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Sample records for rapidly relaxing component

  1. Control of relaxation cracking in austenitic high temperature components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortel, J.C. van

    2007-01-01

    The degradation mechanism "relaxation cracking" is acting in austenitic components operating between 550°C (1020°F) and 750°C (1380°F). The brittle failures are always located in cold formed areas or in welded joints and are mostly addressed within 1 year service. More than 10 different names can be

  2. Variable setpoint as a relaxing component in physiological control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risvoll, Geir B; Thorsen, Kristian; Ruoff, Peter; Drengstig, Tormod

    2017-09-01

    Setpoints in physiology have been a puzzle for decades, and especially the notion of fixed or variable setpoints have received much attention. In this paper, we show how previously presented homeostatic controller motifs, extended with saturable signaling kinetics, can be described as variable setpoint controllers. The benefit of a variable setpoint controller is that an observed change in the concentration of the regulated biochemical species (the controlled variable) is fully characterized, and is not considered a deviation from a fixed setpoint. The variation in this biochemical species originate from variation in the disturbances (the perturbation), and thereby in the biochemical species representing the controller (the manipulated variable). Thus, we define an operational space which is spanned out by the combined high and low levels of the variations in (1) the controlled variable, (2) the manipulated variable, and (3) the perturbation. From this operational space, we investigate whether and how it imposes constraints on the different motif parameters, in order for the motif to represent a mathematical model of the regulatory system. Further analysis of the controller's ability to compensate for disturbances reveals that a variable setpoint represents a relaxing component for the controller, in that the necessary control action is reduced compared to that of a fixed setpoint controller. Such a relaxing component might serve as an important property from an evolutionary point of view. Finally, we illustrate the principles using the renal sodium and aldosterone regulatory system, where we model the variation in plasma sodium as a function of salt intake. We show that the experimentally observed variations in plasma sodium can be interpreted as a variable setpoint regulatory system. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  3. Exploring Relaxation Processes in Components of DNA with UV Nonlinear Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Andrew; West, Brantley; Womick, Jordan

    2012-02-01

    Underlying photoinduced relaxation in DNA is a complex world of solute-solvent interactions and fluctuations in the geometries of macromolecules. Electronic excitations are rapidly deactivated by nuclear motions through conical intersections, thereby suppressing the formation of lesions (e.g., thymine dimers) known to inhibit cellular function. At the instant following internal conversion, the bases are left in ``hot'' quantum states, wherein a subset of vibrational modes possess a highly non-equilibrium distribution of excitation quanta. The transfer of this energy to the surrounding also involves intriguing fundamental physics. We examine these processes in small components of DNA by conducting femtosecond laser spectroscopies at cryogenic temperatures. Our experiments utilize several recent advances in nonlinear optics. Parametric processes in argon gas are used to generate 25fs pulse durations at 265nm. These short pulses are employed in a variety of measurements (e.g., transient grating, 2D photon echo, fluorescence down-conversion) with the goal of understanding relaxation mechanisms. Our data suggest that excited state deactivation in DNA is quite sensitive to the exchange of vibrational energy between the bases and segments of the backbone.

  4. Development of rapid methods for relaxation time mapping and motion estimation using magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Gilani, Syed Irtiza Ali

    2008-01-01

    Recent technological developments in the field of magnetic resonance imaging have resulted in advanced techniques that can reduce the total time to acquire images. For applications such as relaxation time mapping, which enables improved visualisation of in vivo structures, rapid imaging techniques are highly desirable. TAPIR is a Look- Locker-based sequence for high-resolution, multislice T1 relaxation time mapping. Despite the high accuracy and precision of TAPIR, an improveme...

  5. Distinct mechanisms of relaxation to bioactive components from chamomile species in porcine isolated blood vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, R.E., E-mail: Richard.roberts@nottingham.ac.uk; Allen, S.; Chang, A.P.Y.; Henderson, H.; Hobson, G.C.; Karania, B.; Morgan, K.N.; Pek, A.S.Y.; Raghvani, K.; Shee, C.Y.; Shikotra, J.; Street, E.; Abbas, Z.; Ellis, K.; Heer, J.K.; Alexander, S.P.H., E-mail: steve.alexander@nottingham.ac.uk

    2013-11-01

    German chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.), a widely-used herbal medicine, has been reported to have a wide range of biological effects, including smooth muscle relaxation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of representative compounds from chamomile (apigenin, luteolin, (−)-α-bisabolol, farnesene, umbelliferone; 3–30 μM) on vascular tone using porcine coronary and splenic arteries mounted for isometric tension recording in isolated tissue baths and precontracted with the thromboxane-mimetic U46619. Apigenin, luteolin, and (−)-α-bisabolol produced slow, concentration-dependent relaxations in both the coronary and splenic arteries that were not blocked by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase or potassium channels. Removal of extracellular calcium inhibited the relaxations to all three compounds, and these compounds also inhibited calcium re-addition-evoked contractions, indicating that the relaxation response may be mediated through inhibition of calcium influx. Apigenin and luteolin, but not (−)-α-bisabolol, enhanced the relaxation to the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, indicating that apigenin and luteolin may act to regulate cyclic GMP levels. Umbelliferone produced a rapid, transient relaxation in the splenic artery, but not the coronary artery, that was inhibited by L-NAME and removal of the endothelium, suggesting an influence on nitric oxide production. Farnesene, at concentrations up to 30 μM, was without effect in either blood vessel. In conclusion, hydroxylated compounds (apigenin, luteolin and (−)-α-bisabolol) found in chamomile all caused a slow relaxation of isolated blood vessels through an effect on calcium influx. Umbelliferone, on the other hand, produced a rapid, transient relaxation dependent upon release of nitric oxide from the endothelium. - Highlights: • Apigenin, luteolin, and (-)-α-bisabolol are present in chamomile. • They produced slow, concentration-dependent relaxations in arteries. • These

  6. Distinct mechanisms of relaxation to bioactive components from chamomile species in porcine isolated blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R E; Allen, S; Chang, A P Y; Henderson, H; Hobson, G C; Karania, B; Morgan, K N; Pek, A S Y; Raghvani, K; Shee, C Y; Shikotra, J; Street, E; Abbas, Z; Ellis, K; Heer, J K; Alexander, S P H

    2013-11-01

    German chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.), a widely-used herbal medicine, has been reported to have a wide range of biological effects, including smooth muscle relaxation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of representative compounds from chamomile (apigenin, luteolin, (-)-α-bisabolol, farnesene, umbelliferone; 3-30 μM) on vascular tone using porcine coronary and splenic arteries mounted for isometric tension recording in isolated tissue baths and precontracted with the thromboxane-mimetic U46619. Apigenin, luteolin, and (-)-α-bisabolol produced slow, concentration-dependent relaxations in both the coronary and splenic arteries that were not blocked by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase or potassium channels. Removal of extracellular calcium inhibited the relaxations to all three compounds, and these compounds also inhibited calcium re-addition-evoked contractions, indicating that the relaxation response may be mediated through inhibition of calcium influx. Apigenin and luteolin, but not (-)-α-bisabolol, enhanced the relaxation to the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, indicating that apigenin and luteolin may act to regulate cyclic GMP levels. Umbelliferone produced a rapid, transient relaxation in the splenic artery, but not the coronary artery, that was inhibited by L-NAME and removal of the endothelium, suggesting an influence on nitric oxide production. Farnesene, at concentrations up to 30 μM, was without effect in either blood vessel. In conclusion, hydroxylated compounds (apigenin, luteolin and (-)-α-bisabolol) found in chamomile all caused a slow relaxation of isolated blood vessels through an effect on calcium influx. Umbelliferone, on the other hand, produced a rapid, transient relaxation dependent upon release of nitric oxide from the endothelium. © 2013.

  7. Anomalous NMR Relaxation in Cartilage Matrix Components and Native Cartilage: Fractional-Order Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Richard L.; Li, Weiguo; Velasco, M. Pilar; Trujillo, Juan; Reiter, David A.; Morgenstern, Ashley; Spencer, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    We present a fractional-order extension of the Bloch equations to describe anomalous NMR relaxation phenomena (T1 and T2). The model has solutions in the form of Mittag-Leffler and stretched exponential functions that generalize conventional exponential relaxation. Such functions have been shown by others to be useful for describing dielectric and viscoelastic relaxation in complex, heterogeneous materials. Here, we apply these fractional-order T1 and T2 relaxation models to experiments performed at 9.4 and 11.7 Tesla on type I collagen gels, chondroitin sulfate mixtures, and to bovine nasal cartilage (BNC), a largely isotropic and homogeneous form of cartilage. The results show that the fractional-order analysis captures important features of NMR relaxation that are typically described by multi-exponential decay models. We find that the T2 relaxation of BNC can be described in a unique way by a single fractional-order parameter (α), in contrast to the lack of uniqueness of multi-exponential fits in the realistic setting of a finite signal-to-noise ratio. No anomalous behavior of T1 was observed in BNC. In the single-component gels, for T2 measurements, increasing the concentration of the largest components of cartilage matrix, collagen and chondroitin sulfate, results in a decrease in α, reflecting a more restricted aqueous environment. The quality of the curve fits obtained using Mittag-Leffler and stretched exponential functions are in some cases superior to those obtained using mono- and bi-exponential models. In both gels and BNC, α appears to account for microstructural complexity in the setting of an altered distribution of relaxation times. This work suggests the utility of fractional-order models to describe T2 NMR relaxation processes in biological tissues. PMID:21498095

  8. Efficient and robust relaxation procedures for multi-component mixtures including phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Ee, E-mail: eehan@math.uni-bremen.de [Zentrum für Technomathematik, Universität Bremen, Bibliothekstraße 1, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Hantke, Maren, E-mail: maren.hantke@ovgu.de [Institut für Analysis und Numerik, Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg, PSF 4120, D-39016 Magdeburg (Germany); Müller, Siegfried, E-mail: mueller@igpm.rwth-aachen.de [Institut für Geometrie und Praktische Mathematik, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2017-06-01

    We consider a thermodynamic consistent multi-component model in multi-dimensions that is a generalization of the classical two-phase flow model of Baer and Nunziato. The exchange of mass, momentum and energy between the phases is described by additional source terms. Typically these terms are handled by relaxation procedures. Available relaxation procedures suffer from efficiency and robustness resulting in very costly computations that in general only allow for one-dimensional computations. Therefore we focus on the development of new efficient and robust numerical methods for relaxation processes. We derive exact procedures to determine mechanical and thermal equilibrium states. Further we introduce a novel iterative method to treat the mass transfer for a three component mixture. All new procedures can be extended to an arbitrary number of inert ideal gases. We prove existence, uniqueness and physical admissibility of the resulting states and convergence of our new procedures. Efficiency and robustness of the procedures are verified by means of numerical computations in one and two space dimensions. - Highlights: • We develop novel relaxation procedures for a generalized, thermodynamically consistent Baer–Nunziato type model. • Exact procedures for mechanical and thermal relaxation procedures avoid artificial parameters. • Existence, uniqueness and physical admissibility of the equilibrium states are proven for special mixtures. • A novel iterative method for mass transfer is introduced for a three component mixture providing a unique and admissible equilibrium state.

  9. FDC, rapid fabrication of structural components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwala, M.K.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Weeren, R. van; Safari, A.; Danforth, S.C.; Langrana, N.A. [Rutgers-the State Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Jamalabad, V.R.; Whalen, P.J. [AlliedSignal Research and Technology, Morristown, NJ (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Solid freeform fabrication (SFF) is used to make 3-D components directly from computer-aided design (CAD) files. Many SFF techniques have been developed to fabricate parts and prototypes from CAD without hard tooling, dies or molds. Most of these techniques have been commercialized for fabrication of polymer and plastic parts for design verification and form and fit. Other SFF techniques are being developed for production of ceramic components with functional properties. One such technique, called fused deposition of ceramics (FDC), has been developed and demonstrated for structural ceramics. FDC is based on existing fused deposition modeling (FDM{trademark}) technology, commercialized by Stratasys Inc. (Eden Prairie, Minn.), for processing of polymers and waxes. High-green-density, simple- and complex-shaped silicon nitride parts have been formed by fused deposition of ceramics.

  10. Reliability of the Electromechanical Delay Components Assessment during the Relaxation Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Cè

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to assess by an electromyographic (EMG, mechanomyographic (MMG, and force-combined approach the electrochemical and mechanical components of the overall electromechanical delay during relaxation (R-EMD. Reliability of the measurements was also assessed. To this purpose, supramaximal tetanic stimulations (50 Hz were delivered to the gastrocnemius medialis muscle of 17 participants. During stimulations, the EMG, MMG, and force signals were detected, and the time lag between EMG cessation and the beginning of force decay (Δt EMG-F, as temporal indicators of the electrochemical events and from the initial force decrease to the largest negative peak of MMG signal during relaxation (Δt F-MMG, as temporal indicators of the mechanical events was calculated, together with overall R-EMD duration (from EMG cessation to the largest MMG negative peak during relaxation. Peak force (pF, half relaxation time (HRT, and MMG peak-to-peak during the relaxation phase (R-MMG p-p were also calculated. Test-retest reliability was assessed by Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC. With a total R-EMD duration of 96.9 ± 1.9 ms, Δt EMG-F contributed for about 24% (23.4 ± 2.7 ms while Δt F-MMG for about 76% (73.5 ± 3.2 ms. Reliability of the measurements was high for all variables. Our findings show that the main contributor to R-EMD is represented by the mechanical components (series elastic components and muscle fibres behaviour, with a high reliability level for this type of approach.

  11. Merging of the alpha and beta relaxations and aging via the Johari–Goldstein modes in rapidly quenched metallic glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Hachenberg, Jörg; Bedorf, Dennis; Samwer, Konrad; Richert, Ranko; Kahl, Annelen; Demetriou, Marios D.; Johnson, William L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides evidence that the physical aging of deeply and rapidly quenched metallic glasses is promoted by the Johari–Goldstein slow beta relaxation, resulting in a significant irreversible increase in the mechanical modulus on initial heating. Dynamic mechanical analysis has been used to characterize relaxation phenomena of a strong and a fragile metallic glass. In addition, we can extrapolate the temperature dependence of beta- and alpha-relaxation peaks to higher temperatures and ...

  12. Development of rapid methods for relaxation time mapping and motion estimation using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilani, Syed Irtiza Ali

    2008-09-15

    Recent technological developments in the field of magnetic resonance imaging have resulted in advanced techniques that can reduce the total time to acquire images. For applications such as relaxation time mapping, which enables improved visualisation of in vivo structures, rapid imaging techniques are highly desirable. TAPIR is a Look- Locker-based sequence for high-resolution, multislice T{sub 1} relaxation time mapping. Despite the high accuracy and precision of TAPIR, an improvement in the k-space sampling trajectory is desired to acquire data in clinically acceptable times. In this thesis, a new trajectory, termed line-sharing, is introduced for TAPIR that can potentially reduce the acquisition time by 40 %. Additionally, the line-sharing method was compared with the GRAPPA parallel imaging method. These methods were employed to reconstruct time-point images from the data acquired on a 4T high-field MR research scanner. Multislice, multipoint in vivo results obtained using these methods are presented. Despite improvement in acquisition speed, through line-sharing, for example, motion remains a problem and artefact-free data cannot always be obtained. Therefore, in this thesis, a rapid technique is introduced to estimate in-plane motion. The presented technique is based on calculating the in-plane motion parameters, i.e., translation and rotation, by registering the low-resolution MR images. The rotation estimation method is based on the pseudo-polar FFT, where the Fourier domain is composed of frequencies that reside in an oversampled set of non-angularly, equispaced points. The essence of the method is that unlike other Fourier-based registration schemes, the employed approach does not require any interpolation to calculate the pseudo-polar FFT grid coordinates. Translation parameters are estimated by the phase correlation method. However, instead of two-dimensional analysis of the phase correlation matrix, a low complexity subspace identification of the phase

  13. Identification of slow relaxing spin components by pulse EPR techniques in graphene-related materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Barbon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR is a powerful technique that is suitable to study graphene-related materials. The challenging ability requested to the spectroscopy is its capability to resolve the variety of structures, relatively similar, that are obtained in materials produced through different methods, but that also coexist inside a single sample. In general, because of the intrinsic inhomogeneity of the samples, the EPR spectra are therefore a superposition of spectra coming from different structures. We show that by pulse EPR techniques (echo-detected EPR, ESEEM and Mims ENDOR we can identify and characterize species with slow spin relaxing properties. These species are generally called molecular states, and are likely small pieces of graphenic structures of limited dimensions, thus conveniently described by a molecular approach. We have studied commercial reduced graphene oxide and chemically exfoliated graphite, which are characterized by different EPR spectra. Hyperfine spectroscopies enabled us to characterize the molecular components of the different materials, especially in terms of the interaction of the unpaired electrons with protons (number of protons and hyperfine coupling constants. We also obtained useful precious information about extent of delocalization of the molecular states.

  14. Active Components of Ginger Potentiate β-Agonist–Induced Relaxation of Airway Smooth Muscle by Modulating Cytoskeletal Regulatory Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Xu, Carrie; Wakita, Ryo; Emala, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    β-Agonists are the first-line therapy to alleviate asthma symptoms by acutely relaxing the airway. Purified components of ginger relax airway smooth muscle (ASM), but the mechanisms are unclear. By elucidating these mechanisms, we can explore the use of phytotherapeutics in combination with traditional asthma therapies. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine if 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol potentiate β-agonist–induced ASM relaxation; and (2) define the mechanism(s) of action responsible for this potentiation. Human ASM was contracted in organ baths. Tissues were relaxed dose dependently with β-agonist, isoproterenol, in the presence of vehicle, 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol (100 μM). Primary human ASM cells were used for cellular experiments. Purified phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4D or phospholipase C β enzyme was used to assess inhibitory activity of ginger components using fluorescent assays. A G-LISA assay was used to determine the effects of ginger constituents on Ras homolog gene family member A activation. Significant potentiation of isoproterenol-induced relaxation was observed with each of the ginger constituents. 6-Shogaol showed the largest shift in isoproterenol half-maximal effective concentration. 6-Gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol significantly inhibited PDE4D, whereas 8-gingerol and 6-shogaol also inhibited phospholipase C β activity. 6-Shogaol alone inhibited Ras homolog gene family member A activation. In human ASM cells, these constituents decreased phosphorylation of 17-kD protein kinase C–potentiated inhibitory protein of type 1 protein phosphatase and 8-gingerol decreased myosin light chain phosphorylation. Isolated components of ginger potentiate β-agonist–induced relaxation in human ASM. This potentiation involves PDE4D inhibition and cytoskeletal regulatory proteins. Together with β-agonists, 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol may augment existing asthma therapy, resulting in relief of symptoms

  15. Logarithmic superposition of force response with rapid length changes in relaxed porcine airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijpma, G; Al-Jumaily, A M; Cairns, S P; Sieck, G C

    2010-12-01

    We present a systematic quantitative analysis of power-law force relaxation and investigate logarithmic superposition of force response in relaxed porcine airway smooth muscle (ASM) strips in vitro. The term logarithmic superposition describes linear superposition on a logarithmic scale, which is equivalent to multiplication on a linear scale. Additionally, we examine whether the dynamic response of contracted and relaxed muscles is dominated by cross-bridge cycling or passive dynamics. The study shows the following main findings. For relaxed ASM, the force response to length steps of varying amplitude (0.25-4% of reference length, both lengthening and shortening) are well-fitted with power-law functions over several decades of time (10⁻² to 10³ s), and the force response after consecutive length changes is more accurately fitted assuming logarithmic superposition rather than linear superposition. Furthermore, for sinusoidal length oscillations in contracted and relaxed muscles, increasing the oscillation amplitude induces greater hysteresivity and asymmetry of force-length relationships, whereas increasing the frequency dampens hysteresivity but increases asymmetry. We conclude that logarithmic superposition is an important feature of relaxed ASM, which may facilitate a more accurate prediction of force responses in the continuous dynamic environment of the respiratory system. In addition, the single power-function response to length changes shows that the dynamics of cross-bridge cycling can be ignored in relaxed muscle. The similarity in response between relaxed and contracted states implies that the investigated passive dynamics play an important role in both states and should be taken into account.

  16. Experimental issues in the measurement of multi-component relaxation times in articular cartilage by microscopic MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nian; Xia, Yang

    2013-10-01

    A number of experimental issues in the measurement of multi-component T2 and T1ρ relaxations in native and enzymatically digested articular cartilage were investigated by microscopic MRI (μMRI). The issues included the bath solutions (physiological saline and phosphate buffered saline (PBS)), the imaging resolution (35-140 μm), the specimen orientations (0° and 55°), and the strength of spin-lock frequencies (0.5-2 kHz) in the T1ρ experiments. In addition to cartilage, the samples of agar gel and doped water solution were also used in the investigation. Two imaging sequences were used: CPMG-SE and MSME. All raw data were analyzed by the non-negative least square (NNLS) method. The MSME sequence was shown to result in the observation of multi-component T2, even in the gel and liquid samples, demonstrating the artificial uncleanness of this sequence in the multi-component measurements. The soaking of cartilage in PBS reduced the observable T2 components to one at both 0° and 55°, suggesting the effect of phosphate ions on proton exchange between different pools of water molecules. The cartilage orientation with respect to the external magnetic field and the spin-lock strengths in the T1ρ experiment both affected the quantification of the multi-component relaxation. The transitions between a mono-component and multi-components in cartilage under various experimental conditions call for the extra caution in interpreting the relaxation results.

  17. Machine accuracy for rapid prototyping of quality components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Peihua; Yan, May; Huang, X.; Zhang, Xiaochen

    1998-10-01

    Ever-growing global competition forces manufacturers to deliver more competitive products with better quality, lower price and in short time. One of the most important and challenging tasks faced by value-added product manufacturing industry is substantial reduction of product development time. Rapid prototyping technologies have received significant interests from both research and industrial communities. Due to the model accuracy, integrity and strength problems, their applications are limited. The most common sources of errors in the rapid prototyping and manufacturing systems including Cubital machines can be categorized as mathematical, process-related or material- related errors. In this paper, we present an analysis of accuracy of a Cubital Solider 4600 machine and an application on pattern and mould design and manufacturing. The experimental study determines the relationships between the machine accuracy and dimensions and parameter setting, which can be used to control the accuracy of parts to be built.

  18. The search for negative amplitude components in quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times: the example of 1H magnetization exchange in articular cartilage and hydrated collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantazzini, Paola; Galassi, Francesca; Bortolotti, Villiam; Brown, Robert J. S.; Vittur, Franco

    2011-06-01

    When inverting nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation data in order to obtain quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times for fluids in porous media, it is common practice to impose a non-negative (NN) constraint on the distributions. While this approach can be useful in reducing the effects of data distortion and/or preventing wild oscillations in the distributions, it may give misleading results in the presence of real negative amplitude components. Here, some examples of valid negative components for articular cartilage and hydrated collagen are given. Articular cartilage is a connective tissue, consisting mainly of collagen, proteoglycans and water, which can be considered, in many aspects, as a porous medium. Separate T1 relaxation data are obtained for low-mobility ('solid') macromolecular 1H and for higher-mobility ('liquid') 1H by the separation of these components in free induction decays, with α denoting the solid/liquid 1H ratio. When quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times (T1) of the solid and liquid signal components of cartilage or collagen are computed from experimental relaxation data without imposing the usual NN constraint, valid negative peaks may appear. The features of the distributions, in particular negative peaks, and the fact that peaks at longer times for macromolecular and water protons are at essentially the same T1, are interpreted as the result of a magnetization exchange between these two spin pools. For the only-slightly-hydrated collagen samples, with α>1, the exchange leads to small negative peaks at short T1 times for the macromolecular component. However, for the cartilage, with substantial hydration or for a strongly hydrated collagen sample, both with αLt1, the behavior is reversed, with a negative peak for water at short times. The validity of a negative peak may be accepted (dismissed) by a high (low) cost of NN in error of fit. Computed distributions for simulated data using observed signal

  19. Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Tot

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A unique case of metaplastic breast carcinoma with an epithelial component showing tumoral necrosis and neuroectodermal stromal component is described. The tumor grew rapidly and measured 9 cm at the time of diagnosis. No lymph node metastases were present. The disease progressed rapidly and the patient died two years after the diagnosis from a hemorrhage caused by brain metastases. The morphology and phenotype of the tumor are described in detail and the differential diagnostic options are discussed.

  20. Rapid Naming Speed Components and Reading Development in a Consistent Orthography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, George K.; Papadopoulos, Timothy C.; Fella, Argyro; Parrila, Rauno

    2012-01-01

    We examined how rapid automatized naming (RAN) components--articulation time and pause time--predict word and text reading fluency in a consistent orthography (Greek). In total, 68 children were followed from Grade 2 to Grade 6 and were assessed three times on RAN (Digits and Objects), phonological awareness, orthographic processing, speed of…

  1. Optimized co-solute paramagnetic relaxation enhancement for the rapid NMR analysis of a highly fibrillogenic peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oktaviani, Nur Alia [University of Groningen, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute (Netherlands); Risør, Michael W. [University of Aarhus, Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) and Department of Chemistry (Denmark); Lee, Young-Ho [Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research (Japan); Megens, Rik P. [University of Groningen, Stratingh Institute for Chemistry (Netherlands); Jong, Djurre H. de; Otten, Renee; Scheek, Ruud M. [University of Groningen, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute (Netherlands); Enghild, Jan J. [University of Aarhus, Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) and Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics (Denmark); Nielsen, Niels Chr. [University of Aarhus, Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) and Department of Chemistry (Denmark); Ikegami, Takahisa [Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Medical Life Science (Japan); Mulder, Frans A. A., E-mail: fmulder@chem.au.dk [University of Groningen, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Co-solute paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) is an attractive way to speed up data acquisition in NMR spectroscopy by shortening the T{sub 1} relaxation time of the nucleus of interest and thus the necessary recycle delay. Here, we present the rationale to utilize high-spin iron(III) as the optimal transition metal for this purpose and characterize the properties of its neutral chelate form Fe(DO3A) as a suitable PRE agent. Fe(DO3A) effectively reduces the T{sub 1} values across the entire sequence of the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein with negligible impact on line width. The agent is better suited than currently used alternatives, shows no specific interaction with the polypeptide chain and, due to its high relaxivity, is effective at low concentrations and in ‘proton-less’ NMR experiments. By using Fe(DO3A) we were able to complete the backbone resonance assignment of a highly fibrillogenic peptide from α{sub 1}-antitrypsin by acquiring the necessary suite of multidimensional NMR datasets in 3 h.

  2. Rapid nanoparticle-mediated monitoring of bacterial metabolic activity and assessment of antimicrobial susceptibility in blood with magnetic relaxation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalambos Kaittanis

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering the increased incidence of bacterial infections and the emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria at the global level, we designed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as nanosensors for the assessment of antimicrobial susceptibility through magnetic relaxation. In this report, we demonstrate that iron oxide nanosensors, either dextran-coated supplemented with Con A or silica-coated conjugated directly to Con A, can be used for the fast (1 quantification of polysaccharides, (2 assessment of metabolic activity and (3 determination of antimicrobial susceptibility in blood. The use of these polysaccharide nanosensors in the determination of antimicrobial susceptibility in the clinic or the field, and the utilization of these nanoprobes in pharmaceutical R&D are anticipated.

  3. Rapid monitoring of iron-chelating therapy in thalassemia major by a new cardiovascular MR measure: the reduced transverse relaxation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daniel; Jensen, Jens H.; Wu, Ed X.; Feng, Li; Au, Wing-Yan; Cheung, Jerry S.; Ha, Shau-Yin; Sheth, Sujit S.; Brittenham, Gary M.

    2011-01-01

    In iron overload, almost all the excess iron is stored intracellularly as rapidly mobilizable ferritin iron and slowly exchangeable hemosiderin iron. Increases in cytosolic iron may produce oxidative damage that ultimately results in cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Because intracellular ferritin iron is evidently in equilibrium with the low-molecular-weight cytosolic iron pool, measurements of ferritin iron potentially provide a clinically useful indicator of changes in cytosolic iron. The cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) index of cardiac iron used clinically, the effective transverse relaxation rate (R2*), is principally influenced by hemosiderin iron and changes only slowly over several months, even with intensive iron-chelating therapy. Another conventional CMR index of cardiac iron, the transverse relaxation rate (R2), is sensitive to both hemosiderin iron and ferritin iron. We have developed a new MRI measure, the ‘reduced transverse relaxation rate’ (RR2), and have proposed in previous studies that this measure is primarily sensitive to ferritin iron and largely independent of hemosiderin iron in phantoms mimicking ferritin iron and human liver explants. We hypothesized that RR2 could detect changes produced by 1 week of iron-chelating therapy in patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia. We imaged 10 patients with thalassemia major at 1.5 T in mid-ventricular short-axis planes of the heart, initially after suspending iron-chelating therapy for 1 week and subsequently after resuming oral deferasirox. After resuming iron-chelating therapy, significant decreases were observed in the mean myocardial RR2 (7.8%, p 0.90). Although the difference between changes in RR2 and R2 was not significant (p > 0.3), RR2 was consistently more sensitive than R2 (and R2*) to the resumption of iron-chelating therapy, as judged by the effect sizes of relaxation rate differences detected. Although further studies are needed, myocardial RR2 may be a promising

  4. Simultaneous and rapid determination of multiple component concentrations in a Kraft liquor process stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian [Marietta, GA; Chai, Xin Sheng [Atlanta, GA; Zhu, Junyoung [Marietta, GA

    2008-06-24

    The present invention is a rapid method of determining the concentration of the major components in a chemical stream. The present invention is also a simple, low cost, device of determining the in-situ concentration of the major components in a chemical stream. In particular, the present invention provides a useful method for simultaneously determining the concentrations of sodium hydroxide, sodium sulfide and sodium carbonate in aqueous kraft pulping liquors through use of an attenuated total reflectance (ATR) tunnel flow cell or optical probe capable of producing a ultraviolet absorbency spectrum over a wavelength of 190 to 300 nm. In addition, the present invention eliminates the need for manual sampling and dilution previously required to generate analyzable samples. The inventive method can be used in Kraft pulping operations to control white liquor causticizing efficiency, sulfate reduction efficiency in green liquor, oxidation efficiency for oxidized white liquor and the active and effective alkali charge to kraft pulping operations.

  5. Broadening of the thermal component of the prompt GRB emission due to rapid temperature evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharali, Priya; Sahayanathan, Sunder; Misra, Ranjeev; Boruah, Kalyanee

    2017-08-01

    The observations of the prompt emission of gamma ray bursts (GRB) by GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM), on board Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, suggest the presence of a significant thermal spectral component, whose origin is not well understood. Recently, it has been shown that for long duration GRBs, the spectral width as defined as the logarithm of the ratio of the energies at which the spectrum falls to half its peak value, lie in the range of 0.84-1.3 with a median value of 1.07. Thus, while most of the GRB spectra are found to be too narrow to be explained by synchrotron emission from an electron distribution, they are also significantly broader than a blackbody spectrum whose width should be 0.54. Here, we consider the possibility that an intrinsic thermal spectrum from a fire-ball like model, may be observed to be broadened if the system undergoes a rapid temperature evolution. We construct a toy-model to show that for bursts with durations in the range 5-70 s, the widths of their 1 second time-averaged spectra can be at the most ≲ 0.557. Thus, while rapid temperature variation can broaden the detected spectral shape, the observed median value of ˜ 1.07 requires that there must be significant sub-photospheric emission and/or an anisotropic explosion to explain the broadening for most GRB spectra.

  6. The rapid control of interactions in a two-component Fermi gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stites, Ronald William Donald

    In this dissertation, we describe a variety of experiments having application to ultra-cold atomic gases. While the majority of the experimental results focus on the development of a novel laser source for cooling and manipulating a gas of fermionic 6Li atoms, we also report on a preliminary investigation of rapidly controlling interactions in a two-component Fermi gas. One of the primary tools for our ultra-cold atomic physics experiments is 671 nm laser light nearly resonant with the D1 and D2 spectroscopic lines of ultracold fermionic 6Li atoms. Traditionally, this light is generated using dye lasers or tapered amplifier systems. Here we describe a diode pumped solid state ring laser system utilizing a Nd:YVO 4 gain crystal. Nd:YVO4 has a 4F 3/2 → 4I13/2 emission line at 1342 nm. This wavelength is double the 671 nm needed for our experiments. As a part of this investigation, we also measured the Verdet constant of undoped Y3Al5O12 in the near infrared for constructing a Faraday rotator used to drive unidirectional operation of our ring laser. As an alternative method to achieve unidirectional, single-frequency operation of the laser, we developed a novel scheme of "self-injection locking" where a small portion of the output beam is coupled back into the cavity to break the symmetry. This technique is useful for high-power, single-frequency operation of a ring laser because lossy elements needed for frequency selection and unidirectional operation of the laser can be removed from the internal cavity. In addition to our laser experiments, we also drive Raman transitions between different magnetic hyperfine states within 6Li atoms. For atoms in the two lowest hyperfine states, there exists a broad Feshbach resonance at 834.1 Gauss whereby the s-wave scattering length diverges, resulting in strong interactions between the two species. By using two phase locked lasers to drive a transition from a strongly interacting state to a weakly interacting state, we can

  7. Effects of stress on the rapid component of delayed rectifier potassium current in rat cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-li QI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effect of stress on the rapid component of delayed rectifier potassium current (IKr in rat cardiomyocytes. Methods Forty male SD rats were randomly divided into four groups (10 each: control group (Ctrl, exhaustive group (ES, noise group (WN and composite group (ES+WN. Stress animal models were prepared as follows: Rats in ES group were undergoing exhaustive swimming as the stress factor, in WN group undergoing white noise and in ES+WN group undergoing exhaustive swimming + white noise as the stress factor. Langendorff device was used to reversely perfuse collagenase for isolating the rat's ventricular myocytes. The effect of stress on IKr current and gating mechanism of single ventricular myocyte was recorded by whole-cell patch clamp technique. Results Compared with the Ctrl group, the tail current density of IKr (IKr,tail of ventricular myocytes increased significantly in ES group and WN group (P<0.01. The IKr,tail current density of the ventricular myocytes in ES+WN group was significantly higher than that in ES group and WN group (P<0.01, and the effect was voltage dependent. Gating mechanism revealed that the half inactivation voltage of IKr,tail (V1/2,inact can be shifted to the right in ES group, WN group and ES+WN group when compared with the Ctrl group, and the recovery time constant shortened after inactivation (P<0.01. However, the steady-state activation, fast inactivation constant and voltage dependence of IKr,tail were not statistically significant in ES group, WN group and ES+WN group when compared with the Ctrl group. Conclusion Stress increases the IKr current in rat cardiomyocytes, suggesting it be one of the electrophysiological bases of stress-induced arrhythmia. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.08.06

  8. Multiple sources of passive stress relaxation in muscle fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, Wolfgang A; Leake, Mark C [Physiology and Biophysics Laboratory, University of Muenster, Schlossplatz 5, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2004-08-21

    The forces developed during stretch of nonactivated muscle consist of velocity-sensitive (viscous/viscoelastic) and velocity-insensitive (elastic) components. At the myofibrillar level, the elastic-force component has been described in terms of the entropic-spring properties of the giant protein titin, but entropic elasticity cannot account for viscoelastic properties, such as stress relaxation. Here we examine the contribution of titin to passive stress relaxation of isolated rat-cardiac myofibrils depleted of actin by gelsolin treatment. Monte Carlo simulations show that, up to {approx}5 s after a stretch, the time course of stress relaxation can be described assuming unfolding of 1-2 immunoglobulin domains per titin molecule. For extended periods of stress relaxation, the simulations failed to correctly describe the myofibril data, suggesting that in situ, titin-Ig domains may be more stable than predicted in earlier single-molecule atomic-force-microscopy studies. The reasons behind this finding remain unknown; simply assuming a reduced unfolding probability of domains-an effect found here by AFM force spectroscopy on titin-Ig domains in the presence of a chaperone, alpha-B-crystallin-did not help correctly simulate the time course of stress relaxation. We conclude that myofibrillar stress relaxation likely has multiple sources. Evidence is provided that in intact myofibrils, an initial, rapid phase of stress relaxation results from viscous resistance due to the presence of actin filaments.

  9. Rapid, low-cost prototyping of centrifugal microfluidic devices for effective implementation of various microfluidic components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith, Suzanne

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A centrifugal microfluidic platform to develop various microfluidic operations – the first of its kind in South Africa – is presented. Rapid and low-cost prototyping of centrifugal microfluidic disc devices, as well as a set-up to test the devices using centrifugal forces, is described. Preliminary results show that various microfluidic operations such as fluidic valving, transportation, and microfluidic droplet generation can be achieved. This work provides a complete centrifugal microfluidic platform and the building blocks on which to develop a variety of microfluidic applications and potential products rapidly and at a low cost.

  10. Rapid identification of heterogeneous mixture components with hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbacik, E.T.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Otto, Cornelis; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2012-01-01

    For the rapid analysis of complicated heterogeneous mixtures, we have developed a method to acquire and intuitively display hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) images. The imaging is performed with a conventional optical setup based around an optical parametric oscillator.

  11. [Rapid determination of nine components in the first extraction process of Xingnaojing injection by using ultraviolet spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai-Yi; Wei, Dan-Ni; Fang, Jin-Yang; Li, Xi-Yuan; Yan, Bin-Jun

    2017-10-01

    In this study, an analytical method based on ultraviolet spectroscopy was established for the rapid determination of nine components including isophorone, 4-methylene-isophorone, curcumenone, curcumenol, curdione, curzerenone, furanodienone, curcumol and germacrone in the first extraction process of Xingnaojing injection. 166 distillate samples of Gardeniae Fructus and Radix Curcumae were collected in the first extraction process of Xingnaojing injection. The ultraviolet spectra of these samples were collected, and the contents of the nine components in these samples were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Least squares support vector machine and radial basis function artificial neural network were used to establish the multivariate calibration models between the ultraviolet spectra and the contents of the nine components. The results showed that the established ultraviolet spectrum analysis method can determine the contents of the nine components in the distillates accurately, with root mean square error of prediction of 0.068, 0.147, 0.215, 0.319, 1.01, 1.27, 0.764, 0.147, 0.610 mg•L⁻¹, respectively. This proposed method is a rapid, simple and low-cost tool for the monitoring and endpoint determination of the extraction process of Xingnaojing injection to reduce quality defects and variations. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  12. A novel GMO biosensor for rapid ultrasensitive and simultaneous detection of multiple DNA components in GMO products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Zheng, Lei; Chen, Yinji; Xue, Feng; Cheng, Lin; Adeloju, Samuel B; Chen, Wei

    2015-04-15

    Since the introduction of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), there has been on-going and continuous concern and debates on the commercialization of products derived from GMOs. There is an urgent need for development of highly efficient analytical methods for rapid and high throughput screening of GMOs components, as required for appropriate labeling of GMO-derived foods, as well as for on-site inspection and import/export quarantine. In this study, we describe, for the first time, a multi-labeling based electrochemical biosensor for simultaneous detection of multiple DNA components of GMO products on the same sensing interface. Two-round signal amplification was applied by using both an exonuclease enzyme catalytic reaction and gold nanoparticle-based bio-barcode related strategies, respectively. Simultaneous multiple detections of different DNA components of GMOs were successfully achieved with satisfied sensitivity using this electrochemical biosensor. Furthermore, the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed approach was successfully demonstrated by application to various GMO products, including locally obtained and confirmed commercial GMO seeds and transgenetic plants. The proposed electrochemical biosensor demonstrated unique merits that promise to gain more interest in its use for rapid and on-site simultaneous multiple screening of different components of GMO products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A rapid and simple method for identifying bacterial polar lipid components in wet biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuan Manh; Kim, Jaisoo

    2017-08-01

    There are marked differences between wet and freeze-dried cells with regard to the identification of polar lipid components. The determination of the polar lipid composition of freeze-dried cells is well established. However, several approaches to identifying polar lipid components in wet cells have met with limited success owing to the presence of non-polar compounds in the extracts, resulting in a lipid composition with a narrow scope. In this study, we surveyed the lipid profiles of the wet biomasses of three Gram-positive (Microbacterium lacticum, Rhodococcus koreensis, and Streptomyces longwoodensis) and two Gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Novosphingobium capsulatum) bacteria; the results were comparable in quality to those obtained using a standard freeze-dried approach. Moreover, our improved method ensures simple lipid extraction. Overall, the results of the analysis showed minor lipid profile differences between the two approaches with regard to quantity, and lipid identification was consistent in both methods for all species.

  14. A central rapidity straw tracker and measurements on cryogenic components for the large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielsson, Hans

    1997-04-01

    The thesis is divided into two parts in which two different aspects of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project are discussed. The first part describes the design of a transition radiation tracker (TRT) for the inner detector in ATLAS. In particular, the barrel part was studied in detail. The barrel TRT consists of 52544 1.5 m long proportional tubes (straws), parallel to the beam axis and each with a diameter of 4 mm. The detector is divided into three module layers with 32 modules in each layer. The preparatory study comprises: module size optimization, mechanical and thermal calculations, tracking performance and material budget studies. The second part deals with the cryogenic system for the LHC superconducting magnets. They will work at a temperature below 2 K and it is essential to understand the thermal behaviour of the individual cryogenic components in order to assess the insulating properties of the magnet cryostat. The work involves the design of two dedicated heat-inlet measuring benches for cryogenic components, and the results from heat-inlet measurements on two different types of cryogenic components are reported. 54 refs., 79 figs., 14 tabs.

  15. Characterisation of transmission Raman spectroscopy for rapid quantitative analysis of intact multi-component pharmaceutical capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Michael D; Macleod, Neil A; Smith, Mark R; Andrews, Darren; Hammond, Stephen V; Matousek, Pavel

    2011-02-20

    A detailed characterisation of the performance of transmission Raman spectroscopy was performed from the standpoint of rapid quantitative analysis of pharmaceutical capsules using production relevant formulations comprising of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and 3 common pharmaceutical excipients. This research builds on our earlier studies that identified the unique benefits of transmission Raman spectroscopy compared to conventional Raman spectroscopy. These include the ability to provide bulk information of the content of capsules, thus avoiding the sub-sampling problem, and the suppression of interference from the capsule shell. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the technique's insensitivity to the amount of material held within the capsules. Different capsules sizes with different overall fill weights (100-400 mg) and capsule shell colours were assayed with a single calibration model developed using only one weight and size sample set (100 mg) to a relative error of typically Raman spectroscopy and the non-invasive nature of the measurement. Ultimately, this technique has significant promise as a Process Analytical Technology (PAT) tool for online production application. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Stress relaxation and creep on living cells with the atomic force microscope: a means to calculate elastic moduli and viscosities of cell components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Flores, Susana; Toca-Herrera, Jose Luis [Biosurfaces Unit, CIC BiomaGUNE, Paseo Miramon 182, E-20009 San Sebastian-Donostia (Spain); Benitez, Rafael [Departamento Matematicas, Centro Universitario de Plasencia, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida Virgen del Puerto 2, E-10600 Plasencia (Spain); Vivanco, Maria dM, E-mail: jltocaherrera@cicbiomagune.es, E-mail: jose.toca-herrera@boku.ac.at [Cell Biology and Stem Cells Unit, CIC BioGUNE, Parque tecnologico de Bizkaia, Ed. 801A, E-48160 Derio (Spain)

    2010-11-05

    In this work we present a unified method to study the mechanical properties of cells using the atomic force microscope. Stress relaxation and creep compliance measurements permitted us to determine, the relaxation times, the Young moduli and the viscosity of breast cancer cells (MCF-7). The results show that the mechanical behaviour of MCF-7 cells responds to a two-layered model of similar elasticity but differing viscosity. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with an actin-depolymerising agent results in an overall decrease in both cell elasticity and viscosity, however to a different extent for each layer. The layer that undergoes the smaller decrease (36-38%) is assigned to the cell membrane/cortex while the layer that experiences the larger decrease (70-80%) is attributed to the cell cytoplasm. The combination of the method presented in this work, together with the approach based on stress relaxation microscopy (Moreno-Flores et al 2010 J. Biomech. 43 349-54), constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study cell mechanics. This methodology can also be extended to study the mechanical properties of biomaterials in general.

  17. Stress relaxation and creep on living cells with the atomic force microscope: a means to calculate elastic moduli and viscosities of cell components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Flores, Susana; Benitez, Rafael; Vivanco, María dM; Toca-Herrera, José Luis

    2010-11-01

    In this work we present a unified method to study the mechanical properties of cells using the atomic force microscope. Stress relaxation and creep compliance measurements permitted us to determine, the relaxation times, the Young moduli and the viscosity of breast cancer cells (MCF-7). The results show that the mechanical behaviour of MCF-7 cells responds to a two-layered model of similar elasticity but differing viscosity. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with an actin-depolymerising agent results in an overall decrease in both cell elasticity and viscosity, however to a different extent for each layer. The layer that undergoes the smaller decrease (36-38%) is assigned to the cell membrane/cortex while the layer that experiences the larger decrease (70-80%) is attributed to the cell cytoplasm. The combination of the method presented in this work, together with the approach based on stress relaxation microscopy (Moreno-Flores et al 2010 J. Biomech. 43 349-54), constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study cell mechanics. This methodology can also be extended to study the mechanical properties of biomaterials in general.

  18. Rapid discrimination of plastic packaging materials using MIR spectroscopy coupled with independent components analysis (ICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassouf, Amine; Maalouly, Jacqueline; Rutledge, Douglas N; Chebib, Hanna; Ducruet, Violette

    2014-11-01

    Plastic packaging wastes increased considerably in recent decades, raising a major and serious public concern on political, economical and environmental levels. Dealing with this kind of problems is generally done by landfilling and energy recovery. However, these two methods are becoming more and more expensive, hazardous to the public health and the environment. Therefore, recycling is gaining worldwide consideration as a solution to decrease the growing volume of plastic packaging wastes and simultaneously reduce the consumption of oil required to produce virgin resin. Nevertheless, a major shortage is encountered in recycling which is related to the sorting of plastic wastes. In this paper, a feasibility study was performed in order to test the potential of an innovative approach combining mid infrared (MIR) spectroscopy with independent components analysis (ICA), as a simple and fast approach which could achieve high separation rates. This approach (MIR-ICA) gave 100% discrimination rates in the separation of all studied plastics: polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS) and polylactide (PLA). In addition, some more specific discriminations were obtained separating plastic materials belonging to the same polymer family e.g. high density polyethylene (HDPE) from low density polyethylene (LDPE). High discrimination rates were obtained despite the heterogeneity among samples especially differences in colors, thicknesses and surface textures. The reproducibility of the proposed approach was also tested using two spectrometers with considerable differences in their sensitivities. Discrimination rates were not affected proving that the developed approach could be extrapolated to different spectrometers. MIR combined with ICA is a promising tool for plastic waste separation that can help improve performance in this field; however further technological improvements and developments are required before it can be applied

  19. Development of a Rapid Immunodiagnostic Test for Pork Components in Raw Beef and Chicken Meats: a Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Depamede

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A rapid immunodiagnostic test that provides visual evidence of the presence of pork components in raw beef and chicken meats was developed. Colloidal gold was prepared and conjugated with anti-Swine IgG polyclonal antibody. Immunochromatographic test strips were produced, and then were used to test laboratory adulterated raw meat samples. The samples consisted adulteration meat, immunodiagnostic, pork, rapid test of pork-in-beef, or pork-in-chicken at 1/0; 1/100; 1/1,000; 1/5,000; 1/10,000 (w/w adulteration levels that were extracted in phosphate-buffered saline. Raw beef and chicken meats without pork were included as controls. Analysis was completed in 10 min. Detection limit was 1/5,000 (w/w, although 1/10,000 was also observed. This immunodiagnostic tests can be conveniently applied to detect low levels of pork components in raw beef and chicken meat products. For the commercial purposes, further studies need to be carried out.

  20. Rapid discrimination of plastic packaging materials using MIR spectroscopy coupled with independent components analysis (ICA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassouf, Amine, E-mail: amine.kassouf@agroparistech.fr [ER004 “Lebanese Food Packaging”, Faculty of Sciences II, Lebanese University, 90656 Jdeideth El Matn, Fanar (Lebanon); INRA, UMR1145 Ingénierie Procédés Aliments, 1 Avenue des Olympiades, 91300 Massy (France); AgroParisTech, UMR1145 Ingénierie Procédés Aliments, 16 rue Claude Bernard, 75005 Paris (France); Maalouly, Jacqueline, E-mail: j_maalouly@hotmail.com [ER004 “Lebanese Food Packaging”, Faculty of Sciences II, Lebanese University, 90656 Jdeideth El Matn, Fanar (Lebanon); Rutledge, Douglas N., E-mail: douglas.rutledge@agroparistech.fr [INRA, UMR1145 Ingénierie Procédés Aliments, 1 Avenue des Olympiades, 91300 Massy (France); AgroParisTech, UMR1145 Ingénierie Procédés Aliments, 16 rue Claude Bernard, 75005 Paris (France); Chebib, Hanna, E-mail: hchebib@hotmail.com [ER004 “Lebanese Food Packaging”, Faculty of Sciences II, Lebanese University, 90656 Jdeideth El Matn, Fanar (Lebanon); Ducruet, Violette, E-mail: violette.ducruet@agroparistech.fr [INRA, UMR1145 Ingénierie Procédés Aliments, 1 Avenue des Olympiades, 91300 Massy (France); AgroParisTech, UMR1145 Ingénierie Procédés Aliments, 16 rue Claude Bernard, 75005 Paris (France)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • An innovative technique, MIR-ICA, was applied to plastic packaging separation. • This study was carried out on PE, PP, PS, PET and PLA plastic packaging materials. • ICA was applied to discriminate plastics and 100% separation rates were obtained. • Analyses performed on two spectrometers proved the reproducibility of the method. • MIR-ICA is a simple and fast technique allowing plastic identification/classification. - Abstract: Plastic packaging wastes increased considerably in recent decades, raising a major and serious public concern on political, economical and environmental levels. Dealing with this kind of problems is generally done by landfilling and energy recovery. However, these two methods are becoming more and more expensive, hazardous to the public health and the environment. Therefore, recycling is gaining worldwide consideration as a solution to decrease the growing volume of plastic packaging wastes and simultaneously reduce the consumption of oil required to produce virgin resin. Nevertheless, a major shortage is encountered in recycling which is related to the sorting of plastic wastes. In this paper, a feasibility study was performed in order to test the potential of an innovative approach combining mid infrared (MIR) spectroscopy with independent components analysis (ICA), as a simple and fast approach which could achieve high separation rates. This approach (MIR-ICA) gave 100% discrimination rates in the separation of all studied plastics: polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS) and polylactide (PLA). In addition, some more specific discriminations were obtained separating plastic materials belonging to the same polymer family e.g. high density polyethylene (HDPE) from low density polyethylene (LDPE). High discrimination rates were obtained despite the heterogeneity among samples especially differences in colors, thicknesses and surface textures. The reproducibility of

  1. Deep Proton Writing for the rapid prototyping of polymer micro-components for optical interconnects and optofluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Erps, Jürgen; Vervaeke, Michael; Ottevaere, Heidi; Hermanne, Alex; Thienpont, Hugo

    2013-07-01

    The use of photonics in data communication and numerous other industrial applications brought plenty of prospects for innovation and opened up different unexplored market opportunities. This is a major driving force for the fabrication of micro-optical and micro-mechanical structures and their accurate alignment and integration into opto-mechanical modules and systems. To this end, we present Deep Proton Writing (DPW) as a powerful rapid prototyping technology for such micro-components. The DPW process consists of bombarding polymer samples (PMMA or SU-8) with swift protons, which results after chemical processing steps in high-quality micro-optical components. One of the strengths of the DPW micro-fabrication technology is the ability to fabricate monolithic building blocks that include micro-optical and mechanical functionalities which can be precisely integrated into more complex photonic systems. In this paper we comment on how we shifted from using 8.3 to 16.5 MeV protons for DPW and give some examples of micro-optical and micro-mechanical components recently fabricated through DPW, targeting applications in optical interconnections and in optofluidics.

  2. Deep Proton Writing for the rapid prototyping of polymer micro-components for optical interconnects and optofluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Erps, Jürgen, E-mail: jurgen.van.erps@vub.ac.be; Vervaeke, Michael; Ottevaere, Heidi; Hermanne, Alex; Thienpont, Hugo

    2013-07-15

    The use of photonics in data communication and numerous other industrial applications brought plenty of prospects for innovation and opened up different unexplored market opportunities. This is a major driving force for the fabrication of micro-optical and micro-mechanical structures and their accurate alignment and integration into opto-mechanical modules and systems. To this end, we present Deep Proton Writing (DPW) as a powerful rapid prototyping technology for such micro-components. The DPW process consists of bombarding polymer samples (PMMA or SU-8) with swift protons, which results after chemical processing steps in high-quality micro-optical components. One of the strengths of the DPW micro-fabrication technology is the ability to fabricate monolithic building blocks that include micro-optical and mechanical functionalities which can be precisely integrated into more complex photonic systems. In this paper we comment on how we shifted from using 8.3 to 16.5 MeV protons for DPW and give some examples of micro-optical and micro-mechanical components recently fabricated through DPW, targeting applications in optical interconnections and in optofluidics.

  3. Normal perception of Mooney faces in developmental prosopagnosia: Evidence from the N170 component and rapid neural adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towler, John; Gosling, Angela; Duchaine, Bradley; Eimer, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Individuals with developmental prosopagnosia (DP) have a severe difficulty recognizing the faces of known individuals in the absence of any history of neurological damage. These recognition problems may be linked to selective deficits in the holistic/configural processing of faces. We used two-tone Mooney images to study the processing of faces versus non-face objects in DP when it is based on holistic information (or the facial gestalt) in the absence of obvious local cues about facial features. A rapid adaptation procedure was employed for a group of 16 DPs. Naturalistic photographs of upright faces were preceded by upright or inverted Mooney faces or by Mooney houses. DPs showed face-sensitive N170 components in response to Mooney faces versus houses, and N170 amplitude reductions for inverted as compared to upright Mooney faces. They also showed the typical pattern of N170 adaptation effects, with reduced N170 components when upright naturalistic test faces were preceded by upright Mooney faces, demonstrating that the perception of Mooney and naturalistic faces recruits shared neural populations. Our findings demonstrate that individuals with DP can utilize global information about face configurations for categorical discriminations between faces and non-face objects, and suggest that face processing deficits emerge primarily at more fine-grained higher level stages of face perception. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  4. Effect of residual stress relaxation by means of local rapid induction heating on stress corrosion cracking behavior and electrochemical characterization of welded Ti-6Al-4V alloy under slow strain rate test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Tang, Shawei; Liu, Guangyi; Sun, Yue; Hu, Jin

    2017-05-01

    In this study, a welded Ti-6Al-4V alloy was treated by means of local rapid induction heating in order to relax the residual stress existed in the weldment. The welded samples were heat treated at the different temperatures. The stress corrosion cracking behavior and electrochemical characterization of the as-welded samples before and after the post weld heat treatment as a function of residual stress were investigated. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements of the samples under slow strain rate test were performed in a LiCl-methanol solution. The results demonstrated that the residual stress in the as-welded sample was dramatically reduced after the post weld heat treatment, and the residual stress decreased with the increase in the heat treatment temperature. The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility and electrochemical activity of the as-welded sample were significantly reduced after the heat treatment due to the relaxation of the residual stress, which gradually decreased with the decreasing value of the residual stress distributed in the heat treated samples.

  5. A simple PCR-based method for the rapid genotyping of inherited fifth complement component (C5)-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingkai; Wang, Na; Zhang, Xin; Hu, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    The fifth component of complement (C5) is considered to be the center of complement activation and function. However, there are no genetically engineered knockout mice for this gene, and the only commercially available inherited C5-deficient mice, in which a "TA" nucleotide deletion in the coding frame was previously identified, are in theC57BL/10Sn genetic background rather than the commonly used backgrounds C57BL/6 and BALB/c. Therefore, these mice must be backcrossed into the desired genetic background. Here, we developed an ARMS (amplification refractory mutation system) PCR method using a specific primer pair that was able to discriminate between the genotypes when the resulting product was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. These results were supported by quantitative RT-PCR and semi-quantitative PCR and were consistent with the results from sequencing each backcrossed generation. Using ARMS-PCR method, we generated C5-deficient mice in the C57BL/6 background over 9 backcrossed generations and further verified the phenotype using complement-mediated hemolytic assays. In this study, we describe a simple, rapid and reliable PCR-based method for genotyping inherited C5-deficient mice that may be used to backcross C57BL/10Sn mice into other genetic backgrounds.

  6. Rapid Parametric Mapping of the Longitudinal Relaxation Time T1 Using Two-Dimensional Variable Flip Angle Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieringer, Matthias A.; Deimling, Michael; Santoro, Davide; Wuerfel, Jens; Madai, Vince I.; Sobesky, Jan; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Visual but subjective reading of longitudinal relaxation time (T1) weighted magnetic resonance images is commonly used for the detection of brain pathologies. For this non-quantitative measure, diagnostic quality depends on hardware configuration, imaging parameters, radio frequency transmission field (B1+) uniformity, as well as observer experience. Parametric quantification of the tissue T1 relaxation parameter offsets the propensity for these effects, but is typically time consuming. For this reason, this study examines the feasibility of rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angles (VFA) approach at magnetic field strengths of 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla. These efforts include validation in phantom experiments and application for brain T1 mapping. Methods T1 quantification included simulations of the Bloch equations to correct for slice profile imperfections, and a correction for B1+. Fast gradient echo acquisitions were conducted using three adjusted flip angles for the proposed T1 quantification approach that was benchmarked against slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and an inversion-recovery spin-echo based reference method. Brain T1 mapping was performed in six healthy subjects, one multiple sclerosis patient, and one stroke patient. Results Phantom experiments showed a mean T1 estimation error of (-63±1.5)% for slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and (0.2±1.4)% for the proposed approach compared to the reference method. Scan time for single slice T1 mapping including B1+ mapping could be reduced to 5 seconds using an in-plane resolution of (2×2) mm2, which equals a scan time reduction of more than 99% compared to the reference method. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angle approach is feasible at 1.5T/3T/7T. It represents a valuable alternative for rapid T1 mapping due to the gain in speed versus conventional approaches. This progress may serve to enhance the capabilities of

  7. Rapid parametric mapping of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 using two-dimensional variable flip angle magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias A Dieringer

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Visual but subjective reading of longitudinal relaxation time (T1 weighted magnetic resonance images is commonly used for the detection of brain pathologies. For this non-quantitative measure, diagnostic quality depends on hardware configuration, imaging parameters, radio frequency transmission field (B1+ uniformity, as well as observer experience. Parametric quantification of the tissue T1 relaxation parameter offsets the propensity for these effects, but is typically time consuming. For this reason, this study examines the feasibility of rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angles (VFA approach at magnetic field strengths of 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla. These efforts include validation in phantom experiments and application for brain T1 mapping. METHODS: T1 quantification included simulations of the Bloch equations to correct for slice profile imperfections, and a correction for B1+. Fast gradient echo acquisitions were conducted using three adjusted flip angles for the proposed T1 quantification approach that was benchmarked against slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and an inversion-recovery spin-echo based reference method. Brain T1 mapping was performed in six healthy subjects, one multiple sclerosis patient, and one stroke patient. RESULTS: Phantom experiments showed a mean T1 estimation error of (-63±1.5% for slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and (0.2±1.4% for the proposed approach compared to the reference method. Scan time for single slice T1 mapping including B1+ mapping could be reduced to 5 seconds using an in-plane resolution of (2×2 mm2, which equals a scan time reduction of more than 99% compared to the reference method. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate that rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angle approach is feasible at 1.5T/3T/7T. It represents a valuable alternative for rapid T1 mapping due to the gain in speed versus conventional approaches. This progress may serve to enhance

  8. Rapid parametric mapping of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 using two-dimensional variable flip angle magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieringer, Matthias A; Deimling, Michael; Santoro, Davide; Wuerfel, Jens; Madai, Vince I; Sobesky, Jan; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-01-01

    Visual but subjective reading of longitudinal relaxation time (T1) weighted magnetic resonance images is commonly used for the detection of brain pathologies. For this non-quantitative measure, diagnostic quality depends on hardware configuration, imaging parameters, radio frequency transmission field (B1+) uniformity, as well as observer experience. Parametric quantification of the tissue T1 relaxation parameter offsets the propensity for these effects, but is typically time consuming. For this reason, this study examines the feasibility of rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angles (VFA) approach at magnetic field strengths of 1.5 Tesla, 3 Tesla, and 7 Tesla. These efforts include validation in phantom experiments and application for brain T1 mapping. T1 quantification included simulations of the Bloch equations to correct for slice profile imperfections, and a correction for B1+. Fast gradient echo acquisitions were conducted using three adjusted flip angles for the proposed T1 quantification approach that was benchmarked against slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and an inversion-recovery spin-echo based reference method. Brain T1 mapping was performed in six healthy subjects, one multiple sclerosis patient, and one stroke patient. Phantom experiments showed a mean T1 estimation error of (-63±1.5)% for slice profile uncorrected 2D VFA and (0.2±1.4)% for the proposed approach compared to the reference method. Scan time for single slice T1 mapping including B1+ mapping could be reduced to 5 seconds using an in-plane resolution of (2×2) mm2, which equals a scan time reduction of more than 99% compared to the reference method. Our results demonstrate that rapid 2D T1 quantification using a variable flip angle approach is feasible at 1.5T/3T/7T. It represents a valuable alternative for rapid T1 mapping due to the gain in speed versus conventional approaches. This progress may serve to enhance the capabilities of parametric MR based lesion detection and

  9. Barnett relaxation in non-symmetric grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasi, Erald; Weingartner, Joseph C.

