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Sample records for rapidly proliferating tumours

  1. Casein kinase II is elevated in solid human tumours and rapidly proliferating non-neoplastic tissue

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    Münstermann, U; Fritz, G; Seitz, G

    1990-01-01

    Protein kinase CKII (i.e. casein kinase II, CKII, NII) is expressed at a higher level in rapidly proliferating tissues and in solid human tumours (e.g. colorectal carcinomas) when compared to the corresponding non-neoplastic colorectal mucosa. This could be shown by (a) Western blotting of cellular...

  2. Immunohistochemical detection of tumour cell proliferation and intratumoural microvessel density in canine malignant mammary tumours

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    Sennazli Gulbin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between different histological types and grades of canine malignant mammary tumours, tumour cell proliferation and their angiogenic activity using immunohistochemical markers. Mammary tissue samples from 47 bitches with mammary cancer were evaluated. The expression of cellular proliferation marker Ki-67 and endothelial marker Von Willebrand’s factor (vWF were immunohistochemically demonstrated. The tumours with the highest Ki-67 and vWF expressions were found to share similar histomorphological features. Simple solid carcinoma had the highest levels of Ki-67, vWF, and higher histological grade while complex carcinomas, osteosarcomas, and carcinosarcomas had the lowest ones. The differences between the expressions of Ki-67 and vWF in different tumour types were considered to be of great importance in determination of biological behaviour and prognosis of these tumours. This study is one of the few studies that evaluate these differences among the subtypes of malignant canine mammary tumours

  3. Malignant proliferating trichilemmal tumour presenting early in life: An uncommon feature

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    Shalinee Rao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant proliferating trichilemmal tumour is a rare cutaneous malignant neoplasm usually occurring in elderly women. We present a case of malignant trichilemmal tumour in a young lady of 26 years of age with a previous history of proliferating trichilemmal tumour at the same site.

  4. Assessment of the proliferation status of glioblastoma cell and tumour tissue after nanoplatinum treatment

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    Kutwin, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Slawomir

    2017-01-01

    nanoparticles (NP-Pt). The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the antiproliferative properties of NP-Pt and cisplatin against U87 and U118 glioma cell lines and U87 tumour tissue. NP-Pt and cisplatin were incubated with U87 and U118 glioma cells or administered directly into glioma tumour tissue. Cell...... morphology, the level of DNA synthesis, the migration of cells, protein expression levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and the level of DNA oxidation in glioma tumours were investigated. The results showed that NP-Pt treatment of U87 and U118 glioma cells decreased the level of DNA synthesis...... and the migration of cancer cells but also downregulated the level of PCNA protein expression in tumour tissue. Furthermore, NP-Pt caused oxidative DNA damage in tumour tissue to a higher degree than cisplatin. Consequently, NP-Pt can be considered as an effective inhibitor of glioblastoma tumour cell proliferation...

  5. Seminal plasma enhances cervical adenocarcinoma cell proliferation and tumour growth in vivo.

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    Jason R Sutherland

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in women in sub-Saharan Africa. Extensive evidence has shown that cervical cancer and its precursor lesions are caused by Human papillomavirus (HPV infection. Although the vast majority of HPV infections are naturally resolved, failure to eradicate infected cells has been shown to promote viral persistence and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, following neoplastic transformation, exposure of cervical epithelial cells to inflammatory mediators either directly or via the systemic circulation may enhance progression of the disease. It is well recognised that seminal plasma contains an abundance of inflammatory mediators, which are identified as regulators of tumour growth. Here we investigated the role of seminal plasma in regulating neoplastic cervical epithelial cell growth and tumorigenesis. Using HeLa cervical adenocarcinoma cells, we found that seminal plasma (SP induced the expression of the inflammatory enzymes, prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase (PTGS1 and PTGS2, cytokines interleukin (IL -6, and -11 and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A. To investigate the role of SP on tumour cell growth in vivo, we xenografted HeLa cells subcutaneously into the dorsal flank of nude mice. Intra-peritoneal administration of SP rapidly and significantly enhanced the tumour growth rate and size of HeLa cell xenografts in nude mice. As observed in vitro, we found that SP induced expression of inflammatory PTGS enzymes, cytokines and VEGF-A in vivo. Furthermore we found that SP enhances blood vessel size in HeLa cell xenografts. Finally we show that SP-induced cytokine production, VEGF-A expression and cell proliferation are mediated via the induction of the inflammatory PTGS pathway.

  6. The value of the Ki-67 proliferation marker as a prognostic factor in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours.

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    Foltyn, Wanda; Zajęcki, Wojciech; Marek, Bogdan; Kajdaniuk, Dariusz; Siemińska, Lucyna; Zemczak, Anna; Kos-Kudła, Beata

    2012-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP NETs) are a heterogenous group of tumours of various clinical presentations. Proliferative activity of tumour cells is an essential parameter determining the course of the disease and affecting the prognosis. The Ki-67 antigen is an important marker of cell proliferation, which shows activity in all the phases of the cell cycle, excluding the G0 phase. To assess the expression of Ki-67 in GEP NETs and to examine the association of Ki-67 with the stage of the tumour (tumour size, presence of metastases) and the hormonal function of the tumour. We included 61 patients with GEP NETs (25 males and 36 females aged between 20 and 82 years [mean age: 56 years]). The proliferative activity was examined in paraffin blocks containing surgically removed tumour samples and in core-needle biopsies of primary and metastatic tumours. The presence of the Ki-67 antigen was assessed by immunohistochemistry using MIB‑1 monoclonal antibodies. Based on the Ki-67 proliferative index we determined the tumour grade. In addition, we determined the tumour stage according to the TNM classification. In all the subjects we determined the levels of the non-specific NET marker (chromogranin A) and of specific NET markers (serotonin, insulin and gastrin in the blood and 5‑hydroxyindoleacetic acid [5‑HIAA] in 24-hour urine). The diagnoses of low-grade (Ki‑67 ≤ 2%), intermediate-grade (Ki-67 3-20%) and high-grade (Ki‑67 > 20%) NET were established in 38, 12 and 11 patients, respectively. Metastatic disease was diagnosed in 36/61 patients. A significantly higher expression of K-67 was observed in patients with metastatic disease (p = 0.01). A positive correlation was demonstrated between Ki-67 and the stage of the disease (p = 0.01) and between the histologic grade of the tumour and the stage of the disease (p = 0.01). No association between Ki-67 and the levels of chromogranin A, serotonin, insulin, gastrin and 5-HIAA was shown. There

  7. CD117 immunoexpression in canine mast cell tumours: correlations with pathological variables and proliferation markers

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    Pires Maria A

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cutaneous mast cell tumours are one of the most common neoplasms in dogs and show a highly variable biologic behaviour. Several prognosis tools have been proposed for canine mast cell tumours, including histological grading and cell proliferation markers. CD117 is a receptor tyrosine kinase thought to play a key role in human and canine mast cell neoplasms. Normal (membrane-associated and aberrant (cytoplasmic, focal or diffuse CD117 immunoexpression patterns have been identified in canine mast cell tumours. Cytoplasmic CD117 expression has been found to correlate with higher histological grade and with a worsened post-surgical prognosis. This study addresses the role of CD117 in canine mast cell tumours by studying the correlations between CD117 immunoexpression patterns, two proliferation markers (Ki67 and AgNORs histological grade, and several other pathological variables. Results Highly significant (p Conclusion These findings highlight the key role of CD117 in the biopathology of canine MCTs and confirm the relationship between aberrant CD117 expression and increased cell proliferation and higher histological grade. Further studies are needed to unravel the cellular mechanisms underlying focal and diffuse cytoplasmic CD117 staining patterns, and their respective biopathologic relevance.

  8. Rapid and non-enzymatic in vitro retrieval of tumour cells from surgical specimens.

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    Brigitte Mack

    Full Text Available The study of tumourigenesis commonly involves the use of established cell lines or single cell suspensions of primary tumours. Standard methods for the generation of short-term tumour cell cultures include the disintegration of tissue based on enzymatic and mechanical stress. Here, we describe a simple and rapid method for the preparation of single cells from primary carcinomas, which is independent of enzymatic treatment and feeder cells. Tumour biopsies are processed to 1 mm(3 cubes termed explants, which are cultured 1-3 days on agarose-coated well plates in specified medium. Through incisions generated in the explants, single cells are retrieved and collected from the culture supernatant and can be used for further analysis including in vitro and in vivo studies. Collected cells retain tumour-forming capacity in xenotransplantation assays, mimic the phenotype of the primary tumour, and facilitate the generation of cell lines.

  9. Fatty acid metabolites in rapidly proliferating breast cancer.

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    Joseph T O'Flaherty

    Full Text Available Breast cancers that over-express a lipoxygenase or cyclooxygenase are associated with poor survival possibly because they overproduce metabolites that alter the cancer's malignant behaviors. However, these metabolites and behaviors have not been identified. We here identify which metabolites among those that stimulate breast cancer cell proliferation in vitro are associated with rapidly proliferating breast cancer.We used selective ion monitoring-mass spectrometry to quantify in the cancer and normal breast tissue of 27 patients metabolites that stimulate (15-, 12-, 5-hydroxy-, and 5-oxo-eicosatetraenoate, 13-hydroxy-octadecaenoate [HODE] or inhibit (prostaglandin [PG]E2 and D2 breast cancer cell proliferation. We then related their levels to each cancer's proliferation rate as defined by its Mib1 score.13-HODE was the only metabolite strongly, significantly, and positively associated with Mib1 scores. It was similarly associated with aggressive grade and a key component of grade, mitosis, and also trended to be associated with lymph node metastasis. PGE2 and PGD2 trended to be negatively associated with these markers. No other metabolite in cancer and no metabolite in normal tissue had this profile of associations.Our data fit a model wherein the overproduction of 13-HODE by 15-lipoxygenase-1 shortens breast cancer survival by stimulating its cells to proliferate and possibly metastasize; no other oxygenase-metabolite pathway, including cyclooxygenase-PGE2/D2 pathways, uses this specific mechanism to shorten survival.

  10. The Role of Interleukin 17 in Tumour Proliferation, Angiogenesis, and Metastasis

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    Kang, Heechan; Zhao, Hailin; Wang, Tianlong

    2014-01-01

    With 7.6 million deaths globally, cancer according to the World Health Organisation is still one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Interleukin 17 (IL-17) is a cytokine produced by Th17 cells, a T helper cell subset developed from an activated CD4+ T-cell. Whilst the importance of IL-17 in human autoimmune disease, inflammation, and pathogen defence reactions has already been established, its potential role in cancer progression still needs to be updated. Interestingly studies have demonstrated that IL-17 plays an intricate role in the pathophysiology of cancer, from tumorigenesis, proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis, to adapting the tumour in its ability to confer upon itself both immune, and chemotherapy resistance. This review will look into IL-17 and summarise the current information and data on its role in the pathophysiology of cancer as well as its potential application in the overall management of the disease. PMID:25110397

  11. Agrobacteria lacking ornithine lipids induce more rapid tumour formation

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    Vences-Guzmán, Miguel Ángel; Guan, Ziqiang; Bermúdez-Barrientos, José Roberto; Geiger, Otto; Sohlenkamp, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Summary Ornithine lipids (OLs) are phosphorus-free membrane lipids that are widespread among Gram-negative bacteria. Their basic structure consists of a 3-hydroxy fatty acyl group attached in amide linkage to the α-amino group of ornithine and a second fatty acyl group ester-linked to the 3-hydroxy position of the first fatty acid. It has been shown that OLs can be hydroxylated within the amide-linked fatty acyl moiety, the secondary fatty acyl moiety or within the ornithine moiety. These modifications have been related to increased stress tolerance and symbiotic proficiency in different organisms such as Rhizobium tropici or Burkholderia cenocepacia. Analysing the membrane lipid composition of the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens we noticed that it forms two different OLs. In the present work we studied if OLs play a role in stress tolerance and pathogenicity in A. tumefaciens. Mutants deficient in the OLs biosynthesis genes olsB or olsE were constructed and characterized. They either completely lack OLs (ΔolsB) or only form the unmodified OL (ΔolsE). Here we present a characterization of both OL mutants under stress conditions and in a plant transformation assay using potato tuber discs. Surprisingly, the lack of agrobacterial OLs promotes earlier tumour formation on the plant host. PMID:22958119

  12. Use of 5-[{sup 76}Br]bromo-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine as a ligand for tumour proliferation: validation in an animal tumour model

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    Borbath, I.; Pauwels, S. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Catholic Univ. of Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Gregoire, V. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Catholic Univ. of Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Bergstroem, M.; Laryea, D.; Laangstroem, B. [Uppsala University PET Center, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2002-01-01

    Uncontrolled cell proliferation is one of the prominent features in cancer development. Precise tools are needed for determination of the proliferation rate before, during and after treatment, thereby permitting assessment of treatment efficacy. The purpose of this study was to validate the use of 5-[{sup 76}Br]bromo-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine ({sup 76}Br-BFU) as a proliferation marker in an animal tumour model. Comparison was made with 2-[{sup 14}C]thymidine ({sup 14}C-TdR) incorporation and the labelling index assessed by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd-LI). Fibrosarcoma (NFSA)-bearing mice were used for all experiments. Gemcitabine (dFdC), a potent inhibitor of DNA synthesis, was used to modulate cell proliferation. dFdC was injected intraperitoneally at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg or 40 mg/kg to induce partial ({approx}50%) or complete inhibition of DNA synthesis, respectively. {sup 76}Br-BFU (0.5-3 MBq per animal), {sup 14}C-TdR (37-74 kBq per animal) and cold BrdUrd (60 mg/kg) were injected intraperitoneally in combination or alone. Animals were sacrificed at various times after tracer administration, and tumour and small intestine were removed for determination of radioactivity in whole tissue and the DNA fraction, as well as for LI assessment by flow cytometry. Cimetidine (6 mg/kg) was used to decrease {sup 76}Br-BFU elimination and increase its bioavailability. The fraction of radioactivity associated with DNA increased with the time interval between tracer injection and tissue removal. At 6 h after injection, for both tracers, more than 95% of the radioactivity in the tumours was associated with the DNA fraction and an excellent correlation was observed with the LI. Similar findings were observed in the small intestine. Under all experimental conditions, {sup 76}Br-BFU uptake was 4-10 times lower than {sup 14}C-TdR uptake. Co-injection of cimetidine resulted in a three- to fourfold increase in {sup 76}Br-BFU incorporation without affecting the effect of d

  13. Proliferation index: a continuous model to predict prognosis in patients with tumours of the Ewing's sarcoma family.

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    Samantha Brownhill

    Full Text Available The prognostic value of proliferation index (PI and apoptotic index (AI, caspase-8, -9 and -10 expression have been investigated in primary Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours (ESFT. Proliferating cells, detected by immunohistochemistry for Ki-67, were identified in 91% (91/100 of tumours with a median PI of 14 (range 0-87. Apoptotic cells, identified using the TUNEL assay, were detected in 96% (76/79 of ESFT; the median AI was 3 (range 0-33. Caspase-8 protein expression was negative (0 in 14% (11/79, low (1 in 33% (26/79, medium (2 in 38% (30/79 and high (3 in 15% (12/79 of tumours, caspase-9 expression was low (1 in 66% (39/59 and high (3 in 34% (20/59, and caspase-10 protein was low (1 in 37% (23/62 and negative (0 in 63% (39/62 of primary ESFT. There was no apparent relationship between caspase-8, -9 and -10 expression, PI and AI. PI was predictive of relapse-free survival (RFS; p = 0.011 and overall survival (OS; p = <0.001 in a continuous model, whereas AI did not predict outcome. Patients with tumours expressing low levels of caspase-9 protein had a trend towards a worse RFS than patients with tumours expressing higher levels of caspase-9 protein (p = 0.054, log rank test, although expression of caspases-8, -9 and/or -10 did not significantly predict RFS or OS. In a multivariate analysis model that included tumour site, tumour volume, the presence of metastatic disease at diagnosis, PI and AI, PI independently predicts OS (p = 0.003. Consistent with previous publications, patients with pelvic tumours had a significantly worse OS than patients with tumours at other sites (p = 0.028; patients with a pelvic tumour and a PI≥20 had a 6 fold-increased risk of death. These studies advocate the evaluation of PI in a risk model of outcome for patients with ESFT.

  14. Long-term lowering of tumour interstitial fluid pressure reduces Ki-67 expression.

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    Hofmann, Matthias; Schultz, Maike; Bernd, August; Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen; Kaufmann, Roland; Kippenberger, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    High tumour interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) is a characteristic of most solid tumours. Recent data give first evidence that mechanical stretch induced by TIFP triggers proliferation in solid tumours. In the present study we compared two protocols of TIFP reduction on the expression of the tumour proliferation marker Ki-67: (a) short-term lowering of TIFP by a singular puncture and (b) long-term lowering of TIFP by catheterization. Utilizing two experimental tumours (A431, A549) it was found that the TIFP broke down rapidly after a singular puncture but recovered within 6h. In case of permanent catheterization no TIFP recovery was observed. After 24h tumours were excised and stained against the proliferation marker Ki-67. While a singular puncture had no effect catheterized tumours showed a significant decrease in Ki-67 expression. Our data suggest that long-term lowering of TIFP is required to reduce tumour proliferation.

  15. A comparison among HER2, TP53, PAI-1, angiogenesis, and proliferation activity as prognostic variables in tumours from 408 patients diagnosed with early breast cancer

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    Offersen, Birgitte Vrou; Alsner, Jan; Ege Olsen, Karen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prognostic potential of HER2, TP53 mutations, PAI-1 protein levels, angiogenesis and proliferation were investigated in tumours from 408 patients with early breast cancer followed >10 years. One hundred and sixty seven patients (41%) died from breast cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS:...

  16. [Case report: Rapidly growing abdominal wall giant desmoid tumour during pregnancy].

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    Palacios-Zertuche, Jorge Tadeo; Cardona-Huerta, Servando; Juárez-García, María Luisa; Valdés-Flores, Everardo; Muñoz-Maldonado, Gerardo Enrique

    Desmoid tumours are one of the rarest tumours worldwide, with an estimated yearly incidence of 2-4 new cases per million people. They are soft tissue monoclonal neoplasms that originate from mesenchymal stem cells. It seems that the hormonal and immunological changes occurring during pregnancy may play a role in the severity and course of the disease. The case is presented on 28-year-old female in her fifth week of gestation, in whom an abdominal wall tumour was found attached to left adnexa and uterus while performing a prenatal ultrasound. The patient was followed up under clinical and ultrasonographic surveillance. When she presented with abnormal uterine activity at 38.2 weeks of gestation, she was admitted and obstetrics decided to perform a caesarean section. Tumour biopsy was taken during the procedure. Histopathology reported a desmoid fibromatosis. A contrast enhanced abdominal computed tomography scan was performed, showing a tumour of 26×20.5×18cm, with well-defined borders in contact with the uterus, left adnexa, bladder and abdominal wall, with no evidence of infiltration to adjacent structures. A laparotomy, with tumour resection, hysterectomy and left salpingo-oophorectomy, components separation techniques, polypropylene mesh insertion, and drainage was performed. The final histopathology report was desmoid fibromatosis. There is no evidence of recurrence after 6 months follow-up. Desmoid tumours are locally aggressive and surgical resection with clear margins is the basis for the treatment of this disease, using radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy as an adjunct in the treatment. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. Viability and proliferation of L929, tumour and hybridoma cells in the culture media containing sericin protein as a supplement or serum substitute.

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    Cao, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2015-09-01

    Cell cultures often require the addition of animal serum and other supplements. In this study, silk sericin, a bioactive protein, recovered from the waste of silk floss production was hydrolysed into three pepsin-degraded sericin peptides with different ranges of molecular mass. Normal animal cells, tumour cells and hybridoma cells were cultured systematically in FBS culture media containing sericin as a supplement or serum substitute. The culture test and microscopic observation of L929 cells showed that the smaller molecular weight of the degraded sericin is most suitable for cell culture. The cell culture results showed that with the degradation of sericin, for normal mouse fibroblast L929 cells, addition of 0.75 % sericin into FBS culture medium yields cell viability that is superior to FBS culture medium alone. When all serum was replaced by sericin, cell viability in the sericin medium could reach about one half of that in FBS medium. When in a medium containing a mixture of FBS: sericin (6:4, v/v), the cell culture effect is about 80 %. For the cultures of four tumour and one hybridoma cells, regardless of the molecular weight range, these degraded sericin peptides could substitute all serum in FBS media. The cell viability and proliferation of these tumour and hybridoma cells are equivalent or superior to that in FBS medium. In other words, cell viability and proliferation of these tumour and hybridoma cells in sericin media are more preferable to serum media. The mechanism of the sericin protein to promote cell growth and proliferation will be further investigated later.

  18. Sesquiterpene Lactones Isolated from Elephantopus scaber L. Inhibits Human Lymphocyte Proliferation and the Growth of Tumour Cell Lines and Induces Apoptosis In Vitro

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    Geetha, B. S.; Nair, Mangalam S.; Latha, P. G.; Remani, P.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to isolate the compounds responsible for the cytotoxic properties of South Indian Elephantopus scaber L. and further investigate their effects on quiescent and proliferating cells. Bioassay-guided isolation of the whole plant of chloroform extract of South Indian Elephantopus scaber afforded the known sesquiterpene lactone, deoxyelephantopin, and isodeoxyelephantopin whose structures were determined by spectroscopic methods. These compounds caused a dose dependent reduction in the viability of L-929 tumour cells in 72 h culture (IC50 value of 2.7 μg/mL and 3.3 μg/mL) by the cell viability assay. Both the compounds act selectively on quiescent and PHA-stimulated proliferating human lymphocytes and inhibited tritiated thymidine incorporation into cellular DNA of DLA tumour cells. The compound deoxyelephantopin at a concentration of 3 μg/mL caused maximum apoptotic cells. It also exhibited significant in vivo antitumour efficacy against DLA tumour cells. The results, therefore, indicate that the antiproliferative property of deoxyelephantopin and isodeoxyelephantopin could be used in regimens for treating tumors with extensive proliferative potencies. PMID:22500104

  19. Sesquiterpene Lactones Isolated from Elephantopus scaber L. Inhibits Human Lymphocyte Proliferation and the Growth of Tumour Cell Lines and Induces Apoptosis In Vitro

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    B. S. Geetha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to isolate the compounds responsible for the cytotoxic properties of South Indian Elephantopus scaber L. and further investigate their effects on quiescent and proliferating cells. Bioassay-guided isolation of the whole plant of chloroform extract of South Indian Elephantopus scaber afforded the known sesquiterpene lactone, deoxyelephantopin, and isodeoxyelephantopin whose structures were determined by spectroscopic methods. These compounds caused a dose dependent reduction in the viability of L-929 tumour cells in 72 h culture (IC50 value of 2.7 μg/mL and 3.3 μg/mL by the cell viability assay. Both the compounds act selectively on quiescent and PHA-stimulated proliferating human lymphocytes and inhibited tritiated thymidine incorporation into cellular DNA of DLA tumour cells. The compound deoxyelephantopin at a concentration of 3 μg/mL caused maximum apoptotic cells. It also exhibited significant in vivo antitumour efficacy against DLA tumour cells. The results, therefore, indicate that the antiproliferative property of deoxyelephantopin and isodeoxyelephantopin could be used in regimens for treating tumors with extensive proliferative potencies.

  20. Fibulin-5 localisation in human endometrial cancer shifts from epithelial to stromal with increasing tumour grade, and silencing promotes endometrial epithelial cancer cell proliferation.

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    Winship, Amy Louise; Rainczuk, Kate; Ton, Amanda; Dimitriadis, Eva

    2016-07-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common invasive gynaecological malignancy. While endocrine, genetic and inflammatory factors are thought to contribute to its pathogenesis, its precise etiology and molecular regulators remain poorly understood. Fibulin-5 is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that inhibits cell growth and invasion in several cancer cell types and is downregulated in a number of types of human cancer. However, it is unknown whether fibulin-5 plays a role in endometrial tumourigenesis. In the current report, the expression and localisation of fibulin-5 in type I endometrioid human endometrial cancers of grades (G) 1-3 was investigated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Fibulin-5 mRNA was found to be significantly reduced in whole tumour tissues from women across G1-3 compared with benign endometrium (Pendometrial epithelial cancer cells expressing fibulin-5 stimulated cell adhesion and proliferation in vitro . Fibulin-5 mRNA expression in Ishikawa cells was induced by transforming growth factor-β and fibulin-5 in turn activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), suggesting that it may act via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In summary, the present study identified fibulin-5 as a downregulated ECM gene in human endometrial cancer and observed a shift from epithelial to stromal protein localisation with increasing tumour grade in women. These data suggest that loss of fibulin-5 function may promote endometrial cancer progression by enhancing epithelial cell adhesion and proliferation.

  1. Lymph node infarction: role of underlying malignancy, tumour proliferation fraction and vascular compromise--a study of 35 cases and a comprehensive review of the literature.

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    Jiang, Xiaoyin Sara; West, Dava S; Lagoo, Anand S

    2013-01-01

      To determine the roles of the presence of malignancy, tumour proliferation fraction, vascular compromise and therapeutic and diagnostic manipulations in lymph node infarction (LNI).   Thirty-five cases of LNI were identified over a 20-year period. Of the 35 patients, 31 (89%) had an underlying malignancy: 27 of the 31 (87%) were haematologic malignancies, the rest being metastatic carcinoma (two), melanoma, and seminoma. Of the four patients without evidence of malignancy, two were diagnosed with viral infection, one had LNI adjacent to a thrombosed pancreas graft, and one was lost to follow-up. Ki67 immunostaining in viable tumour demonstrated a range (5-60%) of proliferation fractions. A history of fine needle aspiration alone was present in seven of the 35 patients (20%), a history of chemotherapy alone in 11 (31%), and a history of both in two (5.7%). Factor VIII immunostaining highlighted thrombosed and recanalized vessels next to the infarction.   Infarction of lymph nodes is associated with previous, concurrent or subsequent diagnosis of malignancy in the vast majority of cases. Chemotherapy or previous fine needle aspiration can precipitate infarction in some cases, but infarction may occur without such intervention, possibly because of an underlying subacute or chronic vascular compromise produced by vascular thrombosis. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  2. Scar sarcoidosis on a finger mimicking a rapidly growing soft tissue tumour: a case report

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    Henrichs Marcel-Philipp

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scar sarcoidosis is a rare and uncommon but specific cutaneous manifestation of sarcoidosis. In general it arises in pre-existing scars deriving from mechanical traumas. As most surgeons dealing with scars might not be aware of cutaneous sarcoidosis and its different types of appearance the appropriate staging and treatment might be missed or at least delayed. To our knowledge this is the first case in literature of scar sarcoidosis on a finger. Case presentation We present a case of a 33-year-old carpenter who developed scar sarcoidosis on his right index finger 4 years after the tendon of the long digital flexor got accidentally cut by an angle grinder. He was referred due to a swelling of the finger suspected to be a malignant soft tissue tumour. The circumference of the affected finger had almost doubled, adding up to 94 mm. Incision biopsy revealed typical noncaseating granulomas. Further investigation showed a systemic extent of the disease with involvement of the lung. A systemic treatment with oral steroids led to an almost full regression of the swelling with restoration of function and resolution of lung infiltrates. Conclusion In case of a suspicious and/or progressive swelling a definite diagnosis should be achieved by biopsy within a short time to enable a proper treatment. If scar sarcoidosis is proven further investigation is necessary to exclude a systemical involvement. A surgical treatment of the swelling is not indicated.

  3. Scar sarcoidosis on a finger mimicking a rapidly growing soft tissue tumour: a case report.

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    Henrichs, Marcel-Philipp; Streitbürger, Arne; Gosheger, Georg; Surke, Carsten; Dierkes, Christian; Hardes, Jendrik

    2012-10-02

    Scar sarcoidosis is a rare and uncommon but specific cutaneous manifestation of sarcoidosis. In general it arises in pre-existing scars deriving from mechanical traumas. As most surgeons dealing with scars might not be aware of cutaneous sarcoidosis and its different types of appearance the appropriate staging and treatment might be missed or at least delayed. To our knowledge this is the first case in literature of scar sarcoidosis on a finger. We present a case of a 33-year-old carpenter who developed scar sarcoidosis on his right index finger 4 years after the tendon of the long digital flexor got accidentally cut by an angle grinder. He was referred due to a swelling of the finger suspected to be a malignant soft tissue tumour. The circumference of the affected finger had almost doubled, adding up to 94 mm. Incision biopsy revealed typical noncaseating granulomas. Further investigation showed a systemic extent of the disease with involvement of the lung. A systemic treatment with oral steroids led to an almost full regression of the swelling with restoration of function and resolution of lung infiltrates. In case of a suspicious and/or progressive swelling a definite diagnosis should be achieved by biopsy within a short time to enable a proper treatment. If scar sarcoidosis is proven further investigation is necessary to exclude a systemical involvement. A surgical treatment of the swelling is not indicated.

  4. Controversies in Odontogenic Tumours

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    Siwach, Pooja; Joy, Tabita; Tupkari, Jagdish; Thakur, Arush

    2017-01-01

    Odontogenic tumours are lesions that occur solely within the oral cavity and are so named because of their origin from the odontogenic (i.e. tooth-forming) apparatus. Odontogenic tumours comprise a variety of lesions ranging from non-neoplastic tissue proliferations to benign or malignant neoplasms. However, controversies exist regarding the pathogenesis, categorisation and clinical and histological variations of these tumours. The recent 2017 World Health Organization classification of odontogenic tumours included new entities such as primordial odontogenic tumours, sclerosing odontogenic carcinomas and odontogenic carcinosarcomas, while eliminating several previously included entities like keratocystic odontogenic tumours and calcifying cystic odonogenic tumours. The aim of the present review article was to discuss controversies and recent concepts regarding odontogenic tumours so as to increase understanding of these lesions. PMID:29062548

  5. Coupled Proliferation and Apoptosis Maintain the Rapid Turnover of Microglia in the Adult Brain

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    Katharine Askew

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microglia play key roles in brain development, homeostasis, and function, and it is widely assumed that the adult population is long lived and maintained by self-renewal. However, the precise temporal and spatial dynamics of the microglial population are unknown. We show in mice and humans that the turnover of microglia is remarkably fast, allowing the whole population to be renewed several times during a lifetime. The number of microglial cells remains steady from late postnatal stages until aging and is maintained by the spatial and temporal coupling of proliferation and apoptosis, as shown by pulse-chase studies, chronic in vivo imaging of microglia, and the use of mouse models of dysregulated apoptosis. Our results reveal that the microglial population is constantly and rapidly remodeled, expanding our understanding of its role in the maintenance of brain homeostasis.

  6. MicroRNA-211-5p suppresses tumour cell proliferation, invasion, migration and metastasis in triple-negative breast cancer by directly targeting SETBP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-Liang; Zhang, Zhou-Jing; Yi, Zhan-Bo; Li, Jian-Jun

    2017-06-27

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) accounts for 15-20% of all breast cancer in women globally. This subtype often has early and high recurrence rates, resulting in poor survival, partially due to lack of targeted therapies. To date, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying TNBC progression are unclear. Given the crucial role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in cancer metastasis, we aimed to analyse the expression and function of a metastasis-associated miRNA named miR-211-5p in TNBC. MiRNA array analysis was performed to search for metastasis-associated miRNAs in TNBC. The miR-211-5p expression in tumour tissues, adjacent non-tumourous breast tissues of TNBC patients and cell lines were evaluated by real-time PCR. The protein expression levels were analysed by western blot, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation. Luciferase reporter assays were employed to validate the target of miR-211-5p. The effect of miR-211-5p on TNBC progression was investigated in vitro and in vivo. MiR-211-5p was significantly downregulated in TNBC, and its expression level was associated with overall survival in TNBC. The expression of miR-211-5p suppressed TNBC cell proliferation, invasion, migration and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, SETBP1 was identified as a target of miR-211-5p. Through gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies, SETBP1 was shown to significantly affect colony and cell number in vitro. Enforced expression of miR-211-5p inhibited the expression of SETBP1 significantly and the restoration of SETBP1 expression reversed the inhibitory effects of miR-211-5p on TNBC cell proliferation and metastasis. These findings collectively demonstrate a tumour suppressor role of miR-211-5p in TNBC progression by targeting SETBP1, suggesting that miR-211-5p could serve as a potential prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for TNBC.

  7. Identification of SLAMF3 (CD229) as an Inhibitor of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Proliferation and Tumour Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Flora; Amrathlal, Rabbind Singh; Ossart, Christèle; Ouled-Haddou, Hakim; Ghamlouch, Hussein; Galmiche, Antoine; Chatelain, Denis; Lamotte, Luciane; Debuysscher, Véronique; Fuentes, Vincent; Nguyen-Khac, Eric; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Latour, Sylvain; Bouhlal, Hicham

    2013-01-01

    Although hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies and constitutes the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present study, we demonstrate for the first time that hepatocytes express signalling lymphocytic activation molecule family member 3 (SLAMF3/CD229) but not other SLAMF members. We provide evidence to show that SLAMF3 is involved in the control of hepatocyte proliferation and in hepatocellular carcinogenesis. SLAMF3 expression is significantly lower in primary human HCC samples and HCC cell lines than in human healthy primary hepatocytes. In HCC cell lines, the restoration of high levels of SLAMF3 expression inhibited cell proliferation and migration and enhanced apoptosis. Furthermore, SLAMF3 expression was associated with inhibition of HCC xenograft progression in the nude mouse model. The restoration of SLAMF3 expression levels also decreased the phosphorylation of MAPK ERK1/2, JNK and mTOR. In samples from resected HCC patients, SLAMF3 expression levels were significantly lower in tumorous tissues than in peritumoral tissues. Our results identify SLAMF3 as a specific marker of normal hepatocytes and provide evidence for its potential role in the control of proliferation of HCC cells. PMID:24376606

  8. Identification of SLAMF3 (CD229 as an inhibitor of hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and tumour progression.

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    Ingrid Marcq

    Full Text Available Although hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common malignancies and constitutes the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present study, we demonstrate for the first time that hepatocytes express signalling lymphocytic activation molecule family member 3 (SLAMF3/CD229 but not other SLAMF members. We provide evidence to show that SLAMF3 is involved in the control of hepatocyte proliferation and in hepatocellular carcinogenesis. SLAMF3 expression is significantly lower in primary human HCC samples and HCC cell lines than in human healthy primary hepatocytes. In HCC cell lines, the restoration of high levels of SLAMF3 expression inhibited cell proliferation and migration and enhanced apoptosis. Furthermore, SLAMF3 expression was associated with inhibition of HCC xenograft progression in the nude mouse model. The restoration of SLAMF3 expression levels also decreased the phosphorylation of MAPK ERK1/2, JNK and mTOR. In samples from resected HCC patients, SLAMF3 expression levels were significantly lower in tumorous tissues than in peritumoral tissues. Our results identify SLAMF3 as a specific marker of normal hepatocytes and provide evidence for its potential role in the control of proliferation of HCC cells.

  9. MicroRNA Regulation of Brain Tumour Initiating Cells in Central Nervous System Tumours

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    Neha Garg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CNS tumours occur in both pediatric and adult patients and many of these tumours are associated with poor clinical outcome. Due to a paradigm shift in thinking for the last several years, these tumours are now considered to originate from a small population of stem-like cells within the bulk tumour tissue. These cells, termed as brain tumour initiating cells (BTICs, are perceived to be regulated by microRNAs at the posttranscriptional/translational levels. Proliferation, stemness, differentiation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, apoptosis, and cell cycle constitute some of the significant processes modulated by microRNAs in cancer initiation and progression. Characterization and functional studies on oncogenic or tumour suppressive microRNAs are made possible because of developments in sequencing and microarray techniques. In the current review, we bring recent knowledge of the role of microRNAs in BTIC formation and therapy. Special attention is paid to two highly aggressive and well-characterized brain tumours: gliomas and medulloblastoma. As microRNA seems to be altered in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, “microRNA therapy” may now have potential to improve outcomes for brain tumour patients. In this rapidly evolving field, further understanding of miRNA biology and its contribution towards cancer can be mined for new therapeutic tools.

  10. Progranulin promotes tumour necrosis factor-induced proliferation of suppressive mouse CD4⁺ Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ya; Xiao, Haitao; Shi, Tingchen; Oppenheim, Joost J; Chen, Xin

    2014-06-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a pleiotropic growth factor with immunosuppressive properties. Recently, it was reported that PGRN was an antagonist of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptors, preferentially for TNFR2. However, we and others showed that TNF-TNFR2 interaction was critical for the activation and expansion of functional CD4(+)  Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells. We therefore examined the effect of PGRN on the proliferation of naturally occurring murine suppressive Treg cells induced by TNF. Consistent with our previous reports, TNF overcame the hyporesponsiveness of highly purified Treg cells to T-cell receptor stimulation. Furthermore, in the presence of interleukin-2, TNF preferentially stimulated proliferation of Treg cells contained in unfractionated CD4 cells. These effects of TNF on suppressive Treg cells were markedly increased by exogenous PGRN. TNF and TNFR2 interactions are required for this effect of PGRN, because the PGRN by itself did not stimulate Treg cell proliferation. The effect of PGRN on Treg cells was abrogated by antibody against TNFR2, and Treg cells deficient in TNFR2 also failed to respond to PGRN. Furthermore, PGRN also enhanced the proliferative responses of effector T cells to TNF, but to a lesser extent than that of Treg cells, presumably caused by the different levels of TNFR2 expression on these two subsets of CD4 cells. Hence, our data clearly show that PGRN promotes, rather than inhibits, the functional consequence of TNF-TNFR2 interaction on Treg cells. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. A dosimetric phantom study of dose accuracy and build-up effects using IMRT and RapidArc in stereotactic irradiation of lung tumours

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    Seppala Jan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Stereotactic lung radiotherapy (SLRT has emerged as a curative treatment for medically inoperable patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and volumetric modulated arc treatments (VMAT have been proposed as the best practical approaches for the delivery of SLRT. However, a large number of narrow field shapes are needed in the dose delivery of intensity-modulated techniques and the probability of underdosing the tumour periphery increases as the effective field size is decreased. The purpose of this study was to evaluate small lung tumour doses irradiated by intensity-modulated techniques to understand the risk for dose calculation errors in precision radiotherapy such as SLRT. Materials and methods The study was executed with two heterogeneous phantoms with targets of Ø1.5 and Ø4.0 cm. Dose distributions in the simulated tumours delivered by small sliding window apertures (SWAs, IMRT and RapidArc treatment plans were measured with radiochromic film. Calculation algorithms of pencil beam convolution (PBC and anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA were used to calculate the corresponding dose distributions. Results Peripheral doses of the tumours were decreased as SWA decreased, which was not modelled by the calculation algorithms. The smallest SWA studied was 2 mm, which reduced the 90% isodose line width by 4.2 mm with the Ø4.0 cm tumour as compared to open field irradiation. PBC was not able to predict the dose accurately as the gamma evaluation failed to meet the criteria of ±3%/±1 mm on average in 61% of the defined volume with the smaller tumour. With AAA the corresponding value was 16%. The dosimetric inaccuracy of AAA was within ±3% with the optimized treatment plans of IMRT and RapidArc. The exception was the clinical RapidArc plan with dose overestimation of 4%. Conclusions Overall, the peripheral doses of the simulated

  12. The effect of spiritual healing on in vitro tumour cell proliferation and viability--an experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, R; Højgaard, L; Zachariae, C

    2005-01-01

    of the recipient's conscious awareness of the healer's intention. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that spiritual healing will reduce proliferation and viability of two cancer cell lines in vitro. Three controlled experiments were conducted with three different healers and randomised allocation...... three experimental days, doses, assays, and cells, 34 (51.6%) of 66 independent comparisons showed differences in the hypothesised direction (P = 0.90). The average effect size across cell lines, days, assays, and doses approached zero (Cohen's d = -0.01). The results do not support previous reports...... of beneficial effects of spiritual healing on malignant cell growth in vitro. Reported beneficial effects of spiritual healing on the well-being of cancer patients seem more likely to be mediated by psychosocial and psychophysiological effects of the healer-patient relationship....

  13. The caudal regeneration blastema is an accumulation of rapidly proliferating stem cells in the flatworm Macrostomum lignano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Bernhard; Gschwentner, Robert; Hess, Michael W; Nimeth, Katharina T; Adamski, Zbigniew; Willems, Maxime; Rieger, Reinhard; Salvenmoser, Willi

    2009-07-15

    Macrostomum lignano is a small free-living flatworm capable of regenerating all body parts posterior of the pharynx and anterior to the brain. We quantified the cellular composition of the caudal-most body region, the tail plate, and investigated regeneration of the tail plate in vivo and in semithin sections labeled with bromodeoxyuridine, a marker for stem cells (neoblasts) in S-phase. The tail plate accomodates the male genital apparatus and consists of about 3,100 cells, about half of which are epidermal cells. A distinct regeneration blastema, characterized by a local accumulation of rapidly proliferating neoblasts and consisting of about 420 cells (excluding epidermal cells), was formed 24 hours after amputation. Differentiated cells in the blastema were observed two days after amputation (with about 920 blastema cells), while the male genital apparatus required four to five days for full differentiation. At all time points, mitoses were found within the blastema. At the place of organ differentiation, neoblasts did not replicate or divide. After three days, the blastema was made of about 1420 cells and gradually transformed into organ primordia, while the proliferation rate decreased. The cell number of the tail plate, including about 960 epidermal cells, was restored to 75% at this time point. Regeneration after artificial amputation of the tail plate of adult specimens of Macrostomum lignano involves wound healing and the formation of a regeneration blastema. Neoblasts undergo extensive proliferation within the blastema. Proliferation patterns of S-phase neoblasts indicate that neoblasts are either determined to follow a specific cell fate not before, but after going through S-phase, or that they can be redetermined after S-phase. In pulse-chase experiments, dispersed distribution of label suggests that S-phase labeled progenitor cells of the male genital apparatus undergo further proliferation before differentiation, in contrast to progenitor cells of

  14. Controversies in Odontogenic Tumours: Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwach, Pooja; Joy, Tabita; Tupkari, Jagdish; Thakur, Arush

    2017-08-01

    Odontogenic tumours are lesions that occur solely within the oral cavity and are so named because of their origin from the odontogenic (i.e. tooth-forming) apparatus. Odontogenic tumours comprise a variety of lesions ranging from non-neoplastic tissue proliferations to benign or malignant neoplasms. However, controversies exist regarding the pathogenesis, categorisation and clinical and histological variations of these tumours. The recent 2017 World Health Organization classification of odontogenic tumours included new entities such as primordial odontogenic tumours, sclerosing odontogenic carcinomas and odontogenic carcinosarcomas, while eliminating several previously included entities like keratocystic odontogenic tumours and calcifying cystic odonogenic tumours. The aim of the present review article was to discuss controversies and recent concepts regarding odontogenic tumours so as to increase understanding of these lesions.

  15. The caudal regeneration blastema is an accumulation of rapidly proliferating stem cells in the flatworm Macrostomum lignano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamski Zbigniew

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrostomum lignano is a small free-living flatworm capable of regenerating all body parts posterior of the pharynx and anterior to the brain. We quantified the cellular composition of the caudal-most body region, the tail plate, and investigated regeneration of the tail plate in vivo and in semithin sections labeled with bromodeoxyuridine, a marker for stem cells (neoblasts in S-phase. Results The tail plate accomodates the male genital apparatus and consists of about 3,100 cells, about half of which are epidermal cells. A distinct regeneration blastema, characterized by a local accumulation of rapidly proliferating neoblasts and consisting of about 420 cells (excluding epidermal cells, was formed 24 hours after amputation. Differentiated cells in the blastema were observed two days after amputation (with about 920 blastema cells, while the male genital apparatus required four to five days for full differentiation. At all time points, mitoses were found within the blastema. At the place of organ differentiation, neoblasts did not replicate or divide. After three days, the blastema was made of about 1420 cells and gradually transformed into organ primordia, while the proliferation rate decreased. The cell number of the tail plate, including about 960 epidermal cells, was restored to 75% at this time point. Conclusion Regeneration after artificial amputation of the tail plate of adult specimens of Macrostomum lignano involves wound healing and the formation of a regeneration blastema. Neoblasts undergo extensive proliferation within the blastema. Proliferation patterns of S-phase neoblasts indicate that neoblasts are either determined to follow a specific cell fate not before, but after going through S-phase, or that they can be redetermined after S-phase. In pulse-chase experiments, dispersed distribution of label suggests that S-phase labeled progenitor cells of the male genital apparatus undergo further proliferation before

  16. Rapid selection and proliferation of CD133+ cells from cancer cell lines: chemotherapeutic implications.

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    Sarah E Kelly

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered a subset of the bulk tumor responsible for initiating and maintaining the disease. Several surface cellular markers have been recently used to identify CSCs. Among those is CD133, which is expressed by hematopoietic progenitor cells as well as embryonic stem cells and various cancers. We have recently isolated and cultured CD133 positive [CD133+] cells from various cancer cell lines using a NASA developed Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB (Celdyne, Houston, TX. For comparison, another bioreactor, the rotary cell culture system (RCCS manufactured by Synthecon (Houston, TX was used. Both the HFB and the RCCS bioreactors simulate aspects of hypogravity. In our study, the HFB increased CD133+ cell growth from various cell lines compared to the RCCS vessel and to normal gravity control. We observed a +15-fold proliferation of the CD133+ cellular fraction with cancer cells that were cultured for 7-days at optimized conditions. The RCCS vessel instead yielded a (-4.8-fold decrease in the CD133+cellular fraction respect to the HFB after 7-days of culture. Interestingly, we also found that the hypogravity environment of the HFB greatly sensitized the CD133+ cancer cells, which are normally resistant to chemo treatment, to become susceptible to various chemotherapeutic agents, paving the way to less toxic and more effective chemotherapeutic treatment in patients. To be able to test the efficacy of cytotoxic agents in vitro prior to their use in clinical setting on cancer cells as well as on cancer stem cells may pave the way to more effective chemotherapeutic strategies in patients. This could be an important advancement in the therapeutic options of oncologic patients, allowing for more targeted and personalized chemotherapy regimens as well as for higher response rates.

  17. Measurement of proliferation and disappearance of rapid turnover cell populations in human studies using deuterium-labeled glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macallan, Derek C; Asquith, Becca; Zhang, Yan; de Lara, Catherine; Ghattas, Hala; Defoiche, Julien; Beverley, Peter C L

    2009-01-01

    Cell proliferation may be measured in vivo by quantifying DNA synthesis with isotopically labeled deoxyribonucleotide precursors. Deuterium-labeled glucose is one such precursor which, because it achieves high levels of enrichment for a short period, is well suited to the study of rapidly dividing cells, in contrast to the longer term labeling achieved with heavy water ((2)H(2)O). As deuterium is non-radioactive and glucose can be readily administered, this approach is suitable for clinical studies. It has been widely applied to investigate human lymphocyte proliferation, but solid tissue samples may also be analyzed. Rate, duration and route (intravenous or oral) of [6,6-(2)H(2)]-glucose administration should be adapted to the target cell of interest. For lymphocytes, cell separation is best achieved by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), although magnetic bead separation is an alternative. DNA is then extracted, hydrolyzed enzymatically and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Appropriate mathematical modeling is critical to interpretation. Typical time requirements are as follows: labeling, 10-24 h; sampling, approximately 3 weeks; DNA extraction/derivatization, 2-3 d; and GC/MS analysis, approximately 2 d.

  18. Rapid multiplication of Dalbergia sissoo Roxb.: a timber yielding tree legume through axillary shoot proliferation and ex vitro rooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibha, J B; Shekhawat, N S; Mehandru, Pooja; Dinesh, Rachana

    2014-01-01

    An efficient and improved method for in vitro propagation of mature tree of Dalbergia sissoo, an ecologically and commercially important timber yielding species, has been developed through axillary shoot proliferation. Bud breaking occurred from nodal shoot segments derived from rejuvenated shoots produced during early spring from a 20-25-year-old lopped tree, on MS medium containing 8.88 μM benzylaminopurine (BAP). Multiple shoots differentiated (20-21shoots/node) on re-culture of explants on half-strength agar gelled amended MS medium with a combination of 2.22 μM of BAP and 0.002 μM of thidiazuron (TDZ) with 1.0 mM each of Ca(NO3)2, K2SO4, KCl, and NH4(SO4)2. The maximum shoot multiplication (29-30 shoots/node) was achieved on subculturing in the above mentioned but liquid medium. Furthermore, the problem of shoot tip necrosis and defoliation observed on solid medium were overcome by the use of liquid medium. Ex vitro rooting was achieved on soilrite after basal treatment of microshoots with 984 μM of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) for 2 min. About 90 % microshoots were rooted on soilrite within 2-3 weeks under the greenhouse conditions. From 20 nodal shoot segments, about 435 hardened plants were acclimatized and transplanted. This is the first report for rapid in vitro propagation of mature trees of D. sissoo on liquid medium followed by ex vitro rooting.

  19. Role of tumour necrosis factor in pathogenesis of radicular cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Waqar-ur-Rehman; Idris, Muhammad; Khan, Shahbaz Ali

    2011-01-01

    The radicular cyst is very common odontogenic cyst of the jaws, which is usually associated with a tooth with necrotic pulp. The cyst formation requires proliferation of the epithelial rest cells of Malassez present in the periodontal ligament. Proliferation of epithelial rest cells of Malassez is an essential event in the Pathogenesis of radicular cyst. The wall of the cyst contains epithelial cells, macrophages, fibroblasts and other cells. TNF is one of inflammatory mediators, which is produced by macrophages and monocytes. This study was carried out to investigate the role of tumour necrosis factor in the pathogenesis of radicular cyst, which is by far the commonest cystic lesion of the jaws. Explants from 20 radicular cysts were cultured in vitro to grow the epithelial cells. However, the cultures were rapidly contaminated with fibroblasts and it was impossible to grow the epithelial cells separately. Therefore, the proliferative effect of Tumour Necrosis Factor (TNF) was studied on mammalian epithelial cells. TNF at low concentration had a proliferative effect on the epithelial cells, which may play some role in pathogenesis of radicular cyst. TNF stimulated the epithelial cell proliferation in low concentration and inhibit the proliferation in higher concentrations. These two effects may have some implications in the pathogenesis of radicular cyst.

  20. Rapid and Accurate Approach for Screening of Microsatellite Unstable Tumours Using Quasimonomorphic Mononucleotide Repeats and Denaturating High Performance Liquid Chromatography (DHPLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gašper Berginc

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available MSI analysis is becoming increasingly important for the detection of both hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer and sporadic primary colorectal tumours with MSI high phenotype. The Bethesda panel of five microsatellite markers has been proposed to provide uniform criteria for MSI analysis. Here we report on an MSI analysis approach using quasimonomorphic mononucleotide repeats and denaturating high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC. We analysed 595 newly diagnosed colorectal tumours and 145 normal samples. Microsatellite markers BAT-25, BAT-26, NR-21, NR-22, and NR-27 were amplified in multiplex reaction and analysed using DHPLC and capillary electrophoresis (CE. DHPLC conditions for analysis of MSI multiplex assay were evaluated and tested. Analysis and cross-examination of the results obtained from 96 samples using DHPLC and capillary electrophoresis showed the same sensitivity and specificity of the two approaches for detecting MSI-H tumours. Using our new approach we showed that the tested markers are quasimonomorphic in a Slovenian population, with frequencies of polymorphisms 0.07%, 1.4%, 2.1%, 1.4%, and 1.4% for BAT-25, BAT-26, NR-21, NR-22, and NR-27, respectively. Forty-three (7.2% new MSI-H tumours were identified, of which 84% showed instability in all 5 tested markers. Overall, we developed a high-throughput, robust, accurate and cost-effective approach for the detection of MSI-H tumours.

  1. Bilateral ovarian tumour in a young girl

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    Krishna Kumar Govindarajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral ovarian tumour in a girl presents the dilemma of conservative versus aggressive approach towards these tumours. When faced with suspicious tumour and complete replacement of the ovaries bilaterally, bilateral oophorectomy is a viable option, though the certain possibility of infertility and lifelong hormonal supplementation is unavoidable. We report a case of bilateral ovarian masses in a young girl, which on histopathological examination showed mature teratoma with aggregates of proliferating capillary and cavernous sized vessels in the tumour wall. Such associations are rare and must be differentiated from a vascular neoplasm.

  2. The evolution of tumour phylogenetics: principles and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Russell; Schäffer, Alejandro A

    2017-04-01

    Rapid advances in high-throughput sequencing and a growing realization of the importance of evolutionary theory to cancer genomics have led to a proliferation of phylogenetic studies of tumour progression. These studies have yielded not only new insights but also a plethora of experimental approaches, sometimes reaching conflicting or poorly supported conclusions. Here, we consider this body of work in light of the key computational principles underpinning phylogenetic inference, with the goal of providing practical guidance on the design and analysis of scientifically rigorous tumour phylogeny studies. We survey the range of methods and tools available to the researcher, their key applications, and the various unsolved problems, closing with a perspective on the prospects and broader implications of this field.

  3. Alterations of monocarboxylate transporter densities during hypoxia in brain and breast tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Chang; Edin, Nina F Jeppesen; Lauritzen, Knut H

    2012-01-01

    Tumour cells are characterized by aerobic glycolysis, which provides biomass for tumour proliferation and leads to extracellular acidification through efflux of lactate via monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Deficient and spasm-prone tumour vasculature causes variable hypoxia, which favours tum...... tumour cell survival and metastases. Brain metastases frequently occur in patients with advanced breast cancer.Effective treatment strategies are therefore needed against brain metastasis from breast carcinoma.......Tumour cells are characterized by aerobic glycolysis, which provides biomass for tumour proliferation and leads to extracellular acidification through efflux of lactate via monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Deficient and spasm-prone tumour vasculature causes variable hypoxia, which favours...

  4. Effects of auxins on the production of steroidal alkaloids in rapidly proliferating tissue and cell cultures of Solanum lyratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chung-Io; Chao, Chi-Hsein; Lu, Mei-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    Solanum lyratum, a rare species, is used to treat cancer, tumours and warts. Plant cell and tissue culture of S. lyratum, producing steroidal alkaloids, could be useful supplements to natural sources. To study the production of solanine, solanidine and solasodine by adding auxin-type phytohormones including indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) to cell and callus cultures of S. lyratum. Methanolic extracts were made from callus and cell cultures of S. lyratumand and analysed using RP C₁₈ HPLC with UV detection. 2,4-D-induced calli from roots led to a significant enhancement in solanine production with a value of 4.13 mg/g dry weight (DW). The maximal solanidine and solasodine levels of 6.26 and 7.69 mg/g DW were respectively obtained with IBA- and IAA-treated S. lyratum cells at concentrations of 1 and 5 mg/L. Auxins were found to be useful phytohormones for the production of steroidal alkaloids. The callus and cell culture system developed is simple and can hence be a method of production of steroidal alkaloids in S. lyratum and other Solanaceae species. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Young adult chondrocytes proliferate rapidly and produce a cartilaginous tissue at the gel-media interface in agarose cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran-Khanh, Nicolas; Chevrier, Anik; Lascau-Coman, Viorica; Hoemann, Caroline D; Buschmann, Michael D

    2010-06-01

    Primary chondrocytes cultured in agarose can escape the gel, accumulate at the interface between agarose and the culture medium, and form an outgrowing tissue. These outgrowths can appear as voluminous cartilage-like nodules that have never been previously investigated. In the present study, bovine articular chondrocytes from three age groups (fetal, young adult, aged) were seeded and cultured in agarose to test the hypothesis that hyaline-like cartilage outgrowths develop at the interface by appositional growth, in an age-dependant manner. Macroscopic appearance, cell content, cell division, cytoskeletal morphology, and extracellular matrix (ECM) composition were analyzed. Fetal chondrocytes produced a fibrous interfacial tissue while aged chondrocytes produced ECM-poor cell clusters. In contrast young adult chondrocytes produced large cartilaginous outgrowths, rich in proteoglycan and collagen II, where cells in the central region displayed a chondrocyte morphology. Cell proliferation was confined to the peripheral edge of these outgrowths, where elongated cell morphology, cell-cell contacts, and cell extensions toward the culture medium were seen. Thus these voluminous cartilaginous outgrowths formed in an appositional growth process and only for donor chondrocytes from young adult animals. This system offers an interesting ability to proliferate chondrocytes in a manner that results in a chondrocyte morphology and a cartilaginous ECM in central regions of the outgrowing tissue. It also provides an in vitro model system to study neocartilage appositional growth.

  6. Gastric Calcifying Fibrous Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Attila

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramucosal gastric tumours are most commonly found to be gastrointestinal stromal tumours or leiomyomas (smooth muscle tumours; however, a variety of other uncommon mesenchymal tumours can occur in the stomach wall. A rare benign calcifying fibrous tumour is reported and the endoscopic appearance, ultrasound findings and morphology are documented. A review of the literature found only two similar cases.

  7. Rapid proliferation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae during freshwater flash floods in French Mediterranean coastal lagoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Kevin; Hervio-Heath, Dominique; Mosser, Thomas; Rodier, Claire; Tournoud, Marie-George; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle; Colwell, Rita R; Monfort, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae of the non-O1/non-O139 serotype are present in coastal lagoons of southern France. In these Mediterranean regions, the rivers have long low-flow periods followed by short-duration or flash floods during and after heavy intense rainstorms, particularly at the end of the summer and in autumn. These floods bring large volumes of freshwater into the lagoons, reducing their salinity. Water temperatures recorded during sampling (15 to 24°C) were favorable for the presence and multiplication of vibrios. In autumn 2011, before heavy rainfalls and flash floods, salinities ranged from 31.4 to 36.1‰ and concentrations of V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and V. cholerae varied from 0 to 1.5 × 10(3) most probable number (MPN)/liter, 0.7 to 2.1 × 10(3) MPN/liter, and 0 to 93 MPN/liter, respectively. Following heavy rainstorms that generated severe flash flooding and heavy discharge of freshwater, salinity decreased, reaching 2.2 to 16.4‰ within 15 days, depending on the site, with a concomitant increase in Vibrio concentration to ca. 10(4) MPN/liter. The highest concentrations were reached with salinities between 10 and 20‰ for V. parahaemolyticus, 10 and 15‰ for V. vulnificus, and 5 and 12‰ for V. cholerae. Thus, an abrupt decrease in salinity caused by heavy rainfall and major flooding favored growth of human-pathogenic Vibrio spp. and their proliferation in the Languedocian lagoons. Based on these results, it is recommended that temperature and salinity monitoring be done to predict the presence of these Vibrio spp. in shellfish-harvesting areas of the lagoons. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Non-cytotoxic organic-inorganic hybrid bioscaffolds: An efficient bedding for rapid growth of bone-like apatite and cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, Lukasz, E-mail: lukasz.john@chem.uni.wroc.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, 14 F. Joliot-Curie, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Baltrukiewicz, Marta; Sobota, Piotr [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, 14 F. Joliot-Curie, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Brykner, Renata; Cwynar-Zajac, Lucja [Department of Histology and Embryology, Wroclaw Medical University, 6a Chalubinskiego, 50-368 Wroclaw (Poland); Dziegiel, Piotr [Department of Histology and Embryology, Wroclaw Medical University, 6a Chalubinskiego, 50-368 Wroclaw (Poland); Department of Histology and Embryology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 6 Swiecickiego, 61-781 Poznan (Poland)

    2012-10-01

    Synthesis and characterization of organic-inorganic macroporous hybrid scaffolds were investigated. The materials were prepared by combining 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) and triethoxyvinylsilane (TEVS) chemically modified by Ca{sup 2+} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} ions via sol-gel route. In this study we have constructed a sugar-based cracks-free three-dimensional (3D) network with interconnected porous architecture within the range of 150-300 {mu}m and rough topography. The obtained results revealed that both topography and composition of prepared materials allow rapid growth of the bone-like apatite (HAp) layer on their surface after soaking in biological medium. Preliminary studies have shown that hybrids covered by HAp are non-cytotoxic and allow cell proliferation that make them a promising scaffolds in the field of bone regenerative medicine. The materials were mainly characterized by powder X-ray diffraction analysis (PXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and transmission electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy (TEM-EDS). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sol-gel derived biomaterials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3D organic-inorganic hybrid composites for bone tissue engineering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sugar-templated cracks-free macroporous scaffolds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate/triethoxyvinylsilane blend doped with calcium and phosphate ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-cytotoxic bedding for fibroblasts proliferation.

  9. Why are epididymal tumours so rare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Ching-Hei; Wang, Kai; Cooper, Trevor G

    2012-01-01

    Epididymal tumour incidence is at most 0.03% of all male cancers. It is an enigma why the human epididymis does not often succumb to cancer, when it expresses markers of stem and cancer cells, and constitutively expresses oncogenes, pro-proliferative and pro-angiogenic factors that allow tumour cells to escape immunosurveillance in cancer-prone tissues. The privileged position of the human epididymis in evading tumourigenicity is reflected in transgenic mouse models in which induction of tumours in other organs is not accompanied by epididymal neoplasia. The epididymis appears to: (i) prevent tumour initiation (it probably lacks stem cells and has strong anti-oxidative mechanisms, active tumour suppressors and inactive oncogene products); (ii) foster tumour monitoring and destruction (by strong immuno-surveillance and -eradication, and cellular senescence); (iii) avert proliferation and angiogenesis (with persistent tight junctions, the presence of anti-angiogenic factors and misplaced pro-angiogenic factors), which together (iv) promote dormancy and restrict dividing cells to hyperplasia. Epididymal cells may be rendered non-responsive to oncogenic stimuli by the constitutive expression of factors generally inducible in tumours, and resistant to the normal epididymal environment, which mimics that of a tumour niche promoting tumour growth. The threshold for tumour initiation may thus be higher in the epididymis than in other organs. Several anti-tumour mechanisms are those that maintain spermatozoa quiescent and immunologically silent, so the low incidence of cancer in the epididymis may be a consequence of its role in sperm maturation and storage. Understanding these mechanisms may throw light on cancer prevention and therapy in general. PMID:22522502

  10. Focused ultrasound for treatment of bone tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Dario B; Stauffer, Paul R; Vrba, David; Hurwitz, Mark D

    2015-05-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) is a modality with rapidly expanding applications across the field of medicine. Treatment of bone lesions with FUS including both benign and malignant tumours has been an active area of investigation. Recently, as a result of a successful phase III trial, magnetic resonance-guided FUS is now a standardised option for treatment of painful bone metastases. This report reviews the clinical applications amenable to treatment with FUS and provides background on FUS and image guidance techniques, results of clinical studies, and future directions. A comprehensive literature search and review of abstracts presented at the recently completed fourth International Focused Ultrasound Symposium was performed. Case reports and older publications revisited in more recent studies were excluded. For clinical studies that extend beyond bone tumours, only the data regarding bone tumours are presented. Fifteen studies assessing the use of focused ultrasound in treatment of primary benign bone tumours, primary malignant tumours, and metastatic tumours meeting the search criteria were identified. For these clinical studies the responders group varied within 91-100%, 85-87% and 64-94%, respectively. Major complications were reported in the ranges 0%, 0-28% and 0-4% for primary benign, malignant and metastatic tumours, respectively. Image-guided FUS is both safe and effective in the treatment of primary and secondary tumours. Additional phase III trials are warranted to more fully define the role of FUS in treatment of both benign and malignant bone tumours.

