. This differs from other classes of agents that target microtubules, which have either little effect (vincristine) or no effect (docetaxel and nocodazole) on the Ras-Net pathway. XRP44X inhibits various cellular properties, including cell growth, cell cycle progression, and aortal sprouting, similar to other molecules that bind to the tubulin colchicine site. XRP44X has the potentially interesting property of connecting two important pathways involved in cell transformation and may thereby represent an interesting class of molecules that could be developed for cancer treatment.

  19. Adenylate Cyclase Toxin promotes bacterial internalisation into non phagocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, César; Etxaniz, Asier; Uribe, Kepa B; Etxebarria, Aitor; González-Bullón, David; Arlucea, Jon; Goñi, Félix M; Aréchaga, Juan; Ostolaza, Helena

    2015-09-08

    Bordetella pertussis causes whooping cough, a respiratory infectious disease that is the fifth largest cause of vaccine-preventable death in infants. Though historically considered an extracellular pathogen, this bacterium has been detected both in vitro and in vivo inside phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. However the precise mechanism used by B. pertussis for cell entry, or the putative bacterial factors involved, are not fully elucidated. Here we find that adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT), one of the important toxins of B. pertussis, is sufficient to promote bacterial internalisation into non-phagocytic cells. After characterization of the entry route we show that uptake of "toxin-coated bacteria" proceeds via a clathrin-independent, caveolae-dependent entry pathway, allowing the internalised bacteria to survive within the cells. Intracellular bacteria were found inside non-acidic endosomes with high sphingomyelin and cholesterol content, or "free" in the cytosol of the invaded cells, suggesting that the ACT-induced bacterial uptake may not proceed through formation of late endolysosomes. Activation of Tyr kinases and toxin-induced Ca(2+)-influx are essential for the entry process. We hypothesize that B. pertussis might use ACT to activate the endocytic machinery of non-phagocytic cells and gain entry into these cells, in this way evading the host immune system.

  20. Nifedipine promotes the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Qing Guo

    Full Text Available Nifedipine is widely used as a calcium channel blocker (CCB to treat angina and hypertension,but it is controversial with respect the risk of stimulation of cancers. In this study, we demonstrated that nifedipine promoted the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells both invivo and invitro. However, verapamil, another calcium channel blocker, didn't exert the similar effects. Nifedipine and high concentration KCl failed to alter the [Ca2+]i in MDA-MB-231 cells, suggesting that such nifedipine effect was not related with calcium channel. Moreover, nifedipine decreased miRNA-524-5p, resulting in the up-regulation of brain protein I3 (BRI3. Erk pathway was consequently activated and led to the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Silencing BRI3 reversed the promoting effect of nifedipine on the breast cancer. In a summary, nifedipine stimulated the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells via the axis of miRNA-524-5p-BRI3-Erk pathway independently of its calcium channel-blocking activity. Our findings highlight that nifedipine but not verapamil is conducive for breast cancer growth and metastasis, urging that the caution should be taken in clinic to prescribe nifedipine to women who suffering both hypertension and breast cancer, and hypertension with a tendency in breast cancers.

  1. Aquaporin 2 promotes cell migration and epithelial morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Rice, William; Gu, Zhizhan; Li, Jian; Huang, Jianmin; Brenner, Michael B; Van Hoek, Alfred; Xiong, Jianping; Gundersen, Gregg G; Norman, Jim C; Hsu, Victor W; Fenton, Robert A; Brown, Dennis; Lu, Hua A Jenny

    2012-09-01

    The aquaporin 2 (AQP2) water channel, expressed in kidney collecting ducts, contributes critically to water homeostasis in mammals. Animals lacking or having significantly reduced levels of AQP2, however, have not only urinary concentrating abnormalities but also renal tubular defects that lead to neonatal mortality from renal failure. Here, we show that AQP2 is not only a water channel but also an integrin-binding membrane protein that promotes cell migration and epithelial morphogenesis. AQP2 expression modulates the trafficking and internalization of integrin β1, facilitating its turnover at focal adhesions. In vitro, disturbing the interaction between AQP2 and integrin β1 by mutating the RGD motif led to reduced endocytosis, retention of integrin β1 at the cell surface, and defective cell migration and tubulogenesis. Similarly, in vivo, AQP2-null mice exhibited significant retention of integrin β1 at the basolateral membrane and had tubular abnormalities. In summary, these data suggest that the water channel AQP2 interacts with integrins to promote renal epithelial cell migration, contributing to the structural and functional integrity of the mammalian kidney.

  2. Low dose perfluorooctanoate exposure promotes cell proliferation in a human non-tumor liver cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Cui, Ruina [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Guo, Xuejiang [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Hu, Jiayue [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Dai, Jiayin, E-mail: daijy@ioz.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Highlights: • Differential expression of proteins induced by PFOA in HL-7702 was identified. • Most of the differentially expressed proteins are related to cell proliferation. • A low dose of PFOA stimulates HL-7702 cell proliferation. • A high dose of PFOA inhibits HL-7702 cell proliferation. - Abstract: Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) is a well-known persistent organic pollutant widely found in the environment, wildlife and humans. Medical surveillance and experimental studies have investigated the potential effects of PFOA on human livers, but the hepatotoxicity of PFOA on humans and its underlying mechanism remain to be clarified. We exposed a human liver cell line (HL-7702) to 50 μM PFOA for 48 h and 96 h, and identified 111 significantly differentially expressed proteins by iTRAQ analysis. A total of 46 proteins were related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. Through further analysis of the cell cycle, apoptosis and their related proteins, we found that low doses of PFOA (50–100 μM) promoted cell proliferation and numbers by promoting cells from the G1 to S phases, whereas high doses of PFOA (200–400 μM) led to reduced HL-7702 cell numbers compared with that of the control mainly due to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the promotion of cell cycle progression in human cells following PFOA exposure.

  3. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, S.Q.; Cao, J.; Zhang, Q.Y.; Li, Y.Y.; Yan, Y.Q.; Yu, F.X.

    2013-01-01

    To explore the effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and the possible mechanism involved, ADSCs were cocultured with pancreatic cancer cells, and a cell counting kit (CCK-8) was used to detect the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. ELISA was used to determine the concentration of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the supernatants. RT-PCR was performed to detect the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in pancreatic cancer cells and ADSCs. An in vitro invasion assay was used to measure invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. SDF-1 was detected in the supernatants of ADSCs, but not in pancreatic cancer cells. Higher CXCR4 mRNA levels were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with ADSCs (109.3±10.7 and 97.6±7.6 vs 18.3±1.7, respectively; P<0.01). In addition, conditioned medium from ADSCs promoted the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, and AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, significantly downregulated these growth-promoting effects. We conclude that ADSCs can promote the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, which may involve the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis

  4. Low dose perfluorooctanoate exposure promotes cell proliferation in a human non-tumor liver cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Cui, Ruina; Guo, Xuejiang; Hu, Jiayue; Dai, Jiayin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Differential expression of proteins induced by PFOA in HL-7702 was identified. • Most of the differentially expressed proteins are related to cell proliferation. • A low dose of PFOA stimulates HL-7702 cell proliferation. • A high dose of PFOA inhibits HL-7702 cell proliferation. - Abstract: Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) is a well-known persistent organic pollutant widely found in the environment, wildlife and humans. Medical surveillance and experimental studies have investigated the potential effects of PFOA on human livers, but the hepatotoxicity of PFOA on humans and its underlying mechanism remain to be clarified. We exposed a human liver cell line (HL-7702) to 50 μM PFOA for 48 h and 96 h, and identified 111 significantly differentially expressed proteins by iTRAQ analysis. A total of 46 proteins were related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. Through further analysis of the cell cycle, apoptosis and their related proteins, we found that low doses of PFOA (50–100 μM) promoted cell proliferation and numbers by promoting cells from the G1 to S phases, whereas high doses of PFOA (200–400 μM) led to reduced HL-7702 cell numbers compared with that of the control mainly due to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the promotion of cell cycle progression in human cells following PFOA exposure.

  5. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, S.Q.; Cao, J. [Department of Liver Surgery I, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Q.Y.; Li, Y.Y. [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Yan, Y.Q. [Department of Liver Surgery I, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Yu, F.X. [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China)

    2013-09-27

    To explore the effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and the possible mechanism involved, ADSCs were cocultured with pancreatic cancer cells, and a cell counting kit (CCK-8) was used to detect the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. ELISA was used to determine the concentration of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the supernatants. RT-PCR was performed to detect the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in pancreatic cancer cells and ADSCs. An in vitro invasion assay was used to measure invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. SDF-1 was detected in the supernatants of ADSCs, but not in pancreatic cancer cells. Higher CXCR4 mRNA levels were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with ADSCs (109.3±10.7 and 97.6±7.6 vs 18.3±1.7, respectively; P<0.01). In addition, conditioned medium from ADSCs promoted the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, and AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, significantly downregulated these growth-promoting effects. We conclude that ADSCs can promote the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, which may involve the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

  6. Vascular Mural Cells Promote Noradrenergic Differentiation of Embryonic Sympathetic Neurons

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    Vitor Fortuna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic nervous system controls smooth muscle tone and heart rate in the cardiovascular system. Postganglionic sympathetic neurons (SNs develop in close proximity to the dorsal aorta (DA and innervate visceral smooth muscle targets. Here, we use the zebrafish embryo to ask whether the DA is required for SN development. We show that noradrenergic (NA differentiation of SN precursors temporally coincides with vascular mural cell (VMC recruitment to the DA and vascular maturation. Blocking vascular maturation inhibits VMC recruitment and blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR signaling prevents VMC differentiation and also blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. NA differentiation is normal in cloche mutants that are devoid of endothelial cells but have VMCs. Thus, PDGFR-mediated mural cell recruitment mediates neurovascular interactions between the aorta and sympathetic precursors and promotes their noradrenergic differentiation.

  7. Vascular Mural Cells Promote Noradrenergic Differentiation of Embryonic Sympathetic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Vitor; Pardanaud, Luc; Brunet, Isabelle; Ola, Roxana; Ristori, Emma; Santoro, Massimo M; Nicoli, Stefania; Eichmann, Anne

    2015-06-23

    The sympathetic nervous system controls smooth muscle tone and heart rate in the cardiovascular system. Postganglionic sympathetic neurons (SNs) develop in close proximity to the dorsal aorta (DA) and innervate visceral smooth muscle targets. Here, we use the zebrafish embryo to ask whether the DA is required for SN development. We show that noradrenergic (NA) differentiation of SN precursors temporally coincides with vascular mural cell (VMC) recruitment to the DA and vascular maturation. Blocking vascular maturation inhibits VMC recruitment and blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling prevents VMC differentiation and also blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. NA differentiation is normal in cloche mutants that are devoid of endothelial cells but have VMCs. Thus, PDGFR-mediated mural cell recruitment mediates neurovascular interactions between the aorta and sympathetic precursors and promotes their noradrenergic differentiation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel cell growth-promoting factor identified in a B cell leukemia cell line, BALL-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, T.; Holan, V.; Minowada, J.

    1993-01-01

    A novel leukemia cell growth-promoting activity has been identified in the culture supernatant from a human B cell leukemia cell line, BALL-1. The supernatant from unstimulated cultures of the BALL-1 cells significantly promoted the growth of 16 out of 24 leukemia/lymphoma cell lines of different lineages (T, B and non-lymphoid) in a minimal concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and 5 out of 12 cases of fresh leukemia cells in FBS-free medium. The growth-promoting sieve filtration and dialysis. The MW of the factor was less than 10 kDa. The growth-promoting activity was heat and acid stable and resistant to trypsin treatment. The factor isolated from the BALL-1 supernatant was distinct from known polypeptide growth factors with MW below 10 kDa, such as epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor α, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), IGF-II and insulin, as determine by specific antibodies and by cell-growth-promoting tests. The factor is the BALL-1 supernatant did not promote the proliferation of normal human fresh peripheral blood lymphocytes or mouse fibroblast cell line, BALB/C 3T3. In addition to the BALL-1 supernatant, a similar growth-promoting activity was found in the culture supernatant from 13 of 17 leukemia/lymphoma cell lines tested. The activity in these culture supernatant promoted the growth of leukemia/lymphoma cell lines in autocrine and/or paracrine fashions. These observations suggest that the low MW cell growth-promoting activity found in the BALL-1 culture supernatant is mediated by a novel factor which may be responsible for the clonal expansion of particular leukemic clones. (author)

  9. TLR9 ligation in pancreatic stellate cells promotes tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Levie, Elliot; Nguy, Susanna; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Xu, Yijie; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H; Deutsch, Michael; Jonnadula, Saikiran; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Tippens, Daniel; Pushalkar, Smruti; Eisenthal, Andrew; Saxena, Deepak; Ahn, Jiyoung; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle D; Tuveson, David; Miller, George

    2015-11-16

    Modulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling can have protective or protumorigenic effects on oncogenesis depending on the cancer subtype and on specific inflammatory elements within the tumor milieu. We found that TLR9 is widely expressed early during the course of pancreatic transformation and that TLR9 ligands are ubiquitous within the tumor microenvironment. TLR9 ligation markedly accelerates oncogenesis, whereas TLR9 deletion is protective. We show that TLR9 activation has distinct effects on the epithelial, inflammatory, and fibrogenic cellular subsets in pancreatic carcinoma and plays a central role in cross talk between these compartments. Specifically, TLR9 activation can induce proinflammatory signaling in transformed epithelial cells, but does not elicit oncogene expression or cancer cell proliferation. Conversely, TLR9 ligation induces pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) to become fibrogenic and secrete chemokines that promote epithelial cell proliferation. TLR9-activated PSCs mediate their protumorigenic effects on the epithelial compartment via CCL11. Additionally, TLR9 has immune-suppressive effects in the tumor microenvironment (TME) via induction of regulatory T cell recruitment and myeloid-derived suppressor cell proliferation. Collectively, our work shows that TLR9 has protumorigenic effects in pancreatic carcinoma which are distinct from its influence in extrapancreatic malignancies and from the mechanistic effects of other TLRs on pancreatic oncogenesis. © 2015 Zambirinis et al.

  10. Transformation and radiosensitivity of human diploid skin fibroblasts transfected with activated ras oncogene and SV40 T-antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, L N; Little, J B

    1992-08-01

    Three normal human diploid cell strains were transfected with an activated Ha-ras oncogene (EJ ras) or SV40 T-antigen. Multiple clones were examined for morphological alterations, growth requirements, ability to grow under anchorage independent conditions, immortality and tumorigenicity in nude mice. Clones expressing SV40 T-antigen alone or in combination with ras protein p21 were significantly radioresistant as compared with their parent cells or clones transfected with the neo gene only. This radioresistant phenotype persisted in post-crisis, immortalized cell lines. Cells transfected with EJ ras alone showed no morphological alterations nor significant changes in radiosensitivity. Cell clones expressing ras and/or SV40 T-antigen showed a reduced requirement for serum supplements, an increase in aneuploidy and chromosomal aberrations, and enhanced growth in soft agar as an early cellular response to SV40 T-antigen expression. The sequential order of transfection with SV40 T-antigen and ras influenced radio-sensitivity but not the induction of morphological changes. These data suggest that expression of the SV40 T-antigen but not activated Ha-ras plays an important role in the radiosensitivity of human diploid cells. The radioresistant phenotype in SV40 T transfected cells was not related to the enhanced level of genetic instability seen in pre-crisis and newly immortalized cells, nor to the process of immortalization itself.

  11. Human hypervariable sequences in risk assessment: rare Ha-ras alleles in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krontiris, T.G.; DiMartino, N.A.; Mitcheson, H.D.; Lonergan, J.A.; Begg, C.; Parkinson, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    A variable tandem repeat (VTR) is responsible for the hyperallelism one kilobase 3' to the human c-Ha-ras-1 (Ha-ras) gene. Thirty-two distinct restriction fragments, comprising 3 allelic classes by frequency of occurrence, have thus far been detected in a sample size of approximately 800 caucasians. Rare Ha-ras alleles, 21 in all, are almost exclusively confined to the genomes of cancer patients. From their data the authors have computed the relative cancer risk associated with possession of a rare Ha-ras allele to be 27. To understand the molecular basis for this phenomenon, they have begun to clone Ha-ras fragments from nontumor DNA of cancer patients. They report here the weak activation, as detected by transfection and transformation of NIH 3T3 mouse cells, of two Ha-ras genes which were obtained from lymphocyte DNA of a melanoma patient. They have mapped the regions that confer this transforming activity to the fragment containing the VTR in one Ha-ras clone and the fragment containing gene coding sequences in the other

  12. Survey of Differentially Methylated Promoters in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

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    Yipeng Wang

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation, copy number in the genomes of three immortalized prostate epithelial, five cancer cell lines (LNCaP, PC3, PC3M, PC3M-Pro4, PC3MLN4 were compared using a microarray-based technique. Genomic DNA is cut with a methylation-sensitive enzyme Hpall, followed by linker ligation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification, labeling, hybridization to an array of promoter sequences. Only those parts of the genomic DNA that have unmethylated restriction sites within a few hundred base pairs generate PCR products detectable on an array. Of 2732 promoter sequences on a test array, 504 (18.5% showed differential hybridization between immortalized prostate epithelial, cancer cell lines. Among candidate hypermethylated genes in cancer-derived lines, there were eight (CD44, CDKN1A, ESR1, PLAU, RARB, SFN, TNFRSF6, TSPY previously observed in prostate cancer, 13 previously known methylation targets in other cancers (ARHI, bcl-2, BRCA1, CDKN2C, GADD45A, MTAP, PGR, SLC26A4, SPARC, SYK, TJP2, UCHL1, WIT-1. The majority of genes that appear to be both differentially methylated, differentially regulated between prostate epithelial, cancer cell lines are novel methylation targets, including PAK6, RAD50, TLX3, PIR51, MAP2K5, INSR, FBN1, GG2-1, representing a rich new source of candidate genes used to study the role of DNA methylation in prostate tumors.

  13. PI3-kinase γ promotes Rap1a-mediated activation of myeloid cell integrin α4β1, leading to tumor inflammation and growth.

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    Michael C Schmid

    Full Text Available Tumor inflammation, the recruitment of myeloid lineage cells into the tumor microenvironment, promotes angiogenesis, immunosuppression and metastasis. CD11b+Gr1lo monocytic lineage cells and CD11b+Gr1hi granulocytic lineage cells are recruited from the circulation by tumor-derived chemoattractants, which stimulate PI3-kinase γ (PI3Kγ-mediated integrin α4 activation and extravasation. We show here that PI3Kγ activates PLCγ, leading to RasGrp/CalDAG-GEF-I&II mediated, Rap1a-dependent activation of integrin α4β1, extravasation of monocytes and granulocytes, and inflammation-associated tumor progression. Genetic depletion of PLCγ, CalDAG-GEFI or II, Rap1a, or the Rap1 effector RIAM was sufficient to prevent integrin α4 activation by chemoattractants or activated PI3Kγ (p110γCAAX, while activated Rap (RapV12 promoted constitutive integrin activation and cell adhesion that could only be blocked by inhibition of RIAM or integrin α4β1. Similar to blockade of PI3Kγ or integrin α4β1, blockade of Rap1a suppressed both the recruitment of monocytes and granulocytes to tumors and tumor progression. These results demonstrate critical roles for a PI3Kγ-Rap1a-dependent pathway in integrin activation during tumor inflammation and suggest novel avenues for cancer therapy.

