WorldWideScience

Sample records for rapidly form gum

  1. The Use of Hibiscus esculentus (Okra) Gum in Sustaining the Release of Propranolol Hydrochloride in a Solid Oral Dosage Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordin, Mohamed Ibrahim; Kadivar, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of Okra gum in sustaining the release of propranolol hydrochloride in a tablet was studied. Okra gum was extracted from the pods of Hibiscus esculentus using acetone as a drying agent. Dried Okra gum was made into powder form and its physical and chemical characteristics such as solubility, pH, moisture content, viscosity, morphology study using SEM, infrared study using FTIR, crystallinity study using XRD, and thermal study using DSC and TGA were carried out. The powder was used in the preparation of tablet using granulation and compression methods. Propranolol hydrochloride was used as a model drug and the activity of Okra gum as a binder was compared by preparing tablets using a synthetic and a semisynthetic binder which are hydroxylmethylpropyl cellulose (HPMC) and sodium alginate, respectively. Evaluation of drug release kinetics that was attained from dissolution studies showed that Okra gum retarded the release up to 24 hours and exhibited the longest release as compared to HPMC and sodium alginate. The tensile and crushing strength of tablets was also evaluated by conducting hardness and friability tests. Okra gum was observed to produce tablets with the highest hardness value and lowest friability. Hence, Okra gum was testified as an effective adjuvant to produce favourable sustained release tablets with strong tensile and crushing strength. PMID:24678512

  2. The use of Hibiscus esculentus (Okra) gum in sustaining the release of propranolol hydrochloride in a solid oral dosage form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharuddin, Nurul Dhania; Noordin, Mohamed Ibrahim; Kadivar, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of Okra gum in sustaining the release of propranolol hydrochloride in a tablet was studied. Okra gum was extracted from the pods of Hibiscus esculentus using acetone as a drying agent. Dried Okra gum was made into powder form and its physical and chemical characteristics such as solubility, pH, moisture content, viscosity, morphology study using SEM, infrared study using FTIR, crystallinity study using XRD, and thermal study using DSC and TGA were carried out. The powder was used in the preparation of tablet using granulation and compression methods. Propranolol hydrochloride was used as a model drug and the activity of Okra gum as a binder was compared by preparing tablets using a synthetic and a semisynthetic binder which are hydroxylmethylpropyl cellulose (HPMC) and sodium alginate, respectively. Evaluation of drug release kinetics that was attained from dissolution studies showed that Okra gum retarded the release up to 24 hours and exhibited the longest release as compared to HPMC and sodium alginate. The tensile and crushing strength of tablets was also evaluated by conducting hardness and friability tests. Okra gum was observed to produce tablets with the highest hardness value and lowest friability. Hence, Okra gum was testified as an effective adjuvant to produce favourable sustained release tablets with strong tensile and crushing strength.

  3. Evaluation of gum mastic (Pistacia lentiscus) as a microencapsulating and matrix forming material for sustained drug release

    OpenAIRE

    Dinesh M. Morkhade

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a natural gum mastic was evaluated as a microencapsulating and matrix-forming material for sustained drug release. Mastic was characterized for its physicochemical properties. Microparticles were prepared by oil-in-oil solvent evaporation method. Matrix tablets were prepared by wet and melt granulation techniques. Diclofenac sodium (DFS) and diltiazem hydrochloride (DLTZ) were used as model drugs. Mastic produced discrete and spherical microspheres with DLTZ and microcapsules w...

  4. Nicotine Gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotine chewing gum is used to help people stop smoking cigarettes. Nicotine chewing gum should be used together with a ... support groups, counseling, or specific behavioral change techniques. Nicotine gum is in a class of medications called ...

  5. Evaluation of gum mastic (Pistacia lentiscus as a microencapsulating and matrix forming material for sustained drug release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh M. Morkhade

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a natural gum mastic was evaluated as a microencapsulating and matrix-forming material for sustained drug release. Mastic was characterized for its physicochemical properties. Microparticles were prepared by oil-in-oil solvent evaporation method. Matrix tablets were prepared by wet and melt granulation techniques. Diclofenac sodium (DFS and diltiazem hydrochloride (DLTZ were used as model drugs. Mastic produced discrete and spherical microspheres with DLTZ and microcapsules with DFS. Particle size and drug loading of microparticles was in the range of 22–62 µm and 50–87%, respectively. Increase in mastic: drug ratio increased microparticle size, improved drug loading and decreased the drug release rate. Microparticles with gum: drug ratio of 2:1 could sustain DLTZ release up to 12 h and released 57% DFS in 12 h. Mastic produced tablets with acceptable pharmacotechnical properties. A 30% w/w of mastic in tablet could sustain DLTZ release for 5 h from wet granulation, and DFS release for 8 h and 11 h from wet and melt granulation, respectively. Results revealed that a natural gum mastic can be used successfully to formulate matrix tablets and microparticles for sustained drug release.

  6. Sheet metal forming using rapid prototyped tooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Bin

    The demand for rapid, low-cost die fabrication and modification technology is greater than ever in sheet metal forming industry. One category of rapid tooling technology involves the application of advanced polymers and composites to fabricate metal forming dies. Despite their advantages in lead time and cost reductions, polymer dies for sheet metal forming applications have several drawbacks. Due to their lack of strength as compared to conventional die materials, the use of polymer dies is often limited to prototype or short-run production. In addition, because the mechanisms by which they fail are not fully understood, the dies are designed on the basis of experience and intuition. The research (1) characterized the mechanical behavior of an advanced polymer composite tooling material, (2) developed a method to predict the failure mode and the life of a polymer die, and (3) established optimal die design guidelines. The focus was on rapid prototyped, aluminum trihydrate(ATH)-filled, polyurethane-based dies in sheet metal forming. The study involved the determination of dominant process parameters based on the finite element analyses of 90° V-die bending and cylindrical cup drawing processes. The effects of process parameters on stress distribution in the die provided guidelines to the modification of die design for achieving the desired die life. The presented parametric study lays the groundwork for providing reliable tool failure prediction and design optimization guidelines for advanced polymer tooling materials in metal forming. In addition, the failure mechanisms were investigated to predict the failure mode and the fatigue life of the die. To establish a fundamental understanding of the fatigue behavior of the polyurethane-based die material, extensive material tests were performed, the microstructure was studied, and the fatigue properties were identified experimentally. The test data were incorporated into the local stress-based fatigue analysis to

  7. Influence of graphene-oxide nanosheets impregnation on properties of sterculia gum-polyacrylamide hydrogel formed by radiation induced polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Baljit; Singh, Baldev

    2017-06-01

    Present work is an attempt, to explore the potential of graphene oxide nanoplates impregnation, on the mechanical and drug delivery properties of sterculia gum-polyacrylamide composite hydrogel formed by radiation induced polymerization. These polymers were characterized by SEM, cryo-SEM, AFM, FTIR's, 13C NMR and swelling studies. Release profile of an anticancer drug 'gemcitabine' was studied to determine the drug release mechanism and best fit kinetic model. Furthermore, some important biomedical properties of the polymers such as blood compatibility, mucoadhesion, antioxidant properties and gel strength were also studied. Impregnation of GO into sterculia gum-poly(AAm) hydrogels decreased the swelling of hydrogels but improved the mechanical, drug loading and drug release properties of the hydrogels. Release of gemcitabine from drug loaded hydrogels occurred through non-Fickian diffusion mechanism and release profile was best fitted in first order kinetic model. These hydrogels have been found as haemocompatible, mucoadhesive, and antioxidant in nature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Gum biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - gingiva (gums) ... used to close the opening created for the biopsy. ... to eat for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Risks for this procedure include: Bleeding from the biopsy site Infection of the gums Soreness

  9. Tragacanth gum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anne S.; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard; Gavlighi, Hassan Ahmadi

    2013-01-01

    Tragacanth gum is a plant derived hydrocolloid that has a long history of use in food, pharma, and cosmetics. The gum is mainly produced in the Middle East and permitted for food use in the US and Europe. Tragacanth gum consists of complex, heterogeneous polysaccharides, which contain different...

  10. Thaumatin and gum arabic allergy in chewing gum factory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschannen, Mattias P; Glück, Ulrich; Bircher, Andreas J; Heijnen, Ingmar; Pletscher, Claudia

    2017-07-01

    Thaumatin is a sweetener and flavor modifier commonly used in the food industry. Likewise, gum arabic is widely used as a food stabilizer and thickening agent. We report here that a powder mixture composed of 10% thaumatin and 90% gum arabic led to allergic symptoms in the upper airways in occupationally exposed individuals: four of eight workers of a chewing gum factory exposed to this powder mixture had pronounced rhinitis. A positive skin prick test result for pure thaumatin was obtained in all four individuals with rhinitis of whom two also had a positive skin prick test result for pure gum arabic and gum arabic-specific IgE. Subsitution of a powdered thaumatin with a liquid form reduced symptoms among the rhinitic workers. Although gum arabic is a well-known potential allergen, we were unable to find prior documentation of allergic symptoms to thaumatin when it is used in the food industry. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Gum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... appearance. While undergoing treatment for periodontitis, it's especially important to take special care of your teeth and gums to see lasting improvement. This includes flossing and brushing every day and quitting habits that mean bad ...

  12. Stability of flocculated particles in concentrated and high hydrophilic solid layer-by-layer (LBL) emulsions formed using whey proteins and gum Arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Aaron S L; Roos, Yrjö H

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate flocculation in layer-by-layer (LBL) emulsion systems with high total solids content and deflocculation at various pH conditions, and the effects of whey protein isolate (WPI) concentration and total solids content on the stability of LBL emulsions. WPI (1.96% (1WPI) or 10.71% (10WPI), w/w in water) was prepared in water and high-pressure homogenized with sunflower oil (10%, w/w, of total emulsion). Gum Arabic (0.15%, w/w, in total emulsion) was added to assemble electrostatically on WPI at oil particle interfaces at pH3.5 using aqueous citric acid (10% w/w) forming LBL emulsion. The ζ-potential measurements showed charge reversal upon addition of gum Arabic solution into single layer (SL) emulsion confirming the formation of LBL interface. Trehalose:maltodextrin mixture (1:1, w/w, total emulsion, 28.57% (28) or 57.14% (57), w/w, in water) was used in the continuous phase. The high total solids content of the system results in depletion flocculation of the particles leading to bridging flocculation without coalescence as deflocculation into individual particles occurred with increasing pH from pH3.5 to pH6.5 in 10WPI systems. Deflocculation was evident in 10WPI-28 and 10WPI-57 as found from a decreased ζ-average diameter and visually under microscope. Coalescence was observed in 1WPI systems. Viscosity of the systems was significantly (P<0.05) increased with higher total solids content. Accelerated destabilization test showed that systems at higher WPI and total solids contents exhibited the highest stability against creaming. Deflocculation in LBL systems can be controlled by pH while high solids in the aqueous phase provide stability against creaming. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Continuous production of controlled release dosage forms based on hot-melt extruded gum arabic: Formulation development, in vitro characterization and evaluation of potential application fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipping, Thomas; Rein, Hubert

    2016-01-30

    Controlled release matrices based on gum arabic are prepared by applying a continuous hot-melt extrusion technology: the pre-mixture consisting of gum arabic and the incorporated API is plasticized by a co-rotating twin-screw extruder, an intermediate strand is formed by a round nozzle. Single dosed matrices are prepared by cutting the semi elastic strand with a rotary fly cutter. Paracetamol and phenazone are used as model drug substances. High drug loadings up to 70% can be realized. Matrices are characterized concerning their crystalline structure, in vitro dissolution, disintegration time and various physical parameters including glass transition temperature (Tg). Release characteristic behavior is mainly influenced by erosion of the matrices. At higher drug loadings also diffusion based transport gain importance. The solubility of the API shows an influence on the erosion rate of the matrix and should therefore be considered during formulation development. Tg is mainly influenced by the solubility of the API in the surrounding matrix. High soluble phenazone shows a decrease, whereas paracetamol addition has nearly no influence on the Tg of the polymeric system. Activation energy (EA) of the glass transition is determined via dynamic mechanical analysis. The addition of APIs leads to a reduction of EA indicating an increased molecular movement at Tg region compared to placebo extrudates. X-ray diffraction is used to determine the crystalline state of the extruded matrices and interaction between matrix and incorporated APIs. The production of thin layer matrices is an interesting option to provide a fast drug delivery to the oral cavity. High mechanical strength combined with fast disintegration times can be a great advantage for the development of oro-dispersible tablets. A great benefit of the evaluated processing technology is the simple adaption of the final dose by varying either the cutting length or the diameter of the nozzle resulting in a cost

  14. Anionically functionalized guar gum embedded with silica nanoparticles: An efficient nanocomposite adsorbent for rapid adsorptive removal of toxic cationic dyes and metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Abhay Shankar; Ghorai, Soumitra; Sarkar, Debabrata; Das, Raghunath; Sarkar, Supriya; Pal, Sagar

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, a novel biodegradable nanocomposite has been developed (h-GG/SiO2) based on anionically modified guar gum and in-situ deposited SiO2 NPs through sol-gel technique. Here the anionically modified guar gum stimulates the silica polymerization process and hence acts as a unique template for the development of spherical SiO2 NPs. Batch adsorption studies indicate that h-GG/SiO2 nanocomposite shows remarkable adsorption capacity for cationic dyes/metal ions (Qmax: 781.25mgg-1for malachite green (MG), 281.69mgg-1 for safranin (SF); 645.16mgg-1 for Pb2+, 709.21mgg-1 for Cd2+) as well as it efficiently and selectively removes cationic MG from mixture of dye solutions. Finally the worthy regenerative efficacy of h-GG/SiO2 facilitates the adsorbent to be economically promising for practical application in the field of wastewater management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Caffeine gum minimizes sleep inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Rachel A; Kamimori, Gary H; Wesensten, Nancy J; Picchioni, Dante; Balkin, Thomas J

    2013-02-01

    Naps are an effective strategy for maintaining alertness and cognitive performance; however, upon abrupt wakening from naps, sleep inertia (temporary performance degradation) may ensue. In the present study, attenuation of post-nap sleep inertia was attempted by administration of caffeine gum. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design, 15 healthy, non-smoking adults were awakened at 1 hr. and again at 6 hr. after lights out (0100 and 0600, respectively) and were immediately administered a gum pellet containing 100 mg of caffeine or placebo. A 5-min. psychomotor vigilance task was administered at 0 min., 6 min., 12 min., and 18 min. post-awakening. At 0100, response speed with caffeine was significantly better at 12 min. and 18 min. post-awakening compared to placebo; at 0600, caffeine's effects were evident at 18 min. post-awakening. Caffeinated gum is a viable means of rapidly attenuating sleep inertia, suggesting that the adenosine receptor system is involved in sleep maintenance.

  16. Quantification and qualification of bacteria trapped in chewed gum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W Wessel

    Full Text Available Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-chewed into gum and chewed gums were molded to standard dimensions, sonicated and plated to determine numbers of colony-forming-units incorporated, yielding calibration curves of colony-forming-units retrieved versus finger-chewed in. In a second method, calibration curves were created by finger-chewing known numbers of bacteria into gum and subsequently dissolving the gum in a mixture of chloroform and tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic-acid (TE-buffer. The TE-buffer was analyzed using quantitative Polymerase-Chain-Reaction (qPCR, yielding calibration curves of total numbers of bacteria versus finger-chewed in. Next, five volunteers were requested to chew gum up to 10 min after which numbers of colony-forming-units and total numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum were determined using the above methods. The qPCR method, involving both dead and live bacteria yielded higher numbers of retrieved bacteria than plating, involving only viable bacteria. Numbers of trapped bacteria were maximal during initial chewing after which a slow decrease over time up to 10 min was observed. Around 10(8 bacteria were detected per gum piece depending on the method and gum considered. The number of species trapped in chewed gum increased with chewing time. Trapped bacteria were clearly visualized in chewed gum using scanning-electron-microscopy. Summarizing, using novel methods to quantify and qualify oral bacteria trapped in chewed gum, the hypothesis is confirmed that chewing

  17. Gum Disease in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease in your child: Bleeding Bleeding gums during tooth brushing, flossing or any other time Puffiness Swollen and ... months old, you can begin using toothpaste when brushing his or her teeth. When the gaps between your child's teeth close, ...

  18. Gums, badgers, and economics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wilgen, BW

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available . Suffice it to say that they are the second most powerful threat to native biodiversity after direct habitat destruction. However, the effect of removing gum trees – on honey production and on the South African economy – is also a complex one. Honey...

  19. Rapidly in situ forming biodegradable robust hydrogels by combining stereocomplexation and photopolymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, C.; Zhou, W.; Zhong, Zhiyuan; Wouters, Marielle; Feijen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that stereocomplexed hydrogels can be rapidly formed in vitro as well as in vivo upon mixing aqueous solutions of eight-arm poly(ethylene glycol)−poly(l-lactide) (PEG−PLLA) and poly(ethylene glycol)−poly(d-lactide) (PEG−PDLA) star block copolymers. In this study,

  20. Rapid detection of malto-oligosaccharide-forming bacterial amylases by high performance anion-exchange chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duedahl-Olesen, Lene; Larsen, K. L.; Zimmermann, W.

    2000-01-01

    High performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection was applied for the rapid analysis of malto-oligosaccharides formed by extracellular enzyme preparations from 49 starch-degrading bacterial strains isolated from soil and compost samples. Malto-oligosaccharide-formi......High performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection was applied for the rapid analysis of malto-oligosaccharides formed by extracellular enzyme preparations from 49 starch-degrading bacterial strains isolated from soil and compost samples. Malto......-oligosaccharide-forming amylases, indicated by a predominant formation of maltohexaose from starch, were produced by enzyme preparations from four of the isolates growing at pH 7.0 and 10....

  1. Rapid changes in gene expression direct rapid shifts in intestinal form and function in the Burmese python after feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Audra L; Card, Daren C; Ruggiero, Robert P; Schield, Drew R; Adams, Richard H; Pollock, David D; Secor, Stephen M; Castoe, Todd A

    2015-05-01

    Snakes provide a unique and valuable model system for studying the extremes of physiological remodeling because of the ability of some species to rapidly upregulate organ form and function upon feeding. The predominant model species used to study such extreme responses has been the Burmese python because of the extreme nature of postfeeding response in this species. We analyzed the Burmese python intestine across a time series, before, during, and after feeding to understand the patterns and timing of changes in gene expression and their relationship to changes in intestinal form and function upon feeding. Our results indicate that >2,000 genes show significant changes in expression in the small intestine following feeding, including genes involved in intestinal morphology and function (e.g., hydrolases, microvillus proteins, trafficking and transport proteins), as well as genes involved in cell division and apoptosis. Extensive changes in gene expression occur surprisingly rapidly, within the first 6 h of feeding, coincide with changes in intestinal morphology, and effectively return to prefeeding levels within 10 days. Collectively, our results provide an unprecedented portrait of parallel changes in gene expression and intestinal morphology and physiology on a scale that is extreme both in the magnitude of changes, as well as in the incredibly short time frame of these changes, with up- and downregulation of expression and function occurring in the span of 10 days. Our results also identify conserved vertebrate signaling pathways that modulate these responses, which may suggest pathways for therapeutic modulation of intestinal function in humans. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Physicochemical and functional parameters of Cochlospermum vitifolium (bototo gum exudate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Coromoto Martínez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The physicochemical parameters of Cochlospermum vitifolium they were evaluated and were linked to certain functional properties of industrial interest. The physicochemical parameters were determined by the classic methodology used for carbohydrates and the functional properties, as reported in the literature. The results obtained showed that the gum object of this study is low soluble in water, which corresponds with relatively high values of swelling indexes and water absorption capacity. Also, the intrinsic viscosity of the C. vitifolium exudate was related to a high molar mass, in the order of 106. Its emulsifying capacity is high, which is attributed to hydrophobic groups present in its structure. The gum gels at a minimum concentration, similar to that of the gum karaya (4.5%, but the gel that forms agglomerates, it is not uniform. The C. vitifolium gum exhibits important physicochemical and functional parameters which could serve as a criterion for testing its use in various industries.

  3. Chewing gums for optimal health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Madan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article elaborates on the general aspects and health benefits of chewing gum. Chewing gums have been used since the time of prehistoric man as a source of entertainment and relaxation. It has also become a trendsetter with the teenagers. Currently, the health benefits of chewing gums are being studied and used in the treatment of various diseases. Certain medications have also been included in gums to act as an alternative drug delivery system. These gums have been found to be successful for the treatment of diseases, such as peptic ulcers, upper digestive tract cancer, oral candidiasis, and so on. It helps to relieve symptoms of xerostomia, Parkinsonism, tooth sensitivity after bleaching, and oral malodor. It helps in maintaining oral health, relieves stress, helps in weight loss, and improves alertness. Chewing gum may be distracting and irritating in numerous social environments, including schools, colleges, and the workplace. Research into the social effects of chewing gums is also necessary to further our knowledge into the psychosocial aspects of these gums.

  4. Mr. Bubble Gum: "Not Now!"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1989-01-01

    PreS-Gr 2-- Mr. Bubble Gum is a Level 3 book, the most difficult in this series. In four short stories of varying lengths, an older brother tells about his younger brother Eli, who "sticks to me like bubble gum...

  5. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells form nonclassical and potent immune synapses driving rapid cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, A J; Cross, R S; Watson, K A; Liao, Y; Shi, W; Prince, H M; Beavis, P A; Trapani, J A; Kershaw, M H; Ritchie, D S; Darcy, P K; Neeson, P J; Jenkins, M R

    2018-02-12

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cells are effective serial killers with a faster off-rate from dying tumor cells than CAR-T cells binding target cells through their T cell receptor (TCR). Here we explored the functional consequences of CAR-mediated signaling using a dual-specific CAR-T cell, where the same cell was triggered via TCR (tcrCTL) or CAR (carCTL). The carCTL immune synapse lacked distinct LFA-1 adhesion rings and was less reliant on LFA to form stable conjugates with target cells. carCTL receptors associated with the synapse were found to be disrupted and formed a convoluted multifocal pattern of Lck microclusters. Both proximal and distal receptor signaling pathways were induced more rapidly and subsequently decreased more rapidly in carCTL than in tcrCTL. The functional consequence of this rapid signaling in carCTL cells included faster lytic granule recruitment to the immune synapse, correlating with faster detachment of the CTL from the target cell. This study provides a mechanism for how CAR-T cells can debulk large tumor burden quickly and may contribute to further refinement of CAR design for enhancing the quality of signaling and programming of the T cell. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  6. Semi-solid dosage form of clonazepam for rapid oral mucosal absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Osamu; Machida, Yoshiharu; Onishi, Hiraku

    2011-07-01

    In order to obtain an alternative to the intravenous (i.v.) dosage form of clonazepam (CZ), an oral droplet formulation of CZ was developed previously; however, the droplet was physically unstable. Therefore, in the present study, it was attempted to develop an easily-handled dosage form, which was more physically stable and allowed rapid drug absorption from oral mucosa. A semi-solid dosage form, composed of polyethylene glycol 1500 (PEG), CZ, and oleic acid (OA) at 37/1/2 (w/w) and named PEG/CZ/OA, and a semi-solid dosage form containing PEG and CZ at 39/1 (w/w), called PEG/CZ, were prepared. Their physical stability in air at room temperature and oral mucosal absorption in rats were investigated. The semi-solid dosage forms were much more stable physically than the droplet, that is, no recrystallization of CZ was observed for at least 8 days. The effective concentration for humans and rats (20 ng/mL or more) was achieved within 30 min after buccal administration for both PEG/CZ/OA and PEG/CZ. The plasma concentration increased gradually and less varied at each time point for PEG/CZ/OA. PEG/CZ/OA was found to show more rapid and higher absorption of CZ in buccal administration than in sublingual administration. Buccal administration with the semi-solid dosage PEG/CZ with or without OA was suggested to be a possibly useful novel dosage form as an alternative to i.v. injection.

  7. Rapid self-healable poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels formed by selective metal-phosphate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeshi; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Shinji; Asoh, Taka-Aki; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Aoyagi, Takao

    2013-07-14

    Rapid self-healable and biocompatible hydrogels were prepared using the selective formation of metal-ligand interactions between selected metal ions and phosphate end groups of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The phosphate-terminated branch of PEG was synthesized via a substitution reaction of the hydroxyl end groups using phosphoryl chloride. The gelation and gel properties including rheological properties can be tuned by the careful selection of metal ions, branch numbers, and temperature. Especially, the gels rapidly formed by trivalent metal ions such as Fe(3+), V(3+), Al(3+), Ti(3+), and Ga(3+) have relatively small ionic radii. The ligand substitution rates also affected the repeatable autonomic healing ability. We have also demonstrated a gel-sol/sol-gel transition by switching the redox states of Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) ions. Learning from biological systems, the proposed phosphate-metal ion based self-healable hydrogels could become an attractive candidate for various biomedical and environmental applications.

  8. Amorphous salts formed from rapid dehydration of multicomponent chloride and ferric sulfate brines: Implications for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklute, Elizabeth C.; Rogers, A. Deanne; Gregerson, Jason C.; Jensen, Heidi B.; Reeder, Richard J.; Dyar, M. Darby

    2018-03-01

    Salts with high hydration states have the potential to maintain high levels of relative humidity (RH) in the near subsurface of Mars, even at moderate temperatures. These conditions could promote deliquescence of lower hydrates of ferric sulfate, chlorides, and other salts. Previous work on deliquesced ferric sulfates has shown that when these materials undergo rapid dehydration, such as that which would occur upon exposure to present day Martian surface conditions, an amorphous phase forms. However, the fate of deliquesced halides or mixed ferric sulfate-bearing brines are presently unknown. Here we present results of rapid dehydration experiments on Ca-, Na-, Mg- and Fe-chloride brines and multicomponent (Fe2(SO4)3 ± Ca, Na, Mg, Fe, Cl, HCO3) brines at ∼21 °C, and characterize the dehydration products using visible/near-infrared (VNIR) reflectance spectroscopy, mid-infrared attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. We find that rapid dehydration of many multicomponent brines can form amorphous solids or solids with an amorphous component, and that the presence of other elements affects the persistence of the amorphous phase under RH fluctuations. Of the pure chloride brines, only Fe-chloride formed an amorphous solid. XRD patterns of the multicomponent amorphous salts show changes in position, shape, and magnitude of the characteristic diffuse scattering observed in all amorphous materials that could be used to help constrain the composition of the amorphous salt. Amorphous salts deliquesce at lower RH values compared to their crystalline counterparts, opening up the possibility of their role in potential deliquescence-related geologic phenomena such as recurring slope lineae (RSLs) or soil induration. This work suggests that a wide range of aqueous mixed salt solutions can lead to the formation of amorphous salts and are possible for Mars; detailed studies of the formation mechanisms, stability and transformation

  9. Characterization of Grewia Gum, a Potential Pharmaceutical Excipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah.I.Nep

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Grewia gum was extracted from the inner stem bark of Grewia mollis and characterized by several techniques such as gas chromatography (GC, gel permeation chromatography (GPC, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and thermogravimetric analysis of the extracted sample. Spectroscopic techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, and 1H and 13C NMR techniques were also used to characterize the gum. The results showed that grewia gum is a typically amorphous polysaccharide gum containing glucose, rhamnose, galactose, arabinose and xylose as neutral sugars. It has an average molecular weight of 5925 kDa expressed as the pullulan equivalent. The gum slowly hydrated in water, dispersing and swelling to form a highly viscous dispersion exhibiting pseudoplastic flow behaviour. The polysaccharide gum is thermally stable and may have application as stabilizer or suspending agent in foods, cosmetics and in pharmaceuticals. It may have application as a binder or sustained-release polymer matrix in tablets or granulations.

  10. Oxidized Xanthan Gum and Chitosan as Natural Adhesives for Cork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Paiva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural cork stopper manufacturing produces a significant amount of cork waste, which is granulated and combined with synthetic glues for use in a wide range of applications. There is a high demand for using biosourced polymers in these composite materials. In this study, xanthan gum (XG and chitosan (CS were investigated as possible natural binders for cork. Xanthan gum was oxidized at two different aldehyde contents as a strategy to improve its water resistance. This modification was studied in detail by 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, and the degree of oxidation was determined by the hydroxylamine hydrochloride titration method. The performance of the adhesives was studied by tensile tests and total soluble matter (TSM determinations. Xanthan gum showed no water resistance, contrary to oxidized xanthan gum and chitosan. It is hypothesized that the good performance of oxidized xanthan gum is due to the reaction of aldehyde groups—formed in the oxidation process—with hydroxyl groups on the cork surface during the high temperature drying. Combining oxidized xanthan gum with chitosan did not yield significant improvements.

  11. Production of Gum from Cashew Tree Latex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. AZEEZ

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed at producing gum from cashew tree latex, which can act as substitute for gum Arabic. The method used include drying and size reduction of the exudates gum, sieving of the gum to remove impurities, dissolution of the gum in distilled water, filtration to remove polysaccharide waste and finally concentration and stability of the gum. Glycerine, starch and Zinc oxide are some of the additives used in stabilizing the gum. The pH and Viscosity on addition of various percentage concentration of stabilizing agent were determined. Gum of the best quality was obtained with viscosity and pH of 4.52 Ns/m2 and 4.2 respectively; this is because the natural pH of gum from Acacia Senegal ranges between 3.9 - 4.9. The gum can be used as an alternative for synthetic adhesive used presently for stamps and envelopes.