    2017-10-01

    Barnett relaxation, first described by Purcell in 1979, appears to play a major role in the alignment of grains with the interstellar magnetic field. In 1999, Lazarian and Draine proposed that Barnett relaxation and its relative, nuclear relaxation, can induce grains to flip. If this thermal flipping is rapid then the dynamical effect of torques that are fixed relative to the grain body can be greatly reduced. To date, detailed studies of Barnett relaxation have been confined to grains exhibiting dynamic symmetry. In 2009, Weingartner argued that internal relaxation cannot induce flips in any grains, whether they exhibit dynamic symmetry or not. In this work, we develop approximate expressions for the dissipation rate and diffusion coefficient for Barnett relaxation. We revisit the issue of internally induced thermal flipping, finding that it cannot occur for grains with dynamic symmetry, but does occur for grains lacking dynamic symmetry.

  10. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu-Ju Jiang; Weiwei Chen; Hong Dan; Li Tan; He Zhu; Guangzhong Yang; Jinhua Shen; Yong-Bo Peng; Ping Zhao; Lu Xue; Meng-Fei Yu; Liqun Ma; Xiao-Tang Si; Zhuo Wang; Jiapei Dai

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K+- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smoo...

  11. Is Relaxation Training Effective in the Treatment of Clinical Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Lee A.

    The process of relaxation is a complex triarchic phenomenon that incorporates behavioral, cognitive, and physiological components. Existing literature is surveyed in order to determine the efficacy of treating various forms of depression with cognitive-behavioral relaxation strategies. Relaxation training has been shown to be effective in treating…

  12. Rapid Quantitative Analysis of the Major Components in Soymilk Using Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR)

    OpenAIRE

    Nakasato, Katsuhiko; ONO, Tomotada; Ishiguro, Takahiro; TAKAMATSU, Michihiko; Tsukamoto, Chigen; Mikami, Masayuki

    2004-01-01

    Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) on attenuated total reflectance (ATR) sampling was used for the quantitative analysis of the major components (protein, lipid, and sugar) in soymilk. Since mid-infrared spectroscopy shows specific absorption of each functional group of each molecule, it is possible to determine the amount of each component without complicated statistical computation. The determination of protein content was performed by using amide II absorbance at wavenumber 15...

  13. Specific, sensitive, precise, and rapid functional chromogenic assay of activated first complement component (C1) in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkvad, S; Jespersen, J; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen

    1990-01-01

    We present a new functional assay for the first complement component (C1) in plasma, based on its activation by inhibition of the C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-inh) when monospecific antiserum to C1-inh is added to the plasma. After maximal activation, we can determine the concentration of activated ...

  14. Rapid Screening of Active Components with an Osteoclastic Inhibitory Effect in Herba epimedii Using Quantitative Pattern–Activity Relationships Based on Joint-Action Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yan Yuan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Screening of bioactive components is important for modernization and quality control of herbal medicines, while the traditional bioassay-guided phytochemical approach is time-consuming and laborious. The presented study proposes a strategy for rapid screening of active components from herbal medicines. As a case study, the quantitative pattern–activity relationship (QPAR between compounds and the osteoclastic inhibitory effect of Herba epimedii, a widely used herbal medicine in China, were investigated based on joint models. For model construction, standard mixtures data showed that the joint-action models are better than the partial least-squares (PLS model. Then, the Good2bad value, which could reflect components’ importance based on Monte Carlo sampling, was coupled with the joint-action models for screening of active components. A compound (baohuoside I and a component composed of compounds with retention times in the 6.9–7.9 min range were selected by our method. Their inhibition rates were higher than icariin, the key bioactive compound in Herba epimedii, which could inhibit osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in a previous study. Meanwhile, the half-maximal effective concentration, namely, EC50 value of the selected component was 7.54 μg/mL, much smaller than that of baohuoside I—77 μg/mL—which indicated that there is synergistic action between compounds in the selected component. The results clearly show our proposed method is simple and effective in screening the most-bioactive components and compounds, as well as drug-lead components, from herbal medicines.

  15. UHPLC-TOFMS coupled with chemometric method as a powerful technique for rapid exploring of differentiating components between two Ziziphus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sheng; Duan, Jin-ao; Tang, Yuping; Qian, Dawei; Zhu, Zhenhua; Qian, Yefei; Shang, Erxin; Su, Shulan

    2011-03-01

    To rapidly explore the differentiating components and the potential chemical markers for discrimination between those Chinese medicinal herbs with similar chemical characteristics, an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC)-TOFMS coupled with multivariate statistical analysis method was proposed and validated by using two Ziziphus species (Z. jujuba and Z. jujuba var. spinosa) as the model herbs. After the samples were analyzed using UHPLC-TOFMS, the data sets of retention time (RT)-m/z pairs, ion intensities and sample codes were further processed with orthogonal partial least squared discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) to holistically compare the difference between the fruits of these two Ziziphus species, and to generate an S-plot. Those compounds correlating to the points at the two ends of "S" were regarded as the most differentiating components between these two kinds of samples. By comparing the mass/UV spectra and retention times with those of reference compounds, these components were finally characterized as zizyberenalic acid, palmitoleic acid, oleic acid, pomonic acid and rutin, and these compounds would be the potential chemical markers for discrimination of these jujube products. The results suggested that this newly established approach could be used to rapidly determine the subtle differences and explore the potential chemical markers for differentiation within the herbs with similar chemical ingredients. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Rapid metabolic profiling of Nicotiana tabacum defence responses against Phytophthora nicotianae using direct infrared laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Alfredo J; Scharte, Judith; Bones, Philipp; Pirkl, Alexander; Meldau, Stefan; Baldwin, Ian T; Hillenkamp, Franz; Weis, Engelbert; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2010-06-09

    Successful defence of tobacco plants against attack from the oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae includes a type of local programmed cell death called the hypersensitive response. Complex and not completely understood signaling processes are required to mediate the development of this defence in the infected tissue. Here, we demonstrate that different families of metabolites can be monitored in small pieces of infected, mechanically-stressed, and healthy tobacco leaves using direct infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The defence response was monitored for 1 - 9 hours post infection. Infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry allows rapid and simultaneous detection in both negative and positive ion mode of a wide range of naturally occurring primary and secondary metabolites. An unsupervised principal component analysis was employed to identify correlations between changes in metabolite expression (obtained at different times and sample treatment conditions) and the overall defence response.A one-dimensional projection of the principal components 1 and 2 obtained from positive ion mode spectra was used to generate a Biological Response Index (BRI). The BRI obtained for each sample treatment was compared with the number of dead cells found in the respective tissue. The high correlation between these two values suggested that the BRI provides a rapid assessment of the plant response against the pathogen infection. Evaluation of the loading plots of the principal components (1 and 2) reveals a correlation among three metabolic cascades and the defence response generated in infected leaves. Analysis of selected phytohormones by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry verified our findings. The described methodology allows for rapid assessment of infection-specific changes in the plant metabolism, in particular of phenolics, alkaloids, oxylipins, and carbohydrates

  17. Rapid metabolic profiling of Nicotiana tabacum defence responses against Phytophthora nicotianae using direct infrared laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and principal component analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weis Engelbert

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful defence of tobacco plants against attack from the oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae includes a type of local programmed cell death called the hypersensitive response. Complex and not completely understood signaling processes are required to mediate the development of this defence in the infected tissue. Here, we demonstrate that different families of metabolites can be monitored in small pieces of infected, mechanically-stressed, and healthy tobacco leaves using direct infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The defence response was monitored for 1 - 9 hours post infection. Results Infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry allows rapid and simultaneous detection in both negative and positive ion mode of a wide range of naturally occurring primary and secondary metabolites. An unsupervised principal component analysis was employed to identify correlations between changes in metabolite expression (obtained at different times and sample treatment conditions and the overall defence response. A one-dimensional projection of the principal components 1 and 2 obtained from positive ion mode spectra was used to generate a Biological Response Index (BRI. The BRI obtained for each sample treatment was compared with the number of dead cells found in the respective tissue. The high correlation between these two values suggested that the BRI provides a rapid assessment of the plant response against the pathogen infection. Evaluation of the loading plots of the principal components (1 and 2 reveals a correlation among three metabolic cascades and the defence response generated in infected leaves. Analysis of selected phytohormones by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry verified our findings. Conclusion The described methodology allows for rapid assessment of infection-specific changes in the plant metabolism, in particular

  18. Diffusion MRI/NMR magnetization equations with relaxation times

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Dilip; Daniel, Simon

    2012-10-01

    Bloch-Torrey diffusion magnetization equation ignores relaxation effects of magnetization. Relaxation times are important in any diffusion magnetization studies of perfusion in tissues(Brain and heart specially). Bloch-Torrey equation cannot therefore describe diffusion magnetization in a real-life situation where relaxation effects play a key role, characteristics of tissues under examination. This paper describes derivations of two equations for each of the y and z component diffusion NMR/MRI magnetization (separately) in a rotating frame of reference, where rf B1 field is applied along x direction and bias magnetic field(Bo) is along z direction. The two equations are expected to further advance the science & technology of Diffusion MRI(DMRI) and diffusion functional MRI(DFMRI). These two techniques are becoming increasingly important in the study and treatment of neurological disorders, especially for the management of patients with acute stroke. It is rapidly becoming a standard for white matter disorders, as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can reveal abnormalities in white matter fibre structure and provide models of brain connectivity.

  19. Nonlinear fractional relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nonlinear fractional equation; nonlinear fractional relaxation; -expansion. Abstract. We define a nonlinear model for fractional relaxation phenomena. We use -expansion method to analyse this model. By studying the fundamental solutions of this model we find that when → 0 the model exhibits a fast decay rate and ...

  20. Effects of Ginger and Its Constituents on Airway Smooth Muscle Relaxation and Calcium Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siviski, Matthew E.; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Carrie; Hoonjan, Bhupinder; Emala, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma has increased in recent years, and is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Many patients report using alternative therapies to self-treat asthma symptoms as adjuncts to short-acting and long-acting β-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). As many as 40% of patients with asthma use herbal therapies to manage asthma symptoms, often without proven efficacy or known mechanisms of action. Therefore, investigations of both the therapeutic and possible detrimental effects of isolated components of herbal treatments on the airway are important. We hypothesized that ginger and its active components induce bronchodilation by modulating intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) in airway smooth muscle (ASM). In isolated human ASM, ginger caused significant and rapid relaxation. Four purified constituents of ginger were subsequently tested for ASM relaxant properties in both guinea pig and human tracheas: [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol induced rapid relaxation of precontracted ASM (100–300 μM), whereas [10]-gingerol failed to induce relaxation. In human ASM cells, exposure to [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol, but not [10]-gingerol (100 μM), blunted subsequent Ca2+ responses to bradykinin (10 μM) and S-(−)-Bay K 8644 (10 μM). In A/J mice, the nebulization of [8]-gingerol (100 μM), 15 minutes before methacholine challenge, significantly attenuated airway resistance, compared with vehicle. Taken together, these novel data show that ginger and its isolated active components, [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol, relax ASM, and [8]-gingerol attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness, in part by altering [Ca2+]i regulation. These purified compounds may provide a therapeutic option alone or in combination with accepted therapeutics, including β2-agonists, in airway diseases such as asthma. PMID:23065130

  1. Moisture measurement in cheese analogue using stretched and multi-exponential models of the magnetic resonance T2 relaxation curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiman, Melany; Stroshine, Richard L; Cornillon, Paul

    2002-11-01

    The dairy industry would benefit from rapid and non-destructive determination of moisture content of cheese products. The two components primarily responsible for the low-field magnetic resonance (MR) spin-spin relaxation (T2) signal of cheese products are fat and the water bound to protein. If the moisture component of the signal can be distinguished from the fat component, it should be possible to measure moisture using an MR sensor. Therefore, a key aspect of the development of an MR moisture measurement method is examination of techniques for analysis of T2 relaxation curves. One common method of T2 analysis of complex foods, such as cheese, is to fit multi-term exponential models to the curves. An alternative approach is proposed which uses stretched exponential models. The single-term stretched exponential model has been used for porous rock systems and polymers, but not for foods. The T2 relaxation curves were analysed using both models and the results were compared. The number of unknowns in the three-term exponential and two-term stretched exponential models was reduced by assuming the relaxation curve of the fat component was the same as the relaxation curve of pure fat. In each model, one of the exponential terms described the behaviour of the water in the cheese analogue, while the remaining term or terms described the behaviour of the fat. For each model the T2 relaxation time associated with the water was well correlated with moisture content. Coefficients of determination of the relaxation time versus moisture from each of the two models were nearly identical. The advantages and disadvantages of the two models are discussed.

  2. Clinical application of RapidArc volumetric modulated arc therapy as a component in whole brain radiation therapy for poor prognostic, four or more multiple brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Heon; Lee, Kyu Chan; Choi, Jin Ho; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Seok Ho; Sung, Ki Hoon; Kim, Yun Mi [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To determine feasibility of RapidArc in sequential or simultaneous integrated tumor boost in whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for poor prognostic patients with four or more brain metastases. Nine patients with multiple ({>=}4) brain metastases were analyzed. Three patients were classified as class II in recursive partitioning analysis and 6 were class III. The class III patients presented with hemiparesis, cognitive deficit, or apraxia. The ratio of tumor to whole brain volume was 0.8-7.9%. Six patients received 2-dimensional bilateral WBRT, (30 Gy/10- 12 fractions), followed by sequential RapidArc tumor boost (15-30 Gy/4-10 fractions). Three patients received RapidArc WBRT with simultaneous integrated boost to tumors (48-50 Gy) in 10-20 fractions. The median biologically effective dose to metastatic tumors was 68.1 Gy10 and 67.2 Gy10 and the median brain volume irradiated more than 100 Gy3 were 1.9% (24 cm3) and 0.8% (13 cm3) for each group. With less than 3 minutes of treatment time, RapidArc was easily applied to the patients with poor performance status. The follow-up period was 0.3-16.5 months. Tumor responses among the 6 patients who underwent follow-up magnetic resonance imaging were partial and stable in 3 and 3, respectively. Overall survival at 6 and 12 months were 66.7% and 41.7%, respectively. The local progression-free survival at 6 and 12 months were 100% and 62.5%, respectively. RapidArc as a component in whole brain radiation therapy for poor prognostic, multiple brain metastases is an effective and safe modality with easy application.

  3. A novel approach to the rapid assignment of (13)C NMR spectra of major components of vegetable oils such as avocado, mango kernel and macadamia nut oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retief, Liezel; McKenzie, Jean M; Koch, Klaus R

    2009-09-01

    Assignment of (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of major fatty acid components of South African produced vegetable oils was attempted using a method in which the vegetable oil was spiked with a standard triacylglycerol. This proved to be inadequate and therefore a new rapid and potentially generic graphical linear correlation method is proposed for assignment of the (13)C NMR spectra of major fatty acid components of apricot kernel, avocado pear, grapeseed, macadamia nut, mango kernel and marula vegetable oils. In this graphical correlation method, chemical shifts of fatty acids present in a known standard triacylglycerol is plotted against the corresponding chemical shifts of fatty acids present in the vegetable oils. This new approach (under carefully defined conditions and concentrations) was found especially useful for spectrally crowded regions where significant peak overlap occurs and was validated with the well-known (13)C NMR spectrum of olive oil which has been extensively reported in the literature. In this way, a full assignment of the (13)C{1H} NMR spectra of the vegetable oils, as well as tripalmitolein was readily achieved and the resonances belonging to the palmitoleic acid component of the triacylglycerols in the case of macadamia nut and avocado pear oil resonances were also assigned for the first time in the (13)C NMR spectra of these oils. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Idiosyncratic reality claims, relaxation dispositions, and ABC relaxation theory: happiness, literal christianity, miraculous powers, metaphysics, and the paranormal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonathan C; Karmin, Aaron D

    2002-12-01

    This study examined idiosyncratic reality claims, that is, irrational or paranormal beliefs often claimed to enhance relaxation and happiness and reduce stress. The Smith Idiosyncratic Reality Claims Inventory and the Smith Relaxation Dispositions Inventory (which measures relaxation and stress dispositions, or enduring states of mind frequently associated with relaxation or stress) were given to 310 junior college student volunteers. Principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation identified five idiosyncratic reality claim factors: belief in Literal Christianity; Magic; Space Aliens: After Death experiences; and Miraculous Powers of Meditation, Prayer, and Belief. No factor correlated with increased relaxation dispositions Peace, Energy, or Joy, or reduced dispositional somatic stress, worry, or negative emotion on the Smith Relaxation Dispositions Inventory. It was concluded that idiosyncratic reality claims may not be associated with reported relaxation, happiness, or stress. In contrast, previous research strongly supported self-affirming beliefs with few paranormal assumptions display such an association.

  5. Rapid classification of biological components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Vicki S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barrett, Karen B. (Meridian, ID); Key, Diane E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-03-23

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  6. Rapid classification of biological components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Key, Diane E.

    2006-01-24

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to the surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  7. Rapid classification of biological components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Vicki S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barrett, Karen B. (Meridian, ID); Key, Diane E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-03-23

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens of the surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  8. Rapid classification of biological components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Key, Diane E.

    2013-10-15

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method involves attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein the locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to antigens in the array, thereby forming immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do not form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, thereby forming an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to a subject's identity.

  9. An emerging method for rapid characterization of feed structures and feed component matrix at a cellular level and relation to feed quality and nutritive value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2006-06-01

    Feed quality, feed characteristics, nutrient utilization and digestive behaviour are closely related to: (i) total feed composition, (ii) feed intrinsic structures, and (iii) biological component matrix (such as protein to starch matrix, protein to carbohydrate matrix). Conventional "wet" chemical analysis can determine total chemical composition, but fails to detect the feed intrinsic structures and biological component matrix due to destruction of feed samples during the processing for chemical analysis and the "wet" chemical analysis cannot link structural information to chemical information within intact feed tissue. Recently, advanced synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy has been developed as a non-destructive and non-invasive structural-chemical analytical technique. This technique can link chemical information to structural information of biological samples within intact tissue within cellular dimensions. It can provide four kinds of information simultaneously: tissue composition, tissue structure, tissue chemistry and tissue environment. However, this novel technique has been found mainly for medical science research, extremely rare for feed science and nutrition research. The objective of this review article was to illustrate synchrotron-based FTIR microspectroscopy as a novel research tool for rapid characterization of feed structures at a cellular level and for detection of chemical features and molecular chemical make-up of feed biological component matrix and nutrient interaction. The emphasis of this article was to show that feed structural-chemical features at a cellular level are closely related to feed characteristics, feed quality and nutritive value in animals. The synchrotron-based technology will provide us with a greater understanding of the plant-animal interface.

  10. Rapid Changes in Scores on Principal Components of the EEG Spectrum do not Occur in the Course of "Drowsy" Sleep of Varying Length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putilov, Arcady A

    2015-04-01

    Wakefulness is separated from a well-established sleep by an onset period. This is characterized by dramatic changes in scores on the first and second principal components of the electroencephalographic (EEG) spectrum, which reflects the kinetics of sleep- and wake-promoting processes. The present analysis examined whether significant buildups and declines of the first and second scores can occur throughout stage 1 sleep, or only on its boundaries with stage 2 and wakefulness. Twenty-seven adults participated in multiple 20-minute attempts to nap in the course of 24-hour wakefulness after either deprivation, restriction or ad lib night sleep. Power spectra were calculated on 1-minute intervals of 251 EEG records. Irrespective of accumulated sleep debt and duration of stage 1 sleep (from 5 minutes), the first principal component score was permanently attenuated across this stage as well as during preceding wakefulness. It showed rapid buildup only on the boundary with stage 2. The second principal component score always started its decline earlier, on the wake-sleep boundary. It did not show further decline throughout the following intervals of stages 1 and 2. It seems that stage 1 sleep occurs due to a delay of the buildup of the sleep-promoting process relative to the decline of the wake-promoting process which coincide, with initiation of stage 2 sleep and termination of wakefulness. Therefore, "drowsy" sleep can be regarded as occupying "no man's land", between the opponent driving forces for wake and sleep. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2014.

  11. Molecular Relaxation in Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Biman

    2012-01-01

    This book brings together many different relaxation phenomena in liquids under a common umbrella and provides a unified view of apparently diverse phenomena. It aligns recent experimental results obtained with modern techniques with recent theoretical developments. Such close interaction between experiment and theory in this area goes back to the works of Einstein, Smoluchowski, Kramers' and de Gennes. Development of ultrafast laser spectroscopy recently allowed study of various relaxation processes directly in the time domain, with time scales going down to picosecond (ps) and femtosecond (fs

  12. Rapid activity prediction of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors: harnessing docking energetic components for empirical scoring by chemometric and artificial neural network approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangsunan, Patcharapong; Kittiwachana, Sila; Meepowpan, Puttinan; Kungwan, Nawee; Prangkio, Panchika; Hannongbua, Supa; Suree, Nuttee

    2016-06-01

    Improving performance of scoring functions for drug docking simulations is a challenging task in the modern discovery pipeline. Among various ways to enhance the efficiency of scoring function, tuning of energetic component approach is an attractive option that provides better predictions. Herein we present the first development of rapid and simple tuning models for predicting and scoring inhibitory activity of investigated ligands docked into catalytic core domain structures of HIV-1 integrase (IN) enzyme. We developed the models using all energetic terms obtained from flexible ligand-rigid receptor dockings by AutoDock4, followed by a data analysis using either partial least squares (PLS) or self-organizing maps (SOMs). The models were established using 66 and 64 ligands of mercaptobenzenesulfonamides for the PLS-based and the SOMs-based inhibitory activity predictions, respectively. The models were then evaluated for their predictability quality using closely related test compounds, as well as five different unrelated inhibitor test sets. Weighting constants for each energy term were also optimized, thus customizing the scoring function for this specific target protein. Root-mean-square error (RMSE) values between the predicted and the experimental inhibitory activities were determined to be <1 (i.e. within a magnitude of a single log scale of actual IC50 values). Hence, we propose that, as a pre-functional assay screening step, AutoDock4 docking in combination with these subsequent rapid weighted energy tuning methods via PLS and SOMs analyses is a viable approach to predict the potential inhibitory activity and to discriminate among small drug-like molecules to target a specific protein of interest.

  13. Nuclear Spin Relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    and almost completely destroyed by the chaotic thermal environ- ment. Fortunately, the havoc wreaked by thermal molecular motion is not complete. The tiny residual nuclear magnetism (of the order of 10–5), which is established through spin–lattice relaxation, is the basis of almost all NMR and MRI experiments. [1].

  14. Rapid and simultaneous determination of five vinca alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus and human serum using trilinear component modeling of liquid chromatography-diode array detection data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi; Wu, Hai-Long; Li, Yong; Gu, Hui-Wen; Yin, Xiao-Li; Xie, Li-Xia; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-07-15

    A novel chemometrics-assisted high performance liquid chromatography method coupled with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) was proposed for the simultaneous determination of vincristine (VCR), vinblastine (VLB), vindoline (VDL), catharanthine (CAT) and yohimbine (YHB) in Catharanthus roseus (C. roseus) and human serum samples. With the second-order advantage of the alternating trilinear decomposition (ATLD) method, the resolution and rapid determination of five components of interest in complex matrices were performed, even in the present of heavy overlaps and unknown interferences. Therefore, multi-step purification was omitted and five components could be fast eluted out within 7.5min under simple isocratic elution condition (acetonitrile/0.2% formic acid water, 37:63, v/v). Statistical parameters, such as the linear correlation coefficient (R(2)), root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP), limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) had been calculated to investigate the accuracy and reliability of the method. The average recoveries of five vinca alkaloids ranged from 97.1% to 101.9% and 98.8% to 103.0% in C. roseus and human serum samples, respectively. The five vinca alkaloids were adequately determined with limits of detection (LODs) of 29.5-49.3ngmL(-1) in C. roseus and 12.4-27.2ngmL(-1) in human serum samples, respectively. The obtained results demonstrated that the analytical strategy provided a feasible alternative for synchronously monitoring the quality of raw herb and the concentration of blood drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Principle component analysis combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry for rapid diagnosing the sera of patients with major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tiao-Lai; Cho, Yi-Tzu; Su, Hong; Shiea, Jentaie

    2013-09-23

    Previously, we demonstrated that 6M HCl hydrolysis followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry is a useful technique to detect potential protein biomarkers in the sera collected from major depression (MD) patients and from healthy controls. In this study, the effects of various organic acids in hydrolyzing proteins in serum were first examined. The organic matrixes commonly used in MALDI analysis were also examined for characterizing the hydrolyzed peptides. Finally, principle component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze the MALDI mass spectra of acid-hydrolyzed serum samples. It was found that 20% TFA and sinapinic acid were the optimal reagents for hydrolysis and MALDI matrix. Samples collected from MD patients and healthy controls were readily classified through PCA analysis. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve based on the ratio of the intensities of the two fragment ions (m/z 8606 and 9287) indicated by PCA plot was also constructed. The area under the curve was 0.845; the sensitivity and specificity were both 80%. An analytical platform employing trifluoroacetic acid to hydrolyze serum proteins followed by MALDI-TOF/MS and PCA analysis was developed to rapidly differentiate the sera between MD patients and healthy controls. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A rapid ATR-FTIR spectroscopic method for detection of sibutramine adulteration in tea and coffee based on hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebi, Nur; Yilmaz, Mustafa Tahsin; Sagdic, Osman

    2017-08-15

    Sibutramine may be illicitly included in herbal slimming foods and supplements marketed as "100% natural" to enhance weight loss. Considering public health and legal regulations, there is an urgent need for effective, rapid and reliable techniques to detect sibutramine in dietetic herbal foods, teas and dietary supplements. This research comprehensively explored, for the first time, detection of sibutramine in green tea, green coffee and mixed herbal tea using ATR-FTIR spectroscopic technique combined with chemometrics. Hierarchical cluster analysis and PCA principle component analysis techniques were employed in spectral range (2746-2656cm -1 ) for classification and discrimination through Euclidian distance and Ward's algorithm. Unadulterated and adulterated samples were classified and discriminated with respect to their sibutramine contents with perfect accuracy without any false prediction. The results suggest that existence of the active substance could be successfully determined at the levels in the range of 0.375-12mg in totally 1.75g of green tea, green coffee and mixed herbal tea by using FTIR-ATR technique combined with chemometrics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Rapid Synthesis of Thiophene-Based, Organic Dyes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) by a One-Pot, Four-Component Coupling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Keisuke; Yoshizaki, Soichi; Maitani, Masato M; Wada, Yuji; Ogomi, Yuhei; Hayase, Shuzi; Kaiho, Tatsuo; Fuse, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2015-06-26

    This one-pot, four-component coupling approach (Suzuki-Miyaura coupling/C-H direct arylation/Knoevenagel condensation) was developed for the rapid synthesis of thiophene-based organic dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Seven thiophene-based, organic dyes of various donor structures with/without the use of a 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) moiety were successfully synthesized in good yields based on a readily available thiophene boronic acid pinacol ester scaffold (one-pot, 3-step, 35-61%). Evaluation of the photovoltaic properties of the solar cells that were prepared using the synthesized dyes revealed that the introduction of an EDOT structure beside a cyanoacrylic acid moiety improved the short-circuit current (Jsc) while decreasing the fill factor (FF). The donor structure significantly influenced the open-circuit voltage (Voc), the FF, and the power conversion efficiency (PCE). The use of a n-hexyloxyphenyl amine donor, and our originally developed, rigid, and nonplanar donor, both promoted good cell performance (η=5.2-5.6%). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Relaxing Chosen-Ciphertext Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canetti, Ran; Krawczyk, Hugo; Nielsen, Jesper Buus

    2003-01-01

    Security against adaptive chosen ciphertext attacks (or, CCA security) has been accepted as the standard requirement from encryption schemes that need to withstand active attacks. In particular, it is regarded as the appropriate security notion for encryption schemes used as components within...... general protocols and applications. Indeed, CCA security was shown to suffice in a large variety of contexts. However, CCA security often appears to be somewhat too strong: there exist encryption schemes (some of which come up naturally in practice) that are not CCA secure, but seem sufficiently secure...... “for most practical purposes.” We propose a relaxed variant of CCA security, called Replayable CCA (RCCA) security. RCCA security accepts as secure the non-CCA (yet arguably secure) schemes mentioned above; furthermore, it suffices for most existing applications of CCA security. We provide three...

  19. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the product. ...

  20. Fast relaxations in foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishan, Kapilanjan; Helal, Ahmed; Höhler, Reinhard; Cohen-Addad, Sylvie

    2010-07-01

    Aqueous foams present an anomalous macroscopic viscoelastic response at high frequency, previously shown to arise from collective relaxations in the disordered bubble packing. We demonstrate experimentally how these mesoscopic dynamics are in turn tuned by physico-chemical processes on the scale of the gas-liquid interfaces. Two specific local dissipation processes are identified, and we show how the rigidity of the interfaces selects the dominant one, depending on the choice of the surfactant.

  1. Relaxation from particle production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Anson; Marques-Tavares, Gustavo

    2016-12-01

    We consider using particle production as a friction force by which to implement a "Relaxion" solution to the electroweak hierarchy problem. Using this approach, we are able to avoid superplanckian field excursions and avoid any conflict with the strong CP problem. The relaxation mechanism can work before, during or after inflation allowing for inflationary dynamics to play an important role or to be completely decoupled.

  2. Evolving fuzzy rules for relaxed-criteria negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kwang Mong

    2008-12-01

    In the literature on automated negotiation, very few negotiation agents are designed with the flexibility to slightly relax their negotiation criteria to reach a consensus more rapidly and with more certainty. Furthermore, these relaxed-criteria negotiation agents were not equipped with the ability to enhance their performance by learning and evolving their relaxed-criteria negotiation rules. The impetus of this work is designing market-driven negotiation agents (MDAs) that not only have the flexibility of relaxing bargaining criteria using fuzzy rules, but can also evolve their structures by learning new relaxed-criteria fuzzy rules to improve their negotiation outcomes as they participate in negotiations in more e-markets. To this end, an evolutionary algorithm for adapting and evolving relaxed-criteria fuzzy rules was developed. Implementing the idea in a testbed, two kinds of experiments for evaluating and comparing EvEMDAs (MDAs with relaxed-criteria rules that are evolved using the evolutionary algorithm) and EMDAs (MDAs with relaxed-criteria rules that are manually constructed) were carried out through stochastic simulations. Empirical results show that: 1) EvEMDAs generally outperformed EMDAs in different types of e-markets and 2) the negotiation outcomes of EvEMDAs generally improved as they negotiated in more e-markets.

  3. Relaxing to Three Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Karch, A; Karch, Andreas; Randall, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    We propose a new selection principle for distinguishing among possible vacua that we call the "relaxation principle". The idea is that the universe will naturally select among possible vacua through its cosmological evolution, and the configuration with the biggest filling fraction is the likeliest. We apply this idea to the question of the number of dimensions of space. We show that under conventional (but higher-dimensional) FRW evolution, a universe filled with equal numbers of branes and antibranes will naturally come to be dominated by 3-branes and 7-branes. We show why this might help explain the number of dimensions that are experienced in our visible universe.

  4. A Unique and Simple Approach to Improve Sensitivity in 15N-NMR Relaxation Measurements for NH3+ Groups: Application to a Protein-DNA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dan; Lokesh, Ganesh L.R.; Volk, David E.; Iwahara, Junji

    2017-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for research on protein dynamics. In the past decade, there has been significant progress in the development of NMR methods for studying charged side chains. In particular, NMR methods for lysine side-chain NH3+ groups have been proven to be powerful for investigating the dynamics of hydrogen bonds or ion pairs that play important roles in biological processes. However, relatively low sensitivity has been a major practical issue in NMR experiments on NH3+ groups. In this paper, we present a unique and simple approach to improve sensitivity in 15N relaxation measurements for NH3+ groups. In this approach, the efficiency of coherence transfers for the desired components are maximized, whereas undesired anti-phase or multi-spin order components are purged through pulse schemes and rapid relaxation. For lysine side-chain NH3+ groups of a protein-DNA complex, we compared the data obtained with the previous and new pulse sequences under the same conditions and confirmed that the 15N relaxation parameters were consistent for these datasets. While retaining accuracy in measuring 15N relaxation, our new pulse sequences for NH3+ groups allowed an 82% increase in detection sensitivity of 15N longitudinal and transverse relaxation measurements. PMID:28809801

  5. Relaxing Behavioural Inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Amálio

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Object-oriented (OO inheritance allows the definition of families of classes in a hierarchical way. In behavioural inheritance, a strong version, it should be possible to substitute an object of a subclass for an object of its superclass without any observable effect on the system. Behavioural inheritance is related to formal refinement, but, as observed in the literature, the refinement constraints are too restrictive, ruling out many useful OO subclassings. This paper studies behavioural inheritance in the context of ZOO, an object-oriented style for Z. To overcome refinement's restrictions, this paper proposes relaxations to the behavioural inheritance refinement rules. The work is presented for Z, but the results are applicable to any OO language that supports design-by-contract.

  6. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Ju Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM; however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component was prepared, which completely inhibits high K+- and acetylcholine- (ACH- induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K+ was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca2+ channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca2+ channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm.

  7. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K+- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K+ was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca2+ channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca2+ channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm. PMID:27239213

  8. Relaxation cracking in the process industry, an underestimated problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wortel, J.C. van [TNO Institute of Industrial Technology, Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    1998-12-31

    Austenitic components, operating between 500 and 750 deg C, can fail within 1 year service while the ordinary mechanical properties after failure are still within the code requirements. The intergranular brittle failures are situated in the welded or cold deformed areas. This type of cracking has many names, showing the uncertainty concerning the mechanism for the (catastrophical) failures. A just finished investigation showed that it is a relaxation crack problem, introduced by manufacturing processes, especially welding and cold rolling. Cracking/failures can be expected after only 0.1- 0.2 % relaxation strain. These low strain values can already be generated during relaxation of the welding stresses. Especially coarse grained `age hardening` materials are susceptible. Stabilising and Postweld Heat Treatments are very effective to avoid relaxation crack problems during operation. After these heat treatments the components can withstand more than 2 % relaxation strain. At temperatures between 500 and 750 deg C relaxation cracking is the predominant factor for the safety and lifetime of welded austenitic components. (orig.) 12 refs.

  9. 129 Xe NMR Relaxation-Based Macromolecular Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Muller D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Dao, Phuong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Jeong, Keunhong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Slack, Clancy C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Vassiliou, Christophoros C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Finbloom, Joel A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Francis, Matthew B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Wemmer, David E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Physical Biosciences Division; Pines, Alexander [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-07-29

    A 129Xe NMR relaxation-based sensing approach is reported on that exploits changes in the bulk xenon relaxation rate induced by slowed tumbling of a cryptophane-based sensor upon target binding. The amplification afforded by detection of the bulk dissolved xenon allows sensitive detection of targets. The sensor comprises a xenon-binding cryptophane cage, a target interaction element, and a metal chelating agent. Xenon associated with the target-bound cryptophane cage is rapidly relaxed and then detected after exchange with the bulk. Here we show that large macromolecular targets increase the rotational correlation time of xenon, increasing its relaxation rate. Upon binding of a biotin-containing sensor to avidin at 1.5 μM concentration, the free xenon T2 is reduced by a factor of 4.

  10. Double layer relaxation in colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijlstra, J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to improve our insight into the relaxation of the electrical double layer around particles in hydrophobic sols. A detailed knowledge of the relaxation mechanisms is required to explain the behaviour of sols under conditions where the double layer is

  11. Magnetic relaxation in anisotropic magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1971-01-01

    The line shape and the kinematic and thermodynamic slowing down of the critical and paramagnetic relaxation in axially anisotropic materials are discussed. Kinematic slowing down occurs only in the longitudinal relaxation function. The thermodynamic slowing down occurs in either the transverse...

  12. Instantaneous pair theory for high-frequency vibrational energy relaxation in fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ross E.; Stratt, Richard M.

    1999-01-01

    Notwithstanding the long and distinguished history of studies of vibrational energy relaxation, exactly how it is that high frequency vibrations manage to relax in a liquid remains somewhat of a mystery. Both experimental and theoretical approaches seem to say that there is a natural frequency range associated with intermolecular motion in liquids, typically spanning no more than a few hundred cm-1. Landau-Teller-type theories explain rather easily how a solvent can absorb any vibrational energy within this "band," but how is it that molecules can rid themselves of superfluous vibrational energies significantly in excess of these values? In this paper we develop a theory for such processes based on the idea that the crucial liquid motions are those that most rapidly modulate the force on the vibrating coordinate — and that by far the most important of these motions are those involving what we have called the mutual nearest neighbors of the vibrating solute. Specifically, we suggest that whenever there is a single solvent molecule sufficiently close to the solute that the solvent and solute are each other's nearest neighbors, then the instantaneous scattering dynamics of the solute-solvent pair alone suffices to explain the high-frequency relaxation. This highly reduced version of the dynamics has implications for some of the previous theoretical formulations of this problem. Previous instantaneous-normal-mode theories allowed us to understand the origin of a band of liquid frequencies, and even had some success in predicting relaxation within this band, but lacking a sensible picture of the effects of liquid anharmonicity on dynamics, were completely unable to treat higher frequency relaxation. When instantaneous-normal-mode dynamics is used to evaluate the instantaneous pair theory, though, we end up with a multiphonon picture of the relaxation which is in excellent agreement with the exact high-frequency dynamics — suggesting that the critical anharmonicity

  13. Relaxation strategies for patients during dermatologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenefelt, Philip D

    2010-07-01

    Patient stress and anxiety are common preoperatively and during dermatologic procedures and surgeries. Stress and anxiety can occasionally interfere with performance of procedures or surgery and can induce hemodynamic instability, such as elevated blood pressure or syncope, as well as producing considerable discomfort for some patients. Detection of excess stress and anxiety in patients can allow the opportunity for corrective or palliative measures. Slower breathing, biofeedback, progressive muscular relaxation, guided imagery, hypnosis, meditation and music can help calm and rebalance the patient's autonomic nervous system and immune functioning. Handheld miniaturized heart rate variability biofeedback devices are now available. The relaxation response can easily be taught. Guided imagery can be recorded or live. Live rapid induction hypnosis followed by deepening and then self-guided imagery requires no experience on the part of the patient but does require training and experience on the part of a provider. Recorded hypnosis inductions may also be used. Meditation generally requires more prior experience and training, but is useful when the patient already is skilled in it. Live, guided meditation or meditation recordings may be used. Relaxing recorded music from speakers or headphones or live performance music may also be employed to ease discomfort and improve the patient's attitude for dermatologic procedures and surgeries.

  14. Kinematic Characterization of Left Ventricular Chamber Stiffness and Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossahebi, Sina

    Heart failure is the most common cause of hospitalization today, and diastolic heart failure accounts for 40-50% of cases. Therefore, it is critical to identify diastolic dysfunction at a subclinical stage so that appropriate therapy can be administered before ventricular function is further, and perhaps irreversibly impaired. Basic concepts in physics such as kinematic modeling provide a unique method with which to characterize cardiovascular physiology, specifically diastolic function (DF). The advantage of an approach that is standard in physics, such as the kinematic modeling is its causal formulation that functions in contrast to correlative approaches traditionally utilized in the life sciences. Our research group has pioneered theoretical and experimental quantitative analysis of DF in humans, using both non-invasive (echocardiography, cardiac MRI) and invasive (simultaneous catheterization-echocardiography) methods. Our group developed and validated the Parametrized Diastolic Filling (PDF) formalism which is motivated by basic physiologic principles (LV is a mechanical suction pump at the mitral valve opening) that obey Newton's Laws. PDF formalism is a kinematic model of filling employing an equation of motion, the solution of which accurately predicts all E-wave contours in accordance with the rules of damped harmonic oscillatory motion. The equation's lumped parameters---ventricular stiffness, ventricular viscoelasticity/relaxation and ventricular load---are obtained by solving the 'inverse problem'. The parameters' physiologic significance and clinical utility have been repeatedly demonstrated in multiple clinical settings. In this work we apply our kinematic modeling approach to better understand how the heart works as it fills in order to advance the relationship between physiology and mathematical modeling. Through the use of this modeling, we thereby define and validate novel, causal indexes of diastolic function such as early rapid filling energy

  15. Biomolecules: Fluctuations and relaxations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parak, F.; Ostermann, A.; Gassmann, A.; Scherk, C.; Chong, S.-H.; Kidera, A.; Go, N.

    1999-10-01

    The normal-mode refinement of X-ray crystallographic data opened a new possibility to analyze the mean-square displacements in a protein molecule. A comparison of the X-ray structure of myoglobin at several temperatures with Mössbauer data is performed. In the low-temperature regime below 180 K the iron mean-square displacements obtained by Mössbauer spectroscopy are in good agreement with a normal-mode analysis. The X-ray mean-square displacements at the position of the iron, after the motion originated from the external degrees of freedom are subtracted, have practically the same temperature dependence as those from Mössbauer spectroscopy. The difference between the X-ray mean-square displacements and those predicted by normal-mode analysis measures the distribution of molecules into conformational substates. Above 180 K the Mössbauer effect indicates fluctuations between conformational substates. The relaxation from a Fe(III) conformation to a Fe(II) conformation is shown for superoxide dismutase of Propionibacterium shermanii.

  16. Characterization of the collagen component of cartilage repair tissue of the talus with quantitative MRI: comparison of T2 relaxation time measurements with a diffusion-weighted double-echo steady-state sequence (dwDESS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretzschmar, M.; Hainc, N.; Studler, U. [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Bieri, O. [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Physics, Basel (Switzerland); Miska, M. [University Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Heidelberg (Germany); Wiewiorski, M.; Valderrabano, V. [University Hospital Basel, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the collagen component of repair tissue (RT) of the talus after autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) using quantitative T2 and diffusion-weighted imaging. Mean T2 values and diffusion coefficients of AMIC-RT and normal cartilage of the talus of 25 patients with posttraumatic osteochondral lesions and AMIC repair were compared in a cross-sectional design using partially spoiled steady-state free precession (pSSFP) for T2 quantification, and diffusion-weighted double-echo steady-state (dwDESS) for diffusion measurement. RT and cartilage were graded with modified Noyes and MOCART scores on morphological sequences. An association between follow-up interval and quantitative MRI measures was assessed using multivariate regression, after stratifying the cohort according to time interval between surgery and MRI. Mean T2 of the AMIC-RT and cartilage were 43.1 ms and 39.1 ms, respectively (p = 0.26). Mean diffusivity of the RT (1.76 μm{sup 2}/ms) was significantly higher compared to normal cartilage (1.46 μm{sup 2}/ms) (p = 0.0092). No correlation was found between morphological and quantitative parameters. RT diffusivity was lowest in the subgroup with follow-up >28 months (p = 0.027). Compared to T2-mapping, dwDESS demonstrated greater sensitivity in detecting differences in the collagen matrix between AMIC-RT and cartilage. Decreased diffusivity in patients with longer follow-up times may indicate an increased matrix organization of RT. (orig.)

  17. Relaxation dynamics of maximally clustered networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaise, Janis; Johnson, Samuel

    2018-01-01

    We study the relaxation dynamics of fully clustered networks (maximal number of triangles) to an unclustered state under two different edge dynamics—the double-edge swap, corresponding to degree-preserving randomization of the configuration model, and single edge replacement, corresponding to full randomization of the Erdős-Rényi random graph. We derive expressions for the time evolution of the degree distribution, edge multiplicity distribution and clustering coefficient. We show that under both dynamics networks undergo a continuous phase transition in which a giant connected component is formed. We calculate the position of the phase transition analytically using the Erdős-Rényi phenomenology.

  18. The relaxation & stress reduction workbook

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, Martha; Eshelman, Elizabeth Robbins; McKay, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    "The Relaxation & Stress Reduction Workbook broke new ground when it was first published in 1980, detailing easy, step-by-step techniques for calming the body and mind in an increasingly overstimulated world...

  19. Relaxation Pathways in Metallic Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallino, Isabella; Busch, Ralf

    2017-11-01

    At temperatures below the glass transition temperature, physical properties of metallic glasses, such as density, viscosity, electrical resistivity or enthalpy, slowly evolve with time. This is the process of physical aging that occurs among all types of glasses and leads to structural changes at the microscopic level. Even though the relaxation pathways are ruled by thermodynamics as the glass attempts to re-attain thermodynamic equilibrium, they are steered by sluggish kinetics at the microscopic level. Understanding the structural and dynamic pathways of the relaxing glassy state is still one of the grand challenges in materials physics. We review some of the recent experimental advances made in understanding the nature of the relaxation phenomenon in metallic glasses and its implications to the macroscopic and microscopic properties changes of the relaxing glass.

  20. Rapid determination of the volatile components in tobacco by ultrasound-microwave synergistic extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanqin; Chu, Guohai; Zhou, Guojun; Jiang, Jian; Yuan, Kailong; Pan, Yuanjiang; Song, Zhiyu; Li, Zuguang; Xia, Qian; Lu, Xinbo; Xiao, Weiqiang

    2016-03-01

    An ultrasound-microwave synergistic extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction was first employed to determine the volatile components in tobacco samples. The method combined the advantages of ultrasound, microwave, and headspace solid-phase microextraction. The extraction, separation, and enrichment were performed in a single step, which could greatly simplify the operation and reduce the whole pretreatment time. In the developed method, several experimental parameters, such as fiber type, ultrasound power, and irradiation time, were optimized to improve sampling efficiency. Under the optimal conditions, there were 37, 36, 34, and 36 components identified in tobacco from Guizhou, Hunan, Yunnan, and Zimbabwe, respectively, including esters, heterocycles, alkanes, ketones, terpenoids, acids, phenols, and alcohols. The compound types were roughly the same while the contents were varied from different origins due to the disparity of their growing conditions, such as soil, water, and climate. In addition, the ultrasound-microwave synergistic extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction method was compared with the microwave-assisted extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction and headspace solid-phase microextraction methods. More types of volatile components were obtained by using the ultrasound-microwave synergistic extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction method, moreover, the contents were high. The results indicated that the ultrasound-microwave synergistic extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction technique was a simple, time-saving and highly efficient approach, which was especially suitable for analysis of the volatile components in tobacco. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Phase Transitions in Semidefinite Relaxations

    OpenAIRE

    Javanmard, Adel; Montanari, Andrea; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Statistical inference problems arising within signal processing, data mining, and machine learning naturally give rise to hard combinatorial optimization problems. These problems become intractable when the dimensionality of the data is large, as is often the case for modern datasets. A popular idea is to construct convex relaxations of these combinatorial problems, which can be solved efficiently for large scale datasets. Semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations are among the most powerful...

  2. Negative magnetic relaxation in superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnoperov E.P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It was observed that the trapped magnetic moment of HTS tablets or annuli increases in time (negative relaxation if they are not completely magnetized by a pulsed magnetic field. It is shown, in the framework of the Bean critical-state model, that the radial temperature gradient appearing in tablets or annuli during a pulsed field magnetization can explain the negative magnetic relaxation in the superconductor.

  3. Psychomotricity and Relaxation in Psychiatry

    OpenAIRE

    Janete Maximiano

    2014-01-01

    The author pretends to present with this article, the therapeutic contributions of Psychomotricity and Relaxation in Mental Health context, making only reference to adults intervention. A brief description of the body, as a biopsychosocial unity, is found in the introduction, which is followed by the explanation of conceptual and interventional models in Clinical Psychomotricity. The author makes reference to psychotherapeutic values of relaxation, giving some examples of techniques and expos...

  4. Relaxation processes in Aeolian transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selmani Houssem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate experimentally the relaxation process toward the equilibrium regime of saltation transport in the context of spatial inhomogeneous conditions. The relaxation length associated to this process is an important length in aeolian transport. This length stands for the distance needed for the particle flux to adapt to a change in flow conditions or in the boundary conditions at the bed. Predicting the value of this length under given conditions of transport remains an open and important issue. We conducted wind tunnel experiments to document the influence of the upstream particle flux and wind speed on the relaxation process toward the saturated transport state. In the absence of upstream particle flux, data show that the relaxation length is independent of the wind strength (except close to the threshold of transport. In contrast, in the case of a finite upstream flux, the relaxation length exhibits a clear increase with increasing air flow velocity. Moreover, in the latter the relaxation is clearly non-monotonic and presents an overshoot.

  5. Evidence for a mantle component shown by rare gases, C and N isotopes in polycrystalline diamonds from Orapa (Botswana) [rapid communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautheron, Cécile; Cartigny, Pierre; Moreira, Manuel; Harris, Jeff. W.; Allègre, Claude J.

    2005-12-01

    In an attempt to constrain the origin of polycrystalline diamond, combined analyses of rare gases and carbon and nitrogen isotopes were performed on six such diamonds from Orapa (Botswana). Helium shows radiogenic isotopic ratios of R/Ra = 0.14-1.29, while the neon ratios ( 21Ne/ 22Ne of up to 0.0534) reflect a component from mantle, nucleogenic and atmospheric sources. 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios of between 477 and 6056 are consistent with this interpretation. The ( 129Xe/ 130Xe) isotopic ratios range between 6.54 and 6.91 and the lower values indicate an atmospheric component. The He, Ne, Ar and Xe isotopic compositions and the Xe isotopic pattern are clear evidence for a mantle component rather than a crustal one in the source of the polycrystalline diamonds from Orapa. The δ 13C and δ 15N isotopic values of - 1.04 to - 9.79‰ and + 4.5 to + 15.5‰ respectively, lie within the range of values obtained from the monocrystalline diamonds at that mine. Additionally, this work reveals that polycrystalline diamonds may not be the most appropriate samples to study if the aim is to consider the compositional evolution of rare gases through time. Our data shows that after crystallization, the polycrystalline diamonds undergo both gas loss (that is more significant for the lighter rare gases such as He and Ne) and secondary processes (such as radiogenic, nucleogenic and fissiogenic, as well as atmospheric contamination). Finally, if polycrystalline diamonds sampled an old mantle (1-3.2 Ga), the determined Xe isotopic signatures, which are similar to present MORB mantle - no fissiogenic Xe from fission of 238U being detectable - imply either that Xe isotopic ratios have not evolved within the convective mantle since diamond crystallization, or that these diamonds are actually much younger.

  6. Recovery of superfluorescence in inhomogeneously broadened systems through rapid relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balko, B.; Kay, I. W.; Vuduc, R.; Neuberger, J. W.

    1997-05-01

    This paper shows that time-dependent hyperfine interactions of the nucleus with electrons can enhance the superfluorescence (SF) intensity by countering the destructive effect of inhomogeneous broadening on SF.

  7. Rapid Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  8. Weaving a circle: a relaxation program using imagery and music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, K

    2001-01-01

    This article examines the imagery and music components of the relaxation program at the Vancouver Centre of the British Columbia Cancer Agency. An outline of the objectives and design of the experiential portion of the sessions is accompanied by a detailed description of the musical elements and influences. Some participant evaluation is also included.

  9. Phase transitions in semidefinite relaxations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanmard, Adel; Montanari, Andrea; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2016-04-19

    Statistical inference problems arising within signal processing, data mining, and machine learning naturally give rise to hard combinatorial optimization problems. These problems become intractable when the dimensionality of the data is large, as is often the case for modern datasets. A popular idea is to construct convex relaxations of these combinatorial problems, which can be solved efficiently for large-scale datasets. Semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations are among the most powerful methods in this family and are surprisingly well suited for a broad range of problems where data take the form of matrices or graphs. It has been observed several times that when the statistical noise is small enough, SDP relaxations correctly detect the underlying combinatorial structures. In this paper we develop asymptotic predictions for several detection thresholds, as well as for the estimation error above these thresholds. We study some classical SDP relaxations for statistical problems motivated by graph synchronization and community detection in networks. We map these optimization problems to statistical mechanics models with vector spins and use nonrigorous techniques from statistical mechanics to characterize the corresponding phase transitions. Our results clarify the effectiveness of SDP relaxations in solving high-dimensional statistical problems.

  10. Shoreline relaxation at pocket beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turki, Imen; Medina, Raul; Kakeh, Nabil; González, Mauricio

    2015-09-01

    A new physical concept of relaxation time is introduced in this research as the time required for the beach to dissipate its initial perturbation. This concept is investigated using a simple beach-evolution model of shoreline rotation at pocket beaches, based on the assumption that the instantaneous change of the shoreline plan-view shape depends on the long-term equilibrium plan-view shape. The expression of relaxation time is developed function of the energy conditions and the physical characteristics of the beach; it increases at longer beaches having coarse sediments and experiencing low-energy conditions. The relaxation time, calculated by the developed model, is validated by the shoreline observations extracted from video images at two artificially embayed beaches of Barcelona (NW Mediterranean) suffering from perturbations of sand movement and a nourishment project. This finding is promising to estimate the shoreline response and useful to improve our understanding of the dynamic of pocket beaches and their stability.

  11. Vibrational energy relaxation in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnoy, J.; Gale, G. M.

    The de-excitation of the vibrational population of small molecules in the liquid state is considered. Experimental techniques applicable to the measurement of relaxation times in dense phases are first described. Theoretical approaches are subsequently developed with special emphasis on the relationship between ab-initio quantum methods and binary interaction models. Finally, a selection of experimental results is analysed in the light of these theories. Special attention is given to the dependence of the relaxation time on experimental parameters such as density, temperature or the concentration of a mixture. The behaviour of the relaxation time across the liquid/solid phase transition is also treated. La désexcitation vibrationnelle de petites molécules est étudiée en phase liquide. Les techniques expérimentales utilisables pour mesurer les temps de relaxation en phase dense sont d'abord décrites. Les approches théoriques sont ensuite développées en montrant en particulier les liens entre les deux principales : l'approche quantique ab-initio et les modèles d'interaction binaire. Un choix de résultats expérimentaux est finalement analysé à la lumière de ces théories. Les dépendances des temps de relaxation envers les paramètres expérimentaux, comme la densité, la température ou la concentration d'un mélange, sont spécialement étudiées. Le comportement de la relaxation à la transition liquide/solide est aussi abordé.

  12. Psychomotricity and Relaxation in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janete Maximiano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The author pretends to present with this article, the therapeutic contributions of Psychomotricity and Relaxation in Mental Health context, making only reference to adults intervention. A brief description of the body, as a biopsychosocial unity, is found in the introduction, which is followed by the explanation of conceptual and interventional models in Clinical Psychomotricity. The author makes reference to psychotherapeutic values of relaxation, giving some examples of techniques and exposing a clinical case. Finally, the author briefly describes her recent experience of Psychomotor intervention in Psychiatric Service of Hospital Fernando Fonseca.

  13. Molecular relaxations in amorphous phenylbutazone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahra, M.; Thayyil, M. Shahin; Capaccioli, S.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular dynamics of phenylbutazone in the supercooled liquid and glassy state is studied using broadband dielectric spectroscopy for test frequencies 1 kHz, 10 kHz and 100 kHz over a wide temperature range. Above the glass transition temperature Tg, the presence of the structural α-relaxation peak was observed which shifts towards lower frequencies as the temperature decreases and kinetically freezes at Tg. Besides the structural α-relaxation peak, a β-process which arises due to the localized molecular fluctuations is observed at lower temperature.