  14. TIM-1 Promotes Hepatitis C Virus Cell Attachment and Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Qiao, Luhua; Hou, Zhouhua; Luo, Guangxiang

    2017-01-15

    Human TIM and TAM family proteins were recently found to serve as phosphatidylserine (PS) receptors which promote infections by many different viruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Ebola virus, Marburg virus, and Zika virus. In the present study, we provide substantial evidence demonstrating that TIM-1 is important for efficient infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV). The knockdown of TIM-1 expression significantly reduced HCV infection but not HCV RNA replication. Likewise, TIM-1 knockout in Huh-7.5 cells remarkably lowered HCV cell attachment and subsequent HCV infection. More significantly, the impairment of HCV infection in the TIM-1 knockout cells could be restored completely by ectopic expression of TIM-1 but not TIM-3 or TIM-4. Additionally, HCV infection and cell attachment were inhibited by PS but not by phosphatidylcholine (PC), demonstrating that TIM-1-mediated enhancement of HCV infection is PS dependent. The exposure of PS on the HCV envelope was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of HCV particles with a PS-specific monoclonal antibody. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that TIM-1 promotes HCV infection by serving as an attachment receptor for binding to PS exposed on the HCV envelope. TIM family proteins were recently found to enhance infections by many different viruses, including several members of the Flaviviridae family. However, their importance in HCV infection has not previously been examined experimentally. The TIM family proteins include three members in humans: TIM-1, TIM-3, and TIM-4. The findings derived from our studies demonstrate that TIM-1, but not TIM-3 or TIM-4, promotes HCV infection by functioning as an HCV attachment factor. Knockout of the TIM-1 gene resulted in a remarkable reduction of HCV cell attachment and infection. PS-containing liposomes blocked HCV cell attachment and subsequent HCV infection. HCV particles could also be precipitated with a PS-specific monoclonal antibody. These findings suggest that TIM-1

  15. Reciprocal modulation of mesenchymal stem cells and tumor cells promotes lung cancer metastasis

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    Giulia Fregni

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is a multi-step process in which direct crosstalk between cancer cells and their microenvironment plays a key role. Here, we assessed the effect of paired tumor-associated and normal lung tissue mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs on the growth and dissemination of primary human lung carcinoma cells isolated from the same patients. We show that the tumor microenvironment modulates MSC gene expression and identify a four-gene MSC signature that is functionally implicated in promoting metastasis. We also demonstrate that tumor-associated MSCs induce the expression of genes associated with an aggressive phenotype in primary lung cancer cells and selectively promote their dissemination rather than local growth. Our observations provide insight into mechanisms by which the stroma promotes lung cancer metastasis. Keywords: Tumor-associated MSCs, lung cancer, metastasis, GREM1, LOXL2, ADAMTS12, ITGA11

  16. Promotion of breast cancer by β-Hexachlorocyclohexane in MCF10AT1 cells and MMTV-neu mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Patrick S; Matsumura, Fumio

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to β-Hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH), a contaminant of the hexachlorohexane pesticide lindane, has been implicated as a risk factor in the development of breast cancers in epidemiological studies. Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated the ability of β-HCH to elicit its actions via a ligand-independent activation of the estrogen receptor through increased c-Neu (= erbB 2 or HER-2) expression and kinase activation in both the BG-1 and MCF-7 cell lines. In addition, long term exposure (33 passages) to β-HCH was shown to promote the selection of MCF-7 cells which exhibit a more metastatic phenotype. In this current study, we decided to investigate the long-term effects of β-HCH in both the MCF10AT1 cell line which was derived from a normal epithelial cell line by stably transfecting a mutated c-Ha-ras and a MMTV-Neu mouse model for mammary cancer in vivo. MCF10AT1 cells were exposed for 20 passages with β-HCH, 4-OH-Tamoxifen (Tam), or 17-β-estradiol (E 2 ) after which cells were analyzed for proliferation rates and mRNA expression by RT-PCR. In our in vivo studies, MMTV-Neu mice were injected with β-HCH and observed for tumor formation over a 70 week period. β-HCH and Tam selected MCF10AT1 cells demonstrated increased mRNA expression of MMP-13 (collagenase-3) a marker of increased invasiveness. β-HCH treatment was also seen to increase the expression in a number of proto-oncogenes (c-Neu, Cyclin D1, p27), cell status markers (Met-1, CK19), and the inflammatory marker NFκB. Previous studies, have demonstrated the role of these markers as evidence of malignant transformations, and further illustrate the ability of β-HCH to be carcinogenic. To demonstrate β-HCH's tumorigenic properties in an in vivo system, we used an MMTV-Neu mouse model. MMTV-Neu is a c-Neu overexpressing strain which has been shown to spontaneously develop mammary tumors at later stages of aging. In this experiment, β-HCH exposure was shown to both accelerate

  17. The Prognostic Impact of K-RAS Mutations in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Treated with High Dose Cytarabine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, E.I.; Gawish, H.H.; Al-Azizi, N.M.A.; El-Hefni, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Activating point mutation of the RAS gene has been generally accepted as an oncogenic event in a variety of malignancies. It represents one of the most common genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However there is still controversy about its clinical relevance on the treatment outcome of this leukemia. Objective: This study aimed to clarify the biologic and prognostic impact of K-RAS mutations in relation to the dose of cytarabine (ara-C) used in post induction consolidation chemotherapy in adult AML patients. Patients and Methods: The study comprised 71de novo AML patients with a male: Female ratio of 1.4: 1; their ages ranged from 21-59 years with a median of 37 years. They were subjected to full clinical evaluation, routine laboratory investigations, cytogenetic studies by G banding and K-RAS mutation detection using realtime PCR. The patients were randomized into 2 groups (gps) according to the ara-C dose used in consolidation treatment, HDAC gp receiving 400 mg ara-C and LDAC gp receiving 100 mg ara-C. They were followed over a period of 5 years. Results: Mutations in the K-RAS gene (mutRAS) were detected in 23 patients (32%) with the remaining 48 patients (68%) having wild type RAS (wtRAS). Blast cell percentage was significantly lower in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients (p=<0.001). The M4 subtype of AML and cases with Inv 16 showed significantly higher frequencies in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients, (p=0.015, 0.003, respectively). The patients were followed up for a median of 43 months (range 11-57 months). There was no significant difference in overall survival (OS) between mutRAS and wtRAS patients (p=0.326). Within the mutRAS patients treated with HDAC, cumulative OS was significantly higher than those treated with LDAC (p=0.001). This was not the case in the wtRAS group (p=0.285). There was no significant difference in disease The Prognostic Impact of K-RAS Mutations in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Treated with High Dose

  18. The prognostic impact of K-RAS mutations in adult acute myeloid leukemia patients treated with high-dose cytarabine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad EI

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ebtesam I Ahmad, Heba H Gawish, Nashwa MA Al Azizi, Ashraf M ElhefniClinical Pathology Department, Hematology and Oncology Unit of Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University, Sharkia, EgyptBackground: Activating point mutation of the RAS gene has been generally accepted as an oncogenic event in a variety of malignancies. It represents one of the most common genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. However, little is known about its clinical relevance in the treatment outcome for this leukemia.Objective: This study aimed to clarify the biologic and prognostic impact of K-RAS mutations in relation to the dose of cytarabine (ara-C used in postinduction consolidation chemotherapy in adult AML patients.Patients and methods: The study comprised of 71 de novo AML patients with male/female ratio 1.4:1; their ages ranged from 21–59 years with a median of 37 years. They were subjected to full clinical evaluation, routine laboratory investigations, cytogenetic studies by G-banding (Giemsa staining, and K-RAS mutation detection using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The patients were randomized into two groups according to the ara-C dose used in consolidation treatment, the high the dose ara-C (HDAC group receiving 400 mg ara-C and-low-dose ara-C (LDAC group receiving 100 mg ara-C; they were followed over a period of five years.Results: Mutations in the K-RAS gene (mutRAS were detected in 23 patients (32% with the remaining 48 patients (68% having wild-type RAS (wtRAS. The percent of blast cells was significantly lower in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients (P ≤ 0.001 while M4 subtype of AML and Inv(16 frequencies were significantly higher in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients (P = 0.015 and (P = 0.003, respectively. The patients were followed up for a median of 43 months (range 11–57 months. There was no significant difference in overall survival (OS between mutRAS and wtRAS (P = 0.326. Within the mutRAS

  19. EBV promotes human CD8 NKT cell development.

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    Yuling He

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The reports on the origin of human CD8(+ Valpha24(+ T-cell receptor (TCR natural killer T (NKT cells are controversial. The underlying mechanism that controls human CD4 versus CD8 NKT cell development is not well-characterized. In the present study, we have studied total 177 eligible patients and subjects including 128 healthy latent Epstein-Barr-virus(EBV-infected subjects, 17 newly-onset acute infectious mononucleosis patients, 16 newly-diagnosed EBV-associated Hodgkin lymphoma patients, and 16 EBV-negative normal control subjects. We have established human-thymus/liver-SCID chimera, reaggregated thymic organ culture, and fetal thymic organ culture. We here show that the average frequency of total and CD8(+ NKT cells in PBMCs from 128 healthy latent EBV-infected subjects is significantly higher than in 17 acute EBV infectious mononucleosis patients, 16 EBV-associated Hodgkin lymphoma patients, and 16 EBV-negative normal control subjects. However, the frequency of total and CD8(+ NKT cells is remarkably increased in the acute EBV infectious mononucleosis patients at year 1 post-onset. EBV-challenge promotes CD8(+ NKT cell development in the thymus of human-thymus/liver-SCID chimeras. The frequency of total (3% of thymic cells and CD8(+ NKT cells ( approximately 25% of NKT cells is significantly increased in EBV-challenged chimeras, compared to those in the unchallenged chimeras (<0.01% of thymic cells, CD8(+ NKT cells undetectable, respectively. The EBV-induced increase in thymic NKT cells is also reflected in the periphery, where there is an increase in total and CD8(+ NKT cells in liver and peripheral blood in EBV-challenged chimeras. EBV-induced thymic CD8(+ NKT cells display an activated memory phenotype (CD69(+CD45RO(hiCD161(+CD62L(lo. After EBV-challenge, a proportion of NKT precursors diverges from DP thymocytes, develops and differentiates into mature CD8(+ NKT cells in thymus in EBV-challenged human-thymus/liver-SCID chimeras or

  20. A Dominant-Negative PPARγ Mutant Promotes Cell Cycle Progression and Cell Growth in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

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    Joey Z. Liu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available PPARγ ligands have been shown to have antiproliferative effects on many cell types. We herein report that a synthetic dominant-negative (DN PPARγ mutant functions like a growth factor to promote cell cycle progression and cell proliferation in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (CASMCs. In quiescent CASMCs, adenovirus-expressed DN-PPARγ promoted G1→S cell cycle progression, enhanced BrdU incorporation, and increased cell proliferation. DN-PPARγ expression also markedly enhanced positive regulators of the cell cycle, increasing Rb and CDC2 phosphorylation and the expression of cyclin A, B1, D1, and MCM7. Conversely, overexpression of wild-type (WT or constitutively-active (CA PPARγ inhibited cell cycle progression and the activity and expression of positive regulators of the cell cycle. DN-PPARγ expression, however, did not up-regulate positive cell cycle regulators in PPARγ-deficient cells, strongly suggesting that DN-PPARγ effects on cell cycle result from blocking the function of endogenous wild-type PPARγ. DN-PPARγ expression enhanced phosphorylation of ERK MAPKs. Furthermore, the ERK specific-inhibitor PD98059 blocked DN-PPARγ-induced phosphorylation of Rb and expression of cyclin A and MCM7. Our data thus suggest that DN-PPARγ promotes cell cycle progression and cell growth in CASMCs by modulating fundamental cell cycle regulatory proteins and MAPK mitogenic signaling pathways in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs.

  1. DUOX enzyme activity promotes AKT signalling in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Christopher A; Clerkin, John S; Cotter, Thomas G

    2012-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress are related to tumour progression, and high levels of ROS have been observed in prostate tumours compared to normal prostate. ROS can positively influence AKT signalling and thereby promote cell survival. The aim of this project was to establish whether the ROS generated in prostate cancer cells positively regulate AKT signalling and enable resistance to apoptotic stimuli. In PC3 cells, dual oxidase (DUOX) enzymes actively generate ROS, which inactivate phosphatases, thereby maintaining AKT phosphorylation. Inhibition of DUOX by diphenylene iodium (DPI), intracellular calcium chelation and small-interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in lower ROS levels, lower AKT and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) phosphorylation, as well as reduced cell viability and increased susceptibility to apoptosis stimulating fragment (FAS) induced apoptosis. This report shows that ROS levels in PC3 cells are constitutively maintained by DUOX enzymes, and these ROS positively regulate AKT signalling through inactivating phosphatases, leading to increased resistance to apoptosis.

  2. Repurposing Lesogaberan to Promote Human Islet Cell Survival and β-Cell Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jide Tian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The activation of β-cell’s A- and B-type gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAA-Rs and GABAB-Rs can promote their survival and replication, and the activation of α-cell GABAA-Rs promotes their conversion into β-cells. However, GABA and the most clinically applicable GABA-R ligands may be suboptimal for the long-term treatment of diabetes due to their pharmacological properties or potential side-effects on the central nervous system (CNS. Lesogaberan (AZD3355 is a peripherally restricted high-affinity GABAB-R-specific agonist, originally developed for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD that appears to be safe for human use. This study tested the hypothesis that lesogaberan could be repurposed to promote human islet cell survival and β-cell replication. Treatment with lesogaberan significantly enhanced replication of human islet cells in vitro, which was abrogated by a GABAB-R antagonist. Immunohistochemical analysis of human islets that were grafted into immune-deficient mice revealed that oral treatment with lesogaberan promoted human β-cell replication and islet cell survival in vivo as effectively as GABA (which activates both GABAA-Rs and GABAB-Rs, perhaps because of its more favorable pharmacokinetics. Lesogaberan may be a promising drug candidate for clinical studies of diabetes intervention and islet transplantation.

  3. Eficacia de la terapia génica antisentido utilizando oligonucleótidos anti K-ras y antitelomerasa en cáncer colorrectal

    OpenAIRE

    Lledó, S.; Alfonso, R.; Aliño, S. F.

    2005-01-01

    Aim: to test the efficacy of anti-k-ras and antitelomerase oligonucleotides for disabling colorectal cancer cell growth. Material and methods: an established human colorectal cancer cell line (SW 480, ATTC®) was used. Oligodeoxiribonucleotides (ODNs) have a phosphorotioate modification to ensure intracellular intake. We used an antitelomerase ODN (Telp5) and two anti-k-ras ODNs (AS-KRAS and ISIS). AS-KRAS is designed to join the k-ras oncogene's exon 1. ISIS links to the terminal transcriptio...

  4. Natural killer cells promote early CD8 T cell responses against cytomegalovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott H Robbins

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms that help promote protective immune responses to pathogens is a major challenge in biomedical research and an important goal for the design of innovative therapeutic or vaccination strategies. While natural killer (NK cells can directly contribute to the control of viral replication, whether, and how, they may help orchestrate global antiviral defense is largely unknown. To address this question, we took advantage of the well-defined molecular interactions involved in the recognition of mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV by NK cells. By using congenic or mutant mice and wild-type versus genetically engineered viruses, we examined the consequences on antiviral CD8 T cell responses of specific defects in the ability of the NK cells to control MCMV. This system allowed us to demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that NK cells accelerate CD8 T cell responses against a viral infection in vivo. Moreover, we identify the underlying mechanism as the ability of NK cells to limit IFN-alpha/beta production to levels not immunosuppressive to the host. This is achieved through the early control of cytomegalovirus, which dramatically reduces the activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs for cytokine production, preserves the conventional dendritic cell (cDC compartment, and accelerates antiviral CD8 T cell responses. Conversely, exogenous IFN-alpha administration in resistant animals ablates cDCs and delays CD8 T cell activation in the face of NK cell control of viral replication. Collectively, our data demonstrate that the ability of NK cells to respond very early to cytomegalovirus infection critically contributes to balance the intensity of other innate immune responses, which dampens early immunopathology and promotes optimal initiation of antiviral CD8 T cell responses. Thus, the extent to which NK cell responses benefit the host goes beyond their direct antiviral effects and extends to the prevention of innate

  5. Regulating the advertising and promotion of stem cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Tigerstrom, Barbara

    2017-10-01

    There are widespread concerns with the ways in which 'unproven' stem cell therapies are advertised to patients. This article explores the potential and limits of using laws that regulate advertising and promotion as a tool to address these concerns. It examines general consumer protection laws and laws and policies on advertising medical products and services, focusing on the USA, Canada and Australia. The content of existing laws and policies covers most of the marketing practices that cause concern, but several systemic factors are likely to limit enforcement efforts. Potential reforms in Australia that would prevent direct-to-consumer advertising of autologous cell therapies are justified in principle and should be considered by other jurisdictions, but again face important practical limits to their effectiveness.

  6. A New Strategy to Control and Eradicate "Undruggable" Oncogenic K-RAS-Driven Pancreatic Cancer: Molecular Insights and Core Principles Learned from Developmental and Evolutionary Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sciver, Robert E; Lee, Michael P; Lee, Caroline Dasom; Lafever, Alex C; Svyatova, Elizaveta; Kanda, Kevin; Colliver, Amber L; Siewertsz van Reesema, Lauren L; Tang-Tan, Angela M; Zheleva, Vasilena; Bwayi, Monicah N; Bian, Minglei; Schmidt, Rebecca L; Matrisian, Lynn M; Petersen, Gloria M; Tang, Amy H

    2018-05-14

    Oncogenic K-RAS mutations are found in virtually all pancreatic cancers, making K-RAS one of the most targeted oncoproteins for drug development in cancer therapies. Despite intense research efforts over the past three decades, oncogenic K-RAS has remained largely "undruggable". Rather than targeting an upstream component of the RAS signaling pathway (i.e., EGFR/HER2) and/or the midstream effector kinases (i.e., RAF/MEK/ERK/PI3K/mTOR), we propose an alternative strategy to control oncogenic K-RAS signal by targeting its most downstream signaling module, Seven-In-Absentia Homolog (SIAH). SIAH E3 ligase controls the signal output of oncogenic K-RAS hyperactivation that drives unchecked cell proliferation, uncontrolled tumor growth, and rapid cancer cell dissemination in human pancreatic cancer. Therefore, SIAH is an ideal therapeutic target as it is an extraordinarily conserved downstream signaling gatekeeper indispensable for proper RAS signaling. Guided by molecular insights and core principles obtained from developmental and evolutionary biology, we propose an anti-SIAH-centered anti-K-RAS strategy as a logical and alternative anticancer strategy to dampen uncontrolled K-RAS hyperactivation and halt tumor growth and metastasis in pancreatic cancer. The clinical utility of developing SIAH as both a tumor-specific and therapy-responsive biomarker, as well as a viable anti-K-RAS drug target, is logically simple and conceptually innovative. SIAH clearly constitutes a major tumor vulnerability and K-RAS signaling bottleneck in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Given the high degree of evolutionary conservation in the K-RAS/SIAH signaling pathway, an anti-SIAH-based anti-PDAC therapy will synergize with covalent K-RAS inhibitors and direct K-RAS targeted initiatives to control and eradicate pancreatic cancer in the future.