  12. Implications of Partial Conjugation of Whey Protein Isolate to Durian Seed Gum through Maillard Reactions: Foaming Properties, Water Holding Capacity and Interfacial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Tabatabaee Amid

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the conjugation of durian seed gum (DSG with whey protein isolate (WPI through Maillard reactions. Subsequently, the functional properties of durian seed gum in the non-conjugated (control sample and conjugated forms were compared with several commercial gums (i.e., Arabic gum, sodium alginate, kappa carrageenan, guar gum, and pectin. The current study revealed that the conjugation of durian seed gum with whey protein isolate significantly (p < 0.05 improved its foaming properties. In this study, the conjugated durian seed gum produced the most stable foam among all samples. On the other hand, the emulsion stabilized with the conjugated durian seed gum also showed more uniform particles with a larger specific surface area than the emulsion containing the non-conjugated durian seed gum. The conjugated durian seed gum showed significant different foaming properties, specific surface area, particle uniformity and water holding capacity (WHC as compared to the target polysaccharide gums. The conjugated durian seed gum showed more similar functional properties to Arabic gum rather than other studied gums.

  13. Glycinin-gum arabic complex formation: Turbidity measurement and charge neutralization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Die; Hua, Yufei

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between glycinin and anionic polysaccharides has gained considerable attention recently because of its scientific impact on the stability of acid soymilk systems. In this study, the formation of glycinin/gum arabic complexes driven by electrostatic interactions was investigated. Turbidity titrations at different glycinin/gum arabic ratios were conducted and critical pH values (pHφ1) where insoluble complexes began forming were determined firstly. The corresponding pHφ1 values at glycinin/gum arabic ratios of 1:4, 1:2, 1:1, 2:1, 4:1 and 8:1 were 2.85, 3.25, 3.70, 4.40, 4.85 and 5.35, respectively. Afterwards, electromobilities for glycinin and gum arabic at the pH values between 4.1 and 2.6 were measured, and charge densities (ZN) for glycinin and gum arabic were calculated based on the soft particle analysis theory. Further analysis indicated that the product of glycinin/gum arabic ratio (ρ) and ZN ratio of glycinin/gum arabic was approximate 1 at any pHφ1 values. It was revealed that charge neutralization was achieved when glycinin/gum arabic insoluble complexes began forming. NaCl displayed multiple effects on glycinin/gum arabic complex formation according to turbidity and compositional analysis. The present study could provide basic guidance in acid soymilk designing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Compact form fitting small antennas using three-dimensional rapid prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Bryan Jon

    Three-dimensional (3D) rapid prototyping holds significant promise for future antenna designs. Many complex designs that would be unmanufacturable or costly are realizable on a 3D printing machine. The ability to create 3D designs of virtually any configuration makes it possible to build compact antennas that can form fit to any space. These antennas build on the concept that small antennas can best reach the ideal operating limit when utilizing the entire 3D space in a sphere surrounding the antenna. Antennas require a combination of dielectric and conductive materials. 3D rapid prototyping is already well advanced for plastics and dielectric materials (with more options coming online). Prototyping with conductive materials has lagged behind; due mainly to their higher melting points, but this is advancing as well. This dissertation focuses on 3D rapid prototyping for antenna design. A 3D antenna made from small cubical cells is optimized for 2.4--3GHz using a genetic algorithm (GA). The antennas are built using 3D printing of plastic covered by conductive paint. The effects of the conductivity of the paint and number of layers on the resonance and gain of the antenna are evaluated. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using 3D rapid prototyping for antenna design. A 3D dipole is also optimized using a GA to function from 510--910MHz. The antenna was built using 3D rapid prototyping from plastic. The 3D antenna was covered with a conductive coating and measured, showing good agreement with simulation. The 3D GA is used to design 3D antennas of random shape to fit inside the empty space in a cell phone case and optimized for cell phone bands 800--900MHz and 1.6--3.7GHz. The research also evaluates methods and materials that can be used to produce 3D antennas. In addition to the flexibility that 3D prototyping brings to antenna design, this paper describes how this new and emerging method for building antennas can provide fast and affordable antennas for

  15. Structural and compositional properties of CZTS thin films formed by rapid thermal annealing of electrodeposited layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, J.; Ganchev, M.; Loorits, M.; Revathi, N.; Raadik, T.; Raudoja, J.; Grossberg, M.; Mellikov, E.; Volobujeva, O.

    2013-10-01

    In this work Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films were formed by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) of sequentially electrodeposited Cu-Zn and Sn films in 5% H2S containing atmosphere. Six different thermal profiles were used in the experiments. In three of these, the temperature ramping up was varied, while the variable in the other three profiles was the cooling down rate. The optimising parameters for RTA of electrodeposited films were found and annealed films were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM+EDS). The material parameters such as lattice strain and crystallite size were also determined and the influence of annealing temperature and heating rate on these parameters was discussed.The pathway of MoS2 formation was investigated.

  16. A Rapid Determination of Cinnarizine in Bulk and Pharmaceutical Dosage Form by LC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Heda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, selective, rapid and precise reverse phase high pressure liquid chromatographic method has been developed for the estimation of cinnarizine from pharmaceutical formulation. The method was developed using MICRA-NPS C18 (length×OD×ID =33×8.0×6.0 mm, 1.5 μm column with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile, triethylamine buffer (adjusted to pH 4.5 with 10% w/v potassium hydroxide and tetrahydrofuran in the ratio 30:66:4 respectively, at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Wavelength was fixed at 253 nm. The developed method was validated for linearity, accuracy, precision, limit of detection and limit of quantitation. The proposed method can be used for the routine estimation of cinnarizine in pharmaceutical dosage form.

  17. Studies on gum of Moringa oleifera for its emulsifying properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibya Sundar Panda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emulsion has been a form of presenting water insoluble substances for a long period of time. Now a day, it has been a way of presenting various intravenous additives and diagnostic agents in X-ray examinations. Various substances can be used as emulsifying agent, which can be operationally defined as a stabilizer of the droplets formed of the internal phase. Materials and Methods: Gum from Moringa oleifera was evaluated for its emulsifying properties. Castor oil emulsions 30 percent (o/w, containing 2 to 4% Moringa oleifera gum was prepared. Emulsions containing equivalent concentration of acacia were also prepared for comparison. All the emulsions prepared were stored at room temperature and studied for stability at various time intervals for 8 weeks. The prepared emulsions were evaluated for creaming rate, globule size and rate of coalescence. 23 factorial design was chosen to investigate the effects of centrifugation, pH, temperature changes and electrolytes on the creaming rate and globule size. Results: The results of the investigations show that the gum of Moringa oleifera possesses better emulsifying properties as compared to gum acacia. Conclusion: Gum of Moringa oleifera could be used in pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical preparation.

  18. Cortical plasticity induced by rapid Hebbian learning of novel tonal word-forms : Evidence from mismatch negativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yue, Jinxing; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Alter, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Although several experiments reported rapid cortical plasticity induced by passive exposure to novel segmental patterns, few studies have devoted attention to the neural dynamics during the rapid learning of novel tonal word-forms in tonal languages, such as Chinese. In the current study, native

  19. Potential benefits of chewing gum for the delivery of oral therapeutics and its possible role in oral healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Stefan W; van der Mei, Henny C; Maitra, Amarnath; Dodds, Michael W J; Busscher, Henk J

    2016-10-01

    Over the years, chewing gum has developed from a candy towards an oral health-promoting nutraceutical. This review summarizes evidence for the oral health benefits of chewing gum, emphasizing identification of active ingredients in gum that facilitate prevention and removal of oral biofilm. Chewing of sugar-free gum yields oral health benefits that include clearance of food debris, reduction in oral dryness, increase of biofilm pH and remineralization of enamel. These basic effects of chewing gum are attributed to increased mastication and salivation. Active ingredients incorporated in chewing gums aim to expand these effects to inhibition of extrinsic tooth stain and calculus formation, enhanced enamel remineralization, reduction of the numbers of bacteria in saliva and amount of oral biofilm, neutralization of biofilm pH, and reduction of volatile sulfur compounds. Evidence for oral-health benefits of chewing gum additives is hard to obtain due to their relatively low concentrations and rapid wash-out. Clinical effects of gum additives are overshadowed by effects of increased mastication and salivation due to the chewing of gum and require daily chewing of gum for prolonged periods of time. Future studies on active ingredients should focus on specifically targeting pathogenic bacteria, whilst leaving the healthy microbiome unaffected.

  20. Simulation of Microstructure during Laser Rapid Forming Solidification Based on Cellular Automaton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-jian Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The grain microstructure of molten pool during the solidification of TC4 titanium alloy in the single point laser cladding was investigated based on the CAFE model which is the cellular automaton (CA coupled with the finite element (FE method. The correct temperature field is the prerequisite for simulating the grain microstructure during the solidification of the molten pool. The model solves the energy equation by the FE method to simulate the temperature distribution in the molten pool of the single point laser cladding. Based on the temperature field, the solidification microstructure of the molten pool is also simulated with the CAFE method. The results show that the maximum temperature in the molten pool increases with the laser power and the scanning rate. The laser power has a larger influence on the temperature distribution of the molten pool than the scanning rate. During the solidification of the molten pool, the heat at the bottom of the molten pool transfers faster than that at the top of the molten pool. The grains rapidly grow into the molten pool, and then the columnar crystals are formed. This study has a very important significance for improving the quality of the structure parts manufactured through the laser cladding forming.

  1. Rapid solidification of an Al-5Ni alloy processed by spray forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrado Ramos Moreira Afonso

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, intermetallic compounds have attracted much attention due to their potential technological applications as high-temperature materials. In particular the intermetallic compounds, associated with the Al-Ni binary system stand out as promising candidates for high-temperature materials for the use in harsh environments. It is expected that a bulk Al-Ni alloy may exceed the strength of many commercial materials. The great challenge in developing these alloys is to manipulate the solidification thermal parameters in order to obtain the desired microstructural features. One of the indicated routes to obtain very refined intermetallic phases dispersed in the microstructure is the spray forming process. The dendritic and eutectic growth dependences on cooling rate are already known for directionally solidified (DS hypoeutectic Al-Ni alloys. In the case of rapidly solidified (RS samples, extrapolations of such experimental laws are needed, which can be very helpful to estimate realistic values of high cooling rates imposed during the spray forming process. The present study aims to compare directionally solidified and spray-formed Al-5wt. (%Ni alloy samples with a view to providing a basis for understanding how to control solidification parameters and the as-cast microstructure. The Al-5.0wt. (%Ni alloy was shown to have a cellular morphology for the overspray powder size range examined (up to 500 µm. The mean cell spacing decreased from 5.0 to 1.1 µm with the decrease in the powder average diameter. It was found that the experimental cooling rates imposed during the atomization step of the overspray powder solidification varied from 10³ to 2.10(4 K/s. The DSC trace depicted a crystallization peak of an amorphous structure fraction in the smallest Al-5.0wt. (%Ni alloy powder size range (<32 µm estimating a 15 µm critical diameter of amorphous powder in the binary Al97.5Ni2.5 (at% alloy.

  2. Chewing gum bezoars of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milov, D E; Andres, J M; Erhart, N A; Bailey, D J

    1998-08-01

    Children have chewed gum since the Stone Age. Black lumps of prehistoric tar with human tooth impressions have been found in Northern Europe dating from approximately 7000 BC (Middle Stone Age) to 2000 BC (Bronze Age). The bite impressions suggest that most chewers were between 6 and 15 years of age. The Greeks chewed resin from the mastic tree (mastic gum). North American Indians chewed spruce gum. The first manufacturing patent for chewing gum was issued in 1869 for a natural gum, chicle, derived from the Sopadilla tree, indigenous to Central America. Chewing gum sold today is a mixture of natural and synthetic gums and resins, with added color and flavor sweetened with corn syrup and sugar. Chewing gum is big business. A significant amount of the $21 billion US candy industry sales is from chewing gums, many of which appeal almost exclusively to children. Despite the history and prevalence of gum chewing, the medical literature contains very little information about the adverse effects of chewing gum. In the present report, we briefly review gum-chewing complications and describe three children who developed intestinal tract and esophageal obstruction as a consequence of swallowing gum.

  3. Studies on some physicochemical properties of Leucaena Leucocephala bark gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijetha Pendyala

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Gum exudates from Leucaena Leucocephala (Family: Fabaceae plants grown all over India were investigated for its physicochemical properties such as pH, swelling capacity and viscosities at different temperatures using standard methods. Leucaena Leucocephala bark gum appeared to be colorless to reddish brown translucent tears. 5 % w/v mucilage has pH of 7.5 at 28°C. The gum is slightly soluble in water and practically insoluble in ethanol, acetone and chloroform. It swells to about 5 times its original weight in water. A 5 %w/ v mucilage concentration gave a viscosity value which was unaffected at temperature ranges (28-40°C. At concentrations of 2 and 5 %w/v, the gum exhibited pseudo plastic flow pattern while at 10 %w/v concentration the flow behaviour was thixotropic. The results indicate that the swelling ability of Leucaena Leucocephala (LL bark gum may provide potentials for its use as a disintegrant in tablet formulation, as a hydro gel in modified release dosage forms and the rheological flow properties may also provide potentials for its use as suspending and emulsifying agents owing to its pseudo plastic and thixotropic flow patterns.

  4. STUDIES ON SOME PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF LEUCAENA LEUCOCEPHALA BARK GUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijetha Pendyala

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Gum exudates from Leucaena Leucocephala (Family: Fabaceae plants grown all over India were investigated for its physicochemical properties such as pH, swelling capacity and viscosities at different temperatures using standard methods. Leucaena Leucocephala bark gum appeared to be colorless to reddish brown translucent tears. 5 % w/v mucilage has pH of 7.5 at 28°C. The gum is slightly soluble in water and practically insoluble in ethanol, acetone and chloroform. It swells to about 5 times its original weight in water. A 5 %w/v mucilage concentration gave a viscosity value which was unaffected at temperature ranges (28-40°C. At concentrations of 2 and 5 %w/v, the gum exhibited pseudo plastic flow pattern while at 10 %w/v concentration the flow behaviour was thixotropic. The results indicate that the swelling ability of Leucaena Leucocephala (LL bark gum may provide potentials for its use as a disintegrant in tablet formulation, as a hydro gel in modified release dosage forms and the rheological flow properties may also provide potentials for its use as suspending and emulsifying agents owing to its pseudo plastic and thixotropic flow patterns.

  5. 21 CFR 201.319 - Water-soluble gums, hydrophilic gums, and hydrophilic mucilloids (including, but not limited to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Water-soluble gums, hydrophilic gums, and... Specific Labeling Requirements for Specific Drug Products § 201.319 Water-soluble gums, hydrophilic gums... been associated with the ingestion of water-soluble gums, hydrophilic gums, and hydrophilic mucilloids...

  6. Herbal-caffeinated chewing gum, but not bubble gum, improves aspects of memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Matthew G

    2011-08-01

    Research has shown that standard chewing gum can affect aspects of both attention and memory. The present study examined the effects of Think Gum®, a caffeinated-herbal chewing gum, on both concentration and memory using a series of paper-based and online testing. Compared to standard chewing gum and a no-gum control, chewing caffeinated-herbal gum during testing improved aspects of memory, but did not affect concentration. The findings suggest that caffeinated-herbal chewing gum is an effective memory aid. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Oxidation of cashew tree gum exudate polysaccharide with TEMPO reagent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Pablyana L.R.; Maciel, Jeanny S.; Paula, Regina C.M. de; Feitosa, Judith P.A. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica; Sierakowski, Maria Rita [Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: judith@dqoi.ufc.br

    2007-07-01

    Cashew gum (CG), an exudate polysaccharide from Anacardium occidentale trees, was oxidized with TEMPO reagent and the product (CGOX) characterized by spectroscopic techniques (FTIR and NMR), chromatographic analyses (HPLC and GPC), viscosity measurements and thermal analysis (TGA). The yield of the reaction product was 96%. The uronic acid content in starting gum (7.2 m%) was increased to 36 m%. The degree of oxidation based on free galactose and glucose units was 68%. NMR data show that oxidation occurred preferentially at primary carbons of galactose units. High degradation degree after oxidation was estimated by the difference on the expected and observed {eta}{sub CGOX}/{eta}{sub CG} ratio. The presence of organic and inorganic impurities in the new polyelectrolyte was detected by TGA. A less thermally stable cashew gum is formed after the oxidation with TEMPO based on initial decomposition temperature and IPDT. (author)

  8. Setting Mechanical Properties of High Strength Steels for Rapid Hot Forming Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löbbe, Christian; Hering, Oliver; Hiegemann, Lars; Tekkaya, A Erman

    2016-03-25

    Hot stamping of sheet metal is an established method for the manufacturing of light weight products with tailored properties. However, the generally-applied continuous roller furnace manifests two crucial disadvantages: the overall process time is long and a local setting of mechanical properties is only feasible through special cooling techniques. Hot forming with rapid heating directly before shaping is a new approach, which not only reduces the thermal intervention in the zones of critical formability and requested properties, but also allows the processing of an advantageous microstructure characterized by less grain growth, additional fractions (e.g., retained austenite), and undissolved carbides. Since the austenitization and homogenization process is strongly dependent on the microstructure constitution, the general applicability for the process relevant parameters is unknown. Thus, different austenitization parameters are analyzed for the conventional high strength steels 22MnB5, Docol 1400M, and DP1000 in respect of the mechanical properties. In order to characterize the resulting microstructure, the light optical and scanning electron microscopy, micro and macro hardness measurements, and the X-ray diffraction are conducted subsequent to tensile tests. The investigation proves not only the feasibility to adjust the strength and ductility flexibly, unique microstructures are also observed and the governing mechanisms are clarified.

  9. Improved emulsification performance of corn fiber gum following maturation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn fiber gum (CFG) in the solid state (milled powder form) was subjected to a maturation treatment by heating under atmospheric pressure at 110 degrees C for 5 (CFG5) and 24 hours (CFG24). The treatment reduced the solubility and aggregation of the proteinaceous component with increased heating t...

  10. Complex coacervation of whey proteins and gum arabic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinbreck, F.; Vries, de R.J.; Schrooyen, P.; Kruif, de C.G.

    2003-01-01

    Mixtures of gum arabic and whey protein (whey protein isolate, WP) form an electrostatic complex in a specific PH range. Three phase boundaries (PHc, pHphi(l), pHphi(2)) have been determined using an original titration method, newly applied to complex coacervation. It consists of monitoring the

  11. Periodontal (Gum) Disease: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... identify underlying conditions or risk factors (such as smoking) that may contribute to gum disease. Examine your gums and note any signs of ... will vary, depending on the extent of the gum disease. Any type of treatment ... as quitting smoking, as a way to improve treatment outcome. Deep ...

  12. 21 CFR 582.7330 - Gum arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gum arabic. 582.7330 Section 582.7330 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7330 Gum arabic. (a) Product. Acacia (gum arabic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as...

  13. Oral health benefits of chewing gum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades sugar-free chewing gum has developed in an oral healthcare product, next to the conventional products such as the toothbrush and mouthrinses. In this thesis we investigate the oral health benefits of chewing gum and the effects of additives to chewing gum, such as antimicrobials.

  14. Synthesis, physico-chemical and biomedical applications of sulfated Aegle marmelos gum: Green chemistry approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Jindal

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was aimed at obtaining a sulfated derivative of gum obtained from partially ripe fruits of Aegle marmelos employing the ultrasonication technique. Elemental analysis and FTIR-ATR studies confirmed successful sulfation. The molarity of sulfuric acid exerted maximum influence on the degree of substitution followed by reaction temperature and reaction time. The sulfated derivative showed higher swelling in both acidic and alkaline pH as compared to the unmodified gum. It also possessed higher negative zeta potential, higher viscosity, work of shear, firmness, consistency, cohesiveness and index of viscosity as compared to both unmodified gum as well as sodium alginate. Sulfated derivative was superior to unmodified gum and sodium alginate in terms of antimicrobial and anticoagulant activities. The sulfated sample appears to be a potential substitute over the unmodified gum sample and sodium alginate for modulating the physicochemical properties of food and drug release dosage forms.

  15. The CT appearance of intraoral chewing gum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towbin, Alexander J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2008-12-15

    When imaged, intraoral chewing gum has the potential to be misdiagnosed. Chewing gum has a characteristic appearance on CT: it is ovoid in shape, hyperdense, and has small internal locules of air. Reports have described the appearance of gum on radiographs and abdominal CT images; however, no reports could be found detailing its appearance within the mouth. This report describes the appearance of intraoral chewing gum as well as the properties of the gum that lead to this appearance. Because of the potential for misdiagnosis, screening for intraoral foreign bodies should be considered prior to imaging. (orig.)

  16. Xanthan-A Versatile Gum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 10. Xanthan – A Versatile Gum. Anil Lachke. General Article Volume 9 Issue 10 October 2004 pp 25-33. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/10/0025-0033. Keywords. Xanthan ...

  17. Responses of interproximal plaque pH to snack foods and effect of chewing sorbitol-containing gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, M E

    1986-08-01

    Interproximal wire-telemetric plaque pH data were obtained from five volunteers after they ate milk chocolate bars, raisins, chocolate wafer cookies with cream filling, cupcakes with icing and cream filling, and cherry pies. All the foods produced rapid decreases in plaque pH for extended periods. In a second set of test sessions, volunteers chewed sugarless gum for 10 minutes, starting 15 minutes after they ate the snack food. In all cases, the gum chewing caused a rapid increase in plaque pH. The pH remained at a level considered safe for teeth for 30 minutes after chewing the gum.

  18. Hydrothermal vents in Lake Tanganyika harbor spore-forming thermophiles with extremely rapid growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsgaard, Lars; Prieur, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    and peptone. The optimum temperature for growth was 60 °C, while minimum and maximum temperatures were 40 and 75 °C. The pH response was alkalitolerant with optimum pH at 7.4 and 8.5 depending on the growth medium. The distinct feature of rapid proliferation and endospore formation may allow the novel...

  19. Investigation of Transport Properties of a New Biomaterials - GUM Mangosteen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Sourav S.; Sarkar, A.

    2006-06-01

    Biomaterial has occupied leading position in material science for various scientific and technological applications. This present work is carried out over a natural gum extracted from raw fruit of Mangosteen, an east Indian tree (Gercinia Mangostana) following extraction and purification process. Solid specimen of the said gum is developed following sol-gel like process. AC and DC electrical analysis on the dried solid specimen of the gum were carried out and showed high electrical conduction with σ ~ 1 E-03 S/cm, of which ionic and electronic contributions are 70% and 30% respectively. Analysis shows that origin of high electrical conductivity is due to presence of substantial amount of organic acid unit in its polysaccharide background. In fact the observed σ is about 1000 times of that observed in gum Arabica. Optical absorption of this new bio- materials are also studied using UV-VIS analysis. The results show its high absorption co-efficient in UV and blue part of analysed range. A complete electrical characterization of the material have been made. It has also been observed that the electronic conduction can be enhanced to 70% of the total electrical conductivity by forming complex with Iodine and organic (Citric) acid from Lemon fruit. This high potential material is being studied for development of electronic device application.

  20. Optimal experimental conditions for Welan gum production by support vector regression and adaptive genetic algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwei Li

    Full Text Available Welan gum is a kind of novel microbial polysaccharide, which is widely produced during the process of microbial growth and metabolism in different external conditions. Welan gum can be used as the thickener, suspending agent, emulsifier, stabilizer, lubricant, film-forming agent and adhesive usage in agriculture. In recent years, finding optimal experimental conditions to maximize the production is paid growing attentions. In this work, a hybrid computational method is proposed to optimize experimental conditions for producing Welan gum with data collected from experiments records. Support Vector Regression (SVR is used to model the relationship between Welan gum production and experimental conditions, and then adaptive Genetic Algorithm (AGA, for short is applied to search optimized experimental conditions. As results, a mathematic model of predicting production of Welan gum from experimental conditions is obtained, which achieves accuracy rate 88.36%. As well, a class of optimized experimental conditions is predicted for producing Welan gum 31.65g/L. Comparing the best result in chemical experiment 30.63g/L, the predicted production improves it by 3.3%. The results provide potential optimal experimental conditions to improve the production of Welan gum.

  1. Optimal experimental conditions for Welan gum production by support vector regression and adaptive genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongwei; Yuan, Xiang; Cui, Xuerong; Liu, Xin; Wang, Leiquan; Zhang, Weishan; Lu, Qinghua; Zhu, Hu

    2017-01-01

    Welan gum is a kind of novel microbial polysaccharide, which is widely produced during the process of microbial growth and metabolism in different external conditions. Welan gum can be used as the thickener, suspending agent, emulsifier, stabilizer, lubricant, film-forming agent and adhesive usage in agriculture. In recent years, finding optimal experimental conditions to maximize the production is paid growing attentions. In this work, a hybrid computational method is proposed to optimize experimental conditions for producing Welan gum with data collected from experiments records. Support Vector Regression (SVR) is used to model the relationship between Welan gum production and experimental conditions, and then adaptive Genetic Algorithm (AGA, for short) is applied to search optimized experimental conditions. As results, a mathematic model of predicting production of Welan gum from experimental conditions is obtained, which achieves accuracy rate 88.36%. As well, a class of optimized experimental conditions is predicted for producing Welan gum 31.65g/L. Comparing the best result in chemical experiment 30.63g/L, the predicted production improves it by 3.3%. The results provide potential optimal experimental conditions to improve the production of Welan gum.

  2. Undercooling of Rapidly Solidified Droplets and Spray Formed Strips of Al-Cu (Sc)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogno, A.; Natzke, P.; Yin, S.; Henein, H.

    Impulse Atomization (IA) (a single fluid atomization technique) was used to rapidly solidify Al-4.5wt%Cu and Al-4.5wt%Cu-0.4wt%Sc under argon atmosphere. In addition to the IA-generated droplets, the same technique was used to produce strips by Spray Deposition (SD) of the same alloys on a copper substrate with and without oil coating. The rapid solidification microstructures were analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). From the SEM images, the amount of eutectic and the secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS) were measured. These SDAS results lead to the estimation of cooling rate. The eutectic fraction coupled with the metastable extension of the solidus and liquidus lines of Al-Cu (Sc) phase diagram lead to the estimation of primary and eutectic undercoolings. A comparison of the solidification path of the droplets and the strips was done as well as the analysis of the effects of scandium.

  3. Isolation and characterization of gum from Chrysophyllum albidum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study describes the morphology, physicochemical and compressional characteristics of a natural gum derived from the fruits of Chrysophyllum albidum. Preliminary phytochemical screening and physicochemical properties of Chrysophyllum albidum gum (in comparison with tragacanth gum) were determined while ...

  4. GUM Analysis for SIMS Isotopic Ratios in BEP0 Graphite Qualification Samples, Round 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, David C.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Reid, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes GUM calculations for TIMS and SIMS isotopic ratio measurements of reactor graphite samples. These isotopic ratios are used to estimate reactor burn-up, and currently consist of various ratios of U, Pu, and Boron impurities in the graphite samples. The GUM calculation is a propagation of error methodology that assigns uncertainties (in the form of standard error and confidence bound) to the final estimates.

  5. Application of morphing technique with mesh-merging in rapid hull form generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Young Kang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Morphing is a geometric interpolation technique that is often used by the animation industry to transform one form into another seemingly seamlessly. It does this by producing a large number of ‘intermediate’ forms between the two ‘extreme’ or ‘parent’ forms. It has already been shown that morphing technique can be a powerful tool for form design and as such can be a useful addition to the armoury of product designers. Morphing procedure itself is simple and consists of straightforward linear interpolation. However, establishing the correspondence between vertices of the parent models is one of the most difficult and important tasks during a morphing process. This paper discusses the mesh-merging method employed for this process as against the already established mesh-regularising method. It has been found that the merging method minimises the need for manual manipulation, allowing automation to a large extent.

  6. Application of morphing technique with mesh-merging in rapid hull form generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ju Young; Lee, Byung Suk

    2012-09-01

    Morphing is a geometric interpolation technique that is often used by the animation industry to transform one form into another seemingly seamlessly. It does this by producing a large number of `intermediate' forms between the two `extreme' or `parent' forms. It has already been shown that morphing technique can be a powerful tool for form design and as such can be a useful addition to the armoury of product designers. Morphing procedure itself is simple and consists of straightforward linear interpolation. However, establishing the correspondence between vertices of the parent models is one of the most difficult and important tasks during a morphing process. This paper discusses the mesh-merging method employed for this process as against the already established mesh-regularising method. It has been found that the merging method minimises the need for manual manipulation, allowing automation to a large extent.