  14. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with linear ion trap-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometry combined with a systematic strategy based on fragment ions for the rapid separation and characterization of components in Stellera chamaejasme extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhixin; Qu, Yang; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Xiao, Hongbin

    2016-04-01

    Stellera chamaejasme, a famous toxic herb, has been used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat various diseases. For decades, increasing attention in modern pharmacological studies has been drawn to S. chamaejasme because of its potential anti-tumor, anti-virus, and anti-fungus activities. However, due to the intrinsic complexity of chemical constitutes, hardly any investigations formed an overall recognition for the chemical profiles of this herb. In this study, a rapid and sensitive ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometry method was developed to characterize the chemical components of S. chamaejasme extracts. Based on optimized ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry conditions and systematic fragment ions-based strategy, a total of 47 components including flavones, diterpenes, coumarins, and lignans were simultaneously detected and identified or tentatively identified for the first time. The MS(n) fragmentation patterns of all the characterized compounds in positive or negative electrospray ionization modes were also explored and summarized. These results provided essential data for further pharmacological research on S. chamaejasme. Moreover, the method was demonstrated to be an efficient tool for rapid qualitative analysis of secondary metabolites from natural resources. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Malaria rapid diagnostic kits: quality of packaging, design and labelling of boxes and components and readability and accuracy of information inserts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruggeman Cathrien

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study assessed malaria RDT kits for adequate and correct packaging, design and labelling of boxes and components. Information inserts were studied for readability and accuracy of information. Methods Criteria for packaging, design, labelling and information were compiled from Directive 98/79 of the European Community (EC, relevant World Health Organization (WHO documents and studies on end-users' performance of RDTs. Typography and readability level (Flesch-Kincaid grade level were assessed. Results Forty-two RDT kits from 22 manufacturers were assessed, 35 of which had evidence of good manufacturing practice according to available information (i.e. CE-label affixed or inclusion in the WHO list of ISO13485:2003 certified manufacturers. Shortcomings in devices were (i insufficient place for writing sample identification (n = 40 and (ii ambiguous labelling of the reading window (n = 6. Buffer vial labels were lacking essential information (n = 24 or were of poor quality (n = 16. Information inserts had elevated readability levels (median Flesch Kincaid grade 8.9, range 7.1 - 12.9 and user-unfriendly typography (median font size 8, range 5 - 10. Inadequacies included (i no referral to biosafety (n = 18, (ii critical differences between depicted and real devices (n = 8, (iii figures with unrealistic colours (n = 4, (iv incomplete information about RDT line interpretations (n = 31 and no data on test characteristics (n = 8. Other problems included (i kit names that referred to Plasmodium vivax although targeting a pan-species Plasmodium antigen (n = 4, (ii not stating the identity of the pan-species antigen (n = 2 and (iii slight but numerous differences in names displayed on boxes, device packages and information inserts. Three CE labelled RDT kits produced outside the EC had no authorized representative affixed and the shape and relative dimensions of the CE symbol affixed did not comply with the Directive 98/79/EC

  16. Malaria rapid diagnostic kits: quality of packaging, design and labelling of boxes and components and readability and accuracy of information inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Philippe; Maltha, Jessica; Hermans, Veerle; Ravinetto, Raffaella; Bruggeman, Cathrien; Jacobs, Jan

    2011-02-13

    The present study assessed malaria RDT kits for adequate and correct packaging, design and labelling of boxes and components. Information inserts were studied for readability and accuracy of information. Criteria for packaging, design, labelling and information were compiled from Directive 98/79 of the European Community (EC), relevant World Health Organization (WHO) documents and studies on end-users' performance of RDTs. Typography and readability level (Flesch-Kincaid grade level) were assessed. Forty-two RDT kits from 22 manufacturers were assessed, 35 of which had evidence of good manufacturing practice according to available information (i.e. CE-label affixed or inclusion in the WHO list of ISO13485:2003 certified manufacturers). Shortcomings in devices were (i) insufficient place for writing sample identification (n=40) and (ii) ambiguous labelling of the reading window (n=6). Buffer vial labels were lacking essential information (n=24) or were of poor quality (n=16). Information inserts had elevated readability levels (median Flesch Kincaid grade 8.9, range 7.1-12.9) and user-unfriendly typography (median font size 8, range 5-10). Inadequacies included (i) no referral to biosafety (n=18), (ii) critical differences between depicted and real devices (n=8), (iii) figures with unrealistic colours (n=4), (iv) incomplete information about RDT line interpretations (n=31) and no data on test characteristics (n=8). Other problems included (i) kit names that referred to Plasmodium vivax although targeting a pan-species Plasmodium antigen (n=4), (ii) not stating the identity of the pan-species antigen (n=2) and (iii) slight but numerous differences in names displayed on boxes, device packages and information inserts. Three CE labelled RDT kits produced outside the EC had no authorized representative affixed and the shape and relative dimensions of the CE symbol affixed did not comply with the Directive 98/79/EC. Overall, RDTs with evidence of GMP scored better

  17. Tracking ultrafast relaxation dynamics of furan by femtosecond photoelectron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuzhu, E-mail: yuzhu.liu@gmail.com [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China); Knopp, Gregor [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland); Qin, Chaochao [Department of Physics, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Gerber, Thomas [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland)

    2015-01-13

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Relaxation dynamics of furan are tracked by femtosecond photoelectron imaging. • The mechanism for ultrafast formation of α-carbene and β-carbene is proposed. • Ultrafast internal conversion from S{sub 2} to S{sub 1} is observed. • The transient characteristics of the fragment ions are obtained. • Single-color multi-photon ionization dynamics at 800 nm are also studied. - Abstract: Ultrafast internal conversion dynamics of furan has been studied by femtosecond photoelectron imaging (PEI) coupled with photofragmentation (PF) spectroscopy. Photoelectron imaging of single-color multi-photon ionization and two-color pump–probe ionization are obtained and analyzed. Photoelectron bands are assigned to the related states. The time evolution of the photoelectron signal by pump–probe ionization can be well described by a biexponential decay: two rapid relaxation pathways with time constants of ∼15 fs and 85 (±11) fs. The rapid relaxation is ascribed to the ultrafast internal conversion (IC) from the S{sub 2} state to the vibrationally hot S{sub 1} state. The second relaxation process is attributed to the redistributions and depopulation of secondarily populated high vibronic S{sub 1} state and the formation of α-carbene and β-carbene by H immigration. Additionally, the transient characteristics of the fragment ions are also measured and discussed as a complementary understanding.

  18. Relaxation times estimation in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baselice, Fabio; Caivano, Rocchina; Cammarota, Aldo; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Pascazio, Vito

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is a very powerful techniques for soft tissue diagnosis. At the present, the clinical evaluation is mainly conducted exploiting the amplitude of the recorded MR image which, in some specific cases, is modified by using contrast enhancements. Nevertheless, spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times can play an important role in many pathology diagnosis, such as cancer, Alzheimer or Parkinson diseases. Different algorithms for relaxation time estimation have been proposed in literature. In particular, the two most adopted approaches are based on Least Squares (LS) and on Maximum Likelihood (ML) techniques. As the amplitude noise is not zero mean, the first one produces a biased estimator, while the ML is unbiased but at the cost of high computational effort. Recently the attention has been focused on the estimation in the complex, instead of the amplitude, domain. The advantage of working with real and imaginary decomposition of the available data is mainly the possibility of achieving higher quality estimations. Moreover, the zero mean complex noise makes the Least Square estimation unbiased, achieving low computational times. First results of complex domain relaxation times estimation on real datasets are presented. In particular, a patient with an occipital lesion has been imaged on a 3.0T scanner. Globally, the evaluation of relaxation times allow us to establish a more precise topography of biologically active foci, also with respect to contrast enhanced images.

  19. Onsager relaxation of toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samain, A.; Nguyen, F.

    1997-01-01

    The slow relaxation of isolated toroidal plasmas towards their thermodynamical equilibrium is studied in an Onsager framework based on the entropy metric. The basic tool is a variational principle, equivalent to the kinetic equation, involving the profiles of density, temperature, electric potential, electric current. New minimization procedures are proposed to obtain entropy and entropy production rate functionals. (author). 36 refs.

  20. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carati, A; Benfenati, F; Galgani, L

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  1. Sleep, Stress & Relaxation: Rejuvenate Body & Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep, Stress & Relaxation: Rejuvenate Body & Mind; Relieve Stress; best ways to relieve stress; best way to relieve stress; different ways to relieve stress; does smoking relieve stress; does tobacco relieve stress; how can I relieve stress; how can you relieve stress; how do I relieve stress; reduce stress; does smoking reduce stress; how can I reduce stress; how to reduce stress; reduce stress; reduce stress levels; reducing stress; smoking reduce stress; smoking reduces stress; stress reducing techniques; techniques to reduce stress; stress relief; best stress relief; natural stress relief; need stress relief; relief for stress; relief from stress; relief of stress; smoking and stress relief; smoking for stress relief; smoking stress relief; deal with stress; dealing with stress; dealing with anger; dealing with stress; different ways of dealing with stress; help dealing with stress; how to deal with anger; how to deal with stress; how to deal with stress when quitting smoking; stress management; free stress management; how can you manage stress; how do you manage stress; how to manage stress; manage stress; management of stress; management stress; managing stress; strategies for managing stress; coping with stress; cope with stress; copeing with stress; coping and stress; coping skills for stress; coping strategies for stress; coping strategies with stress; coping strategy for stress; coping with stress; coping with stress and anxiety; emotional health; emotional health; emotional health article; emotional health articles; deep relaxation; deep breathing relaxation techniques; deep muscle relaxation; deep relaxation; deep relaxation meditation; deep relaxation technique; deep relaxation techniques; meditation exercises; mindful exercises; mindful meditation exercises; online relaxation exercises; relaxation breathing exercises; relaxation exercise; relaxation exercises; stress relaxation; methods of relaxation for stress; relax stress; relax techniques stress

  2. Violent relaxation in phase-space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindoni, D.; Secco, L.

    2008-05-01

    The problem of violent relaxation mechanism in collisionless systems from the point of view of the distribution function (DF) in μ-space is reviewed. The literature run starts from the seminal paper of Lynden-Bell [Lynden-Bell, D., 1967. MNRAS 136, 101] and is closed by that of the same author [Arad, I., Lynden-Bell, D., 2005. MNRAS 361, 385]. After some introductive sections on the stellar dynamical equilibria and on the Shannon's information theory, the different approaches follow each accompanied with its criticism on the previous works. Different coarse-grained DFs proposed by different authors have been taken into account. It appears that for a collisionless gas of a unique mass specie there is not significant discrepancies among the different approaches which converge to the same DF at the end of relaxation process. The main problem is to avoid the non observed mass segregation in the case of multi-species composition, e.g., in a star-dominated galaxy component. On this topic the results are very different and are depending on the shape and size one chooses for μ-space tiles. A great effort has been spent into the visualization of the different partitions in phase-space in order to understand clearly from what the differences arise.

  3. Computer experiments on the relaxation of collisionless plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Markidis, Stefano; Kaniadakis, Giorgio

    2009-02-01

    The relaxation of a collisionless plasma is not regulated by the usual collisional Boltzmann equation and its related H-theorem. The interactions are long range and the collisions are not instantaneous. A direct simulation approach is presented for measuring by computer experiment what the relaxed distribution is. The conclusion of the analysis is that the relaxed distribution includes both a low energy component that is well described using the usual Boltzmann distribution and a high energy tail described using a power law. The results of the simulation study are compared directly with the model recently proposed by Kaniadakis (2002 Phys. Rev. E 66 056125). The observed cumulative distribution function is well reproduced by the theory.

  4. Equivalent Relaxations of Optimal Power Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, S; Low, SH; Teeraratkul, T; Hassibi, B

    2015-03-01

    Several convex relaxations of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem have recently been developed using both bus injection models and branch flow models. In this paper, we prove relations among three convex relaxations: a semidefinite relaxation that computes a full matrix, a chordal relaxation based on a chordal extension of the network graph, and a second-order cone relaxation that computes the smallest partial matrix. We prove a bijection between the feasible sets of the OPF in the bus injection model and the branch flow model, establishing the equivalence of these two models and their second-order cone relaxations. Our results imply that, for radial networks, all these relaxations are equivalent and one should always solve the second-order cone relaxation. For mesh networks, the semidefinite relaxation and the chordal relaxation are equally tight and both are strictly tighter than the second-order cone relaxation. Therefore, for mesh networks, one should either solve the chordal relaxation or the SOCP relaxation, trading off tightness and the required computational effort. Simulations are used to illustrate these results.

  5. The Effects of Progressive Relaxation and Music on Attention, Relaxation and Stress Responses: An Investigation of the Cognitive-Behavioral Model of Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-28

    In order to test the cognitive behavioral model of relaxation in the present experiment, additional information on attention and attention measurement...gathered from brain-Iesioned patients, as well as component analyses of neuropsychological test battery data. Specific functions of the attention...of the Weschler Memory Scale (WMS-III; The Psychological Corporation, San Antonio, Texas), and a "Silly Sentence Task" (Mesulam, 1985) as prompted by

  6. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    .... We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom...

  7. Relaxation Techniques to Manage IBS Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us Relaxation Techniques to Manage IBS Symptoms Details Content Last Updated: ... Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Relaxation Techniques for IBS You’ve been to the doctor ...

  8. Restricting query relaxation through user constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaasterland, T.

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes techniques to restrict and to heuristically control relaxation of deductive database queries. The process of query relaxation provides a user with a means to automatically identify new queries that are related to the user`s original query. However, for large databases, many relaxations may be possible. The methods to control and restrict the relaxation process introduced in this paper focus the relaxation process and make it more efficient. User restrictions over the data base domain may be expressed as user constraints. This paper describes how user constraints can restrict relaxed queries. Also, a set of heuristics based on cooperative answering techniques are presented for controlling the relaxation process. Finally, the interaction of the methods for relaxing queries, processing user constraints, and applying the heuristic rules is described.

  9. On-line comprehensive two-dimensional HepG2 cell membrane chromatographic analysis system for charactering anti-hepatoma components from rat serum after oral administration of Radix scutellariae: A strategy for rapid screening active compounds in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Dan; Chen, Xiaofei; Cao, Yan; Wu, Xunxun; Ding, Xuan; Zhang, Hai; Zhang, Chuan; Chai, Yifeng; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2016-01-25

    Cell membrane chromatography (CMC) is a bioaffinity chromatography technique for characterizing interactions between drugs and membrane receptors and has been widely used to screen active components from complex samples such as herbal medicines (HMs). However, it has never been applied in vivo due to its relatively high limit of detection (LOD) and the matrix interferences. In this study, a novel on-line comprehensive two-dimensional HepG2/CMC/enrich columns/high performance liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry system was developed to rapidly screen potential anti-hepatoma components from drug-containing serum of rats after oral administration of Radix scutellariae. A matrix interference deduction method with a home-written program in MATLAB was developed, which could successfully eliminate the interference of endogenous substances in serum. Baicalein, wogonin, chrysin, oroxylin A, neobaicalein and rivularin from Radix scutellariae extraction were significantly retained in the HepG2/CMC column. Three potential active components, wogonin, oroxylin A and neobaicalein were firstly screened from the drug-containing serum as well. The cell counting kit-8 assay demonstrated that wogonin, oroxylin A and chrysin showed high inhibitory activities in a dose-dependent manner on HepG2 cells at the concentration of 12.5-200 μM (pCMC system and matrix interference elimination strategy have significant advantages for in vivo screening of active components from complex biological samples and could be applied to other biochromatography models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, M; Popov, V L; Pohrt, R

    2015-11-09

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect "relaxation damping". The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed.

  11. Generalized approach to non-exponential relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Non-exponential relaxation is a universal feature of systems as diverse as glasses, spin glasses, earthquakes, financial markets and the universe. Complex relaxation results from hierarchically constrained dynamics with the strength of the constraints being directly related to the form of the relaxation, which ...

  12. Brief relaxation training program for hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Judith L; Chung, Sheng-Chia; Beigi, Richard; Brooks, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Employee stress leads to attrition, burnout, and increased medical costs. We aimed to assess if relaxation training leads to decreased stress levels based on questionnaire and thermal biofeedback. Thirty-minute relaxation training sessions were conducted for hospital employees and for cancer patients. Perceived Stress levels and skin temperature were analyzed before and after relaxation training.

  13. Domain relaxation in Langmuir films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, James C.; Bernoff, Andrew J.; Mann, Elizabeth K.; Mann, J. Adin; Wintersmith, Jacob R.; Zou, Lu

    We report on theoretical studies of molecularly thin Langmuir films on the surface of a quiescent subfluid and qualitatively compare the results to both new and previous experiments. The film covers the entire fluid surface, but domains of different phases are observed. In the absence of external forcing, the compact domains tend to relax to circles, driven by a line tension at the phase boundaries. When stretched (by a transient applied stagnation-point flow or by stirring), a compact domain elongates, creating a bola consisting of two roughly circular reservoirs connected by a thin tether. This shape will then relax slowly to the minimum-energy configuration of a circular domain. The tether is never observed to rupture, even when it is more than a hundred times as long as it is wide. We model these experiments by taking previous descriptions of the full hydrodynamics, identifying the dominant effects via dimensional analysis, and reducing the system to a more tractable form. The result is a free boundary problem for an inviscid Langmuir film whose motion is driven by the line tension of the domain and damped by the viscosity of the subfluid. Using this model we derive relaxation rates for perturbations of a uniform strip and a circular patch. We also derive a boundary integral formulation which allows an efficient numerical solution of the problem. Numerically this model replicates the formation of a bola and the subsequent relaxation observed in the experiments. Finally, we suggest physical properties of the system (such as line tension) that can be deduced by comparison of the theory and numerical simulations to the experiment. Two movies are available with the online version of the paper.

  14. Relaxed Poisson cure rate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Josemar; Cordeiro, Gauss M; Cancho, Vicente G; Balakrishnan, N

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to make the standard promotion cure rate model (Yakovlev and Tsodikov, ) more flexible by assuming that the number of lesions or altered cells after a treatment follows a fractional Poisson distribution (Laskin, ). It is proved that the well-known Mittag-Leffler relaxation function (Berberan-Santos, ) is a simple way to obtain a new cure rate model that is a compromise between the promotion and geometric cure rate models allowing for superdispersion. So, the relaxed cure rate model developed here can be considered as a natural and less restrictive extension of the popular Poisson cure rate model at the cost of an additional parameter, but a competitor to negative-binomial cure rate models (Rodrigues et al., ). Some mathematical properties of a proper relaxed Poisson density are explored. A simulation study and an illustration of the proposed cure rate model from the Bayesian point of view are finally presented. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Effects of Progressive Relaxation versus Biofeedback-Assisted Relaxation with College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, John D.; Czerlinsky, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Examined use of biofeedback, relaxation training, or both in a college relaxation class with an enrollment of 33 students. Results indicated students receiving relaxation training plus biofeedback improved significantly more on psychological variables than did students receiving only relaxation training. (Author/ABL)

  16. Oxygen-17-induced proton relaxation rates for alcohols and alcohol solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrar Thomas C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of 17O enriched samples of alcohols to measure the correlation time of the OH internuclear vector works well when the hydroxyl proton exchanges rapidly. For alcohols such as methanol and ethanol the hydroxyl exchange rate for neat samples is relatively slow even at room temperature and significant systematic errors result if slow exchange effects are not considered. For slow exchange the hydroxyl proton, 17OH, signal is a relatively complex function of the chemical exchange rate of the hydroxyl proton, the OH spin coupling (about 80 Hz for alcohols and water and the relaxation time for the oxygen. The OH linewidth can become so large due to scalar relaxation with the rapidly relaxing oxygen nucleus that the signal becomes very difficult to detect. For neat 17O enriched ethanol at room temperature the oxygen relaxation time is about 3.0 ms and the hydroxyl proton linewidth is over 1000 Hz.

  17. Selective One-Dimensional Total Correlation Spectroscopy Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiments for a Rapid Identification of Minor Components in the Lipid Fraction of Milk and Dairy Products: Toward Spin Chromatography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaemmanouil, Christina; Tsiafoulis, Constantinos G; Alivertis, Dimitrios; Tzamaloukas, Ouranios; Miltiadou, Despoina; Tzakos, Andreas G; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P

    2015-06-10

    We report a rapid, direct, and unequivocal spin-chromatographic separation and identification of minor components in the lipid fraction of milk and common dairy products with the use of selective one-dimensional (1D) total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. The method allows for the complete backbone spin-coupling network to be elucidated even in strongly overlapped regions and in the presence of major components from 4 × 10(2) to 3 × 10(3) stronger NMR signal intensities. The proposed spin-chromatography method does not require any derivatization steps for the lipid fraction, is selective with excellent resolution, is sensitive with quantitation capability, and compares favorably to two-dimensional (2D) TOCSY and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods of analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that the 1D TOCSY NMR spin-chromatography method can become a procedure of primary interest in food analysis and generally in complex mixture analysis.

  18. Dynamics of Glass Relaxation at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Roger C.; Smith, John R.; Potuzak, Marcel; Guo, Xiaoju; Bowden, Bradley F.; Kiczenski, T. J.; Allan, Douglas C.; King, Ellyn A.; Ellison, Adam J.; Mauro, John C.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of glass relaxation under ambient conditions has intrigued scientists and the general public for centuries, most notably in the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows. Here we report quantitative measurement of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that Corning® Gorilla® Glass shows measurable and reproducible relaxation at room temperature. Remarkably, this relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay rather than simple exponential relaxation, and the value of the stretching exponent (β=3/7) follows a theoretical prediction made by Phillips for homogeneous glasses.

  19. Characterization of structural relaxation in inorganic glasses using length dilatometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Erick

    The processes that govern how a glass relaxes towards its thermodynamic quasi-equilibrium state are major factors in understanding glass behavior near the glass transition region, as characterized by the glass transition temperature (Tg). Intrinsic glass properties such as specific volume, enthalpy, entropy, density, etc. are used to map the behavior of the glass network below in and near the transition region. The question of whether a true thermodynamic second order phase transition takes place in the glass transition region is another pending question. Linking viscosity behavior to entropy, or viewing the glass configuration as an energy landscape are just a couple of the most prevalent methods used for attempting to understand the glass transition. The structural relaxation behavior of inorganic glasses is important for more than scientific reasons, many commercial glass processing operations including glass melting and certain forms of optical fabrication include significant time spent in the glass transition region. For this reason knowledge of structural relaxation processes can, at a minimum, provide information for annealing duration of melt-quenched glasses. The development of a predictive model for annealing time prescription has the potential to save glass manufacturers significant time and money as well as increasing volume throughput. In optical hot forming processes such as precision glass molding, molded optical components can significantly change in shape upon cooling through the glass transition. This change in shape is not scientifically predictable as of yet though manufacturers typically use empirical rules developed in house. The classification of glass behavior in the glass transition region would allow molds to be accurately designed and save money for the producers. The work discussed in this dissertation is comprised of the development of a dilatometric measurement and characterization method of structural relaxation. The measurement and

  20. A distinguishable role of eDNA in the viscoelastic relaxation of biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Brandon W; van der Mei, Henny C; Sjollema, Jelmer; Busscher, Henk J; Sharma, Prashant K

    2013-10-15

    Bacteria in the biofilm mode of growth are protected against chemical and mechanical stresses. Biofilms are composed, for the most part, of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs). The extracellular matrix is composed of different chemical constituents, such as proteins, polysaccharides, and extracellular DNA (eDNA). Here we aimed to identify the roles of different matrix constituents in the viscoelastic response of biofilms. Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus mutans, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were grown under different conditions yielding distinct matrix chemistries. Next, biofilms were subjected to mechanical deformation and stress relaxation was monitored over time. A Maxwell model possessing an average of four elements for an individual biofilm was used to fit the data. Maxwell elements were defined by a relaxation time constant and their relative importance. Relaxation time constants varied widely over the 104 biofilms included and were divided into seven ranges (500 s). Principal-component analysis was carried out to eliminate related time constant ranges, yielding three principal components that could be related to the known matrix chemistries. The fastest relaxation component (component (3 to 70 s) was related to other EPSs, while a distinguishable role was assigned to intact eDNA, which possesses a unique principal component with a time constant range (10 to 25 s) between those of EPS constituents. This implies that eDNA modulates its interaction with other matrix constituents to control its contribution to viscoelastic relaxation under mechanical stress. The protection offered by biofilms to organisms that inhabit it against chemical and mechanical stresses is due in part to its matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) in which biofilm organisms embed themselves. Mechanical stresses lead to deformation and possible detachment of biofilm organisms, and hence, rearrangement processes occur in a biofilm to

  1. Conformational relaxations of human serum albumin studied by molecular dynamics simulations with pressure jumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesylevskyy S. O.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. In this work we developed a novel technique of obtaining the spectrum of conformational relaxations in a solvated protein using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. Methods. Structural relaxations in the protein are initiated by the abrupt jump of pressure in the NPT simulations. The change of the protein volume after the jump is monitored and the Maximum Entropy Method is used for spectral decomposition of the volume relaxation curve. The human serum albumin (HSA is used as a test case. Results. The obtained relaxation spectrum of HSA contains one component attributed to the bulk water and five components caused by the relaxations of the protein globule and its hydration shell. All relaxation components are in good agreement with the available experimental data obtained by the time-resolved spectroscopy and the broadband acoustic spectroscopy of HSA. Conclusions. The developed technique allows obtaining spectra of conformational relaxations of soluble proteins in a range of time scales from ~0.1 ps to ~50 ns utilizing single non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation.

  2. Anomalous T2 Relaxation in Normal and Degraded Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, David A.; Magin, Richard L.; Li, Weiguo; Trujillo, Juan J.; Velasco, M. Pilar; Spencer, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the ordinary monoexponential model with three anomalous relaxation models—the stretched Mittag-Leffler, stretched exponential, and biexponential functions—using both simulated and experimental cartilage relaxation data. Methods Monte Carlo simulations were used to examine both the ability of identifying a given model under high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions and the accuracy and precision of parameter estimates under more modest SNR as would be encountered clinically. Experimental transverse relaxation data were analyzed from normal and enzymatically degraded cartilage samples under high SNR and rapid echo sampling to compare each model. Results Both simulation and experimental results showed improvement in signal representation with the anomalous relaxation models. The stretched exponential model consistently showed the lowest mean squared error in experimental data and closely represents the signal decay over multiple decades of the decay time (e.g. 1-10ms, 10-100ms, and >100ms). The stretched exponential parameter αse showed an inverse correlation with biochemically-derived cartilage proteoglycan content. Conclusion Experimental results obtained at high field suggest potential application of αse as a measure of matrix integrity. Simulation reflecting more clinical imaging conditions, indicate the ability to robustly estimate αse and distinguish between normal and degraded tissue, highlighting its potential as a biomarker for human studies. PMID:26336966

  3. Proton magnetic relaxation in aromatic polyamides during water vapor sorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smotrina, T. V.; Chulkova, Yu. S.; Karasev, D. V.; Lebedeva, N. P.; Perepelkin, K. E.; Grebennikov, S. F.

    2009-07-01

    The state of the components in the aromatic polyamide-water system was studied by NMR and sorption. A comparative analysis of spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation in aromatic para-polyamide ( para-aramid) technical fibers Rusar, Kevlar, and Technora was performed depending on the sorption value. The NMR results correlated with the supramolecular structure of polymers and quasi-chemical equation parameters for water vapor sorption.

  4. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  5. Muscle relaxants and histamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, J

    1995-01-01

    Many anaesthetic drugs and adjuvants can cause the release of histamine by chemical (anaphylactoid) or immunologic (anaphylactic) mechanisms. While both types of reactions can be clinically indistinguishable, they are mechanistically different. In anaphylactoid reactions, only preformed mediators are released, of which histamine may be the most clinically important. In true immunologic reactions, mast cell degranulation occurs, and many vasoactive substances (including histamine) are released. Clinical signs and symptoms of both classes of reactions include hypotension (most common), tachycardia, bronchospasm, or cutaneous manifestations. Anaphylactoid reactions may occur commonly under anaesthesia in response to many drugs, including induction agents, some opiates, plasma expanders, and curariform relaxants. Anaphylactic reactions are far less common than anaphylactoid reactions, but they nevertheless represent more than half of the life-threatening reactions that occur in anaesthetic practice. Muscle relaxants are the most frequently implicated class of drugs; suxamethonium is the most common agent implicated in anaphylactic reactions during anaesthesia, but even drugs without apparent chemical histamine release (i.e., vecuronium) are frequently implicated in anaphylactic reactions.

  6. Diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging: A multidimensional approach for probing microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daeun; Doyle, Eamon K; Wisnowski, Jessica L; Kim, Joong Hee; Haldar, Justin P

    2017-12-01

    To propose and evaluate a novel multidimensional approach for imaging subvoxel tissue compartments called Diffusion-Relaxation Correlation Spectroscopic Imaging. Multiexponential modeling of MR diffusion or relaxation data is commonly used to infer the many different microscopic tissue compartments that contribute signal to macroscopic MR imaging voxels. However, multiexponential estimation is known to be difficult and ill-posed. Observing that this ill-posedness is theoretically reduced in higher dimensions, diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging uses a novel multidimensional imaging experiment that jointly encodes diffusion and relaxation information, and then uses a novel constrained reconstruction technique to generate a multidimensional diffusion-relaxation correlation spectrum for every voxel. The peaks of the multidimensional spectrum are expected to correspond to the distinct tissue microenvironments that are present within each macroscopic imaging voxel. Using numerical simulations, experiment data from a custom-built phantom, and experiment data from a mouse model of traumatic spinal cord injury, diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging is demonstrated to provide substantially better multicompartment resolving power compared to conventional diffusion- and relaxation-based methods. The diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging approach provides powerful new capabilities for resolving the different components of multicompartment tissue models, and can be leveraged to significantly expand the insights provided by MRI in studies of tissue microstructure. Magn Reson Med 78:2236-2249, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. Diluent effects on the Debye-type dielectric relaxation in viscous monohydroxy alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Min; Shahriari, Shervin; Richert, Ranko

    2005-12-15

    With the recognition that the Debye-type dielectric relaxation of liquid monohydroxy alcohols does not reflect the structural relaxation dynamics associated with the viscous flow and the glass transition, its behavior upon dilution is expected to differ from that of real alpha-processes. We have investigated the Debye-type dielectric relaxation of binary alcohol/alkane mixtures across the entire concentration range in the supercooled regimes. The focus is on 2-ethyl-1-hexanol in two nonpolar liquids, 3-methylpentane and squalane, which are more fluid and more viscous than the alcohol, respectively. The Debye relaxation is found to occur only for alcohol mole fractions x > 0.2 and is always accompanied by a non-Debye relaxation originating from the alcohol component. Prior to its complete disappearance, the Debye relaxation is subject to broadening. We observe that the Debye dynamics of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol is accelerated in the more fluid 3-methylpentane, while the more viscous squalane leads to longer Debye relaxation times. The present experiments also provide evidence that the breakdown of the Debye relaxation amplitude does not imply the absence of hydrogen-bonded structures.

  8. Cross relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Cross relaxation, and mI-dependence of the intrinsic electron spin-lattice relaxation rate We, are incorporated explicitly into the rate equations for the electron-spin population differences that govern the saturation behaviour of 14N- and 15N-nitroxide spin labels. Both prove important in spin......-label EPR and ELDOR, particularly for saturation recovery studies. Neither for saturation recovery, nor for CW-saturation EPR and CW-ELDOR, can cross relaxation be described simply by increasing the value of We, the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate. Independence of the saturation recovery rates from...... the hyperfine line pumped or observed follows directly from solution of the rate equations including cross relaxation, even when the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate We is mI-dependent....

  9. Rapid Synthesis of D-A'-π-A Dyes through a One-Pot Three-Component Suzuki-Miyaura Coupling and an Evaluation of their Photovoltaic Properties for Use in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Shunsuke; Fuse, Shinichiro; Maitani, Masato M; Wada, Yuji; Ogomi, Yuhei; Hayase, Shuzi; Kaiho, Tatsuo; Masui, Hisashi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2016-02-12

    Twenty-four D-A'-π-A dyes were rapidly synthesized through a one-pot three-component Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction, which was assisted by microwave irradiation. We measured the absorption spectra, electrochemical properties, and solar-cell performance of all the synthesized dyes. The D5 πA4 dye contained our originally designed rigid and nonplanar donor and exerted the highest efficiency at 5.4 %. The short-circuit current (Jsc ) was the most important parameter for the conversion efficiency (η) in the case of the organic D-A'-π-A dyes. Optimal ranges for the D-A'-π-A dyes were observed for high values of Jsc /λmax at λ=560-620 nm, an optical-absorption edge of λ=690-790 nm, and EHOMO and ELUMO values of <1.14 and -0.56 to -0.76 V, respectively. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Stress and Relaxation in Relation to Personality

    OpenAIRE

    Harish Kumar Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Relaxation plays a significant role in facing stress. The aim of the present study is to see whether personality patterns determine an individual’s ability to relax. As a reaction to stress, coping is the best way to handle stress, which requires rational and conscious thinking. Does this ability to relax anyway facilitate coping reactions? A study was conducted on 100 college students. Results revealed that extraverts...

  11. Structural relaxation in annealed hyperquenched basaltic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoju; Mauro, John C.; Potuzak, M.

    2012-01-01

    The enthalpy relaxation behavior of hyperquenched (HQ) and annealed hyperquenched (AHQ) basaltic glass is investigated through calorimetric measurements. The results reveal a common onset temperature of the glass transition for all the HQ and AHQ glasses under study, indicating that the primary...... relaxation is activated at the same temperature regardless of the initial departure from equilibrium. The analysis of secondary relaxation at different annealing temperatures provides insights into the enthalpy recovery of HQ glasses....

  12. Internal magnetic relaxation in levitation superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyak, B M; Ermakov, G V

    2001-01-01

    Effect of arresting levitation relaxation, appearing during reverse magnetization of YBaCuO superconducting ceramics, was detected. At bipolar magnetization magnetic moment of a sample remains invariable. Internal magnetic relaxation occurs, in the course of which magnetic flux is redistributed inside the sample. As a result the state of filed at the sample boundary does not change and full force acting on the system of closed currents remains constant. A formula for calculating the time of internal relaxation is provided

  13. Technological patterns of preventive relaxation of workings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, L.L.; Bakhtin, A.F.; Zel' vyanskii, M.Sh. (Donetskaya Proektnaya Kontora (USSR))

    1991-09-01

    Presents stress relaxation patterns of workings. The patterns are used at horizon layouts and panel development of mine-take in stone inclines, boundary entries, mine drainage galleries and main galleries. The stress relaxation variants are: stress relaxing longwalls with complete mining with two or three winning galleries, longwalls worked by long pillars on the strike, and longwalls worked with advance mining on the strike. The individual variants differ by the ventilation system adopted.

  14. Impaired gastric relaxation in patients with achalasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Mearin, F; Papo, M; Malagelada, J R

    1995-01-01

    Achalasia is considered a primary motility disorder confined to the oesophagus. The lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) in achalasia is frequently hypertonic and manifests absent or incomplete relaxation in response to deglution. On the other hand, the LOS and the proximal stomach act physiologically as a functional unit whereby relaxation of the LOS during deglution is associated with receptive relaxation of the proximal stomach. Thus, this study investigated the hypothesis that impaired LOS r...

  15. [Autocontrol of muscle relaxation with vecuronium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibilla, C; Zatelli, R; Marchi, M; Zago, M

    1990-01-01

    The optimal conditions for maintaining desired levels of muscle relaxation with vecuronium are obtained by means of the continuous infusion (I.V.) technique. A frequent correction of the infusion flow is required, since it is impossible to predict the exact amount for the muscle relaxant in single case. In order to overcome such limits the authors propose a very feasible infusion system for the self-control of muscle relaxation; furthermore they positively consider its possible daily clinical application.

  16. Polymer Chain Dynamics: Evidence of Nonexponential Mode Relaxation Using Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Current Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrese-Igor, S.; Alegría, A.; Colmenero, J.

    2014-08-01

    The slowest (p=1) mode relaxation of several polyisoprenes has been experimentally isolated by thermally stimulated depolarization current techniques. Close to the glass transition the p=1 mode deviates from the exponential behavior assumed by Rouse and tube-reptation theories. This effect is found to be a consequence of the closeness of τp =1 and α-relaxation time scales. The scenario resembles that of broadened fast component dynamics in polymer blends with high dynamic asymmetry and suggests a possible general interpretation in terms of the effect of local density fluctuations (α relaxation) on chain dynamics.

  17. Investigation of microwave transitions and nonlinear magneto-optical rotation in anti-relaxation-coated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budker, D.; Hollberg, L.; Kimball, D.F.; Kitching, J.; Pustclny, S.; Robinson, H.G.; Yashchuk, V.V.

    2004-06-04

    Using laser optical pumping, widths and frequency shifts are determined for microwave transitions between the components of the ground-state hyperfine structure for {sup 85}Rb and {sup 87}Rb atoms contained in vapor cells with alkane anti-relaxation coatings. The results are compared with data on Zeeman relaxation obtained in nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) experiments, a comparison important for quantitative understanding of spin-relaxation mechanisms in coated cells. By comparing cells manufactured over a forty-year period we demonstrate the long-term stability of coated cells, which may be useful for atomic clocks and magnetometers.

  18. Microwave transitions and nonlinear magneto-optical rotation in anti-relaxation-coated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budker, Dmitry; Hollberg. Leo; Kimball, Derek F.; Kitching J.; Pustelny Szymon; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2004-08-12

    Using laser optical pumping, widths and frequency shifts are determined for microwave transitions between ground-state hyperfine components of {sup 85}Rb and {sup 87}Rb atoms contained in vapor cells with alkane anti-relaxation coatings. The results are compared with data on Zeeman relaxation obtained in nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) experiments, a comparison important for quantitative understanding of spin-relaxation mechanisms in coated cells. By comparing cells manufactured over a forty-year period we demonstrate the long-term stability of coated cells, an important property for atomic clocks and magnetometers.

  19. Load relaxation studies of zircaloy-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, F.H.; Sabol, G.P.; McDonald, S.G.; Li, C.Y.

    1976-01-01

    The results of the present work have shown (1) the load relaxation data of Zircaloy-4 in the temperature range of 200/sup 0/C to 385/sup 0/C can be represented by the phenomenological model based on Hart's plastic equation of state; (2) the room temperature load relaxation data reflect the effects of deformation twinning; (3) at higher temperatures the load relaxation data suggest the contribution of grain boundary sliding; and (4) the effects of strain aging can be identified based on the load relaxation data.

  20. Baryogenesis via Elementary Goldstone Higgs Relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gertov, Helene; Pearce, Lauren; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We extend the relaxation mechanism to the Elementary Goldstone Higgs framework. Besides studying the allowed parameter space of the theory we add the minimal ingredients needed for the framework to be phenomenologically viable. The very nature of the extended Higgs sector allows to consider very...... flat scalar potential directions along which the relaxation mechanism can be implemented. This fact translates into wider regions of applicability of the relaxation mechanism when compared to the Standard Model Higgs case. Our results show that, if the electroweak scale is not fundamental...... but radiatively generated, it is possible to generate the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry via the relaxation mechanism....

  1. Nuclear magnetic relaxation induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization: Longitudinal relaxation dispersion for a dipole-coupled spin-1/2 pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2013-10-01

    In complex biological or colloidal samples, magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD) experiments using the field-cycling technique can characterize molecular motions on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds, provided that a rigorous theory of nuclear spin relaxation is available. In gels, cross-linked proteins, and biological tissues, where an immobilized macromolecular component coexists with a mobile solvent phase, nuclear spins residing in solvent (or cosolvent) species relax predominantly via exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of anisotropic nuclear (electric quadrupole or magnetic dipole) couplings. The physical or chemical exchange processes that dominate the MRD typically occur on a time scale of microseconds or longer, where the conventional perturbation theory of spin relaxation breaks down. There is thus a need for a more general relaxation theory. Such a theory, based on the stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) for the EMOR mechanism, is available for a single quadrupolar spin I = 1. Here, we present the corresponding theory for a dipole-coupled spin-1/2 pair. To our knowledge, this is the first treatment of dipolar MRD outside the motional-narrowing regime. Based on an analytical solution of the spatial part of the SLE, we show how the integral longitudinal relaxation rate can be computed efficiently. Both like and unlike spins, with selective or non-selective excitation, are treated. For the experimentally important dilute regime, where only a small fraction of the spin pairs are immobilized, we obtain simple analytical expressions for the auto-relaxation and cross-relaxation rates which generalize the well-known Solomon equations. These generalized results will be useful in biophysical studies, e.g., of intermittent protein dynamics. In addition, they represent a first step towards a rigorous theory of water 1H relaxation in biological tissues, which is a prerequisite for unravelling the molecular basis of soft

  2. Stress relaxation of constructions elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larionov Evgeniy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A relaxation of stress in the elements of constructions is considered and an approach is proposed for solution of corresponding problems. It is notable that this approach is based on a modification Boltzmann’s principle superposition of fraction creep deformations. This modification reduces the noted problems to solution of linear relative to so-called structural stress integral equations. Next a desired stress is defined by solution of algebraic equations. It should be underline that a material (concrete, steel, graph of elements a considered as a union of its fractions with statistical disturbed strengths. This ascending to Weibull conception [1] permits to modify Boltzmann’s principle superposition [2]. As a result this principle is applicable when a dependence on deformations from the stresses is nonlinear [3-7].

  3. Zen meditation and ABC relaxation theory: an exploration of relaxation states, beliefs, dispositions, and motivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillani, N B; Smith, J C

    2001-06-01

    This study is an attempt to rigorously map the psychological effects of Zen meditation among experienced practitioners. Fifty-nine Zen meditators with at least six years of experience practiced an hour of traditional Zazen seated meditation. A control group of 24 college students spent 60 min silently reading popular magazines. Before relaxation, all participants took the Smith Relaxation States Inventory (SRSI), the Smith Relaxation Dispositions/Motivations Inventory (SRD/MI), and the Smith Relaxation Beliefs Inventory (SRBI). After practice, participants again took the SRSI. Analyses revealed that meditators are less likely to believe in God, more likely to believe in Inner Wisdom, and more likely to display the relaxation dispositions Mental Quiet, Mental Relaxation, and Timeless/Boundless/Infinite. Pre- and postsession analyses revealed that meditators showed greater increments in the relaxation states Mental Quiet, Love and Thankfulness, and Prayerfulness, as well as reduced Worry. Results support Smith's ABC Relaxation Theory.

  4. Effect of extender oils on the stress relaxation behavior of thermoplastic vulcanizates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The long term mechanical behavior of oil extended thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPV based on polypropylene (PP and acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR has been characterized by means of stress relaxation experiments. The morphology of TPV and the phase specific oil distribution which depend on the content and type of oil as well as on the mixing regime have been characterized by means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA and Differential Scanning Calorimetrie (DSC. The discussion of the stress relaxation behavior was carried out using the two-component model, which allows splitting the initial stress into two components: a thermal activated stress component and an athermal one. A master curve was created by shifting the relaxation curves vertically and horizontally towards the reference curve. The vertical shift factor bT is a function of the temperature dependence of the athermal stress components. It was found that the oil distribution strongly affects the athermal stress component which is related to the contribution of the structural changes, e.g. crystallinity of the PP phase and the average molecular weight between the crosslinks of the NBR phase. From the temperature dependence of the horizontal shift factor aT the main viscoelastic relaxation process was determined as the α-relaxation process of the crystalline PP phase. It is not dependent on the polarity and content of the oil as well as the mixing regime.

  5. Biofeedback-assisted relaxation and progressive muscle relaxation potential for enhancing students’ distress tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Jarašiūnaitė, Gabija; Perminas, Aidas; Gustainienė, Loreta; Pečiulienė, Ieva; Kavaliauskaitė-Keserauskienė, Rūta

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed at assessing biofeedback-assisted relaxation and progressive muscle relaxation potential for enhancing distress tolerance in students’ population. 125 female undergraduate students aged between 18 and 27 participated in the study. Distress Tolerance Scale was used to evaluate distress tolerance. Participants of a study were randomly assigned into 3 different groups: 1) weekly biofeedback-assisted relaxation (n=40), 2) weekly progressive muscle relaxation training (n=43), a...

  6. Brownian rotational relaxation and power absorption in magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goya, G.F. [Institute of Nanoscience of Aragon (INA), University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)]. E-mail: goya@unizar.es; Fernandez-Pacheco, R. [Institute of Nanoscience of Aragon (INA), University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Arruebo, M. [Institute of Nanoscience of Aragon (INA), University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Cassinelli, N. [Electronics Division, Bauer and Associates, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Facultad de Ingenieria, UNLP (Argentina); Ibarra, M.R. [Institute of Nanoscience of Aragon (INA), University of Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2007-09-15

    We present a study of the power absorption efficiency in several magnetite-based colloids, to asses their potential as magnetic inductive hyperthermia (MIH) agents. Relaxation times {tau} were measured through the imaginary susceptibility component {chi}{sup '}'(T), and analyzed within Debye's theory of dipolar fluid. The results indicated Brownian rotational relaxation and allowed to calculate the hydrodynamic radius close to the values obtained from photon correlation. The study of the colloid performances as power absorbers showed no detectable increase of temperature for dextran-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, whereas a second Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-based dispersion of similar concentration could be heated up to 12K after 30min under similar experimental conditions. The different power absorption efficiencies are discussed in terms of the magnetic structure of the nanoparticles.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Barker, G J; MacKay, A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The theory of relaxation processes and their measurements are described. An overview is presented of the literature on relaxation time measurements in the normal and the developing brain, in experimental diseases in animals, and in patients with multiple sclerosis. RESULTS AND CONCLUS...

  8. Superparamagnetic relaxation of weakly interacting particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Tronc, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    The influence of particle interactions on the superparamagnetic relaxation time has been studied by Mossbauer spectroscopy in samples of maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) particles with different particle sizes and particle separations. It is found that the relaxation time decreases with decreasing particl...

  9. A case of endophthalmitis associated with limbal relaxing incision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind Haripriya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Limbal relaxing incisions (LRIs are considered a relatively safe procedure with rapid stabilization and absence of infectious complications. Do we need to readdress this last impression? We report a case of nocardia endophthalmitis associated with an exudate at the site of an LRI in a patient who underwent routine cataract surgery. This case, to the best of our knowledge, is the first report of its kind, stressing the need for a cautious approach to the adoption of this method of astigmatic correction.

  10. Rapid collection and identification of a novel component from Clausena lansium Skeels leaves by means of three-dimensional preparative gas chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance/infrared/mass spectrometric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciarrone, Danilo [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco e dei Prodotti per la Salute, University of Messina, Viale Annunziata, 98168, Messina (Italy); Chromaleont s.r.l. A start-up of the University of Messina, c/o University of Messina, Viale Annunziata, 98168 Messina (Italy); Pantò, Sebastiano [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco e dei Prodotti per la Salute, University of Messina, Viale Annunziata, 98168, Messina (Italy); Rotondo, Archimede [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Messina, Via D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Tedone, Laura; Tranchida, Peter Quinto [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco e dei Prodotti per la Salute, University of Messina, Viale Annunziata, 98168, Messina (Italy); Dugo, Paola [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco e dei Prodotti per la Salute, University of Messina, Viale Annunziata, 98168, Messina (Italy); Centro Integrato di Ricerca (C.I.R.), Università Campus Bio-Medico, Via Álvaro del Portillo, 21 - 00128 Roma (Italy); Mondello, Luigi, E-mail: lmondello@unime.it [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco e dei Prodotti per la Salute, University of Messina, Viale Annunziata, 98168, Messina (Italy); Centro Integrato di Ricerca (C.I.R.), Università Campus Bio-Medico, Via Álvaro del Portillo, 21 - 00128 Roma (Italy)

    2013-06-27

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A recently-developed three-dimensional prep-GC system has been applied to wampee essential oil. •The prep GC system enables the rapid collection of pure compounds from complex samples. •An isolated unknown solute was identified through NMR, IR and MS data. •The structure of an oxygenated sesquiterpene is here reported for the first time. -- Abstract: The present research reports the use of a three-dimensional preparative gas chromatography (prep GC) system, equipped with three Deans-switch devices and 5%diphenyl/wax/mid-polarity ionic liquid stationary phases, for the isolation of volatile components from a complex natural source, namely wampee essential oil (derived from Clausena lansium Skeels leaves). Collection was performed by using a simple and effective lab-constructed trapping device. Initially, an unknown (and abundant) wampee oil constituent was erroneously identified as α-sinensal, through an MS database search (a low similarity match was attained), performed after a GC-quadMS experiment., The unknown compound was then the isolated by using the novel prep GC system, in a highly pure form (at the mg level), and was correctly identified by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and mass spectrometry (MS). Both FTIR and MS data were used to confirm the NMR information. The name given to the molecule was (2E,6E)-2-methyl-6-(4-methylcyclohex-3-enylidene)hept-2-enal. The results herein described will demonstrate the need for a high-resolution GC step, prior to analyte collection, in the prep GC analysis of complex samples.

  11. Stress and Relaxation in Relation to Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Kumar Sharma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Relaxation plays a significant role in facing stress. The aim of the present study is to see whether personality patterns determine an individual’s ability to relax. As a reaction to stress, coping is the best way to handle stress, which requires rational and conscious thinking. Does this ability to relax anyway facilitate coping reactions? A study was conducted on 100 college students. Results revealed that extraverts relax easily than introverts. In addition, if intelligence level is average or above average, relaxation does play a role in facilitating coping reactions. It suggests that in designing techniques of stress management, the personality and intelligence level must be taken into consideration to make techniques effective.

  12. Polarizability anisotropy relaxation in nanoconfinement: molecular simulation study of acetonitrile in silica pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milischuk, Anatoli A; Ladanyi, Branka M

    2013-12-12

    We present the results of a molecular simulation study of polarizability anisotropy relaxation of liquid acetonitrile confined in approximately cylindrical silica pores of diameters in the range of 20-40 Å. Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulation is used to determine the density of acetonitrile in pores in equilibrium with the bulk liquid, and canonical-ensemble molecular dynamics is then used to calculate the trajectories of the filled pores prepared in this way. We find that the pores are wetting, partially due to hydrogen bonding between acetonitrile nitrogen and pore silanol groups and that acetonitrile molecules have preferential orientations relative to the interface. The mobility of molecules in interfacial regions is considerably reduced and dependent mainly on their proximity to the interface. We include the contributions of molecular and interaction-induced polarizabilities to the collective polarizability anisotropy relaxation. We find that this relaxation includes a slowly relaxing component absent from the corresponding process in bulk acetonitrile and that the amplitude of this component increases as the pore diameter decreases. These results are in agreement with optical Kerr effect experiments on acetonitrile in silica pores in a similar diameter range. Further analysis of our data indicates that collective reorientation and predominantly translational "collision-induced" polarizability dynamics both contribute to the slowly relaxing portion of polarizability anisotropy decay. We further find that pore anisotropy plays a role, giving rise to different relaxation rates of polarizability anisotropy components with a different mix of axial and radial character and that collective reorientation contributing to polarizability anisotropy relaxation is somewhat faster at long times than single-molecule orientational relaxation.

  13. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnez, M. T.; Johnsen, E.

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller–Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin–Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time. PMID:26130967

  14. Sexual selection halts the relaxation of protamine 2 among rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Lüke

    Full Text Available Sexual selection has been proposed as the driving force promoting the rapid evolutionary changes observed in some reproductive genes including protamines. We test this hypothesis in a group of rodents which show marked differences in the intensity of sexual selection. Levels of sperm competition were not associated with the evolutionary rates of protamine 1 but, contrary to expectations, were negatively related to the evolutionary rate of cleaved- and mature-protamine 2. Since both domains were found to be under relaxation, our findings reveal an unforeseen role of sexual selection: to halt the degree of degeneration that proteins within families may experience due to functional redundancy. The degree of relaxation of protamine 2 in this group of rodents is such that in some species it has become dysfunctional and it is not expressed in mature spermatozoa. In contrast, protamine 1 is functionally conserved but shows directed positive selection on specific sites which are functionally relevant such as DNA-anchoring domains and phosphorylation sites. We conclude that in rodents protamine 2 is under relaxation and that sexual selection removes deleterious mutations among species with high levels of sperm competition to maintain the protein functional and the spermatozoa competitive.

  15. Vibrational and rotational relaxation times of solvated molecular ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Owrutsky, J.; Sarisky, M.; Culver, J. P.; Yodh, A.; Hochstrasser, R. M.

    1993-04-01

    Infrared pump-probe and infrared polarization spectroscopy have been used to measure the vibrational relaxation times (T1) of the antisymmetric stretching mode and the reorientation times (TR) for N3-, NCS-, and NCO- in D2O and/or methanol. For N3-, experiments were also conducted in H2O and hexamethyl-phosphamide (HPMA) solutions. The rapid vibrational relaxation and slow reorientation observed demonstrate strong coupling between the ions and the solvents. Longer vibrational relaxation and shorter reorientation times measured for NCS- reveal weaker solvent interactions that may be due to the importance of the charge distribution and the form of the normal coordinate. A comparison of the T1 and TR times in different solvents permits a determination of the relative interaction strengths for the solvents investigated. The relatively weaker coupling of N3- in the aprotic solvent HMPA demonstrates the importance of hydrogen bonding in strong solvent interactions in ionic solutions. The experimental results are compared with recent molecular dynamics simulations of ionic solutions.

  16. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnez, M. T.; Johnsen, E.

    2015-06-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller-Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin-Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time.

  17. Corroborative evidences of TV γ -scaling of the α-relaxation originating from the primitive relaxation/JG β relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, K. L.; Paluch, M.

    2017-12-01

    Successful thermodynamic scaling of the structural alpha-relaxation time or transport coefficients of glass-forming liquids determined at various temperatures T and pressures P means the data conform to a single function of the product variable TVgamma, where V is the specific volume and gamma is a material specific constant. In the past two decades we have witnessed successful TVgamma-scaling in many molecular, polymeric, and even metallic glass-formers, and gamma is related to the slope of the repulsive part of the intermolecular potential. The advances made indicate TVgamma-scaling is an important aspect of the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of glass-formers. In this paper we show the origin of TVgamma-scaling is not from the structural alpha-relaxation time. Instead it comes from its precursor, the Johari-Goldstein beta-relaxation or the primitive relaxation of the Coupling Model and their relaxation times or tau_0 respectively. It is remarkable that all relaxation times are functions of TVgamma with the same gama, as well as the fractional exponent of the Kohlrausch correlation function of the structural alpha-relaxation. We arrive at this conclusion convincingly based on corroborative evidences from a number of experiments and molecular dynamics simulations performed on a wide variety of glass-formers and in conjunction with consistency with the predictions of the Coupling Model.

  18. The effects of progressive muscle relaxation and autogenic relaxation on young soccer players' mood states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hairul Anuar; Hanafi Ahmad Yusof, Hazwani

    2011-06-01

    This study was designed to compare the effects of two different relaxation techniques, namely progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and autogenic relaxation (AGR) on moods of young soccer players. sixteen adolescent athletes (mean age: 14.1 ± 1.3) received either PMR or AGR training. Using Profile of Mood States- Adolescents, their mood states were measured one week before relaxation training, before the first relaxation session, and after the twelfth relaxation session. Mixed ANOVA revealed no significant interaction effects and no significant main effects in any of the subscales. However, significant main effects for testing sessions were found for confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscales. Post hoc tests revealed post-intervention reductions in the confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscale scores. These two relaxation techniques induce equivalent mood responses and may be used to regulate young soccer players' mood states.

  19. The Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Autogenic Relaxation on Young Soccer Players’ Mood States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hairul Anuar; Hanafi@Ahmad Yusof, Hazwani

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to compare the effects of two different relaxation techniques, namely progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and autogenic relaxation (AGR) on moods of young soccer players. Methods Sixteen adolescent athletes (mean age: 14.1 ± 1.3) received either PMR or AGR training. Using Profile of Mood States- Adolescents, their mood states were measured one week before relaxation training, before the first relaxation session, and after the twelfth relaxation session. Results Mixed ANOVA revealed no significant interaction effects and no significant main effects in any of the subscales. However, significant main effects for testing sessions were found for confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscales. Post hoc tests revealed post-intervention reductions in the confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscale scores. Conclusion These two relaxation techniques induce equivalent mood responses and may be used to regulate young soccer players’ mood states. PMID:22375225

  20. Dielectric relaxation in dipolar mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashok K.; Agarwal, Vinod K.; Mansingh, Abhai

    1981-08-01

    Dielectric constants and losses have been measured at several microwave frequencies in the range 2.4-25 GHz for two binary mixtures: bromoform +1-bromonaphthalene (dipole moment ratio is about 1:1), and nitrobenzene +1-bromonaphthalene (dipole moment ratio is about 4:1). The dielectric data of each binary system have been analyzed in terms of two superimposed Debye regions. This analysis has been carried out to study the effect of internal field on the numerical values of the relative weights or amplitudes C1 and C2 in the dipolar mixtures. It is observed that the discrepancy between the numerical values of weight factors obtained from relaxation data and dipole moment and mole fractions of the binary mixture cannot be attributed to the internal field. For the bromoform +1-bromonaphthalene system, it has been found that both the Budo and Cole-Cole equation represent the system equally well, but for nitrobenzene +1-bromonaphthalene system the Cole distribution fits better than Budo's equation.

  1. A relaxed-certificate facial reduction algorithm based on subspace intersection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Henrik Alsing

    2016-01-01

    A “facial reduction”-like regularization algorithm is established for general conic optimization problems by relaxing requirements on the reduction certificates. This yields a rapid subspace reduction algorithm challenged only by representational issues of the regularized cone. A condition...

  2. Neural control of muscle relaxation in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphick, M R; Melarange, R

    2001-03-01

    Smooth muscle relaxation in vertebrates is regulated by a variety of neuronal signalling molecules, including neuropeptides and nitric oxide (NO). The physiology of muscle relaxation in echinoderms is of particular interest because these animals are evolutionarily more closely related to the vertebrates than to the majority of invertebrate phyla. However, whilst in vertebrates there is a clear structural and functional distinction between visceral smooth muscle and skeletal striated muscle, this does not apply to echinoderms, in which the majority of muscles, whether associated with the body wall skeleton and its appendages or with visceral organs, are made up of non-striated fibres. The mechanisms by which the nervous system controls muscle relaxation in echinoderms were, until recently, unknown. Using the cardiac stomach of the starfish Asterias rubens as a model, it has been established that the NO-cGMP signalling pathway mediates relaxation. NO also causes relaxation of sea urchin tube feet, and NO may therefore function as a 'universal' muscle relaxant in echinoderms. The first neuropeptides to be identified in echinoderms were two related peptides isolated from Asterias rubens known as SALMFamide-1 (S1) and SALMFamide-2 (S2). Both S1 and S2 cause relaxation of the starfish cardiac stomach, but with S2 being approximately ten times more potent than S1. SALMFamide neuropeptides have also been isolated from sea cucumbers, in which they cause relaxation of both gut and body wall muscle. Therefore, like NO, SALMFamides may also function as 'universal' muscle relaxants in echinoderms. The mechanisms by which SALMFamides cause relaxation of echinoderm muscle are not known, but several candidate signal transduction pathways are discussed here. The SALMFamides do not, however, appear to act by promoting release of NO, and muscle relaxation in echinoderms is therefore probably regulated by at least two neuronal signalling systems acting in parallel. Recently, other

  3. A quantum-mechanical relaxation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomski, R.; Kashyap, A.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2012-04-01

    The atomic origin of micromagnetic damping is investigated by developing and solving a quantum-mechanical relaxation model. A projection-operator technique is used to derive an analytical expression for the relaxation time as a function of the heat-bath and interaction parameters. The present findings are consistent with earlier research beyond the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation and show that the underlying relaxation mechanism is very general. Zermelo's recurrence paradox means that there is no true irreversibility in non-interacting nanoparticles, but the corresponding recurrence times are very long and can be ignored in many cases.

  4. [A study on Korean concepts of relaxation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J S

    1992-01-01

    Relaxation technique is an independent nursing intervention used in various stressful situations. The concept of relaxation must be explored for the meaning given by the people in their traditional thought and philosophy. Korean relaxation technique, wanting to become culturally acceptable and effective, is learning to recognize and develop Korean concepts, experiences, and musics of relaxation. This study was aimed at discovering Korean concepts, experiences and musics of relaxation and contributing the development of the relaxation technique for Korean people. The subjects were 59 nursing students, 39 hospitalized patients, 61 housewives, 21 rural residents and 16 researchers. Data were collected from September 4th to October 24th, 1991 by interviews or questionnaires. The data analysis was done by qualitative research method, and validity assured by conformation of the concept and category by 2 nursing scientists who had written a Master's thesis on the relaxation technique. The results of the study were summarized as follows; 1. The meaning of the relaxation concept; From 298 statements, 107 concepts were extracted and then 5 categories "Physical domain", "Psychological domain", "Complex domain", "Situation", and "environment" were organized. 'Don't have discomforts, 'don't have muscle tension', 'don't have energy (him in Korean)', 'don't have activities' subcategories were included in "Physical domain". 'Don't have anxiety', 'feel good', 'emotional stability', 'don't have wordly thoughts', 'feel one's brain muddled', 'loss of desire' subcategories were included in "physical domain" 'Comfort body and mind', 'don't have tension of body and mind', 'be sagged' 'liveliness of thoughts' subcategories were included in "Complex domain". 'Rest', 'sleep', 'others' subcategories were included in "Situation domain". And 'quite environment' & 'comfortable environment' subcategories were included in "Environmental domain". 2. The experiences of the relaxation; From 151

  5. Relaxation dynamics of iron-group dihalides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulpinar, Gul; Demirhan, Dogan; Buyukkilic, Fevzi

    2007-02-01

    In this study, the relaxation dynamics of iron-group dihalides by making use of spin- 1/2 metamagnetic Ising model has been formulated by the method of thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Using a molecular field approximation for the magnetic Gibbs energy, the magnetic Gibbs energy production in the irreversible process is calculated and time derivatives of the order parameters are treated as fluxes conjugate to their appropriate generalized forces in the sense of Onsager’s theory of irreversible thermodynamics. Two relaxation times are calculated and their temperature variances are examined. Moreover, the phase transition behaviors of the relaxation times are also obtained anaytically via the critical exponents.