  7. The Atypical Kinase RIOK1 Promotes Tumor Growth and Invasive Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Weinberg

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite being overexpressed in different tumor entities, RIO kinases are hardly characterized in mammalian cells. We investigated the role of these atypical kinases in different cancer cells. Using isogenic colon-, breast- and lung cancer cell lines, we demonstrate that knockdown of RIOK1, but not of RIOK2 or RIOK3, strongly impairs proliferation and invasiveness in conventional and 3D culture systems. Interestingly, these effects were mainly observed in RAS mutant cancer cells. In contrast, growth of RAS wildtype Caco-2 and Bcr-Abl-driven K562 cells is not affected by RIOK1 knockdown, suggesting a specific requirement for RIOK1 in the context of oncogenic RAS signaling. Furthermore, we show that RIOK1 activates NF-κB signaling and promotes cell cycle progression. Using proteomics, we identified the pro-invasive proteins Metadherin and Stathmin1 to be regulated by RIOK1. Additionally, we demonstrate that RIOK1 promotes lung colonization in vivo and that RIOK1 is overexpressed in different subtypes of human lung- and breast cancer. Altogether, our data suggest RIOK1 as a potential therapeutic target, especially in RAS-driven cancers.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing Ihh promote bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Shasha; Chen, Tingting; Wang, Yanan; Tian, Ruhui; Zhang, Lingling; Song, Pingping; Yang, Shi; Zhu, Yong; Guo, Xizhi; Huang, Yiran; Li, Zheng; Kan, Lixin; Hu, Hongliang

    2014-10-28

    Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling pathway is known to play key roles in various aspects of normal endochondral bone development. This study tested the potential roles of high Ihh signaling in the context of injury-induced bone regeneration. A rabbit tibia defect model was established to test the effects of the implant of Ihh/mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)/scaffold complex. Computed tomography (CT), gross observation, and standard histological and immunohistological techniques were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment. In vitro studies with MSCs and C3H10T1/2 cells were also employed to further understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms. We found that the implanted Ihh/MSCs/scaffold complex promoted bone repair. Consistently, in vitro study found that Ihh induced the upregulation of chondrocytic, osteogenic, and vascular cell markers, both in C3H10T1/2 cells and MSCs. Our study has demonstrated that high Ihh signaling in a complex with MSCs enhanced bone regeneration effectively in a clinically relevant acute injury model. Even though the exact underlying mechanisms are still far from clear, our primary data suggested that enhanced chondrogenesis, osteogenesis, and angiogenesis of MSCs at least partially contribute to the process. This study not only has implications for basic research of MSCs and Ihh signaling pathway but also points to the possibility of direct application of this specific paradigm to clinical bone repair.

  9. Cortactin Tyrosine Phosphorylation Promotes Its Deacetylation and Inhibits Cell Spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiler, Eugenia; Nieto-Pelegrín, Elvira; Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa

    2012-01-01

    Background Cortactin is a classical Src kinase substrate that participates in actin cytoskeletal dynamics by activating the Arp2/3 complex and interacting with other regulatory proteins, including FAK. Cortactin has various domains that may contribute to the assembly of different protein platforms to achieve process specificity. Though the protein is known to be regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation, how tyrosine phosphorylation regulates cortactin activity is poorly understood. Since the basal level of tyrosine phosphorylation is low, this question must be studied using stimulated cell cultures, which are physiologically relevant but unreliable and difficult to work with. In fact, their unreliability may be the cause of some contradictory findings about the dynamics of tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin in different processes. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, we try to overcome these problems by using a Functional Interaction Trap (FIT) system, which involves cotransfecting cells with a kinase (Src) and a target protein (cortactin), both of which are fused to complementary leucine-zipper domains. The FIT system allowed us to control precisely the tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin and explore its relationship with cortactin acetylation. Conclusions/Significance Using this system, we provide definitive evidence that a competition exists between acetylation and tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin and that phosphorylation inhibits cell spreading. We confirmed the results from the FIT system by examining endogenous cortactin in different cell types. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cell spreading promotes the association of cortactin and FAK and that tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin disrupts this interaction, which may explain how it inhibits cell spreading. PMID:22479425

  10. Activated ovarian endothelial cells promote early follicular development and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedem, Alon; Aelion-Brauer, Anate; Guo, Peipei; Wen, Duancheng; Ding, Bi-Sen; Lis, Raphael; Cheng, Du; Sandler, Vladislav M; Rafii, Shahin; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2017-09-19

    New data suggests that endothelial cells (ECs) elaborate essential "angiocrine factors". The aim of this study is to investigate the role of activated ovarian endothelial cells in early in-vitro follicular development. Mouse ovarian ECs were isolated using magnetic cell sorting or by FACS and cultured in serum free media. After a constitutive activation of the Akt pathway was initiated, early follicles (50-150 um) were mechanically isolated from 8-day-old mice and co-cultured with these activated ovarian endothelial cells (AOEC) (n = 32), gel (n = 24) or within matrigel (n = 27) in serum free media for 14 days. Follicular growth, survival and function were assessed. After 6 passages, flow cytometry showed 93% of cells grown in serum-free culture were VE-cadherin positive, CD-31 positive and CD 45 negative, matching the known EC profile. Beginning on day 4 of culture, we observed significantly higher follicular and oocyte growth rates in follicles co-cultured with AOECs compared with follicles on gel or matrigel. After 14 days of culture, 73% of primary follicles and 83% of secondary follicles co-cultured with AOEC survived, whereas the majority of follicles cultured on gel or matrigel underwent atresia. This is the first report of successful isolation and culture of ovarian ECs. We suggest that co-culture with activated ovarian ECs promotes early follicular development and survival. This model is a novel platform for the in vitro maturation of early follicles and for the future exploration of endothelial-follicular communication. In vitro development of early follicles necessitates a complex interplay of growth factors and signals required for development. Endothelial cells (ECs) may elaborate essential "angiocrine factors" involved in organ regeneration. We demonstrate that co-culture with ovarian ECs enables culture of primary and early secondary mouse ovarian follicles.

  11. Utilizing ras signaling pathway to direct selective replication of herpes simplex virus-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihong Pan

    Full Text Available Re-engineering the tropism of viruses is an attractive translational strategy for targeting cancer cells. The Ras signal transduction pathway is a central hub for a variety of pro-oncogenic events with a fundamental role in normal and neoplastic physiology. In this work we were interested in linking Ras activation to HSV-1 replication in a direct manner in order to generate a novel oncolytic herpes virus which can target cancer cells. To establish such link, we developed a mutant HSV-1 in which the expression of ICP4 (infected cell protein-4, a viral protein necessary for replication is controlled by activation of ELK, a transcription factor down-stream of the Ras pathway and mainly activated by ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase, an important Ras effector pathway. This mutant HSV-1 was named as Signal-Smart 1 (SS1. A series of prostate cells were infected with the SS1 virus. Cells with elevated levels of ELK activation were preferentially infected by the SS1 virus, as demonstrated by increased levels of viral progeny, herpetic glycoprotein C and overall SS1 viral protein production. Upon exposure to SS1, the proliferation, invasiveness and colony formation capabilities of prostate cancer cells with increased ELK activation were significantly decreased (p<0.05, while the rate of apoptosis/necrosis in these cells was increased. Additionally, high Ras signaling cells infected with SS1 showed a prominent arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle as compared to cells exposed to parental HSV-1. The results of this study reveal the potential for re-modeling the host-herpes interaction to specifically interfere with the life of cancer cells with increased Ras signaling. SS1 also serves as a "prototype" for development of a family of signal-smart viruses which can target cancer cells on the basis of their signaling portfolio.

  12. H-Ras and K-Ras Oncoproteins Induce Different Tumor Spectra When Driven by the Same Regulatory Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosten, Matthias; Simón-Carrasco, Lucía; Hernández-Porras, Isabel; Lechuga, Carmen G; Blasco, María T; Jacob, Harrys K C; Fabbiano, Salvatore; Potenza, Nicoletta; Bustelo, Xosé R; Guerra, Carmen; Barbacid, Mariano

    2017-02-01

    Genetic studies in mice have provided evidence that H-Ras and K-Ras proteins are bioequivalent. However, human tumors display marked differences in the association of RAS oncogenes with tumor type. Thus, to further assess the bioequivalence of oncogenic H-Ras and K-Ras, we replaced the coding region of the murine K-Ras locus with H-Ras G12V oncogene sequences. Germline expression of H-Ras G12V or K-Ras G12V from the K-Ras locus resulted in embryonic lethality. However, expression of these genes in adult mice led to different tumor phenotypes. Whereas H-Ras G12V elicited papillomas and hematopoietic tumors, K-Ras G12V induced lung tumors and gastric lesions. Pulmonary expression of H-Ras G12V created a senescence-like state caused by excessive MAPK signaling. Likewise, H-Ras G12V but not K-Ras G12V induced senescence in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Label-free quantitative analysis revealed that minor differences in H-Ras G12V expression levels led to drastically different biological outputs, suggesting that subtle differences in MAPK signaling confer nonequivalent functions that influence tumor spectra induced by RAS oncoproteins. Cancer Res; 77(3); 707-18. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Pancreatic stellate cells promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Watanabe, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiromichi; Hamada, Shin; Satoh, Kennichi; Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Recent studies have shown that pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. → Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. → PSCs decreased the expression of epithelial markers but increased that of mesenchymal markers, along with increased migration. → This study suggests epithelial-mesenchymal transition as a novel mechanism by which PSCs contribute to the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Because epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of pancreatic cancer, we hypothesized that PSCs promote EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. Panc-1 and SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with human PSCs isolated from patients undergoing operation for pancreatic cancer. The expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was examined by real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was examined by scratch and two-chamber assays. Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and a scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. The expression of E-cadherin, cytokeratin 19, and membrane-associated β-catenin was decreased, whereas vimentin and Snail (Snai-1) expression was increased more in cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs than in mono-cultured cells. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was increased by co-culture with PSCs. The PSC-induced decrease of E-cadherin expression was not altered by treatment with anti

  14. Transformation and radiosensitivity of human diploid skin fibroblasts transfected with activated RAS oncogene and SV40 T-antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, L.-N.; Little, J.B. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States))

    1992-08-01

    Three normal human diploid cell strains were transfected with an activated Ha-ras oncogene (EJ ras) or SV40 T-antigen. Multiple clones were examined for morphological alterations, growth requirements, ability to grow under anchorage independent conditions, immortality and tumorigenicity in nude mice. Clones expressing SV40 T-antigen alone or in combination with ras protein p21 were significantly radioresistant as compared with their parent cells or clones transfected with the neo gene only. This radioresistant phenotype persisted in post-crisis, immortalized cell lines. These data suggest that expression of the SV40 T-antigen but not activated Ha-ras plays an important role in the radiosensitivity of human diploid cells. The radioresistant phenotype in SV40 T transfected cells was not related to the enhanced level of genetic instability seen in pre-crisis and newly immortalized cells, nor to the process of immortalization itself. (author).

  15. Transformation and radiosensitivity of human diploid skin fibroblasts transfected with activated RAS oncogene and SV40 T-antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, L.-N.; Little, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    Three normal human diploid cell strains were transfected with an activated Ha-ras oncogene (EJ ras) or SV40 T-antigen. Multiple clones were examined for morphological alterations, growth requirements, ability to grow under anchorage independent conditions, immortality and tumorigenicity in nude mice. Clones expressing SV40 T-antigen alone or in combination with ras protein p21 were significantly radioresistant as compared with their parent cells or clones transfected with the neo gene only. This radioresistant phenotype persisted in post-crisis, immortalized cell lines. These data suggest that expression of the SV40 T-antigen but not activated Ha-ras plays an important role in the radiosensitivity of human diploid cells. The radioresistant phenotype in SV40 T transfected cells was not related to the enhanced level of genetic instability seen in pre-crisis and newly immortalized cells, nor to the process of immortalization itself. (author)

  16. A novel splice variant of supervillin, SV5, promotes carcinoma cell proliferation and cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xueran; Yang, Haoran; Zhang, Shangrong; Wang, Zhen; Ye, Fang; Liang, Chaozhao; Wang, Hongzhi; Fang, Zhiyou

    2017-01-01

    Supervillin is an actin-associated protein that regulates actin dynamics by interacting with Myosin II, F-actin, and Cortactin to promote cell contractility and cell motility. Two splicing variants of human Supervillin (SV1 and SV4) have been reported in non-muscle cells; SV1 lacks 3 exons present in the larger isoform SV4. SV2, also called archvillin, is present in striated muscle; SV3, also called smooth muscle archvillin or SmAV, was cloned from smooth muscle. In the present study, we identify a novel splicing variant of Supervillin (SV5). SV5 contains a new splicing pattern. In the mouse tissues and cell lines examined, SV5 was predominantly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles and in proliferating cells, but was virtually undetectable in most normal tissues. Using RNAi and rescue experiments, we show here that SV5 displays altered functional properties in cancer cells, and regulates cell proliferation and cell migration.

  17. Plectin deficiency in liver cancer cells promotes cell migration and sensitivity to sorafenib treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chiung-Chi; Chao, Wei-Ting; Liao, Chen-Chun; Tseng, Yu-Hui; Lai, Yen-Chang Clark; Lai, Yih-Shyong; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang; Liu, Yi-Hsiang

    2018-01-02

    Plectin involved in activation of kinases in cell signaling pathway and plays important role in cell morphology and migration. Plectin knockdown promotes cell migration by activating focal adhesion kinase and Rac1-GTPase activity in liver cells. Sorafenib is a multi-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitor that improves patient survival on hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between the expression of plectin and cell migration as well as the sensitivity of hepatoma cell lines exposing to sorafenib. Hepatoma cell lines PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2 were used to examine the level of plectin expression and cell migration in comparison with Chang liver cell line. In addition, sensitivity of the 3 cell lines to sorafenib treatment was also measured. Expression of plectin was lower in PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2 hepatoma cells than that of Chang liver cells whereas HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 cells exhibit higher rate of cell migration in trans-well migration assay. Immunohistofluorecent staining on E-cadherin revealed the highest rate of collective cell migration in HepG2 cells and the lowest was found in Chang liver cells. Likewise, HepG2 cell line was most sensitive to sorafenib treatment and Chang liver cells exhibited the least sensitivity. The drug sensitivity to sorafenib treatment showed inverse correlation with the expression of plectin. We suggest that plectin deficiency and increased E-cadherin in hepatoma cells were associated with higher rates of cell motility, collective cell migration as well as higher drug sensitivity to sorafenib treatment.

  18. Non-hematopoietic PAR-2 is essential for matriptase-driven pre-malignant progression and potentiation of ras-mediated squamous cell carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales, K U; Friis, S; Konkel, J E

    2015-01-01

    The membrane-anchored serine protease, matriptase, is consistently dysregulated in a range of human carcinomas, and high matriptase activity correlates with poor prognosis. Furthermore, matriptase is unique among tumor-associated proteases in that epithelial stem cell expression of the protease s...

  19. Method of cell transplantation promoting the organization of intraarterial thrombus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Koji; Shimono, Takatsugu; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Miyamoto, Keiichi; Fujinaga, Kazuya; Kajimoto, Masaki; Miyake, Yoichiro; Nishikawa, Masakatsu; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Uchida, Atsumasa; Shimpo, Hideto; Yada, Isao; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2005-08-30

    Endovascular aortic repairs have been developed as less invasive treatments for aortic aneurysms. Some aneurismal cavities, however, remain without organization, causing a re-expansion of the aneurysms. We studied cell transplantation into the aneurismal sac to promote the organization of thrombus for the complete healing of aneurysms. Skin fibroblasts and skeletal myoblasts were isolated from rats for cell transplantation. An intraarterial thrombus model was made by ligation of the carotid artery. Culture medium (medium group, n=11), collagen gel (gel group, n=11), fibroblasts with collagen gel (F group, n=15), myoblasts with collagen gel (M group, n=12), or mixture of fibroblasts and myoblasts with collagen gel (F+M group, n=14) were injected into the thrombus. After 28 days, histologically, the arterial lumens of the F and M groups were partly filled with fibrous tissues, whereas in the F+M group organization was almost completed and luminal sizes diminished. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive cells were more abundantly contained in the organized area of the F+M group than in the other groups. We also analyzed cellular function in vitro with immunofluorescence; coculture of fibroblasts and myoblasts showed that the fraction of alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive fibroblasts increased. This phenomenon accounts for the rapid organization of thrombus in the F+M group in vivo. Cell transplantation accelerated thrombus organization. Especially, myoblasts enhanced differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, contributing to rapid thrombus organization. Cell transplantation into unorganized spaces seems applicable to endovascular treatment of aneurysms.

  20. Co-culture with Sertoli cells promotes proliferation and migration of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fenxi; Hong, Yan; Liang, Wenmei; Ren, Tongming; Jing, Suhua; Lin, Juntang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Co-culture of Sertoli cells (SCs) with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs). ► Presence of SCs dramatically increased proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. ► Presence of SCs stimulated expression of Mdm2, Akt, CDC2, Cyclin D, CXCR4, MAPKs. -- Abstract: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been recently used in transplant therapy. The proliferation and migration of MSCs are the determinants of the efficiency of MSC transplant therapy. Sertoli cells are a kind of “nurse” cells that support the development of sperm cells. Recent studies show that Sertoli cells promote proliferation of endothelial cells and neural stem cells in co-culture. We hypothesized that co-culture of UCMSCs with Sertoli cells may also promote proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. To examine this hypothesis, we isolated UCMSCs from human cords and Sertoli cells from mouse testes, and co-cultured them using a Transwell system. We found that UCMSCs exhibited strong proliferation ability and potential to differentiate to other cell lineages such as osteocytes and adipocytes. The presence of Sertoli cells in co-culture significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration potential of UCMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, these phenotypic changes were accompanied with upregulation of multiple genes involved in cell proliferation and migration including phospho-Akt, Mdm2, phospho-CDC2, Cyclin D1, Cyclin D3 as well as CXCR4, phospho-p44 MAPK and phospho-p38 MAPK. These findings indicate that Sertoli cells boost UCMSC proliferation and migration potential.