  7. Binding of the substrate UDP-glucuronic acid induces conformational changes in the xanthan gum glucuronosyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, S R; Petruk, A A; Brukman, N G; Bianco, M I; Jacobs, M; Marti, M A; Ielpi, L

    2016-06-01

    GumK is a membrane-associated glucuronosyltransferase of Xanthomonas campestris that is involved in xanthan gum biosynthesis. GumK belongs to the inverting GT-B superfamily and catalyzes the transfer of a glucuronic acid (GlcA) residue from uridine diphosphate (UDP)-GlcA (UDP-GlcA) to a lipid-PP-trisaccharide embedded in the membrane of the bacteria. The structure of GumK was previously described in its apo- and UDP-bound forms, with no significant conformational differences being observed. Here, we study the behavior of GumK toward its donor substrate UDP-GlcA. Turbidity measurements revealed that the interaction of GumK with UDP-GlcA produces aggregation of protein molecules under specific conditions. Moreover, limited proteolysis assays demonstrated protection of enzymatic digestion when UDP-GlcA is present, and this protection is promoted by substrate binding. Circular dichroism spectroscopy also revealed changes in the GumK tertiary structure after UDP-GlcA addition. According to the obtained emission fluorescence results, we suggest the possibility of exposure of hydrophobic residues upon UDP-GlcA binding. We present in silico-built models of GumK complexed with UDP-GlcA as well as its analogs UDP-glucose and UDP-galacturonic acid. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we also show that a relative movement between the domains appears to be specific and to be triggered by UDP-GlcA. The results presented here strongly suggest that GumK undergoes a conformational change upon donor substrate binding, likely bringing the two Rossmann fold domains closer together and triggering a change in the N-terminal domain, with consequent generation of the acceptor substrate binding site. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Effect of carboxymethylation on rheological and drug release characteristics of locust bean gum matrix tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravorty, Amrita; Barman, Gouranga; Mukherjee, Sudipta; Sa, Biswanath

    2016-06-25

    This study was undertaken to investigate correlation between the carboxymethylation-induced rheological changes and drug release characteristics of locust bean gum (LBG) matrix tablets. LBG was derivatized to carboxymethyl LBG (CMLBG) and characterized by (13)C NMR, FTIR and elemental analyses. Rheological studies revealed that LBG, in contact with water, produced a strong elastic gel which swelled less due to lower penetration of water resulting in slower drug release. On the other hand, CMLBG formed a viscous polymer solution through which higher influx of water resulted in rapid swelling of the matrix and faster drug release. Although the release from a particular matrix was dependent on drugs' solubilities, CMLBG matrix tablet produced faster release of all the drugs than LBG matrix tablets. In conclusion, rheological study appeared to be an useful tool to predict release of drugs from polysaccharide matrix tablets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Troy Microneedle: A Rapidly Separating, Dissolving Microneedle Formed by Cyclic Contact and Drying on the Pillar (CCDP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroo Kim

    Full Text Available In dissolving microneedle (DMN-mediated therapy, complete and rapid delivery of DMNs is critical for the desired efficacy. Traditional patch-based DMN delivery, however, may fail due to incomplete delivery from insufficient skin insertion or rapid separation of microneedles due to their strong bond to the backing film. Here, we introduce the Troy microneedle, which was created by cyclic contact and drying on the pillar (CCDP, and which enabled simultaneous complete and rapid delivery of DMN. This CCDP process could be flexibly repeated to achieve a specific desired drug dose in a DMN. We evaluated DMN separation using agarose gel, and the Troy microneedle achieved more complete and rapid separation than other, more deeply dipped DMN, primarily because of the Troy's minimal junction between the DMN and pillar. When Troy microneedles were applied to pig cadaver skin, it took only 15 s for over 90% of encapsulated rhodamine B to be delivered, compared to 2 h with application of a traditional DMN patch. In vivo skin penetration studies demonstrated rapid DMN-separation of Troy microneedles still in solid form before dissolution. The Troy microneedle overcomes critical issues associated with the low penetration efficiency of flat patch-based DMN and provides an innovative route for DMN-mediated therapy, combining patient convenience with the desire drug efficacy.

  10. Obtaining process of interpolymeric complexes from lactalbumin, xanthan gum and pectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Coimbra Zuvanov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the optimization process of interpolymeric complexes formation between lactalbumin and the polysaccharides xanthan gum and pectin was studied in order to define the optimum conditions for the complexes formation. For the experimental design, response surface methodology (RSM for three independent variables was used. The optimum conditions for the complexes formation between lactalbumin and xanthan gum were: pH 6.6, NaCl concentration of 0.6 mol/L and xanthan gum concentration 0.083% w/v. And for the complexes formed between pectin and lactalbumin the conditions were: pH 6.6, NaCl concentration of 0.25 mol/L and pectin concentration of 0.113% w/v. The best fitted model for the experimental data was that corresponding to the complex xanthan gum-lactalbumin, whose coefficient of determination (R² was 0.97.

  11. Chewing gum and lozenges as delivery systems for noscapine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard Jensen, L.; Christrup, Lona Louring; Menger, N.

    1991-01-01

    Chewing gum and lozenges were evaluated as delivery systems for noscapine with the aim of developing improved antitussive preparations. The formulations studied were prepared with both the water-soluble hydrochloride salt of noscapine and with the poorly soluble embonate salt and noscapine free b...... in vitro and in vivo and is therefore not a suitable dosage form. Only a lozenge formulation containing noscapine base fulfilled the requirements of taste acceptability and adequate release properties....

  12. Rapid quantification of low level polymorph content in a solid dose form using transmission Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffen, Julia A; Owen, Andrew W; Burley, Jonathan; Taresco, Vincenzo; Matousek, Pavel

    2016-09-05

    This proof of concept study demonstrates the application of transmission Raman spectroscopy (TRS) to the non-invasive and non-destructive quantification of low levels (0.62-1.32% w/w) of an active pharmaceutical ingredient's polymorphic forms in a pharmaceutical formulation. Partial least squares calibration models were validated with independent validation samples resulting in prediction RMSEP values of 0.03-0.05% w/w and a limit of detection of 0.1-0.2% w/w. The study further demonstrates the ability of TRS to quantify all tablet constituents in one single measurement. By analysis of degraded stability samples, sole transformation between polymorphic forms was observed while excipient levels remained constant. Additionally, a beam enhancer device was used to enhance laser coupling to the sample, which allowed comparable prediction performance at 60 times faster rates (0.2s) than in standard mode. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Amyotrophic form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with rapid course in 82-year-old man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, P; Kulczycki, J; Narolewska, A; Grzelec, H

    2000-01-01

    The authors present a case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in 82-year-old man. Besides the onset of the disease in the elderly and short survival time (8 weeks), other uncommon clinical and morphological features also characterized our case. An evident amyotrophic syndrome, confirmed in morphological findings, developed soon after the CJD onset. The spongiform change also observed within the white matter of cerebral hemispheres allowed us to diagnose the 'panencephalopathic' form of CJD.

  14. Rapid anaerobic benzene oxidation with a variety of chelated Fe(III) forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D.R.; Woodward, J.C.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    Fe(III) chelated to such compounds as EDTA, N-methyliminodiacetie acid, ethanol diglycine, humic acids, and phosphates stimulated benzene oxidation coupled to Fe(III) reduction in anaerobic sediments from a petroleum- contaminated aquifer as effectively as or more effectively than nitrilotriacetic acid did in a previously demonstrated stimulation experiment. These results indicate that many forms of chelated Fe(III) might be applicable to aquifer remediation.

  15. Peroxynitrate is formed rapidly during decomposition of peroxynitrite at neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepali; Harish, B; Kissner, Reinhard; Koppenol, Willem H

    2009-08-07

    The decomposition of peroxynitrite near neutral pH leads ultimately to the formation of dioxygen and nitrite via an intermediate with an absorbance maximum at 284 nm. The intermediate oxidises I(-) with a rate constant of (78 +/- 8) x 10 M(-1) s(-1) and decays near pH 7 with a rate constant of (0.58 +/- 0.02) s(-1) at 22 degrees C, but is longer-lived at lower pH. On the basis of experiments performed with a tandem-quenching flow reactor, we tentatively identify this intermediate as peroxynitric acid, formed during the proposed reaction sequence ONOOH + ONOO(-) --> NO(2)(-) + O(2)NOO(-) + H(+) --> 2 NO(2)(-) + O(2). These products are those expected from a peracid. The rate constant for the first reaction is ca. 3 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). Part of the dioxygen formed is in the (1)Delta(g) state (S. Miyamoto, G. E. Ronsein, T. C. Corréa, G. R. Martinez, M. H. G. Medeiros and P. Di Mascio, Dalton Trans., 2009, DOI: 10.1039/b905560f). The decay of peroxynitrous acid at concentrations higher than 0.1 mM near neutral pH is best described by the simultaneous process of isomerisation (k = 1.2 s(-1)) and decomposition to peroxynitrate. The rate of formation and the amount of peroxynitrate formed are much larger than can be accounted for by homolysis reactions.

  16. Xanthan gum production by Xanthomonas campestris pv ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cassava starch is a main renewable bio-resource with low price and mass production in Guangxi, China. It was used as carbon source in growing Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris 8004 (Xcc 8004) for xanthan gum production in this study. The xanthan gum yield of gelatinized cassava starch was higher than that of ...

  17. Gum chewing affects academic performance in adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chewing gum may have an impact on improved memory during specific tasks of recognition and sustained attention. Research objective was to determine the effect of gum chewing on standardized test scores and math class grades of eighth grade students. Four math classes, 108 students, were randomized i...

  18. Take Care of Your Teeth and Gums

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can lead to tooth decay and gum disease. Brushing and flossing help get plaque off your teeth so your mouth can stay healthy. Taking care of your teeth and gums is especially important if you: Have diabetes Have cancer Are an ...

  19. An induced extrinsic tooth stain prevention model to investigate whitening potential of sugar-free chewing gums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Michael Wj; Tian, Minmin; Ramirez, Lilian; Milleman, Jeffery L; Milleman, Kimberly R; Proskin, Howard M

    2017-12-01

    To establish an accelerated clinical test method to evaluate the effectiveness of sugar-free gums in prevention of the formation of extrinsic stains when chewed over a 2-week period in conjunction with daily tooth brushing. A secondary objective was to compare three methods for measuring extrinsic stain. 25 healthy adult volunteers were enrolled in a single center, examiner blind, randomized 4-way crossover clinical study. Starting with a stain-free baseline, subjects rinsed five times daily with freshly brewed black tea, followed either by chewing one of three different gums for 12 minutes or not chewing (negative control). Extrinsic stain was measured at 1 and 2 weeks by modified Lobene Stain Index (MLSI), digital imaging, and a Vita EasyShade spectrophotometer. At 2 weeks, MLSI scores showed a statistically significant mean reduction of 43% or greater versus no-gum control for all three gum treatments. Digital image analysis and Vita EasyShade measurement showed reductions of yellowness (measured by difference in ∆b* values between the three gums and the non-gum control treatment) ranging from 0.28 to 0.34 and 3.52 to 4.18 Δb* units, respectively, for subjects using the chewing gums versus no-gum control (Peffectively reduce new stain formation along with daily tooth brushing in as little as 2 weeks when used in conjunction with tea rinsing to help promote more rapid stain formation. All three test methods confirmed the results, albeit with different levels of statistical significance. A minor modification of gum base polymer, or change of flavors, did not significantly impact the prevention of new stain formation. Regular consumption of sugar-free chewing gum helps prevent extrinsic dental stain accumulation and provides a simple and enjoyable means for consumers to maintain their natural tooth color.

  20. Rapid therapeutic response onset of a new pharmaceutical form of chloroquine phosphate 300 mg: effervescent tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanze, M F; Duru, C; Jacob, M; Bastide, J M; Lankeuh, M

    2001-03-01

    To compare the efficiency, safety and taste of two pharmaceutical forms of chloroquine phosphate 300 mg: effervescent tablets against uncoated tablets. An open randomized study with 60 adults who suffered from acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in three health centres in Nkongsamba health district, Cameroon. Mean times to fever clearance, symptoms clearance and asexual parasites clearance were longer in the uncoated tablets group: 36 h (range 24-48 h, SD = 16.8) vs. 60 h (range 24-96 h, SD = 31.2, P = 0.001) for fever clearance, 36 h (24-48 h, SD = 16.8) vs. 48 h (24-72, SD = 24, P = 0.001) for symptoms clearance and 48 h (24-72, SD = 1) vs. 72 h (48-96, SD = 24, P = 0.001) for parasitaemia clearance. Uncoated tablets took significantly longer to achieve 50% reduction of the initial asexual parasite density: (mean/SD) 19.2 h/7 vs. 52.8 h/16.8, P 0.05. The cure rate at day 7 in the two groups was similar, P > 0.05. There was no chloroquine resistance in the effervescent tablets group but one RI and one RII resistance in the uncoated tablets group. The taste of the two pharmaceutical forms was significantly different, P Effervescent tablets tasted sweet (score = 7.93), whereas uncoated tablets were bitter (score = 2.07). Effervescent tablets of chloroquine phosphate 300 mg work faster than uncoated tablets and because of their safe use and sweet taste achieve good therapeutic compliance.

  1. Rapid growth of black holes in massive star-forming galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, D M; Smail, I; Bauer, F E; Chapman, S C; Blain, A W; Brandt, W N; Ivison, R J

    2005-04-07

    The tight relationship between the masses of black holes and galaxy spheroids in nearby galaxies implies a causal connection between the growth of these two components. Optically luminous quasars host the most prodigious accreting black holes in the Universe, and can account for greater than or approximately equal to 30 per cent of the total cosmological black-hole growth. As typical quasars are not, however, undergoing intense star formation and already host massive black holes (> 10(8)M(o), where M(o) is the solar mass), there must have been an earlier pre-quasar phase when these black holes grew (mass range approximately (10(6)-10(8))M(o)). The likely signature of this earlier stage is simultaneous black-hole growth and star formation in distant (redshift z > 1; >8 billion light years away) luminous galaxies. Here we report ultra-deep X-ray observations of distant star-forming galaxies that are bright at submillimetre wavelengths. We find that the black holes in these galaxies are growing almost continuously throughout periods of intense star formation. This activity appears to be more tightly associated with these galaxies than any other coeval galaxy populations. We show that the black-hole growth from these galaxies is consistent with that expected for the pre-quasar phase.

  2. Crossover clinical investigation of a whitening chewing gum for inhibiting dental stain formation in conjunction with tooth brushing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milleman, Jeffery L; Milleman, Kimberly R; Kleber, Carl J; Proskin, Howard M; Dodds, Michael; Kelley, Michael; Ramirez, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical investigation was to evaluate the effectiveness of a marketed whitening chewing gum compared to a no-gum control in preventing the formation of extrinsic stains on the teeth of stain-forming subjects when chewed over a 12-week period of regular unsupervised use in conjunction with daily tooth brushing. This was a single-center, examiner-blind, randomized, 12-week crossover clinical trial. Stain-forming (after smoking or drinking coffee or tea) adults, starting with a stain-free baseline, either chewed the test gum (Orbit White) unsupervised four times per day, 15 minutes/chew, or used no gum along with daily brushing with a commercially available toothbrush and dentifrice for 12 weeks. At the crossover, all procedures were repeated with subjects assigned the opposite treatment. Extrinsic stain was measured at six and 12 weeks by both the Lobene Stain Index (LSI) and the Modified Lobene Stain Index (MLSI) using separate experienced examiners. After 12 weeks, LSI stain scores showed a significant 25% reduction (p = 0.0008) in new stain formation for subjects using the test chewing gum along with tooth brushing versus tooth brushing alone (no-gum control). The corresponding MLSI stain scores demonstrated a 36% reduction (p teeth. The overall findings of this clinical study demonstrated that regular use of Orbit White chewing gum, soon after smoking or drinking coffee or tea, will supplement daily tooth brushing in preventing unsightly stains from forming on the anterior teeth compared to brushing alone.

  3. Grewia Gum 2: Mucoadhesive Properties of Compacts and Gels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grewia Gum 2: Mucoadhesive Properties of Compacts and Gels. EI Nep, BR Conway. Abstract. Purpose: To compare the mucoadhesive performance of grewia polysaccharide gum with those of guar gum, carboxymethylcellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and carbopol 971P. Methods: Grewia polysaccharide gum ...

  4. Examining disadoption of gum arabic production in Sudan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahim, A.; Ruben, R.; Ierland, van E.C.

    2008-01-01

    Gum arabic production in Sudan has developed over the years in a well-established traditional bush-fallow system in which the gum tree (Acacia senegal) is rotated with annual crops. Following the Sahel drought, the gum area has suffered from deforestation and gum production has declined. Several

  5. Brief Report: Gum Chewing Affects Standardized Math Scores in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Craig A.; Tyler, Chermaine; Stansberry, Sandra A.; Moreno, Jennette P.; Foreyt, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Gum chewing has been shown to improve cognitive performance in adults; however, gum chewing has not been evaluated in children. This study examined the effects of gum chewing on standardized test scores and class grades of eighth grade math students. Math classes were randomized to a gum chewing (GC) condition that provided students with gum…

  6. EU-approved rapid tests for bovine spongiform encephalopathy detect atypical forms: a study for their sensitivities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Meloni

    Full Text Available Since 2004 it become clear that atypical bovine spongiform encephalopthies (BSEs exist in cattle. Whenever their detection has relied on active surveillance plans implemented in Europe since 2001 by rapid tests, the overall and inter-laboratory performance of these diagnostic systems in the detection of the atypical strains has not been studied thoroughly to date. To fill this gap, the present study reports on the analytical sensitivity of the EU-approved rapid tests for atypical L- and H-type and classical BSE in parallel. Each test was challenged with two dilution series, one created from a positive pool of the three BSE forms according to the EURL standard method of homogenate preparation (50% w/v and the other as per the test kit manufacturer's instructions. Multilevel logistic models and simple logistic models with the rapid test as the only covariate were fitted for each BSE form analyzed as directed by the test manufacturer's dilution protocol. The same schemes, but excluding the BSE type, were then applied to compare test performance under the manufacturer's versus the water protocol. The IDEXX HerdChek ® BSE-scrapie short protocol test showed the highest sensitivity for all BSE forms. The IDEXX® HerdChek BSE-scrapie ultra short protocol, the Prionics®--Check WESTERN and the AJ Roboscreen® BetaPrion tests showed similar sensitivities, followed by the Roche® PrionScreen, the Bio-Rad® TeSeE™ SAP and the Prionics®--Check PrioSTRIP in descending order of analytical sensitivity. Despite these differences, the limit of detection of all seven rapid tests against the different classes of material set within a 2 log(10 range of the best-performing test, thus meeting the European Food Safety Authority requirement for BSE surveillance purposes. These findings indicate that not many atypical cases would have been missed surveillance since 2001 which is important for further epidemiological interpretations of the sporadic character of

  7. COMPLEX GAS KINEMATICS IN COMPACT, RAPIDLY ASSEMBLING STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorin, R.; Vilchez, J. M.; Perez-Montero, E. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomia S/N, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Haegele, G. F.; Firpo, V. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad de la Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Papaderos, P., E-mail: amorin@iaa.es [Centro de Astrofisica and Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal)

    2012-08-01

    Deep, high-resolution spectroscopic observations have been obtained for six compact, strongly star-forming galaxies at redshift z {approx} 0.1-0.3, most of them also known as green peas. Remarkably, these galaxies show complex emission-line profiles in the spectral region including H{alpha}, [N II] {lambda}{lambda}6548, 6584, and [S II] {lambda}{lambda}6717, 6731, consisting of the superposition of different kinematical components on a spatial extent of few kiloparsecs: a very broad line emission underlying more than one narrower component. For at least two of the observed galaxies some of these multiple components are resolved spatially in their two-dimensional spectra, whereas for another one a faint detached H{alpha} blob lacking stellar continuum is detected at the same recessional velocity {approx}7 kpc away from the galaxy. The individual narrower H{alpha} components show high intrinsic velocity dispersion ({sigma} {approx} 30-80 km s{sup -1}), suggesting together with unsharped masking Hubble Space Telescope images that star formation proceeds in an ensemble of several compact and turbulent clumps, with relative velocities of up to {approx}500 km s{sup -1}. The broad underlying H{alpha} components indicate in all cases large expansion velocities (full width zero intensity {>=}1000 km s{sup -1}) and very high luminosities (up to {approx}10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}), probably showing the imprint of energetic outflows from supernovae. These intriguing results underline the importance of green peas for studying the assembly of low-mass galaxies near and far.

  8. Chewing gum and context-dependent memory: the independent roles of chewing gum and mint flavour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew J; Miles, Christopher

    2008-05-01

    Two experiments independently investigated the basis of the chewing gum induced context-dependent memory effect. At learning and/or recall, participants either chewed flavourless gum (Experiment 1) or received mint-flavoured strips (Experiment 2). No context-dependent memory effect was found with either flavourless gum or mint-flavoured strips, indicating that independently the contexts were insufficiently salient to induce the effect. This is found despite participants' subjective ratings indicating a perceived change in state following administration of flavourless gum or mint-flavoured strips. Additionally, some preliminary evidence for a non-additive facilitative effect of receiving gum or flavour at either learning and/or recall is reported. The findings raise further concerns regarding the robustness of the previously reported context-dependent memory effect with chewing gum.

  9. Chewing gum and context-dependent memory: The independent roles of chewing gum and mint flavour

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, A.J.; Miles, C.

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments independently investigated the basis of the chewing-gum induced context-dependent memory effect (Baker et al, 2004). At learning and/or recall participants either chewed flavourless gum (Experiment 1) or received mint-flavoured strips (Experiment 2). No context dependent memory effect was found with either flavourless gum or mint-flavoured strips, indicating that independently the contexts were insufficiently salient to induce the effect. This is found despite participants’ su...

  10. The Null Effect of Chewing Gum During Hemodialysis on Dry Mouth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duruk, Nazike; Eşer, Ismet

    2016-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine the effect of chewing gum during hemodialysis on dry mouth and its symptoms. The imposition of fluid restriction and the use of medications that reduce saliva production may lead to dry mouth. This study is a randomized, controlled, single-blind, crossover experimental study. The subjects consisted of 61 hemodialysis patients recruited from 4 dialysis centers in southern Turkey. The data were collected using a Patient Identification Form, a Form for Assessing the Symptoms of Dry Mouth, and a Patient Follow-up Form. Saliva samples were obtained for analysis of flow rates. The salivary flow rates of the patients increased during the first hour on the day when gum was chewed, and this increase was statistically significant. However, no significant difference was found between the salivary flow rates at the 0- and 4-hour time points on the day when gum was chewed (P > .05). In addition, the salivary pH values were in the normal range on both days, although the pH values tended to be more acidic on the day when gum was not chewed. Overall, it was found that chewing gum for 15 minutes each hour during a hemodialysis session did not increase the saliva amount, maintain the pH value of the saliva within a normal range, or control dry mouth symptoms.

  11. The effect of Arabic gum on frozen dough properties and the sensory assessments of the bread produced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Hamid Reza; Jonaidi Jafari, Nematollah; Hamedi, Hassan

    2017-04-01

    The use of hydrocolloids in frozen dough has become frequent as bread improvers due to their anti-staling effect. Nevertheless, the impact of both different frozen storage and Arabic gum level in non-prefermented flat dough with following thawing procedure have not been studied. This work intended to study the effect of three different ratio of Arabic gum on rheological properties of 1, 7, and 30 days of frozen storage and the quality of the bread made from. In order to gain the least detrimental effects on gluten network, we used rapid rate freezing and microwave heating in thawing stage. Rheological results showed that the unfrozen samples to which Arabic gum had been added rendered the highest resistance to extension. The resistance of gum fortified samples were less than fresh dough, however the decline was not significant in 3.0% Arabic gum dough kept in a month storage (p > .05). The similar findings were obtained for extensibility and adhesiveness; in which the maximum incorporation of Arabic gum lessen the destructive impact of long freezing storage. Addition of 3% gum could be able to retard staling through an increment in hydrophilic bonds between water molecules and amylose during thawing (p Arabic gum enriched samples was similar with bread made from non-frozen dough, even after 30 days of storage as indicated by the sensory evaluation of breads. Producing a chapatti-like fermented bread without long fermentation period. Formulation a frozen dough without using chemical additives. Introducing a proper use of a new defrosting method with the aim of achieving a better texture. Improvement in retarding staling by the use of Gum Arabic after 7 days. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Contribution of the cashew gum (Anacardium occidentale L.) for development of layer-by-layer films with potential application in nanobiomedical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, I.M.S. [Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Ciencias da Natureza, CCN, Universidade Federal do Piaui, UFPI, Teresina, PI, 64049-550 (Brazil); Nucleo de Pesquisa em Biodiversidade e Biotecnologia, BIOTEC, Campus Parnaiba, CMRV, Universidade Federal do Piaui, UFPI, Parnaiba, PI, 64202-020 (Brazil); Zampa, M.F. [Nucleo de Pesquisa em Biodiversidade e Biotecnologia, BIOTEC, Campus Parnaiba, CMRV, Universidade Federal do Piaui, UFPI, Parnaiba, PI, 64202-020 (Brazil); Campus Parnaiba, Instituto Federal de Educacao Ciencia e Tecnologia do Piaui, IFPI, Parnaiba, PI, 64210-260 (Brazil); Moura, J.B.; Santos, J.R. dos [Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Ciencias da Natureza, CCN, Universidade Federal do Piaui, UFPI, Teresina, PI, 64049-550 (Brazil); Eaton, P. [REQUIMTE, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, Porto, 4169-007 (Portugal); Zucolotto, V. [Grupo de Biofisica Molecular Sergio Mascarenhas, Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, IFSC, USP, Sao Carlos, SP, 13566-590 (Brazil); and others

    2012-08-01

    The search for bioactive molecules to be employed as recognition elements in biosensors has stimulated researchers to pore over the rich Brazilian biodiversity. In this sense, we introduce the use of natural cashew gum (Anacardium occidentale L.) as an active biomaterial to be used in the form of layer-by-layer films, in conjunction with phthalocyanines, which were tested as electrochemical sensors for dopamine detection. We investigated the effects of chemical composition of cashew gum from two different regions of Brazil (Piaui and Ceara states) on the physico-chemical characteristics of these nanostructures. The morphology of the nanostructures containing cashew gum was studied by atomic force microscopy which indicates that smooth films punctuated by globular features were formed that showed low roughness values. The results indicate that, independent of the origin, cashew gum stands out as an excellent film forming material with potential application in nanobiomedical devices as electrochemical sensors. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study focused on the use of cashew gum for the formation of LbL films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LbL films containing cashew gums were investigated by AFM and cyclic voltammetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cashew gum contributed to obtain stable films with well-defined redox processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cashew gum films detected dopamine in low concentrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These LbL films presented potential application in nanobiomedical devices.

  13. Structure of xanthan gum and cell ultrastructure at different times of alkali stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia de Mello Luvielmo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The effect of alkali stress on the yield, viscosity, gum structure, and cell ultrastructure of xanthan gum was evaluated at the end of fermentation process of xanthan production by Xanthomonas campestris pv. manihotis 280-95. Although greater xanthan production was observed after a 24 h-alkali stress process, a lower viscosity was observed when compared to the alkali stress-free gum, regardless of the alkali stress time. However, this outcome is not conclusive as further studies on gum purification are required to remove excess sodium, verify the efficiency loss and the consequent increase in the polymer viscosity. Alkali stress altered the structure of xanthan gum from a polygon-like shape to a star-like form. At the end of the fermentation, early structural changes in the bacterium were observed. After alkali stress, marked structural differences were observed in the cells. A more vacuolated cytoplasm and discontinuities in the membrane cells evidenced the cell lysis. Xanthan was observed in the form of concentric circles instead of agglomerates as observed prior to the alkali stress.

  14. Structure of xanthan gum and cell ultrastructure at different times of alkali stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvielmo, Márcia de Mello; Borges, Caroline Dellinghausen; Toyama, Daniela de Oliveira; Vendruscolo, Claire Tondo; Scamparini, Adilma Regina Pippa

    2016-01-01

    The effect of alkali stress on the yield, viscosity, gum structure, and cell ultrastructure of xanthan gum was evaluated at the end of fermentation process of xanthan production by Xanthomonas campestris pv. manihotis 280-95. Although greater xanthan production was observed after a 24h-alkali stress process, a lower viscosity was observed when compared to the alkali stress-free gum, regardless of the alkali stress time. However, this outcome is not conclusive as further studies on gum purification are required to remove excess sodium, verify the efficiency loss and the consequent increase in the polymer viscosity. Alkali stress altered the structure of xanthan gum from a polygon-like shape to a star-like form. At the end of the fermentation, early structural changes in the bacterium were observed. After alkali stress, marked structural differences were observed in the cells. A more vacuolated cytoplasm and discontinuities in the membrane cells evidenced the cell lysis. Xanthan was observed in the form of concentric circles instead of agglomerates as observed prior to the alkali stress. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Starch-free grewia gum matrices: Compaction, swelling, erosion and drug release behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nep, E I; Asare-Addo, K; Ghori, M U; Conway, B R; Smith, A M

    2015-12-30

    Polysaccharides are suitable for application as hydrophilic matrices because of their ability to hydrate and swell upon contact with fluids, forming a gel layer which controls drug release. When extracted from plants, polysaccharides often contain significant quantities of starch that impacts upon their functional properties. This study aimed to evaluate differences in swelling, erosion and drug release from matrix tablets prepared from grewia gum (GG) and starch-free grewia gum (GDS) extracted from the stems of Grewia mollis. HPMC was used as a control polymer with theophylline as a model drug. Swelling, erosion, and in-vitro release were performed in deionized water, pH 1.2 and pH 6.8 media. The Vergnaud and Krosmeyer-Peppas model were used for swelling and drug release kinetics, respectively. However, linear regression technique was used to determine the erosion rate. GDS compacts were significantly harder than the native GG and HPMC compacts. GDS matrices exhibited the fastest erosion and drug release in deionised water and phosphate buffer compared with the GG and HPMC. At pH 1.2, GDS exhibited greater swelling than erosion, and drug release was similar to GG and HPMC. This highlights the potential of GDS as a matrix for controlled release similar to HPMC and GG at pH 1.2 but with a more rapid release at pH 6.8. GDS may have wider application in reinforcing compacts with relatively low mechanical strength. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Fractionation of Mastic Gum in Relation to Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sharif Sharifi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Mastic gum is a viscous light-green liquid obtained from the bark of Pistacia lentiscus var. chia. which belongs to the Anacardiaceae family. The gum has been fractionated to investigate the antimicrobial activity of the whole gum and its fractions against various strains of Helicobacter pylori. The polymeric gum fraction was separated from the essential oil and the resin (trunk exudates without essential oil to assess and compare the anti-H. pylori activity of the polymer fraction against lower molecular weight fractions, the gum itself and masticated gum. The polymer fraction was also oxidized and assessed for antimicrobial activity.