  11. Neuropathological diagnosis of brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollo, Bianca

    2011-11-01

    With recent progress in radiological, pathological, immunohistochemical, molecular and genetic diagnoses, the characterisation of brain tumours has improved. The last World Health Organization (WHO) Classification of Tumours of the Central Nervous System was done in 2007, based on morphological features, growth pattern and molecular profile of neoplastic cells, defined malignancy grade. The neuropathological diagnosis and the grading of each histotype are based on identification of histopathological criteria and immunohistochemical data. Molecular and genetic profiles may identify different tumour subtypes varying in biological and clinical behaviour, indicating prognostic and predictive factors. In order to investigate new therapeutic approaches, it is important to study the molecular pathways responsible for proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and anaplastic transformation. Different prognostic and predictive factors for glioma patients were identified by genetic studies, such as the loss of heterozygosis on chromosome 1p and 19q for oligodendrogliomas, proangiogenic factors such as Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor for glioblastomas and the methylation status of gene promoter of MethylGuanine-MethylTransferase. In conclusion, the prognostic evaluation and the therapeutic strategies for patients depend on the synthesis of histological diagnosis, malignancy grade, gene-molecular profile, radiological images, surgical resection and clinical findings (age, tumour location, and "performance status").

  12. Tumours and tumourous diseases; Tumoren, tumoraehnliche Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelmann, W. (ed.)

    2005-07-01

    This book on tumours and tumourous diseases comprises two parts: 1. Bone tumours and tumourous lesions. 2. Soft tissue tumours and tumourous lesions. Details are presented on pathology, diagnosis, conservative and perioperative therapy, surgical therapy, complications after resection, indicators for amputation, recommendations for follow-up treatment, radiotherapy, radionuclide therapy, alternative therapies, therapy concepts in case of metastases, tissue engineering and plastic surgery. (uke) [German] Der vorliegende Band der Reihe Orthopaedie und orthopaedische Chirurgie behandelt das Thema Tumoren und tumoraehnliche Erkrankungen. Der Band teilt sich in zwei Kapitel: 1. Knochentumoren und tumorartige Laesionen und 2. Weichteiltumoren und tumorartige Laesionen. Dargestellt werden Pathologie, Diagnostik, konservative und perioperative Therapie, chirurgische Therapie, Komplikationen nach Resektion, Indikatoren zur Amputation, Nachsorgeempfehlung, Strahlentherapie, Radionuklidtherapie, alternative Therapieverfahren, Therapiekonzepte bei Metastasen, Tissue Engineering und plastisch-chirurgische Massnahmen. (uke)

  13. Potential relevance of cyclooxygenase-2 expression in keratocystic odontogenic tumours: an immunohistochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, R.A.; Carvalho, J.F.C.; van der Waal, I.

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in tumour growth and spread of tumours by interfering with cell proliferation, cellular adhesion, immune surveillance, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. COX-2 levels are increased in various tumours. In

  14. Use of high throughput qPCR screening to rapidly clone low frequency tumour specific T-cells from peripheral blood for adoptive immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrano Oscar K

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The adoptive transfer of autologous tumor reactive lymphocytes can mediate significant tumor regression in some patients with refractory metastatic cancer. However, a significant obstacle for this promising therapy has been the availability of highly efficient methods to rapidly isolate and expand a variety of potentially rare tumor reactive lymphocytes from the natural repertoire of cancer patients. Methods We developed a novel in vitro T cell cloning methodology using high throughput quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR assay as a rapid functional screen to detect and facilitate the limiting dilution cloning of a variety of low frequency T cells from bulk PBMC. In preclinical studies, this strategy was applied to the isolation and expansion of gp100 specific CD8+ T cell clones from the peripheral blood of melanoma patients. Results In optimization studies, the qPCR assay could detect the reactivity of 1 antigen specific T cell in 100,000 background cells. When applied to short term sensitized PBMC microcultures, this assay could detect T cell reactivity against a variety of known melanoma tumor epitopes. This screening was combined with early limiting dilution cloning to rapidly isolate gp100154–162 reactive CD8+ T cell clones. These clones were highly avid against peptide pulsed targets and melanoma tumor lines. They had an effector memory phenotype and showed significant proliferative capacity to reach cell numbers appropriate for adoptive transfer trials (~1010 cells. Conclusion This report describes a novel high efficiency strategy to clone tumor reactive T cells from peripheral blood for use in adoptive immunotherapy.

  15. Perinatal tumours: the contribution of radiology to management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoghue, Veronica; Ryan, Stephanie; Twomey, Eilish [Children' s University Hospital, Radiology Department, Dublin (Ireland)

    2008-06-15

    A formal classification does not exist and they are probably best classified by their location. Overall the most common neoplasms are - Extracranial teratoma - Neuroblastoma - Soft-tissue tumours - Brain tumours - Leukaemia - Renal tumours - Liver tumours - Retinoblastoma. The prognosis is generally poor, although there are some exceptions such as congenital neuroblastoma and hepatoblastoma. These tumours have a tendency to regress and have a benign clinical course despite a clear malignant histological picture. Other tumours, though histologically benign, may be fatal because of their size and location. Large benign masses may cause airway or cardiovascular compromise and death. Others may cause significant mass effect preventing normal organ development. As normal embryonic cells have a high mitotic rate it is not surprising that perinatal tumours may have a rapid growth rate and become enormous in size. (orig.)

  16. Rapid infection and proliferation of dactylogyrid monogeneans on gills of spotted rose snapper (Lutjanus guttatus) after transfer to a sea-cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler-Jiménez, Lilia C; Morales-Serna, Francisco N; Fajer-Ávila, Emma J

    2015-06-15

    Finfish mariculture is typically threatened by parasite and disease outbreaks. Therefore, it is important to identify parasite species of potential risk for this activity. Snappers are valuable food fish worldwide. In the Eastern Pacific, spotted rose snapper (Lutjanus guttatus [Steindachner, 1869]) is a firm candidate for sea-cage aquaculture. In the current study, the parasitism of caged L. guttatus by dactylogyrids was evaluated for the first time during a complete farming period. Twenty five thousand juvenile fish produced at the Research Center for Food and Development (CIAD, Mazatlan Unit) were reared in a sentinel sea-cage from February to November 2012 in Mazatlan Bay, Mexico. A fish sample (n=15) was obtained every month. Dactylogyrids from the left second gill arch were identified and quantified. A total of 18,704 dactylogyrids distributed in three species, Euryhaliotrema perezponcei García-Vargas, Fajer-Ávila and Lamothe-Argumedo, 2008, E. mehen (Soler-Jiménez, García-Gasca and Fajer-Ávila, 2012), and Haliotrematoides guttati García-Vargas, Fajer-Ávila and Lamothe-Argumedo, 2008 (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae) was found, which were able to infect caged L. guttatus since the first month of the farming period. Prevalence of these parasite species was 100% all the time, except for initial low values for E. mehen and H. guttati. The mean intensity of infection of each dactylogyrid species varied significantly between sampling months. Euryhaliotrema perezponcei was the most abundant parasite, reaching the highest mean intensity in May, June and July (154.3, 296.9 and 176.6 parasites/host, respectively). No clear seasonality of infection was observed; however, the influence of the water temperature on the observed infection levels is discussed. There was no mortality, change on behavior or pathological signs. However, given the rapid infection and proliferation of dactylogyrids, particularly E. perezponcei on L. guttaus reared in a sentinel sea

  17. Imaging of sacral tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S.; Ollivier, L.; Brisse, H.; Neuenschwander, S. [Institut Curie, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Leclere, J. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif (France); Vanel, D. [The Rizzoli Institute, Department of Radiology, Bologna (Italy); Missenard, G. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Comite de pathologie tumorale de l' appareil locomoteur, Villejuif (France); Pinieux, G. de [CHRU de Tours, Department of Pathology, Hopital Trousseau, Tours (France)

    2008-04-15

    All components of the sacrum (bone, cartilage, bone marrow, meninges, nerves, notochord remnants, etc.) can give rise to benign or malignant tumours. Bone metastases and intraosseous sites of haematological malignancies, lymphoma and multiple myeloma are the most frequent aetiologies, while primary bone tumours and meningeal or nerve tumours are less common. Some histological types have a predilection for the sacrum, especially chordoma and giant cell tumour. Clinical signs are usually minor, and sacral tumours are often discovered in the context of nerve root or pelvic organ compression. The roles of conventional radiology, CT and MRI are described and compared with the histological features of the main tumours. The impact of imaging on treatment decisions and follow-up is also reviewed. (orig.)

  18. Parapharyngeal space primary tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilli, Gianluigi; Suarez, Vanessa; Muñoz, María Gabriela; Costales, María; Llorente, José Luis

    The aim of this study is to present our experience with the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for parapharyngeal space tumours. This study is a retrospective review of 90 patients diagnosed with tumours of the parapharyngeal space and treated surgically between 1984 and 2015. Patients whose tumours were not primary but invaded the parapharyngeal space expanding from another region, tumours originating in the deep lobe of the parotid gland and head and neck metastasis were excluded from this study. 74% percent of the parapharyngeal space neoplasms were benign and 26% were malignant. Pleomorphic adenoma was the most common neoplasm (27%), followed by paragangliomas (25%), miscellaneous malignant tumours (16%), neurogenic tumours (12%), miscellaneous benign tumours (10%), and malignant salivary gland tumours (10%). The transcervical approach was used in 56 cases, cervical-transparotid approach in 15 cases, type A infratemporal fossa approach in 13 cases, transmandibular approach in 4 cases and transoral approach in 2 cases. The most common complications were those deriving from nervous injuries. Most parapharyngeal space tumours can be removed surgically with a low rate of complications and recurrence. The transcervical approach is the most frequently used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  19. Targeting of Interferon Gamma to Stromal Fibroblasts Using a PDGF Receptor Recognizing Carrier Reduces Tumour Growth in Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakash, J.; Bansal, R.; Tomar, T.; Ostman, A.; Poelstra, K.

    Background: Stromal fibroblasts are the key cell types in tumour stroma, that support angiogenesis, tumour cell proliferation and metastasis. Therefore, inhibition of stromal fibroblasts activity might inhibit tumour growth. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is a potent cytokine and has been used for the

  20. Tumour Heterogeneity: The Key Advantages of Single-Cell Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez-Gabriel, Marta; Ory, Benjamin; Lamoureux, Francois; Heymann, Marie-Francoise; Heymann, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Tumour heterogeneity refers to the fact that different tumour cells can show distinct morphological and phenotypic profiles, including cellular morphology, gene expression, metabolism, motility, proliferation and metastatic potential. This phenomenon occurs both between tumours (inter-tumour heterogeneity) and within tumours (intra-tumour heterogeneity), and it is caused by genetic and non-genetic factors. The heterogeneity of cancer cells introduces significant challenges in using molecular prognostic markers as well as for classifying patients that might benefit from specific therapies. Thus, research efforts for characterizing heterogeneity would be useful for a better understanding of the causes and progression of disease. It has been suggested that the study of heterogeneity within Circulating Tumour Cells (CTCs) could also reflect the full spectrum of mutations of the disease more accurately than a single biopsy of a primary or metastatic tumour. In previous years, many high throughput methodologies have raised for the study of heterogeneity at different levels (i.e., RNA, DNA, protein and epigenetic events). The aim of the current review is to stress clinical implications of tumour heterogeneity, as well as current available methodologies for their study, paying specific attention to those able to assess heterogeneity at the single cell level. PMID:27999407

  1. TUMOUR CASE IN KOI CARP (Cyprinus carpio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Sholichah

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A case study of tumour in koi carp (Cyprinus carpio was observed in rearing periode. This tumour occurs solitary, large, pale red, fleshy masses under the lips and dental plates on the outside, and by reason of its size, may prevent closure the mouth. Moreover, this tumour goes through into the inside of the mouth. At necropsy, there were two soft, firm, small mass at inside of the mouth and the bigger mass at outside the mouth. Samples of this tumour were fixed in 10% formalin were used for histology analysis. The clinical course of the tumour is one of relatively slow but progressive growth. The proliferative stage of the neoplastic process is preceded and accompanied by a striking vascular reaction. Intensed hyperemia invariably occurs in that region of the mucosal surface which later becomes the site of neoplastic proliferation. Neoplastic cells lied around lamina propria and submucosal. These cells were joined together to make vacuolization and the other cells become pleiomorphism with hyperchromatic nucleus and N/C ratio cells are 1:1. In some area, there were many empty holes, around the holes there were debris cells, inflammation cells, and erythrocytes.

  2. Targeting the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jean M; Coleman, Robert L; Sood, Anil K

    2016-03-01

    The study of cancer initiation, growth, and metastasis has traditionally been focused on cancer cells, and the view that they proliferate due to uncontrolled growth signalling owing to genetic derangements. However, uncontrolled growth in tumours cannot be explained solely by aberrations in cancer cells themselves. To fully understand the biological behaviour of tumours, it is essential to understand the microenvironment in which cancer cells exist, and how they manipulate the surrounding stroma to promote the malignant phenotype. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecologic cancer worldwide. The majority of patients will have objective responses to standard tumour debulking surgery and platinum-taxane doublet chemotherapy, but most will experience disease recurrence and chemotherapy resistance. As such, a great deal of effort has been put forth to develop therapies that target the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer. Herein, we review the key components of the tumour microenvironment as they pertain to this disease, outline targeting opportunities and supporting evidence thus far, and discuss resistance to therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Warthin's tumour and smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ru, JA; Majoor, MHJM; van Benthem, PPG; Slootweg, PJ; Peeters, PHM; Hordijk, GJ

    2005-01-01

    Warthin's tumour and smoking. Objective: In an evaluation of our patients with parotid gland neoplasms, we noticed that patients with a Warthin's tumour were heavy smokers. The aim of this study was to confirm earlier findings in the literature concerning a possible association between smoking and

  4. of brain tumours

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also, tumours in the frontal and temporal lobes are more likely to cause psychiatric symptoms than those in parietal or occipital lobes. Left-sided, frontal tumours also seem to be associated with higher rates of depression, while those in the frontal lobe of the right hemisphere may be associated with features that may be.

  5. Wilms' tumour (nephroblastoma)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cancer cells throughout the body and affects fast-dividing cells. With radiation therapy high-energy X-rays reach cancer cells in a specific area of the body. In. Wilms' tumour, radiation is directed at the site of the tumour in the abdomen, and sometimes also at the lungs or the liver. Surgery. Total nephrectomy is the key step in.

  6. Transungual surgical excision of subungual glomus tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chander Grover

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glomus tumours are rare vascular tumours arising subungually in fingernails. Surgical excision provides histopathologic diagnosis and rapid resolution of symptoms. Objective: Present study was aimed at delineating common presentations and long-term treatment outcome of this rare subungual tumour. Patients and Methods: The clinical features and imaging results for 10 patients with subungual glomus tumours were recorded. All were treated with transungual excision. Per-operative findings and, treatment outcomes were recorded and analysed. Results: Females outnumbered males with average age being 33.3 ± 7.55 years. Presenting symptoms were severe pain (100%; nail-plate discoloration and onycholysis. X-ray was normal in 70%, though a magnetic resonance imaging done for five, helped visualise the lesion in three patients. The tumour involved nail bed in five cases and matrix in five, with an average size being 6.1 ± 2.13 mm (range 3-11 mm. An average follow-up of 16.8 months (range 8-24 months was largely uneventful with longitudinal ridging in two cases and recurrence in two (both attributed to a sister lesion. Conclusion: Subungual glomus tumours have characteristic clinical presentation. Imaging is helpful pre-operatively but has a low success rate. Transungual surgical excision is safe and effective, allowing better visualisation, easy exploration and minimal long-term complications.

  7. Transungual surgical excision of subungual glomus tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Chander; Khurana, Ananta; Jain, Rajat; Rathi, Vinita

    2013-10-01

    Glomus tumours are rare vascular tumours arising subungually in fingernails. Surgical excision provides histopathologic diagnosis and rapid resolution of symptoms. Present study was aimed at delineating common presentations and long-term treatment outcome of this rare subungual tumour. The clinical features and imaging results for 10 patients with subungual glomus tumours were recorded. All were treated with transungual excision. Per-operative findings and, treatment outcomes were recorded and analysed. Females outnumbered males with average age being 33.3 ± 7.55 years. Presenting symptoms were severe pain (100%); nail-plate discoloration and onycholysis. X-ray was normal in 70%, though a magnetic resonance imaging done for five, helped visualise the lesion in three patients. The tumour involved nail bed in five cases and matrix in five, with an average size being 6.1 ± 2.13 mm (range 3-11 mm). An average follow-up of 16.8 months (range 8-24 months) was largely uneventful with longitudinal ridging in two cases and recurrence in two (both attributed to a sister lesion). Subungual glomus tumours have characteristic clinical presentation. Imaging is helpful pre-operatively but has a low success rate. Transungual surgical excision is safe and effective, allowing better visualisation, easy exploration and minimal long-term complications.

  8. LTβR signalling preferentially accelerates oncogenic AKT-initiated liver tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarzello, Anthony J; Jiang, Qun; Back, Timothy; Dang, Hien; Hodge, Deborah; Hanson, Charlotte; Subleski, Jeffrey; Weiss, Jonathan M; Stauffer, Jimmy K; Chaisaingmongkol, Jitti; Rabibhadana, Siritida; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Ortaldo, John; Wang, Xin Wei; Norris, Paula S; Ware, Carl F; Wiltrout, Robert H

    2016-10-01

    The relative contributions of inflammatory signalling and sequential oncogenic dysregulation driving liver cancer pathogenesis remain incompletely understood. Lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR) signalling is critically involved in hepatitis and liver tumorigenesis. Therefore, we explored the interdependence of inflammatory lymphotoxin signalling and specific oncogenic pathways in the progression of hepatic cancer. Pathologically distinct liver tumours were initiated by hydrodynamic transfection of oncogenic V-Akt Murine Thymoma Viral Oncogene Homolog 1 (AKT)/β-catenin or AKT/Notch expressing plasmids. To investigate the relationship of LTβR signalling and specific oncogenic pathways, LTβR antagonist (LTβR-Fc) or agonist (anti-LTβR) were administered post oncogene transfection. Initiated livers/tumours were investigated for changes in oncogene expression, tumour proliferation, progression, latency and pathology. Moreover, specific LTβR-mediated molecular events were investigated in human liver cancer cell lines and through transcriptional analyses of samples from patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). AKT/β-catenin-transfected livers displayed increased expression of LTβ and LTβR, with antagonism of LTβR signalling reducing tumour progression and enhancing survival. Conversely, enforced LTβR-activation of AKT/β-catenin-initiated tumours induced robust increases in proliferation and progression of hepatic tumour phenotypes in an AKT-dependent manner. LTβR-activation also rapidly accelerated ICC progression initiated by AKT/Notch, but not Notch alone. Moreover, LTβR-accelerated development coincides with increases of Notch, Hes1, c-MYC, pAKT and β-catenin. We further demonstrate LTβR signalling in human liver cancer cell lines to be a regulator of Notch, pAKTser473 and β-catenin. Transcriptome analysis of samples from patients with ICC links increased LTβR network expression with poor patient survival, increased Notch1 expression and Notch

  9. Primary liver tumour of intermediate (hepatocyte-bile duct cell) phenotype: a progenitor cell tumour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robrechts, C; De Vos, R; Van den Heuvel, M; Van Cutsem, E; Van Damme, B; Desmet, V; Roskams, T

    1998-08-01

    A 57-year-old female patient presented with painless obstructive jaundice and mild mesogastric pain; she was in good general condition on admission. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed diffuse tumoral invasion of the liver, suggesting diffuse metastases. A liver biopsy showed a tumour with a trabecular growth pattern, composed of uniform relatively small cells, very suggestive of an endocrine carcinoma. Additional immunohistochemical stains, however, did not show any endocrine differentiation, but showed positivity for both hepatocyte-type cytokeratins (cytokeratin 8 and 18) and bile duct-type cytokeratins (cytokeratin 7 and 19). In addition, parathyroid hormone-related peptide, shown to be a good marker for cholangiocarcinoma, was immunoreactive. Electron microscopy revealed tumour cells with an intermediate phenotype: the cells clearly showed hepatocyte features on one hand and bile duct cell features on the other hand. Nine days after admission, the patient died due to liver failure and hepatic encephalopathy. Autopsy excluded another primary tumour site. Overall, this tumour was a primary liver tumour with an intermediate phenotype and with a very rapid clinical course. The intermediate (between hepatocyte and bile duct cell) phenotype suggests an immature progenitor cell origin, which is concordant with a rapid clinical course. This type of tumour has not been described previously and provides additional evidence for the existence of progenitor cells in human liver.

  10. First-line treatment with bortezomib rapidly stimulates both osteoblast activity and bone matrix deposition in patients with multiple myeloma, and stimulates osteoblast proliferation and differentiation in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Thomas; Søe, Kent; Abildgaard, Niels; Garnero, Patrick; Pedersen, Per T; Ormstrup, Tina; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Plesner, Torben

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of bortezomib on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation, as well as on bone matrix deposition for the first time in bisphosphonate-naïve, previously untreated patients with myeloma. Methods: Twenty newly diagnosed patients received four cycles of bortezomib treatment, initially as monotherapy and then combined with a glucocorticoid from cycle two to four. Bone remodeling markers were monitored closely during treatment. Furthermore, the effects of bortezomib and a glucocorticoid on immature and mature osteoblasts were also studied in vitro. Results: Treatment with bortezomib caused a significant increase in bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and pro-collagen type I N-terminal propeptide, a novel bone formation marker. The addition of a glucocorticoid resulted in a transient decrease in collagen deposition. In vitro bortezomib induced osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Differentiation but not proliferation was inhibited by glucocorticoid treatment. Conclusions: Bortezomib used as first-line treatment significantly increased collagen deposition in patients with multiple myeloma and osteolytic lesions, but the addition of a glucocorticoid to the treatment transiently inhibited the positive effect of bortezomib, suggesting that bortezomib may result in better healing of osteolytic lesions when used without glucocorticoids in patients that have obtained remission with a previous therapy. The potential bone-healing properties of single-agent bortezomib are currently being explored in a clinical study in patients who have undergone high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation. PMID:20528908

  11. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2011-04-26

    Abstract Background Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression. Methods Primary cultures were established from human breast tumour and adjacent non-tumour tissue. Putative progenitor cell populations were isolated based on co-expression or concomitant absence of the epithelial and myoepithelial markers EPCAM and CALLA respectively. Results Significant reductions in cellular senescence were observed in tumour versus non-tumour cultures, accompanied by a stepwise increase in proliferation:senescence ratios. A novel correlation between tumour aggressiveness and an imbalance of putative progenitor subpopulations was also observed. Specifically, an increased double-negative (DN) to double-positive (DP) ratio distinguished aggressive tumours of high grade, estrogen receptor-negativity or HER2-positivity. The DN:DP ratio was also higher in malignant MDA-MB-231 cells relative to non-tumourogenic MCF-10A cells. Ultrastructural analysis of the DN subpopulation in an invasive tumour culture revealed enrichment in lipofuscin bodies, markers of ageing or senescent cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that an imbalance in tumour progenitor subpopulations imbalances the functional relationship between proliferation and senescence, creating a microenvironment favouring tumour progression.

  12. First-line treatment with bortezomib rapidly stimulates both osteoblast activity and bone matrix deposition in patients with multiple myeloma, and stimulates osteoblast proliferation and differentiation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Thomas; Søe, Kent; Abildgaard, Niels

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of bortezomib on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation, as well as on bone matrix deposition for the first time in bisphosphonate-naïve, previously untreated patients with myeloma. METHODS: Twenty newly diagnosed patients...... received four cycles of bortezomib treatment, initially as monotherapy and then combined with a glucocorticoid from cycle two to four. Bone remodeling markers were monitored closely during treatment. Furthermore, the effects of bortezomib and a glucocorticoid on immature and mature osteoblasts were also...... studied in vitro. RESULTS: Treatment with bortezomib caused a significant increase in bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and pro-collagen type I N-terminal propeptide, a novel bone formation marker. The addition of a glucocorticoid resulted in a transient decrease in collagen deposition. In vitro...

  13. A reproducible brain tumour model established from human glioblastoma biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xingang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing clinically relevant animal models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM remains a challenge, and many commonly used cell line-based models do not recapitulate the invasive growth patterns of patient GBMs. Previously, we have reported the formation of highly invasive tumour xenografts in nude rats from human GBMs. However, implementing tumour models based on primary tissue requires that these models can be sufficiently standardised with consistently high take rates. Methods In this work, we collected data on growth kinetics from a material of 29 biopsies xenografted in nude rats, and characterised this model with an emphasis on neuropathological and radiological features. Results The tumour take rate for xenografted GBM biopsies were 96% and remained close to 100% at subsequent passages in vivo, whereas only one of four lower grade tumours engrafted. Average time from transplantation to the onset of symptoms was 125 days ± 11.5 SEM. Histologically, the primary xenografts recapitulated the invasive features of the parent tumours while endothelial cell proliferations and necrosis were mostly absent. After 4-5 in vivo passages, the tumours became more vascular with necrotic areas, but also appeared more circumscribed. MRI typically revealed changes related to tumour growth, several months prior to the onset of symptoms. Conclusions In vivo passaging of patient GBM biopsies produced tumours representative of the patient tumours, with high take rates and a reproducible disease course. The model provides combinations of angiogenic and invasive phenotypes and represents a good alternative to in vitro propagated cell lines for dissecting mechanisms of brain tumour progression.

  14. Sodium hyaluronate enhances colorectal tumour cell metastatic potential in vitro and in vivo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, B

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Sodium hyaluronate has been used intraperitoneally to prevent postoperative adhesions. However, the effect of sodium hyaluronate on tumour growth and metastasis in vitro and in vivo is still unknown. METHODS: Human colorectal tumour cell lines SW480, SW620 and SW707 were treated with sodium hyaluronate (10-500 microg\\/ml) and carboxymethylcellulose (0.125-1 per cent), and tumour cell proliferation and motility were determined in vitro. For the in vivo experiments male BD IX rats were randomized to a sodium hyaluronate group (n = 11; intraperitoneal administration of 0.5 x 10(6) DHD\\/K12 tumour cells and 5 ml 0.4 per cent sodium hyaluronate) or a phosphate-buffered saline group (n = 11; 0.5 x 10(6) DHD\\/K12 tumour cells and 5 ml phosphate-buffered saline intraperitoneally). Four weeks later the intraperitoneal tumour load was visualized directly. RESULTS: In vitro sodium hyaluronate increased tumour cell proliferation and motility significantly. Sodium hyaluronate-induced tumour cell motility appeared to be CD44 receptor dependent, whereas sodium hyaluronate-induced tumour cell proliferation was CD44 receptor independent. In vivo there was a significantly higher total tumour nodule count in the peritoneal cavity of the sodium hyaluronate-treated group compared with the control (P = 0.016). CONCLUSION: Sodium hyaluronate enhances tumour metastatic potential in vitro and in vivo, which suggests that use of sodium hyaluronate to prevent adhesions in colorectal cancer surgery may also potentiate intraperitoneal tumour growth. Presented to the Patey Prize Session of the Surgical Research Society and the annual scientific meeting of the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland, Brighton, UK, 4-7 May 1999

  15. Squamous odontogenic tumor-like proliferation in a radicular cyst: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Molina, Vicente; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2013-01-01

    The squamous odontogenic tumour is a rare benign neoplasm whose aetiology remains unknown. It usually appears in the jaw and its origin could be related to the ephitelial remnants of Malassez. Histologically comprises numerous islets of squamous, non-keratinized, well-differentiated and rounded epithelial cells a fibrous stroma without signs of atypical cells. There is a non-neoplastic lesion with the same histological pattern than the squamous odontogenic tumour. This entity is characterized by squamous odontogenic tumour proliferations isolated into the cyst wall of an odontogenic cyst. It is rare and has a benign behavior. It has been suggested that these epithelial proliferations could be the former expression of the neoplastic form. It is very important to carry out clinical and radiological controls periodically. So far it has not been documented any change towards a squamous odontogenic tumour nor toward malignancy in a squamous odontogenic tumour like proliferation. Key words:Radicular cyst, squamous odontogenic tumour. PMID:24455099

  16. The development of tumours under a ketogenic diet in association with the novel tumour marker TKTL1: A case series in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Natalie; Walach, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Since the initial observations by Warburg in 1924, it has become clear in recent years that tumour cells require a high level of glucose to proliferate. Therefore, a ketogenic diet that provides the body with energy mainly through fat and proteins, but contains a reduced amount of carbohydrates, has become a dietary option for supporting tumour treatment and has exhibited promising results. In the present study, the first case series of such a treatment in general practice is presented, in which 78 patients with tumours were treated within a time window of 10 months. The patients were monitored regarding their levels of transketolase-like-1 (TKTL1), a novel tumour marker associated with aerobic glycolysis of tumour cells, and the patients' degree of adherence to a ketogenic diet. Tumour progression was documented according to oncologists' reports. Tumour status was correlated with TKTL1 expression (Kruskal-Wallis test, Pketogenic diet, with one patient experiencing a stagnation in tumour progression and others an improvement in their condition. The adoption of a ketogenic diet was also observed to affect the levels of TKTL1 in those patients. In conclusion, the results from the present case series in general practice suggest that it may be beneficial to advise tumour patients to adopt a ketogenic diet, and that those who adhere to it may have positive results from this type of diet. Thus, the use of a ketogenic diet as a complementary treatment to tumour therapy must be further studied in rigorously controlled trials.

  17. Facile and rapid generation of large-scale microcollagen gel array for long-term single-cell 3D culture and cell proliferation heterogeneity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhichao; Jia, Shasha; Zhu, Zhi; Zhang, Mingxia; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2014-03-04

    Microfabricated devices are suitable for single-cell analysis due to their high throughput, compatible dimensions and controllable microenvironment. However, existing devices for single-cell culture and analysis encounter some limitations, such as nutrient depletion, random cell migration and complicated fluid shear influence. Moreover, most of the single-cell culture and analysis devices are based on 2D cell culture conditions, even though 3D cell culture methods have been demonstrated to better mimic the real cell microenvironment in vivo. To solve these problems, herein we develop a microcollagen gel array (μCGA) based approach for high-throughput long-term single-cell culture and single-cell analysis under 3D culture conditions. Type-I collagen, a well-established 3D cell culture medium, was used as the scaffold for 3D cell growth. A 2 × 2 cm PDMS chip with 10 000 μCGA units was fabricated to encapsulate thousands of single cells in less than 15 min. Single cells were able to be confined and survive in μCGA units for more than 1 month. The capability of large-scale and long-term single-cell 3D culture under open culture conditions allows us to study cellular proliferation heterogeneity and drug cytotoxicity at the single-cell level. Compared with existing devices for single-cell analysis, μCGA solves the problems of nutrient depletion and random cellular migration, avoids the influence of complicated fluid shear, and mimics the real 3D growth environment in vivo, thereby providing a feasible 3D long-term single-cell culture method for single-cell analysis and drug screening.

  18. Warthin's tumour and smoking.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ru, J.A. de; Plantinga, R.F.; Majoor, M.H.; Benthem, P.P. van; Slootweg, P.J.; Peeters, P.H.; Hordijk, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In an evaluation of our patients with parotid gland neoplasms, we noticed that patients with a Warthin's tumour were heavy smokers. The aim of this study was to confirm earlier findings in the literature concerning a possible association between smoking and the development of a Warthin's

  19. Extracranial glomus faciale tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, S E J; Gleeson, M J; Odell, E

    2008-09-01

    To describe a unique presentation of a predominantly extracranial glomus faciale tumour. To discuss the role of imaging in the differential diagnosis and evaluation of a hypervascular parotid mass. To review the previous literature concerning the glomus faciale tumour. A 54-year-old woman presented with a six-month history of facial weakness, pain and a parotid mass. Ultrasound revealed a hypervascular parotid mass and pre-operative core biopsy suggested a paraganglioma. Computed tomography defined its deep extent and demonstrated involvement of the petrous temporal bone along the descending portion of the facial nerve canal with a pattern of permeative lucency. A tumour was surgically removed which arose from the facial nerve from the second genu to the proximal divisions within the parotid gland and histology confirmed a paraganglioma. A facial nerve glomus faciale tumour should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a hypervascular parotid mass and may present in a predominantly extracranial location. Computed tomography will prove helpful in such a case in order to limit the differential diagnosis and to define the extent of skull base involvement.

  20. Intestinal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since its first description in 1937,1 the understanding of inflamma- tory myofibroblastic tumour (IMFT) has evolved from a reactive inflammatory process to a neoplasm of intermediate biological potential.2-9 Associated with nosologic, histogenetic and aetiopatho- genetic controversy, IMFTs occur in all age groups and in ...

  1. Multiphase modelling of vascular tumour growth in two spatial dimensions

    KAUST Repository

    Hubbard, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a continuum mathematical model of vascular tumour growth which is based on a multiphase framework in which the tissue is decomposed into four distinct phases and the principles of conservation of mass and momentum are applied to the normal/healthy cells, tumour cells, blood vessels and extracellular material. The inclusion of a diffusible nutrient, supplied by the blood vessels, allows the vasculature to have a nonlocal influence on the other phases. Two-dimensional computational simulations are carried out on unstructured, triangular meshes to allow a natural treatment of irregular geometries, and the tumour boundary is captured as a diffuse interface on this mesh, thereby obviating the need to explicitly track the (potentially highly irregular and ill-defined) tumour boundary. A hybrid finite volume/finite element algorithm is used to discretise the continuum model: the application of a conservative, upwind, finite volume scheme to the hyperbolic mass balance equations and a finite element scheme with a stable element pair to the generalised Stokes equations derived from momentum balance, leads to a robust algorithm which does not use any form of artificial stabilisation. The use of a matrix-free Newton iteration with a finite element scheme for the nutrient reaction-diffusion equations allows full nonlinearity in the source terms of the mathematical model.Numerical simulations reveal that this four-phase model reproduces the characteristic pattern of tumour growth in which a necrotic core forms behind an expanding rim of well-vascularised proliferating tumour cells. The simulations consistently predict linear tumour growth rates. The dependence of both the speed with which the tumour grows and the irregularity of the invading tumour front on the model parameters is investigated. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Are cranial germ cell tumours really tumours of germ cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotting, P J

    2006-12-01

    Germ cell tumours of the brain and those that occur in the gonads are believed to share a common origin from germ cell progenitors. This 'germ cell theory' rests upon similar histopathology between these tumours in different locations and the belief that endogenous somatic cells of the brain could not give rise to the range of cell types seen in germ cell tumours. An alternative 'embryonic cell theory' has been proposed for some classes of cranial germ cell tumours, but this still relies on the misplacement of cells in the brain (in this case the earliest embryonic stem cells) during early embryonic development. Recent evidence has demonstrated that neural stem cells of the brain can also give rise to many of the cell types seen in germ cell tumours. These data suggest that endogenous progenitor cells of the brain are a plausible alternative origin for these tumours. This idea is of central importance for studies aiming to elucidate the mechanisms of tumour development. The application of modern molecular analyses to reveal how tumour cells have altered with respect to their cell of origin relies on the certain identification of the cell from which the particular tumour arose. If the identity of this cell is mistaken, then studies to elucidate the mechanisms by which the progenitor cell has been subverted from its normal behaviour will not yield useful information. In addition, it will prove impossible to generate an appropriate animal model in which to study the underlying causes of those tumours. This article makes the case that current assumptions of the origins of cranial germ cell tumours are unreliable. It reviews the evidence in favour of the 'germ cell theory' and argues in favour of a 'brain cell theory' in which endogenous neural progenitor cells of the brain are the likely origin for these tumours. Thus, the case is made that cranial germ cell tumours, like other brain tumours, arise by the transformation of progenitor cells normally resident in the

  3. Circulating tumour cells in patients with urothelial tumours: Enrichment and in vitro culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolostova, Katarina; Cegan, Martin; Bobek, Vladimir

    2014-09-01

    Results of clinical trials have demonstrated that circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are frequently detected in patients with urothelial tumours. The monitoring of CTCs has the potential to improve therapeutic management at an early stage and also to identify patients with increased risk of tumour progression or recurrence before the onset of clinically detected metastasis. In this study, we report a new effectively simplified methodology for a separation and in vitro culturing of viable CTCs from peripheral blood. We include patients diagnosed with 3 types of urothelial tumours (prostate cancer, urinary bladder cancer, and kidney cancer). A size-based separation method for viable CTC - enrichment from unclothed peripheral blood has been introduced (MetaCell, Ostrava, Czech Republic). The enriched CTCs fraction was cultured directly on the separation membrane, or transferred from the membrane and cultured on any plastic surface or a microscopic slide. We report a successful application of a CTCs isolation procedure in patients with urothelial cancers. The CTCs captured on the membrane are enriched with a remarkable proliferation potential. This has enabled us to set up in vitro cell cultures from the viable CTCs unaffected by any fixation buffers, antibodies or lysing solutions. Next, the CTCs were cultured in vitro for a minimum of 10 to 14 days to enable further downstream analysis (e.g., immunohistochemistry). We demonstrated an efficient CTCs capture platform, based on a cell size separation principle. Furthermore, we report an ability to culture the enriched cells - a critical requirement for post-isolation cellular analysis.

  4. Tumour cell–derived extracellular vesicles interact with mesenchymal stem cells to modulate the microenvironment and enhance cholangiocarcinoma growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Haga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The contributions of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to tumour growth and stroma formation are poorly understood. Tumour cells can transfer genetic information and modulate cell signalling in other cells through the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs. We examined the contribution of EV-mediated inter-cellular signalling between bone marrow MSCs and tumour cells in human cholangiocarcinoma, highly desmoplastic cancers that are characterized by tumour cells closely intertwined within a dense fibrous stroma. Exposure of MSCs to tumour cell–derived EVs enhanced MSC migratory capability and expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin mRNA, in addition to mRNA expression and release of CXCL-1, CCL2 and IL-6. Conditioned media from MSCs exposed to tumour cell–derived EVs increased STAT-3 phosphorylation and proliferation in tumour cells. These effects were completely blocked by anti-IL-6R antibody. In conclusion, tumour cell–derived EVs can contribute to the generation of tumour stroma through fibroblastic differentiation of MSCs, and can also selectively modulate the cellular release of soluble factors such as IL-6 by MSCs that can, in turn, alter tumour cell proliferation. Thus, malignant cells can “educate” MSCs to induce local microenvironmental changes that enhance tumour cell growth.

  5. Diagnosing Musculoskeletal Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Grimer

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1993 we became aware of a worrying increase in apparent errors in the histopathological diagnosis of musculoskeletal tumours in our Unit. As a result all cases seen over the past 8 years were reviewed by an independent panel. Of the 1996 cases reviewed there was an error in 87. In 54 cases (2.7% this had led to some significant change in the active management of the patient. The main areas where errors arose were in those very cases where clinical and radiological features were not helpful in confirming or refuting the diagnosis. The incidence of errors rose with the passage of time, possibly related to a deterioration in the pathologist’s health. The error rate in diagnosing bone tumours in previously published series ranges from 9 to 40%. To ensure as accurate a rate of diagnosis as possible multidisciplinary working and regular audit are essential.

  6. [Vascular tumours and malformations, classification, pathology and imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassef, M; Vanwijck, R; Clapuyt, P; Boon, L; Magalon, G

    2006-01-01

    The understanding of vascular anomalies (vascular tumours and vascular malformations) was obscured, for a long time, by confusion and uncertainties in nosology and terminology. The International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) recently adopted a classification scheme, clearly separating vascular tumours (hemangiomas of different types) which result from active cell proliferation, from vascular malformations, which are inborn defects in vascular morphogenesis. These two types of lesions have different clinical behaviour and require different diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The most frequent vascular tumour is infantile hemangioma. Its clinical aspects and evolution are well-known. New data have been recently obtained concerning the phenotype of tumour cells and its histogenesis. Of the numerous new vascular tumours, which have been recently described, only the congenital hemangiomas, the vascular tumours associated with the Maffucci syndrome and the tumours that may be complicated by a profound thrombocytopenia (Kasabach and Merritt phenomenon) will be considered. Vascular malformations can be classified according to the vessel(s) types they are composed of. A classification table is presented, separating the malformations of vascular trunks from tissular malformations which are more intimately embedded in the surrounding tissues. The different syndromes associated with vascular anomalies take also place in this table. The clinical, imaging and histological aspects of the most frequent malformations (capillary, venous, lymphatic and arteriovenous) are presented. This classification intend to clarify the nosology and terminology of the complex field of vascular tumours and malformation and to offer a common language to the different physicians and specialists contributing, preferably with a interdisciplinary approach, to the diagnosis and treatment of these difficult lesions.

  7. Clinician's Update on the Benign, Premalignant, and Malignant Skin Tumours of the Vulva

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Freja Lærke; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2017-01-01

    Correct and rapid diagnosis of skin tumours often requires biopsy and histopathological examination to differentiate benign lesions such as seborrhoeic keratoses or melanocytic naevi from premalignant and malignant lesions such as malignant melanoma. Particularly, to the untrained eye, any benign...... skin tumour-pigmented or nonpigmented-is easily mistaken for a malignant lesion. Qualified clinical evaluation is paramount in order to reduce the frequency of unwarranted skin biopsies. Herein, the most common benign, premalignant, and malignant vulvar skin tumours are reviewed....

  8. A FIVE-YEAR HISTOPATHOLOGICAL REVIEW OF CNS TUMOURS IN A TERTIARY CENTRE WITH EMPHASIS ON DIAGNOSTIC ASPECTS OF UNCOMMON TUMOURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha Pidakala

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Tumours of central nervous system (CNS are of varied histogenesis and show divergent lines of differentiation and morphological features. These tumours show specific predilection for age and sex groups, more commonly than of tumours of other systems. Though tumours of glial tissue are more common, other tumours of neural, ependymal and meningeal origin are not uncommon. Metastatic disease is the common encounter in elderly. Tumour diagnosis is not always straight forward as many non-neoplastic lesions and reactive proliferations mimic tumours. Immunohistochemistry may help in problematic cases and thus can be used as an adjuvant tool in the diagnosis of such cases in addition to the routine histopathological staining methods. An accurate histological diagnosis is of extreme importance in these sites as exact diagnosis helps in proper management and favourable clinical outcome. MATERIAL & METHODS This study is on a retrospective and prospective basis in our institution from January 2011 to January, 2016. Our institute is a tertiary care center attached to a medical college catering to the needs of a rural based population. During this period, a total of 717 central nervous system tumour specimens were received and diagnosed based on examination of Haematoxylin and Eosin stained sections of formalin fixed and paraffin embedded specimens. Immunohistochemical markers (IHC were applied in selective cases for an accurate diagnosis and a number of rare cases were diagnosed based on morphology and IHC marker studies. RESULTS Age and sex incidence and anatomic distribution of various tumours were studied. In adults, meningiomas occurred most frequently in the present study followed by nerve sheath tumours, astrocytomas, metastatic deposits, glioblastomas and pituitary adenomas. Embryonal tumours occurred frequently in children. Other rare tumours identified are amyloidogenic pituitary adenoma, central neurocytoma, glioneuronal tumour with

  9. Metabolic scaling in solid tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milotti, E.; Vyshemirsky, V.; Sega, M.; Stella, S.; Chignola, R.

    2013-06-01

    Tumour metabolism is an outstanding topic of cancer research, as it determines the growth rate and the global activity of tumours. Recently, by combining the diffusion of oxygen, nutrients, and metabolites in the extracellular environment, and the internal motions that mix live and dead cells, we derived a growth law of solid tumours which is linked to parameters at the cellular level. Here we use this growth law to obtain a metabolic scaling law for solid tumours, which is obeyed by tumours of different histotypes both in vitro and in vivo, and we display its relation with the fractal dimension of the distribution of live cells in the tumour mass. The scaling behaviour is related to measurable parameters, with potential applications in the clinical practice.

  10. Vaginal haemangioendothelioma: an unusual tumour.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohan, H

    2012-02-01

    Vaginal tumours are uncommon and this is a particularly rare case of a vaginal haemangioendothelioma in a 38-year-old woman. Initial presentation consisted of symptoms similar to uterovaginal prolapse with "something coming down". Examination under anaesthesia demonstrated a necrotic anterior vaginal wall tumour. Histology of the lesion revealed a haemangioendothelioma which had some features of haemangiopericytoma. While the natural history of vaginal haemangioendothelioma is uncertain, as a group, they have a propensity for local recurrence. To our knowledge this is the third reported case of a vaginal haemangioendothelioma. Management of this tumour is challenging given the paucity of literature on this tumour. There is a need to add rare tumours to our "knowledge bank" to guide management of these unusual tumours.

  11. From magnesium to magnesium transporters in cancer: TRPM7, a novel signature in tumour development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapani, Valentina; Arduini, Daniela; Cittadini, Achille; Wolf, Federica I

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium availability affects many cellular functions that are critical for tumour growth and spreading, such as proliferation, metabolism and angiogenesis. In vivo, magnesium deficiency, and the resulting inflammation, can trigger both anti- and pro-tumour effects. Recent experimental evidence indicates that altered expression of the transient receptor potential melastatin, type 7 (TRPM7) epithelial magnesium channel is a frequent finding in cancer cells and human tumour tissues, and correlates with cell proliferation and/or migration. We review the role of TRPM7 in tumour development, with particular regard to its channelling function mediating both Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) influx, as well as its kinase activity, likely regulating actomyosin contractility. The potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications based on TRPM7 detection and inhibition, are also discussed.

  12. NSAIDs and Cell Proliferation in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Ettarh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is common worldwide and accounts for significant morbidity and mortality in patients. Fortunately, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that continuous therapy with NSAIDs offers real promise of chemoprevention and adjunct therapy for colon cancer patients. Tumour growth is the result of complex regulation that determines the balance between cell proliferation and cell death. How NSAIDs affect this balance is important for understanding and improving treatment strategies and drug effectiveness. NSAIDs inhibit proliferation and impair the growth of colon cancer cell lines when tested in culture in vitro and many NSAIDs also prevent tumorigenesis and reduce tumour growth in animal models and in patients, but the relationship to inhibition of tumour cell proliferation is less convincing, principally due to gaps in the available data. High concentrations of NSAIDs are required in vitro to achieve cancer cell inhibition and growth retardation at varying time-points following treatment. However, the results from studies with colon cancer cell xenografts are promising and, together with better comparative data on anti-proliferative NSAID concentrations and doses (for in vitro and in vivo administration, could provide more information to improve our understanding of the relationships between these agents, dose and dosing regimen, and cellular environment.

  13. Overexpression of Eag1 potassium channels in clinical tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schliephacke Tessa

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Certain types of potassium channels (known as Eag1, KCNH1, Kv10.1 are associated with the production of tumours in patients and in animals. We have now studied the expression pattern of the Eag1 channel in a large range of normal and tumour tissues from different collections utilising molecular biological and immunohistochemical techniques. Results The use of reverse transcription real-time PCR and specifically generated monoclonal anti-Eag1 antibodies showed that expression of the channel is normally limited to specific areas of the brain and to restricted cell populations throughout the body. Tumour samples, however, showed a significant overexpression of the channel with high frequency (up to 80% depending on the tissue source regardless of the detection method (staining with either one of the antibodies, or detection of Eag1 RNA. Conclusion Inhibition of Eag1 expression in tumour cell lines reduced cell proliferation. Eag1 may therefore represent a promising target for the tailored treatment of human tumours. Furthermore, as normal cells expressing Eag1 are either protected by the blood-brain barrier or represent the terminal stage of normal differentiation, Eag1 based therapies could produce only minor side effects.

  14. Overexpression of Eag1 potassium channels in clinical tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerlein, Bernhard; Weseloh, Rüdiger M; Mello de Queiroz, Fernanda; Knötgen, Hendrik; Sánchez, Araceli; Rubio, María E; Martin, Sabine; Schliephacke, Tessa; Jenke, Marc; Heinz-Joachim-Radzun; Stühmer, Walter; Pardo, Luis A

    2006-01-01

    Background Certain types of potassium channels (known as Eag1, KCNH1, Kv10.1) are associated with the production of tumours in patients and in animals. We have now studied the expression pattern of the Eag1 channel in a large range of normal and tumour tissues from different collections utilising molecular biological and immunohistochemical techniques. Results The use of reverse transcription real-time PCR and specifically generated monoclonal anti-Eag1 antibodies showed that expression of the channel is normally limited to specific areas of the brain and to restricted cell populations throughout the body. Tumour samples, however, showed a significant overexpression of the channel with high frequency (up to 80% depending on the tissue source) regardless of the detection method (staining with either one of the antibodies, or detection of Eag1 RNA). Conclusion Inhibition of Eag1 expression in tumour cell lines reduced cell proliferation. Eag1 may therefore represent a promising target for the tailored treatment of human tumours. Furthermore, as normal cells expressing Eag1 are either protected by the blood-brain barrier or represent the terminal stage of normal differentiation, Eag1 based therapies could produce only minor side effects. PMID:17022810

  15. Overexpression of Eag1 potassium channels in clinical tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerlein, Bernhard; Weseloh, Rüdiger M; Mello de Queiroz, Fernanda; Knötgen, Hendrik; Sánchez, Araceli; Rubio, María E; Martin, Sabine; Schliephacke, Tessa; Jenke, Marc; Heinz-Joachim-Radzun; Stühmer, Walter; Pardo, Luis A

    2006-10-05

    Certain types of potassium channels (known as Eag1, KCNH1, Kv10.1) are associated with the production of tumours in patients and in animals. We have now studied the expression pattern of the Eag1 channel in a large range of normal and tumour tissues from different collections utilising molecular biological and immunohistochemical techniques. The use of reverse transcription real-time PCR and specifically generated monoclonal anti-Eag1 antibodies showed that expression of the channel is normally limited to specific areas of the brain and to restricted cell populations throughout the body. Tumour samples, however, showed a significant overexpression of the channel with high frequency (up to 80% depending on the tissue source) regardless of the detection method (staining with either one of the antibodies, or detection of Eag1 RNA). Inhibition of Eag1 expression in tumour cell lines reduced cell proliferation. Eag1 may therefore represent a promising target for the tailored treatment of human tumours. Furthermore, as normal cells expressing Eag1 are either protected by the blood-brain barrier or represent the terminal stage of normal differentiation, Eag1 based therapies could produce only minor side effects.

  16. Are tumours angiogenesis-dependent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, H. M. W.; Voest, E. E.; Schlingemann, R. O.

    2004-01-01

    The final proof of principle that cancer patients can be effectively treated with angiogenesis inhibitors is eagerly awaited. Various preclinical in vivo experiments have proven that most tumours need new vessel formation in order to grow and to form metastases. First of all, tumours do not grow in

  17. Tumours in the Small Bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kurniawan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel tumours are rare and originate from a wide variety of benign and malignant entities. Adenocarcinomas are the most frequent primary malignant small bowel tumours. Submucosal tumours like gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST or neuroendocrine tumours (NET may show a central umbilication, pathologic vessels, bridging folds or an ulceration of the overlying mucosa. These signs help to differentiate them from harmless bulges caused by impression from outside, e.g. from other intestinal loops. Sarcomas of the small bowel are rare neoplasias with mesenchymal origin, sometimes presenting as protruding masses. Benign tumours like lipoma, fibrolipoma, fibroma, myoma, and heterotopias typically present as submucosal masses. They cannot be differentiated endoscopically from those with malignant potential as GIST or NET. Neuroendocrine carcinomas may present with diffuse infiltration, which may resemble other malignant tumours. The endoscopic appearance of small bowel lymphomas has a great variation from mass lesions to diffuse infiltrative changes. Melanoma metastases are the most frequent metastases to the small bowel. They may be hard to distinguish from other tumours when originating from an amelanotic melanoma.

  18. [Rol of pituitary tumour-transforming gene (PTTG) in the pituitary adenomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ortiga, Ruth; Sánchez Tejada, Laura; Peiró Cabrera, Gloria; Moreno-Pérez, Oscar; Arias Mendoza, Nieves; Aranda López, F Ignacio; Picó Alfonso, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pituitary tumours is far to be understood. Pituitary transforming tumour gene (PTTG), a gen that induces aneuploidy, genetic instability, cellular proliferation and to stimulate angiogenesis, has been involved in neoplasic transformation and shown overexpressed in many neoplasm as lung, breast, endometrium, thyroid and colon malignant tumours. On the other hand, PTTG has been inconsistently studied in pituitary tumours. The majority of studies have been performed in animals and there is a great variability in the methods used in its determination. The goal of this review is to resume the role of PTTG in tumourogenesis and critically to revise the studies published in humans in order to advance in the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas and to find clinical useful predictors of the behavior of these tumours. Copyright 2010 Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of genes involved in the biology of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours using Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeibmann, Astrid; Eikmeier, Kristin; Linge, Anna; Kool, Marcel; Koos, Björn; Schulz, Jacqueline; Albrecht, Stefanie; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Frühwald, Michael C.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Paulus, Werner; Hasselblatt, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours (AT/RT) are malignant brain tumours. Unlike most other human brain tumours, AT/RT are characterized by inactivation of one single gene, SMARCB1. SMARCB1 is a member of the evolutionarily conserved SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex, which has an important role in the control of cell differentiation and proliferation. Little is known, however, about the pathways involved in the oncogenic effects of SMARCB1 inactivation, which might also represent targets for treatment. Here we report a comprehensive genetic screen in the fruit fly that revealed several genes not yet associated with loss of snr1, the Drosophila homologue of SMARCB1. We confirm the functional role of identified genes (including merlin, kibra and expanded, known to regulate hippo signalling pathway activity) in human rhabdoid tumour cell lines and AT/RT tumour samples. These results demonstrate that fly models can be employed for the identification of clinically relevant pathways in human cancer.

  20. Clonal nature of odontogenic tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Oliveira, Carla da Silveira; Castro, Wagner Henriques; de Lacerda, Júlio César Tanos; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2009-04-01

    Although clonal origin is an essential step in the comprehension of neoplasias, there have been no studies to examine whether odontogenic tumours are derived from a single somatic progenitor cell. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clonal origin of odontogenic tumours. Fresh samples of seven ameloblastomas, two odontogenic mixomas, two adenomatoid odontogenic tumour, one calcifying odontogenic cyst, one calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour (CEOT) and six odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) of female patients were included in this study. After DNA extraction, the HUMARA gene polymorphism assay was performed. Most of the informative odontogenic lesions studied (12 out of 16) showed a monoclonal pattern. Among the polyclonal cases, two were OKC, one CEOT and one odontogenic mixoma. Our results suggest that most odontogenic tumours are monoclonal.

  1. Genetically engineered mesenchymal stromal cells producing TNFα have tumour suppressing effect on human melanoma xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyciakova, Silvia; Matuskova, Miroslava; Bohovic, Roman; Polakova, Katarina; Toro, Lenka; Skolekova, Svetlana; Kucerova, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are a promising tool for targeted cancer therapy due to their tumour-homing ability. Intrinsic resistance enables the MSC to longer tolerate therapeutic factors, such as prodrug converting enzymes, cytokines and pro-apoptotic proteins. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is known to be cytotoxic to a variety of cancer cells and exert a tumour-destructive capacity. MSC were retrovirally transduced to stable express an exogenous gene encoding the desired therapeutic agent hTNFα. The effect of a TNFα-producing adipose tissue-derived MSC (AT-MSC/hTNFα) was tested on the tumour cell lines of different origins: melanoma (A375), breast carcinoma (SKBR3, MDA-MB-231), colon carcinoma (HT29), ovarian carcinoma (SKOV3) and glioblastoma (U87-MG) cells. The tumour suppressing effect of AT-MSC/hTNFα on A375 melanoma xenografts was monitored in an immunodeficient mouse model in vivo. Engineered AT-MSC are able to constitutively secrete human TNFα protein, induce apoptosis of tumour cell lines via caspase 3/7 activation and inhibit the tumour cell proliferation in vitro. Melanoma A375 and breast carcinoma SKBR3 cells were the most sensitive, and their proliferation in vitro was reduced by conditioned media produced by AT-MSC/hTNFα to 60% and 40%, respectively. The previously reported tumour supportive effect of AT-MSC on subcutaneous A375 melanoma xenograft growth was neutralised and suppressed by engineered AT-MSC stably producing hTNFα. When AT-MSC/hTNFα were coinjected with A375 melanoma cells, the tumour mass inhibition was up to 97.5%. The results of the present study demonstrate that tumour cells respond to hTNFα-based treatment mediated by genetically engineered AT-MSC/hTNFα both in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Pathohistological and immunohistochemical parameters significant for prognosis and therapy of tumours in cats and dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksić-Kovačević Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of tumours implies a disproportion between proliferation, growth and differentiation, which is accompanied by significant genotypic and phenotypic variations in the diseased. The scenario of multiple oncogenic effects on the inhibition of cell growth, apoptosis and maturation, on the stimulation of proliferation, on cell migration and tissue invasion, is responsible for the occurrence of tumours both in humans and in animals. The qualitative and quantitative determination of biological prognostic factors in the tissue of affected cats and dogs directly indicates a possible tumour metastasizing, and consequently also the prognosis of neoplastic disease. Monitoring of clinical and biological prognostic factors is important for therapy and prediction of tumours in humans and animals. The determination of the proliferative potential of tumour cells by immunohistochemical detection of Ki-67 and PCNA is used in grading certain tumours in cats and dogs. It is also possible immunohistochemically to prove factors of angiogenesis and numerous activating and inhibiting proteins in the tumour tissue. In addition to other histological, clinical and biological parameters, they are significant for the further prognosis and therapy of neoplastic diseases.

  3. p38 MAP kinase inhibition promotes primary tumour growth via VEGF independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Adrian W; Wang, Jiang H; Redmond, Henry P

    2009-11-15

    The surgical insult induces an inflammatory response that activates P38 MAP kinases and solid tumours can also release cytokines. Therfore inhibition of these pathways may reduce tumour growth We set out to examine the effects of P38-MAPK inhibition on apoptosis, proliferation, VEGF release and cell cycle effects in-vitro and on primary tumour growth in-vivo. 4T-1 cells (2 x 105 cells/well) were incubated, in 24 well plates with control, 25, 50 or 100 ng/ml of SB-202190 for 24 hours. Cells were subsequently asessed for apoptosis, proliferation, VEGF release and cell cycle analysis. Balb-c mice each received 1 x 106 4T 1 cells subcutaneously in the flank and were then randomised to receive control or SB202190 (2.5 microM/kg) by intraperitoneal injection daily. Tumour size was measured alternate days and at day 24 animals were sacrificed and serum VEGF assessed. P38-MAPK inhibition in-vitro resulted in a significant reduction in proliferation (75.2 +/- 8.4% vs. 100 +/- 4.3%, p etag/ml compared to 158.6 +/- 27.1 etag/ml) These findings demonstrate that P38-MAPK inhibition in-vitro reduces proliferation and G1 cell cycle phase as well as promoting primary tumour growth in-vivo. These effects would appear to be independent of VEGF.

  4. Spatiotemporally restricted arenavirus replication induces immune surveillance and type I interferon-dependent tumour regression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Halime Kalkavan; Piyush Sharma; Stefan Kasper; Iris Helfrich; Aleksandra A Pandyra; Asmae Gassa; Isabel Virchow; Lukas Flatz; Tim Brandenburg; Sukumar Namineni; Mathias Heikenwalder; Bastian Höchst; Percy A Knolle; Guido Wollmann; Dorothee Von Laer; Ingo Drexler; Jessica Rathbun; Paula M Cannon; Stefanie Scheu; Jens Bauer; Jagat Chauhan; Dieter Häussinger; Gerald Willimsky; Max Löhning; Dirk Schadendorf; Sven Brandau; Martin Schuler; Philipp A Lang; Karl S Lang

    2017-01-01

    ...) preferentially replicate in tumour cells in a variety of murine and human cancer models. Viral replication leads to prolonged local immune activation, rapid regression of localized and metastatic cancers, and long-term disease control...

  5. [Historic malignant tumour: 27 observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparsa, A; Doffoel-Hantz, V; Durox, H; Gaston, J; Delage-Core, M; Bédane, C; Labrousse, F; Sannajust, J P; Bonnetblanc, J-M

    2012-03-01

    When used in the French medical literature to describe a pathological state, the word "historic" normally refers to tumours of startling appearance because of their size. It is difficult to understand how a patient can allow such tumours to continue to grow. We attempt to define this concept. Two dermatologists carried out a retrospective, independent and comparative selection of photographs taken between 1978 and 2008 of malignant cutaneous tumours of unusual size given the histological diagnosis. Socio-professional, demographic, clinical, histological psychological data, and details of treatment history and progress were collected. Twenty-seven patients (11 M, 16 F) of mean age 74 years (34-99 years) presented a "historic" tumour. Twelve patients lived in rural regions. Five patients were company executives. The average duration of development of the "historic" tumours was 4.5 years (6-420 months). The tumours were classed histologically as epidermoid carcinomas (nine) and melanomas (seven). The mean size was 13 cm (6-30 cm). Psychiatric problems, membership of sects or dementia were noted for 13 patients. Treatment consisted of chemotherapy, radiotherapy or, less frequently, surgery. Eighteen patients died on average 13 months after diagnosis. "Historic" malignant tumour (also described in the literature as "giant" tumour) is a real-life fact. No studies have been made of a series of such patients. Despite histological diagnosis, the size was associated with slow tumoral progress and/or late treatment, chiefly accounted for by psychiatric disorders. Socio-professional data indicate that "historic" tumours are equally common in urban and rural areas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. CT appearances of pleural tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salahudeen, H.M. [Department of Radiology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom)], E-mail: hmdsal@gmail.com; Hoey, E.T.D. [Department of Radiology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Robertson, R.J.; Darby, M.J. [Department of Radiology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is the imaging technique of choice for characterizing pleural masses with respect to their location, composition, and extent. CT also provides important information regarding invasion of the chest wall and surrounding structures. A spectrum of tumours can affect the pleura of which metastatic adenocarcinoma is the commonest cause of malignant pleural disease, while malignant mesothelioma is the most common primary pleural tumour. Certain CT features help differentiate benign from malignant processes. This pictorial review highlights the salient CT appearances of a range of tumours that may affect the pleura.