  1. Co-culture with Sertoli cells promotes proliferation and migration of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fenxi, E-mail: fxzhang0824@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Sanquan College, Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China); Hong, Yan; Liang, Wenmei [Department of Histology and Embryology, Guiyang Medical University, Guizhou 550004, People' s Republic of China (China); Ren, Tongming [Department of Anatomy, Sanquan College, Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China); Jing, Suhua [ICU Center, The Third Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China); Lin, Juntang [Stem Cell Center, Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-culture of Sertoli cells (SCs) with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs dramatically increased proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs stimulated expression of Mdm2, Akt, CDC2, Cyclin D, CXCR4, MAPKs. -- Abstract: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been recently used in transplant therapy. The proliferation and migration of MSCs are the determinants of the efficiency of MSC transplant therapy. Sertoli cells are a kind of 'nurse' cells that support the development of sperm cells. Recent studies show that Sertoli cells promote proliferation of endothelial cells and neural stem cells in co-culture. We hypothesized that co-culture of UCMSCs with Sertoli cells may also promote proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. To examine this hypothesis, we isolated UCMSCs from human cords and Sertoli cells from mouse testes, and co-cultured them using a Transwell system. We found that UCMSCs exhibited strong proliferation ability and potential to differentiate to other cell lineages such as osteocytes and adipocytes. The presence of Sertoli cells in co-culture significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration potential of UCMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, these phenotypic changes were accompanied with upregulation of multiple genes involved in cell proliferation and migration including phospho-Akt, Mdm2, phospho-CDC2, Cyclin D1, Cyclin D3 as well as CXCR4, phospho-p44 MAPK and phospho-p38 MAPK. These findings indicate that Sertoli cells boost UCMSC proliferation and migration potential.

  2. Renal Artery Stenosis (RAS) Case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaater, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    Renal Artery Stenosis (RAS), is one of the causes of secondary hypertension; there are many causes of renal artery stenosis, as atherosclerosis of the renal artery which account for 90% of cases of RAS; fibromuscular dysplasia accounts for 10% of RAS. Various causes of thrombophilia either due congenital causes or acquired causes and can lead to RAS. Our patient was presented by acute attack of epistaxis and hypertension. Angiography of the Renal Arteries,are showed no sign of renal artery stenosis. However, the right kidney showed upper pole infarction, and the left kidney showed evidence of functional lower pole renal artery stenosis, although there is no anatomical stenosis detected in angiography. Work up for the cause of thrombophilia did not help in the diagnosis, which may be due to an undiscovered cause of thrombophilia

  3. RASOnD - A comprehensive resource and search tool for RAS superfamily oncogenes from various species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Tej P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ras superfamily plays an important role in the control of cell signalling and division. Mutations in the Ras genes convert them into active oncogenes. The Ras oncogenes form a major thrust of global cancer research as they are involved in the development and progression of tumors. This has resulted in the exponential growth of data on Ras superfamily across different public databases and in literature. However, no dedicated public resource is currently available for data mining and analysis on this family. The present database was developed to facilitate straightforward accession, retrieval and analysis of information available on Ras oncogenes from one particular site. Description We have developed the RAS Oncogene Database (RASOnD as a comprehensive knowledgebase that provides integrated and curated information on a single platform for oncogenes of Ras superfamily. RASOnD encompasses exhaustive genomics and proteomics data existing across diverse publicly accessible databases. This resource presently includes overall 199,046 entries from 101 different species. It provides a search tool to generate information about their nucleotide and amino acid sequences, single nucleotide polymorphisms, chromosome positions, orthologies, motifs, structures, related pathways and associated diseases. We have implemented a number of user-friendly search interfaces and sequence analysis tools. At present the user can (i browse the data (ii search any field through a simple or advance search interface and (iii perform a BLAST search and subsequently CLUSTALW multiple sequence alignment by selecting sequences of Ras oncogenes. The Generic gene browser, GBrowse, JMOL for structural visualization and TREEVIEW for phylograms have been integrated for clear perception of retrieved data. External links to related databases have been included in RASOnD. Conclusions This database is a resource and search tool dedicated to Ras oncogenes. It has

  4. Mechanosensation Dynamically Coordinates Polar Growth and Cell Wall Assembly to Promote Cell Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davì, Valeria; Tanimoto, Hirokazu; Ershov, Dmitry; Haupt, Armin; De Belly, Henry; Le Borgne, Rémi; Couturier, Etienne; Boudaoud, Arezki; Minc, Nicolas

    2018-04-23

    How growing cells cope with size expansion while ensuring mechanical integrity is not known. In walled cells, such as those of microbes and plants, growth and viability are both supported by a thin and rigid encasing cell wall (CW). We deciphered the dynamic mechanisms controlling wall surface assembly during cell growth, using a sub-resolution microscopy approach to monitor CW thickness in live rod-shaped fission yeast cells. We found that polar cell growth yielded wall thinning and that thickness negatively influenced growth. Thickness at growing tips exhibited a fluctuating behavior with thickening phases followed by thinning phases, indicative of a delayed feedback promoting thickness homeostasis. This feedback was mediated by mechanosensing through the CW integrity pathway, which probes strain in the wall to adjust synthase localization and activity to surface growth. Mutants defective in thickness homeostasis lysed by rupturing the wall, demonstrating its pivotal role for walled cell survival. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nicotine promotes initiation and progression of KRAS-induced pancreatic cancer via Gata6-dependent dedifferentiation of acinar cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Patrick C; Sancho, Patricia; Cañamero, Marta; Martinelli, Paola; Madriles, Francesc; Michl, Patrick; Gress, Thomas; de Pascual, Ricardo; Gandia, Luis; Guerra, Carmen; Barbacid, Mariano; Wagner, Martin; Vieira, Catarina R; Aicher, Alexandra; Real, Francisco X; Sainz, Bruno; Heeschen, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    Although smoking is a leading risk factor for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), little is known about the mechanisms by which smoking promotes initiation or progression of PDAC. We studied the effects of nicotine administration on pancreatic cancer development in Kras(+/LSLG12Vgeo);Elas-tTA/tetO-Cre (Ela-KRAS) mice, Kras(+/LSLG12D);Trp53+/LSLR172H;Pdx-1-Cre (KPC) mice (which express constitutively active forms of KRAS), and C57/B6 mice. Mice were given nicotine for up to 86 weeks to produce blood levels comparable with those of intermediate smokers. Pancreatic tissues were collected and analyzed by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction; cells were isolated and assayed for colony and sphere formation and gene expression. The effects of nicotine were also evaluated in primary pancreatic acinar cells isolated from wild-type, nAChR7a(-/-), Trp53(-/-), and Gata6(-/-);Trp53(-/-) mice. We also analyzed primary PDAC cells that overexpressed GATA6 from lentiviral expression vectors. Administration of nicotine accelerated transformation of pancreatic cells and tumor formation in Ela-KRAS and KPC mice. Nicotine induced dedifferentiation of acinar cells by activating AKT-ERK-MYC signaling; this led to inhibition of Gata6 promoter activity, loss of GATA6 protein, and subsequent loss of acinar differentiation and hyperactivation of oncogenic KRAS. Nicotine also promoted aggressiveness of established tumors as well as the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, increasing numbers of circulating cancer cells and their dissemination to the liver, compared with mice not exposed to nicotine. Nicotine induced pancreatic cells to acquire gene expression patterns and functional characteristics of cancer stem cells. These effects were markedly attenuated in K-Ras(+/LSL-G12D);Trp53(+/LSLR172H);Pdx-1-Cre mice given metformin. Metformin prevented nicotine-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis and tumor growth by up-regulating GATA6 and promoting

  6. Cyclic AMP signalling in Dictyostelium : G-proteins activate separate Ras pathways using specific RasGEFs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kae, Helmut; Kortholt, Arjan; Rehmann, Holger; Insall, RobertH.; Van Haastert, Peter J. M.; Spiegelman, George B.; Weeks, Gerald

    In general, mammalian Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs) show little substrate specificity, although they are often thought to regulate specific pathways. Here, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that two RasGEFs can each act on specific Ras proteins. During Dictyostelium

  7. Murine Th9 cells promote the survival of myeloid dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungsun; Li, Haiyan; Zhang, Mingjun; Lu, Yong; Hong, Bangxing; Zheng, Yuhuan; He, Jin; Yang, Jing; Qian, Jianfei; Yi, Qing

    2014-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells to initiate immune responses, and DC survival time is important for affecting the strength of T-cell responses. Interleukin (IL)-9-producing T-helper (Th)-9 cells play an important role in anti-tumor immunity. However, it is unclear how Th9 cells communicate with DCs. In this study, we investigated whether murine Th9 cells affected the survival of myeloid DCs. DCs derived from bone marrow of C57BL/6 mice were cocultured with Th9 cells from OT-II mice using transwell, and the survival of DCs was examined. DCs cocultured with Th9 cells had longer survival and fewer apoptotic cells than DCs cultured alone in vitro. In melanoma B16-OVA tumor-bearing mice, DCs conditioned by Th9 cells lived longer and induced stronger anti-tumor response than control DCs did in vivo. Mechanistic studies revealed that IL-3 but not IL-9 secreted by Th9 cells was responsible for the prolonged survival of DCs. IL-3 upregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL and activated p38, ERK and STAT5 signaling pathways in DCs. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that Th9 cells can promote the survival of DCs through IL-3, and will be helpful for designing Th9 cell immunotherapy and more effective DC vaccine for human cancers.

  8. CD8 Follicular T Cells Promote B Cell Antibody Class Switch in Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Kristen M; Davini, Dan; Lawrence, Travis J; Mullins, Genevieve N; Manansala, Miguel; Al-Kuhlani, Mufadhal; Pinney, James M; Davis, Jason K; Beaudin, Anna E; Sindi, Suzanne S; Gravano, David M; Hoyer, Katrina K

    2018-05-09

    CD8 T cells can play both a protective and pathogenic role in inflammation and autoimmune development. Recent studies have highlighted the ability of CD8 T cells to function as T follicular helper (Tfh) cells in the germinal center in the context of infection. However, whether this phenomenon occurs in autoimmunity and contributes to autoimmune pathogenesis is largely unexplored. In this study, we show that CD8 T cells acquire a CD4 Tfh profile in the absence of functional regulatory T cells in both the IL-2-deficient and scurfy mouse models. Depletion of CD8 T cells mitigates autoimmune pathogenesis in IL-2-deficient mice. CD8 T cells express the B cell follicle-localizing chemokine receptor CXCR5, a principal Tfh transcription factor Bcl6, and the Tfh effector cytokine IL-21. CD8 T cells localize to the B cell follicle, express B cell costimulatory proteins, and promote B cell differentiation and Ab isotype class switching. These data reveal a novel contribution of autoreactive CD8 T cells to autoimmune disease, in part, through CD4 follicular-like differentiation and functionality. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Megakaryocytes promote murine osteoblastic HSC niche expansion and stem cell engraftment after radioablative conditioning

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Timothy S.; Caselli, Anna; Otsuru, Satoru; Hofmann, Ted J.; Williams, Richard; Paolucci, Paolo; Dominici, Massimo; Horwitz, Edwin M.

    2013-01-01

    After radioablative conditioning, host megakaryocytes promote endosteal HSC niche expansion and donor stem cell engraftment.Thrombopoietin administration before radiation and bone marrow transplant enhances megakaryocyte promotion of HSC engraftment.

  10. The muscular expression of RAS in patients with achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casselbrant, A; Kostic, S; Lönroth, H

    2015-09-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) elicits smooth muscle contractions via activation of AngII type 1 receptor (AT1R) in the intestinal wall and in sphincter regions in several species. Achalasia is a rare swallowing disorder and is characterized by a loss of the wave-like contraction that forces food through the oesophagus and a failure of the lower oesophageal sphincter to relax during swallowing. The present study was undertaken to elucidate expression and distribution of a local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the muscular layer of distal normal human oesophagus as well as in patients with achalasia using western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). AT1R, together with enzyme renin and cathepsin D expression were decreased in patients with achalasia. In contrast, the mast cells chymase, cathepsin G, neprilysin and the receptor for angiotensin 1-7 peptides, the MAS receptor, were increased in patients with achalasia. The results showed the existence of a local RAS in human oesophageal muscular layer. The enzymes responsible for AngII production are different and there has been a shift in receptor physiology from AT1R to MAS receptor in patients with achalasia. These changes in the RAS might play a significant role in the physiological motor control for patients with achalasia. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Celecoxib sensitizes imatinib-resistant K562 cells to imatinib by inhibiting MRP1-5, ABCA2 and ABCG2 transporters via Wnt and Ras signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmapuri, Gangappa; Doneti, Ravinder; Philip, Gundala Harold; Kalle, Arunasree M

    2015-07-01

    Imatinib mesylate, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is very effective in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, development of resistance to imatinib therapy is also a very common mechanism observed with long-term administration of the drug. Our previous studies have highlighted the role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in regulating the expression of multidrug resistant protein-1 (MDR1), P-gp, in imatinib-resistant K562 cells (IR-K562) via PGE2-cAMP-PKC-NF-κB pathway and inhibition of COX-2 by celecoxib, a COX-2 specific inhibitor, inhibits this pathway and reverses the drug resistance. Studies have identified that not only MDR1 but other ATP-binding cassette transport proteins (ABC transporters) are involved in the development of imatinib resistance. Here, we tried to study the role of COX-2 in the regulation of other ABC transporters such as MRP1, MRP2, MRP3, ABCA2 and ABCG2 that have been already implicated in imatinib resistance development. The results of the study clearly indicated that overexpression of COX-2 lead to upregulation of MRP family proteins in IR-K562 cells and celecoxib down-regulated the ABC transporters through Wnt and MEK signaling pathways. The study signifies that celecoxib in combination with the imatinib can be a good alternate treatment strategy for the reversal of imatinib resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Coniferyl aldehyde attenuates radiation enteropathy by inhibiting cell death and promoting endothelial cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ye-Ji; Jung, Myung Gu; Son, Yeonghoon; Jang, Jun-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Sung-Ho; Ko, Young-Gyo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Hae-June

    2015-01-01

    Radiation enteropathy is a common complication in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiation-induced intestinal injury could be alleviated by coniferyl aldehyde (CA), an HSF1-inducing agent that increases cellular HSP70 expression. We systemically administered CA to mice with radiation enteropathy following abdominal irradiation (IR) to demonstrate the protective effects of CA against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury. CA clearly alleviated acute radiation-induced intestinal damage, as reflected by the histopathological data and it also attenuated sub-acute enteritis. CA prevented intestinal crypt cell death and protected the microvasculature in the lamina propria during the acute and sub-acute phases of damage. CA induced HSF1 and HSP70 expression in both intestinal epithelial cells and endothelial cells in vitro. Additionally, CA protected against not only the apoptotic cell death of both endothelial and epithelial cells but also the loss of endothelial cell function following IR, indicating that CA has beneficial effects on the intestine. Our results provide novel insight into the effects of CA and suggest its role as a therapeutic candidate for radiation-induced enteropathy due to its ability to promote rapid re-proliferation of the intestinal epithelium by the synergic effects of the inhibition of cell death and the promotion of endothelial cell function.

  13. An Alu-like RNA promotes cell differentiation and reduces malignancy of human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelnuovo, Manuele; Massone, Sara; Tasso, Roberta; Fiorino, Gloria; Gatti, Monica; Robello, Mauro; Gatta, Elena; Berger, Audrey; Strub, Katharina; Florio, Tullio; Dieci, Giorgio; Cancedda, Ranieri; Pagano, Aldo

    2010-10-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a pediatric cancer characterized by remarkable cell heterogeneity within the tumor nodules. Here, we demonstrate that the synthesis of a pol III-transcribed noncoding (nc) RNA (NDM29) strongly restricts NB development by promoting cell differentiation, a drop of malignancy processes, and a dramatic reduction of the tumor initiating cell (TIC) fraction in the NB cell population. Notably, the overexpression of NDM29 also confers to malignant NB cells an unpredicted susceptibility to the effects of antiblastic drugs used in NB therapy. Altogether, these results suggest the induction of NDM29 expression as possible treatment to increase cancer cells vulnerability to therapeutics and the measure of its synthesis in NB explants as prognostic factor of this cancer type.

  14. Disorders of dysregulated signal traffic through the RAS-MAPK pathway: phenotypic spectrum and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D

    2010-12-01

    RAS GTPases control a major signaling network implicated in several cellular functions, including cell fate determination, proliferation, survival, differentiation, migration, and senescence. Within this network, signal flow through the RAF-MEK-ERK pathway-the first identified mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade-mediates early and late developmental processes controlling morphology determination, organogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and growth. Signaling through the RAS-MAPK cascade is tightly controlled; and its enhanced activation represents a well-known event in oncogenesis. Unexpectedly, in the past few years, inherited dysregulation of this pathway has been recognized as the cause underlying a group of clinically related disorders sharing facial dysmorphism, cardiac defects, reduced postnatal growth, ectodermal anomalies, variable cognitive deficits, and susceptibility to certain malignancies as major features. These disorders are caused by heterozygosity for mutations in genes encoding RAS proteins, regulators of RAS function, modulators of RAS interaction with effectors, or downstream signal transducers. Here, we provide an overview of the phenotypic spectrum associated with germline mutations perturbing RAS-MAPK signaling, the unpredicted molecular mechanisms converging toward the dysregulation of this signaling cascade, and major genotype-phenotype correlations. © 2010 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Exosomes Promote Ovarian Cancer Cell Invasion through Transfer of CD44 to Peritoneal Mesothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Koji; Sawada, Kenjiro; Kinose, Yasuto; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Toda, Aska; Nakatsuka, Erika; Hashimoto, Kae; Mabuchi, Seiji; Morishige, Ken-Ichirou; Kurachi, Hirohisa; Lengyel, Ernst; Kimura, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells metastasize within the peritoneal cavity and directly encounter human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMC) as the initial step of metastasis. The contact between ovarian cancer cells and the single layer of mesothelial cells involves direct communications that modulate cancer progression but the mechanisms are unclear. One candidate mediating cell-cell communications is exosomes, 30-100 nm membrane vesicles of endocytic origin, through the cell-cell transfer of proteins, mRNAs, or microRNAs. Therefore, the goal was to mechanistically characterize how EOC-derived exosomes modulate metastasis. Exosomes from ovarian cancer cells were fluorescently labeled and cocultured with HPMCs which internalized the exosomes. Upon exosome uptake, HPMCs underwent a change in cellular morphology to a mesenchymal, spindle phenotype. CD44, a cell surface glycoprotein, was found to be enriched in the cancer cell-derived exosomes, transferred, and internalized to HPMCs, leading to high levels of CD44 in HPMCs. This increased CD44 expression in HPMCs promoted cancer invasion by inducing the HPMCs to secrete MMP9 and by cleaning the mesothelial barrier for improved cancer cell invasion. When CD44 expression was knocked down in cancer cells, exosomes had fewer effects on HPMCs. The inhibition of exosome release from cancer cells blocked CD44 internalization in HPMCs and suppressed ovarian cancer invasion. In ovarian cancer omental metastasis, positive CD44 expression was observed in those mesothelial cells that directly interacted with cancer cells, whereas CD44 expression was negative in the mesothelial cells remote from the invading edge. This study indicates that ovarian cancer-derived exosomes transfer CD44 to HPMCs, facilitating cancer invasion. Mechanistic insight from the current study suggests that therapeutic targeting of exosomes may be beneficial in treating ovarian cancer. Mol Cancer Res; 15(1); 78-92. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American