  17. Rheological and interfacial properties at the equilibrium of almond gum tree exudate (Prunus dulcis) in comparison with gum arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoudhi, Nesrine; Sessa, Mariarenata; Ferrari, Giovanna; Hamdi, Salem; Donsi, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Almond gum contains an arabinogalactan-type polysaccharide, which plays an important role in defining its interfacial and rheological properties. In this study, rheological and interfacial properties of almond gum and gum arabic aqueous dispersions were comparatively investigated. The interfacial tension of almond gum and gum arabic aqueous dispersions was measured using the pendant drop method in hexadecane. The asymptotic interfacial tension values for almond gum were significantly lower than the corresponding values measured for gum arabic, especially at high concentration. Rheological properties were characterized by steady and oscillatory tests using a coaxial geometry. Almond gum flow curves exhibited a shear thinning non-Newtonian behavior with a tendency to a Newtonian plateau at low shear rate, while gum arabic flow curves exhibited such behavior only at high shear rate. The influence of temperature (5-50  ℃) on the flow curves was studied at 4% (m/m) gum concentration and the Newtonian viscosities at infinite and at zero shear rate, for gum arabic and almond gum, respectively, were accurately fitted by an Arrhenius-type equation. The dynamic properties of the two gum dispersions were also studied. Both gum dispersions exhibited viscoelastic properties, with the viscous component being predominant in a wider range of concentrations for almond gum, while for gum arabic the elastic component being higher than the elastic one especially at higher concentrations.The rheological and interfacial tension properties of almond gum suggest that it may represent a possible substitute of gum arabic in different food applications. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Xanthan chain length is modulated by increasing the availability of the polysaccharide copolymerase protein GumC and the outer membrane polysaccharide export protein GumB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Estela M; Ielmini, María V; Patel, Yamini N; Bianco, María I; Franceschini, Esteban A; Schneider, Jane C; Ielpi, Luis

    2013-02-01

    Xanthan is a polysaccharide secreted by Xanthomonas campestris that contains pentameric repeat units. The biosynthesis of xanthan involves an operon composed of 12 genes (gumB to gumM). In this study, we analyzed the proteins encoded by gumB and gumC. Membrane fractionation showed that GumB was mainly associated with the outer membrane, whereas GumC was an inner membrane protein. By in silico analysis and specific globomycin inhibition, GumB was characterized as a lipoprotein. By reporter enzyme assays, GumC was shown to contain two transmembrane segments flanking a large periplasmic domain. We confirmed that gumB and gumC mutant strains uncoupled the synthesis of the lipid-linked repeat unit from the polymerization process. We studied the effects of gumB and gumC gene amplification on the production, composition and viscosity of xanthan. Overexpression of GumB, GumC or GumB and GumC simultaneously did not affect the total amount or the chemical composition of the polymer. GumB overexpression did not affect xanthan viscosity; however, a moderate increase in xanthan viscosity was achieved when GumC protein levels were increased 5-fold. Partial degradation of GumC was observed when only that protein was overexpressed; but co-expression of GumB and GumC diminished GumC degradation and resulted in higher xanthan viscosity than individual GumB or GumC overexpression. Compared with xanthan from the wild-type strain, longer polymer chains from the strain that simultaneously overexpressed GumB and GumC were observed by atomic force microscopy. Our results suggest that GumB-GumC protein levels modulate xanthan chain length, which results in altered polymer viscosity.

  19. Formation of redispersible polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles from gallic acid-chitosan conjugate and gum arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiaobin; Wang, Taoran; Zhou, Mingyong; Xue, Jingyi; Luo, Yangchao

    2016-11-01

    Polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) nanoparticles between chitosan (CS) and biomacromolecules offer better physicochemical properties as delivery vehicles for nutrients than other CS-based nanoparticles. Our major objective was to fabricate PEC nanoparticles between water soluble gallic acid-chitosan conjugate (GA-CS) and gum arabic. The optimal fabrication method, physicochemical characteristics and stability were investigated. Furthermore, we also evaluated the effects of nano spray drying technology on the morphology and redispersibility of nanoparticle powders using Buchi B-90 Nano Spray Dryer. Results showed that the mass ratio between GA-CS and gum arabic and the preparation pH had significant contributions in determining the particle size and count rate of the nanoparticles, with the ratio of 3:1 and pH 5.0 being the optimal conditions that resulted in 112.2nm and 122.9kcps. The polyethylene glycol (PEG) played a vital role in forming the well-separated spray dried nanoparticles. The most homogeneous nanoparticles with the smoothest surface were obtained when the mass ratio of GA-CS and PEG was 1:0.5. In addition, the GA-CS/gum arabic spray dried nanoparticles exhibited excellent water-redispersibiliy compared to native CS/gum arabic nanoparticles. Our results demonstrated GA-CS/gum arabic nanoparticles were successfully fabricated with promising physicochemical properties and great potential for their applications in food and pharmaceutical industries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Design, formulation and evaluation of nicotine chewing gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Aslani

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Taste enhancement of nicotine gums was achieved where formulations comprised aspartame as the sweetener and cherry and eucalyptus as the flavoring agents. Nicotine gums of pleasant taste may, therefore, be used as NRT to assist smokers quit smoking.

  1. Mechanical Reinforcement of Wool Fiber through Polyelectrolyte Complexation with Chitosan and Gellan Gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairul Anuar Mat Amin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The formation of polyelectrolyte complex (PEC wool fibers formed by dipping chitosan or gellan gum-treated wool fibers into biopolymer solutions of opposite charge is reported. Treating wool fibers with chitosan (CH and gellan gum (GG solutions containing food dyes resulted in improved mechanical characteristics compared to wool fibers. In contrast, pH modification of the solutions resulted in the opposite effect. The mechanical characteristics of PEC-treated fibers were affected by the order of addition, i.e., dipping GG-treated fibers into chitosan resulted in mechanical reinforcement, whereas the reverse-order process did not.

  2. Mutanase-containing chewing gum: A new potential approach for prevention of dental caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Kolahi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Study on the effect of topically applied mutanase on plaque formation and caries in rats showed strong inhibition of dental caries. Furthermore, it has been shown that the presence of mutanase in dental plaque may affect the synthesis and structure of sticky, extracellular glucans. The Hypothesis: Mutanase can be easily added to gum base. After chewing of mutanase-containing chewing gum, the enzyme will be released into the oral cavity. Mutanase will hydrolyze sticky, extracellular glucans, e.g., mutan inhibiting cariogenic bacteria to cohere/adhere and form plaque. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: The main challenge with this hypothesis is the source of mutanase. It can be obtained from Paenibacillus sp. MP-1 or Trichoderma harzianum F-340. Directly compressible medicated chewing gum bases can be used to avoid inactivation of mutanase during the manufacturing process.

  3. Preliminary study on aluminum-air battery applying disposable soft drink cans and Arabic gum polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva, S.; Sundari, R.; Wijaya, H. F.; Majlan, E. H.; Sudaryanto; Arwati, I. G. A.; Sebayang, D.

    2017-09-01

    This study is in relation to preliminary investigation of aluminium-air battery using disposable soft drink cans as aluminium source for anode. The cathode uses commercial porous carbon sheet to trap oxygen from air. This work applies a commercial cashing to place carbon cathode, electrolyte, Arabic gum polymer, and aluminium anode in a sandwich-like arrangement to form the aluminium-air battery. The Arabic gum as electrolyte polymer membrane protects anode surface from corrosion due to aluminium oxide formation. The study result shows that the battery discharge test using constant current loading of 0.25 mA yields battery capacity of 0.437 mAh with over 100 minute battery life times at 4M NaOH electrolyte and 20 % Arabic gum polymer as the best performance in this investigation. This study gives significant advantage in association with beneficiation of disposable soft drink cans from municipal solid waste as aluminium source for battery anode.

  4. Entandophragma angolense Gum as a Novel Binder and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    The present work reports on the mucoadhesive and mechanical properties of the water-soluble gum obtained from Entandophragma angolense when incorporated in oral tablets. Flat-faced chlorpheniramine maleate tablets containing the gum were formulated. The potential for chemical interaction between the gum and ...

  5. Evaluation of the suspending properties of Cola acuminata gum on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many natural gums are employed as suspending agents in the formulation of pharmaceutical suspensions. The search to develop locally available natural gum from apparently a waste product as an alternative suspending agent stimulated the interest in this present study. Cola acuminata gum (CAG) extracted from Cola ...

  6. Quantification and Qualification of Bacteria Trapped in Chewed Gum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, Stefan W.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Morando, David; Slomp, Anje M.; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Maitra, Amarnath; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and

  7. Rheological Modeling and Characterization of Ficus platyphylla Gum Exudates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnabuk O. Eddy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ficus platyphylla gum exudates (FP gum have been analyzed for their physicochemical parameters and found to be ionic, mildly acidic, odourless, and yellowish brown in colour. The gum is soluble in water, sparingly soluble in ethanol, and insoluble in acetone and chloroform. The nitrogen (0.39% and protein (2.44% contents of the gum are relatively low. The concentrations of the cations were found to increase according to the following trend, Mn>Fe>Zn>Pb>Cu>Mg>Cd>Ca. Analysis of the FTIR spectrum of the gum revealed vibrations similar to those found in polysaccharides while the scanning electron micrograph indicated that the gum has irregular molecular shapes, arranged randomly. The intrinsic viscosity of FP gum estimated by extrapolating to zero concentrations in Huggins, Kraemer, Schulz-Blaschke, and Martin plots has an average value of 7 dL/g. From the plots of viscosity versus shear rate/speed of rotation and also that of shear stress versus shear rate, FP gum can be classified as a non-Newtonian gum with characteristics-plastic properties. Development of the Master_s curve for FP gum also indicated that the gum prefers to remain in a dilute domain (Cgum (calculated from Arrhenius-Frenkel-Eyring plot was relatively low and indicated the presence of fewer inter- and intramolecular interactions.

  8. Granule properties of paracetamol made with Bombax ceiba gum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bombax ceiba gum was extracted from the calyx of the Bombax flower using both hot and cold water extraction method. The gum was used as binder to prepare paracetamol granules in concentrations of 1, 1.5, 2, and 3 %. Acacia gum was used to prepare the standard at the same concentrations. The granule properties of ...

  9. 78 FR 43226 - Xanthan Gum From Austria and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... COMMISSION Xanthan Gum From Austria and China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... Austria of xanthan gum provided for in subheading 3913.90.20 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the... notification of preliminary determinations by Commerce that ] imports of xanthan gum from Austria and China...

  10. 77 FR 43857 - Xanthan Gum From Austria and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... COMMISSION Xanthan Gum From Austria and China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... Austria and China of xanthan gum, provided for in subheading 3913.90.20 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule... materially injured or threatened with material injury by reason of LTFV ] imports of xanthan gum from Austria...

  11. demonstrating close-packing of atoms using spherical bubble gums

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    ABSTRACT: In this paper, the use of spherical bubble gums (Gum Balls) to demonstrate the close-packing of atoms and ions is presented. Spherical bubble gums having distinctive colours were used to illustrate the different layers in variety of crystalline packing and the formation of tetrahedral and octahedral holes.

  12. Evaluation of the suspending properties of Adansonia digitata gum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sedimentation volume and rate, rheology, and ease of redispersion were employed as evaluation parameters. The results showed that both hot and cold water extracts of the gum used at 2-3 % w/v produced a better suspending property than 4 % w/v Compound Tragacanth gum. The suspending ability of the gums was in ...

  13. Design, formulation and evaluation of caffeine chewing gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Aslani

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: In this study, 20 and 50 mg caffeine gums with suitable and desirable properties (i.e., good taste and satisfactory release were formulated. The best flavor for caffeine gum was cinnamon. Both kinds of 20 and 50 mg gums succeeded in content uniformity test.

  14. 7 CFR 160.7 - Gum spirits of turpentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.7 Gum spirits of turpentine. The designation “gum spirits of turpentine” shall refer to the kind of spirits of turpentine obtained by distillation of the oleoresin (gum...

  15. 21 CFR 172.780 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acacia (gum arabic). 172.780 Section 172.780 Food... Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.780 Acacia (gum arabic). The food additive may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Acacia (gum arabic) is the dried gummy...

  16. THE EFFECT OF GUM ARABIC ORAL TREATMENT ON THE IRON

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EFFECT OF GUM ARABIC TREATMENT ON THE IRON AND PROTEIN STATUS IN CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE PATIENTS. Table 1: Effect of Three Months Gum ... recycling? in a study on animal models of experimental chronic renal failure it ... consuming a low-protein diet with. 50 gram gum arabic/day had a better fecal.

  17. Emulsion stabilizing property of Grewia gum in Arachis oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The emulsifying property of grewia gum in arachis oil emulsion was evaluated. The gum was extracted by maceration, filtration, precipitation and drying techniques. The gum was used at 0.1 to 0.4% w/v to stabilize arachis oil emulsion containing 7.5% w/v acacia. The globule size, globule number and viscosity of the ...

  18. RHEOLOGICAL BEHAVIOUR OF PSYLLIUM GUM FRACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hojjatoleslamyi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Psyllium (Plantago psyllium is a native plant that grows widely in India, Iran and Pinjab. Studies showed psyllium gum has good rheological properties for using in wide range of food products. In this study, different fractions of psyllium gum extracted by water and alkali treatment. Rheological properties of these fractions determined by Brookfield rheometer (RV DVIII. Obtained data fitted in three temperatures 30, 60 and 80°C by Herschel-bulkly rheological model. Results showed that fractions have different behaviour during heating treatment. The most difference observed in AEG0.5 fraction.

  19. Evaluation of mechanical properties of unsaturated polyester-guar gum/hydroxypropyl guar gum composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Guar gum is a natural polysaccharide that has been explored for various applications. However, there is a limited number of studies in which guar gum has been used as a filler in a polymer. The effect of guar gum and its hydroxypropyl derivatives in unsaturated polyester composites were investigated with respect to their mechanical and chemical properties. The effect of hydroxypropylation and the degree of hydroxypropylation on the properties of resultant composites were also studied. It was observed that the inclusion of guar gum and its derivatives resulted in composites with increased solvent resistance and mechanical properties. An increase in the degree of substitution resulted in increased polymer-filler interaction reflected by a positive effect on the mechanical properties of the composites. These results open an avenue for the use of polysaccharides and their derivatives as eco-friendly fillers as a replacement of mineral fillers.

  20. Neem Gum as a Binder in a Formulated Paracetamol Tablet with Reference to Acacia Gum BP

    OpenAIRE

    Ogunjimi, Abayomi Tolulope; Alebiowu, Gbenga

    2014-01-01

    This study determined the physical, compressional, and binding properties of neem gum (NMG) obtained from the trunk of Azadirachta indica (A Juss) in a paracetamol tablet formulation in comparison with official Acacia gum BP (ACA). The physical and flow properties were evaluated using density parameters: porosity, Carr’s index, Hausner’s ratio, and flow rate. Compressional properties were analyzed using Heckel and Kawakita equations. The tensile strength, brittle fracture index, and crushing ...

  1. Addiction to the nicotine gum in never smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etter Jean-François

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Addiction to nicotine gum has never been described in never smokers or in never users of tobacco. Methods Internet questionnaire in 2004–2006 in a self-selected sample of 434 daily users of nicotine gum. To assess dependence on nicotine gum, we used modified versions of the Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale (NDSS, the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence and the Cigarette Dependence Scale. Results Five never smokers used the nicotine gum daily. They had been using the nicotine gum for longer than the 429 ever smokers (median = 6 years vs 0.8 years, p = 0.004, and they had higher NDSS-gum Tolerance scores (median = 0.73 vs = -1.0, p = 0.03, a difference of 1.5 standard deviation units. Two never smokers had never used smokeless tobacco, both answered "extremely true" to: "I use nicotine gums because I am addicted to them", both "fully agreed" with: "after a few hours without chewing a nicotine gum, I feel an irresistible urge to chew one" and: "I am a prisoner of nicotine gum". Conclusion This is to our knowledge the first report of addiction to nicotine gum in never users of tobacco. However, this phenomenon is rare, and although the long-term effect of nicotine gum is unknown, this product is significantly less harmful than tobacco.

  2. The effect of chewing gum on dental plaque accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karami Nogourani M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Studies show that sucrose containing chewing gums are cariogenic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two commercial chewing gums with and without sucrose on dental plaque accumulation compared with the control group. "nMaterials and Methods: In this clinical study, plaque accumulation during three 7-day periods (with two weeks interval was recorded (Sillness & Loe Index in a group of 23 volunteer male dental students who chewed in the first two periods sugar-free or sugar-containing chewing gums (Olips and Orbit, respectively and in the last period did not chew any gum. Participants were asked to chew daily five gum sticks after meals for about twenty minutes. The data were statistically analyzed using Repeated Measure ANOVA and paired-T test. "nResults: The results showed that chewing any gum even sucrose-containing gum decreased the level of dental plaque accumulation (P<0.001. However, the decreasing effect of sugar-free gums was significantly higher (P<0.001. "nConclusion: Although sugar free gum was more effective than sugar containing gum on reducing dental plaque accumulation, chewing even sugar containing gums could decrease the level of dental plaque.

  3. Pressure cell assisted solution characterization of polysaccharides. 2. Locust bean gum and tara gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picout, David R; Ross-Murphy, Simon B; Jumel, Kornelia; Harding, Stephen E

    2002-01-01

    Following the work carried out on guar gum in our first paper of a series, the "pressure cell" solubilization method was applied to two other less highly substituted galactomannans: locust bean gum (LBG) and tara gum. True molecular solution of the polymers was achieved using appropriate temperature, time, and pressure regimes. The technique of capillary viscometry was used to determine the intrinsic viscosity [eta] of the "pressure cell" treated and untreated samples. Molecular weight (M(w)) and radius of gyration (R(g)) were determined by light scattering. The data obtained for LBG and tara gum were compared statistically with reliable data found for guar gum in the literature. The variation in [eta] with M(w) followed the Mark-Houwink-Sakurada relationship, giving the exponent alpha = 0.74 +/- 0.01 for galactomannans consistent with random coil behavior. The characteristic ratio, C(infinity), and the chain persistence length, L(p), were both calculated for LBG and tara gum using the Burchard-Stockmayer-Fixman (BSF) method which is appropriate for flexible to semiflexible chains. A general value of 9 < C(infinity) < 16 and 3 < L(p) < 5 nm can now be estimated with statistical confidence for all galactomannans. According to our statistical analysis, the chain persistence length was found to be insensitive to the degree of galactose substitution.

  4. Chewing gum differentially affects aspects of attention in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucha, Oliver; Mecklinger, Lara; Maier, Kerstin; Hammerl, Marianne; Lange, Klaus W

    2004-06-01

    In a study published previously in this journal (Wilkinson et al., 2002), the effect of chewing gum on cognitive functioning was examined. The results of this study indicated that chewing a piece of gum results in an improvement of working memory and of both immediate and delayed recall of words but not of attention. In the present study, memory and a variety of attentional functions of healthy adult participants were examined under four different conditions: no chewing, mimicking chewing movements, chewing a piece of tasteless chewing gum and chewing a piece of spearmint flavoured chewing gum. The sequence of conditions was randomised across participants. The results showed that the chewing of gum did not improve participants' memory functions. Furthermore, chewing may differentially affect specific aspects of attention. While sustained attention was improved by the chewing of gum, alertness and flexibility were adversely affected by chewing. In conclusion, claims that the chewing a gum improves cognition should be viewed with caution.

  5. Tuliposides and tulipalins in tulip Gum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbe, A.; Verpoorte, R.; Gude, H.; Dijkema, M.H.G.E.

    2013-01-01

    Gummosis in tulip bulbs is one of the negative effects of ethylene gas that is produced during storage by Fusarium-infected bulbs on the healthy bulbs. Several aspects of the gummosis process, like the factors inducing it, the underlying carbohydrate metabolism and the composition of the gum have

  6. Flavor release measurement from gum model system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovejero-López, I.; Haahr, Anne-Mette; van den Berg, Frans W.J.

    2004-01-01

    -scaled using the signal from acetone in the breath of subjects. Next, APCI-MS and sensory TI curves are smoothed by low-pass filtering. Principal component analysis of the individual curves is used to display graphically the product differentiation by APCI-MS or TI signals. It is shown that differences in gum...

  7. 21 CFR 172.695 - Xanthan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... polysaccharide gum derived from Xanthomonas campestris by a pure-culture fermentation process and purified by recovery with isopropyl alcohol. It contains D-glucose, D-mannose, and D-glucuronic acid as the dominant... specifications: (1) Residual isopropyl alcohol not to exceed 750 parts per million. (2) An aqueous solution...

  8. PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND gabonensis GUM EXUDATES A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND gabonensis GUM EXUDATES A. Sani Mamman Ibrahim, Abdullahi. Department of Chemistry ibrakimikel@gma. ABSTRACT. Irvingia gabonensis (Aubry-Lecomte ex O'R. North Eastern Nigeria. The plant is. Physicochemical and rheological studies we standard procedures and the results wer.

  9. ESR spectroscopic properties of irradiated gum Arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonor, S J; Gómez, J A; Kinoshita, A; Calandreli, I; Tfouni, E; Baffa, O

    2013-12-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of irradiated gum Arabic with doses between 0.5 and 5 kGy were studied. A linear relationship between the absorbed dose and the intensities of the ESR spectra was observed. ESR spectra of irradiated gum Arabic showed a decay of relative concentrations of free radicals originated by radiation and the production of at least two species of free radicals with half-times: 3.3 and 125.4 h. The results of spectral simulations for these radical groups were giso=2.0046; A=1.2 mT and gx=gy=2.0062, gz=2.0025. Hydration and dehydration of irradiated gum Arabic returns the ESR spectrum to its initial state before irradiation. The results show that ESR can be used as simple and reliable method to detect irradiated gum Arabic up to 60 days after initial radiation with doses on the order of 5 kGy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Emulsifying and suspending properties of cashew gum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emulsifying abilities of CG were juxtaposed with those of established AG and both gums were found to produce emulsions of liquid paraffin with varying stabilities. At 10%w/v emulsifier concentration, emulsions made with CG creamed within 24 hours of formulation but at 20%w/v, the emulsion remained stable throughout ...

  11. Evaluation of the ability of xanthan gum/gellan gum/hyaluronan hydrogel membranes to prevent the adhesion of postrepaired tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Shyh Ming; Chang, Shwu Jen; Wang, Hung-Yi; Tang, Shu Ching; Yang, Shan-Wei

    2014-12-19

    After tendon-repair surgery, adhesion between the surgical tendon and the synovial sheath is often presented resulting in poor functional repair of the tendon. This may be prevented using a commercially available mechanical barrier implant, Seprafilm, which is composed of hyaluronan (HA) and carboxymethyl cellulose hydrogels. In a rat model, prepared membranes of various compositions of gellan gum (GG), xanthan gum (XG) and HA as well as Seprafilm were wrapped around repaired tendons and the adhesion of the tendons was examined grossly and histologically after 3 weeks of healing. Certain formulations of the XG/GG/HA hydrogel membranes reduced tendon adhesion with equal efficacy but without reducing the tendon strength compared to Seprafilm. The designed membranes swelled rapidly and blanketed onto the tendon tissue more readily and closely than Seprafilm. Also they degraded slowly, which allowed the membranes to function as barriers for extended periods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Intrinsic viscosity of binary gum mixtures with xanthan gum and guar gum: Effect of NaCl, sucrose, and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, J H; Yoo, B

    2017-12-29

    The intrinsic viscosity ([η]) values of binary gum mixtures with xanthan gum (XG) and guar gum (GG) mixed with NaCl and sucrose at different concentrations as well as in the presence of different pH levels were examined in dilute solution as a function of XG/GG mixing ratio (100/0, 75/25, 50/50, and 0/100). Experimental values of concentration (C) and relative viscosity (η rel ) or specific viscosity (η sp ) of gums in dilute solution were fitted to five models to determine [η] values of binary gum mixtures including individual gums. A [η] model (η rel =1+[η]C) of Tanglertpaibul and Rao is recommended as the best model to estimate [η] values for the binary gum mixtures with XG and GG as affected by NaCl, sucrose, and pH. Overall, the synergistic interaction of XG-GG mixtures in the presence of NaCl and sucrose showed a greatly positive variation between measured and calculated values of [η]. In contrast, the binary gum mixtures showed synergy only under an acidic condition (pH3). These results suggest that the NaCl and sucrose addition or acidic condition appears to affect the intermolecular interaction occurred between XG and GG at different gum mixing ratios. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of GutsyGum(tm), A Novel Gum, on Subjective Ratings of Gastro Esophageal Reflux Following A Refluxogenic Meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rachel; Sam, Cecilia H Y; Green, Tim; Wood, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Chewing gum alleviates symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) following a refluxogenic meal. GutsyGum(tm), a chewing gum developed to alleviate the symptoms of GER contains calcium carbonate, with a proprietary blend of licorice extract, papain, and apple cider vinegar (GiGs®). The efficacy of GutsyGum(tm) was determined in alleviating the symptoms of GER after a refluxogenic meal compared to placebo gum. This double-blind, placebo-controlled-crossover trial with a one-week washout between treatments had 24 participants with a history of GER consume a refluxogenic meal and then chew GutsyGum(tm) or placebo gum. Participants completed GER symptom questionnaires, consisting of symptom based 10 cm Visual Analogue Scales, immediately following the meal and then at regular intervals out to four hours postmeal. Adjusted mean ± SEM heartburn score (15-min postmeal to 240 min) was significantly lower in GutsyGum(tm) than in placebo gum treatment (0.81 ± 0.20 vs. 1.45 ± 0.20 cm; p = 0.034). Mean acid reflux score was significantly lower in GutsyGum(tm) than in placebo treatment (0.72 ± 0.19 vs. 1.46 ± 0.19 cm; p = 0.013). There were no significant differences for any of the secondary outcomes. However, pain approached significance with less pain reported in GutsyGum(tm) versus placebo treatment (0.4 ± 0.2 vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 cm; p = 0.081). Although nausea (p = 0.114) and belching (p = 0.154) were lower following GutsyGum(tm), the difference was not statistically significant. GutsyGum(tm) is more effective than a placebo gum in alleviating primary symptoms of heartburn and acid reflux (Clinical Trial Registration: ACTRN12612000973819).

  14. Preparation of a Rapidly Forming Poly(ferrocenylsilane)-Poly(ethylene glycol)-based Hydrogel by a Thiol–Michael Addition Click Reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sui, Xiaofeng; van Ingen, Lennard; Hempenius, Mark A.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis of a rapidly forming redox responsive poly(ferrocenylsilane)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PFS-PEG)-based hydrogel is described, achieved by a thiol-Michael addition click reaction. PFS bearing acrylate side groups (PFS-acryl) was synthesized by side group modification of

  15. EU-Approved Rapid Tests for Bovine Spongform Encephalopathy Detect Atypical Forms: A Study for Their Sensitivities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meloni, D.; Davidse, A.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; varello, K.; Casalone, C.; Corona, C.; Balkema-Buschmann, A.; Groschup, M.; Ingravalle, F.; Bozzetta, E.

    2012-01-01

    Since 2004 it become clear that atypical bovine spongiform encephalopthies (BSEs) exist in cattle. Whenever their detection has relied on active surveillance plans implemented in Europe since 2001 by rapid tests, the overall and inter-laboratory performance of these diagnostic systems in the

  16. Rheological Characterization of Isabgol Husk, Gum Katira Hydrocolloids, and Their Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vipin Kumar; Mazumder, Bhaskar; Nautiyal, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    The rheological parameters of Isabgol husk, gum katira, and their blends were determined in different media such as distilled water, 0.1 N HCl, and phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). The blend properties of Isabgol husk and gum katira were measured for four different percentage compositions in order to understand their compatibility in dispersion form such as 00 : 100, 25 : 50, 50 : 50, 75 : 25, and 100 : 00 in the gel strength of 1 mass%. The miscibility of blends was determined by calculating Isabgol husk-gum katira interaction parameters by Krigbaum and Wall equation. Other rheological properties were analyzed by Bingham, Power, Casson, Casson chocolate, and IPC paste analysis. The study revealed that the power flow index “p” was less than “1” in all concentrations of Isabgol husk, gum katira, and their blends dispersions indicating the shear-thinning (pseudoplastic) behavior. All blends followed pseudoplastic behavior at thermal conditions as 298.15, 313.15, and 333.15°K and in dispersion media such as distilled water, 0.1 N HCl, and phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). Moreover, the study indicated the applicability of these blends in the development of drug delivery systems and in industries, for example, ice-cream, paste, nutraceutical, and so forth. PMID:26904636

  17. Rheological Characterization of Isabgol Husk, Gum Katira Hydrocolloids, and Their Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin Kumar Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The rheological parameters of Isabgol husk, gum katira, and their blends were determined in different media such as distilled water, 0.1 N HCl, and phosphate buffer (pH 7.4. The blend properties of Isabgol husk and gum katira were measured for four different percentage compositions in order to understand their compatibility in dispersion form such as 00 : 100, 25 : 50, 50 : 50, 75 : 25, and 100 : 00 in the gel strength of 1 mass%. The miscibility of blends was determined by calculating Isabgol husk-gum katira interaction parameters by Krigbaum and Wall equation. Other rheological properties were analyzed by Bingham, Power, Casson, Casson chocolate, and IPC paste analysis. The study revealed that the power flow index “p” was less than “1” in all concentrations of Isabgol husk, gum katira, and their blends dispersions indicating the shear-thinning (pseudoplastic behavior. All blends followed pseudoplastic behavior at thermal conditions as 298.15, 313.15, and 333.15°K and in dispersion media such as distilled water, 0.1 N HCl, and phosphate buffer (pH 7.4. Moreover, the study indicated the applicability of these blends in the development of drug delivery systems and in industries, for example, ice-cream, paste, nutraceutical, and so forth.