  7. Mice deleted for cell division cycle 73 gene develop parathyroid and uterine tumours: model for the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, G V; Stevenson, M; Lines, K E; Newey, P J; Reed, A A C; Bowl, M R; Jeyabalan, J; Harding, B; Bradley, K J; Manek, S; Chen, J; Wang, P; Williams, B O; Teh, B T; Thakker, R V

    2017-07-13

    The hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour (HPT-JT) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by occurrence of parathyroid tumours, often atypical adenomas and carcinomas, ossifying jaw fibromas, renal tumours and uterine benign and malignant neoplasms. HPT-JT is caused by mutations of the cell division cycle 73 (CDC73) gene, located on chromosome 1q31.2 and encodes a 531 amino acid protein, parafibromin. To facilitate in vivo studies of Cdc73 in tumourigenesis we generated conventional (Cdc73 +/- ) and conditional parathyroid-specific (Cdc73 +/L /PTH-Cre and Cdc73 L/L /PTH-Cre) mouse models. Mice were aged to 18-21 months and studied for survival, tumour development and proliferation, and serum biochemistry, and compared to age-matched wild-type (Cdc73 +/+ and Cdc73 +/+ /PTH-Cre) littermates. Survival of Cdc73 +/- mice, when compared to Cdc73 +/+ mice was reduced (Cdc73 +/- =80%; Cdc73 +/+ =90% at 18 months of age, Pfourfold higher than that in parathyroid glands of wild-type littermates (P<0.0001). Cdc73 +/- , Cdc73 +/L /PTH-Cre and Cdc73 L/L /PTH-Cre mice had higher mean serum calcium concentrations than wild-type littermates, and Cdc73 +/- mice also had increased mean serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations. Parathyroid tumour development, and elevations in serum calcium and PTH, were similar in males and females. Cdc73 +/- mice did not develop bone or renal tumours but female Cdc73 +/- mice, at 18 months of age, had uterine neoplasms comprising squamous metaplasia, adenofibroma and adenomyoma. Uterine neoplasms, myometria and jaw bones of Cdc73 +/- mice had increased proliferation rates that were 2-fold higher than in Cdc73 +/+ mice (P<0.05). Thus, our studies, which have established mouse models for parathyroid tumours and uterine neoplasms that develop in the HPT-JT syndrome, provide in vivo models for future studies of these tumours.

  8. The Heidelberg classification of renal cell tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovacs, G; Akhtar, M; Beckwith, BJ; Bugert, P; Cooper, CS; Delahunt, B; Eble, JN; Fleming, S; Ljungberg, B; Medeiros, LJ; Moch, H; Reuter, VE; Ritz, E; Roos, G; Schmidt, D; Srigley, [No Value; Storkel, S; VandenBerg, E; Zbar, B

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the conclusions of a workshop entitled 'Impact of Molecular Genetics on the Classification of Renal Cell Tumours', which was held in Heidelberg in October 1996, The focus on 'renal cell tumours' excludes any discussion of Wilms' tumour and its variants, or of tumours metastatic

  9. Putting tumours in context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek

    2001-10-01

    The interactions between cancer cells and their micro- and macroenvironment create a context that promotes tumor growth and protects it from immune attack. The functional association of cancer cells with their surrounding tissues forms a new 'organ' that changes as malignancy progresses. Investigation of this process might provide new insights into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and could also lead to new therapeutic targets. Under normal conditions, ORGANS are made up of TISSUES that exchange information with other cell types via cell-cell contact, cytokines and the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX (ECM). The ECM, which is produced by collaboration between STROMAL fibroblasts and EPITHELIAL cells, provides structural scaffolding for cells, as well as contextual information. The endothelial vasculature provides nutrients and oxygen, and cells of the immune system combat pathogens and remove apoptotic cells. Epithelial cells associate into intact, polarized sheets. These tissues communicate through a complex network of interactions: physically, through direct contact or through the intervening ECM, and biochemically, through both soluble and insoluble signalling molecules. In combination, these interactions provide the information that is necessary to maintain cellular differentiation and to create complex tissue structures. Occasionally, the intercellular signals that define the normal context become disrupted. Alterations in epithelial tissues can lead to movement of epithelial sheets and proliferation - for example, after activation of mesenchymal fibroblasts due to wounding.Normally, these conditions are temporary and reversible, but when inflammation is sustained, an escalating feedback loop ensues.Under persistent inflammatory conditions, continual upregulation of enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by stromal fibroblasts can disrupt the ECM, and invading immune cells can overproduce factors that promote abnormal proliferation. As this process

  10. Paediatric laryngeal granular cell tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dauda Ayuba

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumour (GCT affecting the larynx is not common, especially in children. Most cases are apt to be confused with respiratory papilloma and may even be mistaken for a malignant neoplasia. We present a case of laryngeal GCT in a 12-year-old child to emphasize that the tumour should be regarded in the differential of growths affecting the larynx in children.

  11. MRI characteristics of midbrain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, B. [Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing (China). Neurosurgical Inst.]|[Department of Neuroradiology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital (China); Wang, C.C.; Wang, J. [Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing (China). Neurosurgical Inst.

    1999-03-01

    We diagnosed 60 cases of midbrain tumours by MRI between 1993 to 1997. There were 39 males and 21 females, aged 2-64 years, mean 25.6 years. We found 38 patients with true intramedullary midbrain tumours, 11 predominantly in the tectum, 20 in the tegmentum and 7 with a downward extension to the pons; there were 7 within the cerebral aqueduct. There were 22 patients with infiltrating midbrain tumours extending from adjacent structures, 11 cases each from the thalamus and pineal region. All patients received surgical treatment. Gross total resection was achieved in 42 cases, subtotal (> 75 %) resection in 18. Pathological diagnoses included 16 low-grade and 15 high-grade astrocytomas; 5 oligodendroastrocytomas; 2 ependymomas; 11 glioblastomas; and 11 pineal parenchymal or germ-cell tumours. Midbrain tumours are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, with wide variation in clinical and MRI features, related to the site and type of tumour. MRI not only allows precise analysis of their growth pattern, but also can lead to a correct preoperative diagnosis in the majority of cases. (orig.) (orig.) With 3 figs., 3 tabs., 19 refs.

  12. Semiautomatic methods for segmentation of the proliferative tumour volume on sequential FLT PET/CT images in head and neck carcinomas and their relation to clinical outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, A.I.J.; Troost, E.G.C.; Hoeben, B.A.W.; Grootjans, W.; Lee, J.A.; Gregoire, V.; Hatt, M.; Visvikis, D.; Bussink, J.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Visser, E.P.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Radiotherapy of head and neck cancer induces changes in tumour cell proliferation during treatment, which can be depicted by the PET tracer (18)F-fluorothymidine (FLT). In this study, three advanced semiautomatic PET segmentation methods for delineation of the proliferative tumour volume

  13. CD47 update: a multifaceted actor in the tumour microenvironment of potential therapeutic interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sick, E; Jeanne, A; Schneider, C; Dedieu, S; Takeda, K; Martiny, L

    2012-01-01

    CD47 is a ubiquitous 50 kDa five-spanning membrane receptor that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily. This receptor, also known as integrin-associated protein, mediates cell-to-cell communication by ligation to transmembrane signal-regulatory proteins SIRPα and SIRPγ and interacts with integrins. CD47 is also implicated in cell-extracellular matrix interactions via ligation with thrombospondins. Furthermore, CD47 is involved in many and diverse cellular processes, including apoptosis, proliferation, adhesion and migration. It also plays a key role in many immune and cardiovascular responses. Thus, this multifaceted receptor might be a central actor in the tumour microenvironment. Solid tumours are composed of not only cancer cells that actively proliferate but also other cell types including immune cells and fibroblasts that make up the tumour microenvironment. Tumour cell proliferation is strongly sustained by continuous sprouting of new vessels, which also represents a gate for metastasis. Moreover, infiltration of inflammatory cells is observed in most neoplasms. Much evidence has accumulated indicating that infiltrating leukocytes promote cancer progression. Given its ubiquitous expression on all the different cell types that compose the tumour microenvironment, targeting CD47 could represent an original therapeutic strategy in the field of oncology. We present a current overview of the biological effects associated with CD47 on cancer cells and stromal cells. PMID:22774848

  14. Doubling time of thymic epithelial tumours on CT: correlation with histological subtype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Jooae; Lee, Sang Min; Kim, Namkug; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Seo, Joon Beom [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Soyeoun [Ulsan University Hospital, Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Se Hoon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    We retrospectively evaluated the doubling time (DT) of thymic epithelial tumours (TET) according to the histological subtype on CT. From January 2005 to June 2016, we enrolled 53 patients who had pathologically confirmed TET and at least two CT scans. Tumour size was measured using a two-dimensional method, and the DT was calculated. DTs were compared among histological subtypes, and factors associated with rapid tumour growth (DT <180 days) were assessed. In 42 of the 53 patients (79.2%) the tumours showed interval growth (>2 mm) during follow-up. The median DT for all tumours was 400 days (range 48-1,964 days). There were no significant differences in DT in relation to histological subtype (p = 0.177). When TETs were recategorized into three groups, i.e. low-risk thymomas (types A, AB, B1), high-risk thymomas (types B2, B3), and thymic carcinoma, DT was significantly different among the groups (median DT 436, 381 and 189 days, respectively; p = 0.031). Histological subtype (type B3 and thymic carcinoma) was the single independent predictor of rapid tumour growth. The majority of TETs grew during follow-up with variable and relatively slow growth rates. Histological features of aggressive behaviour significantly correlated with a decreased DT and rapid growth. circle The majority of thymic epithelial tumours grew during follow-up (79.2%, 42/53). (orig.)

  15. Association of primary tumour FDG uptake with clinical, histopathological and molecular characteristics in breast cancer patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koolen, B.B.; Aukema, T.S. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Surgical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vrancken Peeters, M.J.T.F.D.; Rutgers, E.J.T. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Surgical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wesseling, J.; Lips, E.H. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Pathology and Experimental Therapy, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vogel, W.V.; Valdes Olmos, R.A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Werkhoven, E. van [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Biometrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gilhuijs, K.G.A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rodenhuis, S. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Medical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of primary tumour {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake with clinical, histopathological and molecular characteristics of breast cancer patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Second, we wished to establish for which patients pretreatment positron emission tomography (PET)/CT could safely be omitted because of low FDG uptake. PET/CT was performed in 214 primary stage II or III breast cancer patients in the prone position with hanging breasts. Tumour FDG uptake was qualitatively evaluated to determine the possibility of response monitoring with PET/CT and was quantitatively assessed using maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}). FDG uptake was compared with age, TNM stage, histology, hormone and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status, grade, Ki-67 and molecular subtype in univariable and multivariable analyses. In 203 tumours (95 %) FDG uptake was considered sufficient for response monitoring. No subgroup of patients with consistently low tumour FDG uptake could be identified. In a univariable analysis, SUV{sub max} was significantly higher in patients with distant metastases at staging examination, non-lobular carcinomas, tumours with negative hormone receptors, triple negative tumours, grade 3 tumours, and in tumours with a high proliferation index (Ki-67 expression). After multiple linear regression analysis, triple negative and grade 3 tumours were significantly associated with a higher SUV{sub max}. Primary tumour FDG uptake in breast cancer patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy is significantly higher in tumours with prognostically unfavourable characteristics. Based on tumour characteristics associated with low tumour FDG uptake, this study was unable to identify a subgroup of patients unlikely to benefit from pretreatment PET/CT. (orig.)

  16. PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome: early tumour development in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smpokou, Patroula; Fox, Victor L; Tan, Wen-Hann

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report the earliest age of diagnosis of common clinical findings in children with PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (PHTS). Medical records of children with PHTS were reviewed; data included growth measurements, presence or absence of specific clinical manifestations and tumours, and documented ages of diagnosis. Children with PHTS evaluated at Boston Children's Hospital from 1996 to 2011. The cohort included 34 children diagnosed with PHTS via genetic testing, under the age of 21 years. Of these, 23 were male and 11 female. The mean age at their last documented clinical evaluation was 13.6 years. The mean follow-up time was 7.5 years. Macrocephaly and developmental/intellectual disability were consistent findings. Pigmented penile macules were noted in all males examined for this finding. Thyroid nodules, found in half the children screened with ultrasound, were diagnosed as early as at 5 years of age. Thyroid carcinoma, identified in 12% of the children in this cohort, was diagnosed as early as at 7 years of age. Other tumours included renal cell carcinoma diagnosed at 11 years of age and granulosa cell tumour of the ovary and colonic ganglioneuroma, each diagnosed at 16 years of age. Specific clinical findings and tumours are characteristic in children with PHTS. Tumour development occurs in young children with this condition, which necessitates early surveillance, especially of the thyroid. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Study of bantam miRNA expression in brain tumour resulted due to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-06-19

    Jun 19, 2017 ... Disturbance of delicate concordance between stem cell proliferation, specification and differentiation during brain development leads to several neural disorders including tumours. Accumulating evidences have demonstratedinvolvement of short noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) in governing several ...

  18. Origin of pluripotent germ cell tumours: the role of microenvironment during embryonic development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, David Møbjerg; Sonne, Si Brask; Ottesen, Anne Marie

    2008-01-01

    Carcinoma in situ (CIS) testis, known also as intratubular germ cell neoplasia, is the cancer stem cell from which the great majority of testicular germ cell derived tumours (TGCTs) of the testis arise. TGCTs can proliferate into morphologically homogeneous seminomas or can differentiate into vir...

  19. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delyan P Ivanov

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money.

  20. Multiplexing Spheroid Volume, Resazurin and Acid Phosphatase Viability Assays for High-Throughput Screening of Tumour Spheroids and Stem Cell Neurospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Delyan P.; Parker, Terry L.; Walker, David A.; Alexander, Cameron; Ashford, Marianne B.; Gellert, Paul R.; Garnett, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity) were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money. PMID:25119185

  1. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  2. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  3. Multiscale biomechanics of brain tumours favours cancer invasion by cell softening and tissue stiffening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, Josef; Fritsch, Anatol; Grosser, Steffen; Friebe, Sabrina; Reiss-Zimmermann, Martin; Müller, Wolf; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus; Sack, Ingolf

    Cancer progression needs two contradictory mechanical prerequisites. For metastasis individual cancer cells or small clusters have to flow through the microenvironment by overcoming the yield stress exerted by the surrounding. On the other hand a tumour has to behave as a solid to permit cell proliferation and spreading of the tumour mass against its surrounding. We determine that the high mechanical adaptability of cancer cells and the scale controlled viscoelastic properties of tissues reconcile both conflicting properties, fluid and solid, simultaneously in brain tumours. We resolve why different techniques that assess cell and tissue mechanics have produced apparently conflicting results by our finding that tumours generate different viscoelastic behaviours on different length scales, which are in concert optimal for tumour spreading and metastasis. Single cancer cells become very soft in their elastic behavior which promotes cell unjamming. On the level of direct cell-to-cell interactions cells feel their micro-environment as rigid elastic substrate that stimulates cancer on the molecular level. All over a tumour has predominately a stiff elastic character in terms of viscoelastic behaviour caused by a solid backbone. Simultaneously, the tumour mass is characterized by a large local variability in the storage and loss modulus that is caused by areas of a more fluid nature.

  4. CANCER Escape from senescence boosts tumour growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Jan Paul

    2018-01-01

    Some chemotherapies block cancer growth by driving tumour cells into a state of cell-division arrest termed senescence. It emerges that such cells have a boosted capacity to drive tumour growth if they exit senescence

  5. Follicular infundibulum tumour presenting as cutaneous horn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaraman M

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumour of follicular infundibulum is an organoid tumour with a plate like growth attached to the epidermis with connection from the follicular epithelium. We are reporting such a case unusually presenting as cutaneous horn.

  6. Selective induction of apoptosis in glioma tumour cells by a Gynostemma pentaphyllum extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, L; Chen, B H; Makarov, P; Kattengell, K; Heinitz, K; Keilhoff, G

    2010-07-01

    At low concentration H(2)O(2) is an important signal molecule in proliferation of tumour cells. We report about a study investigating the effect of an ethanolic extract from Gynostemma pentaphyllum on proliferation of C6 glioma tumour cells and cellular H(2)O(2) concentration. The proliferation of these cells was maximal at about 1 muM extracellular H(2)O(2). HPLC-finger prints of the extract revealed a set of saponines as essential components. In C6 glioma cells the extract caused increase in super oxide dismutase (SOD) activity, in the amount of SOD protein, and in cellular H(2)O(2) concentration. It inhibited cell proliferation and induced activation of caspase 3 as indication of apoptosis. No effect of the extract was observed on the proliferation of astrocytes of a primary cell culture. From these findings we suggest that the ethanolic extract from Gynostemma pentaphyllum may selectively shift the H(2)O(2) concentration to toxic levels exclusively in tumour cells due to increased SOD activity. It may have a high potency in cancer therapy and cancer prophylaxis. (c) 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Targeting DNA-PKcs and telomerase in brain tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Resham Lal; Lim, Hui Kheng; Venkatesan, Shriram; Lee, Phoebe Su Wen; Hande, M Prakash

    2014-10-13

    Patients suffering from brain tumours such as glioblastoma and medulloblastoma have poor prognosis with a median survival of less than a year. Identifying alternative molecular targets would enable us to develop different therapeutic strategies for better management of these tumours. Glioblastoma (MO59K and KNS60) and medulloblastoma cells (ONS76) were used in this study. Telomerase inhibitory effects of MST-312, a chemically modified-derivative of epigallocatechin gallate, in the cells were assessed using telomere repeat amplification protocol. Gene expression analysis following MST-312 treatment was done by microarray. Telomere length was measured by telomere restriction fragments analysis. Effects of MST-312 on DNA integrity were evaluated by single cell gel electrophoresis, immunofluorescence assay and cytogenetic analysis. Phosphorylation status of DNA-PKcs was measured with immunoblotting and effects on cell proliferation were monitored with cell titre glow and trypan blue exclusion following dual inhibition. MST-312 showed strong binding affinity to DNA and displayed reversible telomerase inhibitory effects in brain tumour cells. In addition to the disruption of telomere length maintenance, MST-312 treatment decreased brain tumour cell viability, induced cell cycle arrest and double strand breaks (DSBs). DNA-PKcs activation was observed in telomerase-inhibited cells presumably as a response to DNA damage. Impaired DNA-PKcs in MO59J cells or in MO59K cells treated with DNA-PKcs inhibitor, NU7026, caused a delay in the repair of DSBs. In contrast, MST-312 did not induce DSBs in telomerase negative osteosarcoma cells (U2OS). Combined inhibition of DNA-PKcs and telomerase resulted in an increase in telomere signal-free chromosomal ends in brain tumour cells as well. Interestingly, continual exposure of brain tumour cells to telomerase inhibitor led to population of cells, which displayed resistance to telomerase inhibition-mediated cell arrest. DNA-PKcs ablation

  8. Scintigraphy in benign bone tumours

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-08-05

    Aug 5, 1989 ... Ackerman LV, Spjut AJ. Tumors of Bone and Carrilage. Washington, DC: US Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, 1962: 84-89. 4. Evans RW. HislOlogical Appearances of Tumours. Edinburgh: E & S Living- stone, 1966: 187-191. 5. Lichtenstein L. Bane Tumors. 5th ed. St Louis, Mo.: CV Mosby, 1977: 30-39.

  9. New horizons in MR-controlled and monitored radiofrequency ablation of liver tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Cernicanu, Alexandru; Lepetit-Coiff?, Matthieu; Viallon, Magalie; Terraz, Sylvain; Becker, Christoph D.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract There is a sustained interest in using magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry to monitor the radiofrequency ablation of liver tumours as a means of visualizing the progress of the thermal coagulation and deciding the optimal end-point. Despite numerous technical challenges, important progress has been made and demonstrated in animal studies. In addition to MR thermometry, MR can now be used for the guidance of the tumour targeting with ?fluoroscopic? rapid image acquisition, and it can ...

  10. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of the pineal region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorhan, C.; Soto-Ares, G.; Pruvo, J.P. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU Lille, Lille (France); Ruchoux, M.M. [Dept. of Neuropathology, Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU Lille (France); Blond, S. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU Lille (France)

    2001-11-01

    We describe CT and MR findings in a 23-month-old infant with a melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of the pineal gland. The tumour has been stereotactically biopsied and surgically resected. The pathological diagnosis was made on the resected piece. Embryology of the pineal gland and the histology of melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Radiofrequency for the treatment of liver tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruers, TJM; de Jong, KP; Ijzermans, JNM

    2005-01-01

    Resection should still be considered the gold standard for many liver tumours. There is, however, growing interest in the use of radiofrequency (RFA) for the treatment of liver tumours. By RFA, tumour tissue can be destructed selectively without significant damage to vascular structures in the

  12. Radiofrequency for the treatment of liver tumours.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruers, T.J.M.; Jong, K.P. de; Ijzermans, J.N.M.

    2005-01-01

    Resection should still be considered the gold standard for many liver tumours. There is, however, growing interest in the use of radiofrequency (RFA) for the treatment of liver tumours. By RFA, tumour tissue can be destructed selectively without significant damage to vascular structures in the

  13. Mohs micrographic surgery of rare cutaneous tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flohil, S.C.; Lee, C.B. van; Beisenherz, J.; Mureau, M.A.M.; Overbeek, L.I.H.; Nijsten, T.; Bos, R.R.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recurrence rates after Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) for rare cutaneous tumours are poorly defined. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the recurrence rate after MMS for rare cutaneous tumours at a university centre. METHODS & MATERIALS: Retrospective review of all rare cutaneous tumours treated

  14. REPORT OF SEVEN CASES OF METASTATIC TUMOURS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major Adebayo

    Abstract. Background: Metastatic tumours make up approximately one per cent of all oral malignancies. Such tumours may present in the jawbones and oral soft tissues. The commonest oral site is the mandible. Nigerian reports of metastatic tumours to the jaws are very rare. Method: This is a retrospective study of six cases ...

  15. Intralymphatic mRNA vaccine induces CD8 T-cell responses that inhibit the growth of mucosally located tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialkowski, Lukasz; van Weijnen, Alexia; Van der Jeught, Kevin; Renmans, Dries; Daszkiewicz, Lidia; Heirman, Carlo; Stangé, Geert; Breckpot, Karine; Aerts, Joeri L.; Thielemans, Kris

    2016-01-01

    The lack of appropriate mouse models is likely one of the reasons of a limited translational success rate of therapeutic vaccines against cervical cancer, as rapidly growing ectopic tumours are commonly used for preclinical studies. In this work, we demonstrate that the tumour microenvironment of TC-1 tumours differs significantly depending on the anatomical location of tumour lesions (i.e. subcutaneously, in the lungs and in the genital tract). Our data demonstrate that E7-TriMix mRNA vaccine-induced CD8+ T lymphocytes migrate into the tumour nest and control tumour growth, although they do not express mucosa-associated markers such as CD103 or CD49a. We additionally show that despite the presence of the antigen-specific T cells in the tumour lesions, the therapeutic outcomes in the genital tract model remain limited. Here, we report that such a hostile tumour microenvironment can be reversed by cisplatin treatment, leading to a complete regression of clinically relevant tumours when combined with mRNA immunization. We thereby demonstrate the necessity of utilizing clinically relevant models for preclinical evaluation of anticancer therapies and the importance of a simultaneous combination of anticancer immune response induction with targeting of tumour environment. PMID:26931556

  16. Intralymphatic mRNA vaccine induces CD8 T-cell responses that inhibit the growth of mucosally located tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialkowski, Lukasz; van Weijnen, Alexia; Van der Jeught, Kevin; Renmans, Dries; Daszkiewicz, Lidia; Heirman, Carlo; Stangé, Geert; Breckpot, Karine; Aerts, Joeri L; Thielemans, Kris

    2016-03-02

    The lack of appropriate mouse models is likely one of the reasons of a limited translational success rate of therapeutic vaccines against cervical cancer, as rapidly growing ectopic tumours are commonly used for preclinical studies. In this work, we demonstrate that the tumour microenvironment of TC-1 tumours differs significantly depending on the anatomical location of tumour lesions (i.e. subcutaneously, in the lungs and in the genital tract). Our data demonstrate that E7-TriMix mRNA vaccine-induced CD8(+) T lymphocytes migrate into the tumour nest and control tumour growth, although they do not express mucosa-associated markers such as CD103 or CD49a. We additionally show that despite the presence of the antigen-specific T cells in the tumour lesions, the therapeutic outcomes in the genital tract model remain limited. Here, we report that such a hostile tumour microenvironment can be reversed by cisplatin treatment, leading to a complete regression of clinically relevant tumours when combined with mRNA immunization. We thereby demonstrate the necessity of utilizing clinically relevant models for preclinical evaluation of anticancer therapies and the importance of a simultaneous combination of anticancer immune response induction with targeting of tumour environment.

  17. Deregulation of miR-183 and KIAA0101 in aggressive and malignant pituitary tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali eRoche

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of microRNAs (miRNAs expression in many types of cancer suggests that they may be involved in crucial steps during tumour progression. Indeed, miRNAs deregulation has been described in pituitary tumourigenesis, but few studies described their role in pituitary tumour progression towards aggressiveness and malignancy.To assess the role of miRNA within the hierarchical events cascade occurring in prolactin (PRL tumours during progression towards aggressiveness and malignancy, we used an integrative genomic approach associating clinic-pathological features, global miRNA expression and transcriptomic profiles performed on the same human tumours. We described the down-regulation of one principal miRNA, miR-183 specifically in the 8 aggressive (A, grade 2b as compared to the 18 non-aggressive (NA, grades 1a, 2a PRL tumours. We demonstrated that it acted as an anti-proliferative gene by directly targeting KIAA0101 which is involved in cell cycle activation and inhibition of p53-p21 mediated cell cycle arrest. Moreover, we showed that miR-183 and KIAA0101 expression are significantly correlated with the main markers of pituitary tumours aggressiveness Ki-67 and p53 labeling.These results confirmed the activation of proliferation in aggressive and malignant PRL tumours as compare to non-aggressive ones. Importantly, those data also demonstrate the ability of such an integrative genomic strategy, applied in the same human tumours, to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for tumoural progression even from a small cohort of patients.

  18. Cellular immortality in brain tumours: an integration of the cancer stem cell paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Ruman; Heath, Rachel; Grundy, Richard

    2009-04-01

    Brain tumours are a diverse group of neoplasms that continue to present a formidable challenge in our attempt to achieve curable intervention. Our conceptual framework of human brain cancer has been redrawn in the current decade. There is a gathering acceptance that brain tumour formation is a phenotypic outcome of dysregulated neurogenesis, with tumours viewed as abnormally differentiated neural tissue. In relation, there is accumulating evidence that brain tumours, similar to leukaemia and many solid tumours, are organized as a developmental hierarchy which is maintained by a small fraction of cells endowed with many shared properties of tissue stem cells. Proof that neurogenesis persists throughout adult life, compliments this concept. Although the cancer cell of origin is unclear, the proliferative zones that harbour stem cells in the embryonic, post-natal and adult brain are attractive candidates within which tumour-initiation may ensue. Dysregulated, unlimited proliferation and an ability to bypass senescence are acquired capabilities of cancerous cells. These abilities in part require the establishment of a telomere maintenance mechanism for counteracting the shortening of chromosomal termini. A strategy based upon the synthesis of telomeric repeat sequences by the ribonucleoprotein telomerase, is prevalent in approximately 90% of human tumours studied, including the majority of brain tumours. This review will provide a developmental perspective with respect to normal (neurogenesis) and aberrant (tumourigenesis) cellular turnover, differentiation and function. Within this context our current knowledge of brain tumour telomere/telomerase biology will be discussed with respect to both its developmental and therapeutic relevance to the hierarchical model of brain tumourigenesis presented by the cancer stem cell paradigm.

  19. Imaging of salivary gland tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.Y.P.; Wong, K.T.; King, A.D. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin NT, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Ahuja, A.T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin NT, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)], E-mail: aniltahuja@cuhk.edu.hk

    2008-06-15

    Salivary gland neoplasms account for <3% of all tumors. Most of them are benign and parotid gland is the commonest site. As a general rule, the smaller the involved salivary gland, the higher is the possibility of the tumor being malignant. The role of imaging in assessment of salivary gland tumour is to define intra-glandular vs. extra-glandular location, detect malignant features, assess local extension and invasion, detect nodal metastases and systemic involvement. Image guided fine needle aspiration cytology provides a safe means to obtain cytological confirmation. For lesions in the superficial parotid and submandibular gland, ultrasound is an ideal tool for initial assessment. These are superficial structures accessible by high resolution ultrasound and FNAC which provides excellent resolution and tissue characterization without a radiation hazard. Nodal involvement can also be assessed. If deep tissue extension is suspected or malignancy confirmed on cytology, an MRI or CT is mandatory to evaluate tumour extent, local invasion and perineural spread. For all tumours in the sublingual gland, MRI should be performed as the risk of malignancy is high. For lesions of the deep lobe of parotid gland and the minor salivary glands, MRI and CT are the modalities of choice. Ultrasound has limited visualization of the deep lobe of parotid gland which is obscured by the mandible. Minor salivary gland lesions in the mucosa of oral cavity, pharynx and tracheo-bronchial tree, are also not accessible by conventional ultrasound. Recent study suggests that MR spectroscopy may differentiate malignant and benign salivary gland tumours as well as distinguishing Warthin's tumor from pleomorphic adenoma. However, its role in clinical practice is not well established. Similarly, the role of nuclear medicine and PET scan, in imaging of parotid masses is limited. Sialography is used to delineate the salivary ductal system and has limited role in assessment of tumour extent.

  20. Oscillatory dynamics in a model of vascular tumour growth - implications for chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maini PK

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigations of solid tumours suggest that vessel occlusion may occur when increased pressure from the tumour mass is exerted on the vessel walls. Since immature vessels are frequently found in tumours and may be particularly sensitive, such occlusion may impair tumour blood flow and have a negative impact on therapeutic outcome. In order to study the effects that occlusion may have on tumour growth patterns and therapeutic response, in this paper we develop and investigate a continuum model of vascular tumour growth. Results By analysing a spatially uniform submodel, we identify regions of parameter space in which the combination of tumour cell proliferation and vessel occlusion give rise to sustained temporal oscillations in the tumour cell population and in the vessel density. Alternatively, if the vessels are assumed to be less prone to collapse, stable steady state solutions are observed. When spatial effects are considered, the pattern of tumour invasion depends on the dynamics of the spatially uniform submodel. If the submodel predicts a stable steady state, then steady travelling waves are observed in the full model, and the system evolves to the same stable steady state behind the invading front. When the submodel yields oscillatory behaviour, the full model produces periodic travelling waves. The stability of the waves (which can be predicted by approximating the system as one of λ-ω type dictates whether the waves develop into regular or irregular spatio-temporal oscillations. Simulations of chemotherapy reveal that treatment outcome depends crucially on the underlying tumour growth dynamics. In particular, if the dynamics are oscillatory, then therapeutic efficacy is difficult to assess since the fluctuations in the size of the tumour cell population are enhanced, compared to untreated controls. Conclusions We have developed a mathematical model of vascular tumour growth formulated as a system of partial

  1. Post-treatment complications of soft tissue tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapeero, L.G. [Department of Radiology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Bone and Soft Tissue Program, United States Military Cancer Institute, 6900 Georgia Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20307 (United States)], E-mail: lshapeero@usuhs.edu; De Visschere, P.J.L.; Verstraete, K.L. [Department of Radiology and Magnetic Resonance/MR-1K12 IB, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Poffyn, B. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Forsyth, R. [Department of Pathology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Sys, G. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Uyttendaele, D. [Department of Radiology and Magnetic Resonance/MR-1K12 IB, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2009-02-15

    Purpose: To identify local and distant complications of patients with soft tissue tumours and evaluate their relationships to types of therapy. Methods and materials: Fifty-one patients (29 males and 22 females, ages 14-80 years) with 34 malignant and 17 benign soft tissue tumours were evaluated for local and distant complications after resection or amputation only (26 patients) or after the addition of radiotherapy (25 patients: 17 patients had external beam therapy, 7 patients had external beam therapy and brachytherapy, and one patient had extracorporeal irradiation and reimplantation). Duration of follow-up averaged 3.75 years for malignant tumours and 2.79 years for benign tumours. Follow-up studies included radiography, T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), computed tomography for thoracic and abdominal metastases, and 3-phase technetium-99m-labeled-methylene-diphosphonate scintigraphy for bone metastases. Results: Recurrent tumours were 2.2 times more frequent in patients who had undergone their initial resection at an outside hospital as compared with those first treated at the university hospital. Nine of 11 recurrences occurred after marginal surgery. Metastases from soft tissue sarcomas, most commonly to lung (nine patients) and to bone and muscle (five patients), showed no specific relationship to type of therapy. DCE-MRI differentiated rapidly enhancing soft tissue recurrences (11 patients) and residual tumours (6 patients) from slowly enhancing muscle inflammation, and non-enhancing fibrosis and seromas that usually did not enhance. Seromas developed in 76% of patients who had postoperative radiation therapy and in 7.7% of patients who had only surgery. Subcutaneous and cutaneous oedema and muscle inflammation was at least four times more frequent after adjunct radiotherapy than after resection alone. Irrespective of the type of treatment, inflammatory changes in muscle and

  2. IDH1-associated primary glioblastoma in young adults displays differential patterns of tumour and vascular morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Sergey; Jury, Alexa; Laxton, Ross; Doey, Lawrence; Kandasamy, Naga; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Jürgensmeier, Juliane M; Jones, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly aggressive tumour with marked heterogeneity at the morphological level in both the tumour cells and the associated highly prominent vasculature. As we begin to develop an increased biological insight into the underlying processes driving the disease, fewer attempts have thus far been made to understand these phenotypic differences. We sought to address this by carefully assessing the morphological characteristics of both the tumour cells and the associated vasculature, relating these observations to the IDH1/MGMT status, with a particular focus on the early onset population of young adults who develop primary glioblastoma. 276 primary glioblastoma specimens were classified into their predominant cell morphological type (fibrillary, gemistocytic, giant cell, small cell, oligodendroglial, sarcomatous), and assessed for specific tumour (cellularity, necrosis, palisades) and vascular features (glomeruloid structures, arcades, pericyte proliferation). IDH1 positive glioblastomas were associated with a younger age at diagnosis, better clinical outcome, prominent oligodendroglial and small cell tumour cell morphology, pallisading necrosis and glomeruloid vascular proliferation in the absence of arcade-like structures. These features widen the phenotype of IDH1 mutation-positive primary glioblastoma in young adults and provide correlative evidence for a functional role of mutant IDH1 in the differential nature of neo-angiogenesis in different subtypes of glioblastoma.

  3. IDH1-associated primary glioblastoma in young adults displays differential patterns of tumour and vascular morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Popov

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is a highly aggressive tumour with marked heterogeneity at the morphological level in both the tumour cells and the associated highly prominent vasculature. As we begin to develop an increased biological insight into the underlying processes driving the disease, fewer attempts have thus far been made to understand these phenotypic differences. We sought to address this by carefully assessing the morphological characteristics of both the tumour cells and the associated vasculature, relating these observations to the IDH1/MGMT status, with a particular focus on the early onset population of young adults who develop primary glioblastoma. 276 primary glioblastoma specimens were classified into their predominant cell morphological type (fibrillary, gemistocytic, giant cell, small cell, oligodendroglial, sarcomatous, and assessed for specific tumour (cellularity, necrosis, palisades and vascular features (glomeruloid structures, arcades, pericyte proliferation. IDH1 positive glioblastomas were associated with a younger age at diagnosis, better clinical outcome, prominent oligodendroglial and small cell tumour cell morphology, pallisading necrosis and glomeruloid vascular proliferation in the absence of arcade-like structures. These features widen the phenotype of IDH1 mutation-positive primary glioblastoma in young adults and provide correlative evidence for a functional role of mutant IDH1 in the differential nature of neo-angiogenesis in different subtypes of glioblastoma.

  4. Polyomavirus-induced pilomatricomas in mice: from viral inoculation to tumour development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Símula, Silvina; Ozuna, Paola Villán; Otero, Javier; Casas, José; Sanjuan, Norberto

    2012-05-01

    Polyomavirus has been used extensively to study tumour induction in mice. Although most neoplasms are well characterized, those arising from hair follicles have been referred to by different names during the last four decades. The purpose of this research was to contribute to a more accurate histological characterization of these tumours as well as to study the viral progression from the onset of infection to the development of neoplasms. Polyomavirus A2 was inoculated into newborn C3H/BiDa mice, and at different time-points (from 5 to 70 days post-inoculation) the mice were sacrificed and studied using histological, immunocytochemical, ultrastructural and virological methods. The fully developed hair follicle tumours consisted of a proliferation of matrix cells that evolved into 'shadow' cells with empty nuclei and finally into amorphous keratin; the tumours were therefore diagnosed as pilomatricomas. Viral VP-1 was observed only in fully differentiated cells and not in proliferating-cell-nuclear-antigen (PCNA)-positive cells in the same tumour. In conclusion, Polyomavirus first replicated in the skin, and then disseminated through the blood and reached the outer sheath of the hair follicles and finally infected matrix cells, leading to the development of pilomatricomas from which infectious virus was isolated. © 2011 The Authors. APMIS © 2011 APMIS.

  5. A preliminary study on a new model system to evaluate tumour-detection and tumour-purging protocols in ovarian cortex tissue intended for fertility preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, R; Bastings, L; Westphal, J R; Massuger, L F A G; Braat, D D M; Beerendonk, C C M

    2015-04-01

    Is it possible to create a model system that mimics ovarian metastatic disease in order to devise new strategies to detect cancer cells and prevent cancer cell transmission via ovarian tissue autotransplantation in cancer survivors? Injection of bovine or human ovarian cortex fragments with cells from different cancer types led to the formation of proliferating tumour masses and newly formed small metastatic lesions. Autotransplantation of ovarian tissue comes with the major concern of cancer cells possibly being present in the tissue. A model system to develop strategies aimed at enhancing the safety of ovarian tissue autotransplantation is currently lacking. The ability of injected human leukaemia, lymphoma, Ewing's sarcoma or breast cancer cells to proliferate and form tumour-like structures in bovine and human ovarian cortex tissue in vitro was assessed. The injected cells were from human cancer cell lines. After 4 days of culture, some tissue fragments were harvested for standard histological staining and immunohistochemical staining of tumour cell specific antigens and the Ki67 proliferation marker, while the remaining fragments were incubated for an additional 6 days (bovine tissue) or 3 days (human tissue) before analysis. Experiments were performed with ovarian tissue from women after prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy. Bovine ovarian tissue was obtained at an abattoir. Glucose uptake during in vitro culture was monitored to quantify the viability of tissue. Tumour formation was assessed at Day 4 and Day 10 in bovine ovarian tissue and at Day 4 and Day 7 in human ovarian tissue, using histology and immunohistochemistry. We found that bovine and human ovarian cortex tissue could be cultured for up to 10 and 7 days, respectively, without any loss of viability. Our preliminary results show that all cell lines tested were capable of forming proliferating tumours in ovarian cortex tissue in vitro. Lymphoma and breast cancer cells produced small metastases near

  6. Heterogeneity and proliferation of invasive cancer subclones in game theory models of the Warburg effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archetti, M

    2015-04-01

    The Warburg effect, a switch from aerobic energy production to anaerobic glycolysis, promotes tumour proliferation and motility by inducing acidification of the tumour microenvironment. Therapies that reduce acidity could impair tumour growth and invasiveness. I analysed the dynamics of cell proliferation and of resistance to therapies that target acidity, in a population of cells, under the Warburg effect. The dynamics of mutant cells with increased glycolysis and motility has been assessed in a multi-player game with collective interactions in the framework of evolutionary game theory. Perturbations of the level of acidity in the microenvironment have been used to simulate the effect of therapies that target glycolysis. The non-linear effects of glycolysis induce frequency-dependent clonal selection leading to coexistence of glycolytic and non-glycolytic cells within a tumour. Mutants with increased motility can invade such a polymorphic population and spread within the tumour. While reducing acidity may produce a sudden reduction in tumour cell proliferation, frequency-dependent selection enables it to adapt to the new conditions and can enable the tumour to restore its original levels of growth and invasiveness. The acidity produced by glycolysis acts as a non-linear public good that leads to coexistence of cells with high and low glycolysis within the tumour. Such a heterogeneous population can easily adapt to changes in acidity. Therapies that target acidity can only be effective in the long term if the cost of glycolysis is high, that is, under non-limiting oxygen concentrations. Their efficacy, therefore, is reduced when combined with therapies that impair angiogenesis. © 2015 The Authors Cell Proliferation Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Total {sup 18}F-dopa PET tumour uptake reflects metabolic endocrine tumour activity in patients with a carcinoid tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiebrich, Helle-Brit; Walenkamp, Annemiek M.; Vries, Elisabeth G.E. de [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Medical Oncology, Groningen (Netherlands); Jong, Johan R. de; Koopmans, Klaas Pieter; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Brouwers, Adrienne H. [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Kema, Ido P. [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Groningen (Netherlands); Sluiter, Wim; Links, Thera P. [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Endocrinology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine ({sup 18}F-dopa) has an excellent sensitivity to detect carcinoid tumour lesions. {sup 18}F-dopa tumour uptake and the levels of biochemical tumour markers are mediated by tumour endocrine metabolic activity. We evaluated whether total {sup 18}F-dopa tumour uptake on PET, defined as whole-body metabolic tumour burden (WBMTB), reflects tumour load per patient, as measured with tumour markers. Seventy-seven consecutive carcinoid patients who underwent an {sup 18}F-dopa PET scan in two previously published studies were analysed. For all tumour lesions mean standardised uptake values (SUVs) at 40% of the maximal SUV and tumour volume on {sup 18}F-dopa PET were determined and multiplied to calculate a metabolic burden per lesion. WBMTB was the sum of the metabolic burden of all individual lesions per patient. The 24-h urinary serotonin, urine and plasma 5-hydroxindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), catecholamines (nor)epinephrine, dopamine and their metabolites, measured in urine and plasma, and serum chromogranin A served as tumour markers. All but 1 were evaluable for WBMTB; 74 patients had metastatic disease. {sup 18}F-dopa PET detected 979 lesions. SUV{sub max} on {sup 18}F-dopa PET varied up to 29-fold between individual lesions within the same patients. WBMTB correlated with urinary serotonin (r = 0.51) and urinary and plasma 5-HIAA (r = 0.78 and 0.66). WBMTB also correlated with urinary norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and plasma dopamine, but not with serum chromogranin A. Tumour load per patient measured with {sup 18}F-dopa PET correlates with tumour markers of the serotonin and catecholamine pathway in urine and plasma in carcinoid patients, reflecting metabolic tumour activity. (orig.)

  8. Tumours of the fetal body: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avni, Fred E.; Massez, Anne; Cassart, Marie [University Clinics of Brussels - Erasme Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-11-15

    Tumours of the fetal body are rare, but lesions have been reported in all spaces, especially in the mediastinum, the pericardial space, the adrenals, the kidney, and the liver. Lymphangioma and teratoma are the commonest histological types encountered, followed by cardiac rhabdomyoma. Adrenal neuroblastoma is the commonest malignant tumour. Imaging plays an essential role in the detection and work-up of these tumours. In addition to assisting clinicians it also helps in counselling parents. Most tumours are detected by antenatal US, but fetal MRI is increasingly used as it brings significant additional information in terms of tumour extent, composition and complications. (orig.)

  9. Early systemic effects on the hepatic mitochondria of tumour bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdiales, J L; Medina, M A; Núñez de Castro, I; Sánchez-Jiménez, F

    1989-03-01

    The activities of citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase, mitochondrial marker enzymes, were evaluated in the liver of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma-bearing mice during the life span of the inoculated animals. After 10 days of tumour transplantation, when cell proliferation has ceased, a 30-40% decrease of these activities was detected in both liver and kidney. Simultaneously, an increase in the total acidic proteinase activity (50-60%) was observed. The gel filtration profiles of liver proteinase activities from inoculated animal extracts displayed different patterns to those of the controls; low molecular weight proteinase activities appear to be enhanced in the livers of tumour-bearing animals.

  10. Proliferation kinetics of a human malignant melanoma serially grown in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spang-Thomsen, M; Vindeløv, L L

    1984-01-01

    The technique of labelled mitoses and flow cytometric DNA analysis were used to determine the proliferation kinetics of a human malignant melanoma grown in nude mice. The effect of tumour volume and of long-term serial transplantation on the kinetic parameters was investigated. The results showed...... that the cell loss factor, which was the dominant factor in the growth of this melanoma, increased from 52 to 69% with increasing tumour size, whereas the calculated growth fraction showed no systematic changes. The cell generation time increased from 34 to 44 hr with tumour size, mainly due to a prolongation...

  11. Tumour targeting with systemically administered bacteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morrissey, David

    2012-01-31

    Challenges for oncology practitioners and researchers include specific treatment and detection of tumours. The ideal anti-cancer therapy would selectively eradicate tumour cells, whilst minimising side effects to normal tissue. Bacteria have emerged as biological gene vectors with natural tumour specificity, capable of homing to tumours and replicating locally to high levels when systemically administered. This property enables targeting of both the primary tumour and secondary metastases. In the case of invasive pathogenic species, this targeting strategy can be used to deliver genes intracellularly for tumour cell expression, while non-invasive species transformed with plasmids suitable for bacterial expression of heterologous genes can secrete therapeutic proteins locally within the tumour environment (cell therapy approach). Many bacterial genera have been demonstrated to localise to and replicate to high levels within tumour tissue when intravenously (IV) administered in rodent models and reporter gene tagging of bacteria has permitted real-time visualisation of this phenomenon. Live imaging of tumour colonising bacteria also presents diagnostic potential for this approach. The nature of tumour selective bacterial colonisation appears to be tumour origin- and bacterial species- independent. While originally a correlation was drawn between anaerobic bacterial colonisation and the hypoxic nature of solid tumours, it is recently becoming apparent that other elements of the unique microenvironment within solid tumours, including aberrant neovasculature and local immune suppression, may be responsible. Here, we consider the pre-clinical data supporting the use of bacteria as a tumour-targeting tool, recent advances in the area, and future work required to develop it into a beneficial clinical tool.

  12. Complex molecular mechanisms cooperate to mediate histone deacetylase inhibitors anti-tumour activity in neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardou Katya

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi are a new class of promising anti-tumour agent inhibiting cell proliferation and survival in tumour cells with very low toxicity toward normal cells. Neuroblastoma (NB is the second most common solid tumour in children still associated with poor outcome in higher stages and, thus NB strongly requires novel treatment modalities. Results We show here that the HDACi Sodium Butyrate (NaB, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA and Trichostatin A (TSA strongly reduce NB cells viability. The anti-tumour activity of these HDACi involved the induction of cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, followed by the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, via the activation of the caspases cascade. Moreover, HDACi mediated the activation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bid and BimEL and the inactivation of the anti-apoptotic proteins XIAP, Bcl-xL, RIP and survivin, that further enhanced the apoptotic signal. Interestingly, the activity of these apoptosis regulators was modulated by several different mechanisms, either by caspases dependent proteolytic cleavage or by degradation via the proteasome pathway. In addition, HDACi strongly impaired the hypoxia-induced secretion of VEGF by NB cells. Conclusion HDACi are therefore interesting new anti-tumour agents for targeting highly malignant tumours such as NB, as these agents display a strong toxicity toward aggressive NB cells and they may possibly reduce angiogenesis by decreasing VEGF production by NB cells.

  13. Resistance of R-Ras knockout mice to skin tumour induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Ulrike; Prince, Stuart; Vähätupa, Maria; Laitinen, Anni M.; Nieminen, Katriina; Uusitalo-Järvinen, Hannele; Järvinen, Tero A. H.

    2015-01-01

    The R-ras gene encodes a small GTPase that is a member of the Ras family. Despite close sequence similarities, R-Ras is functionally distinct from the prototypic Ras proteins; no transformative activity and no activating mutations of R-Ras in human malignancies have been reported for it. R-Ras activity appears inhibitory towards tumour proliferation and invasion, and to promote cellular quiescence. Contrary to this, using mice with a deletion of the R-ras gene, we found that R-Ras facilitates DMBA/TPA-induced skin tumour induction. The tumours appeared in wild-type (WT) mice on average 6 weeks earlier than in R-Ras knockout (R-Ras KO) mice. WT mice developed almost 6 times more tumours than R-Ras KO mice. Despite strong R-Ras protein expression in the dermal blood vessels, no R-Ras could be detected in the epidermis from where the tumours arose. The DMBA/TPA skin tumourigenesis-model is highly dependent upon inflammation, and we found a greatly attenuated skin inflammatory response to DMBA/TPA-treatment in the R-Ras KO mice in the context of leukocyte infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Thus, these data suggest that despite its characterised role in promoting cellular quiescence, R-Ras is pro-tumourigenic in the DMBA/TPA tumour model and important for the inflammatory response to DMBA/TPA treatment. PMID:26133397

  14. The p53/mouse double minute 2 homolog complex deregulation in merlin-deficient tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammoun, Sylwia; Schmid, Marei Caroline; Zhou, Lu; Hilton, David A; Barczyk, Magdalena; Hanemann, Clemens Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency of the tumour suppressor merlin leads to the development of schwannomas, meningiomas and ependymomas occurring spontaneously or as a part of the hereditary disease Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Merlin loss is also found in a proportion of other cancers like mesothelioma, melanoma, breast cancer and glioblastoma. The tumour suppressor/transcription factor p53 regulates proliferation, survival and differentiation and its deficiency plays a role in the development of many tumours. 53 can be negatively regulated by FAK, PI3K/AKT and MDM2 and possibly positively regulated by merlin in different cell lines. In this study we investigated the role of p53 in merlin-deficient tumours. Using our in vitro model of primary human schwannoma cells we have previously demonstrated that FAK is overexpressed/activated and localises into the nucleus of schwannoma cells increasing proliferation. AKT is strongly activated via platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) - and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) - receptors increasing survival. Here we investigated p53 regulation and its role in proliferation and survival of human primary schwannoma cells using western blotting, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry and proliferation, survival and transcription factor assays. In human primary schwannoma cells p53 was found to be downregulated while MDM2 was upregulated leading to increased cell proliferation and survival. p53 is regulated by merlin involving FAK, AKT and MDM2. Merlin reintroduction into schwannoma cells increased p53 levels and activity, and treatment with Nutlin-3, a drug which increases p53 stability by disrupting the p53/MDM2 complex, decreased tumour growth and reduced cell survival. These findings are important to dissect the mechanisms responsible for the development of merlin-deficient tumours and to identify new therapeutic targets. We suggest that Nutlin-3, possibly in combination with FAK or PI3K inhibitors, can be employed as a novel treatment for

  15. Tumour viruses and innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopcraft, Sharon E; Damania, Blossom

    2017-10-19

    Host cells sense viral infection through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which detect pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and stimulate an innate immune response. PRRs are localized to several different cellular compartments and are stimulated by viral proteins and nucleic acids. PRR activation initiates signal transduction events that ultimately result in an inflammatory response. Human tumour viruses, which include Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus, human papillomavirus, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and Merkel cell polyomavirus, are detected by several different PRRs. These viruses engage in a variety of mechanisms to evade the innate immune response, including downregulating PRRs, inhibiting PRR signalling, and disrupting the activation of transcription factors critical for mediating the inflammatory response, among others. This review will describe tumour virus PAMPs and the PRRs responsible for detecting viral infection, PRR signalling pathways, and the mechanisms by which tumour viruses evade the host innate immune system.This article is part of the themed issue 'Human oncogenic viruses'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  16. Oregano demonstrates distinct tumour-suppressive effects in the breast carcinoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubatka, Peter; Kello, Martin; Kajo, Karol; Kruzliak, Peter; Výbohová, Desanka; Mojžiš, Ján; Adamkov, Marián; Fialová, Silvia; Veizerová, Lucia; Zulli, Anthony; Péč, Martin; Statelová, Dagmar; Grančai, Daniel; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2017-04-01

    There has been a considerable interest in the identification of natural plant foods for developing effective agents against cancer. Thus, the anti-tumour effects of oregano in the in vivo and in vitro breast cancer model were evaluated. Lyophilized oregano (ORE) was administered at two concentrations of 0.3 and 3 % through diet. The experiment was terminated 14 weeks after carcinogen administration. At autopsy, mammary tumours were removed and prepared for histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis. Moreover, in vitro evaluation in MCF-7 cells was carried out. Low-dose ORE suppressed tumour frequency by 55.5 %, tumour incidence by 44 %, and tumour volume by 44.5 % compared to control animals. Analysis of rat tumour cells showed Ki67, VEGFR-2, CD24, and EpCAM expression decrease and caspase-3 expression increase after low-dose ORE treatment. High-dose ORE lengthened tumour latency by 12.5 days; moreover, Bcl-2, VEGFR-2, CD24, and EpCAM expression decrease and caspase-3 expression increase in carcinoma cells were observed. Histopathological analysis revealed a decrease in the ratio of high-/low-grade carcinomas in both treated groups. In vitro studies showed that ORE decreased survival and proliferation of MCF-7 cells. In ORE-treated MCF-7 cells, an increase in cells expressing sub-G 0/G 1 DNA content and an increase in the percentage of annexin V/PI positive MCF-7 cells were observed. In vitro, both caspase-dependent and possible non-caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways were found. The deactivation of anti-apoptotic activity of Bcl-2, a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, and the activation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway were observed in the ORE-treated MCF-7 cells. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, a distinct tumour-suppressive effect of oregano in the breast cancer model.

  17. Investigating the effect of longitudinal micro-CT imaging on tumour growth in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, W. Kyle; Ford, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the impact of longitudinal micro-CT imaging on the growth of B16F1 tumours in C57BL/6 mice. Sixty mice received 2 × 105 B16F1 cells subcutaneously in the hind flank and were divided into control (no scan), 'low-dose' (80 kVp, 70 mA, 8 s, 0.07 Gy), 'medium-dose' (80 kVp, 50 mA, 30 s, 0.18 Gy) and 'high-dose' (80 kVp, 50 mA, 50 s, 0.30 Gy) groups. All imaging was performed on a fast volumetric micro-CT scanner (GE Locus Ultra, London, Canada). Each mouse was imaged on days 4, 8, 12 and 16. After the final imaging session, each tumour was excised, weighed on an electronic balance, imaged to obtain the final tumour volume and processed for histology. Final tumour volume was used to evaluate the impact of longitudinal micro-CT imaging on the tumour growth. An ANOVA indicated no statistically significant difference in tumour volume (p = 0.331, α = β = 0.1) when discriminating against a treatment-sized effect. Histological samples revealed no observable differences in apoptosis or cell proliferation. We conclude that four imaging sessions, using standard protocols, over the course of 16 days did not cause significant changes in final tumour volume for B16F1 tumours in female C57BL/6 mice (ANOVA, α = β = 0.1, p = 0.331).

  18. Mobile phone use and risk of brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahkola, A.

    2010-05-15

    Mobile phone use has increased rapidly worldwide since the 1990's. As mobile telephones are used close to the head, the exposure to the radiofrequency radiation emitted by mobile phones has been suggested as a possible risk factor for brain tumours. The effect of mobile phone use on risk of brain tumours, particularly gliomas and meningiomas as well as acoustic neuromas, was evaluated using both a case-control approach and a meta-analysis. In addition, one of the most important sources of error in a case-control study, selection bias due to differential participation, was assessed in a subset of the case-control data. The risk of glioma and meningioma in relation to mobile phone use was investigated in population-based case-control studies conducted in five North European countries. All these countries used a common protocol and were included in a multinational study on mobile phone use and brain tumours, the INTERPHONE study, coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Cases (1,521 gliomas and 1,209 meningiomas) were identified mostly from hospitals and controls (3,299) from national population registers or general practitioners' patient lists. Detailed history of mobile phone use was obtained in personal interviews. Mobile phone use was assessed using several exposure indicators, such as regular use (phone use at least once a week for at least six months), duration of use as well as cumulative number of hours and calls. To comprehensively evaluate the effect of mobile phone use on risk of brain tumours, the existing evidence from the epidemiological studies published on the issue was combined using meta-analysis. In the analysis, a pooled estimate was calculated for all brain tumours combined, and also separately for the three most common tumour types, glioma, meningioma and acoustic neuroma using inverse variance-weighted method. Pooled estimate was also obtained for different telephone types (NMT and GSM) and by the location

  19. Refractive index of carcinogen-induced rat mammary tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zysk, Adam M.; Chaney, Eric J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2006-05-01

    Near-infrared optical techniques for clinical breast cancer screening in humans are rapidly advancing. Based on the computational inversion of the photon diffusion process through the breast, these techniques rely on optical tissue models for accurate image reconstruction. Recent interest has surfaced regarding the effect of refractive index variations on these reconstructions. Although many data exist regarding the scattering and absorption properties of normal and diseased tissue, no measurements of refractive index appear in the literature. In this paper, we present near-infrared refractive index data acquired from N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced rat mammary tumours, which are similar in pathology and disease progression to human ductal carcinoma. Eight animals, including one control, were employed in this study, yielding data from 32 tumours as well as adjacent adipose and connective tissues.

  20. The spatial organization of intra-tumour heterogeneity and evolutionary trajectories of metastases in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Weiwei; Lim, Tony Kiat-Hon; Zhang, Tong; Phang, Su-Ting; Tiang, Zenia; Guan, Peiyong; Ng, Ming-Hwee; Lim, Jia Qi; Yao, Fei; Li, Zheng; Ng, Poh Yong; Yan, Jie; Goh, Brian K.; Chung, Alexander Yaw-Fui; Choo, Su-Pin; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Soon, Wendy Wei-Jia; Sung, Ken Wing-Kin; Foo, Roger Sik-Yin; Chow, Pierce Kah-Hoe

    2017-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has one of the poorest survival rates among cancers. Using multi-regional sampling of nine resected HCC with different aetiologies, here we construct phylogenetic relationships of these sectors, showing diverse levels of genetic sharing, spanning early to late diversification. Unlike the variegated pattern found in colorectal cancers, a large proportion of HCC display a clear isolation-by-distance pattern where spatially closer sectors are genetically more similar. Two resected intra-hepatic metastases showed genetic divergence occurring before and after primary tumour diversification, respectively. Metastatic tumours had much higher variability than their primary tumours, suggesting that intra-hepatic metastasis is accompanied by rapid diversification at the distant location. The presence of co-existing mutations offers the possibility of drug repositioning for HCC treatment. Taken together, these insights into intra-tumour heterogeneity allow for a comprehensive understanding of the evolutionary trajectories of HCC and suggest novel avenues for personalized therapy.

  1. Fertility sparing treatment in borderline ovarian tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Rosa Maria; Vazquez-Vicente, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Borderline ovarian tumours are low malignant potential tumours. They represent 10–15% of all epithelial ovarian malignancies. Patients with this type of tumour are younger at the time of diagnosis than patients with invasive ovarian cancer. Most of them are diagnosed in the early stages and have an excellent prognosis. It has been quite clearly established that the majority of borderline ovarian tumours should be managed with surgery alone. Because a high proportion of women with this malignancy are young and the prognosis is excellent, the preservation of fertility is an important issue in the management of these tumours. In this systemic review of the literature, we have evaluated in-depth oncological safety and reproductive outcomes in women with borderline ovarian tumours treated with fertility-sparing surgery, reviewing the indications, benefits, and disadvantages of each type of conservative surgery, as well as new alternative options to surgery to preserve fertility. PMID:25729420

  2. Genitourinary tumours in the targeted therapies era: new advances in clinical practice and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Carlo; Buzzatti, Giulia; Dellepiane, Chiara; Cavo, Alessia; Tolomeo, Francesco; Cattrini, Carlo; Boccardo, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Genitourinary cancers represent a heterogeneous group of malignancies arising from genitourinary tract, and are responsible for almost 359 000 newly diagnosed cases and 58 420 related deaths in USA. Continuous advances in cancer genetics and genomics have contributed towards changing the management paradigms of these neoplasms. Neoangiogenesis, through the activation of the tyrosine-kinase receptors signalling pathways, represents the key mediator event in promoting tumour proliferation, differentiation, invasiveness and motility. In the last decade, several treatments have been developed with the specific aim of targeting different cell pathways that have been recognized to drive tumour progression. The following review attempts to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature, focusing on new advances in targeted therapies for genitourinary tumours. Furthermore, the promising results of the latest clinical trials and future perspectives will be discussed.

  3. Expression of transforming growth factor-alpha and epidermal growth factor receptor in gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Y C; Jiang, Z; Vittimberga, F; Xu, X; Savas, L; Woda, B; Callery, M; Banner, B

    1999-08-01

    Activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with cell growth and transformation. Both transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) and epidermal growth factor bind to and activate EGFR. We studied the expression of TGF-alpha and two EGFRs (HER-1 and HER-2) in gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) of the stomach (n = 9) and small intestine (n = 6) using standard immunostaining techniques in paraffin-embedded sections. Most GISTs expressed TGF-alpha, and a few expressed HER-1. All HER-1-positive tumours expressed TGF-alpha. These results suggest that a TGF-alpha/EGFR autocrine loop is present in GIST and that TGF-alpha promotes proliferation of GIST tumour cells through its interaction with HER-1 in at least some GISTs. This is the first description of an autocrine loop in GIST. In contrast, HER-2 is not expressed in any GIST.

  4. PP13. CHERNOBYL, BREXIT AND BRAIN TUMOURS

    Science.gov (United States)

    chia, Dr kazumi; Davies, Ms Rhiannon; Brazil, Dr Lucy

    2017-01-01

    follow up studies of childhood cancers that radiation-induced brain and CNS tumors can present very later, 20, 30 years after initial exposure. Due to the very long half life (30 years) of the main radioisotope responsible for the contamination (Caesium-137), the nature of the exposure is extremely protracted. The World Health Organisation recently issued a press release stating that “protracted exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation increases the risk of death from solid cancers.” People at highest risk of developing solid cancers as a result of radiation exposure due to Chernobyl would be those who were children at the time of the disaster or born just after 1986 when the accident occurred. We will present data showing a range of CNS tumours in our Polish patients including information about geographical location and age at the time of the Chernobyl nuclear accident as well as age of diagnosis of brain tumour. In areas affected by rapidly changing patterns of immigration it is important to be aware of the oncological risk factors associated with the groups that we serve.

  5. An unusual presentation of a glomus tumour.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, N

    2011-02-01

    Glomus tumours are benign, soft tissue tumours, usually of fingertips. Classically they present with severe pain, temperature sensitivity and localised tenderness. The diagnosis is often delayed due to sometimes non-specific symptoms and rarity of the disorder. While usually a clinical diagnosis, imaging may be necessary for diagnosis and localisation. We present a case of glomus tumour of the fingertip with an unusual history.

  6. Tumour-targeted nanomedicines: principles and practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lammers, T.G.G.M; Hennink, W.E; Storm, G

    2008-01-01

    .... Various different tumour-targeted nanomedicines have been evaluated over the years, and clear evidence is currently available for substantial improvement of the therapeutic index of anticancer agents...

  7. Elevated tumour marker: an indication for imaging?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMahon, Colm J

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of imaging examinations in patients with elevated tumour markers when (a) the tumour marker is not validated for as a primary diagnostic test; (b) the patient had no personal history of cancer and (c) the patient had no other imaging indication. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients without known cancer who had abnormal carcinoembryonic antigen, CA19-9, CA125 and\\/or CA15-3 serology over a one-year period were included. A retrospective medical record review was performed to assess the number of these cases who underwent imaging because of \\'elevated tumour marker\\' in the absence of a clinical indication for imaging. The number and result of these imaging studies were evaluated. RESULTS: Eight hundred and nineteen patients were included. Of those, 25 patients (mean age: 67.8 [range 41-91] y), were imaged to evaluate: \\'elevated tumour marker\\'. They underwent 29 imaging studies (mean [+\\/-standard deviation (SD)] per patient = 1.2 [+\\/-0.4]), and had 42 elevated tumour marker serology tests (mean [+\\/-SD] per patient = 1.7 [+\\/-0.7]). Four patients had >1 imaging test. No patient had an imaging study which diagnosed a malignancy or explained the elevated tumour marker. CONCLUSION: The non-judicious use of tumour markers can prompt further unnecessary investigations including imaging. In this study, there was no positive diagnostic yield for imaging performed for investigation of \\'elevated tumour marker\\'. \\'Elevated tumour marker\\

  8. Case Report - Bilateral synchronous testicular germ cell tumours in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bilateral testicular tumours are rare, and 80% of bilateral tumours are metachronous. The incidence of testicular tumours is high in cryptorchidism. Synchronous bilateral testicular tumours are rare, and bilateral synchronous testicular tumours in bilateral cryptorchidism extremely rare, probably not reported previously.

