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Sample records for rare diseases clinical

  1. Creating an effective clinical registry for rare diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Agnolo, Hedwig MA; Kievit, Wietske; Andrade, Raul J; Karlsen, Tom Hemming; Wedemeyer, Heiner

    2015-01-01

    The exposure of clinicians to patients with rare gastrointestinal diseases is limited. This hurts clinical studies, which impedes accumulation of scientific knowledge on the natural disease course, treatment outcomes and prognosis in these patients. An excellent method to detect patterns on an aggregate level that would not be possible to discover in individual cases, is a registry study. This paper aims to describe a template to create a successful international registry for rare diseases. We focus mainly on rare hepatic diseases, but lessons from this paper serve other fields in medicine, as well. PMID:27403298

  2. Creating an effective clinical registry for rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agnolo, Hedwig Ma; Kievit, Wietske; Andrade, Raul J; Karlsen, Tom Hemming; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Drenth, Joost Ph

    2016-06-01

    The exposure of clinicians to patients with rare gastrointestinal diseases is limited. This hurts clinical studies, which impedes accumulation of scientific knowledge on the natural disease course, treatment outcomes and prognosis in these patients. An excellent method to detect patterns on an aggregate level that would not be possible to discover in individual cases, is a registry study. This paper aims to describe a template to create a successful international registry for rare diseases. We focus mainly on rare hepatic diseases, but lessons from this paper serve other fields in medicine, as well.

  3. Clinical trial designs for rare diseases: Studies developed and discussed by the International Rare Cancers Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaerts, Jan; Sydes, Matthew R.; Keat, Nicola; McConnell, Andrea; Benson, Al; Ho, Alan; Roth, Arnaud; Fortpied, Catherine; Eng, Cathy; Peckitt, Clare; Coens, Corneel; Pettaway, Curtis; Arnold, Dirk; Hall, Emma; Marshall, Ernie; Sclafani, Francesco; Hatcher, Helen; Earl, Helena; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Paul, James; Blay, Jean-Yves; Whelan, Jeremy; Panageas, Kathy; Wheatley, Keith; Harrington, Kevin; Licitra, Lisa; Billingham, Lucinda; Hensley, Martee; McCabe, Martin; Patel, Poulam M.; Carvajal, Richard; Wilson, Richard; Glynne-Jones, Rob; McWilliams, Rob; Leyvraz, Serge; Rao, Sheela; Nicholson, Steve; Filiaci, Virginia; Negrouk, Anastassia; Lacombe, Denis; Dupont, Elisabeth; Pauporté, Iris; Welch, John J.; Law, Kate; Trimble, Ted; Seymour, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background The past three decades have seen rapid improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of most cancers and the most important contributor has been research. Progress in rare cancers has been slower, not least because of the challenges of undertaking research. Settings The International Rare Cancers Initiative (IRCI) is a partnership which aims to stimulate and facilitate the development of international clinical trials for patients with rare cancers. It is focused on interventional – usually randomised – clinical trials with the clear goal of improving outcomes for patients. The key challenges are organisational and methodological. A multi-disciplinary workshop to review the methods used in ICRI portfolio trials was held in Amsterdam in September 2013. Other as-yet unrealised methods were also discussed. Results The IRCI trials are each presented to exemplify possible approaches to designing credible trials in rare cancers. Researchers may consider these for use in future trials and understand the choices made for each design. Interpretation Trials can be designed using a wide array of possibilities. There is no ‘one size fits all’ solution. In order to make progress in the rare diseases, decisions to change practice will have to be based on less direct evidence from clinical trials than in more common diseases. PMID:25542058

  4. Innovative measures to combat rare diseases in China: The national rare diseases registry system, larger-scale clinical cohort studies, and studies in combination with precision medicine research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Peipei; He, Jiangjiang; Li, Fen; Jin, Chunlin

    2017-01-01

    Summary China is facing the great challenge of treating the world's largest rare disease population, an estimated 16 million patients with rare diseases. One effort offering promise has been a pilot national project that was launched in 2013 and that focused on 20 representative rare diseases. Another government-supported special research program on rare diseases – the “Rare Diseases Clinical Cohort Study” – was launched in December 2016. According to the plan for this research project, the unified National Rare Diseases Registry System of China will be established as of 2020, and a large-scale cohort study will be conducted from 2016 to 2020. The project plans to develop 109 technical standards, to establish and improve 2 national databases of rare diseases – a multi-center clinical database and a biological sample library, and to conduct studies on more than 50,000 registered cases of 50 different rare diseases. More importantly, this study will be combined with the concept of precision medicine. Chinese population-specific basic information on rare diseases, clinical information, and genomic information will be integrated to create a comprehensive predictive model with a follow-up database system and a model to evaluate prognosis. This will provide the evidence for accurate classification, diagnosis, treatment, and estimation of prognosis for rare diseases in China. Numerous challenges including data standardization, protecting patient privacy, big data processing, and interpretation of genetic information still need to be overcome, but research prospects offer great promise.

  5. Elastoma: clinical and histopathological aspects of a rare disease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Marina Gagheggi; Enokihara, Milvia Maria Simões e Silva; Seize, Maria Bandeira de Melo Paiva; Marcassi, Aline Pantano; Piazza, Christiane Affonso De Donato; Cestari, Silmara da Costa Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Elastoma is a connective tissue nevus characterized by changes in elastic fibers. It can be congenital or acquired, and is usually diagnosed before puberty. Associated with osteopoikilosis, it is known as Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome. Histopathology with specific staining for elastic fibers is critical for a diagnostic conclusion. This report describes the case of a 7-year-old male patient with lesions diagnosed as elastoma, with absence of bone changes in the radiological imaging. This study aims to report the clinical presentation and histological examination of such unusual disease.

  6. THE RARE DISEASES CLINICAL RESEARCH NETWORK CONTACT REGISTRY UPDATE: FEATURES AND FUNCTIONALITY

    OpenAIRE

    Richesson, Rachel; Sutphen, Rebecca; Shereff, Denise; Krischer, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN) Contact Registry has grown in size and scope since it was first reported in this journal in 2007. In this paper, we reflect on our seven years’ experience developing and expanding the RDCRN Contact Registry to include many more rare diseases. We present the functional and data requirements that motivated this registry, and the new features and policies that have been developed since. Given the high costs and long-term commitme...

  7. Clinical trial network for the promotion of clinical research for rare diseases in Japan: muscular dystrophy clinical trial network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Reiko; Ogata, Katsuhisa; Tamaura, Akemi; Kimura, En; Ohata, Maki; Takeshita, Eri; Nakamura, Harumasa; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Komaki, Hirofumi

    2016-07-11

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most commonly inherited neuromuscular disease. Therapeutic agents for the treatment of rare disease, namely "orphan drugs", have recently drawn the attention of researchers and pharmaceutical companies. To ensure the successful conduction of clinical trials to evaluate novel treatments for patients with rare diseases, an appropriate infrastructure is needed. One of the effective solutions for the lack of infrastructure is to establish a network of rare diseases. To accomplish the conduction of clinical trials in Japan, the Muscular dystrophy clinical trial network (MDCTN) was established by the clinical research group for muscular dystrophy, including the National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, as well as national and university hospitals, all which have a long-standing history of research cooperation. Thirty-one medical institutions (17 national hospital organizations, 10 university hospitals, 1 national center, 2 public hospitals, and 1 private hospital) belong to this network and collaborate to facilitate clinical trials. The Care and Treatment Site Registry (CTSR) calculates and reports the proportion of patients with neuromuscular diseases in the cooperating sites. In total, there are 5,589 patients with neuromuscular diseases in Japan and the proportion of patients with each disease is as follows: DMD, 29 %; myotonic dystrophy type 1, 23 %; limb girdle muscular dystrophy, 11 %; Becker muscular dystrophy, 10 %. We work jointly to share updated health care information and standardized evaluations of clinical outcomes as well. The collaboration with the patient registry (CTSR), allows the MDCTN to recruit DMD participants with specific mutations and conditions, in a remarkably short period of time. Counting with a network that operates at a national level is important to address the corresponding national issues. Thus, our network will be able to contribute with international research activity, which can lead to

  8. Wide disparity of clinical genetics services and EU rare disease research funding across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Sally Ann; Borg, Isabella

    2016-04-01

    The origins of clinical genetics services vary throughout Europe with some emerging from paediatric medicine and others from an academic laboratory setting. In 2011, the cross-border patients' rights directive recommended the creation of European Research Networks (ERNs) to improve patient care throughout EU. In 2013, the EU recommendation on the care for rare diseases came into place. The process of designating EU centres of expertise in rare diseases is being implemented to allow centres to enter ERNs. Hence, this is an opportune time to reflect on the current status of genetic services and research funding throughout Europe as 80 % of rare diseases have a genetic origin. Our aims were to determine (a) whether EU countries are prepared in terms of appropriate clinical genetic staffing to fulfil the European Union Committee of Experts on Rare Diseases (EUCERD) criteria that will allow national centres to be designated as centres of expertise, (b) which EU countries are successful in grant submissions to EU rare disease research funding and (c) country of origin of researchers from the EU presenting their research work as a spoken presentation at the European Society of Human Genetics annual conference. Our results show there is wide disparity of staffing levels per head of population in clinical genetics units throughout Europe. EU rare disease research funding is not being distributed equitably and the opportunity to present research is skewed with many countries not achieving spoken presentations despite abstract submissions. Inequity in the care of patients with rare diseases exists in Europe. Many countries will struggle to designate centres of expertise as their staffing mix and levels will not meet the EUCERD criteria which may prevent them from entering ERNs. The establishment of a small number of centres of expertise centrally, which is welcome, should not occur at the expense of an overall improvement in EU rare disease patient care. Caution should be

  9. The hidden Niemann-Pick type C patient : Clinical niches for a rare inherited metabolic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksz, Christian J.; Anheim, Mathieu; Bauer, Peter; Bonnot, Olivier; Chakrapani, Anupam; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; de Koning, Tom J.; Degtyareva, Anna; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Doss, Sarah; Duning, Thomas; Giunti, Paola; Iodice, Rosa; Johnston, Tracy; Kelly, Dierdre; Kluenemann, Hans-Hermann; Lorenzl, Stefan; Padovani, Alessandro; Pocovi, Miguel; Synofzik, Matthis; Terblanche, Alta; Bergh, Florian Then; Topcu, Meral; Tranchant, Christine; Walterfang, Mark; Velten, Christian; Kolb, Stefan A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is a rare, inherited neurodegenerative disease of impaired intracellular lipid trafficking. Clinical symptoms are highly heterogeneous, including neurological, visceral, or psychiatric manifestations. The incidence of NP-C is under-estimated due to unde

  10. Not so Rare, Rare Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Munter, Beverly L.; Chaudhry, Ramiz A.

    2008-01-01

    A rare disease or condition is defined by federal legislation such that it: (1) affects less than 200,000 persons in the U.S.; or (2) affects more than 200,000 persons in the U.S. but for which there is no reasonable expectation that the cost of developing and making available in the U.S. a drug for such disease or condition will be recovered from…

  11. Clinical Utility of Whole-Exome Sequencing in Rare Diseases: Galactosialidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Rebecca; Penney, Samantha; Lupski, James R.; Hopkin, Robert J.; Sutton, V. Reid

    2014-01-01

    Rare genetic disorders can go undiagnosed for years as the entire spectrum of phenotypic variation is not well characterized given the reduced number of patients reported in the literature and the low frequency at which these occur. Moreover, the current paradigm for clinical diagnostics defines disease diagnosis by a specified spectrum of phenotypic findings; when such parameters are either missing, or other findings not usually observed are seen, the phenotype driven approach to diagnosis may result in a specific etiological diagnosis not even being considered within the differential diagnosis. The novel implementation of genomic sequencing approaches to investigate rare genetic disorders is allowing not only the discovery of new genes, but also the phenotypic expansion of known Mendelian genetic disorders. Here we report the detailed clinical assessment of a patient with a rare genetic disorder with undefined molecular diagnosis. We applied whole-exome sequencing to this patient and unaffected parents in order to identify the molecular cause of her disorder. We identified compound heterozygous mutations in the CTSA gene, responsible for causing galactosialidosis; the molecular diagnosis was further confirmed by biochemical studies. This report expands on the clinical spectrum of this rare lysosomal disorder and exemplifies how genomic approaches are further elucidating the characterization and understanding of genetic diseases. PMID:24769197

  12. 26 CFR 1.28-1 - Credit for clinical testing expenses for certain drugs for rare diseases or conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... muscular dystrophies; Huntington's disease, a hereditary chorea; myoclonus; Tourette's syndrome; and... drugs for rare diseases or conditions. 1.28-1 Section 1.28-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... clinical testing expenses for certain drugs for rare diseases or conditions. (a) General rule. Section 28...

  13. PATIENT REGISTRIES FOR RARE DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Deliverska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rare diseases are diseases with a particularly low prevalence. The specificities of rare diseases - limited number of patients and scarcity of relevant knowledge and expertise - single them out as a distinctive domain of very high added value. The international reference for classification of diseases and conditions is the International Classification of Diseases (ICD, coordinated by the World Health Organization (WHO. Patient registries and databases constitute key instruments for the development of clinical research in the field of rare diseases. Rare disease registries include not only diseases that are inherently rare, but also common diseases that are rare in specific populations, especially those defined by demographics. Disease registries create the possibility of assessing the long-term safety and benefit of different treatments, perhaps leading to treatment algorithms that allow more choices for patients and clinicians.

  14. The hidden Niemann-Pick type C patient: clinical niches for a rare inherited metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksz, Christian J; Anheim, Mathieu; Bauer, Peter; Bonnot, Olivier; Chakrapani, Anupam; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; de Koning, Tom J; Degtyareva, Anna; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Doss, Sarah; Duning, Thomas; Giunti, Paola; Iodice, Rosa; Johnston, Tracy; Kelly, Dierdre; Klünemann, Hans-Hermann; Lorenzl, Stefan; Padovani, Alessandro; Pocovi, Miguel; Synofzik, Matthis; Terblanche, Alta; Then Bergh, Florian; Topçu, Meral; Tranchant, Christine; Walterfang, Mark; Velten, Christian; Kolb, Stefan A

    2017-05-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is a rare, inherited neurodegenerative disease of impaired intracellular lipid trafficking. Clinical symptoms are highly heterogeneous, including neurological, visceral, or psychiatric manifestations. The incidence of NP-C is under-estimated due to under-recognition or misdiagnosis across a wide range of medical fields. New screening and diagnostic methods provide an opportunity to improve detection of unrecognized cases in clinical sub-populations associated with a higher risk of NP-C. Patients in these at-risk groups ("clinical niches") have symptoms that are potentially related to NP-C, but go unrecognized due to other, more prevalent clinical features, and lack of awareness regarding underlying metabolic causes. Twelve potential clinical niches identified by clinical experts were evaluated based on a comprehensive, non-systematic review of literature published to date. Relevant publications were identified by targeted literature searches of EMBASE and PubMed using key search terms specific to each niche. Articles published in English or other European languages up to 2016 were included. Several niches were found to be relevant based on available data: movement disorders (early-onset ataxia and dystonia), organic psychosis, early-onset cholestasis/(hepato)splenomegaly, cases with relevant antenatal findings or fetal abnormalities, and patients affected by family history, consanguinity, and endogamy. Potentially relevant niches requiring further supportive data included: early-onset cognitive decline, frontotemporal dementia, parkinsonism, and chronic inflammatory CNS disease. There was relatively weak evidence to suggest amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or progressive supranuclear gaze palsy as potential niches. Several clinical niches have been identified that harbor patients at increased risk of NP-C.

  15. Rare Disorders and Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umlauf, Mary; Monaco, Jana; FitzZaland, Mary; FitzZaland, Richard; Novitsky, Scott

    2008-01-01

    According to the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD), a rare or "orphan" disease affects fewer than 200,000 people in the United States. There are more than 6,000 rare disorders that, taken together, affect approximately 25 million Americans. "Exceptional Parent" ("EP") recognizes that when a disorder affects a child or adult, it…

  16. Bayesian methods for the design and interpretation of clinical trials in very rare diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Lisa V; Whitehead, John; Eleftheriou, Despina; Brogan, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the design and interpretation of clinical trials comparing treatments for conditions so rare that worldwide recruitment efforts are likely to yield total sample sizes of 50 or fewer, even when patients are recruited over several years. For such studies, the sample size needed to meet a conventional frequentist power requirement is clearly infeasible. Rather, the expectation of any such trial has to be limited to the generation of an improved understanding of treatment options. We propose a Bayesian approach for the conduct of rare-disease trials comparing an experimental treatment with a control where patient responses are classified as a success or failure. A systematic elicitation from clinicians of their beliefs concerning treatment efficacy is used to establish Bayesian priors for unknown model parameters. The process of determining the prior is described, including the possibility of formally considering results from related trials. As sample sizes are small, it is possible to compute all possible posterior distributions of the two success rates. A number of allocation ratios between the two treatment groups can be considered with a view to maximising the prior probability that the trial concludes recommending the new treatment when in fact it is non-inferior to control. Consideration of the extent to which opinion can be changed, even by data from the best feasible design, can help to determine whether such a trial is worthwhile. © 2014 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24957522

  17. Bayesian methods for the design and interpretation of clinical trials in very rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Lisa V; Whitehead, John; Eleftheriou, Despina; Brogan, Paul

    2014-10-30

    This paper considers the design and interpretation of clinical trials comparing treatments for conditions so rare that worldwide recruitment efforts are likely to yield total sample sizes of 50 or fewer, even when patients are recruited over several years. For such studies, the sample size needed to meet a conventional frequentist power requirement is clearly infeasible. Rather, the expectation of any such trial has to be limited to the generation of an improved understanding of treatment options. We propose a Bayesian approach for the conduct of rare-disease trials comparing an experimental treatment with a control where patient responses are classified as a success or failure. A systematic elicitation from clinicians of their beliefs concerning treatment efficacy is used to establish Bayesian priors for unknown model parameters. The process of determining the prior is described, including the possibility of formally considering results from related trials. As sample sizes are small, it is possible to compute all possible posterior distributions of the two success rates. A number of allocation ratios between the two treatment groups can be considered with a view to maximising the prior probability that the trial concludes recommending the new treatment when in fact it is non-inferior to control. Consideration of the extent to which opinion can be changed, even by data from the best feasible design, can help to determine whether such a trial is worthwhile.

  18. 26 CFR 1.28-0 - Credit for clinical testing expenses for certain drugs for rare diseases or conditions; table of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... drugs for rare diseases or conditions; table of contents. 1.28-0 Section 1.28-0 Internal Revenue... Taxable Year § 1.28-0 Credit for clinical testing expenses for certain drugs for rare diseases or... 505(i). (d) Definition and special rules. (1) Definition of “rare disease or condition”. (i)...

  19. RARE DISEASES AND GENETIC DISCRIMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Yaneva – Deliverska

    2011-04-01

    physicians (not enough physicians involved in rare diseases clinical trials, and the absence of treatment consensus recommendations.It is fundamental to realise that rare diseases can affect any family at any time. It is not just “something terrible that happens to other people”. It is a very cruel reality that can happen to anyone, either when having a child or in the course of one’s own life.In fact, the terminology “rare diseases” only highlights the characteristic of rarity of the complex and heterogeneous mosaic of an estimated 7,000 life-threatening and heavily debilitating conditions.The rare diseases for which a simple and effective preventive treatment is available are being screened for, as part of public health policy. But this is not enough, and it is essential for public authorities to consider rare diseases as a Public Health priority and take action to concretely support patients and families affected by rare diseases.As underlined in the Background Paper on Orphan Diseases for the World Health Organisation Report on Priority Medicines for Europe and the World, “despite the growing public awareness of rare diseases in the last one or two decades, there are still many gaps in knowledge related to the development of treatment for rare diseases. Policymakers have to realise that rare diseases are a crucial health issue for about 30 million people in the EU”.A good medication for rare disease patients is a medication that is both available in the country where they live and affordable. If one of these two factors is missing, the drug is of little use.Personalized medicine however is an emerging term for a medical philosophy that uses a person’s individual clinical, genetic, genomic, and environmental information to tailor a treatment plan that will maximize efficacy and safety for that individual. While the technology offers much promise, it also is also challenged by some ethical and social questions in both its clinical application and in its

  20. A clinical pharmacology-regulatory perspective on the approval of drugs for rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashaw, E D

    2016-10-01

    Orphan drugs or drugs for rare diseases represents a particular regulatory conundrum. There is a desperate need for effective therapies for these patients, who have been historically underserved by the drug development community. However, there is also a need to make sure these therapies are both safe and effective. In response, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has evolved new approaches to facilitate drug development in this area.

  1. A Rare Clinical Presentation of Giant Bilateral Labial Fibroepithelial Stromal Polyps in Patient with Psoriasis Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Filiz Avsar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroepithelial polyps (FEPs are rarely seen lesions of the lower female genital tract with polypoid proliferations of stroma. These tumors usually present in the vulvovaginal region of the reproductive aged women. In this presentation, we report a case of a psoriatic woman who developed unusual multiple polypoid lesions approximately 15 cm in size arising from both left and right labia minora and unique connection of FEPs with psoriasis disease.

  2. Rare diseases and orphan drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica Taruscio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the Regulation (EC N. 141/2000 of the European Parliament and of the Council, rare diseases are life-threatening or chronically debilitating conditions, affecting no more than 5 in 10 000 persons in the European Community. It is estimated that between 6000 to 8000 distinct rare diseases affect up to 6% of the total EU population. Therefore, these conditions can be considered rare if taken individually but they affect a significant proportion of the European population when considered as a single group. Several initiatives have been undertaken at international, European and national level to tackle public health as well as research issues related to the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and surveillance of these diseases. The development of innovative and effective medical products for their diagnosis and treatment is frequently hampered by several factors, including the limited knowledge of their natural history, the difficulties in setting up clinical studies due to the limited numbers of patients affected by a specific disease, the weak interest of sponsors due to the restricted market opportunities. Therefore, incentives and other facilitations have been adopted in many parts of the world, including in the EU, in order to facilitate the development and commercialization of diagnostic tools and treatments devoted to rare diseases. This paper illustrates mainly the European initiatives and will discuss the problematic and controversial aspects surrounding orphan drugs. Finally, activities and measures adopted in Italy are presented.

  3. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis: Rare presentation of rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan S Valsangkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulomatous inflammation of the prostate is a rare type of inflammation of the prostate. It is of various types, with the non-specific type of granulomatous inflammation being the most common. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is a rare type of granulomatous prostatitis of which very few cases have been reported. Histologically it is characterized by the presence of pale-looking foamy macrophages. It can be an incidental finding after transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP, although it may mimic prostatic malignancy clinically, biochemically, and rarely histologically. We report a rare case of xanthogranulomatous prostatitis which presented as a prostatic abscess, a presentation never reported in literature so far. The patient was managed with TURP.

  4. The clinical utility of whole-exome sequencing in the context of rare diseases - the changing tides of medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, M T; Charlebois, K

    2015-10-01

    Whole-exome sequencing (WES) carries the potential to facilitate the identification of disease causing genes. This is particularly relevant concerning rare diseases, which proves particularly difficult for physicians to diagnose. However, the complexity of this technology renders its applicability onto the clinical setting uncertain. Our study thus aims to understand physicians' perspectives regarding the clinical utility of WES, particularly for providing a diagnosis for patients with rare diseases. Ten semi-structured interviews were conducted with physicians with experience and familiarity with WES, and the major themes that emerged from our interviews were (i) the relevance of WES in diagnosing patients with rare diseases (appropriateness); (ii) the cost-effectiveness of WES (accessibility), (iii) the practical issues related to the clinical implementation of WES (practicability); and (iv) ethical, legal and social issues (acceptability). Our study highlights how the clinical implementation of WES presents additional challenges where rare diseases are taken into consideration.

  5. Clinical exome sequencing for cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia uncovers novel gene–disease associations and unanticipated rare disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Schouten, Meyke I; de Bot, Susanne T; Vermeer, Sascha; Meijer, Rowdy; Pennings, Maartje; Gilissen, Christian; Willemsen, Michèl AAP; Scheffer, Hans; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia (CA) and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are two of the most prevalent motor disorders with extensive locus and allelic heterogeneity. We implemented clinical exome sequencing, followed by filtering data for a ‘movement disorders' gene panel, as a generic test to increase variant detection in 76 patients with these disorders. Segregation analysis or phenotypic re-evaluation was utilized to substantiate findings. Disease-causing variants were identified in 9 of 28 CA patients, and 8 of 48 HSP patients. In addition, possibly disease-causing variants were identified in 1 and 8 of the remaining CA and HSP patients, respectively. In 10 patients with CA, the total disease-causing or possibly disease-causing variants were detected in 8 different genes, whereas 16 HSP patients had such variants in 12 different genes. In the majority of cases, the identified variants were compatible with the patient phenotype. Interestingly, in some patients variants were identified in genes hitherto related to other movement disorders, such as TH variants in two siblings with HSP. In addition, rare disorders were uncovered, for example, a second case of HSP caused by a VCP variant. For some patients, exome sequencing results had implications for treatment, exemplified by the favorable L-DOPA treatment in a patient with HSP due to ATP13A2 variants (Parkinson type 9). Thus, clinical exome sequencing in this cohort of CA and HSP patients suggests broadening of disease spectra, revealed novel gene–disease associations, and uncovered unanticipated rare disorders. In addition, clinical exome sequencing results have shown their value in guiding practical patient management. PMID:27165006

  6. Xanthogranulomatous cystitis: A rare clinical entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Santosh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Xanthogranulomatous cystitis (XC is a rare benign disease of unknown etiology. A case of XC in a 30-year-old male is presented due to sparcity of such case report in medical literature. Patient evaluation included clinical, biochemical and radiological studies before treatment. Histological study revealed the rare diagnosis. Patient was asymptomatic at eight weeks follow-up after treatment.

  7. Rare case of Hirayama's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Bharat Gala

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hirayama's disease is a rare benign neurological disorder also known as monomelic amyotrophy, Sobue disease, Juvenile Muscular Atrophy of Distal Upper Extremity (JMADUE. It mainly affects young males in their second or third decades and is most commonly seen in Asian countries like Japan, Malaysia and India. In majority of the cases the cause of the disease is unknown. An 18 year male came with weakness in his right hand and forearm since 1 year. Examination revealed weakness and wasting of muscles of forearm and hand without lower limb involvement and normal deep tendon reflexes. MRI showed focal short segment hyperintense signal in the ventral and right lateral aspect of the cervical cord at C5-C6 level with the involved segment measuring 4x3mm in size. Based on clinical and radiological features a diagnosis of focal amyotrophy was made. Patient is given a cervical collar to prevent flexion at the neck and physiotherapy in the form of hand and forearm exercises were started. Regular follow up of the patient once every 2 months is being done. Hirayama's disease is a rare, benign, self-limiting neurological disorder. Early diagnosis and management by preventing cervical flexion with the help of a cervical collar has shown to halt the progression of the disease. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(3.000: 767-770

  8. Hunter disease eClinic: interactive, computer-assisted, problem-based approach to independent learning about a rare genetic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldovan Laura

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computer-based teaching (CBT is a well-known educational device, but it has never been applied systematically to the teaching of a complex, rare, genetic disease, such as Hunter disease (MPS II. Aim To develop interactive teaching software functioning as a virtual clinic for the management of MPS II. Implementation and Results The Hunter disease eClinic, a self-training, user-friendly educational software program, available at the Lysosomal Storage Research Group (http://www.lysosomalstorageresearch.ca, was developed using the Adobe Flash multimedia platform. It was designed to function both to provide a realistic, interactive virtual clinic and instantaneous access to supporting literature on Hunter disease. The Hunter disease eClinic consists of an eBook and an eClinic. The eClinic is the interactive virtual clinic component of the software. Within an environment resembling a real clinic, the trainee is instructed to perform a medical history, to examine the patient, and to order appropriate investigation. The program provides clinical data derived from the management of actual patients with Hunter disease. The eBook provides instantaneous, electronic access to a vast collection of reference information to provide detailed background clinical and basic science, including relevant biochemistry, physiology, and genetics. In the eClinic, the trainee is presented with quizzes designed to provide immediate feedback on both trainee effectiveness and efficiency. User feedback on the merits of the program was collected at several seminars and formal clinical rounds at several medical centres, primarily in Canada. In addition, online usage statistics were documented for a 2-year period. Feedback was consistently positive and confirmed the practical benefit of the program. The online English-language version is accessed daily by users from all over the world; a Japanese translation of the program is also available. Conclusions The

  9. Diffuse pulmonary meningotheliomatosis: A literature review of a rare diffuse parenchymal lung disease with unclear clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Gleason

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diffuse pulmonary meningotheliomatosis is a rare disease, with unclear clinical significance and very few reported cases in the literature. In this study, we review the demographics, presentation, imaging, diagnostic workup, and histologic findings of the 25 patients previously published in the literature with an outline of the disease history. Materials and Methods: We conducted a review of the literature through July 2016 for studies reporting cases of diffuse pulmonary meningotheliomatosis by searching multiple scholarly databases. Results: Of the 25 cases identified 2 were male (8%, and 23 were female (92%. Ages ranged from 37 to 73 with a median age of 59.5 years at diagnosis. 15 (60% were asymptomatic and imaging abnormalities were discovered incidentally. 8 (32% had unexplained respiratory complaints. 11 (44% had history of or active malignancy. 3 (12% were diagnosed by transbronchial biopsy while the remainder had surgical lung biopsies. Conclusion: Diffuse pulmonary meningotheliomatosis should be considered in all patients with diffuse bilateral pulmonary nodules on HRCT. The condition is more prevalent in females and its clinical significance is unclear, although nearly half of those diagnosed had a history of malignancy. CT imaging and surgical lung biopsy are the modalities of choice for diagnosis but transbronchial biopsies have recently been used obtain the diagnosis. Additional research needs to be done to further characterize the nature of this condition and the clinical scenarios in which is presents.

  10. [RARE DISEASES DTC: DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND CARE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendlovic, Joseph; Barash, Hila; Yardeni, Hadar; Banet-Levi, Yonit; Yonath, Hagith; Raas-Rothschild, Annick

    2016-04-01

    Rare diseases are chronic, progressive genetic disorders, which affect around 6-8% of the general population, mainly children. Therefore, in Israel approximately 500,000 people are probably affected by a rare disease. In this article, we review some of the issues pertaining to rare diseases, such as the need for accurate diagnosis which is necessary not only for specific care and treatment but also for informed family planning. In addition, we review the impact of the activities of patients' organizations on the awareness of rare diseases and their involvement in the creation of the Orphan Drug Act, which was the leading point on the way to drug development worldwide. During the last few years networks for reaching leading specialists' opinions on the way to proper diagnosis were created. Thereafter, the next generation genetic technologies, such as exome sequencing, have been a revolution in terms of options and hope for patients with rare undiagnosed diseases. Patients with rare diseases and their families are a challenge to the health care system, not only in terms of diagnosis and therapy, but also in terms of special needs. In addition, deciphering molecular pathways of rare diseases might be the key for understanding molecular events involved in common disorders. We emphasize the duty to ensure appropriate capacity and equal access to follow-up and clinical management of patients with rare diseases in Israel.

  11. Sneddon syndrome: rare disease or under diagnosed clinical entity? Review of the literature related to a clinical case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orac, Amalia; Artenie, Anca; Toader, Mihaela Paula; Harnagea, Raluca; Dinu-Mitrofan, Diana; Grigorovici, Mirela; Ungureanu, G

    2014-01-01

    Sneddon syndrome is defined by the association of livedo racemosa and recurrent cerebrovascular ischemic lesions. The annual incidence is 4/1,000,000. This syndrome particularly affects young women, some reports suggesting a family predisposition. It is a chronic, progressive, arterio-occlusive disease of unknown etiology that involves small and medium-sized arteries. It is usually associated with antiphospholipid antibodies. We report the case of a female patient with Sneddon syndrome with significant family history, personal history of stroke, epilepsy, migraine, cardiovascular involvement, three miscarriages, cognitive decline, noncompliant to therapy, in the absence of antiphospholipid antibodies. This paper aims to analyze the main characteristic features and management of Sneddon syndrome by conducting a literature review related to a clinical case.

  12. The scientific and clinical relevance of studying rare genetic/neurodevelopmental disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleefstra, T.; Pfundt, R.P.; Brunner, H.G.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Intellectual disability (ID) with or without autism spectrum disorders (ASD), is one of the main reasons for referral to a clinical geneticist. ID has a major impact on affected individuals, their families and society. The recent advances in genetic technologies have enabled to identify d

  13. Zebra: searching for rare diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    disease diagnostic hypotheses in the domain of medical IR. In this work, we build upon an existing vertical medical search engine, Zebra, that is focused on rare disease diagnosis. In previous work, Zebra has been evaluated using real-life medical cases of rare and difficult diseases, and has been found...... to be a useful and competitive tool for clinicians. In this work, we extend Zebra’s functionalities to optimise the task of medical diagnosis through search as follows: we add the option of grouping retrieved documents into clusters based on disease name occurrence, and we offer a ‘disease-ranking’ option...

  14. A rare tonsillar disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safavi Naiyni SA

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available A 16 year old woman with Tangier disease in palatine tonsils is reported. She has recurrent sore throat. In physical examination the palatine tonsils are hypertrophied and has very yellowish points. The facial skin is yellowish but the skin of another areas of body is normal. After tonsillectomy the pathologist report Tangier disease in palatine tonsils

  15. Case Report: Myelodysplastic syndrome- associated myeloid sarcoma: an unusual clinical presentation of a rare disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Emoke; Demian, Smaranda; Nagy, Elod

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma results from the extramedullary homing and proliferation of immature myeloid precursors. We present the timeline, events and diagnostic pitfalls related to a 66 year-old male patient's case, admitted to the Hematology Clinic for pancytopenia, fever, weight loss and fatigue. The severe cytopenia and the few blasts observed in his blood smear indicated a bone marrow biopsy. The bone marrow showed hypercellularity and multilineage dysplasia with the presence of 15% myeloblasts. After the biopsy, he promptly developed paraplegia and nuclear magnetic resonance revealed an epidural tumour which was then resected.In the epidural tumour mass blast-like, round cells were observed with a complex immunophenotype, characterized by myeloperoxidase, CD117, CD15, CD99, leucocyte common antigen positivity and a high Ki-67 proliferation index. Considering the main differential diagnostic issues, the final diagnosis was stated as myelodysplastic syndrome-associated myeloid sarcoma. The prognosis was unfavourable, the bone marrow was quickly invaded by proliferating blast cells, and despite chemotherapy attempts, the patient died.

  16. [Adult-onset rare diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfliegler, György; Kovács, Erzsébet; Kovács, György; Urbán, Krisztián; Nagy, Valéria; Brúgós, Boglárka

    2014-03-01

    The present paper is focusing on rare diseases manifesting in late childhood or adulthood. A part of these syndromes are not of genetic origin, such as relatively or absolutely rare infections, autoimmune diseases, tumours, or diseases due to rare environmental toxic agents. In addition, even a large proportion of genetic disorders may develop in adulthood or may have adult forms as well, affecting are almost each medical specialization. Examples are storage disorders (e.g. adult form of Tay-Sachs disease, Gaucher-disease), enzyme deficiencies (e.g. ornithin-transcarbamylase deficiency of the urea cycle disorders), rare thrombophilias (e.g. homozygous factor V. Leiden mutation, antithrombin deficiency), or some rare monogenic disorders such as Huntington-chorea and many others. It is now generally accepted that at least half of the 6-8000 "rare diseases" belong either to the scope of adult-care (e.g. internal medicine, neurology), or to "age-neutral" specialities such as ophtalmology, dermatology etc.).

  17. A Rare Presentation of a Rare Disease: Pulmonary Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Rehman Mohyuddin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old female presented with a 4-week history of dry cough and wheezing. Chest radiograph showed a 10.5 cm mass-like density in the anterior mediastinum which had not been previously visualized. Computed tomography scan (CT of the chest showed a right hilar mass encasing and narrowing right upper lobe bronchus and right mainstem bronchus and secondary atelectatic changes. Biopsy was consistent with a diagnosis of lymphomatoid granulomatosis Grade 3. She responded well clinically and radiologically to therapy. Lymphomatoid granulomatosis is a rare EBV-associated disorder which is considered a lymphoproliferative disease. The most common radiographic feature is multiple lung nodules. An isolated hilar mass is an exceptionally rare presentation of this rare disease.

  18. Applying complement therapeutics to rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Edimara S; Mastellos, Dimitrios C; Yancopoulou, Despina; Risitano, Antonio M; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2015-12-01

    Around 350 million people worldwide suffer from rare diseases. These may have a genetic, infectious, or autoimmune basis, and several include an inflammatory component. Launching of effective treatments can be very challenging when there is a low disease prevalence and limited scientific insights into the disease mechanisms. As a key trigger of inflammatory processes, complement has been associated with a variety of diseases and has become an attractive therapeutic target for conditions involving inflammation. In view of the clinical experience acquired with drugs licensed for the treatment of rare diseases such as hereditary angioedema and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, growing evidence supports the safety and efficacy of complement therapeutics in restoring immune balance and preventing aggravation of clinical outcomes. This review provides an overview of the candidates currently in the pharmaceutical pipeline with potential to treat orphan diseases and discusses the molecular mechanisms triggered by complement involved with the disease pathogenesis.

  19. Ethical and social aspects on rare diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krajnović Dušanka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rare diseases are a heterogenic group of disorders with a little in common except of their rarity affecting by less than 5 : 10.000 people. In the world is registered about 6000-8000 rare diseases with 6-8% suffering population only in the European Union. In spite of rarity, they represent an important medical and social problem due to their incidence. For many rare diseases have no treatment, but if it exists and if started on time as being available to patients, there is a good prognosis for them to be able for normal life. The problems of patients affected by rare diseases are related to the lack of diagnosis and timely undergoing as well as their treatment or prevention. Orphan drugs are products intended for treatment, diagnosis or prevention of rare diseases, but for their development and marketing the industry has not been interested in yet because of their marketing reasons. Patients suffering from a rare disease although belonging to the vulnerable group for their specific health needs, is becoming invisible in the health care system due to their additional needs un properly recognized. Ethical problems faced by patients, but also health care professionals are related to the allocation of medical diagnostics, unequal approach to health care, inappropriately specialized social services as well as therapy and rare orphan drugs unavailability. Ethical questions related to clinical trails on orphan drugs, population screening and epidemiology testing on rare diseases will also be discussed in this paper. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 41004: Rare diseases: Molecular pathophysiology, the diagnostic and therapeutical modalities, social, ethical and legal aspects

  20. Imaging in the diagnosis of rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    A disease is considered rare if it affects no more than 5 in 10,000 people. More than six thousand rare diseases have been detected so far and they affect 6-8% of the population which equals 2.3-3 million people in Poland. Some of the rare diseases are already diagnosed in utero, e.g. skeletal dysplasias on ultrasonography or central nervous system diseases on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many cases are finally diagnosed after radiologist's suggestion in a radiological report. Although diagnostic imaging cannot be considered as a basis for diagnosis of most of rare diseases, these studies represent an important element in the diagnostic chain. The complicated and long process of diagnosis may be significantly shortened by suggestions of the radiologist, based on the observation of these elements of radiological appearance of the lesions that are characteristic for a particular group of diseases, or even for a particular disease entity. However, the absolute condition for success is the close clinical-radiological cooperation, with clinicians providing the radiologists with their knowledge of patient's history, clinical manifestations, and the results of other investigations.

  1. Rare thyroid non-neoplastic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacka, Katarzyna; Maciejewski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Rare diseases are usually defined as entities affecting less than 1 person per 2,000. About 7,000 different rare entities are distinguished and, among them, rare diseases of the thyroid gland. Although not frequent, they can be found in the everyday practice of endocrinologists and should be considered in differential diagnosis. Rare non-neoplastic thyroid diseases will be discussed. Congenital hypothyroidism's frequency is relatively high and its early treatment is of vital importance for neonatal psychomotor development; CH is caused primarily by thyroid dysgenesis (85%) or dyshormonogenesis (10-15%), although secondary defects - hypothalamic and pituitary - can also be found; up to 40% of cases diagnosed on neonatal screening are transient. Inherited abnormalities of thyroid hormone binding proteins (TBG, TBP and albumin) include alterations in their concentration or affinity for iodothyronines, this leads to laboratory test abnormalities, although usually with normal free hormones and clinical euthyroidism. Thyroid hormone resistance is most commonly found in THRB gene mutations and more rarely in THRA mutations; in some cases both genes are unchanged (non-TR RTH). Recently the term 'reduced sensitivity to thyroid hormones' was introduced, which encompass not only iodothyronine receptor defects but also their defective transmembrane transport or metabolism. Rare causes of hyperthyroidism are: activating mutations in TSHR or GNAS genes, pituitary adenomas, differentiated thyroid cancer or gestational trophoblastic disease; congenital hyperthyroidism cases are also seen, although less frequently than CH. Like other organs and tissues, the thyroid can be affected by different inflammatory and infectious processes, including tuberculosis and sarcoidosis. In most of the rare thyroid diseases genetic factors play a key role, many of them can be classified as monogenic disorders. Although there are still some limitations, progress has been made in our understanding of

  2. Focusing on rare diseases in China: are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Su, Chang; Lee, Ashley M; Bai, Harrison X

    2015-11-02

    The Chinese researchers have made significant progress in studying rare diseases in the recent years. From 2000 to 2014, 269 out of 1892 clinically relevant original research papers published on high impact journals by Chinese institutions, and 2678 out of 6040 clinical trials conducted by Chinese institutions and registered at ClinicalTrial.gov are focused on rare diseases. The number of research papers and of clinical trials has shown a steady trend of increase. Creating public databases for rare disease will escalate progress in rare disease and enable multicenter studies.

  3. [Care for patients with rare diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetsers, Stephanie E; Takkenberg, J J M Hanneke; Bierings, Marc B

    2014-01-01

    A rare disease usually concerns only a handful of patients, but all patients with a rare disease combined represent a significant health burden. Due to limited knowledge and the absence of treatment guidelines, patients with rare diseases usually experience delayed diagnosis and suboptimal treatment. Historically, rare diseases have never been considered a major health problem. However, rare diseases have recently been receiving increased attention. In the Netherlands, a national plan for rare diseases was published in late 2013, with recommendations on how to improve the organisation of healthcare for people with rare diseases. Using the example of the rare disease Fanconi anemia, this paper describes the challenges and opportunities in organising healthcare for rare diseases. Two critical steps in optimising healthcare for rare diseases are developing multidisciplinary healthcare teams and stimulating patient empowerment. Optimal cooperation between patients, patient organisations, multidisciplinary healthcare teams and scientists is of great importance. In this respect, transition to adult healthcare requires special attention.

  4. Collaboration for rare disease drug discovery research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litterman, Nadia K.; Rhee, Michele; Swinney, David C.; Ekins, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Rare disease research has reached a tipping point, with the confluence of scientific and technologic developments that if appropriately harnessed, could lead to key breakthroughs and treatments for this set of devastating disorders. Industry-wide trends have revealed that the traditional drug discovery research and development (R&D) model is no longer viable, and drug companies are evolving their approach. Rather than only pursue blockbuster therapeutics for heterogeneous, common diseases, drug companies have increasingly begun to shift their focus to rare diseases. In academia, advances in genetics analyses and disease mechanisms have allowed scientific understanding to mature, but the lack of funding and translational capability severely limits the rare disease research that leads to clinical trials. Simultaneously, there is a movement towards increased research collaboration, more data sharing, and heightened engagement and active involvement by patients, advocates, and foundations. The growth in networks and social networking tools presents an opportunity to help reach other patients but also find researchers and build collaborations. The growth of collaborative software that can enable researchers to share their data could also enable rare disease patients and foundations to manage their portfolio of funded projects for developing new therapeutics and suggest drug repurposing opportunities. Still there are many thousands of diseases without treatments and with only fragmented research efforts. We will describe some recent progress in several rare diseases used as examples and propose how collaborations could be facilitated. We propose that the development of a center of excellence that integrates and shares informatics resources for rare diseases sponsored by all of the stakeholders would help foster these initiatives. PMID:25685324

  5. Collaboration for rare disease drug discovery research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litterman, Nadia K; Rhee, Michele; Swinney, David C; Ekins, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Rare disease research has reached a tipping point, with the confluence of scientific and technologic developments that if appropriately harnessed, could lead to key breakthroughs and treatments for this set of devastating disorders. Industry-wide trends have revealed that the traditional drug discovery research and development (R&D) model is no longer viable, and drug companies are evolving their approach. Rather than only pursue blockbuster therapeutics for heterogeneous, common diseases, drug companies have increasingly begun to shift their focus to rare diseases. In academia, advances in genetics analyses and disease mechanisms have allowed scientific understanding to mature, but the lack of funding and translational capability severely limits the rare disease research that leads to clinical trials. Simultaneously, there is a movement towards increased research collaboration, more data sharing, and heightened engagement and active involvement by patients, advocates, and foundations. The growth in networks and social networking tools presents an opportunity to help reach other patients but also find researchers and build collaborations. The growth of collaborative software that can enable researchers to share their data could also enable rare disease patients and foundations to manage their portfolio of funded projects for developing new therapeutics and suggest drug repurposing opportunities. Still there are many thousands of diseases without treatments and with only fragmented research efforts. We will describe some recent progress in several rare diseases used as examples and propose how collaborations could be facilitated. We propose that the development of a center of excellence that integrates and shares informatics resources for rare diseases sponsored by all of the stakeholders would help foster these initiatives.

  6. Shared ACVR1 mutations in FOP and DIPG: Opportunities and challenges in extending biological and clinical implications across rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Harry J; Jain, Payal; Resnick, Adam C

    2017-08-02

    Gain-of-function mutations in the Type I Bone Morphogenic Protein (BMP) receptor ACVR1 have been identified in two diseases: Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva (FOP), a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by genetically driven heterotopic ossification, and in 20-25% of Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas (DIPGs), a pediatric brain tumor with no effective therapies and dismal median survival. While the ACVR1 mutation is causal for FOP, its role in DIPG tumor biology remains under active investigation. Here, we discuss cross-fertilization between the FOP and DIPG fields, focusing on the biological mechanisms and principles gleaned from FOP that can be applied to DIPG biology. We highlight our current knowledge of ACVR1 in both diseases, and then describe the growing opportunities and barriers to effectively investigate ACVR1 in DIPG. Importantly, learning from other seemingly unrelated diseases harboring similar mutations may uncover novel mechanisms or processes for future investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Does the low prevalence affect the sample size of interventional clinical trials of rare diseases? An analysis of data from the aggregate analysis of clinicaltrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, Siew Wan; Willis, Adrian; Tudur Smith, Catrin; Day, Simon; Miller, Frank; Madan, Jason; Posch, Martin; Zohar, Sarah; Stallard, Nigel

    2017-03-02

    Clinical trials are typically designed using the classical frequentist framework to constrain type I and II error rates. Sample sizes required in such designs typically range from hundreds to thousands of patients which can be challenging for rare diseases. It has been shown that rare disease trials have smaller sample sizes than non-rare disease trials. Indeed some orphan drugs were approved by the European Medicines Agency based on studies with as few as 12 patients. However, some studies supporting marketing authorisation included several hundred patients. In this work, we explore the relationship between disease prevalence and other factors and the size of interventional phase 2 and 3 rare disease trials conducted in the US and/or EU. We downloaded all clinical trials from Aggregate Analysis of ClinialTrials.gov (AACT) and identified rare disease trials by cross-referencing MeSH terms in AACT with the list from Orphadata. We examined the effects of prevalence and phase of study in a multiple linear regression model adjusting for other statistically significant trial characteristics. Of 186941 ClinicalTrials.gov trials only 1567 (0.8%) studied a single rare condition with prevalence information from Orphadata. There were 19 (1.2%) trials studying disease with prevalence <1/1,000,000, 126 (8.0%) trials with 1-9/1,000,000, 791 (50.5%) trials with 1-9/100,000 and 631 (40.3%) trials with 1-5/10,000. Of the 1567 trials, 1160 (74%) were phase 2 trials. The fitted mean sample size for the rarest disease (prevalence <1/1,000,000) in phase 2 trials was the lowest (mean, 15.7; 95% CI, 8.7-28.1) but were similar across all the other prevalence classes; mean, 26.2 (16.1-42.6), 33.8 (22.1-51.7) and 35.6 (23.3-54.3) for prevalence 1-9/1,000,000, 1-9/100,000 and 1-5/10,000, respectively. Fitted mean size of phase 3 trials of rarer diseases, <1/1,000,000 (19.2, 6.9-53.2) and 1-9/1,000,000 (33.1, 18.6-58.9), were similar to those in phase 2 but were statistically significant

  8. A rare clinical presentation of sarcoidosis; gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güzel, Aygül; Köksal, Nurhan; Aydın, Davut; Aslan, Kerim; Gören, Fikret; Karagöz, Filiz

    2013-10-01

    Gingivitis due to sarcoidosis is a relatively rare condition. Gingivitis or isolated gingival involvement may be the first sign of systemic sarcoidosis. We report the case of a 37 year-old woman with isolated gingivitis due to sarcoidosis confirmed by biopsy. Following treatment with a systemic corticosteroid (prednisolone 40 mg/day), all clinical and radiologic findings were completely improved. In cases of chronic and intractable gingivitis, systemic sarcoidosis should be suspected. It should be confirmed with a biopsy, and the patient should be referred to a chest disease clinic to exclude other organ involvement.

  9. Erythromelalgia: a rare microvascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latessa, Victoria

    2010-06-01

    Erythromelalgia (EM) is a rare condition of unknown etiology that results in intense, burning pain and redness primarily of the feet, and, even more rarely, in the hands. Most cases are idiopathic (primary EM); others occur secondary to medical conditions, such as autoimmune diseases, and neurological or hematological disorders. Symptoms are episodic and can result in severe disability. Triggers, such as exposure to warmth, pressure or exercise, become apparent to those afflicted with this condition; however, triggers may be unavoidable during the course of daily living. There are no diagnostic tests for EM. Diagnosis is based on history, physical examination during symptomatic episode and the exclusion of other probable causes for the syndrome. Early recognition of the signs and symptoms as well as early treatment offer patients the best hope of remissions and improved quality of life.

  10. CEMARA an information system for rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landais, Paul; Messiaen, Claude; Rath, Ana; Le Mignot, Loïc; Dufour, Eric; Ben Said, Mohamed; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Toubiana, Laurent; Baujat, Geneviève; Bourdon-Lanoy, Eva; Gérard-Blanluet, Marion; Bodemer, Christine; Salomon, Rémi; Aymé, Ségolène; Le Merrer, Martine; Verloes, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Rare diseases cover a group of conditions characterized by a low prevalence, affecting less than 1 in 2,000 people; 5000 to 7000 rare diseases have been currently identified in Europe. Most diseases do not have any curative treatment. They represent thus an important public health concern. CEMARA is based on a n-tier architecture. Its main objective is to collect continuous and complete records of patients with rare diseases, and their follow-up through a web-based Information System, and to analyse the epidemiological patterns. In France, 41 out of 131 labelled Reference Centres (RC) are sharing CEMARA. Presently 56,593 cases have been registered by more than 850 health care professionals belonging to 171 clinical sites. The national demand of care was explored in relation with the offer of care in order to reach an improved match. Within 2 years, CEMARA stimulated sharing a common platform, a common ontology with Orphanet and initiating new cohorts of rare diseases for improving patient care and research.

  11. Mast cell leukemia: an extremely rare disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dai-Yin; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Hong, Ying-Chung; Liu, Chun-Yu; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Chen, Po-Min; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai

    2014-08-01

    Systemic mastocytosis is characterized by pathologic proliferation and accumulation of mast cells in at least one extracutaneous organ such as liver, spleen, bone marrow, or lymph nodes. The clinical features are highly variable depending on impairment of the involved organ systems. It often raises diagnostic challenges. Here we report a case of a 78-year-old patient with mast cell leukemia. The literature is reviewed regarding the diagnosis and updated management of this rare disease.

  12. [Computer-assisted diagnosis of rare diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, T; Jerrentrup, A; Schäfer, J R

    2017-03-31

    To establish a comprehensive diagnosis is by far the most challenging task in a physician's daily routine. Especially rare diseases place high demands on differential diagnosis, caused by the high number of around 8000 diseases and their clinical variability. No clinician can be aware of all the different entities and memorizing them all is impossible and inefficient. Specific diagnostic decision-supported systems provide better results than standard search engines in this context. The systems FindZebra, Phenomizer, Orphanet, and Isabel are presented here concisely with their advantages and limitations. An outlook is given to social media usage and big data technologies. Due to the high number of initial misdiagnoses and long periods of time until a confirmatory diagnosis is reached, these tools might be promising in practice to improve the diagnosis of rare diseases.

  13. Kyasanur Forest Disease (KFD): Rare Disease of Zoonotic Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraleedharan, M

    2016-09-01

    Kyasanur forest disease (KFD) is a rare tick borne zoonotic disease that causes acute febrile hemorrhagic illness in humans and monkeys especially in southern part of India. The disease is caused by highly pathogenic KFD virus (KFDV) which belongs to member of the genus Flavivirus and family Flaviviridae. The disease is transmitted to monkeys and humans by infective tick Haemaphysalisspinigera. Seasonal outbreaks are expected to occur during the months of January to June. The aim of this paper is to briefly summarize the epidemiology, mode of transmission of KFD virus, clinical findings, diagnosis, treatment, control and prevention of the disease..

  14. Frequently Asked Questions about Rare Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page What are some examples of rare diseases? Examples of rare diseases caused by mutations in single genes include cystic fibrosis, which affects ... responsible for some rare, inherited types of cancer. Examples of these are ... which certain mutations increase the risk for hereditary breast and ovarian ...

  15. Lessons from rare diseases of cartilage and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, James A; Ranganath, Lakshminarayan R; Boyde, Alan

    2015-06-01

    Studying severe phenotypes of rare syndromes can elucidate disease mechanisms of more common disorders and identify potential therapeutic targets. Lessons from rare bone diseases contributed to the development of the most successful class of bone active agents, the bisphosphonates. More recent research on rare bone diseases has helped elucidate key pathways and identify new targets in bone resorption and bone formation including cathepsin K and sclerostin, for which drugs are now in clinical trials. By contrast, there has been much less focus on rare cartilage diseases and osteoarthritis (OA) remains a common disease with no effective therapy. Investigation of rare cartilage syndromes is identifying new potential targets in OA including GDF5 and lubricin. Research on the arthropathy of the ultra-rare disease alkaptonuria has identified several new features of the OA phenotype, including high density mineralized protrusions (HDMPs) which constitute a newly identified mechanism of joint destruction.

  16. Strengthening clinical and basic researches on rare kidney diseases%加强少见肾脏病的临床与基础研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章友康; 王素霞

    2015-01-01

    Since the reform and opening up 3 decades ago,China′s nephrology has made great achivements after hard work of several generations of Chinese nephrologists;in the diagnosis and treatment for common kidney diseases,especially glomerular diseases,striking progress has been made;and China′s nephrology in some research fields has geared to the international conventions.But as the study foundation of kidney diseases in China is weak,with widespread population and very uneven development,there is still much space for improving China′s diagnosis and treatment of rare kidney diseases,and there is still a long way to go to enhance clinical and basic researches on rare kidney diseases.To achieve this goal,we put forward the following opinions:1 .Standardization of renal biopsy pathologic examination,paying attention to the roles of the immune pathology,and electron microscopy in pathological diagnosis.We emphasize on high quality production and dyeing of pathological specimen;and light microscopy,immunofluorescence,and electron microscopy are all indispensable and mutually complementary.We advocate clinical pathological conference to promote interactions between pathologists and clinical experts.2.Attaching great importance to the collection and analysis of clinical data,combining genetic screening to effectively improve the diagnosis of rare kidney diseases,and prevent misdiagnosis and failure to diagnose.We emphasize on complete collection of illness history (including familial history)and clinical data (including physical,laboratory, and related medical image examinations)for serious analysis;on the basis of the above,disease-relevant special examination and gene detection for patients with suspected inherited kidney diseases should be performed,in order to avoid failure to diagnose rare secondary renal diseases and genetic diseases or misdiagnosing them as primary kidney diseases.3.We also advocate active epidemiological investigation and the pathogenesis

  17. Finding patients using similarity measures in a rare diseases-oriented clinical data warehouse: Dr. Warehouse and the needle in the needle stack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcelon, Nicolas; Neuraz, Antoine; Benoit, Vincent; Salomon, Rémi; Kracker, Sven; Suarez, Felipe; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Hadj-Rabia, Smail; Fischer, Alain; Munnich, Arnold; Burgun, Anita

    2017-09-01

    In the context of rare diseases, it may be helpful to detect patients with similar medical histories, diagnoses and outcomes from a large number of cases with automated methods. To reduce the time to find new cases, we developed a method to find similar patients given an index case leveraging data from the electronic health records. We used the clinical data warehouse of a children academic hospital in Paris, France (Necker-Enfants Malades), containing about 400,000 patients. Our model was based on a vector space model (VSM) to compute the similarity distance between an index patient and all the patients of the data warehouse. The dimensions of the VSM were built upon Unified Medical Language System concepts extracted from clinical narratives stored in the clinical data warehouse. The VSM was enhanced using three parameters: a pertinence score (TF-IDF of the concepts), the polarity of the concept (negated/not negated) and the minimum number of concepts in common. We evaluated this model by displaying the most similar patients for five different rare diseases: Lowe Syndrome (LOWE), Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (DEB), Activated PI3K delta Syndrome (APDS), Rett Syndrome (RETT) and Dowling Meara (EBS-DM), from the clinical data warehouse representing 18, 103, 21, 84 and 7 patients respectively. The percentages of index patients returning at least one true positive similar patient in the Top30 similar patients were 94% for LOWE, 97% for DEB, 86% for APDS, 71% for EBS-DM and 99% for RETT. The mean number of patients with the exact same genetic diseases among the 30 returned patients was 51%. This tool offers new perspectives in a translational context to identify patients for genetic research. Moreover, when new molecular bases are discovered, our strategy will help to identify additional eligible patients for genetic screening. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. [Rare diseases from a life insurance perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, A; Filzmaier, K

    2015-12-01

    A rare disease is defined as a disease that affects a maximum of 5 in 10,000 people. As of today there are roughly 7000 different rare diseases known. On account of this one can say that "rare diseases are rare, but people affected by them are common". For Germany this amounts to: 4 million people that are affected by a rare disease. Diagnosis, therapeutic options and prognosis have substantially improved for some of the rare diseases. Besides the general medical advances--especially in the area of genetics--this is also due to networking and sharing information by so-called Centres of Competence on a national and international scale. This results in a better medical care for the corresponding group of patients. Against this backdrop, the number of people applying for life assurance who are suffering from a complex or rare disease has risen steadily in the last years. Due to the scarce availability of data regarding long-term prognosis of many rare diseases, a biomathematical, medical and actuarial expertise on the part of the insurer is necessary in order to adequately assess the risk of mortality and morbidity. Furthermore there is quite a focus on the issue of rare diseases from not only politics but society as well. Therefore evidence based medical assessment by insurers is especially important in this group of applicants--thinking of legal compliance and reputational risk.