  18. Rheological Characterization of Isabgol Husk, Gum Katira Hydrocolloids, and Their Blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vipin Kumar; Mazumder, Bhaskar; Nautiyal, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    The rheological parameters of Isabgol husk, gum katira, and their blends were determined in different media such as distilled water, 0.1 N HCl, and phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). The blend properties of Isabgol husk and gum katira were measured for four different percentage compositions in order to understand their compatibility in dispersion form such as 00 : 100, 25 : 50, 50 : 50, 75 : 25, and 100 : 00 in the gel strength of 1 mass%. The miscibility of blends was determined by calculating Isabgol husk-gum katira interaction parameters by Krigbaum and Wall equation. Other rheological properties were analyzed by Bingham, Power, Casson, Casson chocolate, and IPC paste analysis. The study revealed that the power flow index "p" was less than "1" in all concentrations of Isabgol husk, gum katira, and their blends dispersions indicating the shear-thinning (pseudoplastic) behavior. All blends followed pseudoplastic behavior at thermal conditions as 298.15, 313.15, and 333.15°K and in dispersion media such as distilled water, 0.1 N HCl, and phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). Moreover, the study indicated the applicability of these blends in the development of drug delivery systems and in industries, for example, ice-cream, paste, nutraceutical, and so forth.

  19. Effect of Probiotic Yogurt and Xylitol-Containing Chewing Gums on Salivary S Mutans Count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Elnaz; Mazaheri, Romina; Tahmourespour, Arezoo

    In addition to improving gastrointestinal health and intestinal microflora, probiotic bacteria have been recently suggested to decrease cariogenic agents in the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of probiotic yogurt and xylitol-containing chewing gums on reducing salivary Streptococcus mutans levels. This randomized clinical trial recruited 50 female students with over 10(5) colony forming units S. mutans per milliliter of their saliva. The participants were randomly allocated to two equal groups to receive either probiotic yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 andBifidobacteriumbifidum ATCC 29521 (200 g daily) or xylitol-containing chewing gums (two gums three times daily after each meal; total xylitol content: 5.58 g daily) for three weeks. At baseline and one day, two weeks, and four weeks after the interventions, saliva samples were cultured on mitis-salivarius-bacitracin agar and salivary S. mutans counts were determined. Data were analyzed with independent t-tests, analysis of variance, and Fisher's least significant difference test. In both groups, S. mutans counts on the first day, second week, and fourth weeks after the intervention were significantly lower than baseline values (P yogurt consumers, the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. Probiotic yogurt and xylitol-containing chewing gums seem to be as effective in reduction of salivary S. mutans levels. Their constant long-term consumption is thus recommended to prevent caries.

  20. Bleeding gums: Duloxetine may be the cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balhara YPS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Duloxetine is a newly introduced drug. It is being prescribed for the management of diabetic neuropathic pain and major depressive disorder. The most frequently observed adverse events with duloxetine are nausea, dry mouth and somnolence, constipation, diarrhea, decreased appetite, weight loss, feeling of fatigue, dizziness, somnolence, hypohidrosis, decreased libido and erectile dysfunction. One of the patients being prescribed the drug developed bleeding gums on being started with the drug which resolved on stopping it. We hereby report this case.

  1. Polymerization of Vinylpyrrolidone to Form a Neutral Coating on Anionic Nanomaterials in Aqueous Suspension for Rapid Sedimentation

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Edward P. C.; Zafar Iqbal; Sherif Nour

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials in water present an array of identifiable potential hazards to ecological and human health. There is no general consensus about the influence of anionic or cationic charge on the toxicity of nanomaterials on environmental ecology. One challenge is the limited number of scalable technologies available for the removal of charged nanomaterials from water. A new method based on polymer coating has been developed in our laboratory for rapid sedimentation of nanomaterials in aqueous s...

  2. [Effect of chewing gum on halitosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca-Monasterios, Fiorella; Chimenos-Küstner, Eduardo; López-López, José

    2014-07-22

    This study aims to estimate the prevalence of oral halitosis in a young population and show the effect of chewing gum on their breath. Prospective, descriptive correlational cross section study. We selected a convenience sample of 121 young individuals and 98 completed the study. It was carried out at the University Dental Hospital-University of Barcelona. The protocol consisted of: questionnaire, oral clinical evaluation, organoleptic tests (OT) and measurement of volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) with sulphide monitoring before and after chewing gum during 15 min, with 2 calibrated investigators. A percentage of 87.8 had adequate oral hygiene, 17.3% reported bad breath and 29.6% had xerostomia. Forty-four subjects had a OT grade ≥2; the agreement of examiners was 75%. The VSC in 53 individuals were ≤100 parts per billion (ppb) and in 45 subjects, it was>100 ppb. A post-reduction of VSC of 17.34% was obtained with a mean decrease of 1.8-9.0 ppb (P=.003). The prevalence of halitosis was 36.7%. The use of chewing gum as an adjunct in cases of halitosis decreases the VSC, improving the perception of others and the patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Validating the applicability of the GUM procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Maurice G.; Harris, Peter M.

    2014-08-01

    This paper is directed at practitioners seeking a degree of assurance in the quality of the results of an uncertainty evaluation when using the procedure in the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) (JCGM 100 : 2008). Such assurance is required in adhering to general standards such as International Standard ISO/IEC 17025 or other sector-specific standards. We investigate the extent to which such assurance can be given. For many practical cases, a measurement result incorporating an evaluated uncertainty that is correct to one significant decimal digit would be acceptable. Any quantification of the numerical precision of an uncertainty statement is naturally relative to the adequacy of the measurement model and the knowledge used of the quantities in that model. For general univariate and multivariate measurement models, we emphasize the use of a Monte Carlo method, as recommended in GUM Supplements 1 and 2. One use of this method is as a benchmark in terms of which measurement results provided by the GUM can be assessed in any particular instance. We mainly consider measurement models that are linear in the input quantities, or have been linearized and the linearization process is deemed to be adequate. When the probability distributions for those quantities are independent, we indicate the use of other approaches such as convolution methods based on the fast Fourier transform and, particularly, Chebyshev polynomials as benchmarks.

  4. Evaluation of carboxymethyl gellan gum as a mucoadhesive polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Munish; Singh, Seema; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-02-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate carboxymethyl gellan gum as bioadhesive polymer for drug delivery applications. Gellan gum was carboxymethylated by reacting it with monochloroacetic acid. Degree of carboxymethyl substitution was found to be 1.18. Further, carboxymethylation of gellan gum was found to increase its degree of crystallinity, surface roughness and diminish the cation-induced gelation. On comparative evaluation carboxymethyl gellan gum showed 2.71-fold higher mucoadhesive strength than gellan gum. Evaluation of ex vivo ocular tolerance using chorioallantoic membrane of hen's egg and cytotoxicity screening on Vero cells using resazurin assay revealed that caroboxymethyl gellan gum is non-irritant and biocompatible. Ionotiropically gelled beads of carboxymethyl gellan gum formulated using metformin as the model drug and calcium chloride as the cross-linking agent showed ex vivo bioadhesion of 100% over 24h. Further, it was observed that carboxymethyl gellan gum beads released metformin at a rate faster than gellan gum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Brief report: gum chewing affects standardized math scores in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Craig A; Tyler, Chermaine; Stansberry, Sandra A; Moreno, Jennette P; Foreyt, John P

    2012-04-01

    Gum chewing has been shown to improve cognitive performance in adults; however, gum chewing has not been evaluated in children. This study examined the effects of gum chewing on standardized test scores and class grades of eighth grade math students. Math classes were randomized to a gum chewing (GC) condition that provided students with gum during class and testing, or a control condition with no gum (NGC). Participants included 108 students. The math sections of the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) and the Woodcock Johnson III Tests of Achievement (WJ-III), and math class grades were used to assess academic performance. Students in the gum chewing condition improved standardized test scores and maintained higher grades in math class compared to those in the no-gum chewing condition. These results are encouraging as gum chewing may be a cost-effective and easily implemented method to increase student performance. NCT00792116. Copyright © 2011 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Formulation development and evaluation of metformin chewing gum with bitter taste masking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Abolfazl Mostafavi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Metfornin chewing gum had suitable appearance and appropriate invitro characteristics that fallow the pharmacopeia suggestions. This chewable gum showed bitterness suppression with a suitable release rate.

  7. Stabilization of emulsions by gum tragacanth (Astragalus spp.) correlates to the galacturonic acid content and methoxylation degree of the gum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi Gavlighi, Hassan; Meyer, Anne S.; Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz

    2013-01-01

    –270 mg/g), and galactose (∼40–140 mg/g), and also contained fucose, rhamnose, and glucose. The ability of the gums to act as stabilizers in whey protein isolate based emulsions varied. The best emulsion stabilization effect, measured as lowest creaming index ratio after 20 days, was obtained with the A....... fluccosus gum. The emulsion stabilization effect correlated linearly and positively to the methoxylation degree, and galacturonic acid content of the gums, but not to acetyl or fucose content. A particularly high correlation was found between methoxyl level in the soluble gum part and emulsion stabilization...

  8. RAPID MULTICOMPONENT ANALYSIS OF HEMOGLOBIN DERIVATIVES FOR CONTROLLED ANTIDOTAL USE OF METHEMOGLOBIN-FORMING AGENTS IN CYANIDE POISONING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZIJLSTRA, WG

    When cyanide poisoning is treated with a methemoglobin-forming agent, oxidative metabolism is protected at the expense of the oxygen capacity of the blood.The affinity of methemoglobin for CN- is high enough to compete with cytochrome oxidase, which protects the latter from becoming blocked, but all

  9. Formulation and experimental evaluation of closed-form control laws for the rapid maneuvering of reactor neutronic power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, J.A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Nuclear Reactor Lab.)

    1989-09-01

    This report describes both the theoretical development and the experimental evaluation of a novel, robust methodology for the time-optimal adjustment of a reactor's neutronic power under conditions of closed-loop digital control. Central to the approach are the MIT-SNL Period-Generated Minimum Time Control Laws' which determine the rate at which reactivity should be changed in order to cause a reactor's neutronic power to conform to a specified trajectory. Using these laws, reactor power can be safely raised by five to seven orders of magnitude in a few seconds. The MIT-SNL laws were developed to facilitate rapid increases of neutronic power on spacecraft reactors operating in an SDI environment. However, these laws are generic and have other applications including the rapid recovery of research and test reactors subsequent to an unanticipated shutdown, power increases following the achievement of criticality on commercial reactors, power adjustments on commercial reactors so as to minimize thermal stress, and automated startups. The work reported here was performed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under contract to the Sandia National Laboratories. Support was also provided by the US Department of Energy's Division of University and Industry Programs. The work described in this report is significant in that a novel solution to the problem of time-optimal control of neutronic power was identified, in that a rigorous description of a reactor's dynamics was derived in that the rate of change of reactivity was recognized as the proper control signal, and in that extensive experimental trials were conducted of these newly developed concepts on actual nuclear reactors. 43 refs., 118 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. Neem gum as a binder in a formulated paracetamol tablet with reference to Acacia gum BP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunjimi, Abayomi Tolulope; Alebiowu, Gbenga

    2014-04-01

    This study determined the physical, compressional, and binding properties of neem gum (NMG) obtained from the trunk of Azadirachta indica (A Juss) in a paracetamol tablet formulation in comparison with official Acacia gum BP (ACA). The physical and flow properties were evaluated using density parameters: porosity, Carr's index, Hausner's ratio, and flow rate. Compressional properties were analyzed using Heckel and Kawakita equations. The tensile strength, brittle fracture index, and crushing strength-friability/disintegration time ratio were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of paracetamol tablets while the drug release properties of the tablets were assessed using disintegration time and dissolution times. Tablet formulations containing NMG exhibited faster onset and higher amount of plastic deformation during compression than those containing ACA. Neem gum produced paracetamol tablets with lower mechanical strength; however, the tendency of the tablets to cap or laminate was lower when compared to those containing ACA. Inclusion of NMG improved the balance between binding and disintegration properties of paracetamol tablets produced than those containing ACA. Neem gum produced paracetamol tablets with lower disintegration and dissolution times than those containing ACA.

  11. A rapid molecular method for differentiating two special forms (lycopersici and radicis-lycopersici) of Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attitalla, Idress H; Fatehi, Jamshid; Levenfors, Jens; Brishammar, Sture

    2004-07-01

    Two pathogenic special forms (f. sp.) of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) and f. sp. radicis-lycopersici (Forl) are morphologically indistinguishable. Although they are pathogenic to the same host genus Lycopersicon (tomato), and infect the same tomato cultivar, they form distinct diseases; Fol causes wilt and Forl causes crown rot and root rot. These two special forms apparently exist as genetically isolated populations, based on vegetative compatibility and molecular variation at the DNA level. In seeking efficient diagnostic tools for differentiating Fol and Forl isolates, we examined three techniques: isozyme analysis, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) RFLP by HaeIII-digestion of total genomic DNA, and an osmotic method using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to detect fungal pigments. The isolates were collected from geographically widespread locations. Distinct HPLC-profile differences were found between an endophytic non-pathogenic isolate and the other pathogenic isolates. However, the direct mtDNA RFLP technique proved to be an efficient diagnostic tool for routine differentiation of Fol and Forl isolates.

  12. Gum pigmentation: an unusual adverse effect of sublingual immunotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goh, Anne; Chiang, Wen Chin; Kang, Liew Woei; Rao, Rajeshwar; Lim, Hwee Hoon; Chng, Chai Kiat

    2014-01-01

    .... This is pigmentation of the gums which can occur anytime during the course of the immunotherapy. It resolves on stopping the immunotherapy and is likely due to a local inflammatory process occurring in the gums of these children. There is no associated pain or itching with the pigmentation. It can persist as long as the child is on the immunotherapy.

  13. Grewia Gum 2: Mucoadhesive Properties of Compacts and Gels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Technology, University of Jos, Nigeria, 3Pharmacy, School of Applied Sciences,. University of ... Where such polymers are used in eye, nose, ..... process [19]. The possession of hydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups by grewia gum [8] would enhance formation of hydrogen bonds between the gum and mucus, and may be.

  14. Gellan Gum: Fermentative Production, Downstream Processing and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishwar B. Bajaj

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The microbial exopolysaccharides are water-soluble polymers secreted by microorganisms during fermentation. The biopolymer gellan gum is a relatively recent addition to the family of microbial polysaccharides that is gaining much importance in food, pharmaceutical and chemical industries due to its novel properties. It is commercially produced by C. P. Kelco in Japan and the USA. Further research and development in biopolymer technology is expected to expand its use. This article presents a critical review of the available information on the gellan gum synthesized by Sphingomonas paucimobilis with special emphasis on its fermentative production and downstream processing. Rheological behaviour of fermentation broth during fermentative production of gellan gum and problems associated with mass transfer have been addressed. Information on the biosynthetic pathway of gellan gum, enzymes and precursors involved in gellan gum production and application of metabolic engineering for enhancement of yield of gellan gum has been specified. Characteristics of gellan gum with respect to its structure, physicochemical properties, rheology of its solutions and gel formation behaviour are discussed. An attempt has also been made to review the current and potential applications of gellan gum in food, pharmaceutical and other industries.

  15. Intrinsic viscosity of guar gum in sweeteners solutions | Samavati ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rheological methods were applied to study the effect of sweeteners on the rheological behavior of guar gum in dilute solutions. The concentration of the sweeteners were 0.1, 0.2%w/v for aspartame, acesulfame-k and cyclamate, and 0.001, 0.002%w/v for neotame. Gum was evaluated for intrinsic viscosity by various ...

  16. Gum Arabic authentication and mixture quantification by near infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yongjiang; Sørensen, Klavs Martin; He, Sailing

    2017-01-01

    by the NIR spectroscopic method. In addition, a partial least squares (PLS) regression model is calibrated to predict the blending percentage of the two pure gum types, producing an accuracy, root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 2.8%. Sampling of the Gum Arabic ‘tears’ is discussed...

  17. Grewia Gum 1: Some Mechanical and Swelling Properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Compacts (500 mg) of both freeze-dried and air-dried grewia gum were separately prepared by compression on a potassium bromide (KBr) press at different pressures and subjected to Heckel analysis. Swelling studies were performed using 200 mg compacts of the gum (freeze-dried or air-dried) compressed on ...

  18. Evaluation of the suspending property of grewia gum in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The suspending property of grewia gum in sulphadimidine suspension was evaluated. The gum was extracted by maceration, filtration, precipitation and drying techniques. It was used at 0.3 to 1% w/v as a suspending agent for sulphadimidine. Sodiumcarboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) and tragacanth were used as basis for ...

  19. Suspension Properties Of Binary Mixtures Of Tragacanth Gum And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work the effect of irvingia gum on the suspending properties of tragacanth in zinc oxide suspension has been investigated. The gum of Irvingia gabonensis was extracted by macerated and characterized using standard procedures. Batches of zinc oxide suspension were formulated with varying ratios of tragacanth ...

  20. Binding Properties Of A Polymeric Gum From Cola accuminata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The binding properties of a polymeric gum obtained from the pods of Cola accuminata was studied. The tablets produced with the new gum showed good weight uniformity, friability and hardness profiles. However all the tablets produced with 1 % w/w binder; Sodium carboxyl methyl cellulose (SCMC) and Cola accuminata ...

  1. Evaluation of the suspending properties of Abizia zygia gum on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: The suspending properties of Albizia zygia gum (family Mimosoideae) were evaluated comparatively with those of Compound Tragacanth, Acacia and Gelatin at concentration range of 0.5 – 4.0%w/v in Sulphadimidine suspension. Characterization tests were carried out on purified Albizia zygia gum. Sedimentation ...

  2. Evaluation of the Suspending Property of Grewia Gum in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The suspending property of grewia gum in metronidazole suspension was evaluated. The gum was extracted by maceration, filtration, precipitation and drying techniques. It was used at 0.3 to 1% w/v as a suspending agent for metronidazole. Sodiumcarboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) and tragacanth were used as basis for ...

  3. Increased gum arabic production after infestation of Acacia senegal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between the beetle Agrilus nubeculosus and gum arabic production by Acacia senegal. Some trees were tapped and left open to facilitate infestation by A. nubeculosus and others were covered with wire mesh as control. Gum yield, physical and chemical properties of ...

  4. Preliminary Investigation of Gum from Hunteria Umbellata Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate the binding properties of the gum obtained from Hunteria umbellata K. Schum (family: Apocynaceae). The gum was extracted from the pulp of fresh fruit pod of Hunteria umbellata using acetone and water (ratio1:2). Granules were prepared by wet granulation technique using varying ...

  5. Polymerization of Vinylpyrrolidone to Form a Neutral Coating on Anionic Nanomaterials in Aqueous Suspension for Rapid Sedimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward P. C. Lai

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials in water present an array of identifiable potential hazards to ecological and human health. There is no general consensus about the influence of anionic or cationic charge on the toxicity of nanomaterials on environmental ecology. One challenge is the limited number of scalable technologies available for the removal of charged nanomaterials from water. A new method based on polymer coating has been developed in our laboratory for rapid sedimentation of nanomaterials in aqueous suspension. Using colloidal silica as a model inorganic oxide, coating of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP around the SiO2 nanoparticles produced SiO2@PVP particles, as indicated by a linear increase of nephelometric turbidity. Purification of the water sample was afforded by total sedimentation of SiO2@PVP particles when left for 24 h. Characterization by capillary electrophoresis (CE revealed nearly zero ionic charge on the particles. Further coating of polydopamine (PDA around those particles in aqueous suspension produced an intense dark color due to the formation of SiO2@PVP@PDA. The SiO2@PVP@PDA peak appeared at a characteristic migration time of 4.2 min that allowed for quantitative CE-UV analysis to determine the original SiO2 concentration with enhanced sensitivity and without any ambiguous identity.

  6. Rapid degradation of an active formylglycine generating enzyme variant leads to a late infantile severe form of multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlotawa, Lars; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; Baumgartner, Matthias; Schmid, Regula; Schmidt, Bernhard; Dierks, Thomas; Gärtner, Jutta

    2013-09-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is a rare inborn error of metabolism affecting posttranslational activation of sulfatases by the formylglycine generating enzyme (FGE). Due to mutations in the encoding SUMF1 gene, FGE's catalytic capacity is impaired resulting in reduced cellular sulfatase activities. Both, FGE protein stability and residual activity determine disease severity and have previously been correlated with the clinical MSD phenotype. Here, we report a patient with a late infantile severe course of disease. The patient is compound heterozygous for two so far undescribed SUMF1 mutations, c.156delC (p.C52fsX57) and c.390A>T (p.E130D). In patient fibroblasts, mRNA of the frameshift allele is undetectable. In contrast, the allele encoding FGE-E130D is expressed. FGE-E130D correctly localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and has a very high residual molecular activity in vitro (55% of wildtype FGE); however, it is rapidly degraded. Thus, despite substantial residual enzyme activity, protein instability determines disease severity, which highlights that potential MSD treatment approaches should target protein folding and stabilization mechanisms.

  7. Injectable self-gelling composites for bone tissue engineering based on gellan gum hydrogel enriched with different bioglasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, T.E.; Piwowarczyk, W.; Pamula, E.; Liskova, J.; Schaubroeck, D.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.; Brackman, G.; Balcaen, L.; Detsch, R.; Declercq, H.; Cholewa-Kowalska, K.; Dokupil, A.; Cuijpers, V.M.; Vanhaecke, F.; Cornelissen, R.; Coenye, T.; Boccaccini, A.R.; Dubruel, P.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogels of biocompatible calcium-crosslinkable polysaccharide gellan gum (GG) were enriched with bioglass particles to enhance (i) mineralization with calcium phosphate (CaP); (ii) antibacterial properties and (iii) growth of bone-forming cells for future bone regeneration applications. Three

  8. Gum Arabic as a Cause of Occupational Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viinanen, Arja; Salokannel, Maija; Lammintausta, Kaija

    2011-01-01

    Background. Gum arabic is a potential sensitizer in food industry. Methods. We examined 11 candy factory workers referred to examinations due to respiratory and skin symptoms paying attention to exposure and sensitization to gum arabic. Skin tests, pulmonary function tests, and respiratory provocation tests were carried out as indicated by the symptoms and findings. Results. Occupational asthma, caused by gum arabic was diagnosed in 4/11 candy factory workers and two of them had also occupational contact urticaria and one had occupational rhinitis. One of them had oral symptoms associated with ingestion of products containing gum arabic. Conclusions. Airborne exposure to gum arabic may cause sensitization leading to allergic rhinitis, asthma, and urticaria. PMID:21747872

  9. Gum Arabic as a Cause of Occupational Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arja Viinanen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gum arabic is a potential sensitizer in food industry. Methods. We examined 11 candy factory workers referred to examinations due to respiratory and skin symptoms paying attention to exposure and sensitization to gum arabic. Skin tests, pulmonary function tests, and respiratory provocation tests were carried out as indicated by the symptoms and findings. Results. Occupational asthma, caused by gum arabic was diagnosed in 4/11 candy factory workers and two of them had also occupational contact urticaria and one had occupational rhinitis. One of them had oral symptoms associated with ingestion of products containing gum arabic. Conclusions. Airborne exposure to gum arabic may cause sensitization leading to allergic rhinitis, asthma, and urticaria.

  10. A galaxy rapidly forming stars 700 million years after the Big Bang at redshift 7.51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, S L; Papovich, C; Dickinson, M; Song, M; Tilvi, V; Koekemoer, A M; Finkelstein, K D; Mobasher, B; Ferguson, H C; Giavalisco, M; Reddy, N; Ashby, M L N; Dekel, A; Fazio, G G; Fontana, A; Grogin, N A; Huang, J-S; Kocevski, D; Rafelski, M; Weiner, B J; Willner, S P

    2013-10-24

    Of several dozen galaxies observed spectroscopically that are candidates for having a redshift (z) in excess of seven, only five have had their redshifts confirmed via Lyman α emission, at z = 7.008, 7.045, 7.109, 7.213 and 7.215 (refs 1-4). The small fraction of confirmed galaxies may indicate that the neutral fraction in the intergalactic medium rises quickly at z > 6.5, given that Lyman α is resonantly scattered by neutral gas. The small samples and limited depth of previous observations, however, makes these conclusions tentative. Here we report a deep near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 43 photometrically-selected galaxies with z > 6.5. We detect a near-infrared emission line from only a single galaxy, confirming that some process is making Lyman α difficult to detect. The detected emission line at a wavelength of 1.0343 micrometres is likely to be Lyman α emission, placing this galaxy at a redshift z = 7.51, an epoch 700 million years after the Big Bang. This galaxy's colours are consistent with significant metal content, implying that galaxies become enriched rapidly. We calculate a surprisingly high star-formation rate of about 330 solar masses per year, which is more than a factor of 100 greater than that seen in the Milky Way. Such a galaxy is unexpected in a survey of our size, suggesting that the early Universe may harbour a larger number of intense sites of star formation than expected.

  11. Form and function of damselfish skulls: rapid and repeated evolution into a limited number of trophic niches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, W James; Westneat, Mark W

    2009-01-01

    biomechanically defined link between structure and the functional ecology of fish skulls, and indicate that certain mechanisms for transmitting motion through their jaw linkages may require particular anatomical configurations, a conclusion that contravenes the concept of "many-to-one mapping" for fish jaw mechanics. Damselfish trophic evolution is characterized by rapid and repeated shifts between a small number of eco-morphological states, an evolutionary pattern that we describe as reticulate adaptive radiation. PMID:19183467

  12. Form and function of damselfish skulls: rapid and repeated evolution into a limited number of trophic niches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper W James

    2009-01-01

    data support a tight and biomechanically defined link between structure and the functional ecology of fish skulls, and indicate that certain mechanisms for transmitting motion through their jaw linkages may require particular anatomical configurations, a conclusion that contravenes the concept of "many-to-one mapping" for fish jaw mechanics. Damselfish trophic evolution is characterized by rapid and repeated shifts between a small number of eco-morphological states, an evolutionary pattern that we describe as reticulate adaptive radiation.

  13. Encapsulation of Aloe Vera extract into natural Tragacanth Gum as a novel green wound healing product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayempour, Soraya; Montazer, Majid; Mahmoudi Rad, Mahnaz

    2016-12-01

    Application of natural materials in wound healing is an interest topic due to effective treatment with no side effects. In this paper, Aloe Vera extract was encapsulated into Tragacanth Gum through a sonochemical microemulsion process to prepare a wound healing product. FESEM/EDX and FT-IR proved the successfully formation of the nanocapsules with spherical shape by cross-linking aluminum ions with Tragacanth Gum. The therapeutic characteristics of the prepared wound healing product were investigated using antimicrobial, cytotoxicity and wound healing assays. Relative high antimicrobial activities with the microbial reduction of 84, 91 and 80% against E. coli, S. aureus and C. albicans, a cell viability of 98% against human fibroblast cells and a good wound healing activity with considerable migration rate of fibroblast cells are the important advantages of the new formed wound healing product. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Acacia Gum, NaCl, and Sucrose on Physical Properties of Lotus Stem Starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritika Puri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumer preferences in east Asian part of the world pave the way for consumption of lotus stem starch (LSS in preparations such as breakfast meals, fast foods, and traditional confectioneries. The present study envisaged the investigation and optimization of additives, that is, acacia gum, sodium chloride (NaCl, and sucrose, on water absorption (WA, water absorption index (WAI, and water solubility index (WSI of LSS employing response surface methodology (RSM. Acacia gum resulted in increased water uptake and swelling of starch; however, NaCl reduced the swelling power of starch by making water unavailable to starch and also due to starch-ion electrostatic interaction. Sucrose restricted the water absorption by binding free water and decreased amylose leaching by building bridges with starch chains and thus forming rigid structure.

  15. Occurrence of gum spots in black cherry after partial harvest cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles O. Rexrode; H. Clay Smith; H. Clay Smith

    1990-01-01

    Bark beetles, primarily the bark beetle Phlosotribus liminori (Harris), are the major cause of gum spots in sawtimber-size black cherry Prunus serotina Ehrh. Approximately 90 percent of all gum spots in the bole sections are caused by bark beetles. Gum spots were studied in 95 black cherry trees near Parsons, West Virginia. Over 50 percent of the bark beetle-caused gum...