  16. Lead identification for the K-Ras protein: virtual screening and combinatorial fragment-based approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathan AAK

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Akbar Ali Khan Pathan,1,2,* Bhavana Panthi,3,* Zahid Khan,1 Purushotham Reddy Koppula,4–6 Mohammed Saud Alanazi,1 Sachchidanand,3 Narasimha Reddy Parine,1 Mukesh Chourasia3,* 1Genome Research Chair (GRC, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, 2Integrated Gulf Biosystems, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 3Department of Pharmacoinformatics, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Hajipur, India; 4Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, 5Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans Affairs Hospital, 6Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Columbia, MO, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Kirsten rat sarcoma (K-Ras protein is a member of Ras family belonging to the small guanosine triphosphatases superfamily. The members of this family share a conserved structure and biochemical properties, acting as binary molecular switches. The guanosine triphosphate-bound active K-Ras interacts with a range of effectors, resulting in the stimulation of downstream signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Efforts to target K-Ras have been unsuccessful until now, placing it among high-value molecules against which developing a therapy would have an enormous impact. K-Ras transduces signals when it binds to guanosine triphosphate by directly binding to downstream effector proteins, but in case of guanosine diphosphate-bound conformation, these interactions get disrupted. Methods: In the present study, we targeted the nucleotide-binding site in the “on” and “off” state conformations of the K-Ras protein to find out suitable lead compounds. A structure-based virtual screening approach has been used to screen compounds from different databases, followed by a combinatorial fragment-based approach to design the apposite lead for the K-Ras protein. Results: Interestingly, the designed compounds exhibit a binding preference for the

  17. Oxidative Stress Posttranslationally Regulates the Expression of Ha-Ras and Ki-Ras in Cultured Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Messina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Addition of hydrogen peroxide to cultured astrocytes induced a rapid and transient increase in the expression of Ha-Ras and Ki-Ras. Pull-down experiments with the GTP-Ras-binding domain of Raf-1 showed that oxidative stress substantially increased the activation of Ha-Ras, whereas a putative farnesylated activated form of Ki-Ras was only slightly increased. The increase in both Ha-Ras and Ki-Ras was insensitive to the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, and was occluded by the proteasomal inhibitor, MG-132. In addition, exposure to hydrogen peroxide reduced the levels of ubiquitinated Ras protein, indicating that oxidative stress leads to a reduced degradation of both isoforms through the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Indeed, the late reduction in Ha-Ras and Ki-Ras was due to a recovery of proteasomal degradation because it was sensitive to MG-132. The late reduction of Ha-Ras levels was abrogated by compound PD98059, which inhibits the MAP kinase pathway, whereas the late reduction of Ki-Ras was unaffected by PD98059. We conclude that oxidative stress differentially regulates the expression of Ha-Ras and Ki-Ras in cultured astrocytes, and that activation of the MAP kinase pathway by oxidative stress itself or by additional factors may act as a fail-safe mechanism limiting a sustained expression of the potentially detrimental Ha-Ras.

  18. Dendritic Cells Promote Pancreatic Viability in Mice with Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrosian, Andrea S.; Nguyen, Andrew H.; Hackman, Michael; Connolly, Michael K.; Malhotra, Ashim; Ibrahim, Junaid; Cieza-Rubio, Napoleon E.; Henning, Justin R.; Barilla, Rocky; Rehman, Adeel; Pachter, H. Leon; Medina-Zea, Marco V.; Cohen, Steven M.; Frey, Alan B.; Acehan, Devrim; Miller, George

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Acute pancreatitis increases morbidity and mortality from organ necrosis by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Dendritic cells (DCs) can promote or suppress inflammation, depending on their subtype and context. We investigated the roles of DC in development of acute pancreatitis. Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced in CD11c.DTR mice using caerulein or L-arginine; DCs were depleted by administration of diphtheria toxin. Survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results Numbers of MHC II+CD11c+DC increased 100-fold in pancreas of mice with acute pancreatitis, to account for nearly 15% of intra-pancreatic leukocytes. Intra-pancreatic DC acquired an immune phenotype in mice with acute pancreatitis; they expressed higher levels of MHC II and CD86 and increased production of interleukin-6, membrane cofactor protein (MCP)-1, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. However, rather than inducing an organ-destructive inflammatory process, DC were required for pancreatic viability; the exocrine pancreas died in mice that were depleted of DC and challenged with caerulein or L-arginine. All mice with pancreatitis that were depleted of DC died from acinar cell death within 4 days. Depletion of DC from mice with pancreatitis resulted in neutrophil infiltration and increased levels of systemic markers of inflammation. However, the organ necrosis associated with depletion of DC did not require infiltrating neutrophils, activation of NF-κB, or signaling by mitogen-activated protein kinase or TNF-α. Conclusions DC are required for pancreatic viability in mice with acute pancreatitis and might protect organs against cell stress. PMID:21801698

  19. Interstitial flows promote an amoeboid cell phenotype and motility of breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Huang, Yu Ling; Zheng, Angela; Wu, Mingming

    2015-03-01

    Lymph nodes, the drainage systems for interstitial flows, are clinically known to be the first metastatic sites of many cancer types including breast and prostate cancers. Here, we demonstrate that breast cancer cell morphology and motility is modulated by interstitial flows in a cell-ECM adhesion dependent manner. The average aspect ratios of the cells are significantly lower (or are more amoeboid like) in the presence of the flow in comparison to the case when the flow is absent. The addition of exogenous adhesion molecules within the extracellular matrix (type I collagen) enhances the overall aspect ratio (or are more mesenchymal like) of the cell population. Using measured cell trajectories, we find that the persistence of the amoeboid cells (aspect ratio less than 2.0) is shorter than that of mesenchymal cells. However, the maximum speed of the amoeboid cells is larger than that of mesenchymal cells. Together these findings provide the novel insight that interstitial flows promote amoeboid cell morphology and motility and highlight the plasticity of tumor cell motility in response to its biophysical environment. Supported by NIH Grant R21CA138366.

  20. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-α-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 μM) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-α and 5 μM sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction

  1. Molecular analysis of p53 and K-ras in lung carcinomas of coal miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, F.H.; Li, Y.W.; Vallyathan, V. [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States). School of Medicine, Dept. of Pathology

    2001-10-01

    Thirty-three cases of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) from the archives of National Coal Workers' Autopsy Study were studied for mutational alterations in p53 and K-ras using PCR-SSCP, DNA sequencing and PCR-oligonucleotide probe hybridization techniques. Mutations of the p53 were observed in 4 smokers (19%) and one in a never smoker (8%). Two polymorphisms in smokers were detected at codon 213, a common site for sequence variation. Among the smokers the p53 mutations were in the heavy smokers. In never smokers there was only a single p53 mutation and two K-ras mutations. In never smokers the frequency of K-ras mutations was similar (17%) in smokers, but one never smoker had two K-ras mutations. Mutations of p53 were more frequent in adenocarcinomas (27%) and they were AT-GC transitions. There were two large cell undifferentiated carcinomas with p53 mutation and one with a K-ras mutation. Two of the 16 squamous cell carcinomas were positive for p53 mutation, while no K-ras mutations were found in this group. The results of these preliminary studies indicate a moderately different mutational spectrum of p53 and K-ras in coal miners independent of cigarette smoking. The mutational spectrum observed in this study of coal miners with heavy cigarette smoking history suggest a protective effect of coal mine dust in preventing abnormal mutations induced by chemical carcinogens in cigarette smoke or reactive oxygen species.

  2. Ras1 interacts with multiple new signaling and cytoskeletal loci in Drosophila eggshell patterning and morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnorr, J D; Holdcraft, R; Chevalier, B; Berg, C A

    2001-10-01

    Little is known about the genes that interact with Ras signaling pathways to regulate morphogenesis. The synthesis of dorsal eggshell structures in Drosophila melanogaster requires multiple rounds of Ras signaling followed by dramatic epithelial sheet movements. We took advantage of this process to identify genes that link patterning and morphogenesis; we screened lethal mutations on the second chromosome for those that could enhance a weak Ras1 eggshell phenotype. Of 1618 lethal P-element mutations tested, 13 showed significant enhancement, resulting in forked and fused dorsal appendages. Our genetic and molecular analyses together with information from the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project reveal that 11 of these lines carry mutations in previously characterized genes. Three mutations disrupt the known Ras1 cell signaling components Star, Egfr, and Blistered, while one mutation disrupts Sec61beta, implicated in ligand secretion. Seven lines represent cell signaling and cytoskeletal components that are new to the Ras1 pathway; these are Chickadee (Profilin), Tec29, Dreadlocks, POSH, Peanut, Smt3, and MESK2, a suppressor of dominant-negative Ksr. A twelfth insertion disrupts two genes, Nrk, a "neurospecific" receptor tyrosine kinase, and Tpp, which encodes a neuropeptidase. These results suggest that Ras1 signaling during oogenesis involves novel components that may be intimately associated with additional signaling processes and with the reorganization of the cytoskeleton. To determine whether these Ras1 Enhancers function upstream or downstream of the Egf receptor, four mutations were tested for their ability to suppress an activated Egfr construct (lambdatop) expressed in oogenesis exclusively in the follicle cells. Mutations in Star and l(2)43Bb had no significant effect upon the lambdatop eggshell defect whereas smt3 and dock alleles significantly suppressed the lambdatop phenotype.

  3. IGFBP1 increases β-cell regeneration by promoting α- to β-cell transdifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Liu, Ka-Cheuk; Schulz, Nadja; Karampelias, Christos; Charbord, Jérémie; Hilding, Agneta; Rautio, Linn; Bertolino, Philippe; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Brismar, Kerstin; Andersson, Olov

    2016-09-15

    There is great interest in therapeutically harnessing endogenous regenerative mechanisms to increase the number of β cells in people with diabetes. By performing whole-genome expression profiling of zebrafish islets, we identified 11 secreted proteins that are upregulated during β-cell regeneration. We then tested the proteins' ability to potentiate β-cell regeneration in zebrafish at supraphysiological levels. One protein, insulin-like growth factor (Igf) binding-protein 1 (Igfbp1), potently promoted β-cell regeneration by potentiating α- to β-cell transdifferentiation. Using various inhibitors and activators of the Igf pathway, we show that Igfbp1 exerts its regenerative effect, at least partly, by inhibiting Igf signaling. Igfbp1's effect on transdifferentiation appears conserved across species: Treating mouse and human islets with recombinant IGFBP1 in vitro increased the number of cells co-expressing insulin and glucagon threefold. Moreover, a prospective human study showed that having high IGFBP1 levels reduces the risk of developing type-2 diabetes by more than 85%. Thus, we identify IGFBP1 as an endogenous promoter of β-cell regeneration and highlight its clinical importance in diabetes. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  4. Transformation by oncogenic RAS sensitizes human colon cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by up-regulating death receptor 4 and death receptor 5 through a MEK-dependent pathway

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drosopoulos, K.G.; Roberts, M.L.; Čermák, Lukáš; Sasazuki, T.; Shirasawa, S.; Anděra, Ladislav; Pintzas, A.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 280, č. 24 (2005), s. 22856-22867 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK5020115; GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB5052407 Keywords : TRAIL * Ras * apoptosis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.854, year: 2005

  5. H- ras deletion protects against angiotensin II-induced arterial hypertension and cardiac remodeling through protein kinase G-Iβ pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Sánchez, Paloma; Luengo, Alicia; Griera, Mercedes; Orea, María Jesús; López-Olañeta, Marina; Chiloeches, Antonio; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; Calleros, Laura; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2018-02-01

    Ras proteins regulate cell survival, growth, differentiation, blood pressure, and fibrosis in some organs. We have demonstrated that H- ras gene deletion produces mice hypotension via a soluble guanylate cyclase-protein kinase G (PKG)-dependent mechanism. In this study, we analyzed the consequences of H- ras deletion on cardiac remodeling induced by continuous angiotensin II (AngII) infusion and the molecular mechanisms implied. Left ventricular posterior wall thickness and mass and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area were similar between AngII-treated H-Ras knockout (H -ras -/- ) and control wild-type (H -ras +/+ ) mice, as were extracellular matrix protein expression. Increased cardiac PKG-Iβ protein expression in H -ras -/- mice suggests the involvement of this protein in heart protection. Ex vivo experiments on cardiac explants could support this mechanism, as PKG blockade blunted protection against AngII-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis markers in H -ras -/- mice. Genetic modulation studies in cardiomyocytes and cardiac and embryonic fibroblasts revealed that the lack of H-Ras down-regulates the B-RAF/MEK/ERK pathway, which induces the glycogen synthase kinase-3β-dependent activation of the transcription factor, cAMP response element-binding protein, which is responsible for PKG-Iβ overexpression in H -ras -/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts. This study demonstrates that H- ras deletion protects against AngII-induced cardiac remodeling, possibly via a mechanism in which PKG-Iβ overexpression could play a partial role, and points to H-Ras and/or downstream proteins as potential therapeutic targets in cardiovascular disease.-Martín-Sánchez, P., Luengo, A., Griera, M., Orea, M. J., López-Olañeta, M., Chiloeches, A., Lara-Pezzi, E., de Frutos, S., Rodríguez-Puyol, M., Calleros, L., Rodríguez-Puyol, D. H- ras deletion protects against angiotensin II-induced arterial hypertension and cardiac remodeling through protein kinase G-Iβ pathway activation.

  6. A human thymic epithelial cell culture system for the promotion of lymphopoiesis from hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudette-Zlatanova, Britte C; Knight, Katherine L; Zhang, Shubin; Stiff, Patrick J; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos; Le, Phong T

    2011-05-01

    A human thymic epithelial cell (TEC) line expressing human leukocyte antigen-ABC and human leukocyte antigen-DR was engineered to overexpress murine Delta-like 1 (TEC-Dl1) for the purpose of establishing a human culture system that supports T lymphopoiesis from hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Cord blood or bone marrow HPCs were co-cultured with either the parental TEC line expressing low levels of the Notch ligands, Delta-like 1 and Delta-like 4, or with TEC-Dl1 to determine if these cell lines support human lymphopoiesis. In co-cultures with cord blood or bone marrow HPCs, TEC-Dl1 cells promote de novo generation of CD7(pos)CD1a(pos) T-lineage committed cells. Most CD7(pos)CD1a(hi) cells are CD4(pos)CD8(pos) double-positive (DP). We found that TEC-Dl1 cells are insufficient to generate mature CD3(hi) CD4(pos) or CD3(hi) CD8(pos) single-positive (SP) T cells from the CD4(pos)CD8(pos) DP T cells; however, we detected CD3(lo) cells within the DP and SP CD4 and CD8 populations. The CD3(lo) SP cells expressed lower levels of interleukin-2Rα and interleukin-7Rα compared to CD3(lo) DP cells. In contrast to the TEC-Dl1 line, the parental TEC-84 line expressing low levels of human Notch ligands permits HPC differentiation to the B-cell lineage. We report for the first time a human TEC line that supports lymphopoiesis from cord blood and bone marrow HPC. The TEC cell lines described herein provide a novel human thymic stroma model to study the contribution of human leukocyte antigen molecules and Notch ligands to T-cell commitment and maturation and could be utilized to promote lymphopoiesis for immune cell therapy. Copyright © 2011 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Drosophila immune response against Ras-induced overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hauling

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Our goal is to characterize the innate immune response against the early stage of tumor development. For this, animal models where genetic changes in specific cells and tissues can be performed in a controlled way have become increasingly important, including the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. Many tumor mutants in Drosophila affect the germline and, as a consequence, also the immune system itself, making it difficult to ascribe their phenotype to a specific tissue. Only during the past decade, mutations have been induced systematically in somatic cells to study the control of tumorous growth by neighboring cells and by immune cells. Here we show that upon ectopic expression of a dominant-active form of the Ras oncogene (RasV12, both imaginal discs and salivary glands are affected. Particularly, the glands increase in size, express metalloproteinases and display apoptotic markers. This leads to a strong cellular response, which has many hallmarks of the granuloma-like encapsulation reaction, usually mounted by the insect against larger foreign objects. RNA sequencing of the fat body reveals a characteristic humoral immune response. In addition we also identify genes that are specifically induced upon expression of RasV12. As a proof-of-principle, we show that one of the induced genes (santa-maria, which encodes a scavenger receptor, modulates damage to the salivary glands. The list of genes we have identified provides a rich source for further functional characterization. Our hope is that this will lead to a better understanding of the earliest stage of innate immune responses against tumors with implications for mammalian immunity.