  19. Analyzing rare diseases terms in biomedical terminologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Pasceri

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Rare disease patients too often face common problems, including the lack of access to correct diagnosis, lack of quality information on the disease, lack of scientific knowledge of the disease, inequities and difficulties in access to treatment and care. These things could be changed by implementing a comprehensive approach to rare diseases, increasing international cooperation in scientific research, by gaining and sharing scientific knowledge about and by developing tools for extracting and sharing knowledge. A significant aspect to analyze is the organization of knowledge in the biomedical field for the proper management and recovery of health information. For these purposes, the sources needed have been acquired from the Office of Rare Diseases Research, the National Organization of Rare Disorders and Orphanet, organizations that provide information to patients and physicians and facilitate the exchange of information among different actors involved in this field. The present paper shows the representation of rare diseases terms in biomedical terminologies such as MeSH, ICD-10, SNOMED CT and OMIM, leveraging the fact that these terminologies are integrated in the UMLS. At the first level, it was analyzed the overlap among sources and at a second level, the presence of rare diseases terms in target sources included in UMLS, working at the term and concept level. We found that MeSH has the best representation of rare diseases terms.

  20. Adult Onset Still’s Disease: A Case Report with a Rare Clinical Manifestation and Pathophysiological Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina M. Antoniou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult-onset Still’s disease is an inflammatory multisystemic disease of unknown etiology. Pleuritis is the most common pulmonary manifestation and pleural effusions are usually exudates with a predominance of neutrophils. We report a case of an eosinophilic pleural effusion as a novel and hitherto unrecognized manifestation of active adult-onset Still’s disease. We also observed a marked NLRP3 inflammasome activation with increased production of IL-1β which coincided with the development and resolved upon remission of the pleural effusion suggesting a possible novel pathogenetic pathway for the development of pleural effusions in the context of the auto-inflammatory disorders.

  1. Spinal actinomycosis: A rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dua Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycosis is an indolent, slowly progressive infection caused by Actinomyces species. Of human actinomycosis, the spinal form is rare and actinomycosis-related spinal neurological deficit is uncommon. We report two cases with cervical and dorsal actinomycosis and one of them with spinal neurological deficit.

  2. [Global strategy for rare and intractable diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima Kodama, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    The progress has been made in research on rare and intractable diseases, for which new drug development has long been limited due to rarity, by establishing a global network in recent years. In Japan, the countermeasure of rare and intractable diseases has been implemented under national policy outline as an integrated strategy since 1972, including surveys and research, construction of medical facilities, reducing burden of medical expenses for patients, and enhancement of welfare and improving QOL of patients. Along with legislation or regulation of orphan drugs development, treatment and care for rare diseases have been emphasized in each national healthcare system globally. In the US, the Office of Rare Diseases was established under NIH in 1989 and European countries also started collaboration for rare disease projects with their own national plans in 1999. As a platform of rare diseases patients, healthcare professionals, researchers, pharmaceutical industry, and policy makers, Orphanet has a well-designed website which networks them. In Japan, there are urgent needs for global standard patient registration system and strengthening global collaboration for developing treatment and care for the patients of rare and intractable diseases, which needs more cooperative relations with patient organizations and pharmaceutical industry within country.

  3. Search for rare liver diseases: The case of glycosylation defects mimicking Wilson Disease ->

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Socha, P.; Vajro, P.; Lefeber, D.J.; Adamowicz, M.; Tanner, S.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric hepatology appears to be a very specific field of paediatrics which deals mainly with rare diseases although clinical features can be commonly found - like increased activity of transaminases. Some of these rare diseases like Wilson disease are commonly looked for and recently Wilsonian li

  4. Rare diseases research: expanding collaborative translational research opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groft, Stephen C

    2013-07-01

    Extensive public-private partnerships, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the rare diseases community, which is seeing a renewed industry interest in smaller niche markets, have resulted in an increase of interventions for rare diseases. Significant collaborative efforts are required among the pharmaceutical industry, foundations, patient-advocacy groups, academic and government investigators and funding programs, regulatory scientists, and reimbursement agencies to meet the unmet diagnostic and treatment needs for approximately 25 million people in the United States with 7,000 rare diseases. The expanding role and outreach activities of patient-advocacy groups have increased public awareness. In the United States, a rare disease is defined as a disorder or condition with a prevalence of $3.5 billion for rare diseases research, including $750 million for orphan product development activities, nearly 11.4% of the NIH research budget. Several research institutes and centers of the NIH, including the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, have initiated varied translational research efforts to address the absence of preclinical and clinical data required for regulatory review purposes. Clinicians can expect to see significant increases in requests from patients and their families to participate in patient registries and natural history or observational studies to gather specific information from a larger pool of patients on the progression of the disease or response to treatments. An expanding emphasis on rare diseases provides hope for the millions of patients with rare diseases.

  5. Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Diseases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — There are more than 6,500 identified rare and neglected diseases, yet only about 250 treatments are available for these conditions. The limited numbers of patients...

  6. Case Report: Myelodysplastic syndrome- associated myeloid sarcoma: an unusual clinical presentation of a rare disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emoke Horvath

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma results from the extramedullary homing and proliferation of immature myeloid precursors. We present the timeline, events and diagnostic pitfalls related to a 66 year-old male patient’s case, admitted to the Hematology Clinic for pancytopenia, fever, weight loss and fatigue. The severe cytopenia and the few blasts observed in his blood smear indicated a bone marrow biopsy. The bone marrow showed hypercellularity and multilineage dysplasia with the presence of 15% myeloblasts. After the biopsy, he promptly developed paraplegia and nuclear magnetic resonance revealed an epidural tumour which was then resected.In the epidural tumour mass blast-like, round cells were observed with a complex immunophenotype, characterized by myeloperoxidase, CD117, CD15, CD99, leucocyte common antigen positivity and a high Ki-67 proliferation index. Considering the main differential diagnostic issues, the final diagnosis was stated as myelodysplastic syndrome-associated myeloid sarcoma. The prognosis was unfavourable, the bone marrow was quickly invaded by proliferating blast cells, and despite chemotherapy attempts, the patient died.

  7. [Acromegaly: multifaceted clinical presentation of a rare disease of the elderly. Report of two cases with long-term follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppiani, Luca; Del Monte, Patrizia; Ruelle, Antonio; Marugo, Alessandro; Bernasconi, Donatella

    2006-04-01

    We report two cases of acromegaly in elderly patients. Both patients had markedly invasive GH-secreting macroadenomas, which caused hugely increased circulating GH levels (over 90 ng/ml). The first patient, 79 year-old, presented with goitre and severe osteoarthrosis, refused surgery and was treated with various somatostatin analogues (ultimately accompanied by cabergoline), without satisfactory control of the disease. The second patient, 67-year-old, presented with symptoms secondary to hypopituitarism, which had been previously misdiagnosed. These symptoms resolved with the appropriate substitutive therapy, which led to a significant improvement in her condition. However, two transphenoidal operations, radiotherapy and long-term somatostatin agonist therapy were required to control GH hypersecretion satisfactorily. The authors wish to underline that acromegaly is a rare but not negligible disorder in the elderly, which can affect the whole body functions and cause severe morbidities. In the two cases presented somatostatin agonists alone were not able to control the tumoral hypersecretion adequately. The prompt discovery (usually through a simple clinical evaluation) of this disease in the elderly, confirmed by hormonal and morphological evaluation, together with a multidisciplinary (medical, surgical, radiotherapeutic) approach can improve their quality of life and increase life expectancy.

  8. Tale of two rare diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Ravindra; Basu, Asish Kumar; Mandal, Biplab; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Maity, Animesh; Sinha, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) phenotype is variable &various genes have been decribed in association with IHH. We describe association of IHH with mosaic trisomy 13. A 20 year old male presented with lack of development of secondary sexual characters, normal height, micropenis, small testes, gynaecomastia, absence of axillary and pubic hairs, hyposmia, synkinesis, bilateral horizontal nystagmus and high arched palate. Investigations showed low gonadotropin, low total testosterone, LH after stimulation with 100 mcg tryptorelin sc was 11.42 mU/mL at 40 min. MRI of hypothalamo-pituitary region showed normal olfactory bulb and tract but shallow olfactory sulcus. Karyotype showed homologous Robertsonian translocation of chromosome 13. This case fits classical IHH except for LH rise on stimulation. Features of Patau syndrome which is associated with trisomy 13 are absent in our case. Mosaic trisomy 13, which can otherwise be rare incidental finding, has not been described in association with IHH. Causal association of novel mutation on chromosome 13 leading to aforementioned phenotype cannot be rule out. PMID:24251138

  9. Tale of two rare diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Shukla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH phenotype is variable & various genes have been decribed in association with IHH.We describe association of IHH with mosaic trisomy 13. A 20 year old male presented with lack of development of secondary sexual characters, normal height, micropenis, small testes, gynaecomastia, absence of axillary and pubic hairs, hyposmia,synkinesis, bilateral horizontal nystagmus and high arched palate. Investigations showed low gonadotropin,low total testosterone, LH after stimulation with 100 mcg tryptorelin sc was 11.42 mU/mL at 40 min. MRI of hypothalamo-pituitary region showed normal olfactory bulb and tract but shallow olfactory sulcus . Karyotype showed homologous Robertsonian translocation of chromosome 13. This case fits classical IHH except for LH rise on stimulation.Features of Patau syndrome which is associated with trisomy 13 are absent in our case. Mosaic trisomy 13, which can otherwise be rare incidental finding , has not been described in association with IHH.Causal association of novel mutation on chromosome 13 leading to aforementioned phenotype cannot be rule out.

  10. Rare Disease Diagnosis as an Information Retrieval Task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragusin, Radu; Petcu, Paula; Lioma, Christina;

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly more clinicians use web Information Retrieval (IR) systems to assist them in diagnosing difficult medical cases, for instance rare diseases that they may not be familiar with. However, web IR systems are not necessarily optimised for this task. For instance, clinicians’ queries tend...... to be long lists of symptoms, often containing phrases, whereas web IR systems typically expect very short keyword-based queries. Motivated by such differences, this work uses a preliminary study of 30 clinical cases to reflect on rare disease retrieval as an IR task. Initial experiments using both Google...... web search and offline retrieval from a rare disease collection indicate that the retrieval of rare diseases is an open problem with room for improvement....

  11. Need to improve clinical trials in rare neurodegenerative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Puopolo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rare neurodegenerative diseases are fatal and no therapy is available to cure or slow down the progression of disease. We report possibly weaknesses in the management of clinical studies in these diseases, ranging from poor preclinical studies, difficulties in the recruitment of patients, delay in the onset of treatment because of lack in early disease-specific biomarkers, and suboptimal design of Phase II clinical trials. The adoption of innovative statistical approaches in early Phase II trials might improve the screening of drugs in rare neurodegenerative disorders, but this implicates efforts from clinical researchers, statisticians, and regulatory people to the development of new strategies that should maintain rigorous scientific integrity together with a more ethical approach to human experimentations.

  12. [SZCZECIN CITIZENS' KNOWLEDGE ABOUT RARE DISEASES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walat, Anna; Skoczylas, Michal Marian; Welnicka, Agnieszka; Kulig, Malgorzata; Rodak, Przemyslaw; Walczak, Zuzanna; Jablońska, Agata

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess knowledge about rare diseases among citizens of Szczecin (Poland). The study was performed by questioning 242 adult customers of Turzyn Shopping Centre in Szczecin (149 females and 93 males). The survey was conducted in the shopping mall on 23 February 2013 (control group) and during the celebration of Rare Disease Day and the 12th Polish Nationwide Cystic Fibrosis Week ("Dolina Mukolinków") on 2 March 2013 (research group). The research tool was a questionnaire devised by the authors and filled out by the writing authors interviewer's answers. In the study group more people knew about the existence of Rare Disease Day than in the control group (86.02% vs 57.72%, chi-square test χ2 > χ2(1); 0.001, p χ2(1); 0.001, p < 0.001). The respondents from the research group knew more about Rare Disease Day and defined the idea of it as closed in a significantly higher degree than the control group. There was no significant difference in the detailed knowledge about rare diseases in either group. This might indicate the need to educate society and patients, along with their families.

  13. Follicular bronchiolitis: a rare disease in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanık, Esra Toprak; Yılmaz, Özge; Türkeli, Ahmet; Şahin, Şebnem; Yüksel, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Follicular bronchiolitis (FB) is a benign progressive lung disease. It is characterized with lymphoplasmocellular infiltration and hyperplastic follicles in the peribronchial areas in the small airways. Follicular bronchiolitis should be considered in cases where chronic cough, recurrent upper respiratory tract infections and progressive dyspnea are observed in children. The diagnosis should be supported by lung biopsy. A 8-year old female patient presented to our hospital with complaints including continuing cough and wheezing. Bilateral extensive rales and rhonchi in the lungs were heard on auscultation and lung graphy revealed reticuloglandular appearance. Bilateral extensive septal thickennings, reticulonodular appearance, patchy bronchiectasis, bronchiolectasis and peribronchial thickennings were found on high-resolution thoracal computarized tomography. A diagnosis of follicular bronchiolitis was made as a result of lung biopsy. Improvement was observed in the complaints and findings of our patient after methylprednisolone treatment. This patient was presented to emphasize rare interstitial lung diseases should also be considered in children who present with a clinical picture of chronic bronchial obstruction and do not respond to standard treatment. PMID:26078687

  14. Rare human diseases: 9p deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galagan V.O.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the study was to review the anamnesis, pheno - and genotype in patients with rare chromosome disorders such as 9p deletion syndrome. Genetic methods of investigation (clinical and genealogical, cytogenetic, FISH- method, paraclinical and instrumental methods of examination were used. Karyotyping was performed by the G-method of differential staining of chromosomes. Only three cases of pathology were diagnosed in the Medical Genetics Center over the last 10 years. By anamnesis data nobody in the probands’ families had bad habits, was exposed to occupational hazards, took part in the elimination of the Chernobyl accident or lived in contaminated areas. Clinical signs of diseases have not been identified in probands’ parents. All probands had trigonocephaly, bilateral epicanthal folds, ocular hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, long philtrum, flat face and nasal bridge, low set ears with malformed auricles. Two patients of three ones had exophthalmos, contracture of the second and third fingers, abnormal external genitalia. In all three cases there was monosomy of chromosome 9 of critical segment p 24. Normal karyotypes were seen in all parents, so there were three cases of new mutations of 9p deletion syndrome. Retardation of physical, psycho-spech, mental development in proband with or without congenital anomalies requires medical genetic counseling in a specialized institution. Cases of reproductive loss in anamnesis require cytogenetic investigation of fetal membranes and amniotic fluid.

  15. Pompe disease: clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabello JF

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Juan Francisco Cabello,1 Deborah Marsden21Genetics and Metabolic Disease Laboratory, Nutrition and Food Technology Institute (INTA, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile; 2Division of Genetics and Genomics, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Pompe disease (acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency, OMIM 232300 is a rare lysosomal storage disorder due to autosomal recessive mutations in the GAA gene. It has also been called acid maltase deficiency and glycogen storage disease type II. There is a broad clinical presentation: the most severe form that presents in the first few months of life with cardiomyopathy and generalized muscle weakness that rapidly progresses to death from cardio-respiratory failure in the first year of life (infant-onset Pompe disease. A more slowly progressive disease, with little or no cardiac involvement, presents with proximal myopathy and/or pulmonary insufficiency, from the second year of life to late adulthood (late-onset Pompe disease. The recent development and introduction of enzyme replacement therapy with intravenous infusion of recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase have made a major improvement in the morbidity and mortality of this disease. New therapies are also in development. With the availability of treatment, diagnostic methods have also improved, allowing for earlier recognition and potential early therapeutic intervention. The advent of newborn screening for Pompe disease may identify patients who can be treated before significant irreversible disease has occurred. Keywords: Pompe disease, glycogen storage disease, lysosomal storage disease, enzyme replacement therapy, gene therapy, chaperone therapy, genotype/phenotype, newborn screening

  16. 75 FR 47458 - TRICARE; Rare Diseases Definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... of Health and Food and Drug Administration definitions when making coverage decisions for treatments... Office of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 199 RIN 0720-AB26 TRICARE; Rare Diseases Definition AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, DoD. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This final rule revises the definition of...

  17. A Rare Presentation of Crohn's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram Bhat M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Free peritoneal perforation is a rare complication of Crohn's disease with a report of only 100 cases in the literature. It needs an emergency exploration and an unaware general surgeon is confounded in intraoperative decision-making. We present our experience when this rarity struck us in a district hospital and briefly review the guidelines of optimal management of this complication of Crohn's disease.

  18. Fahr's disease: a rare neurological presentation in a tropical setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otu, Akaninyene Asuquo; Anikwe, Jude Chinedu; Cocker, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message While rare, Fahr's disease should be considered as a differential diagnosis for seizures, movement disorders, or cognitive impairment in tropical settings. Classically, bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia is seen on CT. Endemic infections, metabolic, and toxic causes should be excluded. Treatment using Levodopa is often beneficial. PMID:26509011

  19. Dupuytren in a Child: Rare Presentation of a Rare Clinical Entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyropoulou, Georgia-Alexandra; Pavlidis, Leonidas; Mylothridis, Panagiotis; Zaraboukas, Thomas; Demiri, Efterpi

    2016-12-01

    Dupuytren disease in children younger than 10 years is rare and only 8 histologically proven cases have been reported. A histologically proven Dupuytren disease in a 10-year-old with an uncommon clinical presentation as a nodule on the radial side of the middle phalanx of the little finger is documented. Dupuytren's disease should be in the differential diagnosis in cases of nodules and contractures in the palm and fingers of children. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Social media methods for studying rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Kurt R; Stringer, Kathleen A; Donohue, Janet E; Yu, Sunkyung; Shaver, Ashley; Caruthers, Regine L; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Fifer, Carlen; Goldberg, Caren; Russell, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    For pediatric rare diseases, the number of patients available to support traditional research methods is often inadequate. However, patients who have similar diseases cluster "virtually" online via social media. This study aimed to (1) determine whether patients who have the rare diseases Fontan-associated protein losing enteropathy (PLE) and plastic bronchitis (PB) would participate in online research, and (2) explore response patterns to examine social media's role in participation compared with other referral modalities. A novel, internet-based survey querying details of potential pathogenesis, course, and treatment of PLE and PB was created. The study was available online via web and Facebook portals for 1 year. Apart from 2 study-initiated posts on patient-run Facebook pages at the study initiation, all recruitment was driven by study respondents only. Response patterns and referral sources were tracked. A total of 671 respondents with a Fontan palliation completed a valid survey, including 76 who had PLE and 46 who had PB. Responses over time demonstrated periodic, marked increases as new online populations of Fontan patients were reached. Of the responses, 574 (86%) were from the United States and 97 (14%) were international. The leading referral sources were Facebook, internet forums, and traditional websites. Overall, social media outlets referred 84% of all responses, making it the dominant modality for recruiting the largest reported contemporary cohort of Fontan patients and patients who have PLE and PB. The methodology and response patterns from this study can be used to design research applications for other rare diseases.

  1. Impact of rare diseases in oral health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-García, Ana; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Posada-de la Paz, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Rare diseases (RD) are those that present a lower prevalence than 5 cases per 10.000 population. The main objective of this review was to study the effect on oral health in rare diseases, while the secondary objective of the study is theme upgrade. Material and Methods Comparative observational case-control studies were analysed and a systematic review was conducted in PubMed. Each rare disease listed on the statistical data record of the Health Portal of the Ministry of Equality, Health and Social Policies Board of Andalusia was associated with “oral health”. The variables studied included dental, oral mucosa and occlusion alterations, oral pathologies (caries, periodontal disease) and other alterations (mouth breathing, parafunctional habits, etc). A bias analysis of the variable caries was conducted. Results Six RD were selected through our inclusion and exclusion criteria (hypogammaglobulinemia, Rett syndrome, Marfan syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, cystic fibrosis and Cri du chat syndrome) in a total of 8 publications, of which four trials were classified as high risk of bias and one of them as medium risk. There were not trials with low risk of bias. Conclusions The main statistically significant differences found by Syndrome compared to a control group were in Hypogammaglobulinemia with a greater tendency to enamel hypoplasia and dry mouth. The Rett syndrome had, as well, a greater tendency to an anterior open bite, ogival palate, bruxism, mouth breathing and tongue thrusting. Prader-Willi syndrome had a tendency of dental erosion, and Cri du chat syndrome showed a higher association to Tannerella forsythia. Key words:Rare diseases, oral health. PMID:27475682

  2. Creating a global rare disease patient registry linked to a rare diseases biorepository database: Rare Disease-HUB (RD-HUB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Yaffa R; Groft, Stephen C; Bartek, Ronald; Brown, Kyle; Christensen, Ronald A; Collier, Elaine; Farber, Amy; Farmer, Jennifer; Ferguson, John H; Forrest, Christopher B; Lockhart, Nicole C; McCurdy, Kate R; Moore, Helen; Pollen, Geraldine B; Richesson, Rachel; Miller, Vanessa Rangel; Hull, Sara; Vaught, Jim

    2010-09-01

    A movement to create a global patient registry for as many as 7,000 rare diseases was launched at a workshop, "Advancing Rare Disease Research: The Intersection of Patient Registries, Biospecimen Repositories, and Clinical Data." http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/PATIENT_REGISTRIES_WORKSHOP/. The workshop was sponsored by the Office of Rare Diseases Research (ORDR). The focus was the building of an infrastructure for an internet-based global registry linking to biorepositories. Such a registry would serve the patients, investigators, and drug companies. To aid researchers the participants suggested the creation of a centralized database of biorepositories for rare biospecimens (RD-HUB)http://biospecimens.ordr.info.nih.gov/ that could be linked to the registry. Over two days of presentations and breakout sessions, several hundred attendees discussed government rules and regulations concerning privacy and patients' rights and the nature and scope of data to be entered into a central registry as well as concerns about how to validate patient and clinician-entered data to ensure data accuracy. Mechanisms for aggregating data from existing registries were also discussed. The attendees identified registry best practices, model coding systems, international systems for recruiting patients into clinical trials and novel ways of using the internet directly to invite participation in research. They also speculated about who would bear ultimate responsibility for the informatics in the registry and who would have access to the information. Hurdles associated with biospecimen collection and how to overcome them were detailed. The development of the recommendations was, in itself, an indication of the commitment of the rare disease community as never before.

  3. PRIMARY GIANT HYDATID DISEASE OF THE SPLEEN: A RARE CASE REPORT WITH REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanyam

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The most common organ involved in hydatid disease is the liver, followed by the lungs. Hydatid disease of spleen is a rare clinical condition, as even in the endemic region the frequency is reported to be 0.5 – 4% of abdominal hydatid diseases. Most commonly splenic involvement is secondary i.e., along with other organs. Primary hydatid diseases in s pleen is rare, here we are reporting a rare case of primary splenic hydatid disease

  4. A rare case of Weil's disease with alveolar haemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Abhiram; Nandy, Manab; Pal, Dipankar; Mallik, Sudesna

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis, a disease of protean manifestations occurs sporadically throughout the year with a peak seasonal incidence during the rainy season mimicking other febrile viral illness. In the rare case, the disease leads to renal and hepatic involvement with hemorrhage which may be associated with multisystem organ dysfunction in form of pulmonary, cardiac and central nervous system, when it is known as Weil's disease. Rarely haemorrhagic manifestations are assosciated. Early diagnosis is important as sometimes the disease may be life threatening. Proper antibiotics results in dramatic improvement. We hereby presented a case that had clinical features of Weil's disease with cough, dyspnoea and haemoptysis. Leptospirosis was detected on ELISA testing. Patient was cured rapidly with antibiotics. PMID:25183149

  5. A rare case of Weil's disease with alveolar haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhiram Chakrabarti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis, a disease of protean manifestations occurs sporadically throughout the year with a peak seasonal incidence during the rainy season mimicking other febrile viral illness. In the rare case, the disease leads to renal and hepatic involvement with hemorrhage which may be associated with multisystem organ dysfunction in form of pulmonary, cardiac and central nervous system, when it is known as Weil's disease. Rarely haemorrhagic manifestations are assosciated. Early diagnosis is important as sometimes the disease may be life threatening. Proper antibiotics results in dramatic improvement. We hereby presented a case that had clinical features of Weil's disease with cough, dyspnoea and haemoptysis. Leptospirosis was detected on ELISA testing. Patient was cured rapidly with antibiotics.

  6. Sustainable public health systems for rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrelli, Rita Maria; Gentile, Amalia Egle; De Santis, Marta; Taruscio, Domenica

    2017-01-01

    In the framework of the Joint Action for Rare Diseases (RD-ACTION), a specific task was defined to identify mechanisms influencing sustainability, equity and resilience of health systems for rare diseases (RDs). Literature narrative review on health systems sustainability and resilience for RDs. Years: 2000-2015. Databases: PubMed, Scopus, EBSCOHost, EMBAL, PASCAL, EMBASE, STN International and GoogleScholar. interpretive synthesis concept and thematic analysis (Dixon-Wood, et al.). 97 papers and 4 grey literature publications were identified. Two main topics stand out: economic evaluation and networks. The first topic did not identify widely accepted criterion to assign more weight to individuals with greater health needs. Healthcare network are identified as increasingly important for sustainability and resilience, in all of their aspects: professional "expertise", "experience" networks of users and carers; policy, learning, and interest networks. Possible mechanisms for ensuring sustainability can be identified in networking, patients' empowerment and reorienting healthcare towards integrated community and home care.

  7. The Matchmaker Exchange: a platform for rare disease gene discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippakis, Anthony A; Azzariti, Danielle R; Beltran, Sergi; Brookes, Anthony J; Brownstein, Catherine A; Brudno, Michael; Brunner, Han G; Buske, Orion J; Carey, Knox; Doll, Cassie; Dumitriu, Sergiu; Dyke, Stephanie O M; den Dunnen, Johan T; Firth, Helen V; Gibbs, Richard A; Girdea, Marta; Gonzalez, Michael; Haendel, Melissa A; Hamosh, Ada; Holm, Ingrid A; Huang, Lijia; Hurles, Matthew E; Hutton, Ben; Krier, Joel B; Misyura, Andriy; Mungall, Christopher J; Paschall, Justin; Paten, Benedict; Robinson, Peter N; Schiettecatte, François; Sobreira, Nara L; Swaminathan, Ganesh J; Taschner, Peter E; Terry, Sharon F; Washington, Nicole L; Züchner, Stephan; Boycott, Kym M; Rehm, Heidi L

    2015-10-01

    There are few better examples of the need for data sharing than in the rare disease community, where patients, physicians, and researchers must search for "the needle in a haystack" to uncover rare, novel causes of disease within the genome. Impeding the pace of discovery has been the existence of many small siloed datasets within individual research or clinical laboratory databases and/or disease-specific organizations, hoping for serendipitous occasions when two distant investigators happen to learn they have a rare phenotype in common and can "match" these cases to build evidence for causality. However, serendipity has never proven to be a reliable or scalable approach in science. As such, the Matchmaker Exchange (MME) was launched to provide a robust and systematic approach to rare disease gene discovery through the creation of a federated network connecting databases of genotypes and rare phenotypes using a common application programming interface (API). The core building blocks of the MME have been defined and assembled. Three MME services have now been connected through the API and are available for community use. Additional databases that support internal matching are anticipated to join the MME network as it continues to grow.

  8. [Wilson's disease: clinical spectrum of liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa Palominos, Alejandra; Ibáñez Samaniego, Luis; Catalina Rodríguez, María-Vega; Pajares Díaz, José; Clemente Ricote, Gerardo

    2013-02-01

    Wilson's disease is a hereditary autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism,characterized by copper accumulation in the liver and brain. This rare entity, which has a broad clinical spectrum, is often difficult to diagnose and should therefore always be suspected in patients with liver disease of unclear cause. We describe two types of manifestation of liver disease in two patients; the first developed fulminant hepatic failure requiring urgent liver transplantation and the second showed advanced chronic liver disease and received standard medical treatment. The objective of this clinical observation is to analyze the diagnosis of Wilson's disease in two patients with distinct onset, illustrating the broad clinical spectrum of the disease, and its treatment.

  9. Intracranial hydatid cyst: imaging findings of a rare disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taslakian, Bedros; Darwish, Houssein

    2016-09-12

    Hydatid disease (echinococcosis) is a worldwide zoonosis produced by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. The disease is endemic in many parts of the world, particularly in the Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, South America and central and south Europe. Intracranial hydatid disease is considered a rare disease and may be sometimes very difficult to diagnose based on the clinical and laboratory findings. Therefore, it is important to be aware of the condition and the imaging findings even in the non-endemic parts of the world. We report the case of a 12-year-old boy who presented with headache and vomiting for a few months. The mass was totally excised, with no postoperative complications. We present MR spectroscopy (MRS) findings in this operatively proven case of hydatid cyst of the brain. We discuss imaging findings, in particular the findings on MRS, which is rarely reported in the literature.

  10. Herpes zoster oticus: A rare clinical entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Gondivkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster oticus also known as Ramsay Hunt syndrome is a rare complication of herpes zoster in which reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus infection in the geniculate ganglion causes otalgia, auricular vesicles, and peripheral facial paralysis. Ramsay Hunt syndrome is rare in children and affects both sexes equally. Incidence and clinical severity increases when host immunity is compromised. Because these symptoms do not always present at the onset, this syndrome can be misdiagnosed. Although secondary to Bell′s palsy in terms of the cause of acute atraumatic peripheral facial paralysis, Ramsay Hunt syndrome, with incidence ranged from 0.3 to 18%, has a worse prognosis. Herpes zoster oticus accounts for about 12% cases of facial palsy, which is usually unilateral and complete and full recovery occurs in only about 20% of untreated patients. The most advisable method to treat Ramsay Hunt syndrome is the combination therapy with acyclovir and prednisone but still not promising, and several prerequisites are required for better results. We present a case of 32-year-old man suffering from Ramsay Hunt syndrome with grade V facial palsy treated effectively with rehabilitation program, after the termination of the combination therapy of acyclovir and prednisone.

  11. [Extrinsic allergic alveolitis--rarely diagnosed disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauková, D; Marget, I; Plutinský, J

    2009-05-01

    Extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA), known as hypersensitive pneumonitis, causes interstitial lung involvement by inhaled antigen. The clinical presentation of the disease has been defined as acute, subacute and chronic. The most often symptoms of the acute form of the disease are flu-like symptoms, dyspnoe and cough. The progressive dyspnoe in particullary is characterized for the chronic form of EAA. Dyspnoe is worsed, if the disease is combinied with usual respiratory infection or reexposition of inhaled antigen. It seems the diagnostic definition of EAA should be easy and prevalence of EAA relative high. The disease belongs to the group of interstitial lung diseases and it is underestimated as a matter of fact. The clinic, radiographic, laboratory and histologic abnormalities are results of inhaled antigen contact and support the diagnosis of EAA. Specific IgG antibodies against the offending antigen along with them are consedered to be detected (established) of EAA.

  12. Search for rare liver diseases: the case of glycosylation defects mimicking Wilson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socha, Piotr; Vajro, Pietro; Lefeber, Dirk; Adamowicz, Maciej; Tanner, Stuart

    2014-09-01

    Pediatric hepatology appears to be a very specific field of paediatrics which deals mainly with rare diseases although clinical features can be commonly found - like increased activity of transaminases. Some of these rare diseases like Wilson disease are commonly looked for and recently Wilsonian like phenotypes have been described which additionally presented with abnormal glycosylation of the plasma protein transferrin. In a subgroup of those patients with specific additional clinical symptoms (cleft uvula, low blood sugar, rhabdomyolysis and dilated cardiomyopathy) phosphoglucomutase 1 deficiency was identified. We recommend screening for abnormal glycosylation of the plasma protein transferrin in children with unexplained liver injury.

  13. Essential thrombocythemia: a rare disease in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Maimone Beatrice

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential thrombocythemia is an acquired myeloproliferative disorder characterized by the proliferation of megakaryocytes in bone marrow, leading to a persistent increase in the number of circulating platelets and thus increasing the risk for thrombotic and hemorrhagic events. The disease features leukocytosis, splenomegaly, vascular occlusive events, hemorrhages and vasomotor disorders. The intricate mechanisms underlying the molecular pathogenesis of this disorder are not completely understood and are still a matter of discussion. Essential thrombocythemia is an extremely rare disorder during childhood. We report on a case of essential thrombocythemia in a child and discuss the diagnostic approach and treatment strategy.

  14. Mechanistic and therapeutic insights gained from studying rare skeletal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Laura L; Warman, Matthew L

    2015-07-01

    Rare bone diseases account for 5% of all birth defects and can cause significant morbidity throughout patients' lives. Significant progress is being made to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these diseases. This paper summarizes presentation highlights of a workshop on Rare Skeletal Diseases convened to explore how the study of rare diseases has influenced the field's understanding of bone anabolism and catabolism and directed the search for new therapies benefiting patients with rare conditions as well as patients with common skeletal disorders.

  15. Rare disease research: Breaking the privacy barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascalzoni, Deborah; Paradiso, Angelo; Hansson, Matts

    2014-06-01

    Due to the few patients affected, rare disease research has to count on international registries to exist in order to produce significant research outputs. Data sharing of registries is therefore a unique resource to allow rare disease research to flourish and any lost data will jeopardize the quality of an already extremely difficult research. The rules usually applied to research such as the right to withdraw or the need for specific consent for every use of data can be detrimental in order to get effective results. Privacy rights regulated through traditional informed consent mechanisms have been regarded as a major barrier in order to effectively share data worldwide. Some authors argue that this barrier hampers results that could be beneficial to the patients so that another right will be overstated: the right to quality healthcare. We argue in this paper that privacy has been often interpreted just one-sided as the right to secrecy but it can entail another meaning: the right to manage one's own private sphere. Managing it pertains, not only to the right to deny access, but also to the right to grant access. At the same time research on patient participation and transparency shows that new forms of IT-based informed consent can provide a good balance between the right of individuals to be in control of their data and the opportunity for science to pursue international research.

  16. Rare disease research: Breaking the privacy barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Mascalzoni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the few patients affected, rare disease research has to count on international registries to exist in order to produce significant research outputs. Data sharing of registries is therefore a unique resource to allow rare disease research to flourish and any lost data will jeopardize the quality of an already extremely difficult research. The rules usually applied to research such as the right to withdraw or the need for specific consent for every use of data can be detrimental in order to get effective results. Privacy rights regulated through traditional informed consent mechanisms have been regarded as a major barrier in order to effectively share data worldwide. Some authors argue that this barrier hampers results that could be beneficial to the patients so that another right will be overstated: the right to quality healthcare. We argue in this paper that privacy has been often interpreted just one-sided as the right to secrecy but it can entail another meaning: the right to manage one's own private sphere. Managing it pertains, not only to the right to deny access, but also to the right to grant access. At the same time research on patient participation and transparency shows that new forms of IT-based informed consent can provide a good balance between the right of individuals to be in control of their data and the opportunity for science to pursue international research.

  17. [Refsum disease--rare, but world-famous].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokke, O

    2001-01-30

    Sigvald Bernhard Refsum (1907-91) was an outstanding Norwegian neurologist, highly respected and recognised both nationally and internationally. His main scientific achievement was that he by clinical means singled out a previously unknown disease entity in the multitude of different neurodegenerative features. In his monograph from 1946 he named the disease "heredopathia atactica polyneuritiformis"; however, it was rapidly known as Refsum's disease. Twenty years later, two German scientists, Klenk and Kahlke, detected large amounts of a peculiar branched-chain fatty acid, phytanic acid, in a Refsum patient. This started an amazing revelation of the biochemical background of the disease, and also led to a logical and effective treatment. Although Refsum's disease is extremely rare, it has become well-known due to this elucidation of both the normal metabolism of phytanic acid and the pathophysiology of the disease.

  18. Innovative research methods for studying treatments for rare diseases: methodological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Joshua J; Thompson, Lauren; O'Keefe, Kelly; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2014-11-24

    To examine methods for generating evidence on health outcomes in patients with rare diseases. Methodological review of existing literature. PubMed, Embase, and Academic Search Premier searched for articles describing innovative approaches to randomized trial design and analysis methods and methods for conducting observational research in patients with rare diseases. We assessed information related to the proposed methods, the specific rare disease being studied, and outcomes from the application of the methods. We summarize methods with respect to their advantages in studying health outcomes in rare diseases and provide examples of their application. We identified 46 articles that proposed or described methods for studying patient health outcomes in rare diseases. Articles covered a wide range of rare diseases and most (72%) were published in 2008 or later. We identified 16 research strategies for studying rare disease. Innovative clinical trial methods minimize sample size requirements (n=4) and maximize the proportion of patients who receive active treatment (n=2), strategies crucial to studying small populations of patients with limited treatment choices. No studies describing unique methods for conducting observational studies in patients with rare diseases were identified. Though numerous studies apply unique clinical trial designs and considerations to assess patient health outcomes in rare diseases, less attention has been paid to innovative methods for studying rare diseases using observational data. © Gagne et al 2014.

  19. Rare Lung Diseases III: Pulmonary Langerhans’ Cell Histiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C Juvet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary Langerhans’ cell histiocytosis (PLCH is an unusual cystic lung disease that is also characterized by extrapulmonary manifestations. The current review discusses the presenting features and relevant diagnostic testing and treatment options for PLCH in the context of a clinical case. While the focus of the present article is adult PLCH and its pulmonary manifestations, it is important for clinicians to distinguish the adult and pediatric forms of the disease, as well as to be alert for possible extrapulmonary complications. A major theme of the current series of articles on rare lung diseases has been the translation of insights gained from fundamental research to the clinic. Accordingly, the understanding of dendritic cell biology in this disease has led to important advances in the care of patients with PLCH.

  20. Research methods to change clinical practice for patients with rare cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingham, Lucinda; Malottki, Kinga; Steven, Neil

    2016-02-01

    Rare cancers are a growing group as a result of reclassification of common cancers by molecular markers. There is therefore an increasing need to identify methods to assess interventions that are sufficiently robust to potentially affect clinical practice in this setting. Methods advocated for clinical trials in rare diseases are not necessarily applicable in rare cancers. This Series paper describes research methods that are relevant for rare cancers in relation to the range of incidence levels. Strategies that maximise recruitment, minimise sample size, or maximise the usefulness of the evidence could enable the application of conventional clinical trial design to rare cancer populations. Alternative designs that address specific challenges for rare cancers with the aim of potentially changing clinical practice include Bayesian designs, uncontrolled n-of-1 trials, and umbrella and basket trials. Pragmatic solutions must be sought to enable some level of evidence-based health care for patients with rare cancers.

  1. A Rare Occurance with Epidermolysis Bullosa Disease: Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya Cimen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa is a congenital and herediter vesiculobullous disease. Dystrophic form of this disease is characterized by severe malnutrition, failure to thrive, adhesions at fingers, joint contractures related with the formation of scar tissues, carcinoma of the skin, anemia, hipoalbuminemia, wound enfections and sepsis. Rarely, mortal dilated cardiomyopathy may occur in patients. In this report we present a 13 year-old pediatric patient with dilated cardiomyopathy, clinically diagnosed with Epidermolysis bullosa as well as a review of recent related literature.

  2. [Pycnodysostosis: a rare disease with frequent fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Lázaro, J A; Linares Álvarez, L

    2014-04-01

    Pycnodysostosis is a rare disease caused by a dysfunction of the osteoclasts due to a mutation in the cathepsin K gene. We present a case of a young adult patient with the above mentioned syndrome, who suffered an atypical fracture of the tibia after a low energy fall. Some bone changes that could have predisposed the fracture were observed when examined in the Emergency Department. Not long afterwards he suffered the same type of fracture in another tibia. Due to the conditions typical of the pycnodysostosis, the above mentioned fracture required an unconventional approach for this mid-shaft tibial fracture (osteosynthesis plate), combined with a longer consolidation time. The case was finally resolved satisfactorily. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. A rare disease in an atypical location - Kimura's Disease of the upper extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Alan Cheuk Si; Lau, Vince Wing Hang [Queen Mary Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hong Kong (China); Au Yeung, Rex Kwok Him [University of Hong Kong, Department of Pathology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-12-15

    Kimura's disease is a rare chronic inflammatory disorder predominantly affecting young Asian male patients, occurring mainly in the head and neck regions. Kimura's disease of the upper extremity is extremely rare, and previous case reports in the literature show similar imaging characteristics with consistent location at the medial epitrochlear region, predominantly with unilateral involvement. We present the first reported case of Kimura's disease affecting the anterolateral aspect of the upper arm, sparing the medial epitrochlear region, illustrating that with typical MR appearance and serology, the involvement of this rare disease in an atypical location still warrants consideration of this diagnosis. There was also bilateral asymmetrical involvement in our patient, suggesting the possibility of a propensity for Kimura's disease affecting the upper extremities to have bilateral involvement, which may necessitate imaging of the clinically asymptomatic contralateral limb in these patients for early lesion identification and treatment. (orig.)

  4. Scrotal calcinosis: a very rare multiple clinical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiummariello, S; Figus, A; Menichini, G; Bellezza, G; Alfano, C

    2009-12-01

    Scrotal calcinosis (SC) is a rare benign disease that affects patients in childhood or early adulthood. It is characterized by slow-growing yellowish-white nodules consisting of deposits of calcium and phosphates, within the scrotal skin. The nodules vary in number, and can be solitary or grouped. Owing to the age of onset and anatomical location, SC may be a source of embarrassment and lead to social isolation. Because of its rarity, the aetiology of SC is still controversial. We report a very rare case of an SC in a 59-year-old white man who presented with multiple nodules with different clinical patterns in the scrotum, which had been present for > 42 years. Despite the rarity and the multiple long-lasting lesions, surgical excision of the scrotal nodules can offer a very good aesthetic outcome in a single procedure even under local anaesthesia.

  5. Renal replacement therapy for rare diseases affecting the kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wühl, Elke; van Stralen, Karlijn J; Wanner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    and separately for children and adults. METHODS: The Orphanet classification of rare disease was searched for rare diseases potentially causing ESRD, and these diagnosis codes were mapped to the corresponding ERA-EDTA primary renal disease codes. Thirty-one diagnoses were defined as rare diseases causing ESRD...... disease affected young patients in up to 46%. On 31 December 2011, 20 595 patients (12.4% of the total RRT population) were on RRT for ESRD caused by a rare disease. The point prevalence was 32.5 per million age-related population in children and 152.0 in adults. Only 5.8% of these patients were younger...

  6. A rare clinic entity: Huge trichobezoar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Hidayatullah; Muhammadi, Marzia; Saberi, Bismillah; Sarwari, Mohammad Arif

    2016-01-01

    Trichobezoar is a rare clinical entity in which a ball of hair amasses within the alimentary tract. It can either be found as isolated mass in the stomach or may extend into the intestine. Trichobezoars mostly occur in young females with psychiatric disorders such as trichophagia and trichotillomania. Authors present a giant trichobezoar in an 18year old female presented with complaints of upper abdominal mass, epigastric area pain, anorexia and weight loss. The patient underwent trans-abdominal ultrasonography (USG), Computed tomography (CT), upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and subsequently laparotomy. USG was inconclusive due to non-specific findings. It revealed a thick echogenic layer with posterior dirty shadowing extending from the left sub-diaphragmatic area to the right sub hepatic region obscuring the adjacent structures. Abdominal CT images revealed a huge, well defined, multi-layered, heterogeneous, solid appearing, non-enhancing mass lesion in the gastric lumen extending from the gastric fundus to the pyloric canal. An endoscopic attempt was performed for removal of this intraluminal mass, but due to its large size, and hard nature, the endoscopic removal was unsuccessful. Finally the large trichobezoar was removed with open laparotomy. Trichobezoars should be suspected in young females with long standing upper abdominal masses; as the possibility of malignancy is not very common in this age group. While USG is inconclusive, trichobezoar can be accurately diagnosed with CT. In patient with huge trichobezoar, laparotomy can be performed firstly because of big size and location of mass, and psychiatric recommendation should be made to prevent relapse of this entity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. A comprehensive global genotype-phenotype database for rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillano, Daniel; Oprea, Gabriela-Elena; Schmitz, Yvonne; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M; Abou Jamra, Rami; Rolfs, Arndt

    2017-01-01

    The ability to discover genetic variants in a patient runs far ahead of the ability to interpret them. Databases with accurate descriptions of the causal relationship between the variants and the phenotype are valuable since these are critical tools in clinical genetic diagnostics. Here, we introduce a comprehensive and global genotype-phenotype database focusing on rare diseases. This database (CentoMD (®)) is a browser-based tool that enables access to a comprehensive, independently curated system utilizing stringent high-quality criteria and a quickly growing repository of genetic and human phenotype ontology (HPO)-based clinical information. Its main goals are to aid the evaluation of genetic variants, to enhance the validity of the genetic analytical workflow, to increase the quality of genetic diagnoses, and to improve evaluation of treatment options for patients with hereditary diseases. The database software correlates clinical information from consented patients and probands of different geographical backgrounds with a large dataset of genetic variants and, when available, biomarker information. An automated follow-up tool is incorporated that informs all users whenever a variant classification has changed. These unique features fully embedded in a CLIA/CAP-accredited quality management system allow appropriate data quality and enhanced patient safety. More than 100,000 genetically screened individuals are documented in the database, resulting in more than 470 million variant detections. Approximately, 57% of the clinically relevant and uncertain variants in the database are novel. Notably, 3% of the genetic variants identified and previously reported in the literature as being associated with a particular rare disease were reclassified, based on internal evidence, as clinically irrelevant. The database offers a comprehensive summary of the clinical validity and causality of detected gene variants with their associated phenotypes, and is a valuable tool

  8. Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Rare Disease, Especially for the Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Rare Disease, Especially for the Healthy Language: ... based hand rub if washing is not possible. Necrotizing Fasciitis Is Rarely Spread from Person to Person Most ...

  9. Rare lung disease research: strategies for improving identification and recruitment of research participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Samir; Bayoumi, Ahmed M; Faughnan, Marie E

    2011-11-01

    Research in rare lung diseases faces methodologic limitations by virtue of the small number of participants available to be studied. We explored several strategies that may improve researchers' ability to identify and recruit research participants with rare lung diseases. We provide an overview of strategies based on available evidence, previously used approaches, and reasoning. First, disease detection is generally poor and may be improved through strategies targeted at primary care practitioners or directly at patients, thus increasing the pool of patients available for research studies. Next, standardization of case definitions in rare lung diseases is often lacking, hindering research recruitment efforts because of confusion over appropriate recruitment criteria. Expert consensus statements can enhance both clinical care and research recruitment by standardizing definitions. Finally, recruitment strategies using rare lung disease registries, clinical research networks, novel Internet-based direct patient recruitment approaches, and patient organizations may facilitate recruitment of patients with rare lung diseases. In summary, although several strategies for improving the identification and recruitment of research participants with rare lung diseases have been proposed, published examples are few. Objective measurement and reporting of novel recruitment methods and collaboration among researchers facing the same limitations across various rare lung diseases are required. Advancements in this area are vital to the design and performance of much-needed robust clinical studies across the spectrum of rare lung diseases.

  10. [Lactate acidosis: a rare or common disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubát, K

    1995-05-01

    The authors present a survey of 50 documented cases of metabolic lactic acidosis (MLAC) recorded in the course of 5 years. To this study cases of severe hyperlactataemia (determined minimum lactate level of concentration 4 mmol/l) have been included. The sample consists of patients hospitalized at the Department of Internal Medicine Litomĕrice (hinterland of about 110,000 inhabitants). Liver involvement in 5 cases, cardiogenous shock in 6 cases, sepsis in 2 cases were the cause of lactic acidosis. The administration of biguanids (Adebit, Silubin R, Diformin) seems to be the probable cause in 21 cases, other cases were triggered by rarer causes. Dehydratation (16), vomiting (9), diarrhoea (11) dominate often in the clinical picture. The patients were admitted to the hospital often unconscious, with diagnose of vasculo-cerebral incidence, transitory ischaemic incidence... Quit rarely the typical Kussmaul's respiratory (only 9 cases) was recorded. Hyperlactatemia was usually associated with decrease of blood pH (theta = 7.12, pH less than 7.35 was recorded in 49 cases, pH less than 6.8 in 5 cases) and with decrease of BE value (= Ccoase, theta = -15.3 mmol/l). When the hypochloremia and/or hypocapnia was simultaneously more severe, only in these cases the value of pH was within physiological limits or even increased (10). The conclusions show that MLAC is not a rare disorder, however, its occurrence is depended rather on the clinician's capacity to diagnose this disorder and to indicate lactate examination. Usual signs of acidosis (Kussmaul's respiratory, decrease of pH, decrease of BE) can be missing in many cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Resources, challenges and way forward in rare mitochondrial diseases research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Neeraj Kumar; Singh, Vipin; Bhardwaj, Anshu

    2015-01-01

    Over 300 million people are affected by about 7000 rare diseases globally. There are tremendous resource limitations and challenges in driving research and drug development for rare diseases. Hence, innovative approaches are needed to identify potential solutions. This review focuses on the resources developed over the past years for analysis of genome data towards understanding disease biology especially in the context of mitochondrial diseases, given that mitochondria are central to major cellular pathways and their dysfunction leads to a broad spectrum of diseases. Platforms for collaboration of research groups, clinicians and patients and the advantages of community collaborative efforts in addressing rare diseases are also discussed. The review also describes crowdsourcing and crowdfunding efforts in rare diseases research and how the upcoming initiatives for understanding disease biology including analyses of large number of genomes are also applicable to rare diseases.

  12. Hirayama Disease: A Rare Disease with Unusual Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanai, Vanlalmalsawmdawngliana

    2016-01-01

    Hirayama disease, also known as monomelic amyotrophy (MMA), is a rare cervical myelopathy that manifests itself as a self-limited, asymmetrical, slowly progressive atrophic weakness of the forearms and hands predominantly in young males. The forward displacement of the posterior dura of the lower cervical dural canal during neck flexion has been postulated to lead to lower cervical cord atrophy with asymmetric flattening. We report a case of Hirayama disease in a 25-year-old Indian man presenting with gradually progressive asymmetrical weakness and wasting of both hands and forearms along with unusual features of autonomic dysfunction and upper motor neuron lesion. PMID:28097028

  13. Hirayama Disease: A Rare Disease with Unusual Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hirayama disease, also known as monomelic amyotrophy (MMA, is a rare cervical myelopathy that manifests itself as a self-limited, asymmetrical, slowly progressive atrophic weakness of the forearms and hands predominantly in young males. The forward displacement of the posterior dura of the lower cervical dural canal during neck flexion has been postulated to lead to lower cervical cord atrophy with asymmetric flattening. We report a case of Hirayama disease in a 25-year-old Indian man presenting with gradually progressive asymmetrical weakness and wasting of both hands and forearms along with unusual features of autonomic dysfunction and upper motor neuron lesion.

  14. Hirayama Disease: A Rare Disease with Unusual Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuradha, S; Fanai, Vanlalmalsawmdawngliana

    2016-01-01

    Hirayama disease, also known as monomelic amyotrophy (MMA), is a rare cervical myelopathy that manifests itself as a self-limited, asymmetrical, slowly progressive atrophic weakness of the forearms and hands predominantly in young males. The forward displacement of the posterior dura of the lower cervical dural canal during neck flexion has been postulated to lead to lower cervical cord atrophy with asymmetric flattening. We report a case of Hirayama disease in a 25-year-old Indian man presenting with gradually progressive asymmetrical weakness and wasting of both hands and forearms along with unusual features of autonomic dysfunction and upper motor neuron lesion.

  15. China launched a pilot project to improve its rare disease healthcare levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yazhou; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Han, Jinxiang

    2014-01-27

    China is facing the great challenge of serving the world's largest rare disease population. It is necessary to develop a specific medical plan to increase the levels of optimal prevention, diagnosis and treatment of rare diseases under the existing clinical service structures in China. In 2013, China launched its first pilot project focused on 20 representative rare diseases. A national network including approximately 100 provincial or municipal medical centers has been established to enable collaboration on rare diseases across China. The main objectives for this project are to develop and apply medical guidelines and clinical pathways for rare diseases, to establish a rare disease patient registry and data repository system, and to promote molecular testing for rare genetic disorders. This project also emphasizes building close links among the collaborative network, clinicians on the frontlines in basic medical services institutions and rare disease patient organizations. Primarily, this project expects to develop an actionable medical services plan to increase the delivery of quality healthcare for individuals and families living with rare diseases in China within five years.

  16. The importance of international collaboration for rare diseases research: a European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julkowska, D; Austin, C P; Cutillo, C M; Gancberg, D; Hager, C; Halftermeyer, J; Jonker, A H; Lau, L P L; Norstedt, I; Rath, A; Schuster, R; Simelyte, E; van Weely, S

    2017-09-01

    Over the last two decades, important contributions were made at national, European and international levels to foster collaboration into rare diseases research. The European Union (EU) has put much effort into funding rare diseases research, encouraging national funding organizations to collaborate together in the E-Rare program, setting up European Reference Networks for rare diseases and complex conditions, and initiating the International Rare Diseases Research Consortium (IRDiRC) together with the National Institutes of Health in the USA. Co-ordination of the activities of funding agencies, academic researchers, companies, regulatory bodies, and patient advocacy organizations and partnerships with, for example, the European Research Infrastructures maximizes the collective impact of global investments in rare diseases research. This contributes to accelerating progress, for example, in faster diagnosis through enhanced discovery of causative genes, better understanding of natural history of rare diseases through creation of common registries and databases and boosting of innovative therapeutic approaches. Several examples of funded pre-clinical and clinical gene therapy projects show that integration of multinational and multidisciplinary expertize generates new knowledge and can result in multicentre gene therapy trials. International collaboration in rare diseases research is key to improve the life of people living with a rare disease.

  17. Rare but Not so Rare? The Evolving Spectrum of Whipple's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Conly

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about Whipple's disease began to emerge in 1907, when George Hoyt Whipple recognized the first case of the disease that now bears his name. He reported the case of a 36-year-old physician with "a gradual loss of weight and strength, stools consisting chiefly of neutral fat and fatty acids, indefinite abdominal signs, and a peculiar multiple arthritis" (1. Findings at autopsy consisted of poly-serositis, aortic valve vegetations and deposition of fat in the intestinal mucosa and regional lymph nodes with marked infiltration by foamy macrophages (1. It was originally thought to be a disorder of fat metabolism, and the term 'intestinal lipodystrophy' was proposed. Whipple's disease has since been recognized as a rare, multivisceral, chronic disease with a clinical presentation dominated by a symptom triad of diarrhea, weight loss and malabsorption. However, digestive symptoms are often preceded for months or years by other symptoms, the most common being arthralgia, although cardiovascular, neurological or pulmonary involvement may be more prominent at times. Once considered the ideal case report, recent characterization of Tropheryma whippelii by means of broad range bacterial ribosomal DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis (2,3 and its subsequent cultivation (4 has led to a veritable explosion of individual case reports, case series and hitherto unrecognized manifestations of the disease, such that it is now considered an underdiagnosed infectious disease (5. It is timely to provide an update on new developments in Whipple's disease.

  18. Human lagochilascariasis-A rare helminthic disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulcinea Maria Barbosa Campos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lagochilascariasis is a parasitic disease caused by a helminth of the order Ascaroidea, genus Lagochilascaris that comprises 6 species, among which only Lagochilascaris minor Leiper, 1909, is implicated in the human form of the disease. It is remarkable that the majority of cases of human lagochilascariasis in the Americas have been reported in Brazil. The natural definitive hosts of this parasite seem to be wild felines and canines. Lagochilascariasis is mostly a chronic human disease that can persist for several years, in which the parasite burrows into the subcutaneous tissues of the neck, paranasal sinuses, and mastoid. L. minor exhibits remarkable ability to migrate through the tissues of its hosts, destroying even bone tissue. Fatal cases have been described in which the parasite was found in the lungs or central nervous system. Treatment is often palliative, with recurrence of lesions. This paper summarizes the main features of the disease and its etiologic agent, including prevalence, life cycle, clinical course, and treatment.

  19. Rare disease diagnosis as an information retrieval task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragusin, Radu; Petcu, Paula; Lioma, Christina;

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly more clinicians use web Information Retrieval (IR) systems to assist them in diagnosing difficult medical cases, for instance rare diseases that they may not be familiar with. However, web IR systems are not necessarily optimised for this task. For instance, clinicians’ queries tend...... search and offline retrieval from a rare disease collection indicate that the retrieval of rare diseases is an open problem with room for improvement....

  20. Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NCATS collaborates with the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) to support GARD, a center designed to provide comprehensive information about rare and...

  1. Ofuji disease: a rare dermatosis and its challenging therapeutic approach*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito, Fernanda Freitas; Martelli, Antonio Carlos Ceribelli; Cavalcante, Maria Lopes Lamenha Lins; Pinto, Ana Cecília Versiani Duarte; Itimura, Gabriela; Soares, Cleverson Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis (EPF) or Ofuji disease is a rare dermatosis, prone to recurrence and chronicity. The peak incidence occurs in the third decade of life and its exact etiology remains unknown. Evidence suggests that the expression of adhesion molecules and the production of cytokines activate the follicular unit, but the stimulus that triggers these changes remains unclear. The three clinical variants reported in the literature include classic EPF, immunosuppression-associated EPF, and infancy-associated EPF. We report a case of eosinophilic pustular folliculitis with peculiar epidemiological characteristics, which represents a challenging therapeutic scenario. PMID:27828641

  2. Pregnancy and Medically Assisted Conception in Rare Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-23

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Spondyloarthritis; Psoriatic Arthritis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Antiphospholipid Syndrome; Sjogren Syndrome; Scleroderma; Myositis; Vasculitis; Mastocytosis; Various Autoimmune and/or Systemic and/or Rare Diseases

  3. A rare case of febrile abdominal pain revealing Horton's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudet, Arnaud; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Ghazali, Aiham Daniel

    2017-07-08

    Horton's disease is a systemic inflammatory vasculitis, usually found in persons over 50years old. It affects medium and large-sized arteries stemming from the external carotid, especially the superficial temporal arteries. It can affect extracranial large vessels but only rarely the aorta. Diagnosis of aortitis is difficult and its incidence is probably underestimated. A 68-year-old Caucasian woman consulted in an emergency department for febrile abdominal pain with inflammatory syndrome. Abdomen was soft with right-side flank sensitivity. A contrast-enhanced CT scan showed aortitis from the descending aorta to the iliac arteries without complication. Because of age, clinical presentation and aortitis, Horton disease was suspected. The temporal artery biopsy showed a histological aspect of degenerative endarteritis with intimal thickening and luminal stenosis. High-dose corticosteroid therapy was introduced which improved clinical conditions and resulted in the amendment of the pain. In the present case, this patient had Horton's disease, based on 3 criteria of The American College of Rheumatology (age, temporal artery abnormalities and inflammatory syndrome) associated with aortitis. However, aortitis is a rare complication of Horton disease and is a major cause of mortality inasmuch as it can be complicated by aneurysm and dissection. It is unusual to diagnose Horton's disease from aortitis symptoms without complications. The aorta represents the most severe localization of Horton's disease. It should not be ignored in etiological hypotheses regarding febrile abdominal pain in the elderly. Corticosteroids should be started rapidly at high doses and temporal artery biopsy should be planned. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Rare disease policies to improve care for patients in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwell, Charlotte; Aymé, Ségolène

    2015-10-01

    Rare diseases are those with a particularly low prevalence; in Europe, diseases are considered to be rare when they affect not more than 5 in 10000 persons in the European Union. The specificities of rare diseases make the area a veritable public health challenge: the limited number of patients and scarcity of knowledge and expertise single rare diseases out as a distinctive domain of high European added-value. The Orphan Medicinal Product Regulation of 1999 was the first European legislative text concerning rare diseases, followed by many initiatives, including recommendations by the Council of Ministers of the European Union in 2009. These initiatives contributed to the development of rare diseases policies at European and national level aimed at improving care for patients with rare diseases. A review of the political framework at European level and in European countries is provided to demonstrate how legislation has created a dynamic that is progressively improving care for patients with rare diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: "Current Research on the Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (Batten Disease)".