  16. Flavor-Enhanced Modulation of Cerebral Blood Flow during Gum Chewing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Hasegawa

    Full Text Available Flavor perception, the integration of taste and odor, is a critical factor in eating behavior. It remains unclear how such sensory signals influence the human brain systems that execute the eating behavior.WE TESTED CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW (CBF IN THE FRONTAL LOBES BILATERALLY WHILE SUBJECTS CHEWED THREE TYPES OF GUM WITH DIFFERENT COMBINATIONS OF TASTE AND ODOR: no taste/no odor gum (C-gum, sweet taste/no odor gum (T-gum, and sweet taste/lemon odor gum (TO-gum. Simultaneous recordings of transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD and near infrared spectrometer (NIRS were used to measure CBF during gum chewing in 25 healthy volunteers. Bilateral masseter muscle activity was also monitored.We found that subjects could discriminate the type of gum without prior information. Subjects rated the TO-gum as the most flavorful gum and the C-gum as the least flavorful. Analysis of masseter muscle activity indicated that masticatory motor output during gum chewing was not affected by taste and odor. The TCD/NIRS measurements revealed significantly higher hemodynamic signals when subjects chewed the TO-gum compared to when they chewed the C-gum and T-gum.These data suggest that taste and odor can influence brain activation during chewing in sensory, cognitive, and motivational processes rather than in motor control.

  17. Analysis of a gum from the exudates of Dichrostachys cinerea (L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-06

    Jul 6, 2011 ... Only little research is currently underway on gums from African plants, yet Africa imports a lot of gums for pharmaceutical and food industries. This study was aimed to investigate the rheological properties, and the moisture and ash contents of the isolated gum resins from Dichrostachys cinerea. The gum.

  18. THE EFFECT OF PREPARATION CONDITIONS OF RAPIDLY SOLIDIFIED IRON BASED GRANULES ON PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE MATERIAL FORMED BY CASTING TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kalinichenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The variety of requirements for friction pairs requires the development of different technologies for the production of tribological materials with reference to the operation modes. Composite materials obtained by the casting technology have been successfully applied for the normalization of the thermomechanical state of the steam turbines. These composites consist of the matrix based on copper alloys reinforced with cast iron granules. Because the structure and properties of cast iron are determined by the conditions of their production studies have been conducted on determination of preparation conditions on grain structure and properties of the synthesized composite material. Using an upgraded unit for production of granules technological regimes were determined providing narrow fractional composition. It has been found that granules formed are characterized with typical microstructure of white cast iron containing perlite and ledeburite. Microhardness of pilot cast iron granules is characterized by high values (from 7450 up to 9450 MPa and depends on the size of the fraction. Composite materials obtained using experimental granules had a microhardness of the reinforcing cast iron granules about 3500 MPa, and a bronze matrix – 1220 MPa, which is higher than the hardness of the composite material obtained by using the annealed DCL-1granules (2250 MPa. Metal base of experimental granules in the composite material has the structure of perlitic ductile iron with inclusions of ferrite not exceeding 10–15% and set around a flocculent graphite. As a result, the increase of physical-mechanical properties of finished products made of composite material is observed. 

  19. High rate of N2 fixation by East Siberian cryophilic soil bacteria as determined by measuring acetylene reduction in nitrogen-poor medium solidified with gellan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Shintaro; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki; Desyatkin, Roman V; Hatano, Ryusuke; Tahara, Satoshi

    2009-05-01

    For evaluating N(2) fixation of diazotrophic bacteria, nitrogen-poor liquid media supplemented with at least 0.5% sugar and 0.2% agar are widely used for acetylene reduction assays. In such a soft gel medium, however, many N(2)-fixing soil bacteria generally show only trace acetylene reduction activity. Here, we report that use of a N(2) fixation medium solidified with gellan gum instead of agar promoted growth of some gellan-preferring soil bacteria. In a soft gel medium solidified with 0.3% gellan gum under appropriate culture conditions, bacterial microbiota from boreal forest bed soils and some free-living N(2)-fixing soil bacteria isolated from the microbiota exhibited 10- to 200-fold-higher acetylene reduction than those cultured in 0.2% agar medium. To determine the N(2) fixation-activating mechanism of gellan gum medium, qualitative differences in the colony-forming bacterial components from tested soil microbiota were investigated in plate cultures solidified with either agar or gellan gum for use with modified Winogradsky's medium. On 1.5% agar plates, apparently cryophilic bacterial microbiota showed strictly distinguishable microbiota according to the depth of soil in samples from an eastern Siberian Taiga forest bed. Some pure cultures of proteobacteria, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens and Burkholderia xenovorans, showed remarkable acetylene reduction. On plates solidified with 1.0% gellan gum, some soil bacteria, including Luteibacter sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Paenibacillus sp., and Arthrobacter sp., uniquely grew that had not grown in the presence of the same inoculants on agar plates. In contrast, Pseudomonas spp. and Burkholderia spp. were apparent only as minor colonies on the gellan gum plates. Moreover, only gellan gum plates allowed some bacteria, particularly those isolated from the shallow organic soil layer, to actively swarm. In consequence, gellan gum is a useful gel matrix to bring out growth potential capabilities of many soil

  20. Expression, purification and biochemical characterization of GumI, a monotopic membrane GDP-mannose:glycolipid 4-{beta}-D-mannosyltransferase from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Silvina R; Bianco, María I; Barreras, Máximo; Ielpi, Luis

    2011-07-01

    We describe the first biochemical characterization of the gumI gene product, an essential protein for xanthan polysaccharide synthesis. Cellular fractionation experiments reveal the presence of a protein associated with the membrane fraction, even in the absence of the other proteins responsible for the synthesis of glycolipid intermediates and the proteins involved in the polymerization and transport of the xanthan chains. By alkaline buffer extraction and detergent phase partitioning, GumI was categorized as a monotopic membrane protein. GumI was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, solubilized and purified in an active and stable form using a simple and reproducible two-step procedure. The purified recombinant GumI is a nonprocessive β-mannosyltransferase that uses GDP-Man as a donor substrate and glucuronic acid-β-1,2-mannose-α-1,3-glucose-β-1,4-glucose-PP-polyisoprenyl as an acceptor. We also established the optimal biochemical conditions for GumI enzymatic activity. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of a conserved domain for glycosyltransferases (GTs) of the GT-B superfamily and homologous proteins in several prokaryote organisms. On the basis of this biochemical characterization, GumI may represent the founding member of a new GT family in the Carbohydrate-Active EnZymes classification.

  1. Synthesis, Optimization, Property, Characterization, and Application of Dialdehyde Cross-Linking Guar Gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dialdehyde cross-linking guar gum (DCLGG, as a novel material, was synthesized using phosphorus oxychloride as a cross-linking reagent, sodium periodate as an oxidant, and ethanol as a solvent through keeping the original particle form of guar gum. The process parameters such as the reaction temperature, reaction time, pH, amount of sodium periodate, and amount of ethanol were optimized by the response surface methodology in order to obtain the regression model of the oxidization. The covalent binding of L-asparagine onto the surfaces of DCLGG was further investigated. The results showed that the best technological conditions for preparing DCLGG were as follows: reaction temperature = 40°C, reaction time = 3.0 h, pH = 4.0, and amount of ethanol = 74.5%. The swelling power of DCLGG was intermediate between cross-linking guar gum and dialdehyde guar gum. The cross-linking and dialdehyde oxidization reduced the viscosity of GG. The cross-liking reduced the melting enthalpy of GG. However, the oxidization increased melting enthalpy of ACLGG. The thermal stability of GG was increased by cross-linking or oxidization. The variation of the onset decomposition temperature and end decomposition temperature of GG was not consistent with thermal stability of GG. L-asparagine could be chemically bound well by DCLGG through forming Schiff base under the weak acidity. The maximum adsorption capacity of L-asparagine on DCLGG with aldehyde content of 56.2% reached 21.9 mg/g.

  2. Application of narrow-bore HPLC columns in rapid determination of sildenafil citrate in its pharmaceutical dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodsi, Razieh; Kobarfard, Farzad; Tabatabai, Sayyed Abbas

    2012-01-01

    A special type of silica-based columns has been recently introduced into the market which is called narrow-bore columns. They have lower internal volume than the standard high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) columns and thus reduce the solvent consumption by almost 80%. A simple, accurate and environmentally friendly reversed phase- HPLC (RP-HPLC method) which could be used in fast and high throughput analyses has been developed for the purpose of determining the sildenafil in bulk and pharmaceutical dosage forms, using narrow-bore C18 column (50 × 3.2 mm, 5 µm particle size) in isocratic mode, with mobile phase comprising of buffer (pH = 3) and acetonitrile in the ratio of 75:25 v/v. The flow rate was 0.7 mL/min and the detection was monitored through Ultraviolet detector (UV detector) at 292 nm. Clonazepam was used as the internal standard and the run time was 4 min. The proposed method has permitted the quantification of sildenafil over the linearity in the range of 30-4000 ng/mL and its percentage recovery was found to be 99-105%. Limit of quantitation (LOQ) is determined as 30 ng/mL. The intra-day and inter-day precisions were found 1.2-2.2% and 1.56-3.4% respectively. The solvent consumption was 2.8 mL per sample of which ca 0.7 mL was acetonitrile. This study shows that the application of narrow-bore column instead of the conventional reversed phase column in HPLC analyses has the advantages of shorter run time and less organic solvent consumption. This method is highly sensitive with excellent recoveries and precision and there is no need for special column and pre-column or post-column treatment of the sample. Moreover, the method is free from interference by common additives and excipients, suggesting applications in routine quality control analyses.

  3. Farmers’ perception on the effects of gum Arabic agroforestry on livelihoods in the Sahelian zone of Borno State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha, S.B.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study analysed farmers’ perception of effects of gum Arabic agroforestry on livelihoods in the Sahelian zone of Borno state, Nigeria. Data for the study were obtained mainly through primary sources. Multi stage, purposive and random sampling techniques were employed to select 321 respondents that was used for this study. The study revealed that the most important (30.25% farm information by respondents was radio. This was closely followed by friends and relatives representing 29.91% of the respondents in the study area. However extension agents were the least important (9.34% source of farm information among respondents in the study area. The study indicated that the most important (29% reason for planting gum Arabic tree was for economic reason. The result showed that the respondents’ perception on improved environmental situation and improved socio-economic status had a mean score of 2.68 and 2.63 respectively implying that the respondents had an agreed perception on the effects of gum Arabic agroforestry on livelihoods. The results in also indicated that all the constraints identified by respondents had a mean score of > 2.56, implying that they had agreed to have encountered problems in the adoption of gum Arabic agroforestry in the study area. The study recommends that awareness creation should be mounted through extension education approach to enlighten the public on the skills, knowledge, techniques and benefits of the adoption of gum Arabic agroforestry in the study area. Farmers in the study area should also be encouraged to form gum Arabic agroforestry cooperatives as this will enable them to take advantage of government and non-governmental programmes, such as provision of credit facilities and technologies etc.

  4. Chew on this: No support for facilitating effects of gum on spatial task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Ingo W; Gittler, Georg; Waldherr, Karin; Pietschnig, Jakob

    2010-09-01

    To determine whether chewing of gum facilitates spatial task performance in healthy participants, two behavioral experiments were performed. In the first experiment, spatial task performance of 349 men and women preceding and after treatment administration (saccharated chewing gum, sugar-free chewing gum, no chewing gum) was assessed using effect modeling by means of Item Response Theory. In the second experiment, another 100 participants were either administered sugar-free chewing gum or no chewing gum during spatial task performance. Effects of gum in the second study were assessed by standard means of data analysis. Results indicated no significant effects of either chewing gum or sugar on spatial task performance in either experiment. Our findings are consistent with recent studies investigating the influences of chewing gum on various memory functions, extending them by another measure of cognitive ability. Thus, further doubt is cast on enhancing effects of chewing gum on cognitive task performance. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Carboxymethylation of Cassia angustifolia seed gum: synthesis and rheological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Gaurav; Pandey, I P; Joshi, Gyanesh

    2015-03-06

    The seeds of Cassia angustifolia are a rich source of galactomannan gum. The seed gums possess a wide variety of industrial applications. To utilize C. angustifolia seed gum for broader industrial applications, the carboxymethyl-Cassia angustifolia seed gum (CM-CAG) was synthesized. The gum was etherified with sodium monochloroacetate (SMCA) in a methanol-water system in presence of alkali (NaOH) at different reaction conditions. The variables studied includes alkali concentration, SMCA concentration, methanol:water ratio, liquor:gum ratio, reaction temperature and time. The extent of carboxymethylation was determined as degree of substitution (DS). The optimum conditions for preparing CM-CAG (DS=0.474) comprised 0.100 mol of NaOH, 0.05 mol of SMCA, 80% of methanol:water ratio (as % methanol) and liquor:gum ratio (v/w) of 10:1 at 75 °C for 60 min using 0.03 mol (as AGU) of CAG. Rheological studies showed CM-CAG to exhibit non-Newtonian pseudoplastic behaviour, relatively high viscosity, cold water solubility and solution stability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Design, formulation and evaluation of nicotine chewing gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Rafiei, Sahar

    2012-01-01

    Background: Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) can help smokers to quit smoking. Nicotine chewing gum has attracted the attention from pharmaceutical industries to offer it to consumers as an easily accessible NRT product. However, the bitter taste of such gums may compromise their acceptability by patients. This study was, therefore, designed to develop 2 and 4 mg nicotine chewing gums of pleasant taste, which satisfy the consumers the most. Materials and Methods: Nicotine, sugar, liquid glucose, glycerin, different sweetening and taste-masking agents, and a flavoring agent were added to the gum bases at appropriate temperature. The medicated gums were cut into pieces of suitable size and coated by acacia aqueous solution (2% w/v), sugar dusting, followed by acacia–sugar–calcium carbonate until a smooth surface was produced. The gums’ weight variation and content uniformity were determined. The release of nicotine was studied in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer using a mastication device which simulated the mastication of chewing gum in human. The Latin Square design was used for the evaluation of organoleptic characteristics of the formulations at different stages of development. Results: Most formulations released 79–83% of their nicotine content within 20 min. Nicotine-containing sugar-coated gums in which aspartame as sweetener and cherry and eucalyptus as flavoring agents were incorporated (i.e. formulations F19-SC and F20-SC, respectively) had optimal chewing hardness, adhering to teeth, and plumpness characteristics, as well as the most pleasant taste and highest acceptability to smokers. Conclusion: Taste enhancement of nicotine gums was achieved where formulations comprised aspartame as the sweetener and cherry and eucalyptus as the flavoring agents. Nicotine gums of pleasant taste may, therefore, be used as NRT to assist smokers quit smoking. PMID:23326788

  7. Gum chewing modulates heart rate variability under noise stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Takeuchi, Noriko; Morita, Manabu

    2012-12-01

    Gum chewing may relieve stress, although this hypothesis has not been proven. Heart-rate variability (HRV) is commonly used to measure stress levels. However, it is not known if gum chewing modulates HRV under acute stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of gum chewing on HRV under acute stress. A cross-over study involving 47 non-smoking healthy subjects, aged 22-27 years, was carried out. The subjects received a stress procedure with gum chewing (GS group) and without gum chewing (S group). Additionally, the other 20 subjects were allocated to the gum chewing without stress group (G group). The GS and S groups were exposed to noise for 5 min (75 dBA) as stress. Before and after stress exposure/gum chewing, participants completed the state portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-s) and a single Stress Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) measurement. HRV measurement was performed before and during stress/gum chewing for 5 min. After the stress procedure, VAS score significantly increased in the GS and S groups. During the stress procedure, the GS group showed a significantly lower level of high frequency (HF) and higher levels of low frequency (LF) and LF/HF than the S group. However, there were no significant differences in the scores of the state portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-s) and VAS between the two stress groups. These findings suggest that gum chewing modulates HRV, but may not relieve acute stress caused by noise.

  8. A rapid validated UV-HPLC method for the simultaneous determination of the antiretroviral compounds darunavir and raltegravir in their dosage form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estan-Cerezo, G; García-Monsalve, A; Soriano-Irigaray, L; Rodríguez-Lucena, F J; Navarro-Ruiz, A

    2017-06-01

    A rapid, simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with ultraviolet detection has been developed for quantification of darunavir and raltegravir in their pharmaceutical dosage form. The assay enables the measurement of both drugs with a linear calibration curve (R2= 0.999) over the concentration range 5-100 mg/L. The determination was performed on an analytical Tracer Excel 120 ODSB (15x0.4.6 cm) column at 35ºC. The selected wavelength was 254 nm. The mobile phase was a mixture of 0.037 M sodium dihydrogen phosphate buffer, acetonitrile and methanol (40:50:10, v/v/v) at a flow rate of 2.0 mL/min Nevirapine (50 mg/L) was used as internal standard. Accuracy, intra-day repeatability (n = 5), and inter-day precision (n = 3) were found to be satisfactory, being the accuracy from -4.33 to 3.88% and precisions were intra-day and inter-day, 0.25% and 4.42% respectively in case of darunavir. Raltegravir intra-day and inter-day precisions lower of 1.01 and 2.36%, respectively and accuracy values bet from -4.02 to 1.06%. Determination of the darunavir and raltegravir in their dosage form was done with a maximum deviation of 4%. This analytical method is rapid, easily implantable and offers good results.

  9. Evidence against memorial facilitation and context-dependent memory effects through the chewing of gum

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, A.J.; Miles, C.

    2007-01-01

    The experiment examined the prediction that chewing gum at learning and/or recall facilitated subsequent word recall. Chewing gum at learning significantly impaired recall, indicating that the chewing of gum has a detrimental impact upon initial word encoding. In addition, a context-dependent memory effect was reported for those participants who both learned and recalled in the absence of gum, however a context dependent effect was not found with chewing gum. The findings contradict previous ...

  10. Evidence against memorial facilitation and context-dependent memory effects through the chewing of gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew J; Miles, Christopher

    2007-05-01

    The experiment examined the prediction that chewing gum at learning and/or recall facilitated subsequent word recall. Chewing gum at learning significantly impaired recall, indicating that the chewing of gum has a detrimental impact upon initial word encoding. In addition, a context-dependent memory effect was reported for those participants who both learned and recalled in the absence of gum; however, a context-dependent effect was not found with chewing gum. The findings contradict previous research.

  11. EFFECT OF GUM CHEWING ON AIR SWALLOWING, SALIVA SWALLOWING AND BELCHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Viana da SILVA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundEructation is a physiologic event which allows gastric venting of swallowed air and most of the time is not perceived as a symptom. This is called gastric belching. Supragastric belching occurs when swallowed air does not reach the stomach and returns by mouth a short time after swallowing. This situation may cause discomfort, life limitations and problems in daily life.ObjectiveOur objective in this investigation was to evaluate if gum chewing increases the frequency of gastric and/or supragastric belches.MethodsEsophageal transit of liquid and gas was evaluated by impedance measurement in 16 patients with complaint of troublesome belching and in 15 controls. The Rome III criteria were used in the diagnosis of troublesome belching. The esophageal transit of liquid and gas was measured at 5 cm, 10 cm, 15 cm and 20 cm from the lower esophageal sphincter. The subjects were evaluated for 1 hour which was divided into three 20-minute periods: (1 while sitting for a 20-minute base period; (2 after the ingestion of yogurt (200 mL, 190 kcal, in which the subjects were evaluated while chewing or not chewing gum; (3 final 20-minute period in which the subjects then inverted the task of chewing or not chewing gum. In gastric belch, the air flowed from the stomach through the esophagus in oral direction and in supragastric belch the air entered the esophagus rapidly from proximal and was expulsed almost immediately in oral direction. Air swallows were characterized by an increase of at least 50% of basal impedance and saliva swallow by a decrease of at least 50% of basal impedance, that progress from proximal to distal esophagus.ResultsIn base period, air swallowing was more frequent in patients than in controls and saliva swallowing was more frequent in controls than in patients. There was no difference between the medians of controls and patients in the number of gastric belches and supragastric belches. In six patients, supragastric belches

  12. Modification mechanism of sesbania gum, and preparation, property, adsorption of dialdehyde cross-linked sesbania gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongbo; Gao, Shiqi; Li, Yanping; Dong, Siqing

    2016-09-20

    This paper studied the modification mechanism of Sesbania gum (SG) by means of the variations in the numbers of surface hydroxyl groups on the granules, Schiff's agent coloration of aldehyde groups, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), etc., and also examined the preparation, property and adsorption of dialdehyde cross-linked sesbania gum (DCLSG). The results showed that the surface hydroxyl numbers of cross-linked sesbania gum (CLSG) decreased with increasing the cross-linking degree. The distribution of the aldehyde groups on the DCLSG particles was nonuniform because most of aldehyde groups mainly located on the edge of particles. The cross-linking occurred only on the surface of SG particles. The oxidization occurred not only on the surface of SG particles, but also in the interior of particles. The cross-linking or oxidization changed the thermal properties, and reduced the swelling power, viscosity, alkali and acid resistance of SG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro tooth whitening effect of two medicated chewing gums compared to a whitening gum and saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael; Hasler-Nguyen, Nathalie; Saroea, Geoffrey

    2008-08-11

    Extrinsic staining of teeth may result from the deposition of a variety of pigments into or onto the tooth surface, which originate mainly from diet or from tobacco use. More recently, clinical studies have demonstrated the efficacy of some chewing gums in removing extrinsic tooth staining. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of two nicotine medicated chewing gums (A and B) on stain removal in an in vitro experiment, when compared with a confectionary whitening chewing gum (C) and human saliva (D). Bovine incisors were stained by alternating air exposure and immersion in a broth containing natural pigments such as coffee, tea and oral microorganisms for 10 days. Stained enamel samples were exposed to saliva alone or to the test chewing gums under conditions simulating human mastication. The coloration change of the enamel samples was measured using a spectrophotometer. Measurements were obtained for each specimen (average of three absorbances) using the L*a*b scale: lightness (L*), red-green (a) and yellow-blue (b). Medicated chewing gums (A and B) removed a greater amount of visible extrinsic stain, while the confectionary chewing gum with a whitening claim (C) had a milder whitening effect as evaluated by quantitative and qualitative assessment. The tested Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) chewing gums were more effective in the removal of the extrinsic tooth stain. This visible improvement in tooth whitening appearance could strengthen the smokers' motivation to quit smoking.

  14. In vitro tooth whitening effect of two medicated chewing gums compared to a whitening gum and saliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroea Geoffrey

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extrinsic staining of teeth may result from the deposition of a variety of pigments into or onto the tooth surface, which originate mainly from diet or from tobacco use. More recently, clinical studies have demonstrated the efficacy of some chewing gums in removing extrinsic tooth staining. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of two nicotine medicated chewing gums (A and B on stain removal in an in vitro experiment, when compared with a confectionary whitening chewing gum (C and human saliva (D. Methods Bovine incisors were stained by alternating air exposure and immersion in a broth containing natural pigments such as coffee, tea and oral microorganisms for 10 days. Stained enamel samples were exposed to saliva alone or to the test chewing gums under conditions simulating human mastication. The coloration change of the enamel samples was measured using a spectrophotometer. Measurements were obtained for each specimen (average of three absorbances using the L*a*b scale: lightness (L*, red-green (a and yellow-blue (b. Results Medicated chewing gums (A and B removed a greater amount of visible extrinsic stain, while the confectionary chewing gum with a whitening claim (C had a milder whitening effect as evaluated by quantitative and qualitative assessment. Conclusion The tested Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT chewing gums were more effective in the removal of the extrinsic tooth stain. This visible improvement in tooth whitening appearance could strengthen the smokers' motivation to quit smoking.

  15. Jumping mechanisms in gum treehopper insects (Hemiptera, Eurymelinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Malcolm

    2013-07-15

    Jumping in a species of Australian gum treehopper was analysed from high-speed images. Pauroeurymela amplicincta adults and nymphs lived together in groups that were tended by ants, but only adults jumped. The winged adults with a body mass of 23 mg and a body length of 7 mm had some morphological characteristics intermediate between those of their close relatives the leafhoppers (Cicadellidae) and the treehoppers (Membracidae). They, like leafhoppers, lacked the prominent prothoracic helmets of membracid treehoppers, and their large hind coxae were linked by press studs (poppers), that are present in leafhoppers but not treehoppers. The hindlegs were only 30-40% longer than the other legs and 67% of body length. They are thus of similar proportion to the hindlegs of treehoppers but much shorter than those of most leafhoppers. Jumping was propelled by the hindlegs, which moved in the same plane as each other beneath and almost parallel to the longitudinal axis of the body. A jump was preceded by full levation of the coxo-trochanteral joints of the hindlegs. In its best jumps, the rapid depression of these joints then accelerated the insect in 1.4 ms to a take-off velocity of 3.8 m s(-1) so that it experienced a force of almost 280 g. In 22% of jumps, the wings opened before take-off but did not flap until the gum treehopper was airborne, when the body rotated little in any plane. The energy expended was 170 μJ, the power output was 122 mW and the force exerted was 64 mN. Such jumps are predicted to propel the insect forwards 1450 mm (200 times body length) and to a height of 430 mm if there is no effect of wind resistance. The power output per mass of jumping muscle far exceeded the maximum active contractile limit of muscle and indicates that a catapult-like action must be used. This eurymelid therefore out-performs both leafhoppers and treehoppers in i ts faster acceleration and in its higher take-off velocity.

  16. Nanoparticulate bioactive-glass-reinforced gellan-gum hydrogels for bone-tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantar, Ana; da Silva, Lucilia P; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Marques, Alexandra P; Correlo, Vitor M; Novak, Saša; Reis, Rui L

    2014-10-01

    This work presents bioactive-glass-reinforced gellan-gum spongy-like hydrogels (GG-BAG) as novel hydrophilic materials for use as the scaffolding in bone-tissue engineering. The reinforcement with bioactive-glass particles resulted in an improvement to the microstructure and to the mechanical properties of the material. These mechanical properties were found to be dependent on the composition and improved with the amount of bioactive glass; however, values necessary to accommodate biomechanical loading were not achieved in this study. Nevertheless, by incorporating the bioactive-glass particles, the composite material acquired the ability to form an apatite layer when soaked in simulated body fluid. Furthermore, human-adipose-derived stem cells were able to adhere and spread within the gellan-gum, spongy-like hydrogels reinforced with the bioactive glass, and remain viable, which is an important result when considering their use in bone-tissue engineering. Thus, hydrogels based on gellan gum and bioactive glass are promising biomaterials for use either alone or with cells, and with the potential for use in osteogenic differentiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. MICROENCAPSULATION OF TURMERIC OLEORESIN IN BINARY AND TERNARY BLENDS OF GUM ARABIC, MALTODEXTRIN AND MODIFIED STARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Maria Cano-Higuita

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Spray-drying is a suitable method to obtain microencapsulated active substances in the powdered form, resulting in powders with improved protection against environmental factors as well as with higher solubility in water, as in the case of turmeric oleoresin. The present study investigated the spray-drying process of turmeric oleoresin microencapsulated with binary and ternary mixtures of different wall materials: gum Arabic, maltodextrin, and modified corn starch. A statistical simplex centroid experimental design was used considering the encapsulation efficiency, curcumin retention, process yield, water content, solubility, and particle morphology as the analyzed responses. Wall matrices containing higher proportions of modified starch and gum Arabic resulted in higher encapsulation efficiency and curcumin retention, whereas the process yield and water content increased with higher proportions of maltodextrin and gum Arabic, respectively. Regression models of the responses were obtained using a surface response method (ANOVA way, showing statistical values of R2 > 0.790. Also, mean analysis was carried out by Tukey's test, permitting to observe some statistical differences between the blends

  18. Ask a Periodontist (Frequently Asked Questions about Gum Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Academy of Periodontology Announces First Recipient of SUNSTAR Innovation Grant American Academy of Periodontology Names New Executive ... in adolescents. However, children should still learn the importance of keeping their teeth and gums healthy to ...

  19. THE EFFECT OF GUM ARABIC ORAL TREATMENT ON THE IRON

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ), .... receiving exogenous recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) and ... Table 3: Effect of Three Months Gum Arabic Treatment on Serum Total Protein Concentration in Chronic Renal Failure Patients and Normal Subjects. Group A ...

  20. Evaluation of mucoadhesive potential of gum cordia, an anionic polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Munish; Kumar, Suresh; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-04-01

    The study involves mucoadhesive evaluation by formulating buccal discs using fluconazole as the model drug. The effect of compression pressure and gum cordia/lactose ratio on the ex vivo bioadhesion time and in vitro release of fluconazole was optimized using central composite experimental design. It was observed that the response ex vivo bioadhesion time was affected significantly by the proportion of gum cordia in the buccal discs while the in vitro release of fluconazole from the buccal discs was influenced significantly by the compression pressure. The optimized batch of buccal discs comprised of gum cordia/lactose - 0.66, fluconazole - 20 mg and was compressed at the pressure of 6600 kg. Further, it provided the ex vivo bioadhesion of 22 h and in vitro release of 80% in 24h. In conclusion, gum cordia is a promising bucoadhesive polymer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Marijuana May Make Your Gums Go to Pot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166148.html Marijuana May Make Your Gums Go to Pot People ... but it was surprising to see that recreational cannabis [pot] users may also be at risk," said ...