  9. Inhibition of proliferation and induction of differentiation of glioma cells with Datura stramonium agglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, T; Yamazaki, K; Yamori, T; Endo, T

    2002-10-07

    We found that a lectin, Datura stramonium agglutinin, induced irreversible differentiation in C6 glioma cells. The differentiated cells had long processes, a low rate of proliferation and a high content of glial fibrillary acidic protein. When the medium was replaced with Datura stramonium agglutinin-free medium after 1 h, cell proliferation continued to be inhibited. Experiments with several other lectins indicated that both recognition of linear N-acetyllactosamine repeats and recognition of multiantennary units of cell-surface glycans were required for the inhibition of C6 proliferation. Proliferation of four human glial tumour cells was also inhibited by Datura stramonium agglutinin. Further, these differentiated human glial tumour cells had long processes and a high content of glial fibrillary acidic protein similar to differentiated C6 glioma cells. Taken together, these observations suggest that Datura stramonium agglutinin may be useful as a new therapy for treating glioma without side effects. Copyright 2002 Cancer Research UK

  10. Generation of gaseous sulfur-containing compounds in tumour tissue and suppression of gas diffusion as an antitumour treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Kazue; Onuma, Kazuo; Chiba, Yota; Yagi, Shinya; Aoki, Shigenobu; Sato, Tomoyuki; Sugawara, Yasushi; Hosoya, Noriyasu; Saeki, Yasutake; Takahashi, Minoru; Fuji, Masayoshi; Ohsaka, Takeo; Okajima, Takeyoshi; Akita, Kenji; Suzuki, Takashi; Senawongse, Pisol; Urushiyama, Akio; Kawai, Kiyoshi; Shoun, Hirofumi; Ishii, Yoshimasa; Ishikawa, Hiroya; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Nakajima, Madoka; Tsuboi, Masaru; Yamanaka, Tateo

    2012-04-01

    The mechanisms of cancer cell growth and metastasis are still not entirely understood, especially from the viewpoint of chemical reactions in tumours. Glycolytic metabolism is markedly accelerated in cancer cells, causing the accumulation of glucose (a reducing sugar) and methionine (an amino acid), which can non-enzymatically react and form carcinogenic substances. There is speculation that this reaction produces gaseous sulfur-containing compounds in tumour tissue. The aims of this study were to clarify the products in tumour and to investigate their effect on tumour proliferation. Products formed in the reaction between glucose and methionine or its metabolites were analysed in vitro using gas chromatography. Flatus samples from patients with colon cancer and exhaled air samples from patients with lung cancer were analysed using near-edge x-ray fine adsorption structure spectroscopy and compared with those from healthy individuals. The tumour proliferation rates of mice into which HT29 human colon cancer cells had been implanted were compared with those of mice in which the cancer cells were surrounded by sodium hyaluronate gel to prevent diffusion of gaseous material into the healthy cells. Gaseous sulfur-containing compounds such as methanethiol and hydrogen sulfide were produced when glucose was allowed to react with methionine or its metabolites homocysteine or cysteine. Near-edge x-ray fine adsorption structure spectroscopy showed that the concentrations of sulfur-containing compounds in the samples of flatus from patients with colon cancer and in the samples of exhaled air from patients with lung cancer were significantly higher than in those from healthy individuals. Animal experiments showed that preventing the diffusion of sulfur-containing compounds had a pronounced antitumour effect. Gaseous sulfur-containing compounds are the main products in tumours and preventing the diffusion of these compounds reduces the tumour proliferation rate, which suggests

  11. Oxygen-Driven Tumour Growth Model: A Pathology-Relevant Mathematical Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Delgado-SanMartin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Xenografts--as simplified animal models of cancer-differ substantially in vasculature and stromal architecture when compared to clinical tumours. This makes mathematical model-based predictions of clinical outcome challenging. Our objective is to further understand differences in tumour progression and physiology between animal models and the clinic. To achieve that, we propose a mathematical model based upon tumour pathophysiology, where oxygen--as a surrogate for endocrine delivery--is our main focus. The Oxygen-Driven Model (ODM, using oxygen diffusion equations, describes tumour growth, hypoxia and necrosis. The ODM describes two key physiological parameters. Apparent oxygen uptake rate (k'R represents the amount of oxygen cells seem to need to proliferate. The more oxygen they appear to need, the more the oxygen transport. k'R gathers variability from the vasculature, stroma and tumour morphology. Proliferating rate (kp deals with cell line specific factors to promote growth. The KH,KN describe the switch of hypoxia and necrosis. Retrospectively, using archived data, we looked at longitudinal tumour volume datasets for 38 xenografted cell lines and 5 patient-derived xenograft-like models. Exploration of the parameter space allows us to distinguish 2 groups of parameters. Group 1 of cell lines shows a spread in values of k'R and lower kp, indicating that tumours are poorly perfused and slow growing. Group 2 share the value of the oxygen uptake rate (k'R and vary greatly in kp, which we interpret as having similar oxygen transport, but more tumour intrinsic variability in growth. However, the ODM has some limitations when tested in explant-like animal models, whose complex tumour-stromal morphology may not be captured in the current version of the model. Incorporation of stroma in the ODM will help explain these discrepancies. We have provided an example. The ODM is a very simple -and versatile- model suitable for the design of preclinical

  12. Granular cell tumour of the neurohypophysis: a rare sellar tumour with specific radiological and operative features.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Aquilina, K

    2012-02-03

    Symptomatic granular cell tumours of the neurohypophysis are rare sellar lesions. Preoperative prediction of the diagnosis on the basis of radiological appearance is useful as these tumours carry specific surgical difficulties. This is possible when the tumour arises from the pituitary stalk, rostral to a normal pituitary gland. This has not been emphasized previously.

  13. Tumour bed irradiation of human tumour xenografts in a nude rat ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 2 ... Human tumour xenografts; radiation; rats; tumour bed ... Dosimetry and the corresponding methodology for radiotherapy of human non-small cell lung cancer xenograft tumours transplanted to and growing subcutaneously on the right lower limb in a nude rat ...

  14. Tumour-to-tumour metastases: prostate carcinoma metastasising to a renal oncocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petts, Gemma; Rashid, Tina; Hrouda, David; Ngo, Nye-Thane

    2013-01-09

    This is a case report of prostate carcinoma metastasising to a renal oncocytoma. The report demonstrates the unusual presentation of metastases from a common cancer to a common benign tumour, and reviews the rare phenomenon of tumour-to-tumour metastases.

  15. Diagnostic utility of Wilms′ tumour-1 protein (WT-1 immunostaining in paediatric renal tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surbhi Goyal

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: WT1 helps to differentiate Wilms′ tumour from other paediatric renal tumours. It may help in differentiating the two subgroups of Wilms′ tumour which have distinct molecular pathogenesis and biological behaviour, however, further prospective studies are required for validation of this hypothesis.

  16. Measurement of the rate of death of canine transmissible venereal tumour cells transplanted into dogs and nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J M

    1981-03-01

    An intranuclear isotope labelling technique in which the fate of cells labelled with I125-iododeoxyuridine (I125UdR) is monitored, has been adapted for use with dogs. The death rate of injected labelled cells is followed by measuring the appearance of label in the urine. Only a small proportion of injected labelled canine transmissible venereal tumour (TVT) cells survive to contribute to tumour formation when the TVT is transmitted by subcutaneous injection. TVT has also been grown in athymic nude mice and tumour was successfully retransferred to dogs from a nude mouse tumour. Using conventional I125UdR techniques, rapid death of the majority of TVT cells transplanted into nude mice was again encountered. The correlation of dog and nude mouse results emphasises the usefulness of the nude mouse as a model for investigating the kinetics of xenografted tumours.

  17. Primary ovarian carcinomas and abdominal metastasis contain 4,6-disulfated chondroitin sulfate rich regions, which provide adhesive properties to tumour cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallen, M.J.E.; Schmidt, S.; Oosterhof, A.; Bulten, J.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van

    2014-01-01

    High mortality in ovarian cancer patients is primarily caused through rapid metastasis of the tumour, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Glycosaminoglycans, are abundantly present in tumours and chondroitin sulfate-E (CSE), a highly 4,6-sulfated glycosaminoglycan, has been

  18. A Rapid Culture Technique Produces Functional Dendritic-Like Cells from Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ning

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Most anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies involving dendritic cells (DC as vaccines rely upon the adoptive transfer of DC loaded with exogenous tumour-peptides. This study utilized human acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells as progenitors from which functional dendritic-like antigen presenting cells (DLC were generated, that constitutively express tumour antigens for recognition by CD8+ T cells. DLC were generated from AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3 using rapid culture techniques and appropriate cytokines. DLC were evaluated for their cell-surface phenotype, antigen uptake and ability to stimulate allogeneic responder cell proliferation, and production of IFN-γ; compared with DC derived from normal human PBMC donors. KG-1 and MUTZ-3 DLC increased expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA-DR, and MUTZ-3 DLC downregulated CD14 and expressed CD1a. Importantly, both KG-1 and MUTZ-3-derived DLC promoted proliferation of allogeneic responder cells more efficiently than unmodified cells; neither cells incorporated FITC-labeled dextran, but both stimulated IFN-γ production from responding allogeneic CD8+ T cells. Control DC produced from PBMC using the FastDC culture also expressed high levels of critical cell surface ligands and demonstrated good APC function. This paper indicates that functional DLC can be cultured from the AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3, and FastDC culture generates functional KG-1 DLC.

  19. Postsurgical Paracicatricial Cutaneous Satellitosis of Giant Cell Tumour of the Tendon Sheath, Localized Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Caputo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Tenosynovial giant cell tumour (localized type is a tumour of tendon sheaths and interphalangeal joints, affecting the digits and arising from the synovium. It is characterized by a proliferation of mononuclear cells and osteoclast-like polykaryocytes. Its propagation to the skin is an exceptional event, which can take place either in localized form in the fingertips (localized type or in the rare diffuse form called giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath (diffuse type. We report here a case of giant cell tumour with cutaneous satellites, which appeared close to and around the surgical scar following the excision of the primary lesion, in a 9-year-old boy. In the cutaneous satellites, a few signs of transformation could be observed, consisting of the lack of stroma and pronounced cellularity characterized by sheets of rounded synovial-like cells admixed with multinucleated giant cells and xanthoma cells. No relapse was observed 1 year after a plastic surgery procedure (complete replacement of the involved skin. Diffuse lesions usually represent a diagnostic problem in comparison with their localized counterparts. The malignant transformation of an originally typical tenosynovial giant cell tumour is a rare but well-documented event. Our case seems to represent a typical example because the pronounced cellularity might wrongly lead to a diagnosis of malignancy.

  20. DNA-flow fluorescence--cytometry of ependymomas. Report on ten surgically removed tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaar, F W; Blech, M; Ahyai, A

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of DNA is estimated from flow cytometric histograms in surgical specimens of ten ependymomas of different location and varying anaplasia. In three cerebral tumours grade I--II, including one ependymoma of the 4th ventricle, only limited elevation of the 4 C maxima was a prominent feature, corresponding to the microscopical frequency of typical mitoses. Four grade-III ependymomas showed aneuploid or polyploid histograms with stem lines. One frontal tumour was classified as "transitional" because of more numerous mitoses and abnormally elevated S and G2 + M phases, which increased in tissue culture. A correlation between the degree of anaplasia with the DNA pattern was difficult to pursue in two spinal ependymomas obviously lacking microscopical mitoses: Both--one a so-called tanycytic variant of grade I--II, and the other probably a metastasis from a cerebellar tumour--had a clear polyploid DNA histogram with a strikingly increased proliferation index, similar to the more malignant tumours of grade III. Also flow DNA measurements probably allow the decoding of heterogenous mixtures of tumour cells which are not always benign in ependymomas of lower grades of anaplasia microscopically.

  1. DNA and prognosis of meningiomas: a comparative cytological and fluorescence-cytophotometrical study of 71 tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahyai, A; Spaar, F W

    1987-01-01

    DNA analysis in meningiomas was performed using flow-fluorescence cytometry in 71 tumours. Three subcategories of rather small, medium-sized or clearly abnormal growth activities were evident in each of the fibroblastic, transitional and syncytial tumour types. These categories reflected grades 1, 2 or 3 of malignancy on a four-grade scale in which the primary fibroscarcomas of the meninges are grade 4. Richly vascularized (haemangioblastic) meningiomas of our series comprised only two subcategories: these included 7 tumours with slight signs of proliferation and 1 with increased growth, probably indicating a propensity to recur. Tumours of grades 2 and 3 have a tendency to recur, which is probably due more to their biological behaviour than to the efficiency of the surgical treatment. The most variable patterns of DNA distribution are detected in the so-called "anaplastic" meningiomas: some of them are microscopically polymorphous blastomas but show unimodal diploid karyograms, whereas the proliferative indizes, ranging between 1 to 15, were obviously indicative for slow-growing benign tumours. The majority of polymorphous and anaplastic meningiomas, however, are characterized by a rather abnormal tetraploidy or aneu/polyploidy not uncommon in a relapse. The corresponding DNA distribution was demonstrated in a recurrent papillomatous meningioma in agreement with its dubious histological prognosis.

  2. The invasive front of carcinomas. The most important area for tumour prognosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryne, M; Boysen, M; Alfsen, C G; Abeler, V M; Sudbø, J; Nesland, J M; Kristensen, G B; Piffko, J; Bankfalvi, A

    1998-01-01

    Various molecular events of importance in tumour spread, like the gain and loss of adhesion molecules, secretion of proteolytic enzymes, increased cell proliferation, and the initiation of angiogenesis occur at the tumour-host interface (invasive front). We have hypothesised that molecular or morphological characteristics at the invasive front area of various carcinomas may reflect tumour prognosis better than other parts of the tumour. Consequently, we recently developed a simple malignancy grading system restricted to the deep invasive front area of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. This grading system proved to have additional prognostic value over the established prognostic factors. All similar studies performed so far have confirmed the high prognostic significance of the invasive front grading in squamous cell carcinomas at different locations. In this review paper we describe the system and the hypothesis on which it has been developed. The reproducibility of the grading is acceptable for further extended studies. Interestingly, observations of similar invasive front alterations in different adenocarcinomas suggest that the invasive tumour front may underlie the biological aggressiveness of carcinomas of glandular origin, as well.

  3. Molecular differential pathology of renal cell tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, G

    1993-01-01

    Recent application of molecular cytogenetic techniques to the evaluation of renal cell tumours revealed four subtypes, each with a characteristic combination of genetic alterations within the chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA. The most common, nonpapillary renal cell carcinomas are characterized by the loss of chromosome 3p sequences, rearrangement of the chromosome 5q region and loss of the chromosome 14q sequences. Papillary renal cell tumours can be divided into two groups. Tumours with a combined trisomy of chromosomes 7 and 17 as well as loss of the Y chromosome are papillary renal cell adenomas. Tumours with additional trisomies such as trisomy 16, 20 or 12 are papillary renal cell carcinomas. Chromophobe renal cell carcinomas show a combination of allelic losses, which do not occur in other types of renal tumours. In addition, they have a rearrangement in the mitochondrial DNA. Renal oncocytomas are benign tumours marked by normal or abnormal karyotypes with balanced or unbalanced translocations and an altered restriction pattern of the mitochondrial DNA. Although the major cytological characteristics of renal cell tumours, such as clear, granular, chromophobe and oncocytic cell phenotypes correspond to nonpapillary, papillary and chromophobe renal cell carcinomas and renal oncocytomas, there are many cases with overlapping phenotype. Therefore, a classification of renal cell tumours based on specific genetic alterations is proposed.

  4. Positron emission tomography (PET) in endocrine tumours ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    endocrine pancreatic tumours is probably limited to those that are less well differentiated and metabolically active. However, a future role for PET imaging in the detection of endocrine tumours, using more specific substrates, appears very promising. Journal of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa Vol.

  5. Tumour cell expansion in bladder epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.J. Rebel (Annemarie)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBladder cancer is common in western society. The major problem of patients with superficial bladder cancer is the high recurrence rate and multifocality of these tumours. In 70 % of the patients superficial bladder cancer recurs after local resection of the tumour within 15 years. The

  6. Neurofibromatosis type 1: brain stem tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilaniuk, L.T. [Department of Radiology, The Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Molloy, P.T. [Division of Neurology, Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States); Zimmerman, R.A. [Department of Radiology, The Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Phillips, P.C. [Division of Neurology, Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States); Vaughan, S.N. [Division of Neurology, Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States); Liu, G.T. [Division of Neuro-Ophthalmology, Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sutton, L.N. [Division of Neurosurgery, Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States); Needle, M. [Division of Oncology, The Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia. PA (United States)

    1997-09-01

    We describe the clinical and imaging findings of brain stem tumours in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The NF1 patients imaged between January 1984 and January 1996 were reviewed and 25 patients were identified with a brain stem tumour. Clinical, radiographical and pathological results were obtained by review of records and images. Brain stem tumour identification occurred much later than the clinical diagnosis of NF1. Medullary enlargement was most frequent (68 %), followed by pontine (52 %) and midbrain enlargement (44 %). Patients were further subdivided into those with diffuse (12 patients) and those with focal (13 patients) tumours. Treatment for hydrocephalus was required in 67 % of the first group and only 15 % of the second group. Surgery was performed in four patients and revealed fibrillary astrocytomas, one of which progressed to an anaplastic astrocytoma. In 40 % of patients both brain stem and optic pathway tumours were present. The biological behaviour of brain stem tumours in NF1 is unknown. Diffuse tumours in the patients with NF1 appear to have a much more favourable prognosis than patients with similar tumours without neurofibromatosis type 1. (orig.). With 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Childhood ovarian juvenile granulosa cell tumour

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2012-05-12

    May 12, 2012 ... exclusively localized in granulosa cell tumours. 6. Juvenile granulosa cell tumour a subtype of ovarian stro- ... organs such as endometrial hyperplasia, endometrial adenocarcinomas and increased risk of ... stem cell transplantation.5 Newer agents that block an- giogenesis are being studied; two are being ...

  8. Occurrence studies of intracranial tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larjavaara, S.

    2011-07-01

    Intracranial tumours are a histopathologically heterogeneous group of tumours. This thesis focused on three types of intracranial tumours; gliomas, meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas (VS). The main objectives of the dissertation were to estimate the occurrence of intracranial tumours by different subtypes, and to assess the validity and completeness of the cancer registry data. The specific aims of the publications were to evaluate the validity of reported incidence rates of meningioma cases, to describe the trends of VS incidence in four Nordic countries, and to define the anatomic distribution of gliomas and to investigate their location in relation to mobile phone use. Completeness of meningioma registration was examined by comparing five separate sources of information, and by defining the frequencies of cases reported to the Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR). Incidence trends of VS were assessed in the four Nordic countries over a twenty-one-year period (1987 - 2007) using cancer registry data. The anatomic site of gliomas was evaluated using both crude locations in the cerebral lobes and, in more detail, a three-dimensional (3D) distribution in the brain. In addition, a study on specific locations of gliomas in relation to the typical position of mobile phones was conducted using two separate approaches: a case-case and a case-specular analysis. The thesis was based on four sets of materials. Data from the international Interphone study were used for the studies on gliomas, while the two other studies were register-based. The dataset for meningiomas included meningioma cases from the FCR and four clinical data sources in Tampere University Hospital (neurosurgical clinic, pathology database, hospital discharge register and autopsy register). The data on VS were obtained from the national cancer registries of Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The coverage of meningiomas was not comprehensive in any of the data sources. The completeness of FCR was

  9. Cooperative tumour cell membrane targeted phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heegon; Lee, Junsung; Oh, Chanhee; Park, Ji-Ho

    2017-06-01

    The targeted delivery of therapeutics using antibodies or nanomaterials has improved the precision and safety of cancer therapy. However, the paucity and heterogeneity of identified molecular targets within tumours have resulted in poor and uneven distribution of targeted agents, thus compromising treatment outcomes. Here, we construct a cooperative targeting system in which synthetic and biological nanocomponents participate together in the tumour cell membrane-selective localization of synthetic receptor-lipid conjugates (SR-lipids) to amplify the subsequent targeting of therapeutics. The SR-lipids are first delivered selectively to tumour cell membranes in the perivascular region using fusogenic liposomes. By hitchhiking with extracellular vesicles secreted by the cells, the SR-lipids are transferred to neighbouring cells and further spread throughout the tumour tissues where the molecular targets are limited. We show that this tumour cell membrane-targeted delivery of SR-lipids leads to uniform distribution and enhanced phototherapeutic efficacy of the targeted photosensitizer.

  10. Biodistribution and SPECT imaging of {sup 125/131}I-crotoxin on mice bearing Ehrlich solid tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Marcella Araugio; Santos, Raquel Gouvea dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: marcellaaraugio@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: santosr@cdtn.br; Silveira, Marina B.; Simal, Carlos [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Dias, Consuelo L. Fortes [Fundacao Ezequiel Dias (FUNED), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The search of specific radiopharmaceuticals to be used in breast tumour diagnosis is relevant to complement the techniques applied in conventional medicine. Crotalus durissus terrificus venom (CV) and its main polypeptide, Crotoxin (Crtx), are natural source of several bioactive substances with therapeutical potential. The aim of this work was to evaluate the binding of Crtx with tumour targets in vivo, as well as, evaluate its applicability for breast tumours diagnosis. Crtx was labelled with {sup 125/131}I using lactoperoxidase method and radiochemical analysis was performed by chromatography. {sup 125}I-Crtx was used for biodistribution and pharmacokinetics studies on swiss mice bearing Ehrlich solid tumour, while {sup 131}I-Crtx was used for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Crtx presented specific binding sites on Ehrlich tumour cells and had a rapid blood clearance (T{sub 1/2}= 201.1 min.). Intratumoral administration increased significantly the activity delivered into the tumour site (128-fold higher) and reduced the kidney burden (7.2-fold lower). {sup 131}I-Crxt demonstrated to interact with tumour cells for until 72 hours allowing good quality images of tumour. Our results indicate the biotechnological potential of Crtx as template for radiopharmaceutical design for cancer diagnosis. (author)

  11. Topically applied Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil causes direct anti-cancer cytotoxicity in subcutaneous tumour bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Demelza J; Greay, Sara J; Hooper, Cornelia M; Kissick, Haydn T; Filion, Pierre; Riley, Thomas V; Beilharz, Manfred W

    2012-08-01

    Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil (TTO) applied topically in a dilute (10%) dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) formulation exerts a rapid anti-cancer effect after a short treatment protocol. Tumour clearance is associated with skin irritation mediated by neutrophils which quickly and completely resolves upon treatment cessation. To examine the mechanism of action underlying the anti-cancer activity of TTO. Immune cell changes in subcutaneous tumour bearing mice in response to topically applied TTO treatments were assessed by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Direct cytotoxicity of TTO on tumour cells in vivo was assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Neutrophils accumulate in the skin following topical 10% TTO/DMSO treatment but are not required for tumour clearance as neutrophil depletion did not abrogate the anti-cancer effect. Topically applied 10% TTO/DMSO, but not neat TTO, induces an accumulation and activation of dendritic cells and an accumulation of T cells. Although topical application of 10% TTO/DMSO appears to activate an immune response, anti-tumour efficacy is mediated by a direct effect on tumour cells in vivo. The direct cytotoxicity of TTO in vivo appears to be associated with TTO penetration. Future studies should focus on enhancing the direct cytotoxicity of TTO by increasing penetration through skin to achieve a higher in situ terpene concentration. This coupled with boosting a more specific anti-tumour immune response will likely result in long term clearance of tumours. Copyright © 2012 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Contrast enhancement pattern on multidetector CT predicts malignancy in pancreatic endocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappelli, Carla [University of Pisa, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, Pisa (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana-Radiodiagnostica I, Pisa (Italy); Boggi, Ugo [University of Pisa, General and Transplant Surgery, Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, Pisa (Italy); Mazzeo, Salvatore; Cervelli, Rosa; Contillo, Benedetta Pontillo; Bartolozzi, Carlo [University of Pisa, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, Pisa (Italy); Campani, Daniela; Funel, Niccola [University of Pisa, Pathology, Department of Surgical, Medical, Molecular and Critical Area Pathology, Pisa (Italy)

    2014-12-02

    Preoperative suspicion of malignancy in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (pNETs) is mostly based on tumour size. We retrospectively reviewed the contrast enhancement pattern (CEP) of a series of pNETs on multiphasic multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), to identify further imaging features predictive of lesion aggressiveness. Sixty pNETs, diagnosed in 52 patients, were classified based on CEP as: type A showing early contrast enhancement and rapid wash-out; type B presenting even (B1) or only (B2) late enhancement. All tumours were resected allowing pathologic correlations. Nineteen pNETs showed type A CEP (5-20 mm), 29 type B1 CEP (5-80 mm) and 12 type B2 (15-100 mm). All tumours were classified as well differentiated tumours, 19 were benign (WDt-b), 15 with uncertain behaviour (WDt-u) and 26 carcinomas (WDC). None of A lesions were malignant (12 WDt-b; 7 WDt-u), all B2 lesions were WDC, 7 B1 lesions were WDt-b, 8 WDt-u and 14 WDC; 4/34 (12 %) lesions ≤2cm were WDC. CEP showed correlation with all histological prognostic indicators. Correlating with the lesion grading and other histological prognostic predictors, CEP may preoperatively suggest the behaviour of pNETs, assisting decisions about treatment. Moreover CEP allows recognition of malignant small tumours, incorrectly classified on the basis of their dimension. (orig.)

  13. Thallium uptake and biological behaviour in childhood brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, E.J.; Howman-Giles, R.; Kellie, S.; Uren, R.F. [Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    1998-03-01

    Full text: The histopathological grade and radiological appearance of the diverse cerebral neoplasms in childhood frequently poorly reflect their biological behaviour. We examined thallium accumulation prior to treatment (and in several cases, at intervals there after) in 13 children to determine its usefulness as a tumour marker. 23 SPECT studies were acquired 20 minutes after the injection of 1-3 mCi of {sup 201}TI. Thallium index (TI), the ratio of counts in tumour/normal brain, was calculated. No uptake was seen in two patients (pts) with a Grade 1 cerebellar astrocytomas (disease free at 4/12 f/u). Three pts with medulloblastomas were studied. One pt showed intense uptake (Tl =12). His tumour (proliferative antigen stain Ki67 = 50%) recurred early after debulking surgery (Tl +ve prior to CT or MRI changes). The second pt was imaged at relapse (Ki67 = 60%) and showed intense uptake, Tl = 17. The third pt showed lower level uptake (Tl = 2), Ki67 = 5%, and is disease-free at 5/12 (as per {sup 201}TI and MRI). One pt with a Grade 1 brainstem glioma showed Tl = 5 and has progressed rapidly despite low grade histology. Four pts with chiasmatic-hypothalamic gliomas have been studied. Although these neoplasms are usually low grade histologically, their growth properties vary greatly. Two pts with Tl<2.5 have been conservatively managed because of slow tumour growth. The other two pts have Tl>3.5 and have required aggressive treatment for rapid disease progression. One pt with a large pilocytic astrocytoma of the optic chiasm showed Tl = 9.5. Active treatment was not undertaken. One pt with a pineal germ cell tumour showed avid {sup 201}TI uptake (Tl not performed) and has had two normal studies, and is clinically well, since BMT. Avid {sup 201}TI uptake also seen in one pt with cerebral neuroblastoma. (Died at 8/12 after Dx.) Thus, {sup 201}TI accumulates in histologically diverse paediatric neoplasms. The Tl appears to reflect biological behaviour in the limited

  14. Inhibitory effect of calcium channel blockers on proliferation of human glioma cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunert-Radek, J.; Stepien, H.; Lyson, K.; Pawlikowski, M.; Radek, A.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of 2 specific calcium channel blockers, verapamil and nimodipine, on the proliferation of human glioma tumour cells were investigated in vitro. Tumour tissues for primary cell cultures were obtained bioptically from 3 patients with the histopathological diagnosis of glioblastoma. The (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation into glioma tumour cells DNA was used as a sensitive index of the cell proliferation. It was found that varapamil (10/sup 4/-10/sup 5/M) and nimodipine (10/sup 4/-10/sup 6/M) significantly inhibited the (/sup 3/H)-thymidine uptake in a dose-related manner. The inhibitory effect of both calcium channel antagonists was reversed by stimultancous addition of calcium chloride (5x10/sup 3/M). These results indicate that verapamil and nimodipine may exert an antiproliferative effect on glioma cells growth acting through a blokade of specific voltage-dependent calcium channels.

  15. FNAC AS A DIAGNOSTIC TOOL IN SALIVARY GLAND TUMOURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalivarapu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND FNAC of salivary gland tumours is an accurate, simple, rapid, inexpensive, well tolerated and harmless procedure. The success of FNAC depends on the adequacy of sample and high-quality preparation. FNAC of salivary gland neoplasms provides essential information in decision making and management. AIM OF THE STUDY Know the role of fine needle aspiration cytology in the diagnosis of benign and malignant lesions of salivary gland. MATERIAL AND METHODS This was a prospective study done at the tertiary care centre for a period of three years. A total number of 67 cases of clinically suspected salivary gland tumours were subjected to fine needle aspiration cytology and correlated with histopathology. RESULTS A total number of 67 cases, clinically suspected as salivary gland tumours were subjected to FNAC and compared with histopathology. The observations of the study were as follows: Most of the tumours were observed between the age group of 31-40 years. The commonest gland involved was the parotid gland, 56 cases of benign, 10 cases of malignant and one case of inconclusive diagnosis was made on FNAC. In the present study, FNAC showed Sensitivity of 66.6%, Specificity of 98%, Positive predictive value; 90.9%, Negative predictive value; 91%, Percentage of false negative cases 33.3%, Percentage of false positive cases 1.9% and Overall Diagnostic Accuracy of 91%. CONCLUSION FNAC is a very useful, simple, cheap, accurate and repeatable technique in the preoperative diagnosis of various salivary gland neoplasms. Overall, diagnostic accuracy was 91%, in cystic lesions of salivary glands, combined FNAC and histopathology is essential for diagnosis.

  16. Total testosterone levels are often more than three times elevated in patients with androgen-secreting tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Lambaa Altinok, Magda; Petersen, Kresten Rubeck

    2015-01-01

    surgery. Terminal hair growth on lip and chin gradually increases after menopause, which complicates distinction from normal physiological variation. Precise testosterone assays have just recently become available in the daily clinic. We present three women diagnosed with testosterone-producing tumours....... Gold standard techniques were used to measure testosterone levels. All tumours originated from the ovaries. Based on the present cases and the existing literature, we suggest that androgen-producing tumours should be suspected in patients with rapid progression of hyperandrogen symptoms, particularly...... when total testosterone levels are above three times the upper reference limit....

  17. Quantification of longitudinal tissue pO2 gradients in window chamber tumours: impact on tumour hypoxia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dewhirst, M W; Ong, E T; Braun, R D; Smith, B; Klitzman, B; Evans, S M; Wilson, D

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that the arteriolar input in window chamber tumours is limited in number and is constrained to enter the tumour from one surface, and that the pO2 of tumour arterioles is lower...

  18. Expression of FGFR3 during human testis development and in germ cell-derived tumours of young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewen, Katherine A; Olesen, Inge A; Winge, Sofia B

    2013-01-01

    Observations in patients with an activating mutation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) suggest a role for FGFR3 signalling in promoting proliferation or survival of germ cells. In this study, we aimed to identify the FGFR3 subtype and the ontogeny of expression during human testis...... development and to ascertain whether FGFR3 signalling is linked to germ cell proliferation and the pathogenesis of testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) of young adult men. Using RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, we examined 58 specimens of human testes throughout development for FGFR3...... expression, and then compared expression of FGFR3 with proliferation markers (PCNA or Ki67). We also analysed for FGFR3 expression 30 TGCTs and 28 testes containing the tumour precursor cell, carcinoma in situ (CIS). Fetal and adult testes expressed exclusively the FGFR3IIIc isoform. FGFR3 protein expression...

  19. Age-related prevalence and morphological appearance of facial skin tumours: a prospective, cross-sectional, observational, multicentre study with special emphasis on melanocytic tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscarella, E; Kyrgidis, A; Sperduti, I; Abramavicus, A; Argenziano, G; Cota, C; Eibenschutz, L; De Simone, P; Longo, C; Hofmann-Wellenhof, R; Zalaudek, I

    2015-07-01

    The clinical and histopathological diagnosis of skin tumours arising on the face may be challenging. An improved knowledge about the age-related patterns of facial skin tumours may aid the correct diagnosis and management. We conducted a prospective, cross-sectional morphological study to investigate the age-related frequency and morphological variability in facial skin tumours in a cohort of consecutive subjects attending two skin lesion clinics in Italy between June and September 2011. A total of 454 consecutive subjects (249 women; 55.5%) presenting with a total of 1866 facial tumours were enrolled in the study. Of the entire cohort, 54 (11.9%) subjects had no facial lesion. Total body naevus count correlated significantly with the mean number of facial lesions (ρ = 0.289, P trend was mainly due to naevi, whereby pigmented melanocytic naevi decreased with increasing age. Conversely, the percentage of non- pigmented naevi increased with increasing age (chi-square, P appearance during lifetime being initially flat, small and pigmented and becoming later raised, large and hypopigmented. Instead, lentigo maligna is an intraepidermal proliferation that typically presents as flat, large pigmented macule. A given histopathological diagnosis of a junctional naevus of a flat, facial pigmented macule of an elderly should be critically reviewed and treated with caution. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  20. Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Squassoni, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    President Bush announced the Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI) on May 31, 2003. Since then, 16 nations have pledged their cooperation in interdicting shipments of weapons of mass destruction-related...

  1. Novel {sup 111}In-labelled bombesin analogues for molecular imaging of prostate tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, M. de; Bernard, H.F.; Krenning, E.P.; Jong, M. de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erion, J.L. [Mallinckrodt Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States); BioSynthema Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States); Schmidt, M.A. [Mallinckrodt Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States); Pharmacia Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States); Srinivasan, A. [Mallinckrodt Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States); Waser, B.; Reubi, J.C. [University of Berne, Institute of Pathology, Berne (Switzerland)

    2007-08-15

    It has been shown that some primary human tumours and their metastases, including prostate and breast tumours, overexpress gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors. Bombesin (BN) is a neuropeptide with a high affinity for these GRP receptors. We demonstrated successful scintigraphic visualisation of BN receptor-positive tumours in preclinical studies using the radiolabelled BN analogue [{sup 111}In-DTPA-Pro{sup 1},Tyr{sup 4}]BN. However, the receptor affinity as well as the serum stability of this analogue leave room for improvement. Therefore new {sup 111}In-labelled BN analogues were synthesised and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The receptor affinity of the new BN analogues was tested on human GRP receptor-expressing prostate tumour xenografts and rat colon sections. Analogues with high receptor affinity (low nM range) were selected for further evaluation. Incubation in vitro of GRP receptor-expressing rat CA20948 and human PC3 tumour cells with the {sup 111}In-labelled analogues resulted in rapid receptor-mediated uptake and internalisation. The BN analogue with the best receptor affinity and in vitro internalisation characteristics, Cmp 3 ([{sup 111}In-DTPA-ACMpip{sup 5},Tha{sup 6},{beta}Ala{sup 11},Tha{sup 13},Nle{sup 14}]BN(5-14)), was tested in vivo in biodistribution studies using rats bearing GRP receptor-expressing CA20948 tumours, and nude mice bearing human PC3 xenografts. Injection of {sup 111}In-labelled Cmp 3 in these animals showed high, receptor-mediated uptake in receptor-positive organs and tumours which could be visualised using planar gamma camera and microSPECT/CT imaging. With their enhanced receptor affinity and their rapid receptor-mediated internalisation in vitro and in vivo, the new BN analogues, and especially Cmp 3, are promising candidates for use in diagnostic molecular imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy of GRP receptor-expressing cancers. (orig.)

  2. Therapeutically blocking Interleukin-11 Receptor-α enhances doxorubicin cytotoxicity in high grade type I endometrioid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winship, Amy; Van Sinderen, Michelle; Rainczuk, Katarzyna; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2017-04-04

    High grade type I endometrial cancers have poor prognosis. Interleukin (IL)11 is elevated in tumours and uterine lavage with increasing tumour grade in women. IL11 regulates cell cycle, invasion and migration and we recently demonstrated that IL11 receptor (R)α inhibition impaired low and moderate grade endometrial tumourigenesis in vivo. In this report, we hypothesized that micro-RNA(miR)-1 regulates IL11 and that IL11 promotes high grade endometrial tumour growth. We aimed to determine whether combination treatment using an anti-human IL11Rα blocking antibody (Ab) and doxorubicin chemotherapeutic impairs high grade tumour growth. MiR-1 was absent in human endometrial tumours versus human benign endometrium (n = 10/group). Transfection with miR-1 mimic restored miR-1 expression, down-regulated IL11 mRNA and impaired cell viability in grade 3-derived AN3CA human endometrial epithelial cancer cells. AN3CA cell proliferation was reduced in response to Ab and doxorubicin combination treatment versus Ab, IgG control, or doxorubicin alone. Subcutaneous xenograft tumours were established in female Balb/c athymic nude mice using AN3CA cells expressing IL11 and IL11Rα. Administration of recombinant human IL11 to mice (n = 4/group) activated IL11 downstream target, signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT3) and significantly increased tumour growth (p < 0.05), suggesting that IL11 promotes high grade tumour growth. IL11Rα blocking Ab reduced STAT3 phosphorylation and combination treatment with doxorubicin resulted in a significant reduction in tumour growth (p < 0.05) compared to Ab, doxorubicin, or IgG control. Our data suggest that therapeutically targeting IL11Rα in combination with doxorubicin chemotherapy could inhibit high grade type I endometrioid cancer growth.

  3. MRI of pineal region tumours: relationship between tumours and adjacent structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, H. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Uozumi, T. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Kiya, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Kurisu, K. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Arita, K. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Sumida, M. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Ikawa, F. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1995-11-01

    A variety of tumours may arise in the pineal region; accurate diagnosis is important in the selection of treatment and prognosis. A retrospective analysis of the MRI studies of 25 patients with pathologically proven pineal region tumours was performed, focused on the relationship between the tumour and neighbouring structures. Compression of the tectal plate was classified as expansive or invasive, and compression of the corpus callosum as inferior, anterior or posterior. In 10 of the 14 patients (71 %) with germ cell tumours tectal compression was of the invasive type; 8 patients (57 %) had multiple tumours and in 13 (93 %) the tumour margins were irregular. Teratomas were readily diagnosed because of characteristic heterogeneous signal intensity. Pineal cell tumours were differentiated from germ cell tumours by their rounded shape, solid nature, sharp margins, and expansive type of tectal compression. Meningiomas were characterised by their falcotentorial attachments, posterior callosal compression, and a low-intensity rim on T2-weighted images. Gd-DTPA injection enabled clear demonstration of the site and extent of tumour spread and was useful in differentiating cystic and solid components. The appearances described, while not pathognomonic, are helpful in the differential diagnosis of pineal region tumours, and valuable in planning appropriate treatment. (orig.). With 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Mechanisms of tumour escape from immune surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiecka Urszula

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The progressive growth and spread of tumour cells in the form of metastases requires an interaction of healthy host cells, such as endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and other cells of mesenchymal origin with immune cells taking part in innate and adaptive responses within the tumour lesion and entire body. The host cells interact with tumour cells to create a dynamic tumour microenvironment, in which healthy cells can both positively and negatively influence the growth and spread of the tumour. The balance of cellular homeostasis and the effect of substances they secrete on the tumour microenvironment determine whether the tumour has a tendency to grow or disappear, and whether the cells remain within the lesion or are capable of metastasis to other regions of the body. Intercellular interactions also determine the tumour’s susceptibility to radiation or other types of cancer treatment. They may also be a rational explanation for differences in treatment outcomes, in which some metastases regress and others progress in response to the same treatment method.

  5. MRI appearances of borderline ovarian tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, C.L. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, West Smithfield, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: clare.bent@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk; Sahdev, A.; Rockall, A.G. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, West Smithfield, London (United Kingdom); Singh, N. [Department of Pathology, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, West Smithfield, London (United Kingdom); Sohaib, S.A. [Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Reznek, R.H. [Cancer Imaging, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, West Smithfield, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    This review was performed to describe the range of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of borderline ovarian tumours. The MRI findings in 26 patients with 31 borderline ovarian tumours (mean age: 40.1 years, range: 14-85 years) were retrospectively reviewed. For each tumour, site, size, MRI characteristics, and enhancement following gadolinium administration were recorded. There were 20 serous and 11 mucinous borderline ovarian subtypes. Nine of 26 patients demonstrated bilateral disease on MRI; synchronous contralateral ovarian disease included three benign, five serous borderline, and one serous invasive tumour. A history of a metachronous mucinous borderline tumour was identified in one patient. MRI appearances were classified into four morphological categories: group 1 (6/31, 19%), unilocular cysts; group 2 (6/31, 19%), minimally septate cysts with papillary projections; group 3 (14/31, 45%), markedly septate lesions with plaque-like excrescences; and group 4 (5/31, 16%), predominantly solid with exophytic papillary projections, all of serous subtype. There was a significant difference in mean volume between serous (841.5 cm{sup 3}) and mucinous (6358.2 cm{sup 3}) subtypes (p = 0.009). All tumours demonstrated at least one MRI feature suggestive of malignancy. The present review demonstrates the variable MRI appearances of borderline ovarian tumours along with imaging features suggestive of tumour subtype. In patients in whom the clinical features are suggestive of a borderline ovarian tumour (young age and normal or minimally elevated CA125), the ability to predict a borderline disease using morphological features observed on MRI would be extremely helpful in surgical planning, with the potential to offer fertility or ovary-preserving surgery. Future studies are required to further this aim.

  6. Carcinoid tumour of the middle ear

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baig, Salman

    2012-09-01

    A case of middle ear mass in a young female from Ireland is described, who presented with left ear hearing loss and intermittent bloody discharge from the same ear. Examination under microscope revealed occlusive polyp in the left ear and a biopsy had been taken under general anaesthesia. Histopathology report described an adenoma \\/ carcinoid tumour of the middle ear confirmed by positive immunohistochemical staining. CT temporal bones revealed the extension of the disease. The patient underwent left tympanotomy and excision of the tumour. In general, these tumours are regarded as benign but may be mistaken for adenocarcinomas because of their histological heterogenecity.

  7. Radiopharmaceuticals as probes to characterize tumour tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Israt S.; Arshad, Mubarik A.; Nguyen, Quang-De; Aboagye, Eric O. [Imperial College London, Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Tumour cells exhibit several properties that allow them to grow and divide. A number of these properties are detectable by nuclear imaging methods. We discuss crucial tumour properties that can be described by current radioprobe technologies, further discuss areas of emerging radioprobe development, and finally articulate need areas that our field should aspire to develop. The review focuses largely on positron emission tomography and draws upon the seminal 'Hallmarks of Cancer' review article by Hanahan and Weinberg in 2011 placing into context the present and future roles of radiotracer imaging in characterizing tumours. (orig.)

  8. Gestational trophoblastic tumours: an update for 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froeling, Fieke E M; Seckl, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    Gestational trophoblastic disease describes a variety of pregnancy-related diseases including the premalignant conditions of a partial and complete hydatidiform mole and the malignant disorders of invasive mole, choriocarcinoma and the rare placental-site trophoblastic tumour and epithelioid trophoblastic tumour. The availability of a highly sensitive tumour marker in the form of human chorionic gonadotrophin, the chemosensitive character of the disease with effective treatment strategies and centralization of care of a rare group of diseases has resulted in excellent survival rates, which can exceed 98 %. This review gives a general overview of gestational trophoblastic disease, the most recent insights in aetiology and pathology and a summary of the different management strategies.

  9. Epithelial tumours of the lacrimal gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Holstein, Sarah Linéa; Coupland, Sarah E; Briscoe, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    of the lacrimal gland, displacement of the eyeball, reduced eye motility and diplopia. Pain and symptoms of short duration before the first ophthalmic consultation are characteristic of malignant tumours. The histological diagnosis determines the subsequent treatment regimen and provides important clues regarding...... the prognosis. The purpose of this paper is to describe the various primary epithelial tumours of the lacrimal gland. In the first part of the review, the frequency, demographics, clinical presentation and diagnostic features are described. In the second part, primarily tumour-specific histological...

  10. Tumour size, tumour complexity, and surgical approach are associated with nephrectomy type in small renal cortical tumours treated electively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Gregory J; Clark, Peter E; Barocas, Daniel A; Cookson, Michael S; Smith, Joseph A; Herrell, S Duke; Chang, Sam S

    2012-06-01

    Study Type - Therapy (case series) Level of Evidence 4 What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Although the benefits of nephron-sparing renal cortical tumour treatments are now widely accepted and have robust data supporting their oncological efficacy, safety, and positive effect on medium- and long-term renal function, the decision to perform partial nephrectomy (PN) remains a complex interaction between several competing factors. Various patient factors, e.g. comorbid conditions, age, body habitus, patient preference, etc. may effect this decision. Then there are the preferences of the surgeon him- or herself, including faculty with different operative techniques and surgical approaches, which may lead to one treatment decision over another. Finally, the anatomy of the tumour itself, i.e. the complexity of the tumour within the kidney and anatomical relationships within the organ, is intuitively critical to a surgeon's assessment of resectability. There is very little published data indicating which of the multitude of clinical variables have the greatest impact on the decision to perform PN. Most previous investigations into the subject have focused on either imperative or relative indications for PN (i.e. solitary kidney, bilateral renal masses, and multifocal tumours) or have used maximal tumour diameter (i.e. tumour size) alone in their assessment of the clinical variables associated with PN use. To identify preoperative variables associated with choice of partial nephrectomy (PN) vs radical nephrectomy (RN). Between January 2004 and June 2008, 203 patients were treated for clinical T1a renal cortical tumours. Of these, 154 (75.8%) had all data available and form the analytic cohort. Patients were categorized into two groups, PN and RN, based on preoperative treatment plan. Patient-, procedure-, and tumour-related variables, together with tumour complexity (based on the R.E.N.A.L Nephrometry Score [RENAL-NS]) were evaluated for their

  11. Deciphering PDT-induced inflammatory responses using real-time FDG-PET in a mouse tumour model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchon, Nicole; Hasséssian, Haroutioun M; Turcotte, Eric; Lecomte, Roger; van Lier, Johan E

    2014-10-01

    processes leading to tumour response in PDT, and allows for rapid as well as cost effective optimization of PDT protocols.

  12. Salivary gland hybrid tumour revisited: could they represent high-grade transformation in a low-grade neoplasm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellquist, Henrik; Skalova, Alena; Azadeh, Bahram

    2016-12-01

    Salivary gland hybrid tumour, first described in 1996, is a very rare neoplasm for which exact morphological criteria have not been universally agreed upon. In contrast, the concept of high-grade transformation (HGT) in salivary neoplasms has been widely accepted during the last decade, and the number of reported cases is rapidly increasing. A review of the literature revealed 38 cases of hybrid tumour reported in 22 publications. During approximately the same time period, well over 100 cases of HGT in salivary neoplasms have been reported. There are important histological similarities between hybrid tumours and salivary tumours with HGT. In the latter, containing one tumour component of low-grade malignancy and the other of high grade, the two tumour components are not entirely separated and appear to originate in the same area. Virtually, all cases reported as hybrid tumour had no clear lines of demarcation between the two tumour types. We are inclined to suggest that most of the 38 cases of hybrid tumours described in the literature would today better be called tumour with HGT rather than hybrid tumour. The relative proportion of the two components may vary, and the high-grade component is sometimes very small, which emphasises the importance of very generous sampling of the surgical specimen. The molecular genetic mechanisms responsible for HGT, including what used to be called hybrid tumour, remain largely unknown. Abnormalities of a few genes (including p53, C-MYC, cyclin D1, HER-2/neu) have been documented. As insufficient data exist on gene abnormalities in these lesions, conclusions as to whether or not they have a common origin and which mechanisms are involved in transformation cannot be drawn. Due to the small number of cases reported, many of which lack follow-up details; indicators of prognosis of hybrid tumours are not available, but their behaviour seems to be similar to that of tumours with HGT, i.e. an accelerated aggressive course. HGT of

  13. Symptoms and time to diagnosis in children with brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitbo, Ditte Marie; Nielsen, Rine; Illum, Niels Ove

    2011-01-01

    Clinical symptoms in brain tumours in children are variable at onset and diagnosis is often delayed. Symptoms were investigated with regard to brain tumour localisation, prediagnostic symptomatic intervals and malignancy.......Clinical symptoms in brain tumours in children are variable at onset and diagnosis is often delayed. Symptoms were investigated with regard to brain tumour localisation, prediagnostic symptomatic intervals and malignancy....

  14. Malignant Renal Tumours in Adults in Nnamdi Azikiwe University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Malignant renal tumour is the third commonest urological tumour after prostate and bladder cancer. It is however the urological tumour with the highest mortality/ incidence ratio. OBJECTIVE: To review the frequency, mode of presentation and histological pattern of patients with malignant renal tumours in ...

  15. Histo-pathological features of primary ovarian Tumours managed in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Ovarian tumours are the 2nd most common female genital tract tumour in Sokoto, northwestern, Nigeria. We determined the histo-pathological features of surgically removed ... (12.5%), malignant teratoma 2(5%) and endodermal sinus tumour (5%). There were 2 cases of metastatic tumours: one from Burkitts ...

  16. Cell proliferation in carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, S.M.; Ellwein, L.B. (Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha (USA))

    1990-08-31

    Chemicals that induce cancer at high doses in animal bioassays often fail to fit the traditional characterization of genotoxins. Many of these nongenotoxic compounds (such as sodium saccharin) have in common the property that they increase cell proliferation in the target organ. A biologically based, computerized description of carcinogenesis was used to show that the increase in cell proliferation can account for the carcinogenicity of nongenotoxic compounds. The carcinogenic dose-response relationship for genotoxic chemicals (such as 2-acetylaminofluorene) was also due in part to increased cell proliferation. Mechanistic information is required for determination of the existence of a threshold for the proliferative (and carcinogenic) response of nongenotoxic chemicals and the estimation of risk for human exposure.

  17. Malignant Appendage Tumours in Zaria | Samaila | Sudanese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and immunohistochemical studies should help in making diagnosis. Surgical intervention with wide margin excision should reduce recurrence rate. Further characterization of these tumours is desirable in our setting. Keywords: Skin Appendage, Malignant, Eccrine Sweat gland. Sudanese Journal of Dermatology Vol.

  18. Clinicopathologic Profile Of Sweat Gland Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Harsh

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign adnexal tumours of the skin, excluding pilosebaceous tumours were identified in 24 patients between the ages of 9 and 70 years with a mean age of 34 years; 17 women and 7 men. Most lesions (n = 13 occurred on the face and scalp. Apocrine hydrocystoma and eccrine acrospiroma were the commonest tumors with apocrine and eccrine differentiation respectively. Few uncommon tumors with included were chondroid syringoma, syringocystadenoma papilliferum. Excisional biopsy is the treatment of choice.

  19. Antenatally detected solid tumour of kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Shasanka Shekhar; Mandelia, Ankur; Gupta, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Congenital renal tumours are rare and usually benign. Polyhydramnios is the most common mode of presentation. Although most cases have been diagnosed postnatally, with advances in imaging technology, an increasing number of cases are being detected on antenatal scans. We describe a case of solid tumour of kidney detected in the second trimester of pregnancy and managed by surgery in the postnatal period. PMID:24526198

  20. Perfusion imaging of parotid gland tumours: usefulness of arterial spin labeling for differentiating Warthin's tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Haruo [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gifu (Japan); Kanematsu, Masayuki [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gifu (Japan); Gifu University Hospital, High-level Imaging Diagnosis Center, Gifu (Japan); Kajita, Kimihiro [Gifu University Hospital, High-level Imaging Diagnosis Center, Gifu (Japan); Mizuta, Keisuke; Aoki, Mitsuhiro [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Gifu (Japan); Okuaki, Tomoyuki [Philips Healthcare, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    To assess prospectively the efficacy of arterial spin labelling (ASL) against conventional and diffusion-weighted (DW) MR imaging for differentiating parotid gland tumours. We included 10 pleomorphic adenomas, 12 Warthin's tumours, and nine malignant tumours of the parotid glands. Only tumours larger than 10 mm were included in this study. All parotid gland tumours underwent T1-weighted, T2-weighted, DW, and ASL imaging. Tumour-to-parotid gland signal intensity ratios (SIRs) and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of solid components were correlated with these pathologies. SIRs on T2-weighted images and ADCs were higher in pleomorphic adenomas than in Warthin's tumours (p <.01) and malignant tumours (p <.01). SIRs on ASL were higher in Warthin's tumours than in pleomorphic adenomas (p <.01) and malignant tumours (p <.05). Az value of SIRs on ASL for differentiating Warthin's tumours from the other pathologies was 0.982. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of SIRs on ASL for the diagnosis of Warthin's tumours at an optimal SIR threshold of over 8.70 were 91.7 %, 94.7 %, and 93.5 %, respectively. ASL with SIR measurements could non-invasively evaluate tumour blood flow of parotid gland tumours and differentiate Warthin's tumours from pleomorphic adenomas and malignant tumours. (orig.)

  1. [Novel irradiation techniques in the treatment of solid tumours. Radiotherapy for metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Arpád; Póti, Zsuzsa

    2014-02-23

    Novel developments in percutaneous radiotherapy, such as positron emission tomography/computed tomography, adaptive radiation planning, intensity modulation radiotherapy and intensity modulated arc therapy (RapidArc), as well as the newer generation of image control (cone-beam computed tomography) and image guided radiotherapy ensure increased dosages of planning target volume and clinical target volume of solid tumours without damaging surrounding tissues and providing maximal protection. By raising the dosages of planned target volume and clinical target volume, these novel technical developments have created new indications in the treatment of solid tumours. With the aid of the cone-beam computed tomography and image guided radiotherapy the organ metastasis (lung, liver, spinal cord) and the primary tumour can be treated safety and effectively. Hypofractionation, dose escalation and the use of stereotactic devices can probably decrease radiation damage. The authors review the most common forms of evidence-based fractionation schemes used in irradiation therapy.

  2. Tumour-targeting properties of antibodies specific to MMP-1A, MMP-2 and MMP-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfaffen, Stefanie; Frey, Katharina; Stutz, Irene; Roesli, Christoph; Neri, Dario [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-08-15

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a group of more than 20 zinc-containing endopeptidases, are upregulated in many diseases, but several attempts to use radiolabelled MMP inhibitors for imaging tumours have proved unsuccessful in mouse models, possibly due to the limited specificity of these agents or their unfavourable pharmacokinetic profiles. In principle, radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies could be considered for the selective targeting and imaging of individual MMPs. We cloned, produced and characterized high-affinity monoclonal antibodies specific to murine MMP-1A, MMP-2 and MMP-3 in SIP (small immunoprotein) miniantibody format using biochemical and immunochemical methods. We also performed comparative biodistribution analysis of their tumour-targeting properties at three time points (3 h, 24 h, 48 h) in mice bearing subcutaneous F9 tumours using radioiodinated protein preparations. The clinical stage L19 antibody, specific to the alternatively spliced EDB domain of fibronectin, was used as reference tumour-targeting agent for in vivo studies. All anti-MMP antibodies and SIP(L19) strongly stained sections of F9 tumours when assessed by immunofluorescence methods. In biodistribution experiments, SIP(SP3), specific to MMP-3, selectively accumulated at the tumour site 24 and 48 h after intravenous injection, but was rapidly cleared from other organs. By contrast, SIP(SP1) and SIP(SP2), specific to MMP-1A and MMP-2, showed no preferential accumulation at the tumour site. Antibodies specific to MMP-3 may serve as vehicles for the efficient and selective delivery of imaging agents or therapeutic molecules to sites of disease. (orig.)

  3. Exophytic benign mixed epithelial stromal tumour of the kidney: case report of a rare tumour entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Küster Jens

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mixed epithelial and stromal tumour (MEST represents a recently described benign composite neoplasm of the kidney, which predominantly affects perimenopausal females. Most tumours are benign, although rare malignant cases have been observed. Case report A 47-year-old postmenopausal female presented to the urologist with flank pain. A CT scan of the abdomen showed a 30-mm-in-diameter uniform mass adjacent to the pelvis of the left kidney. Surgical exploration showed a tumour arising from the lower anterior hilus of the left kidney. The tumour could be excised by preserving the kidney. By intraoperative frozen section the tumour showed characteristic features of MEST with epithelial-covered cysts embedded in an "ovarian-like" stroma. Additional immunohistochemistry investigations showed expression for hormone receptors by the stromal component of the tumour. Discussion MEST typically presents in perimenopausal women as a primarily cystic mass. Commonly, the tumour arises from the renal parenchyma or pelvis. The tumour is composed of an admixture of cystic and sometimes more solid areas. The stromal cells typically demonstrate an ovarian-type stroma showing expression for the estrogen and progesterone receptors. Conclusion MEST represents a distinctive benign tumour entity of the kidney, which affects perimenopausal woman. The tumour should be distinguished from other cystic renal neoplasms. By imaging studies it is difficult to distinguish between a benign or malignant nature of the tumour. Thus, intraoperative frozen section is necessary for conservative surgery, since the overall prognosis is favourable and renal function can be preserved in most cases.

  4. The Immunomodulatory Small Molecule Imiquimod Induces Apoptosis in Devil Facial Tumour Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Patchett

    Full Text Available The survival of the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii is threatened by devil facial tumour disease (DFTD. This transmissible cancer is usually fatal, and no successful treatments have been developed. In human studies, the small immunomodulatory molecule imiquimod is a successful immunotherapy, activating anti-tumour immunity via stimulation of toll-like receptor-7 (TLR7 signaling pathways. In addition, imiquimod is a potent inducer of apoptosis in human tumour cell lines via TLR7 independent mechanisms. Here we investigate the potential of imiquimod as a DFTD therapy through analysis of treated DFTD cell lines and Tasmanian devil fibroblasts. WST-8 proliferation assays and annexin V apoptosis assays were performed to monitor apoptosis, and changes to the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes were analysed using qRT-PCR. Our results show that DFTD cell lines, but not Tasmanian devil fibroblasts, are sensitive to imiquimod-induced apoptosis in a time and concentration dependent manner. Induction of apoptosis was accompanied by down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic BCL2 and BCLXL genes, and up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic BIM gene. Continuous imiquimod treatment was required for these effects to occur. These results demonstrate that imiquimod can deregulate DFTD cell growth and survival in direct and targeted manner. In vivo, this may increase DFTD vulnerability to imiquimod-induced TLR7-mediated immune responses. Our findings have improved the current knowledge of imiquimod action in tumour cells for application to both DFTD and human cancer therapy.

  5. Prospective therapies for high-grade glial tumours: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Samed Talibi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available After three decades of intensive research, cytoreductive surgery remains the gold standard of treatment of malignant gliomas. Survivorship at both 1-year and 5-years has not drastically changed in the UK. Concomitant chemo- and radiotherapy has enhanced the efficiency of surgery, enabling more aggressive tumour resection whilst also preserving the surrounding healthy brain parenchyma. More accurate imaging techniques have also played a role in tumour identification, key to this has been pre- and intra-operative contrast enhancement and compounds that have a high affinity in binding to glioma cells. Intra-operative imaging has heralded the ability to give the operating surgeon continuous feedback to assess the completeness of resection. Research is shifting into investigating the complex cellular and molecular glial tumour-genesis, and has led to the development of efficacious chemotherapy agents and trial novel therapies. Oncolytic virotherapy has shown promise in clinical trials and gene therapy in-vitro studies. Surgery however remains the primary therapeutic option for the management of malignant gliomas removing the mass of proliferating malignant tumour cells and decompression of the space-occupying lesion.

  6. In vivo magnetic enrichment and multiplex photoacoustic detection of circulating tumour cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Shashkov, Evgeny V.; Kelly, Thomas; Kim, Jin-Woo; Yang, Lily; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2009-12-01

    The spread of cancer cells between organs, a process known as metastasis, is the cause of most cancer deaths. Detecting circulating tumour cells-a common marker for the development of metastasis-is difficult because ex vivo methods are not sensitive enough owing to limited blood sample volume and in vivo diagnosis is time-consuming as large volumes of blood must be analysed. Here, we show a way to magnetically capture circulating tumour cells in the bloodstream of mice followed by rapid photoacoustic detection. Magnetic nanoparticles, which were functionalized to target a receptor commonly found in breast cancer cells, bound and captured circulating tumour cells under a magnet. To improve detection sensitivity and specificity, gold-plated carbon nanotubes conjugated with folic acid were used as a second contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging. By integrating in vivo multiplex targeting, magnetic enrichment, signal amplification and multicolour recognition, our approach allows circulating tumour cells to be concentrated from a large volume of blood in the vessels of tumour-bearing mice, and this could have potential for the early diagnosis of cancer and the prevention of metastasis in humans.

  7. Metastatic tumours to hypophysis: a report of three cases and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Šmigoc

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Metastatic tumours to pituitary are rare. The most frequent are metastases from breast and lung.Methods. In this paper, three cases of metastatic tumours to the pituitary are presented with panhypopituitarism as a common symptom: I a 60-year-old gentleman with metastasis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma, who presented with diabetes insipidus, II a 54-year-old lady with metastatic renal clear cell carcinoma and consequent disturbances in visual acuity, brain nerve paresis and III a 57-year-old lady with breast cancer metastasis, visual impairment and brain nerve paresis.Results. A transnasal endoscopic resection of the tumours was performed in all cases, followed by oncological treatment. All patients improved after the treatment.Conclusions. Despite the rarity of the disease, a metastatic tumour to the pituitary gland must be included in the differential diagnosis when symptoms such as diabetes insipidus, ophthalmoplegy due to brain nerve palsies, rapid course of the disease and headache are observed. In 20% to 30%, pituitary metastases are the first manifestation of a tumour of unknown origin. Surgical and adjuvant therapy may improve the quality of life. The survival and prognosis are generally poor.

  8. Guidelines for the management of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (including bronchopulmonary and thymic neoplasms). Part II-specific NE tumour types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oberg, Kjell; Astrup, Lone Bording; Eriksson, Barbro

    2004-01-01

    Part II of the guidelines contains a description of epidemiology, histopathology, clinical presentation, diagnostic procedure, treatment, and survival for each type of neuroendocrine tumour. We are not only including gastroenteropancreatic tumours but also bronchopulmonary and thymic neuroendocrine...... tumours. These guidelines essentially cover basic knowledge in the diagnosis and management of the different forms of neuroendocrine tumour. We have, however, tried to give more updated information about the epidemiology and histopathology, which is essential for the clinical management of these tumours....