  6. Gd-HOPO Based High Relaxivity MRI Contrast Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Ankona; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-11-06

    Tris-bidentate HOPO-based ligands developed in our laboratory were designed to complement the coordination preferences of Gd{sup 3+}, especially its oxophilicity. The HOPO ligands provide a hexadentate coordination environment for Gd{sup 3+} in which all he donor atoms are oxygen. Because Gd{sup 3+} favors eight or nine coordination, this design provides two to three open sites for inner-sphere water molecules. These water molecules rapidly exchange with bulk solution, hence affecting the relaxation rates of bulk water olecules. The parameters affecting the efficiency of these contrast agents have been tuned to improve contrast while still maintaining a high thermodynamic stability for Gd{sup 3+} binding. The Gd- HOPO-based contrast agents surpass current commercially available agents ecause of a higher number of inner-sphere water molecules, rapid exchange of inner-sphere water molecules via an associative mechanism, and a long electronic relaxation time. The contrast enhancement provided by these agents is at least twice that of commercial contrast gents, which are based on polyaminocarboxylate ligands.

  7. Interacting Components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlic, B.; Broenink, Johannes F.; Welch, Peter; Kerridge, Jon; Barnes, Fred

    2006-01-01

    SystemCSP is a graphical modeling language based on both CSP and concepts of component-based software development. The component framework of SystemCSP enables specification of both interaction scenarios and relative execution ordering among components. Specification and implementation of

  8. Anomalous enthalpy relaxation in vitreous silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    It is a challenge to calorimetrically determine the glass transition temperature (Tg) of vitreous silica. Here, we demonstrate that this challenge mainly arises from the extremely high sensitivity of the Tg to the hydroxyl content, but also from decrease of the Tg with repeating the calorimetric...... scans. It is known that the liquid fragility (i.e., the speed of the viscous slow-down of a supercooled liquid at its Tg during cooling) has impact on enthalpy relaxation in glass. Here, we find that vitreous silica (as a strong system) exhibits striking anomalies in both glass transition and enthalpy...... relaxation compared to fragile oxide systems. The anomalous enthalpy relaxation of vitreous silica is discovered by performing the hyperquenching-annealing-calorimetry experiments. We argue that the strong systems like vitreous silica and vitreous Germania relax in a structurally cooperative manner, whereas...

  9. Vibrational and Rotational Energy Relaxation in Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jakob

    Vibrational and rotational energy relaxation in liquids are studied by means of computer simulations. As a precursor for studying vibrational energy relaxation of a solute molecule subsequent to the formation of a chemical bond, the validity of the classical Bersohn-Zewail model for describing......, the vibrational energy relaxation of I2 subsequent to photodissociation and recombination in CCl4 is studied using classical Molecular Dynamics simulations. The vibrational relaxation times and the time-dependent I-I pair distribution function are compared to new experimental results, and a qualitative agreement...... the intramolecular dynamics during photodissociation is investigated. The apparent agreement with quantum mechanical calculations is shown to be in contrast to the applicability of the individual approximations used in deriving the model from a quantum mechanical treatment. In the spirit of the Bersohn-Zewail model...

  10. Stress Relaxation in Entangled Polymer Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Ji-Xuan; Svaneborg, Carsten; Everaers, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    We present an extensive set of simulation results for the stress relaxation in equilibrium and step-strained bead-spring polymer melts. The data allow us to explore the chain dynamics and the shear relaxation modulus, G(t), into the plateau regime for chains with Z=40 entanglements and into the t......We present an extensive set of simulation results for the stress relaxation in equilibrium and step-strained bead-spring polymer melts. The data allow us to explore the chain dynamics and the shear relaxation modulus, G(t), into the plateau regime for chains with Z=40 entanglements...... excellent agreement for the Likhtman-McLeish theory using the double reptation approximation for constraint release, if we remove the contribution of high-frequency modes to contour length fluctuations of the primitive chain....

  11. Effect of Progressive Muscle Relaxation on the Fatigue and Quality of Life Among Iranian Aging Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpour-Dehkordi, Ali; Jalali, Amir

    2016-07-01

    Since the elderly population is increasing rapidly in developing countries which may decrease the physical activity and exercise and in turn could affect the elderly's quality of life, this study aimed to investigate the effect of progressive muscle relaxation on the elderly's quality of life in Iran. In a randomized clinical trial, participants were randomly divided into intervention and control groups. For the intervention group, muscular progressive relaxation was run three days per week for three months (totally 36 sessions). In relaxation, a patient contract a group of his/her muscles in each step and relaxes them after five seconds and finally loosens all muscles and takes five deep breaths. Each session lasts for 45 minutes. The instrument of data gathering consisted of questionnaires on individual's demographic data and quality of life SF-36. After intervention, quality of life increased significantly in the patients undergoing muscular progressive relaxation and fatigue severity decreased significantly in the intervention group compared to prior to intervention. In addition, there was a statistically significant difference in mean score of physical performance, restricted activity after physical problem, energy, socially function, physical pain, overall hygiene, and quality of life between intervention and control groups. By implementing regular and continuous progressive muscle relaxation, quality of life could be increased in different dimensions in the elderly and the context could be provided to age healthily and enjoy higher health and autonomy. Therefore, all of the therapeutic staffs are recommended to implement this plan to promote the elderly's quality of life.

  12. Two-step relaxation mode analysis with multiple evolution times applied to all-atom molecular dynamics protein simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, N.; Mitsutake, A.; Takano, H.

    2017-12-01

    Proteins implement their functionalities when folded into specific three-dimensional structures, and their functions are related to the protein structures and dynamics. Previously, we applied a relaxation mode analysis (RMA) method to protein systems; this method approximately estimates the slow relaxation modes and times via simulation and enables investigation of the dynamic properties underlying the protein structural fluctuations. Recently, two-step RMA with multiple evolution times has been proposed and applied to a slightly complex homopolymer system, i.e., a single [n ] polycatenane. This method can be applied to more complex heteropolymer systems, i.e., protein systems, to estimate the relaxation modes and times more accurately. In two-step RMA, we first perform RMA and obtain rough estimates of the relaxation modes and times. Then, we apply RMA with multiple evolution times to a small number of the slowest relaxation modes obtained in the previous calculation. Herein, we apply this method to the results of principal component analysis (PCA). First, PCA is applied to a 2-μ s molecular dynamics simulation of hen egg-white lysozyme in aqueous solution. Then, the two-step RMA method with multiple evolution times is applied to the obtained principal components. The slow relaxation modes and corresponding relaxation times for the principal components are much improved by the second RMA.

  13. Stress relaxation in viscous soft spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschan, Julia; Vasudevan, Siddarth A; Boukany, Pouyan E; Somfai, Ellák; Tighe, Brian P

    2017-10-04

    We report the results of molecular dynamics simulations of stress relaxation tests in athermal viscous soft sphere packings close to their unjamming transition. By systematically and simultaneously varying both the amplitude of the applied strain step and the pressure of the initial condition, we access both linear and nonlinear response regimes and control the distance to jamming. Stress relaxation in viscoelastic solids is characterized by a relaxation time τ* that separates short time scales, where viscous loss is substantial, from long time scales, where elastic storage dominates and the response is essentially quasistatic. We identify two distinct plateaus in the strain dependence of the relaxation time, one each in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The height of both plateaus scales as an inverse power law with the distance to jamming. By probing the time evolution of particle velocities during relaxation, we further identify a correlation between mechanical relaxation in the bulk and the degree of non-affinity in the particle velocities on the micro scale.

  14. Dynamics of merging: post-merger mixing and relaxation of an Illustris galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Anthony M.; Williams, Liliya L. R.; Hjorth, Jens

    2018-02-01

    During the merger of two galaxies, the resulting system undergoes violent relaxation and seeks stable equilibrium. However, the details of this evolution are not fully understood. Using Illustris simulation, we probe two physically related processes, mixing and relaxation. Though the two are driven by the same dynamics—global time-varying potential for the energy, and torques caused by asymmetries for angular momentum—we measure them differently. We define mixing as the redistribution of energy and angular momentum between particles of the two merging galaxies. We assess the degree of mixing as the difference between the shapes of their energy distributions, N(E)s, and their angular momentum distributions, N(L2)s. We find that the difference is decreasing with time, indicating mixing. To measure relaxation, we compare N(E) of the newly merged system to N(E) of a theoretical prediction for relaxed collisionless systems, DARKexp, and witness the system becoming more relaxed, in the sense that N(E) approaches DARKexp N(E). Because the dynamics driving mixing and relaxation are the same, the timescale is similar for both. We measure two sequential timescales: a rapid, 1 Gyr phase after the initial merger, during which the difference in N(E) of the two merging halos decreases by ~ 80%, followed by a slow phase, when the difference decreases by ~ 50% over ~ 8.5 Gyrs. This is a direct measurement of the relaxation timescale. Our work also draws attention to the fact that when a galaxy has reached Jeans equilibrium it may not yet have reached a fully relaxed state given by DARKexp, in that it retains information about its past history. This manifests itself most strongly in stars being centrally concentrated. We argue that it is particularly difficult for stars, and other tightly bound particles, to mix because they have less time to be influenced by the fluctuating potential, even across multiple merger events.

  15. Vibrational relaxation of matrix-isolated CH/sub 3/F and HCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, L.

    1981-08-01

    Kinetic and spectroscopic studies have been performed on CH/sub 3/F and HCl as a function of host matrix and temperature. Temporally and spectrally resolved infrared fluorescence was used to monitor the populations of both the initially excited state and the lower lying levels which participate in the relaxation process. For CH/sub 3/F, relaxation from any of the levels near 3.5 ..mu.., i.e. the CH stretching fundamentals or bend overtones, occurs via rapid (< 5 ns) V ..-->.. V transfer to 2..nu../sub 3/ with subsequent relaxation of the ..nu../sub 3/ (CF stretch) manifold. Lifetimes of 2..nu../sub 3/ and ..nu../sub 3/ were determined through overtone, ..delta..V = 2, and fundamental fluorescence. These lifetimes show a dramatic dependence on host lattice, an increase of two orders of magnitude in going from Xe and Ar matrices. Lifetimes depend only weakly on temperature. The relaxation of 2..nu../sub 3/ and ..nu../sub 3/ is consistent with a model in which production of a highly rotationally excited guest via collisions with the repulsive wall of the host is the rate limiting step. For HCl, lifetimes of v = 1,2,3 have been determined. In all hosts, the relaxation is non-radiative. For a given vibrational state, v, the relaxation rate increases in the series k(Ar) < k(Kr) < k(Xe). The dependence of the relaxation rate; on v is superlinear in all matrices, the deviation from linearity increasng in the order Ar < Kr < Xe. The relaxation rates become more strongly temperature dependent with increasing vibrational excitation. The results are consistent with a mechanism in which complex formation introduces the anisotropy necessary to induce a near resonant V ..-->.. R transition in the rate limiting step.

  16. Examining multi-component DNA-templated nanostructures as imaging agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganathan, Hamsa

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the leading non-invasive tool for disease imaging and diagnosis. Although MRI exhibits high spatial resolution for anatomical features, the contrast resolution is low. Imaging agents serve as an aid to distinguish different types of tissues within images. Gadolinium chelates, which are considered first generation designs, can be toxic to health, while ultra-small, superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have low tissue-targeting efficiency and rapid bio-distribution, resulting to an inadequate detection of the MRI signal and enhancement of image contrast. In order to improve the utility of MRI agents, the challenge in composition and structure needs to be addressed. One-dimensional (1D), superparamagnetic nanostructures have been reported to enhance magnetic and in vivo properties and therefore has a potential to improve contrast enhancement in MRI images. In this dissertation, the structure of 1D, multi-component NP chains, scaffolded on DNA, were pre-clinically examined as potential MRI agents. First, research was focused on characterizing and understanding the mechanism of proton relaxation for DNA-templated NP chains using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Proton relaxation and transverse relaxivity were higher in multi-component NP chains compared to disperse NPs, indicating the arrangement of NPs on a 1D structure improved proton relaxation sensitivity. Second, in vitro evaluation for potential issues in toxicity and contrast efficiency in tissue environments using a 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanner was performed. Cell uptake of DNA-templated NP chains was enhanced after encapsulating the nanostructure with layers of polyelectrolytes and targeting ligands. Compared to dispersed NPs, DNA-templated NP chains improved MRI contrast in both the epithelial basement membrane and colon cancer tumors scaffolds. The last part of the project was focused on developing a novel MRI agent that detects changes in DNA methylation

  17. Nicotine impairs cyclooxygenase-2-dependent kinin-receptor-mediated murine airway relaxations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yuan, E-mail: yuan.xu@ki.se; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Cigarette smoke induces local inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. In asthmatics, it worsens the symptoms and increases the risk for exacerbation. The present study investigates the effects of nicotine on airway relaxations in isolated murine tracheal segments. Methods: Segments were cultured for 24 h in the presence of vehicle, nicotine (10 μM) and/or dexamethasone (1 μM). Airway relaxations were assessed in myographs after pre-contraction with carbachol (1 μM). Kinin receptors, cyclooxygenase (COX) and inflammatory mediator expressions were assessed by real-time PCR and confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry. Results: The organ culture procedure markedly increased bradykinin- (selective B{sub 2} receptor agonist) and des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin- (selective B{sub 1} receptor agonist) induced relaxations, and slightly increased relaxation induced by isoprenaline, but not that induced by PGE{sub 2}. The kinin receptor mediated relaxations were epithelium-, COX-2- and EP2-receptor-dependent and accompanied by drastically enhanced mRNA levels of kinin receptors, as well as inflammatory mediators MCP-1 and iNOS. Increase in COX-2 and mPGES-1 was verified both at mRNA and protein levels. Nicotine selectively suppressed the organ-culture-enhanced relaxations induced by des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin and bradykinin, at the same time reducing mPGES-1 mRNA and protein expressions. α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitors α-bungarotoxin and MG624 both blocked the nicotine effects on kinin B{sub 2} receptors, but not those on B{sub 1}. Dexamethasone completely abolished kinin-induced relaxations. Conclusion: It is tempting to conclude that a local inflammatory process per se could have a bronchoprotective component by increasing COX-2 mediated airway relaxations and that nicotine could impede this safety mechanism. Dexamethasone further reduced airway inflammation together with relaxations. This might contribute to the steroid resistance seen in

  18. A comparison of the effects of jaw relaxation and music on postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, M

    1995-01-01

    This experimental study compared the effects of jaw relaxation and music, individually and combined, on sensory and affective pain following surgery. Abdominal surgical patients (N = 84) were randomly assigned to four groups: relaxation, music, a combination of relaxation and music, and control. Interventions were taught preoperatively and used by subjects during the first ambulation after surgery. Indicators of the sensory component of pain were sensation and 24-hour narcotic intake. Indicators of the affective component of pain were distress and anxiety of pain. With preambulatory sensation, distress, narcotic intake, and preoperative anxiety as covariates, the four groups were compared using orthogonal a priori contrasts and analysis of covariance. The interventions were neither effective nor significantly different from one another during ambulation. However, after keeping the taped interventions for 2 postoperative days, 89% of experimental subjects reported them helpful for sensation and distress of pain.

  19. Influence of SnO2 nanoparticles on the relaxation dynamics of the conductive processes in polyaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Swarup; Bhattacharya, Subhratanu

    2017-10-01

    The effect of stannic oxide (SnO2) nanoparticles on the electrical conductivity relaxation and distribution of relaxation times within the 4-Dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) doped polyaniline (Pani) was investigated using electrical impedance spectroscopy. A temperature dependent Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) type temporal relaxation function in the time domain was generated from the analysis of the frequency dependence of the dielectric modulus (imaginary component). The thermal evolution of the characteristics parameters of the KWW function was evaluated and using these parameters the temperature dependent average conductivity relaxation time and associated macroscopic conductivity of different samples were estimated. The study revealed that SnO2 nanoparticles within the polyaniline matrix induced faster relaxation of charge carriers that essentially enhanced the conductivity of the nanocomposite. The observed phenomena were well supported by the observed improvement of the localization length of the charge carriers within the nanocomposite.

  20. Picosecond spin relaxations of acceptor-bound exciton and A-band free exciton in wurtzite GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tackeuchi, A.; Otake, H.; Fujita, T.; Kuroda, T. [Department of Applied Physics, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Chinone, T.; Liang, J.H.; Kajikawa, M. [Stanley Electric Company, Ltd., Edanishi 1-3-1, Aoba, Yokohama 225-0014 (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    The spin relaxation process of acceptor-bound excitons in wurtzite GaN is observed by spin-dependent pump and probe reflectance measurement with subpicosecond time resolution. The time evolutions measured at 15-50 K have a single exponential component corresponding to the electron spin relaxation time of 1.40-1.14 ps. These spin relaxation times are slightly longer than those of the A-band free excitons of 0.47-0.25 ps in GaN at 150-225 K. The spin relaxation time is found to be proportional to T{sup -0.175}, where T is the temperature. This weak temperature dependence indicates that the main spin relaxation mechanism is the Bir-Aronov-Pikus process. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Electronic components

    CERN Document Server

    Colwell, Morris A

    1976-01-01

    Electronic Components provides a basic grounding in the practical aspects of using and selecting electronics components. The book describes the basic requirements needed to start practical work on electronic equipment, resistors and potentiometers, capacitance, and inductors and transformers. The text discusses semiconductor devices such as diodes, thyristors and triacs, transistors and heat sinks, logic and linear integrated circuits (I.C.s) and electromechanical devices. Common abbreviations applied to components are provided. Constructors and electronics engineers will find the book useful

  2. Ultrafast Excited State Relaxation of a Metalloporphyrin Revealed by Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shelby, Megan L.; Lestrange, Patrick J.; Jackson, Nicholas E.

    2016-01-01

    Photoexcited Nickel(II) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP), like many open-shell metalloporphyrins, relaxes rapidly through multiple electronic states following an initial porphyrin-based excitation, some involving metal centered electronic configuration changes that could be harnessed catalytically......), structural dynamics before thermalization were not resolved due to the similar to 100 ps duration of the available X-ray probe pulse. Using the femtosecond (fs) X-ray pulses of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the Ni center electronic configuration from the initial excited state to the relaxed (d...

  3. Picosecond spin relaxation in low-temperature-grown GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, M.; Honda, K.; Yasue, Y.; Tackeuchi, A., E-mail: atacke@waseda.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Lu, S. L.; Dai, P. [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Science, Suzhou (China)

    2014-03-24

    The spin relaxation process of low-temperature-grown GaAs is investigated by spin-dependent pump and probe reflectance measurements with a sub-picosecond time resolution. Two very short carrier lifetimes of 2.0 ps and 28 ps, which can be attributed to nonradiative recombinations related to defects, are observed at 10 K. The observed spin polarization shows double exponential decay with spin relaxation times of 46.2 ps (8.0 ps) and 509 ps (60 ps) at 10 K (200 K). The observed picosecond spin relaxation, which is considerably shorter than that of conventional GaAs, indicates the strong relevance of the Elliott-Yafet process as the spin relaxation mechanism. For the first (second) spin relaxation component, the temperature and carrier density dependences of the spin relaxation time indicate that the Bir-Aronov-Pikus process is also effective at temperatures between 10 K and 77 K, and that the D'yakonov-Perel’ process is effective between 125 K (77 K) and 200 K.

  4. Picosecond spin relaxation in low-temperature-grown GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, M.; Honda, K.; Yasue, Y.; Lu, S. L.; Dai, P.; Tackeuchi, A.

    2014-03-01

    The spin relaxation process of low-temperature-grown GaAs is investigated by spin-dependent pump and probe reflectance measurements with a sub-picosecond time resolution. Two very short carrier lifetimes of 2.0 ps and 28 ps, which can be attributed to nonradiative recombinations related to defects, are observed at 10 K. The observed spin polarization shows double exponential decay with spin relaxation times of 46.2 ps (8.0 ps) and 509 ps (60 ps) at 10 K (200 K). The observed picosecond spin relaxation, which is considerably shorter than that of conventional GaAs, indicates the strong relevance of the Elliott-Yafet process as the spin relaxation mechanism. For the first (second) spin relaxation component, the temperature and carrier density dependences of the spin relaxation time indicate that the Bir-Aronov-Pikus process is also effective at temperatures between 10 K and 77 K, and that the D'yakonov-Perel' process is effective between 125 K (77 K) and 200 K.

  5. Immune modulation in response to stress and relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbub-E-Sobhani; Haque, N; Salma, U; Ahmed, A

    2011-03-15

    Traditional medical science has kept the mind separate from the body. Recently people realize the effect of mind on health and psychoneuroimmunology is the new evolved science that describes the interactions between psyche and soma. In this review through a typical psycho-neuro-endocrino-immune network the effects of psychological stress (acute, brief naturalistic and chronic) and relaxation on immune modulation has been shown. From this network Corticotrophin Releasing Factor (CRF), Adrenocorticotrophic Hormone (ACTH), Glucocorticoids (GC), alpha-endorphin and Met-enkephalin are found as important endocrine components and T cells, B cells, monocytes/macrophages, Natural Killer (NK) cells and their cytokines that is Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), Interferon Gamma (IFN-alpha) and interleukins such as IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 etc. are found as important immune components. Finally, it has been shown that, acute, brief naturalistic and chronic stress have different immune modulatory activities which are harmful to one's homeostasis and relaxation can help to maintain that homeostasis.

  6. A Comparative Evaluation of Three Relaxation Training Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Jeffrey E.

    Comparison was made between the effectiveness of three relaxation training procedures: (1) Behavioral Relaxation Training, which consisted of training in relaxing specific parts of the body and controlling breathing; (2) Meditation (based on Benson's procedure for eliciting the relaxation response); and (3) Seashore Sounds "Attention Focusing,"…

  7. Neurogenic contraction and relaxation of human penile deep dorsal vein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segarra, Gloria; Medina, Pascual; Domenech, Cristina; Martínez León, Juan B; Vila, José M; Aldasoro, Martin; Lluch, Salvador

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize neurogenic and pharmacological responses of human penile deep dorsal vein and to determine whether the responses are mediated by nitric oxide from neural or endothelial origin.Ring segments of human penile deep dorsal vein were obtained from 22 multiorgan donors during procurement of organs for transplantation. The rings were suspended in organ bath chambers for isometric recording of tension. We then studied the contractile and relaxant responses to electrical field stimulation and to vasoactive agents.Electrical field stimulation (0.5–2 Hz) and noradrenaline (3×10−10–3×10−5 M) caused frequency- and concentration-dependent contractions that were of greater magnitude in veins denuded of endothelium. The inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME, 10−4 M) increased the adrenergic responses only in rings with endothelium.In preparations contracted with noradrenaline in the presence of guanethidine (10−6 M) and atropine (10−6 M), electrical stimulation induced frequency-dependent relaxations. This neurogenic relaxation was prevented by L-NAME, methylene blue (3×10−5 M) and tetrodotoxin (10−6 M), but was unaffected by removal of endothelium.Acetylcholine (10−8–3×10−5 M) and substance P (3×10−11–3×10−7 M) induced endothelium-dependent relaxations. In contrast, sodium nitroprusside (10−9–3×10−5 M) and papaverine (10−8–3×10−5 M) caused endothelium-independent relaxations.The results provide functional evidence that the human penile deep dorsal vein is an active component of the penile vascular resistance through the release of nitric oxide from both neural and endothelial origin. Dysfunction in any of these sources of nitric oxide should be considered in some forms of impotence. PMID:9690872

  8. Three-axial force sensor with capacitive read-out using a differential relaxation oscillator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brookhuis, Robert Anton; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2013-01-01

    A silicon three-axis force sensor is designed and realized to be used for measurement of the interaction force between a human finger and the environment. To detect the force components, a capacitive read-out system using a novel relaxation oscillator has been developed with an output frequency

  9. Evaluation of biexponential relaxation behaviour in the human brain by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative estimation of individual biologic components in relaxation curves obtained in vivo may increase the specificity of tissue characterization by magnetic resonance imaging. In this study, the potential of biexponential curve analysis was evaluated in T1 and T2 measurements on the human...

  10. Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Aggression among Elementary Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopata, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    A study evaluated the effectiveness of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) as a proactive single-component aggression-reduction intervention for 24 students (ages 6- 9) classified as having emotional disabilities in a day school/treatment program. Students also had histories of aggressive behavior. Results supported PMR as a proactive short-term…

  11. The Dirichlet problem successive upper relaxation numerical method convergence relaxation parameters influence investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliynyk A.P.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The relaxation parameters values to definite sequential upper relaxation block method convergence optimal velocity have been determined for the Dirichlet's problem in two-dimensional rectangle spatial region, the iteration procedure convergence and positive definiteness of the corresponding linear algebraic equations system matrix have been proved.

  12. Time scales of relaxation dynamics during transient conditions in two-phase flow: RELAXATION DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlüter, Steffen [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; Department Soil Physics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Halle Germany; Berg, Steffen [Shell Global Solutions International B.V., Rijswijk Netherlands; Li, Tianyi [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; Vogel, Hans-Jörg [Department Soil Physics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Halle Germany; Institut für Agrar- und Ernährungswissenschaften, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Halle Germany; Wildenschild, Dorthe [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA

    2017-06-01

    The relaxation dynamics toward a hydrostatic equilibrium after a change in phase saturation in porous media is governed by fluid reconfiguration at the pore scale. Little is known whether a hydrostatic equilibrium in which all interfaces come to rest is ever reached and which microscopic processes govern the time scales of relaxation. Here we apply fast synchrotron-based X-ray tomography (X-ray CT) to measure the slow relaxation dynamics of fluid interfaces in a glass bead pack after fast drainage of the sample. The relaxation of interfaces triggers internal redistribution of fluids, reduces the surface energy stored in the fluid interfaces, and relaxes the contact angle toward the equilibrium value while the fluid topology remains unchanged. The equilibration of capillary pressures occurs in two stages: (i) a quick relaxation within seconds in which most of the pressure drop that built up during drainage is dissipated, a process that is to fast to be captured with fast X-ray CT, and (ii) a slow relaxation with characteristic time scales of 1–4 h which manifests itself as a spontaneous imbibition process that is well described by the Washburn equation for capillary rise in porous media. The slow relaxation implies that a hydrostatic equilibrium is hardly ever attained in practice when conducting two-phase experiments in which a flux boundary condition is changed from flow to no-flow. Implications for experiments with pressure boundary conditions are discussed.

  13. Dynamics of Knot Relaxation in Stretched DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Alexander; Narsimhan, Vivek; Soh, Beatrice; Doyle, Patrick

    Knots occur naturally in biological DNA and have been shown to be relevant for next-generation sequencing applications. Knots and other topological constraints in bulk polymer systems have been shown to influence the overall dynamical behavior of aggregate materials, but it is an open question as to the role that individual knots play in polymer dynamics. Here, we investigated the dynamics of polymer knot relaxation by stretching knotted DNA with an extensional field in a microfluidic device and allowing it to relax to its coiled state, measuring the growth rate of the knot using fluorescence microscopy. We find that knots swell during relaxation with a timescale comparable to that of the end-to-end relaxation. The knot growth timescale in insensitive to differences in the perceived topological complexity of the knot and increases with polymer chain length with the same scaling as the end-to-end relaxation timescale. These findings suggest that the timescale governing the swelling of knots in initially stretched chains is subject to global rather than local polymer dynamics. NSF, SMART, NSERC.

  14. Solvent proton magnetic relaxation dispersion in solutions of concanavalin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, S H; Brown, R D; Brewer, C F

    1973-02-01

    Concanavalin A, a protein isolated from jack beans, exhibits several important biological properties, all of which are related to its ability to bind and precipitate specific polysaccharides. Concanavalin A is a dimer at pH 5.6, and has one transition-metal and one calcium-ion binding site per monomer unit of molecular weight 27,000. Both metal-ion sites must be occupied for the protein to be active. It is of interest to determine the role of the transition metal ion in Concanavalin A and its relationship to the sugar binding activity of the protein. We report the magnetic field and temperature dependences of the spin-lattice magnetic relaxation rates of solvent protons in aqueous solutions of zinc and manganese derivatives of Concanavalin A, and the influence of monosaccharide binding on these rates. The results of a leastsquares fit of the data to the theory, with five adjustable parameters, indicate that there is one rapidly exchanging water molecule ligand on the Mn(2+) ion, with a residence lifetime of 2.5 musec at 25 degrees , and with its protons 0.27 nm (2.7 A) from the Mn(2+) ion. We find that at low magnetic fields (proton Larmor frequencies below about 10 MHz), the correlation time for the dipolar interaction between the Mn(2+) electronic spin moment and the protons on the water ligand is the spin-lattice relaxation time tau(S) of the Mn(2+) moment, but that at higher magnetic fields the correlation time for the dipolar interaction is determined by the Brownian rotational tumbling of the protein, because of the substantial variation of tau(S) with magnetic field. Monosaccharide binding to manganese Concanavalin A has little effect on the relaxation rates of solvent protons, a result that indicates that the sugars do not bind directly to the transition metal in the protein.

  15. A Catapult (Slingshot) Current Sheet Relaxation Model for Substorm Triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.

    2010-12-01

    Based on the results of our superposed epoch analysis of Geotail data, we have proposed a catapult (slingshot) current sheet relaxation model in which earthward flows are produced in the central plasma sheet (CPS) due to the catapult (slingshot) current sheet relaxation, together with the rapid enhancement of Poynting flux toward the CPS in the lobe around X ~ -15 Re about 4 min before the substrom onset. These earthward flows are characterized by plasma pressure decrease and large amplitude magnetic field fluctuations. When these flows reach X ~ 12Re in the magnetotail, they give significant disturbances to the inner magnetosphere to initiate some instability such as a ballooning instability or other instabilities, and the substorm starts in the inner magnetosphere. The occurrence of the magnetic reconnection is a natural consequence of the initial convective earthward flows, because the relaxation of a highly stretched catapult current sheet produces a very thin current at its tailward edge being surrounded by intense magnetic fields which were formerly the off-equatorial lobe magnetic fields. Recently, Nishimura et al. [2010] reported that the substorm onset begins when faint poleward discrete arcs collide with equatorward quiet arcs. The region of earthward convective flows correlatively moves earthward prior to the onset. Thus, this region of the earthward convective flows seems to correspond to the faint poleward discrete arcs. Interestingly, our statistical analysis shows that the earthward convective flows are not produced by the magnetic reconnection, but they are attributed to the dominance of the earthward JxB force over the tailward pressure associated with the progress of the plasma sheet thinning.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation studies of sup 5 sup 1 V in BiVO sub 4 single crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, I G; Jeong, D Y; Lim, A R; Choh, S H; Hong, K S

    2002-01-01

    Temperature dependences of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time of sup 5 sup 1 V in BiVO sub 4 single crystals, undoped and doped with 1 mol% of Eu sub 2 O sub 3 , respectively, were measured in the temperature range of 140-400 K. The spin-lattice relaxation times, T sub 1 sub s , of both samples were divided into the long and short components. For the doped crystal, the long component of the relaxation time is much shorter than those of the undoped crystal since the paramagnetic relaxation through Eu sup 3 sup + ions was dominant. From data of the undoped BiVO sub 4 , it is found that the slow motion leads to the phase transition starting at 260 K, and its thermal activation energy is 0.033eV. That is, we observed the thermally activated motion in ferroelastic which precedes the paraelastic phase transition.

  17. Gradient echo single scan inversion recovery: application to proton and fluorine relaxation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavuluri, KowsalyaDevi; Ramanathan, K V

    2016-02-01

    Single scan longitudinal relaxation measurement experiments enable rapid estimation of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1 ) as the time series of spin relaxation is encoded spatially in the sample at different slices resulting in an order of magnitude saving in time. We consider here a single scan inversion recovery pulse sequence that incorporates a gradient echo sequence. The proposed pulse sequence provides spectra with significantly enhanced signal to noise ratio leading to an accurate estimation of T1 values. The method is applicable for measuring a range of T1 values, thus indicating the possibility of routine use of the method for several systems. A comparative study of different single scan methods currently available is presented, and the advantage of the proposed sequence is highlighted. The possibility of the use of the method for the study of cross-correlation effects for the case of fluorine in a single shot is also demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Quantitative analysis of 17O exchange and T1 relaxation data: application to zirconium tungstate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, Paul; Hampson, Matthew R

    2006-09-01

    The theoretical basis behind a recent quantitative analysis of 17O exchange in ZrW2O8 [M.R. Hampson, J.S.O. Evans, P. Hodgkinson, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127 (2005) 15175-15181] is set out. Despite the complexities of combining the multi-exponential relaxation of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei with chemical exchange, it is shown how magnetisation transfer experiments can be analysed to obtain estimates of absolute exchange rates. The multi-exponential relaxation is best modelled using a magnetic mechanism, i.e. the rapid T1 relaxation observed, particularly at high temperatures, can be directly related to the relatively high degree of 17O labelling employed. The combination of the 1D EXSY results with T1 values as a function of temperature provides exchange rates and activation barriers over a wide temperature range (40-226 degrees C).

  19. Mozart versus new age music: relaxation states, stress, and ABC relaxation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonathan C; Joyce, Carol A

    2004-01-01

    Smith's (2001) Attentional Behavioral Cognitive (ABC) relaxation theory proposes that all approaches to relaxation (including music) have the potential for evoking one or more of 15 factor-analytically derived relaxation states, or "R-States" (Sleepiness, Disengagement, Rested / Refreshed, Energized, Physical Relaxation, At Ease/Peace, Joy, Mental Quiet, Childlike Innocence, Thankfulness and Love, Mystery, Awe and Wonder, Prayerfulness, Timeless/Boundless/Infinite, and Aware). The present study investigated R-States and stress symptom-patterns associated with listening to Mozart versus New Age music. Students (N = 63) were divided into three relaxation groups based on previously determined preferences. Fourteen listened to a 28-minute tape recording of Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik and 14 listened to a 28-minute tape of Steven Halpern's New Age Serenity Suite. Others (n = 35) did not want music and instead chose a set of popular recreational magazines. Participants engaged in their relaxation activity at home for three consecutive days for 28 minutes a session. Before and after each session, each person completed the Smith Relaxation States Inventory (Smith, 2001), a comprehensive questionnaire tapping 15 R-States as well as the stress states of somatic stress, worry, and negative emotion. Results revealed no differences at Session 1. At Session 2, those who listened to Mozart reported higher levels of At Ease/Peace and lower levels of Negative Emotion. Pronounced differences emerged at Session 3. Mozart listeners uniquely reported substantially higher levels of Mental Quiet, Awe and Wonder, and Mystery. Mozart listeners reported higher levels, and New Age listeners slightly elevated levels, of At Ease/Peace and Rested/Refreshed. Both Mozart and New Age listeners reported higher levels of Thankfulness and Love. In summary, those who listened to Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik reported more psychological relaxation and less stress than either those who listened to

  20. Asymptotic representation of relaxation oscillations in lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Grigorieva, Elena V

    2017-01-01

    In this book we analyze relaxation oscillations in models of lasers with nonlinear elements controlling light dynamics. The models are based on rate equations taking into account periodic modulation of parameters, optoelectronic delayed feedback, mutual coupling between lasers, intermodal interaction and other factors. With the aim to study relaxation oscillations we present the special asymptotic method of integration for ordinary differential equations and differential-difference equations. As a result, they are reduced to discrete maps. Analyzing the maps we describe analytically such nonlinear phenomena in lasers as multistability of large-amplitude relaxation cycles, bifurcations of cycles, controlled switching of regimes, phase synchronization in an ensemble of coupled systems and others. The book can be fruitful for students and technicians in nonlinear laser dynamics and in differential equations.

  1. Charge relaxation dynamics of an electrolytic nanocapacitor

    CERN Document Server

    Thakore, Vaibhav

    2013-01-01

    Understanding ion relaxation dynamics in overlapping electric double layers (EDLs) is critical for the development of efficient nanotechnology based electrochemical energy storage, electrochemomechanical energy conversion and bioelectrochemical sensing devices besides controlled synthesis of nanostructured materials. Here, using Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method, we present results from the simulations of an electrolytic nanocapacitor subjected to a step potential at t = 0 for various degrees of EDL overlap, solvent viscosities, ratios of cation to anion diffusivity and electrode separations. A continuously varying molecular speed dependent relaxation time, proposed for use with the LB equation, recovers the correct microscopic description of molecular collision phenomena and holds promise for enhancing the stability of the LB algorithm. Results for large EDL overlap showed oscillatory behavior for ionic current densities in contrast to monotonic relaxation to equilibrium for low EDL overlap. Further, at low solv...

  2. Improved memristor-based relaxation oscillator

    KAUST Repository

    Mosad, Ahmed G.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents an improved memristor-based relaxation oscillator which offers higher frequency and wider tunning range than the existing reactance-less oscillators. It also has the capability of operating on two positive supplies or alternatively a positive and negative supply. Furthermore, it has the advantage that it can be fully integrated on-chip providing an area-efficient solution. On the other hand, The oscillation concept is discussed then a complete mathematical analysis of the proposed oscillator is introduced. Furthermore, the power consumption of the new relaxation circuit is discussed and validated by the PSPICE circuit simulations showing an excellent agreement. MATLAB results are also introduced to demonstrate the resistance range and the corresponding frequency range which can be obtained from the proposed relaxation oscillator. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Relaxation and Diffusion in Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ngai, K L

    2011-01-01

    Relaxation and Diffusion in Complex Systems comprehensively presents a variety of experimental evidences of universal relaxation and diffusion properties in complex materials and systems. The materials discussed include liquids, glasses, colloids, polymers, rubbers, plastic crystals and aqueous mixtures, as well as carbohydrates, biomolecules, bioprotectants and pharmaceuticals. Due to the abundance of experimental data, emphasis is placed on glass-formers and the glass transition problem, a still unsolved problem in condensed matter physics and chemistry. The evidence for universal properties of relaxation and diffusion dynamics suggests that a fundamental physical law is at work. The origin of the universal properties is traced to the many-body effects of the interaction, rigorous theory of which does not exist at the present time. However, using solutions of simplified models as guides, key quantities have been identified and predictions of the universal properties generated. These predictions from Ngai’...

  4. Impaired gastric relaxation in patients with achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearin, F; Papo, M; Malagelada, J R

    1995-03-01

    Achalasia is considered a primary motility disorder confined to the oesophagus. The lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) in achalasia is frequently hypertonic and manifests absent or incomplete relaxation in response to deglution. On the other hand, the LOS and the proximal stomach act physiologically as a functional unit whereby relaxation of the LOS during deglution is associated with receptive relaxation of the proximal stomach. Thus, this study investigated the hypothesis that impaired LOS relaxation in patients with achalasia might be associated with impaired relaxation of the proximal stomach. The study consisted of 20 patients with achalasia and 10 healthy controls. Gastric tone variations were quantified using an electronic barostat. Firstly, the study established the basal gastric tone (intragastric volume at the minimal distending pressure+1 mm Hg) and gastric compliance (volume/pressure relation) during isobaric distension (increasing stepwise the intragastric pressure from 0 to 20 mm Hg up to 600 ml). Secondly, the gastric tone response to cold stress (hand immersion into ice water for five minutes) or to control stimuli (water at 37 degrees) was determined. Basal gastric tone mean (SEM) was similar in achalasia and in healthy controls (125 (9) ml v 138 (9) ml, respectively). Compliance was linear and similar in both groups, which also showed similar gastric extension ratios (58 (7) ml/mm Hg v 57 (6) ml/mm Hg). Cold stress induced a gastric relaxatory response that, as a group, was significantly lower in achalasia than in healthy controls (volume: 43 (20) ml v 141 (42) ml; p 100 ml) relaxatory responses whereas four of the 10 healthy controls did not. In conclusion, reflex gastric relaxation is impaired in most patients with achalasia showing that the proximal stomach, and not exclusively the oesophagus, may be effected by the disease.

  5. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design (RAPID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    RAPID is a methodology and software system to define a class of airplane configurations and directly evaluate surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity on and about the configurations. A distinguishing characteristic which separates RAPID from other airplane surface modellers is that the output grids and grid sensitivity are directly applicable in CFD analysis. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process which is incorporated into interactive software for 'real time' visual analysis and into batch software for the application of optimization technology. The computed surface grids and volume grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, and vertical tail components. The double-delta wing and tail components are manifested by solving a fourth order partial differential equation (PDE) subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design parameters are incorporated into the boundary conditions and therefore govern the shapes of the surfaces. The PDE solution yields a smooth transition between boundaries. Surface grids suitable for CFD calculation are created by establishing an H-type topology about the configuration and incorporating grid spacing functions in the PDE equation for the lifting components and the fuselage definition equations. User specified grid parameters govern the location and degree of grid concentration. A two-block volume grid about a configuration is calculated using the Control Point Form (CPF) technique. The interactive software, which runs on Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations, allows design parameters to be continuously varied and the resulting surface grid to be observed in real time. The batch software computes both the surface and volume grids and also computes the sensitivity of the output grid with respect to the input design parameters by applying the precompiler tool

  6. Stress Relaxation in Entangled Polymer Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Ji-Xuan; Svaneborg, Carsten; Everaers, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    We present an extensive set of simulation results for the stress relaxation in equilibrium and step-strained bead-spring polymer melts. The data allow us to explore the chain dynamics and the shear relaxation modulus, G(t), into the plateau regime for chains with Z=40 entanglements and into the t...... excellent agreement for the Likhtman-McLeish theory using the double reptation approximation for constraint release, if we remove the contribution of high-frequency modes to contour length fluctuations of the primitive chain....

  7. Magnetic Relaxation Detector for Microbead Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Paul Peng; Skucha, Karl; Duan, Yida; Megens, Mischa; Kim, Jungkyu; Izyumin, Igor I.; Gambini, Simone; Boser, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    A compact and robust magnetic label detector for biomedical assays is implemented in 0.18-μm CMOS. Detection relies on the magnetic relaxation signature of a microbead label for improved tolerance to environmental variations and relaxed dynamic range requirement, eliminating the need for baseline calibration and reference sensors. The device includes embedded electromagnets to eliminate external magnets and reduce power dissipation. Correlated double sampling combined with offset servo loops and magnetic field modulation, suppresses the detector offset to sub-μT. Single 4.5-μm magnetic beads are detected in 16 ms with a probability of error <0.1%. PMID:25308988

  8. Signal prediction by anticipatory relaxation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Henning U.

    2016-03-01

    Real-time prediction of signals is a task often encountered in control problems as well as by living systems. Here, a parsimonious prediction approach based on the coupling of a linear relaxation-delay system to a smooth, stationary signal is described. The resulting anticipatory relaxation dynamics (ARD) is a frequency-dependent predictor of future signal values. ARD not only approximately predicts signals on average but can anticipate the occurrence of signal peaks, too. This can be explained by recognizing ARD as an input-output system with negative group delay. It is characterized, including its prediction horizon, by its analytically given frequency response function.

  9. Semi-convergence and relaxation parameters for a class of SIRT algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elfving, Tommy; Nikazad, Touraj; Hansen, Per Christian

    2010-01-01

    adaptively during the iterations, so as to control the propagated noise component of the error. The advantage of using this strategy for the choice of relaxation parameters on noisy and ill-conditioned problems is demonstrated with an example from tomography (image reconstruction from projections).......This paper is concerned with the Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT) class of iterative methods for solving inverse problems. Based on a careful analysis of the semi-convergence behavior of these methods, we propose two new techniques to specify the relaxation parameters...

  10. Influence of pudendal nerve blockade on stress relaxation in the female urethra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thind, P; Bagi, P; Mieszczak, C

    1996-01-01

    The urethral pressure decay following a sudden and sustained dilatation corresponds to stress relaxation. Urethral stress relaxation can be described by the equation Pt = Pequ + P alpha e-t/tau alpha + P beta e-t/tau beta, where Pt is the pressure at time t, Pequ is the equilibrium pressure after...... or the connective tissue components. The method may prove useful in the further evaluation of the closure function of the urethra with special reference to the pathophysiology of stress urinary incontinence....

  11. Long valley relaxation time of free carriers in monolayer WSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tengfei; Yang, Siyuan; Li, Dian; Cui, Xiaodong

    2017-06-01

    Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) feature a valley degree of freedom, giant spin-orbit coupling, and spin-valley locking. These exotic natures have stimulated efforts of exploring potential applications in conceptual spintronics, valleytronics, and quantum computing. Among all the exotic directions, a long relaxation time of spin and/or valley polarization is critical. The present valley dynamics studies concentrate on the band edge excitons which predominate the optical response due to an enhanced Coulomb interaction in two dimensions. The valley relaxation time of free carriers remains ambiguous. In this Rapid Communication, we use time-resolved Kerr rotation spectroscopy to probe the valley dynamics of excitons and free carriers in monolayer tungsten diselenide. The valley relaxation time of free carriers is found around 2 ns at 70 K, about three orders of magnitude longer than the excitons of about 2 ps, and 15 times larger than that of trions (130 ps). The extended valley relaxation time of free carriers evidences that an exchange interaction dominates the valley relaxation in optical excitations. The pump-probe spectroscopy also reveals an exciton binding energy of 0.60 eV in monolayer WSe2.

  12. Nuclear transfer and anisotropic motional spin phenomena: relaxation time temperature dependence studies of water adsorbed on silica gel. Part IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woessner, D.E.; Zimmerman, J.R.

    1962-12-15

    An experimental investigation of the temperature dependence of the nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation phenomena of water vapor adsorbed on silica gel is described. Two-component relaxation data are observed. With temperature increase, the longer T/sub 2/ value decreases while its fractional population increases. These data are shown to be consistent with nuclear transfers between two state environments possessing distinct relaxation characteristics. and a comparison with theory is made. Evidence of a change of surface characteristics is presented; for early experiments, two-component longitudinal relaxation occurs below a transition temperature; in later experiments, only one-component T/sub 1/ behavior is found. A theory for an anisotropic motional model for nuclear magnetic dipole-dipole relaxation on surfaces is presented. The motional model is random reorientation of the interproton vector about an axis normal to the surface that occurs much faster than the time dependence of the angle between the vector and this axis. The relaxation processes are thus related to multiple nuclear correlation times. Consequences of an anisotropic model agree with experimental observations. (auth)

  13. Oscillators and relaxation phenomena in Pleistocene climate theory

    CERN Document Server

    Crucifix, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Ice sheets appeared in the northern hemisphere around 3 million years ago and glacial-interglacial cycles have paced Earth's climate since then. Superimposed on these long glacial cycles comes an intricate pattern of millennial and sub-millennial variability, including Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events. There are numerous theories about theses oscillations. Here, we review a number of them in order draw a parallel between climatic concepts and dynamical system concepts, including, in particular, the relaxation oscillator, excitability, slow-fast dynamics and homoclinic orbits. Namely, almost all theories of ice ages reviewed here feature a phenomenon of synchronisation between internal climate dynamics and the astronomical forcing. However, these theories differ in their bifurcation structure and this has an effect on the way the ice age phenomenon could grow 3 million years ago. All theories on rapid events reviewed here rely on the concept of a limit cycle in the ocean circulation, which may be excited...

  14. Novel magnetic relaxation nanosensors: an unparalleled "spin" on influenza diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Tyler; Banerjee, Tuhina; Kallu, Jyothi; Sulthana, Shoukath; Zegar, Irene; Santra, Santimukul

    2016-12-01

    Rapid detection and diagnosis of pathogenic strains of influenza is necessary for expedited treatment and quicker resolutions to the ever-rising flu pandemics. Considering this, we propose the development of novel magnetic relaxation nanosensors (MRnS) for the rapid detection of influenza through targeted binding with hemagglutinin. 2,6- and 2,3-sialic acid ligands and entry blocker peptides are conjugated to iron oxide nanoparticles to create functional MRnS. Positive detection of various hemagglutinin variants (H1 and H5) is possible with protein concentrations as little as 1.0 nM. Most importantly, detection using functional MRnS is achieved within minutes and differentiates between influenza subtypes. This specificity allows mixtures of MRnS to screen for multiple pathogens at once, discarding the need to conduct multiple individual tests. Current methods used to diagnose influenza, such as RT-PCR and viral culturing, while largely effective, are complex, time-consuming and costly. As well, they are not as sensitive or specific, and have been known to produce false-positive results. In contrast to these methods, targeted MRnS are robust, point-of-care diagnostic tools featuring simple, rapid and low-cost procedures. These qualities, as well as high sensitivity and specificity, and low turnaround times, make a strong case for the diagnostic application of MRnS in clinical settings.

  15. Time and Temperature Dependence of Viscoelastic Stress Relaxation in Gold and Gold Alloy Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongkolsuttirat, Kittisun

    modulus relaxation of Au films also proves that the films exhibit linear viscoelastic behavior. From this, a linear viscoelastic model is shown to fit very well to experimental steady state stress relaxation data and can predict time dependent stress for complex loading histories including the ability to predict stress-time behavior at other strain rates during loading. Two specific factors that are expected to influence the viscoelastic behavior-degree of alloying and grain size are investigated to explore the influence of V concentration in solid solution and grain size of pure Au. It is found that the normalized modulus of Au films is dependent on both concentration (C) and grain size (D) with proportionalities of C1/3 and D 2, respectively. A quantitative model of the rate-equation for dislocation glide plasticity based on Frost and Ashby is proposed and fitted well with steady state anelastic stress relaxation experimental data. The activation volume and the density of mobile dislocations is determined using repeated stress relaxation tests in order to further understand the viscoelastic relaxation mechanism. A rapid decrease of mobile dislocation density is found at the beginning of relaxation, which correlates well with a large reduction of viscoelastic modulus at the early stage of relaxation. The extracted activation volume and dislocation mobility can be ascribed to mobile dislocation loops with double kinks generated at grain boundaries, consistent with the dislocation mechanism proposed for the low activation energy measured in this study.

  16. Glomerular extracellular matrix components and integrins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, L. M.; de Melker, A. A.; Kramer, D.; Kuikman, I.; Chand, A.; Claessen, N.; Weening, J. J.; Sonnenberg, A.

    1998-01-01

    It has become apparent that extracellular matrix components and their cellular receptors, the integrins, are important regulators of glomerular development and function. In this rapidly evolving field we studied the production of extracellular matrix components and integrins by rat glomerular

  17. Rapid Polymer Sequencer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor (Inventor); Brock, Matthew W (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Method and system for rapid and accurate determination of each of a sequence of unknown polymer components, such as nucleic acid components. A self-assembling monolayer of a selected substance is optionally provided on an interior surface of a pipette tip, and the interior surface is immersed in a selected liquid. A selected electrical field is impressed in a longitudinal direction, or in a transverse direction, in the tip region, a polymer sequence is passed through the tip region, and a change in an electrical current signal is measured as each polymer component passes through the tip region. Each of the measured changes in electrical current signals is compared with a database of reference electrical change signals, with each reference signal corresponding to an identified polymer component, to identify the unknown polymer component with a reference polymer component. The nanopore preferably has a pore inner diameter of no more than about 40 nm and is prepared by heating and pulling a very small section of a glass tubing.

  18. Collection Development: Relaxation & Meditation, September 1, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettus, Dodi

    2010-01-01

    One of the first books to document the relationship between stress and physical and emotional health was "The Relaxation Response" by Herbert Benson, M.D., with Miriam Z. Klipper. Originally published in 1975, the book grew out of Benson's observations as a cardiologist and his research as a fellow at Harvard Medical School. Benson's study of…

  19. Waveform relaxation methods for implicit differential equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. van der Houwen; W.A. van der Veen

    1996-01-01

    textabstractWe apply a Runge-Kutta-based waveform relaxation method to initial-value problems for implicit differential equations. In the implementation of such methods, a sequence of nonlinear systems has to be solved iteratively in each step of the integration process. The size of these systems

  20. High Relaxivity Gadolinium-Polydopamine Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhao; Carniato, Fabio; Xie, Yijun; Huang, Yuran; Li, Yiwen; He, Sha; Zang, Nanzhi; Rinehart, Jeffrey D; Botta, Mauro; Gianneschi, Nathan C

    2017-10-10

    This study reports the preparation of a series of gadolinium-polydopamine nanoparticles (GdPD-NPs) with tunable metal loadings. GdPD-NPs are analyzed by nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion and with a 7-tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. A relaxivity of 75 and 10.3 mM(-1) s(-1) at 1.4 and 7 T is observed, respectively. Furthermore, superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry is used to study intraparticle magnetic interactions and determine the GdPD-NPs consist of isolated metal ions even at maximum metal loadings. From these data, it is concluded that the observed high relaxivities arise from a high hydration state of the Gd(III) at the particle surface, fast rate of water exchange, and negligible antiferromagnetic coupling between Gd(III) centers throughout the particles. This study highlights design parameters and a robust synthetic approach that aid in the development of this scaffold for T1 -weighted, high relaxivity MRI contrast agents. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Relaxation and music to reduce postsurgical pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, M; Stanton-Hicks, M; Grass, J A; Anderson, G C; Lai, H L; Roykulcharoen, V; Adler, P A

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the effects of relaxation, music, and the combination of relaxation and music on postoperative pain, across and between two days and two activities (ambulation and rest) and across ambulation each day. This secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial was conducted from 1995 to 1997. After surgery, patients do not always receive sufficient relief from opioids and may have undesired side-effects. More complete relief (10-30%) was found recently with adjuvant interventions of relaxation, music, and their combination. Comparison of effects between days and treatments have not been examined longitudinally. With a repeated measures design, abdominal surgery patients (n = 468) in five US hospitals were assigned randomly to one of four groups; relaxation, music, their combination, and control. With institutional approval and written informed consent, subjects were interviewed and taught interventions preoperatively. Postoperative testing was at ambulation and rest on days 1 and 2 using visual analogue (VAS) sensation and distress of pain scales. Multivariate analysis indicated that although pain decreased by day 2, interventions were not different between days and activities. They were effective for pain across ambulation on each day, across ambulation and across rest over both days (all P pain on both postoperative days and at both ambulation and rest.

  2. Electron beam relaxation in turbulent plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karfidov, D.M.; Lukina, N.A. [General Physics Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The electron beam interaction with collisionless plasma was studied experimentally. The beam relaxation length is shown to be determined by strong Langmuir turbulence development. Effective collision frequency of turbulence is determined; final cavity size determined from plasma electrical field strength measurements is estimated to be about 30 Debay lengths. (author)

  3. Relaxations of combinatorial problems via association schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klerk, E.; De Oliveira Filho, F.M.; Pasechnik, D.V.; Anjos, M.F.; Lasserre, J.B.

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter we describe a novel way of deriving semidefinite programming relaxations of a wide class of combinatorial optimization problems. Many combinatorial optimization problems may be viewed as finding an induced subgraph of a specific type of maximum weight in a given weighted graph. The

  4. Minimum dissipative relaxed states in toroidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The relaxation model proposed by Taylor [1] is well-suited to characterize the reversed field pinch (RFP) as a self-organized state, but its application to tokamak discharges was beset with difficulties. Bhattacharjee and Kwok [2] tried to overcome these by formulat- ing additional global invariants and constructed tokamak ...

  5. Calculated /sup 13/C NMR relaxation parameters for a restricted internal diffusion model. Application to methionine relaxation in dihydrofolate reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, R.E.; Avitabile, J.

    1978-11-08

    /sup 13/C NMR relaxation parameters, T/sub 1/, T/sub 2/, and NOE, have been calculated based on a model assuming internal rotational diffusion subject to boundary conditions limiting the range of motion. Numerical results are presented as a function of diffusion coefficients D/sub 0/ and D/sub i/ and angle ..beta.. defined as in the free internal rotation calculation, as well as 2theta, the allowed range of motion. Relaxation times vary from values expected in the absence of internal motion to values slightly below those calculated using the free internal rotation model as the range is increased from 0 to 360/sup 0/. The discrepancy in the latter comparison arises from the boundary condition preventing diffusion from 180/sup +/ to 180/sup -/. Changes in T/sub 2/ are typically monotonic or nearly monotonic as a function of theta; however, changes in T/sub 1/ and NOE values are markedly nonmonotonic for D/sub 0/ approx. < 10/sup 6/ s/sup -1/ and for certain values of D/sub i/. Criteria for the applicability of the present calculations to the analysis of /sup 13/C NMR relaxation data obtained in studies of macromolecules undergoing restricted internal motion have been suggested. The results have been generalized to the case of multiple internal rotations, specifically for the problem of one free and one restricted diffusional process. In general, two types of rotation are not commutative. This model has been applied to relaxation data recently obtained for the methionine methyl resonances of specifically /sup 13/C-labeled dihydrofolate reductase obtained from S. faecium. The results indicate that the data can be readily explained by assuming rapid free internal diffusion about the S--CH/sub 3/ bond and restricted internal diffusion about the CH/sub 2/--S bond of methionine, such that for the broadest resonances the motional range is restricted to approx. 90/sup 0/ and for the sharpest resonances the range is >180/sup 0/. Restriction of the motion allows a

  6. Vibrational relaxation of the bending mode of HDO in liquid D2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodis, Pavol; Larsen, Olaf F A; Woutersen, Sander

    2005-06-23

    The vibrational relaxation of the bending mode of HDO in liquid D2O has been studied using time-resolved mid-infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. At short delays, the transient spectrum clearly shows the v = 1 --> 2 induced absorption and v = 1 --> 0 bleaching and stimulated emission, whereas at long delays, the transient spectrum is dominated by the spectral changes caused by the temperature increase in the sample after vibrational relaxation. From the decay of the v = 1 --> 2 induced absorption, we obtain an estimate of 390 +/- 50 fs for the vibrational lifetime, in surprisingly good agreement with recent theoretical predictions. In the v = 0 --> 1 frequency region, the decay of the absorption change involves a second, slower component, which suggests that after vibrational relaxation the system is not yet in thermal equilibrium.

  7. The influence of moisture on charge relaxation in modified polyimide films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almaz M. Kamalov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The charge relaxation processes in the films based on polyimide and polytetrafluoroethylene (the latter serves as a coating have been studied. The coating effect on the charge relaxation processes in the films under high humidity conditions was revealed. The obtained experimental data was analyzed in the context of the present-day knowledge of the charge relaxation mechanism. The complex spectra of the thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDC were resolved into individual components described by the first-order kinetics equations using computer simulation. The TSDC activation energies were calculated and interpreted in terms of the mechanism of release of charge carriers. It was shown that the polytetrafluoroethylene coats on film surfaces lead to an essential increase in the electret state stability at elevated temperature and high humidity.