  5. Rare clinical form of glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ejma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (glioblastoma multiforme - GBM is the most malignant tumor classified by WHO. It is also the most common primary CNS tumor with a very aggressive course and unfavourable prognosis, usually develops in adults, and is typically located supratentorially in the fronto-temporal region. However, the literature describes an unusual position of GBM (e.g. spinal cord, pons, pineal region, familial gliomas unconnected with the family of gliomas predisposed to the occurrence of syndromes, unusual glioma and metastatic sites, gliomas transplanted with organs. In this paper, based on the available literature, the authors discuss an unusual and rare form of glioblastoma multiforme.

  6. From research on rare diseases to new orphan drug development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemstra, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Rare diseases have a prevalence of lower than 5 in 10,000 inhabitants and are life-threatening or chronically debilitating. It is estimated that worldwide more than 5000 rare diseases exist, which account for over 55 million patients in the EU and the US together. However, the development of drugs

  7. From research on rare diseases to new orphan drug development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemstra, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Rare diseases have a prevalence of lower than 5 in 10,000 inhabitants and are life-threatening or chronically debilitating. It is estimated that worldwide more than 5000 rare diseases exist, which account for over 55 million patients in the EU and the US together. However, the development of drugs f

  8. Information Supply Chain System for Managing Rare Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishna-Remani, Venugopal

    2012-01-01

    Timely identification and reporting of rare infectious diseases has important economic, social and health implications. In this study, we investigate how different stakeholders in the existing reporting system influence the timeliness in identification and reporting of rare infectious diseases. Building on the vision of the information supply…

  9. Information Supply Chain System for Managing Rare Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishna-Remani, Venugopal

    2012-01-01

    Timely identification and reporting of rare infectious diseases has important economic, social and health implications. In this study, we investigate how different stakeholders in the existing reporting system influence the timeliness in identification and reporting of rare infectious diseases. Building on the vision of the information supply…

  10. Leveraging Terminological Resources for Mapping between Rare Disease Information Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rance, Bastien; Snyder, Michelle; Lewis, Janine; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Background Rare disease information sources are incompletely and inconsistently cross-referenced to one another, making it difficult for information seekers to navigate across them. The development of such cross-references established manually by experts is generally labor intensive and costly. Objectives To develop an automatic mapping between two of the major rare diseases information sources, GARD and Orphanet, by leveraging terminological resources, especially the UMLS. Methods We map the rare disease terms from Orphanet and ORDR to the UMLS. We use the UMLS as a pivot to bridge between the rare disease terminologies. We compare our results to a mapping obtained through manually established cross-references to OMIM. Results Our mapping has a precision of 94%, a recall of 63% and an F1-score of 76%. Our automatic mapping should help facilitate the development of more complete and consistent cross-references between GARD and Orphanet, and is applicable to other rare disease information sources as well. PMID:23920611

  11. A Rare Clinical Condition: Erasmus Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Ugan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SS is a systemic autoimmune disease progressing with fibrosis of the skin and internal organs, the cause of which cannot be precisely explained. The disease is known to be associated with environmental factors. In particular, exposure to silica powders is believed to have a part in the pathogenesis of the disease by the triggering of a number of immune reactions. Silicosis and SS association is defined as Erasmus Syndrome (ES. Here, we report on a 30-year-old patient working in denim sandblasting who developed SS while being followed for 6 years due to silicosis.

  12. Machado-Joseph disease and other rare spinocerebellar ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matilla-Dueñas, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a group of neurodegenerative diseases characterised by progressive lack of motor coordination leading to major disability. SCAs show high clinical, genetic, molecular and epidemiological variability. In the last one decade, the intensive scientific research devoted to the SCAs is resulting in clear advances and a better understanding on the genetic and nongenetic factors contributing to their pathogenesis which are facilitating the diagnosis, prognosis and development of new therapies. The scope of this chapter is to provide an updated information on Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), the most frequent SCA subtype worldwide and other rare spinocerebellar ataxias including dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA), the X-linked fragile X tremor and ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) and the nonprogressive episodic forms of inherited ataxias (EAs). Furthermore, the different therapeutic strategies that are currently being investigated to treat the ataxia and non-ataxia symptoms in SCAs are also described.

  13. BOWEN’S DISEASE IN LEG - A RARE OCCURRENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowri Sankar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available ar old female presented with complaints of asymptomatic , raised skin lesion over left leg for the past two years , which on local examination revealed a single , localized , well defined , rounded plaque of 4 cm . Clinically Bowen’s disease was not suspected because of its rarity and also occurred in the unusual site . Biopsy was taken and sent for histo - pathological examination . In histo - pathological examination Bowen’s disease was diagnosed . This case is highlighted to show the pathologist’s help in making a proper diagnosis when atypical skin lesions are seen at unusual sites . INTRODUCTION : Most of the overt malignant conditions actually originate as microscopic lesions , which are designated as in - situ carcinomas . These in - situ carcinomas are typically notic ed as intra - epithelial lesions , most often seen in squamous cell epithelial lined tissue eg . oral mucosa , genitals , cervix and skin . In skin , the intra - epithelial carcinoma - in situ lesions may be Bowen’s disease , Bowenoid papulosis or Erythroplasia of Queyrat . In the same way gastrointestinal and urinary system also can show in - situ malignancies . Bowen’s disease was first described by an American dermatologist John T Bowen in the year 1912 . It is most commonly reported in sun exposed sites . It rarely oc curs in patients with darkly pigmented skin . Bowen’s disease is observed in skin and external genitals and is sometimes associated with arsenic poisoning and visceral carcinomas . Bowen’s disease is a rare , persistent , progressive , intra - epithelial carcinom a , 8% of which will develop into an invasive squamous cell carcinoma . Treat

  14. Computer-assisted initial diagnosis of rare diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Alves

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Most documented rare diseases have genetic origin. Because of their low individual frequency, an initial diagnosis based on phenotypic symptoms is not always easy, as practitioners might never have been exposed to patients suffering from the relevant disease. It is thus important to develop tools that facilitate symptom-based initial diagnosis of rare diseases by clinicians. In this work we aimed at developing a computational approach to aid in that initial diagnosis. We also aimed at implementing this approach in a user friendly web prototype. We call this tool Rare Disease Discovery. Finally, we also aimed at testing the performance of the prototype. Methods. Rare Disease Discovery uses the publicly available ORPHANET data set of association between rare diseases and their symptoms to automatically predict the most likely rare diseases based on a patient’s symptoms. We apply the method to retrospectively diagnose a cohort of 187 rare disease patients with confirmed diagnosis. Subsequently we test the precision, sensitivity, and global performance of the system under different scenarios by running large scale Monte Carlo simulations. All settings account for situations where absent and/or unrelated symptoms are considered in the diagnosis. Results. We find that this expert system has high diagnostic precision (≥80% and sensitivity (≥99%, and is robust to both absent and unrelated symptoms. Discussion. The Rare Disease Discovery prediction engine appears to provide a fast and robust method for initial assisted differential diagnosis of rare diseases. We coupled this engine with a user-friendly web interface and it can be freely accessed at http://disease-discovery.udl.cat/. The code and most current database for the whole project can be downloaded from https://github.com/Wrrzag/DiseaseDiscovery/tree/no_classifiers.

  15. Computer-assisted initial diagnosis of rare diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñol, Marc; Vilaplana, Jordi; Teixidó, Ivan; Cruz, Joaquim; Comas, Jorge; Vilaprinyo, Ester; Sorribas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Most documented rare diseases have genetic origin. Because of their low individual frequency, an initial diagnosis based on phenotypic symptoms is not always easy, as practitioners might never have been exposed to patients suffering from the relevant disease. It is thus important to develop tools that facilitate symptom-based initial diagnosis of rare diseases by clinicians. In this work we aimed at developing a computational approach to aid in that initial diagnosis. We also aimed at implementing this approach in a user friendly web prototype. We call this tool Rare Disease Discovery. Finally, we also aimed at testing the performance of the prototype. Methods. Rare Disease Discovery uses the publicly available ORPHANET data set of association between rare diseases and their symptoms to automatically predict the most likely rare diseases based on a patient’s symptoms. We apply the method to retrospectively diagnose a cohort of 187 rare disease patients with confirmed diagnosis. Subsequently we test the precision, sensitivity, and global performance of the system under different scenarios by running large scale Monte Carlo simulations. All settings account for situations where absent and/or unrelated symptoms are considered in the diagnosis. Results. We find that this expert system has high diagnostic precision (≥80%) and sensitivity (≥99%), and is robust to both absent and unrelated symptoms. Discussion. The Rare Disease Discovery prediction engine appears to provide a fast and robust method for initial assisted differential diagnosis of rare diseases. We coupled this engine with a user-friendly web interface and it can be freely accessed at http://disease-discovery.udl.cat/. The code and most current database for the whole project can be downloaded from https://github.com/Wrrzag/DiseaseDiscovery/tree/no_classifiers. PMID:27547534

  16. Computer-assisted initial diagnosis of rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Rui; Piñol, Marc; Vilaplana, Jordi; Teixidó, Ivan; Cruz, Joaquim; Comas, Jorge; Vilaprinyo, Ester; Sorribas, Albert; Solsona, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Most documented rare diseases have genetic origin. Because of their low individual frequency, an initial diagnosis based on phenotypic symptoms is not always easy, as practitioners might never have been exposed to patients suffering from the relevant disease. It is thus important to develop tools that facilitate symptom-based initial diagnosis of rare diseases by clinicians. In this work we aimed at developing a computational approach to aid in that initial diagnosis. We also aimed at implementing this approach in a user friendly web prototype. We call this tool Rare Disease Discovery. Finally, we also aimed at testing the performance of the prototype. Methods. Rare Disease Discovery uses the publicly available ORPHANET data set of association between rare diseases and their symptoms to automatically predict the most likely rare diseases based on a patient's symptoms. We apply the method to retrospectively diagnose a cohort of 187 rare disease patients with confirmed diagnosis. Subsequently we test the precision, sensitivity, and global performance of the system under different scenarios by running large scale Monte Carlo simulations. All settings account for situations where absent and/or unrelated symptoms are considered in the diagnosis. Results. We find that this expert system has high diagnostic precision (≥80%) and sensitivity (≥99%), and is robust to both absent and unrelated symptoms. Discussion. The Rare Disease Discovery prediction engine appears to provide a fast and robust method for initial assisted differential diagnosis of rare diseases. We coupled this engine with a user-friendly web interface and it can be freely accessed at http://disease-discovery.udl.cat/. The code and most current database for the whole project can be downloaded from https://github.com/Wrrzag/DiseaseDiscovery/tree/no_classifiers.

  17. Amelogenesis imperfecta and localised aggressive periodontitis: A rare clinical entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundannavar, Gayatri; Rosh, Radhika M; Chandrasekaran, Shoba; Hussain, Ahad M

    2013-01-01

    This case report presents two female patients whose chief complaint was discoloration of teeth. On careful clinical examination it was found that the patients had features of amelogenesis imperfecta and localised aggressive periodontitis. This article will give an insight of clinical and radiographic features of amelogenesis imperfecta with localised aggressive periodontitis, which is a rare clinical entity.

  18. Amelogenesis imperfecta and localised aggressive periodontitis: A rare clinical entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Gundannavar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report presents two female patients whose chief complaint was discoloration of teeth. On careful clinical examination it was found that the patients had features of amelogenesis imperfecta and localised aggressive periodontitis. This article will give an insight of clinical and radiographic features of amelogenesis imperfecta with localised aggressive periodontitis, which is a rare clinical entity.

  19. Celiac disease: clinical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Emel’yanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented clinical cases of patients with a diagnosis of gluten enteropathy in treatment in the department of gastroenterology Regional Clinical Hospital. The case is of interest to doctors of different specialties for the differential diagnosis of anemia and malabsorption syndrome, demonstrate both the classic version, and atypical forms of the disease course. Diagnosis of celiac disease is based on three key positions: clinical findings, histology and serological markers. The clinical picture of celiac disease is characterized by pronounced polymorphism, by going beyond the a gastroenterological pathology. For screening of gluten sensitive celiac typically used an antibody to tissue transglutaminase. Morphological research of the mucous membrane of the small intestine is the determining criterion in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The use of specific gluten-free diet leads to the positive dynamics of the disease and improve the quality of life of patients.

  20. The European Union Committee of Experts on Rare Diseases: three productive years at the service of the rare disease community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymé, Ségolène; Rodwell, Charlotte

    2014-02-28

    The European Union Committee of Experts on Rare Diseases was entrusted with aiding the European Commission in a number of tasks, ranging from the monitoring of initiatives, to recommending improvements and actions to be pursued in the future, in addition to helping strengthen liaison at both European and International levels in the field of rare diseases. The three-year mandate of the EUCERD drew to a close in July 2013 with an impressive record. The EUCERD has laid down the foundations for future work so as to continue to advance in the key areas that have been identified as of interest for the rare disease community at large: centres of expertise, European Reference Networks, patient registries and databases, newborn screening, and indicators for national rare disease plans/strategies. The work of the Committee should now be continued by the newly formed European Commission Expert Group on Rare Diseases.

  1. Rare disease relations through common genes and protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Novo, Sara; Pazos, Florencio; Chagoyen, Monica

    2016-06-01

    ODCs (Orphan Disease Connections), available at http://csbg.cnb.csic.es/odcs, is a novel resource to explore potential molecular relations between rare diseases. These molecular relations have been established through the integration of disease susceptibility genes and human protein-protein interactions. The database currently contains 54,941 relations between 3032 diseases.

  2. [A rare clinical report of giant hemangiopericytoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkarubo, A N; Shishkina, L V; Tailakov, Sh T; Dorosh, K V; Khromov, A P

    2014-01-01

    Authors show an example of a successful treatment of a patient with a giant intracranial hemangiopericytoma. Hemangiopericytoma are aggressive tumors with a high rate of recurrence and metastasis. Despite the malignant nature of these tumors often reach a large size with minor clinical signs. Surgical removal of the tumor is still the primary method of treatment.

  3. Juvenile granulosa cell tumour: a rare clinical entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaliki Hymavathi Reddy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the third most common neoplasm of the female genital tract. Based on the cell type of origin, primary ovarian malignancies are classified into surface epithelium, germ cell, and sex cord tumors. Sex cord tumors account for 1% to 2% of ovarian malignancies. They may contain granulosa cells, theca cells, sertoli cells, or fibroblasts of gonadal stromal origin. Granulosa Cell Tumours (GCTs account for approximately 2-5% of all ovarian tumors and can be divided into adult (95% and juvenile (5% types based on histologic findings. GCTs secrete estrogen thus resulting in menstrual irregularities in the affected individual. More serious estrogen effects can occur in various end organs such as uterus resulting in endometrial hyperplasia, endometrial adenocarcinomas and increased risk of breast cancers. Androgen production is also reported but rare and produces virilization in the affected women. Juvenile Granulosa Cell Tumours (JGCTs are clinically and histopathologically distinct from the GCTs. They are rarely encountered but mostly in youngsters. Surgery is the primary modality of treatment with chemotherapy being reserved for advanced or recurrent disease states. We herewith report an interesting case of JGCT in a young teenage girl. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(4.000: 1150-1154

  4. A rare case of Weil's disease with alveolar haemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Abhiram Chakrabarti; Manab Nandy; Dipankar Pal; Sudesna Mallik

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis, a disease of protean manifestations occurs sporadically throughout the year with a peak seasonal incidence during the rainy season mimicking other febrile viral illness. In the rare case, the disease leads to renal and hepatic involvement with hemorrhage which may be associated with multisystem organ dysfunction in form of pulmonary, cardiac and central nervous system, when it is known as Weil's disease. Rarely haemorrhagic manifestations are assosciated. Early diagnosis is imp...

  5. Analyzing rare diseases terms in biomedical terminologies Analizzare la terminologia biomedica sulle malattie rare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Pasceri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rare disease patients too often face common problems, including the lack of access to correct diagnosis, lack of quality information on the disease, lack of scientific knowledge of the disease, inequities and difficulties in access to treatment and care. These things could be changed by implementing a comprehensive approach to rare diseases, increasing international cooperation in scientific research, by gaining and sharing scientific knowledge about and by developing tools for extracting and sharing knowledge. A significant aspect to analyze is the organization of knowledge in the biomedical field for the proper management and recovery of health information. For these purposes, the sources needed have been acquired from the Office of Rare Diseases Research, the National Organization of Rare Disorders and Orphanet, organizations that provide information to patients and physicians and facilitate the exchange of information among different actors involved in this field. The present paper shows the representation of rare diseases terms in biomedical terminologies such as MeSH, ICD-10, SNOMED CT and OMIM, leveraging the fact that these terminologies are integrated in the UMLS. At the first level, it was analyzed the overlap among sources and at a second level, the presence of rare diseases terms in target sources included in UMLS, working at the term and concept level. We found that MeSH has the best representation of rare diseases terms.Pazienti affetti da malattie rare molto spesso affrontano problemi comuni, tra cui la mancanza di accesso alla diagnosi corretta, la mancanza di informazioni di qualità sulla malattia, la mancanza di conoscenze scientifiche, e le difficoltà di accesso al trattamento e cura. Inadempienze e lacune che potrebbero essere colmate mediante l'attuazione di un approccio globale alle malattie rare, aumentando la cooperazione internazionale nella ricerca scientifica e lo sviluppo di strumenti per l'estrazione e la

  6. Pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease in rare anemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Aessopos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Rare anemias encompass a large and markedly heterogeneous group of nearly 90 different conditions, mostly congenital or genetically determined, that, according to the definition of the European Commission, have a global prevalence of less than 5 per 10,000 individuals. However, the geographical distribution of several of those anemias varies considerably and thus their local prevalence may be significantly higher in certain regions...

  7. Celiac disease, rare symptoms, autoimmune patology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Volta

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 42-years-old woman with constipation, anemia and recurrent itch. After several investigations, celiac disease was diagnosed and a treatment with a gluten-free diet was applied with beneficial effects. Recognizing celiac disease can be difficult because some of its symptoms are similar to those of other diseases. In fact, sometimes it is confused with irritable bowel syndrome or iron-deficiency anemia or intestinal infections: as a result, celiac disease is commonly underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. This case report is described to address the physician to a correct diagnosis of celiac disease.

  8. Organization for rare diseases India (ORDI) - addressing the challenges and opportunities for the Indian rare diseases' community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasimha, Harsha Karur; Shirol, Prasannakumar Basayya; Ramamoorthy, Preveen; Hegde, Madhuri; Barde, Sangeeta; Chandru, Vijay; Ravinandan, M E; Ramchandran, Ramani; Haldar, Kasturi; Lin, Jimmy C; Babar, Imran A; Girisha, Katta M; Srinivasan, Sudha; Navaneetham, Duraiswamy; Battu, Rajani; Devarakonda, Rajashree; Kini, Usha; Vijayachandra, Kinnimulki; Verma, Ishwar C

    2014-08-13

    In order to address the unmet needs and create opportunities that benefit patients with rare disease in India, a group of volunteers created a not-for-profit organization named Organization for Rare Diseases India (ORDI; www.ordindia.org). ORDI plans to represent the collective voice and advocate the needs of patients with rare diseases and other stakeholders in India. The ORDI team members come from diverse backgrounds such as genetics, molecular diagnostics, drug development, bioinformatics, communications, information technology, patient advocacy and public service. ORDI builds on the lessons learned from numerous similar organizations in the USA, European Union and disease-specific rare disease foundations in India. In this review, we provide a background on the landscape of rare diseases and the organizations that are active in this area globally and in India. We discuss the unique challenges in tackling rare diseases in India, and highlight the unmet needs of the key stakeholders of rare diseases. Finally, we define the vision, mission, goals and objectives of ORDI, identify the key developments in the health care context in India and welcome community feedback and comments on our approach.

  9. Rare inherited kidney diseases: challenges, opportunities, and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devuyst, Olivier; Knoers, Nine V A M; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Schaefer, Franz

    2014-05-24

    At least 10% of adults and nearly all children who receive renal-replacement therapy have an inherited kidney disease. These patients rarely die when their disease progresses and can remain alive for many years because of advances in organ-replacement therapy. However, these disorders substantially decrease their quality of life and have a large effect on health-care systems. Since the kidneys regulate essential homoeostatic processes, inherited kidney disorders have multisystem complications, which add to the usual challenges for rare disorders. In this review, we discuss the nature of rare inherited kidney diseases, the challenges they pose, and opportunities from technological advances, which are well suited to target the kidney. Mechanistic insights from rare disorders are relevant for common disorders such as hypertension, kidney stones, cardiovascular disease, and progression of chronic kidney disease.

  10. How important are rare variants in common disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint Pierre, Aude; Génin, Emmanuelle

    2014-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies have uncovered hundreds of common genetic variants involved in complex diseases. However, for most complex diseases, these common genetic variants only marginally contribute to disease susceptibility. It is now argued that rare variants located in different genes could in fact play a more important role in disease susceptibility than common variants. These rare genetic variants were not captured by genome-wide association studies using single nucleotide polymorphism-chips but with the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies, they have become detectable. It is now possible to study their contribution to common disease by resequencing samples of cases and controls or by using new genotyping exome arrays that cover rare alleles. In this review, we address the question of the contribution of rare variants in common disease by taking the examples of different diseases for which some resequencing studies have already been performed, and by summarizing the results of simulation studies conducted so far to investigate the genetic architecture of complex traits in human. So far, empirical data have not allowed the exclusion of many models except the most extreme ones involving only a small number of rare variants with large effects contributing to complex disease. To unravel the genetic architecture of complex disease, case-control data will not be sufficient, and alternative study designs need to be proposed together with methodological developments.

  11. Primary thyroid lymphoma: A rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary thyroid lymphomas are rare neoplasms comprising of 1-5% of thyroid malignancies. These are predominantly B-cell in origin. Here, we report a case of 60 years lady, a known case of lymphocytic thyroiditis, diagnosed as thyroid lymphoma (diffuse large B-cell on fine needle aspiration and confirmed histopathogically and immunohistochemically. She presented with a sudden increase in thyroid swelling. Fine needle aspiration performed showed highly cellular smears comprising predominantly of the monomorphic population of medium to large sized lymphoid cells with high nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio and scant cytoplasm. A possibility of thyroid lymphoma possibly diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was suggested which was later confirmed on biopsy. Fine needle aspiration provides an easy mode for diagnosing large cell lymphoma like diffuse large B-cell. Hence, an early diagnosis is possible for a timely intervention. Also, cases of lymphocytic thyroiditis should be regularly followed for the development of lymphoma.

  12. Insights into rare diseases from social media surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, William

    2016-11-09

    The internet, and social media platforms, are increasingly being used by substantial sectors of the worldwide population. By engaging effectively with online and social media, scientists and clinicians can obtain unprecedented access to relatively large cohorts of individuals with rare diseases, as well as their relatives, carers and professionals involved in their healthcare. Online surveys of these stakeholder groups may provide important new insights into rare conditions and their management relatively quickly and easily, with the possibility of rapid translation into healthcare interventions and policy. Here, I describe our recent positive experience with the online survey approach to a rare disease (X-linked ichthyosis), and review its advantages and limitations.

  13. Experience With Direct-to-Patient Recruitment for Enrollment Into a Clinical Trial in a Rare Disease: A Web-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischer, Jeffrey; Cronholm, Peter F; Burroughs, Cristina; McAlear, Carol A; Borchin, Renee; Easley, Ebony; Davis, Trocon; Kullman, Joyce; Carette, Simon; Khalidi, Nader; Koening, Curry; Langford, Carol A; Monach, Paul; Moreland, Larry; Pagnoux, Christian; Specks, Ulrich; Sreih, Antoine G; Ytterberg, Steven; Merkel, Peter A

    2017-02-28

    The target sample size for clinical trials often necessitates a multicenter (center of excellence, CoE) approach with associated added complexity, cost, and regulatory requirements. Alternative recruitment strategies need to be tested against this standard model. The aim of our study was to test whether a Web-based direct recruitment approach (patient-centric, PC) using social marketing strategies provides a viable option to the CoE recruitment method. PC recruitment and Web-based informed consent was compared with CoE recruitment for a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of continuing versus stopping low-dose prednisone for maintenance of remission of patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). The PC approach was not as successful as the CoE approach. Enrollment of those confirmed eligible by their physician was 10 of 13 (77%) and 49 of 51 (96%) in the PC and CoE arms, respectively (P=.05). The two approaches were not significantly different in terms of eligibility with 34% of potential participants in the CoE found to be ineligible as compared with 22% in the PC arm (P=.11) nor in provider acceptance, 22% versus 26% (P=.78). There was no difference in the understanding of the trial as reflected in the knowledge surveys of individuals in the PC and CoE arms. PC recruitment was substantially less successful than that achieved by the CoE approach. However, the PC approach was good at confirming eligibility and was as acceptable to providers and as understandable to patients as the CoE approach. The PC approach should be evaluated in other clinical settings to get a better sense of its potential.

  14. Experience With Direct-to-Patient Recruitment for Enrollment Into a Clinical Trial in a Rare Disease: A Web-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background The target sample size for clinical trials often necessitates a multicenter (center of excellence, CoE) approach with associated added complexity, cost, and regulatory requirements. Alternative recruitment strategies need to be tested against this standard model. Objectives The aim of our study was to test whether a Web-based direct recruitment approach (patient-centric, PC) using social marketing strategies provides a viable option to the CoE recruitment method. Methods PC recruitment and Web-based informed consent was compared with CoE recruitment for a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of continuing versus stopping low-dose prednisone for maintenance of remission of patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Results The PC approach was not as successful as the CoE approach. Enrollment of those confirmed eligible by their physician was 10 of 13 (77%) and 49 of 51 (96%) in the PC and CoE arms, respectively (P=.05). The two approaches were not significantly different in terms of eligibility with 34% of potential participants in the CoE found to be ineligible as compared with 22% in the PC arm (P=.11) nor in provider acceptance, 22% versus 26% (P=.78). There was no difference in the understanding of the trial as reflected in the knowledge surveys of individuals in the PC and CoE arms. Conclusions PC recruitment was substantially less successful than that achieved by the CoE approach. However, the PC approach was good at confirming eligibility and was as acceptable to providers and as understandable to patients as the CoE approach. The PC approach should be evaluated in other clinical settings to get a better sense of its potential. PMID:28246067

  15. Pharmacotherapy challenges of Fontan-associated plastic bronchitis: a rare pediatric disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Kristina; Caruthers, Regine L; Schumacher, Kurt R; Stringer, Kathleen A

    2013-09-01

    Pediatric pharmacotherapy is often challenging due to the paucity of available clinical data on the safety and efficacy of drugs that are commonly used in children. This quandary is even more prevalent in children with rare diseases. Although extrapolations for dosing and administration are often made from available adult data with similar disease states, this translation becomes even more problematic in rare pediatric diseases. Understanding of rare disease pathophysiology is typically poor, and few, if any, effective therapies have been studied and identified. One condition that illustrates these issues is plastic bronchitis, a rare, most often pediatric disease that is characterized by the production of obstructive bronchial airway casts. This illness primarily occurs in children with congenital heart disease, often after palliative surgery. Plastic bronchitis is a highly clinically relevant and therapeutically challenging problem with a high mortality rate, and, a generally accepted effective pharmacotherapy regimen has yet to be identified. Furthermore, the disease is ill defined, which makes timely identification and treatment of children with plastic bronchitis difficult. The pharmacotherapies currently used to manage this disease are largely anecdotal and vary between the use of macrolide antibiotics, mucolytics, bronchodilators, and inhaled fibrinolytics in a myriad of combinations. The purpose of this review is 2-fold: first, to highlight the dilemma of treating plastic bronchitis, and second, to bring attention to the continuing need for studies of drug therapies used in children so safe and effective drug regimens can be established, particularly for rare diseases. © 2013 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  16. Important role of translational science in rare disease innovation, discovery, and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariser, Anne R; Gahl, William A

    2014-08-01

    Rare diseases play a leading role in innovation and the advancement of medical and pharmaceutical science. Most rare diseases are genetic disorders or atypical manifestations of infectious, immunologic, or oncologic diseases; they all provide opportunities to study extremes of human pathology and provide insight into both normal and aberrant physiology. Recently, drug development has become increasingly focused on classifying diseases largely on genetic grounds; this has allowed the identification of molecularly defined targets and the development of targeted therapies. Clinical trials are now focusing on progressively smaller subgroups within both common and rare disease populations, often based on genetic tests or biomarkers. Drug developers, researchers, and regulatory agencies face a variety of challenges throughout the life cycle of drug research and development for rare diseases. These include the small numbers of patients available for study, lack of knowledge of the disease's natural history, incomplete understanding of the basic mechanisms causing the disorder, and variability in disease severity, expression, and course. Traditional approaches to rare disease clinical research have not kept pace with advances in basic science, and increased attention to translational science is needed to address these challenges, especially diagnostic testing, registries, and novel trial designs.

  17. Psychomotor Delay, a Possible Rare Presentation of Moyamoya Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Ashrafi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease is a rare, chronic cerebrovascular occlusive disease of unknown etiology. It is characterized by progressive stenosis of the arteries of the circle of Willis leading to ischemicstrokes in young people and cerebral hemorrhage, which is more frequent in adults. Secondarily,an abnormal network of fine collateral vessels arises at the base of the brain. The term moyamoyarefers to the angiographic appearance of the cerebral vasculature. We present such a disease in an 18-month-old Iranian girl with global developmental delay, which is a very rare presentationof moyamoya disease. She was diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA.

  18. Taming molecular flexibility to tackle rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubellis, Maria Vittoria; Baaden, Marc; Andreotti, Giuseppina

    2015-06-01

    Many mutations responsible of Fabry disease destabilize lysosomal alpha-galactosidase, but retain the enzymatic activity. These mutations are associated to a milder phenotype and are potentially curable with a pharmacological therapy either with chaperones or with drugs that modulate proteostasis. We demonstrate the effectiveness of molecular dynamics simulations to correlate the genotype to the severity of the disease. We studied the relation between protein flexibility and residual enzymatic activity of pathological missense mutants in the cell. We found that mutations occurring at flexible sites are likely to retain activity in vivo. The usefulness of molecular dynamics for diagnostic purposes is not limited to lysosomal galactosidase because destabilizing mutations are widely encountered in other proteins, too, and represent a large share of all the ones associated to human diseases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Biological treatment of rare inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baslund, B.

    2008-01-01

    The current status of the use of biological medicine in the treatment of adult onset morbus still, Wegeners granulomatosis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is reviewed. The need for controlled trials is emphasized. Anti-CD20 treatment for SLE patients with kidney involvement and patients wi...... with Wegeners granulomatosis seems promising. Anti-TNF and IL1 receptor antagonist can control disease activity in most patients with adult morbus still Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  20. Recommendations for the inclusion of Fabry disease as a rare febrile condition in existing algorithms for fever of unknown origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Raffaele; Cauda, Roberto; Feriozzi, Sandro; Gambaro, Giovanni; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Lacombe, Didier; Livneh, Avi; Martini, Alberto; Ozdogan, Huri; Pisani, Antonio; Riccio, Eleonora; Verrecchia, Elena; Dagna, Lorenzo

    2017-07-19

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) is a rather rare clinical syndrome representing a major diagnostic challenge. The occurrence of more than three febrile attacks with fever-free intervals of variable duration during 6 months of observation has recently been proposed as a subcategory of FUO, Recurrent FUO (RFUO). A substantial number of patients with RFUO have auto-inflammatory genetic fevers, but many patients remain undiagnosed. We hypothesize that this undiagnosed subgroup may be comprised of, at least in part, a number of rare genetic febrile diseases such as Fabry disease. We aimed to identify key features or potential diagnostic clues for Fabry disease as a model of rare genetic febrile diseases causing RFUO, and to develop diagnostic guidelines for RFUO, using Fabry disease as an example of inserting other rare diseases in the existing FUO algorithms. An international panel of specialists in recurrent fevers and rare diseases, including internists, infectious disease specialists, rheumatologists, gastroenterologists, nephrologists, and medical geneticists convened to review the existing diagnostic algorithms, and to suggest recommendations for arriving at accurate diagnoses on the basis of available literature and clinical experience. By combining specific features of rare diseases with other diagnostic considerations, guidelines have been designed to raise awareness and identify rare diseases among other causes of FUO. The proposed guidelines may be useful for the inclusion of rare diseases in the diagnostic algorithms for FUO. A wide spectrum of patients will be needed to validate the algorithm in different clinical settings.

  1. [Rare diseases in pulmonary medicine and its challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wencker, M; Teschler, H; Vogelmeier, C; Koczulla, R

    2012-07-01

    The importance of rare disease is appreciated by all parties and tremendous effort is made to increase the knowledge about the individual disorders and improve the care of affected patients. Political initiatives on a European level aim to improve the structure of medical care for patients with rare diseases in each member state. The provided incentives for the development of medicines for orphan diseases have led to increased research activities and numbers of licensed Orphan Drugs. Patients are organized nationally and internationally in various patient organizations and umbrella organizations. They are involved in health care policy, support the detection and research of rare diseases and offer support to affected patients and families with educational meetings and materials as well as options for discussions. Many experts are engaged in national and international networks and registries that generate and publish high quality research data on rare diseases. A well developed infrastructure is in place to support the search for qualified partners that can be of assistance with specific questions in a rare lung disease.

  2. FORGE Canada Consortium: outcomes of a 2-year national rare-disease gene-discovery project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Chandree L; Majewski, Jacek; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Samuels, Mark E; Fernandez, Bridget A; Bernier, Francois P; Brudno, Michael; Knoppers, Bartha; Marcadier, Janet; Dyment, David; Adam, Shelin; Bulman, Dennis E; Jones, Steve J M; Avard, Denise; Nguyen, Minh Thu; Rousseau, Francois; Marshall, Christian; Wintle, Richard F; Shen, Yaoqing; Scherer, Stephen W; Friedman, Jan M; Michaud, Jacques L; Boycott, Kym M

    2014-06-01

    Inherited monogenic disease has an enormous impact on the well-being of children and their families. Over half of the children living with one of these conditions are without a molecular diagnosis because of the rarity of the disease, the marked clinical heterogeneity, and the reality that there are thousands of rare diseases for which causative mutations have yet to be identified. It is in this context that in 2010 a Canadian consortium was formed to rapidly identify mutations causing a wide spectrum of pediatric-onset rare diseases by using whole-exome sequencing. The FORGE (Finding of Rare Disease Genes) Canada Consortium brought together clinicians and scientists from 21 genetics centers and three science and technology innovation centers from across Canada. From nation-wide requests for proposals, 264 disorders were selected for study from the 371 submitted; disease-causing variants (including in 67 genes not previously associated with human disease; 41 of these have been genetically or functionally validated, and 26 are currently under study) were identified for 146 disorders over a 2-year period. Here, we present our experience with four strategies employed for gene discovery and discuss FORGE's impact in a number of realms, from clinical diagnostics to the broadening of the phenotypic spectrum of many diseases to the biological insight gained into both disease states and normal human development. Lastly, on the basis of this experience, we discuss the way forward for rare-disease genetic discovery both in Canada and internationally.

  3. Multiple Autoimmune Syndromes Associated with Psoriasis: A Rare Clinical Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Masood

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases are known to have association with each other but it is very rare to see multiple autoimmune diseases in one patient. The combination of at least three autoimmune diseases in the same patient is referred to as multiple autoimmune syndrome. The case we are reporting features multiple autoimmune syndrome with five different conditions. The patient had type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus, vitiligo, and psoriasis. Psoriasis has rarely been reported previously under the spectrum of autoimmune syndrome. Although the relationship of autoimmune conditions with each other has been explored in the past, this case adds yet another dimension to the unique evolution of autoimmune pathologies. The patient presented with a combination of five autoimmune diseases, which makes it consistent type three multiple autoimmune syndromes with the addition of psoriasis. The current case is unique in this aspect that the combination of these five autoimmune disorders has never been reported in the past.

  4. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: a rare pediatric brain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Ryan M; Foster, Michael B; Omoruyi, Adetokunbo O; Kingery, Suzanne E; Wintergerst, Kupper A

    2015-05-01

    We report a 9-year-old female who presented with new onset intractable seizure activity followed by a prolonged encephalopathic state. After ruling out common etiologies, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) was considered, and antibody levels to thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin were both markedly elevated in her serum. She was euthyroid at the time of presentation. Upon treatment with high dose methylprednisolone, the patient demonstrated a significant improvement in her encephalopathy. The diagnosis of HE requires strong clinical suspicion with evidence of antithyroid antibodies, as well as an encephalopathy not explained by another etiology. While well documented in the adult literature, only a handful of pediatric cases have been described to date. Patients with HE have a nearly universal response to high dose glucocorticoids. HE should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient, adult or pediatric, who displays prolonged, unexplainable encephalopathy.

  5. Contribution of Electronic Medical Records to the Management of Rare Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Bremond-Gignac

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Electronic health record systems provide great opportunity to study most diseases. Objective of this study was to determine whether electronic medical records (EMR in ophthalmology contribute to management of rare eye diseases, isolated or in syndromes. Study was designed to identify and collect patients’ data with ophthalmology-specific EMR. Methods. Ophthalmology-specific EMR software (Softalmo software Corilus was used to acquire ophthalmological ocular consultation data from patients with five rare eye diseases. The rare eye diseases and data were selected and collected regarding expertise of eye center. Results. A total of 135,206 outpatient consultations were performed between 2011 and 2014 in our medical center specialized in rare eye diseases. The search software identified 29 congenital aniridia, 6 Axenfeld/Rieger syndrome, 11 BEPS, 3 Nanophthalmos, and 3 Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. Discussion. EMR provides advantages for medical care. The use of ophthalmology-specific EMR is reliable and can contribute to a comprehensive ocular visual phenotype useful for clinical research. Conclusion. Routinely EMR acquired with specific software dedicated to ophthalmology provides sufficient detail for rare diseases. These software-collected data appear useful for creating patient cohorts and recording ocular examination, avoiding the time-consuming analysis of paper records and investigation, in a University Hospital linked to a National Reference Rare Center Disease.

  6. Galli-Galli Disease: A Rare Acantholytic Variant of Dowling-Degos Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gomes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Galli-Galli disease is a rare acantholytic variant of Dowling-Degos disease, with few cases reported in the literature. We describe a case of Galli-Galli disease and review the literature.

  7. [Acute renal failure: a rare presentation of Addison's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhi, Houda

    2016-01-01

    Addison's disease is a rare condition. Its onset of symptoms most often is nonspecific contributing to a diagnostic and therapeutic delay. Acute renal failure can be the first manifestation of this disease. We report the case of a patient with Addison's disease who was initially treated for acute renal failure due to multiple myeloma and whose diagnosis was adjusted thereafter. Patient's condition dramatically improved after treatment with intravenous rehydration; injectable hydrocortisone.

  8. Acral pityriasis versicolor – A rare clinical presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasleem Arif

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pityriasis versicolor is a superficial fungal infection of the skin caused by the yeast of the genus Malassezia and presents as hypo or hyper pigmented scaly macules. The most commonly affected sites include upper trunk, upper arms, neck and the abdomen. Lesions confined to the acral parts like hands and feet have rarely been reported. In this article the author reports a 40 year old male who presented with multiple hypo pigmented scaly macules confined to the acral parts (hands and wrist. The acral variant of pityriasis versicolor is considered to be a very rare clinical entity which prompted the author to report this case.

  9. Adult-onset Still's disease and cardiac tamponade: a rare association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrilho-Ferreira, Pedro; Silva, Doroteia; de Jesus Silva, Maria; André, Rui; Varela, Manuel Gato; Diogo, António Nunes

    2015-06-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder with potentially severe clinical features, including cardiac involvement. This systemic inflammatory disease of unknown origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pericarditis, with or without pericardial effusion. Cardiac tamponade is a very rare sequela that requires an invasive approach, such as percutaneous or surgical pericardial drainage, in addition to the usual conservative therapy. The authors describe a case of adult-onset Still's disease rendered more difficult by pericarditis and cardiac tamponade, and they briefly review the literature on this entity.

  10. Oral health and oromotor function in rare diseases--a database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögreen, Lotta; Andersson-Norinder, Jan; Bratel, John

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to study oral health and oromotor function in individuals with rare diseases. A disease is defined as rare when it affects no more than 100 individuals per million population and leads to a marked degree of disability. An affected nervous or musculoskeletal system, cognitive impairment, neuropsychiatric disorders and craniofacial malformations are common in rare diseases and may all be risk factors for oral health and oromotor function. In 1996-2008, 1,703 individuals with 169 rare diseases, aged 3-67 years, answered a questionnaire about general health, oral health and orofacial function and 1,614 participated in a clinical examination. A control group of 135 healthy children, aged 3-14 years, was also included in the study. Oral health was examined by a dentist and oromotor function by a speech-language pathologist. The participants with rare diseases were recruited via family programmes, referrals to the clinic and research projects, while the controls were randomly selected from a Swedish municipality. In the diagnosis group, 40% had moderate or severe problems coping with dental treatment, 43% were receiving specialised dental care. Difficulties related to tooth brushing were common compared with the controls. Approximately two thirds of the study group and the control group were caries free. Frontal open bite, long face and high palate were common in individuals with rare diseases compared with controls. Oromotor impairment was a frequent finding (43%) and was absent among the controls. There was a significant correlation between oromotor impairment and certain structural deviations and oral-health issues. Compared with healthy controls, individuals with rare diseases often have difficulty coping with dental treatment and managing tooth brushing. Dysmorphology and oromotor dysfunction are frequent findings in this population and they often require extra prophylactic dental care and access to specialised dental care in order to prevent oral disease.

  11. Kikuchi-fujimoto disease, the masquerading menace: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Kataria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease (KFD or histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis is a rare, benign, self-limiting disease with unknown etiology characterized by regional lymphadenopathy. A 30-year-old female presented with fever, weakness, multiple joint pain, oral ulcers, erythematous facial rashes, hemorrhagic crusting on both lips, and cervical lymphadenopathy of 2-month duration. Clinically, the disease was mimicking systemic lupus erythematosus, but immunofluorescence was negative for it. Lymph node biopsy suggested a diagnosis of KFD.

  12. A methodology for a minimum data set for rare diseases to support national centers of excellence for healthcare and research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet, Rémy; Maaroufi, Meriem; de Carrara, Albane; Messiaen, Claude; Luigi, Emmanuel; Landais, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Although rare disease patients make up approximately 6–8% of all patients in Europe, it is often difficult to find the necessary expertise for diagnosis and care and the patient numbers needed for rare disease research. The second French National Plan for Rare Diseases highlighted the necessity for better care coordination and epidemiology for rare diseases. A clinical data standard for normalization and exchange of rare disease patient data was proposed. The original methodology used to build the French national minimum data set (F-MDS-RD) common to the 131 expert rare disease centers is presented. Methods To encourage consensus at a national level for homogeneous data collection at the point of care for rare disease patients, we first identified four national expert groups. We reviewed the scientific literature for rare disease common data elements (CDEs) in order to build the first version of the F-MDS-RD. The French rare disease expert centers validated the data elements (DEs). The resulting F-MDS-RD was reviewed and approved by the National Plan Strategic Committee. It was then represented in an HL7 electronic format to maximize interoperability with electronic health records. Results The F-MDS-RD is composed of 58 DEs in six categories: patient, family history, encounter, condition, medication, and questionnaire. It is HL7 compatible and can use various ontologies for diagnosis or sign encoding. The F-MDS-RD was aligned with other CDE initiatives for rare diseases, thus facilitating potential interconnections between rare disease registries. Conclusions The French F-MDS-RD was defined through national consensus. It can foster better care coordination and facilitate determining rare disease patients’ eligibility for research studies, trials, or cohorts. Since other countries will need to develop their own standards for rare disease data collection, they might benefit from the methods presented here. PMID:25038198

  13. Generalized subcutaneous edema as a rare manifestation of dermatomyositis: clinical lesson from a rare feature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2011-04-01

    Generalized subcutaneous edema is a very rare manifestation of inflammatory myopathies. A 61-year-old woman presented with classic signs and symptoms of dermatomyositis. She was also noted to have generalized edema that was so florid that an alternative diagnosis was considered. Her disease was resistant to corticosteroids, azathioprine, and mycophenolate mofetil. Intravenous administration of immunoglobulins was started because of marked worsening of her disease-muscle weakness, generalized anasarca, and involvement of her bulbar muscles. This led to dramatic resolution of her subcutaneous edema and significant improvement of her skin and muscle disease. As the initial screen for malignancy was negative, a positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was requested, which interestingly showed a metabolically active cervical tumor. Anasarca is an unusual manifestation of dermatomyositis. In treatment-refractory cases, it seems reasonable to consider positron emission tomography scan in excluding underlying malignant disease.

  14. Rare Disease Patient Registry & Natural History Study - Coordination of Rare Diseases at Sanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-28

    Rare Disorders; Undiagnosed Disorders; Disorders of Unknown Prevalence; Cornelia De Lange Syndrome; Prenatal Benign Hypophosphatasia; Perinatal Lethal Hypophosphatasia; Odontohypophosphatasia; Adult Hypophosphatasia; Childhood-onset Hypophosphatasia; Infantile Hypophosphatasia; Hypophosphatasia; Kabuki Syndrome; Bohring-Opitz Syndrome; Narcolepsy Without Cataplexy; Narcolepsy-cataplexy; Hypersomnolence Disorder; Idiopathic Hypersomnia Without Long Sleep Time; Idiopathic Hypersomnia With Long Sleep Time; Idiopathic Hypersomnia; Kleine-Levin Syndrome; Kawasaki Disease; Leiomyosarcoma; Leiomyosarcoma of the Corpus Uteri; Leiomyosarcoma of the Cervix Uteri; Leiomyosarcoma of Small Intestine; Acquired Myasthenia Gravis; Addison Disease; Hyperacusis (Hyperacousis); Juvenile Myasthenia Gravis; Transient Neonatal Myasthenia Gravis; Williams Syndrome; Lyme Disease; Myasthenia Gravis; Marinesco Sjogren Syndrome(Marinesco-Sjogren Syndrome); Isolated Klippel-Feil Syndrome; Frasier Syndrome; Denys-Drash Syndrome; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome; Emanuel Syndrome; Isolated Aniridia; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to Paternal Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 11; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to Imprinting Defect of 11p15; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to 11p15 Translocation/Inversion; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to 11p15 Microduplication; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to 11p15 Microdeletion; Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome; Aniridia-intellectual Disability Syndrome; Aniridia - Renal Agenesis - Psychomotor Retardation; Aniridia - Ptosis - Intellectual Disability - Familial Obesity; Aniridia - Cerebellar Ataxia - Intellectual Disability; Aniridia - Absent Patella; Aniridia; Peters Anomaly - Cataract; Peters Anomaly; Potocki-Shaffer Syndrome; Silver-Russell Syndrome Due to Maternal Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 11; Silver-Russell Syndrome Due to Imprinting Defect of 11p15; Silver-Russell Syndrome Due to 11p15 Microduplication; Syndromic Aniridia; WAGR Syndrome; Wolf

  15. Sarcoidosis, Celiac Disease and Deep Venous Thrombosis: a Rare Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Çelik

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder of unknown etiology and it may rarely be associated with a second disorder. Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy characterized with malabsorption caused by gluten intolerance, and several reports indicate an association between celiac disease and sarcoidosis. In addition, although celiac disease is associated with several extraintestinal pathologies, venous thrombosis has been rarely reported. Herein we present a rare case report of a patient with a diagnosis of sarcoidosis, celiac disease and deep venous thrombosis because of the rare association of these disorders. The patient was admitted with abdominal pain, weight loss, chronic diarrhea and a 5-day history of swelling in her right leg. A diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis was achieved by doppler ultrasonographic examination. The diagnosis of celiac disease was made by biopsy of duodenal mucosa and supported with elevated serum level of anti-gliadin IgA and IgG, and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was achieved by transbronchial needle aspiration from the subcarinal lymph node during flexible bronchoscopy.

  16. Communication strategies employed by rare disease patient organizations in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Esparcia, Antonio; López-Villafranca, Paloma

    2016-08-01

    The current study focuses on communication strategies employed by rare disease patient organizations. The aims of these organizations are: educate and inform the public about rare diseases, raise awareness of the problems related to rare diseases, and achieve social legitimacy in order give visibility to their demands. We analyzed the portrayal of rare disease and patient organizations by Spain's major media organizations in terms of circulation and viewership - the press (El País, El Mundo, La Vanguardia,ABC and El Periódico), radio (CadenaSer, Onda Cero, Cope and RNE), and television (Telecinco, Antena 3, La 1, La Sexta, Cuatro) -between 2012 and 2014.We then carried out a descriptive analysis of communication activities performed via the World Wide Web and social networks by 143 national organizations. Finally, we conducted a telephone questionnaire of a representative sample of 90 organizations in order to explore the association between media presence and funding and public image. The triangulation of quantitative and qualitative methods allowed us to meet the study's objectives. Increased visibility of the organizations afforded by an increase in the coverage of the topic by the medialed to an increase in membership - but not in donations - and increased awareness of these diseases.

  17. The long tail and rare disease research: the impact of next-generation sequencing for rare Mendelian disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tony; Lee, Ariel; Shen, Carol; Lin, C Jimmy

    2015-09-14

    There are an estimated 6000-8000 rare Mendelian diseases that collectively affect 30 million individuals in the United States. The low incidence and prevalence of these diseases present significant challenges to improving diagnostics and treatments. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have revolutionized research of rare diseases. This article will first comment on the effectiveness of NGS through the lens of long-tailed economics. We then provide an overview of recent developments and challenges of NGS-based research on rare diseases. As the quality of NGS studies improve and the cost of sequencing decreases, NGS will continue to make a significant impact on the study of rare diseases moving forward.

  18. Incentives for Starting Small Companies Focused on Rare and Neglected Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekins, Sean; Wood, Jill

    2016-04-01

    Starting biotech or pharmaceutical companies is traditionally thought to be based around a scientist, their technology platform or a clinical candidate spun out from another company. Between us we have taken a different approach and formed two small early stage companies after initially leveraging the perspective of a parent with a child with a life-threatening rare disease. Phoenix Nest ( http://www.phoenixnestbiotech.com/ ) was co-founded to work on treatments for Sanfilippo syndrome a devastating neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder. In the space of just over 3 years we have built up collaborations with leading scientists in academia and industry and been awarded multiple NIH small business grants. The second company, Collaborations Pharmaceuticals Inc. ( http://www.collaborationspharma.com/ ) was founded to address some of the other 7000 or so rare diseases as well as neglected infectious diseases. The Rare Pediatric Disease Priority Review Voucher is likely the most important incentive for companies working on rare diseases with very small populations. This may also be partially responsible for the recent acquisitions of rare disease companies with late stage candidates. Lessons learned in the process of starting our companies are that rare disease parents or patients can readily partner with a scientist and fund research through NIH grants rather than venture capital or angel investors initially. This process may be slow so patience and perseverance is key. We would encourage other pharmaceutical scientists to meet rare disease parents, patients or advocates and work with them to further the science on their diseases and create a source of future drugs.

  19. Huntington's disease: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roos Raymund AC

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Huntington disease (HD is a rare neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by unwanted choreatic movements, behavioral and psychiatric disturbances and dementia. Prevalence in the Caucasian population is estimated at 1/10,000-1/20,000. Mean age at onset of symptoms is 30-50 years. In some cases symptoms start before the age of 20 years with behavior disturbances and learning difficulties at school (Juvenile Huntington's disease; JHD. The classic sign is chorea that gradually spreads to all muscles. All psychomotor processes become severely retarded. Patients experience psychiatric symptoms and cognitive decline. HD is an autosomal dominant inherited disease caused by an elongated CAG repeat (36 repeats or more on the short arm of chromosome 4p16.3 in the Huntingtine gene. The longer the CAG repeat, the earlier the onset of disease. In cases of JHD the repeat often exceeds 55. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms and signs in an individual with a parent with proven HD, and is confirmed by DNA determination. Pre-manifest diagnosis should only be performed by multidisciplinary teams in healthy at-risk adult individuals who want to know whether they carry the mutation or not. Differential diagnoses include other causes of chorea including general internal disorders or iatrogenic disorders. Phenocopies (clinically diagnosed cases of HD without the genetic mutation are observed. Prenatal diagnosis is possible by chorionic villus sampling or amniocentesis. Preimplantation diagnosis with in vitro fertilization is offered in several countries. There is no cure. Management should be multidisciplinary and is based on treating symptoms with a view to improving quality of life. Chorea is treated with dopamine receptor blocking or depleting agents. Medication and non-medical care for depression and aggressive behavior may be required. The progression of the disease leads to a complete dependency in daily life, which

  20. ["Ledderhose" disease. Plantar fibromatosis--clinical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnitzke, B; Decker, O; Neumann, U

    1991-01-01

    The Ledderhose's diseases is a relatively rare and not well known clinical picture. Even there are tight pathomorphological and clinical relations to the Dupuytren's contracture, the genesis is also here quite unknown. Because of inefficiency of conventional therapy the surgical treatment is the only alternative. On the sample of 12 operations in 7 patients from 1979 to 1989 surgical procedure and long-term results are discussed.

  1. The Dr Pheo Blog and virtual counselling for rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Run

    2015-01-01

    Patients with suspected or diagnosed rare diseases face challenges. Their own physicians usually do not have a large experience in a particular rare disease, specialists may not be easily accessible, and medical knowledge on rare diseases is either not readily available or too general to be applied to the patients' individual situations. As a specialist with experience in pheochromocytoma, I therefore started a blog to disseminate knowledge about the tumour and to discuss readers' questions about it (http://drpheo.blogspot.com/). Between 2009 and 2014, the blog was viewed 81,223 times and received 1286 comments during the 5-year period. About half of the comments contained mostly questions (questioning comments), including 429 directly on pheochromocytoma (7.5/month). The majority of the questioning comments were about the diagnosis (62%) and natural history (21%) of pheochromocytoma, with the remainder on management (14%) and follow-up or prognosis (4%). Many readers' comments started with encouraging words about the blog and remarked how difficult it was to find useful information on pheochromocytoma elsewhere. Experience with the Dr Pheo Blog suggests that physician specialist-written blogs are potentially an effective and convenient way of providing pertinent knowledge on rare diseases to the public. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. [Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is a rare inherited heart disease.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Tfelt-Hansen, 1jacob; Olesen, Morten S

    2010-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is a rare inherited heart disease, which can lead to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in patients with a structurally normal heart. The age of onset is usually between two and 12 years and the initial symptom is frequently syncope...

  3. Rare disease diagnosis as an information retrieval task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragusin, Radu; Petcu, Paula; Lioma, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly more clinicians use web Information Retrieval (IR) systems to assist them in diagnosing difficult medical cases, for instance rare diseases that they may not be familiar with. However, web IR systems are not necessarily optimised for this task. For instance, clinicians’ queries tend...

  4. Children with Rare Chronic Skin Diseases: Hemangiomas and Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sheila Dove; Miller, Cynthia Dieterich

    The paper reports on studies involving children having the rare chronic skin diseases of hemangiomas and epidermolysis bullosa (characterized by easy blistering). One study compared the self-concept and psychosocial development of young (mean age 46 months) children (N=19) with hemangiomas with 19 children without hemangiomas. Findings indicated…

  5. Delayed access to treatments for rare diseases: who's to blame?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltmate, Karen; Janiszewski, Peter M; Gingerich, Sheena; Cloutier, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The development and commercialization of drugs for rare diseases, termed 'orphan drugs', has historically been economically unattractive. However, because of the introduction of legislation that provides financial and regulatory incentives for the development of orphan drugs, new developments are making their way through the regulatory approval processes. Unfortunately, delays in availability of new drugs for treating rare disease continue to persist. This paper reviews the approach of several regulatory jurisdictions to orphan drugs in an effort to determine their relative effectiveness in providing patient access. Generally speaking, regulatory authorities across jurisdictions have recognized the need to enhance timely access to safe, effective treatment for patients with rare diseases and have been able to shift the approval timelines for access to new care. The greater impediment to orphan drug access appears to be funding, particularly in publicly sponsored health-care systems. Redundancies in federal and provincial reviews of orphan drugs can result in significant delays in access to new drugs. Clearly, more must be done to accelerate access to the treatments so desperately needed by patients. Public payers must be held accountable for their process and decisions--especially for rare disease therapies.

  6. Children with Rare Chronic Skin Diseases: Hemangiomas and Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sheila Dove; Miller, Cynthia Dieterich

    The paper reports on studies involving children having the rare chronic skin diseases of hemangiomas and epidermolysis bullosa (characterized by easy blistering). One study compared the self-concept and psychosocial development of young (mean age 46 months) children (N=19) with hemangiomas with 19 children without hemangiomas. Findings indicated…

  7. HEREDITARY ANGIOEDEMA IN CHILDREN — A RARE CLINICAL CASE IN THE PRACTICE OF THE ABDOMINAL SURGEON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. Yu. Dyakonova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is a rare and dangerous hereditary disease, the differential diagnostics of which is very difficult up to date. Children with this disorder come with acute abdominal pain that may be caused by diseases of the digestive and urinary system, various gynecological diseases, and infectious processes in the body. The main task of the children's surgeon is to exclude acute surgical pathology and perform differential diagnostics with diseases such as acute appendicitis, Meckel diverticulum, intestinal obstruction, omentum infarction and the other as soon as possible. The article presents the clinical observation of a 14-year-old female patient with angioedema.

  8. HALLERVORDEN-SPATZ DISEASE - A RARE CASE REPORT - “Eye of th e Tiger” Sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjunaiah H. S.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:Hallervorden-Spatz disease (HSD is a rare neurological disease characterized by progressivedegeneration of basal ganglia, globuspallidus and reticular part of the substantianigra, produced byironaccumulation. The defect has been found in the pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2 producing gene locatedinchromosome 20p13-p12.3. Clinical presentations include dystonia, dysarthria, dysphasia, dementia, severemental retardation and severe movement disability may develop at later stages. Rare clinical features includerigidity, choreoathetosis, seizures, optic atrophy and pigmentary retinopathy. The characteristic MRI brainpattern of HSD shows the “eye of the tiger ” pattern. Treatment is symptomatic. We present the case of apatient, 19 years old boy with Hallervorden-Spatz disease who came to our physiotherapy department withfeatures of spasticity, dystonia and gait difficulty. He was diagnosed on the basis of clinical findings and typicalMRI brain of “eye of the tiger” pattern. His detailed evaluation was carried out and physiotherapy treatmentwas started.