  9. Tumour-to-tumour metastasis: male breast carcinoma metastasis arising in an extrapleural solitary fibrous tumour - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheipl, Susanne; Moinfar, Farid; Leithner, Andreas; Sadoghi, Patrick; Jorgensen, Mette; Rinner, Beate; Liegl, Bernadette

    2014-11-25

    Tumour-to-tumour metastasis (TTM) occurs when one tumour metastasises to a separate tumour within the same individual. TTM is observed frequently in breast cancer but has not been described in male breast cancer. In addition reports describing solitary fibrous tumours (SFT) of the pleura hosting other neoplasms' metastases are limited. We report an exceptional case of male breast cancer metastasising to an extrapleural SFT, occurring in the subcutaneous tissue of the back of a 68-year old Caucasian patient. A 68-year old male was diagnosed with a metastasising ductal breast cancer. He was treated by mastectomy of the right breast and axillary lymph-adenectomy. Further staging revealed an increasing subcutaneous expansion located on the patient's back. Excision biopsy confirmed a SFT hosting a breast cancer metastasis. The patient received palliative chemotherapy but died of disease seven years after initial diagnosis. The abundance of blood vessels within these lesions might predispose SFTs for an involvement in TTM. This case describes the possibility of concurrent rare occurrences and reminds clinicians, as well as pathologists, to be open-minded and fastidious about their differential diagnoses, sampling and examination of histological specimens. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/13000_2014_203.

  10. Tumours and tumour-like conditions of the jaw seen in Zaria, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    About 94% of the ameloblastomas occurred in the mandible. The malignant jaw tumours were made up of the following histological types: - 79 (75.2%) malignant lymphoma; 10 (9.5%) osteogenic sarcomas; 2 (1.9%) chondrosarcoma; 1 (1.0%) malignant ameloblastoma and 6 (5.7%) secondary tumours, 7 (6.7%) were ...

  11. Orofacial tumours and tumour-like lesions in Kano, Nigeria | Arotiba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most prevalent tumours were squamous cell carcinoma (46% of malignant lesions) and ameloblastoma (31% of benign lesions) the mandible (38.2%) and the maxilla (23.6%) were the most commonly affected sites. Patients usually delayed before seeking treatment and the mean duration of tumours was 30 months ...

  12. Tumour-induced neoneurogenesis and perineural tumour growth: a mathematical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolas, Georgios; Bianchi, Arianna; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.

    2016-02-01

    It is well-known that tumours induce the formation of a lymphatic and a blood vasculature around themselves. A similar but far less studied process occurs in relation to the nervous system and is referred to as neoneurogenesis. The relationship between tumour progression and the nervous system is still poorly understood and is likely to involve a multitude of factors. It is therefore relevant to study tumour-nerve interactions through mathematical modelling: this may reveal the most significant factors of the plethora of interacting elements regulating neoneurogenesis. The present work is a first attempt to model the neurobiological aspect of cancer development through a system of differential equations. The model confirms the experimental observations that a tumour is able to promote nerve formation/elongation around itself, and that high levels of nerve growth factor and axon guidance molecules are recorded in the presence of a tumour. Our results also reflect the observation that high stress levels (represented by higher norepinephrine release by sympathetic nerves) contribute to tumour development and spread, indicating a mutually beneficial relationship between tumour cells and neurons. The model predictions suggest novel therapeutic strategies, aimed at blocking the stress effects on tumour growth and dissemination.

  13. Primary bone tumours and tumour-like lesions in children in Zaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    osteoma 2.5%, osterochondroma 22.5%, fibroma 5%); while malignant tumours occurred in 19 (47.5%) (osteosarcoma 5%, Burkitt's lymphoma 37.5%, diffuse lympholastic lymphoma 5%). Tumour-like lesions accounted for 9 (22.5%), all Þ brous ...

  14. Loss of the tumour suppressor gene AIP mediates the browning of human brown fat tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Linda; Hansen, Nils; Saba, Karim H; Nilsson, Jenny; Fioretos, Thoas; Rissler, Pehr; Nord, Karolin H

    2017-10-01

    Human brown fat tumours (hibernomas) show concomitant loss of the tumour suppressor genes MEN1 and AIP. We hypothesized that the brown fat phenotype is attributable to these mutations. Accordingly, in this study, we demonstrate that silencing of AIP in human brown preadipocytic and white fat cell lines results in the induction of the brown fat marker UCP1. In human adipocytic tumours, loss of MEN1 was found both in white (one of 51 lipomas) and in brown fat tumours. In contrast, concurrent loss of AIP was always accompanied by a brown fat morphology. We conclude that this white-to-brown phenotype switch in brown fat tumours is mediated by the loss of AIP. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Changes in expression of oestrogen regulated and proliferation genes with neoadjuvant treatment highlight heterogeneity of clinical resistance to the aromatase inhibitor, letrozole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William R; Larionov, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    Clinical resistance is a major factor limiting benefits to endocrine therapy. Causes of resistance may be diverse and the mechanism of resistance in individual breast cancers is usually unknown. The present study illustrates how changes in the expression of proliferation and oestrogen-regulated genes occurring during neoadjuvant treatment with the aromatase inhibitor, letrozole, may define distinctive tumour subgroups and suggest different mechanisms of resistance in clinically endocrine resistant breast cancers. Postmenopausal women with large primary oestrogen-receptor (ER)-rich breast cancers were treated neoadjuvantly with letrozole (2.5 mg daily) for three months. Clinical response was determined by ultrasound changes in tumour volume. Tumour ribonucleic acid (RNA) from biopsies taken before, after 14 days and after three months of treatment was hybridized on Affymetrix U133A chips. Changes in expression of KIAA0101, TFF3, SERPINA3, IRS-1 and TFF1 were taken as markers of oestrogen regulation and those in CDC2, CKS-2, Cyclin B1, Thymidine Synthetase and PCNA as markers of proliferation. Fifteen tumours with < 50% volume reduction over three months of treatment were classified as being clinically non-responsive. Gene expression changes after 14 days of treatment with letrozole revealed different patterns of change in oestrogen regulated and proliferation genes in individual resistant tumours. Tumours could be separated into three different subgroups as follows: i) nine cases in which both proliferation and oestrogen signalling signatures were generally reduced on treatment (ii) four cases in which both signatures were generally unaffected or increased with treatment and (iii) two cases in which expression of the majority of oestrogen-regulated genes decreased whereas proliferation genes remained unchanged or increased. In 14 out of 15 tumours, RNA profiles were also available after three months of treatment. Patterns of change observed after 14 days were

  16. Naturally occurring tumours in the basal metazoan Hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domazet-Lošo, Tomislav; Klimovich, Alexander; Anokhin, Boris; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Hamm, Mailin J; Lange, Christina; Bosch, Thomas C G

    2014-06-24

    The molecular nature of tumours is well studied in vertebrates, although their evolutionary origin remains unknown. In particular, there is no evidence for naturally occurring tumours in pre-bilaterian animals, such as sponges and cnidarians. This is somewhat surprising given that recent computational studies have predicted that most metazoans might be prone to develop tumours. Here we provide first evidence for naturally occurring tumours in two species of Hydra. Histological, cellular and molecular data reveal that these tumours are transplantable and might originate by differentiation arrest of female gametes. Growth of tumour cells is independent from the cellular environment. Tumour-bearing polyps have significantly reduced fitness. In addition, Hydra tumours show a greatly altered transcriptome that mimics expression shifts in vertebrate cancers. Therefore, this study shows that spontaneous tumours have deep evolutionary roots and that early branching animals may be informative in revealing the fundamental mechanisms of tumorigenesis.

  17. Targeting ALCAM in the cryo-treated tumour microenvironment successfully induces systemic anti-tumour immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo-Saito, Chie; Fuwa, Takafumi; Kawakami, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Cryoablative treatment has been widely used for treating cancer. However, the therapeutic efficacies are still controversial. The molecular mechanisms of the cryo-induced immune responses, particularly underlying the ineffectiveness, remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we identified a new molecular mechanism involved in the cryo failure. We used cryo-ineffective metastatic tumour models that murine melanoma B16-F10 cells were subcutaneously and intravenously implanted into C57BL/6 mice. When the subcutaneous tumours were treated cryoablation on day 7 after tumour implantation, cells expressing activated leucocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166) were significantly expanded not only locally in the treated tumours but also systemically in spleen and bone marrow of the mice. The cryo-induced ALCAM(+) cells including CD45(-) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells significantly suppressed interferon γ production and cytotoxicity of tumour-specific CD8(+) T cells via ALCAM expressed in these cells. This suggests that systemic expansion of the ALCAM(+) cells negatively switches host-immune directivity to the tumour-supportive mode. Intratumoural injection with anti-ALCAM blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) following the cryo treatment systemically induced tumour-specific CD8(+) T cells with higher cytotoxic activities, resulting in suppression of tumour growth and metastasis in the cryo-resistant tumour models. These suggest that expansion of ALCAM(+) cells is a determinant of limiting the cryo efficacy. Further combination with an immune checkpoint inhibitor anti-CTLA4 mAb optimized the anti-tumour efficacy of the dual-combination therapy. Targeting ALCAM may be a promising strategy for overcoming the cryo ineffectiveness leading to the better practical use of cryoablation in clinical treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. β-Adrenergic system, a backstage manipulator regulating tumour progression and drug target in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Li, Zhijie; Lu, Lan; Cho, Chi Hin

    2013-12-01

    β-Adrenoceptors are broadly distributed in various tissues of the body. Stress hormones regulate a panel of important physiological functions and disease states including cancer. Nicotine and its derivatives could stimulate the release of stress hormones from cancer cells, leading to the promotion of cancer development. β-Blockers have been widely used to control hypertension for decades. Recently, these agents could have significant implications in cancer therapy through blockade of adrenoceptors in tumour tissues. In this review, we summarize recent advancements about the influence of stress hormones, nicotine and β-adrenoceptors on cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and metastasis, and also tumour vasculature normalization. Relevant signal pathways and potential value of β-blockers in the treatment of cancer are also discussed in this review. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. The epigenetic modifier EZH2 controls melanoma growth and metastasis through silencing of distinct tumour suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingg, Daniel; Debbache, Julien; Schaefer, Simon M; Tuncer, Eylul; Frommel, Sandra C; Cheng, Phil; Arenas-Ramirez, Natalia; Haeusel, Jessica; Zhang, Yudong; Bonalli, Mario; McCabe, Michael T; Creasy, Caretha L; Levesque, Mitchell P; Boyman, Onur; Santoro, Raffaella; Shakhova, Olga; Dummer, Reinhard; Sommer, Lukas

    2015-01-22

    Increased activity of the epigenetic modifier EZH2 has been associated with different cancers. However, evidence for a functional role of EZH2 in tumorigenesis in vivo remains poor, in particular in metastasizing solid cancers. Here we reveal central roles of EZH2 in promoting growth and metastasis of cutaneous melanoma. In a melanoma mouse model, conditional Ezh2 ablation as much as treatment with the preclinical EZH2 inhibitor GSK503 stabilizes the disease through inhibition of growth and virtually abolishes metastases formation without affecting normal melanocyte biology. Comparably, in human melanoma cells, EZH2 inactivation impairs proliferation and invasiveness, accompanied by re-expression of tumour suppressors connected to increased patient survival. These EZH2 target genes suppress either melanoma growth or metastasis in vivo, revealing the dual function of EZH2 in promoting tumour progression. Thus, EZH2-mediated epigenetic repression is highly relevant especially during advanced melanoma progression, which makes EZH2 a promising target for novel melanoma therapies.

  20. Genetic Systems to Investigate Regulation of Oncogenes and Tumour Suppressor Genes in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie M. Quinn

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Animal growth requires coordination of cell growth and cell cycle progression with developmental signaling. Loss of cell cycle control is extremely detrimental, with reduced cycles leading to impaired organ growth and excessive proliferation, potentially resulting in tissue overgrowth and driving tumour initiation. Due to the high level of conservation between the cell cycle machinery of Drosophila and humans, the appeal of the fly model continues to be the means with which we can use sophisticated genetics to provide novel insights into mammalian growth and cell cycle control. Over the last decade, there have been major additions to the genetic toolbox to study development in Drosophila. Here we discuss some of the approaches available to investigate the potent growth and cell cycle properties of the Drosophila counterparts of prominent cancer genes, with a focus on the c-Myc oncoprotein and the tumour suppressor protein FIR (Hfp in flies, which behaves as a transcriptional repressor of c-Myc.

  1. Augmented reality in bone tumour resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y. K.; Gupta, S.; Yoon, C.; Han, I.; Kim, H-S.; Choi, H.; Hong, J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated the accuracy of augmented reality (AR)-based navigation assistance through simulation of bone tumours in a pig femur model. Methods We developed an AR-based navigation system for bone tumour resection, which could be used on a tablet PC. To simulate a bone tumour in the pig femur, a cortical window was made in the diaphysis and bone cement was inserted. A total of 133 pig femurs were used and tumour resection was simulated with AR-assisted resection (164 resection in 82 femurs, half by an orthropaedic oncology expert and half by an orthopaedic resident) and resection with the conventional method (82 resection in 41 femurs). In the conventional group, resection was performed after measuring the distance from the edge of the condyle to the expected resection margin with a ruler as per routine clinical practice. Results The mean error of 164 resections in 82 femurs in the AR group was 1.71 mm (0 to 6). The mean error of 82 resections in 41 femurs in the conventional resection group was 2.64 mm (0 to 11) (p Augmented reality in bone tumour resection: An experimental study. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:137–143. PMID:28258117

  2. [Tumours of the upper cervical spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández García, Borja Jesús; Isla Guerrero, Alberto; Castaño, Ana; Alvarez Ruiz, Fernando; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Vertebral tumours arising in the upper cervical spine are rare. We present our experience in managing these neoplasms. We retrospectively reviewed the case histories of patients treated at our institution between January 2000 and June 2011. There were 9 patients with tumours in C1-C2-C3: 2metastases, 3chordomas, 2plasmocytomas, 1chondrosarcoma and 1osteochondroma. All patients complained of neck pain at the time of diagnosis. Three patients underwent an anterior and posterior approach, 3 an exclusively posterior approach and 3 an exclusively anterior surgical approach. Tumour resection was intralesional in 7 cases. Chemo-radiotherapy was used as adjuvant therapy in patients with malignant tumours. Vertebral tumours in the upper cervical spine are usually malignant. Achieving en bloc resection is particularly challenging and is technically unfeasible in many cases. This worsens the prognosis and makes adjuvant treatment very important. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. An Ectopic ACTH Secreting Metastatic Parotid Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Dacruz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year old woman presented with features of Cushing’s syndrome (CS secondary to an ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH secreting metastatic parotid tumour 3 years after excision of the original tumour. She subsequently developed fatal intestinal perforation and unfortunately died despite best possible medical measures. Ectopic ACTH secretion accounts for 5–10% of all patients presenting with ACTH dependent hypercortisolism; small cell carcinoma of lung (SCLC and neuroendocrine tumours (NET account for the majority of such cases. Although there are 4 previous case reports of ectopic ACTH secreting salivary tumours in literature, to our knowledge this is the first published case report in which the CS developed after 3 years of what was deemed as a successful surgical excision of primary salivary tumour. Our patient initially had nonspecific symptoms which may have contributed to a delay in diagnosis. Perforation of sigmoid colon is a recognised though underdiagnosed complication associated with steroid therapy and hypercortisolism. This case demonstrates the challenges faced in diagnosis as well as management of patients with CS apart from the practical difficulties faced while trying to identify source of ectopic ACTH.

  4. Biphasic effects of propranolol on tumour growth in B16F10 melanoma-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Sonia; Buoncervello, Maria; Rampin, Andrea; Spada, Massimo; Macchia, Daniele; Giordani, Luciana; Stati, Tonino; Bearzi, Claudia; Catalano, Liviana; Rizzi, Roberto; Gabriele, Lucia; Marano, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Propranolol is a vasoactive drug that shows antiangiogenic and antitumour activities in melanoma. However, it is unknown whether these activities are dose-dependent and whether there is a relationship between systemic vascular effects of propranolol and anti-melanoma activity. Effects of increasing doses of propranolol (10, 20, 30 and 40 mg·kg-1 ·day-1 ) on tumour growth were studied in B16F10 melanoma-bearing mice. Histological and biochemical analyses were used to assess propranolol effects on angiogenesis and cancer cell proliferation. Systemic vascular resistance (SVR) was evaluated by measuring cardiac output and arterial BP. In vitro analyses revealed that B16F10 cells expressed β-adrenoceptors, but neither isoprenaline, a β-adrenoceptor agonist, nor the β-blocker propranolol affected cancer cell proliferation. In vivo studies showed that the antitumour efficacy of propranolol follows a U-shaped biphasic dose-response curve. Low doses (10 and 20 mg·kg-1 ·day-1 ) significantly inhibit tumour growth, whereas higher doses are progressively less effective. We also found that high-dose propranolol stimulates tumour arteriogenesis whereas no effect on angiogenesis was observed at any dose. Based on these data and considering that propranolol is a vasoactive drug, we hypothesized that it causes systemic vasoconstriction or vasodilation depending on the dose and thus alters tumour perfusion and growth. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that propranolol has a biphasic effect on SVR with low and high doses producing vasoconstriction and vasodilation respectively. Propranolol inhibits melanoma growth in a U-shaped biphasic manner. A direct relationship exists between SVR and anti-melanoma activity. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Biphasic effects of propranolol on tumour growth in B16F10 melanoma‐bearing mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Sonia; Buoncervello, Maria; Rampin, Andrea; Spada, Massimo; Macchia, Daniele; Giordani, Luciana; Stati, Tonino; Bearzi, Claudia; Catalano, Liviana; Rizzi, Roberto; Gabriele, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Propranolol is a vasoactive drug that shows antiangiogenic and antitumour activities in melanoma. However, it is unknown whether these activities are dose‐dependent and whether there is a relationship between systemic vascular effects of propranolol and anti‐melanoma activity. Experimental Approach Effects of increasing doses of propranolol (10, 20, 30 and 40 mg·kg−1·day−1) on tumour growth were studied in B16F10 melanoma‐bearing mice. Histological and biochemical analyses were used to assess propranolol effects on angiogenesis and cancer cell proliferation. Systemic vascular resistance (SVR) was evaluated by measuring cardiac output and arterial BP. Key Results In vitro analyses revealed that B16F10 cells expressed β‐adrenoceptors, but neither isoprenaline, a β‐adrenoceptor agonist, nor the β‐blocker propranolol affected cancer cell proliferation. In vivo studies showed that the antitumour efficacy of propranolol follows a U‐shaped biphasic dose–response curve. Low doses (10 and 20 mg·kg−1·day−1) significantly inhibit tumour growth, whereas higher doses are progressively less effective. We also found that high‐dose propranolol stimulates tumour arteriogenesis whereas no effect on angiogenesis was observed at any dose. Based on these data and considering that propranolol is a vasoactive drug, we hypothesized that it causes systemic vasoconstriction or vasodilation depending on the dose and thus alters tumour perfusion and growth. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that propranolol has a biphasic effect on SVR with low and high doses producing vasoconstriction and vasodilation respectively. Conclusions and Implications Propranolol inhibits melanoma growth in a U‐shaped biphasic manner. A direct relationship exists between SVR and anti‐melanoma activity. PMID:27792834

  6. A STUDY OF OVARIAN TUMOURS : CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL CORRELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Devi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study incidence age distribution of benign and malignant ovarian tu mours in general population. METHODS AND MATERIAL : To study 120 patients with ovarian tumours in Govt . general hospital during June 2003 and June 2005. RESULTS: Clinical and pathological evaluation of all ovarian tumours was done and incidence, age distrib ution of various benign and malignant ovarian neoplasms were tabulated and compared with other studies. CONCLUSIONS: Most common ovarian tumours are benign tumours and serous cystadenoma is the commonest benign tumour and S erous cystadeno carcinoma is the most common malignant tumour.

  7. Epidemiology, diagnostics and treatment of vascular tumours and malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcicki, Piotr; Wójcicka, Karolina

    2014-01-01

    Vascular tumours and vascular malformations are common vasculose anomalies characteristic for dissimilar clinical course, specific biological as well as immune cytological and histological properties. Vascular lesions classification system and their detailed division into groups and subgroups were elaborated and implemented in Rome, in 1996, during meeting of the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA). It was based on modification of an earlier going division by Mullikien and Głowacki from 1982. Infantile hemangiomas are the most numerous group of benign tumours of mesenchymal origin. Vascular malformations appear definitely less often. They are composed of normal endothelium lined displastic vessels which originate from vascular tissue abnormal morphogenesis. In contrast, in hemangiomas, at the proliferation stage, increased, multiplication of endothelial cells is observed as well as of fibroblasts, mastocytes and macrophages. Infantile hemangiomas are usually not present at the moment of birth and white chloasma with superficial teleangiectasis appears which increases within 3-4 weeks and gets bright red colour and reveal very characteristic clinical course basing on intensive growth period and involution long process. Vascular malformations are observed most often at the delivery moment or they may appear at an early childhood. They enlarge proportionally along with the child's growth and their sudden expansion may be triggered by an infection, hormonal changes or trauma. Contrary to hemangiomas, they do not subside spontaneously and their abrupt increase may result in impairment or deformation of important anatomical structures. Infantile hemangiomas and vascular malformations require different and individual treatments which are often multi-stage procedures carried on in specialistic centres of plastic surgery, vascular surgery or maxillofacial surgery.

  8. MRI of intracranial germ cell tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumida, M. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Uozumi, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Kiya, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Mukada, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Arita, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Kurisu, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Sugiyama, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Onda, J. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Satoh, H. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Ikawa, F. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Migita, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1995-01-01

    We reviewed MRI findings in proven intracranial germ cell tumours in 22 cases, 12 of whom received Gd-DTPA. On T1-weighted images, the signal intensity of the tumour parenchyma was moderately low in 19 cases and isointense in 3; on T2-weighted images, it was high in all cases. Regions of different intensity thought to be cysts were found in 17 (77 %): 7 of 12 patients with germinoma (58 %) and in all other cases. Of the 13 patients with pineal lesions T1-weighted sagittal images showed the aqueduct to be obstructed in 5, stenotic in 7 and normal in 1. Strong contrast enhancement was observed in all 12 cases. Of the 14 patients with suprasellar lesions, 5 were found to have an intrasellar extension, and in 3 of these, the normal pituitary gland, which could be distinguished from the tumour, was displaced anteriorly. Ten patients (45 %) had multiple lesions. (orig.)

  9. Angiofibroma, a rare cardiac tumour in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Gayen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Angiofibromas, located in any other sites than nasopharynx are unusual. Cardiac angiofibromas are a very rare cardiac tumours in comparison to rhabdomyomas which are the commonest in the children. We report a right ventricular tumour in a10 year old girl which was excised under cardiopulmonary bypass successfully and diagnosed as angiofibroma on histopathology. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2012, Vol-8, No-4, 51-54 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v8i4.8702  

  10. Cellular prion protein (PrPC) in the development of Merlin-deficient tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, L; Ryan, Y; Hilton, D A; Lyons-Rimmer, J; Dave, F; Maze, E A; Adams, C L; Rigby-Jones, R; Ammoun, S; Hanemann, C O

    2017-11-02

    Loss of function mutations in the neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) gene, coding for a tumour suppressor, Merlin, cause multiple tumours of the nervous system such as schwannomas, meningiomas and ependymomas. These tumours may occur sporadically or as part of the hereditary condition neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2). Current treatment is confined to (radio) surgery and no targeted drug therapies exist. NF2 mutations and/or Merlin inactivation are also seen in other cancers including some mesothelioma, breast cancer, colorectal carcinoma, melanoma and glioblastoma. To study the relationship between Merlin deficiency and tumourigenesis, we have developed an in vitro model comprising human primary schwannoma cells, the most common Merlin-deficient tumour and the hallmark for NF2. Using this model, we show increased expression of cellular prion protein (PrPC) in schwannoma cells and tissues. In addition, a strong overexpression of PrPC is observed in human Merlin-deficient mesothelioma cell line TRA and in human Merlin-deficient meningiomas. PrPC contributes to increased proliferation, cell-matrix adhesion and survival in schwannoma cells acting via 37/67 kDa non-integrin laminin receptor (LR/37/67 kDa) and downstream ERK1/2, PI3K/AKT and FAK signalling pathways. PrPC protein is also strongly released from schwannoma cells via exosomes and as a free peptide suggesting that it may act in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner. We suggest that PrPC and its interactor, LR/37/67 kDa, could be potential therapeutic targets for schwannomas and other Merlin-deficient tumours.

  11. Sertoliform cystadenoma: a rare benign tumour of the rete testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremmer, Felix; Schweyer, Stefan; Behnes, Carl Ludwig; Blech, Manfred; Radzun, Heinz Joachim

    2013-02-14

    Sertoliform cystadenoma of the rete testis represents an uncommon benign tumour. They appear in patients from 26 to 62 years of age. We describe a case of a 66-year-old man with a tumour in the area of the epididymal head. The tumour markers were not increased. Under the assumption of a malignant testicular tumour an inguinal orchiectomy was performed. The cut surface of this tumour was of grey/white color and showed small cysts. The tumour consisted of two compartments. The epithelial like tumour cells showed a sertoliform growth pattern and cystic dilatations. In between the tumour cells repeatedly actin expressing sclerotic areas could be recognized as the second tumour component. Proliferative activity was not increased. Immunohistochemically the tumour cells were positiv for inhibin, S-100, and CD 99. Alpha feto protein (AFP), human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-HCG) and placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) as well as synaptophysin, epithelial membrane antigene (EMA), and BCL-2 were not expressed. As far as we know this is the sixth reported case of this tumour. Because of the benign nature of this tumour the correct diagnosis is important for the intra- and postoperative management. Here we present a case of this rare tumour and discuss potential differential diagnosis. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1956026143857335.

  12. The frequency of neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia in patients with pulmonary neuroendocrine tumours and non-neuroendocrine cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Selim M H; Goodwill, Joseph; Lim, Eric; Yap, Yoong K; Wells, Athol U; Hansell, David M; Davis, Peter; Selim, Abdel-Ghani; Abdel-Ghani, Syed; Goldstraw, Peter; Nicholson, Andrew G

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate the frequency of neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (NEH) in resected neuroendocrine tumours and non-neuroendocrine cell carcinomas and to study its relationship to selected clinical parameters. Random blocks without tumour from resected typical carcinoids (TCs, n = 46), atypical carcinoids (ACs, n = 14), large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas (LCNECs, n = 18), small cell carcinomas (SCLCs, n = 22), adenocarcinomas (ADENOs, n = 26) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs, n = 18) were stained for CD56 and evaluated for linear proliferations, cell aggregates (>4 CD56+ cells), and tumourlets (<5 mm with basement membrane invasion). There was a statistically significant difference between the frequency of NEH in all neuroendocrine tumours (TC/AC/LCNEC/SCLC, 35/100, 35%) (P = 0.009) when compared with non-neuroendocrine carcinomas (ADENO/SCC, 6/44, 14%) and in the frequency of NEH in TC (21/46, 46%) versus all other tumours (AC/LCNEC/SCLC/SCC/ADENO, 20/98, 20%) (P = 0.001). There was increased frequency of NEH in peripheral TCs (8/13, 62%) compared with central TCs (14/33, 43%) (P = 0.33). There was no association between smoking history and NEH. Clinical and imaging data showed no evidence of an increased frequency of obliterative bronchiolitis in patients with NEH. NEH is significantly increased in the background lung of neuroendocrine tumours when compared with non-neuroendocrine carcinomas, supportive data for NEH having neoplastic potential.

  13. Prognostic relevance of a T-type calcium channels gene signature in solid tumours: A correlation ready for clinical validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaro, Lorenzo; Vivaldi, Caterina; Lin, Dong; Xue, Hui; Falcone, Alfredo; Wang, Yuzhuo; Crea, Francesco; Bootman, Martin D

    2017-01-01

    T-type calcium channels (TTCCs) mediate calcium influx across the cell membrane. TTCCs regulate numerous physiological processes including cardiac pacemaking and neuronal activity. In addition, they have been implicated in the proliferation, migration and differentiation of tumour tissues. Although the signalling events downstream of TTCC-mediated calcium influx are not fully elucidated, it is clear that variations in the expression of TTCCs promote tumour formation and hinder response to treatment. We examined the expression of TTCC genes (all three subtypes; CACNA-1G, CACNA-1H and CACNA-1I) and their prognostic value in three major solid tumours (i.e. gastric, lung and ovarian cancers) via a publicly accessible database. In gastric cancer, expression of all the CACNA genes was associated with overall survival (OS) among stage I-IV patients (all p<0.05). By combining the three potential biomarkers, a TTCC signature was developed, which retained a significant association with OS both in stage IV and stage I-III patients. In lung and ovarian cancer, association with OS was also significant when all tumour stages were considered, but was partly lost or inconclusive after splitting cases into localized and metastatic subsets. Alterations in CACNA gene expression are linked to tumour prognosis. Gastric cancer represents the most promising setting for further evaluation.

  14. Prevention and treatment of colon cancer by peroral administration of HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthia, Manoj; Storm, Petter; Nadeem, Aftab; Hsiung, Sabrina; Svanborg, Catharina

    2014-01-01

    Most colon cancers start with dysregulated Wnt/β-catenin signalling and remain a major therapeutic challenge. Examining whether HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells) may be used for colon cancer treatment is logical, based on the properties of the complex and its biological context. To investigate if HAMLET can be used for colon cancer treatment and prevention. Apc(Min)(/+) mice, which carry mutations relevant to hereditary and sporadic human colorectal tumours, were used as a model for human disease. HAMLET was given perorally in therapeutic and prophylactic regimens. Tumour burden and animal survival of HAMLET-treated and sham-fed mice were compared. Tissue analysis focused on Wnt/β-catenin signalling, proliferation markers and gene expression, using microarrays, immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Confocal microscopy, reporter assay, immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, ion flux assays and holographic imaging were used to determine effects on colon cancer cells. Peroral HAMLET administration reduced tumour progression and mortality in Apc(Min)(/+) mice. HAMLET accumulated specifically in tumour tissue, reduced β-catenin and related tumour markers. Gene expression analysis detected inhibition of Wnt signalling and a shift to a more differentiated phenotype. In colon cancer cells with APC mutations, HAMLET altered β-catenin integrity and localisation through an ion channel-dependent pathway, defining a new mechanism for controlling β-catenin signalling. Remarkably, supplying HAMLET to the drinking water from the time of weaning also significantly prevented tumour development. These data identify HAMLET as a new, peroral agent for colon cancer prevention and treatment, especially needed in people carrying APC mutations, where colon cancer remains a leading cause of death.

  15. The 2016 WHO Classification of Tumours of the Urinary System and Male Genital Organs-Part B: Prostate and Bladder Tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Peter A; Moch, Holger; Cubilla, Antonio L; Ulbright, Thomas M; Reuter, Victor E

    2016-07-01

    It has been 12 yr since the publication of the last World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumours of the prostate and bladder. During this time, significant new knowledge has been generated about the pathology and genetics of these tumours. Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate is a newly recognized entity in the 2016 WHO classification. In most cases, it represents intraductal spread of aggressive prostatic carcinoma and should be separated from high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. New acinar adenocarcinoma variants are microcystic adenocarcinoma and pleomorphic giant cell adenocarcinoma. Modifications to the Gleason grading system are incorporated into the 2016 WHO section on grading of prostate cancer, and it is recommended that the percentage of pattern 4 should be reported for Gleason score 7. The new WHO classification further recommends the recently developed prostate cancer grade grouping with five grade groups. For bladder cancer, the 2016 WHO classification continues to recommend the 1997 International Society of Urological Pathology grading classification. Newly described or better defined noninvasive urothelial lesions include urothelial dysplasia and urothelial proliferation of uncertain malignant potential, which is frequently identified in patients with a prior history of urothelial carcinoma. Invasive urothelial carcinoma with divergent differentiation refers to tumours with some percentage of "usual type" urothelial carcinoma combined with other morphologies. Pathologists should mention the percentage of divergent histologies in the pathology report. Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate is a newly recognized entity in the 2016 World Health Organization classification. Better defined noninvasive urothelial lesions include urothelial dysplasia and urothelial proliferation of uncertain malignant potential. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [A young man with rapidly progressing dyspnoea and a mediastinal mass].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Spronsen, D J; van den Berkmortel, F W P J; Bootsma, G P; de Mulder, P H M

    2004-11-13

    An 18-year-old male presented with a 2-week history of rapid progressive dyspnoea and dry cough due to a large mediastinal mass with compression of the trachea. Based on the raised serum values of the tumour markers chorionogonadotrophin and alphafoetoprotein the diagnosis of germ-cell tumour was made. Because of the severity of his symptoms chemotherapy with bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin was begun on the same day and before the results of the histology investigations were known. The next day the symptoms were diminished and after completing four courses of chemotherapy there was complete remission. The differential diagnosis of a rapid progressive mediastinal mass is limited and mainly relates to malignant lymphoma and germ-cell tumours. In emergency situations if tumour markers are raised then anti-tumour therapy may be begun before any histological confirmation is available.

  17. Proteolytic and non-proteolytic migration of tumour cells and leucocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, Peter; Wolf, Katarina

    2003-01-01

    The migration of different cell types, such as leucocytes and tumour cells, involves cellular strategies to overcome the physical resistance of three-dimensional tissue networks, including proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components. High-resolution live-cell imaging techniques have recently provided structural and biochemical insight into the differential use of matrix-degrading enzymes in the migration processes of different cell types within the three-dimensional ECM. Proteolytic migration is achieved by slow-moving cells, such as fibroblasts and mesenchymally moving tumour cells, by engaging matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsins and serine proteases at the cell surface in a focalized manner ('pericellular proteolysis'), while adhesion and migratory traction are provided by integrins. Pericellular breakdown of ECM components generates localized matrix defects and remodelling along migration tracks. In contrast with tumour cells, constitutive non-proteolytic migration is used by rapidly moving T lymphocytes. This migration type does not generate proteolytic matrix remodelling, but rather depends on shape change to allow cells to glide and squeeze through gaps and trails present in connective tissues. In addition, constitutive proteolytic migration can be converted into non-proteolytic movement by protease inhibitors. After the simultaneous inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases, serine/threonine proteases and cysteine proteases in tumour cells undergoing proteolysis-dependent movement, a fundamental adaptation towards amoeboid movement is able to sustain non-proteolytic migration in these tumour cells (the mesenchymal-amoeboid transition). Instead of using proteases for matrix degradation, the tumour cells use leucoyte-like strategies of shape change and squeezing through matrix gaps along tissue scaffolds. The diversity of protease function in cell migration by different cell types highlights response diversity and molecular adaptation of

  18. JPRS Report, Proliferation Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-27

    JPRS-TND-92-016 27 MAY 1992 JPRS Repor Proliferation Issues ÄBpxovea tcz pursue ieiaaM| Ipfe. fötmbuasa OsüoaÜBd .^L ■ — —— au »** 19980112...6 MOROCCO Berrada on Proposed Nuclear Power Plant [ MAROC SOIR 22 Apr] 6 JPRS-TND-92-016 27 May 1992 2 CENTRAL EURASIA Proposals on...three days of talks here on normalizing relations with Japan, which were largely stalemated over Tokyo’s demand for Pyongyang’s assurance that it did

  19. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour arising incidentally as a polypoid lesion in the gallbladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Filipe C. Abrantes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that usually originates from abdominal soft tissues. A female patient aged 50 years presented with a 1.2 cm gallbladder polyp. The microscopic study showed spindle cell proliferation in an edematous background rich in lymphocytes and plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry showed positivity for vimentin, smooth muscle actin, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK, and negativity for other markers. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH revealed ALK gene rearrangement. The diagnosis was IMT of the gallbladder, a unique case considering that it was identified at the early stage of development of these neoplasms.

  20. Ovarian hilus-cell tumour: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, T N; Valkov, I M; Dokumov, S I

    1980-01-01

    A case of hilus-cell tumour of the ovary, associated with polycystic ovarian disease is reported. The authors discuss the data from hormonal investigations, the morphological picture and the genesis of the tumour.

  1. Sexual function in patients with metastatic midgut carcinoid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horst-Schrivers, Anouk N. A.; van Ieperen, Ellen; Wymenga, A. N. Machteld; Boezen, H. Marike; Weijmar-Schultz, Willibrord C. M.; Kema, Ido P.; Meijer, Wim G.; de Herder, Wouter W.; Willemse, Pax H. B.; Links, Thera P.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Sexual dysfunction is a poorly studied aspect of quality of life in patients with midgut carcinoid tumours. We investigated whether carcinoid patients experience sexual problems. Methods: Patients with metastatic midgut carcinoid tumours filled in a validated questionnaire for sexual

  2. Laryngeal tumours: clinical features and management challenges as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laryngeal tumours: clinical features and management challenges as seen in two centres in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. ... The commonest mode of presentation was hoarseness (100%). Twenty ... Keywords: Challenges, Management, Laryngeal tumours, Squamous cell carcinoma, Papillomas, Total laryngectomy, Port Harcourt ...

  3. A G-quadruplex-binding compound showing anti-tumour activity in an in vivo model for pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnmacht, Stephan A; Marchetti, Chiara; Gunaratnam, Mekala; Besser, Rachael J; Haider, Shozeb M; Di Vita, Gloria; Lowe, Helen L; Mellinas-Gomez, Maria; Diocou, Seckou; Robson, Mathew; Šponer, Jiri; Islam, Barira; Barbara Pedley, R; Hartley, John A; Neidle, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We report here that a tetra-substituted naphthalene-diimide derivative (MM41) has significant in vivo anti-tumour activity against the MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer xenograft model. IV administration with a twice-weekly 15 mg/kg dose produces ca 80% tumour growth decrease in a group of tumour-bearing animals. Two animals survived tumour-free after 279 days. High levels of MM41 are rapidly transported into cell nuclei and were found to accumulate in the tumour. MM41 is a quadruplex-interactive compound which binds strongly to the quadruplexes encoded in the promoter sequences of the BCL-2 and k-RAS genes, both of which are dis-regulated in many human pancreatic cancers. Levels of BCL-2 were reduced by ca 40% in tumours from MM41-treated animals relative to controls, consistent with BCL-2 being a target for MM41. Molecular modelling suggests that MM41 binds to a BCL-2 quadruplex in a manner resembling that previously observed in co-crystal structures with human telomeric quadruplexes. This supports the concept that MM41 (and by implication other quadruplex-targeting small molecules) can bind to quadruplex-forming promoter regions in a number of genes and down-regulate their transcription. We suggest that quadruplexes within those master genes that are up-regulated drivers for particular cancers, may be selective targets for compounds such as MM41. PMID:26077929

  4. Optimizing radiotherapy protocols using computer automata to model tumour cell death as a function of oxygen diffusion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Potiron, Vincent; Delpon, Grégory; Supiot, Stéphane; Chiavassa, Sophie; Paris, François; Costes, Sylvain V

    2017-05-23

    The concept of hypofractionation is gaining momentum in radiation oncology centres, enabled by recent advances in radiotherapy apparatus. The gain of efficacy of this innovative treatment must be defined. We present a computer model based on translational murine data for in silico testing and optimization of various radiotherapy protocols with respect to tumour resistance and the microenvironment heterogeneity. This model combines automata approaches with image processing algorithms to simulate the cellular response of tumours exposed to ionizing radiation, modelling the alteration of oxygen permeabilization in blood vessels against repeated doses, and introducing mitotic catastrophe (as opposed to arbitrary delayed cell-death) as a means of modelling radiation-induced cell death. Published data describing cell death in vitro as well as tumour oxygenation in vivo are used to inform parameters. Our model is validated by comparing simulations to in vivo data obtained from the radiation treatment of mice transplanted with human prostate tumours. We then predict the efficacy of untested hypofractionation protocols, hypothesizing that tumour control can be optimized by adjusting daily radiation dosage as a function of the degree of hypoxia in the tumour environment. Further biological refinement of this tool will permit the rapid development of more sophisticated strategies for radiotherapy.

  5. The effect of spiritual healing on in vitro tumour cell proliferation and viability - an experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, R.; Hojgaard, L.; Zachariae, C.

    2005-01-01

    of cells to five different doses of healing or control. Researchers conducting the assays and statistical analyses were blinded to the experimental conditions. Main outcome measures were MTT viability, 3H-thymidine incorporation and counts of an adherent human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7...... three experimental days, doses, assays, and cells, 34 (51.6%) of 66 independent comparisons showed differences in the hypothesised direction (P = 0.90). The average effect size across cell lines, days, assays, and doses approached zero (Cohen's d = -0.01). The results do not support previous reports...

  6. Anticancer activity of cationic porphyrins in melanoma tumour-bearing mice and mechanistic in vitro studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Porphyrin TMPyP4 (P4) and its C14H28-alkyl derivative (C14) are G-quadruplex binders and singlet oxygen (1O2) generators. In contrast, TMPyP2 (P2) produces 1O2 but it is not a G-quadruplex binder. As their photosensitizing activity is currently undefined, we report in this study their efficacy against a melanoma skin tumour and describe an in vitro mechanistic study which gives insights into their anticancer activity. Methods Uptake and antiproliferative activity of photoactivated P2, P4 and C14 have been investigated in murine melanoma B78-H1 cells by FACS, clonogenic and migration assays. Apoptosis was investigated by PARP-1 cleavage and annexin-propidium iodide assays. Biodistribution and in vivo anticancer activity were tested in melanoma tumour-bearing mice. Porphyrin binding and photocleavage of G-rich mRNA regions were investigated by electrophoresis and RT-PCR. Porphyrin effect on ERK pathway was explored by Western blots. Results Thanks to its higher lipophylicity C14 was taken up by murine melanoma B78-H1 cells up to 30-fold more efficiently than P4. When photoactivated (7.2 J/cm2) in B78-H1 melanoma cells, P4 and C14, but not control P2, caused a strong inhibition of metabolic activity, clonogenic growth and cell migration. Biodistribution studies on melanoma tumour-bearing mice showed that P4 and C14 localize in the tumour. Upon irradiation (660 nm, 193 J/cm2), P4 and C14 retarded tumour growth and increased the median survival time of the treated mice by ~50% (P porphyrin P2 did not. The light-dependent mechanism mediated by P4 and C14 is likely due to the binding to and photocleavage of G-rich quadruplex-forming sequences within the 5′-untranslated regions of the mitogenic ras genes. This causes a decrease of RAS protein and inhibition of downstream ERK pathway, which stimulates proliferation. Annexin V/propidium iodide and PARP-1 cleavage assays showed that the porphyrins arrested tumour growth by apoptosis and necrosis. C14 also

  7. Challenges in diagnosis and management of giant solitary fibrous tumour of pleura: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jessica H Y; Hsu, Anne A L

    2016-08-08

    Majority of patients with solitary fibrous tumours of the pleura (SFTP) are asymptomatic. Acute presentation with symptoms resulting from mass effect due to rapid expansion of tumour size has not been reported before. This report chronicles the case of a giant SFTP in a 76-year-old lady who presented with acute onset of haemoptysis, left-sided pleuritic chest pain and hoarseness of voice. Her chest radiograph showed a large left upper hemithorax mass with an ipsilateral effusion. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the thorax confirmed the presence of a pleural-based mass lesion in the left apex measuring 9.7 cm with close apposition to the aortic arch. The mass demonstrated neovascularization and there was also presence of a moderate-sized heterogeneous-appearing left pleural effusion. Thoracocentesis yielded deeply haemoserous pleural fluid with a pleural aspirate hematocrit closely approaching that of peripheral blood hematocrit and alongside a 2 unit decrease in haemoglobin, was indicative of a haemothorax. Repeat CT 10 days from initial presentation showed reduction in size of the left apical mass as well as resolution of the left effusion. This was consistent with the occurrence of an intra-tumoural bleed resulting in rapid increase in the size of the SFTP, causing rupture of superficial blood vessels on the tumour surface (haemothorax) and consequential compression of the lung parenchyma (haemoptysis) and left recurrent laryngeal nerve (hoarseness of voice). The patient eventually underwent an uneventful surgical resection. A benign SFTP can present acutely with compressive symptoms as a result of spontaneous intra-tumoural bleed causing sudden increase in its size. It is important to allow temporal regression of these acute changes before deciding on surgical resectability.

  8. Platinum compounds with anti-tumour activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plooy, A.C.M.; Lohman, P.H.M.

    1980-01-01

    Ten platinum (Pt) coordination complexes with different ligands, comprising both Pt(II) and Pt(IV) complexes of which the cis-compounds all possessed at least some anti-tumour activity and the trans-compounds were inactive, were tested as to their effect on cell survival and the induction and repair

  9. Spermatogenesis and testicular tumours in ageing dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, M. A.; de rooij, D. G.; Teerds, K. J.; van de Gaag, I.; van Sluijs, F. J.

    2001-01-01

    The aims of this investigation were to quantify the changes in canine spermatogenesis that occur during ageing and to study the prevalence of testicular tumours and their effects on spermatogenesis in dogs. Testes from 74 dogs of various breeds without clinically detected testicular disease and from

  10. Granular cell tumour of the urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph von Klot

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available With only 16 cases reported in the literature, the mostly benign granular cell tumour of the urinary bladder is exceptionally rare. We present the case of a 68-year old patient with one of these lesions demonstrating our histological findings including several immunohistochemical stainings used to differentiate between other more common entities.

  11. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy (progonoma) treated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The two infants both presented within three months of each other and though clinically Burkitt's lymphoma was stated as a possible diagnosis, the correct diagnosis was made on biopsy specimens. Radical surgery consisting of wide resection of the tumour with margins of healthy tissue via hemi-maxillectomy was performed ...

  12. Unique Juxtaposition of Onchocerca Nodule and Tumoural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 45-year-old Igbo man presented with a subcutaneous nodule in the lateral aspect of his left thigh. Following its excision, the lesion turned out on microscopy to be due to the unique juxtaposition of onchocerca nodule and tumoural calcinosis. Such selectivity in disease localization is deemed to be worthy of documentation ...

  13. Maxillary brown tumour: unusual presentation of parathyroid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a report of a maxillary brown tumour caused by primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) secondary to parathyroid carcinoma. A 62-year-old man presented with a large swelling in the right maxilla, which caused right-sided nasal obstruction, intermittent bleeding and diplopia. A computed tomography scan demonstrated ...

  14. POSTERIOR CRANIAL FOSSA TUMOURS IN CHILDREN AT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-05-05

    May 5, 2004 ... symptoms were the most common mode of presentation (30%) followed by headaches and vomiting. Twenty percent of our patients ... paediatric posterior fossa tumours are medulloblastoma. (20%) astrocytoma (15%) ... cranial nerve palsies, headaches, vomiting and blindness due to raised intracranial ...

  15. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour presenting as gastroduodenal intussusception.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilson, Mark H

    2012-08-01

    Gastroduodenal intussusception secondary to gastrointestinal stromal tumour is a very rare cause for intestinal obstruction. The diagnosis of this condition can be challenging, as symptoms are often non-specific and intermittent. This article reports a case where the diagnosis was made preoperatively with abdominal imaging and was treated by a combination of endoscopic reduction and laparoscopic resection.

  16. The role of methylation in urological tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, A.G. van der

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in DNA methylation have been described in human cancer for more than thirty years now. Since the last decade DNA methylation gets more and more important in cancer research. In this review the different alterations of DNA methylation are discussed in testicular germ cell tumours,

  17. Cystic lesions accompanying extra-axial tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohle, PNM; Wurzer, HAL; Seelen, PJ; Kingma, LM; Go, KG

    We examined the mechanism of cyst formation in extra-axial tumours in the central nervous system (CNS). Cyst fluid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood plasma were analysed in eight patients with nine peritumoral cysts: four with meningiomas, two with intracranial and two spinal intradural

  18. The feasibility of a brain tumour website

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil, K; Jakobsen, J; Juhler, M

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with a high-grade glioma (HGG) and their caregivers have imminent and changing informational and supportive care needs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of a Danish brain tumour website (BTW) in patients with HGG and their caregivers. We...

  19. Imaging biomarkers in primary brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopci, Egesta; Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Franzese, Ciro; Navarria, Pierina; Scorsetti, Marta [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Radiosurgery and Radiotherapy, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Grimaldi, Marco [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Radiology, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Zucali, Paolo Andrea; Simonelli, Matteo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Medical Oncology, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Bello, Lorenzo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Neurosurgery, Rozzano, MI (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    We are getting used to referring to instrumentally detectable biological features in medical language as ''imaging biomarkers''. These two terms combined reflect the evolution of medical imaging during recent decades, and conceptually comprise the principle of noninvasive detection of internal processes that can become targets for supplementary therapeutic strategies. These targets in oncology include those biological pathways that are associated with several tumour features including independence from growth and growth-inhibitory signals, avoidance of apoptosis and immune system control, unlimited potential for replication, self-sufficiency in vascular supply and neoangiogenesis, acquired tissue invasiveness and metastatic diffusion. Concerning brain tumours, there have been major improvements in neurosurgical techniques and radiotherapy planning, and developments of novel target drugs, thus increasing the need for reproducible, noninvasive, quantitative imaging biomarkers. However, in this context, conventional radiological criteria may be inappropriate to determine the best therapeutic option and subsequently to assess response to therapy. Integration of molecular imaging for the evaluation of brain tumours has for this reason become necessary, and an important role in this setting is played by imaging biomarkers in PET and MRI. In the current review, we describe most relevant techniques and biomarkers used for imaging primary brain tumours in clinical practice, and discuss potential future developments from the experimental context. (orig.)

  20. Minor salivary gland tumours in Kaduna, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were 6 metastatic lesions (5 loco—regiona1 and l pulmonary). Duration of symptoms ranged from 2 weeks to 192 months (mean. 22.3 months). Treatment protocol (Table. 2) for malignant tumours was surgery. (n=l9), radiotherapy (n=l l), chemotherapy. 102 andiradiotherapy (nil). Suprahyoid neck dissection was undertaken ...

  1. Tumour and tumour-like lesions of the patella - a multicentre experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, J.; James, S.L.; Davies, A.M. [The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Kroon, H.M. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, C-2-S, P. O Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Woertler, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Anderson, S.E. [Knochentumor- Referenzzentrum der Schweizerischen Gesellschaft fuer Pathologie, Basel (Switzerland)

    2009-03-15

    Fifty-nine cases of lesions presenting in the patella were identified after review of the databases of four European bone tumour registries. Of the 59 cases, 46% were non neoplastic, 39% were benign and 15% were malignant. The commonest benign neoplasm was giant cell tumour (GCT) (11 cases). Younger patients were more likely to have a benign neoplasm. Lesions in patients less than 40 years of age included giant cell tumour, chondroblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC), osteomyelitis, osteoid osteoma and solitary bone cyst. In patients older than 40 years, the following were common lesions: intra-osseous gout, metastasis and intra-osseous ganglion. Expansion of the patella with thinning of cortex was seen more commonly in GCT and brown tumour in hyperparathyroidism. There was associated soft tissue extension in gout and malignant lesions. (orig.)

  2. Primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the kidney with vena caval and atrial tumour thrombus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Poh Ho; Manikandan, Ramaswamy; Philip, Joe; Hope, Kirsten; Williamson, Michael

    2008-08-11

    Renal primitive neuroectodermal tumour is an extremely rare malignancy. A 21-year-old woman presented with microscopic haematuria, a palpable right loin mass, dyspnoea, dizziness and fatigue. Initial ultrasound scan of the kidneys revealed an 11 cm right renal mass with venous extension into the inferior vena cava. Computed tomography of the thorax and abdomen revealed an extension of the large renal mass into the right renal vein, inferior vena cava and up to the right atrium. A small paracaval lymph node was noted and three small metastatic nodules were identified within the lung parenchyma. The patient underwent a radical nephrectomy and inferior vena caval tumour (level IV) thrombectomy with cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Immunohistochemical staining of the specimen showed a highly specific cluster of differentiation (CD) 99, thus confirming the diagnosis of a primitive neuroectodermal tumour. It is important that a renal primitive neuroectodermal tumour be considered, particularly in young patients with a renal mass and extensive thrombus.

  3. Density-dependent quiescence in glioma invasion: instability in a simple reaction–diffusion model for the migration/proliferation dichotomy

    KAUST Repository

    Pham, Kara

    2012-01-01

    Gliomas are very aggressive brain tumours, in which tumour cells gain the ability to penetrate the surrounding normal tissue. The invasion mechanisms of this type of tumour remain to be elucidated. Our work is motivated by the migration/proliferation dichotomy (go-or-grow) hypothesis, i.e. the antagonistic migratory and proliferating cellular behaviours in a cell population, which may play a central role in these tumours. In this paper, we formulate a simple go-or-grow model to investigate the dynamics of a population of glioma cells for which the switch from a migratory to a proliferating phenotype (and vice versa) depends on the local cell density. The model consists of two reaction-diffusion equations describing cell migration, proliferation and a phenotypic switch. We use a combination of numerical and analytical techniques to characterize the development of spatio-temporal instabilities and travelling wave solutions generated by our model. We demonstrate that the density-dependent go-or-grow mechanism can produce complex dynamics similar to those associated with tumour heterogeneity and invasion.

  4. A Mathematical Model Quantifies Proliferation and Motility Effects of TGF-β on Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shizhen Emily Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor (TGF-β is known to have properties of both a tumour suppressor and a tumour promoter. While it inhibits cell proliferation, it also increases cell motility and decreases cell–cell adhesion. Coupling mathematical modelling and experiments, we investigate the growth and motility of oncogene-expressing human mammary epithelial cells under exposure to TGF-β. We use a version of the well-known Fisher–Kolmogorov equation, and prescribe a procedure for its parametrisation. We quantify the simultaneous effects of TGF-β to increase the tendency of individual cells and cell clusters to move randomly and to decrease overall population growth. We demonstrate that in experiments with TGF-β treated cells in vitro, TGF-β increases cell motility by a factor of 2 and decreases cell proliferation by a factor of 1/2 in comparison with untreated cells.

  5. Effect of coffee drinking on cell proliferation in rat urinary bladder epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lina, B A; Rutten, A A; Woutersen, R A

    1993-12-01

    A possible effect of freshly brewed drip coffee on urinary bladder carcinogenesis was investigated in male Wistar rats using cell proliferation in urinary bladder epithelium as the indicator of tumour promotion. Male rats were given either undiluted coffee brew (100% coffee), coffee diluted 10 times (10% coffee) or tap water (controls), as their only source of drinking fluid for 2 or 6 wk. Uracil, known to induce cell proliferation in urinary bladder epithelium, was included in the study as a positive control. In rats receiving 100% coffee, body weights, liquid intake and urinary volume were decreased. Neither histopathological examination of urinary bladder tissue nor the bromodeoxyuridine labelling index revealed biologically significant differences between rats receiving coffee and the tap water controls. Uracil increased the labelling index and induced hyperplasia of the urinary bladder epithelium, as expected. It was concluded that these results produced no evidence that drinking coffee predisposes to tumour development in the urinary bladder.

  6. Fas Ligand Expression in Lynch Syndrome-Associated Colorectal Tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, Jan J.; de Jong, Steven; Boersma-van Eck, Wietske; Zwart, Nynke; Hollema, Harry; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.

    Fas Ligand (FasL) expression by cancer cells may contribute to tumour immune escape via the Fas counterattack against tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). Whether this plays a role in colorectal carcinogenesis in Lynch syndrome was examined studying FasL expression, tumour cell apoptosis and

  7. Odontogenic tumours in Children and Adilescents: A Review od ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ameloblastoma was the commonest odontogenic tumours with 14 (29.1%) solid ameloblastoma and 9 (18.8%) cystic ameloblastoma cases followed by fibromyxoma with 8 (16.7%) cases. calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour , calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour and odontogenic fibroma were occasionally seen.

  8. GRANULAR CELL TUMOUR OF THE LARYNX – A CASE REPORT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-01

    Dec 1, 2015 ... neuroectodermal origin as demonstrated by immunophenotypic and ultrastructural evidence.1. These tumours occur commonly in the tongue though they can occur in any part of the body. Granular cell tumours (GCTs) may be benign or malignant though the latter versions are rare (2% of all such tumours).

  9. Clinico-pathological analysis of malignant salivary gland tumours in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND Salivary gland tumours are common head and neck tumours. Malignant salivary gland tumours generally occur less frequently than benign ones and account for greater morbidity and mortality. Patients in our environment are seen to present at late stages and Mucoepidermoid carcinoma is the commonest ...

  10. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour-case series from five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour (CEOT) also known as Pindborg's tumour is a relatively rare odontogenic neoplasm of epithelial derivation that constitutes about 0.4-3% of all intraosseous odontogenic tumours. Objectives: To document all cases of CEOT encountered in five tertiary centres in Nigeria ...

  11. Multicentre study of Wilm's tumours treated by different therapeutic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both National Wilm's Tumour Study (NWTS) group and the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) have helped to improve the clinical management and outcome of patients with Wilm's tumours. In this study, we compared three groups of patients with Wilm's tumours from different racial backgrounds and ...

  12. tumours and cancers in graeco-roman times 1. introduction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    benign (in modern terms), whilst oidêmata were soft, painless tumours and even includ- .... Oidêma.6 A soft, usually non-tender tumour, sometimes pitting on ..... Tumours and cancers in Graeco-Roman times. 1923. Prognostic. Regimen in acute diseases. The sacred disease. The art. Breaths. Law. Decorum. Physician.

  13. Carcinoid heart disease secondary to ovarian tumour: a logical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-13

    Mar 13, 2013 ... Carcinoid heart disease secondary to ovarian tumours is uncommon. The ovarian carcinoids do not have metastasis in the liver unlike gastrointestinal tumours. Hence the management priorities need to be different. We present a case in which removal of the primary tumour before heart surgery resulted in a ...

  14. Mesenchymal tumours of the mediastinum—part II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. den Bakker (Michael); A. Marx (Alexander); K. Mukai (Kiyoshi); P. Ströbel (Philipp)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThis is the second part of a two-part review on soft tissue tumours which may be encountered in the mediastinum. This review is based on the 2013 WHO classification of soft tissue tumours and the 2015 WHO classification of tumours of the lung, pleura, thymus and heart and provides an

  15. Central nervous system tumours in children in Ibadan, Nigeria: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CNS) tumours are uncommon in black children, these neoplasms are the fourth most common paediatric tumours in Ibadan. Our centre is the major referral centre for CNS tumours in Nigeria. The last major study of paediatric CNS neoplasms from ...

  16. Tumour suppressor genes in sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Ganesan, Trivadi S

    2002-01-01

    of the evolution of tumour progression. A major focus of research has been to identify tumour suppressor genes implicated in sporadic ovarian cancer over the past decade. Several tumour suppressor genes have been identified by strategies such as positional cloning and differential expression display. Further...

  17. Neonatal testicular tumour presenting as an acute scrotum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ann Pediatr Surg 8:19–21 c. 2012 Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Annals of Pediatric Surgery 2012, 8:19–21. Keywords: acute scrotum, granulosa cell tumour, neonatal, testicular tumour .... that trisomy 12 may be widespread (75%) in paediatric granulosa stromal cell tumours and can be identified by fluorescence in-situ ...

  18. Management of Giant Cell Tumour: A Nigerian Experience | Eyesan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant cell tumours (GCT) are the commonest bone tumours worldwide. It is rarely malignant but when it does it progresses to fibrosarcoma with high mortality. Otherwise it causes poor cosmesis, disability and pathological fractures. A total of 19 cases of histologically established Giant cell tumour of the bone were reviewed ...

  19. Regional tumour glutamine supply affects chromatin and cell identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højfeldt, Jonas W; Helin, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Limited perfusion of solid tumours produces a nutrient-deprived tumour core microenvironment. Low glutamine levels in the tumour core are now shown to lead to reduced levels of α-ketoglutarate and decreased histone demethylase activity, thereby promoting a less differentiated and more therapy...

  20. Largest recorded non-invasive true intrathoracic desmoid tumour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intrathoracic desmoid tumours are rare soft-tissue neoplasms arising from fascial or musculo-aponeurotic structures, accounting for less than 0.03% of all neoplasms. Most cases in fact represent intrathoracic extension of chest wall tumours. This case report describes the largest recorded true intrathoracic desmoid tumour ...

  1. Urological Tumours in Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a hospital based retrospective histopathological study of urological tumours in 10 years. Specimens consisted of all surgical excisions, trucut and fine needle biopsies of kidney, prostate, urinary bladder, testis and penis. Urological tumours accounted for 11.45% of all malignant tumours during the period of study.

  2. Spinal cord compression due to tumours at Kenyatta Nationa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The commonest spinal cord tumour was meningioma (23.7%) followed by neurofibroma (15.8%). Most of the patients (70%) did not show any clinical improvement after surgery. Conclusion: Spinal cord tumours accounted for about 15% of all CNS tumours treated at the Kenyatta National Hospital. Most of the patients had ...

  3. Primary Central Nervous System Tumours in Children and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary CNS tumours are the commonest childhood solid tumours in most developed countries, accounting for 25-30% of cases. In our environment they occur less frequently. These tumours are nonetheless the cause of significant morbidity and mortality in the paediatric age group worldwide. However paediatric CNS ...

  4. Hypophosphataemia-inducing mesenchymal tumour in the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christa; Brücker, Rolf; Bützberger, Stefan; Schmid, Christoph

    2010-10-06

    Tumour-induced (or oncogenic) osteomalacia is a paraneoplastic syndrome characterised by progressive fatigue, muscle weakness, bone pain, non-healing and recurrent fractures caused by mesenchymal tumours that secrete proteins that inhibit renal phosphate transport and 1α-hydroxylation of 25-OH-vitamin D. The potentially curative treatment of choice is complete surgical excision of the tumour.

  5. Orbito-Ocular Tumours In Nigerian Children | Onwasigwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This study has brought to light the many aspect of orbito-ocular tumours in Nigerian children and also highlighted the many problems caused by inadequate facilities for diagnosis and management. Key words: Orbito-ocular tumours, children, retinoblastoma, tumour sites. [Jnl College of Medicine Vol.7(2) 2002: ...

  6. Malignant tumours of childhood in Zaria | Samaila | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fi ve commonest tumours over-all were rhabdomyosarcoma, Burkitt lymphoma, retinoblastoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and nephroblastoma. Germ cell tumours affected the ovary predominantly and two of the endodermal sinus tumour cases were seen in the testis of an eighteen month child and sacrococcygeum of a ...

  7. A Retroperitoneal Extra-Renal Wilms' Tumour: A Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-03-06

    Mar 6, 2017 ... Abdominal ultrasound and CT scans revealed an extra-renal mass. Intravenous urogram (IVU) showed prompt excretion bilaterally. Post excision histology of the tumour confirmed a Wilms' tumour. A Retroperitoneal Extra-Renal Wilms' Tumour: A Case Report. Address for correspondence: Dr. Samuel ...