  2. Design, formulation and evaluation of Aloe vera chewing gum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Ghannadi, Alireza; Raddanipour, Razieh

    2015-01-01

    .... The aim of the present study was to design and evaluate the formulation of Aloe vera chewing gum with an appropriate taste and quality with the indications for healing oral wounds, such as lichen...

  3. Studies on some Physicochemical Properties of the Plant Gum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. senegal, A. sieberiana and A. nilotica) in Batagarawa, Katsina State, were determined and compared. Data generated from the study confirm that there are a number of physicochemical differences between the gum exudates.

  4. Cetirizine release from cyclodextrin formulated compressed chewing gum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojanov, Mladen; Larsen, Kim Lambertsen

    2012-01-01

    Beside the efficient effect on masking cetirizine bitter taste, the cyclodextrins (CDs) as well could have influence on the release from the formulation. In vitro release profiles of cetirizine from compressed chewing gums containing α-, β- and γ-CD were investigated using a three cell chewing...... instead the complexes with respect to release yield. Thus unnecessary expenses for the complex preformulation may be avoided. Keywords: Cetirizine, chewing gum, cyclodextrin, complex, drug release...

  5. The effect of chewing gum on dental plaque accumulation

    OpenAIRE

    Karami Nogourani M.; Banihashemi M

    2010-01-01

    "nBackground and Aims: Studies show that sucrose containing chewing gums are cariogenic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two commercial chewing gums with and without sucrose on dental plaque accumulation compared with the control group. "nMaterials and Methods: In this clinical study, plaque accumulation during three 7-day periods (with two weeks interval) was recorded (Sillness & Loe Index) in a group of 23 volunteer male dental students who chewed in th...

  6. GumTree—An integrated scientific experiment environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Tony; Hauser, Nick; Götz, Andy; Hathaway, Paul; Franceschini, Fredi; Rayner, Hugh; Zhang, Lidia

    2006-11-01

    GumTree is an open source and multi-platform graphical user interface for performing neutron scattering and X-ray experiments. It handles the complete experiment life cycle from instrument calibration, data acquisition, and real time data analysis to results publication. The aim of the GumTree Project is to create a highly Integrated Scientific Experiment Environment (ISEE), allowing interconnectivity and data sharing between different distributed components such as motors, detectors, user proposal database and data analysis server. GumTree is being adapted to several instrument control server systems such as TANGO, EPICS and SICS, providing an easy-to-use front-end for users and simple-to-extend model for software developers. The design of GumTree is aimed to be reusable and configurable for any scientific instrument. GumTree will be adapted to six neutron beam instruments for the OPAL reactor at ANSTO. Other European institutes including ESRF, ILL and PSI have shown interest in using GumTree as their workbench for instrument control and data analysis.

  7. GumTree-An integrated scientific experiment environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Tony [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, Private Mailbag 1, Menai 2234, NSW (Australia)]. E-mail: Tony.Lam@ansto.gov.au; Hauser, Nick [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, Private Mailbag 1, Menai 2234, NSW (Australia); Goetz, Andy [ESRF, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, Grenoble 38043 (France); Hathaway, Paul [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, Private Mailbag 1, Menai 2234, NSW (Australia); Franceschini, Fredi [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, Private Mailbag 1, Menai 2234, NSW (Australia); Rayner, Hugh [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, Private Mailbag 1, Menai 2234, NSW (Australia); Zhang, Lidia [Bragg Institute, ANSTO, Private Mailbag 1, Menai 2234, NSW (Australia)

    2006-11-15

    GumTree is an open source and multi-platform graphical user interface for performing neutron scattering and X-ray experiments. It handles the complete experiment life cycle from instrument calibration, data acquisition, and real time data analysis to results publication. The aim of the GumTree Project is to create a highly Integrated Scientific Experiment Environment (ISEE), allowing interconnectivity and data sharing between different distributed components such as motors, detectors, user proposal database and data analysis server. GumTree is being adapted to several instrument control server systems such as TANGO, EPICS and SICS, providing an easy-to-use front-end for users and simple-to-extend model for software developers. The design of GumTree is aimed to be reusable and configurable for any scientific instrument. GumTree will be adapted to six neutron beam instruments for the OPAL reactor at ANSTO. Other European institutes including ESRF, ILL and PSI have shown interest in using GumTree as their workbench for instrument control and data analysis.

  8. Evaluation of carboxymethyl moringa gum as nanometric carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimpy; Abhishek; Ahuja, Munish

    2017-10-15

    In the present study, carboxymethylation of Moringa oleifera gum was carried out by reacting with monochloroacetic acid. Modified gum was characterised employing Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Rheology study. The carboxymethyl modification of moringa gum was found to increase its degree of crystallinity, reduce viscosity and swelling, increase the surface roughness and render its more anionic. The interaction between carboxymethyl moringa gum and chitosan was optimised by 2-factor, 3-level central composite experimental design to prepare polyelectrolyte nanoparticle using ofloxacin, as a model drug. The optimal calculated parameters were found to be carboxymethyl moringa gum- 0.016% (w/v), chitosan- 0.012% (w/v) which provided polyelectrolyte nanoparticle of average particle size 231nm and zeta potential 28mV. Carboxymethyl moringa gum-chitosan polyelectrolyte nanoparticles show sustained in vitro release of ofloxacin upto 6h which followed first order kinetics with mechanism of release being erosion of polymer matrix. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of guar and xanthan gums on functional properties of mango (Mangifera indica) kernel starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawab, Anjum; Alam, Feroz; Haq, Muhammad Abdul; Hasnain, Abid

    2016-12-01

    The effects of different concentrations of guar and xanthan gums on functional properties of mango kernel starch (MKS) were studied. Both guar and xanthan gum enhanced the water absorption of MKS. The addition of xanthan gum appeared to reduce the SP (swelling power) and solubility at higher temperatures while guar gum significantly enhanced the SP as well as solubility of MKS. The addition of both gums produced a reinforcing effect on peak viscosity of MKS as compared to control. Pasting temperature of MKS was higher than that of starch modified by gums indicating ease of gelatinization. Guar gum played an accelerative effect on setback but xanthan gum delayed the setback phenomenon during the cooling of the starch paste. Both gums were found to be effective in reducing the syneresis while gel firmness was markedly improved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Hyaluronic acid-based nano-sized drug carrier-containing Gellan gum microspheres as potential multifunctional embolic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ming Fang; Tyan, Yen Sheng; Chien, Yu Chen; Lee, Ming Wei

    2018-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop a gellan gum-based multifunctional embolic agent. Calibrated spherical gellan gum and nanoparticle-containing gellan gum microspheres were prepared via water-in oil emulsification method. Self-assembled nanoparticles composed of short-chain hyaluronic acid and polyethylenimine as the doxorubicin carrier were prepared. The short-chain hyaluronic acid/polyethylenimine/ doxorubicin (sHH/PH/Dox) with the mean size was 140 ± 8 nm. To examine sHH/PH/Dox nanoparticle uptake into cells, the results confirmed that sHH/PH nanoparticles as drug carrier can facilitate the transport of doxorubicin into HepG2 liver cancer cells. Subsequently, sHH/PH/Dox merged into the gellan gum (GG) microspheres forming GG/sHH/PH/Dox microsphere. After a drug release experiment lasting 45 days, the amount of released doxorubicin from 285, 388, and 481 μm GG/sHH/PH/Dox microspheres were approximately 4.8, 1.8 and 1.1-fold above the IC50 value of the HepG2 cell. GG/sHH/PH/Dox microspheres were performed in rabbit ear embolization model and ischemic necrosis on ear was visible due to the vascular after 8 days. Regarding the application of this device in the future, we aim to provide better embolization agents for transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE).

  11. Acute Ingestion of Caffeinated Chewing Gum Improves Repeated Sprint Performance of Team Sports Athletes With Low Habitual Caffeine Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Mark; Tierney, Peter; Gray, Nicola; Hawe, Greg; Macken, Maria; Egan, Brendan

    2017-11-01

    The effects of acute ingestion of caffeine on short-duration high intensity performance are equivocal, while studies of novel modes of delivery and the efficacy of low doses of caffeine are warranted. The aims of the present study were to investigate the effect of acute ingestion of caffeinated chewing gum on repeated sprint performance (RSP) in team sport athletes, and whether habitual caffeine consumption alters the ergogenic effect, if any, on RSP. Eighteen male team sports athletes undertook four RSP trials using a 40 m maximum shuttle run test (MST), which incorporates 10x40 m sprints with 30 s between the start of each sprint. Each participant completed two familiarization sessions, followed by caffeine (CAF; caffeinated chewing gum; 200 mg caffeine) and placebo (PLA; non-caffeinated chewing gum) trials in a randomized, double-blind manner. RSP, assessed by sprint performance decrement (Sdec;%), did not differ (p=0.209, ES=0.16; n=18) between CAF (5.00±2.84%) and PLA (5.43±2.68%). Secondary analysis revealed that low habitual caffeine consumers (130 mg/day, n=6) (3.98±2.57% vs. 3.80±1.79%, respectively; p=0.684, ES=0.08). The data suggest that a low dose of caffeine in the form of caffeinated chewing gum attenuates the sprint performance decrement during RSP by team sport athletes with low, but not moderate-to-high, habitual consumption of caffeine.

  12. Unleashing Empirical Equations with "Nonlinear Fitting" and "GUM Tree Calculator"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell-Smith, J. W.; Saunders, P.; Feistel, R.

    2017-10-01

    Empirical equations having large numbers of fitted parameters, such as the international standard reference equations published by the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS), which form the basis of the "Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater—2010" (TEOS-10), provide the means to calculate many quantities very accurately. The parameters of these equations are found by least-squares fitting to large bodies of measurement data. However, the usefulness of these equations is limited since uncertainties are not readily available for most of the quantities able to be calculated, the covariance of the measurement data is not considered, and further propagation of the uncertainty in the calculated result is restricted since the covariance of calculated quantities is unknown. In this paper, we present two tools developed at MSL that are particularly useful in unleashing the full power of such empirical equations. "Nonlinear Fitting" enables propagation of the covariance of the measurement data into the parameters using generalized least-squares methods. The parameter covariance then may be published along with the equations. Then, when using these large, complex equations, "GUM Tree Calculator" enables the simultaneous calculation of any derived quantity and its uncertainty, by automatic propagation of the parameter covariance into the calculated quantity. We demonstrate these tools in exploratory work to determine and propagate uncertainties associated with the IAPWS-95 parameters.

  13. Solar drying of uruguayan red gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Ono

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available he use of solar energy as an alternative to non-renewable energy sources has been widely researched in the last decades. Compared to air drying, solar drying kilns can better control the drying process, resulting in a higher quality of the dry wood and lower final wood moisture content values. Investment and running costs for a solar drying kiln are lower than those of a conventional kiln. Moreover, the solar drying process can be advantageous for drying hardwoods which are traditionally considered difficult to dry such as eucalyptus wood of medium and high density (Red gums, known in Spanish as “Eucaliptos colorados”. The solar drying kiln naturally incorporates a daily high relative humidity period that can be similar to a conditioning or steaming step, although at a lower temperature.This results in fewer defects due to the drying process.A pilot scale 2.5 m3 semi-greenhouse type solar wood drying kiln was constructed at LATU (Uruguay Technological Laboratory in Montevideo, Uruguay. The operating conditions and the results from two drying runs are presented. Two species of red gum (Eucalyptus tereticornis Sm., ADD 870 kg/m3, and Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh., ADD 800 kg/m3 were dried from initial average moisture contents (WMC of around 60% down to 10.0% and 12.7% in 108 days and 76 days, respectively. Boards were provided by the Grupo Forestal San Gregorio from trees harvested at Tacuarembo and Paysandu Departments from cattle shelter forests 60 and 70 years old.Mean volume shrinkage was 18% for E. tereticornis, and 16% for E. camaldulensis, and the level of defects was moderate. Residual stresses and moisture content gradients were observed for both species. Final moisture content values were similar compared to those obtained in conventional drying kilns but with longer drying periods and lower operating costs. This would make the solar drying process attractive to small and medium sized forest products industries in a small country

  14. Development and Validation of a Stability-Indicating RP-HPLC Method for Rapid Determination of Doxycycline in Pharmaceutical Bulk and Dosage Forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Pourmoslemi, Soroush Mirfakhraee, Saeid Yaripour, Ali Mohammadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A rapid stability-indicating RP-HPLC method for analysis of doxycycline in the presence of its degradation products was developed and validated. Methods: Forced degradation studies were carried out on bulk samples and capsule dosage forms of doxycycline using acid, base, H2O2, heat, and UV light as described by ICH for stress conditions to demonstrate the stability-indicating power of the method. Separations were performed on a Perfectsil® Target ODS column (3-5µm, 125 mm×4 mm, using a mobile phase consisting of methanol-50 mM ammonium acetate buffer (containing 0.1% v/v trifluoroacetic acid and 0.1% v/v triethylamine, pH 2.5 (50:50 v/v at room temperature. The flow rate was 0.8 mL/min. Results: The method linearity was investigated in the range of 25–500 µg/mL (r > 0.9999. The LOD and LOQ were 5 and 25 µg/mL, respectively. The method selectivity was evaluated by peak purity test using a diode array detector. There was no interference among detection of doxycycline and its stressed degradation products. Total peak purity numbers were in the range of 0.94-0.99, indicating the homogeneity of DOX peaks. Conclusion: These data show the stability-indicating nature of the method for quality control of doxycycline in bulk samples and capsule dosage forms.

  15. A NEW SPECIES OF INVASIVE GALL WASP (HYMENOPTERA: EULOPHIDAE: TETRASTICHINAE) ON BLUE GUM (EUCALYPTUS GLOBULUS) IN CALIFORNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The blue gum gall wasp, Selitrichodes globulus La Salle & Gates (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae), is described as an invasive gall inducer on blue gum, Eucalyptus globulus (Myrtaceae), in California....

  16. Peach gum polysaccharides-based edible coatings extend shelf life of cherry tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengzhong; Tao, Jun; Zhang, Huanxin

    2017-07-01

    Cherry tomato is a nutritious, but highly perishable fruit. Peach gum polysaccharides (PGPs) can form edible films with antioxidant and antibacterial activities. The effects of PGP-based edible coatings on cherry tomatoes during hypothermic storage (4 °C) were investigated. PGP-based edible coatings effectively maintained firmness, decreased weight loss, inhibited respiration rate and delayed the changes in total acidity, ascorbic acid and sugar content of cherry tomatoes during hypothermic storage (4 °C) compared with those of the control (p cherry tomatoes.

  17. Rapid detection of human and canine visceral leishmaniasis: assessment of a latex agglutination test based on the A2 antigen from amastigote forms of Leishmania infantum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhoundi, Behnaz; Mohebali, Mehdi; Shojaee, Saeedeh; Jalali, Mahmoud; Kazemi, Bahram; Bandehpour, Mojgan; Keshavarz, Hossein; Edrissian, Gholam Hossein; Eslami, Mohammad Bagher; Malekafzali, Hossein; Kouchaki, Ameneh

    2013-03-01

    The diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in humans and animal reservoir hosts is difficult, particularly in rural areas where the disease is endemic and laboratory facilities are limited. This study aimed to develop a latex agglutination test (LAT) for the rapid detection of anti-Leishmania antibodies against the A2 antigen derived from the amastigote form as well as those against crude antigens derived from the promastigote form of an Iranian strain of Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum. The A2 antigen (42-100 kDa) was prepared from the amastigote form of L. infantum, purified with electroelution and compared with the crude antigen from the promastigote form of L. infantum. Both antigens showed appropriate intensity reactions, were selected using dot blotting of positive and negative pooled sera and used to sensitize 0.9-μm latex beads. The tests were carried out on sera from 43 symptomatic, human patients with VL confirmed by parasitological examination and direct agglutination test (DAT), 30 healthy controls and 32 patients with other infections but without VL. Canine sera were collected from 63 domestic dogs with VL confirmed using parasitological examinations and DAT and 31 healthy dogs from areas non-endemic for VL. Compared with the controls, human sera from DAT-confirmed patients yielded a sensitivity of 88.4% (95% CI, 82.1-94.5%) and specificity of 93.5% (95% CI, 87.0-99.7%) on A2-LAT (amastigote) when 1:3200 was used as the cut-off titre. A good degree of agreement was found between A2-LAT and DAT (0.914). LAT required 3-5 min to complete, versus the 12-18 h needed for DAT. Compared with the controls, A2-LAT of canine sera from DAT-confirmed cases yielded a sensitivity of 95.2% (95% CI, 95.0-95.4%) and specificity of 100% (95% CI 100%) when 1:320 was used as the cut-off titre. A good degree of agreement was found between A2-LAT and DAT (0.968). Similarly, the sensitivity and specificity of Pro.-LAT (promastigote) was calculated to be 88.4% and 91

  18. Structure of xanthan gum and cell ultrastructure at different times of alkali stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marcia Demello Luvielmo; Caroline Dellinghausen Borges; Daniela Deoliveira Toyama; Claire Tondo Vendruscolo; Adilma Regina Pippa Scamparini

    2016-01-01

      The effect of alkali stress on the yield, viscosity, gum structure, and cell ultrastructure of xanthan gum was evaluated at the end of fermentation process of xanthan production by Xanthomonas campestris pv. manihotis 280-95...

  19. Aplikasi Campuran Alginat Dari Sargassum Crassifolium Dan Gum Sebagai Pengental Textile Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subaryono Subaryono

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian aplikasi campuran alginat dari Sargassum crassifolium dan gum untuk meningkatkan viskositas alginat sebagai pengental pada textile printing telah dilakukan. Viskositas campuran alginat dengan guar gum, gum arab, dan locust bean gum diamati pada penyimpanan selama 8 jam. Produk terbaik diujikan sebagai pengental pada textile printing. Campuran alginat dengan guar gum pada perbandingan 90:10 dan 80:20 meningkatkan viskositas dan stabilitas alginat selama penyimpanan. Campuran alginat dengan gum arab dan locust bean gum akan menurunkan viskositas alginat sehingga tidak sesuai untuk aplikasi textile printing. Aplikasi campuran alginat dengan guar gum 90:10 dan 80:20 sebagai pengental pada tekstil printing menghasilkan produk akhir yang setara dengan pengental komersial manutex.

  20. Evidence for a role for the gumB and gumC gene products in the formation of xanthan from its pentasaccharide repeating unit by Xanthomonas campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojnov, A A; Zorreguieta, A; Dow, J M; Daniels, M J; Dankert, M A

    1998-06-01

    The biosynthesis of the extracellular polysaccharide xanthan in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris is directed by a cluster of 12 genes, gumB-gumM. Several xanthan-deficient mutants of the wild-type strain 8004 have previously been described which carry Tn5 insertions in this region of the chromosome. Here it is shown that the transposon insertion in one of these mutants, strain 8397, is located 15 bp upstream of the translational start site of the gumB gene. EDTA-treated cells of strain 8397 were able to synthesize the lipid-linked pentasaccharide repeating unit of xanthan from the three nucleotide sugar donors (UDP-glucose, GDP-mannose and UDP-glucuronic acid) but were unable to polymerize the pentasaccharide into mature xanthan. A subclone of the gum gene cluster carrying gumB and gumC restored xanthan production to strain 8397 to levels approximately 28% of the wild-type. In contrast, subclones carrying gumB or gumC alone were not effective. These results are discussed with reference to previous speculations, based on computer analysis, that gumB and gumC are both involved in the translocation of xanthan across the bacterial membranes.

  1. Diverse rheological properties, mechanical characteristics and microstructures of corn fiber gum and soy protein isolate hydrogels prepared by laccase and heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two types of corn fiber gum (CFGs) were extracted from corn fibers (CFs) obtained from wet or dry corn milling processing. Both CFGs could form hydrogels when induced via laccase, but CFGs isolated from wet milled CFs exhibited higher storage modulus (G') and better mechanical strength as obtained f...

  2. Fluoride and urea chewing gums in an intra-oral experimental caries model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjogren, K; Ruben, J; Lingstrom, P; Lundberg, AB; Birkhed, D

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of sugar-free chewing gums containing fluoride (F) and urea in an intra-oral experimental caries model. Placebo chewing gums (without any active ingredient) and no gum served as controls. Fifteen subjects participated in a cross-over,

  3. The impact of chewing gum on halitosis parameters: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Francisco Wilker Mustafa Gomes; Friedrich, Stephanie Anagnostopoulos; Silveira, Carina Folgearini; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker

    2017-02-17

    This study aimed to analyze the impact of chewing gum on halitosis parameters. Three databases were searched with the following focused question: 'Can chewing gum additionally reduce halitosis parameters, such as organoleptic scores and volatile sulfur compounds (VSC), when compared to a control treatment'? Controlled clinical trials presenting at least two halitosis measurements (organoleptic scores and/or VSC) were included. Ten studies were included, and different active ingredients were used. One study was performed using a chewing gum without any active ingredient. Chewing gum containing probiotic bacterium was shown to significantly reduce the organoleptic scores. Chewing gums containing zinc acetate and magnolia bark extract as well as allylisothiocyanate (AITC) with zinc lactate significantly reduced the levels of VSC in comparison to a placebo chewing gum. Furthermore, a sodium bicarbonate-containing chewing gum significantly reduced the VSC levels in comparison to rinsing with water. Furthermore, eucalyptus-extract chewing gum showed significant reductions in both organoleptic scores and VSC when compared with a control chewing gum. Chewing gum containing sucrose was able to reduce the VSC levels, in comparison to xylitol and zinc citrate chewing gum, but only for 5 min. It was concluded that chewing gums containing probiotics Lactobaccilus, zinc acetate and magnolia bark extract, eucalyptus-extract, and AITC with zinc lactate may be suitable for halitosis management. However, the low number of included studies and the high heterogeneity among the selected studies may limit the clinical applications of these findings.

  4. Gum spots in black cherry caused by natural attacks of peach bark beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles O. Rexrode

    1981-01-01

    Peach bark beetles, Phloeotribus liminaris (Harris), made abortive attacks on healthy black cherry, Prunus serotina Ehrh., trees. The beetle attacks caused five types of gum spots in the wood and a gummy exudate on the bark. The most extensive and common types of gum spot were single and multiple rows of interray gum spots that...

  5. Gum spots caused by cambium miners in black cherry in West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles O. Rexrode; John E. Baumgras

    1980-01-01

    Six types of gum spots in black cherry, Prunus serotina Ehrh. were associated with parenchyma flecks caused by the cambium miner Phytobia pruni (Gross). The number of parenchyma flecks and associated gum spots increased with the height of the tree. Four percent of the flecks produced gum spots in the first 18 to 20 feet of the...

  6. Evaluation of Beilschmiedia Seed Gum as a Tablet Binder MN FEMI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hardness, disintegration time and dissolution rate increased with increase in concentration of. Beilschmiedia gum. Tablets containing 5 % w/w of Beilschmiedia gum had a binding capacity approximately twice that of gelatin with a dissolution rate of 91 % after 30 min. The results obtained suggest that Beilschmiedia gum ...

  7. Acute and chronic effects of gum chewing on food reinforcement and energy intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Christine; Temple, Jennifer L

    2013-04-01

    Although chewing gum has been considered a potential method for reducing energy intake, little empirical data exist to support this idea. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that chewing gum before eating reduces motivation to eat, hunger, and energy intake. In order to test this hypothesis, we conducted two experiments in which participants chewed gum prior to completing a food reinforcement task or before all eating occasions for two of three weeks. In Experiment 1, we found that chewing gum had no influence on the reinforcing value of food, but chewing mint gum reduced liking of and energy intake from fruit. In addition, chewing gum reduced self-reported hunger immediately after gum chewing and after eating compared with the no gum condition. In Experiment 2, gum chewing had no significant effect on total energy intake, but participants consumed fewer meals, consumed more energy per meal, and had a lower nutrient adequacy ratio during the gum chewing weeks. These studies provide no evidence that acute or chronic gum chewing reduces hunger or energy intake. In fact, chewing mint-flavored gum may deter consumption of fruit and reduce diet quality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 78 FR 33354 - Xanthan Gum From Austria: Final Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... International Trade Administration Xanthan Gum From Austria: Final Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair... final determination in the antidumping (``AD'') investigation of xanthan gum from Austria.\\1\\ On March 4... the Preliminary Determination. The Department has determined that xanthan gum from Austria is being...

  9. The effect of gum Arabic oral treatment on the iron and protein status ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of gum Arabic oral treatment on the iron and protein status in chronic renal failure patients under regular hemodialysis in Central Sudan L'effet du ... and gum arabic (50 g/day) treatment; Group B (n=14): CRF patients under LPD, gum arabic, iron (ferrous sulphate 200 mg/day) and folic acid (5 mg/day) treatment; ...

  10. The role of time on task performance in modifying the effects of gum chewing on attention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tucha, Lara; Simpson, William

    Recent research examined the effects of chewing gum on attention and reported a significant interaction of gum chewing with time. Using a crossover within-subject design, the present study examined the effect of gum chewing on sustained attention in healthy adults over a period of 30 min. The

  11. Design, formulation and evaluation of Aloe vera chewing gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Ghannadi, Alireza; Raddanipour, Razieh

    2015-01-01

    Aloe vera has antioxidant, antiinflammatory, healing, antiseptic, anticancer and antidiabetic effects. The aim of the present study was to design and evaluate the formulation of Aloe vera chewing gum with an appropriate taste and quality with the indications for healing oral wounds, such as lichen planus, mouth sores caused by cancer chemotherapy and mouth abscesses as well as reducing mouth dryness caused by chemotherapy. In Aloe vera powder, the carbohydrate content was determined according to mannose and phenolic compounds in terms of gallic acid. Aloe vera powder, sugar, liquid glucose, glycerin, sweeteners and different flavors were added to the soft gum bases. In Aloe vera chewing gum formulation, 10% of dried Aloe vera extract entered the gum base. Then the chewing gum was cut into pieces of suitable sizes. Weight uniformity, content uniformity, the organoleptic properties evaluation, releasing the active ingredient in the phosphate buffer (pH, 6.8) and taste evaluation were examined by Latin square method. One gram of Aloe vera powder contained 5.16 ± 0.25 mg/g of phenolic compounds and 104.63 ± 4.72 mg/g of carbohydrates. After making 16 Aloe vera chewing gum formulations, the F16 formulation was selected as the best formulation according to its physicochemical and organoleptic properties. In fact F16 formulation has suitable hardness, lack of adhesion to the tooth and appropriate size and taste; and after 30 min, it released more than 90% of its drug content. After assessments made, the F16 formulation with maltitol, aspartame and sugar sweeteners was selected as the best formulation. Among various flavors used, peppermint flavor which had the most acceptance between consumers was selected.