  9. Genetic Factors of the Disease Course After Sepsis: Rare Deleterious Variants Are Predictive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taudien, Stefan; Lausser, Ludwig; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Sponholz, Christoph; Schöneweck, Franziska; Felder, Marius; Schirra, Lyn-Rouven; Schmid, Florian; Gogos, Charalambos; Groth, Susann; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Huse, Klaus; Zipfel, Peter F; Kurzai, Oliver; Moepps, Barbara; Gierschik, Peter; Bauer, Michael; Scherag, André; Kestler, Hans A; Platzer, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by dysregulated host response to infection. For its clinical course, host genetic factors are important and rare genomic variants are suspected to contribute. We sequenced the exomes of 59 Greek and 15 German patients with bacterial sepsis divided into two groups with extremely different disease courses. Variant analysis was focusing on rare deleterious single nucleotide variants (SNVs). We identified significant differences in the number of rare deleterious SNVs per patient between the ethnic groups. Classification experiments based on the data of the Greek patients allowed discrimination between the disease courses with estimated sensitivity and specificity>75%. By application of the trained model to the German patients we observed comparable discriminatory properties despite lower population-specific rare SNV load. Furthermore, rare SNVs in genes of cell signaling and innate immunity related pathways were identified as classifiers discriminating between the sepsis courses. Sepsis patients with favorable disease course after sepsis, even in the case of unfavorable preconditions, seem to be affected more often by rare deleterious SNVs in cell signaling and innate immunity related pathways, suggesting a protective role of impairments in these processes against a poor disease course. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Phenotype Similarity Regression for Identifying the Genetic Determinants of Rare Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Daniel; Richardson, Sylvia; Turro, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Rare genetic disorders, which can now be studied systematically with affordable genome sequencing, are often caused by high-penetrance rare variants. Such disorders are often heterogeneous and characterized by abnormalities spanning multiple organ systems ascertained with variable clinical precision. Existing methods for identifying genes with variants responsible for rare diseases summarize phenotypes with unstructured binary or quantitative variables. The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) allows composite phenotypes to be represented systematically but association methods accounting for the ontological relationship between HPO terms do not exist. We present a Bayesian method to model the association between an HPO-coded patient phenotype and genotype. Our method estimates the probability of an association together with an HPO-coded phenotype characteristic of the disease. We thus formalize a clinical approach to phenotyping that is lacking in standard regression techniques for rare disease research. We demonstrate the power of our method by uncovering a number of true associations in a large collection of genome-sequenced and HPO-coded cases with rare diseases. PMID:26924528

  11. Phenotype Similarity Regression for Identifying the Genetic Determinants of Rare Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Daniel; Richardson, Sylvia; Turro, Ernest

    2016-03-01

    Rare genetic disorders, which can now be studied systematically with affordable genome sequencing, are often caused by high-penetrance rare variants. Such disorders are often heterogeneous and characterized by abnormalities spanning multiple organ systems ascertained with variable clinical precision. Existing methods for identifying genes with variants responsible for rare diseases summarize phenotypes with unstructured binary or quantitative variables. The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) allows composite phenotypes to be represented systematically but association methods accounting for the ontological relationship between HPO terms do not exist. We present a Bayesian method to model the association between an HPO-coded patient phenotype and genotype. Our method estimates the probability of an association together with an HPO-coded phenotype characteristic of the disease. We thus formalize a clinical approach to phenotyping that is lacking in standard regression techniques for rare disease research. We demonstrate the power of our method by uncovering a number of true associations in a large collection of genome-sequenced and HPO-coded cases with rare diseases.

  12. Review of Studies on Rare Earth against Plant Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    慕康国; 张文吉; 崔建宇; 张福锁; 胡林

    2004-01-01

    Agricultural application of rare earth (RE) has been generalized for several decades, and it is involved in crops, vegetables and stock raising in China. However, all the researches on RE mainly focus on the fields such as plant physiological activity, physiological and biochemical mechanism, sanitation toxicology and environmental security. Plant protection by using RE and the induced resistance of plant against diseases were summarized. The mechanism of rare earth against plant disease is highlighted, which includes following two aspects. First, RE elements can control some phytopathogen directly and reduce its virulence to host plant. Another possibility is that RE elements can affect host plant and induce the plant to produce some resistance to disease.

  13. Hashimoto's thyroiditis associated Evans syndrome: A rare case report on the clustered autoimmune disease triad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koti, Kalyan; Thumma, Rayapa Reddy; Nagarajan, Swathanthra; Mathi, Atchyuta

    2013-07-01

    Evans syndrome is a rare combination of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenia. Their association with autoimmune thyroid diseases has been reported by few authors; however, a sequential development of the Evans syndrome in cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is extremely rare. The clustering of these autoimmune diseases might share a common pathogenic pathway. We present the fourth such case in world literature, of a 34-year-old female diagnosed with Hashimoto's thyroiditis in 2006, who has been taking synthetic thyroid hormone since then. Her condition is now clinically complicated with the development of the Evans syndrome.

  14. Rare association of Fahr’s disease with multiple myeloma: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathy KP, Behera PK, Dalai RK, Misra GC

    2014-01-01

    Fahr’s disease or Fahr’s syndrome is a rare neurological disorder characterized by abnormal calcified deposits in the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex. 47 years male who presented to us with progressive ataxia and Parkinsonian symptoms was found to have extensive bilateral calcifications including bilateral basal ganglia in CT scan of the brain. The secondary causes of intracranial calcifications were ruled out to make a clinical diagnosis of Fahr’s disease. While investigating for chronic...

  15. Using phase II data for the analysis of phase III studies: an application in rare diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wandel, Simon; Neuenschwander, Beat; Friede, Tim; Röver, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research and drug development in orphan diseases is challenging, since large-scale randomized studies are difficult to conduct. Formally synthesizing the evidence is therefore of great value, yet this is rarely done in the drug approval process. Phase III designs that make better use of phase II data can facilitate drug development in orphan diseases. A Bayesian meta-analytic approach is used to inform the phase III study with phase II data. It is particularly attractive, since uncer...

  16. CLINICAL CASE OF RARE TYPE V OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. T. Yakhyayeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta, also known as the brittle bone disease, is a clinically heterogenic hereditary connective tissue disease characterized by brittle bones and high risk of skeletal bone fractures. Other observable symptoms, such as deformities of limb and spinal bones, blue sclerae, dentinogenesis imperfecta and progressive hearing loss vary in severity depending on the type of the disease. According to the original classification by D.O. Silence (1979, there are 4 types of osteogenesis imperfecta; however, the number thereof has multiplied due to discovery of new disease-inducing mutations. Type V osteogenesis imperfecta is distinguished by characteristic clinical radiographic symptoms; also, patients with this type of the disease do not feature a type I collagen gene mutation. Nevertheless, all types of osteogenesis imperfecta, including type V, are characterized by high bone brittleness, frequent fractures and further bone deformities, which is the most common cause of incapacitation of the patients.

  17. Disease transmission by cannibalism: rare event or common occurrence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Volker H W; Antonovics, Janis

    2007-05-07

    Cannibalism has been documented as a possible disease transmission route in several species, including humans. However, the dynamics resulting from this type of disease transmission are not well understood. Using a theoretical model, we explore how cannibalism (i.e. killing and consumption of dead conspecifics) and intraspecific necrophagy (i.e. consumption of dead conspecifics) affect host-pathogen dynamics. We show that group cannibalism, i.e. shared consumption of victims, is a necessary condition for disease spread by cannibalism in the absence of alternative transmission modes. Thus, endemic diseases transmitted predominantly by cannibalism are likely to be rare, except in social organisms that share conspecific prey. These results are consistent with a review of the literature showing that diseases transmitted by cannibalism are infrequent in animals, even though both cannibalism and trophic transmission are very common.

  18. A rare case of Weil’s disease with alveolar haemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abhiram Chakrabarti; Manab Nandy; Dipankar Pal; Sudesna Mallik

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis, a disease of protean manifestations occurs sporadically throughout the year with a peak seasonal incidence during the rainy season mimicking other febrile viral illness. In the rare case, the disease leads to renal and hepatic involvement with hemorrhage which may be associated with multisystem organ dysfunction in form of pulmonary, cardiac and central nervous system, when it is known as Weil’s disease. Rarely haemorrhagic manifestations are assosciated. Early diagnosis is important as sometimes the disease may be life threatening. Proper antibiotics results in dramatic improvement. We hereby presented a case that had clinical features of Weil’s disease with cough, dyspnoea and haemoptysis. Leptospirosis was detected on ELISA testing. Patient was cured rapidly with antibiotics.

  19. Generalized eruptive histiocytoma: a rare disease in an elderly patient*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Fernanda; Serafini, Natália Battisti; Reis, Brisa Dondoni; Nuñez, Mónica Daniela Gauto; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Lupi, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Generalized eruptive histiocytoma is considered an extremely rare subtype of non-Langerhans cells histiocytosis. In the literature, there are few reports of this disease that mainly affects adults. In this report, we present a case of generalized eruptive histiocytoma in an elderly patient who had presented symptoms for over two months. Multiple erythematous papules, asymptomatic and symmetrically distributed were observed on the trunk and limbs. Histological examination showed a dense mononuclear cell dermal infiltrate. In the immunohistochemical analysis, the cells were CD68 positive, but CD1a, S100 and CD34 negative. A diagnosis of generalized eruptive histiocytoma was established. The aim of our paper is to report a case of a very rare disease, whose subtype and affected age group are even more unusual. PMID:23539013

  20. Pulmonary necrobiotic nodules: a rare extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Warwick

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The present article reports the case of a 22-yr-old female with new onset Crohn's colitis, anterior uveitis and multiple pulmonary nodules which, on histological examination, were necrobiotic nodules. This is a rare but recognised pulmonary extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease and only the fourth reported case. The present case report is followed by a brief review of the relevant literature.

  1. Chronic Granulomatous Disease: Lessons from a Rare Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Segal, B.H.; Veys, P.; Malech, H; Cowan, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare primary immunodeficiency with x-linked or autosomal recessive inheritance involving defects in genes encoding phox proteins which are the subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase. This results in failure to produce superoxide anion and downstream antimicrobial oxidant metabolites and to activate antimicrobial proteases. Affected patients are susceptible to severe, life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and excessive inflammation character...

  2. Violent death in a rare peroxisomal disease--Zellweger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinescu, Bogdan; Martius, Eliza; Pelin, Ana Maria

    2015-10-01

    Peroxisomal diseases are rare (1:50,000), genetically determined disorders (autosomal recessive), systemic, multiorgan illnesses with prominent involvement of the nervous system, caused either by the failure to form or to maintain the peroxisome, or by a defect in the function of a single or multiple peroxisomal enzymes. Peroxisomes contain approximately 50 enzymes which are responsible for many metabolic reactions, and play an important role in the oxidation of saturated very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA). The authors present the case of a Romanian boy, who died at the age of 1.6 of one of the peroxisomal diseases-Zellweger syndrome. Newborn infants with Zellweger syndrome have a typical dysmorphic facies, neonatal seizures, profound hypotonia, and eye abnormalities. Major abnormalities are present in the liver (fibrotic), kidney (cortical cysts), and brain (lipid-laden macrophages and histiocytes in cortical and periventricular areas, demyelination, centrosylvian polymicrogyria and pachygyria)-cerebro-hepato-renal syndrome (CHRS) (Zellweger). Infants with Zellweger syndrome rarely live more than a few months, but in this case the survival was longer, and the cause of death was not directly the peroxisomal disease but a violent cause of death-mechanical asphyxia with tracheo-bronchial food aspiration. The authors present the results of investigations carried out during the child's life, but also data collected at the autopsy and hystopathological postnecroptic investigations. By presenting this case, the authors wish to bring to your attention a rare pathology in forensic practice by the paradox of finding a common violent cause of death, asphyxia with food aspiration, in a rare metabolic-genetic disease, which is usually fatal by itself.

  3. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome: A rare clinical entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reet Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ellis-van Creveld (EVC syndrome is a genetic disorder with autosomal recessive transmission, which may clinically present as small stature, short limbs, fine sparse hair, hypoplastic fingernails, multiple musculofibrous frenula, conical teeth, hypoplasia of the enamel, hypodontia, and malocclusion. Heart defects, especially abnormalities of atrial septation, have been found in about 60% of cases. The mutation in EVC and EVC2 gene is responsible for this syndrome. The presence of multiple orodental findings makes this syndrome important for dentists. The aim of this article is to present a rare case of EVC syndrome in a 10-year-old girl along with the review of literature.

  4. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome: A rare clinical entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Reet; Dahiya, Parveen; Kaur, Simerpreet; Bhardwaj, Rohit; Chaudhary, Karun

    2013-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) syndrome is a genetic disorder with autosomal recessive transmission, which may clinically present as small stature, short limbs, fine sparse hair, hypoplastic fingernails, multiple musculofibrous frenula, conical teeth, hypoplasia of the enamel, hypodontia, and malocclusion. Heart defects, especially abnormalities of atrial septation, have been found in about 60% of cases. The mutation in EVC and EVC2 gene is responsible for this syndrome. The presence of multiple orodental findings makes this syndrome important for dentists. The aim of this article is to present a rare case of EVC syndrome in a 10-year-old girl along with the review of literature.

  5. Cervical Paraganglioma Mimicking Thyroid Nodule: A Rare Clinical Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna İmge Aydoğan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Paraganglioma is a rare neuroendocrine tumor. When it is located in the neck, it is commonly misdiagnosed as other thyroid neoplasms. Case Report. We report a case of cervical paraganglioma in a 55-year-old female. Patient was admitted to our clinic with goiter and neck pain. Thyroid ultrasonography revealed a 20 mm solitary, heterogeneous nodule located in the upper pole of left thyroid lobe. Fine needle aspiration cytology was nondiagnostic. She underwent left lobectomy and histopathology showed paraganglioma. Discussion. Cervical paragangliomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of thyroid nodules.

  6. SUDDEN ONSET OF DOUBLE ELEVATOR PALSY: A RARE CLINICAL ENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundip

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Double elevator palsy (DEP currently known as Monocular Elevation Deficit is a rare condition characterized by restricted elevation of one eye in all positions of up gaze . Clinically it presents as a unilateral restriction of superior rectus (SR and inferior oblique (IO. We present a case report of DEP in 3 year old boy who presented with sudden onset of DEP in right eye in our OPD. Very little information on acquired causes of DEP is available. Diagnosis , differential diagnosis and m anagement are discussed and then the literature is reviewed.

  7. Adult-onset Leigh′s disease: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaik Afshan Jabeen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leigh syndrome (LS is a heterogeneous familial or sporadic neurodegenerative disorder. It is typically seen in infancy or childhood, although rare cases of adult onset have been described. The authors describe a 37-year-old woman who presented with protracted gastrointestinal symptoms followed by acute brain stem syndrome with severe metabolic acidosis and who subsequently showed dramatic clinical and neuroradiological improvement.

  8. [High cost drugs for rare diseases in Brazil: the case of lysosomal storage disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Mônica Vinhas; Krug, Bárbara Corrêa; Picon, Paulo Dornelles; Schwartz, Ida Vanessa Doederlein

    2010-11-01

    This paper approaches in a critical way aspects of Brazilian public policies for drugs, emphasizing those classified as high cost and for rare diseases. The lysosomal storage diseases was taken as an example because of their rarity and the international trend for the development of new drugs for their treatment, all at high costs. Three lysosomal storage diseases were approached: Gaucher disease, Fabry disease and mucopolysaccharidosis type I. Gaucher disease has its treatment drug licensed in Brazil and guidelines for its use are established through a clinical protocol by the Ministry of Health. The others have their drug treatments registered in Brazil; however, no treatment guidelines for them have been developed by the government. The objective of the paper was to foster the discussion on the role of health technology assessment for high-cost drugs for rare diseases in Brazil, emphasizing the need for establishing health policies with legitimacy towards these diseases. Despite the difficulties in establishing a health policy for each rare disease, it is possible to create rational models to deal with this growing challenge.

  9. Risks and prevention of nosocomial transmission of rare zoonotic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, D J; Rutala, W A

    2001-02-01

    Americans are increasingly exposed to exotic zoonotic diseases through travel, contact with exotic pets, occupational exposure, and leisure pursuits. Appropriate isolation precautions are required to prevent nosocomial transmission of rare zoonotic diseases for which person-to-person transmission has been documented. This minireview provides guidelines for the isolation of patients and management of staff exposed to the following infectious diseases with documented person-to-person transmission: Andes hantavirus disease, anthrax, B virus infection, hemorrhagic fevers (due to Ebola, Marburg, Lassa, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, Argentine hemorrhagic fever, and Bolivian hemorrhagic fever viruses), monkeypox, plague, Q fever, and rabies. Several of these infections may also be encountered as bioterrorism hazards (i.e., anthrax, hemorrhagic fever viruses, plague, and Q fever). Adherence to recommended isolation precautions will allow for proper patient care while protecting the health care workers who provide care to patients with known or suspected zoonotic infections capable of nosocomial transmission.

  10. Schwannoma (Neurilemmoma) on the Base of the Tongue: A Rare Clinical Case

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 20 Final Diagnosis: Schwannoma of the tongue Symptoms: Dysarthria • dysphagia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Excision of the mass via trans-oral approach Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Schwannomas are slow-growing benign tumors. They can arise from any peripheral nerve, including the cranial nerves (except the olfactory and optic nerves), spinal nerves, and autonomic nerves. Schwannomas of the head and neck account for 25–40% of all cases. However, ...

  11. Exercise-induced haemoptysis as a rare presentation of a rare lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalek, Andrew D; Haney, Carissa; Merino, Maria; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Moss, Joel; Olivier, Kenneth N

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid primarily affecting the lungs is a seldom seen clinical entity. This case discusses the work-up of a patient presenting with exercise-induced haemoptysis and diffuse cystic lung disease on radiographic imaging. The common clinical and radiographic findings of diffuse cystic lung diseases as well as a brief overview of pulmonary amyloid are presented. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. HETEROTOPIC OSSIFICATION OF HIP IN A RARE CASE OF MOYAMOYA DISEASE: A RARE CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A case of extensive ossification around the left hip joint involving lesser trochanter of the femur leading to ankylosis of left hip joint in a 60 years male is being reported. The diagnosis of moyamoya disease was made , which is a rare form of occlusive cerebrovasc ular disorder. Occlusion of an artery may present with Transient Ischemic Attacks , headaches , stroke and seizures. Surgical management is the only option in these cases. This 60 years male had an acute onset hemiplegia 4 ½ years back and at present came wit h complaints of pain and swelling over the left hip. Surgical excision was done and histopathological examination revealed extensive ossification of skeletal muscle. A diagnosis of Moyamoya disease complicated with heterotopic ossification was made. There was no recurrence after 8 months of follow up.

  13. A RARE CASE OF: MARCHIAFAVA-BIGNAMI DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Marchiafava- Bignami disease is the symmetrical demyelination of the corpus callosum, mostly observed in people with chronic alcoholism & sometimes in people with chronic nutritional deficiency. We have been reported such case of a male patient who had history of chronic alcoholism, different clinical presentation and MRI findings consistent with the diagnosis of Marchiafava- Bignami disease.

  14. Talla baja y enfermedades raras Low height and rare diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Chueca

    2008-01-01

    which are of great importance due to their clinical repercussion, such as Turner’s Syndrome, Noonan’s Syndrome and Willi-Prader’s Syndrome. - The frequent osseous dysplasias, in some cases with genetic alterations of the SHOX gene, situated in the short arm of the Xp chromosome. The importance of these diagnoses lies in the possibility of carrying out early and efficient treatment, in some of them, with GH. In conclusion, the diagnosis of rare diseases with low height is a current and normal challenge in paediatric endocrinology due to the great advances in molecular genetics and the possibility of treatment in some of them. It always involves a multidisciplinary approach due to the frequent association of pathology it presents, and, in its turn, it offers the possibility of carrying out timely genetic counselling.

  15. Preventive study in subjects at risk of fatal familial insomnia: Innovative approach to rare diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forloni, Gianluigi; Tettamanti, Mauro; Lucca, Ugo; Albanese, Yasmin; Quaglio, Elena; Chiesa, Roberto; Erbetta, Alessandra; Villani, Flavio; Redaelli, Veronica; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Artuso, Vladimiro; Roiter, Ignazio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The text describes a preventive clinical trial with drug treatment in a very rare neurodegenerative disease (Fatal familial Insomnia, FFI) designed with the help of individuals at genetic risk of developing the disease, asymptomatic carriers, who have agreed to be exposed over a 10-year period to doxycycline, an antibiotic with anti-prion activity. At least 10 carriers of the FFI mutation over 42 y old will be treated with doxycycline (100 mg/die) and the incidence of the disease will be compared to that of an historical dataset. For ethical reasons a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was not feasible, however the study design and the statistical analysis ensure the scientific value of the results. This approach might represent an important breakthrough in terms of potential therapy and knowledge of rare diseases that could give some hopes to these neglected patients. PMID:25996399

  16. 76 FR 78931 - Food and Drug Administration Rare Disease Patient Advocacy Day; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Rare Disease Patient Advocacy... Disease Patient Advocacy Day. This meeting is intended to enhance the awareness of the rare disease..., and devices) intended for the diagnosis, prevention, and/or treatment of rare diseases or...

  17. Co-existence of porokeratosis variants concurrent with Bowen's disease: two rare cases report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korviriyakamol, Tarinee; Kattipathananpong, Pinnaree; Chunhasewee, Chakkrapong; Wessagowit, Vesarat; Kootiratrakarn, Tanawatt

    2014-03-01

    Coexisting variants of porokeratosis rarely occurs. Disseminated superficial porokeratosis (DSP) is characterized by multiple uniform small annular papules distributed all over body. DSP commonly coexist with linear porokeratosis (LP), but it is uncommon for DSP to coexist with porokeratosis of Mibelli (PM). PM presents with central atrophic erythematous plaques and thread-like elevated border. It occurs mainly on extremities. Although malignant transformation can be found in the porokeratosis, there is still no report case of coexisting variants of porokeratosis concurrent with Bowen's disease. The clinical and histopathologic finding of rare coexisting variants of porokeratosis (PM and DSP) concurrent with squamous dysplasia is described.

  18. Enterovenous fistulization:A rare complication of Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeong Woo Lim; Kyung-Jo Kim; Byong Duk Ye; Jeong-Sik Byeon; Seung-Jae Myung; Suk-Kyun Yang; Jin Ho Kim

    2011-01-01

    The presence of hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) is associated with numerous diseases, and has been regarded as a serious, even catastrophic condition. However,anecdotal reports mention that some patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), who developed HPVG after diagnostic examinations of the colon, were successfully managed with antibiotic therapy and have followed benign courses. In contrast, among IBD patients, the development of HPVG is rarely caused by enterovenous fistula. We describe a 32-year-old man with Crohn’s ileocolitis who presented with hypotension and fever associated with HPVG, as well as superior mesenteric vein thrombosis, possibly caused by enterovenous fistula, who was successfully managed by surgery. We also review the literature concerning portal venous gas associated with Crohn’s disease.

  19. Clinical characteristics of caroli's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ozlem Yonem; Yusuf Bayraktar

    2007-01-01

    Caroli's disease is a rare congenital condition characterized by non-obstructive saccular or fusiform dilatation of larger intrahepatic bile ducts. Cholangitis,liver cirrhosis, and cholangiocarcinoma are its potential complications. The diagnosis of Caroli's disease depends on demonstrating that the cystic lesions are in continuity with the biliary tree which can be showed by ultrasonography, computerized tomography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. Treatment of Caroli's disease relies on the location of the biliary abnormalities. While localized forms confined to one lobe can be treated with surgery, liver transplantation is the only effective modality for diffuse forms. Although a rare disorder;Caroli's disease should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic cholestasis of unknown cause.

  20. Krabbe Disease: Report of a Rare Lipid Storage and Neurodegenerative Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavuluri, Pratyusha; Vadakedath, Sabitha; Gundu, Rajkumar; Uppulety, Sushmitha

    2017-01-01

    Krabbe disease is a rare (one in 100,000 births) autosomal recessive condition, usually noticed among children. It causes sphingolipidosis (dysfunctional metabolism of sphingolipids) and leads to fatal degenerative changes affecting the myelin sheath of the nervous system. We report a case of a six-year-old male child who presented with symptoms of muscle spasticity and irritability. Diagnosis of this disease can only be made with clinical suspicion. Laboratory diagnosis includes brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy, biochemical analysis of cerebrospinal fluid, and genetic analysis for detecting mutation in genes coding for galactosyl cerebroside (GALC). We report a case of late infantile Krabbe disease.

  1. Rare variants in PLXNA4 and Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva C Schulte

    Full Text Available Approximately 20% of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD report a positive family history. Yet, a large portion of causal and disease-modifying variants is still unknown. We used exome sequencing in two affected individuals from a family with late-onset familial PD followed by frequency assessment in 975 PD cases and 1014 ethnically-matched controls and linkage analysis to identify potentially causal variants. Based on the predicted penetrance and the frequencies, a variant in PLXNA4 proved to be the best candidate and PLXNA4 was screened for additional variants in 862 PD cases and 940 controls, revealing an excess of rare non-synonymous coding variants in PLXNA4 in individuals with PD. Although we cannot conclude that the variant in PLXNA4 is indeed the causative variant, these findings are interesting in the light of a surfacing role of axonal guidance mechanisms in neurodegenerative disorders but, at the same time, highlight the difficulties encountered in the study of rare variants identified by next-generation sequencing in diseases with autosomal dominant or complex patterns of inheritance.

  2. [Concept maps as a tool for the diagnosis of rare diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega Calvo, Manuel; Gómez-Chaparro Moreno, José Luis; González-Meneses López, Antonio; Guillén Enríquez, Javier; Varo Baena, Antonio; Fernández de la Mota, Elvira

    2012-01-01

    Rare diseases are a real public health problem for hospitals and also for primary care. We describe some metaphor-based diagnosis procedures, such as: "When you hear hoof beats don't always think horses, sometimes they could be zebras", or that one about the antiquarian who recognised a museum masterpiece while walking in the Rastro (Madrid). The "lightning diagnoses" by Skoda are an important historic record. T. Greenhalgh has tried to cover the gap between evidence based medicine and the intuitive diagnosis. We point out some clinical epidemiology rules in order to improve their early detection by family practitioners and paediatricians. In our opinion, the training in the diagnosis of rare diseases has to be different for primary care level and for hospital doctors. Concept maps are useful for diagnosis in primary care clinics.

  3. A rare presentation of clinically intractable hypertension: Pancreatic paraganglioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Ming Tseng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Paraganglioma is a rare extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma which originates from chromaffin cells within the ganglia of the sympathetic trunk and of the celiac, renal, suprarenal, and hypogastric plexuses. Pancreatic paragangliomas are rarer still. And even then, paragangliomas are mostly reported to be nonfunctional. We report a case of a 64-year-old woman with underlying disease of hypertension who presented with biliary colic. Contrast-enhanced computer tomography showed an enhancing mass in the uncinate process of the pancreas. Pylorus-sparing Whipple procedure was performed for complete tumor excision. Hypertensive crisis developed after Whipple, which improved after continuous intravenous nicardipine infusion. Pathology revealed a paraganglioma. A 24-h catecholamine urine test showed increased norepinephrine and vanillylmandelic acid level. Functional paraganglioma was diagnosed.

  4. Brexit and rare diseases: big risk, bigger opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyry, Hanna I; Cox, Timothy M; Roos, Jonathan C P

    2017-04-01

    The UK's planned exit from the EU will leave its national health sector in a very dangerous position. It will also have profound consequences for domestic UK law. The impact may be particularly drastic for patients for whom EU law protects the right to treatment. At a particular risk are patients with rare, 'orphan', diseases whose treatments are uniquely enabled at the EU level. We examine the potential effects of Brexit on the orphan sector and identify an opportunity to solve long-standing and intensifying difficulties, especially the pricing of orphan drugs.

  5. Late onset ‘en coup de sabre’ following trauma: Rare presentation of a rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasleem Arif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available En coup de sabre (linear scleroderma of face is a rare type of morphea (localized scleroderma involving frontoparietal area of the forehead and scalp. Many triggering factors have been implicated in the development of morphea like trauma, immobilization, bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG vaccination, injections of vitamin K, mechanical compression from clothing, etc. Linear scleroderma primarily affects the pediatric population, with 67% of patients diagnosed before 18 years of age. In this article, we describe a case of 26 year old female who presented with a three months history of brownish indurated plaque of skin on the frontal and forehead regions of the head. The patient gave a history of trauma at the same site six years back. The diagnosis of morphea was made clinically supported by histopathological features of the skin biopsy. Her neurological examination was normal. ANA was negative. Brain MRI didn’t reveal any abnormality. She was treated with topical tacrolimus 0.1% ointment. The late onset en coup de sabre is a rare presentation and hence reported.

  6. Putting A Face On Rare Diseases | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who have a rare and potentially dangerous disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Photo Courtesy of: Patricia Weltin That has ... daughters with a rare and potentially dangerous disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), a connective tissue disorder causing joint ...

  7. Papulonodular secondary syphilis: a rare clinic presentation confirmed by serologic and histologic exams*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veasey, John Verrinder; Lellis, Rute Facchini; Boin, Maria Fernanda Feitosa de Camargo; Porto, Pedro Loureiro; Chen, Jessica Chia Sin

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum and divided into three stages according to the duration of the disease: primary, secondary and tertiary. Secondary syphilis has diverse clinical presentations, such as papular-nodular lesions. This presentation is rare, with 15 cases reported in the literature over the past 20 years. We report a case of secondary syphilis with papular-nodular lesions in a healthy 63-year-old patient, who has presented treponema in immunohistochemical examination of the skin lesions. PMID:27192520

  8. Leiomyoma of the deferens: a curious and extremely rare disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rose, Aldo F; Mantica, Guglielmo; Piol, Nataniele; Toncini, Carlo; Spina, Bruno; Terrone, Carlo

    2017-08-01

    Leiomyomas are rare benign tumors that can occur in the male urinary tract. We present a unique case of leiomyoma of the vas deferens. We present the clinical case of a 69-year-old patient with a suspected bulk close to the right epididymis, which turned out to be a leiomyoma of the vas deferens. To our knowledge, it is the fourth case in literature. A proper identification and the knowledge of this pathology, even if it is a very unusual event, is necessary to avoid a surgical over treatment and preserve the testicle, by removing only the tumor.

  9. Clinical patterns in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooden, Stephanie Maria van

    2012-01-01

    The clinical heterogeneity of Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients may reflect the existence of subtypes of the disease. PD subtypes have often been defined by a classification according to researcher-specified criteria, such as age-at-onset or predominant clinical motor features. The general objective

  10. Lower Extremity Arterial Occlusive Disease As a Rare Complication of Crohn's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-wei Wu; Xue-ying Jiang; Chang-wei Liu; Yong-jun Li; Rong Zeng

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dinical characteristics and treatment strategy of lower extremity arterial occlusive disease in patients with Crohn's disease(CD).Methods Clinical information of 9 cases suffering from lower extremity arterial occlusion and CD was investigated retrospectively.Results All the cases were less than 50 years old and the most were females(8/9).Arterial occlusions occurred in either active(5/9)or inactive(4/9)stage of CD.Besides the arteries of lower extremities,other arteries could also be involved such as aorta,iliac artery,renal artery or mesentery artery.Seven cases had atherosclerotic imaging findings(4 had aortic plaques and 6 had iliac artery stenoses).Embolectomy or thromboendarterectomy were mostly performed.Four(44.4% )cases had recurrent lower limb ischemia.Conclusions Arterial occlusive disease is a rare extraintestinal manifestation of CD.A thorough inspection of aorta is necessary.Embolectomy is mostly preferred.Anticoagulation treatment is highly recommended after the operation.

  11. Focal epithelial hyperplasia. A rare disease in our area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Saint-Gerons, Rafael; Toro-Rojas, Mariano; Ceballos-Salobreña, Alejandro; Aparicio-Soria, Jose Luis; Fuentes-Vaamonde, Helena

    2005-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a benign, asymptomatic disease, occurring with very low frequency within our population. It appears as papules, principally on the lower lip, although it can also be found on the retro-commissural mucosa and tongue, and less frequently on the upper lip, gingiva and palate. We present the clinical case of a 9-year-old Saharan girl with lesions that clinically and histologically corresponded to a focal epithelial hyperplasia.

  12. Alien hand and leg as the presenting feature of probable sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: A rare presentation of a rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banshi Lal Kumawat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD can have varied clinical presentation depending upon the genotype at codon 129. The common presenting clinical features of sCJD are rapid onset cognitive impairment, ataxia, psychosis and visual signs (field defects, distortion, cortical blindness. Alien limb sign was first described in patients with corpus callosal tumors and later with other neurodegenerative conditions like corticobasal degeneration. Alien hand complaints as the presenting feature of sCJD has been described in literature, but simultaneous alien hand and leg has been rarely described as presenting feature of sCJD. We describe here a case of a 55-year-old man who presented with progressive left alien hand and leg as the sole clinical manifestation of probable sCJD.

  13. Alien hand and leg as the presenting feature of probable sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: A rare presentation of a rare disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumawat, Banshi Lal; Sharma, Chandra Mohan; Nath, Kunal; Acharya, Mihir; Khandelwal, Dinesh; Jain, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) can have varied clinical presentation depending upon the genotype at codon 129. The common presenting clinical features of sCJD are rapid onset cognitive impairment, ataxia, psychosis and visual signs (field defects, distortion, cortical blindness). Alien limb sign was first described in patients with corpus callosal tumors and later with other neurodegenerative conditions like corticobasal degeneration. Alien hand complaints as the presenting feature of sCJD has been described in literature, but simultaneous alien hand and leg has been rarely described as presenting feature of sCJD. We describe here a case of a 55-year-old man who presented with progressive left alien hand and leg as the sole clinical manifestation of probable sCJD. PMID:25745324

  14. Families Seek a Greater Role in Search for Rare Disease Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Of the nearly 7,000 rare diseases identified by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), only a few hundred currently have treatments. The development of therapies for rare diseases is often hampered by the special challenges of conducting the needed studies for rare disease drugs and medical devices, such as small numbers of patients and the fact…

  15. Ovarian involvement in Crohn's disease: a rare complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Saborit

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The transmural condition of Crohn's disease predisposes to fistulae or abscesses. The internal fistula incidence is about 15%. Among them, enteroovarian fistula is rarely described on the literature. Herein, the authors present three cases of enteroovarian fistulas. Case reports: Two women are diagnosed with ileal Crohn's disease that presented a pelvic abscess diagnosed by ultrasound and CT. On surgery, an inflammatory mass involving the ileum and the ovary was found. The third woman was operated because of a tuboovarian abscess and was diagnosed with ileal Crohn's disease afterwards. In the three cases, the histopathological analysis of the ovary showed granulomas with abscess compatible with Crohn's disease. In one of the cases, multinucleated giant cells were found in the foreign body reaction to vegetable matter. A right ileocolectomy and an adnexectomy were performed in all three cases. No further involvement of the contralateral ovary or other gynaecological complications was observed. Discussion: The treatment of Crohn's disease complications should be individualized. In the case of ovarian involvement, surgical treatment should include adnexectomy.

  16. [Rare cutaneous manifestaions of lupus erythematosus. A clinical overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, A; Schuppe, H C; Ruzicka, T; Lehmann, P

    2000-11-01

    Lupus erythematosus (LE) is a disease with a wide spectrum of cutaneous and systemic manifestations and has been the subject of many studies over several decades. Clinical features of patients with LE show a great variation, and for this reason it is difficult to develop a unifying concept of this disease. Consequently, this has led to the identification of subsets which have been defined by constellations of clinical and photobiological features, histological changes as well as laboratory abnormalities. Besides the characteristic classical forms such as systemic LE (SLE), subacute cutaneous LE (SCLE), and discoid LE (DLE), there are uncommon variants of LE which often lead to diagnostic difficulties. Bullous LE (BLE) and urticarial vasculitis are listed as characteristic but non-specific manifestations of systemic LE. LE tumidus (LET), LE hypertrophic/verrucous (LEHV), chilblain LE, and LE profundus (LEP) are uncommon subtypes of chronic cutaneous LE. Annular erythema and papulonodular mucinosis are further uncommon cutaneous manifestations of LE. This clinical review summarizes the typical features of the uncommon forms of LE in order to improve clinical diagnostic precision and to achieve a better differentiation of the subtypes.

  17. Reducing selection bias in case-control studies from rare disease registries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mistry Pramod K

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In clinical research of rare diseases, where small patient numbers and disease heterogeneity limit study design options, registries are a valuable resource for demographic and outcome information. However, in contrast to prospective, randomized clinical trials, the observational design of registries is prone to introduce selection bias and negatively impact the validity of data analyses. The objective of the study was to demonstrate the utility of case-control matching and the risk-set method in order to control bias in data from a rare disease registry. Data from the International Collaborative Gaucher Group (ICGG Gaucher Registry were used as an example. Methods A case-control matching analysis using the risk-set method was conducted to identify two groups of patients with type 1 Gaucher disease in the ICGG Gaucher Registry: patients with avascular osteonecrosis (AVN and those without AVN. The frequency distributions of gender, decade of birth, treatment status, and splenectomy status were presented for cases and controls before and after matching. Odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each variable before and after matching. Results The application of case-control matching methodology results in cohorts of cases (i.e., patients with AVN and controls (i.e., patients without AVN who have comparable distributions for four common parameters used in subject selection: gender, year of birth (age, treatment status, and splenectomy status. Matching resulted in odds ratios of approximately 1.00, indicating no bias. Conclusions We demonstrated bias in case-control selection in subjects from a prototype rare disease registry and used case-control matching to minimize this bias. Therefore, this approach appears useful to study cohorts of heterogeneous patients in rare disease registries.

  18. Acute erythroid leukemia: autopsy report of a rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Rúbia Ferreira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute erythroid leukemia (AEL is a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukemia(AML, characterized by predominant erythroid proliferation. The 2008 WorldHealth Organization (WHO classification of AML defined two AEL subtypes:erythroleukaemia (EL, in which erythroid precursors account for 50% or moreof all nucleated bone marrow cells and myeloblasts account for 20% or more ofthe nonerythroid cell population; and pure erythroid leukemia (PEL, in whicherythroid precursors account for 80% or more of all nucleated bone marrowcells. We report the case of an elderly female patient with wasting syndromeand pancytopenia without evidence of blasts in peripheral blood. A diagnosisof PEL was established on the basis of bone marrow biopsy findings. Thepatient died on postadmission day 20, and an autopsy was performed. Wereclassified the disease as EL on the basis of the autopsy findings, whichincluded myeloblasts accounting for more than 20% of the nonerythroid cellsin the bone marrow, as well as leukemic infiltration and myeloid metaplasia insolid organs, such as the liver, spleen, kidneys, adrenal glands, and abdominallymph nodes. A rare disease, AEL accounts for less than 5% of all AMLs and ispractically a diagnosis of exclusion. Autopsy reports of AEL are extremely rarein the literature. We demonstrate that in the case reported here, leukemia cellstended to infiltrate solid organs with myeloid metaplasia. Our findings alsoshow that a larger neoplastic bone marrow sample is crucial to the correctdiagnosis of EL, which is based on morphological and quantitative criteria.

  19. Clinical features of legionnaires' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, B A

    1998-06-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a systemic infectious disease primarily involving the lungs, with multisystemic extrapulmonary manifestations. Any species of Legionella may cause legionnaires' disease in normal and compromised hosts. The clinical diagnosis of legionnaires' disease may be made on the basis of associated extrapulmonary clinical and laboratory findings. Although no single finding in legionnaires' disease is pathognomonic, the association of key extrapulmonary constitutes a typical pattern that is diagnostically characteristic. The syndromic approach based on a weighted point evaluation system described in the article gives physicians a system to arrive at a rapid presumptive clinical diagnosis of legionnaires' disease. Definitive diagnosis of legionnaires' disease is by direct fluorescent antibody testing of respiratory specimens, serological methods, Legionella urinary antigenuria, or culture.

  20. A Rare Chromosome 3 Imbalance and Its Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Sims

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The duplication of chromosome 3q is a rare disorder with varying chromosomal breakpoints and consequently symptoms. Even rarer is the unbalanced outcome from a parental inv(3 resulting in duplicated 3q and a deletion of 3p. Molecular karyotyping should aid in precisely determining the length and breakpoints of the 3q+/3p− so as to better understand a child’s future development and needs. We report a case of an infant male with a 57.5 Mb duplication from 3q23-qter. This patient also has an accompanying 1.7 Mb deletion of 3p26.3. The duplicated segment in this patient encompasses the known critical region of 3q26.3-q27, which is implicated in the previously reported 3q dup syndrome; however, the accompanying 3p26.3 deletion is smaller than the previously reported cases. The clinical phenotype of this patient relates to previously reported cases of 3q+ that may suggest that the accompanying 1.7 Mb heterozygous deletion is not clinically relevant. Taken together, our data has refined the location and extent of the chromosome 3 imbalance, which will aid in better understanding the molecular underpinning of the 3q syndrome.

  1. Gastric siderosis: An under-recognized and rare clinical entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiten P Kothadia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The increased deposition of iron in gastric mucosa is known as gastric siderosis. It is believed that the only regulated step of the iron metabolism cycle occurs during absorption in the small intestine. Once this system becomes overwhelmed due to either local or widespread iron levels, then iron can be absorbed very quickly by a passive concentration-dependent mechanism. This excess iron is initially stored in the liver but later can be found in the pancreas, heart and joints. Excess iron is not expected to deposit in the gastric mucosa. This gastric deposition has been found in association with hemochromatosis, oral iron medications, alcohol abuse, blood transfusions, hepatic cirrhosis and spontaneous portacaval shunt with esophageal varices. The precise mechanism of this iron deposition in gastric epithelial and stromal cells is still not well understood; thus, identification of iron in gastric mucosa raises many questions. On histology, the pattern of deposition is variable, and recognition of the pattern is often useful to choose the appropriate workup for the patient and to diagnose and possibly treat the cause of iron overload. In this article, we have described a well-referenced review of this rare clinical entity with different histological patterns, diagnostic tests and the clinical significance of the different patterns of iron deposition.

  2. Speech, eating and saliva control in rare diseases - a database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögreen, L; Mogren, Å; Andersson-Norinder, J; Bratel, J

    2015-11-01

    The aim was to study the background to and the manifestations of affected intelligibility of speech and reported difficulty with eating and saliva control in rare diseases. In Sweden, a disease or disorder is defined as rare when it affects no more than 100 individuals per million population and leads to a marked degree of disability. In 1996-2008, 1703 individuals with 169 rare diseases (3-67 years) answered a questionnaire about oral health and oro-facial function and 1614 participated in a clinical examination. A control group of 135 healthy children was included. Oromotor impairment was a frequent finding (43%) and was absent among the controls. Half the children in the youngest age group (3-6 years) had moderate/severely affected intelligibility or no speech compared with one-third in the other age groups. The most frequent eating difficulties were related to chewing and were found in approximately 20% of the individuals in the study group. Artificial nutrition was most common in children aged 3-6 years (9·2%), followed by children aged 7-12 years (4·9%), adolescents aged 13-19 years (3·3%) and adults (1·4%). Impaired saliva control was common (31·2%) and strongly and significantly correlated with oromotor dysfunction, intellectual disability, open mouth at rest and epilepsy. In conclusion, oromotor impairment and oro-facial dysfunctions, such as affected intelligibility, eating difficulties and impaired saliva control, are frequent in individuals with rare diseases. There is a strong correlation between oromotor impairment and affected intelligibility, eating difficulties and impaired saliva control in individuals with rare diseases.

  3. Sustainable rare diseases business and drug access: no time for misconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollet, Pierrick; Lemoine, Adrien; Dunoyer, Marc

    2013-07-23

    Legislative incentives enacted in Europe through the Regulation (EC) No. 141/2000 to incentivize orphan drug development have over the last 12 years constituted a powerful impetus toward R&D directed at the rare diseases population. However, despite therapeutic promises contained in these projects and significant economic impact linked to burgeoning R&D expenditures, the affordability and value of OMPs has become a topic of health policy debate in Europe fueled by the perception that OMPs have high acquisition costs, and by misconceptions around pricing dynamics and rare-diseases business models. In order to maintain sustainable patient access to new and innovative therapies, it is essential to address these misconceptions, and to ensure the successful continuation of a dynamic OMPs R&D within rare-diseases public health policy. Misconceptions abound regarding the pricing of rare diseases drugs and reflect a poor appreciation of the R&D model and the affordability and value of OMPs. Simulation of potential financial returns of small medium sized rare diseases companies focusing on high priced drugs show that their economic returns are likely to be close to their cost of capital. Research in rare diseases is a challenging endeavour characterised by high fixed costs in which companies accrue substantial costs for several years before potentially generating returns from the fruits of their investments. Although heavily dependent upon R&D capabilities of each individual company or R&D organization, continuous flow of R&D financial investment should allow industry to increasingly include efficiencies in research and development in cost considerations to its customers. Industry should also pro-actively work on facilitating development of a specific value based pricing approach to help understanding what constitute value in rare diseases. Policy makers must reward innovation based upon unmet need and patient outcome. Broader understanding by clinicians, the public, and

  4. Primary Adrenal Insufficiency (Addison's Disease) Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Rare Occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godswill, Okwuonu Chimezie; Odigie, Ojeh-Oziegbe

    2014-10-01

    Coexistence of Addison's disease and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a rare occurrence with only few reported cases in the literature. We describe a 29-year-old woman who presented to us with clinical features of acute Addisonian crisis and SLE. Laboratory investigations were confirmatory of Addison's disease in a background of SLE. The patient made remarkable improvement on administration of steroids as replacement therapy for adrenal insufficiency and treatment of SLE. Clinicians need to have a high-index of suspicion of this possible coexistence in order to avoid the associated deleterious hemodynamic and metabolic consequences.

  5. Crowdfunding drug development: the state of play in oncology and rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragojlovic, Nick; Lynd, Larry D

    2014-11-01

    In this article, we present descriptive data on 125 crowdfunding campaigns aimed at financing research in oncology (including basic research, drug discovery, and clinical trials). We also describe five campaigns that have succeeded in raising substantial funds to support the development of treatments for ultrarare diseases. The data suggest that crowdfunding is a viable approach to supporting early proof-of-concept research that could allow researchers in oncology and rare diseases to succeed in traditional grant competitions or to attract private investment. The data also suggest that such an approach could become a valuable additional source of funding for early-stage innovators in the drug development arena.

  6. Clinical neurogenetics: huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordelon, Yvette M

    2013-11-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant, adult-onset, progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the triad of abnormal movements (typically chorea), cognitive impairment, and psychiatric problems. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the gene encoding the protein huntingtin on chromosome 4 and causes progressive atrophy of the striatum as well as cortical and other extrastriatal structures. Genetic testing has been available since 1993 to confirm diagnosis in affected adults and for presymptomatic testing in at-risk individuals. This review covers HD signs, symptoms, and pathophysiology; current genetic testing issues; and current and future treatment strategies.

  7. 4th Rare Disease South Eastern Europe (See) Meeting Skopje, Macedonia (November 14th, 2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucev, Zoran; Tasic, Velibor; Polenakovic, Momir

    2015-01-01

    The 4th meeting on rare diseases in South Eastern Europe (SEE) was held in Skopje, at the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts (MASA) on the 14(th) of November 2015. The focuses were metabolic, rare brain diseases as well as the rare dysmorphic syndrome. The authors of the report are particularly keen on stating that one of the main goals of the meeting, namely to help the treatment of patients with rare disease has begun to bear fruits. The talk on an iminosugar-based pharmacological chaperone compound as a drug candidate for the treatment of GM1-gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis IVB (Morquio disease type B) was enlightening. To date, there is no treatment available to be offered to patients, but chaperones lead mutated proteins to adopt a native-like conformation and to successfully traffic to their normal cellular destination. DORPHAN is developing an iminosugar-based pharmacological chaperone compound for the treatment of GM1-gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis IVB. A talk on recent developments in the laboratory diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) was particularly interesting, covering the laboratory diagnosis of the MPS diseases by a strategy of clinical examination, biochemical analysis of urine samples, enzyme tests and genetic characterization of underlying mutations. New techniques were developed, including analysis of urinary glycosaminoglycans with tandem mass spectrometry, miniaturized enzyme tests or novel synthetic substrates for enzyme assays using mass spectrometry detection of products using dried blood spots. Feasibility and cost-effectiveness of these methods in newborn screening programs have been demonstrated. Neuromuscular RDs, and especially familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) were a topic of the Bulgarian colleagues. Diagnosis, screening and the role of microglia were also topics of particular interest. In summary, this year RD meeting was exciting and productive on a wide range of diseases and on a novel insights on

  8. Rare Lung Diseases: Interstitial Lung Diseases and Lung Manifestations of Rheumatological Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, Mahesh Babu; Goh, Daniel Y T; Lim, Michael Teik Chung

    2015-10-01

    The concept of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease (ChILD) is relatively young. There has been tremendous progress in this field in the last decade. The key advance has been the recognition of interstitial lung diseases that are often distinct and occur mainly in infants. Diagnosis is challenging because the incidence is low and no single center in the world has enough cases to promote experience and clinical skills. This has led to formation of international groups of people interested in the field and the "Children's interstitial and diffuse lung disease research network" (ChILDRN) is one such group which contributed to the progress of this field. Clinically, these disorders overlap with those of other common respiratory disorders. Hence, clinical practice guidelines emphasize the additional role of chest imaging, genetic testing and lung biopsy in the diagnostic evaluation. Genetic testing, in particular, has shown tremendous progress in this field. Being noninvasive, it has the potential to help early recognition in a vast majority. Despite progress, definitive therapeutic modalities are still lacking and supportive care is still the backbone of management in the majority. Early recognition of the definitive diagnosis helps in the management, even if, in a significant number, it helps in avoiding unnecessary therapy. Also discussed in this article, is the pulmonary manifestation of rheumatic diseases in children. The incidence and spectrum of pulmonary involvement in rheumatic conditions vary and can be result of the primary disease or its management or due to an concurrent infection.

  9. Research on economy and social exclusion: China dolls and rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Akihiko

    2013-02-01

    The second workshop on "Research on Economy And Social Exclusion (REASE)" was held in the University of Tokyo on January 26, 2013. Focusing on rare diseases and disorders in China, three speakers from China introduced the current status of rare diseases and the challenge of support organizations for patients with rare disease and disorders in China, and especially pointed out some important issues associated with rare diseases and disorders in China. From the viewpoint of economics, this paper discusses some of the important issues of rare diseases and disorders in China raised in this workshop, especially from the aspects of economy of scale and orphan drugs, and the emergence of stigma from discrimination. It was shown that international coordination and cooperation are called for in order to give a proper incentive to the drug industries to create new drugs for rare diseases, and suggested that an important step toward inclusion is to reduce stigma by making rare diseases visible as much as possible.

  10. Idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis: A challenging case in a rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charat Thongprayoon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Retroperitoneal fibrosis is a rare but severe disease. The diagnosis is usually late when a patient is evaluated for renal insufficiency. Untreated cases may develop serious complications or advance to end-stage renal disease. Case Report: We report a 66-year-old man who presented with worsening kidney function. He was successfully given the diagnosis of idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Prednisone (1 mg/kg per day was initiated. The patient′s symptoms continued to improve at 1 month with stable kidney function. Conclusion: Clinicians should have high index of suspicion for retroperitoneal fibrosis when patients present with an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR or C-reactive protein (CRP and renal insufficiency from obstructive uropathy. The diagnosis of retroperitoneal fibrosis is primarily made from imaging by computed tomography (CT scan. Biopsy should be performed in patients who do not have typical findings on CT scan and to exclude the possibility of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4-related disease.

  11. Cryptogenic Multifocal Ulcerous Stenosing Enteritis: An Exceptionally Rare Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptogenic Multifocal Ulcerous Stenosing Enteritis (CMUSE is a rare idiopathic disease of the small bowel. Its origin and pathophysiology has not been well described. Clinicopathologic features include unexplained ileal strictures with supercial ulceration. We present a case of a 31-year-old HIV positive lady who was admitted with complaints of recurrent abdominal pain and constipation. Laboratory investigations revealed iron deciency anemia. Ultrasonography of the abdomen showed dilated bowel loops and a subsequent barium follow through showed ve strictures in the ileum. Segmental small bowel resection with end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Grossly ileum showed ve ileal strictures. The diagnosis of CMUSE was made on histopathology after ruling out other causes of strictures. The present case highlights the importance of considering CMUSE in patients with chronic or recurrent episodes of intestinal obstruction with multiple small intestinal ulcers and strictures after other common causes have been ruled out.

  12. Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma of the nasal type with predominant T-cell markers: A rare subtype of rare disease entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Nandan Varshney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma of nasal type is a rare and comparatively a new entry among group of Non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The disease is characterized by a clinically aggressive course with involvement of upper aero-digestive tract and classical immune-phenotyping with CD2, CD3 and CD56 positivity. Being a rare entity, treatment entities are yet not formulated in guidelines. We hereby report a case of extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma with predominant T cell markers who was initially treated with CHOP regime of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and later successfully treated with SMILE regime.

  13. Study and analysis of the state of rare disease research in Shandong Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Heng; Cui, Yazhou; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Pang, Jingxiang; Zhang, Xiumei; Xu, Shuangqing; Han, Jinxiang

    2012-11-01

    As the world's most populous country, China has the world's largest number of rare disease groups in terms of prevalence. However, the country has no system of registering cases of most rare diseases, so there is very little documented information on the epidemiology of those diseases. The purpose of this study was to study the state of rare disease research and survey doctors in Shandong Province regarding their level of awareness of rare diseases. Types of rare diseases and numbers of cases were tallied and their geographical distribution over the decades was analyzed. Eight hundred and twenty-four doctors in tertiary hospitals and maternity and child care hospitals were surveyed by questionnaire. Data were descriptively analyzed and a map of disease distribution was created. Articles about rare diseases were retrieved from the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database to provide pertinent data. This study yielded 5,749 cases of 323 different types of rare diseases. The survey found that doctors lack awareness of research on rare diseases. An authoritative and information-rich platform for rare disease research is urgently needed. Key steps are to study epidemiological and statistical techniques and then obtain available data to provide a basis for the definition and regulation of rare diseases in China.

  14. Promoting innovation in small markets: Evidence from the market for rare and intractable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Toshiaki; Uchida, Gyo

    2017-07-01

    In many medical care markets with limited profit potential, firms often have little incentive to innovate. These include the market for rare diseases, "neglected" tropical diseases, and personalized medicine. Governments and not-for-profit organizations promote innovation in such markets but empirical evidence on the policy effect is limited. We study this issue by analyzing the impact of a demand-side policy in Japan, which reduces the cost sharing of patients with some rare and intractable diseases and attempts to establish and promote the treatment of those diseases. Using clinical trials data taken from public registries, we identify the effect of the policy using a difference-in-difference approach. We find that the demand-side policy increased firms' incentive to innovate: firm-sponsored clinical trials increased 181% (0.16 per disease per year) when covered by the policy. This result indicates that the demand-side policy can be an important part of innovation policies in markets with limited profit potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Single ventricle, bicuspid aorta and interatrial wall aneurysm as a rare complex adult congenital heart disease: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Berisha, Blerim; Krasniqi, Xhevdet; Thaqi, Agim; Gashi, Masar; Ko?inaj, Dardan

    2009-01-01

    Background Single ventricle, bicuspid aortic valve and interatrial wall aneurysm in adulthood are a rare and unique case in medical literature. This presented case with congenital heart disease has never been treated surgically and clinical consequences seriously presented in adulthood. Case presentation A 27 year old man with complex congenital heart disease presented. At the age of six, the single ventricle was ultrasonographly diagnosed, but at age 27 clinical consequences started to be se...

  16. Fahr’s Disease – about a clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Alexandre

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Fahr’s disease is a rare neuropsychiatric disorder with calcification of the basal nucleus. Its symptoms include movement disorders, dementia and affective disorders. The diagnosis is made with brain image particulary CAT or MRI. The authors describe a clinical case of Fahr’s disease, which presented initially with affective symptoms.

  17. Challenges and Hurdles to Business as Usual in Drug Development for Treatment of Rare Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, D C

    2016-10-01

    Only 10-15 first-in-class new medicines are approved each year by the global pharmaceutical industry for all diseases, of which less than a third is for rare (orphan) diseases. The drug discovery processes to identify rare and common diseases are similar, suggesting it will be impossible to discover new drugs for even a small fraction of the rare diseases using the current paradigm. Different approaches are required to address this large unmet medical need.

  18. 8th European Conference on Rare Diseases & Orphan Products (ECRD 2016

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    Michael Schlander

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Table of contents O1 The European Social Preferences Measurement (ESPM study project: social cost value analysis, budget impact, commercial life cycle revenue management, and the economics of biopharmaceutical Research & Development (R&D Michael Schlander, Søren Holm, Erik Nord, Jeff Richardson, Silvio Garattini, Peter Kolominsky-Rabas, Deborah Marshall, Ulf Persson, Maarten Postma, Steven Simoens, Oriol de Solà Morales, Keith Tolley, Mondher Toumi, Harry Telser O2 Newborn Screening: the potential and the challenges James R Bonham O3 Untreatable disease outcomes - how would we measure them? Helmut Hintner, Anja Diem, Martin Laimer O4 Taking Integrated Care Forward: Experiences from Canada to inspire service provision for people living with rare disease in Europe Réjean Hébert O5 Listening to the patient’s voice: social media listening for safety and benefits in rare diseases Nabarun Dasgupta, Carrie E. Pierce, Melissa Jordan O6 Via Opta: Mobile apps making visually impaired patients’ lives easier Barbara Bori, Mohanad Fors, Emilie Prazakova O7 A report of the IRDiRC “Small Population Clinical Trial” Task Force Simon Day O8 HAE patient identification and diagnosis: An innovative, ‘game changing’ collaboration Thomas J. Croce Jr. O9 Co-creating with the community: primary packaging & administration for people with haemophilia Jonas Fransson, Philip Wood O10 Go with Gaucher, taking forward the next generation. How to involve young people to create a new generation of patient advocates Anne-Grethe Lauridsen, Joanne Higgs, Vesna Stojmirova Aleksovska P1 ODAK – Orphan Drug for Acanthamoeba Keratitis Christina Olsen, Ritchie Head, Antonio Asero, Vincenzo Papa, Christa van Kan, Loic Favennec, Silvana Venturella, Michela Salvador, Alan Krol P5 Rare Navigators help people living with rare diseases to manage the social – and healthcare systems Stephanie J. Nielsen, Birthe B. Holm P6 The eAcademy for Tay-Sachs & Sandhoff disease app

  19. Chronic meningococcemia: a rare presentation of meningococcal disease: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Adolfo Guerra Soares Brandão

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic meningococcemia is a rare clinical presentation within the spectrumof infections due to Neisseria meningitidis, which was first described in 1902.It is defined as a chronic and benign meningococcal bacteremia withoutmeningeal signs or symptoms with at least one week’s duration, characterizedby intermittent or continuous fever, polymorphic cutaneous rash, and migratoryarthropathy. The incidence is believed to be around 1:200,000 inhabitants. Itaffects predominantly young people and adults, and it is equally distributedbetween genders. Diagnosis may be challenging in the early stages of thedisease because of the difficulty in isolating Neisseria meningitidis (it reaches74% of positivity in advanced stages. Recently, the use of PCR for detectingNeisseria sp antigen in skin biopsies specimens has been considered for thoseculture-negative cases. The authors report a case of a 54-year-old femalepatient who sought medical attention for a five-day fever followed by arthralgiaand skin lesions predominantly in the lower limbs. The patient progressed toa toxemic clinical status that improved after the administration of antibiotictherapy, which consisted of oxacillin and ceftriaxone. The diagnosis of chronicmeningococcemia was performed after the isolation of Neisseria meningitidisin two different blood sample cultures. This is, to our knowledge, the firstcase of chronic meningococcemia described in Brazil (up to the writing of thisreport.