  8. Congenital granula cell tumour: report of a case | Olojede | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital granular cell tumour of the newborn is an uncommon benign tumour of uncertain origin. Mostly, it occurs as a single tumour but rarely as multiple. The lesion arises from the mucosa of the gingiva either from maxillary or mandibular alveolar ridge. This paper reports a three-day old female patient who presented at ...

  9. An Approach to Breast Cancer Immunotherapy: The Apoptotic Activity of Recombinant Anti-Interleukin-6 Monoclonal Antibodies in Intact Tumour Microenvironment of Breast Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Shousha, S; Moaaz, M; Sheta, M; Motawea, M A

    2016-06-01

    Current work is one of our comprehensive preclinical studies, a new approach to breast cancer (BC) immunotherapy through induction of tumour cell apoptosis. Tumour growth is not just a result of uncontrolled cell proliferation but also of reduced apoptosis. High levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) are associated with metastatic BC and correlated with poor survival as it promotes growth of tumour-initiating cells during early tumorigenesis protecting these cells from apoptosis. Therefore, this study aims at investigating the potential of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies to suppress IL-6 proliferative/anti-apoptotic activities in intact tumour microenvironment of BC. Fresh sterile tumour and normal breast tissue specimens were taken from 50 female Egyptian patients with BC undergoing radical mastectomy. A unique tissue culture system designed to provide cells of each intact tumour/normal tissue sample with its proper microenvironment either supplemented or not with anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies. To evaluate the apoptotic activity of anti-IL-6 as a novel candidate for BC treatment strategy, we compared its effects with those obtained using tumour necrosis-related apoptosis-inducing ligand TRAIL as an established apoptotic agent. Our results revealed that levels of either anti-IL-6- or TRAIL-induced apoptosis in the tumour or normal tissue cultures were significantly higher than those in their corresponding untreated ones (P < 0.001). No statistically significant differences have been found between apoptosis levels induced by anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies and those induced by TRAIL. Recombinant anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies could represent a novel effective element of immunotherapeutic treatment strategy for BC. The selectivity and anti-apoptotic potential of anti-IL-6 is highly hopeful in IL-6- abundant BC tumour microenvironment. © 2016 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  10. Orbital tumours and tumour-like lesions: exploring the armamentarium of multiparametric imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Bela S; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Ailianou, Angeliki; Merlini, Laura; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; Delattre, Bénédicte M; Rager, Olivier; Burkhardt, Karim; Becker, Minerva

    2016-02-01

    Although the orbit is a small anatomical space, the wide range of structures present within it are often the site of origin of various tumours and tumour-like conditions, both in adults and children. Cross-sectional imaging is mandatory for the detection, characterization, and mapping of these lesions. This review focuses on multiparametric imaging of orbital tumours. Each tumour is reviewed in relation to its clinical presentation, compartmental location, imaging characteristics, and its histological features. We herein describe orbital tumours as lesions of the globe (retinoblastoma, uveal melanoma), optic nerve sheath complex (meningioma, optic nerve glioma), conal-intraconal compartment (hemangioma), extraconal compartment (dermoid/epidermoid, lacrimal gland tumours, lymphoma, rhabdomysarcoma), and bone and sinus compartment (fibrous dysplasia). Lesions without any typical compartmental localization and those with multi-compartment involvement (veno-lymphatic malformation, plexiform neurofibroma, idiopathic orbital pseudotumour, IgG4 related disease, metastases) are also reviewed. We discuss the role of advanced imaging techniques, such as MR diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography CT (FDG-PET CT), and positron emission tomography MRI (MRI PET) as problem-solving tools in the evaluation of those orbital masses that present with non-specific morphologic imaging findings. Main messages/Teaching points • A compartment-based approach is essential for the diagnosis of orbital tumours. • CT and MRI play a key role in the work-up of orbital tumours. • DWI, PET CT, and MRI PET are complementary tools to solve diagnostic dilemmas. • Awareness of salient imaging pearls and diagnostic pitfalls avoids interpretation errors.

  11. Fractionated Radiotherapy with 3 x 8 Gy Induces Systemic Anti-Tumour Responses and Abscopal Tumour Inhibition without Modulating the Humoral Anti-Tumour Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H P M Habets

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence indicates that fractionated radiotherapy (RT can result in distant non-irradiated (abscopal tumour regression. Although preclinical studies indicate the importance of T cells in this infrequent phenomenon, these studies do not preclude that other immune mechanisms exhibit an addition role in the abscopal effect. We therefore addressed the question whether in addition to T cell mediated responses also humoral anti-tumour responses are modulated after fractionated RT and whether systemic dendritic cell (DC stimulation can enhance tumour-specific antibody production. We selected the 67NR mammary carcinoma model since this tumour showed spontaneous antibody production in all tumour-bearing mice. Fractionated RT to the primary tumour was associated with a survival benefit and a delayed growth of a non-irradiated (contralateral secondary tumour. Notably, fractionated RT did not affect anti-tumour antibody titers and the composition of the immunoglobulin (Ig isotypes. Likewise, we demonstrated that treatment of tumour-bearing Balb/C mice with DC stimulating growth factor Flt3-L did neither modulate the magnitude nor the composition of the humoral immune response. Finally, we evaluated the immune infiltrate and Ig isotype content of the tumour tissue using flow cytometry and found no differences between treatment groups that were indicative for local antibody production. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the 67NR mammary carcinoma in Balb/C mice is associated with a pre-existing antibody response. And, we show that in tumour-bearing Balb/C mice with abscopal tumour regression such pre-existing antibody responses are not altered upon fractionated RT and/or DC stimulation with Flt3-L. Our research indicates that evaluating the humoral immune response in the setting of abscopal tumour regression is not invariably associated with therapeutic effects.

  12. Distinct overlapping sequences at the carboxy-terminus of merlin regulate its tumour suppressor and morphogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulajainen, Minja; Melikova, Maria; Muranen, Taru; Carpén, Olli; Grönholm, Mikaela

    2012-09-01

    The Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) gene product merlin is a tumour suppressor, which in addition to inhibiting cell proliferation regulates cell morphology. The morphogenic properties of merlin may play a role in tumour suppression, as patient-derived tumour cells demonstrate cytoskeletal abnormalities. However, it is still unclear how these functions are linked. The N-terminal FERM-domain of merlin is highly homologous to the oncogenic protein ezrin, while the C-termini are less conserved, suggesting that the opposite effect of the proteins on proliferation could be mediated by their distinct C-terminal regions. In this study we characterize the role of the most C-terminal residues of merlin in the regulation of proliferation, cytoskeletal organization, phosphorylation and intramolecular associations. In addition to the two full-length merlin isoforms and truncating mutations found in patients, we focused on the evolutionally conserved C-terminal residues 545-547, also harbouring disease-causing mutations. We demonstrate that merlin induces cell extensions, which result from impaired retraction of protrusions rather than from increased formation of filopodia. The residues 538-568 were found particularly important for this morphogenic activity. The results further show that both merlin isoforms are able to equally inhibit proliferation, whereas C-terminal mutants affecting residues 545-547 are less effective in growth suppression. This study demonstrates that the C-terminus contains distinct but overlapping functional domains important for regulation of the morphogenic activity, intramolecular associations and cell proliferation. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2012 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Infective complications following tumour endoprosthesis surgery for bone and soft tissue tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, T; May, D; Buising, K; Thursky, K; Slavin, M; Choong, P

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to describe the incidence of infective complications, including tumour endoprosthesis infection, in a cohort of patients undergoing tumour endoprosthesis surgery in Victoria, Australia. This retrospective cohort study was performed over 15 years (January 1996-December 2010). 121 patients underwent tumour endoprosthesis surgery during the study period. Patients were followed for a median of 34 months (interquartile range [IQR] 17, 80). Overall, 34 patients (28%) experienced infective complications including: bacteraemia in 19 patients (16%) and tumour endoprosthesis infection in 17 (14%). The majority of patients with early and late acute infections (haematogenous) were managed with debridement and retention of the prosthesis in addition to biofilm-active antibiotics. Late chronic infections were predominantly managed by exchange of the prosthesis. The overall success rate of treatment was 71%. The success rate for debridement and retention was 75% compared with 67% for exchange procedures. There is a significant rate of infective complications following tumour endoprosthesis surgery including 14% of patients experiencing infection involving the tumour endoprosthesis. This study is the first to report on outcomes from debridement and retention of the prosthesis; which had comparable success rates to other treatment modalities. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Proliferation: myth or reality?; La proliferation: mythe ou realite?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This article analyzes the proliferation approach, its technical condition and political motivation, and the share between the myth (political deception, assumptions and extrapolations) and the reality of proliferation. Its appreciation is complicated by the irrational behaviour of some political actors and by the significant loss of the non-use taboo. The control of technologies is an important element for proliferation slowing down but an efficient and autonomous intelligence system remains indispensable. (J.S.)

  15. Metallothionein immunoexpression in non-syndromic and syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johann, Aline-Cristina-Batista-Rodrigues; Caldeira, Patrícia-Carlos; Caliari, Marcelo-Vidigal; Gomez, Ricardo-Santiago; Aguiar, Maria-Cássia-Ferreira; Mesquita, Ricardo-Alves

    2015-07-01

    To compare the metallothionein (MT) immunoexpression in non-syndromic and syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KOT), to correlate MT with cellular proliferation, and to evaluate the influence of inflammation in MT. Fourteen cases of KOT were submitted to immunohistochemistry for MT and Ki-67 analysis. The lesions were grouped according to their grade of inflammation, and statistical analysis was performed. MT was higher in non-syndromic KOT than in syndromic KOT (p<0.05). No statistical difference in Ki-67 could be identified; however, an inverse correlation was observed between MT and Ki-67 in both lesions. When analysing inflammation, non-syndromic KOT showed no differences in either MT or Ki-67. The MT immunophenotype of syndromic KOT was different from non-syndromic KOT. MT might not be involved in the proliferation control of both KOT. MT and Ki-67 immunoexpressions proved to be unaffected by inflammation in non-syndromic KOT.

  16. Bilateral diffuse uveal melanocytic proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemp, Kristian; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Heegaard, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    cataract formation and uveal melanocytic tumours. The awareness and documentation of BDUMP has increased during the past decade, and the increasing amount of data collected demonstrates the effect of treatment with plasmapheresis and the value of diagnostic tools in BDUMP such as genetic and immunologic...... investigations. The literature of BDUMP has not been reviewed since 2003, and there is a growing need for an updated review on diagnosis and management of BDUMP. We review the literature and report a case of BDUMP with a white ciliary body tumour, iris rubeosis, increased iris pigmentation and cataract....

  17. Childhood tumours with a high probability of being part of a tumour predisposition syndrome; reason for referral for genetic consultation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Floor A M; Hopman, Saskia M J; Aalfs, Cora M; Berger, Lieke P V; Bleeker, Fonnet E; Dommering, Charlotte J; Jongmans, Marjolijn C J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314344349; Letteboer, Tom G W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815837; Olderode-Berends, Maran J W; Wagner, Anja; Hennekam, Raoul C; Merks, Johannes H M

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Recognising a tumour predisposition syndrome (TPS) in childhood cancer patients is of major clinical relevance. The presence of a TPS may be suggested by the type of tumour in the child. We present an overview of 23 childhood tumours that in themselves should be a reason to refer a

  18. Childhood tumours with a high probability of being part of a tumour predisposition syndrome; reason for referral for genetic consultation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Floor A. M.; Hopman, Saskia M. J.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Berger, Lieke P. V.; Bleeker, Fonnet E.; Dommering, Charlotte J.; Jongmans, Marjolijn C. J.; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Olderode-Berends, Maran J. W.; Wagner, Anja; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Merks, Johannes H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Recognising a tumour predisposition syndrome (TPS) in childhood cancer patients is of major clinical relevance. The presence of a TPS may be suggested by the type of tumour in the child. We present an overview of 23 childhood tumours that in themselves should be a reason to refer a child for genetic

  19. Childhood tumours with a high probability of being part of a tumour predisposition syndrome; reason for referral for genetic consultation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Floor A. M.; Hopman, Saskia M. J.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Berger, Lieke P. V.; Bleeker, Fonnet E.; Dommering, Charlotte J.; Jongmans, Marjolijn C. J.; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Olderode - Berends, Maran J.W.; Wagner, Anja; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Merks, Johannes H. M.

    Introduction: Recognising a tumour predisposition syndrome (TPS) in childhood cancer patients is of major clinical relevance. The presence of a TPS may be suggested by the type of tumour in the child. We present an overview of 23 childhood tumours that in themselves should be a reason to refer a

  20. R-Spondin chromosome rearrangements drive Wnt-dependent tumour initiation and maintenance in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Teng; Schatoff, Emma M; Murphy, Charles; Zafra, Maria Paz; Wilkinson, John E; Elemento, Olivier; Dow, Lukas E

    2017-07-11

    Defining the genetic drivers of cancer progression is a key in understanding disease biology and developing effective targeted therapies. Chromosome rearrangements are a common feature of human malignancies, but whether they represent bona fide cancer drivers and therapeutically actionable targets, requires functional testing. Here, we describe the generation of transgenic, inducible CRISPR-based mouse systems to engineer and study recurrent colon cancer-associated EIF3E-RSPO2 and PTPRK-RSPO3 chromosome rearrangements in vivo. We show that both Rspo2 and Rspo3 fusion events are sufficient to initiate hyperplasia and tumour development in vivo, without additional cooperating genetic events. Rspo-fusion tumours are entirely Wnt-dependent, as treatment with an inhibitor of Wnt secretion, LGK974, drives rapid tumour clearance from the intestinal mucosa without effects on normal intestinal crypts. Altogether, our study provides direct evidence that endogenous Rspo2 and Rspo3 chromosome rearrangements can initiate and maintain tumour development, and indicate a viable therapeutic window for LGK974 treatment of RSPO-fusion cancers.

  1. Overexpression of MYB drives proliferation of CYLD-defective cylindroma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Neil; Andersson, Mattias K; Sinclair, Naomi; Fehr, André; Hodgson, Kirsty; Lord, Christopher J; Kazakov, Dmitry V; Vanecek, Tomas; Ashworth, Alan; Stenman, Göran

    2016-06-01

    Cutaneous cylindroma is an adnexal tumour with apocrine differentiation. A predisposition to multiple cylindromas is seen in patients with Brooke-Spiegler syndrome, who carry germline mutations in the tumour suppressor gene CYLD. Previous studies of inherited cylindromas have highlighted the frequent presence of bi-allelic truncating CYLD mutations as a recurrent driver mutation. We have previously shown that sporadic cylindromas express either MYB-NFIB fusion transcripts or show evidence of MYB activation in the absence of such fusions. Here, we investigated inherited cylindromas from several families with germline CYLD mutations for the presence of MYB activation. Strikingly, none of the inherited CYLD-defective (n = 23) tumours expressed MYB-NFIB fusion transcripts. However, MYB expression was increased in the majority of tumours (69%) and global gene expression analysis revealed that well-established MYB target genes were up-regulated in CYLD-defective tumours. Moreover, knock-down of MYB expression caused a significant reduction in cylindroma cell proliferation, suggesting that MYB is also a key player and oncogenic driver in inherited cylindromas. Taken together, our findings suggest molecular heterogeneity in the pathogenesis of sporadic and inherited cutaneous cylindromas, with convergence on MYB activation. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  2. Early response assessment in prostate carcinoma by {sup 18}F-fluorothymidine following anticancer therapy with docetaxel using preclinical tumour models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Nobuyuki; Hasegawa, Yoko; Yokoyama, Osamu [University of Fukui, Department of Urology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Fukui (Japan); Kiyono, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Masato; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa [University of Fukui, Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Fukui (Japan); Ponde, Datta E.; Dence, Carmen [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Welch, Michael J. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2011-01-15

    The aim of the study was to assess the potential usefulness of 3-deoxy-3-{sup 18}F-fluorothymidine (FLT) as a radiopharmaceutical for imaging the early therapeutic effects of docetaxel (DTX) on tumour proliferation in hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). Cells of the androgen-independent human prostate tumour cell line, 22Rv1, were implanted in athymic male mice. Approximately 3 weeks after cell implantation, the mice were treated with DTX or vehicle. Before and after the treatment, the mice were imaged with a microPET-Focus-F120 scanner (Concorde Microsystems, Knoxville, TN, USA) using FLT and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Tracer accumulations in the tumours were then analysed and compared with the proliferation activity and apoptotic index of the tumours. In a separate cell study, 22Rv1 cells were treated with DTX, then incubated with FLT or FDG and examined for their tracer uptake. The microPET imaging showed a significant decrease of FLT uptake in tumours after administration of DTX, while the changes of FDG uptake were minimal. Immunohistochemical analysis of the tumours revealed that the changes of FLT uptake were well correlated with those of proliferation activity but not with the apoptotic index. In vitro studies demonstrated that the significant decrease of FLT uptake in the cells after incubation with DTX correlated with the % S-phase cell fraction, while there were only minimal changes in the prostate-specific antigen concentration of the cell medium and FDG uptake in the cells. These results indicate that FLT is a promising tracer for monitoring the early effects of anticancer therapy with DTX in patients with HRPC. (orig.)

  3. Deletion of the amino acid transporter Slc6a14 suppresses tumour growth in spontaneous mouse models of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Ellappan; Bhutia, Yangzom D; Ramachandran, Sabarish; Gnanaprakasam, Jaya P; Prasad, Puttur D; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2015-07-01

    SLC6A14 mediates Na(+)/Cl(-)-coupled concentrative uptake of a broad-spectrum of amino acids. It is expressed at low levels in many tissues but up-regulated in certain cancers. Pharmacological blockade of SLC6A14 causes amino acid starvation in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer cells and suppresses their proliferation in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we interrogated the role of this transporter in breast cancer by deleting Slc6a14 in mice and monitoring the consequences of this deletion in models of spontaneous breast cancer (Polyoma middle T oncogene-transgenic mouse and mouse mammary tumour virus promoter-Neu-transgenic mouse). Slc6a14-knockout mice are viable, fertile and phenotypically normal. The plasma amino acids were similar in wild-type and knockout mice and there were no major compensatory changes in the expression of other amino acid transporter mRNAs. There was also no change in mammary gland development in the knockout mouse. However, when crossed with PyMT-Tg mice or MMTV/Neu (mouse mammary tumour virus promoter-Neu)-Tg mice, the development and progression of breast cancer were markedly decreased on Slc6a14(-/-) background. Analysis of transcriptomes in tumour tissues from wild-type mice and Slc6a14-null mice indicated no compensatory changes in the expression of any other amino acid transporter mRNA. However, the tumours from the null mice showed evidence of amino acid starvation, decreased mTOR signalling and decreased cell proliferation. These studies demonstrate that SLC6A14 is critical for the maintenance of amino acid nutrition and optimal mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling in ER+ breast cancer and that the transporter is a potential target for development of a novel class of anti-cancer drugs targeting amino acid nutrition in tumour cells. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  4. Genomancy: predicting tumour response to cancer therapy based on the oracle of genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P D; Lee, J K; Theodorescu, D

    2009-01-01

    Cells are complex systems that regulate a multitude of biologic pathways involving a diverse array of molecules. Cancer can develop when these pathways become deregulated as a result of mutations in the genes coding for these proteins or of epigenetic changes that affect gene expression, or both1,2. The diversity and interconnectedness of these pathways and their molecular components implies that a variety of mutations may lead to tumorigenic cellular deregulation3-6. This variety, combined with the requirement to overcome multiple anticancer defence mechanisms7, contributes to the heterogeneous nature of cancer. Consequently, tumours with similar histology may vary in their underlying molecular circuitry8-10, with resultant differences in biologic behaviour, manifested in proliferation rate, invasiveness, metastatic potential, and unfortunately, response to cytotoxic therapy. Thus, cancer can be thought of as a family of related tumour subtypes, highlighting the need for individualized prediction both of disease progression and of treatment response, based on the molecular characteristics of the tumour.

  5. DIAGNOSTIC ABILITY OF MRI IN CHARACTERISATION OF SUPRATENTORIAL BRAIN TUMOURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Sri Sailaja Rednam

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Brain tumours arise from the normal constituents of brain and its coverings; 80% of all the intracranial tumours are supratentorial. Imaging plays a crucial function in the management of patients with brain tumours. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI has earned recognition as the optimal screening technique for the detection of most intracranial tumours. MRI using conventional Spin-Echo sequences like axial T1, T2 and Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR, coronal T2, sagittal T1, post contrast SE T1 axial, sagittal and coronal sequences were taken which provides inherently illustrious contrast resolution between structural abnormalities and adjacent brain parenchyma and has proved to be more sensitive in identification of focal lesions of the brain. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was conducted in 50 patients who all were clinically suspected of supratentorial brain tumour cases and underwent MRI in the Department of Radiodiagnosis, Konaseema Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Foundation, Amalapuram, during the period of 18 months from July 2015 to December 2016. RESULTS The MRI features of 50 supratentorial tumours were reviewed, out of which 72% were found to be extra-axial tumours and 28% intra-axial tumours. About 48% were found to be glial tumours and 52% were found to be non-glial tumours. CONCLUSION MRI proves to be a valuable modality of imaging in evaluating the characteristics, distribution, location and assessing the extent of various intra- and extra-axial tumours in the supratentorial region.

  6. Incidence and prevalence of salivary gland tumours in Valparaiso, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Juan; Martinez, René; Niklander, Sven; Marshall, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine the incidence and prevalence of salivary gland tumours in the province of Valparaíso, Chile. Material and Methods Retrospective review of salivary gland tumours diagnosed between the years 2000 and 2011 from four local pathology services. Information on demographics and histopathology were retrieved from the medical records. Results The study sample consisted of 279 salivary gland tumours. Prevalence and incidence rates per 100.000 persons were 15.4 and 2.51, respectively. Most of the neoplasms corresponded to benign tumours (70.3%). The most affected gland was the parotid gland. Pleomorphic adenoma was the most common benign tumour (53.8%) and mucoepidermoid carcinoma was the most common malignant tumour (7.2%). Conclusions Salivary gland tumours are uncommon neoplasms that usually arise in the parotid gland. Pleomorphic adenoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma were the most common benign and malignant tumours reported in this series. Key words:Salivary gland tumours, benign tumours, malignant tumours, salivary glands neoplasms, cancer, neoplasia. PMID:26034925

  7. Molecular characterisation of soft tissue tumours: a gene expression study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Torsten O; West, Rob B; Linn, Sabine C; Alter, Orly; Knowling, Margaret A; O'Connell, John X; Zhu, Shirley; Fero, Mike; Sherlock, Gavin; Pollack, Jonathan R; Brown, Patrick O; Botstein, David; van de Rijn, Matt

    2002-04-13

    Soft-tissue tumours are derived from mesenchymal cells such as fibroblasts, muscle cells, or adipocytes, but for many such tumours the histogenesis is controversial. We aimed to start molecular characterisation of these rare neoplasms and to do a genome-wide search for new diagnostic markers. We analysed gene-expression patterns of 41 soft-tissue tumours with spotted cDNA microarrays. After removal of errors introduced by use of different microarray batches, the expression patterns of 5520 genes that were well defined were used to separate tumours into discrete groups by hierarchical clustering and singular value decomposition. Synovial sarcomas, gastrointestinal stromal tumours, neural tumours, and a subset of the leiomyosarcomas, showed strikingly distinct gene-expression patterns. Other tumour categories--malignant fibrous histiocytoma, liposarcoma, and the remaining leiomyosarcomas--shared molecular profiles that were not predicted by histological features or immunohistochemistry. Strong expression of known genes, such as KIT in gastrointestinal stromal tumours, was noted within gene sets that distinguished the different sarcomas. However, many uncharacterised genes also contributed to the distinction between tumour types. These results suggest a new method for classification of soft-tissue tumours, which could improve on the method based on histological findings. Large numbers of uncharacterised genes contributed to distinctions between the tumours, and some of these could be useful markers for diagnosis, have prognostic significance, or prove possible targets for treatment.

  8. Primary bone tumours of the hand. Report of 21 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.; Azouz, E.M.; Campbell, J.; Marton, D.; Morris, L.; Padovani, J.; Sprague, P.; Beluffi, G.; Berzero, G.F.; Cherubino, P.

    1988-02-01

    Twenty-one primary bone tumours of the hand in children from 8 paediatric hospitals are reported. Osteochondromas and enchondromas were not included. Our material consisted of 16 patients with common tumours (3 Ewing's sarcoma, 5 aneurysmal bone cyst, 6 osteoid osteoma and 2 epithelioma) and 5 patients with uncommon tumours (osteoma, simple bone cyst, haemangiopericytoma, capillary angiomatous tumour and benign ossifying fibroma or osteoblastoma). The X-ray diagnosis of the common tumours should have high concordance with histology, whereas that of uncommon tumours in much more difficult and uncertain. The characteristic features of Ewing's sarcoma are stressed as all our children with this tumour had a delayed diagnosis and a fatal outcome. Differential diagnosis with other short tubular bone lesions of the hand - specifically osteomyelitis - is discussed and the posibilities of microscopic diagnosis are stressed.

  9. Aniridia-Wilms′ tumour syndrome-A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyasagar M

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Wilms′ tumour is rarely associated with sporadic non-familial congenital aniridia. A child with sporadic aniridia has a 25% chance of subsequently developing Wilms′ tumour. Unawareness of this association can lead to a delayed diagnosis of Wilms′ tumour. One such case in a 2 year old is reported. Wilms′ tumour, one of the common childhood malignancies, is associated with other congenital anomalies in about 15% of cases. These include hemihypertrophy, genitourinary abnormalities, mental retardation, aniridia etc. Sporadic non-familial aniridia was noted in only 1.1% of 547 children with Wilms′ tumours evaluated by the National Wilms′ Tumour study group. Unawareness on the part of a clinician about these associated anomalies can lead to an avoidable delay in diagnosing Wilms′ tumour. One such case in a two year old girl is being reported.

  10. [Signal symptoms in tumours of the petrous bone (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charachon, R

    1981-01-01

    Supra-labyrinthic tumours usually produce lesions of the Vth and VIth cranial nerves, whereas infra-labyrinthic tumours affect the sensory-motor nerves. Both types of tumour may reveal themselves by cochleo-vestibular disorders and/or middle ear symptoms. The author has treated a series of patients with such tumours and describes the most frequent types of intrapetrosal growth: cholesteatoma (12 cases), glomic tumours (11 cases), facial nerve tumours (3 cases), metastases (2 cases). Meningiomas can also be encountered, as well as rarer tumours (4 cases), such as embryonic sarcoma, chordoma, chondroma and chondrosarcoma, cavernous angioma, eosinophilic granuloma, solitary plasmocytoma and fibrous dysplasia of the petrous bone. Some signal symptoms (sudden deafness, mucous otitis media, paralysis of vocal cords) can be particularly misleading.

  11. Primary Malignant Neuroendocrine Tumour of Pleura: First Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic tumours of pleura are the most common malignant tumours causing malignant pleural effusion. Lungs are the most common primary sites. Primary pleural tumours are rarely seen and diffuse malignant mesothelioma is the most common malignant tumour of pleura. Primary malignant neuroendocrine tumour of pleura is not reported in the literature. Here, we report a rare case of primary malignant neuroendocrine tumour of pleura in a fifty-two-year-old, nonsmoker female who presented with right-sided pleural effusion and ipsilateral, dull aching chest pain. Clinical presentations of inflammatory lesions like tuberculous pleuritis and benign and malignant neoplasms of pleura are indistinguishable; hence, fluid cytology, pleural biopsy, and immunohistochemistry are necessary for exact tissue diagnosis of the tumours, which is mandatory for correct treatment and prognostic assessment.

  12. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan protein is stimulated by interleukin 11 and promotes endometrial epithelial cancer cell proliferation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winship, Amy; Van Sinderen, Michelle; Heffernan-Marks, Ariella; Dimitriadis, Eva

    2017-03-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecological cancer. We identified interleukin 11 (IL11) as a critical mediator of endometrial tumourigenesis and demonstrated that IL11 regulates chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG4) in human placental trophoblasts. CSPG4 is a cell membrane protein overexpressed in numerous human cancers, although its role in endometrial cancer has not been investigated. We examined CSPG4 expression and localization in primary human type I endometrioid grade (G) 1-3 tumours by qPCR and immunohistochemistry and determined whether IL11 stimulated CSPG4. IL11 upregulated CSPG4 mRNA in HEC1A (G2-derived endometrial epithelial cancer cell line) cells. IL11 administration to BALB/c nude mice enhanced HEC1A xenograft tumour growth and increased CSPG4 protein in tumours. CSPG4 mRNA was unchanged between human G1-3 endometrial cancer and control tissues. CSPG4 protein levels were elevated in the epithelium of G2 and G3 endometrial cancer and in the tumour-associated stroma of G3 tumour tissues compared to proliferative phase or post-menopausal endometrium. CSPG4 knockdown by siRNA reduced HEC1A proliferation and migration in vitro and reduced gene expression of the key epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) regulator SNAIL. Our data suggest that CSPG4 inhibition may impair endometrial cancer progression by reducing cancer cell proliferation, migration and potentially EMT.

  13. Giant desmoid tumour of the thorax following latissimus dorsi and implant breast reconstruction: case report and review of the literature

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, AM

    2017-03-01

    The case of a giant thoracic desmoid tumour in a 44-year-old woman, who presented two years following a breast reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi (LD) flap and implant, is reported. Clinical findings included a rapidly growing, painless mass. Computed tomography (CT) suggested skin and intercostal soft tissue invasion. The tumour was resected en bloc with the LD muscle, implant capsule and underlying rib segments. The resultant thoracic and abdominal wall defects were reconstructed with Dualmesh® and polypropylene meshes respectively. There was no evidence of recurrence at thirty-six months follow-up.

  14. Clinician’s Update on the Benign, Premalignant, and Malignant Skin Tumours of the Vulva: The Dermatologist’s View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freja Lærke Sand

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Correct and rapid diagnosis of skin tumours often requires biopsy and histopathological examination to differentiate benign lesions such as seborrhoeic keratoses or melanocytic naevi from premalignant and malignant lesions such as malignant melanoma. Particularly, to the untrained eye, any benign skin tumour—pigmented or nonpigmented—is easily mistaken for a malignant lesion. Qualified clinical evaluation is paramount in order to reduce the frequency of unwarranted skin biopsies. Herein, the most common benign, premalignant, and malignant vulvar skin tumours are reviewed.

  15. The asphericity of the metabolic tumour volume in NSCLC: correlation with histopathology and molecular markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Ego, Kilian; Steffen, Ingo G. [University Hospital, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Magdeburg (Germany); Buchert, Ralph [University Medicine Charite, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Wertzel, Heinz; Achenbach, H.J. [Lung Clinic Lostau GmbH, Lostau (Germany); Riedel, Sandra; Schreiber, Jens [University Hospital, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Clinic of Pneumology, Magdeburg (Germany); Schultz, Meinald [Institute of Pathology Stendal, Stendal (Germany); Furth, Christian; Amthauer, Holger [University Hospital, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Magdeburg (Germany); University Medicine Charite, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Derlin, Thorsten [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Hofheinz, Frank [Helmholtz-Center Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kalinski, Thomas [University Hospital Magdeburg, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Institute for Pathology, Magdeburg (Germany); Institute for Pathology Lademannbogen, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Asphericity (ASP) is a tumour shape descriptor based on the PET image. It quantitates the deviation from spherical of the shape of the metabolic tumour volume (MTV). In order to identify its biological correlates, we investigated the relationship between ASP and clinically relevant histopathological and molecular signatures in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The study included 83 consecutive patients (18 women, aged 66.4 ± 8.9 years) with newly diagnosed NSCLC in whom PET/CT with {sup 18}F-FDG had been performed prior to therapy. Primary tumour resection specimens and core biopsies were used for basic histopathology and determination of the Ki-67 proliferation index. EGFR status, VEGF, p53 and ALK expression were obtained in a subgroup of 44 patients. The FDG PET images of the primary tumours were delineated using an automatic algorithm based on adaptive thresholding taking into account local background. In addition to ASP, SUVmax, MTV and some further descriptors of shape and intratumour heterogeneity were assessed as semiquantitative PET measures. SUVmax, MTV and ASP were associated with pathological T stage (Kruskal-Wallis, p = 0.001, p < 0.0005 and p < 0.0005, respectively) and N stage (p = 0.017, p = 0.003 and p = 0.002, respectively). Only ASP was associated with M stage (p = 0.026). SUVmax, MTV and ASP were correlated with Ki-67 index (Spearman's rho = 0.326/p = 0.003, rho = 0.302/p = 0.006 and rho = 0.271/p = 0.015, respectively). The latter correlations were considerably stronger in adenocarcinomas than in squamous cell carcinomas. ASP, but not SUVmax or MTV, showed a tendency for a significant association with the extent of VEGF expression (p = 0.058). In multivariate Cox regression analysis, ASP (p < 0.0005) and the presence of distant metastases (p = 0.023) were significantly associated with progression-free survival. ASP (p = 0.006), the presence of distant metastases (p = 0.010), and Ki-67 index (p = 0.062) were significantly associated with

  16. Radiobiological hypoxia, histological parameters of tumour microenvironment and local tumour control after fractionated irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaromina, Ala; Thames, Howard; Zhou, Xuanjing; Hering, Sandra; Eicheler, Wolfgang; Dörfler, Annegret; Leichtner, Thomas; Zips, Daniel; Baumann, Michael

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the relationships between radiobiological hypoxic fraction (rHF), pimonidazole hypoxic fraction (pHF) as well as other histological parameters of the tumour microenvironment, and local tumour control after fractionated irradiation in human squamous cell carcinomas (hSCCs). Ten different hSCC cell lines were transplanted into nude mice and rHF was calculated from local tumour control rates after single dose irradiation under normal or clamped blood flow conditions. In parallel, tumours were irradiated with 30 fractions within 6 weeks. Radiation response was quantified as dose required to cure 50% of tumours (TCD(50)). Unirradiated tumours were excised for histological evaluation including relative hypoxic area (pHF), relative vascular area (RVA), and fraction of perfused vessels (PF). A weak but significant positive correlation between rHF (R(2)=0.6, p=0.014) and TCD(50) after fractionated irradiation was found. The pHF did not correlate with rHF but was significantly associated with the TCD(50) after single dose clamp (R(2)=0.8, p=0.003) and showed a trend for an association with TCD(50) after fractionated irradiation (R(2)=0.4, p=0.067). Relative vascular area and fraction of perfused vessels did not show an association with rHF or TCD(50) after fractionated irradiation. Our data suggest that radiobiological hypoxia contributes to the response after fractionated irradiation but that also other radiobiological mechanisms are involved. In the present study, pimonidazole labelling does not reflect rHF and has a limited value to predict local tumour control after fractionated irradiation. The association between pHF and TCD(50) after single dose clamp warrants further investigation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The ROCO Kinase QkgA Is Necessary for Proliferation Inhibition by Autocrine Signals in Dictyostelium discoideum▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan E Phillips; Gomer, Richard H.

    2010-01-01

    AprA and CfaD are secreted proteins that function as autocrine signals to inhibit cell proliferation in Dictyostelium discoideum. Cells lacking AprA or CfaD proliferate rapidly, and adding AprA or CfaD to cells slows proliferation. Cells lacking the ROCO kinase QkgA proliferate rapidly, with a doubling time 83% of that of the wild type, and overexpression of a QkgA-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein slows cell proliferation. We found that qkgA− cells accumulate normal levels of ex...

  18. Dual effect of LPS on murine myeloid leukemia cells: Pro-proliferation and anti-proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Lingling [Department of Pediatrics, Jingjiang People' s Hospital, Yangzhou University, Jingjiang 214500 (China); Noncoding RNA Center, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Zhao, Yingmin [Department of Pediatrics, Jingjiang People' s Hospital, Yangzhou University, Jingjiang 214500 (China); Gu, Xin; Wang, Jijun; Pang, Lei; Zhang, Yanqing; Li, Yaoyao; Jia, Xiaoqin; Wang, Xin [Noncoding RNA Center, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Gu, Jian [Department of Hematology, Yangzhou University School of Clinical Medicine, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Yu, Duonan, E-mail: duonan@yahoo.com [Department of Pediatrics, Jingjiang People' s Hospital, Yangzhou University, Jingjiang 214500 (China); Noncoding RNA Center, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine for Prevention and Treatment of Senile Disease, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Institute of Comparative Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Jiangsu Co-Innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Disease and Zoonosis, Yangzhou 225001 (China)

    2016-06-10

    Modification of the bone marrow microenvironment is considered as a promising strategy to control leukemic cell proliferation, diseases progression and relapse after treatment. However, due to the diversity and complexity of the cellular and molecular compartments in the leukemic microenvironment, it is extremely difficult to dissect the role of each individual molecule or cell type in vivo. Here we established an in vitro system to dissect the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), stromal cells and endothelial cells in the growth of mouse myeloid tumor cells and B-lymphoma cells. We found that either LPS or bone marrow stromal cells as a feeder layer in culture is required for the proliferation of myeloid tumor cells. Surprisingly, the growth of myeloid leukemic cells on stromal cells is strongly inhibited when coupled with LPS in culture. This opposing effect of LPS, a complete switch from pro-proliferation to antitumor growth is due, at least in part, to the rapidly increased production of interleukin 12, Fas ligand and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 from stromal cells stimulated by LPS. These results demonstrate that LPS can either facilitate or attenuate tumor cell proliferation, thus changing the disease course of myeloid leukemias through its direct effect or modulation of the tumor microenvironment. - Highlights: • LPS alone in culture is required for the proliferation of murine myeloid tumor cells. • Bone marrow stromal cells as a feeder layer is also required for the proliferation of myeloid tumor cells. • However, the growth of myeloid tumor cells is inhibited when LPS and stromal cells are both available in culture. • Thus LPS can either facilitate or attenuate tumor growth through its direct effect or modulation of tumor microenvironment.

  19. COX-2, VEGF and tumour angiogenesis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, D P

    2009-06-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests a protective effective of regular NSAID use against developing cancer. Cyclooxygenase-2, a target of NSAIDs, is upregulated in many cancers and has been associated with increased VEGF production and angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is the formation of new vessels from existing vasculature and as an essential process for tumour development represents an important therapeutic target. Following an extensive review of the literature this article details the current knowledge on the role of COX-2 in tumorigenesis focusing on its relationship to angiogenesis and VEGF production by tumour cells. While COX-2 is clearly detrimental to prognosis and NSAIDs have a beneficial effect, the possibility of COX-2 independent effects being partly or wholly responsible for this benefit cannot be excluded.

  20. [Surgical treatment of children with hepatic tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, A.; Kvist, N.; Kirkegaard, P.

    2008-01-01

    %). There was no difference in survival dependent on the type of resection, and there was no impact of the extension of tumour growth at the time of diagnosis. CONCLUSION: The combination of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by liver resection or liver transplantation is the treatment of choice in all children...... with hepatoblastoma. The results have improved dramatically over the last decades. The results in Denmark compare well with international results. Since 2000, very effective chemotherapy has downstaged all referred patients, so subsequent liver resection have been possible Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4/14......INTRODUCTION: In this paper we review the results of surgical treatment of children with hepatic tumours. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study comprises 33 children who have undergone lever resection or liver transplantation since 1990. 26 patients had hepatoblastoma, 3 had hepatocellular carcinoma, 2...

  1. Interstitial ablative techniques for hepatic tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erce, C; Parks, R W

    2003-03-01

    Most patients with liver tumours are not suitable for surgery but interstitial ablative techniques may control disease progression and improve survival rates. A review was undertaken using Medline of all reported studies of cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, interstitial laser photocoagulation, high-intensity focused ultrasound and ethanol ablation of primary liver tumours and hepatic metastases. Although there are no randomized clinical trials, cryoablation, thermal ablation and ethanol ablation have all been shown to be associated with improved palliation in patients with primary and secondary liver cancer. The techniques can be undertaken safely with minimal morbidity and mortality. Although surgical resection remains the first line of treatment for selected patients with primary and secondary liver malignancies, interstitial ablative techniques are promising therapies for patients not suitable for hepatic resection or as an adjunct to liver surgery. Copyright 2003 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Doxycycline inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of both human papillomavirus positive and negative cervical cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xinyu; Li, Lei; Li, Changzhong

    2016-05-01

    The clinical management of cervical cancer remains a challenge and the development of new treatment strategies merits attention. However, the discovery and development of novel compounds can be a long and labourious process. Drug repositioning may circumvent this process and facilitate the rapid translation of hypothesis-driven science into the clinics. In this work, we show that a FDA-approved antibiotic, doxycycline, effectively targets human papillomavirus (HPV) positive and negative cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Doxycycline significantly inhibits proliferation of a panel of cervical cancer cell lines. It also induces apoptosis of cervical cancer cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, the apoptosis induced by doxycycline is through caspase-dependent pathway. Mechanism studies demonstrate that doxycycline affects oxygen consumption rate, glycolysis, and reduces ATP levels in cervical cancer cells. In HeLa xenograft mouse model, doxycycline significantly inhibits growth of tumour. Our in vitro and in vivo data clearly demonstrate the inhibitory effects of doxycycline on the growth and survival of cervical cancer cells. Our work provides the evidence that doxycycline can be repurposed for the treatment of cervical cancer and targeting energy metabolism may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for cervical cancer.

  3. A benign maxillary tumour with malignant features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricalde, Rosario R; Lim, Aimee Caroline E; Lopa, Ramon Antonio B; Carnate, Jose M

    2010-06-01

    Non-specific biopsy results such as chronic inflammation, hemorrhage, necrosis can be frustrating to the clinician. This is especially true if the patient presents with clinical features suggestive of an aggressive tumour. This is a review of the clinical features, diagnostic dilemmas and surgical management of a benign maxillary mass with malignant features - a disease called hematoma-like mass of the maxillary sinus (HLMMS). Our experience with five cases will also be cited.

  4. Cushing syndrome associated with an adrenal tumour

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, Helena; Brain, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS) in children is a rare disorder that is most frequently caused by an adrenal tumour or a pituitary corticotrophin-secreting adenoma. The management is challenging and requires an individualised approach and multidisciplinary care. We present the case of a 23-month-old female child with a history of excessive weight gain, growth failure, hirsutism, acne and behavioural difficulties. Investigations revealed elevated serum midnight cortisol and 24 h urinary free cortisol. Ov...

  5. MR diffusion imaging of human intracranial tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K; Gideon, P; Wagn, P

    1997-01-01

    We used MRI for in vivo measurement of brain water self-diffusion in patients with intracranial tumours. The study included 28 patients (12 with high-grade and 3 with low-grade gliomas, 7 with metastases, 5 with meningiomas and 1 with a cerebral abscess). Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were...... (P meningiomas did not differ significantly from those seen with high-grade gliomas or cerebral metastases...

  6. Hypoxia-induced nitric oxide production and tumour perfusion is inhibited by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Natalie; Cane, Gaelle; Robson, Mathew; Gaude, Edoardo; Howat, William J; Szlosarek, Peter W; Pedley, R Barbara; Frezza, Christian; Ashcroft, Margaret; Maxwell, Patrick H

    2016-03-14

    The hypoxic tumour microenvironment represents an aggressive, therapy-resistant compartment. As arginine is required for specific hypoxia-induced processes, we hypothesised that arginine-deprivation therapy may be useful in targeting hypoxic cancer cells. We explored the effects of the arginine-degrading agent ADI-PEG20 on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) activation, the hypoxia-induced nitric oxide (NO) pathway and proliferation using HCT116 and UMUC3 cells and xenografts. The latter lack argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1) making them auxotrophic for arginine. In HCT116 cells, ADI-PEG20 inhibited hypoxic-activation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α, leading to decreased inducible-nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), NO-production, and VEGF. Interestingly, combining hypoxia and ADI-PEG20 synergistically inhibited ASS1. ADI-PEG20 inhibited mTORC1 and activated the unfolded protein response providing a mechanism for inhibition of HIF and ASS1. ADI-PEG20 inhibited tumour growth, impaired hypoxia-associated NO-production, and decreased vascular perfusion. Expression of HIF-1α/HIF-2α/iNOS and VEGF were reduced, despite an increased hypoxic tumour fraction. Similar effects were observed in UMUC3 xenografts. In summary, ADI-PEG20 inhibits HIF-activated processes in two tumour models with widely different arginine biology. Thus, ADI-PEG20 may be useful in the clinic to target therapy-resistant hypoxic cells in ASS1-proficient tumours and ASS1-deficient tumours.

  7. Papillary renal cell carcinoma within a renal oncocytoma: case report of an incidental finding of a tumour within a tumour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowsell, Corwyn; Fleshner, Neil; Marrano, Paula; Squire, Jeremy; Evans, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The most common renal tumours are clear cell, papillary, chromophobe and collecting duct renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), and benign oncocytomas and angiomyolipomas. Tumours with hybrid features between some of these entities have been recognised; in particular, tumours with features of both chromophobe RCC and oncocytoma. Case reports describing one distinct type of primary renal tumour actually within another are very rare. The incidental finding of a papillary RCC located in an oncocytoma in a nephrectomy specimen from a 75‐year‐old man is described. Morphological criteria for each tumour type were completely satisfied and fluorescence in situ hybridisation detected the expected number of copies of chromosome 7 in the cells of each tumour type. The cells in the papillary tumour contained three copies, whereas the oncocytoma cells contained only two per nucleus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a papillary RCC being identified within an oncocytoma. PMID:17405978

  8. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; Rodrigues, Goncalo; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tesic Mark, Milica; Molina, Henrik; Kohsaka, Shinji; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Singh, Swarnima; Williams, Caitlin; Soplop, Nadine; Uryu, Kunihiro; Pharmer, Lindsay; King, Tari; Bojmar, Linda; Davies, Alexander E; Ararso, Yonathan; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Haiying; Hernandez, Jonathan; Weiss, Joshua M; Dumont-Cole, Vanessa D; Kramer, Kimberly; Wexler, Leonard H; Narendran, Aru; Schwartz, Gary K; Healey, John H; Sandstrom, Per; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Kure, Elin H; Grandgenett, Paul M; Hollingsworth, Michael A; de Sousa, Maria; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K; Jarnagin, William R; Brady, Mary S; Fodstad, Oystein; Muller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Minn, Andy J; Bissell, Mina J; Garcia, Benjamin A; Kang, Yibin; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K; Ghajar, Cyrus M; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Hector; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-11-19

    Ever since Stephen Paget's 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer's greatest mysteries. Here we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis, while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. Finally, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis.

  9. Giant solitary fibrous tumour of the liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eggermont Alexander MM

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT is an uncommon mesenchymal neoplasm that most frequently affects the pleura, although it has been reported with increasing frequency in various other sites such as in the peritoneum, pericardium and in non-serosal sites such as lung parenchyma, upper respiratory tract, orbit, thyroid, parotid gland, or thymus. Liver parenchyma is rarely affected. Clinically, SFTs cause symptoms after having reached a certain size or when vital structures are involved. In recent years, SFTs are more often identified and distinguished from other tumours with a similar appearance due to the availability of characteristic immunohistochemical markers. Case presentation In this manuscript we report the case of a large tumour of the liver, which was histologically diagnosed as a SFT, and showed involvement of a single hepatic segment. Because of the patient's presentation and clinical course, it may represent a radiation-induced lesion. Conclusion When a SFT has been diagnosed, surgery is the treatment of choice. The small number of patients with a SFT of the liver and its unknown natural behaviour creates the need to a careful registration and follow-up of all identified cases

  10. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; Rodrigues, Goncalo; Hashimoto, Ayako; Mark, Milica Tesic; Molina, Henrik; Kohsaka, Shinji; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Singh, Swarnima; Williams, Caitlin; Soplop, Nadine; Uryu, Kunihiro; Pharmer, Lindsay; King, Tari; Bojmar, Linda; Davies, Alexander E.; Ararso, Yonathan; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Haiying; Hernandez, Jonathan; Weiss, Joshua M.; Dumont-Cole, Vanessa D.; Kramer, Kimberly; Wexler, Leonard H.; Narendran, Aru; Schwartz, Gary K.; Healey, John H.; Sandstrom, Per; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Kure, Elin H.; Grandgenett, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; de Sousa, Maria; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K.; Jarnagin, William R.; Brady, Mary S.; Fodstad, Oystein; Muller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Minn, Andy J.; Bissell, Mina J.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Kang, Yibin; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Hector; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-01-01

    Ever since Stephen Paget’s 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer’s greatest mysteries. Here we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis, while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. Finally, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis. PMID:26524530

  11. The natural history of disappearing bone tumours and tumour-like conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagawa, Takashi; Watanabe, Hideomi; Shinozaki, Tetsuya; Ahmed, Adel Refaat; Shirakura, Kenji; Takagishi, Kenji

    2001-11-01

    We describe 27 cases of bone tumours or tumour-like lesions where there was spontaneous regression. The follow-up period was 2.8-16.7 years (average, 7.0 years). Fourteen of these cases were no longer visible on plain radiographs. Histological diagnosis included exostosis, eosinophilic granuloma, fibrous dysplasia, fibrous cortical defect, non-ossifying fibroma, osteoid osteoma and bone island. Most cases began to reduce in adolescence or earlier, although sclerotic type lesions showed their regression in older patients. All lesions thought to be eosinophilic granuloma began to regress after periods of less than 3 months, while the duration of the other lesions showed wide variation (1-74 months). As resolution of the lesions took between 2 and 79 months (mean, 25.0 {+-} 20.3 months) we consider that the most likely mechanism was recovery of normal skeletal growth control. In exostosis with fracture, alteration of vascular supply may contribute to growth arrest, but not to subsequent remodelling stage. In inflammatory-related lesions such as eosinophilic granuloma, cessation of inflammation may be the mechanism of growth arrest, whilst temporary inflammation may stimulate osteogenic cells engaged in remodeling. In the sclerotic type, growth arrest is a less probable mechanism. Necrosis within the tumour and/or local changes in hormonal control, plus remodelling of the sclerotic area takes longer. Knowledge of the potential for spontaneous resolution may help in management of these tumour and tumour-like lesions of bone. Yanagawa, T. et al. (2001)

  12. Occurrence of tumours metastatic to bones and multicentric tumours with skeletal involvement in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, M E; Inkelmann, M A; Galiza, G J N; Silva, T M; Kommers, G D

    2014-01-01

    The skeletons of 110 dogs with malignant tumours of different origins were examined by necropsy examination over a 3-year period to identify bone metastases. Twenty-one cases of metastatic or multicentric tumours with bone involvement were recorded. In general, more female dogs presented with bony metastases; however, when the dogs with mammary tumours were omitted, the gender distribution of the cases was approximately equivalent. The mammary gland was the primary site of most of the metastatic bone lesions, followed by the musculoskeletal system and the respiratory system. The majority (77%) of metastases were grossly visible and present in multiple bones. However, in 23% of the cases, the metastases could be diagnosed only at the microscopical level. The vertebrae and the humerus were the most frequently affected bones regardless of the primary site and the histogenesis of the tumours. The results of this study revealed a high prevalence of bone metastases and/or bone involvement in dogs with multicentric tumours. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. JPRS report. Proliferation issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-07-10

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons-relevant technologies. Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) and Joint Publications Research Service (JPRS) publications contain political, military, economic, environmental, and sociological news, commentary, and other information, as well as scientific and technical data and reports. All information has been obtained from foreign radio and television broadcasts, news agency transmissions, newspapers, books, and periodicals. Items generally are processed from the first or best available sources. It should not be inferred that they have been disseminated only in the medium, in the language, or to the area indicated. Items from foreign language sources are translated; those from English-language sources are transcribed. Except for excluding certain diacritics, FBIS renders personal names and place-names in accordance with the romanization systems approved for U.S. Government publications by the U.S. Board of Geographic Names.

  14. JPRS report. Proliferation issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-03-13

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons-relevant technologies. Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) and Joint Publications Research Service (JPRS) publications contain political, military, economic, environmental, and sociological news, commentary, and other information, as well as scientific and technical data and reports. All information has been obtained from foreign radio and television broadcasts. news agency transmissions, newspapers, books, and periodicals. Items generally are processed from the first or best available sources. It should not be inferred that they have been disseminated only in the medium, in the language, or to the area indicated. Items from foreign language sources are translated; those from English-language sources are transcribed. Except for excluding certain diacritics, FBIS renders personal names and place-names in accordance with the romanization systems approved for U.S. Government publications by the U.S. Board of Geographic Names.

  15. JPRS report. Proliferation issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-07-16

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons-relevant technologies. Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) and Joint Publications Research Service (JPRS) publications contain political, military, economic, environmental, and sociological news, commentary, and other information, as well as scientific and technical data and reports. All information has been obtained from foreign radio and television broadcasts, news agency transmissions, newspapers, books, and periodicals. Items generally are processed from the first or best available sources. It should not be inferred that they have been disseminated only in the medium, in the language, or to the area indicated. Items from foreign language sources are translated; those from English-language sources are transcribed. Except for excluding certain diacritics, FBIS renders personal names and place-names in accordance with the romanization systems approved for U.S. Government publications by the U.S. Board of Geographic Names.

  16. JPRS report. Proliferation issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-02-21

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons-relevant technologies. Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) and Joint Publications Research Service (JPRS) publications contain political, military, economic, environmental, and sociological news, commentary, and other information, as well as scientific and technical data and reports. All information has been obtained from foreign radio and television broadcasts, news agency transmissions, newspapers, books, and periodicals. Items generally are processed from the first or best available sources. It should not be inferred that they have been disseminated only in the medium, in the language, or to the area indicated. Items from foreign language sources are translated; those from English-language sources are transcribed. Except for excluding certain diacritics, FBIS renders personal names and place-names in accordance with the romanization systems approved for U.S. Government publications by the U.S. Board of Geographic Names.

  17. Comparative Analysis of Clinical, Hormonal and Morphological Studies in Patients with Neuroendocrine ACTH-Producing Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Kolesnikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the problem of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs with clinical symptoms of hypercorticism caused by hypersecretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH by tumour cells. In most cases (85%, the tumours were localized in the pituitary gland (Cushing's disease; 15% of the patients had an extrapituitary tumour that manifest as an ectopic ACTH secretion (EAS. Comparative analysis of clinical, hormonal, histological, and immunohistochemical characteristics of pituitary and extrapituitary ACTH-secreting NET was performed. It included 46 patients with CD and 38 ones exhibiting ectopic ACTH secretion (EAS. Results of the study suggest differences between CD and EAS in terms of the severity of clinical manifestations and duration of the disease. Hormonal studies showed that EAS unlike CD was associated with high plasma ACTH and cortisol levels, late-evening salivary cortisol and daily urinary free cortisol, the absence of a 60% or greater reduction of cortisol in the HDDST test, and the presence of a low (less than 2 ACTH gradient in response to desmopressin administration with catheterization of cavernous sinuses. The study of morphofunctional characteristics of the removed NET demonstrated the ability of both pituitary and extrapituitary NETs to express ACTH as well as GH, PRL, LH, and FSH. The angiogenic markers (CD31 and VEGF were detected with equal frequency regardless of the NET localization. The histological structure of all corticotropinomas suggested their benign origin, but extrapituitary NETs were represented by different morphological types with varying malignancy, invasiveness, and metastatic properties. A higher cell proliferation potential (Ki-67 was documented for NET in patients presenting with an ectopic ACTH secretion compared to those having corticotropinomas.

  18. Changes of proliferation kinetics after X-irradiation of a human malignant melanoma grown in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spang-Thomsen, M; Vindeløv, L L

    1984-01-01

    A human malignant melanoma grown in nude mice was exposed to single-dose X-irradiation and the effect on the proliferation kinetics was investigated by two methods. Flow cytometric DNA analysis was performed on tumour tissue obtained by sequential fine-needle aspirations after the treatment...... to monitor the initial cell cycle distribution changes. The technique of labelled mitoses was used to examine the kinetics of the tumours during regrowth. The results showed that the treatment initially induced a partial synchronization of small fractions of cells accumulated in the G2 phase of the cell...

  19. Mathematical modelling of the development of a cylindrical tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algis Kavaliauskas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with interaction of tumour cells and leucocytes in the cylindrical cavities. This type of interaction is typical in the cases of development of a tumour in the intestine, blood vessel or in a bone cavity. Two cases are separated: the case of soft and hard tumour. In the case of a solid tumour, leucocytes can interact only with the surface cells of the tumour. This type of interaction is described by the system of two nonlinear first degree differential equations. The expressions of stationary points are obtained and analysis of their stability is performed. In the case of a soft tumour the system of two partial differential equations with first order derivatives and initial and boundary conditions is proposed. An algorithm for computing the numeric solution of the mathematical model is applied. In this case the diffusion of leucocytes and their ability to reach the tumour cells in the whole volume of the tumour is included. The algorithm is constructed and the system is solved numerically. Bifurcation curve is obtained. It separates two qualitatively different areas on the two parameter plane. Under the same initial parameters in the first area development of the tumour cells cannot be stopped, whereas in the second area leukocytes defeat the tumour cells.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15181/csat.v2i1.183

  20. Variation, "evolution", immortality and genetic instabilities in tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignold, L P

    2007-08-18

    The pathological characteristics of tumour cells often include variation of their histopathological features (i.e. "degrees of de-differentiation") between cases of the same tumour type and between different foci within individual tumours. Usually, only a few cell lines from tumours are immortal. Currently, somatic mutation, replicative infidelity of DNA and aneuploidy are suggested as alternative mechanisms of genomic disturbance underlying tumours. Nevertheless, apart from Hansemann's ideas of "anaplasia" and "de-differentiation" (proposed in the 1890s), and supposed "evolutionary themes" in cancer cell biology, little has been published concerning how histopathologic variation and immortality in tumour cells might arise. This paper reviews applications of the concepts of "variation" to tumours, including concepts of "evolution" and "cellular Darwinism". It is proposed that combinations of somatic mutation, DNA replicative infidelity and aneuploidy may explain the variabilities in tumours, and provide immortality in occasional tumour cells. A possible model involves (i) an initial somatic mutation causing reduced replicative fidelity of DNA, which could be variable in intensity, and thus give rise to variations between cases; (ii) a phase of replicative infidelity of DNA causing daughter cells lines to develop various abnormalities to different degrees, and hence provide for variation between areas of the same tumour. As a last event (iii) occasional asymmetric chromosomal distributions (aneuploidy) might "refresh" the ability of a daughter cell to replicate DNA faithfully causing them to become immortal. Thus extensively mutant and variable, hyperploid, and occasionally immortal cells might arise.

  1. Activation of blood coagulation in cancer: implications for tumour progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Luize G.; Monteiro, Robson Q.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have suggested a role for blood coagulation proteins in tumour progression. Herein, we discuss (1) the activation of the blood clotting cascade in the tumour microenvironment and its impact on primary tumour growth; (2) the intravascular activation of blood coagulation and its impact on tumour metastasis and cancer-associated thrombosis; and (3) antitumour therapies that target blood-coagulation-associated proteins. Expression levels of the clotting initiator protein TF (tissue factor) have been correlated with tumour cell aggressiveness. Simultaneous TF expression and PS (phosphatidylserine) exposure by tumour cells promote the extravascular activation of blood coagulation. The generation of blood coagulation enzymes in the tumour microenvironment may trigger the activation of PARs (protease-activated receptors). In particular, PAR1 and PAR2 have been associated with many aspects of tumour biology. The procoagulant activity of circulating tumour cells favours metastasis, whereas the release of TF-bearing MVs (microvesicles) into the circulation has been correlated with cancer-associated thrombosis. Given the role of coagulation proteins in tumour progression, it has been proposed that they could be targets for the development of new antitumour therapies. PMID:23889169

  2. Nanoparticle-blood interactions: the implications on solid tumour targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarovits, James; Chen, Yih Yang; Sykes, Edward A; Chan, Warren C W

    2015-02-18

    Nanoparticles are suitable platforms for cancer targeting and diagnostic applications. Typically, less than 10% of all systemically administered nanoparticles accumulate in the tumour. Here we explore the interactions of blood components with nanoparticles and describe how these interactions influence solid tumour targeting. In the blood, serum proteins adsorb onto nanoparticles to form a protein corona in a manner dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties. These serum proteins can block nanoparticle tumour targeting ligands from binding to tumour cell receptors. Additionally, serum proteins can also encourage nanoparticle uptake by macrophages, which decreases nanoparticle availability in the blood and limits tumour accumulation. The formation of this protein corona will also increase the nanoparticle hydrodynamic size or induce aggregation, which makes nanoparticles too large to enter into the tumour through pores of the leaky vessels, and prevents their deep penetration into tumours for cell targeting. Recent studies have focused on developing new chemical strategies to reduce or eliminate serum protein adsorption, and rescue the targeting potential of nanoparticles to tumour cells. An in-depth and complete understanding of nanoparticle-blood interactions is key to designing nanoparticles with optimal physicochemical properties with high tumour accumulation. The purpose of this review article is to describe how the protein corona alters the targeting of nanoparticles to solid tumours and explains current solutions to solve this problem.

  3. Minimally invasive surgery in management of renal tumours in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Kathrine Olaussen; Johal, Navroop Singh; Mushtaq, Imran

    2016-10-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in the management of malignant and benign renal tumours in children is gradually becoming more common. Experience is limited and restricted to case reports, retrospective chart reviews and a few cohort studies. There are currently no randomized controlled trials or controlled clinical trials comparing the laparoscopic and open surgical approach for the management of renal tumours in children. MIS may offer the same oncologic outcome in malignant renal tumours whilst providing the advantages associated with MIS in correctly selected cases. The technique for tumour resection has been shown to be feasible in regards to the recommended oncologic principles, although lymph node sampling can be inadequate in some cases. Preliminary reports do not show an increased risk of tumour rupture or inferior oncologic outcomes after MIS. However, the sample size remains small and duration of follow-up inadequate to draw any firm conclusions. Implementation of MIS is lacking in the protocols of the major study groups, and standardized recommendations for the indications and contra-indications remain undefined. The objective of this article is to present a review of the literature on the role of MIS in the management of renal tumours in children, with the main focus on Wilms' tumour (WT). Further studies on MIS in renal tumours are required to evaluate the incidence of oncological complications such as complete tumour resection and intra-operative tumour spillage. A long-term follow-up of patients managed by MIS is essential to compare recurrence rates and overall survival rates.

  4. Local tumour hyperthermia as immunotherapy for metastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Fiering, Steven

    2014-12-01

    Abstract Local tumour hyperthermia for cancer treatment is currently used either for ablation purposes as an alternative to surgery or less frequently, in combination with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy to enhance the effects of those traditional therapies. As it has become apparent that activating the immune system is crucial to successfully treat metastatic cancer, the potential of boosting anti-tumour immunity by heating tumours has become a growing area of cancer research. After reviewing the history of hyperthermia therapy for cancer and introducing methods for inducing local hyperthermia, this review describes different mechanisms by which heating tumours can elicit anti-tumour immune responses, including tumour cell damage, tumour surface molecule changes, heat shock proteins, exosomes, direct effects on immune cells, and changes in the tumour vasculature. We then go over in vivo studies that provide promising results showing that local hyperthermia therapy indeed activates various systemic anti-tumour immune responses that slow growth of untreated tumours. Finally, future research questions that will help bring the use of local hyperthermia as systemic immunotherapy closer to clinical application are discussed.