  8. A rapid live-cell ELISA for characterizing antibodies against cell surface antigens of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and its use in isolating algae from natural environments with related cell wall components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenzhi; Cossey, Sarah; Rosenberg, Julian N; Oyler, George A; Olson, Bradley J S C; Weeks, Donald P

    2014-09-25

    Cell walls are essential for most bacteria, archaea, fungi, algae and land plants to provide shape, structural integrity and protection from numerous biotic and abiotic environmental factors. In the case of eukaryotic algae, relatively little is known of the composition, structure or mechanisms of assembly of cell walls in individual species or between species and how these differences enable algae to inhabit a great diversity of environments. In this paper we describe the use of camelid antibody fragments (VHHs) and a streamlined ELISA assay as powerful new tools for obtaining mono-specific reagents for detecting individual algal cell wall components and for isolating algae that share a particular cell surface component. To develop new microalgal bioprospecting tools to aid in the search of environmental samples for algae that share similar cell wall and cell surface components, we have produced single-chain camelid antibodies raised against cell surface components of the single-cell alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We have cloned the variable-region domains (VHHs) from the camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies and overproduced tagged versions of these monoclonal-like antibodies in E. coli. Using these VHHs, we have developed an accurate, facile, low cost ELISA that uses live cells as a source of antigens in their native conformation and that requires less than 90 minutes to perform. This ELISA technique was demonstrated to be as accurate as standard ELISAs that employ proteins from cell lysates and that generally require >24 hours to complete. Among the cloned VHHs, VHH B11, exhibited the highest affinity (EC50 algae sharing cell surface components with C. reinhardtii in water samples from natural environments. In addition, mCherry-tagged VHH B11 was used along with fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to select individual axenic isolates of presumed wild relatives of C. reinhardtii and other Chlorphyceae from the same environmental samples. Camelid antibody

  9. The effect of music relaxation versus progressive muscular relaxation on insomnia in older people and their relationship to personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Naomi; Rotem, Tomer; Arnon, Zahi; Haimov, Iris

    2008-01-01

    A large percentage of older people suffer from chronic insomnia, affecting many aspects of life quality and well-being. Although insomnia is most often treated with medication, a growing number of studies demonstrate the efficiency of various relaxation techniques. The present study had three aims: first, to compare two relaxation techniques--music relaxation and progressive muscular relaxation--on various objective and subjective measures of sleep quality; second, to examine the effect of these techniques on anxiety and depression; and finally, to explore possible relationships between the efficiency of both techniques and personality variables. Fifteen older adults took part in the study. Following one week of base-line measurements of sleep quality, participants followed one week of music relaxation and one week of progressive muscular relaxation before going to sleep. Order of relaxation techniques was controlled. Results show music relaxation was more efficient in improving sleep. Sleep efficiency was higher after music relaxation than after progressive muscular relaxation. Moreover, anxiety was lower after music relaxation. Progressive muscular relaxation was related to deterioration of sleep quality on subjective measures. Beyond differences between the relaxation techniques, extraverts seemed to benefit more from both music and progressive muscular relaxation. The advantage of non-pharmacological means to treat insomnia, and the importance of taking individual differences into account are discussed.

  10. Brief relaxation training is not sufficient to alter tolerance to experimental pain in novices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karen E; Norman, Greg J

    2017-01-01

    Relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing and muscle relaxation, are aspects common to most forms of mindfulness training. There is now an abundance of research demonstrating that mindfulness training has beneficial effects across a wide range of clinical conditions, making it an important tool for clinical intervention. One area of extensive research is on the beneficial effects of mindfulness on experiences of pain. However, the mechanisms of these effects are still not well understood. One hypothesis is that the relaxation components of mindfulness training, through alterations in breathing and muscle tension, leads to changes in parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system functioning which influences pain circuits. The current study seeks to examine how two of the relaxation subcomponents of mindfulness training, deep breathing and muscle relaxation, influence experiences of pain in healthy individuals. Participants were randomized to either a 10 minute deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, or control condition after which they were exposed to a cold pain task. Throughout the experiment, measures of parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system activity were collected to assess how deep breathing and progressive muscle relaxation alter physiological responses, and if these changes moderate any effects of these interventions on responses to pain. There were no differences in participants' pain tolerances or self-reported pain ratings during the cold pain task or in participants' physiological responses to the task. Additionally, individual differences in physiological functioning were not related to differences in pain tolerance or pain ratings. Overall this study suggests that the mechanisms through which mindfulness exerts its effects on pain are more complex than merely through physiological changes brought about by altering breathing or muscle tension. This indicates a need for more research examining the specific subcomponents of

  11. Principal components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallin, M.; Hörmann, S.; Piegorsch, W.; El Shaarawi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Principal Components are probably the best known and most widely used of all multivariate analysis techniques. The essential idea consists in performing a linear transformation of the observed k-dimensional variables in such a way that the new variables are vectors of k mutually orthogonal

  12. Observation of a Relaxed Plasma State in a Quasi-Infinite Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, T.; Brown, M. R.; Dandurand, D.

    2013-02-01

    A helical relaxed plasma state is observed in a long cylindrical volume. The cylinder is long enough so that the predicted minimum energy state is a close approximation to the infinite cylinder solution. The plasma is injected at v≥50km/s by a coaxial magnetized plasma gun located at one end of the cylindrical volume. The relaxed state is rapidly attained in 1-2 axial Alfvén times after initiation of the plasma. Magnetic data are favorably compared with an analytical model. Magnetic data exhibit broadband fluctuations of the measured axial modes during the formation period. The broadband activity rapidly decays as the energy condenses into the lowest energy mode, which is in agreement with the minimum energy eigenstate of ∇×B=λB.

  13. Validation Relaxation: A Quality Assurance Strategy for Electronic Data Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Avi; Gordon, Nicholas; Griffiths, Thomas; Kraemer, John D; Siedner, Mark J

    2017-08-18

    .8%-2.8%) to 0.6% at day 45 (95% CI 0.3%-0.9%; OR=0.969; Pdata capture platforms can be used to create a set of detectable data errors, which can subsequently be used to assess group and individual enumerator error rates, their trends over time, and categories of data collection that require further training or additional quality control measures. This strategy may be particularly useful for identifying individual enumerators or systematic data errors that are responsive to enumerator training and is best applied to questions for which errors cannot be prevented through training or software design alone. Validation relaxation should be considered as a component of a holistic data quality assurance strategy.

  14. Audio-visual relaxation training for anxiety, sleep, and relaxation among Chinese adults with cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Sing-Ling

    2004-12-01

    The long-term effect of an audio-visual relaxation training (RT) treatment involving deep breathing, exercise, muscle relaxation, guided imagery, and meditation was compared with routine nursing care for reducing anxiety, improving sleep, and promoting relaxation in Chinese adults with cardiac disease. This research was a quasi-experimental, two-group, pretest-posttest study. A convenience sample of 100 cardiology patients (41 treatment, 59 control) admitted to one large medical center hospital in the Republic of China (ROC) was studied for 1 year. The hypothesized relationships were supported. RT significantly (p anxiety, sleep, and relaxation in the treatment group as compared to the control group. It appears audio-visual RT might be a beneficial adjunctive therapy for adult cardiac patients. However, considerable further work using stronger research designs is needed to determine the most appropriate instructional methods and the factors that contribute to long-term consistent practice of RT with Chinese populations.

  15. Nonadiabatic, stochastic model for the classic relaxing paramagnet ferrichrome A: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, G. R.; Corson, M. R.; Balko, B.

    1983-03-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy is an important tool for the study of systems showing ionic spin relaxation. Progress in stochastic theoretical models for such systems has made possible a detailed analysis of Mössbauer spectra showing relaxation effects in terms of meaningful physical parameters. In order to test the applicability of these methods, we have performed Mössbauer-effect measurements on the classic relaxing paramagnet ferrichrome A down to 115 mK, and have analyzed our spectra using the nonadiabatic stochastic relaxation theory of Clauser and Blume. We have obtained good theoretical fits to our data over the temperature range from 4.2 K down to 115 mK holding fixed all parameters except sample temperature. From our results we obtain the values for the crystal-field spin-Hamiltonian parameters D=-0.29 cm-1 and ED=0.25. In addition, we determined that the hyperfine interaction is not isotropic or axial, and that the major component of the hyperfine interaction tensor has a value in the principal-axis system corresponding to a field at the nucleus of 215 kOe/unit spin. We find that from 4.2 K to 115 mK the spin-spin interaction is the dominant relaxation mechanism. A series of calculations and theoretical Mössbauer spectra are discussed in order to show the effects of various physical situations and their interpretations.

  16. The Effects of Stress Inoculation, Physical Relaxation and Skills ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the physical relaxation was more effective than the other treatment conditions in reducing psychophysiological symptoms, the stress inoculation was more effective in reducing the participants worry and emotionality reactions to evaluative situations. Keywords: Stress Inoculation; Physical Relaxation; Stress Management.

  17. Effects of Stress and Relaxation on Time Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    1998). Common relaxation methods include progressive muscle relaxation, meditation, imaging, autogenic training (self- hypnosis ), listening to 14 music...2001). Menstrual and circadian rythms in time perception in healthy women and women with premenstrual syndrome. Neuroscience Research, 41(4), 339

  18. Vibrational Energy Relaxation in Water-Acetonitrile Mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cringus, Dan; Yeremenko, Sergey; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Nelson, Keith A.; Okada, Tadashi; Silvestri, Sandro De

    2004-01-01

    IR pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study the effect of hydrogen bonding on the vibrational energy relaxation pathways. Hydrogen bonding accelerates the population relaxation from 12ps in diluted acetonitrile solution to 700fs in bulk water.

  19. Vibrational energy relaxation in water-acetonitrile mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cringus, D; Yeremenko, S; Pshenichnikov, MS; Wiersma, DA; Kobayashi, T; Okada, T; Kobayashi, T; Nelson, KA; DeSilvestri, S

    2005-01-01

    IR pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study the effect of hydrogen bonding on the vibrational energy relaxation pathways. Hydrogen bonding accelerates the population relaxation from 12ps in diluted acetonitrile solution to 700fs in bulk water.

  20. Vibrational energy relaxation in water-acetonitrile mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cringus, Dan; Yeremenko, Sergey; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    2004-01-01

    IR pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study the effect of hydrogen bonding on the vibrational energy relaxation pathways. Hydrogen bonding accelerates the population relaxation from 12ps in diluted acetonitrile solution to 700fs in bulk water.

  1. [Natural polymers according to NMR data: cross-relaxation in hydrated collagen macromolecules from two connective tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, V V; Foucat, L; Renou, J P

    2004-01-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation and cross-relaxation in oriented and randomly oriented collagen fibers from two connective tissues (15-month-old calf and 8-year-old steer) at a water content of 0.6 g H2O/g dry matter were studied. Collagens were chosen according to different numbers of covalent nonreducible cross-links, which increase during the life of the animal. The spin-lattice relaxation curves for all the collagens after a 180 degree-tau-90 degree pulse sequence were described by two exponential components. The dependences of two components of spin lattice relaxation time and their populations on the length of the 180 degree-pulse were obtained. On the basis of data of Goldman-Shen sequence and the two-phase model, the populations of proton fractions (p(w) and p(c)) as well as the rates of transfer of magnetization between water protons and collagen protons (k(w) and k(c)) were calculated. No significant difference between k(w) (k(c)) in oriented and randomly oriented fibers as well as in fibers with different cross-linking was found. The estimates of the cross-relaxation times for low cross-link collagen and high cross-link one were done. The correlation times of dipole-dipole interactions for both connective tissues were calculated using the cross-relaxation theory.

  2. Mixed-Integer Nonconvex Quadratic Optimization Relaxations and Performance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-14

    approaches are considered: one is based on convex semidefinite relaxation ( SDR ), while the other is based on quasi- convex relaxations. For SDR , a new... receive SNR. 2 Statement of the problem studied This project considers a class of nonconvex quadratic optimization problems involving both in- teger and...problem, two relaxation approaches are considered: one is based on convex semidefinite relaxation ( SDR ), while the other is based on quasi-convex

  3. Study of the heat flux generated by accelerated electrons on the components near the plasma; Etude du flux de chaleur dissipe par les electrons rapides sur les composants proches du plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laugier, J. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    2003-07-01

    Experimental data have shown that a heat flux appears on components situated near the wave guide of the lower hybrid antenna of Tore-Supra. This heat flux is due to the energy release during collisions that occur between the component surface and the electrons accelerated by the high frequency field generated by the antenna. Simulations show that the electrons may reach an energy of 2-3 keV and that the heat flux generated in the shield may reach 10 MW/m{sup 2}. In this work a correlation has been established between the local heat flux due to electron impact and the mean electrical field near the antenna: {phi} (W/m{sup 2}) = 4.10{sup -4} x E{sup -6} (10{sup 5} V/m). It is also shown that the ratio of electrons that reach the shield is roughly not dependent on the value of the mean electrical field. In the hypothesis of a Gaussian distribution of electron initial velocities this ratio is 10%. (A.C.)

  4. Active nematic gels as active relaxing solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turzi, Stefano S.

    2017-11-01

    I propose a continuum theory for active nematic gels, defined as fluids or suspensions of orientable rodlike objects endowed with active dynamics, that is based on symmetry arguments and compatibility with thermodynamics. The starting point is our recent theory that models (passive) nematic liquid crystals as relaxing nematic elastomers. The interplay between viscoelastic response and active dynamics of the microscopic constituents is naturally taken into account. By contrast with standard theories, activity is not introduced as an additional term of the stress tensor, but it is added as an external remodeling force that competes with the passive relaxation dynamics and drags the system out of equilibrium. In a simple one-dimensional channel geometry, we show that the interaction between nonuniform nematic order and activity results in either a spontaneous flow of particles or a self-organization into subchannels flowing in opposite directions.

  5. Microplastic relaxations of single and polycrystalline molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichl, W.; Weiss, B. [Wien Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Materialphysik; Chen, D.L.

    1998-05-01

    The microplasticity of high-purity molybdenum single crystals and of Mo polycrystals of technical purity has been investigated by relaxation step tests in uniaxial compression. A new model for the evaluation of relaxation tests in the microplastic range of b.c.c metals is presented which takes into account the decrease of the mobile dislocation density due to exhaustion of non-screw dislocations. The model allows an independent determination of the activation volume and of the microstructure parameters controlling dislocation exhaustion. The results indicate that in the high-purity single crystals the deformation rate is controlled by interactions of non-screw dislocations with the grown-in network. In the polycrystals additional interactions with impurity atoms seem to occur. In the single crystals the activity and subsequent exhaustion of two different glide systems was observed, followed by a gradual onset of screw dislocation motion. (orig.) 26 refs.

  6. Relaxation time estimation in surface NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunewald, Elliot D.; Walsh, David O.

    2017-03-21

    NMR relaxation time estimation methods and corresponding apparatus generate two or more alternating current transmit pulses with arbitrary amplitudes, time delays, and relative phases; apply a surface NMR acquisition scheme in which initial preparatory pulses, the properties of which may be fixed across a set of multiple acquisition sequence, are transmitted at the start of each acquisition sequence and are followed by one or more depth sensitive pulses, the pulse moments of which are varied across the set of multiple acquisition sequences; and apply processing techniques in which recorded NMR response data are used to estimate NMR properties and the relaxation times T.sub.1 and T.sub.2* as a function of position as well as one-dimensional and two-dimension distributions of T.sub.1 versus T.sub.2* as a function of subsurface position.

  7. New limits of secondary β-relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Satya N.; Rams-Baron, Marzena; Wojnarowska, Zaneta; Knapik-Kowalczuk, Justyna; Paluch, Marian

    2017-02-01

    Glass is an ultraviscous liquid that ceases to flow on a laboratory timescale but continues to relax on a geological timescale. Quintessentially, it has become hopeless for humans to explore the equilibrium behavior of glass, although the technology of glass making witness a remarkable advance. In this work, we propose a novel thermodynamic path to prepare a high density amorphous state of matter (carvedilol dihydrogen phosphate) using high pressure. In addition, we provide the impeccable experimental evidence of heterogeneous nature of secondary β-relaxation and probe its properties to understand the various aspects of pressure densified glass, such as dynamics, packing and disorder. These features are expected to provide new horizons to glass preparation and functional response to pharmaceutical applications.

  8. Two-temperature reaction and relaxation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnichenko, E.; Gorbachev, Yu.

    2017-05-01

    Within the method of solving the kinetic equations for gas mixtures with internal degrees of freedom developed by the authors and based on the approximate summational invariants (ASI) concept, gas-dynamic equations for a multi-temperature model for the spatially inhomogeneous case are derived. For the two-temperature case, the expressions for the non-equilibrium reaction and relaxation rates are obtained. Special attention is drawn to corresponding thermodynamic equations. Different possibilities of introducing the gas-dynamic variables related to the internal degrees of freedom are considered. One is based on the choice of quantum numbers as the ASI, while the other is based on the choice of internal (vibrational) energy as the ASI. Limits to a one-temperature situation are considered in all the cases. For the cutoff harmonic oscillator model, explicit expressions for the reaction and relaxation rates are derived.

  9. Spin relaxation 1/f noise in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, S.; Guimarães, M. H. D.; Kaverzin, A.; van Wees, B. J.; Vera-Marun, I. J.

    2017-02-01

    We report the first measurement of 1/f type noise associated with electronic spin transport, using single layer graphene as a prototypical material with a large and tunable Hooge parameter. We identify the presence of two contributions to the measured spin-dependent noise: contact polarization noise from the ferromagnetic electrodes, which can be filtered out using the cross-correlation method, and the noise originated from the spin relaxation processes. The noise magnitude for spin and charge transport differs by three orders of magnitude, implying different scattering mechanisms for the 1/f fluctuations in the charge and spin transport processes. A modulation of the spin-dependent noise magnitude by changing the spin relaxation length and time indicates that the spin-flip processes dominate the spin-dependent noise.

  10. Multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics with flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, G. R., E-mail: graham.dennis@anu.edu.au; Dewar, R. L.; Hole, M. J. [Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); Hudson, S. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    We present an extension of the multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (MRxMHD) equilibrium model that includes plasma flow. This new model is a generalization of Woltjer's model of relaxed magnetohydrodynamics equilibria with flow. We prove that as the number of plasma regions becomes infinite, our extension of MRxMHD reduces to ideal MHD with flow. We also prove that some solutions to MRxMHD with flow are not time-independent in the laboratory frame, and instead have 3D structure which rotates in the toroidal direction with fixed angular velocity. This capability gives MRxMHD potential application to describing rotating 3D MHD structures such as 'snakes' and long-lived modes.

  11. Hole spin relaxation in quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, L. M.; Reinecke, T. L.; Kotlyar, R.

    2004-03-01

    We present results for relaxation of the spin of a hole in a cylindrical quantum dot due to acoustic phonon assisted spin flips at low temperatures with an applied magnetic field. The hole dispersion is calculated by numerical diagonalization of the Luttinger Hamiltonian and applying perturbation theory with respect to the magnetic field, and the hole-phonon coupling is described by the Bir-Pikus Hamiltonian. We find that the decoherence time for hole spins for dots ≲20 nm is on the order of 10-8 s. This is several orders smaller than the decoherence time due to phonon assisted processes for electron spins in similar dots and is comparable to the total decoherence time of an electron spin in a quantum dot, which is controlled by the hyperfine interaction with nuclei. We obtain the dependence of the relaxation rate of the hole spin on dot size and hole mass.

  12. Ultrafast Excited State Relaxation of a Metalloporphyrin Revealed by Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelby, Megan L. [Chemical; Department; Lestrange, Patrick J. [Department; Jackson, Nicholas E. [Department; Haldrup, Kristoffer [Physics; Mara, Michael W. [Chemical; Department; Stickrath, Andrew B. [Chemical; Zhu, Diling [LCLS, SLAC National Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, United States; Lemke, Henrik T. [LCLS, SLAC National Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, United States; Chollet, Matthieu [LCLS, SLAC National Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, United States; Hoffman, Brian M. [Department; Li, Xiaosong [Department; Chen, Lin X. [Chemical; Department

    2016-07-06

    Photoexcited Nickel(II) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP), like many open-shell metalloporphyrins, relaxes rapidly through multiple electronic states following an initial porphyrin-based excitation, some involving metal centered electronic configuration changes that could be harnessed catalytically before excited state relaxation. While a NiTMP excited state present at 100 ps was previously identified by X-ray transient absorption (XTA) spectroscopy at a synchrotron source as a relaxed (d,d) state, the lowest energy excited state (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2007, 129, 9616 and Chem. Sci., 2010, 1, 642), structural dynamics before thermalization were not resolved due to the similar to 100 ps duration of the available X-ray probe pulse. Using the femtosecond (fs) X-ray pulses of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the Ni center electronic configuration from the initial excited state to the relaxed (d,d) state has been obtained via ultrafast Ni K-edge XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) on a time scale from hundreds of femtoseconds to 100 ps. This enabled the identification of a short-lived Ni(I) species aided by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) methods. Computed electronic and nuclear structure for critical excited electronic states in the relaxation pathway characterize the dependence of the complex's geometry on the electron occupation of the 3d orbitals. Calculated XANES transitions for these excited states assign a short-lived transient signal to the spectroscopic signature of the Ni(I) species, resulting from intramolecular charge transfer on a time scale that has eluded previous synchrotron studies. These combined results enable us to examine the excited state structural dynamics of NiTMP prior to thermal relaxation and to capture intermediates of potential photocatalytic significance.

  13. Spectral hole lifetimes and spin population relaxation dynamics in neodymium-doped yttrium orthosilicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruzeiro, E. Zambrini; Tiranov, A.; Usmani, I.; Laplane, C.; Lavoie, J.; Ferrier, A.; Goldner, P.; Gisin, N.; Afzelius, M.

    2017-05-01

    We present a detailed study of the lifetime of optical spectral holes due to population storage in Zeeman sublevels of Nd3 +:Y2SiO5 . The lifetime is measured as a function of magnetic field strength and orientation, temperature, and Nd3 + doping concentration. At the lowest temperature of 3 K we find a general trend where the lifetime is short at low field strengths, then increases to a maximum lifetime at a few hundred mT, and then finally decays rapidly for high field strengths. This behavior can be modeled with a relaxation rate dominated by Nd3 +-Nd3 + cross relaxation at low fields and spin lattice relaxation at high magnetic fields. The maximum lifetime depends strongly on both the field strength and orientation, due to the competition between these processes and their different angular dependencies. The cross relaxation limits the maximum lifetime for concentrations as low as 30 ppm of Nd3 + ions. By decreasing the concentration to less than 1 ppm we could completely eliminate the cross relaxation, reaching a lifetime of 3.8 s at 3 K. At higher temperatures the spectral hole lifetime is limited by the magnetic-field-independent Raman and Orbach processes. In addition we show that the cross relaxation rate can be strongly reduced by creating spectrally large holes of the order of the optical inhomogeneous broadening. Our results are important for the development and design of new rare-earth-ion doped crystals for quantum information processing and narrow-band spectral filtering for biological tissue imaging.

  14. Effect of Progressive Muscle Relaxation on the Fatigue and Quality of Life Among Iranian Aging Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hassanpour-Dehkordi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the elderly population is increasing rapidly in developing countries which may decrease the physical activity and exercise and in turn could affect the elderly’s quality of life, this study aimed to investigate the effect of progressive muscle relaxation on the elderly’s quality of life in Iran. In a randomized clinical trial, participants were randomly divided into intervention and control groups. For the intervention group, muscular progressive relaxation was run three days per week for three months (totally 36 sessions. In relaxation, a patient contract a group of his/her muscles in each step and relaxes them after five seconds and finally loosens all muscles and takes five deep breaths. Each session lasts for 45 minutes. The instrument of data gathering consisted of questionnaires on individual’s demographic data and quality of life SF-36. After intervention, quality of life increased significantly in the patients undergoing muscular progressive relaxation and fatigue severity decreased significantly in the intervention group compared to prior to intervention. In addition, there was a statistically significant difference in mean score of physical performance, restricted activity after physical problem, energy, socially function, physical pain, overall hygiene, and quality of life between intervention and control groups. By implementing regular and continuous progressive muscle relaxation, quality of life could be increased in different dimensions in the elderly and the context could be provided to age healthily and enjoy higher health and autonomy. Therefore, all of the therapeutic staffs are recommended to implement this plan to promote the elderly’s quality of life.

  15. The Efficacy of Relaxation Training in Treating Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesco, Pagnini; Mauro, Manzoni Gian; Gianluca, Castelnuovo; Enrico, Molinari

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a review of scientific literature about relaxation training and its effects on anxiety. Research investigating progressive relaxation, meditation, applied relaxation and autogenic training were considered. All these methods proved to be effective in reducing anxiety in all kind of samples, affected or not by physical or…

  16. Evaluation of a closed-loop muscle relaxation control system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eleveld, DJ; Proost, JH; Wierda, JMKH

    Automatic muscle relaxation control may reduce anesthesiologists' workload freeing them for other patient care requirements. In this report we describe a muscle relaxation controller designed for routine clinical application using rocuronium and the train-of-four count. A muscle relaxation monitor

  17. Progressive Relaxation Training: A Manual for the Helping Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Douglas A.; Borkovec, Thomas D.

    This manual sets forth in detail the therapist behaviors necessary for effective application of this relaxation training technique. The materials presented are designed to provide therapists in many disciplines with the skills they need to train their clients in relaxation. A background to relaxation training is presented, and the basic procedures…

  18. Relaxation Behind Strong Shock Waves in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    GENERALOV, LOSEV , and OSIPOV (1964) showed that the major effects of vibrational energy transfer occur for moderate Mach numbers corresponding to...an upper limit for needing to include vibrational energy exchange. However, Turchak (as do Generalov, Losev , and Osipov) neglects dissociation and...P.C.T., Physics of Fluids, Suppl. I 12_, 1-54, 1969 GENERALOV, N. A., LOSEV , S. A., and OSIPOV, A. I., "Relaxation of the Vibrational Energy of Air

  19. Batch Covariance Relaxation (BCR) Adaptive Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    techniques dictates the need for processing flexibility which may be met most easily by a digital mechanization. The effort conducted addresses the...essential aspects of Batch Covariance Relaxation (BCR) adaptive processing applied to a digital adaptive array processing. In contrast to dynamic... libarary , RADAR:LIB. An extensive explanation as to how to use these programs is given. It is shown how the output of each is used as part of the input for

  20. p-q growth via relaxation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Benedetti

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Local Lipschitz continuity of local minimizers of vectorial integrals ∫Ω f(x,Dudx is proved when f satisfies p-q growth condition and ξ↦f(x,ξ is not convex. The uniform convexity and the radial structure condition with respect to the last variable are assumed only at infinity. In the proof, we use semicontinuity and relaxation results for functionals with nonstandard growth.

  1. Electrode reactions in slowly relaxing media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.; Newton, Marshall D.

    2017-11-01

    Standard models of reaction kinetics in condensed materials rely on the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution for the population of reactants at the top of the free energy barrier separating them from the products. While energy dissipation and quantum effects at the barrier top can potentially affect the transmission coefficient entering the rate pre-exponential factor, much stronger dynamical effects on the reaction barrier are caused by the breakdown of ergodicity for populating the reaction barrier (violation of the Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics). When the spectrum of medium modes coupled to the reaction coordinate includes fluctuations slower than the reaction rate, such nuclear motions dynamically freeze on the reaction time scale and do not contribute to the activation barrier. Here we consider the consequences of this scenario for electrode reactions in slowly relaxing media. Changing the electrode overpotential speeds the electrode electron transfer up, potentially cutting through the spectrum of nuclear modes coupled to the reaction coordinate. The reorganization energy of electrochemical electron transfer becomes a function of the electrode overpotential, switching between the thermodynamic value at low rates to the nonergodic limit at higher rates. The sharpness of this transition depends on the relaxation spectrum of the medium. The reorganization energy experiences a sudden drop with increasing overpotential for a medium with a Debye relaxation but becomes a much shallower function of the overpotential for media with stretched exponential dynamics. The latter scenario characterizes the electron transfer in ionic liquids. The analysis of electrode reactions in room-temperature ionic liquids shows that the magnitude of the free energy of nuclear solvation is significantly below its thermodynamic limit. This result applies to reaction times faster than microseconds and is currently limited by the available dielectric relaxation data.

  2. Fingerprinting Molecular Relaxation in Deformed Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Lam, Christopher N.; Chen, Wei-Ren; Wang, Weiyu; Liu, Jianning; Liu, Yun; Porcar, Lionel; Stanley, Christopher B.; Zhao, Zhichen; Hong, Kunlun; Wang, Yangyang

    2017-07-01

    The flow and deformation of macromolecules is ubiquitous in nature and industry, and an understanding of this phenomenon at both macroscopic and microscopic length scales is of fundamental and practical importance. Here, we present the formulation of a general mathematical framework, which could be used to extract, from scattering experiments, the molecular relaxation of deformed polymers. By combining and modestly extending several key conceptual ingredients in the literature, we show how the anisotropic single-chain structure factor can be decomposed by spherical harmonics and experimentally reconstructed from its cross sections on the scattering planes. The resulting wave-number-dependent expansion coefficients constitute a characteristic fingerprint of the macromolecular deformation, permitting detailed examinations of polymer dynamics at the microscopic level. We apply this approach to survey a long-standing problem in polymer physics regarding the molecular relaxation in entangled polymers after a large step deformation. The classical tube theory of Doi and Edwards predicts a fast chain retraction process immediately after the deformation, followed by a slow orientation relaxation through the reptation mechanism. This chain retraction hypothesis, which is the keystone of the tube theory for macromolecular flow and deformation, is critically examined by analyzing the fine features of the two-dimensional anisotropic spectra from small-angle neutron scattering by entangled polystyrenes. We show that the unique scattering patterns associated with the chain retraction mechanism are not experimentally observed. This result calls for a fundamental revision of the current theoretical picture for nonlinear rheological behavior of entangled polymeric liquids.

  3. Fingerprinting Molecular Relaxation in Deformed Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The flow and deformation of macromolecules is ubiquitous in nature and industry, and an understanding of this phenomenon at both macroscopic and microscopic length scales is of fundamental and practical importance. Here, we present the formulation of a general mathematical framework, which could be used to extract, from scattering experiments, the molecular relaxation of deformed polymers. By combining and modestly extending several key conceptual ingredients in the literature, we show how the anisotropic single-chain structure factor can be decomposed by spherical harmonics and experimentally reconstructed from its cross sections on the scattering planes. The resulting wave-number-dependent expansion coefficients constitute a characteristic fingerprint of the macromolecular deformation, permitting detailed examinations of polymer dynamics at the microscopic level. We apply this approach to survey a long-standing problem in polymer physics regarding the molecular relaxation in entangled polymers after a large step deformation. The classical tube theory of Doi and Edwards predicts a fast chain retraction process immediately after the deformation, followed by a slow orientation relaxation through the reptation mechanism. This chain retraction hypothesis, which is the keystone of the tube theory for macromolecular flow and deformation, is critically examined by analyzing the fine features of the two-dimensional anisotropic spectra from small-angle neutron scattering by entangled polystyrenes. We show that the unique scattering patterns associated with the chain retraction mechanism are not experimentally observed. This result calls for a fundamental revision of the current theoretical picture for nonlinear rheological behavior of entangled polymeric liquids.

  4. Experimental characterization of stress relaxation in glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadali, Hemanth C.

    Glass viscoelasticity has gained importance in recent years as glass lens molding appeared as a valuable alternative to the traditional grinding and polishing process for manufacturing glass lenses. In the precision lens molding process, knowledge of viscoelastic properties of glass in the transition region, which affect the stress relaxation behavior, is required to precisely predict the final size and shape of molded lenses. The purpose of this study is to establish a step-by-step procedure for characterizing the viscoelastic behavior of glass in the glass transition region using a finite term Prony series of a Generalized Maxwell model. This study focuses on viscoelastic characterization of stabilized glass samples at lower stress levels between 3 and 12 MPa where it demonstrates linearity. Analysis and post-processing of creep data, performed in MATLAB and MAPLE, include displacement-to-strain conversion, determination of viscoelastic moments and constants, normalization, curve fitting and retardation-to-relaxation conversion. The process of curve fitting is carried out using a constrained optimization scheme to satisfy the constraint equations involving viscoelastic constants and functions. A set of relaxation parameters needed in numerical modeling, i.e., weights and times of the Prony series are presented in this thesis for borosilicate glass at different temperatures. Additionally, the issues related to the characterization of optical glasses were identified and discussed.

  5. Precession relaxation of viscoelastic oblate rotators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouard, Julien; Efroimsky, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Perturbations of all sorts destabilize the rotation of a small body and leave it in a non-principal spin state. In such a state, the body experiences alternating stresses generated by the inertial forces. This yields nutation relaxation, i.e. evolution of the spin towards the principal rotation about the maximal-inertia axis. Knowledge of the time-scales needed to damp the nutation is crucial in studies of small bodies' dynamics. In the literature hitherto, nutation relaxation has always been described with aid of an empirical quality factor Q introduced to parametrize the energy dissipation rate. Among the drawbacks of this approach was its inability to describe the dependence of the relaxation rate upon the current nutation angle. This inability stemmed from our lack of knowledge of the quality factor's dependence on the forcing frequency. In this article, we derive our description of nutation damping directly from the rheological law obeyed by the material. This renders us the nutation damping rate as a function of the current nutation angle, as well as of the shape and the rheological parameters of the body. In contradistinction from the approach based on an empirical Q factor, our development gives a zero damping rate in the spherical-shape limit. Our method is generic and applicable to any shape and to any linear rheological law. However, to simplify the developments, here we consider a dynamically oblate rotator with a Maxwell rheology.

  6. Probing relaxation times in graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Christian; Neumann, Christoph; Kazarski, Sebastian; Fringes, Stefan; Engels, Stephan; Haupt, Federica; Müller, André; Stampfer, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Graphene quantum dots are attractive candidates for solid-state quantum bits. In fact, the predicted weak spin-orbit and hyperfine interaction promise spin qubits with long coherence times. Graphene quantum dots have been extensively investigated with respect to their excitation spectrum, spin-filling sequence and electron-hole crossover. However, their relaxation dynamics remain largely unexplored. This is mainly due to challenges in device fabrication, in particular concerning the control of carrier confinement and the tunability of the tunnelling barriers, both crucial to experimentally investigate decoherence times. Here we report pulsed-gate transient current spectroscopy and relaxation time measurements of excited states in graphene quantum dots. This is achieved by an advanced device design that allows to individually tune the tunnelling barriers down to the low megahertz regime, while monitoring their asymmetry. Measuring transient currents through electronic excited states, we estimate a lower bound for charge relaxation times on the order of 60–100 ns. PMID:23612294

  7. Ideal relaxation of the Hopf fibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiet, Christopher Berg; Candelaresi, Simon; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2017-07-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamics relaxation is the topology-conserving reconfiguration of a magnetic field into a lower energy state where the net force is zero. This is achieved by modeling the plasma as perfectly conducting viscous fluid. It is an important tool for investigating plasma equilibria and is often used to study the magnetic configurations in fusion devices and astrophysical plasmas. We study the equilibrium reached by a localized magnetic field through the topology conserving relaxation of a magnetic field based on the Hopf fibration in which magnetic field lines are closed circles that are all linked with one another. Magnetic fields with this topology have recently been shown to occur in non-ideal numerical simulations. Our results show that any localized field can only attain equilibrium if there is a finite external pressure, and that for such a field a Taylor state is unattainable. We find an equilibrium plasma configuration that is characterized by a lowered pressure in a toroidal region, with field lines lying on surfaces of constant pressure. Therefore, the field is in a Grad-Shafranov equilibrium. Localized helical magnetic fields are found when plasma is ejected from astrophysical bodies and subsequently relaxes against the background plasma, as well as on earth in plasmoids generated by, e.g., a Marshall gun. This work shows under which conditions an equilibrium can be reached and identifies a toroidal depression as the characteristic feature of such a configuration.

  8. OCT-based approach to local relaxations discrimination from translational relaxation motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Lev A.; Matveyev, Alexandr L.; Gubarkova, Ekaterina V.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Sirotkina, Marina A.; Kiseleva, Elena B.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Vitkin, Alex; Zaitsev, Vladimir Y.

    2016-04-01

    Multimodal optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging tool for tissue state characterization. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an approach to mapping mechanical properties of tissue based on OCT. One of challenging problems in OCE is elimination of the influence of residual local tissue relaxation that complicates obtaining information on elastic properties of the tissue. Alternatively, parameters of local relaxation itself can be used as an additional informative characteristic for distinguishing the tissue in normal and pathological states over the OCT image area. Here we briefly present an OCT-based approach to evaluation of local relaxation processes in the tissue bulk after sudden unloading of its initial pre-compression. For extracting the local relaxation rate we evaluate temporal dependence of local strains that are mapped using our recently developed hybrid phase resolved/displacement-tracking (HPRDT) approach. This approach allows one to subtract the contribution of global displacements of scatterers in OCT scans and separate the temporal evolution of local strains. Using a sample excised from of a coronary arteria, we demonstrate that the observed relaxation of local strains can be reasonably fitted by an exponential law, which opens the possibility to characterize the tissue by a single relaxation time. The estimated local relaxation times are assumed to be related to local biologically-relevant processes inside the tissue, such as diffusion, leaking/draining of the fluids, local folding/unfolding of the fibers, etc. In general, studies of evolution of such features can provide new metrics for biologically-relevant changes in tissue, e.g., in the problems of treatment monitoring.

  9. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in MAS solid-state NMR provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanoseconds-to-milliseconds (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear (13C, 15N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radio-frequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins has been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely (i) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR), and (ii) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e. proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable, and that this cross-correlated relaxation rate constant depends on ns-ms motions, and can thus itself provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin-diffusion attenuates this cross-correlated relaxation, due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and the present manuscript reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation. PMID:27500976

  10. Rapid analysis of the essential oil components of dried Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim by Fe2O3-magnetic-microsphere-assisted microwave distillation and simultaneous headspace single-drop microextraction followed by GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qing

    2013-06-01

    In this work, microwave distillation assisted by Fe2 O3 magnetic microspheres (FMMS) and headspace single-drop microextraction were combined, and developed for determination of essential oil compounds in dried Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim (ZBM). The FMMS were used as microwave absorption solid medium for dry distillation of dried ZBM. Using the proposed method, isolation, extraction, and concentration of essential oil compounds can be carried out in a single step. The experimental parameters including extraction solvent, solvent volume, microwave power, irradiation time, and the amount of added FMMS, were studied. The optimal analytical conditions were: 2.0 μL decane as the extraction solvent, microwave power of 300 W, irradiation time of 2 min, and the addition of 0.1 g FMMS to ZBM. The method precision was from 4 to 10%. A total of 52 compounds were identified by the proposed method. The conventional steam distillation method was also used for the analysis of essential oil in dried ZBM and only 31 compounds were identified by steam distillation method. It was found that the proposed method is a simple, rapid, reliable, and solvent-free technique for the determination of volatile compounds in Chinese herbs. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Psychophysiological Effects of Progressive Relaxation in Anxiety Neurotic Patients and of Progressive Relaxation and Alpha Feedback in Nonpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Paul M.

    1978-01-01

    Compared physiological effects of progressive relaxation, alpha feedback, and a no-treatment condition. Nonpatients showed more psychophysiological habituation than patients in response to hearing very loud tones and to reaction time tasks. Patients showed greater physiological response to relaxation than nonpatients. After relaxation, autonomic…

  12. Electrical conduction and glass relaxation in alkali- silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Paul William

    Electrical response measurements from 1 Hz to 1 MHz between 50o and 540oC were made on potassium, sodium and lithium-silicate glasses with low alkali oxide contents. Conductivity and electrical relaxation responses for both annealed and air quenched glasses of the same composition were compared. Quenching was found to lower the dc conductivity, σdc, and activation energy as well as increase the pre-exponential term when compared to the corresponding annealed glass of the same composition. All of the glasses exhibited Arrhenius behavior in the log σdc against 1/T plots. A sharp decrease in σdc was observed for glasses containing alkali concentrations of 7 mol% or less. The σdc activation energy exhibited similar behavior when plotted as a function of alkali composition and was explained in terms of a mixture of the weak and strong electrolyte models. The depression angle for fits to the complex impedance data were also measured as a function of thermal history, alkali concentration and alkali species. These results were interpreted in terms of changes in the distribution of relaxation times. Annealed samples from a single melt of a 10 mol% K2O-90SiO2 glass were reheated to temperatures ranging from 450o to 800oC, held isothermally for 20 min, and then quenched in either air or silicon oil. The complex impedance of both an annealed and the quenched samples were then measured as a function of temperature from 120o to 250oC. The σdc was found to be remain unaffected by heat treatments below 450oC, to increase rapidly over an approximate 200oC range of temperatures that was dependent on cooling rate and to be constant for heat treatments above this range. This behavior is interpreted in terms of the mean structural relaxation time as a function of temperature and cooling rate near the glass transition temperature and glass transformation ranges. A more detailed definition for the transition and transformation temperatures and ranges was also provided.

  13. Collective dynamic dipole moment and orientation fluctuations, cooperative hydrogen bond relaxations, and their connections to dielectric relaxation in ionic acetamide deep eutectics: Microscopic insight from simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit; Mukherjee, Biswaroop

    2016-08-28

    The paper reports a detailed simulation study on collective reorientational relaxation, cooperative hydrogen bond (H-bond) fluctuations, and their connections to dielectric relaxation (DR) in deep eutectic solvents made of acetamide and three uni-univalent electrolytes, lithium nitrate (LiNO3), lithium bromide (LiBr), and lithium perchlorate (LiClO4). Because cooperative H-bond fluctuations and ion migration complicate the straightforward interpretation of measured DR timescales in terms of molecular dipolar rotations for these conducting media which support extensive intra- and inter-species H-bonding, one needs to separate out the individual components from the overall relaxation for examining the microscopic origin of various timescales. The present study does so and finds that reorientation of ion-complexed acetamide molecules generates relaxation timescales that are in sub-nanosecond to nanosecond range. This explains in molecular terms the nanosecond timescales reported by recent giga-Hertz DR measurements. Interestingly, the simulated survival timescale for the acetamide-Li(+) complex has been found to be a few tens of nanosecond, suggesting such a cation-complexed species may be responsible for a similar timescale reported by mega-Hertz DR measurements of acetamide/potassium thiocyanate deep eutectics near room temperature. The issue of collective versus single particle relaxation is discussed, and jump waiting time distributions are determined. Dependence on anion-identity in each of the cases has been examined. In short, the present study demonstrates that assumption of nano-sized domain formation is not required for explaining the DR detected nanosecond and longer timescales in these media.

  14. Strong enhancement of vibrational relaxation by Watson-Crick base pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, Sander; Cristalli, Gloria

    2004-09-15

    We have studied the ultrafast dynamics of NH-stretch vibrational excitations in Watson-Crick base pairs consisting of adenine and uracil derivatives. To estimate the influence of the A:U hydrogen bonding on the vibrational dynamics, we have also studied the uracil derivative in monomeric form. The vibrational relaxation of the NH-stretching mode is found to occur much faster in the Watson-Crick base pair than in monomeric uracil. From the delay dependence of the transient vibrational spectra, it can be concluded that both in base-paired and monomeric uracil, the energy relaxation takes place in two steps, the first step being a rapid transfer of energy from the NH-stretching mode to an accepting mode, the second step the relaxation of this accepting mode. The transient spectra show evidence that in the base pair the hydrogen bond between the nucleobases acts as the accepting mode, and that the hydrogen bonding between the bases is responsible for the extremely fast vibrational relaxation in this system.

  15. Magneto-dependent stress relaxation of magnetorheological gels

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yangguang

    2017-09-01

    The stress relaxation behaviors of magnetorheological (MR) gels under stepwise shear loading are systematically investigated. The particle-enhanced effect, the magneto-induced effect, and the temperature-enhanced effect on the stress relaxation of MR gels are discussed. For further analysis of the magneto-induced stress relaxation mechanism in MR gels, a phenomenological model is established to describe the stress relaxation behavior of the matrix and the magnetic particle chains. All characteristic parameters introduced in the model, i.e. relaxation time, instantaneous modulus, and stable modulus, have well-defined physical meanings and are fitted based on the experimental results. The influence of each parameter on the macroscopic response is discussed and it is found that the relaxation stress induced by the magneto-mechanical coupling effect plays an important role in the stress relaxation process of MR gels.

  16. Magneto-dependent stress relaxation of magnetorheological gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yangguang; Liu, Taixiang; Liao, Guojiang; Lubineau, Gilles

    2017-11-01

    The stress relaxation behaviors of magnetorheological (MR) gels under stepwise shear loading are systematically investigated. The particle-enhanced effect, the magneto-induced effect, and the temperature-enhanced effect on the stress relaxation of MR gels (MRG) are discussed. For further analysis of the magneto-induced stress relaxation mechanism in MRG, a phenomenological model is established to describe the stress relaxation behavior of the matrix and the magnetic particle chains. All characteristic parameters introduced in the model, i.e. relaxation time, instantaneous modulus, and stable modulus, have well-defined physical meanings and are fitted based on the experimental results. The influence of each parameter on the macroscopic response is discussed and it is found that the relaxation stress induced by the magneto-mechanical coupling effect plays an important role in the stress relaxation process of MRG.

  17. Dielectric and structural relaxation in water and some monohydric alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatze, Udo

    2017-07-01

    Relaxation times of the principal (Debye-type) relaxation terms in the dielectric spectra of water and normal alcohols have been evaluated in order to eliminate the effect of multi-molecular cross-correlations and to thus yield reorientation times of the molecular electric dipole moments. The reorientation times have been compared to relaxation times from ultraviolet and X-ray Brillouin spectra as well as from broadband ultrasonic spectra, which are considered as the structure relaxation times characterizing the density fluctuations of the liquid hydrogen bond networks. With some alcohols, shear impedance spectra indicate the network fluctuations to be tightly associated with shear viscosity relaxation. Within the limits of uncertainty, the molecular dipole moment reorientation times and the structure relaxation times feature close correlations. This finding suggests a coupling between translational and orientational molecular motions, and it is discussed in the light of the wait-and-switch model of dielectric relaxation.

  18. T2 relaxation time mapping of the cartilage cap of osteochondromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Horn, Paul; Laor, Tal [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati (United States); Daedzinski, Bernard J. [Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States); Kim, Dong Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Pharmacology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Our aim was to evaluate the cartilage cap of osteochondromas using T2 maps and to compare these values to those of normal patellar cartilage, from age and gender matched controls. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board and request for informed consent was waived. Eleven children (ages 5-17 years) with osteochondromas underwent MR imaging, which included T2-weighted fat suppressed and T2 relaxation time mapping (echo time = 9-99/repetition time = 1500 msec) sequences. Lesion origins were femur (n = 5), tibia (n = 3), fibula (n = 2), and scapula (n = 1). Signal intensity of the cartilage cap, thickness, mean T2 relaxation times, and T2 spatial variation (mean T2 relaxation times as a function of distance) were evaluated. Findings were compared to those of patellar cartilage from a group of age and gender matched subjects. The cartilage caps showed a fluid-like high T2 signal, with mean thickness of 4.8 mm. The mean value of mean T2 relaxation times of the osteochondromas was 264.0 ± 80.4 msec (range, 151.0-366.0 msec). Mean T2 relaxation times were significantly longer than the values from patellar cartilage (39.0 msec) (p < 0.0001). These findings were observed with T2 spatial variation plots across the entire distance of the cartilage cap, with the most pronounced difference in the middle section of the cartilage. Longer T2 relaxation times of the cartilage caps of osteochondromas should be considered as normal, and likely to reflect an increased water content, different microstructure and component.

  19. Night eating syndrome: effects of brief relaxation training on stress, mood, hunger, and eating patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlow, L A; O'Neil, P M; Malcolm, R J

    2003-08-01

    Night eating syndrome (NES) is characterized by a lack of appetite in the morning, consumption of 50% or more of daily food intake after 6:00 p.m., and difficulty falling and/or staying asleep. It has been associated with stress and with poor results at attempts to lose weight. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a relaxation intervention (Abbreviated Progressive Muscle Relaxation Therapy, APRT) that has been shown to significantly reduce stress levels in normal, healthy adults would also benefit an NES sample. A total of 20 adults with NES were randomly assigned to either a relaxation training (APRT) or a Control (quietly sitting for the same amount of time) group, and all subjects attended two laboratory sessions 1 week apart. Pre- and postsession indices of stress, anxiety, relaxation, and salivary cortisol were obtained, as well as Day 1 and Day 8 indices of mood. Food diaries and hunger ratings were also obtained. The results indicated that 20 min of a muscle relaxation exercise significantly reduced stress, anxiety, and salivary cortisol immediately postsession. After practicing these exercises daily for a week, subjects exhibited lowered stress, anxiety, fatigue, anger, and depression on Day 8. APRT was also associated with significantly higher a.m. and lower p.m. ratings of hunger, and a trend of both more breakfast and less night-time eating. These data support the role of stress and anxiety in NES and suggest that practicing relaxation may be an important component of treatment for this condition.

  20. Rapid mapping of digital integrated circuit logic gates via multi-spectral backside imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Adato, Ronen; Zangeneh, Mahmoud; Zhou, Boyou; Joshi, Ajay; Goldberg, Bennett; Unlu, M Selim

    2016-01-01

    Modern semiconductor integrated circuits are increasingly fabricated at untrusted third party foundries. There now exist myriad security threats of malicious tampering at the hardware level and hence a clear and pressing need for new tools that enable rapid, robust and low-cost validation of circuit layouts. Optical backside imaging offers an attractive platform, but its limited resolution and throughput cannot cope with the nanoscale sizes of modern circuitry and the need to image over a large area. We propose and demonstrate a multi-spectral imaging approach to overcome these obstacles by identifying key circuit elements on the basis of their spectral response. This obviates the need to directly image the nanoscale components that define them, thereby relaxing resolution and spatial sampling requirements by 1 and 2 - 4 orders of magnitude respectively. Our results directly address critical security needs in the integrated circuit supply chain and highlight the potential of spectroscopic techniques to addres...

  1. Gradient-induced longitudinal relaxation of hyperpolarized noble gases in the fringe fields of superconducting magnets used for magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wangzhi; Cleveland, Zackary I; Möller, Harald E; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2011-02-01

    When hyperpolarized noble gases are brought into the bore of a superconducting magnet for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or spectroscopy studies, the gases must pass through substantial field gradients, which can cause rapid longitudinal relaxation. In this communication, we present a means of calculating this spatially dependent relaxation rate in the fringe field of typical magnets. We then compare these predictions to experimental measurements of (3)He relaxation at various positions near a medium-bore 2-T small animal MRI system. The calculated and measured relaxation rates on the central axis of the magnet agree well and show a maximum (3)He relaxation rate of 3.83×10(-3) s(-1) (T(1)=4.4 min) at a distance of 47 cm from the magnet isocenter. We also show that if this magnet were self-shielded, its minimum T(1) would drop to 1.2 min. In contrast, a typical self-shielded 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner will induce a minimum on-axis T(1) of 12 min. Additionally, we show that the cylindrically symmetric fields of these magnets enable gradient-induced relaxation to be calculated using only knowledge of the on-axis longitudinal field, which can either be measured directly or calculated from a simple field model. Thus, while most MRI magnets employ complex and proprietary current configurations, we show that their fringe fields and the resulting gradient-induced relaxation are well approximated by simple solenoid models. Finally, our modeling also demonstrates that relaxation rates can increase by nearly an order of magnitude at radial distances equivalent to the solenoid radius. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Relaxation techniques for pain management in labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caroline A; Levett, Kate M; Collins, Carmel T; Crowther, Caroline A

    2011-12-07

    Many women would like to avoid pharmacological or invasive methods of pain management in labour and this may contribute towards the popularity of complementary methods of pain management. This review examined currently available evidence supporting the use of relaxation therapies for pain management in labour. To examine the effects of relaxation methods for pain management in labour on maternal and perinatal morbidity. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 November 2010), The Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field's Trials Register (November 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1966 to 30 November 2010), CINAHL (1980 to 30 November 2010), the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (30 November 2010), Chinese Clinical Trial Register (30 November 2010), Current Controlled Trials (30 November 2010), ClinicalTrials.gov, (30 November 2010) ISRCTN Register (30 November 2010), National Centre for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) (30 November 2010) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (30 November 2010). Randomised controlled trials comparing relaxation methods with standard care, no treatment, other non-pharmacological forms of pain management in labour or placebo. Three review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and extracted data. Data were checked for accuracy. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality. We attempted to contact study authors for additional information. We included 11 studies (1374 women) in the review. Relaxation was associated with a reduction in pain intensity during the latent phase (mean difference (MD) -1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.97 to -0.53, one trial, 40 women) and active phase of labour (MD -2.48, 95% CI -3.13 to 0.83, two trials, 74 women). There was evidence of improved outcomes from relaxation instruction with increased satisfaction with pain

  3. Proton NMR relaxation in hydrous melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunstein, J.; Bacarella, A.L.; Benjamin, B.M.; Brown, L.L.; Girard, C.

    1976-01-01

    Pulse and continuous wave NMR measurements are reported for protons in hydrous melts of calcium nitrate at temperatures between -4 and 120/sup 0/C. Although measured in different temperature ranges, spin-lattice (T/sub 1/) and spin-spin (T/sub 2/) relaxation times appear to be nearly equal to each other and proportional to the self-diffusion coefficients of solute metal cations such as Cd/sup 2 +/. At temperatures near 50/sup 0/C, mean Arrhenius coefficients ..delta.. H/sub T/sub 1// (kcal/mol) are 7.9, 7.3, and 4.8, respectively, for melts containing 2.8, 4.0, and 8.0 moles of water per mole of calcium nitrate, compared to 4.6 kcal/mol for pure water. Temperature dependence of T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ in Ca(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/-2.8 H/sub 2/O between -4 and 120/sup 0/C are non-Arrhenius and can be represented by a Fulcher-type equation with a ''zero mobility temperature'' (T/sub 0/) of 225/sup 0/K, close to the value of T/sub 0/ for solute diffusion, electrical conductance and viscosity. Resolution of the relaxation rates into correlation times for intramolecular (rotational) and intermolecular (translational) diffusional motion is discussed in terms of the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound and more recent models for dipolar relaxation. (auth)

  4. Bulk Modulus Relaxation in Partially Molten Dunite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, I.; Cline, C. J., II

    2016-12-01

    Synthetic solgel-derived Fo90 olivine was mixed with 3.5 wt % basaltic glass and hot-pressed within Ni/Fe foil to produce a dense aggregate expected to contain a small melt fraction at temperatures ≥ 1100°C. This specimen was precision ground and tested in both torsional and flexural forced oscillation to determine the relaxation behavior of both shear (G) and bulk (K) moduli at seismic frequencies. A recent upgrade of our experimental facility allows such measurements to be made without alteration of the driver/detector geometry, and uses an oscillating bending force rather than a bending moment, as previously described. The torsional and flexural tests were conducted in a gas apparatus at 200 MPa confining pressure, with oscillation periods ranging between 1 and 1000 s, during slow staged-cooling from 1300 to 25°C. Shear modulus and associated dissipation data are consistent with those for melt-bearing olivine specimens previously tested in torsion, with a pronounced dissipation peak superimposed on high-temperature background within the 1-1000 s observational window at temperatures of 1100-1200°C. A filament elongation model relates the observed flexural measurements to the variations along the experimental assembly of the complex Young's modulus (E*), bending moment and diametral moment of inertia. With E* given by 1/E*=1/(3G*) + 1/(9K*), and the complex shear modulus (G*) derived from torsional oscillation, any relaxation of K can be identified. Preliminary modeling shows that the viscoelastic properties in flexure are broadly consistent with those expected from the shear-mode viscoelasticity with anharmonic (real) values of K. However, some discrepancies between modeled results and flexure data at super-solidus temperatures require further investigation of possible differences in shear modulus relaxation between the torsional and flexural modes, and of potential relaxation of the bulk modulus through stress-induced changes in melt redistribution and

  5. Dendrimers as high relaxivity MR contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, Michelle R; Ogawa, Mikako; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2014-01-01

    Dendrimers are versatile macromolecules with tremendous potential as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. Dendrimer-based agents provide distinct advantages over low-molecular-weight gadolinium chelates, including enhanced r1 relaxivity due to slow rotational dynamics, tunable pharmacokinetics that can be adapted for blood pool, liver, kidney, and lymphatic imaging, the ability to be a drug carrier, and flexibility for labeling due to their inherent multivalency. Clinical applications are increasingly being developed, particularly in lymphatic imaging. Herein we present a broad overview of dendrimer-based MRI contrast agents with attention to the unique chemistry and physical properties as well as emerging clinical applications. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Modelling Creep (Relaxation of the Urinary Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdravkovic Nebojsa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We first present the results of an experiment in which the passive properties of the urinary bladder were investigated using strips of rabbit bladder. Under the assumption that the urinary bladder had orthopaedic characteristics, the strips were taken in the longitudinal and in the circumferential directions. The material was subjected to uniaxial tension, and stress-stretch curves were generated for various rates of deformation. We found that the rates did not have a significantly effect on the passive response of the material. Additionally, the stress-stretch dependence during relaxation of the material when exposed to isometric conditions was determined experimentally.

  7. Reflexogenic relaxation gastroduodenography by the acupuncture method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabkin, I.Kh.; Tsibulyak, V.N.; Mnatsakyan, K.A.; Kondorskaya, I.L.; Galkina, T.V.

    The communication is based upon the results of x-ray examination of the stomach and duodenum in 63 patients with stenoses of the pyloroduodenal zone, cicatrical deformities of the duodenal bulb, bulbar ulcer, duodenal organic lesions, and functional stenosis of the loop. First a routine X-ray examination of the stomach and duodenum was performed using barium-water mixture, then followed acupuncture aimed at hypotension in the definite points of the floor of the auricle where branches of the vagus innervating the stomach and duodenum are located. As distinct from pharmacological relaxation this method produces a purpose-oriented selective effect.

  8. STRUCTURAL STRESS RELAXATION IN STAINLESS INSTABILITY STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lyabuk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The approach to the description of conditions of martensitic transformation in austenitic steel is advanced. Transformation induced hardening is the result of Le Chatelier principle in instability alloys. The phase transformation in austenitic instability stainless steel is the cause of reduction of grain refining and increase of strength. It was experimentally shown that physical-mechanical characteristics of the prepared materials were defined by the structure and inhomogeneous distribution of the hardening phase within a grain. The reasons for high thermal stability of inverse austenitic were established. The factors determining the inverse austenitic relaxation resistibility and resources for its increasing were revealed.

  9. How Rapid is Rapid Prototyping? Analysis of ESPADON Programme Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian D. Alston

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available New methodologies, engineering processes, and support environments are beginning to emerge for embedded signal processing systems. The main objectives are to enable defence industry to field state-of-the-art products in less time and with lower costs, including retrofits and upgrades, based predominately on commercial off the shelf (COTS components and the model-year concept. One of the cornerstones of the new methodologies is the concept of rapid prototyping. This is the ability to rapidly and seamlessly move from functional design to the architectural design to the implementation, through automatic code generation tools, onto real-time COTS test beds. In this paper, we try to quantify the term “rapid” and provide results, the metrics, from two independent benchmarks, a radar and sonar beamforming application subset. The metrics show that the rapid prototyping process may be sixteen times faster than a conventional process.

  10. Audio-Visual and Autogenic Relaxation Alter Amplitude of Alpha EEG Band, Causing Improvements in Mental Work Performance in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikicin, Mirosław; Kowalczyk, Marek

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of regular audio-visual relaxation combined with Schultz's autogenic training on: (1) the results of behavioral tests that evaluate work performance during burdensome cognitive tasks (Kraepelin test), (2) changes in classical EEG alpha frequency band, neocortex (frontal, temporal, occipital, parietal), hemisphere (left, right) versus condition (only relaxation 7-12 Hz). Both experimental (EG) and age-and skill-matched control group (CG) consisted of eighteen athletes (ten males and eight females). After 7-month training EG demonstrated changes in the amplitude of mean electrical activity of the EEG alpha bend at rest and an improvement was significantly changing and an improvement in almost all components of Kraepelin test. The same examined variables in CG were unchanged following the period without the intervention. Summing up, combining audio-visual relaxation with autogenic training significantly improves athlete's ability to perform a prolonged mental effort. These changes are accompanied by greater amplitude of waves in alpha band in the state of relax. The results suggest usefulness of relaxation techniques during performance of mentally difficult sports tasks (sports based on speed and stamina, sports games, combat sports) and during relax of athletes.

  11. Factors influencing lower esophageal sphincter relaxation after deglutition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbling, Lita; Gezelius, Per; Franzén, Thomas

    2011-06-21

    To study the relationship between upper esophageal sphincter (UES) relaxation, peristaltic pressure and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation following deglutition in non-dysphagic subjects. Ten non-dysphagic adult subjects had a high-resolution manometry probe passed transnasally and positioned to cover the UES, the esophageal body and the LES. Ten water swallows in each subject were analyzed for time lag between UES relaxation and LES relaxation, LES pressure at time of UES relaxation, duration of LES relaxation, the distance between the transition level (TL) and the LES, time in seconds that the peristaltic wave was before (negative value) or after the TL when the LES became relaxed, and the maximal peristaltic pressure in the body of the esophagus. Relaxation of the LES occurred on average 3.5 s after the bolus had passed the UES and in most cases when the peristaltic wave front had reached the TL. The LES remained relaxed until the peristaltic wave faded away above the LES. LES relaxation seemed to be caused by the peristaltic wave pushing the bolus from behind against the LES gate.