  20. Towards government-funded special biomedical research programs to combat rare diseases in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Yao, Lan; Liu, Zhiyong

    2015-04-01

    Rare diseases are rarely conditions that are often debilitating and even life-threatening, which was identified by the World Health Organization (WHO) with a prevalence of 0.65-1‰. 5,000-7,000 rare diseases are thought to exist, which account for around 10% of diseases for individuals worldwide. It is estimated that over 10 million people were patients with rare disease in China. During the past years, public awareness of rare diseases has in fact heightened with the launching of campaigns by patients' organizations and spontaneous efforts by members of the public, not only in developed countries and regions including United States of America (USA), the European Union (EU), and in Japan, but also in China. However, the features of missed or delayed diagnosis, shortage of effective drugs, and the high cost of currently available drugs for rare diseases make it an important public health issue and a challenge to medical care worldwide. To combat rare disease, the government should assume the responsibility of taking on the important task of promoting the sustained development of a system of medical care for and research into rare diseases. Government-funded special biomedical research programs in the USA, EU, and Japan may serve as a reference for China coping with rare diseases. The government-funded special biomedical research programs consisting of leading clinicians and researchers to enhance basic and applied research on rare diseases were expected to be launched in China.

  1. State of diagnostic quandary solved by modern technology: a rare case of Madelung's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyaw, Htoo; Grillo, Michael; Lin, Aung Naing; Kapp, David A

    2016-02-05

    Madelung's disease is a neglected metabolic disease characterised by generalised multiple fatty tissue deposits. A 64-year-old Caucasian woman presented with generalised weakness and symptomatic hypoglycaemia with altered mental status. Physical examination showed very distinct physical characteristics with multiple lumps distributed over the upper body. Her neurological symptoms were solved by giving intravenous glucose and optimisation of medical treatment. Even though she had unique characteristics of Madelung's disease, many physicians, on several occasions, failed to recognise her 'hidden diagnosis'. This diagnostic uncertainty was able to be solved by searching the Internet for similar clinical features and images. This case demonstrates characteristics and unique features of a rare disease that can be seen in a female patient even though it is mostly found in males.

  2. Rare Cancers Europe (RCE) methodological recommendations for clinical studies in rare cancers: A European consensus position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.G. Casali (Paolo); P. Bruzzi (P.); J. Bogaerts (Jan); J-Y. Blay (Jean Yves); M. Aapro (Matti); A. Adamous; A. Berruti (Alfredo); J. Bressington; B. Bruzzi; R. Capocaccia (Riccardo); F. Cardoso (Fatima); J.E. Celis; A. Cervantes (Andres); F. Ciardiello; C. Claussen; M. Coleman; S. Comis; S. Craine; D. De Boltz; F. De Lorenzo; A.P. Dei Tos (Angelo); G. Gatta (Gemma); J. Geissler (Jan); R. Giuliani; E. Grande (Enrico); A. Gronchi (Alessandro); S. Jezdic; B. Jonsson; L. Jost; H. Keulen; D. Lacombe (Denis); G. Lamory; Y. Le Cam; S. Leto di Priolo; L. Licitra; F. Macchia; A. Margulies; S. Marreaud (Sandrine); G. McVie; S. Narbutas; K. Oliver; N. Pavlidis; J. Pelouchova; G. Pentheroudakis; M.J. Piccart (Martine); M. Pierotti (Marco Alessandro); G. Pravettoni; K. Redmond; P.H.J. Riegman (Peter); M.P. Ruffilli; D. Ryner; S. Sandrucci; M. Seymour; V. Torri (Valter); A. Trama; S. van Belle (S.); G. Vassal; M. Wartenberg; C. Watts; A. Wilson; W. Yared

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWhile they account for one-fifth of new cancer cases, rare cancers are difficult to study. A higher than average degree of uncertainty should be accommodated for clinical as well as for population-based decision making. Rules of rational decision making in conditions of uncertainty shoul

  3. Chronic granulomatous disease: lessons from a rare disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Brahm H; Veys, Paul; Malech, Harry; Cowan, Morton J

    2011-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare primary immunodeficiency with X-linked or autosomal recessive inheritance involving defects in genes encoding phox proteins, which are the subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase. This results in failure to produce superoxide anion and downstream antimicrobial oxidant metabolites and to activate antimicrobial proteases. Affected patients are susceptible to severe, life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and excessive inflammation characterized by granulomatous enteritis resembling Crohn's disease and genitourinary obstruction. Early diagnosis of CGD and rapid treatment of infections are critical. Prophylaxis with antibacterial and mold-active antifungal agents and the administration of interferon-γ has significantly improved the natural history of CGD. Currently, the only cure is allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), although there remains controversy as to which patients with CGD should get a transplant. Allele-based HLA typing of alternative donors, improved supportive care measures, and use of reduced toxicity conditioning have resulted in event-free survival (EFS) of at least 80% even with an unrelated donor and even better when the patient has no active infections/inflammation. Gene correction of CGD would eliminate the risks of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and the immunoablative chemotherapy required for allogeneic HCT. Based on gene therapy trials in patients with SCID-X1, ADA-SCID, and the early experience with CGD, it is clear that at least some degree of myeloablation will be necessary for CGD as there is no inherent selective growth advantage for gene-corrected cells. Current efforts for gene therapy focus on use of lentivector constructs, which are thought to be safer from the standpoint of insertional mutagenesis and more efficient in transducing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs).

  4. The rare disease challenge and how to promote a productive rare disease community: Case study of Birt-Hogg-Dubé Symposia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colledge Vicki L

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Resources for rare diseases are lacking. Patients do not have the information and support that they need, and researchers struggle to make progress due to a shortage of skills and collaborations within the field. One way to overcome these hurdles is to host annual Symposia, focused on a specific rare disease. Here, we use the example of Birt-Hogg-Dubé Symposia to discuss the practical issues of such meetings, including the importance of timing and the choice of invited speakers. We highlight the ways in which rare disease symposia can create a single community, removing barriers between patients, clinicians and researchers.

  5. Kikuchi's Disease: A Rare Cause of Fever of Unknown Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal-ud-din, Mir; Noor, Muhammad Munir; Ali, Shadab; Ali, Rashid

    2015-04-01

    Kikuchi Fujimoto Disease (KFD) or histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis can present with unexplained fever and lymphadenopathy. It is often mistaken for more serious conditions like malignant lymphoma or tuberculosis. First case was described by Kikuchi in Japan, very few cases have been reported in Pakistan. A middle aged female presented with fever and body aches for one month. She was investigated extensively for pyrexia of unknown origin, all of which came out to be normal except a raised ESR. Anti-tuberculous drugs were started on clinical suspicion, with no improvement after a month. Later, a detailed physical examination revealed cervical lymphadenopathy. One of the lymph nodes was excised and biopsied. The histopathology suggested Kikuchi's disease. Oral Prednisolone was started showing improvement. Her fever subsided and lymph nodes disappeared at the follow-up visit. No relapse was encountered in the subsequent visits.

  6. Cold agglutinin disease in sepsis: A rare entity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ravinder; Kukar, Neetu; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Kaur, Shaminder

    2015-01-01

    Cold agglutinin disease (CAgD) is a type of autoimmune hemolytic anemia which generally occurs in adults and is characterized by the presence of IgM antibodies directed against polysaccharide antigens on red blood cell surface. A 16-year-old male, having clinical picture of sepsis and anemia, presented to the Emergency Department of our Institute in an Hemodynamically unstable condition. Investigation profile revealed hemolysis due to CAgD, which responded to corticosteroids, antibiotics and supportive treatment. This case highlights the importance of recognizing this entity in such type of cases presenting with sepsis and anemia. PMID:26229347

  7. Clinic Analysis of Behcet Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingjun Lin; Hongni Li; Yixia Huang; Kangkeng Zheng; Zhongxia Zhou; Xiaofeng Lin

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the clinic manifestation and prognosis of Behcet disease.Method: Twenty patients requiring inpatient treatment with Behcet disease were retrospectively analyzed.Results: The morbidity of Behcet disease is 5.5/100 000. In the systemic damage, stomatocace and skin lesion are 95%, eye lesion and genital ulcer 50%, joint lesion 45%,gastrointestinal lesion 35%, Uveitis is the major disease in eye lesion, and followed in order by retinal vasculitis and obstruction of retinal artery. Attack age average 30.3 years old. Diagnosis age average 34.8 years old. The patients stay in hospital for 41 days on the average. Cure rate is 55%, improvement rate 40%, blinding rate of eye lesion is 36%.Conclusions: Behcet disease is a multisystem lesion disease. Stomatocace and skin lesion is the major lesion, the next in common occurrence are eye and genital lesions. Repeated attack of uveitis, complicated cataract and secondary glaucoma are the major causes of blindness.

  8. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: A great masquerade in neurology, a rare case report from South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaprakash Varadan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is a rare, fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by an infectious protein called prion and is characterized by spongiform changes, neuronal loss, reactive astrocytic proliferation, and accumulation of pathologic cellular protein. Clinical presentation of CJD is characterized by rapidly progressive dementia, neurologic symptoms and visual impairment, and the development of akinetic mutism, which can mimic many neurological conditions. The diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, electroencephalogram, and typical cerebrospinal fluid and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings. Literature on the incidence and prevalence of CJD is lacking in South India. We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with progressive dementia and typical neurologic symptoms, myoclonic jerks, and MRI findings of CJD. This case highlights the need for a high index of suspicion to diagnose CJD.

  9. Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome: A rare neutral lipid storage disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Souvik

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome is a rare neutral lipid storage disorder characterized by ichthyosis, lipid vacuolations in peripheral leucocytes, and multisystem involvement. It is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the CGI-58 gene. A total of 42 cases have been reported worldwide till February 2009 out of which 4 have been previously reported from India. We report a case of a 20-month-old male with congenital ichthyosis, organomegaly, and bilateral cryptorchidism. Examination of the peripheral smear revealed lipid vacuoles in the leucocytes consistent with Jordan′s anomaly, which was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Liver biopsy revealed micronodular cirrhosis with macrovesicular steatosis while skin biopsy showed ichthyosis vulgaris. Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome was diagnosed on the basis of clinical and laboratory criteria with certain unreported manifestations. Dietary modifications were instituted and followed up after 1 year with promising results. This emphasizes the importance of neonatal screening for lipid vacuolations in peripheral blood in all cases of congenital ichthyosis.

  10. Large animal models of rare genetic disorders: sheep as phenotypically relevant models of human genetic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnapureddy, Ashish R; Stayner, Cherie; McEwan, John; Baddeley, Olivia; Forman, John; Eccles, Michael R

    2015-09-02

    Animals that accurately model human disease are invaluable in medical research, allowing a critical understanding of disease mechanisms, and the opportunity to evaluate the effect of therapeutic compounds in pre-clinical studies. Many types of animal models are used world-wide, with the most common being small laboratory animals, such as mice. However, rodents often do not faithfully replicate human disease, despite their predominant use in research. This discordancy is due in part to physiological differences, such as body size and longevity. In contrast, large animal models, including sheep, provide an alternative to mice for biomedical research due to their greater physiological parallels with humans. Completion of the full genome sequences of many species, and the advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies, means it is now feasible to screen large populations of domesticated animals for genetic variants that resemble human genetic diseases, and generate models that more accurately model rare human pathologies. In this review, we discuss the notion of using sheep as large animal models, and their advantages in modelling human genetic disease. We exemplify several existing naturally occurring ovine variants in genes that are orthologous to human disease genes, such as the Cln6 sheep model for Batten disease. These, and other sheep models, have contributed significantly to our understanding of the relevant human disease process, in addition to providing opportunities to trial new therapies in animals with similar body and organ size to humans. Therefore sheep are a significant species with respect to the modelling of rare genetic human disease, which we summarize in this review.

  11. Follicular Dowling Degos disease: A rare variant of an evolving dermatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dowling Degos disease is a rare, reticulate pigmentary disorder with variable phenotypic expression that manifests as hyperpigmented macules and reticulate pigmentary anomaly of the flexures. Many variants of this condition and its overlap with other reticulate pigmentary disorders have been reported in the literature. We present here two cases of DDD with follicular localization, both clinically and histologically. It was associated with ichthyosis vulgaris in one case. Follicular DDD is an uncommon variant of this evolving dermatosis. Our report supports the possible role for disordered follicular keratinisation in its pathogenesis.

  12. Affinity proteomics within rare diseases: a BIO-NMD study for blood biomarkers of muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Chaouch, Amina; Lochmüller, Hanns; Politano, Luisa; Bertini, Enrico; Spitali, Pietro; Hiller, Monika; Niks, Eric H; Gualandi, Francesca; Pontén, Fredrik; Bushby, Kate; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Schwartz, Elena; Le Priol, Yannick; Straub, Volker; Uhlén, Mathias; Cirak, Sebahattin; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Muntoni, Francesco; Ferlini, Alessandra; Schwenk, Jochen M; Nilsson, Peter; Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    Despite the recent progress in the broad-scaled analysis of proteins in body fluids, there is still a lack in protein profiling approaches for biomarkers of rare diseases. Scarcity of samples is the main obstacle hindering attempts to apply discovery driven protein profiling in rare diseases. We addressed this challenge by combining samples collected within the BIO-NMD consortium from four geographically dispersed clinical sites to identify protein markers associated with muscular dystrophy using an antibody bead array platform with 384 antibodies. Based on concordance in statistical significance and confirmatory results obtained from analysis of both serum and plasma, we identified eleven proteins associated with muscular dystrophy, among which four proteins were elevated in blood from muscular dystrophy patients: carbonic anhydrase III (CA3) and myosin light chain 3 (MYL3), both specifically expressed in slow-twitch muscle fibers and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 2 (MDH2) and electron transfer flavoprotein A (ETFA). Using age-matched sub-cohorts, 9 protein profiles correlating with disease progression and severity were identified, which hold promise for the development of new clinical tools for management of dystrophinopathies. © 2014 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  13. Sheehan's syndrome presenting as psychosis: a rare clinical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoib, Sheikh; Dar, Mohamand Maqbool; Arif, Tasleem; Bashir, Haamid; Bhat, Mohammad Hayat; Ahmed, Javid

    2013-02-01

    Sheehan's syndrome (SS) refers to the occurrence of varying degree of hypopituitarism after parturition (1). It is a rare cause of hypopituitarism in developed countries owing to advances in obstetric care and its frequency is decreasing worldwide. However, it is still frequent in underdeveloped and developing countries. Sheehan's syndrome is often diagnosed late as it evolves slowly (2,3). Reports of psychoses in patients with Sheehan's syndrome are rare. Herein, a case report of psychosis in a 31 year old woman who developed Sheehan's syndrome preceded by postpartum haemorrhage is presented. Treatment with thyroxine and glucocorticoids resulted in complete remission after attaining euthyroid and eucortisolemic state.

  14. Meckel-Gruber syndrome: a rare clinical entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Tulika; Bardhan, Jayati; Das, Bibekananda; Patra, Kajal Kumar; Dhali, Badal; Seth, Shelley

    2010-09-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome is an inherited genetic disorder of unknown aetiology. It is an autosomal recessive condition and its incidence is as rare as 1:13,250 to 1:140,000. Some population show an increased incidence of this condition eg, Finnish and Gujarati Indians. Since the time it was first reported by Meckel in 1822 and subsequently by Gruber in 1934, only 200 cases have been reported. Here the case was diagnosed antenatally by an ultrasound and termination of the pregnancy at an early stage was done as per the wishes of the parents. This interesting and rare case of Meckel-Gruber syndrome is reported here.

  15. Endobronchial Enigma: A Clinically Rare Presentation of Nocardia beijingensis in an Immunocompetent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Abdel-Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocardiosis is an opportunistic infection caused by the Gram-positive weakly acid-fast, filamentous aerobic Actinomycetes. The lungs are the primary site of infection mainly affecting immunocompromised patients. In rare circumstances even immunocompetent hosts may also develop infection. Diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis is usually delayed due to nonspecific clinical and radiological presentations which mimic fungal, tuberculous, or neoplastic processes. The present report describes a rare bronchoscopic presentation of an endobronchial nocardial mass in a 55-year-old immunocompetent woman without underlying lung disease. The patient exhibited signs and symptoms of unresolving community-acquired pneumonia with a computed tomography (CT scan that showed a space-occupying lesion and enlarged paratracheal lymph node. This patient represents the unusual presentation of pulmonary Nocardia beijingensis as an endobronchial mass. Pathology obtained during bronchoscopy demonstrated polymerase chain reaction (PCR confirmation of nocardiosis. Symptoms and clinical findings improved with antibiotic treatment. This patient emphasizes the challenge in making the diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis, especially in a low risk host. A literature review presents the difficulties and pitfalls in the clinical assessment of such an individual.

  16. Acute onset anarthria without hepatic manifestation: a rare presentation of Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rajesh; Bhandari, Aveg; Tiwari, Navin; Chaudhari, Tejendra S

    2013-08-20

    Wilson disease (WD) is one of the few inherited but treatable disorder mainly affecting the liver and brain resulting in severe disability or death if left untreated. Hence, it is important to keep a high index of suspicion for diagnosing this clinical entity in appropriate clinical settings. The clinical presentation can be quite variable and they may present solely with neurological features sans hepatic symptoms. Such neurological manifestations usually follow subacute to chronic course. Acute onset anarthria as the heralding and predominant presenting feature has been rarely reported in the literature. We reported a case of a 12-year-old girl who presented with acute onset anarthria and dystonia of 1-month duration. On further evaluation, a diagnosis of WD was made. The patient showed partial improvement after she was started on copper chelating agents and anticholinergics.

  17. Cognitive impairments in common and rare somatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Vyacheslavovna Pizova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an update on the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and pathomorphology of cognitive impairments (CIs in different autoimmune, endocrine, and infectious diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, BehНet's disease, primary angiitis of the central nervous system, polyarteritis nodosa, cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, hypothyroidism, herpetic lesion, and neurosyphilis. These patients are observed to have ischemic-hypoxic brain damage, the causes of which are free radical-induced cell injury, oxidative stress, excitation toxicity, cell necrosis and/or apoptosis, inflammation and immune disease, molecular sequestration, and cell death. There is enhanced imbalance in the pro-oxidant and antioxidant systems as cerebrovascular insufficiency progresses; as this takes place, the nerve cells are most susceptible to the induction of free radical reactions. In these cases, antioxidants that block the effects of free radicals and may potentially improve brain perfusion, by assisting the coupling of neurons and vessels, are first-choice drugs. To improve the cognitive status and to prevent the progression of CIs, it is important to build a cognitive reserve in a patient; this is largely favored by the preservation of a proactive approach to life and social bonds, as well as intellectual work.

  18. Moyamoya disease associated with asymptomatic mosaic Turner syndrome: a rare cause of hemorrhagic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjila, Sunil; Miller, Benjamin R; Rao-Frisch, Anitha; Otvos, Balint; Mitchell, Anna; Bambakidis, Nicholas C; De Georgia, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare cerebrovascular anomaly involving the intracranial carotid arteries that can present clinically with either ischemic or hemorrhagic disease. Moyamoya syndrome, indistinguishable from moyamoya disease at presentation, is associated with multiple clinical conditions including neurofibromatosis type 1, autoimmune disease, prior radiation therapy, Down syndrome, and Turner syndrome. We present the first reported case of an adult patient with previously unrecognized mosaic Turner syndrome with acute subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation of moyamoya syndrome. A 52-year-old woman was admitted with a subarachnoid hemorrhage with associated flame-shaped intracerebral hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe. Physical examination revealed short stature, pectus excavatum, small fingers, micrognathia, and mild facial dysmorphism. Cerebral angiography showed features consistent with bilateral moyamoya disease, aberrant intrathoracic vessels, and an unruptured 4-mm right superior hypophyseal aneurysm. Genetic analysis confirmed a diagnosis of mosaic Turner syndrome. Our case report is the first documented presentation of adult moyamoya syndrome with subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage as the initial presentation of mosaic Turner syndrome. It illustrates the utility of genetic evaluation in patients with cerebrovascular disease and dysmorphism.

  19. Clinical zinc deficiency as early presentation of Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Biervliet, Stephanie; Küry, Sébastien; De Bruyne, Ruth; Vanakker, Olivier M; Schmitt, Sébastien; Vande Velde, Saskia; Blouin, Eric; Bézieau, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    Wilson disease is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of the copper metabolism caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the ATP-ase Cu(2+) transporting polypeptide (ATP7B) gene. The copper accumulation in different organs leads to the suspicion of Wilson disease. We describe a child with clinical zinc deficiency as presenting symptom of Wilson disease, which was confirmed by 2 mutations within the ATP7B gene and an increased copper excretion.

  20. Hartnup disease. Clinical, pathological, and biochemical observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmoush, A J; Alpers, D H; Feigin, R D; Armbrustmacher, V; Prensky, A L

    1976-12-01

    Hartnup disease is a rare genetic disorder of amino acid transport associated with variable and intermittent clinical abnormalities. A family is described in which three siblings had an intermittently progressive neurological disease and two of the affected siblings had the Hartnup-pattern aminoaciduria. Neuropathological examination of one case showed severe diffuse atrophy, generalized neuronal loss in the cortex, and Purkinje cell loss in the cerebellum. In vivo and in vitro studies of intestinal amino acid transport in the surviving sibling indicated a partial defect in the transport of several neutral amino acids (tryptophan, alanine, serine, and methionine) with normal transport of other neutral amino acids (threonine, phenylalanine, histidine, tyrosine, and isoleucine). Transport of glycine, proline, hydroxyproline, and the basic amino acids appeared normal.

  1. Monogenic Autoinflammatory Diseases: Concept And Clinical Manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus, Adriana Almeida; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this review are to describe the clinical manifestations of the growing spectrum of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases including recently described syndromes. The autoinflammatory diseases can be grouped based on clinical findings: 1. the three classic hereditary “periodic fever syndromes”, familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF); TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS); and mevalonate kinase deficiency/hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS); 2. the cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), comprising familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID) or CINCA, and; 3. pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA); 4. disorders presenting with skin pustules, including deficiency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (DIRA); Majeed syndrome; pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome; deficiency of interleukin 36 receptor antagonist (DITRA); CARD14 mediated psoriasis (CAMPS), and early-onset inflammatory bowel diseases (EO-IBD); 5. inflammatory disorders caused by mutations in proteasome components, the proteasome associated autoinflammatory syndromes (PRAAS) 6. very rare conditions presenting with autoinflammation and immunodeficiency. PMID:23711932

  2. Monogenic autoinflammatory diseases: concept and clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida de Jesus, Adriana; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this review is to describe the clinical manifestations of the growing spectrum of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases including recently described syndromes. The autoinflammatory diseases can be grouped based on clinical findings: 1. the three classic hereditary "periodic fever syndromes", familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF); TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS); and mevalonate kinase deficiency/hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS); 2. the cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), comprising familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID) or CINCA, and; 3. pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA); 4. disorders presenting with skin pustules, including deficiency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (DIRA); Majeed syndrome; pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome; deficiency of interleukin 36 receptor antagonist (DITRA); CARD14 mediated psoriasis (CAMPS), and early-onset inflammatory bowel diseases (EO-IBD); 5. inflammatory disorders caused by mutations in proteasome components, the proteasome associated autoinflammatory syndromes (PRAAS) and 6. very rare conditions presenting with autoinflammation and immunodeficiency.

  3. Prioritizing treatment of rare diseases: a survey of preferences of Norwegian doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desser, Arna S

    2013-10-01

    Understanding doctors' preferences for prioritizing treatment of rare diseases can provide an important context for policy makers who must decide whether to exempt rare disease treatments, which are often quite expensive, from standard cost-effectiveness criteria. We surveyed a random sample of 551 Norwegian doctors in November 2011 and compared results to a similar survey of the Norwegian population. Respondents chose whether to prioritize treatment of patients with rare versus common diseases and then decided how to allocate funds between the two groups for each of two scenarios: (1) equal costs per person and (2) higher costs for the rare disease. Respondents were randomized to treatment costs for the rare disease in the second scenario that were either 8 or 25 times higher than treating the common disease. Except for different prevalence, the diseases were described identically. Doctors displayed no general preference for prioritizing treatment of rare diseases, but a large number favored the principle of reserving a small share of funds for rare disease patients. Doctors' responses differed significantly from those of the general population when the rare disease was more costly to treat. A larger share of doctors prioritized the common disease group for treatment while a smaller share expressed indifference. When dividing funds between the two patient groups, doctors allocated a smaller share of funds to the rare disease. Doctors were much less likely than the general population to divide funds equally between the groups. This study indicates that there is little support among Norwegian doctors for prioritizing the treatment of rare diseases.

  4. [Registries for rare diseases : OSSE - An open-source framework for technical implementation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storf, Holger; Schaaf, Jannik; Kadioglu, Dennis; Göbel, Jens; Wagner, Thomas O F; Ückert, Frank

    2017-05-01

    Meager amounts of data stored locally, a small number of experts, and a broad spectrum of technological solutions incompatible with each other characterize the landscape of registries for rare diseases in Germany. Hence, the free software Open Source Registry for Rare Diseases (OSSE) was created to unify and streamline the process of establishing specific rare disease patient registries. The data to be collected is specified based on metadata descriptions within the registry framework's so-called metadata repository (MDR), which was developed according to the ISO/IEC 11179 standard. The use of a central MDR allows for sharing the same data elements across any number of registries, thus providing a technical prerequisite for making data comparable and mergeable between registries and promoting interoperability.With OSSE, the foundation is laid to operate linked patient registries while respecting strong data protection regulations. Using the federated search feature, data for clinical studies can be identified across registries. Data integrity, however, remains intact since no actual data leaves the premises without the owner's consent. Additionally, registry solutions other than OSSE can participate via the OSSE bridgehead, which acts as a translator between OSSE registry networks and non-OSSE registries. The pseudonymization service Mainzelliste adds further data protection.Currently, more than 10 installations are under construction in clinical environments (including university hospitals in Frankfurt, Hamburg, Freiburg and Münster). The feedback given by the users will influence further development of OSSE. As an example, the installation process of the registry for undiagnosed patients at University Hospital Frankfurt is described in more detail.

  5. Acute alithiasic cholecystitis: a not so rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Blasco-Alonso

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC occurs more frequently in critically ill patients, in the immediate postoperative period, after trauma or extensive burns. It has a high rate of morbidity and mortality. Ischemia, infection and vesicular stasis are determinants in its pathogenesis. Material and method: Retrospective study including all cases of AAC diagnosed in our pediatric intensive care unit between January 1997 and December 2012. Results: We included 7 patients, all associated with viral or bacterial infection. All of them suffered from abdominal pain, mainly localized in the right upper quadrant, jaundice and dark urine. Abdominal ultrasound showed thickening and hypervascularity of the gallbladder wall in all cases. The outcome was satisfactory without surgery in all patients. Conclusions: The clinical presentation is oligosymptomatic within severe systemic diseases. The AAC should be suspected in the appearance of any abdominal pain with jaundice/dark urine and hypertransaminasemia in patients suffering from critical or serious infections.

  6. A rare case of occupational lung disease – Talcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathish Kumar M, Dhipu Mathew, Thilagavathy, Aruna Shanmuganathan, Srinivasan R

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Talcosis/ Talcpneumoconiosis is one of the rarer forms of magnesium silicate induced lung disease, It usually occurs in the fourth decade and affects people working in talc related industries like roof, shingle, pharmaceutical companies, talcum powder industries, electric ceramics, rubber industry etc. We report a case of talc pneumoconiosis/talcosis in a 51yr old male who presented with breathlessness and dry cough for the past 5 yrs and progressively worsening for the past 5 days. Who was working in a talcum powder manufacturing company for >28yrs in the packaging section. The diagnosis was possible by history, clinical examination, Chest X-ray, PFT/DLCO, HRCT chest, Bronchoscopy & Trans bronchial lung biopsy showing interstitial fibrosis.

  7. "It's not all in my head!" - The complex relationship between rare diseases and mental health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Rebecca

    2017-02-27

    The incidence of mental health disorders is significantly higher in individuals with a rare disease, compared to the general population. This letter considers the possible reasons for this in terms of the many ways in which a rare disease impacts on an individual's life, and how these impacts can be strongly related to factors which predispose to mental health difficulties.Furthermore, issues surrounding mental health can also play a significant role in the process of diagnosing a rare disease. The unusual nature of such diseases intrinsically predisposes an individual to obtain an inaccurate diagnosis of a psychosomatic disorder, a diagnosis which can often be further complicated by the presence of genuine psychiatric symptoms.This letter argues that these common experiences of rare disease patients have impacts upon the way in which their psychiatric care should be offered and managed, and that sensitivity and understanding surrounding these issues should be considered a necessary part of effective care for rare disease patients.

  8. Contribution of rare and common variants determine complex diseases-Hirschsprung disease as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Maria M; Sribudiani, Yunia; Brouwer, Rutger W W; Amiel, Jeanne; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Borrego, Salud; Ceccherini, Isabella; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Fernández, Raquel M; Garcia-Barcelo, Maria-Mercè; Griseri, Paola; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Tam, Paul K; van Ijcken, Wilfred F J; Eggen, Bart J L; te Meerman, Gerard J; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2013-10-01

    Finding genes for complex diseases has been the goal of many genetic studies. Most of these studies have been successful by searching for genes and mutations in rare familial cases, by screening candidate genes and by performing genome wide association studies. However, only a small fraction of the total genetic risk for these complex genetic diseases can be explained by the identified mutations and associated genetic loci. In this review we focus on Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) as an example of a complex genetic disorder. We describe the genes identified in this congenital malformation and postulate that both common 'low penetrant' variants in combination with rare or private 'high penetrant' variants determine the risk on HSCR, and likely, on other complex diseases. We also discuss how new technological advances can be used to gain further insights in the genetic background of complex diseases. Finally, we outline a few steps to develop functional assays in order to determine the involvement of these variants in disease development.

  9. Primary tubercular caecal perforation: a rare clinical entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Sonia

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intestinal tuberculosis is a common problem in endemic areas, causing considerable morbidity and mortality. An isolated primary caecal perforation of tubercular origin is exceptionally uncommon. Case presentation We report the case of a 39 year old male who presented with features of perforation peritonitis, which on laparotomy revealed a caecal perforation with a dusky appendix. A standard right hemicolectomy with ileostomy and peritoneal toileting was done. Histopathology revealed multiple transmural caseating granulomas with Langerhans-type giant cells and acid-fast bacilli, consistent with tuberculosis, present only in the caecum. Conclusions We report this extremely rare presentation of primary caecal tuberculosis to sensitize the medical fraternity to its rare occurrence, which will be of paramount importance owing to the increasing incidence of tuberculosis all over the world, especially among the developing countries.

  10. Pediatric Ramsay Hunt syndrome: A rare clinical entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natashya Hilda Sima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ramsay Hunt syndrome is a rare cause of facial nerve paralysis in children, caused due to reactivation of latent Varicella–Zoster virus within the geniculate ganglion. In addition to the facial nerve, Ramsay Hunt syndrome may also affect the vestibulocochlear nerve leading to inner ear dysfunction and in severe case may also involve other cranial nerves. We report a case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome in a 15-year-old child.

  11. Congenital labial mucocele: rare presentation of a common disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Igor Henrique; Cardoso, Samantha; Carvalho, Camila Nunes; Carvalho, Alessandra Albuquerque Tavares; Leão, Jair Carneiro; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucoceles are common lesions characterized by accumulation of mucus following rupture of a minor salivary gland duct. However, congenital mucoceles are a rare and distinctive oral condition observed in newborns. This case report details the features of a congenital labial nodule diagnosed as congenital mucocele. These lesions are rare in the oral cavity and should be diagnosed in the delivery room, but many cases are referred for further evaluation. Management is simple, and recurrence is not expected.

  12. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report: Translational Research in Rare Respiratory Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristof, Arnold S; Petrof, Basil J; Hamid, Qutayba; Kolb, Martin; Landry, Jennifer S; MacKenzie, Alex; McCormack, Francis X; Murawski, Inga J; Moss, Joel; Rauch, Frank; Rosas, Ivan O; Shapiro, Adam J; Smith, Benjamin M; Thomas, David Y; Trapnell, Bruce C; Young, Lisa R; Zariwala, Maimoona A

    2017-08-01

    Rare respiratory diseases (RRDs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that collectively represent a significant health care burden. In recent years, strong advocacy and policy initiatives have led to advances in the implementation of research and clinical care for rare diseases. The development of specialized centers and research networks has facilitated support for affected individuals as well as emerging programs in basic, translational, and clinical research. In selected RRDs, subsequent gains in knowledge have informed the development of targeted therapies and effective diagnostic tests, but many gaps persist. There was therefore a desire to identify the elements contributing to an effective translational research program in RRDs. To this end, a workshop was convened in October 2015 with a focus on the implementation of effective transnational research networks and collaborations aimed at developing novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Key elements included an emphasis on molecular pathogenesis, the continuing engagement of patient advocacy groups and policy makers, the effective use of preclinical models in the translational research pipeline, and the detailed phenotyping of patient cohorts. During the course of the workshop, current logistical and knowledge gaps were identified, and new solutions or opportunities were highlighted.

  13. Huntington's disease: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColgan, Peter; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2017-08-17

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fully penetrant neurodegenerative disease caused by a dominantly inherited CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene on chromosome 4. In Western populations HD has a prevalence of 10.6-13.7 individuals per 100,000. It is characterised by cognitive, motor and psychiatric disturbance. At the cellular level mutant huntingtin results in neuronal dysfunction and death through a number of mechanisms, including disruption of proteostasis, transcription and mitochondrial function and direct toxicity of the mutant protein. Early macroscopic changes are seen in the striatum with involvement of the cortex as the disease progresses. There are currently no disease modifying treatments therefore supportive and symptomatic management is the mainstay of treatment. In recent years there have been significant advances in understanding both the cellular pathology and the macroscopic structural brain changes that occur as the disease progresses. In the last decade there has been a large growth in potential therapeutic targets and clinical trials. Perhaps the most promising of these are the emerging therapies aimed at lowering levels of mutant huntingtin. Antisense oligonucleotide therapy is one such approach with clinical trials currently underway. This may bring us one step closer to treating and potentially preventing this devastating condition. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. A study on the relationship with 61 rare cases of abnormal chromosome karyotype and clinical diseases%61例国内外首报的染色体异常核型与临床关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂向东; 张宝珍; 曾健; 丛学文; 王志红; 周游

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解国内外首报的染色体异常与生育缺陷和小儿智力低下的关系.方法 抽取6784例患有生育缺陷和小儿智力低下患者外周血,进行常规染色体分析,部份患者孕中期抽取羊水、脐带血进行染色体核型分析.结果 发现染色体异常核型714例,其中61例为国内外首次发现的染色体异常核型.通过对61例特殊患者进行临床病例分析,发现29例患者有习惯性流产史,占总数48%,10例患者为无精子或严重少精子症,占总数16%,5例患者为不育症,占总数0.8%,5例患者精子畸形率>30%,占总数0.8%,3例表现为原发性闭经,占总数0.5%,2例生育畸形儿,占总数0.3%,2例智力低下,占总数0.3%,3例胎儿发育畸形,占总数0.5%,2例平衡易位携带者,占总数0.3%.结论 染色体异常是导致生育缺陷和小儿智力低下的遗传因素之一.%Objective: To study the relationship of chromosome aberration to birth defects and infantile mental retardation. Methods: Peripheral blood from 6784 patients with infertility, habitual abortion, dead fetus or abnormal birth and amniotic fluid of the middle stage of pregnancy or cord blood from part of those patients was sampled. Chromosome analysis was performed on cultured lymphocytes. Results: There were 714 cases of abnormal chromosome karyotype including 61 rare cases reported firstly in the world. Further clinical analysis showed 29 cases of spontaneous abortion (48%), 10 cases of oligospermia or azoospermia ( 16% ), 5 cases of infertility (0.8% ), 5 cases of teratospermia (0.8% ) , 3 cases of primary amenorrhea (0.5% ) , 2 cases of congenital malformation (0.3% ), 2 cases of mental retardation (0.3% ), 3 cases of fetal development malformation (0.5% ) and 2 carrier of chromosomal balanced translocation (0.3% ). Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormality is one of the genetic factors leading to birth defects and infantile mental retardation.

  15. Taking Control of Castleman Disease: Leveraging Precision Medicine Technologies to Accelerate Rare Disease Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Samantha Kass; Jayanthan, Raj K; Mitchell, Grant W; Carreras Tartak, Jossie A; Croglio, Michael P; Suarez, Alexander; Liu, Amy Y; Razzo, Beatrice M; Oyeniran, Enny; Ruth, Jason R; Fajgenbaum, David C

    2015-12-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare and heterogeneous disorder characterized by lymphadenopathy that may occur in a single lymph node (unicentric) or multiple lymph nodes (multicentric), the latter typically occurring secondary to excessive proinflammatory hypercytokinemia. While a cohort of multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) cases are caused by Human Herpes Virus-8 (HHV-8), the etiology of HHV-8 negative, idiopathic MCD (iMCD), remains unknown. Breakthroughs in "omics" technologies that have facilitated the development of precision medicine hold promise for elucidating disease pathogenesis and identifying novel therapies for iMCD. However, in order to leverage precision medicine approaches in rare diseases like CD, stakeholders need to overcome several challenges. To address these challenges, the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network (CDCN) was founded in 2012. In the past 3 years, the CDCN has worked to transform the understanding of the pathogenesis of CD, funded and initiated genomics and proteomics research, and united international experts in a collaborative effort to accelerate progress for CD patients. The CDCN's collaborative structure leverages the tools of precision medicine and serves as a model for both scientific discovery and advancing patient care.

  16. Trichinella infection and clinical disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M R; Meyer, C N; Krantz, T

    1996-01-01

    . Life-threatening cardiopulmonary, renal and central nervous system complications developed. The patient recovered after several months. Her husband, who also ate the pork, did not have clinical symptoms, but an increased eosinophil count and a single larva in a muscle biopsy confirmed infection......Trichinellosis is caused by ingestion of insufficiently cooked meat contaminated with infective larvae of Trichinella species. The clinical course is highly variable, ranging from no apparent infection to severe and even fatal disease. We report two illustrative cases of trichinellosis. Returning...

  17. Lung ultrasound has limited diagnostic value in rare cystic lung diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jesper Rømhild; Bendstrup, Elisabeth; Henriksen, Daniel P

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lung ultrasound (LUS) used to identify interstitial syndrome (IS) and pleural thickening related to diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD) has shown significant correlations with ground glass opacity (GGO) on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). However, the applicability of LUS...... in patients with DPLD subtypes as rare cystic lung diseases has not previously been investigated. This study aimed to observe if distinctive LUS findings could be found in patients with lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH), and Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS). Methods......: This single centre case-based cross-sectional study of patients diagnosed with LAM, PCLH and BHDS was conducted at a Danish DPLD specialist centre. Patients underwent clinical examination including LUS. LUS findings were compared to findings scored according to a modified Belmaati score on HRCT and reviewed...

  18. Autoimmune pulmonary proteinosis in a Chilean teenager, a rare aetiology of interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Alexis; Boza, Maria Lina; Koppmann, Andres; Gonzalez, Sergio

    2014-05-23

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is rare and encompasses a heterogeneous group of diseases, and is even rarer in children than in adults. ILDs compromise more than 100 different entities, including pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). There are many causes of PAP in children, including surfactant protein gene mutations (SFTPB, SFTPC, ABCA3, TTF-1), GMCSF receptor mutations and antigranulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor autoantibodies. We report a case of a 13-year-old Chilean girl who presented with an 8-month history of progressive exercise intolerance, fatigability and diminished school performance. Physical examination revealed resting tachypnoea, a few basal bilateral inspiratory crackles, and hypoxaemia on minimal exertion. Clinical suspicion and evaluation, including international collaboration, led to the diagnosis of autoimmune PAP and specific therapy for the condition.

  19. Muscle-Eye-Brain Disease; a Rare Form of Syndromic Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosal Gurinder S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by muscular hypotonia since birth and the histologic features of muscular dystrophy. Syndromic congenital muscular dystrophies are clinically similar autosomal recessive disorders characterized by congenital muscular dystrophy, lissencephaly, and eye anomalies. We present a case of a rare form of syndromic congenital muscular dystrophy in an eight year old girl, born of first- degree consanguinity. She had: global developmental delay; a seizure disorder; hypotonia; progressive muscle contractures including bilateral symmetrical flexion contractures of hips, knees, equinus contracture and thoracolumbar scoliosis; diminished deep tendon reflexes: bilateral premature cataract; pseudophakia; and nystagmus. The patient was also highly myopic. Based on clinical features, muscle biopsy and MRI of the brain, a diagnosis of muscle- eye- brain disease was made. Identification of these patients may help to prevent this crippling disorder in the future siblings of probands by utilizing genetic counselling and mutation analysis.

  20. The Role of microRNAs in the Biology of Rare Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica Taruscio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Rare diseases (RD are characterized by low prevalence and affect not more than five individuals per 10,000 in the European population; they are a large and heterogeneous group of disorders including more than 7,000 conditions and often involve all organs and tissues, with several clinical subtypes within the same disease. Very often information concerning either diagnosis and/or prognosis on many RD is insufficient. microRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level by either degrading or blocking translation of messenger RNA targets. Recently, microRNA expression patterns of body fluids underscored their potential as noninvasive biomarkers for various diseases. The role of microRNAs as potential biomarkers has become particularly attractive. The identification of disease-related microRNAs is essential for understanding the pathogenesis of diseases at the molecular level, and is critical for designing specific molecular tools for diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Computational analysis of microRNA-disease associations is an important complementary means for prioritizing microRNAs for further experimental examination. In this article, we explored the added value of miRs as biomarkers in a selected panel of RD hitting different tissues/systems at different life stages, but sharing the need of better biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic purposes.

  1. Gaucher-related synucleinopathies: the examination of sporadic neurodegeneration from a rare (disease) angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardi, S Pablo; Cheng, Seng H; Shihabuddin, Lamya S

    2015-02-01

    Gaucher disease, the most common lysosomal storage disease, is caused by a recessively inherited deficiency in glucocerebrosidase and subsequent accumulation of toxic lipid substrates. Heterozygous mutations in the lysosomal glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA1) have recently been recognized as the highest genetic risk factor for the development of α-synuclein aggregation disorders ("synucleinopathies"), including Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Despite the wealth of experimental, clinical and genetic evidence that supports the association between mutant genotypes and synucleinopathy risk, the precise mechanisms by which GBA1 mutations lead to PD and DLB remain unclear. Decreased glucocerebrosidase activity has been demonstrated to promote α-synuclein misprocessing. Furthermore, aberrant α-synuclein species have been reported to downregulate glucocerebrosidase activity, which further contributes to disease progression. In this review, we summarize the recent findings that highlight the complexity of this pathogenetic link and how several pathways that connect glucocerebrosidase insufficiency with α-synuclein misprocessing have emerged as potential therapeutic targets. From a translational perspective, we discuss how various therapeutic approaches to lysosomal dysfunction have been explored for the treatment of GBA1-related synucleinopathies, and potentially, for non-GBA1-associated neurodegenerative diseases. In summary, the link between GBA1 and synucleinopathies has become the paradigm of how the study of a rare lysosomal disease can transform the understanding of the etiopathology, and hopefully the treatment, of a more prevalent and multifactorial disorder.

  2. Discovery of Innovative Therapies for Rare Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases via Off-Label Prescription of Biologics: The Case of IL-6 Receptor Blockade in Castleman's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musters, Anne; Assaf, Amira; Gerlag, Danielle M; Tak, Paul P; Tas, Sander W

    2015-01-01

    Biologics have revolutionized the field of clinical immunology and proven to be both effective and safe in common immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, and various hematological disorders. However, in patients with rare, severe IMIDs failing on standard therapies, it is virtually impossible to conduct randomized controlled trials. Therefore, biologics are usually prescribed off-label in these often severely ill patients. Unfortunately, off-label prescription is sometimes hampered in these diseases due to a lack of reimbursement that is often based on a presumed lack of evidence for effectiveness. In the present article, we will discuss that off-label prescription of biologics can be a good way to discover new treatments for rare diseases. This will be illustrated using a case of multicentric Castleman's disease, an immune-mediated lymphoproliferative disorder, in which off-label tocilizumab (humanized anti-IL-6 receptor blocking antibody) treatment resulted in remarkable clinical improvement. Furthermore, we will give recommendations for monitoring efficacy and safety of biologic treatment in rare IMIDs, including the use of registries. In conclusion, we put forward that innovative treatments for rare IMIDs can be discovered via off-label prescription of biologicals, provided that this is based on rational arguments including knowledge of the pathophysiology of the disease.

  3. Evolutionary evidence of the effect of rare variants on disease etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlov, I P; Gorlova, O Y; Frazier, M L; Spitz, M R; Amos, C I

    2011-03-01

    The common disease/common variant hypothesis has been popular for describing the genetic architecture of common human diseases for several years. According to the originally stated hypothesis, one or a few common genetic variants with a large effect size control the risk of common diseases. A growing body of evidence, however, suggests that rare single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), i.e. those with a minor allele frequency of less than 5%, are also an important component of the genetic architecture of common human diseases. In this study, we analyzed the relevance of rare SNPs to the risk of common diseases from an evolutionary perspective and found that rare SNPs are more likely than common SNPs to be functional and tend to have a stronger effect size than do common SNPs. This observation, and the fact that most of the SNPs in the human genome are rare, suggests that rare SNPs are a crucial element of the genetic architecture of common human diseases. We propose that the next generation of genomic studies should focus on analyzing rare SNPs. Further, targeting patients with a family history of the disease, an extreme phenotype, or early disease onset may facilitate the detection of risk-associated rare SNPs.

  4. Where are we now in the investigation of rare diseases in the Republic of Macedonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polenakovic, Momir; Gucev, Zoran; Tasic, Velibor

    2014-01-01

    In Europe Rare Disease (RD) is the one which affects less than 1/2000, in the USA 1/1250, while in Japan RD is the one that affects fewer than 1/50,000 patients. EU estimates that 5-8000 distinct rare diseases affect 6-8% of the Population. The impact of rare diseases in the health systems is impresssive: at least 3 million patients in the UK, 4 million in Germany, and between 27 and 36 million EU citizens. There is not a precise register for rare diseases in the Republic of Macedonia. Rare diseases are becoming increasingly important as possible targets of new forms of treatment, as a valuable source of a novel insight in fundamental lows of biology, and in the specific mechanisms of many diseases. Molecular methods have created a better diagnosis and oftentimes treatment. Rare diseases pose significant problem for the patients, since their problems are often not recognized by the medical community and shunned by the health insurance. The cumulative costs of diagnosis and treatment of rare diseases is significant for any society and oftentimes not acceptable for developing countries.

  5. Fibroadenoma of axillary ectopic breast tissue: A rare clinical entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunder Goyal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Supernumerary breast or polymastia is a well-documented anomaly of the breast and commonly presents along the embryonic milk line extending between the axilla and groin. Reported incidence of accessory breast is 0.4-6% in females. During 2 years period, we encountered only two cases out of twenty cases of axillary lumps. We present one case of fibroadenoma in ectopic breast tissue (EBT in axilla. Ectopic breast denotes breast tissue at more than two pectoral regions, which is mostly benign but at times can be malignant. EBT is at a greater risk of malignancy. Fibroadenoma of ectopic axillary breast tissue (EBT is quiet rare, but should always be kept in mind for differential diagnosis of an axillary mass.

  6. Graves' orbitopathy as a rare disease in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perros, Petros; Hegedüs, L; Bartalena, L.

    2017-01-01

    qualify as rare. Recent published data on the incidence of GO and Graves' hyperthyroidism in Europe were used to estimate the prevalence of GO. The position statement was developed by a series of reviews of drafts and electronic discussions by members of the European Group on Graves' Orbitopathy...

  7. Acropigmentation of Kitamura with immigration delay disease: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumir Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reticulate acropigmentation of Kitamura (RAK is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder first described in Japan characterised by a reticulate pattern of slightly atrophic, angulated, hyperpigmented macules affecting the acral areas of the body. We hereby report a case of RAK in a young Indian male with adermatoglyphia that has not been previously reported in the literature.

  8. Infantile Pompe disease: Clinical picture, diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Kotlukova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is a rare inherited disease that belongs to lysosomal accumulation diseases and can be considered as cardiac glycogenosistype II, as well as a severe neuromuscular disease or metabolic myopathy. Physicians of different specialties very rarely identify this pathology, which is due to both its rarity and clinical and genetic polymorphism. Infantile Pompe disease is the severest form. It is characterized by a progressive pattern and a fatal outcome during the first year of life. The possibility of performing enzyme replacement therapy for this disease, which can improve the prognosis and quality of life of patients, makes the early diagnosis of Pompe disease urgent. The paper describes the clinical presentation of infantile Pompe disease and current methods for its diagnosis and treatment. The authors give their experience in diagnosing and treating infantile Pompe disease, by demonstrating 3 cases of the disease. The characteristics of each infant, which confirm the clinical and genetic variety of this pathology, are discussed.

  9. World health dilemmas: Orphan and rare diseases, orphan drugs and orphan patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Andreou, Nicholas; Constantinou, Katerina; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2014-01-01

    According to global annual estimates hunger/malnutrition is the major cause of death (36 of 62 million). Cardiovascular diseases and cancer (5.44 of 13.43 million) are the major causes of death in developed countries, while lower respiratory tract infections, human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, diarrhoeal disease, malaria and tuberculosis (10.88 of 27.12 million) are the major causes of death in developing countries with more than 70% of deaths occurring in children. The majority of approximately 800 million people with other rare diseases, including 100000 children born with thalassaemia annually receive no treatment. There are major ethical dilemmas in dealing with global health issues such as poverty and the treatment of orphan and rare diseases. Of approximately 50000 drugs about 10% are orphan drugs, with annual sales of the latter approaching 100 billion USD. In comparison, the annual revenue in 2009 from the top 12 pharmaceutical companies in Western countries was 445 billion USD and the top drug, atorvastatin, reached 100 billion USD. In the same year, the total government expenditure for health in the developing countries was 410 billion USD with only 6%-7% having been received as aid from developed countries. Drugs cost the National Health Service in the United Kingdom more than 20 billion USD or 10% of the annual health budget. Uncontrollable drug prices and marketing policies affect global health budgets, clinical practice, patient safety and survival. Fines of 5.3 billion USD were imposed on two pharmaceutical companies in the United States, the regulatory authority in France was replaced and clinicians were charged with bribery in order to overcome recent illegal practises affecting patient care. High expenditure for drug development is mainly related to marketing costs. However, only 2 million USD was spent developing the drug deferiprone (L1) for thalassaemia up to the stage of multicentre clinical trials. The

  10. Ledderhose Disease: Clinical, Radiological (Ultrasound and MRI), and Anatomopathological Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Omor, Y.; Dhaene, B.; Grijseels, S.; Alard, S.

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fibromatosis, or Ledderhose disease, is a rare hyperproliferative disorder of the plantar aponeurosis. It may occur at any age, with the greatest prevalence at middle age and beyond. This disorder is more common in men than woman and it is sometimes associated with other forms of fibromatosis. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination. Ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be useful to confirm the diagnosis. A 44-year-old man with Ledderhose disease who underwent u...

  11. Research on economy and social exclusion: China dolls and rare diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    Summary The second workshop on “Research on Economy And Social Exclusion (REASE)” was held in the University of Tokyo on January 26, 2013. Focusing on rare diseases and disorders in China, three speakers from China introduced the current status of rare diseases and the challenge of support organizations for patients with rare disease and disorders in China, and especially pointed out some important issues associated with rare diseases and disorders in China. From the viewpoint of economics, this paper discusses some of the important issues of rare diseases and disorders in China raised in this workshop, especially from the aspects of economy of scale and orphan drugs, and the emergence of stigma from discrimination. It was shown that international coordination and cooperation are called for in order to give a proper incentive to the drug industries to create new drugs for rare diseases, and suggested that an important step toward inclusion is to reduce stigma by making rare diseases visible as much as possible. PMID:25343098

  12. Anterior hypopituitarism is rare and autoimmune disease is common in adults with idiopathic central diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, M J; Orr, C; Moran, C; Behan, L A; Agha, A; Ball, S G; Thompson, C J

    2012-05-01

    Central diabetes insipidus is a rare clinical condition with a heterogenous aetiology. Up to 40% of cases are classified as idiopathic, although many of these are thought to have an autoimmune basis. Published data have suggested that anterior hypopituitarism is common in childhood-onset idiopathic diabetes insipidus. We aimed to assess the incidence of anterior hypopituitarism in a cohort of adult patients with idiopathic diabetes insipidus. We performed a retrospective review of the databases of two pituitary investigation units. This identified 39 patients with idiopathic diabetes insipidus. All had undergone magnetic resonance imaging scanning and dynamic pituitary testing (either insulin tolerance testing or GHRH/arginine and short synacthen testing) to assess anterior pituitary function. One patient had partial growth hormone deficiency; no other anterior pituitary hormonal deficits were found. Thirty-three percent had at least one autoimmune disease in addition to central diabetes insipidus. Our data suggest that anterior hypopituitarism is rare in adult idiopathic diabetes insipidus. Routine screening of these patients for anterior hypopituitarism may not, therefore, be indicated. The significant prevalence of autoimmune disease in this cohort supports the hypothesis that idiopathic diabetes insipidus may have an autoimmune aetiology. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Anterior Hypopituitarism is Rare and Autoimmune Disease is Common in Adults with Idiopathic Central Diabetes Insipidus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Objective: Central diabetes insipidus is a rare clinical condition with a heterogenous aetiology. Up to 40% of cases are classified as idiopathic, though many of these are thought to have an autoimmune basis. Published data has suggested that anterior hypopituitarism is common in childhood onset idiopathic diabetes insipidus. We aimed to assess the incidence of anterior hypopituitarism in a cohort of adult patients with idiopathic diabetes insipidus. Design and Patients: We performed a retrospective review of the databases of two pituitary investigation units. This identified 39 patients with idiopathic diabetes insipidus. All had undergone MRI scanning and dynamic pituitary testing (either insulin tolerance testing or GHRH\\/arginine and short synacthen testing) to assess anterior pituitary function. Results: One patient had partial growth hormone deficiency; no other anterior pituitary hormonal deficits were found. 33% had at least one autoimmune disease in addition to central diabetes insipidus. Conclusions: Our data suggest that anterior hypopituitarism is rare in adult idiopathic diabetes insipidus. Routine screening of these patients for anterior hypopituitarism may not therefore be indicated. The significant prevalence of autoimmune disease in this cohort supports the hypothesis that idiopathic diabetes insipidus may have an autoimmune aetiology.

  14. Refractory coeliac disease in a country with a high prevalence of clinically-diagnosed coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilus, T; Kaukinen, K; Virta, L J; Huhtala, H; Mäki, M; Kurppa, K; Heikkinen, M; Heikura, M; Hirsi, E; Jantunen, K; Moilanen, V; Nielsen, C; Puhto, M; Pölkki, H; Vihriälä, I; Collin, P

    2014-02-01

    Refractory coeliac disease (RCD) is thought to be a rare disorder, but the accurate prevalence is unknown. We aimed to identify the prevalence of and the risk factors for developing RCD in a Finnish population where the clinical detection rate of coeliac disease is high. The study involved 11 hospital districts in Finland where the number of treated RCD patients (n = 44), clinically diagnosed coeliac disease patients (n = 12 243) and adult inhabitants (n = 1.7 million) was known. Clinical characteristics at diagnosis of coeliac disease between the RCD patients and patients with uncomplicated disease were compared. The prevalence of RCD was 0.31% among diagnosed coeliac disease patients and 0.002% in the general population. Of the enrolled 44 RCD patients, 68% had type I and 23% type II; in 9% the type was undetermined. Comparing 886 patients with uncomplicated coeliac disease with these 44 patients that developed RCD later in life, the latter were significantly older (median 56 vs 44 years, P coeliac disease. Patients with evolving RCD had more severe symptoms at the diagnosis of coeliac disease, including weight loss in 36% (vs. 16%, P = 0.001) and diarrhoea in 54% (vs. 38%, P = 0.050). Refractory coeliac disease is very rare in the general population. Patients of male gender, older age, severe symptoms or seronegativity at the diagnosis of coeliac disease are at risk of future refractory coeliac disease and should be followed up carefully. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A: from typical to rare phenotypic and genotypic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombelli, Francesco; Stojkovic, Tanya; Dubourg, Odile; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Tardieu, Sandrine; Larcher, Kathy; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Latour, Philippe; Vignal, Odile; Cazeneuve, Cécile; Brice, Alexis; Leguern, Eric

    2014-08-01

    Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is genetically heterogeneous, with 11 genes identified. Axonal CMT has most frequently been associated with mutations in the MFN2 gene (CMT2A). To describe the clinical and molecular features of CMT2A, to delineate prognostic factors, to understand connections between a certain phenotype and more serious clinical consequences, and to identify interactions among the associated genes. We describe the clinical, molecular, electrophysiological, and additional features of 43 patients with CMT2A. The degree of physical disability was determined by the CMT neuropathy score and adapted to the CMT neuropathy score gradient to evaluate the clinical course. We evaluated all data within the context of the most recent and important publications concerning this issue. Twenty-five patients had early-onset CMT2A and severe functional disability, with 9 being wheelchair bound, and 18 had late-onset disease and a milder phenotype. Optic atrophy, vocal cord palsy, and auditory impairment were observed in 5, 6, and 2 patients, respectively. Among the 24 patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord, 6 had evidence of spinal atrophy with or without hydromyelia. In 1 patient, magnetic resonance imaging revealed hydrocephalus. Twenty different MFN2 mutations were identified, and 14 were considered new variants. Their transmission was predominantly autosomal dominant, with vertical transmission in 8 and de novo occurrence in 3. However, we also identified rare types of transmission, especially a germinal mosaicism and an autosomal recessive inheritance. One patient carried a rare variant in the GDAP1 gene and another in the OPA1 gene in association with MFN2 mutation. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A associated with MFN2 mutations is clinically very heterogeneous. Ranging from a mild to a severe form, CMT2A exhibits various types of transmission. Optic atrophy and vocal cord palsy were observed in patients with severe

  16. Listeriosis: Is It a Rare Disease in Thailand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawtongkum, Weerasak; Thisyakorn, Usa

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes infection has been characterized as rare in Thailand. Within one month, 3 cases of listeriosis were seen at Vachira Phuket Hospital in Phuket, Thailand. Two cases were neonates with septicemia, of which one made an uneventful recovery and the other expired. The third case was an eleven-year-old boy with meningitis who also succumbed to his illness. All isolated L. monocytogenes were sensitive to ampicillin. An outbreak investigation revealed no L. monocytogenes contamination in tested food sources in Phuket.

  17. Database for Parkinson Disease Mutations and Rare Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    G.W., Van Broeckhoven C, Vance, J.M.: “Parkinson Disease Variant Database ”. MDS 19th International Congress of Parkinson’s Disease and Movement...abstracts submitted to ( international ) meetings and announcements of seminars including presentation of the database . Page 9 ABSTRACT NUYTEMANS UDALL...