  5. Site-specific volumetric analysis of lung tumour motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepin, Eric W [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Wu Huanmei [Purdue School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Sandison, George A [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Langer, Mark [Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Shirato, Hiroki, E-mail: epepin@purdue.ed [Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2010-06-21

    The treatment of lung cancer with radiation therapy is hindered by respiratory motion. Real-time adjustments to compensate for this motion are hampered by mechanical system latencies and imaging-rate restrictions. To better understand tumour motion behaviour for adaptive image-guided radiation therapy of lung cancer, the volume of a tumour's motion space was investigated. Motion data were collected by tracking an implanted fiducial using fluoroscopy at 30 Hz during treatment sessions. A total of 637 treatment fractions from 31 tumours were used in this study. For each fraction, data points collected from three consecutive breathing cycles were used to identify instantaneous tumour location. A convex hull was created over these data points, defining the tumour motion envelope. The study sought a correlation between the tumour location in the lung and the convex hull's volume and shape. It was found that tumours located in the upper apex had smaller motion envelopes (<50 mm{sup 3}), whereas tumours located near the chest wall or diaphragm had larger envelopes (>70 mm{sup 3}). Tumours attached to fixed anatomical structures had small motion spaces. Three general shapes described the tumour motion envelopes: 50% of motion envelopes enclosed largely 1D oscillation, 38% enclosed an ellipsoid path, 6% enclosed an arced path and 6% were of hybrid shape. This location-space correlation suggests it may be useful in developing a predictive model, but more work needs to be done to verify it.

  6. Neonatal airway obstruction caused by rapidly growing nasopharyngeal teratoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maartens, I.A.; Wassenberg, T.; Halbertsma, F.J.; Marres, H.A.M.; Andriessen, P.

    2009-01-01

    A case report is presented of a rapidly growing congenital nasopharyngeal teratoma (epignathus) in a preterm infant, leading to severe upper airway obstruction. Prenatal diagnosis by ultrasonography did not reveal the condition because the tumour masses were initially small and there was no

  7. Lipoxin A4 promotes lung epithelial repair whilst inhibiting fibroblast proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengxing Zheng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Therapy that promotes epithelial repair whilst protecting against fibroproliferation is critical for restoring lung function in acute and chronic respiratory diseases. Primary human alveolar type II cells were used to model the effects of lipoxin A4 in vitro upon wound repair, proliferation, apoptosis and transdifferention. Effects of lipoxin A4 upon primary human lung fibroblast proliferation, collagen production, and myofibroblast differentiation were also assessed. Lipoxin A4 promoted type II cell wound repair and proliferation, blocked the negative effects of soluble Fas ligand/tumour necrosis factor α upon cell proliferation, viability and apoptosis, and augmented the epithelial cell proliferative response to bronchoaveolar lavage fluid (BALF from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. In contrast, Lipoxin A4 reduced fibroblast proliferation, collagen production and myofibroblast differentiation induced by transforming growth factor β and BALF from ARDS. The effects of Lipoxin A4 were phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase dependent and mediated via the lipoxin A4 receptor. Lipoxin A4 appears to promote alveolar epithelial repair by stimulating epitheial cell wound repair, proliferation, reducing apoptosis and promoting trans-differentiation of alveolar type II cells into type I cells. Lipoxin A4 reduces fibroblast proliferation, collagen production and myofibroblast differentiation. These data suggest that targeting lipoxin actions may be a therapeutic strategy for treating the resolution phase of ARDS.

  8. A human tRNA methyltransferase 9-like protein prevents tumour growth by regulating LIN9 and HIF1-α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Ulrike; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Patil, Ashish; Endres, Lauren; Estrada, Yeriel; Chan, Clement TY; Su, Dan; Dedon, Peter C; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Begley, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence points to aberrant regulation of translation as a driver of cell transformation in cancer. Given the direct control of translation by tRNA modifications, tRNA modifying enzymes may function as regulators of cancer progression. Here, we show that a tRNA methyltransferase 9-like (hTRM9L/KIAA1456) mRNA is down-regulated in breast, bladder, colorectal, cervix and testicular carcinomas. In the aggressive SW620 and HCT116 colon carcinoma cell lines, hTRM9L is silenced and its re-expression and methyltransferase activity dramatically suppressed tumour growth in vivo. This growth inhibition was linked to decreased proliferation, senescence-like G0/G1-arrest and up-regulation of the RB interacting protein LIN9. Additionally, SW620 cells re-expressing hTRM9L did not respond to hypoxia via HIF1-α-dependent induction of GLUT1. Importantly, hTRM9L-negative tumours were highly sensitive to aminoglycoside antibiotics and this was associated with altered tRNA modification levels compared to antibiotic resistant hTRM9L-expressing SW620 cells. Our study links hTRM9L and tRNA modifications to inhibition of tumour growth via LIN9 and HIF1-α-dependent mechanisms. It also suggests that aminoglycoside antibiotics may be useful to treat hTRM9L-deficient tumours. PMID:23381944

  9. Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R)-dependent pathways control tumour growth and tumour response to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Soraya I; Andrade, Luciana N S; Onuchic, Ana C; Nonogaki, Sueli; Fernandes, Patrícia D; Pinheiro, Mônica C; Rohde, Ciro B S; Chammas, Roger; Jancar, Sonia

    2010-05-13

    Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages induces a suppressor phenotype. Previous data from our group suggested that this occurs via Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R)-mediated pathways. In the present study, we investigated the impact of apoptotic cell inoculation or induction by a chemotherapeutic agent (dacarbazine, DTIC) on tumour growth, microenvironmental parameters and survival, and the effect of treatment with a PAF-R antagonist (WEB2170). These studies were performed in murine tumours: Ehrlich Ascitis Tumour (EAT) and B16F10 melanoma. Tumour growth was assessed by direct counting of EAT cells in the ascitis or by measuring the volume of the solid tumour. Parameters of the tumour microenvironment, such as the frequency of cells expressing cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), caspase-3 and galectin-3, and microvascular density, were determined by immunohistochemistry. Levels of vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were determined by ELISA, and levels of nitric oxide (NO) by Griess reaction. PAF-R expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Inoculation of apoptotic cells before EAT implantation stimulated tumour growth. This effect was reversed by in vivo pre-treatment with WEB2170. This treatment also reduced tumour growth and modified the microenvironment by reducing PGE2, VEGF and NO production. In B16F10 melanoma, WEB2170 alone or in association with DTIC significantly reduced tumour volume. Survival of the tumour-bearing mice was not affected by WEB2170 treatment but was significantly improved by the combination of DTIC with WEB2170. Tumour microenvironment elements were among the targets of the combination therapy since the relative frequency of COX-2 and galectin-3 positive cells and the microvascular density within the tumour mass were significantly reduced by treatment with WEB2170 or DTIC alone or in combination. Antibodies to PAF-R stained the cells from inside the tumour, but not the

  10. Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R-dependent pathways control tumour growth and tumour response to chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohde Ciro BS

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages induces a suppressor phenotype. Previous data from our group suggested that this occurs via Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R-mediated pathways. In the present study, we investigated the impact of apoptotic cell inoculation or induction by a chemotherapeutic agent (dacarbazine, DTIC on tumour growth, microenvironmental parameters and survival, and the effect of treatment with a PAF-R antagonist (WEB2170. These studies were performed in murine tumours: Ehrlich Ascitis Tumour (EAT and B16F10 melanoma. Methods Tumour growth was assessed by direct counting of EAT cells in the ascitis or by measuring the volume of the solid tumour. Parameters of the tumour microenvironment, such as the frequency of cells expressing cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2, caspase-3 and galectin-3, and microvascular density, were determined by immunohistochemistry. Levels of vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 were determined by ELISA, and levels of nitric oxide (NO by Griess reaction. PAF-R expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Results Inoculation of apoptotic cells before EAT implantation stimulated tumour growth. This effect was reversed by in vivo pre-treatment with WEB2170. This treatment also reduced tumour growth and modified the microenvironment by reducing PGE2, VEGF and NO production. In B16F10 melanoma, WEB2170 alone or in association with DTIC significantly reduced tumour volume. Survival of the tumour-bearing mice was not affected by WEB2170 treatment but was significantly improved by the combination of DTIC with WEB2170. Tumour microenvironment elements were among the targets of the combination therapy since the relative frequency of COX-2 and galectin-3 positive cells and the microvascular density within the tumour mass were significantly reduced by treatment with WEB2170 or DTIC alone or in combination. Antibodies to PAF-R stained

  11. Current status and guidelines for the assessment of tumour vascular support with dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, K.A. [University of Sussex, Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer (United Kingdom); Lee, T.Y. [Robarts Research Institute, Imaging Research Laboratories, London, Ontario (Canada); Goh, V. [St Thomas' Hospital, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Klotz, E. [Computed Tomography H IM CT PLM-E PA, Siemens Healthcare Sector, Forchheim (Germany); Cuenod, C. [INSERM U970 PARCC, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou (HEGP), Paris (France); Bisdas, S. [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Neuroradiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Groves, A.M. [University College London, University College Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Hayball, M.P. [Cambridge Computed Imaging Ltd, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Alonzi, R. [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood (United Kingdom); Brunner, T. [Gray Institute for Radiation, Oncology and Biology, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) assesses the vascular support of tumours through analysis of temporal changes in attenuation in blood vessels and tissues during a rapid series of images acquired with intravenous administration of iodinated contrast material. Commercial software for DCE-CT analysis allows pixel-by-pixel calculation of a range of validated physiological parameters and depiction as parametric maps. Clinical studies support the use of DCE-CT parameters as surrogates for physiological and molecular processes underlying tumour angiogenesis. DCE-CT has been used to provide biomarkers of drug action in early phase trials for the treatment of a range of cancers. DCE-CT can be appended to current imaging assessments of tumour response with the benefits of wide availability and low cost. This paper sets out guidelines for the use of DCE-CT in assessing tumour vascular support that were developed using a Delphi process. Recommendations encompass CT system requirements and quality assurance, radiation dosimetry, patient preparation, administration of contrast material, CT acquisition parameters, terminology and units, data processing and reporting. DCE-CT has reached technical maturity for use in therapeutic trials in oncology. The development of these consensus guidelines may promote broader application of DCE-CT for the evaluation of tumour vascularity. (orig.)

  12. Intracavitary moderator balloon combined with (252)Cf brachytherapy and boron neutron capture therapy, improving dosimetry in brain tumour and infiltrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, S F; Campos, T P R

    2015-07-01

    This article proposes a combination of californium-252 ((252)Cf) brachytherapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and an intracavitary moderator balloon catheter applied to brain tumour and infiltrations. Dosimetric evaluations were performed on three protocol set-ups: (252)Cf brachytherapy combined with BNCT (Cf-BNCT); Cf-BNCT with a balloon catheter filled with light water (LWB) and the same set-up with heavy water (HWB). Cf-BNCT-HWB has presented dosimetric advantages to Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT in infiltrations at 2.0-5.0 cm from the balloon surface. However, Cf-BNCT-LWB has shown superior dosimetry up to 2.0 cm from the balloon surface. Cf-BNCT-HWB and Cf-BNCT-LWB protocols provide a selective dose distribution for brain tumour and infiltrations, mainly further from the (252)Cf source, sparing the normal brain tissue. Malignant brain tumours grow rapidly and often spread to adjacent brain tissues, leading to death. Improvements in brain radiation protocols have been continuously achieved; however, brain tumour recurrence is observed in most cases. Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT-HWB represent new modalities for selectively combating brain tumour infiltrations and metastasis.

  13. Intracavitary moderator balloon combined with 252Cf brachytherapy and boron neutron capture therapy, improving dosimetry in brain tumour and infiltrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, S F

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This article proposes a combination of californium-252 (252Cf) brachytherapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and an intracavitary moderator balloon catheter applied to brain tumour and infiltrations. Methods: Dosimetric evaluations were performed on three protocol set-ups: 252Cf brachytherapy combined with BNCT (Cf-BNCT); Cf-BNCT with a balloon catheter filled with light water (LWB) and the same set-up with heavy water (HWB). Results: Cf-BNCT-HWB has presented dosimetric advantages to Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT in infiltrations at 2.0–5.0 cm from the balloon surface. However, Cf-BNCT-LWB has shown superior dosimetry up to 2.0 cm from the balloon surface. Conclusion: Cf-BNCT-HWB and Cf-BNCT-LWB protocols provide a selective dose distribution for brain tumour and infiltrations, mainly further from the 252Cf source, sparing the normal brain tissue. Advances in knowledge: Malignant brain tumours grow rapidly and often spread to adjacent brain tissues, leading to death. Improvements in brain radiation protocols have been continuously achieved; however, brain tumour recurrence is observed in most cases. Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT-HWB represent new modalities for selectively combating brain tumour infiltrations and metastasis. PMID:25927876

  14. KPNA2 is overexpressed in human and mouse endometrial cancers and promotes cellular proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenberg, Kristian; Valtcheva, Nadejda; Brandt, Simone; Zhong, Qing; Wong, Christine E; Noske, Aurelia; Rechsteiner, Markus; Rueschoff, Jan H; Caduff, Rosmarie; Dellas, Athanassios; Obermann, Ellen; Fink, Daniel; Fuchs, Thomas; Krek, Wilhelm; Moch, Holger; Frew, Ian J; Wild, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most frequently occurring malignancy of the female genital tract in Western countries. Although in many cases surgically curable, about 30% of the tumours represent an aggressive and untreatable disease. In an attempt to establish a reliable prognostic marker for endometrial carcinomas disregarding their histological diversity, we investigated the expression of KPNA2, a mediator of nucleocytoplasmic transport, and other cell proliferation-associated proteins and their correlation with cancer progression. We analysed patient tissue microarrays (TMAs) assembled from 527 endometrial cancer tissue specimens and uterus samples from a Trp53 knockout mouse model of endometrial cancer. Our data show that KPNA2 expression was significantly up-regulated in human endometrial carcinomas and associated with higher tumour grade (p = 0.026), higher FIGO stage (p = 0.027), p53 overexpression (p endometrial cancer subtype was detected. In the mouse model, KPNA2 showed increased expression levels from precancerous (EmgD, EIC) to far-advanced invasive lesions. We further investigated the cell proliferation capacity after siRNA-mediated KPNA2 knockdown in the human endometrial cancer cell line MFE-296. KPNA2 silencing led to decreased proliferation of the cancer cells, suggesting interplay of the protein with the cell cycle. Taken together, increased expression of KPNA2 is an independent prognostic marker for poor survival. The mechanism of enhanced nucleocytoplasmic transport by KPNA2 overexpression seems a common event in aggressive cancers since we have shown a significant correlation of KPNA2 expression and tumour aggressiveness in a large variety of other solid tumour entities. Introducing KPNA2 immunohistochemistry in routine diagnostics may allow for the identification of patients who need more aggressive treatment regimens. Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Simultaneous immunisation with a Wilms' tumour 1 epitope and its ubiquitin fusions results in enhanced cell mediated immunity and tumour rejection in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Nasir Saeedi; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mousavi, Asadollah; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Nomani, Alireza; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Day, Stephanie; Amanzadeh, Amir; Alimohammadian, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-07-01

    Protein fusion to ubiquitin results in its targeting to proteasome and processing through MHC class I pathway. We used this approach to induce cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response against a MHC class I epitope. Therefore, two known proteasome targeting systems, "ubiquitin fusion degradation" (UFD) and "N-end rule", were used to immunise C57BL/6 mice. Two plasmids encoding an epitope from Wilms' Tumour 1 (WT1-126), fused N-terminally to ubiquitin, were constructed. They were designated as "pUbVVPT" and "pUbGRPT", targeting the fused epitope to UFD and N-end pathways, respectively. A plasmid encoding WT1-126 without ubiquitin fusion (pPT) was also constructed as control. Three mice groups were immunised using these constructs (UGR, UVV and PT groups). Two other groups received mixed immunisations of pUbVVPT or pUbGRPT plus pPT plasmids (UVV+PT and UGR+PT). All mice received a WT1-126 peptide booster. Lymphoproliferative responses following stimulation with WT1-126 were observed in all immunisation groups, with mice receiving the mixture of plasmids eliciting the highest proliferation (UVV+PT>UGR+PT>PT). Moreover, In vivo cytotoxicity assay results revealed highest specific lysis of target cells in UVV+PT group. Tumour growth was decreased in all immunised groups, and was completely abrogated in UGR+PT group. In addition, T(H)1 type cytokines patterns were detected from all immunised groups and WT1-126-specific IFNγ producing lymphocytes were developed in them. These results suggest that the delivery of ubiquitin-fused epitopes along with epitopes alone can be used to optimise the effect of DNA vaccines on the induction of anti-tumour immunity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Insulin resistance in vascular endothelial cells promotes intestinal tumour formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X; Häring, M-F; Rathjen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    did not change intestinal tumour number or size distribution on either a low or high-fat diet. We therefore asked whether cells in the tumour stroma might explain the association between tumour formation and insulin resistance. To this end, we generated Apc(Min/+) mice with loss of insulin receptors......The risk of several cancers, including colorectal cancer, is increased in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes, conditions characterised by hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance. Because hyperinsulinaemia itself is an independent risk factor for cancer development, we examined tissue...... in vascular endothelial cells. Strikingly, these mice had 42% more intestinal tumours than controls, no change in tumour angiogenesis, but increased expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in primary culture of tumour endothelial cells. Insulin decreased VCAM-1 expression and leukocyte...

  17. Tumour heterogeneity promotes collective invasion and cancer metastatic dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallou, Adrien; Jennings, Joel; Kabla, Alexandre J

    2017-08-01

    Heterogeneity within tumour cell populations is commonly observed in most cancers. However, its impact on metastatic dissemination, one of the primary determinants of the disease prognosis, remains poorly understood. Working with a simplified numerical model of tumour spheroids, we investigated the impact of mechanical heterogeneity on the onset of tumour invasion into surrounding tissues. Our work establishes a positive link between tumour heterogeneity and metastatic dissemination, and recapitulates a number of invasion patterns identified in vivo, such as multicellular finger-like protrusions. Two complementary mechanisms are at play in heterogeneous tumours. A small proportion of stronger cells are able to initiate and lead the escape of cells, while collective effects in the bulk of the tumour provide the coordination required to sustain the invasive process through multicellular streaming. This suggests that the multicellular dynamics observed during metastasis is a generic feature of mechanically heterogeneous cell populations and might rely on a limited and generic set of attributes.

  18. Kinase fusions are frequent in Spitz tumours and spitzoid melanomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Thomas; He, Jie; Yelensky, Roman; Esteve-Puig, Rosaura; Botton, Thomas; Yeh, Iwei; Lipson, Doron; Otto, Geoff; Brennan, Kristina; Murali, Rajmohan; Garrido, Maria; Miller, Vincent A.; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Berger, Michael F.; Sparatta, Alyssa; Palmedo, Gabriele; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Busam, Klaus J.; Kutzner, Heinz; Cronin, Maureen T.; Stephens, Philip J.; Bastian, Boris C.

    2014-01-01

    Spitzoid neoplasms are a group of melanocytic tumours with distinctive histopathological features. They include benign tumours (Spitz naevi), malignant tumours (spitzoid melanomas) and tumours with borderline histopathological features and uncertain clinical outcome (atypical Spitz tumours). Their genetic underpinnings are poorly understood, and alterations in common melanoma-associated oncogenes are typically absent. Here we show that spitzoid neoplasms harbour kinase fusions of ROS1 (17%), NTRK1 (16%), ALK (10%), BRAF (5%) and RET (3%) in a mutually exclusive pattern. The chimeric proteins are constitutively active, stimulate oncogenic signalling pathways, are tumourigenic and are found in the entire biologic spectrum of spitzoid neoplasms, including 55% of Spitz naevi, 56% of atypical Spitz tumours and 39% of spitzoid melanomas. Kinase inhibitors suppress the oncogenic signalling of the fusion proteins in vitro. In summary, kinase fusions account for the majority of oncogenic aberrations in spitzoid neoplasms and may serve as therapeutic targets for metastatic spitzoid melanomas.

  19. Tumour-induced osteomalacia: An emergent paraneoplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Guillermo; Varsavsky, Mariela

    2016-04-01

    Endocrine paraneoplastic syndromes are distant manifestations of some tumours. An uncommon but increasingly reported form is tumour-induced osteomalacia, a hypophosphatemic disorder associated to fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) secretion by tumours. The main biochemical manifestations of this disorder include hypophosphatemia, inappropriately low or normal tubular reabsorption of phosphate, low serum calcitriol levels, increased serum alkaline phosphatase levels, and elevated or normal serum FGF-23 levels. These tumours, usually small, benign, slow growing and difficult to discover, are mainly localized in soft tissues of the limbs. Histologically, phosphaturic mesenchymal tumours of the mixed connective tissue type are most common. Various imaging techniques have been suggested with variable results. Treatment of choice is total surgical resection of the tumour. Medical treatment includes oral phosphorus and calcitriol supplements, octreotide, cinacalcet, and monoclonal antibodies. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Isolating dividing neural and brain tumour cells for gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endaya, Berwini; Cavanagh, Brenton; Alowaidi, Faisal; Walker, Tom; de Pennington, Nicholas; Ng, Jin-Ming A; Lam, Paula Y P; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Neuzil, Jiri; Meedeniya, Adrian C B

    2016-01-15

    The characterisation of dividing brain cells is fundamental for studies ranging from developmental and stem cell biology, to brain cancers. Whilst there is extensive anatomical data on these dividing cells, limited gene transcription data is available due to technical constraints. We focally isolated dividing cells whilst conserving RNA, from culture, primary neural tissue and xenografted glioma tumours, using a thymidine analogue that enables gene transcription analysis. 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine labels the replicating DNA of dividing cells. Once labelled, cultured cells and tissues were dissociated, fluorescently tagged with a revised click chemistry technique and the dividing cells isolated using fluorescence-assisted cell sorting. RNA was extracted and analysed using real time PCR. Proliferation and maturation related gene expression in neurogenic tissues was demonstrated in acutely and 3 day old labelled cells, respectively. An elevated expression of marker and pathway genes was demonstrated in the dividing cells of xenografted brain tumours, with the non-dividing cells showing relatively low levels of expression. BrdU "immune-labelling", the most frequently used protocol for detecting cell proliferation, causes complete denaturation of RNA, precluding gene transcription analysis. This EdU labelling technique, maintained cell integrity during dissociation, minimized copper exposure during labelling and used a cell isolation protocol that avoided cell lysis, thus conserving RNA. The technique conserves RNA, enabling the definition of cell proliferation-related changes in gene transcription of neural and pathological brain cells in cells harvested immediately after division, or following a period of maturation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Metachronous renal tumours after surgical management of oncocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, M Adam; Breau, Rodney H; Umbreit, Eric C; Lohse, Christine M; Cheville, John C; Thompson, R Houston; Blute, Michael L; Leibovich, Bradley C

    2011-09-01

    • To assess the risk of metachronous renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and benign renal tumours after surgical treatment of primary renal oncocytoma. • Patients treated for primary renal oncocytoma between 1970 and 2007 were identified. Tumours were reviewed by a urological pathologist and patients were followed for subsequent renal tumours. • Of 424 patients with a median follow up of 7.1 year, 17 (4.0%) patients were diagnosed with a metachronous renal tumour at a median of 3.0 years (range 0.3-16 years). Of the 17 metachronous tumours, eight were oncocytoma, four were RCC and five were not resected or biopsied. • Eleven metachronous tumours occurred after solitary unilateral oncocytoma, five occurred after multifocal unilateral oncocytoma, and one occurred after multifocal bilateral oncocytoma. • Estimated 10-year tumour-free and RCC tumour-free survival was 94.8% and 98.7%, respectively. Patients with primary multifocal oncocytoma were at higher risk of metachronous tumour (hazard ratio 4.0; P = 0.007). Initial oncocytoma size (hazard ratio 1.1; P = 0.11) was not highly associated with risk of tumour recurrence. • To our knowledge, we report the largest cohort of oncocytoma after surgical management. Metachronous renal neoplasm in a patient with previous oncocytoma is more likely to be benign compared with patients who present with a renal tumour for the first time. Multifocal primary oncocytoma is associated with metachronous renal tumours. • Overall, the risk of metachronous RCC in a patient with an oncocytoma is similar to that of the general population, which does not support the use of routine cross-sectioning imaging surveillance. © 2010 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2010 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  2. Wilms's tumour and aniridia: clinical and cytogenetic features.

    OpenAIRE

    Shannon, R S; Mann, J R; Harper, E; Harnden, D. G.; Morten, J E; Herbert, A.

    1982-01-01

    A survey carried out to detect children with aniridia/Wilms's tumour syndrome identified 8 living and 3 dead children. The incidence of aniridia was found to be 1 in 43 among Wilms's tumour patients in the UK. The clinical features included complete bilaterial aniridia, cataracts, glaucoma, mental retardation, hyperkinesis, hypospadias, and undescended testes. A high incidence of bilateral tumours (36%), male sex, presentation at a young age, and advanced maternal age appeared to be associate...

  3. Chondromyxoid Fibroma: An Unusual Tumour at An Atypical Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdary, Prashanth Basappa; Patil, Mallikarjuna Devaredappa; Govindarajan, Abhay Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Rib tumours are mostly secondaries arising from breast or prostrate malignancies. Among primary rib tumours, osteochondromas are reported as the commonest cause. Chondromyxoid fibromas are primary benign rib tumours that are seldom seen, occurring almost exclusively at the metaphyseal ends of large tubular bones. Here a case of chondromyxoid fibroma of rib, its clinical and radiological features, management and prognosis, is discussed which has only an occasional mention in literature.

  4. Resectability of advanced liver tumours in children after combination chemotherapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Munro, F D; Simpson, E.; Azmy, A. F.

    1994-01-01

    Five patients with locally advanced or metastatic liver tumours were treated at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children between 1983 and 1992 by preoperative combination chemotherapy and subsequent complete resection of the residual liver tumour. Chemotherapy was generally well tolerated with few significant adverse effects. Tumour resection was accomplished by lobectomy in three cases and an extended lobectomy in the remaining two. All five children are currently well and free of disease at a m...

  5. Immunisation of colorectal cancer patients with autologous tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt; Stenholm, A C; Kronborg, O

    1998-01-01

    Patients with colorectal cancer were entered into a clinical phase I trial of immunotherapy with an autologous tumour cell/bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. We attempted to describe the possible effects and side effects of the immunisation, and further to investigate whether expression...... of immune-response-related surface molecules on the tumour cells in the vaccine correlated with survival. The first and second vaccine comprised of 107 irradiated tumour cells mixed with BCG, the third of irradiated tumour cells only. Thirty-nine patients were considered, but only 6 patients fulfilled...

  6. Giant cell tumour of extensor tendon sheath: Preventing recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S S Shirol

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant Cell Tumour of tendon sheath is relatively rare tumour with an overall incidence of around 1 in 50,000 individuals. Marginal excision of giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath is the treatment of choice. It is also the commonest hand lesion to recur after excision. The incidence of local recurrence is high, ranging from 9-44%. Here we present a case report of a giant cell tumour of extensor tendon sheath in hand which was successfully treated with special emphasis on ways of prevention of recurrence.

  7. [Updates to the WHO classification of bone tumours].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jundt, G

    2017-12-19

    The fourth edition of the WHO Classification of Soft Tissue and Bone Tumours, published in 2013, extends the approach to describe genetics and pathology of these tumours in the context of epidemiological, clinical and imaging data, which was adopted in the third edition. Added are a few new entities, reclassifications and renamings. The most important point, also of clinical relevance and with consequences for treatment, is the introduction of a stratification of bone tumours based on their biological behaviour into three groups (benign, intermediate, malignant) in analogy to soft tissue tumours.

  8. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma: A rare salivary gland tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Jackson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC is a rare and recently described tumour of the salivary glands. MASC has similar histomorphological and immunohistochemical features of secretory carcinoma of the breast. MASC can be mistaken for other salivary gland tumours, especially acinic cell carcinoma. A 28-year-old man was diagnosed with a rare salivary gland tumour in Pretoria, South Africa (SA. To our knowledge, a report of MASC in SA has not previously been published. The surgeons dealing with salivary gland tumours should be aware of the clinical presentation. Current treatment is similar to that of other salivary gland malignancies.

  9. Metastatic breast cancer presenting as a primary hindgut neuroendocrine tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okines, Alicia F C; Hawkes, Eliza A; Rao, Sheela; VAN As, Nicholas; Marsh, Henry; Riddell, Angela; Wilson, Philip O G; Osin, Peter; Wotherspoon, Andrew C; Wetherspoon, Andrew C

    2010-07-01

    The examination of limited, potentially non-representative fragments of tumour tissue from a core biopsy can be misleading and misdirect subsequent treatment, especially in cases where a primary tumour has not been identified. This case report is of a 65-year-old woman presenting with a destructive sacral mass, diagnosed on radiological imaging and core biopsy as a hindgut neuroendocrine tumour, which on histopathological review of the subsequently resected tumour was found instead to represent a metastasis from an occult hormone-positive breast cancer with neuroendocrine features.

  10. Salivary gland tumours in a Mexican sample. A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Montes, C; Garces-Ortiz, M

    2002-01-01

    Salivary gland tumours are an important part of the Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, unfortunately, only few studies on these tumours have been done in Latin-American population. The aim of this study was to compare demographic data on salivary gland tumours in a Mexican sample with those previously published from Latin American and non-Latin American countries. All cases of salivary gland tumours or lesions diagnosed in our service were reviewed. Of the reviewed cases,67 were confirmed as salivary gland tumours. Out of these 64.2% were benign neoplasms, 35.8% were malignant and a slight female predominance (56.7%) was found. The most common location was palate followed by lips and floor of the mouth. Mean age for benign tumours was 40.6 years with female predominance (60.5%). Mean age for malignant tumours was 41 years and female predominance was found again. Palate followed by retromolar area were the usual locations. Pleomorphic adenoma (58.2%), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (17.9%) and adenoid cystic carcinoma (11.9%) were the more frequent neoplasms. All retromolar cases were malignant and all submandibular gland tumours were benign. We found a high proportion of salivary gland neoplasms in children. Our results showed that differences of the studied tumours among our sample and previously reported series exist. These differences can be related to race and geographical location.

  11. 3D Multiscale Modelling of Angiogenesis and Vascular Tumour Growth

    KAUST Repository

    Perfahl, H.

    2012-11-01

    We present a three-dimensional, multiscale model of vascular tumour growth, which couples nutrient/growth factor transport, blood flow, angiogenesis, vascular remodelling, movement of and interactions between normal and tumour cells, and nutrient-dependent cell cycle dynamics within each cell. We present computational simulations which show how a vascular network may evolve and interact with tumour and healthy cells. We also demonstrate how our model may be combined with experimental data, to predict the spatio-temporal evolution of a vascular tumour.

  12. Intraoperative ultrasound assistance in treatment of intradural spinal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Miller, Dorothea; Schulte, Dirk Michael; Benes, Ludwig; Bozinov, Oliver; Sure, Ulrich; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2011-09-01

    Currently, the standard practice to treat intradural spinal tumours involves microsurgical resection of the lesions. It is essential to be able to locate the lesion precisely to reduce the risk of neurological morbidity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate intraoperative ultrasonography (IOUS) in visualizing intradural spinal tumours, and assess its potential to improve surgical precision and minimize surgical trauma. Between January 2006 and July 2007, 30 patients with suspected intradural spinal tumours underwent surgery with the aid of IOUS. There were 13 patients with intramedullary tumours (ependymoma=2, astrocytoma=5, hemangioblastoma=2 and metastasis=4); and 14 patients with extramedullary tumours (meningioma=6, neurinoma=6, filum terminale ependymoma=1 and lipoma=1). In 3 patients histopathology did not reveal any neoplasm despite an MRI suggesting tumour. Their sonographic features are analyzed and the advantages of IOUS are discussed. The shape and expansion of intradural tumours could be visualized on IOUS. The sonographic visualization allowed adapting the approach to an appropriate location and size before dura opening. Certain sonographic features can be used for a differential diagnosis of different intradural tumours. In addition, IOUS can inform neurosurgeons about the location of the neoplastic tissue, its relation to the spinal cord and the size of residual tumour following excision. IOUS is a sensitive intraoperative tool. When appropriately applied to assist surgical procedures, it offers additional intraoperative information that helps to improve surgical precision and therefore might reduce the procedure related morbidity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma: A rare salivary gland tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, B S; Pratt, T L; Van Rooyen, A

    2017-03-29

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a rare and recently described tumour of the salivary glands. MASC has similar histomorphological and immunohistochemical features of secretory carcinoma of the breast. MASC can be mistaken for other salivary gland tumours, especially acinic cell carcinoma. A 28-year-old man was diagnosed with a rare salivary gland tumour in Pretoria, South Africa (SA). To our knowledge, a report of MASC in SA has not previously been published. The surgeons dealing with salivary gland tumours should be aware of the clinical presentation. Current treatment is similar to that of other salivary gland malignancies.

  14. Giant cell tumour of talar body.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bapat M

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumour (osteoclastoma of talar bone is a rare entity and is seen more commonly in the third decade of life. We report this disease entity in a 17-years-old girl. The patient presented with painful swelling of the left ankle with an osteolytic lesion in the talus on conventional radiographs. Intralesional curettage and autologous bone grafting was performed following which patient′s pain and swelling disappeared. Complete range of movement at the ankle joint was regained with minimal restriction at the subtalar joint. There is no evidence of relapse at six months follow up.

  15. Personalization of the medical treatment of solid tumours using patient-derived tumour explants (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louandre, Christophe; Donnadieu, Jérome; Lachaier, Emma; Page, Cyril; Chauffert, Bruno; Galmiche, Antoine

    2016-03-01

    Improving the pre-clinical characterization of therapeutic approaches and developing new biological assays that will enable treatment personalization for individual patients are promising developments in oncology. Here we describe a new approach consisting of culturing human tumour explants. This approach involves the preparation of slices from freshly-obtained, surgically-resected material that can be maintained ex vivo for several days. Recent studies have provided proof of principle that this approach can be easily implemented in order to explore the mode of action of various anticancer drugs and the responses of 'real' tumours at the individual patient level. We present the practical aspects and highlight the versatility of this approach, which allows for the analysis of the susceptibility of any individual tumour to multiple anticancer drugs in parallel. We discuss its potential as a companion assay in the design of optimal clinical trials and as a guide for the prescription of medical treatment. We discuss which future clinical and biological studies are needed to validate the information gathered from cultured tumour explants, and to integrate this information with that gathered from other assays in order to optimize the medical treatment of cancer.

  16. Tumour bed irradiation of human tumour xenografts in a nude rat ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    for radiotherapy of human non-small cell lung cancer xenograft tumours transplanted to and growing subcutaneously on the right lower limb in a nude rat model were investigated. Procedures and results described herein prove the feasibility of use of the device, which is applicable for any investigation involving irradiation ...

  17. Primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the kidney with vena caval and atrial tumour thrombus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong Poh

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Renal primitive neuroectodermal tumour is an extremely rare malignancy. Case presentation A 21-year-old woman presented with microscopic haematuria, a palpable right loin mass, dyspnoea, dizziness and fatigue. Initial ultrasound scan of the kidneys revealed an 11 cm right renal mass with venous extension into the inferior vena cava. Computed tomography of the thorax and abdomen revealed an extension of the large renal mass into the right renal vein, inferior vena cava and up to the right atrium. A small paracaval lymph node was noted and three small metastatic nodules were identified within the lung parenchyma. The patient underwent a radical nephrectomy and inferior vena caval tumour (level IV thrombectomy with cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Immunohistochemical staining of the specimen showed a highly specific cluster of differentiation (CD 99, thus confirming the diagnosis of a primitive neuroectodermal tumour. Conclusion It is important that a renal primitive neuroectodermal tumour be considered, particularly in young patients with a renal mass and extensive thrombus.

  18. PMP27 PROMOTES PEROXISOMAL PROLIFERATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MARSHALL, PA; KRIMKEVICH, YI; LARK, RH; DYER, JM; VEENHUIS, M; GOODMAN, JM; Krimkevich, Yelena I.; Lark, Richard H.; Dyer, John M.; Goodman, Joel M.

    Peroxisomes perform many essential functions in eukaryotic cells. The weight of evidence indicates that these organelles divide by budding from preexisting peroxisomes. This process is not understood at the molecular level. Peroxisomal proliferation can be induced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by

  19. CSE1L/CAS, the cellular apoptosis susceptibility protein, enhances invasion and metastasis but not proliferation of cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ying-Chun

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CAS protein is regarded as a proliferation-associated protein that associates with tumour proliferation as it associates with microtubule and functions in the mitotic spindle checkpoint. However, there is no any actual experimental study showing CAS (or CSE1 and CSE1L can increase the proliferation of cancer cells. Previous pathological study has reported that CAS was strongly positive stained in all of the metastasis melanoma that be examined. Thus, CAS may regulate the invasion and metastasis of cancers. CAS is highly expressed in cancers; if CAS is associated with cancer proliferation, then increased CAS expression should be able to increase the proliferation of cancer cells. We studied whether increased CAS expression can increase cancer cell proliferation and whether CAS regulates the invasion of cancer cells. Methods We enhanced or reduced CAS expression by transfecting CAS or anti-CAS expression vectors into human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The proliferations of cells were determined by trypan blue exclusion assay and flow cytometry analysis. Invasion of cancer cells were determined by matrigel-based invasion assay. Results Our studies showed that increased CAS expression was unable to enhance cancer cell proliferation. Immunofluorescence showed CAS was distributed in cytoplasm areas near cell membrane and cell protrusions. CAS was localized in cytoplasmic vesicle and immunogold electronmicroscopy showed CAS was located in vesicle membrane. CAS overexpression enhanced matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 secretion and cancer cell invasion. Animal experiments showed CAS reduction inhibited the metastasis of B16-F10 melanoma cells by 56% in C57BL/6 mice. Conclusion Our results indicate that CAS increases the invasion but not the proliferation of cancer cells. Thus, CAS plus ECM-degradation proteinases may be used as the markers for predicting the advance of tumour metastasis.

  20. Rapid Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  1. Cell Proliferation and Cytotoxicity Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adan, Aysun; Kiraz, Yağmur; Baran, Yusuf

    Cell viability is defined as the number of healthy cells in a sample and proliferation of cells is a vital indicator for understanding the mechanisms in action of certain genes, proteins and pathways involved cell survival or death after exposing to toxic agents. Generally, methods used to determine viability are also common for the detection of cell proliferation. Cell cytotoxicity and proliferation assays are generally used for drug screening to detect whether the test molecules have effects on cell proliferation or display direct cytotoxic effects. Regardless of the type of cell-based assay being used, it is important to know how many viable cells are remaining at the end of the experiment. There are a variety of assay methods based on various cell functions such as enzyme activity, cell membrane permeability, cell adherence, ATP production, co-enzyme production, and nucleotide uptake activity. These methods could be basically classified into different categories: (I) dye exclusion methods such as trypan blue dye exclusion assay, (II) methods based on metabolic activity, (III) ATP assay, (IV) sulforhodamine B assay, (V) protease viability marker assay, (VI) clonogenic cell survival assay, (VII) DNA synthesis cell proliferation assays and (V) raman micro-spectroscopy. In order to choose the optimal viability assay, the cell type, applied culture conditions, and the specific questions being asked should be considered in detail. This particular review aims to provide an overview of common cell proliferation and cytotoxicity assays together with their own advantages and disadvantages, their methodologies, comparisons and intended purposes.

  2. Anti-tumour effect of metformin in canine mammary gland tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, K; Watanabe, M; Tsuboi, M; Sugano, S; Yoshitake, R; Tanaka, Y; Ong, S M; Saito, T; Matsumoto, K; Fujita, N; Nishimura, R; Nakagawa, T

    2015-08-01

    Metformin is an oral hypoglycaemic drug used in type 2 diabetes. Its pharmacological activity reportedly involves mitochondrial respiratory complex I, and mitochondrial respiratory complex inhibitors have a strong inhibitory effect on the growth of metastatic canine mammary gland tumour (CMGT) cell lines. It is hypothesised that metformin has selective anti-tumour effects on metastatic CMGT cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro effect of metformin on cell growth, production of ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in two CMGT clonal cell lines with different metastatic potential. In addition, transcriptome analysis was used to determine cellular processes disrupted by metformin and in vivo anti-tumour effects were examined in a mouse xenograft model. Metformin inhibited CMGT cell growth in vitro, with the metastatic clone (CHMp-5b) displaying greater sensitivity. ATP depletion and ROS elevation were observed to a similar extent in the metastatic and non-metastatic (CHMp-13a) cell lines after metformin exposure. However, subsequent AMPK activation and mTOR pathway inhibition were prominent only in metformin-insensitive non-metastatic cells. Microarray analysis revealed inhibition of cell cycle progression by metformin treatment in CHMp-5b cells, which was further confirmed by Western blotting and cell cycle analysis. Additionally, metformin significantly suppressed tumour growth in xenografted metastatic CMGT cells. In conclusion, metformin exhibited an anti-tumour effect in metastatic CMGT cells through AMPK-independent cell cycle arrest. Its mechanism of action differed in the non-metastatic clone, where AMPK activation and mTOR inhibition were observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mutant p53 accumulates in cycling and proliferating cells in the normal tissues of p53 R172H mutant mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leushacke, Marc; Li, Ling; Wong, Julin S.; Chiam, Poh Cheang; Rahmat, Siti Aishah Binte; Mann, Michael B.; Mann, Karen M.; Barker, Nick; Lozano, Guillermina; Terzian, Tamara; Lane, David P.

    2015-01-01

    The tumour suppressor p53 is regulated primarily at the protein level. In normal tissues its levels are maintained at a very low level by the action of specific E3 ligases and the ubiquitin proteosome pathway. The mutant p53 protein contributes to transformation, metastasis and drug resistance. High levels of mutant p53 can be found in tumours and the accumulation of mutant p53 has previously been reported in pathologically normal cells in human skin. We show for the first time that similarly elevated levels of mutant p53 can be detected in apparently normal cells in a mutant p53 knock-in mouse model. In fact, in the small intestine, mutant p53 spontaneously accumulates in a manner dependent on gene dosage and cell type. Mutant p53 protein is regulated similarly to wild type p53, which can accumulate rapidly after induction by ionising radiation or Mdm2 inhibitors, however, the clearance of mutant p53 protein is much slower than wild type p53. The accumulation of the protein in the murine small intestine is limited to the cycling, crypt base columnar cells and proliferative zone and is lost as the cells differentiate and exit the cell cycle. Loss of Mdm2 results in even higher levels of p53 expression but p53 is still restricted to proliferating cells in the small intestine. Therefore, the small intestine of these p53 mutant mice is an experimental system in which we can dissect the molecular pathways leading to p53 accumulation, which has important implications for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:26255629

  4. MRI of intracranial germ-cell tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, L.; Korogi, Y.; Sugahara, T.; Ikushima, I.; Shigematsu, Y.; Okuda, T.; Takahashi, M. [Department of Radiology, Kumamoto University School of Medicine (Japan); Kochi, M.; Ushio, Y. [Department of Neurosurgery, Kumamoto University School of Medicine (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    Abstract. Our aim was to review the MRI appearances of primary intracranial germ-cell tumours (GCT). We reviewed the MRI studies of 32 patients: 19 with germinomas, five with teratomas, one with an embryonal carcinoma, five with mixed and two with malignant nongerminomatous GCT. Eleven were in the pineal region, 12 suprasellar, five in the both sites, two in the basal ganglia and two in the corpus callosum. Contrast-enhanced images were available for 27 patients. The solid parts of GCT were nearly isointense with grey matter on both T1- and T2-weighted images. In seven patients with nongerminomatous GCT high-signal components were found on T1-weighted images, representing haemorrhage, high-protein fluid or fat. Cystic components were detected in 17 of 27 patients; eight germinomas and all nine nongerminomatous GCT had cysts. The solid components of germinomas enhanced homogeneously in eight cases and heterogeneously in 10, while all nongerminomatous GCT showed heterogeneous enhancement. MRI features tumours can facilitate correct diagnosis of GCT, including histological subtypes. (orig.)

  5. Carcinogenicity/tumour promotion by NDL PCB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrenk, D. [Kaiserslautern Univ. (Germany). Food Chemistry and Environmental Toxicology

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) belong to the group of persistent environmental pollutants exhibiting neurotoxic, teratogenic and tumour-promoting effects in experimental animal models. PCB congeners can be divided into 'dioxinlike' and 'non-dioxinlike' congeners on the basis of their ability to act as aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Like the most toxic dioxin congener 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) 'dioxinlike' PCBs bind to the AhR and show characteristic effects on the expression of AhR-regulated genes including the induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1. On the other hand, 'non-dioxinlike' PCB congeners have a lower or no binding affinity to the AhR, but exhibit a 'phenobarbital-type' induction of CYP 2B1/2 activity. A carcinogenic potential of PCBs has been demonstrated with technical mixtures such as Aroclors or Clophens. In these studies the liver and the thyroid gland were found to be the principal target organs of PCB-mediated carcinogenesis in rodents. No studies have been published, however, on the carcinogenicity of individual congeners. In two-stage initiation-promotion protocols in rats, both technical mixtures and individual 'dioxinlike' and 'non-dioxinlike' congeners were reported to act as liver tumour promoters.

  6. Primary malignant bone tumours in Ibadan, Nigeria: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omololu, A B; Okolo, C A; Ogunlade, S O; Oyebadejo, T Y; Adeoye, A O; Ogunbiyi, J O; Akang, E E; Gopaldasani, V K

    2009-03-01

    Bone tumours are relatively rare compared to tumours of other sites. The frequency of primary malignant bone tumours is low in our environment, as was observed in an earlier study. The aim of this study is to update the information available on the pattern of primary malignant bone tumours at the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria. The medical records of 49 patients with malignant bone tumours documented in the Cancer Registry of UCH, Ibadan between January 2001 and September 2007 were reviewed retrospectively. The results were then added to those of the previous study published in 2002. This brought the number of cases of primary malignant bone tumours to 163 from January 1977 to September 2007. Primary malignant bone tumours represented 0.53% of the 30462 cases of cancer seen in the hospital in the period studied. The male female ratio was 1.5:1. About 44% of the tumours occurred among patients less than 20 years of age. Osteogenic sarcoma was the commonest malignant bone tumour. Important changes recorded in the seven years since the last review from this centre include; a rise in the prevalence rate of primary malignant bone tumours (49 new cases in the last seven years as compared to 114 cases over 23 years), the male-female ratio of Osteogenic sarcoma showed a decline (1.5:1 as compared to 1.6:1), and there was an increase in the prevalence of primary malignant bone tumours in the 0-9 years and > 60 years age groups. The significance of these findings will need to be determined by further studies.

  7. Monitoring of in vivo function of superparamagnetic iron oxide labelled murine dendritic cells during anti-tumour vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Tavaré

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs generated in vitro to present tumour antigens have been injected in cancer patients to boost in vivo anti-tumour immune responses. This approach to cancer immunotherapy has had limited success. For anti-tumour therapy, delivery and subsequent migration of DCs to lymph nodes leading to effective stimulation of effector T cells is thought to be essential. The ability to non-invasively monitor the fate of adoptively transferred DCs in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is an important clinical tool to correlate their in vivo behavior with response to treatment. Previous reports of superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs labelling of different cell types, including DCs, have indicated varying detrimental effects on cell viability, migration, differentiation and immune function. Here we describe an optimised labelling procedure using a short incubation time and low concentration of clinically used SPIO Endorem to successfully track murine DC migration in vivo using MRI in a mouse tumour model. First, intracellular labelling of bone marrow derived DCs was monitored in vitro using electron microscopy and MRI relaxometry. Second, the in vitro characterisation of SPIO labelled DCs demonstrated that viability, phenotype and functions were comparable to unlabelled DCs. Third, ex vivo SPIO labelled DCs, when injected subcutaneously, allowed for the longitudinal monitoring by MR imaging of their migration in vivo. Fourth, the SPIO DCs induced the proliferation of adoptively transferred CD4(+ T cells but, most importantly, they primed cytotoxic CD8(+ T cell responses to protect against a B16-Ova tumour challenge. Finally, using anatomical information from the MR images, the immigration of DCs was confirmed by the increase in lymph node size post-DC injection. These results demonstrate that the SPIO labelling protocol developed in this study is not detrimental for DC function in vitro and in vivo has potential clinical application in

  8. Radiolabelled somatostatin analogue treatment in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: factors associated with response and suggestions for therapeutic sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campana, Davide; Nori, Francesca; Cacciari, Giulia; Tomassetti, Paola [University of Bologna, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Bologna (Italy); Capurso, Gabriele; Panzuto, Francesco; Delle Fave, Gianfranco [University of Rome, Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Rome (Italy); Partelli, Stefano [Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Hospital, Department of Surgery, Negrar (Italy); University of Verona, Department of Surgery, Verona (Italy); Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Pancreas Surgical Unit, Ancona (Italy); Tamburrino, Domenico; Falconi, Massimo [University of Verona, Department of Surgery, Verona (Italy); Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Pancreas Surgical Unit, Ancona (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a relatively new treatment modality for patients with unresectable or metastatic gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP NETs). The aim of this study was to determine the time to progression of patients treated with PRRT and to identify the prognostic factors related to treatment response. Patients with sporadic GEP NETs prospectively treated with PRRT were retrospectively analysed. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). A total of 69 patients (37 men and 32 women; 45 with pancreatic and 24 with gastrointestinal lesion; 22 NET G1 and 41 NET G2) were treated with {sup 90}Y or {sup 177}Lu. The objective response rate was 27.5 % (partial response, PR), while 50.7 % had stable disease and 23.2 % had progressive disease. Significant differences in PFS were observed in relationship to the stage of the disease (44 months for stage III, 23 months for stage IV), the evidence of a PR 6 months after the end of the PRRT (39 months in patients with a PR, 22 months in patients without a PR) and previous transarterial chemoembolization (TACE, yes 13 months vs no 31 months). Stage IV, NET G2 and previous TACE were found to be significant factors for tumour progression at multivariate analysis. Low tumour burden and a low proliferation index represent independent prognostic factors for long PFS, while previous chemoembolization techniques represent independent prognostic factors for early tumour progression and shorter PFS. Our data suggest that chemoembolization techniques to reduce the hepatic tumour burden should be avoided. (orig.)

  9. Crystalline silica-induced leukotriene B4-dependent inflammation promotes lung tumour growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpathy, Shuchismita R; Jala, Venkatakrishna R; Bodduluri, Sobha R; Krishnan, Elangovan; Hegde, Bindu; Hoyle, Gary W; Fraig, Mostafa; Luster, Andrew D; Haribabu, Bodduluri

    2015-04-29

    Chronic exposure to crystalline silica (CS) causes silicosis, an irreversible lung inflammatory disease that may eventually lead to lung cancer. In this study, we demonstrate that in K-ras(LA1) mice, CS exposure markedly enhances the lung tumour burden and genetic deletion of leukotriene B4 receptor-1 (BLT1(-/-)) attenuates this increase. Pulmonary neutrophilic inflammation induced by CS is significantly reduced in BLT1(-/-)K-ras(LA1) mice. CS exposure induces LTB4 production by mast cells and macrophages independent of inflammasome activation. In an air-pouch model, CS-induced neutrophil recruitment is dependent on LTB4 production by mast cells and BLT1 expression on neutrophils. In an implantable lung tumour model, CS exposure results in rapid tumour growth and decreased survival that is attenuated in the absence of BLT1. These results suggest that the LTB4/BLT1 axis sets the pace of CS-induced sterile inflammation that promotes lung cancer progression. This knowledge may facilitate development of immunotherapeutic strategies to fight silicosis and lung cancer.

  10. Pathological and ultrasonic features of urinary bladder tumours | Ma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bladder tumour is a leading type of urinary tract malignancy after the prostate. This study was carried out to analyse the pathological and ultrasonographic features of urinary bladder tumours. Method: Ninety six consecutive patients were reviewed prospectively between, September 2004 and December 2007.

  11. Hand Tumours in Lagos, Nigeria: A Clinicopathologic Study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hand tumours occur infrequently and are commonly benign, however when malignant they could be life threatening. This study was aimed at determining the prevalence, demographics, the clinical presentations and treatment outcome of hand tumours among patients attending the hand service of the Lagos ...

  12. Neuroendocrine tumour in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-26

    Jun 26, 2015 ... concomitant gastrin-producing neuroendocrine tumour was found. Neuroendocrine tumours. (NETs) are very rare neoplasms originating from a wide variety of endocrine and nervous system tissue with the ability to produce different hormones. A somatostatin- and gastrin- secreting NET in a patient with HIV ...

  13. Tumours and cancers in Graeco-Roman times | Retief | Acta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Graeco-Roman times all tumours (Greek: onkoi, abnormal swellings) were considered to be of inflammatory origin, the result of unfavourable humoural fluxes, and caused by an extravascular outpouring of fluid into tissue spaces. The neoplastic nature of tumours is a more recent concept, barely two centuries old.

  14. Tumours and cancers in Graeco-Roman times | Retief | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Graeco-Roman times all tumours (Greek: onkoi, abnormal swellings) were considered to be of inflammatory origin, the result of unfavourable humoural fluxes, and caused by an extravascular outpouring of fluid into tissue spaces. The neoplastic nature of tumours is a more recent concept, barely two centuries old.

  15. Histopathological Study of 66 Germ Cell Tumours Seen in Maiduguri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective study of 66 histologically diagnosed teratomas in the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, in North Eastern part of Nigeria from January 1990 to December 2001 was carried out to analyze the age, gender, anatomical site and the hitological types. The tumours represented 2.1% of all tumours ...

  16. The neuropsychiatry of brain tumours | Oosthuizen | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Every psychiatrist who has worked in the clinical field for some time will be able to relate a story of a patient who presented with psychiatric symptoms but eventually turned out to have a brain tumour. We all fear that someday we will misdiagnose a brain tumour and therefore fail to save a patient's life. The purpose of this ...

  17. Minor salivary gland tumours in Kaduna, Nigeria | Ajike | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the incidence, clinical presentation and management of minor salivary gland tumours at the Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Kaduna, Nigeria. Methods: Retrospective study of minor salivary gland tumours at Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Kaduna, Nigeria. Results: The ...

  18. Tumour marker expression in blood and lymphatic vessels of human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The behaviour of tumours cannot be effectively assessed on histological tissue sections only, hence, specific bi-ological markers were used to predict tumour behaviour. The biological markers at the same time must provide prognostic information, necessary for the treatment of patients. The immunostaining of antibodies ...

  19. Neural tumours of the head and neck | Chindia | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To document the pattern of occurrence of all primary neural tumours arising in the neck and craniofacial region over the period 1982 to 1991. Design: A retrospective study. Setting: Cancer Registry, Nairobi, Kenya. Results: Out of the 289 cases who were identified to have had whole body neural tumours, ...

  20. Primary cardiac tumours in a paediatric population: An experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: To observe the histopathological spectrum of primary cardiac tumours in paediatric population those came in Pathology Department over a period of last 16 years. Materials and Methods: During the time period of 16 years (1995-2010), we had received 16 cases of primary cardiac tumours in paediatric patients ...

  1. Gene expression profiling of breast tumours from New Zealand patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukaruppan, Anita; Lasham, Annette; Blenkiron, Cherie; Woad, Kathryn J; Black, Michael A; Knowlton, Nicholas; McCarthy, Nicole; Findlay, Michael P; Print, Cristin G; Shelling, Andrew N

    2017-10-27

    New Zealand has one of the highest rates of breast cancer incidence in the world. We investigated the gene expression profiles of breast tumours from New Zealand patients, compared them to gene expression profiles of international breast cancer cohorts and identified any associations between altered gene expression and the clinicopathological features of the tumours. Affymetrix microarrays were used to measure the gene expression profiles of 106 breast tumours from New Zealand patients. Gene expression data from six international breast cancer cohorts were collated, and all the gene expression data were analysed using standard bioinformatic and statistical tools. Gene expression profiles associated with tumour ER and ERBB2 status, molecular subtype and selected gene expression signatures within the New Zealand cohort were consistent with those found in international cohorts. Significant differences in clinicopathological features such as tumour grade, tumour size and lymph node status were also observed between the New Zealand and international cohorts. Gene expression profiles, which are a sensitive indicator of tumour biology, showed no clear difference between breast tumours from New Zealand patients and those from non-New Zealand patients. This suggests that other factors may contribute to the high and increasing breast cancer incidence in New Zealand compared to international populations.

  2. Psychiatric manifestations of brain tumours: a review | Magoha | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To carry out a current review of psychiatric manifestations of brain tumours. Data Source: To carry out a review of psychiatric manifestations of brain tumours utilizing electronic databases in the internet including Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline, MedScape and Psych Info Searches. Data Extraction: Abstracts of ...

  3. Incidence of Brain Tumours at an Academic Centre in Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the incidence of brain tumours at King AbdulAziz University Hospital (KAUH) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, over eight year period. Design: Retrospective study. Sitting: King Abdul Aziz University Hospital in Jeddah Saudi Arabia. Subjects: Patients with intracranial tumours. Results: The overall average ...

  4. Multicentre study of Wilm's tumours treated by different therapeutic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) have helped to improve the clinical management and outcome of patients with Wilm's tumours. In this study, we compared three groups of patients with Wilm's tumours from different racial backgrounds and therapeutic strategies. Patients and methods A clinicopathological ...

  5. a review of 156 odontogenic tumours in calabar, nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-09-01

    Sep 1, 2014 ... 1Oral and Maxillofacial Unit, Department of Dental Surgery, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Cala- bar, Nigeria, 2Department of Oral ... genic tumours in our centre in order to obtain a base- line data and subsequently ..... tumour-like lesions of the oral cavity and related structures in Israeli children.

  6. Granular cell tumour of the larynx - A case report | Appiah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present the case due to the rarity of the laryngeal granular cell tumour and the need to highlight the importance of taking deep biopsies. If biopsies are superficial, an inexperienced pathologist would mistake it for well differentiated carcinoma. Keywords: Granular cell tumour, larynx, cordectomy, laryngofissure ...

  7. Testicular adrenal rest tumours in congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claahsen-van der Grinten, H.L.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Otten, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    In adult patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), the presence of testicular adrenal rest tumours (TART) is an important complication leading to gonadal dysfunction and infertility. These tumours can be already found in childhood and puberty. In this paper, we review the embryological,

  8. Testicular Adrenal Rest Tumours in Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claahsen-van der Grinten, H. L.; Hermus, A. R. M. M.; Otten, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    In adult patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), the presence of testicular adrenal rest tumours (TART) is an important complication leading to gonadal dysfunction and infertility. These tumours can be already found in childhood and puberty. In this paper, we review the embryological, histological, biochemical, and clinical features of TART and discuss treatment options. PMID:19956703

  9. Testicular Adrenal Rest Tumours in Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otten BJ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In adult patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH, the presence of testicular adrenal rest tumours (TART is an important complication leading to gonadal dysfunction and infertility. These tumours can be already found in childhood and puberty. In this paper, we review the embryological, histological, biochemical, and clinical features of TART and discuss treatment options.

  10. Descriptive pattern of Benign Salivary Gland Tumours in Jos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: This was a descriptive study of all histotogically confirmed benign salivary gland tumours over a period of ten years. The slides were reported independently by four pathologists. Diagnosis was made and classification done according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of salivary gland tumours.

  11. The effectiveness of ultrasound in the diagnosis of bladder tumours ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of an ultrasound in diagnosis of bladder tumours has been investigated by different authors. Some have questioned its effectiveness while others have considered the technique to be an important tool in the initial evaluation of bladder tumours. This study was carried out to establish the effectiveness of the ...

  12. Small Bowel Obstruction caused by a Carcinoid Tumour | Shallaly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a rare case of carcinoid tumour presenting as a small bowel obstruction in a young male patient. Pitfalls of diagnosis, including confusion with irritable bowel syndrome are high-lighted. The current management strategies of this tumour are reviewed. Keywords: irritable bowel, appendicitis, choleystitis.

  13. Malignant Gastrointestinal Tumours in South Western Nigeria: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Malignant tumours of the gastro-intestinal tract are not as rare as previous studies suggest. Recent studies have indicated increasing incidence. OBJECTIVE: To document the pattern, age and sex distribution as well as histopathology characteristics of malignant tumours of the gastro-intestinal system in ...

  14. Paediatric solid tumours in Nigerian children: A changing pattern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The following study was a 5-year retrospective review of paediatric solid tumours as seen at the Jos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Objective: To determine the relative frequencies of childhood solid malignant tumours in Jos, Central Nigeria and compare with reports of previous studies both locally and abroad.

  15. Surgical Considerations in the Management of Tumours of the Nose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Tumours of the nose and paranasal sinuses in sub-Saharan Africa are generally characterised by late presentation posing management challenges to the otorhinolaryngologists in the sub-region. OBJECTIVES: To appraise surgical considerations in the management of tumours of the nose and paranasal ...

  16. Oral Tumours In Zaria | Rafindadi | Nigerian Journal of Surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The malignant tumours were made up of 115 squamous cell carcinomas; 6 fibrosarcomas; 4 malignant melanomas; 2 heamangiopericytomas; and 27 unclassified malignant lesions. The M:F ratio was 2.3:1 for malignant tumours. It is concluded that squamous cell carcinoma is the commonest oral neoplasm seen in Zaria ...

  17. Challenging investigation of a metastatic adnexal cutaneous tumour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hupfeld, Line; Kallenbach, Klaus; Klausen, Siri

    2014-01-01

    Adnexal cutaneous tumours are very rare. A lack of knowledge about their clinical presentations can lead to prolonged diagnostic investigations and disease progression. This case report presents a challenging investigation of a metastatic malignant adnexal tumour due to misleading histology......, immunohistochemical analysis and clinical findings....

  18. tumours and cancers in graeco-roman times 1. introduction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    either gradually absorbed, discharged as septic residue (abscess), or remained indefinitely as a tumour which could .... tumours (possibly renal cysts or abscesses) associated with kidney stones in Nature of Man c.14. ... fleshy protuberances), and gingival gumboils as parulides, while the term. 19 Airs, waters and places 7; ...

  19. [Thyroid ectopic tumour in the right ventricle of the heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennira, S; Mahfoudhi, H; Zairi, I; Ben Moussa, F; Slimane, M L; Kraiem, S; Thameur, H; Dellagi, K

    2011-08-01

    The intracardiac ectopic thyroid tumour is rare. We report the case of a woman who was admitted for exertional dyspnea. The echocardiography revealed an obstructive tumor in the right ventricular outflow tract. Histological examination of the removed tumour showed the ectopic follicular thyroid tissue. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary malignant bone tumour in a tropical African University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osteogenic sarcoma was the most common primary malignant bone tumour while the mandible was the most commonly affected bone. In contrast to previous studies, Burkitt's lymphoma affected the mandible more commonly than the maxilla. The relative frequency of primary malignant bone tumours is low in our ...

  1. Histopathological Features of Tumours of the Orbit and Adnexia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVE: This study was to determine and report the histological types of orbital and adnexal tumours seen in the eye unit in Korle-bu Teaching Hospital METHODS:This was a retrospective study of orbital and adnexal tumours in a referral orbit and oculoplastic clinic in a teaching hospital in Ghana. Biopsy specimen ...