  12. Relaxation guided imagery reduces motor fluctuations in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Ilana; Benyakov, Orna; Erikh, Ilana; Nassar, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Motor fluctuations in Parkinson's disease (PD) cause major disabling symptoms. We aimed to assess the efficacy of relaxation guided imagery in PD patients with motor fluctuation. In a prospective pilot, case cohort, PD patients underwent (i) a relaxation session with relaxation guided imagery, and (ii) a control session of relaxing music. Three-day diaries were completed at baseline and after each intervention. Subsequently, patients received discs for home listening-a relaxation guided imagery disc and a relaxing music disc. After three months the patients were interviewed by phone. Twenty one PD patients participated and 19 completed this study. There was a significant increase in the percent of "on" time after listening to the relaxation guided imagery disc as compared with baseline (from 47.7% to 62.8%, 95% CI 5.26-25.03, p = 0.005). Relaxing music caused no significant change in percent of "on" time from baseline (from 47.7% to 53.0%, p = 0.161). Although all sessions were performed in "on" state, there was a significant decrease in UPDRS motor subscores after each of the two sessions as compared with the UPDRS score before the session (relaxation guided imagery mean reduction -3.81 p = 0.0002 and after relaxing music mean reduction -1.95, p = 0.001), significantly more so after the relaxation guided imagery (p = 0.020). After 3 months listening to the relaxation guided imagery disc increased "on" time from baseline by 12.6% (95% CI 3.19-28.39, p = 0.111) but this did not reach statistical significance. In this pilot study we showed that relaxation guided imagery is a promising treatment for PD.

  13. Numerical analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation-diffusion responses of sedimentary rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arns, Christoph H; AlGhamdi, Tariq; Arns, Ji-Youn, E-mail: c.arns@unsw.edu.au [School of Petroleum Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2011-01-15

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation-diffusion response of porous reservoir rock is frequently used, e.g. in oil field applications, to extract characteristic length scales of pore space or information about saturating fluids. External gradients are typically applied to encode for diffusion. In reservoir rocks, field inhomogeneities due to internal gradients can even at low fields be strong enough to interfere with this encoding. Furthermore, the encoding for diffusion coefficients of fluids takes a finite amount of time, during which diffusing fluid molecules can experience restricted diffusion. Both effects can combine to make the interpretation of the diffusion dimension of a relaxation-diffusion measurement difficult. We use x-ray-CT images of porous rock samples to define the solid and fluid phases of reservoir rock and simulate the full experimental pulse sequence, taking into account the static applied field, external gradients and internal gradients as a function of susceptibility of each component, and surface and bulk relaxation properties of fluids and fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces. We carry out simulations of NMR relaxation-diffusion measurements, while explicitly tracking the time-dependent diffusion coefficient in each fluid as well as associated local gradients. This allows us to quantify the influence of restricted diffusion and internal gradients for common choices of experimental parameters.

  14. Static tensioning promotes hamstring tendons force relaxation more reliably than cycling tensioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedade, Sérgio Rocha; Dal Fabbro, Inácio Maria; Mischan, Martha Maria; Piedade, Cezar; Maffulli, Nicola

    2017-08-01

    Graft elongation might be a major reason for increased anterior laxity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. This study analyzed the force relaxation values and their stabilization when single strands of the gracilis and semitendinosus tendons underwent cyclic and static tensioning at 2.5% strain level, and compared the efficiency of static and cyclic tensioning in promoting force relaxation. Eighteen gracilis tendons and 18 semitendinosus tendons from nine male cadavers (mean age: 22.44years) were subjected to 10 in vitro cyclic loads at 2.5% strain level, or to a static load at 2.5% strain level. During cyclic loading, the reduction in force values tended to stabilize after the sixth cyclic load, while, in the case of static loading, this stabilization occurred by the second minute. Comparing static and cyclic loading, the gracilis tendon had similar mechanical responses in both conditions, while the semitendinosus tendon showed greater force relaxation in static compared with cyclic loading. Considering that the semitendinosus tendon is the main component of the hamstring graft, its biomechanical response to loading should guide the tensioning protocol. Therefore, static tensioning seems more effective for promoting force relaxation of the semitendinosus tendon than cyclic tensioning. The gracilis tendon showed a similar mechanical response to either tensioning protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Transverse relaxation of scalar-coupled protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Takuya F; Baishya, Bikash; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-10-25

    In a preliminary communication (B. Baishya, T. F. Segawa, G. Bodenhausen, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 17538-17539), we recently demonstrated that it is possible to obtain clean echo decays of protons in biomolecules despite the presence of homonuclear scalar couplings. These unmodulated decays allow one to determine apparent transverse relaxation rates R(2) (app) of individual protons. Herein, we report the observation of R(2) (app) for three methyl protons, four amide H(N) protons, and all 11 backbone H(α) protons in cyclosporin A. If the proton resonances overlap, their R(2) (app) rates can be measured by transferring their magnetization to neighboring (13)C nuclei, which are less prone to overlap. The R(2) (app) rates of protons attached to (13)C are faster than those attached to (12)C because of (13)C-(1)H dipolar interactions. The differences of these rates allow the determination of local correlation functions. Backbone H(N) and H(α) protons that have fast decay rates R(2) (app) also feature fast longitudinal relaxation rates R(1) and intense NOESY cross peaks that are typical of crowded environments. Variations of R(2) (app) rates of backbone H(α) protons in similar amino acids reflect differences in local environments.

  16. Gorsky relaxation in the presence of traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, V.; Dattagupta, S.

    1981-03-01

    It has been shown recently that a linear response theoretic formalism leads to a straightforward derivation of the theory of the Gorsky effect at low interstitial concentrations, for arbitrary specimen geometry and applied stress inhomogeneity. We now extend this formalism to the practically important situation in which traps (e.g., N interstitials) inhibit the diffusion of the H interstitials, in order to motivate the experimental application of the Gorsky relaxation technique to the determination of the trap parameters. An explicit calculation is done for a typical specimen geometry, using Schroeder's phenomenological model for diffusion in the presence of traps. Exact expressions are obtained for the anelastic creep function, the relaxation strength and the internal friction. The structure and physical implications of these expressions are discussed using numerical values for the parameters deduced by other methods (in particular, neutron scattering). Noteworthy features of the predicted dynamic response include shifts in the position and height of the Gorsky peak owing to the occurrence of an effective diffusion constant and the difference in the values of the trace of the elastic dipole tensor in the free and trapped states; and an additional Snoek-like contribution due to local free ↔ trapped transitions of the diffusing particles.

  17. Relaxation oscillations in real laser cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepanski, Pawel; Malinowski, Michal; Wolski, Radoslaw

    1990-07-01

    An approximate analysis of the relaxation oscillations in Fabry Perot laser cavities is presented. A linear smallsignal perturbation solution of the coupled laser rate equations is generalized by including transverse1 as well longitudinal field dependence2. By the threshold field approximation3 we obtain an expression relating the frequency 0 and damping rate X of the relaxation oscillations to the laser parameters such as steadystate output power P0/Pq normaliezed to the saturation power P distributed losses a L'' poin losses at the mirrors a1 and a arbitrary relectivities o the mirrors r1 and r2 spontaneous liftime ''r of the active medium and geometry o the resonator. 2. THEORY The couppled laser rate equations for single mode can be written in the following form dN I(r) N N dQ I(r) N Q --- ---- (1) dt I ''r #r dt I -r 5 S Q where N denotes the inversion density I (r) describes the total intensity of the nmth laser mode in the cavity I is the saturation in tensity p is the exatation rate Q denotes the number of the photons in the nmth laser mode and ''r is the cavity lifetime. An approximate expressions for the spatial dependence of the electric fields for the forward and backward amplitudes of the nmth laser mode in our approach can be written as R AUR(t) f(x e''TZ S A(r) f(x

  18. Relaxation of the composite Higgs little hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batell, Brian; Fedderke, Michael A.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2017-12-01

    We describe a composite Higgs scenario in which a cosmological relaxation mechanism naturally gives rise to a hierarchy between the weak scale and the scale of spontaneous global symmetry breaking. This is achieved through the scanning of sources of explicit global symmetry breaking by a relaxion field during an exponentially long period of inflation in the early universe. We explore this mechanism in detail in a specific composite Higgs scenario with QCD-like dynamics, based on an ultraviolet SU( N )TC `technicolor' confining gauge theory with three Dirac technifermion flavors. We find that we can successfully generate a hierarchy of scales ξ≡〈 h〉2/ F π 2 ≳ 1.2 × 10- 4 (i.e., compositeness scales F π ˜ 20 TeV) without tuning. This evades all current electroweak precision bounds on our (custodial violating) model. While directly observing the heavy composite states in this model will be challenging, a future electroweak precision measurement program can probe most of the natural parameter space for the model. We also highlight signatures of more general composite Higgs models in the cosmological relaxation framework, including some implications for flavor and dark matter.

  19. Lucia Jig - temporomandibular dysfunction promotes muscle relaxation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Piccolo Pereira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Assess whether the Lucia Jig is a device that promotes masticatory muscle relaxation in individuals with temporomandibular dysfunction. This study was carried out in three stages (interviews, clinical examination, and laboratory and participation of adult individuals, between 21 and 40 years of age, of both genders, who replied to the RDC/TMD questionnaire to diagnose muscular temporomandibular dysfunction. The Lucia Jig was prepared and electromyographic examination of the masseter and temporal muscles was performed bilaterally, in the postural condition of the mandibular at rest, after immediately installing the Lucia Jig in the oral cavity and at periods of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 min. The values obtained were compared using repeated measures (p < 0.05 over the entire duration of the experiment (0 to 30 min with the Lucia Jig. There was an increase in the normalized electromyographic signal of the masticatory muscles, with the use of the Lucia Jig over the period of 30 min, with no statistically significant difference. Based on the results of this study through electromyographic data, the device did not promote masticatory muscle relaxation in individuals with muscular temporomandibular dysfunction.

  20. Auger-Limited Carrier Recombination and Relaxation in CdSe Colloidal Quantum Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baghani, Erfan; O’Leary, Stephen K.; Fedin, Igor; Talapin, Dmitri V.; Pelton, Matthew

    2015-03-19

    Using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, we show that two-exciton Auger recombination dominates carrier recombination and cooling dynamics in CdSe nanoplatelets, or colloidal quantum wells. The electron-hole recombination rate depends only on the number of electron-hole pairs present in each nanoplatelet, and is consistent with a twoexciton recombination process over a wide range of exciton densities. The carrier relaxation rate within the conduction and valence bands also depends only on the number of electron-hole pairs present, apart from an initial rapid decay, and is consistent with the cooling rate being limited by reheating due to Auger recombination processes. These Auger-limited recombination and relaxation dynamics are qualitatively different from the carrier dynamics in either colloidal quantum dots or epitaxial quantum wells. TOC FIGURE:

  1. Strain-enhanced stress relaxation impacts nonlinear elasticity in collagen gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sungmin; Hu, Kenneth H; Butte, Manish J; Chaudhuri, Ovijit

    2016-05-17

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex assembly of structural proteins that provides physical support and biochemical signaling to cells in tissues. The mechanical properties of the ECM have been found to play a key role in regulating cell behaviors such as differentiation and malignancy. Gels formed from ECM protein biopolymers such as collagen or fibrin are commonly used for 3D cell culture models of tissue. One of the most striking features of these gels is that they exhibit nonlinear elasticity, undergoing strain stiffening. However, these gels are also viscoelastic and exhibit stress relaxation, with the resistance of the gel to a deformation relaxing over time. Recent studies have suggested that cells sense and respond to both nonlinear elasticity and viscoelasticity of ECM, yet little is known about the connection between nonlinear elasticity and viscoelasticity. Here, we report that, as strain is increased, not only do biopolymer gels stiffen but they also exhibit faster stress relaxation, reducing the timescale over which elastic energy is dissipated. This effect is not universal to all biological gels and is mediated through weak cross-links. Mechanistically, computational modeling and atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicate that strain-enhanced stress relaxation of collagen gels arises from force-dependent unbinding of weak bonds between collagen fibers. The broader effect of strain-enhanced stress relaxation is to rapidly diminish strain stiffening over time. These results reveal the interplay between nonlinear elasticity and viscoelasticity in collagen gels, and highlight the complexity of the ECM mechanics that are likely sensed through cellular mechanotransduction.

  2. Temperature Dependence of Spin Relaxation Time in InAs Columnar Quantum Dots at 10 to 150 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Sota; Sasayama, Kazutoshi; Oyanagi, Yoshitsugu; Yamaguchi, Ryo; Lu, Shulong; Li, Lianhe; Fiore, Andrea; Tackeuchi, Atsushi

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated carrier spin relaxation in InAs columnar quantum dots (CQDs) using time-resolved photoluminescence measurement. The CQDs were formed by depositing a 1.8 monolayer InAs seed dot layer and a short-period GaAs/InAs superlattice (SL). The spin relaxations of the 3- and 35-period SL CQDs show double exponential decay up to 50 and 130 K, respectively. The spin relaxation times of the fast component, whose amplitudes are 4-11 times larger than that of the slow component, are around 100 ps for the two samples. For the 3-period SL CQDs, the fast spin relaxation time shows no temperature dependence up to around 50 K, indicating the relevance of the Bir-Aronov-Pikus process. The slow spin relaxation time of the 35-period SL CQDs was found to decrease from 3.42 ns at 10 K to 0.849 ns at 130 K. This large change may be explained by the Elliott-Yafet process considering acoustic phonon scattering.

  3. Parameterization of NMR relaxation curves in terms of logarithmic moments of the relaxation time distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Oleg V.; Stapf, Siegfried

    2017-06-01

    This work addresses the problem of a compact and easily comparable representation of multi-exponential relaxation data. It is often convenient to describe such data in a few parameters, all being of physical significance and easy to interpret, and in such a way that enables a model-free comparison between different groups of samples. Logarithmic moments (LMs) of the relaxation time constitute a set of parameters which are related to the characteristic relaxation time on the log-scale, the width and the asymmetry of an underlying distribution of exponentials. On the other hand, the calculation of LMs does not require knowing the actual distribution function and is reduced to a numerical integration of original data. The performance of this method has been tested on both synthetic and experimental NMR relaxation data which differ in a signal-to-noise ratio, the sampling range and the sampling rate. The calculation of two lower-order LMs, the log-mean time and the log-variance, has proved robust against deficiencies of the experiment such as scattered data point and incomplete sampling. One may consider using them as such to monitor formation of a heterogeneous structure, e.g., in phase separation, vitrification, polymerization, hydration, aging, contrast agent propagation processes. It may also assist in interpreting frequency and temperature dependences of relaxation, revealing a crossover from slow to fast exchange between populations. The third LM was found to be a less reliable quantity due to its susceptibility to the noise and must be used with caution.

  4. Immersed boundary lattice Boltzmann model based on multiple relaxation times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianhua; Han, Haifeng; Shi, Baochang; Guo, Zhaoli

    2012-01-01

    As an alterative version of the lattice Boltzmann models, the multiple relaxation time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann model introduces much less numerical boundary slip than the single relaxation time (SRT) lattice Boltzmann model if some special relationship between the relaxation time parameters is chosen. On the other hand, most current versions of the immersed boundary lattice Boltzmann method, which was first introduced by Feng and improved by many other authors, suffer from numerical boundary slip as has been investigated by Le and Zhang. To reduce such a numerical boundary slip, an immerse boundary lattice Boltzmann model based on multiple relaxation times is proposed in this paper. A special formula is given between two relaxation time parameters in the model. A rigorous analysis and the numerical experiments carried out show that the numerical boundary slip reduces dramatically by using the present model compared to the single-relaxation-time-based model.

  5. Nuclear spin relaxation in liquids theory, experiments, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalewski, Jozef

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used across many fields because of the rich data it produces, and some of the most valuable data come from the study of nuclear spin relaxation in solution. While described to varying degrees in all major NMR books, spin relaxation is often perceived as a difficult, if not obscure, topic, and an accessible, cohesive treatment has been nearly impossible to find.Collecting relaxation theory, experimental techniques, and illustrative applications into a single volume, this book clarifies the nature of the phenomenon, shows how to study it, and explains why such studies are worthwhile. Coverage ranges from basic to rigorous theory and from simple to sophisticated experimental methods, and the level of detail is somewhat greater than most other NMR texts. Topics include cross-relaxation, multispin phenomena, relaxation studies of molecular dynamics and structure, and special topics such as relaxation in systems with quadrupolar nuclei and paramagnetic systems.Avoiding ove...

  6. Measuring Propellant Stress Relaxation Modulus Using Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-29

    Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 04 August 2016 – 29 March 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Measuring Propellant Stress Relaxation Modulus Using Dynamic...ERC 14. ABSTRACT A method for determining the stress relaxation master curve of solid rocket propellants was developed. The propellant was tested in... stress relaxation modulus, Mpa; E∞ = long-term equilibrium modulus, Mpa; E0 = storage modulus, Mpa; E0 0 = loss modulus, Mpa; F = Fisher test

  7. Anomalous rotational relaxation: a fractional Fokker-Planck equation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydiner, Ekrem

    2005-04-01

    In this study we have analytically obtained the relaxation function in terms of rotational correlation functions based on Brownian motion for complex disordered systems in a stochastic framework. We found out that the rotational relaxation function has a fractional form for complex disordered systems, which indicates that relaxation has nonexponential character and obeys the Kohlrausch-William-Watts law, following the Mittag-Leffler decay.

  8. Secondary magnetic relaxations in Mn{sub 12} complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelisti, Marco; Bartolome, Juan E-mail: barto@posta.unizar.es

    2000-11-01

    We present new experiments on the zero-field magnetic relaxation in Mn{sub 12} acetate and Mn{sub 12} 2-Cl benzoate. By dynamical magnetic measurements, this study shows that a small portion of few percent of the clusters does not undergo the main relaxation process and that they relax faster in the temperature region of 2 K. The effective relaxation times of these secondary processes follow an Arrhenius law with energy barrier of approximately 23 and 30 K for the acetate and the 2-Cl benzoate, respectively.

  9. Structural Relaxations in the Rotator Phase of N-Eicosane

    OpenAIRE

    Di Giambattista, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    We present relaxations of the heat capacity of the n-alkane n-eicosane (C20H42) in the metastable rotator phase. These relaxations are not connected to melting but rather to structural changes. A comparative study of the relaxation times with calorimetry in the time and frequency domain shows a slowing down of the dynamics on approaching the melting temperature of the rotator phase. Relaxation behaviour is also observed in the lattice structure by investigations with X-ray diffraction. It is ...

  10. Determination of surface relaxivity from NMR diffusion measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slijkerman, W F; Hofman, J P

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) T2-decay measurements are usually interpreted in terms of pore-size distributions. The T2 relaxation time of a water-wet pore is proportional to the size of the pore via surface relaxivity. Quantitative knowledge of the surface relaxivity is important when T2 spectra are to be used for further use such as NMR derived capillary curves. In this study, we demonstrate that surface relaxivity can be directly determined from NMR measurements. Diffusion of hydrogen spins is restricted by the pore size and this effect is independent of surface relaxivity. Hence, surface relaxivity can be determined by combining restricted diffusion and T2-relaxation. The latter two effects are measured simultaneously in a NMR T2 decay measurement performed in a static magnetic field gradient. This method generalises existing ones for uniform pore systems to full pore-size distributions of realistic rocks. We have performed laboratory NMR diffusion measurements on a number of sandstone core plugs. The surface relaxivities found from these data are compared to those obtained from other methods. This method of measuring surface relaxivity can in principle be applied to NMR data obtained in boreholes which leads to a new application of NMR logging in the characterisation of oil and gas reservoirs.

  11. Graduate Students' Effectiveness at Training Others in Progressive Relaxation Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Graduate students in psychology were effective at reducing undergraduate student anxiety through progressive relaxation training (PRT). Trainer sex did not differentially influence PRT effectiveness. (RM)

  12. Plasma Relaxation and Topological Aspects in Electronmagnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shivamoggi, B K

    2016-01-01

    Parker's formulation of isotopological plasma relaxation process toward minimum magnetics energy states in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is extended to electron MHD (EMHD). The lower bound on magnetic energy in EMHD is determined by both the magnetic field and the electron vorticity field topologies, and is shown to be reduced further in EMHD by an amount proportional to the sum of total electron-flow kinetic energy and total electron-flow enstrophy. The EMHD Beltrami condition becomes equivalent to the potential vorticity conservation equation in two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamics, and the torsion coefficient and turns out to be proportional to potential vorticity. The winding pattern of the magnetic field lines appears to evolve therefore in the same way as "potential vorticity" lines in 2D hydrodynamics.

  13. Multiscale dipole relaxation in dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    Dipole relaxation from thermally induced perturbations is investigated on different length scales for dielectric materials. From the continuum dynamical equations for the polarisation, expressions for the transverse and longitudinal dipole autocorrelation functions are derived in the limit where...... the cross coupling between the electric field fluctuations and dipole moment fluctuations can be ignored. The peak frequencies in the spectra of the autocorrelation functions are also derived. They depend on the wave vector squared which is a fingerprint of the underlying dipole diffusion mechanism....... The theoretical predictions are compared with molecular dynamics simulation results for a model dielectric material and liquid water. For the transverse dipole autocorrelation function the agreement is excellent in the limit of small wave vectors and the presence of a diffusion mechanism is confirmed...

  14. Spirooxazine Photoisomerization and Relaxation in Polymer Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Larkowska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available 9′-Hydroxy-1,3,3-trimethylspiro[indoline-2,3′[3H]naphtha[2,1-b]-1,4oxazine] (SPO-7OH was used in studies of photochromic transformations in polymer matrices. Illumination with UV lamp caused opening the spirostructure of the oxazine with formation of open merocyanine species absorbing at ca. 610 nm. The kinetic studies of thermal relaxation of the open form showed that this process can be described with a biexponential function including both photochemical reaction and rheological behaviour of the polymeric environment. Basing on Arrhenius plot of the rate constant ascribed to the photochemical reaction, the activation energy was determined, which was 66.1 and 84.7 kJ/mole for poly(methyl methacrylate-co-butyl methacrylate and poly(vinylpyrrolidone matrix, respectively.

  15. Providing emotional stability through relaxation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janbozorgi, M; Zahirodin, A; Norri, N; Ghafarsamar, R; Shams, J

    2009-01-01

    To determine the effects of integrative relaxation training (IRT) on emotional stability, we exposed 32 patients diagnosed with anxiety disorder to a pre-test (16PF) and to 12 sessions of group psychoeducation training. Patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups (study 17 and control 15 patients). The study group received 12 weekly group sessions of IRT. Level of anxiety was evaluated in a post-test using a questionnaire and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Emotional stability and level of anxiety were significantly reduced in the study group: there was a marked increase in scores for emotionally s and venturesome and a decrease in scores for apprehensive and tense. The STAI score was statistically significantly lower in the study group.

  16. Antagonistic modulatory roles of magnesium and calcium on release of endothelium-derived relaxing factor and smooth muscle tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, M E; Buga, G M; Wood, K S; Byrns, R E; Chaudhuri, G; Ignarro, L J

    1990-02-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms associated with the reciprocal relation between magnesium and calcium on vascular smooth muscle tone in bovine pulmonary artery and vein. Rapid removal of magnesium from Krebs-bicarbonate medium used to bathe isolated rings of precontracted artery or vein caused transient endothelium- and calcium-dependent relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation. Both responses were antagonized by oxyhemoglobin, methylene blue, or superoxide anion and were enhanced by superoxide dismutase. The transient relaxation was followed by sustained endothelium-independent contraction. Endothelium-denuded vascular rings contracted in response to extracellular magnesium depletion without alteration in cyclic GMP levels. The data suggest that vascular endothelium-derived nitric oxide is responsible for the calcium-dependent relaxation elicited by extracellular magnesium depletion. Indeed, in bioassay cascade studies, magnesium removal from the medium used to perfuse intact artery or vein enhanced the formation and/or release of an endothelium-derived relaxing factor by calcium-dependent mechanisms. In the absence of both extracellular magnesium and calcium, calcium readdition caused transient endothelium-dependent relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation, and both responses were abolished by oxyhemoglobin or methylene blue. In the presence of magnesium, however, readdition of calcium to calcium-depleted medium caused only contractile responses. Addition of magnesium to calcium-containing medium consistently caused endothelium- and cyclic GMP-independent relaxation that was not altered by oxyhemoglobin or methylene blue. Thus, magnesium and calcium elicit reciprocal or mutually antagonistic effects at the levels of both endothelium-derived relaxing factor formation and/or release and smooth muscle contraction. This relation may be of physiological importance, and the possibility that a reduction in circulating magnesium levels could lead

  17. Density of states, specific heat and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate in PrOs4Sb12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Alrub, Tayseer; Curnoe, Stephanie

    2007-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of the density of states, specific heat and nuclear spin-relaxation rate in the unconventional superconductor PrOs4Sb12. In this material, superconductivity is best described by a three component order parameter in the triplet channel. Instead of nodes, deep dips appear in the gap function producing power law temperature dependencies at higher temperatures and exponential suppression at low temperatures of the specific heat and the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rate. Various experimental observations will be discussed in this context.

  18. Effect of pressure relaxation during the laser heating and electron-ion relaxation stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimier, B.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.; Hallo, L. [Univ Bordeaux 1, CEA, CNRS, CELIA, UMR 5107, 33 - Talence (France)

    2008-09-15

    The multi-phase equation of state by Bushman et al. (Sov. Tech. Rev. 5:1-44, 2008) is modified to describe states with different electron and ion temperatures and it is applied to the non-equilibrium evolution of an aluminum sample heated by a subpicosecond laser pulse. The sample evolution is described by the two-temperature model for the electron and ion temperatures, while the pressure and density are described by a simplified relaxation equation. The pressure relaxation in the heating stage reduces the binding energy and facilitates the electron-driven ablation. The model is applied to estimate the ablation depth of an Al target irradiated by a subpicosecond laser pulse. It improves the agreement with the experimental data and provides a new explanation of the ablation process. (authors)

  19. Relaxation Effects in MOS Devices due to Tunnel Exchange with Near-Interface Oxide Traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewksbury, Theodore L., III

    Transistors and capacitors in many types of analog MOS circuits such as charge-redistribution A/D converters, switched-capacitor filters and sample-and-holds, are routinely subjected to momentary large-signal stress conditions during the course of their normal operation. During these transients, charge can be captured by oxide traps close to the Si-SiO _2 interface by tunneling. When the stress is removed, the emission of this trapped charge persists for periods which greatly exceed the capture time, leading to dielectric relaxation in capacitors and transient threshold voltage shifts in MOSFETs. While the amount of trapped charge is too small to be of interest in most digital circuits where the resulting threshold voltage shifts fall comfortably within noise margins, in analog circuits it can lead to hysteresis effects, charge redistribution errors and long-tail components in the settling time of comparators and operational amplifiers with MOS input stages. As analog integrated circuits are pushed towards higher levels of speed and accuracy, these trapping-induced relaxation effects will impose increasingly important performance limitations. Previous experimental studies of charge trapping by near-interface oxide traps have neglected the voltage and time ranges relevant to analog circuits, while existing theories do not provide a complete description of the various mechanisms by which traps can be charged and discharged. This thesis undertakes a detailed characterization of trapping -induced relaxation effects in MOSFETs and capacitors as a function of bias, time, temperature and geometry, under conditions relevant to analog circuit operation. A theoretical description of various relaxation mechanisms is presented and it is shown that the dominant charging/discharging mechanism under the bias conditions of interest is by the elastic tunneling of charge carriers to and from oxide traps. Tunneling occurs directly between the silicon band edges and an oxide trap, or

  20. Pharmacological characterization of the relaxant effect induced by adrenomedullin in rat cavernosal smooth muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, L.N. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Farmacologia, Departamento de Enfermagem Psiquiátrica e Ciências Humanas, Escola de Enfermagem de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Gonzaga, N.A. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Tirapelli, D.P.C.; Tirapelli, L.F. [Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Tirapelli, C.R. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Departamento de Enfermagem Psiquiátrica e Ciências Humanas, Escola de Enfermagem de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanisms underlying the relaxant effect of adrenomedullin (AM) in rat cavernosal smooth muscle (CSM) and the expression of AM system components in this tissue. Functional assays using standard muscle bath procedures were performed in CSM isolated from male Wistar rats. Protein and mRNA levels of pre-pro-AM, calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR), and Subtypes 1, 2 and 3 of the receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP) family were assessed by Western immunoblotting and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Nitrate and 6-keto-prostaglandin F{sub 1α} (6-keto-PGF{sub 1α}; a stable product of prostacyclin) levels were determined using commercially available kits. Protein and mRNA of AM, CRLR, and RAMP 1, -2, and -3 were detected in rat CSM. Immunohistochemical assays demonstrated that AM and CRLR were expressed in rat CSM. AM relaxed CSM strips in a concentration-dependent manner. AM{sub 22-52}, a selective antagonist for AM receptors, reduced the relaxation induced by AM. Conversely, CGRP{sub 8-37}, a selective antagonist for calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors, did not affect AM-induced relaxation. Preincubation of CSM strips with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, quanylyl cyclase inhibitor), Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS (cGMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor), SC560 [5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-trifluoromethyl pyrazole, selective cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitor], and 4-aminopyridine (voltage-dependent K{sup +} channel blocker) reduced AM-induced relaxation. On the other hand, 7-nitroindazole (selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), wortmannin (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor), H89 (protein kinase A inhibitor), SQ22536 [9-(tetrahydro-2-furanyl)-9H-purin-6-amine, adenylate cyclase inhibitor], glibenclamide (selective blocker of ATP-sensitive K{sup +} channels), and

  1. The theory of nonclassical relaxation oscillations in singularly perturbed delay systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glyzin, S. D.; Kolesov, A. Yu. [Yaroslavl' State University (Russian Federation); Rozov, N. Kh., E-mail: glyzin@uniyar.ac.ru, E-mail: kolesov@uniyar.ac.ru, E-mail: fpo.mgu@mail.ru [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-01

    Some special classes of relaxation systems are introduced, with one slow and one fast variable, in which the evolution of the slow component x(t) in time is described by an ordinary differential equation, while the evolution of the fast component y(t) is described by a Volterra-type differential equation with delay y(t−h), h=const>0, and with a small parameter ε>0 multiplying the time derivative. Questions relating to the existence and stability of impulse-type periodic solutions, in which the x-component converges pointwise to a discontinuous function as ε→0 and the y-component is shaped like a δ-function, are investigated. The results obtained are illustrated by several examples from ecology and laser theory. Bibliography: 11 titles. (paper)

  2. Deletion of the titin N2B region accelerates myofibrillar force development but does not alter relaxation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhamine, Fatiha; Radke, Michael H.; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Granzier, Henk; Gotthardt, Michael; Stehle, Robert

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cardiac titin is the main determinant of sarcomere stiffness during diastolic relaxation. To explore whether titin stiffness affects the kinetics of cardiac myofibrillar contraction and relaxation, we used subcellular myofibrils from the left ventricles of homozygous and heterozygous N2B-knockout mice which express truncated cardiac titins lacking the unique elastic N2B region. Compared with myofibrils from wild-type mice, myofibrils from knockout and heterozygous mice exhibit increased passive myofibrillar stiffness. To determine the kinetics of Ca2+-induced force development (rate constant kACT), myofibrils from knockout, heterozygous and wild-type mice were stretched to the same sarcomere length (2.3 µm) and rapidly activated with Ca2+. Additionally, mechanically induced force-redevelopment kinetics (rate constant kTR) were determined by slackening and re-stretching myofibrils during Ca2+-mediated activation. Myofibrils from knockout mice exhibited significantly higher kACT, kTR and maximum Ca2+-activated tension than myofibrils from wild-type mice. By contrast, the kinetic parameters of biphasic force relaxation induced by rapidly reducing [Ca2+] were not significantly different among the three genotypes. These results indicate that increased titin stiffness promotes myocardial contraction by accelerating the formation of force-generating cross-bridges without decelerating relaxation. PMID:24982444

  3. Comparative study of acoustic relaxation time of cholesteric liquid crystal and mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Manisha G.; Gharde, Rita; Radha, S.

    2016-09-01

    The present study focuses on the relaxation processes in Cholesteric Liquid Crystal and mixtures. We have dispersed two different monomers in CLC to form Polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDCLCs). PDLC films have a remarkable electro-optical behavior since they can be switched from highly light scattering state (OFF) to transparent state (ON) simply by application of an electric field. We have also doped ferroelectric nano - powder (NP) in CLC. The phase transitions occurred at temperatures lower than those exhibited by the mesogenic component before doping. The viscosity, ultrasonic velocity and density show variation with change in the material as well as temperature. The acoustic relaxation time and ultrasonic attenuation decrease with increase in temperature for CLC and CLC+NP. The parameters of PDCLC2 in comparison with PDCLC1 are more linear in isotropic and anisotropic regions. For PDCLC2 the values reach maximum value at the Cholesteric-isotropic transition.

  4. Analysis of ultrafast relaxation in photoexcited DNA base pairs of adenine and thymine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylova, E.; Schultz, T.; Hertel, I. V.; Radloff, W.

    2008-05-01

    The photoinduced dynamics in base pairs of adenine and thymine were analyzed by femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. On the short-time scale up to a few picoseconds, the characteristic time constants for the dimers are quite similar to the corresponding values of the monomers. This leads to the conclusion that ultrafast intramolecular relaxation proceeds via ππ ∗ and nπ ∗ states of one component within the dimer. On the long-time scale, we obtained a novel time constant of roughly 40 ps for the thymine dimer and the adenine-thymine base pair. This time constant was never observed in the monomers and is tentatively assigned to an intermolecular relaxation process, possibly via a hydrogen transfer state.

  5. Field-dependent atomic relaxation in a squeezed vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, S S [Department of Mathematics, College of Science, University of Bahrain, PO Box 32038 (Bahrain); Jarad, T M [UMIST, Department of Mathematics, PO Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Puri, R R [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Theoretical Physics Division, Bombay 400085 (India); Bullough, R K [UMIST, Department of Mathematics, PO Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-01

    The relaxation process of a single two-level atom driven by an intense resonant coherent field is studied in the presence of a broadband squeezed vacuum field. Generalized forms for the self-field operator and the field-dependent damping coefficients are derived. In the steady state, positive atomic inversion ({approx}5%) is shown for some range of the phase of the squeezed vacuum field. The squeezing-induced enhanced and asymmetric coherence (i.e. non-zero dispersive atomic polarization) induces profound asymmetry in the side-bands of the Mollow fluorescent spectrum and the absorptive-dispersive spectra near the Rabi side-band frequencies. The case of two and three cooperative atoms, instead of a single atom, shows (i) positive atomic inversion in the steady state for larger interval of the squeeze phase parameter and more enhanced extrema for the atomic polarization components and (ii) the extra side peaks in the fluorescent spectrum become asymmetric and of dispersive-like profile. Dressed-state analysis in the single-atom case with the field-dependent decay process in the presence of the squeezed vacuum field is presented and shows that the inequality of the (field-dependent) decay rates of the dressed states leads to more positive inversion in the dressed states as compared with the normal vacuum case.

  6. Field-dependent atomic relaxation in a squeezed vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, S. S.; Jarad, T. M.; Puri, R. R.; Bullough, R. K.

    2005-11-01

    The relaxation process of a single two-level atom driven by an intense resonant coherent field is studied in the presence of a broadband squeezed vacuum field. Generalized forms for the self-field operator and the field-dependent damping coefficients are derived. In the steady state, positive atomic inversion (~5%) is shown for some range of the phase of the squeezed vacuum field. The squeezing-induced enhanced and asymmetric coherence (i.e. non-zero dispersive atomic polarization) induces profound asymmetry in the side-bands of the Mollow fluorescent spectrum and the absorptive-dispersive spectra near the Rabi side-band frequencies. The case of two and three cooperative atoms, instead of a single atom, shows (i) positive atomic inversion in the steady state for larger interval of the squeeze phase parameter and more enhanced extrema for the atomic polarization components and (ii) the extra side peaks in the fluorescent spectrum become asymmetric and of dispersive-like profile. Dressed-state analysis in the single-atom case with the field-dependent decay process in the presence of the squeezed vacuum field is presented and shows that the inequality of the (field-dependent) decay rates of the dressed states leads to more positive inversion in the dressed states as compared with the normal vacuum case.

  7. Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum complementing chemical component relaxation in complex ventral hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elstner, Kristen E; Read, John W; Rodriguez-Acevedo, Omar; Ho-Shon, Kevin; Magnussen, John; Ibrahim, Nabeel

    2017-04-01

    A rarely used technique for enabling closure of large ventral hernias with loss of domain is preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum (PPP), which uses intermittent insufflation to gradually stretch the contracted abdominal wall muscles, increasing the capacity of the abdominal cavity. This allows the re-introduction of herniated viscera into the abdominal cavity and assists in closure of giant hernias which may otherwise be considered inoperable. This was a prospective study assessing 16 patients between 2013 and 2015 with multi-recurrent ventral hernia. All patients were treated preoperatively with both Botulinum Toxin A (BTA) injections to the lateral abdominal wall muscles to confer flaccid paralysis, and short-term PPP to passively expand the abdominal cavity. All patients underwent serial abdominal CT imaging, with pre- and post-treatment circumference measurements of the peritoneal cavity and hernia sac, prior to undergoing operative mesh repair of their hernia. The mean hernia defect size was 236 cm2, with mean 28 % loss of domain. The mean overall duration of PPP was 6.2 days. The mean gain in abdominal circumference was 4.9 cm (5.6 %) (p 0.002) after BTA and PPP. Fascial closure and mesh hernia repair were performed in all 16 patients, with no patients suffering from postoperative abdominal hypertension, ventilatory impairment, or wound dehiscence. There are no hernia recurrences to date. Eight patients (50 %) experienced PPP-related complications, consisting of subcutaneous emphysema, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, pneumocardium, and metabolic acidosis. No complication required intervention. PPP is a useful adjunct in the repair of complex ventral hernia. It passively expands the abdominal cavity, allowing viscera to re-establish right of domain. At the same time, it helps to minimize the risks of postoperative abdominal compartment syndrome and the sequelae of fascial closure under tension. However, its benefits must be carefully weighed with the risk of serious complications, such as infection, perforation, pneumothorax, and pneumomediastinum.

  8. Noninteracting control of nonlinear systems based on relaxed control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jayawardhana, B.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose methodology to solve noninteracting control problem for general nonlinear systems based on the relaxed control technique proposed by Artstein. For a class of nonlinear systems which cannot be stabilized by smooth feedback, a state-feedback relaxed control can be designed to

  9. Stress relaxation in the region of microplastic deformation of polycrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochivalova, G. P.; Dudarev, E. F.; Nikitina, N. V.

    1987-07-01

    Stress relaxation equations are derived to predict the relaxation capacity of a material on the basis of studies of microplastic deformation under static loading. The approach was checked experimentally on spring steels LANKMts, ÉI702, ÉP637, and 50KhFA.

  10. Dielectric relaxation phenomena of rigid polar liquid molecules ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The dielectric relaxation phenomena of rigid polar liquid molecules chloral and ethyltrichloroacetate () in benzene, -hexane and -heptane () under 4.2, 9.8 and 24.6 GHz electric fields at 30°C are studied to show the possible existence of double relaxation times 2 and 1 for rotations of the whole and the flexible ...

  11. Towards minimum achievable phase noise of relaxation oscillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraedts, P.F.J.; van Tuijl, Adrianus Johannes Maria; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Wienk, Gerhardus J.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2013-01-01

    A relaxation oscillator design is described, which has a phase noise rivaling ring oscillators, while also featuring linear frequency tuning. We show that the comparator in a relaxation-oscillator loop can be prevented from contributing to 1/f2 colored phase noise and degrading control linearity.

  12. Stress relaxation and estimation of activation volume in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The stress relaxation of ferroelectric/piezoelectric material was studied using compression testing. The deformation was produced by the switching of ferroelectric domains. The internal stresses were estimated by decremental stress relaxation during unloading. The results were interpreted in terms of reversible and ...

  13. Models for multiple relaxation processes in collagen fiber

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Models for multiple relaxation processes in collagen fiber. Two element model suits best the dimensional relaxation processes, of which one event appears to originate from stress strain induced changes in hydrogen bond network whereas the other seems to be more ...

  14. Relaxation in x-space magnetic particle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Laura R; Goodwill, Patrick W; Conolly, Steven M

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new imaging modality that noninvasively images the spatial distribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs). MPI has demonstrated high contrast and zero attenuation with depth, and MPI promises superior safety compared to current angiography methods, X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging angiography. Nanoparticle relaxation can delay the SPIO magnetization, and in this work we investigate the open problem of the role relaxation plays in MPI scanning and its effect on the image. We begin by amending the x-space theory of MPI to include nanoparticle relaxation effects. We then validate the amended theory with experiments from a Berkeley x-space relaxometer and a Berkeley x-space projection MPI scanner. Our theory and experimental data indicate that relaxation reduces SNR and asymmetrically blurs the image in the scanning direction. While relaxation effects can have deleterious effects on the MPI scan, we show theoretically and experimentally that x-space reconstruction remains robust in the presence of relaxation. Furthermore, the role of relaxation in x-space theory provides guidance as we develop methods to minimize relaxation-induced blurring. This will be an important future area of research for the MPI community.

  15. Gamma dosimetric parameters in some skeletal muscle relaxants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H C MANJUNATHA

    2017-08-29

    Aug 29, 2017 ... But literature survey also reveals that there is no such studies on measurements in the skeletal muscle relaxants. Hence there is a need to measure the mass attenuation coefficient in skeletal muscle relaxants. To know the after-effects of radiation on skeletal muscle, it is important to consider the attenuation ...

  16. Stress relaxation and estimation of activation volume in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Stress relaxation and estimation of activation volume in a commercial hard PZT piezoelectric ceramic. B L CHENG and M J REECE*. Department of Materials, Queen Mary and Westfield College, Mile End Road, E1 4NS, London, UK. Abstract. The stress relaxation of ferroelectric/piezoelectric material was studied using ...

  17. K + -induced relaxation in vascular smooth muscle of alloxan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of different concentration of intracellular potassium (K+), on rate of relaxation were studied in isolated aortae of normal and diabetic rats. The relaxation responses induced by raised extracellular potassium concentration was attenuated in aortic rings from diabetic rats. Possible reasons are discussed in the text.

  18. Reduced-Complexity Semidefinite Relaxations of Optimal Power Flow Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Skovgaard; Hansson, Anders; Vandenberghe, Lieven

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new method for generating semidefinite relaxations of optimal power flow problems. The method is based on chordal conversion techniques: by dropping some equality constraints in the conversion, we obtain semidefinite relaxations that are computationally cheaper, but potentially weaker...

  19. Communication: Relaxation-limited electronic currents in extended reservoir simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruss, Daniel; Smolyanitsky, Alex; Zwolak, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Open-system approaches are gaining traction in the simulation of charge transport in nanoscale and molecular electronic devices. In particular, "extended reservoir" simulations, where explicit reservoir degrees of freedom are present, allow for the computation of both real-time and steady-state properties but require relaxation of the extended reservoirs. The strength of this relaxation, γ, influences the conductance, giving rise to a "turnover" behavior analogous to Kramers turnover in chemical reaction rates. We derive explicit, general expressions for the weak and strong relaxation limits. For weak relaxation, the conductance increases linearly with γ and every electronic state of the total explicit system contributes to the electronic current according to its "reduced" weight in the two extended reservoir regions. Essentially, this represents two conductors in series—one at each interface with the implicit reservoirs that provide the relaxation. For strong relaxation, a "dual" expression-one with the same functional form-results, except now proportional to 1/γ and dependent on the system of interest's electronic states, reflecting that the strong relaxation is localizing electrons in the extended reservoirs. Higher order behavior (e.g., γ2 or 1/γ2) can occur when there is a gap in the frequency spectrum. Moreover, inhomogeneity in the frequency spacing can give rise to a pseudo-plateau regime. These findings yield a physically motivated approach to diagnosing numerical simulations and understanding the influence of relaxation, and we examine their occurrence in both simple models and a realistic, fluctuating graphene nanoribbon.

  20. Effectiveness of relaxation techniques before diagnostic screening of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Aiger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Psychophysiological arousal was observed in cancer patients during the application of relaxation techniques prior to a diagnostic scan (PET-CT. The aim of the study is twofold: firstly, it is sought to establish whether such techniques can minimize patient arousal before diagnostic screening begins, and secondly to measure which of them are most effective. The dependent variable is electrodermal activity, recording the attentional level and emotional response, and the independent variable comprises the relaxation techniques used, namely Jacobson, breathing and visualization. The 39 patients were split into experimental groups to whom the relaxation techniques (Jacobson, breathing exercises, and visualization were applied before they went for the PET-CT. An activity-module procedure was applied to track electrodermal activity during the relaxation sessions, consisting of instructions, timeout; wait, task; relaxation and end of the recording session. The control group received no relaxation techniques before the PET-CT. Session-end results show that patients who perform relaxation techniques achieve greater attentional focus using Jacobson's technique (M = .212 and enhanced emotional containment using visualization (M = .206. It is concluded that relaxation techniques minimize the state of activation during the waiting period before a diagnostic scan.

  1. Energy relaxation in optically excited Si and Ge nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeed, S.

    2014-01-01

    The scientific objective of the research presented in this thesis is to explore energy relaxation processes of optically excited Si and Ge nanocrystals. The identification and deeper understanding of unique energy relaxation paths in these materials will open a new window of opportunity for these

  2. Stress relaxation of bi-disperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengeller, Ludovica; Huang, Qian; Dorokhin, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    We present start-up of uniaxial extension followed by stress relaxation experiments of a bi-disperse 50 % by weight blend of 95k and 545k molecular weight polystyrene. We also show, for comparison, stress relaxation measurements of the polystyrene melts with molecular weight 95k and 545k, which...

  3. Relaxation between electrons and surface phonons of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 63; Issue 5. Relaxation between ... The energy relaxation between the hot degenerate electrons of a homogeneously photoexcited metal film and the surface phonons (phonon wave vectors in two dimensions) is considered under Debye approximation. The state of ...

  4. Communication: Relaxation-limited electronic currents in extended reservoir simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruss, Daniel; Smolyanitsky, Alex; Zwolak, Michael

    2017-10-14

    Open-system approaches are gaining traction in the simulation of charge transport in nanoscale and molecular electronic devices. In particular, "extended reservoir" simulations, where explicit reservoir degrees of freedom are present, allow for the computation of both real-time and steady-state properties but require relaxation of the extended reservoirs. The strength of this relaxation, γ, influences the conductance, giving rise to a "turnover" behavior analogous to Kramers turnover in chemical reaction rates. We derive explicit, general expressions for the weak and strong relaxation limits. For weak relaxation, the conductance increases linearly with γ and every electronic state of the total explicit system contributes to the electronic current according to its "reduced" weight in the two extended reservoir regions. Essentially, this represents two conductors in series-one at each interface with the implicit reservoirs that provide the relaxation. For strong relaxation, a "dual" expression-one with the same functional form-results, except now proportional to 1/γ and dependent on the system of interest's electronic states, reflecting that the strong relaxation is localizing electrons in the extended reservoirs. Higher order behavior (e.g., γ(2) or 1/γ(2)) can occur when there is a gap in the frequency spectrum. Moreover, inhomogeneity in the frequency spacing can give rise to a pseudo-plateau regime. These findings yield a physically motivated approach to diagnosing numerical simulations and understanding the influence of relaxation, and we examine their occurrence in both simple models and a realistic, fluctuating graphene nanoribbon.

  5. Evaluation of Physiological Indices to Indicate Sleepy or Relaxed States Using Illuminance Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibagaki, Yumi; Ogawa, Kozue; Hagiwara, Hiroshi

    The purpose of the present study was to clarify the ability of physiological indices to reflect the degree of sleepiness or relaxation of an individual due to stress, fatigue and other factors. Several studies have investigated the use of high-frequency (HF) components (0.15-0.40Hz) in heart rate variability to evaluate parasympathetic nervous activity. However, it has been difficult to assess the differences between states of sleepiness and relaxation using this method. In the present study, in order to evaluate the indices, two experimental illuminance conditions, 100 and 1,500 lx, reflecting differing states of arousal, were used during a cognitive judgment test lasting for 30 minutes. During the cognitive judgment test, electroencephalograms (EEG), electrocardiograms (ECG), physiological state and reaction time were measured, and results indicated that the two illuminance conditions could be differentiated from the recorded physiological data. More specifically, in the 1,500-lx condition, arousal level, activity level and test performance increased, and the level of HF components decreased. Opposite tendencies were observed in the 100-lx condition. Two indices of Lorenz plots (LP) at ECG RR intervals, center (C of LP) and ellipse area (S of LP), were subsequently determined from the physiological data. Subjects were then divided according to these LP indices based on their exhibited physiological responses, and we evaluated the effectiveness of the indices in differentiating between states of sleepiness and relaxation by comparing arousal level, psychological state, and reaction time. Results indicated that the C of LP and S of LP are possible indices for evaluating sleepiness or relaxation and suggest that these two indices may also be able to evaluate the relationship between physiological changes and other, subjective feelings.

  6. Relaxation Fluctuations about an Equilibrium in Quantum Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshminarayan, A

    1997-01-01

    Classically chaotic systems relax to coarse grained states of equilibrium. Here we numerically study the quantization of such bounded relaxing systems, in particular the quasi-periodic fluctuations associated with the correlation between two density operators. We find that when the operators, or their Wigner-Weyl transforms, have obvious classical limits that can be interpreted as piecewise continuous functions on phase space, the fluctuations can distinguish classically chaotic and regular motions, thus providing a novel diagnostic devise of quantum chaos. We uncover several features of the relaxation fluctuations that are shared by disparate systems thus establishing restricted universality. If we consider the nonlinearity driving the chaos as pseudo-time, we find that the onset of classical chaos is indicated quantally as the relaxation of the relaxation fluctuations to a Gaussian distribution.

  7. Surface relaxation of Cu(5 1 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pussi, K.; Caragiu, M.; Hanna, K. J.; Moritz, W.; Diehl, R. D.

    2015-03-01

    The multilayer relaxation of the stepped Cu(5 1 1) surface has been studied by quantitative low-energy electron diffraction and analyzed using the CLEED program package. Relaxations with respect to the bulk interlayer spacing of 0.6934 Å are -9.5%, -10.4%, +8.2% and -1.8% for the first four interlayer spacings, respectively (negative sign corresponds to contraction). The relaxation sequence (- - + -…) is thus in agreement with the theoretical prediction. The deeper relaxations are damped in a non-uniform manner and the lateral relaxations are smaller than 2% of the lateral spacing. This result agrees well with theoretical studies of the same surface. The Pendry R-factor for the favored structure is 0.21.

  8. Surface relaxation of Cu(5 1 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pussi, K; Caragiu, M; Hanna, K J; Moritz, W; Diehl, R D

    2015-03-04

    The multilayer relaxation of the stepped Cu(5 1 1) surface has been studied by quantitative low-energy electron diffraction and analyzed using the CLEED program package. Relaxations with respect to the bulk interlayer spacing of 0.6934 Å are -9.5%, -10.4%, +8.2% and -1.8% for the first four interlayer spacings, respectively (negative sign corresponds to contraction). The relaxation sequence (- - + -…) is thus in agreement with the theoretical prediction. The deeper relaxations are damped in a non-uniform manner and the lateral relaxations are smaller than 2% of the lateral spacing. This result agrees well with theoretical studies of the same surface. The Pendry R-factor for the favored structure is 0.21.

  9. 3D Printing for the Rapid Prototyping of Structural Electronics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Macdonald, Eric; Salas, Rudy; Espalin, David; Perez, Mireya; Aguilera, Efrain; Muse, Dan; Wicker, Ryan B

    2014-01-01

    .... The use of advanced 3D printing technology enhanced with component placement and electrical interconnect deposition can provide electronic prototypes that now can be rapidly fabricated in comparable...

  10. Interaction quench in the Holstein model: Thermalization crossover from electron- to phonon-dominated relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yuta; Werner, Philipp; Tsuji, Naoto; Aoki, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    We study the relaxation of the Holstein model after a sudden switch-on of the interaction by means of the nonequilibrium dynamical mean field theory, with the self-consistent Migdal approximation as an impurity solver. We show that there exists a qualitative change in the thermalization dynamics as the interaction is varied in the weak-coupling regime. On the weaker interaction side of this crossover, the phonon oscillations are damped more rapidly than the electron thermalization time scale, as determined from the relaxation of the electron momentum distribution function. On the stronger interaction side, the relaxation of the electrons becomes faster than the phonon damping. In this regime, despite long-lived phonon oscillations, a thermalized momentum distribution is realized temporarily. The origin of the "thermalization crossover" found here is traced back to different behaviors of the electron and phonon self-energies as a function of the electron-phonon coupling. In addition, the importance of the phonon dynamics is demonstrated by comparing the self-consistent Migdal results with those obtained with a simpler Hartree-Fock impurity solver that neglects the phonon self-energy. The latter scheme does not properly describe the evolution and thermalization of isolated electron-phonon systems.

  11. Affinity analysis for biomolecular interactions based on magneto-optical relaxation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurich, Konstanze; Nagel, Stefan; Heister, Elena; Weitschies, Werner

    2008-12-01

    Magneto-optical relaxation measurements of magnetically labelled biomolecules are a promising tool for immunometric analyses. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and its polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies (anti-CEA) were utilized as a model system for affinity analysis of the interaction between antibody and antigen. For this purpose antibodies were coupled with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Aggregation of these antibody sensors due to interactions with the CEA was observed subsequently by measuring the relaxation time of the birefringence of a transmitted laser beam that occurs in a pulsed magnetic field. A kinetic model of chain-like aggregation developed for these purposes enables the rapid and simple calculation of the kinetic parameters of the underlying protein interaction. From the known antigen concentration and the increase in particle size during the interaction we are able to estimate the unknown parameters with standard methods for the statistical description of stepwise polymerization. This novel affinity analysis was successfully applied for the antigen-antibody interaction described herein and can be applied to other biomolecular interactions. First efforts have been made to establish magneto-optical relaxation measurements in body fluids.

  12. During Training and Posttraining Effects of Live and Taped Extended Progressive Relaxation, Self-Relaxation, and Electromyogram Biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiman, Irving; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Compared live and taped progressive relaxation (LR, TR), self-relaxation (SR), and electromyogram biofeedback (BF) on measures of autonomic and somatic arousal and subjective tension. LR was superior to RE on reductions in physiological arousal; SR and BR were equivalent except for the superiority of SR on reductions in autonomic arousal.…

  13. A Psychophysiological Comparison of the Effects of Three Relaxation Techniques: Respiratory Manipulation Training, Progressive Muscle Relaxation, and Pleasant Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, David J.

    A within-subjects, three condition design was employed to examine the effects of three relaxation techniques on blood pressures, pulse rates, and self-report measures of relaxation for 12 college students. Respiratory Manipulation Training incorporated instructions to exhale and not to inhale for as long as possible. When breathing could no longer…

  14. Characteristics of Viscoelastic Crustal Deformation Following a Megathrust Earthquake: Discrepancy Between the Apparent and Intrinsic Relaxation Time Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukahata, Yukitoshi; Matsu'ura, Mitsuhiro

    2017-12-01

    The viscoelastic deformation of an elastic-viscoelastic composite system is significantly different from that of a simple viscoelastic medium. Here, we show that complicated transient deformation due to viscoelastic stress relaxation after a megathrust earthquake can occur even in a very simple situation, in which an elastic surface layer (lithosphere) is underlain by a viscoelastic substratum (asthenosphere) under gravity. Although the overall decay rate of the system is controlled by the intrinsic relaxation time constant of the asthenosphere, the apparent decay time constant at each observation point is significantly different from place to place and generally much longer than the intrinsic relaxation time constant of the asthenosphere. It is also not rare that the sense of displacement rate is reversed during the viscoelastic relaxation. If we do not bear these points in mind, we may draw false conclusions from observed deformation data. Such complicated transient behavior can be explained mathematically from the characteristics of viscoelastic solution: for an elastic-viscoelastic layered half-space, the viscoelastic solution is expressed as superposition of three decaying components with different relaxation time constants that depend on wavelength.

  15. Impaired parasympathetic augmentation under relaxation in patients with depression as assessed by a novel non-contact microwave radar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takemi; Kakisaka, Kota; Shinba, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    In order to conduct objective screening of major depressive disorder (MDD), a chair-based system was developed which measures alteration of parasympathetic activation induced by relaxing audio-visual exposure in a non-contact way using dual compact-radars attached to a chair back. The system determines autonomic activation by calculating low (LF) and high frequency (HF) components of heart rate variability (HRV) before and after relaxation. Forty-one subjects (28 normal subjects, 13 MDD subjects) were exposed to relaxing natural sounds and images for 10 min. In order to determine the possibility of MDD from autonomic alteration induced by relaxing, linear discriminant analysis was conducted using LF and HF before and after relaxation. F-test revealed the significance of derived linear discriminant function (p < 0.001). The Mahalanobis distance and U value were 3.2 and 0.89, respectively. The derived linear discriminant function achieved 85% sensitivity (11 out of 13 MDD patients) and 89% specificity (25 out of 28 normal subjects).

  16. 13C spin relaxation measurements in RNA: Sensitivity and resolution improvement using spin-state selective correlation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boisbouvier, Jerome; Brutscher, Bernhard; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Marion, Dominique [C.N.R.S.-C.E.A., Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel (France)

    1999-07-15

    A set of new NMR pulse sequences has been designed for the measurement of {sup 13}C relaxation rate constants in RNA and DNA bases: the spin-lattice relaxation rate constant R(C{sub z}), the spin-spin relaxation rate constant R(C{sub +}), and the CSA-dipolar cross-correlated relaxation rate constant {gamma}{sub C,CH}{sup xy}. The use of spin-state selective correlation techniques provides increased sensitivity and spectral resolution. Sensitivity optimised C-C filters are included in the pulse schemes for the suppression of signals originating from undesired carbon isotopomers. The experiments are applied to a 15% {sup 13}C-labelled 33-mer RNA-theophylline complex. The measured R(C{sub +})/{gamma}{sub C,CH}{sup xy} ratios indicate that {sup 13}C CSA tensors do not vary significantly for the same type of carbon (C{sub 2}, C{sub 6}, C{sub 8}), but that they differ from one type to another. In addition, conformational exchange effects in the RNA bases are detected as a change in the relaxation decay of the narrow {sup 13}C doublet component when varying the spacing of a CPMG pulse train. This new approach allows the detection of small exchange effects with a higher precision compared to conventional techniques.

  17. Foam relaxation in fractures and narrow channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-Yao; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Perazzo, Antonio; Stone, Howard A.

    2017-11-01

    Various applications, from foam manufacturing to hydraulic fracturing with foams, involve pressure-driven flow of foams in narrow channels. We report a combined experimental and theoretical study of this problem accounting for the compressible nature of the foam. In particular, in our experiments the foam is initially compressed in one channel and then upon flow into a second channel the compressed foam relaxes as it moves. A plug flow is observed in the tube and the pressure at the entrance of the tube is higher than the exit. We measure the volume collected at the exit of the tube, V, as a function of injection flow rate, tube length and diameter. Two scaling behaviors for V as a function of time are observed depending on whether foam compression is important or not. Our work may relate to foam fracturing, which saves water usage in hydraulic fracturing, more efficient enhanced oil recovery via foam injection, and various materials manufacturing processes involving pressure-driven flow foams.