  18. Addison’s Disease: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay N. Agrawal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A female patient presented with progressive weakness, asthenia and generalized hyperpigmentation. The characteristic hyperpimentation pointed towards possibility of Addison’s disease which was proved by markedly decreased plasma cortisol levels, hyponatremia and hyperkalemia. This could be one of the very few cases of Addison’s Disease reported.

  19. Childhood-onset (Juvenile Huntington′s disease: A rare case report

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    Kailash Chandra Patra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington′s disease (HD is a rare dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized clinically by a combination of abnormal involuntary (choreic movements, neuropsychiatric manifestations, and dementia. It is caused by an unstable CAG repeat expansion in the gene IT15 which encodes a Huntingtin protein. We present a case of a 9 year old boy who had developmental regression starting from the age of 8 years of age along with resistant seizures and signs of cerebellar involvement with absence of chorea and is on anticonvulsants, baclofen, and tetrabenzine. As is expected in a case of childhood-onset HD, our patient is rapidly deteriorating and is currently in the terminal phase of his illness along with resistant convulsions.

  20. Intrauterine device--associated pelvic actinomycosis: a rare disease mimicking advanced ovarian cancer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirova, Y M; Feuilhade, F; Belda-Lefrère, M A; Le Bourgeois, J P

    1997-01-01

    A case report of intrauterine device (IUD)-associated tubo-ovarian actinomycosis is presented. The patient was a 37-year-old nulliparous woman with IUD usage for the last four years. She presented anemia and weight lost of 8 kg. Ultrasound and computed tomography showed an unilateral large mass in the right adnexum adherent to the uterus and compressing the urinary bladder. Preoperative diagnosis of ovarian cancer with liver metastases was made. Bilateral salpingoophorectomy and total abdominal hysterectomy were performed. After pathological and biological analyses, actinomycosis was diagnosed and the patient was treated postoperatively with penicillin. The purpose of this article is to add to the literature a new case of this rare disease which clinically mimics ovarian cancer.

  1. Spinal Rosai–Dorfman disease: Case report of a rare disorde

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    A. Elsotouhy

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: This is a rare case of spinal Rosai–Dorfman Disease with epidural and intradural components causing cord compression. To our knowledge, this represents the first case of combined epidural and intradural extramedullary lesions in the literature.

  2. A Rare Case of Pott's Disease (Spinal Tuberculosis) Mimicking Metastatic Disease in the Southern Region of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osmanagic, Azra; Emamifar, Amir; Christian Bang, Jacob;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pott's disease (PD) or spinal tuberculosis is a rare condition which accounts for less than 1% of total tuberculosis (TB) cases. The incidence of PD has recently increased in Europe and the United States, mainly due to immigration; however, it is still a rare diagnosis in Scandinavian...

  3. Craniofacial brown tumor as a result of secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic renal disease patient: A rare entity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Pradhuman; Verma, Kanika Gupta; Verma, Dinesh; Patwardhan, Nitin

    2014-01-01

    Brown tumors are erosive bony lesions caused by rapid osteoclastic activity and peritrabecular fibrosis due to primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism resulting in a local destructive phenomenon. The differential diagnosis based on histological examination is only presumptive. Clinical, radiological and laboratory data are necessary for definitive diagnosis. Here, we report a very rare case of brown tumor involving maxilla and mandible, which is the result of secondary hyperparathyroidism in 30-year-old female patient with chronic renal disease. PMID:25328310

  4. [Clinical case of the month. Cardiac complications of acromegaly: a rare cause of dilated cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoitille, A; Beckers, A; Piérard, L A

    2012-04-01

    Acromegaly is a disease characterized by chronic growth hormone hypersecretion. Cardiovascular complications represent the main cause of death. We present here a rare case of dilated cardiomyopathy whose diagnosis revealed an acromegaly. This will provide the opportunity to review an uncommon disease and its recently reassessed prevalence.

  5. Unilateral sudden hearing loss: a rare symptom of Moyamoya disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gül, Fatih; Berçin, Sami; Müderris, Togay; Yalçıner, Gökhan; Ünal, Özkan; Kırış, Muzaffer

    2016-01-01

    A 38-year-old female patient experienced a sudden onset of unilateral sensorineural hearing loss due to Moyamoya disease. A detailed summary of audiological and neurological findings indicated that the sudden hearing loss might be due to Moyamoya disease resulting in occlusion of posterior and middle cerebral arteries. Intravenous prednisolone and trimetazidine dihydrochloride may improve hearing thresholds and speech understanding. To our knowledge, this is the first article in the literature reporting a case of sudden hearing loss as the first manifestation of Moyamoya disease in a young adult.

  6. Peripheral neuroblastoma in an adult: Rare disease at a rare site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadabur Nagendrappa Lokesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult peripheral neuroblastoma represents less than 1% of all malignant primary tumors of peripheral nerves. We report a young adult who presented with swelling over the left wrist with left epitrochlear and axillary lymph nodes. Incision biopsy of the swelling was suggestive of malignant small round cell tumor. On immunohistochemistry, cells were positive for synaptophysin, chromogranin and nonspecific enolase and negative for leucocyte common antigen, cytokeratin, CD99 and myogenin. Urinary vanillyl mandelic acid and homovanillic acid levels were elevated. The patient received 8 cycles of chemotherapy (OJEC. Reassessment positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan showed a complete metabolic response at the primary site and partial response at left axillary lymph nodes. The patient underwent axillary lymph node clearance followed by radiotherapy to the tumor bed and lymph node regions. The patient could not afford autologous haematopoetic stem cell transplant and was started on isotretinoin maintenance. He is on follow-up for 12 months and disease free.

  7. Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: when rare diseases shed light on immune system functioning

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    Elena eSieni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The human immune system depends on the activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, Natural Killer cells, and NKT cells in order to fight off a viral infection. Understanding the molecular mechanisms during this process and the role of individual proteins was greatly improved by the study of Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (FHL. Since 1999, genetic sequencing is the gold standard to classify patients into different subgroups of FHL. The diagnosis, once based on a clinical constellation of abnormalities, is now strongly supported by the results of a functional flow-cytometry screening, which directs the genetic study. A few additional congenital immune deficiencies can also cause a resembling or even identical clinical picture to FHL. As in many other rare human disorders, the collection and analysis of a relatively large number of cases in registries is crucial to draw a complete picture of the disease. The conduction of prospective therapeutic trials allows investigators to increase the awareness of the disease and to speed up the diagnostic process, but also provides important functional and genetic confirmations. Children with confirmed diagnosis may undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which is the only cure known to date. Moreover, detailed characterization of these rare patients helped to understand the function of individual proteins within the exocytic machinery of CTL, NK and NKT cells. Moreover, identification of these genotypes also provides valuable information on variant phenotypes, other than FHL, associated with biallelic and monoallelic mutations in the FHL-related genes.In this review we describe how detailed characterization of patients with genetic HLH has resulted in improvement in knowledge regarding contribution of individual proteins to the functional machinery of cytotoxic T-cells and NK cells. The review also details how identification of these genotypes has provided valuable information on variant

  8. Early Diagnosis of Rare Diseases with a Focus on Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Narrative Review

    OpenAIRE

    Bonaguro, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Health outcomes for rare diseases can be greatly affected by timely diagnosis.This paper presents a narrative review of current literature on rare diseases, with a focuson Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH), to identify needs for early diagnosisinitiatives. The review assessed: what needs to be done, what is currently being done,and what are the approaches or change theories that underlie these initiatives.Literature from online key-word searches included academic articles pertaining todia...

  9. The attitudes of medical students towards rare diseases: A cross-sectional study

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    Medić Branislava

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Rare diseases are chronic, degenerative and may lead to permanent disability. We aimed to assess knowledge and attitudes of the 3rd and 6th year medical students towards the treatment of rare diseases in Serbia. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, two samples of students were questioned for a survey: 350/446 (78.48% students of the 3rd year, and 242/517 (46.81% students of the 6th year. Results. Sixth year students estimated that they were more informed on the issue analyzed than the 3rd year students (median value of 4 and 3, interquartile range of 3-5, and 1-4, respectively; p < 0.05. However, a significant percentage of participants estimated incorrectly the prevalence of rare diseases according to the European Union standards (3rd year - 42.68%, 6th year - 49.55%. Core curriculum subjects were the main source of information on rare diseases (3rd year - 63.14%; 6th year - 92.14%. Our participants agreed that the most important problems are the following: high drug prices, difficult access to drugs and lack of public information. Students found, without any differences, that community access to effective drugs for rare disease should be improved (median value - 10, interquartile range 8-10 in both groups, p < 0.05. In order to improve pharmacotherapy of rare diseases in Serbia, the participants suggested establishment of a National Plan for Rare Diseases, approval of more appropriate drugs, simplified access to appropriate medicines, and more rapid diagnostics. Conclusion. It is necessary to improve the knowledge and attitudes of medical students towards pharmacotherapy of rare diseases. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175023

  10. Are complement deficiencies really rare? Overview on prevalence, clinical importance and modern diagnostic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grumach, Anete Sevciovic; Kirschfink, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Complement deficiencies comprise between 1 and 10% of all primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) according to national and supranational registries. They are still considered rare and even of less clinical importance. This not only reflects (as in all PIDs) a great lack of awareness among clinicians and general practitioners but is also due to the fact that only few centers worldwide provide a comprehensive laboratory complement analysis. To enable early identification, our aim is to present warning signs for complement deficiencies and recommendations for diagnostic approach. The genetic deficiency of any early component of the classical pathway (C1q, C1r/s, C2, C4) is often associated with autoimmune diseases whereas individuals, deficient of properdin or of the terminal pathway components (C5 to C9), are highly susceptible to meningococcal disease. Deficiency of C1 Inhibitor (hereditary angioedema, HAE) results in episodic angioedema, which in a considerable number of patients with identical symptoms also occurs in factor XII mutations. New clinical entities are now reported indicating disease association with partial complement defects or even certain polymorphisms (factor H, MBL, MASPs). Mutations affecting the regulators factor H, factor I, or CD46 and of C3 and factor B leading to severe dysregulation of the alternative pathway have been associated with renal disorders, such as atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) and - less frequent - with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN). We suggest a multi-stage diagnostic protocol starting based on the recognition of so called warning signs which should aid pediatricians and adult physicians in a timely identification followed by a step-wise complement analysis to characterize the defect at functional, protein and molecular level.

  11. GAUCHER´S DISEASE: A RARE CAUSE OF FANCONI SYNDROME?

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    Musso CG

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher´s disease consists of a genetic autosomic recesive alteration that leads to a reduction in the acid glucosil-ceramide beta-glucosidase enzyme. This enzyme brakes the glucosilceramide, a substance from which many esphingo and glucolipids are synthesized. Even though the renal compromise is not frequent in Gaucher disease, proteinuria (in nephrotic range or not and glomerulonephritis have been described in this illness.Fanconi syndrome is charaterized by a dysfunction in the proximal tubular reabsorption. Among the etiologies of Fanconi syndrome there are many metabolic diseases, but no association has been described yet in the literature between Fanconi syndrome and Gaucher disease. We present the following case report where this association was observed.

  12. Disease transmission by cannibalism: rare event or common occurrence?

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolf, Volker H.W.; Antonovics, Janis

    2007-01-01

    Cannibalism has been documented as a possible disease transmission route in several species, including humans. However, the dynamics resulting from this type of disease transmission are not well understood. Using a theoretical model, we explore how cannibalism (i.e. killing and consumption of dead conspecifics) and intraspecific necrophagy (i.e. consumption of dead conspecifics) affect host–pathogen dynamics. We show that group cannibalism, i.e. shared consumption of victims, is a necessary c...

  13. Disseminated Abdominal Hydatidosis: A Rare Presentation of Common Infectious Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Almalik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease is one of the most geographically widespread zoonoses with substantial disease burden. In this report we are discussing an unusual case of intra-abdominal HD that was ongoing for 22 years despite two surgical interventions. Significant symptomatic relief was achieved within the first two months of combination therapy with albendazole and praziquantel. HD is still of public health concern in the Middle East that needs optimized care.

  14. Disseminated Abdominal Hydatidosis: A Rare Presentation of Common Infectious Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almalik, Abdulrahman; Alsharidi, Aynaa; Al-Sheef, Mohammed; Enani, Mushirah

    2014-01-01

    Hydatid disease is one of the most geographically widespread zoonoses with substantial disease burden. In this report we are discussing an unusual case of intra-abdominal HD that was ongoing for 22 years despite two surgical interventions. Significant symptomatic relief was achieved within the first two months of combination therapy with albendazole and praziquantel. HD is still of public health concern in the Middle East that needs optimized care. PMID:25114815

  15. Contemporary Approaches for Identifying Rare Bone Disease Causing Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles R.Farber; Thomas L.Clemens

    2013-01-01

    Recent improvements in the speed and accuracy of DNA sequencing, together with increasingly sophisti-cated mathematical approaches for annotating gene networks, have revolutionized the field of human genetics and made these once time consuming approaches assessable to most investigators. In the field of bone research, a particularly active area of gene discovery has occurred in patients with rare bone disorders such as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) that are caused by mutations in single genes. In this perspective, we highlight some of these technological advances and describe how they have been used to identify the genetic determinants underlying two previously unexplained cases of OI. The widespread availability of advanced methods for DNA sequencing and bioinformatics analysis can be expected to greatly facilitate identification of novel gene networks that normally function to control bone formation and maintenance.

  16. Bullosis Diabeticorum: Rare Presentation in a Common Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old African American male presented with a sudden onset of blisters. He had a past medical history of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus type I, diabetic vasculopathy, and neuropathy. The physical examination revealed nonerythematous skin denudations on both elbows and lateral aspect of arm bilaterally. Investigations which included skin biopsies confirmed the diagnosis of bullosis diabeticorum. The bullae were treated with hydrotherapy and healed with no complications in 4 weeks. We present this case to illustrate the rare occurrence of diabetic bulla in a diabetic patient especially with poor glycemic control. The case is also a reminder of the importance of diabetes screening in nondiabetic patients who are diagnosed with diabetic bulla.

  17. Renal replacement therapy for rare diseases affecting the kidney: an analysis of the ERA-EDTA Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuhl, E.; Stralen, K.J. van; Wanner, C.; Ariceta, G.; Heaf, J.G.; Bjerre, A.K.; Palsson, R.; Duneau, G.; Hoitsma, A.J.; Ravani, P.; Schaefer, F.; Jager, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, increased efforts have been undertaken to address the needs of patients with rare diseases by international initiatives and consortia devoted to rare disease research and management. However, information on the overall prevalence of rare diseases within the end-stage ren

  18. Tubercular myositis of infraspinatus: a rare clinical entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Verma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis of the musculoskeletal system is generally confined to bones and joints. The surrounding soft tissue is secondarily infected. Tuberculous bursitis, tenosynovitis and primary pyomyositis are rarer manifestations of the disease. Of these, primary tuberculouspyomyositis is probably the rarest entity. We report a case of tubercular myositis of infraspinatus in an 8 year-old female who presented with pain, low grade fever, weight loss, anorexia, progressively increasing pain in the scapular region and restriction of movements. There was no history of trauma, diabetes, immunosuppression, corticosteroid usage, or renal failure. History of contact was present. Tenderness was present along the medial border of scapula and movements of upper extremity requiring movement of the scapula were painful and grossly restricted. MRI of the scapulothoracic region and shoulder revealed small amount of fluid along medial border of scapula with T2 hyperintensity of infraspinatus. Histopathology showed caseous necrosis, inflammatory cells and granulomatous cells suggestive of tuberculosis. Polymerase Chain Reaction for Mycobacterium tuberculosis was found to be positive. Patient was started on four-drug antitubercular treatment and regular dressings. The patient's general condition improved and at 4 weeks post starting ATT, there was no pain and the patient was able to perform complete range of movement. This is probably the first reported case of tubercular myositis of infraspinatus in an immunocompetent patient without any identifiable focus elsewhere in the body. Rarity of the condition, presence of characteristic findings on MRI and histopathology make the case illustrative for young Orthopaedics surgeons. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(8.000: 3619-3621

  19. The UK10K project identifies rare variants in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Klaudia; Min, Josine L; Huang, Jie;

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of rare and low-frequency variants to human traits is largely unexplored. Here we describe insights from sequencing whole genomes (low read depth, 7×) or exomes (high read depth, 80×) of nearly 10,000 individuals from population-based and disease collections. In extensively......-marker and rare variant aggregation tests. We describe population structure and functional annotation of rare and low-frequency variants, use the data to estimate the benefits of sequencing for association studies, and summarize lessons from disease-specific collections. Finally, we make available an extensive...

  20. Pleomorphic adenoma of the vulva, clinical reminder of a rare occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda A. Moatamed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleomorphic adenoma, also known as mixed tumor, is a benign tumor which typically presents as a painless and persistent mass. The majority of pleomorphic adenomas involve the salivary glands, most commonly the parotid gland. Other sites include breast and skin. It is a rare tumor in the vulva. In this article we are reporting a case of pleomorphic adenoma of labia with characteristic pathologic and clinical findings, as reminder of a common benign neoplasm occurring with rare locality.

  1. Study designs for identification of rare disease variants in complex diseases: the utility of family-based designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Ottman, Ruth

    2011-11-01

    The recent progress in sequencing technologies makes possible large-scale medical sequencing efforts to assess the importance of rare variants in complex diseases. The results of such efforts depend heavily on the use of efficient study designs and analytical methods. We introduce here a unified framework for association testing of rare variants in family-based designs or designs based on unselected affected individuals. This framework allows us to quantify the enrichment in rare disease variants in families containing multiple affected individuals and to investigate the optimal design of studies aiming to identify rare disease variants in complex traits. We show that for many complex diseases with small values for the overall sibling recurrence risk ratio, such as Alzheimer's disease and most cancers, sequencing affected individuals with a positive family history of the disease can be extremely advantageous for identifying rare disease variants. In contrast, for complex diseases with large values of the sibling recurrence risk ratio, sequencing unselected affected individuals may be preferable.

  2. Guillain-Barre syndrome: A rare manifestation of Hansen's disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rakshith, K; Pai, Shivanand; Mittal, Saumya; Misri, Z; Shenoy, Nisha

    2017-01-01

    ... 5 days. The weakness was distal as well as proximal. The patient also turned out to be a case of Hansen's disease. This was detected approximately 2 months before his presentation to the hospital as a result of ulceration of the foot. He was off treatment because of gastric ulcerations. There was no other significant medical history. The pati...

  3. A rare case of hidebound disease with dental implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Bali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (also called as Scleroderma or hidebound disease is a chronic sclerotic disease of unknown etiology which causes diffuse, increased deposition of extra cellular matrix in connective tissue with vascular abnormalities, resulting in tissue hypoxia. The disease is characterized by diffuse fibrosis; degenerative changes; and vascular abnormalities in the skin (scleroderma, articular structures, and internal organs. Aesthetic and facial dysfunctions are followed by important oral and facial manifestations. Most oral manifestations begin with tongue rigidity and facial skin changes. Bone resorption of mandibular angle and widening of periodontal ligament space on periapical radiographs are important radiological findings. Other systemic changes include the involvement of internal organs, which lead to serious complications as well as disorders in the cardiac muscle and Raynaud΄s phenomenon. This is a case report of 30-year-old female patient with the classical features of this disease. This case is reported for its rarity and variable expressivity. The main aim of this article is to describe thorough presentation of the case report, various forms of scleroderma, pathogenesis, oral, extraoral, periodontal manifestations of scleroderma, and its treatment options. A brief review of the literature, focusing on dental alterations is also presented.

  4. Osler-Weber-Rendu disease: A rare cause of recurrent hemoptysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoja, Amir M; Jalan, Rahul K; Jain, Dheeraj L; Kajale, Omkar V

    2016-01-01

    Osler-Weber-Rendu disease, also known as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, is a rare autosomal dominant condition causing systemic fibrovascular dysplasia. It has an incidence of 1-2/100,000. Phenotypic variation is extreme ranging from asymptomatic to severely symptomatic, from cases with no or few mucocutaneous lesions to those with diffuse cutaneous telangiectasia. We discuss a case of Osler-Weber-Rendu disease causing diffuse cutaneous telangiectasia and hemoptysis. The patient presented with complaints of hemoptysis and was extensively examined and investigated before being diagnosed with Osler-Weber-Rendu disease. We successfully managed the patient's hemoptysis by bronchial artery embolization. This case emphasizes the need for careful examination and investigation and to consider such rare diseases when all the common causes of hemoptysis are ruled out. An early and proper diagnosis will lead to more effective management of such a rare disease with few treatment options available.

  5. Osler-Weber-Rendu disease: A rare cause of recurrent hemoptysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir M Khoja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osler-Weber-Rendu disease, also known as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, is a rare autosomal dominant condition causing systemic fibrovascular dysplasia. It has an incidence of 1-2/100,000. Phenotypic variation is extreme ranging from asymptomatic to severely symptomatic, from cases with no or few mucocutaneous lesions to those with diffuse cutaneous telangiectasia. We discuss a case of Osler-Weber-Rendu disease causing diffuse cutaneous telangiectasia and hemoptysis. The patient presented with complaints of hemoptysis and was extensively examined and investigated before being diagnosed with Osler-Weber-Rendu disease. We successfully managed the patient′s hemoptysis by bronchial artery embolization.  This case emphasizes the need for careful examination and investigation and to consider such rare diseases when all the common causes of hemoptysis are ruled out. An early and proper diagnosis will lead to more effective management of such a rare disease with few treatment options available.

  6. Unilateral renal cell carcinoma with coexistent renal disease: a rare cause of end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Alvarez-Navascués, R

    2001-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a disorder encompassing a wide spectrum of pathological renal lesions. Coexistence of unilateral RCC and associated pathology in the contralateral kidney is an unusual and challenging therapeutic dilemma that can result in renal failure. So far, data on unilateral RCC with chronic renal failure necessitating renal replacement therapy have not been published. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from unilateral RCC, and to assess the associated pathology and possible pathogenic factors. In 1999, a survey of the 350 patients treated by chronic dialysis in Asturias, Spain, was carried out to identify and collect clinical information on patients with primary unilateral RCC whilst on their renal replacement programme. Seven patients were identified as having ESRD and unilateral RCC, giving an incidence of 2% of patients treated by dialysis. There was a wide spectrum of associated disease and clinical presentation. All patients underwent radical or partial nephrectomy and were free of recurrence 6--64 months after surgery. Six patients were alive and free of malignancy recurrence for 6--30 months after the onset of haemodialysis. ESRD is rare in association with unilateral RCC, but does contribute to significant morbidity. However, the data presented here are encouraging and suggest that cancer-free survival with renal replacement therapy can be achieved in such patients.

  7. Eosinophilic Fasciitis: an Atypical Presentation of a Rare Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Poradosu

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: The diagnosis of eosinophilic fasciitis is challenging due to the lack of pathognomonic signs and symptoms. As spontaneous resolution has been described, watchful waiting is defendable depending on the clinical presentation. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be useful in establishing the diagnosis, a deep muscle biopsy remains the gold standard diagnostic tool.

  8. Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease is a rare cause of lymphadenopathy and fever of unknown origin in children: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scagni, Paola; Peisino, Maria Grazia; Bianchi, Maurizio; Morello, Maura; Sardi, Nicola; Linari, Alessandra; Mastrodicasa, Luana; Madon, Enrico; Pecco, Paola

    2005-06-01

    Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease, a benign and unusual self-limiting histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis of unknown origin, should be included in the differential diagnosis of lymphadenopathy and fever of unknown origin. This disease mostly affects young Asian women and has rarely been reported in children, thus remaining a poorly recognized entity that is frequently confused with malignant lymphoma. The authors describe two children with Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease, with particular attention to diagnostic approach and clinical and histologic features of the disease.

  9. Emphysematous cystitis: A rare disease of Genito-urinary system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpi Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Emphysematous cystitis (EC is a rare infection of the urinary tract that results in gas production in the bladder. It is more common in diabetic and female patients, and can be associated with more serious complications, including pyelonephritis. Case Report: We describe a case of recurrent bacterial cystitis caused by Escherichia coli (E. coli. An incidental finding in our patient of pneumaturia on computed tomography (CT scan prompted further work-up. Differential diagnoses for pneumaturia include infection, trauma, and fistula, most commonly colovesicular. The patient history ruled out trauma and CT scanning ruled out a fistula; culture of the urine then showed a bacterial load greater than 100,000 E. coli/mL. The patient was then diagnosed with EC. She was treated with ceftriaxone and released in stable condition. Conclusion: The literature was scarce when it came to diagnoses of EC based on bacterial load. We present this case to increase health care providers′ awareness of recurrent EC with a urine culture bacterial load greater than 100,000 E. coli/mL.

  10. Pediatric Interstitial Lung Disease Masquerading as Difficult Asthma: Management Dilemmas for Rare Lung Disease in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EY Chan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic nontransplant-related childhood bronchiolitis obliterans is an uncommon disease. Most patients present with chronic recurrent dyspnea, cough and wheezing, which are also features of asthma, by far a much more common condition. The present case study reports on a six-year-old girl who presented to a tertiary care centre with recurrent episodes of respiratory distress on a background of baseline tachypnea, chronic hypoxemia and exertional dyspnea. Her past medical history revealed significant lung disease in infancy, including respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis and repaired gastroesophageal reflux. She was treated for 'asthma exacerbations' throughout her early childhood years. Bronchiolitis obliterans was subsequently diagnosed with an open lung biopsy. She did not have sustained improvement with systemic corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine or clarithromycin. Cardiac catheterization confirmed the presence of secondary pulmonary hypertension. Treatment options remain a dilemma for this patient because there is no known effective treatment for this condition, and the natural history is not well understood. The present case demonstrates the need for careful workup in 'atypical asthma', and the urgent need for further research into the rare lung diseases of childhood.

  11. Fungal neuroinfections: rare disease but unacceptably high mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njambi, S; Huttova, M; Kovac, M; Freybergh, P F; Bauer, F; Muli, J M

    2007-06-01

    Within last 25 years we have observed 20 cases of fungal meningitis and/or cerebral abscesses. Commonest etiologic agens was Candida spp. (C. albicans 9 of 20). Molds were responsible for 4 cases of brain abscess. Mortality was 50% what seems to be very high. Extremely high mortality is caused by delayed onset of therapy, severe underlying disease and multiresistant fungal organisms such as Mucorales, Fusarium solani and Aureobasidium.

  12. Rare Submandibular Presentation of Pediatric Castleman Disease: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jodi; Mandel, Louis

    2017-04-01

    Castleman disease (CD), a benign lymphoproliferative disorder that affects lymph nodes, is uncommon in children, with only approximately 100 cases published. Although 23% of pediatric CD cases are found in the neck, there is no substantial reported percentage found in the salivary glands, especially the submandibular salivary gland (SMSG). A pediatric case of CD involving the SMSG is reported because of its extreme rarity. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Rare and low-frequency variants in human common diseases and other complex traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettre, Guillaume

    2014-11-01

    In humans, most of the genetic variation is rare and often population-specific. Whereas the role of rare genetic variants in familial monogenic diseases is firmly established, we are only now starting to explore the contribution of this class of genetic variation to human common diseases and other complex traits. Such large-scale experiments are possible due to the development of next-generation DNA sequencing. Early findings suggested that rare and low-frequency coding variation might have a large effect on human phenotypes (eg, PCSK9 missense variants on low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and coronary heart diseases). This observation sparked excitement in prognostic and diagnostic medicine, as well as in genetics-driven strategies to develop new drugs. In this review, I describe results and present initial conclusions regarding some of the recent rare and low-frequency variant discoveries. We can already assume that most phenotype-associated rare and low-frequency variants have modest-to-weak phenotypical effect. Thus, we will need large cohorts to identify them, as for common variants in genome-wide association studies. As we expand the list of associated rare and low-frequency variants, we can also better recognise the current limitations: we need to develop better statistical methods to optimally test association with rare variants, including non-coding variation, and to account for potential confounders such as population stratification.

  14. Rare Diseases on the Internet: An Assessment of the Quality of Online Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzkendorf, Svenja; Göbel, Jens; Storf, Holger; Zeidler, Jan; Graf von der Schulenburg, Johann-Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Background The importance of the Internet as a medium for publishing and sharing health and medical information has increased considerably during the last decade. Nonetheless, comprehensive knowledge and information are scarce and difficult to find, especially for rare diseases. Additionally, the quality of health or medical information about rare diseases is frequently difficult to assess for the patients and their family members. Objective The aim of this study is to assess the quality of information on the Internet about rare diseases. Additionally, the study aims to evaluate if the quality of information on rare diseases varies between different information supplier categories. Methods A total of 13 quality criteria for websites providing medical information about rare diseases were transferred to a self-disclosure questionnaire. Identified providers of information on the Internet about rare diseases were invited to fill out the questionnaire. The questionnaire contained questions about the information provider in general (eg, supplier category, information category, language, use of quality certificates, and target group) and about quality aspects that reflect the 13 quality criteria. Differences in subgroup analyses were performed using t tests. Results We identified 693 websites containing information about rare diseases. A total of 123 questionnaires (17.7%) were completely filled out by the information suppliers. For the remaining identified suppliers (570/693, 82.3%), the questionnaires were filled out by the authors based on the information available on their website. In many cases, the quality of websites was proportionally low. Furthermore, subgroup analysis showed no statistically significant differences between the quality of information provided by support group/patient organization compared to medical institution (P=.19). The quality of information by individuals (patient/relative) was significantly lower compared to information provided by support

  15. Kullback-Leibler divergence for detection of rare haplotype common disease association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shili

    2015-11-01

    Rare haplotypes may tag rare causal variants of common diseases; hence, detection of such rare haplotypes may also contribute to our understanding of complex disease etiology. Because rare haplotypes frequently result from common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), focusing on rare haplotypes is much more economical compared with using rare single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) from sequencing, as SNPs are available and 'free' from already amassed genome-wide studies. Further, associated haplotypes may shed light on the underlying disease causal mechanism, a feat unmatched by SNV-based collapsing methods. In recent years, data mining approaches have been adapted to detect rare haplotype association. However, as they rely on an assumed underlying disease model and require the specification of a null haplotype, results can be erroneous if such assumptions are violated. In this paper, we present a haplotype association method based on Kullback-Leibler divergence (hapKL) for case-control samples. The idea is to compare haplotype frequencies for the cases versus the controls by computing symmetrical divergence measures. An important property of such measures is that both the frequencies and logarithms of the frequencies contribute in parallel, thus balancing the contributions from rare and common, and accommodating both deleterious and protective, haplotypes. A simulation study under various scenarios shows that hapKL has well-controlled type I error rates and good power compared with existing data mining methods. Application of hapKL to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) shows a strong association of the complement factor H (CFH) gene with AMD, identifying several individual rare haplotypes with strong signals.

  16. Clinical studies on thyroid diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskes, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on some aspects of thyroid disease: prevention of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), diagnosis of related conditions as autoimmune hypophysitis in autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s disease), and treatment of amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT).

  17. Clinical studies on thyroid diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskes, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on some aspects of thyroid disease: prevention of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), diagnosis of related conditions as autoimmune hypophysitis in autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s disease), and treatment of amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT).

  18. [IgG4-related disease is a rare differential diagnosis of malignant and autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storgaard, Anders; Detlefsen, Sönke

    2015-04-06

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is an inflammatory and fibrotic disease with the potential to produce diffuse enlargement, massforming lesions or stenoses in a wide range of organs. Elevation of serum IgG4 concentration and high levels of IgG4-positive cells in the inflamed tissue are common denominators. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis is one of the main manifestations, and its recognition preceded the definition of IgG4-RD as a novel clinical entity. The aetiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology and clinical long-term outcome of IgG4-RD are not fully elucidated. Steroids are effective in most patients, sometimes combined with other antiinflammatory drugs.

  19. The Creation Of The National Registry Of Rare Diseases In The Slovak Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cisárik F.

    2014-08-01

    Its creation builds on the existing registries as well as on the structure of health care in the Slovak Republic. With the protection of personal data in mind, the collection of data will be carried out by the National Centre of Health Information (NCHI, which will also use the existing tool in the process of creation. Thanks to the cooperation between NCHI and the Slovak Society of Medical Genetics, NCHI developed separate reporting forms on rare diseases according to OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man and ORPHANET rare disease coding (ORPHA codes of rare diseases, and the International classification of diseases code (ICD 10. The activities also include cooperation with the existing registries (part of which are rare diseases. For example National Registry of Congenital Developmental Heart Defects, national register of neuromuscular disorders, oncologic register or register of diabetes mellitus. Gathering the information from these registries we will extend the data about rare diseases in the Slovak republic. At the international level the participation in the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT is important.

  20. CEMARA: a Web dynamic application within a N-tier architecture for rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiaen, Claude; Le Mignot, Loïc; Rath, Ana; Richard, Jean-Baptiste; Dufour, Eric; Ben Said, Mohamed; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Verloes, Alain; Le Merrer, Martine; Bodemer, Christine; Baujat, Geneviève; Gerard-Blanluet, Marion; Bourdon-Lanoy, Eva; Salomon, Rémi; Ayme, Ségolène; Landais, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Rare diseases include a group of conditions characterized by a prevalence lower than 5 per 10,000 in the community. In France, any rare disease affects less than 30,000 patients and often much less. Three to 4% of children and 6% of the population in Europe are affected. It is a true public health stake since most diseases do not have any curative treatment. In France, the Ministry of Health has initiated a National Rare Diseases Plan. Twenty five out of 132 labelled Reference Centres (RC) decided to share a common Information System named CEMARA. It is dedicated to collect continuous and complete records of all patients presenting with a rare disease, and their follow-up. The main objective of CEMARA is to contribute to the missions of the RC regarding the registration and description of their activities, coordination of the network of their correspondents, organization of the follow-up of rare diseases, and analysis of the epidemiological patterns. A description of CEMARA is provided as well as its cooperation with Orphanet and Genatlas, and a presentation of 11803 current records collected by more than 300 health care professionals belonging to more than 70 sites.

  1. Creating a European Union framework for actions in the field of rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moliner, Antoni Montserrat

    2010-01-01

    Rare diseases, including those of genetic origin, are defined by the European Union as life-threatening or chronically debilitating diseases which are of such low prevalence (less than 5 per 10,000). The specificities of rare diseases - limited number of patients and scarcity of relevant knowledge and expertise - single them out as a unique domain of very high European added-value. The legal instruments at the disposal of the European Union, in terms of the Article 152 of the Treaties of the European Union, are very limited. However a combination of instruments using the research and the pharmaceutical legal basis and an intensive and creative use of funding from the First Public Health Programme 2003-2008 and from the Second Health Programme 2008-2013 has permitted to create a solid basis that Member States have considered enough to put rare diseases in a privileged position in the health agenda. The adoption of the Commission Communication, in November 2008, and of the Council Recommendation, in June 2009, and the future adoption of the Directive on Cross-border healthcare, maybe during 2010, have created an operational framework to act in the field of rare disease with European coordination in several areas (classification and codification, European Reference Networks, orphan drugs, European Committee of Experts, etc.). In conclusion, Rare diseases is an area with enormous and practical potentialities for the European cooperation.

  2. Next-generation sequencing for diagnosis of rare diseases in the neonatal intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Hussein; Luco, Stephanie M.; Li, Rui; Bareke, Eric; Beaulieu, Chandree; Jarinova, Olga; Carson, Nancy; Nikkel, Sarah M.; Graham, Gail E.; Richer, Julie; Armour, Christine; Bulman, Dennis E.; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Geraghty, Michael; Lines, Matthew A.; Lacaze-Masmonteil, Thierry; Majewski, Jacek; Boycott, Kym M.; Dyment, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rare diseases often present in the first days and weeks of life and may require complex management in the setting of a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Exhaustive consultations and traditional genetic or metabolic investigations are costly and often fail to arrive at a final diagnosis when no recognizable syndrome is suspected. For this pilot project, we assessed the feasibility of next-generation sequencing as a tool to improve the diagnosis of rare diseases in newborns in the NICU. Methods: We retrospectively identified and prospectively recruited newborns and infants admitted to the NICU of the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario and the Ottawa Hospital, General Campus, who had been referred to the medical genetics or metabolics inpatient consult service and had features suggesting an underlying genetic or metabolic condition. DNA from the newborns and parents was enriched for a panel of clinically relevant genes and sequenced on a MiSeq sequencing platform (Illumina Inc.). The data were interpreted with a standard informatics pipeline and reported to care providers, who assessed the importance of genotype–phenotype correlations. Results: Of 20 newborns studied, 8 received a diagnosis on the basis of next-generation sequencing (diagnostic rate 40%). The diagnoses were renal tubular dysgenesis, SCN1A-related encephalopathy syndrome, myotubular myopathy, FTO deficiency syndrome, cranioectodermal dysplasia, congenital myasthenic syndrome, autosomal dominant intellectual disability syndrome type 7 and Denys–Drash syndrome. Interpretation: This pilot study highlighted the potential of next-generation sequencing to deliver molecular diagnoses rapidly with a high success rate. With broader use, this approach has the potential to alter health care delivery in the NICU. PMID:27241786

  3. Using online health communication to manage chronic sorrow: mothers of children with rare diseases speak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Adriana D

    2015-01-01

    Families affected by rare disease experience psychosocial reactions similar to families with prevalent chronic diseases. The ability to respond and manage the condition depends on psychosocial factors. This phenomenological study of 16 mothers of children with Alagille syndrome explored their lived experience in using online health communications to manage their chronic sorrow. Data consisted of semi-structured interviews analyzed using techniques described by van Manen. Analysis yielded four essential themes: connectedness, online triggers, empowerment, and seasons of online use contributed to online communication essential to a rare disease community. Findings suggest mothers need emotional support and help accessing appropriate online resources.

  4. Orphan drugs for rare diseases: is it time to revisit their special market access status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven; Cassiman, David; Dooms, Marc; Picavet, Eline

    2012-07-30

    Orphan drugs are intended for diseases with a very low prevalence, and many countries have implemented legislation to support market access of orphan drugs. We argue that it is time to revisit the special market access status of orphan drugs. Indeed, evidence suggests that there is no societal preference for treating rare diseases. Although society appears to assign a greater value to severity of disease, this criterion is equally relevant to many common diseases. Furthermore, the criterion of equity in access to treatment, which underpins orphan drug legislation, puts more value on health improvement in rare diseases than in common diseases and implies that population health is not maximized. Finally, incentives for the development, pricing and reimbursement of orphan drugs have created market failures, including monopolistic prices and the artificial creation of rare diseases. We argue that, instead of awarding special market access status to orphan drugs, there is scope to optimize research and development (R&D) of orphan drugs and to control prices of orphan drugs by means of, for example, patent auctions, advance purchase commitments, pay-as-you-go schemes and dose-modification studies. Governments should consider carefully the right incentive strategy for R&D of orphan drugs in rare diseases.

  5. Genetic Factors of the Disease Course After Sepsis: Rare Deleterious Variants Are Predictive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Taudien

    2016-10-01

    Sepsis patients with favorable disease course after sepsis, even in the case of unfavorable preconditions, seem to be affected more often by rare deleterious SNVs in cell signaling and innate immunity related pathways, suggesting a protective role of impairments in these processes against a poor disease course.

  6. Socio-economic burden of rare diseases: A systematic review of cost of illness evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, Aris; Tordrup, David; Kanavos, Panos

    2015-07-01

    Cost-of-illness studies, the systematic quantification of the economic burden of diseases on the individual and on society, help illustrate direct budgetary consequences of diseases in the health system and indirect costs associated with patient or carer productivity losses. In the context of the BURQOL-RD project ("Social Economic Burden and Health-Related Quality of Life in patients with Rare Diseases in Europe") we studied the evidence on direct and indirect costs for 10 rare diseases (Cystic Fibrosis [CF], Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy [DMD], Fragile X Syndrome [FXS], Haemophilia, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis [JIA], Mucopolysaccharidosis [MPS], Scleroderma [SCL], Prader-Willi Syndrome [PWS], Histiocytosis [HIS] and Epidermolysis Bullosa [EB]). A systematic literature review of cost of illness studies was conducted using a keyword strategy in combination with the names of the 10 selected rare diseases. Available disease prevalence in Europe was found to range between 1 and 2 per 100,000 population (PWS, a sub-type of Histiocytosis, and EB) up to 42 per 100,000 population (Scleroderma). Overall, cost evidence on rare diseases appears to be very scarce (a total of 77 studies were identified across all diseases), with CF (n=29) and Haemophilia (n=22) being relatively well studied, compared to the other conditions, where very limited cost of illness information was available. In terms of data availability, total lifetime cost figures were found only across four diseases, and total annual costs (including indirect costs) across five diseases. Overall, data availability was found to correlate with the existence of a pharmaceutical treatment and indirect costs tended to account for a significant proportion of total costs. Although methodological variations prevent any detailed comparison between conditions and based on the evidence available, most of the rare diseases examined are associated with significant economic burden, both direct and indirect.

  7. Rare diseases knowledge management: the contribution of proximity measurements in OntoOrpha and OMIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimé, X; Charlet, J; Furst, F; Kuntz, P; Trichet, F; Dhombres, F

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce an application of Proxima and define a new measure of proximity between two concepts present in an ontology. The approach is based on the three dimensions of a conceptualization: intention with relations between concepts, expression with terms denoting concepts, and extension with instances of concepts. This preliminary work, in the field of rare diseases, involved the Orphanet Ontology of Rare Diseases (OntoOrpha) and corpus of texts extracted from Online Inheritance in Man (OMIM). The proximity measurements are consistent with an appropriate representation of groups of diseases in the ontology, which are derived from the Orphanet classifications of rare diseases. Other semantic relations are explored and new perspectives in medical knowledge curation are proposed.

  8. C9orf72 mutation is rare in Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson's disease and essential tremor in China

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    Bin eJiao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available GGGGCC repeat expansions in the C9orf72 gene have been identified as a major contributing factor in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD. Given the overlapping of clinical phenotypes and pathological characteristics between these two diseases and Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and essential tremor (ET, we speculated regarding whether C9orf72 repeat expansions also play a major role in these three diseases. Using the repeat-primed polymerase chain reaction method, we screened for C9orf72 in three groups of patients with PD (n=911, AD (n=279, and ET (n=152 in the Chinese Han population. There were no pathogenic repeats (>30 repeats detected in either the patients or controls (n=314, which indicated that the pathogenic expansions of C9orf72 might be rare in these three diseases. However, the analysis of the association between the number of repeats (p=0.001, short/intermediate genotype (short: <7 repeats; intermediate: ≥7 repeats (odds ratio 1.37 [1.05, 1.79], intermediate/intermediate genotype (Odds ratio 2.03 [1.17, 3.54] and PD risks indicated that intermediate repeat alleles could act as contributors to PD. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to reveal the correlation between C9orf72 and Chinese PD, AD or ET patients. Additionally, the results of this study suggest the novel idea that the intermediate repeat allele in C9orf72 is most likely a risk factor for PD.

  9. Mutations in DJ-1 are rare in familial Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratz, Nathan; Pauciulo, Michael W.; Elsaesser, Veronika E.; Marek, Diane K.; Halter, Cheryl A.; Wojcieszek, Joanne; Rudolph, Alice; Shults, Clifford W.; Foroud, Tatiana; Nichols Ph.D., William C.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in DJ-1 (PARK7) are one cause of early-onset autosomal-recessive parkinsonism. We screened for DJ-1 mutations in 93 affected individuals from the 64 multiplex Parkinson disease (PD) families in our sample that had the highest family-specific multipoint LOD scores at the DJ-1 locus. In addition to sequencing all coding exons for alterations, we used multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to examine the genomic copy number of DJ-1 exons. A known polymorphism (R98Q) was found in five PD subjects, once as a homozygote and in the other four cases as heterozygotes. No additional missense mutations and no exon deletions or duplications were detected. Our results, in combination with those of previous studies, suggest that alterations in DJ-1 are not a common cause of familial PD. PMID:16997464

  10. [SBMA: a rare disease but a classic ALS mimic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradat, Pierre-François

    2014-05-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a neurodegenerative disorder of lower motor neurons characterized by proximal limb muscular atrophy, bulbar involvement, marked fasciculation, hand tremor and gynaecomastia. SBMA is caused by a CAG-repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene on the X-chromosome. Due to its mode of transmission, only male are symptomatic and clinical features appear progressively in adulthood. Motor signs and symptoms are restricted to lower motor neuron involvement, in contrast with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) characterized by the association with upper motor neuron involvement. The diminution of sensory potential at electroneuromyogram is a major criteria discriminating between SBMA and ALS. Diagnostic confirmation is based on genetic testing.

  11. Urine-derived induced pluripotent stem cells as a modeling tool to study rare human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liang; Cui, Yazhou; Luan, Jing; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Han, Jinxiang

    2016-08-01

    Rare diseases with a low prevalence are a key public health issue because the causes of those diseases are difficult to determine and those diseases lack a clearly established or curative treatment. Thus, investigating the molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathology of rare diseases and facilitating the development of novel therapies using disease models is crucial. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are well suited to modeling rare diseases since they have the capacity for self-renewal and pluripotency. In addition, iPSC technology provides a valuable tool to generate patient-specific iPSCs. These cells can be differentiated into cell types that have been affected by a disease. These cells would circumvent ethical concerns and avoid immunological rejection, so they could be used in cell replacement therapy or regenerative medicine. To date, human iPSCs could have been generated from multiple donor sources, such as skin, adipose tissue, and peripheral blood. However, these cells are obtained via invasive procedures. In contrast, several groups of researchers have found that urine may be a better source for producing iPSCs from normal individuals or patients. This review discusses urinary iPSC (UiPSC) as a candidate for modeling rare diseases. Cells obtained from urine have overwhelming advantages compared to other donor sources since they are safely, affordably, and frequently obtained and they are readily obtained from patients. The use of iPSC-based models is also discussed. UiPSCs may prove to be a key means of modeling rare diseases and they may facilitate the treatment of those diseases in the future.

  12. Gastric Duplication Cyst: A Rare Congenital Disease Often Misdiagnosed in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Falleti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal duplication is a rare congenital disease which affected more commonly the ileum, while the stomach is rarely involved. Generally diagnosed in paediatric or young age, it could be difficult to suspect a gastrointestinal duplication in adults. Herein, we report a 55-year-old male with a gastric duplication cyst found on routinely checkup for chronic hepatitis and first misdiagnosed as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST; we also discuss its embryology.

  13. Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program (IDCRP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Our mission is to conduct infectious disease clinical research of importance to the military through a unique, adaptive, and collaborative network, to inform health...

  14. Adult hypertrophic pyloric stenosis due to peptic ulcer disease: a rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shameer Deen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Primary adult hypertrophic stenosis is uncommon with an uncertain etiopathogenesis and associated gastric outlet obstruction mimics gastric carcinoma. We present a case of AHPS as sequel of peptic ulcer disease in a 72 year old male. With the advent of proton pump inhibitors as a mainstay of medical therapy, complication into gastric outlet obstruction is a rare disease today. Upper GI endoscopy revealed a distended stomach, residual food and a hyperemic bulky pylorus not accommodating the endoscope. Barium meal follow-through revealed a dilated stomach and minimal barium passing through the pylorus. Histological analysis revealed mild dysplasia at the focus with dense inflammatory infiltrates composed of lymphocytes and eosinophils in the lamina propria. No evidence of malignancy was noted, favouring chronic gastritis. The condition mimics other forms of proliferative disorders like carcinoma, gastrointestinal stromal tumors. We present the clinical findings, imaging analysis and discuss etiopathogenesis and management. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(5.000: 1730-1732

  15. A rare presentation of adult onset Still’s disease in an elderly patient

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    Mariya Apostolova

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Adult onset Still’s disease (AOSD is a rare inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology that usually affects young adults. Very few patients older than 70-year-old have been reported. Clinical features include quotidian fevers, arthralgias, arthritis, pharyngitis, lymphadenopathy and an evanescent rash. AOSD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin. Early diagnosis is often difficult since it is a diagnosis of exclusion and the presence of infectious, neoplastic and autoimmune conditions needs to be ruled out before the diagnosis is made. No specific laboratory tests are available to aid in the diagnosis of AOSD. As a result, a set of diagnostic criteria that define the clinical features of this condition, termed the Yamaguchi criteria, have been most commonly used to establish the diagnosis. We describe the case of a 72-year-old Caucasian male with past medical history significant for generalized anxiety disorder, depression, BPH, and hypertriglyceridemia, who presented to a tertiary institution complaining of profound generalized weakness and weight loss that started three weeks prior to presentation. Initial laboratory studies showed leukocytosis, elevated ESR, CRP, ferritin and liver dysfunction. Cultures, ANA and rheumatoid factor studies were negative. The patient underwent further extensive workup that excluded the presence of infectious, neoplastic and autoimmune disorders and was subsequently diagnosed with AOSD and new onset diabetes mellitus. For the management of AOSD he was started on prednisone with significant improvement in markers of inflammation, symptoms and level of function.

  16. MDS clinical diagnostic criteria for Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postuma, R.B.; Berg, D; Stern, M.; Poewe, W.; Olanow, C.W.; Oertel, W.; Obeso, J.; Marek, K.; Litvan, I.; Lang, A.E.; Halliday, G.; Goetz, C.G.; Gasser, T.; Dubois, B.; Chan, P.; Bloem, B.R.; Adler, C.H.; Deuschl, G.

    2015-01-01

    This document presents the Movement Disorder Society Clinical Diagnostic Criteria for Parkinson's disease (PD). The Movement Disorder Society PD Criteria are intended for use in clinical research but also may be used to guide clinical diagnosis. The benchmark for these criteria is expert clinical di

  17. A rare presentation of stroke in young age ( moyamoya disease

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    Amal F Radwan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year-old hypertensive housewife presented with a sudden onset of left-sided hemiplegia, hemianaesthesia, dysarthria and urinary incontinence. The condition was preceded by recurrent attacks of motor neurological deficits over a 3-year duration. She reported a history of a fall from a height at the age of 10, which was followed by a hearing deficit and a history of two caesarean sections after eclampsia. The blood pressure was 170/100 mmHg. Laboratory investigations revealed hyperglycaemia (fasting glucose 306 mg/dl and normal kidney function tests. The computed tomography scans revealed old multiple bilateral cerebral infarcts with recent intracranial haemorrhage in the right parietal region. The inflammatory markers (ESR and CRP and immune profile (ANA, anti-ds DNA and ANCA were found to be normal. Cerebral angiography revealed a complete occlusion of the intracranial parts of both internal carotid arteries at their supraclinoid segments along with the proximal parts of the anterior cerebral artery and middle cerebral artery, with collaterals from the posterior circulation. Consequently, the diagnosis of moyamoya disease with the collaterals was confirmed. Antihypertensive medications and insulin were administered. Cerebral dehydration measures were undertaken with partial improvement. A superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery bypass operation was performed with some postoperative improvement. One month later, she suffered a new stroke with severe impairment of the level of consciousness; the computed tomography scans revealed a large recent cerebral infarct, her condition deteriorated rapidly and she died shortly thereafter.

  18. Using phase II data for the analysis of phase III studies: An application in rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandel, Simon; Neuenschwander, Beat; Röver, Christian; Friede, Tim

    2017-06-01

    Clinical research and drug development in orphan diseases are challenging, since large-scale randomized studies are difficult to conduct. Formally synthesizing the evidence is therefore of great value, yet this is rarely done in the drug-approval process. Phase III designs that make better use of phase II data can facilitate drug development in orphan diseases. A Bayesian meta-analytic approach is used to inform the phase III study with phase II data. It is particularly attractive, since uncertainty of between-trial heterogeneity can be dealt with probabilistically, which is critical if the number of studies is small. Furthermore, it allows quantifying and discounting the phase II data through the predictive distribution relevant for phase III. A phase III design is proposed which uses the phase II data and considers approval based on a phase III interim analysis. The design is illustrated with a non-inferiority case study from a Food and Drug Administration approval in herpetic keratitis (an orphan disease). Design operating characteristics are compared to those of a traditional design, which ignores the phase II data. An analysis of the phase II data reveals good but insufficient evidence for non-inferiority, highlighting the need for a phase III study. For the phase III study supported by phase II data, the interim analysis is based on half of the patients. For this design, the meta-analytic interim results are conclusive and would justify approval. In contrast, based on the phase III data only, interim results are inconclusive and require further evidence. To accelerate drug development for orphan diseases, innovative study designs and appropriate methodology are needed. Taking advantage of randomized phase II data when analyzing phase III studies looks promising because the evidence from phase II supports informed decision-making. The implementation of the Bayesian design is straightforward with public software such as R.

  19. A Study of Evaluation and Management of Rare Congenital Breast Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sudhir Kumar; Bala, Jyoti; Zaman, Muzzafar; Mittal, Amit; Gupta, Guarav; Rudra, Samer; Singal, Samita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Polymastia and polythelia may be asymptomatic or cause pain, restriction of arm movement, milk discharge, cosmetic problems or anxiety. Cosmesis is the main indication for surgical excision of accessory breasts in axilla. In addition it also confirms the diagnosis and allays the patient’s fear of harbouring a malignancy. Aim To evaluate the presentation of symptoms, investigations required for diagnosis and the management to improve the treatment protocols in patients with breast diseases. Materials and Methods This retrospective study on breast diseases presenting as supernumerary breasts and nipples was conducted in the Department of Surgery between January 2013 and January 2016 at MMIMS Research and hospital, Mullana, Ambala. Patients were evaluated for breast diseases, either benign or malignant in both genders. A total of 32 cases diagnosed as accessory breasts disease were retrieved from the hospital archive. The clinical and radiological evaluation was done in the form of ultrasound and mammography wherever necessary. Accessory breast tissues were excised under general anesthesia and histopathological examinations were done. Results Out of 32 cases: 1(3.125%) male patient had unilateral and 1(3.125%) male had bilateral accessory nipple, 7 (21.87%) females had unilateral and 1(3.125%) had bilateral accessory nipple, 1 (3.125%) diagnosed as accessory axillary fibroadenoma in female, 16(50%) presented as unilateral and 5 (15.62%) had bilateral swelling in the axilla as accessory breast. Patients underwent surgical excision and in 8(25%) cases z- shaped incision was made in view of better cosmesis. Patients were followed up upto 6 months postoperatively. There were no residual swelling and movements of the arm over the shoulder joint were normal. In 3(9.37%) cases, wound dehiscence occurred; in 2 (6.25%) cases lymphoedema formation was seen. These were successfully managed conservatively. Conclusion As breast swellings either fibroadenoma or

  20. The many faces of rare diseases (RD): meeting report on Rare Disease in South-Eastern Europe, 15-16 November 2013, Skopje, Republic of Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucev, Z; Tasic, V; Polenakovic, M

    2014-03-01

    The Second meeting on Rare Diseases in South Eastern Europe (SEE) was held in Skope, Macedonia on November 15-16, 2013. Objective and main data: Rare diseases (RD) are a major problem in developed and especially in countries without affluence. 6-8% of every population suffers from RD. The cumulative effect of RDs on the health system of a country is increasing. Diagnosis often remains a challenge and requires international collaboration. Treatment in diseases for which medication exist is often inaccessible to patients because of the high costs. All countries of SEE need screening programs that address more diseases. Patient organizations play a major role in increasing awareness and providing the needed pressure on society to treat treatable RDs. On the other hand, RDs are frequently a source of valuable new molecular insights not only on mechanisms of their etiology and pathology, but sometimes provide an insight on mechanisms of frequent diseases in man. Further efforts are needed in improving all the RD aspects mentioned.

  1. CHRONIC THROMBOEMBOLIC PULMONARY HYPERTENSION AND PROBLEMS OF RARE AND INTERDISCIPLINARY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shostak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH is a rare life-threatening disease with a prevalence of 2 cases per 100000 population. CTEPH is a chronic, progressive disease characterized by high disability and mortality rates in young and middle-aged people, often with underlying genetic and autoimmune thrombophilic disorders. The need for pathogenetic therapy with orphan drugs that can slow the progression of the disease is supported.

  2. Pityriasis rubra pilaris (Devergie's disease: clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galkina ЕМ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pityriasis rubra pilaris (Devergie's disease is a rare chronic papulosquamous skin disease, it is of unknown etiology, leading to palmoplantar keratoderma, erythroderma and ectropion. Due to its rarity and difficulty in differentiating it with psoriasis, we are presenting our own observations and diagnostcis. We present a patient with a classical type 1 iasis rubra pilaris of a type I, whose condition improved significantly after treatment with systemic aromatic retinoids.

  3. [Neurologic and psychiatric syndromes of rare para-rheumatic diseases (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottwald, W

    1977-03-01

    In Wegener's granulomatosis peripheral nerves are more often involved than central nervous structures; functional psychoses are secondary e.g. to renal complications. Neurologic-psychiatric symptoms are varied and result from local spread from the upper respiratory tract with separate granulomata and vasculitis. Striped muscle is involved in about 10% of cases. Specific vegetative disturbances of function do not appear to occur. This is also true for Granuloma gangrenescens. Its multicentric inflammatory, ulcerating and necrotic foci involve midline structures and often start at the anterior neuroporus. Becet's disease, however, shows clear characteristic localisation, symmetry of various dermatologic phenomena in the extremities and the almost obligatory involvement of mouth, stomach and the genitals and their surroundings. This one may assume to be due to a mesencephalic parasympathicotonic reaction as the basis for the occurrence of perioral and acro-syndroms after Fischer-Brügge and Sunder-plassmann. Some similarity with the localization of other collagenous diseases is evident. The anterior basal ganglia represent a favored focus where e.g. initial, imcomplete and readily recurrent processes, possibly of an exsudative nature, may start off neurovascular changes of limited areas without necessarily producing clinically detectable signs of the usual neurologic-psychiatric type. In Behcet's disease, rather as in scleroderma, the nervous system appears to be decisively involved. About one third of the cases show changes in the nervous system ("Neuro-Behcet" in the usual sense) with little peripheral signs and rare myositis. But Behcet's disease may also-like erythematodes or progressive sclerodermia-simulate a disseminated encephalomyelitis. The pathogenetic factors of Reiter's syndrome appear to be closely related. The relatively constant main symptoms are also localized and permit the conclusion that they depend on vasomotorically linked innervation of the

  4. Funding therapies for rare diseases: an ethical dilemma with a potential solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Colman; Jan, Stephen; Thompson, Kelly

    2016-02-16

    Funding rare disease therapies presents a challenge in Australia where there is a legislative requirement to consider cost-effectiveness. Currently the Life Saving Drugs Programme (LSDP) provides subsidised access to high-cost therapies for rare, life-threatening conditions. However the LSDP is currently under review by the Minsiter for Health and future access to rare disease therapies in uncertain. Internationally there is no gold standard model to evaluate and fund rare disease therapies, and considerable variation exists. However, common features of international systems include the opportunity for early stakeholder engagement, flexibility with evidence requirements, cost-effectiveness criteria and transparency in relation to the decision making framework and outcomes. Australians value equality and equal opportunity in relation to health care. To meet these expectations there is a clear need to maintain a separate fit-for-purpose framework to evaluate and fund rare disease therapies drawing on overseas best practice. This will provide certainty for industry to continue to invest in such treatments, as well as ensuring funding recommendations are reflective of Australian values balanced against the need for financial sustainability.