  8. Biomaterials that promote cell-cell interactions enhance the paracrine function of MSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Taimoor H; Mooney, David J; Duda, Georg N; Geissler, Sven

    2017-09-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) secrete paracrine factors that play crucial roles during tissue regeneration. Whether this paracrine function is influenced by the properties of biomaterials in general, and those used for cell delivery in particular, largely remains unexplored. Here, we investigated if three-dimensional culture in distinct microenvironments - nanoporous hydrogels (mean pore size ∼5 nm) and macroporous scaffolds (mean pore size ∼120 μm) - affects the secretion pattern of MSCs, and consequently leads to differential paracrine effects on target progenitor cells such as myoblasts. We report that compared to MSCs encapsulated in hydrogels, scaffold seeded MSCs show an enhanced secretion profile and exert beneficial paracrine effects on various myoblast functions including migration and proliferation. Additionally, we show that the heightened paracrine effects of scaffold seeded cells can in part be attributed to N-cadherin mediated cell-cell interactions during culture. In hydrogels, this physical interaction between cells is prevented by the encapsulating matrix. Functionally blocking N-cadherin negatively affected the secretion profile and paracrine effects of MSCs on myoblasts, with stronger effects observed for scaffold seeded compared to hydrogel encapsulated cells. Together, these findings demonstrate that the therapeutic potency of MSCs can be enhanced by biomaterials that promote cell-cell interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Follicular B Cells Promote Atherosclerosis via T Cell-Mediated Differentiation Into Plasma Cells and Secreting Pathogenic Immunoglobulin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Christopher; Liu, Yu-Han; Kanellakis, Peter; Kallies, Axel; Li, Yi; Cao, Anh; Hosseini, Hamid; Tipping, Peter; Toh, Ban-Hock; Bobik, Alex; Kyaw, Tin

    2018-05-01

    B cells promote or protect development of atherosclerosis. In this study, we examined the role of MHCII (major histocompatibility II), CD40 (cluster of differentiation 40), and Blimp-1 (B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein) expression by follicular B (FO B) cells in development of atherosclerosis together with the effects of IgG purified from atherosclerotic mice. Using mixed chimeric Ldlr -/- mice whose B cells are deficient in MHCII or CD40, we demonstrate that these molecules are critical for the proatherogenic actions of FO B cells. During development of atherosclerosis, these deficiencies affected T-B cell interactions, germinal center B cells, plasma cells, and IgG. As FO B cells differentiating into plasma cells require Blimp-1, we also assessed its role in the development of atherosclerosis. Blimp-1-deficient B cells greatly attenuated atherosclerosis and immunoglobulin-including IgG production, preventing IgG accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions; Blimp-1 deletion also attenuated lesion proinflammatory cytokines, apoptotic cell numbers, and necrotic core. To determine the importance of IgG for atherosclerosis, we purified IgG from atherosclerotic mice. Their transfer but not IgG from nonatherosclerotic mice into Ldlr -/- mice whose B cells are Blimp-1-deficient increased atherosclerosis; transfer was associated with IgG accumulating in atherosclerotic lesions, increased lesion inflammatory cytokines, apoptotic cell numbers, and necrotic core size. The mechanism by which FO B cells promote atherosclerosis is highly dependent on their expression of MHCII, CD40, and Blimp-1. FO B cell differentiation into IgG-producing plasma cells also is critical for their proatherogenic actions. Targeting B-T cell interactions and pathogenic IgG may provide novel therapeutic strategies to prevent atherosclerosis and its adverse cardiovascular complications. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Development of a High-Throughput Gene Expression Screen for Modulators of RAS-MAPK Signaling in a Mutant RAS Cellular Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severyn, Bryan; Nguyen, Thi; Altman, Michael D; Li, Lixia; Nagashima, Kumiko; Naumov, George N; Sathyanarayanan, Sriram; Cook, Erica; Morris, Erick; Ferrer, Marc; Arthur, Bill; Benita, Yair; Watters, Jim; Loboda, Andrey; Hermes, Jeff; Gilliland, D Gary; Cleary, Michelle A; Carroll, Pamela M; Strack, Peter; Tudor, Matt; Andersen, Jannik N

    2016-10-01

    The RAS-MAPK pathway controls many cellular programs, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In colorectal cancers, recurrent mutations in this pathway often lead to increased cell signaling that may contribute to the development of neoplasms, thereby making this pathway attractive for therapeutic intervention. To this end, we developed a 26-member gene signature of RAS-MAPK pathway activity utilizing the Affymetrix QuantiGene Plex 2.0 reagent system and performed both primary and confirmatory gene expression-based high-throughput screens (GE-HTSs) using KRAS mutant colon cancer cells (SW837) and leveraging a highly annotated chemical library. The screen achieved a hit rate of 1.4% and was able to enrich for hit compounds that target RAS-MAPK pathway members such as MEK and EGFR. Sensitivity and selectivity performance measurements were 0.84 and 1.00, respectively, indicating high true-positive and true-negative rates. Active compounds from the primary screen were confirmed in a dose-response GE-HTS assay, a GE-HTS assay using 14 additional cancer cell lines, and an in vitro colony formation assay. Altogether, our data suggest that this GE-HTS assay will be useful for larger unbiased chemical screens to identify novel compounds and mechanisms that may modulate the RAS-MAPK pathway. © 2016 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  11. Activated iNKT cells promote memory CD8+ T cell differentiation during viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma C Reilly

    Full Text Available α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer is the prototypical lipid ligand for invariant NKT cells. Recent studies have proposed that α-GalCer is an effective adjuvant in vaccination against a range of immune challenges, however its mechanism of action has not been completely elucidated. A variety of delivery methods have been examined including pulsing dendritic cells with α-GalCer to optimize the potential of α-GalCer. These methods are currently being used in a variety of clinical trials in patients with advanced cancer but cannot be used in the context of vaccine development against pathogens due to their complexity. Using a simple delivery method, we evaluated α-GalCer adjuvant properties, using the mouse model for cytomegalovirus (MCMV. We measured several key parameters of the immune response to MCMV, including inflammation, effector, and central memory CD8(+ T cell responses. We found that α-GalCer injection at the time of the infection decreases viral titers, alters the kinetics of the inflammatory response, and promotes both increased frequencies and numbers of virus-specific memory CD8(+ T cells. Overall, our data suggest that iNKT cell activation by α-GalCer promotes the development of long-term protective immunity through increased fitness of central memory CD8(+ T cells, as a consequence of reduced inflammation.

  12. Methylation of the ATM promoter in glioma cells alters ionizing radiation sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Kanaklata; Wang, Lilin; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Price, Brendan D.

    2006-01-01

    Glioblastomas are among the malignancies most resistant to radiation therapy. In contrast, cells lacking the ATM protein are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation. The relationship between ATM protein expression and radiosensitivity in 3 glioma cell lines was examined. T98G cells exhibited normal levels of ATM protein, whereas U118 and U87 cells had significantly lower levels of ATM and increased (>2-fold) sensitivity to ionizing radiation compared to T98G cells. The ATM promoter was methylated in U87 cells. Demethylation by azacytidine treatment increased ATM protein levels in the U87 cells and decreased their radiosensitivity. In contrast, the ATM promoter in U118 cells was not methylated. Further, expression of exogenous ATM did not significantly alter the radiosensitivity of U118 cells. ATM expression is therefore heterogeneous in the glioma cells examined. In conclusion, methylation of the ATM promoter may account for the variable radiosensitivity and heterogeneous ATM expression in a fraction of glioma cells

  13. A Novel Ras Effector Pathway Found to Play Significant Role in Tumor Suppression | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer; photo by Richard Frederickson, Staff Photographer Normal cells have mechanisms to prevent the development of cancer. Among these is a type of tumor suppressor mechanism known as oncogene-induced senescence, or OIS, which halts the uncontrolled growth of cells caused by mutations in oncogenes. The oncogene Ras plays a crucial role in inducing OIS

  14. Galectin-3 mediates cross-talk between K-Ras and Let-7c tumor suppressor microRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Levy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Galectin-3 (Gal-3 and active (GTP-bound K-Ras contribute to the malignant phenotype of many human tumors by increasing the rate of cell proliferation, survival, and migration. These Gal-3-mediated effects result from a selective binding to K-Ras.GTP, causing increased nanoclustering in the cell membrane and leading to robust Ras signaling. Regulation of the interactions between Gal-3 and active K-Ras is not fully understood. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To gain a better understanding of what regulates the critical interactions between these two proteins, we examined the role of Gal-3 in the regulation of K-Ras by using Gal-3-knockout mouse embryonic-fibroblasts (Gal-3-/- MEFs and/or Gal-3/Gal-1 double-knockout MEFs. We found that knockout of Gal-3 induced strong downregulation (∼60% of K-Ras and K-Ras.GTP. The downregulation was somewhat more marked in the double-knockout MEFs, in which we also detected robust inhibition(∼50% of ERK and Akt activation. These additional effects are probably attributable to inhibition of the weak interactions of K-Ras.GTP with Gal-1. Re-expression of Gal-3 reversed the phenotype of the Gal-3-/- MEFs and dramatically reduced the disappearance of K-Ras in the presence of cycloheximide to the levels seen in wild-type MEFs. Furthermore, phosphorylation of Gal-3 by casein kinase-1 (CK-1 induced translocation of Gal-3 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane, leading to K-Ras stabilization accompanied by downregulation of the tumor suppressor miRNA let-7c, known to negatively control K-Ras transcription. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a novel cross-talk between Gal-3-mediated downregulation of let 7c microRNA (which in turn negatively regulates K-Ras transcription and elucidates the association among Gal-3 let-7c and K-Ras transcription/translation, cellular compartmentalization and activity.

  15. The Ras suppressor-1 (RSU-1 in cancer

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    Lefteris C Zacharia

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary tumors are seldom the cause of death for cancer patients as most patients die from metastatic disease. Thus, deciphering metastatic mechanisms and key molecules involved is of utmost importance for the improved survival of cancer patients. Metastasis is a complex process in which cancer cells dissociate from the original tumor and spread to distant sites of the body. During the metastatic process, cancer cells lose contact both with the extracellular matrix (ECM and the neighboring cells within the primary tumor, thus invading though surrounding tissues. Therefore, ECM, and ECM-related adhesion proteins play a critical role in the metastatic process. Ras suppressor-1 (RSU-1 was first identified as a suppressor of Ras-dependent oncogenic transformation and is localized to cell-ECM adhesions where it is known to interact with the pro-survival adhesion protein PINCH-1. Although the connection to cancer is obvious, little is known regarding its expression in various cancer types. This opinion piece is focusing on recent literature regarding the expression of RSU-1 in various cancer types and the possible molecular mechanism of its action, pointing towards questions that need still to be addressed in this research field.

  16. Isolation of a strong Arabidopsis guard cell promoter and its potential as a research tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegel Robert S

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A common limitation in guard cell signaling research is that it is difficult to obtain consistent high expression of transgenes of interest in Arabidopsis guard cells using known guard cell promoters or the constitutive 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter. An additional drawback of the 35S promoter is that ectopically expressing a gene throughout the organism could cause pleiotropic effects. To improve available methods for targeted gene expression in guard cells, we isolated strong guard cell promoter candidates based on new guard cell-specific microarray analyses of 23,000 genes that are made available together with this report. Results A promoter, pGC1(At1g22690, drove strong and relatively specific reporter gene expression in guard cells including GUS (beta-glucuronidase and yellow cameleon YC3.60 (GFP-based calcium FRET reporter. Reporter gene expression was weaker in immature guard cells. The expression of YC3.60 was sufficiently strong to image intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in guard cells of intact plants and resolved spontaneous calcium transients in guard cells. The GC1 promoter also mediated strong reporter expression in clustered stomata in the stomatal development mutant too-many-mouths (tmm. Furthermore, the same promoter::reporter constructs also drove guard cell specific reporter expression in tobacco, illustrating the potential of this promoter as a method for high level expression in guard cells. A serial deletion of the promoter defined a guard cell expression promoter region. In addition, anti-sense repression using pGC1 was powerful for reducing specific GFP gene expression in guard cells while expression in leaf epidermal cells was not repressed, demonstrating strong cell-type preferential gene repression. Conclusion The pGC1 promoter described here drives strong reporter expression in guard cells of Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. It provides a potent research tool for targeted guard cell expression or

  17. Isolation of a strong Arabidopsis guard cell promoter and its potential as a research tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingzhen; Costa, Alex; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Siegel, Robert S; Schroeder, Julian I

    2008-01-01

    Background A common limitation in guard cell signaling research is that it is difficult to obtain consistent high expression of transgenes of interest in Arabidopsis guard cells using known guard cell promoters or the constitutive 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter. An additional drawback of the 35S promoter is that ectopically expressing a gene throughout the organism could cause pleiotropic effects. To improve available methods for targeted gene expression in guard cells, we isolated strong guard cell promoter candidates based on new guard cell-specific microarray analyses of 23,000 genes that are made available together with this report. Results A promoter, pGC1(At1g22690), drove strong and relatively specific reporter gene expression in guard cells including GUS (beta-glucuronidase) and yellow cameleon YC3.60 (GFP-based calcium FRET reporter). Reporter gene expression was weaker in immature guard cells. The expression of YC3.60 was sufficiently strong to image intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in guard cells of intact plants and resolved spontaneous calcium transients in guard cells. The GC1 promoter also mediated strong reporter expression in clustered stomata in the stomatal development mutant too-many-mouths (tmm). Furthermore, the same promoter::reporter constructs also drove guard cell specific reporter expression in tobacco, illustrating the potential of this promoter as a method for high level expression in guard cells. A serial deletion of the promoter defined a guard cell expression promoter region. In addition, anti-sense repression using pGC1 was powerful for reducing specific GFP gene expression in guard cells while expression in leaf epidermal cells was not repressed, demonstrating strong cell-type preferential gene repression. Conclusion The pGC1 promoter described here drives strong reporter expression in guard cells of Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. It provides a potent research tool for targeted guard cell expression or gene silencing. It is also

  18. Neural stem cells promote nerve regeneration through IL12-induced Schwann cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Don-Ching; Chen, Jong-Hang; Hsu, Tai-Yu; Chang, Li-Hsun; Chang, Hsu; Chi, Ya-Hui; Chiu, Ing-Ming

    2017-03-01

    Regeneration of injured peripheral nerves is a slow, complicated process that could be improved by implantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) or nerve conduit. Implantation of NSCs along with conduits promotes the regeneration of damaged nerve, likely because (i) conduit supports and guides axonal growth from one nerve stump to the other, while preventing fibrous tissue ingrowth and retaining neurotrophic factors; and (ii) implanted NSCs differentiate into Schwann cells and maintain a growth factor enriched microenvironment, which promotes nerve regeneration. In this study, we identified IL12p80 (homodimer of IL12p40) in the cell extracts of implanted nerve conduit combined with NSCs by using protein antibody array and Western blotting. Levels of IL12p80 in these conduits are 1.6-fold higher than those in conduits without NSCs. In the sciatic nerve injury mouse model, implantation of NSCs combined with nerve conduit and IL12p80 improves motor recovery and increases the diameter up to 4.5-fold, at the medial site of the regenerated nerve. In vitro study further revealed that IL12p80 stimulates the Schwann cell differentiation of mouse NSCs through the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3). These results suggest that IL12p80 can trigger Schwann cell differentiation of mouse NSCs through Stat3 phosphorylation and enhance the functional recovery and the diameter of regenerated nerves in a mouse sciatic nerve injury model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Harvey murine sarcoma virus p21 ras protein: biological and biochemical significance of the cysteine nearest the carboxy terminus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Norris, K; Papageorge, A G

    1984-01-01

    localization. We have now further characterized the post-translational processing of these mutants and have also studied two C-terminal v-rasH point mutants: one encodes serine in place of cysteine-186, the other threonine for valine-187. The Thr-187 mutant was transformation-competent, and its p21 protein...... not undergo the posttranslational processing common to biologically active ras proteins: their electrophoretic migration rate did not change, they remained in the cytosol, and they failed to bind lipid. Since the cell-encoded ras proteins also contain this cysteine, we conclude that this amino acid residue...

  20. Bone marrow-derived fibrocytes promote stem cell-like properties of lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Atsuro; Goto, Hisatsugu; Nakano, Mayuri; Mitsuhashi, Atsushi; Aono, Yoshinori; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Uehara, Hisanori; Kondo, Kazuya; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2018-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a minor population that have clonal tumor initiation and self-renewal capacity and are responsible for tumor initiation, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance. CSCs reside in niches, which are composed of diverse types of stromal cells and extracellular matrix components. These stromal cells regulate CSC-like properties by providing secreted factors or by physical contact. Fibrocytes are differentiated from bone marrow-derived CD14 + monocytes and have features of both macrophages and fibroblasts. Accumulating evidence has suggested that stromal fibrocytes might promote cancer progression. However, the role of fibrocytes in the CSC niches has not been revealed. We herein report that human fibrocytes enhanced the CSC-like properties of lung cancer cells through secreted factors, including osteopontin, CC-chemokine ligand 18, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. The PIK3K/AKT pathway was critical for fibrocytes to mediate the CSC-like functions of lung cancer cells. In human lung cancer specimens, the number of tumor-infiltrated fibrocytes was correlated with high expression of CSC-associated protein in cancer cells. These results suggest that fibrocytes may be a novel cell population that regulates the CSC-like properties of lung cancer cells in the CSC niches. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Cell-derived micro-environment helps dental pulp stem cells promote dental pulp regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuexin; Li, Hui; Sun, Jingjing; Luo, Xiangyou; Yang, Hefeng; Xie, Li; Yang, Bo; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2017-10-01

    The function of the dental pulp is closely connected to the extracellular matrix (ECM) structure, and ECM has received significant attention due to its biological functions for regulating cells. As such, the interaction between the ECM niche and cells is worth exploring for potential clinical uses. In this study, dental pulp stem cell (DPSC)-derived ECM (DPM) was prepared through cell culture and decellularization to function as the cell niche, and changes in DPSC behaviour and histological analysis of dental pulp tissue regeneration were evaluated following the DPM culture. DPM promoted the replication of DPSCs and exhibited retention of their mineralization. Then, the DPM-based culture strategy under odontogenic culture medium was further investigated, and the mineralization-related markers showed that DPSCs were regulated towards odontogenic differentiation. Dental pulp-like tissue with well-arranged ECM was harvested after a 2-month subcutaneous implantation in nude mice with DPM application. Additionally, DPSCs cultured on the plastic culture surface showed the up-regulation of mineralization makers in vitro, but there was a disorder in matrix formation and mineralization when the cells were cultured in vivo. DPM-based cultivation could serve as a cell niche and modulate DPSC behaviour, and this method also provided an alternative to harvest tissue-specific ECM and provided a strategy for ECM-cell interaction. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. RAS in Pregnancy and Preeclampsia and Eclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rodriguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a common disease of pregnancy characterized by the presence of hypertension and commitment of many organs, including the brain, secondary to generalized endothelial dysfunction. Its etiology is not known precisely, but it involved several factors, highlighting the renin angiotensin system (RAS, which would have an important role in the origin of multisystem involvement. This paper reviews the evidence supporting the involvement of RAS in triggering the disease, in addition to the components of this system that would be involved and how it eventually produces brain engagement.

  3. G Protein-Coupled Receptor 87 (GPR87 Promotes Cell Proliferation in Human Bladder Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptor 87 (GPR87 is a newly deorphanized member of the cell surface molecule G protein-coupled receptor family. GPR signaling was shown to play a role in promotion of cell growth and survival, metastasis, and drug resistance. The overexpression of GPR87 has also been reported in many malignant tumors including bladder cancer. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of silencing GPR87 expression with a replication-deficient recombinant adenoviral vector expressing short hairpin RNA targeting GPR87 (Ad-shGPR87 and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms in bladder cancer cells. Six GPR87-expressing human bladder cancer cells, HT1197, HT1376, J82, RT112, TCCSUP and UMUC3, were used. Infection with Ad-shGPR87 effectively downregulated the GPR87 expression, and significantly reduced the percentage of viable cells in 4 of 6 cell lines as detected by an MTT assay. Significant inhibition on cell proliferation with Ad-shGPR87 was observed in the wild-type p53 bladder cancer cell lines (HT1197, RT112, TCCSUP and UMUC3, but not in the mutant p53 cells (HT1376 and J82. As represented by a wild-type p53 RT112 cell, Ad-shGPR87 infection significantly enhanced p53 and p21 expression and caused caspase-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, the treatment with Ad-shGPR87 exerted a significant antitumor effect against the GPR87-expressing RT112 xenografts. GPR87 appeared to be a promising target for gene therapy, and Ad-shGPR87 had strong antitumor effects, specifically anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects, against GPR87-expressing human bladder cancer cells.

  4. Quantitative Assays for RAS Pathway Proteins and Phosphorylation States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI CPTAC program is applying its expertise in quantitative proteomics to develop assays for RAS pathway proteins. Targets include key phosphopeptides that should increase our understanding of how the RAS pathway is regulated.