  18. Stress relaxation functions: Methods of approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Mark V.; Gant, Frederick S.

    1994-04-01

    A new method of determining Prony series coefficients is presented. This method, the domain of influence method (DOI), capitalizes on characteristics of the exponential decay curve to adjust its parameters to fit a set of data. This method was applied to viscoelastic stress relaxation data. The method is general and can be used to develop exponential decay curves to represent other types of data where appropriate. The DOI method does not include any error correction within itself. To improve the results of the DOI method some form of error correction is necessary. The nonlinearity of the Prony series does not lend itself to common methods of error minimization. Optimization methods can be applied to this problem. These methods use the functional behavior of the problem under study to minimize or maximize some characteristic of the problem. Here the function minimized was an error function between the DOI estimated Prony series and the viscoelastic data. Optimization was achieved by adjusting the Prony series coefficients to minimize that error. The DOI method was encoded in FORTRAN and integrated with commercially available optimization routines to produce a tool called Viscoelastic Coefficient Determination or VCD. A description of this code including a discussion of the salient features is presented. An example is used to demonstrate the DOI method, illustrate the operation of VCD, and demonstrate the capabilities of the method and the software. A code listing appears in the appendix.

  19. Turbulent Magnetic Relaxation in Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrake, Jonathan; Arons, Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    We present a model for magnetic energy dissipation in a pulsar wind nebula. A better understanding of this process is required to assess the likelihood that certain astrophysical transients may be powered by the spin-down of a “millisecond magnetar.” Examples include superluminous supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and anticipated electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave detections of binary neutron star coalescence. Our model leverages recent progress in the theory of turbulent magnetic relaxation to specify a dissipative closure of the stationary magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wind equations, yielding predictions of the magnetic energy dissipation rate throughout the nebula. Synchrotron losses are self-consistently treated. To demonstrate the model’s efficacy, we show that it can reproduce many features of the Crab Nebula, including its expansion speed, radiative efficiency, peak photon energy, and mean magnetic field strength. Unlike ideal MHD models of the Crab (which lead to the so-called σ-problem), our model accounts for the transition from ultra to weakly magnetized plasma flow and for the associated heating of relativistic electrons. We discuss how the predicted heating rates may be utilized to improve upon models of particle transport and acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae. We also discuss implications for the Crab Nebula’s γ-ray flares, and point out potential modifications to models of astrophysical transients invoking the spin-down of a millisecond magnetar.

  20. Vertical dimonsion changes after muscle relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahroodi MH

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 116 edentulous patients in the age group 37-90 yrs were selected. Out of the above,"n12 patients had visited the dept. Of prosthodontics for the first time for treatment. Other 34 of them were"npatients of the dental school and the rest were from Kahrizak and Nikan sanatoriums."nInitially, the V.D. of rest was measured as usual for all the patients. After subjecting them to the excercises of completely opening and closing of the mouth for 15 no. of times, the rest position was measured again. Results show that the changes in V.D.R. after, excercises, relaxing the elevator and depressor muscles and the duration of usage of prosthesis, the following conclusions are obtained."n1. There is an increase in V.D.R. after tiring out the elevator and depressor muscles of the jaws."n2. There is a direct co - relation between the increased V.D.R. and duration of use of prosthesis after excercises."n3. Change in the V.D.R. after excercise is notably more in women."n4. No definite conclusion is obtained in the relationship between changes in V.D.R. after excercises and use of prosthesis during sleep."n5. As above no conclusions as yet can be deduced between changes in V.D.R. and different operators.

  1. Anelastic Relaxation Mechanisms Characterization by Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soberon Mobarak, Martin Jesus, E-mail: msoberon@sep.gob.mx [Secretaria de Educacion Publica (Mexico)

    2005-02-15

    Anelastic behavior of crystalline solids is generated by several microstructural processes. Its experimental study yields valuable information about materials, namely: modulus, dissipation mechanisms and activation enthalpies. However, conventional techniques to evaluate it are complicated, expensive, time consuming and not easily replicated. As a new approach, in this work a Moessbauer spectrum of an iron specimen is obtained with the specimen at repose being its parameters the 'base parameters'. After that, the same specimen is subjected to an alternated stress-relaxation cycle at frequency {omega}{sub 1} and a new Moessbauer spectrum is obtained under this excited condition; doing the same at several increasing frequencies {omega}{sub n} in order to scan a wide frequencies spectrum. The differences between the Moessbauer parameters obtained at each excitation frequency and the base parameters are plotted against frequency, yielding an 'anelastic spectrum' that reveals the different dissipation mechanisms involved, its characteristic frequency and activation energy. Results are in good agreement with the obtained with other techniques

  2. Viscous relaxation of Ganymede's impact craters: Constraints on heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Michael T.; Singer, Kelsi N.; McKinnon, William B.; Schenk, Paul M.

    2017-11-01

    Measurement of crater depths in Ganymede's dark terrain have revealed substantial numbers of unusually shallow craters indicative of viscous relaxation [see companion paper: Singer, K.N., Schenk, P. M., Bland, M.T., McKinnon, W.B., (2017). Relaxed impact craters on Ganymede: Regional variations and high heat flow. Icarus, submitted]. These viscously relaxed craters provide insight into the thermal history of the dark terrain: the rate of relaxation depends on the size of the crater and the thermal structure of the lithosphere. Here we use finite element simulations of crater relaxation to constrain the heat flux within the dark terrain when relaxation occurred. We show that the degree of viscous relaxation observed cannot be achieved through radiogenic heating alone, even if all of the relaxed craters are ancient and experienced the high radiogenic fluxes present early in the satellite's history. For craters with diameter ≥ 10 km, heat fluxes of 40-50 mW m-2 can reproduce the observed crater depths, but only if the fluxes are sustained for ∼1 Gyr. These craters can also be explained by shorter-lived ;heat pulses; with magnitudes of ∼100 mW m-2 and timescales of 10-100 Myr. At small crater diameters (4 km) the observed shallow depths are difficult to achieve even when heat fluxes as high as 150 mW m-2 are sustained for 1 Gyr. The extreme thermal conditions required to viscously relax small craters may indicate that mechanisms other than viscous relaxation, such as topographic degradation, are also in play at small crater diameters. The timing of the relaxation event(s) is poorly constrained due to the sparsity of adequate topographic information, though it likely occurred in Ganymede's middle history (neither recently, nor shortly after satellite formation). The consistency between the timing and magnitude of the heat fluxes derived here and those inferred from other tectonic features suggests that a single event caused both Ganymede's tectonic deformation and

  3. Viscous relaxation of Ganymede's impact craters: Constraints on heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Michael; Singer, Kelsi N.; McKinnon, William B.; Schenk, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    Measurement of crater depths in Ganymede’s dark terrain have revealed substantial numbers of unusually shallow craters indicative of viscous relaxation [see companion paper: Singer, K.N., Schenk, P. M., Bland, M.T., McKinnon, W.B., (2017). Relaxed impact craters on Ganymede: Regional variations and high heat flow. Icarus, submitted]. These viscously relaxed craters provide insight into the thermal history of the dark terrain: the rate of relaxation depends on the size of the crater and the thermal structure of the lithosphere. Here we use finite element simulations of crater relaxation to constrain the heat flux within the dark terrain when relaxation occurred. We show that the degree of viscous relaxation observed cannot be achieved through radiogenic heating alone, even if all of the relaxed craters are ancient and experienced the high radiogenic fluxes present early in the satellite’s history. For craters with diameter ≥ 10 km, heat fluxes of 40–50 mW m-2−2"> can reproduce the observed crater depths, but only if the fluxes are sustained for ∼1 Gyr. These craters can also be explained by shorter-lived “heat pulses” with magnitudes of ∼100 mW m-2−2"> and timescales of 10–100 Myr. At small crater diameters (4 km) the observed shallow depths are difficult to achieve even when heat fluxes as high as 150 mW m-2−2"> are sustained for 1 Gyr. The extreme thermal conditions required to viscously relax small craters may indicate that mechanisms other than viscous relaxation, such as topographic degradation, are also in play at small crater diameters. The timing of the relaxation event(s) is poorly constrained due to the sparsity of adequate topographic information, though it likely occurred in Ganymede’s middle history (neither recently, nor shortly after satellite formation). The consistency between the timing and magnitude of the heat fluxes derived here and those inferred from other tectonic features suggests that a single event

  4. Rapid quenching effects in PVC films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. D.; Mandell, J. F.; Mcgarry, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    Using a specially constructed microbalance for hydrostatic weighing, density changes in PVC thin films (with no additives, 30-100 micrometers thick), due to rapid quenching (approximately 300 C/sec) through the glass transition temperature, have been observed. The more severe the quench, the greater is the free volume content. Isobaric volume recovery of PVC has also been studied by volume dilatometry. Both show aging of relaxing molecular rearrangements takes place as a linear function of logarithmic aging time at room temperature. Distribution of retardation times and Primak's distributed activation energy spectra have been applied to the volume recovery data. The concomitant changes in mechanical properties of PVC after quenching have been monitored by tensile creep and stress-strain to failure. All reflect the presence of excess free volume content, due to rapid quenching.

  5. Relaxing music counters heightened consolidation of emotional memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Nikki S; Wong, Wendy Wing; Velik, Lauren

    2012-02-01

    Emotional events tend to be retained more strongly than other everyday occurrences, a phenomenon partially regulated by the neuromodulatory effects of arousal. Two experiments demonstrated the use of relaxing music as a means of reducing arousal levels, thereby challenging heightened long-term recall of an emotional story. In Experiment 1, participants (N=84) viewed a slideshow, during which they listened to either an emotional or neutral narration, and were exposed to relaxing or no music. Retention was tested 1 week later via a forced choice recognition test. Retention for both the emotional content (Phase 2 of the story) and material presented immediately after the emotional content (Phase 3) was enhanced, when compared with retention for the neutral story. Relaxing music prevented the enhancement for material presented after the emotional content (Phase 3). Experiment 2 (N=159) provided further support to the neuromodulatory effect of music by post-event presentation of both relaxing music and non-relaxing auditory stimuli (arousing music/background sound). Free recall of the story was assessed immediately afterwards and 1 week later. Relaxing music significantly reduced recall of the emotional story (Phase 2). The findings provide further insight into the capacity of relaxing music to attenuate the strength of emotional memory, offering support for the therapeutic use of music for such purposes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malý, Pavel; Gruber, J. Michael; Cogdell, Richard J.; Mančal, Tomáš; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-02-22

    Energy relaxation in light-harvesting complexes has been extensively studied by various ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, the fastest processes being in the sub–100-fs range. At the same time, much slower dynamics have been observed in individual complexes by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy (SMS). In this work, we use a pump–probe-type SMS technique to observe the ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes LH2 of purple bacteria. After excitation at 800 nm, the measured relaxation time distribution of multiple complexes has a peak at 95 fs and is asymmetric, with a tail at slower relaxation times. When tuning the excitation wavelength, the distribution changes in both its shape and position. The observed behavior agrees with what is to be expected from the LH2 excited states structure. As we show by a Redfield theory calculation of the relaxation times, the distribution shape corresponds to the expected effect of Gaussian disorder of the pigment transition energies. By repeatedly measuring few individual complexes for minutes, we find that complexes sample the relaxation time distribution on a timescale of seconds. Furthermore, by comparing the distribution from a single long-lived complex with the whole ensemble, we demonstrate that, regarding the relaxation times, the ensemble can be considered ergodic. Our findings thus agree with the commonly used notion of an ensemble of identical LH2 complexes experiencing slow random fluctuations.

  7. Analysis of 2D NMR relaxation data using Chisholm approximations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, S.; Haase, A.; Gleich, B.

    2017-08-01

    To analyze 2D NMR relaxation data based on a discrete delta-like relaxation map we extended the Padé-Laplace method to two dimensions. We approximate the forward Laplace image of the time domain signal by a Chisholm approximation, i.e. a rational polynomial in two dimensions. The poles and residues of this approximation correspond to the relaxation rates and weighting factors of the underlying relaxation map. In this work we explain the principle ideas of our algorithm and demonstrate its applicability. Therefore we compare the inversion results of the Chisholm approximation and Tikhonov regularization method as a function of SNR when the investigated signal is based on a given discrete relaxation map. Our algorithm proved to be reliable for SNRs larger than 50 and is able to compete with the Tikhonov regularization method. Furthermore we show that our method is also able to detect the simulated relaxation compartments of narrow Gaussian distributions with widths less or equal than 0.05 s-1. Finally we investigate the resolution limit with experimental data. For a SNR of 750 the Chisholm approximation method was able to resolve two relaxation compartments in 8 of 10 cases when both compartments differ by a factor of 1.7.

  8. Anaphylaxis to muscle relaxants: rational for skin tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moneret-Vautrin, D A; Kanny, G

    2002-09-01

    IgE-dependent allergy to muscle relaxants (MR) has an estimated prevalence of 1 out of 6500 General Anesthesias (GA). 62% of anaphylaxis during surgery are due to MR anaphylaxis. All the molecules are divalent, carrying two NH4+ epitopes (quaternary ammonium ions), either structurally or after rapid in vivo protonization (vecuronium). The excellent overall performance of skin test makes them the golden standard for the diagnosis of anaphylactoid reactions. Techniques include intradermal tests and prick-tests. The current localizations are the forearm and the back. Positivity criteria are 3 mm for prick-tests. For IDTs, the criterium is the doubling of the size of the injection papula, when 0.02 to 0.04 ml is injected: 8 mm. The recommended concentrations are not falsely negative. Commercial concentrations can be tested by prick tests, except for mivacurium and atracurium tested of 1:10 dilution. A scale of concentrations is advised for IDT starting with 1:10,000, up to a normally non reactive concentration that is: 100 micrograms/ml (succinylcholine), 200 micrograms/ml (gallamine), 10 micrograms/ml (atracurium), 2 micrograms/ml (mivacurium), 200 micrograms/ml (pancuronium), 400 micrograms/ml (vecuronium), 1,000 micrograms/ml (rocuronium), 200 micrograms/ml (cis atracurium). The specificity and sensitivity of the skin tests to MRs are greater than 95%. The reproducibility over years is 88%. The overall concordance of PT and IDR is 97%. Both types of tests can be used for the diagnosis. IDT have to be carried out for the search of the cross sensitization. 84% of patients do have cross sensitization to MRs but only 16% react to all MRs. The further use of MRs selected by negative IDTs has been proved to be safe.

  9. Vibrational energy transfer in selectively excited diatomic molecules. [Relaxation rates, self-relaxation, upper limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasch, C.J.

    1978-09-01

    Single rovibrational states of HCl(v=2), HBr(v=2), DCl(v=2), and CO(v=2) were excited with a pulsed optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Total vibrational relaxation rates near - resonance quenchers were measured at 295/sup 0/K using time resolved infrared fluorescence. These rates are attributed primarily to V - V energy transfer, and they generally conform to a simple energy gap law. A small deviation was found for the CO(v) + DCl(v') relaxation rates. Upper limits for the self relaxation by V - R,T of HCl(v=2) and HBr(v=2) and for the two quantum exchange between HCl and HBr were determined. The HF dimer was detected at 295/sup 0/K and 30 torr HF pressure with an optoacoustic spectrometer using the OPO. Pulsed and chopped, resonant and non-resonant spectrophones are analyzed in detail. From experiments and first order perturbation theory, these V - V exchange rates appear to behave as a first order perturbation in the vibrational coordinates. The rotational dynamics are known to be complicated however, and the coupled rotational - vibrational dynamics were investigated theoreticaly in infinite order by the Dillon and Stephenson and the first Magnus approximations. Large ..delta..J transitions appear to be important, but these calculations differ by orders of magnitude on specific rovibrational transition rates. Integration of the time dependent semiclassical equations by a modified Gordon method and a rotationally distorted wave approximation are discussed as methods which would treat the rotational motion more accurately. 225 references.

  10. Structural relaxation in a heavily cold-worked metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mear, F.O. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: alg13@cam.ac.uk; Lenk, B.; Zhang, Y.; Greer, A.L. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Differential scanning calorimetry heating runs on as-cast and shot-peened bulk metallic glass Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 10}P{sub 20} show a broad temperature range of heat release (relaxation spectrum) with two peaks. The higher-temperature peak is reduced by shot-peening, suggesting uniform deformation and partial relaxation of the glassy structure. Peening of pre-annealed samples shows the stored energy of cold work to be a few per cent of the work done. Peening increases atomic mobility, revealed by a downward temperature shift of the relaxation spectrum.

  11. Developing a Learning Algorithm-Generated Empirical Relaxer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Wayne [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Applied Math; Kallman, Josh [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Toreja, Allen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gallagher, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jiang, Ming [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Laney, Dan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    One of the main difficulties when running Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) simulations is determining how much to relax the mesh during the Eulerian step. This determination is currently made by the user on a simulation-by-simulation basis. We present a Learning Algorithm-Generated Empirical Relaxer (LAGER) which uses a regressive random forest algorithm to automate this decision process. We also demonstrate that LAGER successfully relaxes a variety of test problems, maintains simulation accuracy, and has the potential to significantly decrease both the person-hours and computational hours needed to run a successful ALE simulation.

  12. Active muscular relaxation techniques. Part I. Basic principles and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebenson, C

    1989-12-01

    New treatment methods are being incorporated into chiropractic care. These methods include muscular relaxation techniques which have their origins in physical medicine and osteopathic approaches developed in the late 1940s. They involve active participation by the patient and are, therefore, ideal introductions into self-care and rehabilitation. These active muscular relaxation techniques are complimentary to chiropractic adjustments. This article describes three different methods used to relax hypertonic musculature. The different types of muscle hypertonicity are described. These active procedures are compared to other passive methods such as spray and stretch and massage.

  13. Effects of different "relaxing" music styles on the autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Diez, Joaquín; Domé, María Natalia; Delvenne, Andrea Alvarez; Braidot, Nestor; Cardinali, Daniel P; Vigo, Daniel Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects on heart rate variability (HRV) of exposure to different styles of "relaxing" music. Autonomic responses to musical stimuli were correlated with subjective preferences regarding the relaxing properties of each music style. Linear and nonlinear HRV analysis was conducted in 25 healthy subjects exposed to silence or to classical, new age or romantic melodies in a random fashion. At the end of the study, subjects were asked to choose the melody that they would use to relax. The low-to-high-frequency ratio was significantly higher when subjects were exposed to "new age" music when compared with silence (3.4 ± 0.3 vs. 2.6 ± 0.3, respectively, P classical" or "romantic" melodies (2.1 ± 0.4 and 2.2 ± 0.3). These results were related to a reduction in the high frequency component with "new age" compared to silence (17.4 ± 1.9 vs. 23.1 ± 1.1, respectively P music induced a shift in HRV from higher to lower frequencies, independently on the music preference of the listener.

  14. Effects of different "relaxing" music styles on the autonomic nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Pérez-Lloret

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the effects on heart rate variability (HRV of exposure to different styles of "relaxing" music. Autonomic responses to musical stimuli were correlated with subjective preferences regarding the relaxing properties of each music style. Linear and nonlinear HRV analysis was conducted in 25 healthy subjects exposed to silence or to classical, new age or romantic melodies in a random fashion. At the end of the study, subjects were asked to choose the melody that they would use to relax. The low-to-high-frequency ratio was significantly higher when subjects were exposed to "new age" music when compared with silence (3.4 ± 0.3 vs. 2.6 ± 0.3, respectively, P < 0.02, while no differences were found with "classical" or "romantic" melodies (2.1 ± 0.4 and 2.2 ± 0.3. These results were related to a reduction in the high frequency component with "new age" compared to silence (17.4 ± 1.9 vs. 23.1 ± 1.1, respectively P < 0.004. Significant differences across melodies were also found for nonlinear HRV indexes. Subjects′ preferences did not correlate with autonomic responses to melodies. The results suggest that "new age" music induced a shift in HRV from higher to lower frequencies, independently on the music preference of the listener.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide as a mediator of human corpus cavernosum smooth-muscle relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Sorrentino, Raffaella; Maffia, Pasquale; Mirone, Vincenzo; Imbimbo, Ciro; Fusco, Ferdinando; De Palma, Raffaele; Ignarro, Louis J.; Cirino, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is synthesized by 2 enzymes, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE). l-Cysteine (l-Cys) acts as a natural substrate for the synthesis of H2S. Human penile tissue possesses both CBS and CSE, and tissue homogenates efficiently convert l-Cys to H2S. CBS and CSE are localized in the muscular trabeculae and the smooth-muscle component of the penile artery, whereas CSE but not CBS is also expressed in peripheral nerves. Exogenous H2S [sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS)] or l-Cys causes a concentration-dependent relaxation of strips of human corpus cavernosum. l-Cys relaxation is inhibited by the CBS inhibitor, aminoxyacetic acid (AOAA). Electrical field stimulation of human penile tissue, under resting conditions, causes an increase in tension that is significantly potentiated by either propargylglycine (PAG; CSE inhibitor) or AOAA. In rats, NaHS and l-Cys promote penile erection, and the response to l-Cys is blocked by PAG. Our data demonstrate that the l-Cys/H2S pathway mediates human corpus cavernosum smooth-muscle relaxation. PMID:19255435

  16. Dynamics of pistachio oils by proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Pellegrino; Mineo, Valerio; Bubici, Salvatore; De Pasquale, Claudio; Aboud, Farid; Maccotta, Antonella; Planeta, Diego; Alonzo, Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    A number of pistachio oils were selected in order to test the efficacy of nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation dispersion (NMRD) technique in the evaluation of differences among oils (1) obtained from seeds subjected to different thermal desiccation processes, (2) retrieved from seeds belonging to the same cultivar grown in different geographical areas and (3) produced by using seed cultivars sampled in the same geographical region. NMRD measures relaxation rate values which are related to the dynamics of the chemical components of complex food systems. Results not only allowed to relate kinematic viscosity to relaxometry parameters but also were successful in the differentiation among the aforementioned oils. In fact, from the one hand, the larger the kinematic viscosity, the faster the rotational motions appeared as compared to the translational ones. On the other hand, relaxation rate curves (NMRD) varied according to the oxidative stresses and chemical composition of each sample. The present study showed for the first time that NMRD is a very promising technique for quick evaluations of pistachio oil quality without the need for time-consuming chemical manipulations.

  17. Endothelial relaxation mechanisms and oxidative stress are restored by atorvastatin therapy in ovariectomized rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Facco Caliman

    Full Text Available The studies on hormone replacement therapy (HRT in females with estrogen deficiency are not conclusive. Thus, non-estrogen therapies, such as atorvastatin (ATO, could be new strategies to substitute or complement HRT. This study evaluated the effects of ATO on mesenteric vascular bed (MVB function from ovariectomized (OVX female rats. Female rats were divided into control SHAM, OVX, and OVX treated with 17β-estradiol (EST or ATO groups. The MVB reactivity was determined in organ chambers, vascular oxidative stress by dihydroethidine staining, and the expression of target proteins by western blot. The reduction in acetylcholine-induced relaxation in OVX rats was restored by ATO or EST treatment. The endothelium-dependent nitric oxide (NO component was reduced in OVX rats, whereas the endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF component or prostanoids were not altered in the MVBs. Endothelial dysfunction in OVX rats was associated with oxidative stress, an up-regulation of iNOS and NADPH oxidase expression and a down-regulation of eNOS expression. Treatment with ATO or EST improved the NO component of the relaxation and normalized oxidative stress and the expression of those signaling pathways enzymes. Thus, the protective effect of ATO on endothelial dysfunction caused by estrogen deficiency highlights a significant therapeutic benefit for statins independent of its effects on cholesterol, thus providing evidence that non-estrogen therapy could be used for cardiovascular benefit in an estrogen-deficient state, such as menopause.

  18. Relaxation phenomena in dense glassy polymer membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, R.H.B.; Bouma, Richard Hendrik Bouke

    1995-01-01

    Dense polymeric films can be used as permeation-selective barriers which change the composition of a fluid by differences in solubility and/or diffusivity of fluid components in the membrane material. In general glassy polymers show rather high selectivities, but usually in combination with low

  19. Optimal Echo Spacing for Multi-Echo Imaging measurements of Bi-exponential T2 relaxation

    OpenAIRE

    Dula, Adrienne N.; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Does, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    Calculations, analytical solutions, and simulations were used to investigate the trade-off of echo spacing and receiver bandwidth for the characterization of bi-exponential transverse relaxation using a multi-echo imaging pulse sequence. The Cramer-Rao lower bound of the standard deviation of the four parameters of a two-pool model were computed for a wide range of component T2 values and echo spacing. The results demonstrate that optimal echo spacing (TEopt) is not generally the minimal avai...

  20. Criticality in the Relaxation Phase of a Spontaneously Contracting Atria Isolated from a Frog's Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contoyiannis, Y. F.; Diakonos, F. K.; Papaefthimiou, C.; Theophilidis, G.

    2004-08-01

    We investigate the spontaneous contraction generated by the atria of a frog’s heart isolated in a physiological solution. In the relaxation phase, the recorded time series for two different sampling rates possesses an intermittent component similar to the dynamics of the order parameter’s fluctuations of a thermal critical system belonging to the mean field universality class. This behavior is not visible through conventional analysis in the frequency space due to the presence of Brownian noise dominating the corresponding power spectrum.

  1. Rapidly rotating red giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehan, Charlotte; Mosser, Benoît; Michel, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Stellar oscillations give seismic information on the internal properties of stars. Red giants are targets of interest since they present mixed modes, wich behave as pressure modes in the convective envelope and as gravity modes in the radiative core. Mixed modes thus directly probe red giant cores, and allow in particular the study of their mean core rotation. The high-quality data obtained by CoRoT and Kepler satellites represent an unprecedented perspective to obtain thousands of measurements of red giant core rotation, in order to improve our understanding of stellar physics in deep stellar interiors. We developed an automated method to obtain such core rotation measurements and validated it for stars on the red giant branch. In this work, we particularly focus on the specific application of this method to red giants having a rapid core rotation. They show complex spectra where it is tricky to disentangle rotational splittings from mixed-mode period spacings. We demonstrate that the method based on the identification of mode crossings is precise and efficient. The determination of the mean core rotation directly derives from the precise measurement of the asymptotic period spacing ΔΠ1 and of the frequency at which the crossing of the rotational components is observed.

  2. Ber analysis of the box relaxation for BPSK signal recovery

    KAUST Repository

    Thrampoulidis, Christos

    2016-06-24

    We study the problem of recovering an n-dimensional BPSK signal from m linear noise-corrupted measurements using the box relaxation method which relaxes the discrete set {±1}n to the convex set [-1,1]n to obtain a convex optimization algorithm followed by hard thresholding. When the noise and measurement matrix have iid standard normal entries, we obtain an exact expression for the bit-wise probability of error Pe in the limit of n and m growing and m/n fixed. At high SNR our result shows that the Pe of box relaxation is within 3dB of the matched filter bound (MFB) for square systems, and that it approaches the (MFB) as m grows large compared to n. Our results also indicate that as m, n → ∞, for any fixed set of size k, the error events of the corresponding k bits in the box relaxation method are independent.

  3. Multi-region relaxed Hall magnetohydrodynamics with flow

    CERN Document Server

    Lingam, Manasvi; Hudson, Stuart R

    2016-01-01

    The recent formulations of multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (MRxMHD) have generalized the famous Woltjer-Taylor states by incorporating a collection of "ideal barriers" that prevent global relaxation, and flow. In this paper, we generalize MRxMHD with flow to include Hall effects (MRxHMHD), and thereby obtain the partially relaxed counterparts of the famous double Beltrami states as a special subset. The physical and mathematical consequences arising from the introduction of the Hall term are also presented. We demonstrate that our results (in the ideal MHD limit) constitute an important subset of ideal MHD equilibria, and we compare our approach against other variational principles proposed for deriving the relaxed states.

  4. Relaxations in the metastable rotator phase of n-eicosane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giambattista, C.; Sanctuary, R.; Perigo, E.; Baller, J.

    2015-08-01

    We present relaxations in the metastable rotator phase of the n-alkane eicosane (C20H42). The relaxation times found by calorimetry increase with increasing temperature on approaching the melting temperature of the rotator phase. This is the opposite behavior than the one found for classical activated processes. The relaxation behavior found by calorimetry is confirmed by investigations of the lattice structure with X-ray diffraction. It is shown that one lattice parameter of the orthorhombic phase relaxes on the same time scales found in calorimetry, whereas another lattice parameter reacts almost instantly on temperature perturbations. Increasing cooperativity for the creation of conformational defects in the alkane chains is proposed to be responsible for the observed behaviour.

  5. Search Trees with Relaxed Balance and Near-Optimal Height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerberg, Rolf; Larsen, Kim Skak; Jensen, Rune E.

    2001-01-01

    We introduce a relaxed k-tree, a search tree with relaxed balance and a height bound, when in balance, of (1+epsilon)log_2 n + 1, for any epsilon > 0. The number of nodes involved in rebalancing is O(1/epsilon) per update in the amortized sense, and O(log n/epsilon) in the worst case sense....... This is the first binary search tree with relaxed balance having a height bound better than c log_2 n for a fixed constant c. In all previous proposals, the constant is at least 1/log_2 phi>1.44, where phi is the golden ratio. As a consequence, we can also define a standard (non-relaxed) k-tree with amortized...... constant rebalancing, which is an improvement over the current definition. World Wide Web search engines are possible applications for this line of work....

  6. Effect of Progressive Muscle Relaxation in Female Health Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Female stress, relaxation techniques, health care professionals. Original Article ... Stress management programs such as meditation, yoga, hypnosis ..... stress in undergraduate medical students at S. N. Medical College,. Bagalkot ...

  7. Dielectric relaxation studies of dilute solutions of amides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malathi, M.; Sabesan, R.; Krishnan, S

    2003-11-15

    The dielectric constants and dielectric losses of formamide, acetamide, N-methyl acetamide, acetanilide and N,N-dimethyl acetamide in dilute solutions of 1,4-dioxan/benzene have been measured at 308 K using 9.37 GHz, dielectric relaxation set up. The relaxation time for the over all rotation {tau}{sub (1)} and that for the group rotation {tau}{sub (2)} of (the molecules were determined using Higasi's method. The activation energies for the processes of dielectric relaxation and viscous flow were determined by using Eyring's rate theory. From relaxation time behaviour of amides in non-polar solvent, solute-solvent and solute-solute type of molecular association is proposed.

  8. Parkinson's disease tremor is diminished with relaxation guided imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Ilana; Benyakov, Orna; Erikh, Ilana; Suraiya, Suheir; Schiller, Yitzhak

    2009-10-30

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may have pronounced tremor that exacerbates during stress. To determine whether PD tremor improves with relaxation guided imagery (RGI) and relaxing music. Twenty patients with PD with moderate to severe tremor participated in sessions where relaxation techniques were implemented. Tremor was objectively monitored using an accelerometer. RGI dramatically decreased tremor in all 20 patients (baseline 270.38 +/- 85.82 vs. RGI 35.57 +/- 43.90 movements per minute P music significantly reduced tremor but to a lesser degree than RGI (220.04 +/- 106.53 movements per minute P = 0.01). Self-relaxation had no significant effect on tremor. RGI can supplement conventional medical treatments for tremor in patients with PD on best medical treatment. (c) 2009 Movement Disorder Society.

  9. Dielectric relaxation and hydrogen bonding studies of 1, 3 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    propanediol, 1,4-dioxane and their mixtures have been studied using time domain reflectometry (TDR). The excess permittivity, excess inverse relaxation time and Kirkwood correlation factor have also been determined at various concentrations of ...

  10. An Initialization Technique for the Waveform-Relaxation Circuit Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Habib, S. E.-D.; Al-Karim, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the development of the Cairo University Waveform Relaxation (CUWORX) simulator. In order to accelerate the convergence of the waveform relaxation (WR) in the presence of logic feedback, CUWORK is initialized via a logic simulator. This logic initialization scheme is shown to be highly effective for digital synchronous circuits. Additionally, this logic initialization scheme preserves fully the multi-rate properties of the WR algorithm.

  11. Method to measure the relaxation rates of molecular levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakos, J. S.; Mandula, K.; Sorlei, Zsuzsa

    The influence of buffer gases (He and SF6) on vibrational and relaxational rates has been studied. The line shapes (width and amplitude) of the small signal gain of the 119-micron methanol laser line are measured at different methanol vapor and buffer gas pressures using an infrared far-infrared double resonance method. The relaxation rates are calculated using the modified rate equations of the Henningsen-Jensen model.

  12. The use of relaxation, hypnosis, and imagery in sport psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newmark, Thomas S; Bogacki, David F

    2005-10-01

    Hypnosis is a procedure during which a mental health professional suggests that a patient experience changes in sensations, perceptions, thoughts, or behavior. The purpose of this article is to briefly describe the use of various methods of relaxation, hypnosis, and imagery techniques available to enhance athletic performance. The characteristics that these techniques have in common include relaxation, suggestibility, concentration, imaginative ability, reality testing, brain function, autonomic control, and placebo effect. Case studies are provided for illustration.

  13. Multiple-Relaxation-Time Lattice Boltzmann Models in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    dHumieres, Dominique; Ginzburg, Irina; Krafczyk, Manfred; Lallemand, Pierre; Luo, Li-Shi; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a concise exposition of the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann equation, with examples of fifteen-velocity and nineteen-velocity models in three dimensions. Simulation of a diagonally lid-driven cavity flow in three dimensions at Re=500 and 2000 is performed. The results clearly demonstrate the superior numerical stability of the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann equation over the popular lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equation.

  14. Relaxation of jammed colloidal suspensions after shear cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Francesca; Lasne, David; Sarcia, Régis; Hébraud, Pascal

    2006-07-01

    The dynamics of heterogeneities in a shear thickening, concentrated colloidal suspension is investigated through speckle visibility spectroscopy, a dynamic light scattering technique recently introduced [P. K. Dixon and D. J. Durian, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 184302 (2003)]. Formation of shear-induced heterogeneities is observed in the jamming regime, and their relaxation after shear cessation is monitored as a function of the applied shear stress. The relaxation time of these heterogeneities increases when a higher stress is applied.

  15. In Vivo Detection of PARACEST Agents With Relaxation Correction

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Craig K.; Li, Alex X.; Suchý, Mojmír; Hudson, Robert H.E.; Menon, Ravi S.; Bartha, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Several pulse sequences have been used to detect paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) contrast agents in animals to quantify the uptake over time following a bolus injection. The observed signal change is a combination of relaxation effects and PARACEST contrast. The purpose of the current study was to isolate the PARACEST effect from the changes in bulk water relaxation induced by the PARACEST agent in vivo for the fast low-angle shot pulse sequence. A fast low-angle...

  16. Stretched exponential relaxation and ac universality in disordered dielectrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milovanov, Alexander V.; Rypdal, Kristoffer; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the connection between the properties of dielectric relaxation and alternating-current (ac) conduction in disordered dielectrics. The discussion is divided between the classical linear-response theory and a self-consistent dynamical modeling. The key issues are stretc....... Mathematically, our study refers to the expanding area of fractional calculus and we propose a systematic derivation of the fractional relaxation and fractional diffusion equations from the property of ac universality....

  17. Mechanism of resveratrol-induced relaxation in the human gallbladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ching-Chung; Lee, Ming-Che; Tey, Shu-Leei; Liu, Ching-Wen; Huang, Shih-Che

    2017-05-08

    Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound extracted from plants and is also a constituent of red wine. Resveratrol produces relaxation of vascular smooth muscle and may prevent cardiovascular diseases. Although resveratrol has been reported to cause relaxation of the guinea pig gallbladder, limited data are available about the effect of resveratrol on the gallbladder smooth muscle in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relaxation effects of resveratrol in human gallbladder muscle strips. We studied the relaxant effects of resveratrol in human gallbladder. In addition, we also investigated mechanism of resveratrol-induced relaxation in human gallbladder by tetraethylammonium (a non-selective potassium channels blocker), iberiotoxin (an inhibitor of large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel), glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker), charybdotoxin (an inhibitor of large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels and slowly inactivating voltage-gated potassium channels), apamine (a selective inhibitor of the small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel), KT 5720 (a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A inhibitor), KT 5823 (a cGMP-dependent protein kinase G inhibitor), NG-Nitro-L-arginine (a competitive inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase), tetrodotoxin (a selective neuronal Na+ channel blocker), and ω-conotoxin GVIA (a selective neuronal Ca2+ channel blocker). The present study showed that resveratrol has relaxant effects in human gallbladder muscle strips. In addition, we found that resveratrol-induced relaxation in human gallbladder is associated with nitric oxide, ATP-sensitive potassium channel, and large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel pathways. This study provides the first evidence concerning the relaxant effects of resveratrol in human gallbladder muscle strips. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that resveratrol is a potential new drug or health supplement in the treatment of biliary

  18. Immersed Boundary-Lattice Boltzmann Method Using Two Relaxation Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Hayashi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available An immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM using a two-relaxation time model (TRT is proposed. The collision operator in the lattice Boltzmann equation is modeled using two relaxation times. One of them is used to set the fluid viscosity and the other is for numerical stability and accuracy. A direct-forcing method is utilized for treatment of immersed boundary. A multi-direct forcing method is also implemented to precisely satisfy the boundary conditions at the immersed boundary. Circular Couette flows between a stationary cylinder and a rotating cylinder are simulated for validation of the proposed method. The method is also validated through simulations of circular and spherical falling particles. Effects of the functional forms of the direct-forcing term and the smoothed-delta function, which interpolates the fluid velocity to the immersed boundary and distributes the forcing term to fixed Eulerian grid points, are also examined. As a result, the following conclusions are obtained: (1 the proposed method does not cause non-physical velocity distribution in circular Couette flows even at high relaxation times, whereas the single-relaxation time (SRT model causes a large non-physical velocity distortion at a high relaxation time, (2 the multi-direct forcing reduces the errors in the velocity profile of a circular Couette flow at a high relaxation time, (3 the two-point delta function is better than the four-point delta function at low relaxation times, but worse at high relaxation times, (4 the functional form of the direct-forcing term does not affect predictions, and (5 circular and spherical particles falling in liquids are well predicted by using the proposed method both for two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases.

  19. Relaxation versus adiabatic quantum steady-state preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venuti, Lorenzo Campos; Albash, Tameem; Marvian, Milad; Lidar, Daniel; Zanardi, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Adiabatic preparation of the ground states of many-body Hamiltonians in the closed-system limit is at the heart of adiabatic quantum computation, but in reality systems are always open. This motivates a natural comparison between, on the one hand, adiabatic preparation of steady states of Lindbladian generators and, on the other hand, relaxation towards the same steady states subject to the final Lindbladian of the adiabatic process. In this work we thus adopt the perspective that the goal is the most efficient possible preparation of such steady states, rather than ground states. Using known rigorous bounds for the open-system adiabatic theorem and for mixing times, we are then led to a disturbing conclusion that at first appears to doom efforts to build physical quantum annealers: relaxation seems to always converge faster than adiabatic preparation. However, by carefully estimating the adiabatic preparation time for Lindbladians describing thermalization in the low-temperature limit, we show that there is, after all, room for an adiabatic speedup over relaxation. To test the analytically derived bounds for the adiabatic preparation time and the relaxation time, we numerically study three models: a dissipative quasifree fermionic chain, a single qubit coupled to a thermal bath, and the "spike" problem of n qubits coupled to a thermal bath. Via these models we find that the answer to the "which wins" question depends for each model on the temperature and the system-bath coupling strength. In the case of the "spike" problem we find that relaxation during the adiabatic evolution plays an important role in ensuring a speedup over the final-time relaxation procedure. Thus, relaxation-assisted adiabatic preparation can be more efficient than both pure adiabatic evolution and pure relaxation.

  20. Contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation via the atomic scale Green-Kubo stress correlation function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, V A

    2017-11-14

    We studied the connection between the structural relaxation and viscosity for a binary model of repulsive particles in the supercooled liquid regime. The used approach is based on the decomposition of the macroscopic Green-Kubo stress correlation function into the correlation functions between the atomic level stresses. Previously we used the approach to study an iron-like single component system of particles. The role of vibrational motion has been addressed through the demonstration of the relationship between viscosity and the shear waves propagating over large distances. In our previous considerations, however, we did not discuss the role of the structural relaxation. Here we suggest that the contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation can be taken into account through the consideration of the contribution from the atomic stress auto-correlation term only. This conclusion, however, does not mean that only the auto-correlation term represents the contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation. Previously the role of the structural relaxation for viscosity has been addressed through the considerations of the transitions between inherent structures and within the mode-coupling theory by other authors. In the present work, we study the structural relaxation through the considerations of the parent liquid and the atomic level stress correlations in it. The comparison with the results obtained on the inherent structures also is made. Our current results suggest, as our previous observations, that in the supercooled liquid regime, the vibrational contribution to viscosity extends over the times that are much larger than the Einstein's vibrational period and much larger than the times that it takes for the shear waves to propagate over the model systems. Besides addressing the atomic level shear stress correlations, we also studied correlations between the atomic level pressure elements.

  1. Contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation via the atomic scale Green-Kubo stress correlation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    We studied the connection between the structural relaxation and viscosity for a binary model of repulsive particles in the supercooled liquid regime. The used approach is based on the decomposition of the macroscopic Green-Kubo stress correlation function into the correlation functions between the atomic level stresses. Previously we used the approach to study an iron-like single component system of particles. The role of vibrational motion has been addressed through the demonstration of the relationship between viscosity and the shear waves propagating over large distances. In our previous considerations, however, we did not discuss the role of the structural relaxation. Here we suggest that the contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation can be taken into account through the consideration of the contribution from the atomic stress auto-correlation term only. This conclusion, however, does not mean that only the auto-correlation term represents the contribution to viscosity from the structural relaxation. Previously the role of the structural relaxation for viscosity has been addressed through the considerations of the transitions between inherent structures and within the mode-coupling theory by other authors. In the present work, we study the structural relaxation through the considerations of the parent liquid and the atomic level stress correlations in it. The comparison with the results obtained on the inherent structures also is made. Our current results suggest, as our previous observations, that in the supercooled liquid regime, the vibrational contribution to viscosity extends over the times that are much larger than the Einstein's vibrational period and much larger than the times that it takes for the shear waves to propagate over the model systems. Besides addressing the atomic level shear stress correlations, we also studied correlations between the atomic level pressure elements.

  2. Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-01-21

    The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible

  3. Weak nanoscale chaos and anomalous relaxation in DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Alexey K.

    2017-06-01

    Anomalous nonexponential relaxation in hydrated biomolecules is commonly attributed to the complexity of the free-energy landscapes, similarly to polymers and glasses. It was found recently that the hydrogen-bond breathing of terminal DNA base pairs exhibits a slow power-law relaxation attributable to weak Hamiltonian chaos, with parameters similar to experimental data. Here, the relationship is studied between this motion and spectroscopic signals measured in DNA with a small molecular photoprobe inserted into the base-pair stack. To this end, the earlier computational approach in combination with an analytical theory is applied to the experimental DNA fragment. It is found that the intensity of breathing dynamics is strongly increased in the internal base pairs that flank the photoprobe, with anomalous relaxation quantitatively close to that in terminal base pairs. A physical mechanism is proposed to explain the coupling between the relaxation of base-pair breathing and the experimental response signal. It is concluded that the algebraic relaxation observed experimentally is very likely a manifestation of weakly chaotic dynamics of hydrogen-bond breathing in the base pairs stacked to the photoprobe and that the weak nanoscale chaos can represent an ubiquitous hidden source of nonexponential relaxation in ultrafast spectroscopy.

  4. Topology Synthesis of Structures Using Parameter Relaxation and Geometric Refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, P. V.; Tinker, M. L.

    2007-01-01

    Typically, structural topology optimization problems undergo relaxation of certain design parameters to allow the existence of intermediate variable optimum topologies. Relaxation permits the use of a variety of gradient-based search techniques and has been shown to guarantee the existence of optimal solutions and eliminate mesh dependencies. This Technical Publication (TP) will demonstrate the application of relaxation to a control point discretization of the design workspace for the structural topology optimization process. The control point parameterization with subdivision has been offered as an alternative to the traditional method of discretized finite element design domain. The principle of relaxation demonstrates the increased utility of the control point parameterization. One of the significant results of the relaxation process offered in this TP is that direct manufacturability of the optimized design will be maintained without the need for designer intervention or translation. In addition, it will be shown that relaxation of certain parameters may extend the range of problems that can be addressed; e.g., in permitting limited out-of-plane motion to be included in a path generation problem.

  5. Mechanisms responsible for neuromuscular relaxation in the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Diana; Mañé, Noemí; Gil, Víctor; Martínez-Cutillas, Míriam; Jiménez, Marcel

    2016-11-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) is responsible for the genesis of motor patterns ensuring an appropriate intestinal transit. Enteric neurons are classified into afferent, interneuron, and motoneuron types, with the latter two being further categorized as excitatory or inhibitory, which cause smooth muscle contraction or inhibition, respectively. Muscle relaxation mechanisms are key for the understanding of physiological processes such as sphincter relaxation, gastric accommodation, or descending peristaltic reflex. Nitric oxide (NO) and ATP or a related purine represent the primary inhibitory neurotransmitters. Nitrergic neurons synthesize NO through nNOS enzyme activity. NO diffuses across the cell membrane to bind its receptor, namely, guanylyl cyclase, and then activates a number of intracellular mechanisms that ultimately result in muscle relaxation. ATP acts as an inhibitory neurotransmitter together with NO, and the purinergic P2Y1 membrane receptor has been identified as a key item in order to understand how ATP may relax intestinal smooth muscle. Although, probably, no clinician doubts the significance of NO in the pathophysiology of digestive motility, the relevance of purinergic neurotransmission is apparently much lower, as ATP has not been associated with any specific motor dysfunction yet. The goal of this review is to discuss the function of both relaxation mechanisms in order to establish the physiological grounds of potential motor dysfunctions arising from impaired intestinal relaxation.

  6. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON THE RELAXATION OF BOLTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abid

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Loss of pre-load with time, commonly known as ‘Relaxation’ is an established phenomena. Behaviour of a bolted joint depends upon the pre-load in the bolts in use, not the pre-load introduced by the mechanic. Loss of pre-load is expected due to the many factors such as embedment relaxation, gasket creep, elastic interactions, and vibration loosening or stress relaxation. In a gasketed joint, due to the gasket flexibility, relaxation is always substantial during preliminary passes, as 80 to 100% loss is not uncommon in almost all the bolts, resulting in a dynamic behaviour. Pre-load in a gasketed joint is stabilized and retained to certain extent in the final passes only. In a non-gasketed joint, due to no gasket and no rotation its static behaviour is concluded. This paper highlights the factors affecting the amount of relaxation with time and presents important considerations that can reduce this. Both the short and long term relaxations are recorded and a ‘best fit’ model for relaxation behaviour is derived.

  7. Equilibrium magnetization and magnetization relaxation of multicore magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilg, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    Multicore magnetic nanoparticles show promising features for biomedical applications. Their magnetic properties, however, are not well understood to date, so that several ad hoc assumptions are often needed to interpret experimental results. Here, we present a comprehensive computer simulation study on the effect of dipolar interactions and magnetic anisotropy on the equilibrium magnetization and magnetization relaxation dynamics of monodisperse multicore magnetic nanoparticles in viscous solvents. We include thermal fluctuations of the internal Néel relaxation via the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation coupled to rotational Brownian motion of the cluster. We find that the effective magnetic moment of the cluster is reduced compared to the noninteracting case due to frustrated dipole-dipole interactions. Furthermore, the magnetization relaxation is found to proceed in a two-step fashion with a fast initial decay being followed by a long-time relaxation. For moderate dipolar interaction strengths, the latter can be approximated quite well by an exponential decay with rate given by the sum of the relaxation rates in the immobilized state and the Brownian rotation. These findings can be helpful for a better interpretation of experimental data obtained from magnetization relaxation measurements.

  8. PREFACE: Muon spin rotation, relaxation or resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffner, Robert H.; Nagamine, Kanetada

    2004-10-01

    To a particle physicist a muon is a member of the lepton family, a heavy electron possessing a mass of about 1/9 that of a proton and a spin of 1/2, which interacts with surrounding atoms and molecules electromagnetically. Since its discovery in 1937, the muon has been put to many uses, from tests of special relativity to deep inelastic scattering, from studies of nuclei to tests of weak interactions and quantum electrodynamics, and most recently, as a radiographic tool to see inside heavy objects and volcanoes. In 1957 Richard Garwin and collaborators, while conducting experiments at the Columbia University cyclotron to search for parity violation, discovered that spin-polarized muons injected into materials might be useful to probe internal magnetic fields. This eventually gave birth to the modern field of muSR, which stands for muon spin rotation, relaxation or resonance, and is the subject of this special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. Muons are produced in accelerators when high energy protons (generally >500 MeV) strike a target like graphite, producing pions which subsequently decay into muons. Most experiments carried out today use relatively low-energy (~4 MeV), positively-charged muons coming from pions decaying at rest in the skin of the production target. These muons have 100% spin polarization, a range in typical materials of about 180 mg cm-2, and are ideal for experiments in condensed matter physics and chemistry. Negatively-charged muons are also occasionally used to study such things as muonic atoms and muon-catalysed fusion. The muSR technique provides a local probe of internal magnetic fields and is highly complementary to inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance, for example. There are four primary muSR facilities in the world today: ISIS (Didcot, UK), KEK (Tsukuba, Japan), PSI (Villigen, Switzerland) and TRIUMF (Vancouver, Canada), serving about 500 researchers world-wide. A new facility, JPARC (Tokai, Japan

  9. Electron Tunneling in Lithium Ammonia Solutions Probed by Frequency-Dependent Electron-Spin Relaxation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T.J.; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H.; Edwards, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multi-exponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1–10)×10−12 s over a temperature range 230–290K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a timescale of ca. 10−13 s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great potential

  10. Electron tunneling in lithium-ammonia solutions probed by frequency-dependent electron spin relaxation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T J; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H; Edwards, Peter P

    2012-06-06

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T(1)) and spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multiexponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1-10) × 10(-12) s over a temperature range 230-290 K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a time scale of ∼10(-13) s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great

  11. MUSCLE RELAXANTS: ARE THEY NEEDED IN ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Dubinina

    2016-01-01

    follow-up, the patient-rated evaluation of TE efficiency remained significantly unchanged  in Group 1 whereas at the end of the study it significantly increased in Group 2 as compared to the baseline values (p < 0.01. There were no significant differences between the groups in the time course of changes in BASDAI and BASFI. When performing the BASMI tests, there was an intensive increment  in the volume of movements after the third TE lesson. The increment  occurred saltatorily in Group 1, but more rapidly and evenly in Group 2. No serious adverse events were recorded in Group 2 during the investigation. Conclusion. Incorporation of THC into the treatment of patients with AS contributes to the enhanced  efficiency of TE. There is a need for further investigations to study the use of muscle relaxants, including THC,  in AS in order to elaborate recommendations on how to administer this class of drugs for this disease.

  12. Simulating the Formation of Lunar Floor-Fracture Craters Using Elastoviscoplastic Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombard, A. J.; Gillis, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    Lunar floor-fracture craters formed during the height of mare basalt emplacement. Due to a general temporal and spatial relation with the maria, these craters, numbering some 200, may be diagnostic of the thermal structure of the crust during this time. As the name suggests, these craters exhibit brittle failure, generally limited to the central floor region. That, and a shallower depth than fresh lunar craters, has led to two main theories as to their formation: laccolith emplacement under the crater and viscous relaxation. The implications of each model for the state of the Moon's crust during this time are quite different, so the viability of each model must be checked. Laccolith emplacement has been treated elsewhere. However, previous attempts to study the relaxation of the craters have assumed only a uniform, Newtonian viscous response of the near surface to the topographic driving forces, and simply postulated that the fractures resulted from tensile stresses associated with floor uplift. Here, we use a more sophisticated rheological model that includes not only non-Newtonian viscous behavior (i.e., the viscosity is stress-dependent), but also incorporates elastic behavior and a plastic component to the rheology to directly simulate the formation of the floor fractures. The results of our simulations show that while elastoviscoplastic relaxation is potentially viable for larger floor-fracture craters, it is not viable for craters with diameters materials can behave in three main ways: elastically, viscously (via solid-state creep), and brittly (plasticity is a continuum approach to simulate this phenomenon). We combine these three deformation mechanisms in an extended Maxwell solid, where the total strain can be broken down into a simple summation of the elastic, creep, and plastic strains. In relaxation phenomena in general, the system takes advantage of any means possible to eliminate deviatoric stresses by relaxing away the topography. Previous analyses

  13. Diffusion relaxation times of nonequilibrium isolated small bodies and their solid phase ensembles to equilibrium states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2017-08-01

    The possibility of obtaining analytical estimates in a diffusion approximation of the times needed by nonequilibrium small bodies to relax to their equilibrium states based on knowledge of the mass transfer coefficient is considered. This coefficient is expressed as the product of the self-diffusion coefficient and the thermodynamic factor. A set of equations for the diffusion transport of mixture components is formulated, characteristic scales of the size of microheterogeneous phases are identified, and effective mass transfer coefficients are constructed for them. Allowing for the developed interface of coexisting and immiscible phases along with the porosity of solid phases is discussed. This approach can be applied to the diffusion equalization of concentrations of solid mixture components in many physicochemical systems: the mutual diffusion of components in multicomponent systems (alloys, semiconductors, solid mixtures of inert gases) and the mass transfer of an absorbed mobile component in the voids of a matrix consisting of slow components or a mixed composition of mobile and slow components (e.g., hydrogen in metals, oxygen in oxides, and the transfer of molecules through membranes of different natures, including polymeric).

  14. Ice sheet growth with laterally varying bedrock relaxation time

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, Wouter; Vizcaino Rubio, Pablo; De Boer, Bas; van de Wal, Roderik

    2017-04-01

    Isostatic response of the bedrock, or glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) in included in most ice sheet models. This is important because the surface elevation determines the mass balance and thereby implicitly also the strength of the mass balance feedback where higher surface elevation yields lower temperatures implying less melt and vice versa. Usually a single relaxation time or a set of relaxation times is used to model the response everywhere on Earth or at least for an entire ice sheet. In reality the viscosity in the Earth's mantle, and hence the relaxation time experienced by the ice, varies with location. Seismic studies indicate that several regions that were covered by ice during the last glacial cycle are underlain by mantle in which viscosity varies with orders of magnitude, such as Antarctica and North America. The question is whether such a variation of viscosity influences ice evolution. Several GIA models exist that can deal with 3D viscosity, but their large computation times make it nearly impossible to couple them to ice sheet models. Here we use the ANICE ice-sheet model (de Boer et al. 2013) with a simple bedrock-relaxation model in which a different relaxation time is used for separate regions. A temperature anomaly is applied to grow a schematic ice sheet on a flat earth, with other forcing mechanisms neglected. It is shown that in locations with a fast relaxation time of 300 years the equilibrium ice sheet is significantly thinner and narrower but also ice thickness in neighbouring regions (with the more standard relaxation time of 3000 years) is affected.

  15. Fruit juice-induced endothelium-dependent relaxations in isolated porcine coronary arteries: evaluation of different fruit juices and purees and optimization of a red fruit juice blend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Cyril; Kim, Jong-Hun; Trinh, Sandrine; Chataigneau, Thierry; Popken, Anne M; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2011-05-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that several polyphenol-rich sources such as red wine and green tea are potent inducers of endothelium-dependent relaxations in isolated arteries. As various fruits and berries are known to contain high levels of polyphenols, the aim of the present study was to assess the ability of selected pure fruit juices and purees as well as blends to cause endothelium-dependent relaxations in isolated arteries. Vascular reactivity was assessed using porcine coronary artery rings, and fruit juices, purees and blends were characterized for their content in vitamin C, total phenolic, sugar and antioxidant activity. Fruit juices and purees caused variable concentration-dependent relaxations, with blackcurrant, aronia, cranberry, blueberry, lingonberry, and grape being the most effective fruits. Several blends of red fruits caused endothelium-dependent relaxations. Relaxations to blend D involved both a NO- and an EDHF-mediated components. The present findings indicate that some berries and blends of red fruit juices are potent inducers of endothelium-dependent relaxations in the porcine coronary artery. This effect involves both endothelium-derived NO and EDHF, and appears to be dependent on their polyphenolic composition rather than on the polyphenolic content.

  16. Configuring systems from components: the EMS approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogiec, J. M.; Desavouret, E.; Kotelnikov, S.; Trombly-Freytag, K.; Walbridge, D.

    2004-11-01

    EMS is an exercise in component technology. It offers rapid development of specialized data acquisition, visualization and analysis systems via assembly from vertical and horizontal components. The EMS architecture allows for agile development of systems and promotes reuse of software. The framework supports a visual builder that shows connections between components and lists component properties. The system offers both off-line setup of properties and run-time modifications. Multi-bus architecture allows for independent routing of data, controls, debugs, and exceptions. The architecture, configuration process, and control of applications through scripting are presented.

  17. Biexponential longitudinal relaxation in white matter: Characterization and impact on T1 mapping with IR-FSE and MP2RAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioux, James A; Levesque, Ives R; Rutt, Brian K

    2016-06-01

    Magnetization transfer in white matter (WM) causes biexponential relaxation, but most quantitative T1 measurements fit data assuming monoexponential relaxation. The resulting monoexponential T1 estimate varies based on scan parameters and represents a source of variation between studies, especially at high fields. In this study, we characterized WM T1 relaxation and performed simulations to determine how to minimize this deviation. To characterize biexponential relaxation, four volunteers were scanned at 3T and 7T using inversion recovery fast spin echo (IR-FSE) with 13 inversion times (TIs). Three volunteers were scanned with IR-FSE using TIs chosen by simulations to reduce T1 deviation, and with MP2RAGE. At 3T, the biexponential relaxation has a short component of T1  = 48 ms (9%) and a long component of T1  = 939 ms. At 7T the short component is T1  = 57 ms (11%) and the long component is 1349 ms (89%). For IR-FSE, acquiring four TIs with a minimum of 150 ms (3T) or 200 ms (7T) yielded monoexponential T1 estimates that match the long component to within 10 ms. For MP2RAGE, significant differences (90 ms at 3T, 125 ms at 7T) remain at all parameter values. Many T1 mapping sequences yield robust estimates of the long T1 component with suitable choice of TIs, allowing reproducible, sequence-independent T1 values to be measured. However, this is not true of MP2RAGE in its current implementation. Magn Reson Med 75:2265-2277, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Measurement of the relaxation time of hot electrons in laser-solid interaction at relativistic laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Shepherd, R; Chung, H K; Dyer, G; Faenov, A; Fournier, K B; Hansen, S B; Hunter, J; Kemp, A; Pikuz, T; Ping, Y; Widmann, K; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-08-22

    The authors have measured the relaxation time of hot electrons in short pulse laser-solid interactions using a picosecond time-resolved x-ray spectrometer and a time-integrated electron spectrometer. Employing laser intensities of 10{sup 17}, 10{sup 18}, and 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, they find increased laser coupling to hot electrons as the laser intensity becomes relativistic and thermalization of hot electrons at timescales on the order of 10 ps at all laser intensities. They propose a simple model based on collisional coupling and plasma expansion to describe the rapid relaxation of hot electrons. The agreement between the resulting K{sub {alpha}} time-history from this model with the experiments is best at highest laser intensity and less satisfactory at the two lower laser intensities.