  5. A robust GWSS method to simultaneously detect rare and common variants for complex disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Feng Kao

    Full Text Available The rapid advances in sequencing technologies and the resulting next-generation sequencing data provide the opportunity to detect disease-associated variants with a better solution, in particular for low-frequency variants. Although both common and rare variants might exert their independent effects on the risk for the trait of interest, previous methods to detect the association effects rarely consider them simultaneously. We proposed a class of test statistics, the generalized weighted-sum statistic (GWSS, to detect disease associations in the presence of common and rare variants with a case-control study design. Information of rare variants was aggregated using a weighted sum method, while signal directions and strength of the variants were considered at the same time. Permutations were performed to obtain the empirical p-values of the test statistics. Our simulation showed that, compared to the existing methods, the GWSS method had better performance in most of the scenarios. The GWSS (in particular VDWSS-t method is particularly robust for opposite association directions, association strength, and varying distributions of minor-allele frequencies. It is therefore promising for detecting disease-associated loci. For empirical data application, we also applied our GWSS method to the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 data, and the results were consistent with the simulation, suggesting good performance of our method. As re-sequencing studies become more popular to identify putative disease loci, we recommend the use of this newly developed GWSS to detect associations with both common and rare variants.

  6. The pooling of manpower and resources through the establishment of European reference networks and rare disease patient registries is a necessary area of collaboration for rare renal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Samantha

    2014-09-01

    This review aims to provide guidance on emerging concepts and policy related to European reference networks (ERNs) for rare diseases (RDs) and the development and management of RD patient registries. A major problem facing many RDs including rare renal disorders is that patients do not have a specialist centre that they can attend where clinicians, working as a multidisciplinary team, are experts in the particular disease. Furthermore, for most RDs, no single centre, and in many cases no single country, has sufficient numbers of patients and resources to fully understand the natural history or to conduct clinical and translational research. Therefore, the pooling of manpower and resources through the establishment of ERN and RD patient registries is a common and necessary area of collaboration. The concept of European networks for RDs dates back to the early 2000s and the Commission launch of a call for European pilot reference networks for RDs. These networks of expert centres have been brought together through the desire for further knowledge and innovation in RD areas. Networks demand a holistic approach and long-term vision with close collaboration between clinicians, diagnostic laboratories, scientists, patients and their families. The development of legal measures for ERNs is in progress at the Commission and these networks will be a shared responsibility of the Commission and member states. In the context of ERNs, an essential activity is the patient registries. Patient registries are organized databases where patient information, including demographic, medical and family history, are collected, stored and available for retrieval via standardized and secure methods. Patient registries are increasingly recognized as crucial tools for RD research for which international collaboration is absolutely essential to understand the pathogenesis of rare genotypes, achieve a unified collection of phenotypic data, foster natural history studies providing the foundation

  7. A Rare Manifestation of Crohn's Disease: Sinonasal Granulomatosis. Report of a Case and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Baili

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Crohn’s disease is a granulomatous inflammatory bowel disease. Its pathologic findings include non-contiguous chronic inflammation and non-caseating granulomas, sometimes with extra-intestinal localizations. Sinonasal manifestations of Crohn’s disease are quite rare and only a few cases have been reported up to date in the worldwide literature. They are characterized by chronic mucosal inflammation, obstruction, bleeding and occasionally septal perforation. We report a case of sinonasal granulomatosis revealing Crohn’s disease in a 22-year-old woman and go over the available literature on sinonasal involvement in Crohn’s disease.

  8. Understanding rare and common diseases in the context of human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana-Murci, Lluis

    2016-11-07

    The wealth of available genetic information is allowing the reconstruction of human demographic and adaptive history. Demography and purifying selection affect the purge of rare, deleterious mutations from the human population, whereas positive and balancing selection can increase the frequency of advantageous variants, improving survival and reproduction in specific environmental conditions. In this review, I discuss how theoretical and empirical population genetics studies, using both modern and ancient DNA data, are a powerful tool for obtaining new insight into the genetic basis of severe disorders and complex disease phenotypes, rare and common, focusing particularly on infectious disease risk.

  9. Ledderhose Disease: Clinical, Radiological (Ultrasound and MRI, and Anatomopathological Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Omor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plantar fibromatosis, or Ledderhose disease, is a rare hyperproliferative disorder of the plantar aponeurosis. It may occur at any age, with the greatest prevalence at middle age and beyond. This disorder is more common in men than woman and it is sometimes associated with other forms of fibromatosis. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination. Ultrasound (US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be useful to confirm the diagnosis. A 44-year-old man with Ledderhose disease who underwent ultrasound and MR is described in this paper.

  10. Ledderhose Disease: Clinical, Radiological (Ultrasound and MRI), and Anatomopathological Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omor, Y; Dhaene, B; Grijseels, S; Alard, S

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fibromatosis, or Ledderhose disease, is a rare hyperproliferative disorder of the plantar aponeurosis. It may occur at any age, with the greatest prevalence at middle age and beyond. This disorder is more common in men than woman and it is sometimes associated with other forms of fibromatosis. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination. Ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be useful to confirm the diagnosis. A 44-year-old man with Ledderhose disease who underwent ultrasound and MR is described in this paper.

  11. The treatable intellectual disability APP www.treatable-id.org: A digital tool to enhance diagnosis & care for rare diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Karnebeek Clara D M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intellectual disability (ID is a devastating and frequent condition, affecting 2-3% of the population worldwide. Early recognition of treatable underlying conditions drastically improves health outcomes and decreases burdens to patients, families and society. Our systematic literature review identified 81 such inborn errors of metabolism, which present with ID as a prominent feature and are amenable to causal therapy. The WebAPP translates this knowledge of rare diseases into a diagnostic tool and information portal. Methods & results Freely available as a WebAPP via http://www.treatable-id.org and end 2012 via the APP store, this diagnostic tool is designed for all specialists evaluating children with global delay / ID and laboratory scientists. Information on the 81 diseases is presented in different ways with search functions: 15 biochemical categories, neurologic and non-neurologic signs & symptoms, diagnostic investigations (metabolic screening tests in blood and urine identify 65% of all IEM, therapies & effects on primary (IQ/developmental quotient and secondary outcomes, and available evidence For each rare condition a ‘disease page’ serves as an information portal with online access to specific genetics, biochemistry, phenotype, diagnostic tests and therapeutic options. As new knowledge and evidence is gained from expert input and PubMed searches this tool will be continually updated. The WebAPP is an integral part of a protocol prioritizing treatability in the work-up of every child with global delay / ID. A 3-year funded study will enable an evaluation of its effectiveness. Conclusions For rare diseases, a field for which financial and scientific resources are particularly scarce, knowledge translation challenges are abundant. With this WebAPP technology is capitalized to raise awareness for rare treatable diseases and their common presenting clinical feature of ID, with the potential to improve health outcomes

  12. Clostridium difficile: clinical disease and diagnosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Knoop, F C; Owens, M.; Crocker, I C

    1993-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a spectrum of disease ranging from antibiotic-associated diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis. Although the disease was first described in 1893, the etiologic agent was not isolated and identified until 1978. Since clinical and pathological features of C. difficile-associated disease are not easily distinguished from those of other gastrointestinal diseases, including ulcerative colitis, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, and Cro...

  13. Leprous neuromyositis: A rare clinical entity and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhanker Mitra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy (Hansen's disease, is a slow growing intracellular acid-fast bacillus that affects the skin, peripheral nerves and respiratory tract. In patients with suppressed cell-mediated immunity, the infiltration of the Bacilli can produce disseminated illness such as leprous neuromyositis. We reported a case of 56-year-old gentleman presenting with pyrexia of unknown origin, asymmetric sensory motor axonal polyneuropathy and was on chronic exogenous steroid therapy. On evaluation, his skin, muscle, nerve and bone marrow biopsy showed numerous globi of acid-fast Bacilli suggestive of leprous neuromyositis, a rare form of disseminated Hansen's disease. We reported this case in view of its rarity, atypical manifestation of a relatively rare disease and literature review on poor electrophysiological correlation in the diagnosis of leprous neuromyositis as compared to the histopathological examination.

  14. ATYPICAL CELIAC DISEASE: A CLINICAL CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Roslavtseva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease has traditionally been associated with severe malabsorption syndrome. Recent years it was shown that among children of preschool and school-age mild cases with atypical clinical picture were dominated that leads to diagnostic difficulties. Here we are citing an example of an atypical clinical/latent celiac disease course in a child aged 4.5 years.

  15. Graves' orbitopathy as a rare disease in Europe: a European Group on Graves' Orbitopathy (EUGOGO) position statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perros, P; Hegedüs, L; Bartalena, L; Marcocci, C; Kahaly, G J; Baldeschi, L; Salvi, M; Lazarus, J H; Eckstein, A; Pitz, S; Boboridis, K; Anagnostis, P; Ayvaz, G; Boschi, A; Brix, T H; Currò, N; Konuk, O; Marinò, M; Mitchell, A L; Stankovic, B; Törüner, F B; von Arx, G; Zarković, M; Wiersinga, W M

    2017-04-20

    Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is an autoimmune condition, which is associated with poor clinical outcomes including impaired quality of life and socio-economic status. Current evidence suggests that the incidence of GO in Europe may be declining, however data on the prevalence of this disease are sparse. Several clinical variants of GO exist, including euthyroid GO, recently listed as a rare disease in Europe (ORPHA466682). The objective was to estimate the prevalence of GO and its clinical variants in Europe, based on available literature, and to consider whether they may potentially qualify as rare. Recent published data on the incidence of GO and Graves' hyperthyroidism in Europe were used to estimate the prevalence of GO. The position statement was developed by a series of reviews of drafts and electronic discussions by members of the European Group on Graves' Orbitopathy. The prevalence of GO in Europe is about 10/10,000 persons. The prevalence of other clinical variants is also low: hypothyroid GO 0.02-1.10/10,000; GO associated with dermopathy 0.15/10,000; GO associated with acropachy 0.03/10,000; asymmetrical GO 1.00-5.00/10,000; unilateral GO 0.50-1.50/10,000. GO has a prevalence that is clearly above the threshold for rarity in Europe. However, each of its clinical variants have a low prevalence and could potentially qualify for being considered as a rare condition, providing that future research establishes that they have a distinct pathophysiology. EUGOGO considers this area of academic activity a priority.

  16. Detection of Rare Drug Resistance Mutations by Digital PCR in a Human Influenza A Virus Model System and Clinical Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whale, Alexandra S; Bushell, Claire A; Grant, Paul R; Cowen, Simon; Gutierrez-Aguirre, Ion; O'Sullivan, Denise M; Žel, Jana; Milavec, Mojca; Foy, Carole A; Nastouli, Eleni; Garson, Jeremy A; Huggett, Jim F

    2016-02-01

    Digital PCR (dPCR) is being increasingly used for the quantification of sequence variations, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), due to its high accuracy and precision in comparison with techniques such as quantitative PCR (qPCR) and melt curve analysis. To develop and evaluate dPCR for SNP detection using DNA, RNA, and clinical samples, an influenza virus model of resistance to oseltamivir (Tamiflu) was used. First, this study was able to recognize and reduce off-target amplification in dPCR quantification, thereby enabling technical sensitivities down to 0.1% SNP abundance at a range of template concentrations, a 50-fold improvement on the qPCR assay used routinely in the clinic. Second, a method was developed for determining the false-positive rate (background) signal. Finally, comparison of dPCR with qPCR results on clinical samples demonstrated the potential impact dPCR could have on clinical research and patient management by earlier (trace) detection of rare drug-resistant sequence variants. Ultimately this could reduce the quantity of ineffective drugs taken and facilitate early switching to alternative medication when available. In the short term such methods could advance our understanding of microbial dynamics and therapeutic responses in a range of infectious diseases such as HIV, viral hepatitis, and tuberculosis. Furthermore, the findings presented here are directly relevant to other diagnostic areas, such as the detection of rare SNPs in malignancy, monitoring of graft rejection, and fetal screening. Copyright © 2016 Whale et al.

  17. Cardiac tamponade as the first clinical sign of gastric adenocarcinoma: a rare condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arısoy, Arif; Memiç, Kadriye; Karavelioğlu, Yusuf; Sen, Fatma

    2014-06-01

    Cardiac tamponade originating from a primary gastric cancer (GC) is a rare condition. Patients are generally asymptomatic until the disease is advanced. We report a rare patient with cardiac tamponade as the first manifestation of primary GC. A 46-year-old male was admitted with progressive dyspnea. Cardiac tamponade was diagnosed on two-dimensional ultrasonographic echocardiography. Pericardiocentesis yielded 1500 ml of bloody fluid. Pericardial cytologic examination was positive for malignant cells. The patient underwent abdominal computed tomography scan, which showed thickening of the gastric wall and several mesenteric lymph nodes. Endoscopic examination of the stomach disclosed malignant ulcer along the lesser curvature, and the biopsy showed diffuse type adenocarcinoma. Chemotherapy was initiated by the Oncology Department, and he had no pericardial effusion after six courses of systemic chemotherapy. In conclusion, this is a rare condition and difficult to diagnosis early. Thus, physicians should be aware of malignancy of the stomach when patients present with unexplained cardiac manifestations.

  18. Study Provides Insights into Diagnosis, Treatment of Rare Immune Disease: Autoimmmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Award Clinical Terms of Award Restriction for China Clinical Terms Guidance Compliance Sample Letter Inclusion Codes ... Division of AIDS Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Transplantation Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Division of ...

  19. Diagnostic needs for rare diseases and shared prediagnostic phenomena: Results of a German-wide expert Delphi survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöß, Susanne; Klemann, Christian; Rother, Ann-Katrin; Mehmecke, Sandra; Schumacher, Ulrike; Mücke, Urs; Mücke, Martin; Stieber, Christiane; Klawonn, Frank; Kortum, Xiaowei; Lechner, Werner; Grigull, Lorenz

    2017-01-01

    Background Worldwide approximately 7,000 rare diseases have been identified. Accordingly, 4 million individuals live with a rare disease in Germany. The mean time to diagnosis is about 6 years and patients receive several incorrect diagnoses during this time. A multiplicity of factors renders diagnosing a rare disease extremely difficult. Detection of shared phenomena among individuals with different rare diseases could assist the diagnostic process. In order to explore the demand for diagnostic support and to obtain the commonalities among patients, a nationwide Delphi survey of centers for rare diseases and patient groups was conducted. Methods A two-step Delphi survey was conducted using web-based technologies in all centers for rare diseases in Germany. Moreover, the leading patient support group, the German foundation for rare diseases (ACHSE), was contacted to involve patients as experts in their disease. In the survey the experts were invited to name rare diseases with special need for diagnostic improvement. Secondly, communal experiences of affected individuals were collected. Results 166 of 474 contacted experts (35%) participated in the first round of the Delphi process and 95 of 166 (57%) participated in the second round. Metabolic (n = 74) and autoimmune diseases (n = 39) were ranked the highest for need for diagnostic support. For three diseases (i.e. scleroderma, Pompe’s disease, and pulmonary arterial hypertension), a crucial need for diagnostic support was explicitly stated. A typical experience of individuals with a rare disease was stigmatization of having psychological or psychosomatic problems. In addition, most experts endured an ‘odyssey’ of seeing many different medical specialists before a correct diagnosis (n = 38) was confirmed. Conclusion There is need for improving the diagnostic process in individuals with rare diseases. Shared experiences in individuals with a rare disease were observed, which could possibly be utilized for

  20. Pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase and proline biosynthesis: From osmotolerance to rare metabolic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Arellano, Isabel; Carmona-Álvarez, Francisco; Martínez, Ana I; Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Cervera, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS) is a bifunctional enzyme that exhibits glutamate kinase (GK) and γ-glutamyl phosphate reductase (GPR) activities. The enzyme is highly relevant in humans because it belongs to a combined route for the interconversion of glutamate, ornithine and proline. The deficiency of P5CS activity in humans is associated with a rare, inherited metabolic disease. It is well established that some bacteria and plants accumulate proline in response to osmotic stress. The alignment of P5CSs from different species and analysis of the solved structures of GK and GPR reveal high sequence and structural conservation. The information acquired from different mutant enzymes with increased osmotolerant properties, together with the position of the insertion found in the longer human isoform, permit the delimitation of the regulatory site of GK and P5CS and the proposal of a model of P5CS architecture. Additionally, the GK moiety of the human enzyme has been modeled and the known clinical mutations and polymorphisms have been mapped. PMID:20091669

  1. The Alström syndrome: is it a rare or unknown disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, Pietro; Munno, Vincenzo; Marshall, Jan D; Scandellari, Cesare; Sicolo, Nicola

    2002-01-01

    The Alström syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retinal degeneration, obesity, progressive hearing impairment, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and kidney and heart failure. Mental retardation is absent and the extremities are normal. The Alström syndrome gene located on chromosome 2, has been recently identified. The Alström syndrome involves multiple organ systems with a complex interaction between pathways. Phenotypic expression varies considerably, even within sibships. Manifestations observed in some, but not all, Alström syndrome patients include acanthosis nigricans, alopecia, short stature, scoliosis, kyphosis, hyperostosis frontalis interna, muscle dystonia, advanced bone age and subcapsular cataract. Other metabolic and endocrinological abnormalities have been described: hypothyroidism, hypogonadism, diabetes insipidus, growth hormone deficiency, hyperuricemia and hyperlipidemia. In the final stages of the disease, affected individuals exhibit progressive chronic nephropathy with eventual kidney failure. The most frequent causes of death include hepatic dysfunction and congestive heart failure secondary to dilated cardiomyopathy. We have summarized our personal clinical data and the information from the scientific literature on the topic in order to provide an up-to-date review on the Alström syndrome.

  2. An unusual presentation of Gaucher's disease: aortic valve fibrosis in a patient homozygous for a rare G377S mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perić, Zinaida; Kardum-Skelin, Ika; Puskarić, Biljana Jelić; Letilović, Tomislav; Vrhovac, Radovan; Jaksić, Branimir

    2010-03-01

    Gaucher's disease (GD) has variable presentations, but cardiac involvement is a generally uncommon clinical manifestation of the disease. In the past 25 years, the underlying genetic disorder in GD has been well characterized, with almost 300 mutations identified in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA). Nevertheless, clear genotype-phenotype correlations have been confirmed only for the most frequent mutations. We present a female patient, who was known to have aortic valve pathology from the age of 30. Despite medical follow up, at the age of 60 she presented with heart failure (NYHA III). At that time echocardiography showed severe fibrosed aortic valve stenosis. Valvuloplasty was planned, when thrombocytopenia, previously considered to be autoimmune, became severe. Anemia and leukopenia were also noted. Moderate splenomegaly and severe bone marrow infiltration were found on MRI. Bone marrow aspiration revealed typical Gaucher cells and the enzyme activity assay confirmed the diagnosis. DNA investigation showed that the patient is homozygous for the G377S mutation. To our knowledge, of all mutations identified so far, only homozygosity for the D409H mutation has been associated with cardiovascular valvular disease in patients with a rare type 3c GD. G377S, found in our patient, is a rare mutation, previously reported as a 'mild' mutation, because of the finding that homoallelic patients were essentialy asymptomatic or had mild disease. Our patient, also homozygous for G377S mutation, had a severe form of type 1 GD, with rare cardiac valve involvement, which is a previously unreported clinical presentation for this mutation. This case further proves that patients with the same genotypes can have different phenotypes, emphasizing the influence of other genetic and/or environmental factors.

  3. Illness Perception and Information Behaviour of Patients with Rare Chronic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katavic, Snježana Stanarevic; Tanackovic, Sanjica Faletar; Badurina, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study examined possible correlations between health information behaviour and illness perception among patients with rare chronic diseases. Illness perception is related to coping strategies used by patients, and some health information behaviour practices may be associated with better coping and more positive perception of…

  4. Mucopolysaccharidosis type II: European recommendations for the diagnosis and multidisciplinary management of a rare disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Scarpa (Maurizio); Z. Almássy (Zsuzsanna); M. Beck (Michael); O.A. Bodamer (Olaf); I.A. Bruce (Iain); L. de Meirleir (Linda); N. Guffon (Nathalie); E. Guillen-Navarro (Encarna); P. Hensman (Pauline); S. Jones (Simon); W. Kamin (Wolfgang); C. Kampmann (Christoph); C. Lampe (Christina); C.A. Lavery (Christine); E. Leão Teles (Elisa); B. Link (Bianca); A.M. Lund (Allan); G. Malm (Gunilla); S. Pitz (Susanne); M. Rothera (Michael); C. Stewart (Catherine); A. Tylki-Szymaska (Anna); A.T. van der Ploeg (Ans); R. Walker (Robert); J. Zeman (Jiri); J.E. Wraith (James)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractMucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is a rare, life-limiting, X-linked recessive disease characterised by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. Consequent accumulation of glycosaminoglycans leads to pathological changes in multiple body systems. Age at onset, signs

  5. Erdheim-Chester disease: a rare cause of recurrent fever of unknown origin mimicking lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariampillai, Anusiyanthan; Sivapiragasam, Abirami; Kumar, Amit; Hindenburg, Alexander; Cunha, Burke A; Zhou, Jianhong

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with recurrent fever of unknown origin (FUO) with prominent back pain, hepatosplenomegaly, and abdominal/pelvic adenopathy suggesting lymphoma. A bone biopsy showed histiocytic infiltration. Studies for lymphoma were negative, but immunohistochemical stains were diagnostic of Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD). ECD should be included as a rare cause of recurrent FUO with bone involvement.

  6. The UK10K project identifies rare variants in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bala, Senduran; Clapham, Peter; Coates, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of rare and low-frequency variants to human traits is largely unexplored. Here we describe insights from sequencing whole genomes (low read depth, 7×) or exomes (high read depth, 80×) of nearly 10,000 individuals from population-based and disease collections. In extensively pheno...

  7. Urinary balantidiasis: A rare incidental finding in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhpreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Balantidiasis is a rare zoonotic disease in humans. Balantidium coli is the causative ciliated protozoan. We present a case of urinary balantidiasis in a patient having chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD who was on steroids for a long time. He has no symptoms of bowel or urinary involvement. We are reporting this case because of its rarity in human urine and also for future references.

  8. A rare association of Castleman′s disease and nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Tazi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman′s Disease (CD is an uncommon and poorly understood disorder of lymph node hyperplasia of unknown etiology. This entity belongs to the atypical lymphoproliferative disorders, a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by a hyperplastic reactive process involving the immune system. The association of the nephrotic syndrome and CD is extremely rare and their interrelation remains enigmatic. We report a case of CD of the hyaline-vascular type with unicentric localization complicated by nephrotic syndrome.

  9. [Multiple system atrophy and Alzheimer's disease: a case report of a rare association of two neuro-degenerative disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, R; Bourdain, F; Matej, R

    2007-12-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neurodegenerative disorder typically characterised by cerebellar dysfunction, parkinsonism, pyramidal signs and dysautonomy. Cognitive impairement is usually limited to a moderate subcortical dysexecutive syndrom. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman suffering from MSA who progressively developed severe dementia. Neuropathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of definite MSA and also showed histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. This association is extremely rare in the literature. Our observation confirmes that franc dementia in MSA should prompt a search for another associated cause and underlines the usefulness of neuropathological verifications in atypical clinical pictures.

  10. Acalculous cholecystitis:A rare presentation of leptospirosis progressing to Weil’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George Peter; Hegde Narasimha

    2011-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic infection with higher incidence in tropics. Leptospirosis, is known for its variable manifestations, and is a clinical challenge for physicians in the tropics. Experienced clinicians, at times can mistake leptospirosis for non-medical conditions. A few reports of leptospirosis presenting as acalculous cholecystitis was found in review of literature. We intent to highlight acalculous cholecystitis as a rare but clinically significant presentation of leptospirosis.

  11. Telethon Network of Genetic Biobanks: a key service for diagnosis and research on rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filocamo, Mirella; Baldo, Chiara; Goldwurm, Stefano; Renieri, Alessandra; Angelini, Corrado; Moggio, Maurizio; Mora, Marina; Merla, Giuseppe; Politano, Luisa; Garavaglia, Barbara; Casareto, Lorena; Bricarelli, Francesca Dagna

    2013-08-30

    Several examples have always illustrated how access to large numbers of biospecimens and associated data plays a pivotal role in the identification of disease genes and the development of pharmaceuticals. Hence, allowing researchers to access to significant numbers of quality samples and data, genetic biobanks are a powerful tool in basic, translational and clinical research into rare diseases. Recently demand for well-annotated and properly-preserved specimens is growing at a high rate, and is expected to grow for years to come. The best effective solution to this issue is to enhance the potentialities of well-managed biobanks by building a network.Here we report a 5-year experience of the Telethon Network of Genetic Biobanks (TNGB), a non-profit association of Italian repositories created in 2008 to form a virtually unique catalogue of biospecimens and associated data, which presently lists more than 750 rare genetic defects. The process of TNGB harmonisation has been mainly achieved through the adoption of a unique, centrally coordinated, IT infrastructure, which has enabled (i) standardisation of all the TNGB procedures and activities; (ii) creation of an updated TNGB online catalogue, based on minimal data set and controlled terminologies; (iii) sample access policy managed via a shared request control panel at web portal. TNGB has been engaged in disseminating information on its services into both scientific/biomedical - national and international - contexts, as well as associations of patients and families. Indeed, during the last 5-years national and international scientists extensively used the TNGB with different purposes resulting in more than 250 scientific publications. In addition, since its inception the TNGB is an associated member of the Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure and recently joined the EuroBioBank network. Moreover, the involvement of patients and families, leading to the formalization of various agreements

  12. Clinical presentation of juvenile Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruocco Heloísa H.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical presentation a group of patients with juvenile onset of Huntington disease. METHOD: All patients were interviewed following a structured clinical questioner. Patients were genotyped for the trinucleotide cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG repeat in the Huntington Disease gene. High resolution brain MRI was performed in all patients. RESULTS: We identified 4 patients with juvenile onset of disease among 50 patients with Huntington disease followed prospectively in our Neurogenetics clinic. Age at onset varied from 3 to 13 years, there were 2 boys, and 3 patients had a paternal inheritance of the disease. Expanded Huntington disease allele sizes varied from 41 to 69 trinucleotide repeats. The early onset patients presented with rigidity, bradykinesia, dystonia, dysarthria, seizures and ataxia. MRI showed severe volume loss of caudate and putamen nuclei (p=0.001 and reduced cerebral and cerebellum volumes (p=0.01. CONCLUSION: 8% of Huntington disease patients seen in our clinic had juvenile onset of the disease. They did not present with typical chorea as seen in adult onset Huntington disease. There was a predominance of rigidity and bradykinesia. Two other important clinical features were seizures and ataxia, which related with the imaging findings of early cortical atrophy and cerebellum volume loss.

  13. Female primary bladder neck obstruction: role of videourodynamics and treatment options in a rare clinical entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammirati, Enrico; Manassero, Alberto; Giammò, Alessandro; Marson, Francesco; Gurioli, Alberto; Carone, Roberto

    2017-04-28

    Primary female bladder neck obstruction is a rare clinical condition characterized by the absence/incomplete bladder neck opening during the voiding phase of micturition. We present the cases of two women complaining dysuria, abdominal straining and sensation of incomplete bladder emptying. Videourodynamic evaluation was fundamental for a correct diagnosis. Videourodynamic evaluation showed a high detrusor pressure during emptying phase, partial use of abdominal strain, very low urine flow rate and significant postvoid residual; imaging showed a defect in the physiological funneling of the bladder neck, absent or incomplete. The first step therapy is represented by oral alpha-blockers and clean intermittent self-catheterization in case of high postvoid residual. Surgical operations, such as bladder neck incision and resection, represent the last option. In our experience, bladder neck obstruction is a rare condition in women and only a complete clinical evaluation associated with videourodynamic study can lead to an appropriate diagnosis and treatment.

  14. Camurati-Engelmann disease-a rare cause of tetany identified on bone scintigraphy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Peng; Huang, Jian-Min; Li, Huan-Li; Huang, Xiao-Jie; Wei, Ling-Ge

    2017-07-01

    Camurati-Engelmann disease (i.e., progressive diaphyseal dysplasia) is an extremely rare autosomal dominant bone disorder. The most common clinical manifestations were chronic skeletal pain, waddling gait, muscular weakness. We described that a 27-year-old male with a 1-year history of intermittent tetany was referred for bone scintigraphy. The whole body bone scan images showed abnormal increased uptake of the tracer in the long bones of the upper and lower extremities as well as in the skull. Combined the family history, the findings of the images and the genetic study, the diagnosis of Camurati-Engelmann disease was confirmed. The patient responded well to the treatment of calcium gluconate. Bone scintigraphy would be helpful in the diagnosis and assessing the severity of Camurati-Engelmann disease.

  15. Hirayama’s Disease – A Rare Case Report with Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana Gowda BS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hirayama’s disease is a rare benign disorder, also referred to as monomelic amyotrophy (MMA, Juvenile non progressive amyotrophy, Sobue disease. It is a focal, lower motor neuron type of disease. Mainly young males in their second and third decades of age are most commonly affected. It is seen most commonly in Asian countries like India and Japan. In majority of people cause of this disease is unknown. MRI of cervical spine in flexion will reveal the cardinal features of Hirayama disease. Case Report: A 22 year gentleman came with a history of insidious onset of weakness in both the hands begenning with left side followed by right of 4 years duration. On examination he had clawing of both hands with wasting of forearm muscles. Lower limbs had no abnormality with normal deep tendon reflexes. MRI showed thinning of cord from C4 to C7 level suggestive of cord atrophy. Based on these features a diagnosis of focal amyotrophy was made. A cervical collar was prescribed and patient is under regular follow up. Conclusion: Hirayama disease is a rare self-limiting disease. Early diagnosis is necessary as the use of a simple cervical collar which will prevent neck flexion, has been shown to stop the progression. Keywords: Hirayama’s disease, monomelic amyotrophy, Juvenile non-progressive amyotrophy, Sobue disease.

  16. The Human Phenotype Ontology: Semantic Unification of Common and Rare Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groza, Tudor; Köhler, Sebastian; Moldenhauer, Dawid; Vasilevsky, Nicole; Baynam, Gareth; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Schriml, Lynn Marie; Kibbe, Warren Alden; Schofield, Paul N.; Beck, Tim; Vasant, Drashtti; Brookes, Anthony J.; Zankl, Andreas; Washington, Nicole L.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Haendel, Melissa A.; Parkinson, Helen; Robinson, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) is widely used in the rare disease community for differential diagnostics, phenotype-driven analysis of next-generation sequence-variation data, and translational research, but a comparable resource has not been available for common disease. Here, we have developed a concept-recognition procedure that analyzes the frequencies of HPO disease annotations as identified in over five million PubMed abstracts by employing an iterative procedure to optimize precision and recall of the identified terms. We derived disease models for 3,145 common human diseases comprising a total of 132,006 HPO annotations. The HPO now comprises over 250,000 phenotypic annotations for over 10,000 rare and common diseases and can be used for examining the phenotypic overlap among common diseases that share risk alleles, as well as between Mendelian diseases and common diseases linked by genomic location. The annotations, as well as the HPO itself, are freely available. PMID:26119816

  17. Genome-wide association analysis of imputed rare variants: application to seven common complex diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mägi, Reedik; Asimit, Jennifer L; Day-Williams, Aaron G; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Morris, Andrew P

    2012-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been successful in identifying loci contributing effects to a range of complex human traits. The majority of reproducible associations within these loci are with common variants, each of modest effect, which together explain only a small proportion of heritability. It has been suggested that much of the unexplained genetic component of complex traits can thus be attributed to rare variation. However, genome-wide association study genotyping chips have been designed primarily to capture common variation, and thus are underpowered to detect the effects of rare variants. Nevertheless, we demonstrate here, by simulation, that imputation from an existing scaffold of genome-wide genotype data up to high-density reference panels has the potential to identify rare variant associations with complex traits, without the need for costly re-sequencing experiments. By application of this approach to genome-wide association studies of seven common complex diseases, imputed up to publicly available reference panels, we identify genome-wide significant evidence of rare variant association in PRDM10 with coronary artery disease and multiple genes in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) with type 1 diabetes. The results of our analyses highlight that genome-wide association studies have the potential to offer an exciting opportunity for gene discovery through association with rare variants, conceivably leading to substantial advancements in our understanding of the genetic architecture underlying complex human traits.

  18. Seronegative celiac disease: Shedding light on an obscure clinical entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volta, Umberto; Caio, Giacomo; Boschetti, Elisa; Giancola, Fiorella; Rhoden, Kerry J; Ruggeri, Eugenio; Paterini, Paola; De Giorgio, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Although serological tests are useful for identifying celiac disease, it is well established that a minority of celiacs are seronegative. To define the prevalence and features of seronegative compared to seropositive celiac disease, and to establish whether celiac disease is a common cause of seronegative villous atrophy. Starting from 810 celiac disease diagnoses, seronegative patients were retrospectively characterized for clinical, histological and laboratory findings. Of the 810 patients, fourteen fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for seronegative celiac disease based on antibody negativity, villous atrophy, HLA-DQ2/-DQ8 positivity and clinical/histological improvement after gluten free diet. Compared to seropositive, seronegative celiac disease showed a significantly higher median age at diagnosis and a higher prevalence of classical phenotype (i.e., malabsorption), autoimmune disorders and severe villous atrophy. The most frequent diagnosis in the 31 cases with seronegative flat mucosa was celiac disease (45%), whereas other diagnoses were Giardiasis (20%), common variable immunodeficiency (16%) and autoimmune enteropathy (10%). Although rare seronegative celiac disease can be regarded as the most frequent cause of seronegative villous atrophy being characterized by a high median age at diagnosis; a close association with malabsorption and flat mucosa; and a high prevalence of autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Intrinsic brainstem schwannoma – A rare clinical entity and a histological enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraparenchymal schwannomas arising in the brainstem are very rare, and only eight cases have been reported in literature till now. We report an intraparenchymal brainstem schwannoma presenting with the classical clinical presentation of an intrinsic brainstem lesion, and discuss its clinicoradiological characteristics and histological origins. We highlight the importance of an intraoperative frozen section diagnosis in such cases. Intraoperative tissue diagnosis significantly may alter the surgical strategy, which should be aimed at near total intracapsular decompression of the schwannoma.

  20. Using Administrative Data to Ascertain True Cases of Muscular Dystrophy: Rare Disease Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael G; Royer, Julie; Mann, Joshua R; McDermott, Suzanne

    2017-01-12

    Administrative records from insurance and hospital discharge data sources are important public health tools to conduct passive surveillance of disease in populations. Identifying rare but catastrophic conditions is a challenge since approaches for maximizing valid case detection are not firmly established. The purpose of our study was to explore a number of algorithms in which International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes and other administrative variables could be used to identify cases of muscular dystrophy (MD). We used active surveillance to identify possible cases of MD in medical practices in neurology, genetics, and orthopedics in 5 urban South Carolina counties and to identify the cases that had diagnostic support (ie, true cases). We then developed an algorithm to identify cases based on a combination of ICD-9-CM codes and administrative variables from a public (Medicaid) and private insurer claims-based system and a statewide hospital discharge dataset (passive surveillance). Cases of all types of MD and those with Duchenne or Becker MD (DBMD) that were common to both surveillance systems were examined to identify the most specific administrative variables for ascertainment of true cases. Passive statewide surveillance identified 3235 possible cases with MD in the state, and active surveillance identified 2057 possible cases in 5 actively surveilled counties that included 2 large metropolitan areas where many people seek medical care. There were 537 common cases found in both the active and passive systems, and 260 (48.4%) were confirmed by active surveillance to be true cases. Of the 260 confirmed cases, 70 (26.9%) were recorded as DBMD. Accuracy of finding a true case in a passive surveillance system was improved substantially when specific diagnosis codes, number of times a code was used, age of the patient, and specialty provider variables were used.

  1. Canavan disease - unusual imaging features in a child with mild clinical presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ho V.; Ishak, Gisele E. [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle Children' s Hospital, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Canavan disease is a rare hereditary leukodystrophy that manifests in early childhood. Associated with rapidly progressive clinical deterioration, it usually results in death by the third year of life. The predominant MRI appearance is diffuse and symmetrical white matter disease. We discuss an atypical, late presentation of Canavan disease with a benign clinical course and uncharacteristic imaging features. This case introduces a previously unreported pattern of diffuse cortical abnormality without significant white matter involvement. (orig.)

  2. Spinal cord herniation following cervical meningioma excision: a rare clinical entity and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyer, Siddharth N; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Kanna, Rishi; Maheswaran, Anupama; Rajasekaran, S

    2016-05-01

    Spinal cord herniation following surgery is an extremely uncommon clinical condition with very few reports in published literature. This condition usually occurs as a spontaneous idiopathic phenomenon often in the thoracic spine or following a scenario of post traumatic spinal cord/nerve root injury. Rarely has it been reported following spinal cord tumor surgery. To document a case of cervical spinal cord herniation as a late onset complication following spinal cord tumor surgery with an atypical presentation of monoparesis. Case report. We describe the clinical presentation, operative procedure, post operative outcome and review of literature of this rare clinical condition. A 57-year-old man presented with right upper limb monoparesis due to a spinal cord herniation 6 years after a cervical intradural meningioma excision. The patients underwent surgery to reduce the herniation and duroplasty with subsequent complete resolution of symptoms. Spinal cord herniation must be considered as differential diagnosis in scenarios of spinal cord tumor excision presenting with late onset neurological deficit. These cases may present as paraparesis, Brown-sequard syndrome and rarely as in our case as monoparesis.

  3. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease- A Clinical Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirala Khalessi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in medicine have given us a better insight into a group of disorders known as autoimmune diseases. In particular, advances have occurred in our understanding of the Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED. In this article, the authors review the different postulated theories in the pathogenesis of this disease. The clinical presentation, the available para-clinical diagnostic tools, and the important differential diagnoses will be summarized. The management methods, including steroid therapy, immunosuppressive medications, other biological agents and intra-tympanic injections, will be addressed. Cochlear implantation as a final solution to the advanced stages of the disease, causing total deafness, will also be discussed.

  4. Huntington's disease: clinical characteristics, pathogenesis and therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Ken; Aminoff, Michael J

    2007-02-01

    Huntington's disease is a devastating disorder with no known cure. The disease results from an expanded sequence of CAG repeats in the huntingtin gene and leads to a movement disorder with associated cognitive and systemic deficits. Huntington's disease is diagnosed by genetic testing and disease progression can be followed with a variety of imaging modalities. The accumulation of aggregated huntingtin with associated striatal degeneration is evident at autopsy. The pathophysiology of Huntington's disease remains unknown, although protein aggregation, excitotoxicity, deficits in energy metabolism, transcriptional dysregulation and apoptosis may all be involved. Current pharmacologic therapy for Huntington's disease is limited and exclusively symptomatic. However, the disease is being heavily researched, and a wide range of disease-modifying therapies is currently under development. The efficacy of these therapies is being evaluated in transgenic models of Huntington's disease and in preliminary clinical trials.

  5. Clinical and Histologic Mimickers of Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboj, Amrit K; Oxentenko, Amy S

    2017-08-17

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small bowel, classically associated with diarrhea, abdominal pain, and malabsorption. The diagnosis of celiac disease is made when there are compatible clinical features, supportive serologic markers, representative histology from the small bowel, and response to a gluten-free diet. Histologic findings associated with celiac disease include intraepithelial lymphocytosis, crypt hyperplasia, villous atrophy, and a chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate in the lamina propria. It is important to recognize and diagnose celiac disease, as strict adherence to a gluten-free diet can lead to resolution of clinical and histologic manifestations of the disease. However, many other entities can present with clinical and/or histologic features of celiac disease. In this review article, we highlight key clinical and histologic mimickers of celiac disease. The evaluation of a patient with serologically negative enteropathy necessitates a carefully elicited history and detailed review by a pathologist. Medications can mimic celiac disease and should be considered in all patients with a serologically negative enteropathy. Many mimickers of celiac disease have clues to the underlying diagnosis, and many have a targeted therapy. It is necessary to provide patients with a correct diagnosis rather than subject them to a lifetime of an unnecessary gluten-free diet.

  6. Clinical update in sexually transmitted diseases-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanfair, Robyn Neblett; Workowski, Kimberly A

    2014-02-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and their associated syndromes are extremely common in clinical practice. Early diagnosis, appropriate treatment, and partner management are important to ensure sexual, physical, and reproductive health in our patients.

  7. A rare case of velopharyngeal insufficiency in a patient with Behçet’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Hakan Kaya

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI, in which the velopharyngeal port does not close during speech, is an important condition that reduces the quality of life in affected patients. Behçet’s disease (BD is a systemic autoimmune vasculitis with effects on many organs and systems in the body. Patients with BD may have otorhinolaryngological symptoms as part of its multi-system disease involvement. In rare cases, autoimmune diseases have been linked to VPI. Here we report the first case of BD diagnosed in a patient with VPI.

  8. Collaboration for rare disease drug discovery research [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4l6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia K. Litterman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Rare disease research has reached a tipping point, with the confluence of scientific and technologic developments that if appropriately harnessed, could lead to key breakthroughs and treatments for this set of devastating disorders. Industry-wide trends have revealed that the traditional drug discovery research and development (R&D model is no longer viable, and drug companies are evolving their approach. Rather than only pursue blockbuster therapeutics for heterogeneous, common diseases, drug companies have increasingly begun to shift their focus to rare diseases. In academia, advances in genetics analyses and disease mechanisms have allowed scientific understanding to mature, but the lack of funding and translational capability severely limits the rare disease research that leads to clinical trials. Simultaneously, there is a movement towards increased research collaboration, more data sharing, and heightened engagement and active involvement by patients, advocates, and foundations. The growth in networks and social networking tools presents an opportunity to help reach other patients but also find researchers and build collaborations. The growth of collaborative software that can enable researchers to share their data could also enable rare disease patients and foundations to manage their portfolio of funded projects for developing new therapeutics and suggest drug repurposing opportunities. Still there are many thousands of diseases without treatments and with only fragmented research efforts. We will describe some recent progress in several rare diseases used as examples and propose how collaborations could be facilitated. We propose that the development of a center of excellence that integrates and shares informatics resources for rare diseases sponsored by all of the stakeholders would help foster these initiatives.

  9. Clinical subgroups in bilateral Meniere disease

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Meniere disease (MD) is a heterogeneous clinical condition characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, episodic vestibular symptoms and tinnitus associated with several comorbidities such as migraine or autoimmune disorders (AD). The frequency of bilateral involvement may range from 5-50% and it depends on the duration of the disease. We have performed a two-step cluster analysis in 398 patients with bilateral MD to identify the best predictors to define clinical subgroups with a potential d...

  10. Spontaneous Perforation of Common Bile Duct: A Rare Presentation of Gall Stones Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duminda Subasinghe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Spontaneous perforation of the extrahepatic biliary system is a rare presentation of gall stones. Very few cases of bile duct perforation have been reported in adults. It is rarely suspected or correctly diagnosed preoperatively. Case Presentation. A 66-year-old female presented at the surgical emergency with 3 days’ history of severe upper abdominal pain with distension and repeated episodes of vomiting, as she had evidence of generalized peritonitis and underwent an exploratory laparotomy. A single 0.5 cm × 0.5 cm free perforation was present on the anterolateral surface of the common bile duct at the junction of cystic duct. A cholecystectomy and the CBD exploration were performed. Conclusion. Spontaneous perforation of the extrahepatic bile duct is a rare but important presentation of gall stones in adults. Therefore, awareness of the clinical presentation, expert ultrasound examination, and surgery are important aspects in the management.

  11. Shared genomic segment analysis: the power to find rare disease variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Stacey; Abo, Ryan P; Abel, Haley J; Neklason, Deborah W; Tuohy, Therese M; Burt, Randall W; Thomas, Alun; Camp, Nicola J

    2012-11-01

    Shared genomic segment (SGS) analysis uses dense single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping in high-risk (HR) pedigrees to identify regions of sharing between cases. Here, we illustrate the power of SGS to identify dominant rare risk variants. Using simulated pedigrees, we consider 12 disease models based on disease prevalence, minor allele frequency and penetrance to represent disease loci that explain 0.2-99.8% of total disease risk. Pedigrees were required to contain ≥ 15 meioses between all cases and to be HR based on significant excess of disease (P power for a single pedigree ranged widely. Nonetheless, fewer than 10 pedigrees were sufficient for excellent power in the majority of models. Power increased with the risk attributable to the disease locus, penetrance and the excess of disease in the pedigree. Sharing allowing for one sporadic case was uniformly more powerful than sharing using all cases. Furthermore, an SGS analysis using a large attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis pedigree identified a 1.96 Mb region containing the known causal APC gene with genome-wide significance. SGS is a powerful method for detecting rare variants and a valuable complement to genome-wide association studies and linkage analysis.

  12. Hirayama's Disease – A Rare Case Report with Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana Gowda, BS; Mohan Kumar, J; Basim, Praveen Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Hirayama's disease is a rare benign disorder, also referred to as monomelic amyotrophy (MMA), Juvenile non progressive amyotrophy, Sobue disease. It is a focal, lower motor neuron type of disease. Mainly young males in their second and third decades of age are most commonly affected. It is seen most commonly in Asian countries like India and Japan. In majority of people cause of this disease is unknown. MRI of cervical spine in flexion will reveal the cardinal features of Hirayama disease. Case Report: A 22 year gentleman came with a history of insidious onset of weakness in both the hands begenning with left side followed by right of 4 years duration. On examination he had clawing of both hands with wasting of forearm muscles. Lower limbs had no abnormality with normal deep tendon reflexes. MRI showed thinning of cord from C4 to C7 level suggestive of cord atrophy. Based on these features a diagnosis of focal amyotrophy was made. A cervical collar was prescribed and patient is under regular follow up. Conclusion: Hirayama disease is a rare self-limiting disease. Early diagnosis is necessary as the use of a simple cervical collar which will prevent neck flexion, has been shown to stop the progression PMID:27298910

  13. Reported Numbers of Patients with Rare Diseases Based on Ten-Year Longitudinal National Disability Registries in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hung, Wen-Jiu

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to describe a general demographic picture of patients with rare diseases in Taiwan and particularly focuses on the prevalence of rare diseases over time, age and gender distributions. We analyzed data mainly from the national disability registry from 2002 to 2011 in Taiwan, Republic of China. The results showed that the number of…

  14. Exploring the genetic counselor's role in facilitating meaning-making: rare disease diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Benjamin M

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of the constructivist meaning-making framework is to encourage grief adaptation through the search for meaning in loss. Strategies to help patients construct meaning from their experiences may lead to positive adaptation. This strategy has been used in contemporary grief counseling, but it may also be beneficial in the genetic counseling scenario. The diagnosis of a rare genetic disorder often has considerable psychosocial impact as patients and families describe feelings of isolation and hopelessness. Negative experiences with healthcare providers often reinforce these feelings. Genetic counselors continue to provide education and psychosocial support to patients and families with rare genetic disorders, and meaning-making strategies may provide a framework for which to help patients and families adapt to these challenging diagnoses. In this paper I explore the background of meaning-making counseling strategy and describe an experience in which it was used for counseling a family with a child with Mowat-Wilson syndrome. I show how a meaning-making framework can help families explore and construct meaning from their experiences and encourage positive adaptation. I also address the possible limitations of this strategy and the need to share additional experiences with this counseling framework. Meaning-making can be another tool for genetic counselors to help guide families in their grief and adaptation to rare disease diagnoses. I also describe qualities and aspects of counseling through the lens of meaning-making and stress the importance of addressing psychosocial dimensions of rare disease diagnoses.

  15. [Clinical and therapeutical considerations regarding a rare case of pre-pyloric stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabetay, C; Zavate, A; Ciuca, M; Ciobanu, O; Malos, A

    2009-01-01

    The neonatal obstacle caused by a pre-pyloric diaphragm represent a rare cause of high oclusion in new-born. We present the case of a 6 days old new-born admitted in our department for nonbilious vomiting and feeding intolerance in which the clinical exam and the imagistic explorations (plain and contrast abdominal X-Rays, and ultrasound) could not reveal an evident cause for the oclusion. The surgical intervention imposed by the simptoms revealed the existece of a complete diaphragm in the prepyloric region. The initial excision of the diaphragm was not sufficient, the patient undergoing a second surgical intervention of gastrojejunal anastromosis with favorable evolution this time. The authors are presenting diagnosis and theraputical management peculiarities of this rare condition.

  16. Hepatosplenic T Cell Lymphoma in an Immunocompetent Female Diagnosed using Flow Cytometry: A Rare Clinical Entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorwal, Pranav; Sachdev, Ritesh; Pande, Amit; Jain, Dharmendra; Jha, Bhawna; Raina, Vimarsh

    2016-08-01

    Hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma is a rare haematopoietic malignancy that comprises less than 1% of Non-Hodgkin lymphomas. We are reporting a case of a 26-year-old female, who presented with pallor, weight loss, jaundice, pancytopenia and hepatosplenomegaly. The bone marrow examination showed infiltration by lymphoid cells. These cells on flow cytometric evaluation showed the phenotype of hepatosplenic T cell lymphoma. The cells were positive for CD3, CD8, CD56 and TCR γδ and negative for CD5, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD57, TCRαβ along with B cell markers. This case is reported for being a rare clinical entity and its presence in an immunocompetent female making it rarer.

  17. Rare mutations of CACNB2 found in autism spectrum disease-affected families alter calcium channel function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra F S Breitenkamp

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD are complex neurodevelopmental diseases clinically defined by dysfunction of social interaction. Dysregulation of cellular calcium homeostasis might be involved in ASD pathogenesis, and genes coding for the L-type calcium channel subunits CaV1.2 (CACNA1C and CaVβ2 (CACNB2 were recently identified as risk loci for psychiatric diseases. Here, we present three rare missense mutations of CACNB2 (G167S, S197F, and F240L found in ASD-affected families, two of them described here for the first time (G167S and F240L. All these mutations affect highly conserved regions while being absent in a sample of ethnically matched controls. We suggest the mutations to be of physiological relevance since they modulate whole-cell Ba2+ currents through calcium channels when expressed in a recombinant system (HEK-293 cells. Two mutations displayed significantly decelerated time-dependent inactivation as well as increased sensitivity of voltage-dependent inactivation. In contrast, the third mutation (F240L showed significantly accelerated time-dependent inactivation. By altering the kinetic parameters, the mutations are reminiscent of the CACNA1C mutation causing Timothy Syndrome, a Mendelian disease presenting with ASD. In conclusion, the results of our first-time biophysical characterization of these three rare CACNB2 missense mutations identified in ASD patients support the hypothesis that calcium channel dysfunction may contribute to autism.

  18. A rare case of haemolytic disease of newborn with Bombay phenotype mother

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamee Shastry

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting a rare case of severe hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN with Bombay phenotype mother. A retrospective study of a case with severe haemolytic disease of newborn with Bombay phenotype mother was done. Blood grouping, antibody screening, and lectin study was done on the blood sample of the baby and mother to confirm the diagnosis. Hematological and biochemical parameters were obtained from the hospital laboratory information system for the analysis. Blood group of the baby was A positive, direct antiglobulin test was negative. Blood group of the mother was confirmed to be Bombay phenotype, Hematological parameters showed all the signs of ongoing hemolysis and the bilirubin level was in the zone of exchange transfusion. Due to the unavailability of this rare phenotype blood unit, baby was managed conservatively. Anticipating the fetal anemia and HDN with mothers having Bombay phenotype and prior notification to the transfusion services will be of great help in optimizing the neonatal care and outcome.

  19. A rare case of haemolytic disease of newborn with Bombay phenotype mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Shamee; Lewis, Leslie E; Bhat, Sudha S

    2013-07-01

    We are reporting a rare case of severe hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) with Bombay phenotype mother. A retrospective study of a case with severe haemolytic disease of newborn with Bombay phenotype mother was done. Blood grouping, antibody screening, and lectin study was done on the blood sample of the baby and mother to confirm the diagnosis. Hematological and biochemical parameters were obtained from the hospital laboratory information system for the analysis. Blood group of the baby was A positive, direct antiglobulin test was negative. Blood group of the mother was confirmed to be Bombay phenotype, Hematological parameters showed all the signs of ongoing hemolysis and the bilirubin level was in the zone of exchange transfusion. Due to the unavailability of this rare phenotype blood unit, baby was managed conservatively. Anticipating the fetal anemia and HDN with mothers having Bombay phenotype and prior notification to the transfusion services will be of great help in optimizing the neonatal care and outcome.

  20. [Rare diseases: specific ethical and legal aspects of genetic counseling and screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Caro, Javier

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses the specific rights of patients with rare diseases from a dual perspective. On the one hand, they concern a new generation of patients' rights that arise once the consolidation of basic rights has occurred, fundamentally after the application of Law 41/2002 (on Regulating Patient Autonomy and Rights and Obligations in the Field of Health Documentation and Information) and its development by the autonomous communities. On the other hand, the fundamental question raises a serious issue related to these patients, which involves the principles of equality, equity, non-discrimination and solidarity. This is aimed at promoting legislative measures to protect patients' equality of access to health and social services, with the ultimate aim of improving their quality of life. The author has given special relevance in his study to the treatment of rare diseases that are genetic in origin, and to the importance of adequate genetic counseling.

  1. RNF213 Rare Variants in Slovakian and Czech Moyamoya Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyselová, Kateřina; Viszlayová, Daša; Morimoto, Takaaki; Roubec, Martin; Školoudík, David; Petrovičová, Andrea; Juskanič, Dominik; Strauss, Jozef; Halaj, Marián; Kurray, Peter; Hranai, Marián; Harada, Kouji H.; Inoue, Sumiko; Yoshida, Yukako; Habu, Toshiyuki; Herzig, Roman; Youssefian, Shohab; Koizumi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    RNF213/Mysterin has been identified as a susceptibility gene for moyamoya disease, a cerebrovascular disease characterized by occlusive lesions in the circle of Willis. The p.R4810K (rs112735431) variant is a founder polymorphism that is strongly associated with moyamoya disease in East Asia. Many non-p.R4810K rare variants of RNF213 have been identified in white moyamoya disease patients, although the ethnic mutations have not been investigated in this population. In the present study, we screened for RNF213 variants in 19 Slovakian and Czech moyamoya disease patients. A total of 69 RNF213 coding exons were directly sequenced in 18 probands and one relative who suffered from moyamoya disease in Slovakia and the Czech Republic. We previously reported one proband harboring RNF213 p.D4013N. Results from the present study identified four rare variants other than p.D4013N (p.R4019C, p.E4042K, p.V4146A, and p.W4677L) in four of the patients. P.V4146A was determined to be a novel de novo mutation, and p.R4019C and p.E4042K were identified as double mutations inherited on the same allele. P.W4677L, found in two moyamoya disease patients and an unaffected subject in the same pedigree, was a rare single nucleotide polymorphism. Functional analysis showed that RNF213 p.D4013N, p.R4019C and p.V4146A-transfected human umbilical vein endothelial cells displayed significant lowered migration, and RNF213 p.V4146A significantly reduced tube formation, indicating that these are disease-causing mutations. Results from the present study identified RNF213 rare variants in 22.2% (4/18 probands) of Slovakian and Czech moyamoya disease patients, confirming that RNF213 may also be a major causative gene in a relative large population of white patients. PMID:27736983

  2. Clinical and diagnostic challenges in a rare case of motor weakness with endocrinopathy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Garg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrolyte imbalance always poses challenging situations to the attending intensivists, particularly if it is associated with endocrinopathies and other comorbidities. One such rare clinical scenario is hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP due to hyperthyroidism. The epidemiology of such a condition is slightly higher among males of Asian origin as compared to its universal occurrence. The diagnostic challenges in this clinical situation can lead to higher morbidity if timeliness is compromised from the presentation to active management. Moreover, atypical presentation of this pathologic condition further compounds the problem if it is associated with overt hyperthyroidism. Here, we report a unique case that presented to the emergency medicine department of our institute with weakness of all the four limbs and in which we faced all the diagnostic and management challenges as the clinical condition of hypokalemia was somehow dominated by overt hyperthyroidism.

  3. Mozart Ear Deformity: a Rare Diagnosis in the Ear Reconstruction Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telich-Tarriba, Jose E; Victor-Baldin, Andre; Apellaniz-Campo, Armando

    2017-07-01

    Mozart ear is a rare auricular deformity; clinically the auricle is characterized by the bulging appearance of the anterosuperior portion of the auricle due to fusion of the crura of the antihelix, an inversion in the normal form of the cavum conchae resulting in its convexity and a slit-like narrowing of the orifice of the external auditory meatus.A retrospective review of clinical and photographic records of patients attended at the ear reconstruction clinic of our hospital between June of 2010 and May 2016 was performed; out of 576 consecutive patients only 3 fulfilled the inclusion criteria, with a prevalence of 0.5%. The authors present these patients.Surgical interventions mainly focus on the correction of the convex concha; however, the procedure should be tailored to the severity of the deformity and the wishes of the patient.

  4. Analysis of clinical manifestations of symptomatic acquired jejunoileal diverticular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chia-Yuan Liu; Wen-Hsiung Chang; Shee-Chan Lin; Cheng-Hsin Chu; Tsang-En Wang; Shou-Chuan Shih

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze systematically our experience over 22 years with symptomatic acquired diverticular disease of the jejunum and ileum, exploring the clinical manifestations and diagnosis of this rare but life-threatening disease.METHODS: The medical records of patients with surgically confirmed symptomatic jejunoileal diverticular disease were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included demographic data, laboratory results, clinical course (acute or chronic), preoperative diagnosis, and operative findings. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) surgical confirmation of jejunoileal diverticular disease and (2)exclusion of congenital diverticula (e.g. Meckel's diverticulum).RESULTS: From January 1982 to July 2004, 28 patients with a total of 29 operations met the study criteria. The male:female ratio was 14:14, and the mean age was 62.6±3.5 years. The most common manifestation was abdominal pain. In nearly half of the patients, the symptoms were chronic. Two patients died after surgery. Only four cases were correctly diagnosed prior to surgery, three by small bowel series.CONCLUSION: Symptomatic acquired small bowel diverticular disease is difficult to diagnose. It should be considered in older patients with unexplained chronic abdominal symptoms. A small bowel series may be helpful in diagnosing this potentially life-threatening disease.

  5. Necrolytic acral erythema: a rare skin disease associated with hepatitis C virus infection*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Luciane Francisca Fernandes; Enokihara, Milvia Maria Simões e Silva; Enokihara, Mauro Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Necrolytic acral erythema is a rare skin disease associated with hepatitis C virus infection. We report a case of a 31-year-old woman with hepatitis C virus infection and decreased zinc serum level. Physical examination revealed scaly, lichenified plaques, well-demarcated with an erythematous peripheral rim located on the lower limbs. After blood transfusion and oral zinc supplementation the patient presented an improvement of lesions. PMID:27828642

  6. Highly sensitive measurements of disease progression in rare disorders: Developing and validating a multimodal model of retinal degeneration in Stargardt disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bax, Nathalie M.; Fakin, Ana; Groenewoud, Joannes M. M.; Klevering, B. Jeroen; Moore, Anthony T.; Michaelides, Michel; Webster, Andrew R.; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Hoyng, Carel B.