  5. HCG-Activated Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC Promote Trophoblast Cell Invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Yu

    Full Text Available Successful embryo implantation and placentation depend on appropriate trophoblast invasion into the maternal endometrial stroma. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG is one of the earliest embryo-derived secreted signals in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC that abundantly expresses hCG receptors. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of human embryo-secreted hCG on PBMC function and investigate the role and underlying mechanisms of activated PBMC in trophoblast invasion. Blood samples were collected from women undergoing benign gynecological surgery during the mid-secretory phase. PBMC were isolated and stimulated with or without hCG for 0 or 24 h. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF expressions in PBMC were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The JAR cell line served as a model for trophoblast cells and was divided into four groups: control, hCG only, PBMC only, and PBMC with hCG. JAR cell invasive and proliferative abilities were detected by trans-well and CCK8 assays and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 (MMP-2, MMP-9, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells were detected by western blotting and real-time PCR analysis. We found that hCG can remarkably promote IL-1β and LIF promotion in PBMC after 24-h culture. PBMC activated by hCG significantly increased the number of invasive JAR cells in an invasion assay without affecting proliferation, and hCG-activated PBMC significantly increased MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF and decreased TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells in a dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrated that hCG stimulates cytokine secretion in human PBMC and could stimulate trophoblast invasion.

  6. Nanotopography Promotes Pancreatic Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyung Woo; Cha, Kyoung Je; Han, Jiyou; Jang, Yu Jin; Kim, Dong Sung; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2016-03-22

    Although previous studies suggest that nanotopographical features influence properties and behaviors of stem cells, only a few studies have attempted to derive clinically useful somatic cells from human pluripotent stem cells using nanopatterned surfaces. In the present study, we report that polystyrene nanopore-patterned surfaces significantly promote the pancreatic differentiation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. We compared different diameters of nanopores and showed that 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces highly upregulated the expression of PDX1, a critical transcription factor for pancreatic development, leading to an approximately 3-fold increase in the percentage of differentiating PDX1(+) pancreatic progenitors compared with control flat surfaces. Furthermore, in the presence of biochemical factors, 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces profoundly enhanced the derivation of pancreatic endocrine cells producing insulin, glucagon, or somatostatin. We also demonstrate that nanopore-patterned surface-induced upregulation of PDX1 is associated with downregulation of TAZ, suggesting the potential role of TAZ in nanopore-patterned surface-mediated mechanotransduction. Our study suggests that appropriate cytokine treatments combined with nanotopographical stimulation could be a powerful tool for deriving a high purity of desired cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

  7. Schwann cells promote neuronal differentiation of bone marrow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-04-25

    Apr 25, 2011 ... Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), a type of multipotent stem cell, can differentiate into various types ... induced to differentiate into neuron-like cells when they are ... axonal regeneration and functional reconstruction do not.

  8. The Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a Model for Understanding RAS Proteins and Their Role in Human Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzanelli, Giulia; Francisco, Rita; Azevedo, Luísa; Carvalho, Patrícia Dias; Almeida, Ana; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Oliveira, Maria José; Lucas, Cândida; Sousa, Maria João

    2018-01-01

    The exploitation of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a biological model for the investigation of complex molecular processes conserved in multicellular organisms, such as humans, has allowed fundamental biological discoveries. When comparing yeast and human proteins, it is clear that both amino acid sequences and protein functions are often very well conserved. One example of the high degree of conservation between human and yeast proteins is highlighted by the members of the RAS family. Indeed, the study of the signaling pathways regulated by RAS in yeast cells led to the discovery of properties that were often found interchangeable with RAS proto-oncogenes in human pathways, and vice versa. In this work, we performed an updated critical literature review on human and yeast RAS pathways, specifically highlighting the similarities and differences between them. Moreover, we emphasized the contribution of studying yeast RAS pathways for the understanding of human RAS and how this model organism can contribute to unveil the roles of RAS oncoproteins in the regulation of mechanisms important in the tumorigenic process, like autophagy. PMID:29463063

  9. RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Houcai; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Lixia; Xiong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shuying; Xing, Haiyan; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Wei, Hui; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianxiang, E-mail: wangjx@ihcams.ac.cn

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • RPS27a expression was up-regulated in advanced-phase CML and AL patients. • RPS27a knockdown changed biological property of K562 and K562/G01 cells. • RPS27a knockdown affected Raf/MEK/ERK, P21 and BCL-2 signaling pathways. • RPS27a knockdown may be applicable for new combination therapy in CML patients. - Abstract: Ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27a) could perform extra-ribosomal functions besides imparting a role in ribosome biogenesis and post-translational modifications of proteins. The high expression level of RPS27a was reported in solid tumors, and we found that the expression level of RPS27a was up-regulated in advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute leukemia (AL) patients. In this study, we explored the function of RPS27a in leukemia cells by using CML cell line K562 cells and its imatinib resistant cell line K562/G01 cells. It was observed that the expression level of RPS27a was high in K562 cells and even higher in K562/G01 cells. Further analysis revealed that RPS27a knockdown by shRNA in both K562 and K562G01 cells inhibited the cell viability, induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and increased cell apoptosis induced by imatinib. Combination of shRNA with imatinib treatment could lead to more cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression in RPS27a knockdown cells. Further, it was found that phospho-ERK(p-ERK) and BCL-2 were down-regulated and P21 up-regulated in RPS27a knockdown cells. In conclusion, RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells. It appears that drugs targeting RPS27a combining with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) might represent a novel therapy strategy in TKI resistant CML patients.

  10. Palmitoylation at Cys574 is essential for MT1-MMP to promote cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anilkumar, Narayanapanicker; Uekita, Takamasa; Couchman, John R

    2005-01-01

    of the palmitoylated cysteine relative to LLY573, a motif that interacts with mu2 subunit of adaptor protein 2, is critical for the cell motility-promoting activity of MT1-MMP and its clathrin-mediated internalization. Taken together, palmitoylation of MT1-MMP is one of the key posttranslational modifications......MT1-MMP is a type I transmembrane proteinase that promotes cell migration and invasion. Here, we report that MT1-MMP is palmitoylated at Cys574 in the cytoplasmic domain, and this lipid modification is critical for its promotion of cell migration and clathrin-mediated internalization...... that determines MT1-MMP-dependent cell migration....

  11. Cell recognition molecule L1 promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation through the regulation of cell surface glycosylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Department of Clinical Laboratory, Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China); Huang, Xiaohua [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Department of Clinical Biochemistry, College of Laboratory Medicine, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); An, Yue [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China); Ren, Feng [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Yang, Zara Zhuyun; Zhu, Hongmei; Zhou, Lei [The Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650228 (China); Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Monash University, Clayton 3800 (Australia); He, Xiaowen; Schachner, Melitta [Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience and Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Xiao, Zhicheng, E-mail: zhicheng.xiao@monash.edu [The Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650228 (China); Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Monash University, Clayton 3800 (Australia); Ma, Keli, E-mail: makeli666@aliyun.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Li, Yali, E-mail: yalilipaper@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Department of Anatomy, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119078 (Singapore)

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •Down-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression blocks L1-induced neuronal differentiation of ESCs. •Up-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression in L1-ESCs depends on the activation of PLCγ. •L1 promotes ESCs to differentiate into neuron through regulating cell surface glycosylation. -- Abstract: Cell recognition molecule L1 (CD171) plays an important role in neuronal survival, migration, differentiation, neurite outgrowth, myelination, synaptic plasticity and regeneration after injury. Our previous study has demonstrated that overexpressing L1 enhances cell survival and proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) through promoting the expression of FUT9 and ST3Gal4, which upregulates cell surface sialylation and fucosylation. In the present study, we examined whether sialylation and fucosylation are involved in ESC differentiation through L1 signaling. RNA interference analysis showed that L1 enhanced differentiation of ESCs into neurons through the upregulation of FUT9 and ST3Gal4. Furthermore, blocking the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) signaling pathway with either a specific PLCγ inhibitor or knockdown PLCγ reduced the expression levels of both FUT9 and ST3Gal4 mRNAs and inhibited L1-mediated neuronal differentiation. These results demonstrate that L1 promotes neuronal differentiation from ESCs through the L1-mediated enhancement of FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression.

  12. Cell recognition molecule L1 promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation through the regulation of cell surface glycosylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ying; Huang, Xiaohua; An, Yue; Ren, Feng; Yang, Zara Zhuyun; Zhu, Hongmei; Zhou, Lei; He, Xiaowen; Schachner, Melitta; Xiao, Zhicheng; Ma, Keli; Li, Yali

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Down-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression blocks L1-induced neuronal differentiation of ESCs. •Up-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression in L1-ESCs depends on the activation of PLCγ. •L1 promotes ESCs to differentiate into neuron through regulating cell surface glycosylation. -- Abstract: Cell recognition molecule L1 (CD171) plays an important role in neuronal survival, migration, differentiation, neurite outgrowth, myelination, synaptic plasticity and regeneration after injury. Our previous study has demonstrated that overexpressing L1 enhances cell survival and proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) through promoting the expression of FUT9 and ST3Gal4, which upregulates cell surface sialylation and fucosylation. In the present study, we examined whether sialylation and fucosylation are involved in ESC differentiation through L1 signaling. RNA interference analysis showed that L1 enhanced differentiation of ESCs into neurons through the upregulation of FUT9 and ST3Gal4. Furthermore, blocking the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) signaling pathway with either a specific PLCγ inhibitor or knockdown PLCγ reduced the expression levels of both FUT9 and ST3Gal4 mRNAs and inhibited L1-mediated neuronal differentiation. These results demonstrate that L1 promotes neuronal differentiation from ESCs through the L1-mediated enhancement of FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression

  13. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 signalling promotes goblet cell hyperplasia in airway epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polosukhin, Vasiliy V; Cates, Justin M; Lawson, William E; Milstone, Aaron P; Matafonov, Anton G; Massion, Pierre P; Lee, Jae Woo; Randell, Scott H; Blackwell, Timothy S

    2018-01-01

    Goblet cell hyperplasia is a common feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) airways, but the mechanisms that underlie this epithelial remodelling in COPD are not understood. Based on our previous finding of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) nuclear localization in large airways from patients with COPD, we investigated whether hypoxia-inducible signalling could influence the development of goblet cell hyperplasia. We evaluated large airway samples obtained from 18 lifelong non-smokers and 13 former smokers without COPD, and 45 former smokers with COPD. In these specimens, HIF-1α nuclear staining occurred almost exclusively in COPD patients in areas of airway remodelling. In COPD patients, 93.2 ± 3.9% (range 65 – 100%) of goblet cells were HIF-1α positive in areas of goblet cell hyperplasia, whereas nuclear HIF-1α was not detected in individuals without COPD or in normal-appearing pseudostratified epithelium from COPD patients. To determine the direct effects of hypoxia-inducible signalling on epithelial cell differentiation in vitro, human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) were grown in air-liquid interface cultures under hypoxia (1% O2) or following treatment with a selective HIF-1α stabilizer, (2R)-[(4-biphenylylsulphonyl)amino]-N-hydroxy-3-phenyl-propionamide (BiPS). HBECs grown in hypoxia or with BiPS treatment were characterized by HIF-1α activation, carbonic anhydrase IX expression, mucus-producing cell hyperplasia and increased expression of MUC5AC. Analysis of signal transduction pathways in cells with HIF-1α activation showed increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation without activation of epidermal growth factor receptor, Ras, PI3K-Akt or STAT6. These data indicate an important effect of hypoxia-inducible signalling on airway epithelial cell differentiation and identify a new potential target to limit mucus production in COPD. PMID:21557221

  14. Status of neutron complex of INR RAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grachev, M I; Koptelov, E A; Kravchuk, L V; Matveev, V A; Perekrestenko, A D; Sidorkin, S F [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospekt, Moscow (Russian Federation); Stavissky, Y Y

    2001-03-01

    The neutron complex of INR RAS consists of two sources of neutrons, beam stop, lead slowing down spectrometer and solid state spectrometers. The description of objects and their condition, the program of planned researches, co-operation with other institutes of the Moscow Region, progress reached for last two years are introduced in the article. (author)

  15. Status of neutron complex of INR RAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grachev, M.I.; Koptelov, E.A.; Kravchuk, L.V.; Matveev, V.A.; Perekrestenko, A.D.; Sidorkin, S.F.; Stavissky, Y.Y.

    2001-01-01

    The neutron complex of INR RAS consists of two sources of neutrons, beam stop, lead slowing down spectrometer and solid state spectrometers. The description of objects and their condition, the program of planned researches, co-operation with other institutes of the Moscow Region, progress reached for last two years are introduced in the article. (author)

  16. TP508 accelerates fracture repair by promoting cell growth over cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinmin; Wang Hali; Touma, Edward; Qi Yuchen; Rousseau, Emma; Quigg, Richard J.; Ryaby, James T.

    2007-01-01

    TP508 is a synthetic 23-amino acid peptide representing a receptor-binding domain of human thrombin. We have previously shown that a single injection of TP508 accelerates fracture healing in a rat femoral fracture model. To understand how TP508 acts at the protein level during fracture healing, we compared the translational profiles between saline-control and fractured femur at six time points after TP508 treatment using the second generation of BD Clontech TM Antibody Microarray. Here, we demonstrate that TP508 accelerates fracture healing by modulating expression levels of proteins primarily involved in the functional categories of cell cycle, cellular growth and proliferation, and cell death. The majority of those proteins are physically interrelated and functionally overlapped. The action of those proteins is highlighted by a central theme of promoting cell growth via balance of cell survival over cell death signals. This appears to occur through the stimulation of several bone healing pathways including cell cycle-G1/S checkpoint regulation, apoptosis, JAK/STAT, NF-κB, PDGF, PI3K/AKT, PTEN, and ERK/MAPK

  17. The neural stem cell fate determinant TLX promotes tumorigenesis and genesis of cells resembling glioma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Jun-Kyum; Jeon, Hye-Min; Oh, Se-Yeong; Kim, Sung-Hak; Nam, Do-Hyun; Kim, Hyunggee

    2010-11-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that deregulation of stem cell fate determinants is a hallmark of many types of malignancies. The neural stem cell fate determinant TLX plays a pivotal role in neurogenesis in the adult brain by maintaining neural stem cells. Here, we report a tumorigenic role of TLX in brain tumor initiation and progression. Increased TLX expression was observed in a number of glioma cells and glioma stem cells, and correlated with poor survival of patients with gliomas. Ectopic expression of TLX in the U87MG glioma cell line and Ink4a/Arf-deficient mouse astrocytes (Ink4a/Arf(-/-) astrocytes) induced cell proliferation with a concomitant increase in cyclin D expression, and accelerated foci formation in soft agar and tumor formation in in vivo transplantation assays. Furthermore, overexpression of TLX in Ink4a/Arf(-/-) astrocytes inhibited cell migration and invasion and promoted neurosphere formation and Nestin expression, which are hallmark characteristics of glioma stem cells, under stem cell culture conditions. Our results indicate that TLX is involved in glioma stem cell genesis and represents a potential therapeutic target for this type of malignancy.

  18. Monitoring Ras Interactions with the Nucleotide Exchange Factor Son of Sevenless (Sos) Using Site-specific NMR Reporter Signals and Intrinsic Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Flavell, Liz; Bobby, Romel; Breeze, Alexander L; Embrey, Kevin J; Golovanov, Alexander P

    2016-01-22

    The activity of Ras is controlled by the interconversion between GTP- and GDP-bound forms partly regulated by the binding of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Son of Sevenless (Sos). The details of Sos binding, leading to nucleotide exchange and subsequent dissociation of the complex, are not completely understood. Here, we used uniformly (15)N-labeled Ras as well as [(13)C]methyl-Met,Ile-labeled Sos for observing site-specific details of Ras-Sos interactions in solution. Binding of various forms of Ras (loaded with GDP and mimics of GTP or nucleotide-free) at the allosteric and catalytic sites of Sos was comprehensively characterized by monitoring signal perturbations in the NMR spectra. The overall affinity of binding between these protein variants as well as their selected functional mutants was also investigated using intrinsic fluorescence. The data support a positive feedback activation of Sos by Ras·GTP with Ras·GTP binding as a substrate for the catalytic site of activated Sos more weakly than Ras·GDP, suggesting that Sos should actively promote unidirectional GDP → GTP exchange on Ras in preference of passive homonucleotide exchange. Ras·GDP weakly binds to the catalytic but not to the allosteric site of Sos. This confirms that Ras·GDP cannot properly activate Sos at the allosteric site. The novel site-specific assay described may be useful for design of drugs aimed at perturbing Ras-Sos interactions. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Promotion of breast cancer by β-Hexachlorocyclohexane in MCF10AT1 cells and MMTV-neu mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumura Fumio

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to β-Hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH, a contaminant of the hexachlorohexane pesticide lindane, has been implicated as a risk factor in the development of breast cancers in epidemiological studies. Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated the ability of β-HCH to elicit its actions via a ligand-independent activation of the estrogen receptor through increased c-Neu (= erbB2 or HER-2 expression and kinase activation in both the BG-1 and MCF-7 cell lines. In addition, long term exposure (33 passages to β-HCH was shown to promote the selection of MCF-7 cells which exhibit a more metastatic phenotype. Methods In this current study, we decided to investigate the long-term effects of β-HCH in both the MCF10AT1 cell line which was derived from a normal epithelial cell line by stably transfecting a mutated c-Ha-ras and a MMTV-Neu mouse model for mammary cancer in vivo. MCF10AT1 cells were exposed for 20 passages with β-HCH, 4-OH-Tamoxifen (Tam, or 17-β-estradiol (E2 after which cells were analyzed for proliferation rates and mRNA expression by RT-PCR. In our in vivo studies, MMTV-Neu mice were injected with β-HCH and observed for tumor formation over a 70 week period. Results β-HCH and Tam selected MCF10AT1 cells demonstrated increased mRNA expression of MMP-13 (collagenase-3 a marker of increased invasiveness. β-HCH treatment was also seen to increase the expression in a number of proto-oncogenes (c-Neu, Cyclin D1, p27, cell status markers (Met-1, CK19, and the inflammatory marker NFκB. Previous studies, have demonstrated the role of these markers as evidence of malignant transformations, and further illustrate the ability of β-HCH to be carcinogenic. To demonstrate β-HCH's tumorigenic properties in an in vivo system, we used an MMTV-Neu mouse model. MMTV-Neu is a c-Neu overexpressing strain which has been shown to spontaneously develop mammary tumors at later stages of aging. In this experiment,

  20. CNPY2 promoted the proliferation of renal cell carcinoma cells and increased the expression of TP53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Hidefumi; Ito, Saya; Ueda, Takashi; Morioka, Yukako; Kayukawa, Naruhiro; Ueno, Akihisa; Nakagawa, Hideo; Fujihara, Atsuko; Ushijima, So; Kanazawa, Motohiro; Hongo, Fumiya; Ukimura, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying the progression of the disease are not well understood. The data in this report suggest that canopy FGF signaling regulator 2 (CNPY2) is a promoter of RCC progression. We found that CNPY2 significantly promoted growth of RCC cells and upregulated TP53 gene expression. Although TP53 is widely known as a tumor suppressor, in RCC TP53 promoted tumor cell growth. A typical p53 target gene, CDKN1A, was upregulated by both p53 and CNPY2 in RCC cells, suggesting that CNPY2 increased the expression level of TP53. Consistent with these results, CNPY2 and TP53 expression levels were positively correlated in RCC patients. These findings suggested that CNPY2 promoted cancer cell growth in RCC through regulating TP53 gene expression. - Highlights: • CNPY2 promoted growth of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells. • TP53 expression levels were increased by CNPY2 in RCC cells. • Growth of RCC cells was promoted by TP53. • CNPY2 expression positively correlated with TP53 expression in RCC patients.