  2. A short history of neuroendocrine tumours and their peptide hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Herder, Wouter W; Rehfeld, Jens F; Kidd, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas started in 1870, when Rudolf Heidenhain discovered the neuroendocrine cells, which can lead to the development of these tumours. Siegfried Oberndorfer was the first to introduce the term carcinoid in 1907. The panc...

  3. Epidemiology of childhood cancer and the SACCSG tumour regis try

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In South Africa leukaemia is the most common malignancy in childhood, representing 25.35% of all cancers, which is similar to rates in other countries. While brain tumours and leukaemia comprise almost half of childhood malignancies in developed countries, in South Africa brain tumours represent only 13.44% of the total.

  4. Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour in a supratentorial location

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cerebro spinal fluid seeding, as in our second patient,[4] which led to their death. e entire CNS must therefore be imaged at presentation to identify subarachnoid spread of the tumour. e differential diagnosis for atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour includes. PNET, medulloblastoma, high-grade glioma and teratoma.[1,3,6].

  5. Predictive model for functional consequences of oral cavity tumour resections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alphen, M.J.A.; Hageman, T.A.G.; Hageman, Tijmen Antoon Geert; Smeele, L.E.; Balm, Alfonsus Jacobus Maria; Balm, A.J.M.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Lemke, H.U.

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of functional consequences after treatment of large oral cavity tumours is mainly based on the size and location of the tumour. However, patient specific factors play an important role in the functional outcome, making the current predictions unreliable and subjective. An objective

  6. Indications for Ablative Surgery in Extremity Musculoskeletal Tumours

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Surgical options for treatment of extremity musculoskeletal tumours include excision [limb sparing] surgery or amputation [limb ablation]. Ablative surgery is for advanced extremity musculoskeletal tumours when limb salvage surgery is not feasible. Objective: To determine the indications for ablative surgery in ...

  7. Breast tumours of adolescents in an African population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umanah Ivy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tumours of the breast are uncommon in childhood and adolescence. Patients in this age group often require a different approach to diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this study is to highlight the clinicopathologic features of breast tumours in adolescents in a Nigerian city. Materials and Methods: Eighty-four breast tumour materials from patients aged 10-19 years were analyzed over a 10-year period at the Department of Pathology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH, Benin City, Edo State, Benin City, Nigeria. Results: A majority of the breast tumours were benign. Fibroadenoma was the most common tumour with 46 cases (54.8%, followed by fibrocystic changes with 15 cases (17%. Malignancy was extremely rare in this group, with only one case (1.2% of an invasive ductal carcinoma. Histologically, most tumours were indistinguishable from the adult types. Conclusion: Fibroadenoma is the most common breast tumour in adolescents in Benin City, Nigeria. Breast cancer and male breast tumours are rare in this age group. Routine complete physical examination of children and adolescents should include breast examination.

  8. Influence of honey bee products on transplantable murine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsolić, N; Knezević, A; Sver, L; Terzić, S; Hackenberger, B K; Basić, I

    2003-12-01

    The effect of propolis [it is a water-soluble derivative (WSDP)] and related polyphenolic compounds of propolis (caffeic acid, caffeic acid phenethyl ester and quercetin), honey, royal jelly and bee venom on tumour growth, metastasizing ability and induction of apoptosis and necrosis in murine tumour models (mammary carcinoma and colon carcinoma) was investigated. WSDP and related polyphenolic compounds showed significant anti-metastatic effect (P Honey also exerted pronounced anti-metastatic effect (P bee venom injection, the number of tumour nodules in the lung was significantly lower (P bee venom subcutaneously. Local presence of bee venom in the tissue caused significant delay in subcutaneous tumour formation. These findings clearly demonstrate that anti-tumour and anti-metastatic effects of bee venom are highly dependent on the route of injection and on close contact between components of the bee venom and tumour cells. These data show that honey bee products given orally or systemically may have an important role in the control of tumour growth and tumour metastasizing ability.

  9. Huge Symptomatic Brenner Tumour Simulating Uterine Fibroid: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    Background. Brenner tumours are rare ovarian neoplasms which are frequently so small and symptomless as to be incidental findings at laparotomies for other conditions. The occurrence of a huge symptomatic Brenner tumour is even rarer in our environment. Our objective is to report a case of huge symptomatic Brenner ...

  10. Tumours and cancers in Graeco-Roman times | Retief | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Graeco-Roman times all tumours (Greek: onkoi, abnormal swellings) were considered to be of inflammatory origin, the result of unfavourable hurnoural fluxes, and caused by an extravascular outpouring of fluid into tissue spaces. The neoplastic nature of tumours is a ... Metrics Loading ... Metrics powered by PLOS ALM.

  11. Molecular and clinical aspects of borderline ovarian tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbruggen, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis the molecular and clinical aspects of borderline ovarian tumours are discussed. In chapter 2 the prognostic and clinical value of morphometry and DNA cytology is studied in 93 borderline ovarian tumours (BOTs) after previous research that claimed prognostic power for these indicators.

  12. A pictorial review of imaging of abdominal tumours in adolescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasalkar, Darshana D.; Chu, Winnie C.W. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Cheng, Frankie W.T.; Li, Chi Kong [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Shatin, Hong Kong (China); Hui, Sze Ki [Princess Margaret Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hong Kong (China); Ling, Siu Cheung [Princess Margaret Hospital, Department of Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Hong Kong (China)

    2010-09-15

    Neoplastic abdominal tumours, particularly those originating from embryonal tissue (such as hepatoblastoma and nephroblastoma) and neural crest cells (such as neuroblastoma), are well-documented in young children. Neoplasms of adulthood, most commonly carcinoma of different visceral organs, are also well-documented. Abdominal tumours in adolescence constitute a distinct pathological group. The radiological features of some of these tumours have been described only in isolated reports. The purpose of this pictorial essay was to review the imaging findings of various kinds of abdominal tumours in adolescent patients (with an age range of 10-16 years) who presented to the Children Cancer Center of our institution in the past 15 years. Some tumours, though rare, have characteristic imaging appearances (especially in CT) that enable an accurate diagnosis before definite histological confirmation. (orig.)

  13. Endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy for odontogenic cysts and tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tsugihama; Otori, Nobuyoshi; Asaka, Daiya; Okushi, Tetsushi; Haruna, Shin-ichi

    2014-12-01

    Odontogenic maxillary cysts and tumours originate from the tooth root and have traditionally been treated through an intraoral approach. Here, we report the efficacy and utility of endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy (EMMM) for the treatment of odontogenic maxillary cysts and a tumour. We undertook EMMM under general anaesthesia in six patients: four had radicular cysts, one had a dentigerous cyst, and one had a keratocystic odontogenic tumour. The cysts and tumours were completely excised and the inferior turbinate and nasolacrimal duct were preserved in all patients. There were no peri- or postoperative complications, and no incidences of recurrence. Endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy appears to be an effective and safe technique for treating odontogenic cysts and tumours.

  14. Approaches to the management of antenatally diagnosed congenital tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahony, Rhona; McParland, Peter [National Maternity Hospital, Department of Fetal and Maternal Medicine, Dublin (Ireland)

    2009-11-15

    Congenital fetal tumours are rare, but current imaging modalities including US and MRI facilitate antenatal diagnosis and investigation, allowing a presumptive diagnosis and management strategy. Although the prevalence of fetal tumours is difficult to ascertain, an incidence of 7.2 per 100,000 live births has previously been reported, with the incidence of neonatal malignancy estimated at 36.5 per million births. Teratomas and neuroblastomas are the most common solid tumours described. Tumours may be very large or associated with severe hydrops leading to significant dystocia with the potential for difficult vaginal or caesarean delivery. Once the diagnosis of a fetal tumour is made, optimal management incorporates a multidisciplinary approach including obstetrician, neonatologist, paediatric surgeon and paediatric oncologist so that counselling is appropriate and a clear management plan is in place for parents. (orig.)

  15. Residential Radon and Brain Tumour Incidence in a Danish Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner, Elvira V.; Andersen, Zorana J.; Andersen, Claus Erik

    2013-01-01

    of exposure to residential radon on the risk of primary brain tumour in a prospective Danish cohort. Methods: During 1993–1997 we recruited 57,053 persons. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence from enrolment until 31 December 2009, identifying 121 primary brain tumour cases. We traced......Background: Increased brain tumour incidence over recent decades may reflect improved diagnostic methods and clinical practice, but remain unexplained. Although estimated doses are low a relationship between radon and brain tumours may exist. Objective: To investigate the long-term effect...... (CI) for the risk of primary brain tumours associated with residential radon exposure with adjustment for age, sex, occupation, fruit and vegetable consumption and traffic-related air pollution. Effect modification by air pollution was assessed. Results: Median estimated radon was 40.5 Bq/m3...

  16. Tumour Markers and Kidney Function: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Coppolino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumour markers represent useful tools in diagnosis and clinical management of patients with cancer, because they are easy to use, minimally invasive, and easily measured in either blood or urine. Unfortunately, such an ideal marker, as yet, does not exist. Different pathological states may increase the level of a tumour marker in the absence of any neoplasia. Alternatively, low levels of tumour markers could be also found in the presence of neoplasias. We aimed at reviewing studies currently available in the literature examining the association between tumour markers and different renal impairment conditions. Each tumour marker was found to be differently influenced by these criteria; additionally we revealed in many cases a lack of available published data.

  17. Primary ovarian carcinomas and abdominal metastasis contain 4,6-disulfated chondroitin sulfate rich regions, which provide adhesive properties to tumour cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrtille J E Vallen

    Full Text Available High mortality in ovarian cancer patients is primarily caused through rapid metastasis of the tumour, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Glycosaminoglycans, are abundantly present in tumours and chondroitin sulfate-E (CSE, a highly 4,6-sulfated glycosaminoglycan, has been indicated to play a role in carcinogenesis. In this study we investigated the presence of CSE in ovarian cancer metastasis and studied its role in tumour cell adhesiveness and migration. CSE was studied immunohistochemically in primary ovarian carcinomas and abdominal metastases using the single chain antibody GD3G7. The role of CSE was studied in 2D (scratch assays and 3D (collagen matrices, spheroids systems using SKOV3 cells applying 1: overexpression of CSE by stable transfection with DNA encoding GalNAc4S-6 sulfotransferase, 2: enzymatic removal of CS, and 3: addition of CSE. In ovarian cancer tissue, CSE expression was predominantly seen in the stromal compartment of both primary ovarian carcinomas and metastases, with a comparable degree of intensity and extent. Overexpression of CSE disaccharide units by tumour cells increased their adhesive properties which was especially seen in tumour spheroid formation. Increased expression of CSE reduced cell migration. Addition of free CSE had similar effects. The data presented here indicate that CSE is associated with metastatic lesions and that it provides tumours with adhesive properties. CSE rich motifs are put forward as a potential target for ovarian cancer therapy.

  18. Targeted radionuclide therapy with RAFT-RGD radiolabelled with {sup 90}Y or {sup 177}Lu in a mouse model of αvβ3-expressing tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozon-Petitprin, A.; Bacot, S.; Ahmadi, M.; Marti-Batlle, D.; Perret, P.; Broisat, A.; Riou, L.M. [INSERM, U1039, Grenoble (France); Universite de Grenoble, UMR-S1039, Grenoble (France); Gauchez, A.S.; Bourre, J.C.; Fagret, D.; Vuillez, J.P. [INSERM, U1039, Grenoble (France); Universite de Grenoble, UMR-S1039, Grenoble (France); CHRU Grenoble, Hopital Michallon, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Grenoble (France); Claron, M.; Boturyn, D. [CNRS, UMR 5250, Departement de Chimie Moleculaire, Grenoble (France); Ghezzi, Catherine [INSERM, U1039, Grenoble (France); Universite de Grenoble, UMR-S1039, Grenoble (France); INSERM U1039, Radiopharmaceutiques biocliniques, Batiment Jean Roget, Domaine de la Merci, Faculte de Medecine, La Tronche (France)

    2014-08-28

    The αvβ3 integrin plays an important role in tumour-induced angiogenesis, tumour proliferation, survival and metastasis. The tetrameric RGD-based peptide, regioselectively addressable functionalized template-(cyclo-[RGDfK]){sub 4} (RAFT-RGD), specifically targets the αvβ3 integrin in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of RAFT-RGD radiolabelled with β{sup -} emitters in a nude mouse model of αvβ3 integrin-expressing tumours. Biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies were performed after injection of {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RGD or {sup 177}Lu-RAFT-RGD in nude mice subcutaneously xenografted with αvβ3 integrin-expressing U-87 MG cells. Experimental targeted radionuclide therapy with {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RGD or {sup 177}Lu-RAFT-RGD and {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RAD or {sup 177}Lu-RAFT-RAD (nonspecific controls) was evaluated by intravenous injection of the radionuclides into mice bearing αvβ3 integrin-expressing U-87 MG tumours of different sizes (small or large) or bearing TS/A-pc tumours that do not express αvβ3. Tumour volume doubling time was used to evaluate the efficacy of each treatment. Injection of 37 MBq of {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RGD into mice with large αvβ3-positive tumours or 37 MBq of {sup 177}Lu-RAFT-RGD into mice with small αvβ3-positive tumours caused significant growth delays compared to mice treated with 37 MBq of {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RAD or 37 MBq of {sup 177}Lu-RAFT-RAD or untreated mice. In contrast, injection of 30 MBq of {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RGD had no effect on the growth of αvβ3-negative tumours. {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RGD and {sup 177}Lu-RAFT-RGD are potent agents targeting αvβ3-expressing tumours for internal targeted radiotherapy. (orig.)

  19. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunostaining in breast carcinoma and its relationship to clinical and pathological variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, S; Jain, R; Rusia, U; Gupta, R L

    1997-01-01

    Tumour proliferative activity of 74 breast lesions was assessed by determining mitotic index and immunostaining for proliferative cell nuclear antigen using Peroxidase antiperoxidase method. The indices were correlated with histomorphology and clinical stage of the disease. Positively stained nuclei and mitotic figures were counted per 1000 cells to calculate Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) and mitotic index respectively. Sixty four cases stained positive for PCNA. The index ranged between 0 to 98. PCNA index was significantly low in benign lesions as compared to malignant lesions (p < 0.0002). There was a linear correlation between the mitotic index and PCNA index. PCNA index also showed significant correlation with tumour size and histologic grade; however, it had no correlation with axillary lymph node status.

  20. DNA alterations in Cd133+ and Cd133- tumour cells enriched from intra-operative human colon tumour biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Madrid, Diana; Wettergren, Yvonne; Falk, Peter; Lundholm, Kent; Asting, Annika G

    2017-03-27

    Tumour stem cells are considered important to promote disease progression, recurrence and treatment resistance following chemotherapy in colon cancer. However, genomic analyses of colorectal cancer have mainly been performed on integrated tumour tissue consisting of several different cell types in addition to differentiated tumour cells. The purpose of the present study was to compare genomic alterations in two cell fractions enriched of CD133+ and CD133-/EpCAM+ cells, respectively, obtained from fresh intraoperative human tumour biopsies. The tumour biopsies were fractionated into CD133+ and CD133-/EpCAM+ cells by immunomagnetic separation, confirmed by immunocytochemistry and Q-PCR. DNA were extracted and used for array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) after whole genome amplification. Frozen tumour tissue biopsies were used for DNA/RNA extraction and Q-PCR analyses to check for DNA alterations detected in the cell fractions. The number and size of DNA alterations were equally distributed across the cell fractions; however, large deletions were detected on chromosome 1, 7 and 19 in CD133-/EpCAM+ cells. Deletions were frequent in both cell fractions and a deletion on chromosome 19p was confirmed in 90% of the patients. Isolation of enriched cells derived from tumour tissue revealed mainly genomic deletions, which were not observed in tumour tissue DNA analyses. CD133+ cells were genetically heterogeneous among patients without any defined profile compared to CD133-/EpCAM+ cells.

  1. Childhood tumours with a high probability of being part of a tumour predisposition syndrome; reason for referral for genetic consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postema, Floor A M; Hopman, Saskia M J; Aalfs, Cora M; Berger, Lieke P V; Bleeker, Fonnet E; Dommering, Charlotte J; Jongmans, Marjolijn C J; Letteboer, Tom G W; Olderode-Berends, Maran J W; Wagner, Anja; Hennekam, Raoul C; Merks, Johannes H M

    2017-07-01

    Recognising a tumour predisposition syndrome (TPS) in childhood cancer patients is of major clinical relevance. The presence of a TPS may be suggested by the type of tumour in the child. We present an overview of 23 childhood tumours that in themselves should be a reason to refer a child for genetic consultation. We performed a PubMed search to review the incidence of TPSs in children for 85 tumour types listed in the International Classification of Childhood Cancer third edition (ICCC-3). The results were discussed during a national consensus meeting with representative clinical geneticists from all six academic paediatric oncology centres in The Netherlands. A TPS incidence of 5% or more was considered a high probability and therefore in itself a reason for referral to a clinical geneticist. The literature search resulted in data on the incidence of a TPS in 26 tumours. For 23/26 tumour types, a TPS incidence of 5% or higher was reported. In addition, during the consensus meeting the experts agreed that children with any carcinoma should always be referred for clinical genetic consultation as well, as it may point to a TPS. We present an overview of 23 paediatric tumours with a high probability of a TPS; this will facilitate paediatric oncologists to decide which patients should be referred for genetic consultation merely based on type of tumour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Domestic Politics and Nuclear Proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chul Min; Yim, Man Sung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The external security threat is known as the most important factor of nuclear weapons program, the domestic politics situation can also affect the nuclear proliferation decision of a country. For example, when a leader wants nuclear weapons as an ultimate weapon, the domestic politics situation can determine the effectiveness of the weapons program of a country. This study analyzes the current knowledge of the relationship between domestic politics and nuclear proliferation and suggests the main challenges of the quantitative models trying to calculate nuclear proliferation risk of countries. The domestic politics status is one of the most important indicators of nuclear program. However, some variables have never been used in quantitative analyses; for example, number of veto players and the public opinion on nuclear weapons; despite they are considered to be important in various qualitative studies. Future studies should focus on how should they be coded and how can they be linked with existing domestic politics variables.

  3. Calcium signaling and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Mauro Cunha Xavier; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Goulart, Vânia A M; Tonelli, Fernanda M P; Gomes, Katia N; Ulrich, Henning; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2015-11-01

    Cell proliferation is orchestrated through diverse proteins related to calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling inside the cell. Cellular Ca(2+) influx that occurs first by various mechanisms at the plasma membrane, is then followed by absorption of Ca(2+) ions by mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and, finally, there is a connection of calcium stores to the nucleus. Experimental evidence indicates that the fluctuation of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum provides a pivotal and physiological role for cell proliferation. Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmatic reticulum triggers Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane in an phenomenon called store-operated calcium entries (SOCEs). SOCE is activated through a complex interplay between a Ca(2+) sensor, denominated STIM, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and a Ca(2+) channel at the cell membrane, denominated Orai. The interplay between STIM and Orai proteins with cell membrane receptors and their role in cell proliferation is discussed in this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Integration of next-generation sequencing in clinical diagnostic molecular pathology laboratories for analysis of solid tumours; an expert opinion on behalf of IQN Path ASBL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deans, Zandra C.; Costa, Jose Luis; Cree, Ian; Dequeker, Els; Edsjo, Anders; Henderson, Shirley; Hummel, Michael; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Loddo, Marco; Machado, Jose Carlos; Marchetti, Antonio; Marquis, Katherine; Mason, Joanne; Normanno, Nicola; Rouleau, Etienne; Schuuring, Ed; Snelson, Keeda-Marie; Thunnissen, Erik; Tops, Bastiaan; Williams, Gareth; van Krieken, Han; Hall, Jacqueline A.

    The clinical demand for mutation detection within multiple genes from a single tumour sample requires molecular diagnostic laboratories to develop rapid, high-throughput, highly sensitive, accurate and parallel testing within tight budget constraints. To meet this demand, many laboratories employ

  5. Applications of accelerators to tumour therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    The first lecture is devoted to an historical review of the developments of the teletherapy techniques which make use of hadron beams and are collectively called “hadrontherapy”. The main emphasis is on the use of protons and light ions, but also neutrons, pions and antiprotons are considered. The second lecture reviews the rationale behind the use of carbon ions in the treatment of radioresistant tumours and the results obtained both with proton and carbon ion beams on the 60 000 patients treated worldwide. The numbers of patients who would profit from hadrontherapy are presented together with the current landscape of running and planned hospital based centres. The main technical challenges set by this therapeutic modality are discussed in the third lecture together with the approaches either adopted or suggested to face them. The challenges are the treatment of moving organs, the development of new tools for Quality Assurance, the design of rotating gantries for carbon ions. The last discussed issue con...

  6. Effects of morphine on tumour growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mads; Zhu, Wei; Tønnesen, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Endogenous opiate alkaloids, such as morphine, and their peptide counterparts have been implicated in a wide variety of pharmacological and physiological functions. In addition to their use in the treatment of pain, opioids, appears to be important in the growth regulation of normal and neoplasti...... tissue. This review will focus on the influence of endogenous and exogenous opioids on tumour growth, with emphasis on immunoregulatory and antiproliferative mechanisms.......Endogenous opiate alkaloids, such as morphine, and their peptide counterparts have been implicated in a wide variety of pharmacological and physiological functions. In addition to their use in the treatment of pain, opioids, appears to be important in the growth regulation of normal and neoplastic...

  7. Prophylactic antibiotic regimens in tumour surgery (PARITY)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Michael Mørk; Hettwer, Werner H; Grum-Schwensen, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    -day regimen of post-operative antibiotics, in comparison to a 24-hour regimen, decreases surgical site infections in patients undergoing endoprosthetic reconstruction for lower extremity primary bone tumours. METHODS: We performed a pilot international multi-centre RCT. We used central randomisation...... to conceal treatment allocation and sham antibiotics to blind participants, surgeons, and data collectors. We determined feasibility by measuring patient enrolment, completeness of follow-up, and protocol deviations for the antibiotic regimens. RESULTS: We screened 96 patients and enrolled 60 participants......% at one year (the remainder with partial data or pending queries). In total, 18 participants missed at least one dose of antibiotics or placebo post-operatively, but 93% of all post-operative doses were administered per protocol. CONCLUSIONS: It is feasible to conduct a definitive multi-centre RCT of post...

  8. Evaluation of Residual Cellularity and Proliferation on Preoperatively Treated Breast Cancer: A Comparison between Image Analysis and Light Microscopy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Corletto

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Histopathology has been suggested as a reliable method for tumour reduction evaluation of preoperatively treated breast cancer. Immunocytochemistry can be used to enhance the visibility of residual tumour cellularity and in the evaluation of its proliferative activity. We compared Image Analysis (IA with Light Microscopy Analysis (LMA on sections of breast carcinomas treated with preoperative chemo‐ or chemo/radiotherapy in the evaluation of the Neoplastic Cell Density (NCD (69 cases and the Proliferation Index (PI (35 cases. NCD was expressed as the immunoreactive area to cytokeratin over the total original neoplastic area and PI was expressed as the number of immunostained tumoural nuclei with MIB1 MoAb over the total of tumoural nuclei. The intraobserver agreement and that between IA and LMA for both indices were estimated by the common (Kw and the jackknife weighted kappa statistic (K˜w. The extent of agreement of each considered category was also assessed by means of the category‐specific kappa statistics (Kcs. The intraobserver agreement within LMA for NCD and PI and that between IA and LMA for PI were both satisfactory. Upon evaluation of the NCD, the agreement between IA and LMA showed unsatisfactory results, especially when the ratio between the residual tumour cells and the background was critical.

  9. Guidelines for the management of neuroendocrine tumours by the Brazilian gastrointestinal tumour group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechelmann, Rachel P; Weschenfelder, Rui F; Costa, Frederico P; Andrade, Aline Chaves; Osvaldt, Alessandro Bersch; Quidute, Ana Rosa P; Dos Santos, Allan; Hoff, Ana Amélia O; Gumz, Brenda; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Vilhena Pereira, Bruno S; Lourenço Junior, Delmar Muniz; da Rocha Filho, Duilio Reis; Fonseca, Eduardo Antunes; Riello Mello, Eduardo Linhares; Makdissi, Fabio Ferrari; Waechter, Fabio Luiz; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Coura-Filho, George B; de Paulo, Gustavo Andrade; Girotto, Gustavo Colagiovanni; Neto, João Evangelista Bezerra; Glasberg, João; Casali-da-Rocha, Jose Claudio; Rego, Juliana Florinda M; de Meirelles, Luciana Rodrigues; Hajjar, Ludhmila; Menezes, Marcos; Bronstein, Marcello D; Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson Villares; Pereira, Maria Adelaide Albergaria; Barros, Milton; Forones, Nora Manoukian; do Amaral, Paulo Cezar Galvão; de Medeiros, Raphael Salles Scortegagna; Araujo, Raphael L C; Bezerra, Regis Otaviano França; Peixoto, Renata D'Alpino; Aguiar, Samuel; Ribeiro, Ulysses; Pfiffer, Tulio; Hoff, Paulo M; Coutinho, Anelisa K

    2017-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours are a heterogeneous group of diseases with a significant variety of diagnostic tests and treatment modalities. Guidelines were developed by North American and European groups to recommend their best management. However, local particularities and relativisms found worldwide led us to create Brazilian guidelines. Our consensus considered the best feasible strategies in an environment involving more limited resources. We believe that our recommendations may be extended to other countries with similar economic standards.

  10. In vitro immunopotentiating properties and tumour cell toxicity induced by Lophophora williamsii (peyote) cactus methanolic extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Molina, M; Gomez-Flores, R; Tamez-Guerra, P; Tamez-Guerra, R; Castillo-Leon, L; Rodríguez-Padilla, C

    2003-11-01

    Lophophora williamsii, also known as peyote, is found primarily in dry regions from Central Mexico, including the Mexican States of Nayarit, San Luis Potosí, Zacatecas, Nuevo León, Chihuahua, Coahuila and Tamaulipas, to Texas particularly in regions along Rio Grande. Peyote extracts have been associated with stimulating the central nervous system and regulating blood pressure, sleep, hunger and thirst. However, there is no evidence of any effect of peyote on the immune system or against tumour cell growth. The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effects of peyote methanolic extracts on some parameters of mouse and human leukocyte immunocompetence and tumour cell growth. Peyote extract (0.18-18 micro g/mL) activated nitric oxide production by murine macrophages, and stimulated up to 2.4-fold proliferation of murine thymic lymphocytes. In addition, peyote extract induced up to 1.85-, 2.29- and 1.89-fold increases in mRNA signal of IL-1, IL-6 and IL-8 by human leukocytes. Also examined were the effects of peyote extracts on murine lymphoma L5178Y-R and fi broblastoma L929, and human myeloid U937 and mammary gland MCF7 tumour cell growth using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). Peyote extracts were toxic for MCF7, L5178Y-R, U937 and L929 (18 mg/mL peyote extract caused 1.3%, 8%, 45% and 60% viability respectively) cell lines. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Pro-tumoural CXCL10/CXCR3-A autocrine loop in invasive mucinous lung adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Duruisseaux

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma (IMA is a mucinous variant of lepidic predominant lung adenocarcinoma (LPA and associated with a worse prognosis. We postulated that cytokine expression would enable us to differentiate IMA from LPA in terms of prognosis and acquisition of pro-tumoural capacities. A 30-cytokine panel was assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF from IMA (n=38, LPA (n=25 and control samples (n=7. We investigated the expression of differentially expressed cytokines and splice variants of their receptors in surgical samples. The presence of EGFR and KRAS mutations were determined. We also examined the expression of cytokines and splice variants of their receptors in different cell lines, exploring their functional impact on signalling pathways, proliferation and migration. Only C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10 was differentially expressed, namely overexpressed in IMA BALF compared with LPA. CXCL10 overexpression in BALF was linked to a worse prognosis. In surgical samples, CXCL10 and its receptor C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3 were overexpressed in IMA compared to LPA. A pro-tumoural CXCR3-A splice variant was overexpressed in IMA, suggesting a CXCL10/CXCR3-A autocrine loop in IMA. CXCL10 and CXCR3 expression were not correlated with EGFR or KRAS status. CXCL10 up-regulated CXCR3-A expression, Erk1/2 phosphorylation and enhanced migration in the mucinous H2228 cell line. CXCL10/CXCR3-A may play a pro-tumoural role in IMA via an autocrine mechanism.

  12. Tumour anti-vascular alpha therapy: a mechanism for the regression of solid tumours in metastatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Barry J [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW 2217 (Australia); Raja, Chand [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW 2217 (Australia); Rizvi, Syed [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW 2217 (Australia); Song, Emma Y [Centre for Experimental Radiation Oncology, St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW 2217 (Australia); Graham, Peter [Cancer Care Centre, St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW 2217 (Australia)

    2007-07-07

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) is an emerging therapeutic modality, thought to be best suited to cancer micrometastases, leukaemia and lymphoma. TAT has not been indicated for solid tumours. However, several melanoma patients in a phase 1 clinical trial of systemic targeted alpha therapy for melanoma experienced marked regression of subcutaneous and internal tumours. This response cannot be ascribed to killing of all cancer cells in the tumours by targeted alpha therapy. These new observations support the original hypothesis that tumours can be regressed by a mechanism called tumour anti-vascular alpha therapy. This effect depends on the expression of targeted receptors by capillary pericytes and contiguous cancer cells, and on the short-range and high-energy transfer of alpha radiation. (letter to the editor)

  13. Merlin: a tumour suppressor with functions at the cell cortex and in the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Cooper, Jonathan; Karajannis, Matthias A; Giancotti, Filippo G

    2012-03-01

    Inhibition of proliferation by cell-to-cell contact is essential for tissue organization, and its disruption contributes to tumorigenesis. The FERM domain protein Merlin, encoded by the NF2 tumour suppressor gene, is an important mediator of contact inhibition. Merlin was thought to inhibit mitogenic signalling and activate the Hippo pathway by interacting with diverse target-effectors at or near the plasma membrane. However, recent studies highlight that Merlin pleiotropically affects signalling by migrating into the nucleus and inducing a growth-suppressive programme of gene expression through its direct inhibition of the CRL4DCAF1 E3 ubiquitin ligase. In addition, Merlin promotes the establishment of epithelial adhesion and polarity by recruiting Par3 and aPKC to E-cadherin-dependent junctions, and by ensuring the assembly of tight junctions. These recent advances suggest that Merlin acts at the cell cortex and in the nucleus in a similar, albeit antithetic, manner to the oncogene β-catenin.

  14. Improved cytotoxic effects of Salmonella-producing cytosine deaminase in tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the cytotoxic activity of a Salmonella strain carrying a salicylate-inducible expression system that controls cytosine deaminase production, we have modified both, the vector and the producer bacterium. First, the translation rates of the expression module containing the Escherichia coli codA gene cloned under the control of the Pm promoter have been improved by using the T7 phage gene 10 ribosome binding site sequence and replacing the original GUG start codon by AUG. Second, to increase the time span in which cytosine deaminase may be produced by the bacteria in the presence of 5-fluorocytosine, a 5-fluorouracyl resistant Salmonella strain has been constructed by deleting its upp gene sequence. This new Salmonella strain shows increased cytosine deaminase activity and, after infecting tumour cell cultures, increased cytotoxic and bystander effects under standard induction conditions. In addition, we have generated a purD mutation in the producer strain to control its intracellular proliferation by the presence of adenine and avoid the intrinsic Salmonella cell death induction. This strategy allows the analysis and comparison of the cytotoxic effects of cytosine deaminase produced by different Salmonella strains in tumour cell cultures. © 2014 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Analysis of giant cell tumour of bone cells for Noonan syndrome/cherubism-related mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovszky, Linda; Idowu, Bernadine; Taylor, Richard; Mertens, Fredrik; Athanasou, Nicholas; Flanagan, Adrienne

    2013-01-01

    Giant cell tumour of bone (GCTB) is an osteolytic tumour which contains numerous osteoclast-like giant cells and a proliferation of mononuclear stromal cells (MSC). Giant cell-rich osteolytic lesions can also develop in the jaw bones in Noonan syndrome, a cherubism-like developmental abnormality that is transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion, often because of mutation in the PTPN11 or BRAF genes. We screened GCTBs for mutations in PTPN11 and BRAF to determine whether GCTBs develop through alterations of genes involved in Noonan syndrome. MSC were isolated from 10 GCTBs. Chromosome banding analysis of these cells revealed telomeric associations (tas) in 7 of the 10 cases. Thus, the cultured cells expressed a cytogenetic abnormality typically found in short-term cultures from GCTBs. Sequencing of DNA extracted from the seven GCTB-derived MSC cultures displaying tas did not identify any mutation in PTPN11 or in exons 9-15 of BRAF. Our findings indicate that the molecular pathways involved in GCTB development are different from those causing Noonan syndrome. The method for isolating and culturing GCTB stromal cells described in this study generated a population of MSC that contained tas, indicating that it is useful for obtaining stromal cells from GCTB and other giant cell-rich lesions, such as giant cell reparative granuloma, for genetic and other studies. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Collision Tumour of Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Malignant Melanoma in the Oral Cavity of a Dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, F; Castro, P; Ramírez, G A

    2016-05-01

    A 7-year-old, male cocker spaniel was presented with a gingival proliferative lesion in the rostral maxilla and enlargement of the regional lymph node. Morphological and immunohistochemical analysis revealed a collision tumour composed of two malignant populations, epithelial and melanocytic, with metastasis of the neoplastic melanocytes to the regional lymph node. The epithelial component consisted of trabeculae and islands of well-differentiated squamous epithelium immunoreactive to cytokeratins. The melanocytic component had a varying degree of pigmentation of polygonal and spindle-shaped cells, growing in nests or densely packed aggregates and immunolabelled with S100, melanoma-associated antigen (melan A), neuron-specific enolase and vimentin antibodies. Protein markers involved in tumorigenesis or cell proliferation (i.e. COX-2, p53, c-kit and Ki67), were overexpressed by the neoplastic cells. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of an oral collision tumour involving malignant melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma in the dog. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nuclear expression of Snail1 in borderline and malignant epithelial ovarian tumours is associated with tumour progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuhkanen Hanna

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factor Snail1 has a central role in induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the expression of Snail1 protein during epithelial ovarian tumourigenesis and to study the association of Snail1 expression with clinicopathological factors and prognosis. Methods Epithelial and stromal fibroblast-like fusiform cells of 14 normal ovarian samples, 21 benign, 24 borderline and 74 malignant epithelial ovarian tumours were studied for Snail1 protein using immunohistochemistry. Results Nuclei of surface peritoneal cells of normal ovaries (n = 14 were regarded as negative for Snail1. Nuclear expression of Snail1 protein in epithelial ovarian tumours was increased during tumour progression from precursor lesions into carcinomas both in epithelial (p = 0.006 and stromal cells (p = 0.007. Nuclei of benign tumours (n = 21 were negative for Snail1. In borderline tumours (n = 24 occasional positive epithelial cells were found in 2 (8% samples and in 3 (13% samples stromal cells were focally positive for Snail1. In carcinomas (n = 74 focal Snail1 staining in epithelial cells was present in 17 (23% tumours, and in stromal cells in 18 (24% tumours. Nuclear expression of Snail1 in epithelial or stromal cells was not associated with clinicopathological factors or prognosis. Conclusion Nuclear Snail1 expression seems to be related to tumour progression, and expression in borderline tumours indicates a role for Snail1 in early epithelial ovarian tumour development. Snail1 also appears to function more generally in tissue remodelling as positive staining was demonstrated in stromal cells.

  18. Aerobic Glycolysis: Meeting the Metabolic Requirements of Cell Proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Lunt, Sophia Yunkyungkwon

    2011-01-01

    Warburg's observation that cancer cells exhibit a high rate of glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen (aerobic glycolysis) sparked debate over the role of glycolysis in normal and cancer cells. Although it has been established that defects in mitochondrial respiration are not the cause of cancer or aerobic glycolysis, the advantages of enhanced glycolysis in cancer remain controversial. Many cells ranging from microbes to lymphocytes use aerobic glycolysis during rapid proliferation, which...

  19. MRI of intraspinal nerve sheath tumours presenting with sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loke, T.K.L.; Chan, C.S. [United Christian Hospital (Hong Kong). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Ma, H.T.G. [St Teresa`s Hospital, Kowloon (Hong Kong). MRI and CT scanning Dept.; Ward, S.C.; Metreweli, C. [Prince of wales Hospital, New Territories (Hong Kong). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1995-08-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of 14 intraspinal nerve sheath tumours (NST) presenting with sciatica were reviewed. The group comprised seven schwannomas, six neurofibromas and one perineuroma. The tumours were either iso- or hypointense with respect to spinal cord on T1-weighted (T1W) images; almost all tumours were hyperintense compared with spinal cord on T2-weighted (T2W) images. The tumours were all detectable on unenhanced T1 W images. Nine NST were scanned following Gadolinium-Diethylenetriamine penta acetic acid (DTPA) injection and all showed intense enhancement. This aids differentiation from sequestrated disc fragments. Tumours were more likely to show homogeneous enhancement unless they were recurrent tumours. Rim enhancement occurs more commonly in schwannomas and this can be used to differentiate these from neurofibromas. It is estimated that on unenhanced images, schwannomas cannot be distinguished from neurofibromas. Four tumours occurred at T1 1-T12. There was poor correlation of the site of the lesion with the clinical findings. It is recommended that the MRI studies in patients with sciatica should include the lower thoracic region especially if no protruded disc was found in the lumbar region. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Unusual Paraneoplastic Syndrome Accompanies Neuroendocrine Tumours of the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Bertani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine tumours comprise a small percentage of pancreatic neoplasia (10% (1. Diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumours is difficult, especially if the tumours are small and nonfunctional. CT scans, MRI, and nuclear scans are sufficiently sensitive assessment tools for tumours with diameters of at least 2 cm; otherwise, the sensitivity and specificity of these techniques is less than 50% (2. Myasthenia gravis (MG is a heterogeneous neuromuscular junction disorder that is primarily caused when antibodies form against the acetylcholine receptors (Ab-AchR. MG can develop in conjunction with neoplasia, making MG a paraneoplastic disease. In those cases, MG is most commonly associated with thymomas and less frequently associated with extrathymic malignancies. The mechanism underlying this paraneoplastic syndrome has been hypothesized to involve an autoimmune response against the tumour cells (3. No published reports have linked malignant pancreatic diseases with MG. Here, we report the case of a young woman, negative for Ab-AchR, with a neuroendocrine tumour in the pancreatic head, who experienced a complete resolution of her MG-like syndrome after surgical enucleation of the tumour.

  1. Giant Mediastinal Germ Cell Tumour: An Enigma of Surgical Consideration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdaus Hayati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of 16-year-old male, who was referred from private centre for dyspnoea, fatigue, and orthopnea. The chest radiograph revealed complete opacification of left chest which was confirmed by computed tomography as a large left mediastinal mass measuring 14 × 15 × 18 cm. The diagnostic needle core biopsy revealed mixed germ cell tumour with possible combination of embryonal carcinoma, yolk sac, and teratoma. After 4 cycles of neoadjuvant BEP regime, there was initial response of tumour markers but not tumour bulk. Instead of classic median sternotomy or clamshell incision, posterolateral approach with piecemeal manner was chosen. Histology confirmed mixed germ cell tumour with residual teratomatous component without yolk sac or embryonal carcinoma component. Weighing 3.5 kg, it is one of the largest mediastinal germ cell tumours ever reported. We describe this rare and gigantic intrathoracic tumour and discuss the spectrum of surgical approach and treatment of this exceptional tumour.

  2. Mechanism of /sup 201/Tl uptake in tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehweil, A.M.; Omar, Y.T.; McKillop, J.H.; Milroy, R.; Wilson, R.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.

    1989-07-01

    We have studied the mechanism of tumour uptake of /sup 201/Tl by in vivo and in vitro studies. In a series of patients with breast cancer (n=26), lung cancer (n=56) and lymphoma (n=15), the time course of tumour uptake of /sup 201/Tl paralleled that in the myocardium with almost identical times of peak uptake being obtained in tumours and myocardium. In a patient with hepatic metastases from colonic cancer undergoing laparotomy, /sup 99m/Tc labelled microspheres and /sup 201/Tl were injected into the hepatic artery and biopsies of metastatic and normal liver tissue obtained. The tumour to normal liver activity ratios for /sup 201/Tl were one tenth of those for /sup 99m/Tc microspheres. In the final part of the study, cells from a lung cancer tissue culture line were incubated for 30 min with /sup 201/Tl with and without the addition of cardiac glycoside, which acts a sodium potassium pump blocker. The cells exposed to the cardiac glycoside showed markedly decreased uptake of /sup 201/Tl compared to the cells not so exposed (0.6%+-0.1% vs 11.8+-0.7% of the administered dose). The mechanism of /sup 201/Tl uptake of tumours is similar to that in the myocardium. Sodium potassium pump activity appears to be more important than tumour blood flow. /sup 201/Tl uptake may provide a useful means of studying tumour viability.

  3. Brain tumours in children: importance of early identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Charles William; Perrow, Rachel; Paul, Siba Prosad

    A Brain tumours account for a quarter of all childhood cancers in the UK but are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children. Studies have previously shown that there is a delay in diagnosing brain tumours in children in the UK. The HeadSmart campaign was launched to increase awareness among health professionals working in different settings regarding brain tumour symptoms in children. Although headache is considered to be one of the most important symptoms, it is not often reported in paediatric practice, especially if the child is young. The HeadSmart symptom card is a useful resource and should be used when dealing with a child with symptoms suggestive of brain tumours. Nurses working in different settings play a vital role in early identification of brain tumours and also in supporting the child and his/her family through the child's journey following diagnosis of a brain tumour. The HeadSmart campaign has led to a reduction in the total diagnostic interval, to 7 weeks, and the ultimate aim is to reduce it further to 5 weeks which will be on a par with the time taken to diagnose brain tumours in children in other developed countries.

  4. Tumour acidosis: from the passenger to the driver's seat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbet, Cyril; Feron, Olivier

    2017-10-01

    The high metabolic demand of cancer cells leads to an accumulation of H+ ions in the tumour microenvironment. The disorganized tumour vasculature prevents an efficient wash-out of H+ ions released into the extracellular medium but also favours the development of tumour hypoxic regions associated with a shift towards glycolytic metabolism. Under hypoxia, the final balance of glycolysis, including breakdown of generated ATP, is the production of lactate and a stoichiometric amount of H+ ions. Another major source of H+ ions results from hydration of CO2 produced in the more oxidative tumour areas. All of these events occur at high rates in tumours to fulfil bioenergetic and biosynthetic needs. This Review summarizes the current understanding of how H+-generating metabolic processes segregate within tumours according to the distance from blood vessels and inversely how ambient acidosis influences tumour metabolism, reducing glycolysis while promoting mitochondrial activity. The Review also presents novel insights supporting the participation of acidosis in cancer progression via stimulation of autophagy and immunosuppression. Finally, recent advances in the different therapeutic modalities aiming to either block pH-regulatory systems or exploit acidosis will be discussed.

  5. SPECTRUM OF NEUROENDOCRINE TUMOURS- A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasupuleti Prathima

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Neuroendocrine tumours occur at various sites in the human body. They are considered as one of the close differentials for many tumours. Various benign and malignant tumours undergo neuroendocrine differentiation. Its incidence is slightly increasing due to advanced imaging modalities. Although rare, they can be seen in breast, gallbladder and skin. The aim of the study is to study the spectrum of neuroendocrine tumours from various sites, their clinical presentation, histomorphological features with immunohistochemistry and review of literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a retrospective study for a period of 3 years (June 2013-June 2016. Surgical resection specimens were included in the study. Out of the total specimens received, 24 cases were of neuroendocrine tumours. Differential diagnosis of small round cell tumours also was considered and a panel of immunohistochemical markers were included to rule out them. Biopsy specimens were excluded from the study. RESULTS Out of the 24 cases, 18 cases were benign lesions. 6 cases were malignant lesions. Female preponderance was noted. Peak incidence was seen in 20-30 years of age group. CONCLUSION Neuroendocrine tumours can occur anywhere in the body and it should be considered in one of the differential diagnosis. Diagnosis must be accurately made.

  6. [Central nervous system tumours in childhood: their clinical pathological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega Aznar, A; Romero Vidal, F J

    Paediatric tumours affecting the central nervous system (CNS) constitute the second most frequent group of tumours at this age. Taking the WHO 2000 classification as our starting point, our intention was to describe the more important clinical and pathological features in the differential diagnosis of the different tumourous entities with the highest incidence in childhood. We highlight, above all, the characteristics that justify the need for a smooth flow of information between neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuroradiologists, neuropathologists and oncologists. We do not deal with familial tumourous syndromes, genetic aspects or clinical information derived from analyses of molecular alterations. Among CNS tumours, enough age related differences exist to be able to consider those appearing during childhood in their own right. Their topographic specificity is very characteristic and while 50% of them are infratentorial, 90% of those that occur in adults are supratentorial. Embryonic tumours are very frequent in childhood, but rare in adults, and the opposite happens with meningiomas. They are also different as regards their histological features, clinical characteristics, the early tendency to spread throughout the nervous system in the course of the disease and their biological behaviour. These data make us think that, in the pathogenesis of brain tumours in children, the molecular and epigenetic factors involved are different from those at play in the case of adults. A correct diagnosis requires a multidisciplinary approach and an understanding of the histological criteria and nomenclature by the health professionals involved in treating these patients.

  7. Ultrasensitive tumour-penetrating nanosensors of protease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ester J; Dudani, Jaideep S; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2017-01-01

    The ability to identify cancer lesions with endogenous biomarkers is currently limited to tumours ~1 cm in diameter. We recently reported an exogenously administered tumour-penetrating nanosensor that sheds, in response to tumour-specific proteases, peptide fragments that can then be detected in the urine. Here, we report the optimization, informed by a pharmacokinetic mathematical model, of the surface presentation of the peptide substrates to both enhance on-target protease cleavage and minimize off-target cleavage, and of the functionalization of the nanosensors with tumour-penetrating ligands that engage active trafficking pathways to increase activation in the tumour microenvironment. The resulting nanosensor discriminated sub-5 mm lesions in human epithelial tumours and detected nodules with median diameters smaller than 2 mm in an orthotopic model of ovarian cancer. We also demonstrate enhanced receptor-dependent specificity of signal generation in the urine in an immunocompetent model of colorectal liver metastases, and in situ activation of the nanosensors in human tumour microarrays when re-engineered as fluorogenic zymography probes.

  8. Oxytocin stimulates cell proliferation in vaginal cell line Vk2E6E7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallak, Theodora K; Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin

    2017-03-01

    Objective During and after menopause, the symptoms of vaginal atrophy cause great discomfort and necessitate effective treatment options. Currently, vaginally applied oxytocin is being investigated as a treatment for the symptoms of vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women. To clarify the mechanisms behind oxytocins effects on vaginal atrophy, the present study investigated the effects of oxytocin on cell proliferation in the cells of the Vk2E6E7 line, a non-tumour vaginal cell line. The study also compared the effects of oxytocin with those of estradiol (E2). Study design The effects of both oxytocin and E2 on the proliferation of Vk2E6E7 cells were investigated using Cell Proliferation ELISA BrdU Colorimetric Assay. The expression of both oxytocin and oxytocin receptor was studied in Vk2E6E7 cells using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescent staining. Main outcome measures Cell proliferation and gene expression. Results Oxytocin increased cell proliferation both time dependently and dose dependently. This differed from the effect pattern observed in cells treated with E2. In addition, in oxytocin-treated cells, the oxytocin receptor was found to be co-localized with caveolin-1, indicating pro-proliferative signalling within the cell. Conclusions Oxytocin stimulates cell proliferation and the co-localization of oxytocin receptor with caveolin-1 in oxytocin-treated cells, supporting the role of oxytocin signalling in cell proliferation. In addition, these findings suggest that increased cell proliferation is one mechanism by which local vaginal oxytocin treatment increases vaginal thickness and relieves vaginal symptoms in postmenopausal women with vaginal atrophy.

  9. Nuclear Proliferation: A Historical Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    unsuccessful, however, and in 1981 Egypt ratified the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. In 1982 Egypt’s Hydrometallurgy Pilot Plant for reprocessing...Country Profile: Egypt,” http://www.iaea.org/DataCenter/index.html (accessed ɠ/8/2007>). 1982: Hydrometallurgy Pilot Plant for reprocessing

  10. Nuclear Proliferation Technology Trends Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Talbert, Robert J.

    2005-10-04

    A process is underway to develop mature, integrated methodologies to address nonproliferation issues. A variety of methodologies (both qualitative and quantitative) are being considered. All have one thing in common, a need for a consistent set of proliferation related data that can be used as a basis for application. One approach to providing a basis for predicting and evaluating future proliferation events is to understand past proliferation events, that is, the different paths that have actually been taken to acquire or attempt to acquire special nuclear material. In order to provide this information, this report describing previous material acquisition activities (obtained from open source material) has been prepared. This report describes how, based on an evaluation of historical trends in nuclear technology development, conclusions can be reached concerning: (1) The length of time it takes to acquire a technology; (2) The length of time it takes for production of special nuclear material to begin; and (3) The type of approaches taken for acquiring the technology. In addition to examining time constants, the report is intended to provide information that could be used to support the use of the different non-proliferation analysis methodologies. Accordingly, each section includes: (1) Technology description; (2) Technology origin; (3) Basic theory; (4) Important components/materials; (5) Technology development; (6) Technological difficulties involved in use; (7) Changes/improvements in technology; (8) Countries that have used/attempted to use the technology; (9) Technology Information; (10) Acquisition approaches; (11) Time constants for technology development; and (12) Required Concurrent Technologies.

  11. anterior hyaloidal fibrovascular proliferation (ahfvp)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okonkwo

    fibrovascular proliferation in ischaemic diabetic eyes is known to occur predominantly in the region posterior to the equator, ie, the pre-equatorial fundus. There is a. 5 preponderance of posterior neovascularization occurring in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. This posterior. 7,8,9 proliferative disease in ischaemic diabetic ...

  12. Blood vessel hyperpermeability and pathophysiology in human tumour xenograft models of breast cancer: a comparison of ectopic and orthotopic tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Karyn S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human tumour xenografts in immune compromised mice are widely used as cancer models because they are easy to reproduce and simple to use in a variety of pre-clinical assessments. Developments in nanomedicine have led to the use of tumour xenografts in testing nanoscale delivery devices, such as nanoparticles and polymer-drug conjugates, for targeting and efficacy via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect. For these results to be meaningful, the hyperpermeable vasculature and reduced lymphatic drainage associated with tumour pathophysiology must be replicated in the model. In pre-clinical breast cancer xenograft models, cells are commonly introduced via injection either orthotopically (mammary fat pad, MFP or ectopically (subcutaneous, SC, and the organ environment experienced by the tumour cells has been shown to influence their behaviour. Methods To evaluate xenograft models of breast cancer in the context of EPR, both orthotopic MFP and ectopic SC injections of MDA-MB-231-H2N cells were given to NOD scid gamma (NSG mice. Animals with matched tumours in two size categories were tested by injection of a high molecular weight dextran as a model nanocarrier. Tumours were collected and sectioned to assess dextran accumulation compared to liver tissue as a positive control. To understand the cellular basis of these observations, tumour sections were also immunostained for endothelial cells, basement membranes, pericytes, and lymphatic vessels. Results SC tumours required longer development times to become size matched to MFP tumours, and also presented wide size variability and ulcerated skin lesions 6 weeks after cell injection. The 3 week MFP tumour model demonstrated greater dextran accumulation than the size matched 5 week SC tumour model (for P  Conclusions Dextran accumulation and immunostaining results suggest that small MFP tumours best replicate the vascular permeability required to observe the EPR effect

  13. Tumour Cell Labelling by Magnetic Nanoparticles with Determination of Intracellular Iron Content and Spatial Distribution of the Intracellular Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Cuschieri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically labelled cells are used for in vivo cell tracking by MRI, used for the clinical translation of cell-base therapies. Studies involving magnetic labelled cells may include separation of labelled cells, targeted delivery and controlled release of drugs, contrast enhanced MRI and magnetic hyperthermia for the in situ ablation of tumours. Dextran-coated super-paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO ferumoxides are used clinically as an MR contrast agents primarily for hepatic imaging. The material is also widely used for in vitro cell labelling, as are other SPIO-based particles. Our results on the uptake by human cancer cell lines of ferumoxides indicate that electroporation in the presence of protamine sulphate (PS results in rapid high uptake of SPIO nanoparticles (SPIONs by parenchymal tumour cells without significant impairment of cell viability. Quantitative determination of cellular iron uptake performed by colorimetric assay is in agreement with data from the literature. These results on intracellular iron content together with the intracellular distribution of SPIONs by magnetic force microscopy (MFM following in vitro uptake by parenchymal tumour cells confirm the potential of this technique for clinical tumour cell detection and destruction.

  14. Gelatinase B/MMP-9 in Tumour Pathogenesis and Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farina, Antonietta Rosella; Mackay, Andrew Reay, E-mail: andrewreay.mackay@univaq.it [Department of Applied Clinical and Biotechnological Sciences, University of L’Aquila, Via Vetoio, Coppito 2, L’Aquila 67100 (Italy)

    2014-01-27

    Since its original identification as a leukocyte gelatinase/type V collagenase and tumour type IV collagenase, gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 is now recognised as playing a central role in many aspects of tumour progression. In this review, we relate current concepts concerning the many ways in which gelatinase B/MMP-9 influences tumour biology. Following a brief outline of the gelatinase B/MMP-9 gene and protein, we analyse the role(s) of gelatinase B/MMP-9 in different phases of the tumorigenic process, and compare the importance of gelatinase B/MMP-9 source in the carcinogenic process. What becomes apparent is the importance of inflammatory cell-derived gelatinase B/MMP-9 in tumour promotion, early progression and triggering of the “angiogenic switch”, the integral relationship between inflammatory, stromal and tumour components with respect to gelatinase B/MMP-9 production and activation, and the fundamental role for gelatinase B/MMP-9 in the formation and maintenance of tumour stem cell and metastatic niches. It is also apparent that gelatinase B/MMP-9 plays important tumour suppressing functions, producing endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors, promoting inflammatory anti-tumour activity, and inducing apoptosis. The fundamental roles of gelatinase B/MMP-9 in cancer biology underpins the need for specific therapeutic inhibitors of gelatinase B/MMP-9 function, the use of which must take into account and substitute for tumour-suppressing gelatinase B/MMP-9 activity and also limit inhibition of physiological gelatinase B/MMP-9 function.

  15. Raman spectroscopy: a novel experimental approach to evaluating renal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensalah, Karim; Fleureau, Julien; Rolland, Denis; Lavastre, Olivier; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Guillé, François; Patard, Jean-Jacques; Senhadji, Lotfi; de Crevoisier, Renaud

    2010-10-01

    New optical techniques of spectroscopy have shown promising results in the evaluation of solid tumours. To evaluate the potential of Raman spectroscopy (RS) to assess renal tumours at surgery. Over a 5-mo period, Raman optical spectra were prospectively acquired on surgical renal specimens removed due to suspicion of cancer. Raman measures were normalised to ensure comparison between spectra. A lower resolution signal was computed using a wavelet decomposition procedure to diminish the size of the signal and exploit the complete spectrum. A support vector machine (SVM) with a linear kernel and a sequential minimal optimisation solver was applied. A leave-one-out cross-validation technique was used to train and test the SVM. There were 36 patients with 34 malignant tumours (27 clear-cell, 6 papillary, and 1 chromophobe) and 2 benign (1 oncocytoma and 1 metanephric cyst) tumours. A total of 241 analysable Raman spectra were obtained. The SVM was able to classify tumoural and normal tissue with an accuracy of 84% (sensitivity 82%, specificity 87%). High-grade and low-grade tumours were differentiated with a precision of 82% (sensitivity 84%, specificity 80%). Histologic subtype could be categorised with an accuracy of 93% (sensitivity 96%, specificity 87%). SVM could not be applied to classify benign and malignant tumours because of the restricted number of benign spectra. RS can accurately differentiate normal and tumoural renal tissue, low-grade and high-grade renal tumours, and histologic subtype of renal cell carcinoma. Larger prospective studies are needed to confirm these preliminary data. Copyright 2010 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Inhibition of Lysyl Oxidase and Lysyl Oxidase-Like Enzymes Has Tumour-Promoting and Tumour-Suppressing Roles in Experimental Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Maria; Adamo, Hanibal; Bergh, Anders; Halin Bergström, Sofia

    2016-01-25

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) and LOX-like (LOXL) enzymes are key players in extracellular matrix deposition and maturation. LOX promote tumour progression and metastasis, but it may also have tumour-inhibitory effects. Here we show that orthotopic implantation of rat prostate AT-1 tumour cells increased LOX and LOXLs mRNA expressions in the tumour and in the surrounding non-malignant prostate tissue. Inhibition of LOX enzymes, using Beta-aminopropionitrile (BAPN), initiated before implantation of AT-1 cells, reduced tumour growth. Conversely, treatment that was started after the tumours were established resulted in unaffected or increased tumour growth. Moreover, treatment with BAPN did not suppress the formation of spontaneous lymph node metastases, or lung tumour burden, when tumour cells were injected intravenously. A temporal decrease in collagen fibre content, which is a target for LOX, was observed in tumours and in the tumour-adjacent prostate tissue. This may explain why early BAPN treatment is more effective in inhibiting tumour growth compared to treatment initiated later. Our data suggest that the enzymatic function of the LOX family is context-dependent, with both tumour-suppressing and tumour-promoting properties in prostate cancer. Further investigations are needed to understand the circumstances under which LOX inhibition may be used as a therapeutic target for cancer patients.

  17. Alternol, a natural compound, exerts an anti-tumour effect on osteosarcoma by modulating of STAT3 and ROS/MAPK signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Dongqing; Zhou, Zifei; Wang, Hongsheng; Zhang, Tao; Zang, Jie; Yin, Fei; Sun, Wei; Chen, Jiepeng; Duan, Lili; Xu, Jing; Wang, Zhuoying; Wang, Chongren; Lin, Binhui; Fu, Zeze; Liao, Yuxin; Li, Suoyuan; Sun, Mengxiong; Hua, Yingqi; Zheng, Longpo; Cai, Zhengdong

    2017-02-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most frequent primary malignant bone tumour. Alternol, a novel compound purified from microbial fermentation products exerts anti-tumour effects across several cancer types. The effect of alternol on human OS remains to be elucidated. We first evaluated the anti-tumour effect of alternol in several human OS cell lines in vitro and investigated its underlying mechanism. Alternol inhibited OS cell proliferation, migration and induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, G2/M cell cycle arrest in a dose and time-dependent manner. Moreover, alternol treatment inhibited signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) phosphorylation in 143B and MG63 human OS cells, as evaluated using a STAT3-dependent dual luciferase reporter system. Exposure to alternol resulted in excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and Jun amino-terminal kinases (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) and p38 activation. Furthermore, alternol-induced cell death was significantly restored in the presence of the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) or a caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. NAC also prevented G2/M phase arrest and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), but did not reverse STAT3 inactivation. Finally, alternol suppressed tumour growth in vivo in the nude mouse OS tibia orthotopic model. Immunohistochemistry revealed that alternol treatment resulted in down-regulation of phosph-STAT3 Tyr705 and up-regulation of cleaved caspase-3 and phosph-SAPK (Stress-activated protein kinases)/JNK expression. Taken together, our results reveal that alternol suppresses cell proliferation, migration and induces apoptosis, cell cycle arrest by modulating of ROS-dependent MAPK and STAT3 signalling pathways in human OS cells. Therefore, alternol is a promising candidate for developing anti-tumour drugs target OS. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for

  18. Determination of tumour hypoxia with the PET tracer [{sup 18}F]EF3: improvement of the tumour-to-background ratio in a mouse tumour model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, Nicolas; Bol, Anne; Bast, Marc de; Labar, Daniel; Lee, John; Mahy, Pierre; Gregoire, Vincent [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Center for Molecular Imaging and Experimental Radiotherapy, Brussels (Belgium)

    2007-09-15

    The 2-(2-nitroimidazol-1-yl)-N-(3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)acetamide (EF3) is a 2-nitroimidazole derivative which undergoes bioreductive activation under hypoxic conditions. Using the PET tracer [{sup 18}F]EF3 in mice, tumour-to-muscle ratios ranging from 1.3 to 3.5 were observed. This study investigated the impact of various interventions aimed at increasing [{sup 18}F]EF3 elimination, thus potentially increasing the tumour-to-noise ratio in mice, by increasing the renal filtration rate (spironolactone, furosemide), decreasing tubular re-absorption (metronidazole, ornidazole, amino acid solution) or stimulating gastro-intestinal elimination (phenobarbital). C3H mice were injected i.v. with an average of 12.95 MBq of [{sup 18}F]EF3. Drugs were injected i.v. 15 min before the tracer or daily 4 days prior to the experiment (phenobarbital). Anaesthetised mice were imaged from 30 to 300 min with a dedicated animal PET (Mosaic, Philips). Regions of interest were delineated around the tumour, bladder, heart, liver and leg muscle. Radioactivity was expressed as a percentage of injected activity per gram of tissue. Ornidazole decreased the urinary excretion and increased the liver uptake of [{sup 18}F]EF3, but without causing any changes in the other organs. Phenobarbital significantly increased the liver concentration and decreased radioactivity in blood and muscle without affecting the tracer uptake in tumour. Consequently, a small but non-significant increase in tumour-to-noise ratio was observed. Although some effects were observed with other drugs, they did not modify the tumour-to-noise ratio. Only phenobarbital induced a trend toward an increased tumour-to-noise ratio that could possibly be tested in the clinical situation. (orig.)

  19. Congenital tumours involving the head, neck and central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, Elida; Castellote, Amparo; Mayolas, Nuria; Enriquez, Goya [Hospital Universitario Vall d' Hebron, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Carreras, Elena [Hospital Universitario Vall d' Hebron, Fetal Medicine Unit, Barcelona (Spain); Peiro, Jose Luis [Hospital Universitario Vall d' Hebron, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    Congenital intracranial tumours are uncommon and differ from those occurring in older children in clinical presentation, imaging characteristics and prognosis. These tumours are often detected incidentally on routine prenatal US and/or fetal MRI. Hence, the paediatric radiologist should be familiar with the features of those lesions that should be included in the differential diagnosis. In general, the prognosis of these conditions is poor owing to large tumour size and the limitations of adjuvant therapy at such a young age. Congenital lesions involving the head and neck region require a meticulous imaging approach using both US and MRI techniques to better guide prenatal planning and fetal or neonatal surgical procedures. (orig.)

  20. Solitary fibrous tumour of the pleura: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakovich, George; Laflamme, Maxime; Ouellette, Denise; Beauchamp, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours of the pleura are rare pleural neoplasms that are distinct from mesothelioma. Most of them are benign, although some behave aggressively; morphological and pathological features are important in distinguishing them from mesothelioma and in predicting clinical behaviour. Solitary fibrous tumours often grow to a large size before causing symptoms, and are characteristically associated with hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy in up to 20% of cases. In cases of benign lesions, complete resection is usually curative. A case involving a 62-year-old woman who underwent surgical resection of a solitary fibrous tumour of the pleura measuring 25 cm in size is described. PMID:20617210