    2017-01-01

    Background Each inherited retinal disorder is rare, but together, they affect millions of people worldwide. No treatment is currently available for these blinding diseases, but promising new options—including gene therapy—are emerging. Arguably, the most prevalent retinal dystrophy is Stargardt disease. In each case, the specific combination of ABCA4 variants (> 900 identified to date) and modifying factors is virtually unique. It accounts for the vast phenotypic heterogeneity including variable rates of functional and structural progression, thereby potentially limiting the ability of phase I/II clinical trials to assess efficacy of novel therapies with few patients. To accommodate this problem, we developed and validated a sensitive and reliable composite clinical trial endpoint for disease progression based on structural measurements of retinal degeneration. Methods and findings We used longitudinal data from early-onset Stargardt patients from the Netherlands (development cohort, n = 14) and the United Kingdom (external validation cohort, n = 18). The composite endpoint was derived from best-corrected visual acuity, fundus autofluorescence, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Weighting optimization techniques excluded visual acuity from the composite endpoint. After optimization, the endpoint outperformed each univariable outcome, and showed an average progression of 0.41° retinal eccentricity per year (95% confidence interval, 0.30–0.52). Comparing with actual longitudinal values, the model accurately predicted progression (R2, 0.904). These properties were largely preserved in the validation cohort (0.43°/year [0.33–0.53]; prediction: R2, 0.872). We subsequently ran a two-year trial simulation with the composite endpoint, which detected a 25% decrease in disease progression with 80% statistical power using only 14 patients. Conclusions These results suggest that a multimodal endpoint, reflecting structural macular changes, provides a

  7. [Clinical aspects of the Niigata Minamata disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimohata, Takayoshi; Hirota, Koichi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo

    2015-01-01

    The Minamata disease was discovered in the Minamata region, Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan, in 1956. Symptoms of this disease included cerebellar ataxia, sensory disturbance, narrowing of the visual field, and hearing and speech disturbances. In 1965, similar conditions were identified in persons living around the Agano River area, Niigata Prefecture, Japan and accordingly termed as the Niigata Minamata disease or the second Minamata disease. Both the diseases have been attributed to poisoning with methyl mercury that was generated during the production of acetaldehyde using mercury as a catalyst. The discharged methyl mercury accumulated in fishes and shellfishes and caused poisoning on consumption. This review discusses the history, clinical presentation including atypical forms, and autopsy findings of the Niigata Minamata disease. In addition, it highlights the problems about criteria for official recognition and the therapeutic trial for this disease.

  8. Clinical presentation of adult coeliac disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tajuddin, T

    2012-02-01

    The mode of presentation of coeliac disease has been changing to more atypical or silent disease. Few studies described the clinical presentation of adult coeliac disease in Ireland in recent years. We retrospectively collected the clinical data for all patients who had a diagnosis of coeliac disease made in our centre between January 07 and December 08. Forty seven adults, predominantly females (n = 30), had a confirmed diagnosis of coeliac disease made during the study period. In our patient cohort, the presenting symptom was diarrhoea in 19 (40%) patients, while 16 patients (34%) did not have any G.I. symptoms, 10 (21%) presented with anaemia. Females presented at a significantly younger age compared to males, with median ages at diagnosis of 44.5 and 57 years, respectively (p = 0.04). Females also presented more commonly with non G.I. symptoms (p = 0.07). The reasons behind this gender difference need further study.

  9. Determinants and Equity Evaluation for Health Expenditure Among Patients with Rare Diseases in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Xiong Xin; Liang Zhao; Xiao-Dong Guan; Lu-Wen Shi

    2016-01-01

    Background:China has not established social security system for rare diseases.Rare diseases could easily impoverish patients and their families.Little research has studied the equity and accessibility of health services for patients with rare diseases in China.This study aimed to explore the factors that influence health expenditure of rare diseases and evaluate its equity.Methods:Questionnaire survey about living conditions and cost burden of patients with rare diseases was conducted.Individual and family information,health expenditure and reimbursement in 2014 of 982 patients were collected.The impact of medical insurance,individual sociodemographic characteristics,family characteristics,and healthcare need on total and out-of-pocket (OOP) health expenditures was analyzed through the generalized linear model.Equity of health expenditure was evaluated by both concentration index and Lorenz curve.Results:Of all the surveyed patients,11.41% had no medical insurance and 92.10% spent money to seek medical treatment in 2014.It was suggested female (P =0.048),over 50 years of age (P =0.062),high-income group (P =0.021),hospitalization (P =0.000),and reimbursement ratio (RR) (P =0.000) were positively correlated with total health expenditure.Diseases not needing long-term treatment (P =0.000) was negatively correlated with total health expenditure.Over 50 years of age (P =0.065),high-income group (P =0.018),hospitalization (P =0.000) and having Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) (P =0.022) were positively correlated with OOP health expenditure.Patient or the head of the household having received higher education (P =0.044 and P =0.081) and reimbursement ratio (P =0.078) were negatively correlated with OOP health expenditure.The equity evaluation found concentration indexes of health expenditure before and after reimbursement were 0.0550 and 0.0539,respectively.Conclusions:OOP health expenditure of patients with UEBMI was significantly more than that of

  10. Celiac disease in non-clinical populations of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Mai; Ishimura, Norihisa; Fukuyama, Chika; Izumi, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Nahoko; Araki, Asuka; Oka, Akihiko; Mishiro, Tomoko; Ishihara, Shunji; Maruyama, Riruke; Adachi, Kyoichi; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2017-04-07

    Celiac disease is a chronic autoimmune enteropathy caused by gluten ingestion. While its prevalence in Western countries is reported to be as high as 1%, the prevalence has not been evaluated in a large-scale study of a Japanese population. The aim of our study was to clarify the possible presence of celiac disease in a Japanese non-clinical population as well as in patients showing symptoms suggestive of the disease. Serum samples were collected from 2008 non-clinical adults and 47 patients with chronic unexplained abdominal symptoms between April 2014 and June 2016. The anti-tissue transglutaminase (TTG) immunoglobulin A antibody titer was determined as a screening test for celiac disease in all subjects, and individuals with a value of >2 U/mL subsequently underwent testing for the presence of serum endomysial IgA antibody (EMA) as confirmation. Those testing positive for EMA or with a high concentration (>10 U/mL) of TTG were further investigated by histopathological examinations of duodenal mucosal biopsy specimens and HLA typing tests. Of the 2008 non-clinical adults from whom serum samples were collected, 161 tested positive for TTG, and all tested negative for EMA. Four subjects who had a high TTG titer were invited to undergo confirmatory testing, and the histopathological results confirmed the presence of celiac disease in only a single case (0.05%). Of the 47 symptomatic patients, one (2.1%) was found to have a high TTG titer and was diagnosed with celiac disease based on duodenal histopathological findings. The presence of celiac disease in a non-clinical Japanese population was low at 0.05% and was rarely found in patients with unexplained chronic abdominal symptoms.

  11. Isolated peritoneal hydatidosis clinically mimicking ovarian tumor: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradhan M Pagaro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid cyst disease is rare and it is a parasitic infection where humans accidentally get infected by ingesting larval forms of parasite whereas, the definitive hosts are dog. The common sites of hydatid cyst are liver, lungs, spleen. Unusual sites of the hydatid cyst is reported in subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall, peritoneum. We report an unusual form of the primary hydatid cyst disease involving peritoneum in a 65-year-old female, presenting as swelling in the abdomen since 3 months. Sonography revealed a cystic mass and diagnosis of ovarian tumor was considered. The Cancer Antigen 125 (CA--125, an ovarian malignant marker was normal. Exploratory laprotomy was carried out. Cytological examination, gross, and the histopathological findings suggested the diagnosis of hydatid cyst disease involving only peritoneum. Primary isolated hydatidosis involving peritoneum is very rare and only few cases have been reported. Moreover, it mimics other tumors of the abdomen like in our case we considered it as an ovarian tumor.

  12. A young diabetic with suicidal risk: Rare disease with a rarer presentation

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    Rajeev Philip

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rare genetic or inherited forms of diabetes can mimic immune mediated type 1 diabetes. Early age of onset and associated features help to differentiate these diseases from type 1 diabetes. Wolfram syndrome, an inherited neuro degenerative disorder, presents as insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, optic atrophy and deafness. But less well described features like psychiatric manifestations can be the presentation of this disease. We present such a case. Wolfram syndrome should be considered as a differential diagnosis in insulin dependent diabetic children who present with neuropsychiatric problems.

  13. The role of functionally defective rare germline variants of sialic acid acetylesterase in autoimmune Addison's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Earn H; MacArthur, Katie; Mitchell, Anna L; Pearce, Simon H S

    2012-01-01

    Background Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is a rare condition with a complex genetic basis. A panel of rare and functionally defective genetic variants in the sialic acid acetylesterase (SIAE) gene has recently been implicated in several common autoimmune conditions. We performed a case–control study to determine whether these rare variants are associated with a rarer condition, AAD. Method We analysed nine SIAE gene variants (W48X, M89V, C196F, C226G, R230W, T312M, Y349C, F404S and R479C) in a United Kingdom cohort of 378 AAD subjects and 387 healthy controls. All samples were genotyped using Sequenom iPlex chemistry to characterise primer extension products. Results A heterozygous rare allele at codon 312 (312*M) was found in one AAD patient (0.13%) but was not detected in the healthy controls. The commoner, functionally recessive variant at codon 89 (89*V) was found to be homozygous in two AAD patients but was only found in the heterozygous state in controls. Taking into account all nine alleles examined, 4/378 (1.06%) AAD patients and 1/387 (0.25%) healthy controls carried the defective SIAE alleles, with a calculated odds ratio of 4.13 (95% CI 0.44–97.45, two-tailed P value 0.212, NS). Conclusion We demonstrated the presence of 89*V homozygotes and the 312*M rare allele in the AAD cohort, but overall, our analysis does not support a role for rare variants in SIAE in the pathogenesis of AAD. However, the relatively small collection of AAD patients limits the power to exclude a small effect. PMID:23011869

  14. Dangerous and Expensive Screening and Treatment for Rare Childhood Diseases: The Case of Krabbe Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantos, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Public policy surrounding newborn screening is in flux. New technology allows more screening for more diseases at lower cost. Traditional criteria for target diseases have been criticized by leading health policymakers. The example of newborn screening for Krabbe disease highlights many of the dilemmas associated with population-based screening…

  15. A rare case of benign multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma: a clinical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashish; Rao, Harish K; Pande, Raghav; Gupta, Soumya

    2013-06-01

    A middle aged housewife presented with an anterior abdominal wall mass which was slowly growing over a period of 1 years over the midline scar of previous caesarean section with cystic degeneration in a part of the tumor. Fine needle aspiration cytology revealed a papillary serous cystadenoma. At exploratory laparotomy tumor was seen arising from the ventral surface of the parietal peritoneum with normal viscera, omentum and ovaries. The pathologist reported the tumor as Benign Multicystic Peritoneal Mesothelioma. It is a rare but clinically favourable neoplasm with wide excision as the definitive treatment. Of the 130 cases reported in the literature, it has the least incidence in the Indian Subcontinent.

  16. Foreign body granuloma mimicking recurrent intracranial tumor: a very rare clinical entity.

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    Askin Esen Hasturk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gelatin sponge, oxidized cellulose and microfibrillar collagen are used to achieve hemostasis during neurosurgical procedures. Hemostatic agents may produce clinically symptomatic, radiologically apparent mass lesions. The differential diagnosis should include the foreign body along with recurrent tumor. We present a case of intracranial hemostatic agents found in a 56-year-old male patient seven years after undergoing a craniotomy for a left posterior parietal convexity meningioma. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI suggested the presence of a recurrent tumor. We emphasize that although it is rare, a granuloma due to a foreign body reaction can result in a false image of tumor recurrence.

  17. [Lyme disease--clinical manifestations and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is a systemic infectious disease that can present in a variety of clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by a group of spirochaetes--Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato or Lyme borrelia--that are transmitted to humans by the bite of Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is the most common arthropode-borne infectious disease in many European countries including Germany. Early localized infection is typically manifested by an erythema migrans skin lesion, in rarer cases as a borrelial lymphocytoma. The most common early disseminated manifestation is (early) neuroborreliosis. In adults, neuroborreliosis appears typically as meningoradiculoneuritis. Neuroborreliosis in children, however, is typically manifested by meningitis. In addition, multiple erythema migrans lesions and Lyme carditis occur relatively frequently. The most common manifestation oflate Lyme disease is Lyme arthritis. Early manifestations (and usually also late manifestations) of Lyme disease can be treated successfully by application of suitable antibacterial agents. For the treatment of Lyme disease, doxycycline, certain penicillins such as amoxicillin and some cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefuroxime axetil) are recommended in current guidelines. A major challenge is the treatment of chronic, non-specific disorders, i. e., posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome and "chronic Lyme disease". Prevention of Lyme disease is mainly accomplished by protecting against tick bites. Prophylactic administration of doxycycline after tick bites is generally not recommended in Germany. There is no vaccine available for human beings.

  18. Molecular Characterization of Three Canine Models of Human Rare Bone Diseases: Caffey, van den Ende-Gupta, and Raine Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hytönen, Marjo K; Arumilli, Meharji; Lappalainen, Anu K; Owczarek-Lipska, Marta; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Hundi, Sruthi; Salmela, Elina; Venta, Patrick; Sarkiala, Eva; Jokinen, Tarja; Gorgas, Daniela; Kere, Juha; Nieminen, Pekka; Drögemüller, Cord; Lohi, Hannes

    2016-05-01

    One to two percent of all children are born with a developmental disorder requiring pediatric hospital admissions. For many such syndromes, the molecular pathogenesis remains poorly characterized. Parallel developmental disorders in other species could provide complementary models for human rare diseases by uncovering new candidate genes, improving the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and opening possibilities for therapeutic trials. We performed various experiments, e.g. combined genome-wide association and next generation sequencing, to investigate the clinico-pathological features and genetic causes of three developmental syndromes in dogs, including craniomandibular osteopathy (CMO), a previously undescribed skeletal syndrome, and dental hypomineralization, for which we identified pathogenic variants in the canine SLC37A2 (truncating splicing enhancer variant), SCARF2 (truncating 2-bp deletion) and FAM20C (missense variant) genes, respectively. CMO is a clinical equivalent to an infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease), for which SLC37A2 is a new candidate gene. SLC37A2 is a poorly characterized member of a glucose-phosphate transporter family without previous disease associations. It is expressed in many tissues, including cells of the macrophage lineage, e.g. osteoclasts, and suggests a disease mechanism, in which an impaired glucose homeostasis in osteoclasts compromises their function in the developing bone, leading to hyperostosis. Mutations in SCARF2 and FAM20C have been associated with the human van den Ende-Gupta and Raine syndromes that include numerous features similar to the affected dogs. Given the growing interest in the molecular characterization and treatment of human rare diseases, our study presents three novel physiologically relevant models for further research and therapy approaches, while providing the molecular identity for the canine conditions.

  19. Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease: Clinical and laboratory characteristics and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease is an uncommon disorder with worldwide distribution, characterized by fever and benign enlargement of the lymph nodes, primarily affecting young adults. Awareness about this disorder may help prevent misdiagnosis and inappropriate investigations and treatment. The objective of the study was to evaluate the clinical and laboratory characteristics of histopathologically confirmed cases of Kikuchi′s disease from a tertiary care center in southern India. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of all adult patients with histopathologically confirmed Kikuchi′s disease from January 2007 to December 2011 in a 2700-bed teaching hospital in South India was done. The clinical and laboratory characteristics and outcome were analyzed. Results: There were 22 histopathologically confirmed cases of Kikuchi′s disease over the 5-year period of this study. The mean age of the subjects′ was 29.7 years (SD 8.11 and majority were women (Male: female- 1:3.4. Apart from enlarged cervical lymph nodes, prolonged fever was the most common presenting complaint (77.3%. The major laboratory features included anemia (54.5%, increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (31.8%, elevated alanine aminotransferase (27.2% and elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH (31.8%. Conclusion: Even though rare, Kikuchi′s disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of young individuals, especially women, presenting with lymphadenopathy and prolonged fever. Establishing the diagnosis histopathologically is essential to avoid inappropriate investigations and therapy.

  20. Acute onset anarthria without hepatic manifestation: a rare presentation of Wilson disease

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Rajesh; Bhandari, Aveg; Tiwari, Navin; Chaudhari, Tejendra S

    2013-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is one of the few inherited but treatable disorder mainly affecting the liver and brain resulting in severe disability or death if left untreated. Hence, it is important to keep a high index of suspicion for diagnosing this clinical entity in appropriate clinical settings. The clinical presentation can be quite variable and they may present solely with neurological features sans hepatic symptoms. Such neurological manifestations usually follow subacute to chronic course. A...

  1. Childhood disintegrative disorder with seasonal total mutism: A rare clinical presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Shirazi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood disintegrative disorder (CDD is a rare autistic-like clinical condition with unknown etiology, in that previously acquired age-appropriate language, social and adaptive abilities deteriorate significantly in 2-10-year-old healthy children, although physical and neurological evaluations display no observable abnormality. Our case is a 22-year-old female born of a consanguineous marriage, with the appearance of CDD symptoms in her fifth year of age following normal mental and physical development during her initial four years of life. Without any precipitating factor, she gradually lost her language abilities, social relational skills, affectionate behavior, adaptive capacities, peer play and meaningful interest in her surrounding, friends and family members over a period of 4 years, reaching a plateau in her ninth year of age. The unique special clinical symptom in this case is a seasonal total mutism, which after the beginning of her CDD symptoms is revealing every year covering the spring. As no additional physical or psychological change accompanies her total seasonal speech loss, it cannot be attributed to any mental condition known as having a seasonal pattern. Because in the literature CDD is presented mostly as case reports with lacking of advanced research data, describing any new case is recommended to improve the knowledge about this rare condition, especially if it displays some new unusual signs, not reported till now.

  2. Recommendations for the development of rare disease drugs using the accelerated approval pathway and for qualifying biomarkers as primary endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkis, Emil D; O'Donovan, Mary; Cox, Gerald; Hayes, Mark; Goodsaid, Federico; Tandon, P K; Furlong, Pat; Boynton, Susan; Bozic, Mladen; Orfali, May; Thornton, Mark

    2015-02-10

    For rare serious and life-threatening disorders, there is a tremendous challenge of transforming scientific discoveries into new drug treatments. This challenge has been recognized by all stakeholders who endorse the need for flexibility in the regulatory review process for novel therapeutics to treat rare diseases. In the United States, the best expression of this flexibility was the creation of the Accelerated Approval (AA) pathway. The AA pathway is critically important for the development of treatments for diseases with high unmet medical need and has been used extensively for drugs used to treat cancer and infectious diseases like HIV.In 2012, the AA provisions were amended to enhance the application of the AA pathway to expedite the development of drugs for rare disorders under the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA). FDASIA, among many provisions, requires the development of a more relevant FDA guidance on the types of evidence that may be acceptable in support of using a novel surrogate endpoint. The application of AA to rare diseases requires more predictability to drive greater access to appropriate use of AA for more rare disease treatments that might not be developed otherwise.This white paper proposes a scientific framework for assessing biomarker endpoints to enhance the development of novel therapeutics for rare and devastating diseases currently without adequate treatment and is based on the opinions of experts in drug development and rare disease patient groups. Specific recommendations include: 1) Establishing regulatory rationale for increased AA access in rare disease programs; 2) Implementing a Biomarker Qualification Request Process to provide the opportunity for an early determination of biomarker acceptance; and 3) A proposed scientific framework for qualifying biomarkers as primary endpoints. The paper's final section highlights case studies of successful examples that have incorporated biomarker endpoints into

  3. Bowen diseaseclinic, dermoscopy, patology

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    Poklękowska Katarzyna

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Bowen Disease is squamous cell carcinoma in situ in which the basement membrane is intact on histopathology. Lesions are usually solitary but may be multiple in 10-20 percent of cases. It typically presents as an erythematous enlarging plaque having irregular borders with scaling and crusting. The lesions may be fissured or verrucous or, rarely, pigmented. Ulceration may occur and is often a sign that invasive disease is developing. The risk of progression of Bowen disease to invasive carcinoma is about 3%. Bowen disease is most commonly found in patients over 60 years old. Oher risk factors: include chronic sun exposure, immunosuppression, arsenic exposure and cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV- 16, 18, 34 i 48 infection.The majority of cases of Bowen disease revealed a peculiar dermoscopic pattern characterized by glomerular vesselsProliferation of numerous atypical keratinocytes throughout the entire thickness of the epidermis with hyperkeratosis, mitotic figures, multinucleated cells and dyskeratotic cells, full thickness dysplasia of the squamous epithelum, disorderly maturation of the epidermis, parakeratosis and loss of granular layer.

  4. Bilateral invasive lobular breast cancer in a female teenager: a rare finding of a common disease - case report and review of literature

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    Ndumbe Peter

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Management of cancer patients in low-resource communities presents enormous challenges. Breast cancer is a public health problem in Cameroon and occurs mostly in elderly women. The predominant histological type is a duct carcinoma. Lobular carcinoma in teenagers is rare. In this report we present a case of bilateral invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast that was confirmed on biopsies in a 22-year-old female. We present this rare finding and review the pathological, clinical and radiographic challenges of the disease. Nodules in the breast from patients of any age should be submitted for histology. Public education is beneficial and should be intensified

  5. Bilateral invasive lobular breast cancer in a female teenager: a rare finding of a common disease--case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enownchong, Enow-Orock George; Thomas, Egbe Obinchemti; Akum, Achidi Eric; Defang, Asonganyi Etienne; Paul, Ndom; Emmanuel, Fongang; Peter, Ndumbe

    2010-07-19

    Management of cancer patients in low-resource communities presents enormous challenges. Breast cancer is a public health problem in Cameroon and occurs mostly in elderly women. The predominant histological type is a duct carcinoma. Lobular carcinoma in teenagers is rare. In this report we present a case of bilateral invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast that was confirmed on biopsies in a 22-year-old female. We present this rare finding and review the pathological, clinical and radiographic challenges of the disease. Nodules in the breast from patients of any age should be submitted for histology. Public education is beneficial and should be intensified.

  6. Discovery of innovative therapies for rare immune-mediated inflammatory diseases via off-label prescription of biologics: the case of IL-6 receptor blockade in Castleman’s disease

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    Anne eMusters

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biologics have revolutionized the field of clinical immunology and proven to be both effective and safe in common immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, and various haematological disorders. However, in patients with rare, severe IMIDs failing on standard therapies it is virtually impossible to conduct randomized controlled trials. Therefore, biologics are usually prescribed off-label in these often severely ill patients. Unfortunately, off-label prescription is sometimes hampered in these diseases due to a lack of reimbursement that is often based on a presumed lack of evidence for effectiveness. In the present article will discuss that off-label prescription of biologics can be a good way to discover new treatments for rare diseases. This will be ilustrated using a case of multicentric Castleman’s disease, an immune-mediated lymphoproliferative disorder, in which off-label tocilizumab (humanized anti-IL-6 receptor blocking antibody treatment resulted in remarkable clinical improvement. Furthermore, we will give recommendations for monitoring efficacy and safety of biologic treatment in rare IMIDs, including the use of registries. In conclusion, we put forward that innovative treatments for rare IMIDs can be discovered via off-label prescription of biologicals, provided that this is based on rational arguments including knowledge of the pathophysiology of the disease.

  7. A rare case of extra nodal Rosai-Dorfman disease with isolated multifocal osseous manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maharshi H Patel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML or Rosai-Dorfman disease is a non-neoplastic condition which typically presents as massive, bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy and can involve multiple extranodal organ systems such as skin, eyes, and upper respiratory tract in about 28% cases. Bone lesions in association with nodal disease are seen in less than 10% cases. Isolated bone involvement as the only manifestation of SHML is extremely rare, with less than 50 cases reported in the literature. We report a very uncommon case of Rosai-Dorfman disease with isolated multifocal osseous involvement as the only presenting feature, involving about 10 different sites with no lymphadenopathy or other organ system involvement.

  8. Genes that affect brain structure and function identified by rare variant analyses of Mendelian neurologic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Ender; Harel, Tamar; Pehlivan, Davut; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Gambin, Tomasz; Akdemir, Zeynep Coban; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Erdin, Serkan; Bayram, Yavuz; Campbell, Ian M.; Hunter, Jill V.; Atik, Mehmed M.; Van Esch, Hilde; Yuan, Bo; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Isikay, Sedat; Yesil, Gozde; Yuregir, Ozge O.; Bozdogan, Sevcan Tug; Aslan, Huseyin; Aydin, Hatip; Tos, Tulay; Aksoy, Ayse; De Vivo, Darryl C.; Jain, Preti; Geckinli, B. Bilge; Sezer, Ozlem; Gul, Davut; Durmaz, Burak; Cogulu, Ozgur; Ozkinay, Ferda; Topcu, Vehap; Candan, Sukru; Cebi, Alper Han; Ikbal, Mevlit; Gulec, Elif Yilmaz; Gezdirici, Alper; Koparir, Erkan; Ekici, Fatma; Coskun, Salih; Cicek, Salih; Karaer, Kadri; Koparir, Asuman; Duz, Mehmet Bugrahan; Kirat, Emre; Fenercioglu, Elif; Ulucan, Hakan; Seven, Mehmet; Guran, Tulay; Elcioglu, Nursel; Yildirim, Mahmut Selman; Aktas, Dilek; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet; Ture, Mehmet; Yakut, Tahsin; Overton, John D.; Yuksel, Adnan; Ozen, Mustafa; Muzny, Donna M.; Adams, David R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chung, Wendy K.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R

    2015-01-01

    Development of the human nervous system involves complex interactions between fundamental cellular processes and requires a multitude of genes, many of which remain to be associated with human disease. We applied whole exome sequencing to 128 mostly consanguineous families with neurogenetic disorders that often included brain malformations. Rare variant analyses for both single nucleotide variant (SNV) and copy number variant (CNV) alleles allowed for identification of 45 novel variants in 43 known disease genes, 41 candidate genes, and CNVs in 10 families, with an overall potential molecular cause identified in >85% of families studied. Among the candidate genes identified, we found PRUNE, VARS, and DHX37 in multiple families, and homozygous loss of function variants in AGBL2, SLC18A2, SMARCA1, UBQLN1, and CPLX1. Neuroimaging and in silico analysis of functional and expression proximity between candidate and known disease genes allowed for further understanding of genetic networks underlying specific types of brain malformations. PMID:26539891

  9. Moyamoya Disease Clinical Course and Severity in Childhood

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    Ayse Kacar Bayram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Moyamoya disease (MMD is a rare, progressive and oclusive cerebrovascular disorder, predominantly affecting the terminal segment of the internal carotid arteries (ICA and its main branches. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical course and severity of MMD in pediatric patients. Material and Method: We examined 5 consecutive pediatric patients with MMD, focusing on clinical and radiological features, the therapy and outcome over the 58-month follow-up period. Results: The study population consisted of 3 boys and 2 girls. The mean age at diagnosis of patients was 7.2 ± 3.4 years (age range: 3-10 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 30.4 ± 17.4 months (follow-up interval: 12-58 months. Neurological findings at presentation included: motor deficit in 4 patients (80.0%, epileptic seizures in 2 patients (40.0%, movement disorders in 3 patients (60.0%, and headache in 1 patients (20.0%. There was areas of infarction on brain MRI in all patients. Angiographic findings included: internal carotid artery stenosis in all patients, anterior cerebral artery stenosis in 3 patients, middle cerebral artery stenosis in 3 patients, posterior cerebral artery stenosis in 2 patients, and vertebral artery stenosis in 1 patient. Enoxaparine therapy was started to all patients. Subdural hematoma developed in 1 patient during follow-up. Cerebral infarctions recurred despite medical treatment in 4 patients. Discussion: Although this disease is rare, it is an important cause of pediatric stroke. MMD shows different clinical course and disease severity in childhood. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are crucial.

  10. A Rare Case of Pott's Disease (Spinal Tuberculosis) Mimicking Metastatic Disease in the Southern Region of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osmanagic, Azra; Emamifar, Amir; Christian Bang, Jacob;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pott's disease (PD) or spinal tuberculosis is a rare condition which accounts for less than 1% of total tuberculosis (TB) cases. The incidence of PD has recently increased in Europe and the United States, mainly due to immigration; however, it is still a rare diagnosis in Scandinavian...... was suggestive of PD. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the patient's gastric fluid was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT). Based on MRI and PCR findings, standard treatment for TB was initiated. Results of the spine biopsy and culture showed colonies of MT and confirmed the diagnosis afterwards. Due...... to the instability of the spine and severe and continuous pain, spine-stabilizing surgery was performed. Her TB was cured after nine months of treatment. CONCLUSIONS PD is an important differential diagnosis of malignancy that should be diagnosed instantly. History of exposure to TB and classic radiologic finding...

  11. Investigating the role of rare coding variability in Mendelian dementia genes (APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, GRN, MAPT, and PRNP) in late-onset Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Celeste; Guerreiro, Rita; Gibbs, Raphael; Ding, Jinhui; Lupton, Michelle K.; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Niblock, Michael; Gallo, Jean-Marc; Adnan, Jihad; Killick, Richard; Brown, Kristelle S.; Medway, Christopher; Lord, Jenny; Turton, James; Bras, Jose; Morgan, Kevin; Powell, John F.; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John

    2014-01-01

    The overlapping clinical and neuropathologic features between late-onset apparently sporadic Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD), and other neurodegenerative dementias (frontotemporal dementia, corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease) raise the question of whether shared genetic risk factors may explain the similar phenotype among these disparate disorders. To investigate this intriguing hypothesis, we analyzed rare coding variability in 6 Mendelian dementia genes (APP, PSEN1, PSEN2, GRN, MAPT, and PRNP), in 141 LOAD patients and 179 elderly controls, neuropathologically proven, from the UK. In our cohort, 14 LOAD cases (10%) and 11 controls (6%) carry at least 1 rare variant in the genes studied. We report a novel variant in PSEN1 (p.I168T) and a rare variant in PSEN2 (p.A237V), absent in controls and both likely pathogenic. Our findings support previous studies, suggesting that (1) rare coding variability in PSEN1 and PSEN2 may influence the susceptibility for LOAD and (2) GRN, MAPT, and PRNP are not major contributors to LOAD. Thus, genetic screening is pivotal for the clinical differential diagnosis of these neurodegenerative dementias. PMID:25104557

  12. Kawasaki disease shock syndrome: a rare and severe complication of Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakan, Mustafa; Gemici, Hakan; Aktay-Ayaz, Nuray; Keskindemirci, Gonca; Bornaun, Helen; İkizoğlu, Tarkan; Çeliker, Alpay

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute systemic vasculitis that occurs most commonly in young children. It affects medium-sized muscular arteries and the coronary arteries are the predominant site of involvement. Morbidity and mortality is generally due to coronary artery aneurysms that develop during the chronic phase. Although it is well known that Kawasaki disease can cause myocarditis, tachycardia and heart failure during acute stage, Kawasaki disease shock syndrome has been recently described. It is characterized by hypotension, signs and symptoms of poor perfusion and a shock-like state. Herein we describe two cases of Kawasaki disease shock syndrome that were treated in the pediatric intensive care unit and followed a course without morbidity or mortality.

  13. Rare clinical experiences for surgical treatment of melanoma with osseous metastases in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Rong-Sen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant melanoma occurs infrequently in Taiwan. Once it has progressed into osseous metastases, the prognosis is poor. There are no reported clinical experiences of surgical management in this area. Methods To improve our understanding of the rare clinical experiences, we retrospectively investigated clinical characteristics, radiological findings, treatment modalities, survival outcomes and prognoses of 11 Taiwanese patients with osseous metastasis of melanoma treated surgically at two national medical centers, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Cheng Kung University Hospital from January 1983 to December 2006. Results Six patients suffered from acral-lentiginous melanoma. Nine patients sustained multiple osseous metastases and most lesions were osteolytic. Nine patients also had sustained metastases to other organs including liver, lungs, lymph nodes, brain and spleen. Second malignancies including lung cancer, thyroid papillary carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma and cervical cancer co-existed in four patients. The interval from the initial diagnosis of melanoma to the clinical detection of osseous metastases varied from 0–37.8 months (mean 9.75 months. Metastatic melanoma was invariably fatal; the mean survival time from bone metastases to death was 5.67 months. Conclusion Due to the high morbidity and poor survival of Taiwanese patients with osseous metastases of melanoma, surgical treatment should be directed towards pain relief and the prevention of skeletal debilitation in order to maintain their quality of life.

  14. Isolated dysarthria-facial paresis syndrome: A rare clinical entity which is usually overlooked

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celebisoy Mehmet

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of the study is to search the lesion localization of the pure isolated facial paresis-dysarthria syndrome in patients who were admitted to our neurology clinic in a prospective study. Methods: Over a period of six years, the patients who had no prominent sensorimotor dysfunction were examined by neurologists and underwent computerized tomography (CT and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Results: Eleven patients out of more than 2000 had the aforementioned clinical picture. Lacunar infarctions were identified at the corona radiata in nine patients, and at the internal capsule in two patients. As reported previously, facial paresis was usually mild and temporary. Six of our eleven patients were seen at the outpatient clinic one month later. Four of them had completely recovered and the other two had mild dsyarthria without any facial paresis. The other five could not be reached after leaving the hospital. Conclusions: Dysarthria-facial paresis is a rare clinical entity and possibly a variation of dysarthria-clumsy hand syndrome, and we suggest that pure facial paresis (FP and pure dysarthria should be considered as very extreme examples of this syndrome.

  15. Excess relative risk as an effect measure in case-control studies of rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologists often use ratio-type indices (rate ratio, risk ratio and odds ratio) to quantify the association between exposure and disease. By comparison, less attention has been paid to effect measures on a difference scale (excess rate or excess risk). The excess relative risk (ERR) used primarily by radiation epidemiologists is of peculiar interest here, in that it involves both difference and ratio operations. The ERR index (but not the difference-type indices) is estimable in case-control studies. Using the theory of sufficient component cause model, the author shows that when there is no mechanistic interaction (no synergism in the sufficient cause sense) between the exposure under study and the stratifying variable, the ERR index (but not the ratio-type indices) in a rare-disease case-control setting should remain constant across strata and can therefore be regarded as a common effect parameter. By exploiting this homogeneity property, the related attributable fraction indices can also be estimated with greater precision. The author demonstrates the methodology (SAS codes provided) using a case-control dataset, and shows that ERR preserves the logical properties of the ratio-type indices. In light of the many desirable properties of the ERR index, the author advocates its use as an effect measure in case-control studies of rare diseases.

  16. Excess relative risk as an effect measure in case-control studies of rare diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chung Lee

    Full Text Available Epidemiologists often use ratio-type indices (rate ratio, risk ratio and odds ratio to quantify the association between exposure and disease. By comparison, less attention has been paid to effect measures on a difference scale (excess rate or excess risk. The excess relative risk (ERR used primarily by radiation epidemiologists is of peculiar interest here, in that it involves both difference and ratio operations. The ERR index (but not the difference-type indices is estimable in case-control studies. Using the theory of sufficient component cause model, the author shows that when there is no mechanistic interaction (no synergism in the sufficient cause sense between the exposure under study and the stratifying variable, the ERR index (but not the ratio-type indices in a rare-disease case-control setting should remain constant across strata and can therefore be regarded as a common effect parameter. By exploiting this homogeneity property, the related attributable fraction indices can also be estimated with greater precision. The author demonstrates the methodology (SAS codes provided using a case-control dataset, and shows that ERR preserves the logical properties of the ratio-type indices. In light of the many desirable properties of the ERR index, the author advocates its use as an effect measure in case-control studies of rare diseases.

  17. Molecular basis and clinical management of Pompe disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Parenti

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease (glycogenosis type II is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder due to mutations of the GAA gene, leading to the deficiency of acid α-glucosidase and consequent glycogen storage in various tissues, mainly in the skeletal muscle, heart and liver. The consequent clinical picture is mainly due to the muscle and heart involvement, although clinical manifestations may be multi-systemic. The phenotype of patients is heterogeneous and the severity is inversely related to the residual enzymatic activity of acid α-glucosidase. More than 200 different mutations of GAA gene have been described and genotype/phenotype correlations have been established for some of them. Traditionally three forms have been described, i.e. early onset classical and non-classical forms and late onset attenuated forms. A severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in combination with conduction disorder in newborns represents a typical feature in the classic infantile presentation, while clinical picture in late onset forms is dominated by skeletal muscle dysfunction, resulting in mobility and respiratory problems. Enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human GAA is the approved therapeutic approach in Pompe disease patients. Clinical trials on enzyme replacement therapy (ERT support the efficacy in improving survival and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, while efficacy seems to be variable on manifestations due to skeletal muscle involvement, mainly in lateonset patients. Considering the limitations of ERT and its high costs, innovative therapeutic approaches are now under development.

  18. Vision for improvement: Expressive writing as an intervention for people with Stargardt's disease, a rare eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Jennifer L; Lu, Qian

    2016-05-01

    This study implemented and evaluated the effectiveness of an expressive writing intervention among patients with Stargardt's disease, a rare disease due to macular degeneration. Participants were randomly assigned to either an expressive writing intervention or a neutral writing condition. Participants completed measures at three time points: baseline, 3 weeks, and 6 weeks post-intervention. Psychological health outcomes improved at the 3-week follow-up for the intervention condition compared to control. Self-reported physical health improved at the 6-week follow-up in the intervention condition compared to control. These results suggest that expressive writing may be an effective, practical, and low-cost intervention for those with Stargardt's disease.

  19. A Study of Information Needs and Information Behaviors of the Primary Caregivers of Children and Adolescents with Rare Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Yu Fan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rare diseases by definition do not occur often and it is difficult to provide palliative care for those affected due to the lack of information and treatment for those rare diseases. The families of those with rare diseases bear a heavy burden and have a harder time than even the families of disabled people. This research’s goal is to provide the families of those with rare diseases with information on how to provide care for their family members. The study uses the qualitative research method of semi-structured interview. We interviewed 10 rare disease children and adolescents’ primary caregivers. The results of the study indicated that if no one suffers from the rare diseases in their family, primary caregivers are not aware of the rare disease information. After their initial diagnosis, the caregivers will want to know how to best care for their family member, from how best to provide supportive care to providing physical therapy, in order to improve their quality of life and prognosis. When they discover their child’s disease is incurable, primary caregivers need information about social welfare and their child’s future. The main source of medical care information is provided by hospitals and patient-support organizations. Regarding information behavior, primary caregivers employ the information which they obtain and they either check the information they obtain with a professional authority, multiple sources, or compare it with patient experience to validate if the information is accurate or not. Finally, primary caregivers are glad to share what they find with other families that have children with a rare disease. They may use different ways of sharing information such as the Internet or face to face. [Article content in Chinese

  20. Rare disease partnership: the role of the US HAEA in angioedema care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuraw, Bruce L; Christiansen, Sandra C

    2013-11-01

    Rare diseases, including hereditary angioedema, present a unique set of challenges for clinicians and investigators. The most successful way to negotiate these difficulties has been to develop collaborative efforts among physicians and with patient advocacy organizations and pharmaceutical companies. The US Hereditary Angioedema Association is a large nonprofit patient advocacy organization that has been the catalyst for these types of collaborative arrangements involving hereditary angioedema. The dedication and unique structure of this patient advocacy organization has allowed it to make a substantial contribution to improving hereditary angioedema diagnosis and care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Localized cystic disease of the kidney: A rare diagnosis of this uncommon condition in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. Behr

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Localized cystic disease of the kidney (LCDK is a rare condition found primarily in adults, with the total number of documented cases less than 75. Its incidence in the pediatric population is even more minuscule. It is a benign condition, but can be difficult to classify with certainty on imaging, often necessitating surgical excision to adequately rule out a malignancy. We present the case of a six-year-old child with a cystic mass of the kidney who underwent a radical nephroureterectomy, for which pathology showed LCDK. We then review the literature on the subject.

  2. The UK10K project identifies rare variants in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bala, Senduran; Clapham, Peter; Coates, Guy;

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of rare and low-frequency variants to human traits is largely unexplored. Here we describe insights from sequencing whole genomes (low read depth, 7×) or exomes (high read depth, 80×) of nearly 10,000 individuals from population-based and disease collections. In extensively...... phenotyped cohorts we characterize over 24 million novel sequence variants, generate a highly accurate imputation reference panel and identify novel alleles associated with levels of triglycerides (APOB), adiponectin (ADIPOQ) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLR and RGAG1) from single...... resource, including individual-level genetic and phenotypic data and web-based tools to facilitate the exploration of association results....

  3. The treatment of Wilson's disease, a rare genetic disorder of copper metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purchase, Rupert

    2013-01-01

    Wilson's disease is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterised by the deposition of copper in the brain, liver; cornea, and other organs. The overload of copper inevitably leads to progressive liver and neurological dysfunction. Copper overload in patients with Wilson's disease is caused by impairment to the biliary route for excretion of dietary copper A combination of neurological, psychiatric and hepatic symptoms can make the diagnosis of Wilson's disease challenging. Most symptoms appear in the second and third decades of life. The disease affects between one in 30,000 and one in 100,000 individuals, and is fatal if left untreated. Five drugs are currently available to treat Wilson's disease: British Anti-Lewisite; D-penicillamine; trientine; zinc sulfate or acetate; and ammonium tetrathiomolybdate. Each drug can reduce copper levels and/or transform copper into a metabolically inert and unavailable form in the patient. The discovery and introduction of these five drugs owes more to the inspiration of a few dedicated physicians and agricultural scientists than to the resources of the pharmaceutical industry.

  4. Design and Implementation of the Hepatorenal Fibrocystic Disease Core Center Clinical Database: A Centralized Resource for Characterizing Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease and Other Hepatorenal Fibrocystic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Guay-Woodford

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD and other hepatorenal fibrocystic diseases (HRFD are relatively rare recessive disorders that constitute an important set of childhood nephropathies. Little is known about fundamental pathogenesis, and advances toward clinical trials will require well-characterized patient cohorts and the development of predictive and prognostic biomarkers. Such studies in rare diseases require greater collaboration than the efforts in common diseases where large patient repositories can be built at a single site. For the HRFD, clinical and translational research studies would be well served by centralized case accrual that coordinates collection of clinical data, biospecimens (DNA and tissues, and genetic information. As a part of the NIH-funded Hepatorenal Fibrocystic Disease Core Center, we have established a web-accessible portal to enroll patients with ARPKD and other HRFD and compile baseline and longitudinal clinical information in a REDCap-based clinical database. This central database is structured to collect clinical data from patients throughout the Americas (North, Central, and South. By using informatic analyses, we have defined the first data-driven estimates of ARPKD-related neonatal mortality, as well as the incidence and prevalence of this disease. These data indicate that while ARPKD is a rare disorder, there are hundreds of patients potentially available for deep clinical phenotyping in the United States alone. The centralization and sharing of clinical information and biomaterials from ARPKD and other HRFD patients hold the potential to accelerate progress in understanding disease pathways. Once the database is mature, the well-characterized patient cohorts will provide an important resource for developing clinical trials to evaluate new targeted therapeutic interventions in this spectrum of disorders.

  5. Proposed 'grant-and-access' program with price caps could stimulate development of drugs for very rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Ana M; Reed, Shelby D; Schulman, Kevin A

    2012-11-01

    The 1983 Orphan Drug Act created incentives for the development of orphan drugs. Despite its successes, including a substantial increase in new drugs, approved orphan drugs still treat fewer than 5 percent of registered rare diseases. In addition, concerns have arisen about the high prices of many of these therapies, which can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars per patient each year. In this article, we propose a new "grant-and-access pathway," in which drug developers could opt to compete for federal grants to subsidize the costs of clinical testing. In return for the grant funding, companies would no longer claim orphan drug tax credits and would agree to price caps for marketed products based on the duration and costs associated with drug development, expected market size, and target rate of return. We identify scenarios in which such a policy could provide a net benefit to society.

  6. CLINICAL STUDY OF HEART DISEASE COMPLICATING PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction-Heart disease complicating pregnancy is considered as a high risk situation. Increased cardiac demands during the course of pregnancy potentially increase morbidity and mortality in women with underlying heart disease. AIM: To determine maternal and fetal outcome in women with heart disease complicating pregnancy, To emphasize on proper protocol for managing pregnancy complicated by heart disease, To correlate the time of booking & NYHA grading with maternal & fetal outcome. Risk of adverse outcome is more in rural population as compared to its urban counterpart. METHOD: A prospective clinical study of 25 cases of pregnancy complicated by heart disease, reporting to tertiary care hospital for delivery, was carried out to find out the incidence and maternal and fetal outcome. RESULTS: The incidence of heart disease in pregnancy in the present study was 0.6%. Most of the women (91% belonged to low socioeconomic class in the rural population. Rheumatic heart lesions constituted 77% of the cases. Mitral stenosis was the commonest lesion in 40% of cases. Ten (40% women delivered spontaneously vaginally at term. Cesarean section was performed in 14 cases (56%. There were 5 maternal deaths. There were no perinatal deaths. CONCLUSION: Early diagnosis of heart disease, regular antenatal check-up, institutional delivery, limiting family size can reduce the maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity associated with heart disease

  7. Celiac crisis is a rare but serious complication of celiac disease in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamma, Shailaja; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Kelly, Ciaran P.; Murray, Joseph; Sheth, Sunil; Schuppan, Detlef; Dennis, Melinda; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Celiac crisis is a life-threatening syndrome in which patients with celiac disease have profuse diarrhea and severe metabolic disturbances. Celiac crisis is rare among adults and not well documented. To improve awareness of this condition and to facilitate diagnosis, we reviewed cases of celiac crisis to identify presenting features, formulate diagnostic criteria, and develop treatment strategies. Methods Cases of biopsy-proven celiac disease were reviewed. Celiac crisis was defined as acute onset or rapid progression of gastrointestinal symptoms that could be attributed to celiac disease and required hospitalization and/or parenteral nutrition, along with signs or symptoms of dehydration or malnutrition. Results Twelve patients met preset criteria for celiac crisis; 11 developed celiac crisis before they were diagnosed with celiac disease. Eleven patients had increased titres of tTG and 1 had immunoglobulin A deficiency. Results of biopsy analyses of duodenum samples from all patients were consistent with a Marsh 3 score (33% with total villous atrophy). Patients presented with severe dehydration, renal dysfunction, and electrolyte disturbances. All patients required hospitalization and intravenous fluids, 6 required corticosteroids, and 5 required parenteral nutrition. All patients eventually had a full response to a gluten-free diet. Conclusion Celiac crisis has a high morbidity and, although rarely described, occurs in adults and often has a clear precipitating factor. Patients that present with severe unexplained diarrhea and malabsorption should be tested for celiac disease; treatment with systemic steroids or oral budesonide should be considered. Nutritional support is often required in the short term but most patients ultimately respond to gluten avoidance. PMID:20417725

  8. A young man with hemoptysis: Rare association of idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis, celiac disease and dilated cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopi C Khilnani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH is a rare cause of recurrent diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH with no specific treatment. Herein, we discuss a case of hemoptysis, who had IPH and other rare associations. A 19-year-old man presented with recurrent hemoptysis, generalized weakness and progressive dyspnea for 3 years. Earlier, he was diagnosed with anemia and was treated with blood transfusions and hematinics. On examination he had pallor, tachycardia and was underweight. Investigations revealed low level of hemoglobin (7.8 g/dl and iron deficiency. An electrocardiography (ECG showed sinus tachycardia, interventricular conduction delay and T-wave inversion. Echocardiography revealed dilated cardiomyopathy with left ventricular dysfunction. Computed tomography of the chest demonstrated bilateral diffuse ground glass opacity suggestive of pulmonary hemorrhage. Pulmonary function tests showed restrictive pattern with increased carbon monoxide diffusion. Bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial lung biopsy showed hemosiderin-laden macrophages. Patient could recall recurrent episodes of diarrhea in childhood. Serum antitissue transglutamase antibodies were raised (291.66 IU/ml, normal <30 IU/ml. Duodenal biopsy showed subtotal villous atrophy consistent with celiac disease. He was started on gluten-free diet, beta blockers and diuretics. After two years of treatment, he has been showing consistent improvement. Screening for CD is important in patients with IPH. Cardiomyopathy forms rare third association. All three show improvement with gluten-free diet.

  9. Construction and implications of structural equation modeling network for pediatric cataract: a data mining research of rare diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erping Long; Shuangjuan Xu; Zhenzhen Liu; Xiaohang Wu; Xiayin Zhang; Jinghui Wang; Wangting Li; Runzhong Liu; Zicong Chen; Kexin Chen; Tongyong Yu; Dongxuan Wu; Xutu Zhao; Jingjing Chen; Zhuoling Lin; Qianzhong Cao

    2017-01-01

    .... This study aims to investigate the interrelationship and the effectiveness of potential factors of pediatric cataract, for the exploration of data mining strategy in the scenarios of rare diseases...

  10. The Promise and Payoff of Rare Diseases Research, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins | NIH MedlinePlus the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. The Promise and Payoff of Rare Diseases Research, From ... them at the present time. How much does the mapping of the human genome help? The Human ...

  11. Identifying relationships among genomic disease regions: predicting genes at pathogenic SNP associations and rare deletions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Raychaudhuri

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Translating a set of disease regions into insight about pathogenic mechanisms requires not only the ability to identify the key disease genes within them, but also the biological relationships among those key genes. Here we describe a statistical method, Gene Relationships Among Implicated Loci (GRAIL, that takes a list of disease regions and automatically assesses the degree of relatedness of implicated genes using 250,000 PubMed abstracts. We first evaluated GRAIL by assessing its ability to identify subsets of highly related genes in common pathways from validated lipid and height SNP associations from recent genome-wide studies. We then tested GRAIL, by assessing its ability to separate true disease regions from many false positive disease regions in two separate practical applications in human genetics. First, we took 74 nominally associated Crohn's disease SNPs and applied GRAIL to identify a subset of 13 SNPs with highly related genes. Of these, ten convincingly validated in follow-up genotyping; genotyping results for the remaining three were inconclusive. Next, we applied GRAIL to 165 rare deletion events seen in schizophrenia cases (less than one-third of which are contributing to disease risk. We demonstrate that GRAIL is able to identify a subset of 16 deletions containing highly related genes; many of these genes are expressed in the central nervous system and play a role in neuronal synapses. GRAIL offers a statistically robust approach to identifying functionally related genes from across multiple disease regions--that likely represent key disease pathways. An online version of this method is available for public use (http://www.broad.mit.edu/mpg/grail/.

  12. Access to information supporting availability of medicines for patients suffering from rare diseases looking for possible treatments: the EuOrphan Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakisaitis, Donatas; Spokiene, Indre; Juskevicius, Jonas; Valuckas, Konstantinas Povilas; Baiardi, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Currently in Europe, approximately 30 million people suffer from rare diseases, and a major problem is that many patients do not have access to quality healthcare for their disorders. Moreover, there is also a lack of quality information and a networking system aimed at supporting interaction among patients, clinicians, researchers, pharmaceutical industries, and governmental bodies. The purpose of this article is to inform physicians, public health care professionals, and other health care providers about EuOrphan service, the aim of which is to ensure easier access to quality information on rare diseases and their treatment. A set of web-based services is available at www.euorphan.com where information for target-users on treatments and products available worldwide for rare disease care as well as indications about healthcare centers are provided. Moreover, the service aims at providing consultancies for pharmaceutical companies to ultimately support the European legislation in bringing new drugs of a high ethical standard to the market and to exert a positive impact on the large population of patients suffering from rare diseases in Europe. The services provided by EuOrphan can facilitate concrete networking among patients, patient associations, doctors, and companies and also support the organization of clinical trials. In this perspective, EuOrphan could become a very valuable tool for globalizing the information about the availability of treatment (authorized or under development) of orphan patients.

  13. Dermatomiofibroma: relato de caso de doença rara Dermatomyofibroma: a case report of a rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Marques de Macedo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available O Dermatomiofibroma está incluído no grupo de lesões neoplásicas mesenquimais benignas de linhagem fibroblástica e miofibroblástica da pele. É uma doença rara, havendo aproximadamente 100 casos descritos na literatura mundial até o momento. Este artigo relata o caso de uma mulher jovem com apresentação clínica típica e diagnóstico histopatológico de dermatomiofibroma. Foram realizadas colorações especiais que mostraram preservação das fibras colágenas e a imunohistoquímica revelou positividade para vimentina e negatividade para actina e S100. Por se tratar de doença rara, os achados histopatológicos são de grande importância, mas a supeição clínica é possível em casos típicos como este.Dermato myofibroma is included in the group of benign cutaneous mesenchymal neoplastic lesions of fibroblastic and myofibroblastic lineage. It's a rare disease and there are approximately only one hundred cases described worldwide in the medical literature up to now. The present study reports the case of a young woman with typical clinical cutaneous lesion and histopathological diagnosis of dermato myofibroma. Special stains were carried out which showed preserved collagen fibers and immunohistochemistry was positive for vimentin and negative for actin and S100. As it is a rare disease, the histopathological findings are of great importance but clinical suspicion is possible in typical cases such as this one.

  14. Common and rare genetic markers of lipid variation in subjects with type 2 diabetes from the ACCORD clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skylar W. Marvel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Individuals with type 2 diabetes are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Alterations in circulating lipid levels, total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, and triglycerides (TG are heritable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Here we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS of common and rare variants to investigate associations with baseline lipid levels in 7,844 individuals with type 2 diabetes from the ACCORD clinical trial. Methods DNA extracted from stored blood samples from ACCORD participants were genotyped using the Affymetrix Axiom Biobank 1 Genotyping Array. After quality control and genotype imputation, association of common genetic variants (CV, defined as minor allele frequency (MAF ≥ 3%, with baseline levels of TC, LDL, HDL, and TG was tested using a linear model. Rare variant (RV associations (MAF < 3% were conducted using a suite of methods that collapse multiple RV within individual genes. Results Many statistically significant CV (p < 1 × 10−8 replicate findings in large meta-analyses in non-diabetic subjects. RV analyses also confirmed findings in other studies, whereas significant RV associations with CNOT2, HPN-AS1, and SIRPD appear to be novel (q < 0.1. Discussion Here we present findings for the largest GWAS of lipid levels in people with type 2 diabetes to date. We identified 17 statistically significant (p < 1 × 10−8 associations of CV with lipid levels in 11 genes or chromosomal regions, all of which were previously identified in meta-analyses of mostly non-diabetic cohorts. We also identified 13 associations in 11 genes based on RV, several of which represent novel findings.

  15. Common and rare genetic markers of lipid variation in subjects with type 2 diabetes from the ACCORD clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvel, Skylar W; Rotroff, Daniel M; Wagner, Michael J; Buse, John B; Havener, Tammy M; McLeod, Howard L; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Alterations in circulating lipid levels, total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglycerides (TG) are heritable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Here we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of common and rare variants to investigate associations with baseline lipid levels in 7,844 individuals with type 2 diabetes from the ACCORD clinical trial. DNA extracted from stored blood samples from ACCORD participants were genotyped using the Affymetrix Axiom Biobank 1 Genotyping Array. After quality control and genotype imputation, association of common genetic variants (CV), defined as minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥ 3%, with baseline levels of TC, LDL, HDL, and TG was tested using a linear model. Rare variant (RV) associations (MAF < 3%) were conducted using a suite of methods that collapse multiple RV within individual genes. Many statistically significant CV (p < 1 × 10(-8)) replicate findings in large meta-analyses in non-diabetic subjects. RV analyses also confirmed findings in other studies, whereas significant RV associations with CNOT2, HPN-AS1, and SIRPD appear to be novel (q < 0.1). Here we present findings for the largest GWAS of lipid levels in people with type 2 diabetes to date. We identified 17 statistically significant (p < 1 × 10(-8)) associations of CV with lipid levels in 11 genes or chromosomal regions, all of which were previously identified in meta-analyses of mostly non-diabetic cohorts. We also identified 13 associations in 11 genes based on RV, several of which represent novel findings.

  16. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research.

  17. Bell’s palsy in a case of Darier’s disease – a rare disease association or coincidental finding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritika Pandey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Darier’s disease (DD is a rare acantholytic dyskeratotic autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by the presence of warty, brown papules and plaques affecting the seborrhoeic areas. Frequent bacterial, fungal and viral particularly herpes simplex virus (HSV infections complicate DD. Bell’s palsy is an acute onset, idiopathic facial paralysis resulting from a dysfunction anywhere along the peripheral part of the facial nerve. Reactivation of HSV is considered to be the main cause of Bell’s palsy. This case represents, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of DD presenting with Bell’s palsy. This case underlines the importance of recognizing HSV infection in DD.

  18. Intra-abdominal pectus bar migration – a rare clinical entity: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasiou Thanos

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present the case of a 20-year-old male who underwent successful surgical correction of pectus excavatum with the Highly Modified Ravitch Repair (HMRR. At 29 months the attempted operative removal of the Ravitch bar was unsuccessful despite the impression of adequate bar location on chest x-ray. Subsequent imaging with computed tomography was unclear in determining whether the bar was supra or infra-diaphragmatic due to the tissue distortion subsequent to initial surgery. Video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS successfully retrieved the bar and revealed that it was not in the thorax, but had migrated to the intra-abdominal bare area of the liver, with no evidence of associated diaphragmatic defect or hernia. Intra-abdominal pectus bar migration is a rare clinical entity, and safe removal can be facilitated by the use of the VATS technique.

  19. Atypical presentation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a rare but important cause of rapidly progressive dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillefer, Marguerite S; Tangarorang, Glendo L; Kuchel, George A; Menkes, Daniel L

    2011-09-01

    We report an atypical presentation of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in a 74-year-old woman that illustrates the difficulty in diagnosing this rare, but important, cause of rapidly progressive dementia. Despite well-established criteria, this diagnosis is often missed or substantially delayed (Table 1). In this case, a precipitous cognitive decline associated with a urinary tract infection initiallysuggested delirium. Although atypical CJD was considered as a cause when symptoms persisted, a definitive diagnosis was established postmortem when the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) prion protein 14-3-3 tested positive. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease must be considered in the differential diagnosis of rapidly progressive dementia as Connecticut accounts for approximately three of the more than 200 cases diagnosed nationally.

  20. Clinical Subgroups in Bilateral Meniere Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frejo, Lidia; Soto-Varela, Andres; Santos-Perez, Sofía; Aran, Ismael; Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Perez-Guillen, Vanesa; Perez-Garrigues, Herminio; Fraile, Jesus; Martin-Sanz, Eduardo; Tapia, Maria C.; Trinidad, Gabriel; García-Arumi, Ana María; González-Aguado, Rocío; Espinosa-Sanchez, Juan M.; Marques, Pedro; Perez, Paz; Benitez, Jesus; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Meniere disease (MD) is a heterogeneous clinical condition characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, episodic vestibular symptoms, and tinnitus associated with several comorbidities, such as migraine or autoimmune disorders (AD). The frequency of bilateral involvement may range from 5 to 50%, and it depends on the duration of the disease. We have performed a two-step cluster analysis in 398 patients with bilateral MD (BMD) to identify the best predictors to define clinical subgroups with a potential different etiology to improve the phenotyping of BMD and to develop new treatments. We have defined five clinical variants in BMD. Group 1 is the most frequently found, includes 46% of patients, and is defined by metachronic hearing loss without migraine and without AD. Group 2 is found in 17% of patients, and it is defined by synchronic hearing loss without migraine or AD. Group 3, with 13% of patients, is characterized by familial MD, while group 4, that includes 12% of patients, is associated by the presence of migraine in all cases. Group 5 is found in 11% of patients and is defined by AD. This approach can be helpful in selecting patients for genetic and clinical research. However, further studies will be required to improve the phenotyping in these clinical variants for a better understanding of the diverse etiological factors contributing to BMD. PMID:27822199