  19. Electron spin relaxation enhancement measurements of interspin distances in human, porcine, and Rhodobacter electron transfer flavoprotein ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF QO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Alistair J.; Usselman, Robert J.; Watmough, Nicholas; Simkovic, Martin; Frerman, Frank E.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2008-02-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is a membrane-bound electron transfer protein that links primary flavoprotein dehydrogenases with the main respiratory chain. Human, porcine, and Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO each contain a single [4Fe-4S] 2+,1+ cluster and one equivalent of FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated enzyme and become paramagnetic on reduction with the enzymatic electron donor or with dithionite. The anionic flavin semiquinone can be reduced further to diamagnetic hydroquinone. The redox potentials for the three redox couples are so similar that it is not possible to poise the proteins in a state where both the [4Fe-4S] + cluster and the flavoquinone are fully in the paramagnetic form. Inversion recovery was used to measure the electron spin-lattice relaxation rates for the [4Fe-4S] + between 8 and 18 K and for semiquinone between 25 and 65 K. At higher temperatures the spin-lattice relaxation rates for the [4Fe-4S] + were calculated from the temperature-dependent contributions to the continuous wave linewidths. Although mixtures of the redox states are present, it was possible to analyze the enhancement of the electron spin relaxation of the FAD semiquinone signal due to dipolar interaction with the more rapidly relaxing [4Fe-4S] + and obtain point-dipole interspin distances of 18.6 ± 1 Å for the three proteins. The point-dipole distances are within experimental uncertainty of the value calculated based on the crystal structure of porcine ETF-QO when spin delocalization is taken into account. The results demonstrate that electron spin relaxation enhancement can be used to measure distances in redox poised proteins even when several redox states are present.

  20. Transformation fatigue and stress relaxation of shape memory alloy wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, P.; Bollas, D.; Parthenios, J.; Dracopoulos, V.; Galiotis, C.

    2007-12-01

    The present work deals with the stress generation capability of nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (SMAs) under constrained conditions for two well-defined loading modes: recurrent crystalline transformation (transformation fatigue) and a one-step continuous activation (generated stress relaxation). The data acquired will be very useful during the design process of an SMA Ni-Ti element as a functional part of an assembly. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was employed in order to investigate the transformation characteristics of the alloy before and after the tests. Transformation fatigue tests revealed that the parameter that affects more the rate of the functional degradation is the number of crystalline transitions the wire undergoes. Thus, the service life limit of this material as a stress generator can be reduced to a few thousand working cycles. For stress relaxation, the main factor that affects the ability for stress generation is the working temperature: the higher the temperature above the austenite finish (TAf) limit the higher the relaxation effect. Thermomechanical treatment of the alloy during the tests reveals the 'hidden' transformation from the cubic structure (B2) of austenite to the rhombohedral structure of the R-phase. It is believed that the gradual loss of the stress generation capability of the material under constrained conditions must be associated to a gradual slipping relaxation mechanism. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations on as-received, re-trained, fatigued and stress-relaxed specimens in the martensitic state provide further support for this hypothesis.

  1. Cosmology and astrophysics from relaxed galaxy clusters - I. Sample selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantz, Adam B.; Allen, Steven W.; Morris, R. Glenn; Schmidt, Robert W.; von der Linden, Anja; Urban, Ondrej

    2015-05-01

    This is the first in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Here we present a new, automated method for identifying relaxed clusters based on their morphologies in X-ray imaging data. While broadly similar to others in the literature, the morphological quantities that we measure are specifically designed to provide a fair basis for comparison across a range of data quality and cluster redshifts, to be robust against missing data due to point source masks and gaps between detectors, and to avoid strong assumptions about the cosmological background and cluster masses. Based on three morphological indicators - symmetry, peakiness, and alignment - we develop the symmetry-peakiness-alignment (SPA) criterion for relaxation. This analysis was applied to a large sample of cluster observations from the Chandra and ROSAT archives. Of the 361 clusters which received the SPA treatment, 57 (16 per cent) were subsequently found to be relaxed according to our criterion. We compare our measurements to similar estimators in the literature, as well as projected ellipticity and other image measures, and comment on trends in the relaxed cluster fraction with redshift, temperature, and survey selection method. Code implementing our morphological analysis will be made available on the web (http://www.slac.stanford.edu/amantz/work/morph14/).

  2. Wheal and flare responses to muscle relaxants in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J H; Adelson, D; Walker, B

    1991-11-01

    Chemically and pharmacologically unrelated molecules release histamine in humans to produce both cutaneous and systemic responses. It has been suggested that molecular changes in the new benzylisoquinoline-derived muscle relaxant, atracurium, make it less likely to cause histamine release. We therefore injected volunteers intradermally with equimolar concentrations of various muscle relaxants, morphine, papaverine (a benzylisoquinoline), and histamine, to evaluate the relative ability of these drugs to cause wheal and flare responses, and mast-cell degranulation. There were no significant differences in wheal and flare responses among the three benzylisoquinoline-derived muscle relaxants, D-tubocurarine, metocurine, and atracurium. The cutaneous effects of morphine were significantly greater than those of the benzylisoquinoline muscle relaxants, suggesting both direct vascular changes and histamine release. Papaverine injection was followed by a significant wheal but no flare. Skin biopsies from vecuronium- and papaverine-induced wheals revealed normal intact mast-cell granules, suggesting a direct cutaneous vascular response rather than histamine release. Skin biopsies after morphine and atracurium injections revealed mast-cell degranulation. All evaluated benzylisoquinoline muscle relaxants are equipotent histamine releasers at equimolar concentrations. A hydrogenated, benzylisoquinoline-nitrogen-containing ring, present in atracurium but not in papaverine, appears to be the molecular conformation responsible for mast-cell degranulation by atracurium.

  3. Experimental model of human corpus cavernosum smooth muscle relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommel P. Regadas

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To describe a technique for en bloc harvesting of the corpus cavernosum, cavernous artery and urethra from transplant organ donors and contraction-relaxation experiments with corpus cavernosum smooth muscle. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The corpus cavernosum was dissected to the point of attachment with the crus penis. A 3 cm segment (corpus cavernosum and urethra was isolated and placed in ice-cold sterile transportation buffer. Under magnification, the cavernous artery was dissected. Thus, 2 cm fragments of cavernous artery and corpus cavernosum were obtained. Strips measuring 3 x 3 x 8 mm3 were then mounted vertically in an isolated organ bath device. Contractions were measured isometrically with a Narco-Biosystems force displacement transducer (model F-60, Narco-Biosystems, Houston, TX, USA and recorded on a 4-channel Narco-Biosystems desk model polygraph. RESULTS: Phenylephrine (1µM was used to induce tonic contractions in the corpus cavernosum (3 - 5 g tension and cavernous artery (0.5 - 1g tension until reaching a plateau. After precontraction, smooth muscle relaxants were used to produce relaxation-response curves (10-12M to 10-4 M. Sodium nitroprusside was used as a relaxation control. CONCLUSION: The harvesting technique and the smooth muscle contraction-relaxation model described in this study were shown to be useful instruments in the search for new drugs for the treatment of human erectile dysfunction.

  4. Universal Behavior of Spin Dipolar Relaxation in Atomic Condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuangang; Zhou, Yiquan; Deng, Min; Liu, Qi; Tey, Mengkhoon; Gao, Bo; You, Li

    2017-04-01

    The dipolar relaxation of atomic spinor condensates is studied in terms of the semi-analytical scattering wave functions by utilizing the quantum-defect theory. At nonzero magnetic fields, inelastic dipolar relaxation of exothermic reaction leads to loss of the atomic population. By tuning the bias field, we find that the dipolar relaxation rate exhibits a universal behavior involving a unique dip and peak structure, different from the commonly referenced result based on the Born or the distortedwave Born approximations. The positions for the dip and the peak are shown to be determined dominantly by the short-range s-wave scattering length and the Van der Waals radius, independent of the dipolar interaction strength of ultracold atoms. This is confirmed by the precision measured dipolar relaxation decay rate for both spin-polarized atomic coherent spin states and twin-Fock states of F = 1 87 Rb BoseEinstein condensates. We observe the dipolar relaxation suppression as predicted by our theory for the large bias field, a feature not previously studied experimentally. Our results implicate the possibility of extracting the short-range scattering length and the Van der Waals dispersion coefficient from spin dipolar decay measurements.

  5. Experimental model of human corpus cavernosum smooth muscle relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regadas, Rommel P; Moraes, Maria E A; Mesquita, Francisco J C; Cerqueira, Joao B G; Gonzaga-Silva, Lucio F

    2010-01-01

    To describe a technique for en bloc harvesting of the corpus cavernosum, cavernous artery and urethra from transplant organ donors and contraction-relaxation experiments with corpus cavernosum smooth muscle. The corpus cavernosum was dissected to the point of attachment with the crus penis. A 3 cm segment (corpus cavernosum and urethra) was isolated and placed in ice-cold sterile transportation buffer. Under magnification, the cavernous artery was dissected. Thus, 2 cm fragments of cavernous artery and corpus cavernosum were obtained. Strips measuring 3 x 3 x 8 mm(3) were then mounted vertically in an isolated organ bath device. Contractions were measured isometrically with a Narco-Biosystems force displacement transducer (model F-60, Narco-Biosystems, Houston, TX, USA) and recorded on a 4-channel Narco-Biosystems desk model polygraph. Phenylephrine (1 microM) was used to induce tonic contractions in the corpus cavernosum (3-5 g tension) and cavernous artery (0.5-1 g tension) until reaching a plateau. After precontraction, smooth muscle relaxants were used to produce relaxation-response curves (10(-12) M to 10(-4) M). Sodium nitroprusside was used as a relaxation control. The harvesting technique and the smooth muscle contraction-relaxation model described in this study were shown to be useful instruments in the search for new drugs for the treatment of human erectile dysfunction.

  6. Bias-dependent spin relaxation in a Spin-LED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosco, C.A. C. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)]. E-mail: c.a.c.bosco@tue.nl; Snouck, D. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Van Dorpe, P. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Van Roy, W. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Koopmans, B. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2006-01-25

    We have investigated the bias-dependent spin relaxation in Cu-CoFe-AlO{sub x}-GaAs/AlGaAs-type of Spin-LEDs using microscopic time-resolved magnetization modulation spectroscopy (TIMMS). We observed a significant dependence of the electron spin relaxation time (effects as large as 40%) as a function of applied bias. The additional spin relaxation at non-zero bias is found to scale almost linearly with the injection current, and thereby with the current-induced hole density in the active region. This observation is indicative for a dominant contribution by Bir-Aronov-Pikus (BAP) electron-hole spin-flip scattering. In agreement with this observation, a similar BAP-enhanced spin relaxation shows up at increased laser fluence. From spatio-temporal imaging of spin relaxation, scanning pump and probe beams across the {approx}50{mu} m outside of optical window, we found a significant position dependence (lateral effects) of the spin dynamics.

  7. Ultrafast Energy Relaxation in Single Light-Harvesting Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Malý, Pavel; Cogdell, Richard J; Mančal, Tomáš; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2015-01-01

    Energy relaxation in light-harvesting complexes has been extensively studied by various ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, the fastest processes being in the sub-100 fs range. At the same time much slower dynamics have been observed in individual complexes by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy (SMS). In this work we employ a pump-probe type SMS technique to observe the ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes LH2 of purple bacteria. After excitation at 800 nm, the measured relaxation time distribution of multiple complexes has a peak at 95 fs and is asymmetric, with a tail at slower relaxation times. When tuning the excitation wavelength, the distribution changes in both its shape and position. The observed behaviour agrees with what is to be expected from the LH2 excited states structure. As we show by a Redfield theory calculation of the relaxation times, the distribution shape corresponds to the expected effect of Gaussian disorder of the pigment transition energies. By repe...

  8. Krylov subspace acceleration of waveform relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumsdaine, A.; Wu, Deyun [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Standard solution methods for numerically solving time-dependent problems typically begin by discretizing the problem on a uniform time grid and then sequentially solving for successive time points. The initial time discretization imposes a serialization to the solution process and limits parallel speedup to the speedup available from parallelizing the problem at any given time point. This bottleneck can be circumvented by the use of waveform methods in which multiple time-points of the different components of the solution are computed independently. With the waveform approach, a problem is first spatially decomposed and distributed among the processors of a parallel machine. Each processor then solves its own time-dependent subsystem over the entire interval of interest using previous iterates from other processors as inputs. Synchronization and communication between processors take place infrequently, and communication consists of large packets of information - discretized functions of time (i.e., waveforms).

  9. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  10. Relaxation training for anxiety: a ten-years systematic review with meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Castelnuovo Gianluca; Pagnini Francesco; Manzoni Gian; Molinari Enrico

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Relaxation training is a common treatment for anxiety problems. Lacking is a recent quantitative meta-analysis that enhances understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety reduction outcomes after relaxation treatment. Methods All studies (1997–2007), both RCT, observational and without control group, evaluating the efficacy of relaxation training (Jacobson's progressive relaxation, autogenic training, applied relaxation and meditation) for anxiety p...

  11. Variability and component composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. van der Storm (Tijs)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn component-based product populations, feature models have to be described at the component level to be able to benefit from a product family approach. As a consequence, composition of components becomes very complex. We describe how component-level variability can be managed in the

  12. Mitigating component performance variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gara, Alan G.; Sylvester, Steve S.; Eastep, Jonathan M.; Nagappan, Ramkumar; Cantalupo, Christopher M.

    2018-01-09

    Apparatus and methods may provide for characterizing a plurality of similar components of a distributed computing system based on a maximum safe operation level associated with each component and storing characterization data in a database and allocating non-uniform power to each similar component based at least in part on the characterization data in the database to substantially equalize performance of the components.

  13. Unexpected power-law stress relaxation of entangled ring polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    KAPNISTOS, M.; LANG, M.; PYCKHOUT-HINTZEN, W.; RICHTER, D.; CHO, D.; CHANG, T.

    2016-01-01

    After many years of intense research, most aspects of the motion of entangled polymers have been understood. Long linear and branched polymers have a characteristic entanglement plateau and their stress relaxes by chain reptation or branch retraction, respectively. In both mechanisms, the presence of chain ends is essential. But how do entangled polymers without ends relax their stress? Using properly purified high-molar-mass ring polymers, we demonstrate that these materials exhibit self-similar dynamics, yielding a power-law stress relaxation. However, trace amounts of linear chains at a concentration almost two decades below their overlap cause an enhanced mechanical response. An entanglement plateau is recovered at higher concentrations of linear chains. These results constitute an important step towards solving an outstanding problem of polymer science and are useful for manipulating properties of materials ranging from DNA to polycarbonate. They also provide possible directions for tuning the rheology of entangled polymers. PMID:18953345

  14. Efficient relaxed-Jacobi smoothers for multigrid on parallel computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiang; Mittal, Rajat

    2017-03-01

    In this Technical Note, we present a family of Jacobi-based multigrid smoothers suitable for the solution of discretized elliptic equations. These smoothers are based on the idea of scheduled-relaxation Jacobi proposed recently by Yang & Mittal (2014) [18] and employ two or three successive relaxed Jacobi iterations with relaxation factors derived so as to maximize the smoothing property of these iterations. The performance of these new smoothers measured in terms of convergence acceleration and computational workload, is assessed for multi-domain implementations typical of parallelized solvers, and compared to the lexicographic point Gauss-Seidel smoother. The tests include the geometric multigrid method on structured grids as well as the algebraic grid method on unstructured grids. The tests demonstrate that unlike Gauss-Seidel, the convergence of these Jacobi-based smoothers is unaffected by domain decomposition, and furthermore, they outperform the lexicographic Gauss-Seidel by factors that increase with domain partition count.

  15. Experimental study on relaxation time in direction changing movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chi; Song, Weiguo; Fu, Libi; Lian, Liping; Lo, Siuming

    2017-02-01

    Controlled experiments were conducted to clarify the movement characteristics of pedestrians in direction changing processes. We track pedestrians' trajectories and map them into real space coordinates by the direct linear transformation method. In the acceleration process, the relaxation time and free moving speed in our experiments respectively equal 0.659 s and 1.540 m/s, which are consistent with those for Chinese participants in other experiments. Meanwhile, the values of relaxation time in the direction changing process are calculated by a derived equation from the concept of the social force model. It is observed that the relaxation time is not an invariable parameter, and tends to increase with an increase in the angular difference. Furthermore, results show that pedestrians are insensitive to a tiny angular difference between instantaneous velocity and desired velocity. These experimental results presented in this work can be applied in model development and validation.

  16. Exercise and relaxation intervention for patients with advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Stage, M; Laursen, J

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer patients experience loss of physical capacity, dyspnea, pain, reduced energy and psychological distress. The aim of this study was to explore feasibility, health benefits and barriers of exercise in former sedentary patients with advanced stage lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer...... (NSCLC) (III-IV) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) (ED), undergoing chemotherapy. The intervention consisted of a hospital-based, supervised, group exercise and relaxation program comprising resistance-, cardiovascular- and relaxation training 4 h weekly, 6 weeks, and a concurrent unsupervised home...... exercise and relaxation intervention showed an adherence rate of 76%, whereas the patients failed to comply with the home-based exercise. The hospital-based intervention initiated at time of diagnosis encouraged former sedentary lung cancer patients to participation and was undertaken safely by cancer...

  17. Extreme quantum nonequilibrium, nodes, vorticity, drift and relaxation retarding states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Nicolas G.

    2018-02-01

    Consideration is given to the behaviour of de Broglie trajectories that are separated from the bulk of the Born distribution with a view to describing the quantum relaxation properties of more ‘extreme’ forms of quantum nonequilibrium. For the 2D isotropic harmonic oscillator, through the construction of what is termed the ‘drift field’, a description is given of a general mechanism that causes the relaxation of ‘extreme’ quantum nonequilibrium. Quantum states are found which do not feature this mechanism, so that relaxation may be severely delayed or possibly may not take place at all. A method by which these states may be identified, classified and calculated is given in terms of the properties of the nodes of the state. Properties of the nodes that enable this classification are described for the first time.

  18. Relaxation therapy reduces anxiety in child and adolescent psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platania-Solazzo, A; Field, T M; Blank, J; Seligman, F; Kuhn, C; Schanberg, S; Saab, P

    1992-01-01

    The immediate effects of relaxation therapy (RT) were assessed in 40 hospitalized children and adolescents with diagnoses of adjustment disorder and depression. These effects were assessed using a within subjects pre-test/post-test design and by comparison with a control group of 20 depressed and adjustment disorder patients who watched a 1-h relaxing videotape. The 1-h RT class consisted of yoga exercise, a brief massage and progressive muscle relaxation. Decreases were noted in both self-reported anxiety and in anxious behavior and fidgeting as well as increases in positive affect in the RT but not the video group. In addition, adjustment disorder patients and a third of the depressed patients showed decreases in cortisol levels following RT, while no changes were noted in the video group. Thus, both diagnostic groups appeared to benefit from the RT class.

  19. Modeling of Dielectric Relaxation Processes in Moist Sand Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrov, P. P.; Krasnoukhova, V. N.; Kroshka, E. S.; Lapina, A. S.

    2017-08-01

    The results of experimental measurements in the frequency range 10 kHz - 1 GHz of the complex dielectric permittivity of quartz granule powders of various sizes moistened with distilled water and a salt solution are presented. On the basis of these results, a relaxation model has been constructed that makes it possible to separate the influence of relaxation processes caused by polarization of the water-mineral and water-air interfaces on the complex dielectric permittivity. The model parameters are found for various granule sizes and solution concentrations. It is shown that the relaxation time of both processes decreases with decreasing granule size and increasing the concentration of the solution. A different character of the dielectric permittivity hysteresis at different frequencies with a decrease/increase in the water saturation coefficient is explained. The prospects of using the dielectric method for determining the petrophysical characteristics of rocks are discussed.

  20. Relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy for the study of protein allostery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Patrick J; Mittermaier, Anthony

    2015-06-01

    Allosteric transmission of information between distant sites in biological macromolecules often involves collective transitions between active and inactive conformations. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can yield detailed information on these dynamics. In particular, relaxation dispersion techniques provide structural, dynamic, and mechanistic information on conformational transitions occurring on the millisecond to microsecond timescales. In this review, we provide an overview of the theory and analysis of Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion NMR experiments and briefly describe their application to the study of allosteric dynamics in the homeodomain from the PBX transcription factor (PBX-HD). CPMG NMR data show that local folding (helix/coil) transitions in one part of PBX-HD help to communicate information between two distant binding sites. Furthermore, the combination of CPMG and other spin relaxation data show that this region can also undergo local misfolding, reminiscent of conformational ensemble models of allostery.

  1. Vibrational relaxation of hot carriers in C60 molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjet, Mohamed; Chakraborty, Himadri

    2017-04-01

    Electron-phonon coupling in molecular systems is at the heart of several important physical phenomena, including the mobility of carriers in organic electronic devices. Following the optical absorption, the vibrational relaxation of excited (hot) electrons and holes to the fullerene band-edges driven by electron-phonon coupling, known as the hot carrier thermalization process, is of particular fundamental interest. Using the non-adiabatic molecular dynamical methodology (PYXAID + Quantum Espresso) based on density functional approach, we have performed a simulation of vibrionic relaxations of hot carriers in C60. Time-dependent population decays and transfers in the femtosecond scale from various excited states to the states at the band-edge are calculated to study the details of this relaxation process. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation.

  2. Interface relaxation and band gap shift in epitaxial layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziming Zhu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Although it is well known that the interface relaxation plays the crucial role for the electronic properties in semiconductor epitaxial layers, there is lack of a clear definition of relationship between interfacial bond-energy variation and interface bond-nature-factor (IBNF in epitaxial layers before and after relaxation. Here we establish an analytical method to shed light on the relationship between the IBNF and the bond-energy change, as well as the relation with band offset in epitaxial layers from the perspective of atomic-bond-relaxation consideration and continuum mechanics. The theoretical predictions are consistent with the available evidences, which provide an atomistic understanding on underlying mechanism of interface effect in epitaxial nanostructures. Thus, it will be helpful for opening up to tailor physical-chemical properties of the epitaxial nanostructures to the desired specifications.

  3. Volume relaxation in polymers and its effect on waveguide applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyi; Xiao, Gaozhi; Grover, Chander P

    2004-04-10

    Volume relaxation in polymers and the effect intrinsic to glassy polymers can significantly affect their refractive index over time. Its beta rate has been found to be related only to relaxation temperature T and the glass transition temperature of the polymer Tg and not to the polymeric chemical structure. Universal values of beta have been obtained for polymers and were used to predict the minimum index change related to volume in polymers. The index change is in the range from 7.86 x 10(-5) to 5.26 x 10(-4) when the Tg - T value of polymers is between 90 and 350 degrees C. These volume-relaxation-induced changes can cause serious deterioration or even failure in corresponding polymer waveguide devices, such as arrayed waveguide gratings and variable optical attenuators, when the Tg of a polymer is not sufficiently high. A minimum requirement is therefore suggested for the Tg of polymers used to fabricate waveguide devices.

  4. Accelerating convergence of molecular dynamics-based structural relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Asbjørn

    2005-01-01

    We describe strategies to accelerate the terminal stage of molecular dynamics (MD)based relaxation algorithms, where a large fraction of the computational resources are used. First, we analyze the qualitative and quantitative behavior of the QuickMin family of MD relaxation algorithms and explore...... the influence of spectral properties and dimensionality of the molecular system on the algorithm efficiency. We test two algorithms, the MinMax and Lanczos, for spectral estimation from an MD trajectory, and use this to derive a practical scheme of time step adaptation in MD relaxation algorithms to improve...... efficiency. We also discuss the implementation aspects. Secondly, we explore the final state refinement acceleration by a combination with the conjugate gradient technique, where the key ingredient is an implicit corrector step. Finally, we test the feasibility of passive Hessian matrix accumulation from...

  5. Relaxation Characteristics of 828 DGEBA Epoxy Over Long Time Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoo, Jasmine; Reprogle, Riley C.; Wisler, Brian; Arechederra, Gabriel K.; McCoy, John D.; Kropka, Jamie M.; Long, Kevin N.

    The mechanical relaxation response in uniaxial compression of a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxy was studied over long time periods. The epoxy, 828DEA, was Epon 828 cured with diethanolamine (DEA). A sample was compressed at constant strain rate and held at various strain levels for days to allow the sample to relax. The sample was then compressed further and held once more. The relaxation curves were fit with a stretched exponential function. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Viscous relaxation of the Moho under large lunar basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C. David; Grimm, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    Viscously relaxed topography on the Moon is evidence of a period in lunar history of higher internal temperatures and greater surface activity. Previous work has demonstrated the viscous relaxation of the Tranquilitatis basin surface. Profiles of the lunar Moho under nine basins were constructed from an inversion of lunar gravity data. These profiles show a pattern of increasingly subdued relief with age, for which two explanations have been proposed. First, ancient basins may have initially had extreme Moho relief like that of younger basins like Orientale, but, due to higher internal temperatures in early lunar history, this relief viscously relaxed to that observed today. Second, ductile flow in the crust immediately after basin formation resulted in an initially shallow basin and subdued mantle uplift. The intent is to test the first hypothesis.

  7. Surface relaxation and stress for 5d transition metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zólyomi, V.; Vitos, L.; Kwon, S. K.; Kollár, J.

    2009-03-01

    Using the density functional theory, we present a systematic theoretical study of the layer relaxation and surface stress of 5d transition metals. Our calculations predict layer contractions for all surfaces, except for the (111) surface of face centered cubic Pt and Au, where slight expansions are obtained similarly to the case of the 4d series. We also find that the relaxations of the close packed surfaces decrease with increasing occupation number through the 5d series. The surface stress for the relaxed, most closely packed surfaces shows similar atomic number dependence as the surface energy. Using Cammarata's model and our calculated surface stress and surface energy values, we examine the possibility of surface reconstructions, which is in reasonable agreement with the experimental observations.

  8. Phonon-assisted relaxation in a frustrated antiferromagnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutka, H. [Institute Laue-Langevin, B.P. 156, F-38042, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)]. E-mail: mutka@ill.fr; Payen, C. [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel, UMR 6502, Universite de Nantes, B.P. 32229, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Bono, D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR8502, Universite Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Ehlers, G. [Institute Laue-Langevin, B.P. 156, F-38042, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Fouquet, P. [Institute Laue-Langevin, B.P. 156, F-38042, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Johnson, M.R. [Institute Laue-Langevin, B.P. 156, F-38042, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Mendels, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR8502, Universite Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Mevellec, J.Y. [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel, UMR 6502, Universite de Nantes, B.P. 32229, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Stewart, J.R. [Institute Laue-Langevin, B.P. 156, F-38042, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2007-03-15

    A thermally activated magnetic relaxation is observed using neutron spin-echo in the pyrochlore slab (kagome bilayer) compound SrCr{sub 9x}Ga{sub 12-9x}O{sub 19}(x=0.95) in a restricted temperature range, 4Krelaxation regime with a weaker temperature dependence. The activation energy of the thermally activated relaxation, of the order of 7meV, coincides with the energy of a phonon mode observed with neutron and Raman spectroscopy, indicating a phonon-assisted regime. The experimental observation of phonon-assisted process gives additional insight to the importance of spin-phonon coupling in frustrated magnets with regard to the models mostly based on purely magnetic interactions.

  9. Stability and suppression of turbulence in relaxing molecular gas flows

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoryev, Yurii N

    2017-01-01

    This book presents an in-depth systematic investigation of a dissipative effect which manifests itself as the growth of hydrodynamic stability and suppression of turbulence in relaxing molecular gas flows. The work describes the theoretical foundations of a new way to control stability and laminar turbulent transitions in aerodynamic flows. It develops hydrodynamic models for describing thermal nonequilibrium gas flows which allow the consideration of suppression of inviscid acoustic waves in 2D shear flows. Then, nonlinear evolution of large-scale vortices and Kelvin-Helmholtz waves in relaxing shear flows are studied. Critical Reynolds numbers in supersonic Couette flows are calculated analytically and numerically within the framework of both linear and nonlinear classical energy hydrodynamic stability theories. The calculations clearly show that the relaxation process can appreciably delay the laminar-turbulent transition. The aim of the book is to show the new dissipative effect, which can be used for flo...

  10. Electron spin relaxation in cryptochrome-based magnetoreception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kattnig, Daniel R; Solov'yov, Ilia A; Hore, P J

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic compass sense of migratory birds is thought to rely on magnetically sensitive radical pairs formed photochemically in cryptochrome proteins in the retina. An important requirement of this hypothesis is that electron spin relaxation is slow enough for the Earth's magnetic field to have...... a significant effect on the coherent spin dynamics of the radicals. It is generally assumed that evolutionary pressure has led to protection of the electron spins from irreversible loss of coherence in order that the underlying quantum dynamics can survive in a noisy biological environment. Here, we address...... this question for a structurally characterized model cryptochrome expected to share many properties with the putative avian receptor protein. To this end we combine all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, Bloch-Redfield relaxation theory and spin dynamics calculations to assess the effects of spin relaxation...

  11. Rheology and Relaxation Timescales of ABA Triblock Polymer Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Andrew; Lodge, Timothy

    When dissolved in a midblock selective solvent, ABA polymers form gels composed of aggregated end block micelles bridged by the midblocks. While much effort has been devoted to the study of the structure of these systems, the dynamics of these systems has received less attention. We examine the underlying mechanism of shear relaxation of ABA triblock polymer gels, especially as a function of chain length, composition, and concentration. Recent work using time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering of polystyrene (PS)-block-poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (PEP) in squalane has elucidated many aspects of the dynamics of diblock chain exchange. By using rheology to study bulk relaxation phenomena of the triblock equivalent, PS-PEP-PS, we apply the knowledge gained from the chain exchange studies to bridge the gap between the molecular and macroscopic relaxation phenomena in PS-PEP-PS triblock gels.

  12. Spin Relaxation in InAs Columnar Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umi, Takehiko; Nosho, Hidetaka; Lu, Shulong; Li, Lianhe; Fiore, Andrea; Tackeuchi, Atsushi

    2009-04-01

    We have investigated carrier spin dynamics in InAs columnar quantum dots (CQDs) by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurement. The CQDs were formed by depositing a 1.8 monolayer InAs seed dot layer and a short-period GaAs/InAs superlattice (SL). The spin relaxation time was found to be prolonged from 1.6 to 5.3 ns by increasing the number of SL periods from 3 to 35. The PL decay time also increased from 0.93 to 1.9 ns, indicating a decrease in the spatial overlap of electron and hole wave functions. The changes in both the spin relaxation time and the PL decay time suggest that the Bir-Aronov-Pikus process is the main spin relaxation mechanism.

  13. Spin relaxation via exchange with donor impurity-bound electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Ian

    In the Bir-Aronov-Pikus depolarization process affecting conduction electrons in p-type cubic semiconductors, spin relaxation is driven by exchange with short-lived valence band hole states. We have identified an analogous spin relaxation mechanism in nominally undoped silicon at low temperatures, when many electrons are bound to dilute dopant ion potentials. Inelastic scattering with externally injected conduction electrons accelerated by electric fields can excite transitions into highly spin-orbit-mixed bound excited states, driving strong spin relaxation of the conduction electrons via exchange interaction. We reveal the consequences of this spin depolarization mechanism both below and above the impact ionization threshold, where conventional charge and spin transport are restored. Based upon: Lan Qing, Jing Li, Ian Appelbaum, and Hanan Dery, Phys Rev. B 91, 241405(R) (2015). We acknowledge support from NSF, DTRA, and ONR.

  14. Phonon mediated spin relaxation in a moving quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2015-03-01

    We study decoherence of an electron spin qubit that is being transported in a moving quantum dot. Our focus is on spin relaxation due to phonon noise through the spin-orbit interaction. We find that the effective magnetic field caused by the motion of the electron can either enhance or suppress spin relaxation depending on the angle between the moving direction and the external magnetic field. At low external magnetic field (BAlt 0 . 5 T), the suppression effect can be significant, which indicates that a moving quantum dot can maintain spin coherence better than a static dot. We also find that the spin relaxation rate is not a monotonically increasing function of the applied magnetic field when the motion of the electron is taken into account. We thank financial support by US ARO and NSF PIF.

  15. The calculation of the relaxation processes during dehydration of fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Ershov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The methods of study of relaxation processes that are applicable during fish dehydration considering the influence of the chemical composition, geometric size of the processing object and regime parameters of the dehydration processes are developed in this work. The usage of the numerical methods of calculation on the basis of solution of the second-order differential equation with boundary conditions of the third kind allow with sufficient accuracy for engineering practice modeling the different conditions of the dehydration process conducting with periodic restoration of hydraulic conductivity properties of the objects of dehydration. The proposed calculation methods applicable to dehydration processes. Which consists of a continuous initial period and the combined periods of drying fish and relaxation dehydration facility. During the relaxation is provided an exposure to a drying agent for dewatering for a certain time. During relaxation stops the supply of electric power to the heating elements. Reduces the rate of circulation of the drying agent. In the drying installation is supplied with air of lower temperature and higher relative humidity than the drying agent. In drier conditions are created that constrain external mass transfer and promotes relaxation of moisture, that is, to its redistribution in the thickness of the fish. During the relaxation of the moisture is gradually shifting from the central layers where dehydration has not yet come to the dehydrated surface layers. The appearance of moisture inside the dehydrated surface area leads to putting up and expansion of capillaries. At the next interval change product moisture re-enters the dehydration process, the high conductive properties throughout its volume.

  16. Ultrafast studies of photodissociation in solution: Dissociation, recombination and relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Jason Christopher [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Photodissociation of M(CO)6 (M=Cr,Mo,W) and the formation of solvated M(CO)5•S complex was studied in cyclohexane; rate-limiting step is vibrational energy relaxation from the new bond to the solvent. For both M=Cr and Mo, the primary relaxation occurs in 18 ps; for Cr, there is an additional vibrational relaxation (150 ps time scale) of a CO group poorly coupled to other modes. Relaxation of M=W occurs in 42 ps; several possible mechanisms for the longer cooling are discussed. Vibrational relaxation is also investigated for I2- and IBr- in nonpolar and slightly polar solvents. Attempts were made to discover the mechanism for the fast energy transfer in nonpolar solvent. The longer time scale dynamics of I3- and IBr2- were also studied; both formed a metastable complex following photodissociation and 90-95% return to ground state in 100 ps, implying a barrier to recombination of 4.3 kcal/mol and a barrier to escape of ≥5.5 kcal/mol. The more complex photochemistry of M3(CO)12 (M=Fe,Ru) is also investigated, using visible and ultraviolet radiations, dissociation, geminate recombination, vibrational relaxation, and bridging structures and their reactions were studied. Attempts were made to extend ultrafast spectroscopy into the mid-infrared, but signal-to-noise was poor.

  17. Do relaxed selection and habitat temperature facilitate biased mitogenomic introgression in a narrowly endemic fish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsey, Christopher Darrin; Bell, Katherine L; García-de-León, Francisco J; Nice, Chris C; Meyer, Axel

    2016-06-01

    Introgression might be exceptionally common during the evolution of narrowly endemic species. For instance, in the springs of the small and isolated Cuatro Ciénegas Valley, the mitogenome of the cichlid fish Herichthys cyanoguttatus could be rapidly introgressing into populations of the trophically polymorphic H. minckleyi. We used a combination of genetic and environmental data to examine the factors associated with this mitochondrial introgression. A reduced representation library of over 6220 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the nuclear genome showed that mitochondrial introgression into H. minckleyi is biased relative to the amount of nuclear introgression. SNP assignment probabilities also indicated that cichlids with more hybrid ancestry are not more commonly female providing no support for asymmetric backcrossing or hybrid-induced sex-ratio distortion in generating the bias in mitochondrial introgression. Smaller effective population size in H. minckleyi inferred from the SNPs coupled with sequences of all 13 mitochondrial proteins suggests that relaxed selection on the mitogenome could be facilitating the introgression of "H. cyanoguttatus" haplotypes. Additionally, we showed that springs with colder temperatures had greater amounts of mitochondrial introgression from H. cyanoguttatus. Relaxed selection in H. minckleyi coupled with temperature-related molecular adaptation could be facilitating mitogenomic introgression into H. minckleyi.

  18. The ghost of herbivory past: slow defence relaxation in the chlorophyte Scenedesmus obliquus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobus VIJVERBERG

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The freshwater chlorophyte Scenedesmus obliquus (Turpin Kützing produces colonies as an inducible defence against herbivores. We investigated the dynamics of Scenedesmus colony formation and disintegration in response to the density of the herbivorous rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus in large-scale mesocosms. Additional bioassays were performed to investigate Scenedesmus colony disintegration under different light regimes. In the mesocosm experiment, colony formation took place rapidly, but relaxation towards the initial size took relatively long (>10 d after cessation of herbivory. In the bioassays, in the absence of infochemicals, colonies disintegrated almost immediately in the dark (1-1.5 d, within 4 d under a photoperiod of 16:8 (L:D and between 8 and 12 days under full light. Colony disintegration times in the mesocosm experiment were substantially longer as compared to treatments with the same photoperiod (L:D 16:8 in the bioassays. So after a peak of herbivory, the 'ghost of herbivory past', i.e. the remaining infochemicals, may continue to induce colony formation, causing an additional lengthening of colony disintegration times and associated fitness costs (higher sedimentation loss rates. This indicates that costs of colony formation are not only important during the induction phase, but may be even more important during the relaxation phase. We compared these sedimentation costs to the costs of herbivory for differently sized Scenedesmus, and found a clear trade-off pattern for these costs.

  19. The flat density profiles of massive, and relaxed galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popolo, A. Del, E-mail: adelpopolo@oact.inaf.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, University Of Catania, Viale Andrea Doria 6, Catania, 95125 (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    The present paper is an extension and continuation of Del Popolo (2012a) which studied the role of baryon physics on clusters of galaxies formation. In the present paper, we studied by means of the SIM introduced in Del Popolo (2009), the total and DM density profiles, and the correlations among different quantities, observed by Newman et al. (2012a,b), in seven massive and relaxed clusters, namely MS2137, A963, A383, A611, A2537, A2667, A2390. As already found in Del Popolo 2012a, the density profiles depend on baryonic fraction, angular momentum, and the angular momentum transferred from baryons to DM through dynamical friction. Similarly to Newman et al. (2012a,b), the total density profile, in the radius range 0.003–0.03r{sub 200}, has a mean total density profile in agreement with dissipationless simulations. The slope of the DM profiles of all clusters is flatter than -1. The slope, α, has a maximum value (including errors) of α = −0.88 in the case of A2390, and minimum value α = −0.14 for A2537. The baryonic component dominates the mass distribution at radii < 5–10 kpc, while the outer distribution is dark matter dominated. We found an anti-correlation among the slope α, the effective radius, R{sub e}, and the BCG mass, and a correlation among the core radius r{sub core}, and R{sub e}. Moreover, the mass in 100 kpc (mainly dark matter) is correlated with the mass inside 5 kpc (mainly baryons). The behavior of the total mass density profile, the DM density profile, and the quoted correlations can be understood in a double phase scenario. In the first dissipative phase the proto-BCG forms, and in the second dissipationless phase, dynamical friction between baryonic clumps (collapsing to the center) and the DM halo flattens the inner slope of the density profile. In simple terms, the large scatter in the inner slope from cluster to cluster, and the anti-correlation among the slope, α and R{sub e} is due to the fact that in order to have a total

  20. Slow viscoelastic relaxation and aging in aqueous foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent-Bonnieu, S.; Höhler, R.; Cohen-Addad, S.

    2006-05-01

    Like emulsions, pastes and many other forms of soft condensed matter, aqueous foams present slow mechanical relaxations when subjected to a stress too small to induce any plastic flow. To identify the physical origin of this viscoelastic behaviour, we have simulated how dry disordered coarsening 2D foams respond to a small applied stress. We show that the mechanism of long time relaxation is driven by coarsening-induced rearrangements of small bubble clusters. These findings are in full agreement with a scaling law previously derived from experimental creep data for 3D foams. Moreover, we find that the temporal statistics of coarsening-induced bubble rearrangements are described by a Poisson process.

  1. Longitudinal relaxation of initially straight flexible and stiff polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrakopoulos, Panagiotis; Dissanayake, Inuka

    2004-11-01

    The present talk considers the relaxation of a single flexible or stiff polymer chain from an initial straight configuration in a viscous solvent. This problem commonly arises when strong flows are turned off in both industrial and biological applications. The problem is also motivated by recent experiments with single biopolymer molecules relaxing after being fully extended by applied forces as well as by the recent development of micro-devices involving stretched tethered biopolymers. Our results are applicable to a wide array of synthetic polymers such as polyacrylamides, Kevlar and polyesters as well as biopolymers such as DNA, actin filaments, microtubules and MTV. In this talk we discuss the mechanism of the polymer relaxation as was revealed through Brownian Dynamics simulations covering a broad range of time scales and chain stiffness. After the short-time free diffusion, the chain's longitudinal reduction at early intermediate times is shown to constitute a universal behavior for any chain stiffness caused by a quasi-steady relaxation of tensions associated with the deforming action of the Brownian forces. Stiff chains are shown to exhibit a late intermediate-time longitudinal reduction associated with a relaxation of tensions affected by the deforming Brownian and the restoring bending forces. The longitudinal and transverse relaxations are shown to obey different laws, i.e. the chain relaxation is anisotropic at all times. In the talk, we show how from the knowledge of the relaxation mechanism, we can predict and explain the polymer properties including the polymer stress and the solution birefringence. In addition, a generalized stress-optic law is derived valid for any time and chain stiffness. All polymer properties which depend on the polymer length are shown to exhibit two intermediate-time behaviors with the early one to constitute a universal behavior for any chain stiffness. This work was supported in part by the Minta Martin Research Fund. The

  2. Characterization of the Transverse Relaxation Rates in Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watnick, Paula I.; Dea, Phoebe; Chan, Sunney I.

    1990-03-01

    The ^2H NMR transverse relaxation rates of a deuterated phospholipid bilayer reflect slow motions in the bilayer membrane. A study of dimyristoyl lecithin specifically deuterated at several positions of the hydrocarbon chains indicates that these motions are cooperative and are confined to the hydrocarbon chains of the lipid bilayer. However, lipid head group interactions do play an important role in modulating the properties of the cooperative fluctuations of the hydrocarbon chains (director fluctuations), as evidenced by the effects of various lipid additives on the ^2H NMR transverse relaxation rates of the dimyristoyl lecithin bilayer.

  3. Multistage Spectral Relaxation Method for Solving the Hyperchaotic Complex Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Saberi Nik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a pseudospectral method application for solving the hyperchaotic complex systems. The proposed method, called the multistage spectral relaxation method (MSRM is based on a technique of extending Gauss-Seidel type relaxation ideas to systems of nonlinear differential equations and using the Chebyshev pseudospectral methods to solve the resulting system on a sequence of multiple intervals. In this new application, the MSRM is used to solve famous hyperchaotic complex systems such as hyperchaotic complex Lorenz system and the complex permanent magnet synchronous motor. We compare this approach to the Runge-Kutta based ode45 solver to show that the MSRM gives accurate results.

  4. Plate-wide stress relaxation explains European Palaeocene basin inversions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S.B.; Thomsen, Erik; Hansen, D.L.

    2005-01-01

    of the in-plane tectonic stress. The onset of relaxation inversions was plate-wide and simultaneous, and may have been triggered by stress changes caused by elevation of the North Atlantic lithosphere by the Iceland plume or the drop in NS convergence rate between Africa and Europe....... Paleocene phase was characterized by domal uplift of a wider area with only mild fault movements, and formation of more distal and shallow marginal troughs. A simple flexural model explains how domal, secondary inversion follows inevitably from primary, convergence related inversion upon relaxation...

  5. A model for the generic alpha relaxation in viscous liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2005-01-01

    Dielectric measurements on molecular liquids just above the glass transition indicate that alpha relaxation is characterized by a generic high-frequency loss varying as one over square root of frequency, whereas deviations from this come from one or more low-lying beta processes [Olsen et al., Phys....... Rev. Lett., 86 (2001) 1271]. Assuming that long-wavelength fluctuations dominate the dynamics, a model for the dielectric alpha relaxation based on the simplest coupling between the density and dipole density fields is proposed here. The model, which is solved in second-order perturbation theory...

  6. Power-law relaxation in human violent conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picoli, Sergio; Antonio, Fernando J.; Itami, Andreia S.; Mendes, Renio S.

    2017-08-01

    We study relaxation patterns of violent conflicts after bursts of activity. Data were obtained from available catalogs on the conflicts in Iraq, Afghanistan and Northern Ireland. We find several examples in each catalog for which the observed relaxation curves can be well described by an asymptotic power-law decay (the analog of the Omori's law in geophysics). The power-law exponents are robust, nearly independent of the conflict. We also discuss the exogenous or endogenous nature of the shocks. Our results suggest that violent conflicts share with earthquakes and other natural and social phenomena a common feature in the dynamics of aftershocks.

  7. An Electron/Photon/Relaxation Data Library for MCNP6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, III, H. Grady [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-07

    The capabilities of the MCNP6 Monte Carlo code in simulation of electron transport, photon transport, and atomic relaxation have recently been significantly expanded. The enhancements include not only the extension of existing data and methods to lower energies, but also the introduction of new categories of data and methods. Support of these new capabilities has required major additions to and redesign of the associated data tables. In this paper we present the first complete documentation of the contents and format of the new electron-photon-relaxation data library now available with the initial production release of MCNP6.

  8. Measuring the equations of state in a relaxed magnetohydrodynamic plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, M.; Barbano, L. J.; Suen-Lewis, E. M.; Shrock, J. E.; Light, A. D.; Brown, M. R.; Schaffner, D. A.

    2018-01-01

    We report measurements of the equations of state of a fully relaxed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) laboratory plasma. Parcels of magnetized plasma, called Taylor states, are formed in a coaxial magnetized plasma gun, and are allowed to relax and drift into a closed flux conserving volume. Density, ion temperature, and magnetic field are measured as a function of time as the Taylor states compress and heat. The theoretically predicted MHD and double adiabatic equations of state are compared to experimental measurements. We find that the MHD equation of state is inconsistent with our data.

  9. Dispersion of Sound in Dilute Suspensions with Nonlinear Particle Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2010-01-01

    The theory accounting for nonlinear particle relaxation (viscous and thermal) has been applied to the prediction of dispersion of sound in dilute suspensions. The results suggest that significant deviations exist for sound dispersion between the linear and nonlinear theories at large values of Omega(Tau)(sub d), where Omega is the circular frequency, and Tau(sub d) is the Stokesian particle relaxation time. It is revealed that the nonlinear effect on the dispersion coefficient due to viscous contribution is larger relative to that of thermal conduction

  10. Multistage spectral relaxation method for solving the hyperchaotic complex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi Nik, Hassan; Rebelo, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    We present a pseudospectral method application for solving the hyperchaotic complex systems. The proposed method, called the multistage spectral relaxation method (MSRM) is based on a technique of extending Gauss-Seidel type relaxation ideas to systems of nonlinear differential equations and using the Chebyshev pseudospectral methods to solve the resulting system on a sequence of multiple intervals. In this new application, the MSRM is used to solve famous hyperchaotic complex systems such as hyperchaotic complex Lorenz system and the complex permanent magnet synchronous motor. We compare this approach to the Runge-Kutta based ode45 solver to show that the MSRM gives accurate results.

  11. Relaxing rdf queries based on user and domain preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolog, Peter; Stueckenschmidt, Heiner; Wache, Holger

    2009-01-01

    to provide very broad queries. Existing methods for automatically refining such queries based on user profiles often overshoot the target resulting in queries that do not return any answer. In this article, we investigate methods for automatically relaxing such over-constrained queries based on domain...... knowledge and user preferences. We describe a framework for information access that combines query refinement and relaxation in order to provide robust, personalized access to heterogeneous resource description framework data as well as an implementation in terms of rewriting rules and explain its...

  12. Nitric oxide pathway-mediated relaxant effect of aqueous sesame leaves extract (Sesamum radiatum Schum. & Thonn.) in the guinea-pig isolated aorta smooth muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konan, André B; Datté, Jacques Y; Yapo, Paul A

    2008-01-01

    Background Sesamum radiatum Schum. & Thonn. (Pedaliaceae) is an annual herbaceous plant, which belongs to the family Pedaliaceae and genus Sesamum. Sesame is used in traditional medicine in Africa and Asia for many diseases treatment. Sesame plant especially the leaves, seed and oil are consumed locally as a staple food by subsistence farmers. The study analyses the relaxation induced by the aqueous extract of leaves from sesame (ESera), compared with those of acetylcholine (ACh) in the guinea-pig aortic preparations (GPAPs), in order to confirm the use in traditional medicine for cardiovascular diseases. Methods The longitudinal strips of aorta of animals were rapidly removed from animals. The aorta was immediately placed in a Mac Ewen solution. Experiments were performed in preparations with intact endothelium as well as in aortae where the endothelium had been removed. The preparations were suspended between two L-shaped stainless steel hooks in a 10 ml organ bath with Mac Ewen solution. The isometric contractile force of the aorta strips of guinea-pig were recorded by using a strain gauge. All both drugs caused concentration-dependent relaxations responses. Results The aqueous extract of leaves from sesame ESera (1 × 10-7 – 0.1 μg/ml) caused a graded relaxation in GPAPs with intact endothelium, with a EC50-value of 1 × 10-4 μg/ml. The same effect was observed with ACh (7 × 10-2 nM – 7 × 10-1 μM), which caused relaxation in a concentration-dependent manner. The relaxation in response to ESera and, like that to ACh in GPAPs without endothelium, was fully abolished. Destruction of the endothelium or incubation with the nitric oxyde synthase inhibitor (L-NNA) significantly enhanced the inhibition of the relaxation response to ESera. Moreover, all concentrations induced vasoconstrictions. However, L-NNA produced a significant displacement to the right (about 65-fold) of the relaxation response to ESera. Similar results were obtained with ACh. Both

  13. Nitric oxide pathway-mediated relaxant effect of aqueous sesame leaves extract (Sesamum radiatum Schum. & Thonn.) in the guinea-pig isolated aorta smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konan, André B; Datté, Jacques Y; Yapo, Paul A

    2008-05-27

    Sesamum radiatum Schum. & Thonn. (Pedaliaceae) is an annual herbaceous plant, which belongs to the family Pedaliaceae and genus Sesamum. Sesame is used in traditional medicine in Africa and Asia for many diseases treatment. Sesame plant especially the leaves, seed and oil are consumed locally as a staple food by subsistence farmers. The study analyses the relaxation induced by the aqueous extract of leaves from sesame (ESera), compared with those of acetylcholine (ACh) in the guinea-pig aortic preparations (GPAPs), in order to confirm the use in traditional medicine for cardiovascular diseases. The longitudinal strips of aorta of animals were rapidly removed from animals. The aorta was immediately placed in a Mac Ewen solution. Experiments were performed in preparations with intact endothelium as well as in aortae where the endothelium had been removed. The preparations were suspended between two L-shaped stainless steel hooks in a 10 ml organ bath with Mac Ewen solution. The isometric contractile force of the aorta strips of guinea-pig were recorded by using a strain gauge. All both drugs caused concentration-dependent relaxations responses. The aqueous extract of leaves from sesame ESera (1 x 10(-7) - 0.1 microg/ml) caused a graded relaxation in GPAPs with intact endothelium, with a EC50-value of 1 x 10(-4) microg/ml. The same effect was observed with ACh (7 x 10(-2) nM - 7 x 10(-1) microM), which caused relaxation in a concentration-dependent manner. The relaxation in response to ESera and, like that to ACh in GPAPs without endothelium, was fully abolished. Destruction of the endothelium or incubation with the nitric oxyde synthase inhibitor (L-NNA) significantly enhanced the inhibition of the relaxation response to ESera. Moreover, all concentrations induced vasoconstrictions. However, L-NNA produced a significant displacement to the right (about 65-fold) of the relaxation response to ESera. Similar results were obtained with ACh. Both diclofenac and tetra

  14. Smooth muscle relaxation activity of an aqueous extract of dried immature fruit of Poncirus trifoliata (PF-W) on an isolated strip of rat ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyu-Sang; Shim, Won-Sik; dela Peña, Ike Campomayor; Seo, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Woo-Young; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Kim, Dae-Duk; Chung, Suk-Jae; Cheong, Jae-Hoon; Shim, Chang-Koo

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrated that an aqueous extract of dried immature fruit of Poncirus trifoliate (PF-W) produces relaxation of intestinal smooth muscle using the ileac strips of a rat. Furthermore, the underlying mechanism of its relaxant activity was investigated. PF-W was prepared using the standard extraction protocol. A 1.5 - 2 cm long rat ileac strip was placed in an organ bath with Tyrode's solution and smooth muscle contractility was recorded by connecting it to a force transducer. Various compounds were added to the organ baths, and changes in muscular contractility were measured. PF-W concentration-dependently induced relaxation of rat ileac strips that were contracted both spontaneously and via acetylcholine treatment. Various potassium channel blockers did not inhibit the relaxation by PF-W. No difference in the effect of PF-W was observed between ileac strips treated with low (20 mM) and high concentrations (60 mM) of KCl. PF-W inhibited the contraction of rat ileac strips induced by extracellular calcium. PF-W acts as a potent smooth muscle relaxant, implicating its possible action as a rapid acting reliever for abdominal pains and a cure for intestinal convulsion. Considering that PF-W also exhibits prokinetic activity, its use in various gastrointestinal disorders seems promising.

  15. Application of chemometrics to low-field H-1 NMR relaxation data of intact fish flesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Signe Munk; Pedersen, H.T.; Engelsen, S.B.

    1999-01-01

    squares (PLS) regression on complete relaxation curves and compared with conventional regression models on exponential fitting parameters. Predictions on an independent test set were superior for the PLS regression models, with optimal prediction errors of 12 g kg(-1), 6 g kg(-1) and 3.9% for oil......The possibilities for application of low-field H-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a rapid method for simultaneous assessment of basic quality parameters in fish were explored. In a first experiment, 200 salmon (Salmo salar) samples mapping the variation over an entire fish were measured by NMR...... and subsequently analysed for oil or water content by standard chemical methods. In a second experiment, 58 differently thawed cod (Gadus morhua) samples were measured by NMR and subsequently analysed for water-holding capacity. Correlations between chemical data and NMR data were evaluated using partial least...

  16. Electron-phonon relaxation and excited electron distribution in gallium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukov, V. P. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Urals Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Pervomayskaya st. 91, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Tyuterev, V. G., E-mail: valtyut00@mail.ru [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Kievskaya st. 60, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, Lenin st. 36, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Chulkov, E. V. [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Tomsk State University, Lenin st. 36, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Qumicas, UPV/EHU and Centro de Fisica de Materiales CFM-MPC and Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Apdo. 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Echenique, P. M. [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Qumicas, UPV/EHU and Centro de Fisica de Materiales CFM-MPC and Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Apdo. 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2016-08-28

    We develop a theory of energy relaxation in semiconductors and insulators highly excited by the long-acting external irradiation. We derive the equation for the non-equilibrium distribution function of excited electrons. The solution for this function breaks up into the sum of two contributions. The low-energy contribution is concentrated in a narrow range near the bottom of the conduction band. It has the typical form of a Fermi distribution with an effective temperature and chemical potential. The effective temperature and chemical potential in this low-energy term are determined by the intensity of carriers' generation, the speed of electron-phonon relaxation, rates of inter-band recombination, and electron capture on the defects. In addition, there is a substantial high-energy correction. This high-energy “tail” largely covers the conduction band. The shape of the high-energy “tail” strongly depends on the rate of electron-phonon relaxation but does not depend on the rates of recombination and trapping. We apply the theory to the calculation of a non-equilibrium distribution of electrons in an irradiated GaN. Probabilities of optical excitations from the valence to conduction band and electron-phonon coupling probabilities in GaN were calculated by the density functional perturbation theory. Our calculation of both parts of distribution function in gallium nitride shows that when the speed of the electron-phonon scattering is comparable with the rate of recombination and trapping then the contribution of the non-Fermi “tail” is comparable with that of the low-energy Fermi-like component. So the high-energy contribution can essentially affect the charge transport in the irradiated and highly doped semiconductors.

  17. Stress Relaxation Behavior and Its Prediction of CrMoWV Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAO Tie-shan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The stress relaxation data up to 8760h at 550℃ and 600℃of 12Cr-1Mo-1W-0.25V heat-resistant steel were used as the object to study the method of how to accurately and effectively predict long-term relaxation stress by using short-time relaxation data. When relaxation model is used to extrapolate the long-term relaxation stress directly, it is found that the parameters of the relaxation model depend on the length of the fitted data. The time-dependent parameter model, naming as timing parameter method, is proposed to predict the long-term relaxation stress with high accuracy. By comparison of the results of timing parameter method and direct extrapolation method, timing parameter method has obvious advantages in predicting long time relaxation stress with short time relaxation data, as the timing parameter method has a more accurate prediction than that of direct extrapolation method.

  18. Local spin dynamics at low temperature in the slowly relaxing molecular chain [Dy(hfac)3(NIT(C6H4OPh))]: A μ{sup +} spin relaxation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arosio, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.arosio@guest.unimi.it; Orsini, Francesco [Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano, and INSTM, Milano (Italy); Corti, Maurizio [Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Pavia and INSTM, Pavia (Italy); Mariani, Manuel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Università degli Studi di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Bogani, Lapo [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Caneschi, Andrea [INSTM and Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Lago, Jorge [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain); Lascialfari, Alessandro [Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano, and INSTM, Milano (Italy); Centro S3, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Modena (Italy)

    2015-05-07

    The spin dynamics of the molecular magnetic chain [Dy(hfac){sub 3}(NIT(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}OPh))] were investigated by means of the Muon Spin Relaxation (μ{sup +}SR) technique. This system consists of a magnetic lattice of alternating Dy(III) ions and radical spins, and exhibits single-chain-magnet behavior. The magnetic properties of [Dy(hfac){sub 3}(NIT(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}OPh))] have been studied by measuring the magnetization vs. temperature at different applied magnetic fields (H = 5, 3500, and 16500 Oe) and by performing μ{sup +}SR experiments vs. temperature in zero field and in a longitudinal applied magnetic field H = 3500 Oe. The muon asymmetry P(t) was fitted by the sum of three components, two stretched-exponential decays with fast and intermediate relaxation times, and a third slow exponential decay. The temperature dependence of the spin dynamics has been determined by analyzing the muon longitudinal relaxation rate λ{sub interm}(T), associated with the intermediate relaxing component. The experimental λ{sub interm}(T) data were fitted with a corrected phenomenological Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound law by using a distribution of thermally activated correlation times, which average to τ = τ{sub 0} exp(Δ/k{sub B}T), corresponding to a distribution of energy barriers Δ. The correlation times can be associated with the spin freezing that occurs when the system condenses in the ground state.

  19. Rapid Self-healing Nanocomposite Hydrogel with Tunable Dynamic Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiaochu; Mishra, Sumeet; Chapman, Brian; Chen, Pangkuan; Tracy, Joseph; Holten-Andersen, Niels

    The macroscopic healing rate and efficiency in self-repairing hydrogel materials are largely determined by the dissociation dynamics of their polymer network, which is hardly achieved in a controllable manner. Inspired by mussel's adhesion chemistry, we developed a novel approach to assemble inorganic nanoparticles and catechol-decorated PEG polymer into a hydrogel network. When utilized as reversible polymer-particle crosslinks, catechol-metal coordination bonds yield a unique gel network with dynamic mechanics controlled directly by interfacial crosslink structure. Taking advantage of this structure-property relationship at polymer-particle interfaces, we designed a hierarchically structured hybrid gel with two distinct relaxation timescales. By tuning the relative contribution of the two relaxation modes, we are able to finely control the gel's dynamic mechanical behavior from a viscoelastic fluid to a stiff solid, yet preserving its rapid self-healing property without the need for external stimuli.

  20. Reusable Component Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Reusable Component Services (RCS) is a super-catalog of components, services, solutions and technologies that facilitates search, discovery and collaboration in...