  1. β-Catenin promotes cell proliferation, migration, and invasion but induces apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang CM

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chun-ming Yang,1 Shan Ji,2 Yan Li,3 Li-ye Fu,3 Tao Jiang,3 Fan-dong Meng31Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, 2Department of Endocrinology, The Fifth People’s Hospital of Shenyang, 3Department of Biotherapy, Cancer Research Institute, The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, ChinaAbstract: β-Catenin (CTNNB1 gene coding protein is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway that has been shown to play an important role in the formation of certain cancers. Abnormal accumulation of CTNNB1 contributes to most cancers. This research studied the involvement of β-catenin in renal cell carcinoma (RCC cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. Proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis were analyzed by using Cell Counting Kit-8 and by flow cytometry. Migration and invasion assays were measured by transwell analysis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to detect the expression of CTNNB1, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CXCR4, and CCL18 in RCC cell lines. It was found that CTNNB1 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and induced apoptosis of A-498 cells. CTNNB1 overexpression promoted cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and inhibited apoptosis of 786-O cells. Moreover, knockdown of CTNNB1 decreased the levels of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CXCR4, and CCL18 expression, but CTNNB1 overexpression increased the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CXCR4, and CCL18. Further in vivo tumor formation study in nude mice indicated that inhibition of CTNNB1 delayed the progress of tumor formation through inhibiting PCNA and Ki67 expression. These results indicate that CTNNB1 could act as an oncogene and may serve as a promising therapeutic strategy for RCC.Keywords: kidney cancer, oncogene, β-catenin, survival time, tumor migration-related protein

  2. Stat1 phosphorylation determines Ras oncogenicity by regulating p27 kip1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Wang

    Full Text Available Inactivation of p27 Kip1 is implicated in tumorigenesis and has both prognostic and treatment-predictive values for many types of human cancer. The transcription factor Stat1 is essential for innate immunity and tumor immunosurveillance through its ability to act downstream of interferons. Herein, we demonstrate that Stat1 functions as a suppressor of Ras transformation independently of an interferon response. Inhibition of Ras transformation and tumorigenesis requires the phosphorylation of Stat1 at tyrosine 701 but is independent of Stat1 phosphorylation at serine 727. Stat1 induces p27 Kip1 expression in Ras transformed cells at the transcriptional level through mechanisms that depend on Stat1 phosphorylation at tyrosine 701 and activation of Stat3. The tumor suppressor properties of Stat1 in Ras transformation are reversed by the inactivation of p27 Kip1. Our work reveals a novel functional link between Stat1 and p27 Kip1, which act in coordination to suppress the oncogenic properties of activated Ras. It also supports the notion that evaluation of Stat1 phosphorylation in human tumors may prove a reliable prognostic factor for patient outcome and a predictor of treatment response to anticancer therapies aimed at activating Stat1 and its downstream effectors.

  3. Interactions of Ras proteins with the plasma membrane and their roles in signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Sharon; Henis, Yoav I

    2008-01-01

    The complex dynamic structure of the plasma membrane plays critical roles in cellular signaling; interactions with the membrane lipid milieu, spatial segregation within and between cellular membranes and/or targeting to specific membrane-associated scaffolds are intimately involved in many signal transduction pathways. In this review, we focus on the membrane interactions of Ras proteins. These small GTPases play central roles in the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, and their excessive activation is commonly encountered in human tumors. Ras proteins associate with the membrane continuously via C-terminal lipidation and additional interactions in both their inactive and active forms; this association, as well as the targeting of specific Ras isoforms to plasma membrane microdomains and to intracellular organelles, have recently been implicated in Ras signaling and oncogenic potential. We discuss biochemical and biophysical evidence for the roles of specific domains of Ras proteins in mediating their association with the plasma membrane, and consider the potential effects of lateral segregation and interactions with membrane-associated protein assemblies on the signaling outcomes.

  4. miR-11 regulates pupal size of Drosophila melanogaster via directly targeting Ras85D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yao; Li, Shengjie; Jin, Ping; Chen, Liming; Ma, Fei

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs play diverse roles in various physiological processes during Drosophila development. In the present study, we reported that miR-11 regulates pupal size during Drosophila metamorphosis via targeting Ras85D with the following evidences: pupal size was increased in the miR-11 deletion mutant; restoration of miR-11 in the miR-11 deletion mutant rescued the increased pupal size phenotype observed in the miR-11 deletion mutant; ectopic expression of miR-11 in brain insulin-producing cells (IPCs) and whole body shows consistent alteration of pupal size; Dilps and Ras85D expressions were negatively regulated by miR-11 in vivo; miR-11 targets Ras85D through directly binding to Ras85D 3'-untranslated region in vitro; removal of one copy of Ras85D in the miR-11 deletion mutant rescued the increased pupal size phenotype observed in the miR-11 deletion mutant. Thus, our current work provides a novel mechanism of pupal size determination by microRNAs during Drosophila melanogaster metamorphosis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurayoshi, Kenta; Ozono, Eiko; Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P.; Komori, Hideyuki; Ohtani, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • ARF promoter showed higher responsiveness to deregulated E2F activity than the E2F1 promoter. • ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specificity than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. • HSV-TK driven by ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity than that driven by E2F1 promoter. - Abstract: In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter

  6. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurayoshi, Kenta [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Ozono, Eiko [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary, University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom); Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Anschutz Medical Campus, 12800 East 19th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Komori, Hideyuki [Center for Stem Cell Biology, Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ohtani, Kiyoshi, E-mail: btm88939@kwansei.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • ARF promoter showed higher responsiveness to deregulated E2F activity than the E2F1 promoter. • ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specificity than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. • HSV-TK driven by ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity than that driven by E2F1 promoter. - Abstract: In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter

  7. Hydrophilic polyurethane matrix promotes chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalluri, Sandeep M; Krishnan, G Rajesh; Cheah, Calvin; Arzumand, Ayesha; Yuan, Yuan; Richardson, Caley A; Yang, Shuying; Sarkar, Debanjan

    2015-09-01

    Segmental polyurethanes exhibit biphasic morphology and can control cell fate by providing distinct matrix guided signals to increase the chondrogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Polyethylene glycol (PEG) based hydrophilic polyurethanes can deliver differential signals to MSCs through their matrix phases where hard segments are cell-interactive domains and PEG based soft segments are minimally interactive with cells. These coordinated communications can modulate cell-matrix interactions to control cell shape and size for chondrogenesis. Biphasic character and hydrophilicity of polyurethanes with gel like architecture provide a synthetic matrix conducive for chondrogenesis of MSCs, as evidenced by deposition of cartilage-associated extracellular matrix. Compared to monophasic hydrogels, presence of cell interactive domains in hydrophilic polyurethanes gels can balance cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. These results demonstrate the correlation between lineage commitment and the changes in cell shape, cell-matrix interaction, and cell-cell adhesion during chondrogenic differentiation which is regulated by polyurethane phase morphology, and thus, represent hydrophilic polyurethanes as promising synthetic matrices for cartilage regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Local angiotensin II promotes adipogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells through type 2 angiotensin receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Y. Sysoeva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is often associated with high systemic and local activity of renin-angiotensin system (RAS. Mesenchymal stem cells of adipose tissue are the main source of adipocytes. The aim of this study was to clarify how local RAS could control adipose differentiation of human adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs. We examined the distribution of angiotensin receptor expressing cells in human adipose tissue and found that type 1 and type 2 receptors are co-expressed in its stromal compartment, which is known to contain mesenchymal stem cells. To study the expression of receptors specifically in ADSCs we have isolated them from adipose tissue. Up to 99% of cultured ADSCs expressed angiotensin II (AngII receptor type 1 (AT1. Using the analysis of Ca2+ mobilization in single cells we found that only 5.2 ± 2.7% of ADSCs specifically respond to serial Ang II applications via AT1 receptor and expressed this receptor constantly. This AT1const ADSCs subpopulation exhibited increased adipose competency, which was triggered by endogenous AngII. Inhibitory and expression analyses showed that AT1const ADSCs highly co-express AngII type 2 receptor (AT2, which was responsible for increased adipose competency of this ADSC subpopulation.

  9. The miR-599 promotes non-small cell lung cancer cell invasion via SATB2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Wenjun; Wang, Guanghai; Liu, Yiqing; Huang, Zhenglan; Zhang, Caiqing; Ning, Kang; Yu, Cuixiang; Shen, Yajuan; Wang, Minghui; Li, Yuantang; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Bingchang; Zhao, Yaoran

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many types of cancers by negatively regulating gene expression at posttranscriptional level. Here, we identified that miR-599 is up-regulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. It promoted NSCLC cell proliferation by negatively regulating SATB2. In NSCLC cell lines, CCK-8 proliferation assay indicated that the cell proliferation is promoted by miR-599 mimics. Transwell assay showed that miR-599 mimics promoted the invasion and migration of NSCLC cells. Luciferase assays confirmed that miR-599 directly binds to the 3'untranslated region of SATB2, and western blotting showed that miR-599 suppresses the expression of SATB2 at the protein level. This study indicates that miR-599 promotes proliferation and invasion of NSCLC cell lines via SATB2. The miR-599 may represent a potential therapeutic target for NSCLC treatment. - Highlights: • miR-599 is up-regulated in NSCLC. • miR-599 promotes the proliferation and invasion of NSCLC cells. • miR-599 inhibitors inhibits the proliferation and invasion of NSCLC cells. • miR-599 targets 3′ UTR of SATB2 in NSCLC cells. • miR-599 inhibits SATB2 in NSCLC cells.

  10. Lack of HXK2 Induces Localization of Active Ras in Mitochondria and Triggers Apoptosis in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Amigoni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that activated Ras proteins are localized to the plasma membrane and in the nucleus in wild-type cells growing exponentially on glucose, while in the hxk2Δ strain they accumulated mainly in mitochondria. An aberrant accumulation of activated Ras in these organelles was previously reported and correlated to mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of ROS, and cell death. Here we show that addition of acetic acid to wild-type cells results in a rapid recruitment of Ras-GTP from the nucleus and the plasma membrane to the mitochondria, providing a further proof that Ras proteins might be involved in programmed cell death. Moreover, we show that Hxk2 protects against apoptosis in S. cerevisiae. In particular, cells lacking HXK2 and showing a constitutive accumulation of activated Ras at the mitochondria are more sensitive to acetic-acid-induced programmed cell death compared to the wild type strain. Indeed, deletion of HXK2 causes an increase of apoptotic cells with several morphological and biochemical changes that are typical of apoptosis, including DNA fragmentation, externalization of phosphatidylserine, and ROS production. Finally, our results suggest that apoptosis induced by lack of Hxk2 may not require the activation of Yca1, the metacaspase homologue identified in yeast.

  11. Lack of HXK2 induces localization of active Ras in mitochondria and triggers apoptosis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigoni, Loredana; Martegani, Enzo; Colombo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    We recently showed that activated Ras proteins are localized to the plasma membrane and in the nucleus in wild-type cells growing exponentially on glucose, while in the hxk2Δ strain they accumulated mainly in mitochondria. An aberrant accumulation of activated Ras in these organelles was previously reported and correlated to mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of ROS, and cell death. Here we show that addition of acetic acid to wild-type cells results in a rapid recruitment of Ras-GTP from the nucleus and the plasma membrane to the mitochondria, providing a further proof that Ras proteins might be involved in programmed cell death. Moreover, we show that Hxk2 protects against apoptosis in S. cerevisiae. In particular, cells lacking HXK2 and showing a constitutive accumulation of activated Ras at the mitochondria are more sensitive to acetic-acid-induced programmed cell death compared to the wild type strain. Indeed, deletion of HXK2 causes an increase of apoptotic cells with several morphological and biochemical changes that are typical of apoptosis, including DNA fragmentation, externalization of phosphatidylserine, and ROS production. Finally, our results suggest that apoptosis induced by lack of Hxk2 may not require the activation of Yca1, the metacaspase homologue identified in yeast.

  12. Interaction between the p21ras GTPase activating protein and the insulin receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, G.J.; Medema, R.H.; Burgering, B.M.T.; Clark, R.; McCormick, F.; Bos, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the involvement of the p21ras-GTPase activating protein (GAP) in insulin-induced signal transduction. In cells overexpressing the insulin receptor, we did not observe association between GAP and the insulin receptor after insulin treatment nor the phosphorylation of GAP on tyrosine

  13. Regulation and Selectivity of Exchange Factors for G-proteins of the Ras-family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popovic, M.

    2013-01-01

    Small G-proteins are important regulators of the cellular signaling pathways. Among them, members of the Ras family of small G-proteins regulate processes such as cell differentiation, growth, migration, transport and adhesion, and their deregulation may lead to various diseases. Small G-proteins

  14. Sorafenib-induced defective autophagy promotes cell death by necroptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Baltatzis, George; Fonseca, Pedro; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Lennartsson, Lena; Bj?rklund, Ann-Charlotte; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Grand?r, Dan; Egevad, Lars; Nilsson, Sten; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the main cytoprotective mechanisms that cancer cells deploy to withstand the cytotoxic stress and survive the lethal damage induced by anti-cancer drugs. However, under specific conditions, autophagy may, directly or indirectly, induce cell death. In our study, treatment of the Atg5-deficient DU145 prostate cancer cells, with the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sorafenib, induces mitochondrial damage, autophagy and cell death. Molecular inhibition of autophagy by silencin...

  15. The Adenovirus E1A C Terminus Suppresses a Delayed Antiviral Response and Modulates RAS Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemke, Nathan R; Berk, Arnold J

    2017-12-13

    The N-terminal half of adenovirus e1a assembles multimeric complexes with host proteins that repress innate immune responses and force host cells into S-phase. In contrast, the functions of e1a's C-terminal interactions with FOXK, DCAF7, and CtBP are unknown. We found that these interactions modulate RAS signaling, and that a single e1a molecule must bind all three of these host proteins to suppress activation of a subset of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). These ISGs were otherwise induced in primary respiratory epithelial cells at 12 hr p.i. This delayed activation of ISGs required IRF3 and coincided with an ∼10-fold increase in IRF3 from protein stabilization. The induced IRF3 bound to chromatin and localized to the promoters of activated ISGs. While IRF3, STAT1/2, and IRF9 all greatly increased in concentration, there were no corresponding mRNA increases, suggesting that e1a regulates the stabilities of these key activators of innate immune responses, as shown directly for IRF3. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rac1 acts in conjunction with Nedd4 and dishevelled-1 to promote maturation of cell-cell contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Nethe (Micha); B.J. de Kreuk (Bart-Jan); D.V.F. Tauriello (Daniele); E.C. Anthony (Eloise); B. Snoek (Barbara); T. Stumpel (Thomas); M. Salinas; K. Maurice (Karelle); D. Geerts (Dirk); A.M. Deelder (André); P. Hensbergen (Paul); P.L. Hordijk (Peter )

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe Rho-GTPase Rac1 promotes actin polymerization and membrane protrusion that mediate initial contact and subsequent maturation of cell-cell junctions. Here we report that Rac1 associates with the ubiquitin-protein ligase neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated 4

  17. Illegitimate WNT signaling promotes proliferation of multiple myeloma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derksen, Patrick W. B.; Tjin, Esther; Meijer, Helen P.; Klok, Melanie D.; Mac Gillavry, Harold D.; van Oers, Marinus H. J.; Lokhorst, Henk M.; Bloem, Andries C.; Clevers, Hans; Nusse, Roel; van der Neut, Ronald; Spaargaren, Marcel; Pals, Steven T.

    2004-01-01

    The unrestrained growth of tumor cells is generally attributed to mutations in essential growth control genes, but tumor cells are also influenced by signals from the environment. In multiple myeloma (MM), the factors and signals coming from the bone marrow microenvironment are possibly even essential for the growth of the tumor cells. As targets for intervention, these signals may be equally important as mutated oncogenes. Given their oncogenic potential, WNT signals form a class of paracrine growth factors that could act to influence MM cell growth. In this paper, we report that MM cells have hallmarks of active WNT signaling, whereas the cells have not undergone detectable mutations in WNT signaling genes such as adenomatous polyposis coli and β-catenin (CTNNB1). We show that the malignant MM plasma cells overexpress β-catenin, including its N-terminally unphosphorylated form, suggesting active β-catenin/T cell factor-mediated transcription. Further accumulation and nuclear localization of β-catenin, and/or increased cell proliferation, was achieved by stimulation of WNT signaling with either Wnt3a, LiCl, or the constitutively active S33Y mutant of β-catenin. In contrast, by blocking WNT signaling by dominant-negative T cell factor, we can interfere with the growth of MM cells. We therefore suggest that MM cells are dependent on an active WNT signal, which may have important implications for the management of this incurable form of cancer. PMID:15067127

  18. Insulin resistance in vascular endothelial cells promotes intestinal tumour formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X; Häring, M-F; Rathjen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    in vascular endothelial cells. Strikingly, these mice had 42% more intestinal tumours than controls, no change in tumour angiogenesis, but increased expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in primary culture of tumour endothelial cells. Insulin decreased VCAM-1 expression and leukocyte...... adhesion in quiescent tumour endothelial cells with intact insulin receptors and partly prevented increases in VCAM-1 and leukocyte adhesion after treatment with tumour necrosis factor-α. Knockout of insulin receptors in endothelial cells also increased leukocyte adhesion in mesenteric venules...

  19. Promoter motifs required for c-mpl gene expression induced by thrombopoietin in CMK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunohara, Masataka; Sato, Iwao; Morikawa, Shigeru

    2017-11-30

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) and its receptor, c-Mpl, are the central regulators of megakaryocyte development and platelet production and are also crucial to regulate megakaryocytopoiesis. TPO remarkably elevated c-mpl promoter activity, while the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, GF109203, H7 and Calphostin C, clearly reduced the steady level of its promoter activity.  In the present study, motifs crucial for c-mpl promoter activity induced by TPO treatment have been analyzed using a human megakaryoblastic cell line, CMK. Destruction of the -107Sp1 and the -57Sp1 sites in the c-mpl promoter enhancer region resulted in decrease of the promoter activity by 53.1% and 64.4%, respectively, and destruction of -69Ets and -28Ets elements dramatically decreased the promoter activity by 96.4% and 87.8%, respectively, while mutation of -77GATA moderately reduced the activity by 31.4%. The result was in agreement with our previous report that showed the crucial motifs in the c-mpl promoter for the promoter activity induced by PMA-treatment. This indicates that TPO-induced activation of the c-mpl promoter activity is fully modulated by transcription through a PKC-dependent pathway and the two Sp1 and two Ets motifs are crucial for the activation of the c-mpl promoter activity rather than a GATA motif in the c-mpl promoter of CMK cells.