  12. Design, formulation and evaluation of Aloe vera chewing gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Ghannadi, Alireza; Raddanipour, Razieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aloe vera has antioxidant, antiinflammatory, healing, antiseptic, anticancer and antidiabetic effects. The aim of the present study was to design and evaluate the formulation of Aloe vera chewing gum with an appropriate taste and quality with the indications for healing oral wounds, such as lichen planus, mouth sores caused by cancer chemotherapy and mouth abscesses as well as reducing mouth dryness caused by chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: In Aloe vera powder, the carbohydrate content was determined according to mannose and phenolic compounds in terms of gallic acid. Aloe vera powder, sugar, liquid glucose, glycerin, sweeteners and different flavors were added to the soft gum bases. In Aloe vera chewing gum formulation, 10% of dried Aloe vera extract entered the gum base. Then the chewing gum was cut into pieces of suitable sizes. Weight uniformity, content uniformity, the organoleptic properties evaluation, releasing the active ingredient in the phosphate buffer (pH, 6.8) and taste evaluation were examined by Latin square method. Results: One gram of Aloe vera powder contained 5.16 ± 0.25 mg/g of phenolic compounds and 104.63 ± 4.72 mg/g of carbohydrates. After making 16 Aloe vera chewing gum formulations, the F16 formulation was selected as the best formulation according to its physicochemical and organoleptic properties. In fact F16 formulation has suitable hardness, lack of adhesion to the tooth and appropriate size and taste; and after 30 min, it released more than 90% of its drug content. Conclusion: After assessments made, the F16 formulation with maltitol, aspartame and sugar sweeteners was selected as the best formulation. Among various flavors used, peppermint flavor which had the most acceptance between consumers was selected. PMID:26605214

  13. Safety Assessment of Microbial Polysaccharide Gums as Used in Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Monice M; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2016-07-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel assessed the safety of 34 microbial polysaccharide gums for use in cosmetics, finding that these ingredients are safe in cosmetic formulations in the present practices of use and concentration. The microbial polysaccharide gums named in this report have a variety of reported functions in cosmetics, including emulsion stabilizer, film former, binder, viscosity-increasing agent, and skin-conditioning agent. The Panel reviewed available animal and clinical data in making its determination of safety. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Effect of partially hydrolyzed guar gum on pasting, thermo-mechanical and rheological properties of wheat dough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, Deepak; Barak, Sheweta; Khatkar, B S

    2016-12-01

    Partially hydrolyzed guar gum was prepared using enzymatic hydrolysis of native guar gum that can be utilized as soluble fiber source. The effect of partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG) on pasting, thermo-mechanical and rheological properties of wheat flour was investigated using rapid visco-analyzer, Mixolab and Microdoughlab. Wheat flour was replaced with 1-5g PHGG per 100g of wheat flour on weight basis. PHGG addition decreased the peak, trough, breakdown, setback and final viscosity of wheat flour. Water absorption and amylase activity of wheat dough were increased whereas starch gelatinization and protein weakening of wheat dough were reduced as a result of PHGG addition to wheat flour. PHGG addition also increased the peak dough height, arrival time, dough development time, dough stability and peak energy of wheat dough system. However, dough softening was decreased after PHGG addition to wheat flour dough. Overall, it can be assumed that PHGG has influenced the properties of wheat flour dough system by decreasing the RVA viscosities and increasing the water absorption and starch gelatinization of wheat dough system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fluorescence spectral studies of Gum Arabic: Multi-emission of Gum Arabic in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhenadhayalan, Namasivayam, E-mail: ndhena@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Mythily, Rajan, E-mail: rajanmythily@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss Vaishnav College (Autonomous), 833, Gokul Bagh, E.V.R. Periyar Road, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600 106 (India); Kumaran, Rajendran, E-mail: kumaranwau@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss Vaishnav College (Autonomous), 833, Gokul Bagh, E.V.R. Periyar Road, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600 106 (India)

    2014-11-15

    Gum Arabic (GA), a food hydrocolloid is a natural composite obtained from the stems and branches of Acacia Senegal and Acacia Seyal trees. GA structure is made up of highly branched arabinogalactan polysaccharides. Steady-state absorption, fluorescence, and time-resolved fluorescence spectral studies of acid hydrolyzed GA solutions were carried out at various pH conditions. The fluorescence in GA is predominantly attributed to the presence of tyrosine and phenylalanine amino acids. The presence of multi-emissive peaks at different pH condition is attributed to the exposure of the fluorescing amino acids to the aqueous phase, which contains several sugar units, hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of GA exhibits a multi-exponential decay with different fluorescence lifetime of varying amplitude which confirms that tyrosine is confined to a heterogeneous microenvironment. The existence of multi-emissive peaks with large variation in the fluorescence intensities were established by 3D emission contour spectral studies. The probable location of the fluorophore in a heterogeneous environment was further ascertained by constructing a time-resolved emission spectrum (TRES) and time-resolved area normalized emission spectrum (TRANES) plots. Fluorescence spectral technique is used as an analytical tool in understanding the photophysical properties of a water soluble complex food hydrocolloid containing an intrinsic fluorophore located in a multiple environment is illustrated. - Highlights: • The Manuscript deals with the steady state absorption, emission, fluorescence lifetime and time-resolved emission spectrum studies of Gum Arabic in aqueous medium at various pH conditions. • The fluorescence emanates from the tyrosine amino acid present in GA. • Change in pH results in marked variation in the fluorescence spectral properties of tyrosine. • Fluorescence spectral techniques are employed as a tool in establishing the

  16. Seeking sunlight: rapid phototactic motility of filamentous mat-forming cyanobacteria optimize photosynthesis and enhance carbon burial in Lake Huron’s submerged sinkholes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bopaiah A Biddanda

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied the motility of filamentous mat-forming cyanobacteria consisting primarily of Oscillatoria-like cells growing under low-light, low-oxygen and high-sulfur conditions in Lake Huron’s submerged sinkholes using in situ observations, in vitro measurements and time-lapse microscopy. Gliding movement of the cyanobacterial trichomes (100-10,000 µm long filaments, composed of cells ~10 µm wide and ~3 µm tall revealed individual as well as group-coordinated motility. When placed in a petri dish and dispersed in ground water from the sinkhole, filaments re-aggregated into defined colonies within minutes, then dispersed again. Speed of individual filaments increased with temperature from ~50 µm minute-1 or ~15 body lengths minute-1 at 10°C to ~215 µm minute-1 or ~70 body lengths minute-1 at 35°C – rates that are rapid relative to non-flagellated/ciliated microbes. Filaments exhibited precise and coordinated positive phototaxis towards pinpoints of light and congregated under the light of foil cutouts. Such light-responsive clusters showed an increase in photosynthetic yield – suggesting phototactic motility aids in light acquisition as well as photosynthesis. Once light source was removed, filaments slowly spread out evenly and re-aggregated, demonstrating coordinated movement through inter-filament communication regardless of light. Pebbles and pieces of broken shells placed upon intact mat were quickly covered by vertically motile filaments within hours and became fully buried in the anoxic sediments over 3-4 diurnal cycles – likely facilitating the preservation of falling debris. Coordinated horizontal and vertical filament motility optimize mat cohesion and dynamics, photosynthetic efficiency and sedimentary carbon burial in modern-day sinkhole habitats that resemble the shallow seas in Earth’s early history. Analogous cyanobacterial motility may have played a key role in the oxygenation of the planet by optimizing

  17. Seeking sunlight: rapid phototactic motility of filamentous mat-forming cyanobacteria optimize photosynthesis and enhance carbon burial in Lake Huron's submerged sinkholes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddanda, Bopaiah A; McMillan, Adam C; Long, Stephen A; Snider, Michael J; Weinke, Anthony D

    2015-01-01

    We studied the motility of filamentous mat-forming cyanobacteria consisting primarily of Oscillatoria-like cells growing under low-light, low-oxygen, and high-sulfur conditions in Lake Huron's submerged sinkholes using in situ observations, in vitro measurements and time-lapse microscopy. Gliding movement of the cyanobacterial trichomes (100-10,000 μm long filaments, composed of cells ∼10 μm wide and ∼3 μm tall) revealed individual as well as group-coordinated motility. When placed in a petri dish and dispersed in ground water from the sinkhole, filaments re-aggregated into defined colonies within minutes, then dispersed again. Speed of individual filaments increased with temperature from ∼50 μm min(-1) or ∼15 body lengths min(-1) at 10°C to ∼215 μm min(-1) or ∼70 body lengths min(-1) at 35°C - rates that are rapid relative to non-flagellated/ciliated microbes. Filaments exhibited precise and coordinated positive phototaxis toward pinpoints of light and congregated under the light of foil cutouts. Such light-responsive clusters showed an increase in photosynthetic yield - suggesting phototactic motility aids in light acquisition as well as photosynthesis. Once light source was removed, filaments slowly spread out evenly and re-aggregated, demonstrating coordinated movement through inter-filament communication regardless of light. Pebbles and pieces of broken shells placed upon intact mat were quickly covered by vertically motile filaments within hours and became fully buried in the anoxic sediments over 3-4 diurnal cycles - likely facilitating the preservation of falling debris. Coordinated horizontal and vertical filament motility optimize mat cohesion and dynamics, photosynthetic efficiency and sedimentary carbon burial in modern-day sinkhole habitats that resemble the shallow seas in Earth's early history. Analogous cyanobacterial motility may have played a key role in the oxygenation of the planet by optimizing photosynthesis while favoring

  18. Grewia gum as a potential aqueous film coating agent. I: Some physicochemical characteristics of fractions of grewia gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikoni J Ogaji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Grewia gum has received attention as a polymeric pharmaceutical excipient in the recent times, being employed as a suspending, film coating, mucoadhesive, and binding agent. The low aqueous solubility, however, has limited its characterization and application. Objective: The purpose of this study was to fractionate and evaluate some physicochemical properties of the gum. Materials and Methods: Aqueous dispersion of the gum was treated at 80΀C for 30 min in the presence of sodium chloride and was subsequently fractionated by successively centrifuging it at 3445 rpm for 30 min. Skeletal density, solubility, particle size, and rheological as well as thermal characteristics of the fractions were evaluated. The 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and near infrared (NIR profiles of the fractions were also investigated. The solubility of the gum increased up to fourfold while the viscosity decreased from 244 to as low as70 cP at 40 rpm with some fractions. Results: Grewia gum and the fractions showed good thermal stability exhibiting no thermal events, but charred irreversibly at 297΀C irrespective of the fraction. The molecular weight averages by weight and by number of the fractions were between 233,100 and 235,000. The 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectra showed broad peaks. The NMR and NIR spectra suggested the presence of -OH and -OCH 3 functional groups in this gum. Conclusion: The fractionation improved solubility and facilitated further investigations on its characteristics that may have implication on its processing, application, and optimization as a potential pharmaceutical excipient.

  19. Effect of Encapsulating Nitrate in Sesame Gum on Rumen Fermentation Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiedza Isabel Mamvura

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Encapsulation is a method used to protect material from certain undesirable environments, for controlled release at a more favorable time and place. Animal productivity would be enhanced if feed additives are delivered to be utilized at their site of action, bypassing the rumen where they are likely to be degraded by microbial action. A novel method of encapsulation with sesame gum was used to coat nitrate, a known enteric methane mitigating agent, and tested for the effect on methane reduction and other in vitro fermentation parameters using rumen fluid from cannulated Hanwoo steers. Orchard grass was used as basal diet for fermentation. The treatments were matrix (1.1 g sesame gum+0.4 g sesame oil cake only, encapsulated nitrate (matrix+nitrate [21 mM], free nitrate (21 mM, and a control that contained no additive. Analyses of fermentation parameters were done at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, and 48 h time periods. In comparison to control, both free and encapsulated nitrate produced significantly reduced (p<0.01 methane (76% less and also the total volatile fatty acids were reduced. A significantly higher (p<0.01 concentration of ammonia nitrogen was obtained with the encapsulated nitrate treatment (44% compared to the free form (28% and matrix only (20% (p = 0.014. This might suggest slow release of encapsulated nitrate so that it is fully reduced to ammonia. Thus, this pioneering study found a significant reduction in methane production following the use of sesame gum encapsulated nitrate that shows the potential of a controlled release system in enhancing sustainability of ruminant production while reducing/eliminating the risk of nitrite toxicity.

  20. Formulation and evaluation of controlled release matrix mucoadhesive tablets of domperidone using Salvia plebeian gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurpreet Arora

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to prepare controlled release matrix mucoadhesive tablets of domperidone using Salvia plebeian gum as natural polymer. Tablets were formulated by direct compression technology employing the natural polymer in different concentrations (5, 10, 15 and 20% w/w. The prepared batches were evaluated for drug assay, diameter, thickness, hardness and tensile strength, swelling index, mucoadhesive strength (using texture analyzer and subjected to in vitro drug release studies. Real-time stability studies were also conducted on prepared batches. In vitro drug release data were fitted in various release kinetic models for studying the mechanism of drug release. Tensile strength was found to increase from 0.808 ± 0.098 to 1.527 ± 0.10 mN/cm 2 and mucoadhesive strength increased from 13.673 ± 1.542 to 40.378 ± 2.345 N, with an increase in the polymer concentration from 5 to 20% (A1 to A4. Swelling index was reported to increase with both increase in the concentration of gum and the time duration. The in vitro drug release decreased from 97.76 to 83.4% (A1 to A4 with the increase in polymer concentration. The drug release from the matrix tablets was found to follow zero-order and Higuchi models, indicating the matrix-forming potential of natural polymer. The value of n was found to be between 0.5221 and 0.8992, indicating the involvement of more than one drug release mechanism from the formulation and possibly the combination of both diffusion and erosion. These research findings clearly indicate the potential of S. plebeian gum to be used as binder, release retardant and mucoadhesive natural material in tablet formulations.

  1. Anti-inflammatory effect of Pistacia atlantica subsp. kurdica volatile oil and gum on acetic acid-induced acute colitis in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Minaiyan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Baneh tree or Pistacia atlantica subsp. kurdica is an endemic plant of Iran which belongs to Anacardiaceae family. It has various traditional uses including astringent and anti-diarrheal as well as improving some of the symptoms of gastrointestinal upsets. In this study we decided to investigate the effects of various fractions of baneh gum with different doses in an animal model of ulcerative colitis as one of the important chronic inflammatory bowel diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Methods: The volatile oil and aqueous baneh gum suspensions were prepared and the constituents of the volatile oil were analyzed by GC/MS. They were used to treat colitis induced by acetic acid 4% in rats. Three doses of gum (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg were administered both orally (p.o. and intra-rectally (i.r. while volatile oil was administered p.o. with doses 100, 200 and 400 µl/kg for four constitutive days. Anti-inflammatory effects of the test compounds were compared with oral prednisolone and hydrocortisone enema. Wet colon weight/ length ratio and tissue damage scores and area as well as indices of colitis and tissue myeloperoxidase activity were evaluated for each specimen. Results: Alpha-pinene was the main constituent of baneh volatile oil (41.23%. We observed therapeutic effects in applied doses of oral gum as well as volatile oil to reduce all indices of colitis and myeloperoxidase activity. Unlike the oral form of gum, its rectal administration was not significantly effective to improve colitis. Conclusion: This research has proved the anti-inflammatory potential of oral gum of Pistacia atlantica subsp. kurdica and its volatile oil in an experimentally induced colitis.

  2. Confectionery-based dose forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangso, Kristian J; Ho, Quy Phuong; Boyd, Ben J

    2015-01-01

    Conventional dosage forms such as tablets, capsules and syrups are prescribed in the normal course of practice. However, concerns about patient preferences and market demands have given rise to the exploration of novel unconventional dosage forms. Among these, confectionery-based dose forms have strong potential to overcome compliance problems. This report will review the availability of these unconventional dose forms used in treating the oral cavity and for systemic drug delivery, with a focus on medicated chewing gums, medicated lollipops, and oral bioadhesive devices. The aim is to stimulate increased interest in the opportunities for innovative new products that are available to formulators in this field, particularly for atypical patient populations.

  3. Chewing gum and context-dependent memory effects: a re-examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Christopher; Johnson, Andrew J

    2007-03-01

    Two experiments re-examined whether chewing spearmint gum affects initial word learning and/or immediate recall for a word list. Both experiments failed to show effects of chewing gum at learning or recall, nor did they suggest that chewing gum produces a context-dependent memory effect. This was true when extraneous contextual cues at learning and recall were minimised (Experiment 2). Together, the data are inconsistent with [Wilkinson, L., Scholey, A. & Wesnes, K. (2002). Chewing gum selectively improves aspects of memory in healthy volunteers. Appetite, 38, 235-236.] claim that chewing gum aids immediate recall of visually presented words. Our results are consistent with [Baker, J. R., Bezance, J. B., Zellaby, E. & Aggleton, J. P. (2004). Chewing gum can produce context-dependent effects upon memory. Appetite, 43, 207-210.] finding that chewing gum of itself is not a sufficient condition to provoke context-dependent learning with immediate testing.

  4. Effects of chewing gum on the stress and work of university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew P; Woods, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Recent research has indicated that chewing gum can relieve perceptions of stress in an occupational sample (Smith, 2009). In the present study, 72 students completed 2 weeks of either chewing gum or refraining from chewing gum. They completed scales measuring perceived stress, anxiety, depression, and single item measures of work levels and tiredness. These were completed both pre- and post-treatment. Perceived stress decreased as a function of the amount of gum chewed. The chewing gum condition was also associated with a decrease in not getting enough academic work done. There were no significant effects of chewing gum on mental health outcomes. These results confirm some of findings from previous studies of chewing gum and stress in other samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 21 CFR 184.1343 - Locust (carob) bean gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) bean gum is primarily the macerated endosperm of the seed of the locust (carob) bean tree, Ceratonia siliqua (Linne), a leguminous evergreen tree, with lesser quantities of seed coat and germ. (b) The...(o)(28) of this chapter. Beverages and beverage bases, nonalcoholic, § 170.3(n)(3) of this chapter...

  6. Terpenoids of Boswellia neglecta oleo-gum resin

    OpenAIRE

    L. O. A. Manguro; S. O.Wagai; J. O. Onyango

    2016-01-01

    Oleo-gum resin exudate from Boswellia neglecta afforded a new ursane-type triterpene characterized as 3α-acetoxy-28-hydroxy-11-oxours-12-en-24-ioc acid (1) together with twelve known compounds. Their structural elucidation was accomplished using physical, chemical and spectroscopic methods.

  7. Terpenoids of Boswellia neglecta oleo-gum resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O. A. Manguro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Oleo-gum resin exudate from Boswellia neglecta afforded a new ursane-type triterpene characterized as 3α-acetoxy-28-hydroxy-11-oxours-12-en-24-ioc acid (1 together with twelve known compounds. Their structural elucidation was accomplished using physical, chemical and spectroscopic methods.

  8. Evaluation of the bioadhesive property of Grewia gum in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tablets formulated by wet granulation contained 75 mg of the drug and 15 or 20 %w/w of the gum. Similar tablets made differently with carbopol 934, tragacanth and sodium carboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) were used as basis for comparison. Hydration of tablets and substrate surfaces was done using 0.1N hydrochloric ...

  9. Gellan gum fluid gels for topical administration of diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Mohammed H; Conway, Barbara R; Mills, Thomas; Smith, Alan M

    2016-12-30

    Diclofenac topical formulations are often preferred for drug administration to patients who experience serious GIT problems. Absorption of the drug through the skin, however, can be challenging due to the natural protective feature of the stratum corneum (SC). In this article, fluid gels prepared from gellan gum were explored as a topical drug delivery vehicle. Rheological analysis of the formulations showed that it was possible to produce a topical gel with a viscosity and the mechanical strength similar to that of the commercially available Voltaren® gel using 1% w/w of a 50:50 low acyl/high acyl (LA/HA) gellan blend. Soft-tribology was used to assess the lubrication properties of gellan fluid gels. The lubrication of the gellan gum fluid gel formulations at high rubbing speeds was similar to the lubrication of the Voltaren® gel. The use of gellan gum dramatically increased skin permeation of diclofenac when compared with the commercially available formulation and could be controlled by changing the gellan gum concentration and/or sodium ion concentration in the formulation. This study highlights the potential use of fluid gels that can be easily tuned to have physical properties suitable for topical formulations with the added advantage of increasing drug permeation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Components responsible for the emulsification properties of corn fibre gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    An emulsion was prepared using corn fibre gum (CFG) and the resulting oil and aqueous phases were separated by centrifugation. The material adsorbed onto the surface of the oil droplets in the oil phase was desorbed using surfactant. The desorbed CFG and the non adsorbed CFG that remained present in...

  11. Viscofying properties of corn fiber gum with various polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of corn fiber gum (CFG) on the aqueous solutions of a series of widely-used commercial polysaccharides has been studied by rheological techniques using stress synergism index to evaluate its viscosifying action. Though CFG solution exhibited Newtonian fluid behaviour with a very low vis...

  12. Radiation induced degradation of xanthan gum in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayrabolulu, Hande; Demeter, Maria; Cutrubinis, Mihalis; Güven, Olgun; Şen, Murat

    2018-03-01

    In our previous study, we have investigated the effect of gamma rays on xanthan gum in the solid state and it was determined that dose rate was an important factor effecting the radiation degradation of xanthan gum. In the present study, in order to provide a better understanding of how ionizing radiation effect xanthan gum, we have investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on aqueous solutions of xanthan at various concentrations (0.5-4%). Xanthan solutions were irradiated with gamma rays in air, at ambient temperature, at different dose rates (0.1-3.3-7.0 kGy/h) and doses (2.5-50 kGy). Change in their molecular weights was followed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Chain scission yield (G(S)), and degradation rate constants (k) were calculated. It was determined that, solution concentration was a factor effecting the degradation chemical yield and degradation rate of xanthan gum. Chain scission reactions were more effective for lower solution concentrations.

  13. Gum acacia coating with garlic and cinnamon as an alternate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gum acacia coating with garlic and cinnamon as an alternate, natural preservative for meat and fish. ... The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determined by macrobroth dilution method against five spoilage and disease causing bacteria (Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus ...

  14. Cashew gum and gelatin blend for food packaging application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashew gum (CG) and gelatin (G) films were developed using the casting method and response surface methodology. The objective was produce packaging films from CG/G blends that exhibit effective barrier properties. A study of zeta potential versus pH was first carried out to determine the isoelectric...

  15. Gum from the bark of Anogeissius leiocarpus as a potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The granule elegance, mean particle size and particle size distribution, bulk, tapped and true densities, friability, angle of repose and compressibility (Carr's index) were determined and used to assess the gum relative to PVP and corn starch in granule formulation. Results of the various studies showed that lower ...

  16. Evaluation of Beilschmiedia Seed Gum as a Tablet Binder | Femi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    family Lauraceae) was evaluated for its binding properties at a concentration range of 0.5-10 % w/w in paracetamol tablets with official gelatin as a control. A comparative analysis showed that the granules bound with Beilschmiedia gum were ...

  17. Increased gum arabic production after infestation of Acacia senegal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-20

    Jul 20, 2011 ... disease, changes in climate, changes in the economical development, or ... species of Acacia trees botanically, only two species, ... joined to the main chain by 1,6-linkages. Only a few plant species are cultivated at present to obtain gums used in the food industry as additives; most of them belong to the.

  18. Synthesis and optimization of polyacrylamide and gum arabic graft ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Graft copolymerization of polyacrylamide onto gum arabic was carried out in aqueous medium at room temperature (30oC) using various initiator (ceric ion) and monomer (acrylamide) concentrations. The extent of graft copolymer formation was determined in terms of percentage graft yield. The results obtained showed that ...

  19. Formulation and In vitro Evaluation of Natural Gum-Based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    microbeads ranged from 35.3 to 79.8 % and dissolution times, t15 and t80 increased with increase in the concentration of the natural gums present in the blends. Controlled release was obtained for over 4 h and the release was found to be by a combination of diffusion and erosion mechanisms from spherical formulations.

  20. Rapid, simple and stability-indicating determination of polyhexamethylene biguanide in liquid and gel-like dosage forms by liquid chromatography with diode-array detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Küsters, Markus; Beyer, Sören; Kutscher, Stephan; Schlesinger, Harald; Gerhartz, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A rapid and simple method for the determination of potyhexamethylene biguanide (polyhexanide, PHMB) in liquid and gel-like pharmaceutical formulations by means of high performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode-array detection...

  1. Seeking sunlight: rapid phototactic motility of filamentous mat-forming cyanobacteria optimize photosynthesis and enhance carbon burial in Lake Huron’s submerged sinkholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddanda, Bopaiah A.; McMillan, Adam C.; Long, Stephen A.; Snider, Michael J.; Weinke, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the motility of filamentous mat-forming cyanobacteria consisting primarily of Oscillatoria-like cells growing under low-light, low-oxygen, and high-sulfur conditions in Lake Huron’s submerged sinkholes using in situ observations, in vitro measurements and time-lapse microscopy. Gliding movement of the cyanobacterial trichomes (100–10,000 μm long filaments, composed of cells ∼10 μm wide and ∼3 μm tall) revealed individual as well as group-coordinated motility. When placed in a petri dish and dispersed in ground water from the sinkhole, filaments re-aggregated into defined colonies within minutes, then dispersed again. Speed of individual filaments increased with temperature from ∼50 μm min-1 or ∼15 body lengths min-1 at 10°C to ∼215 μm min-1 or ∼70 body lengths min-1 at 35°C – rates that are rapid relative to non-flagellated/ciliated microbes. Filaments exhibited precise and coordinated positive phototaxis toward pinpoints of light and congregated under the light of foil cutouts. Such light-responsive clusters showed an increase in photosynthetic yield – suggesting phototactic motility aids in light acquisition as well as photosynthesis. Once light source was removed, filaments slowly spread out evenly and re-aggregated, demonstrating coordinated movement through inter-filament communication regardless of light. Pebbles and pieces of broken shells placed upon intact mat were quickly covered by vertically motile filaments within hours and became fully buried in the anoxic sediments over 3–4 diurnal cycles – likely facilitating the preservation of falling debris. Coordinated horizontal and vertical filament motility optimize mat cohesion and dynamics, photosynthetic efficiency and sedimentary carbon burial in modern-day sinkhole habitats that resemble the shallow seas in Earth’s early history. Analogous cyanobacterial motility may have played a key role in the oxygenation of the planet by optimizing photosynthesis while

  2. Naturalistic assessment of demand for cigarettes, snus, and nicotine gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Jeffrey S; Wilson, A George; Koffarnus, Mikhail N; Judd, Michael C; Bickel, Warren K

    2017-01-01

    Behavioral economic measures of demand provide estimates of tobacco product abuse liability and may predict effects of policy-related price regulation on consumption of existing and emerging tobacco products. In the present study, we examined demand for snus, a smokeless tobacco product, in comparison to both cigarettes and medicinal nicotine. We used both a naturalistic method in which participants purchased these products for use outside the laboratory, as well as laboratory-based self-administration procedures. Cigarette smokers (N = 42) used an experimental income to purchase their usual brand of cigarettes and either snus or gum (only one product available per session) across a range of prices, while receiving all products they purchased from one randomly selected price. In a separate portion of the study, participants self-administered these products during laboratory-based, progressive ratio sessions. Demand elasticity (sensitivity of purchasing to price) was significantly greater for snus than cigarettes. Elasticity for gum was intermediate between snus and cigarettes but was not significantly different than either. Demand intensity (purchasing unconstrained by price) was significantly lower for gum compared to cigarettes, with no significant difference observed between snus and cigarettes. Results of the laboratory-based, progressive ratio sessions were generally discordant with measures of demand elasticity, with significantly higher "breakpoints" for cigarettes compared to gum and no significant differences between other study products. Moreover, breakpoints and product purchasing were generally uncorrelated across tasks. Under naturalistic conditions, snus appears more sensitive to price manipulation than either cigarettes or nicotine gum in existing smokers.

  3. Saffron and beetroot extracts encapsulated in maltodextrin, gum Arabic, modified starch and chitosan: Incorporation in a chewing gum system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chranioti, Charikleia; Nikoloudaki, Aspasia; Tzia, Constantina

    2015-08-20

    Maltodextrin (MD-21DE), gum Arabic (GA), gum Arabic-modified starch (GA-MS), modified starch-chitosan (MS-CH) and modified starch-maltodextrin-chitosan (MS-MD-CH) were used as agents for beetroot and saffron coloring-extracts microencapsulation by freeze drying. The produced powders were evaluated in terms of coloring strength (E) during storage at 40°C for 10 weeks and a first-order kinetic was applied. Color parameters (L(*), a(*), b(*), C(*) and ΔE(*)) and water sorption behavior was also studied. Moreover, incorporation of the powders in a chewing gum model system was conducted. The type of encapsulating agent significantly (PGA>GA-MS>MS-CH>MS-MD-CH. The water sorption study revealed that MD and GA kept their structural integrity up to water activities of 0.66 and 0.82, respectively. The chewing gum samples produced with coloring extracts encapsulated in GA-MS showed the greatest a(*)(for beetroot) and b(*) (for saffron) values indicating a better protection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Contribution of lipids, phenolic acids, and protein rich components to emulsifying properties of corn fiber gum and acacia gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn fiber gum (CFG) is an arabinoxylan enriched fraction obtained by the extraction of corn bran/fiber using a proprietary alkaline hydrogen peroxide process. When purified CFG prepared by this process was hydrolyzed with concentrated base (1.5 N methanolic KOH at 70 °C for one hour) considerable ...

  5. Value added product recovery from sludge generated during gum arabic refining process by vermicomposting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Veena; Satyanarayan, Sanjeev; Satyanarayan, Shanta

    2016-09-01

    Gum arabic is multifunctional and used in food products, pharmaceutical, confectionery, cosmetic, printing and textile industry. Gum arabic has an excellent market and its production is being increased to meet the market demand. In the process, huge quantity of solid waste is generated during its refining process. An attempt has been made to vermicompost this organic waste using Eudrilus eugeniae. This research work is first of its kind. Literature on this substrate has not been reported anywhere else for vermicomposting. Results were excellent with volatile solid reduction of 51.34 %; C/N ratio reduced to 16.31 % indicating efficient loss of carbon as carbon dioxide during vermicomposting period. Manurial value, i.e. nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium content in the range, required for the plants also increased. Porosity of 67.74 % and water holding capacity of 65.75 % were observed. The maturity of the vermicompost was evaluated through scanning electron microscopy wherein the complete conversion of large raw material particles into finer particles forming a uniform matrix with more surface area was observed indicating its efficient conversion. Microbial quality of vermicompost was also studied. The final vermicompost is free of fungal cells and pathogenic bacteria.

  6. A comparison of corn fiber gum, hydrophobically modified starch, gum arabic and soybean soluble polysaccharide: interfacial dynamics, viscoelastic response at oil/water interfaces and emulsion stabilization mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The interfacial rheology of polysaccharide adsorption layers of corn fiber gum (CFG), octenyl succinate anhydride-modified starch (OSA-s), gum arabic (GA) and soybean soluble polysaccharides (SSPS) at the oil/water interface and their emulsifying properties in oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions were compa...

  7. Effects of chewing gum on mood, learning, memory and performance of an intelligence test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew

    2009-04-01

    Recent research suggests that chewing gum may increase alertness and lead to changes in cognitive performance. The present study examined effects of chewing gum on these functions within the context of a single study. This study had four main aims. The first was to examine whether chewing gum improved learning and memory of information in a story. The second aim was to determine whether chewing gum improved test performance on a validated intellectual task (the Alice Heim task). A third aim was to determine whether chewing gum improved performance on short memory tasks (immediate and delayed recall of a list of words, delayed recognition memory, retrieval from semantic memory, and a working memory task). The final aim was to determine whether chewing gum improved mood (alertness, calm and hedonic tone). A cross-over design was used with gum and no-gum sessions being on consecutive weeks. In each week, volunteers attended for two sessions, two days apart. The first session assessed mood, immediate recall of information from a story and performance on short memory tasks. The second session assessed mood, delayed recall of information from a story and performance of an intelligence test (the Alice Heim test). There were no significant effects of chewing gum on any aspect of recall of the story. Chewing gum improved the accuracy of performing the Alice Heim test which confirms the benefits of gum on test performance seen in an earlier study. Chewing gum had no significant effect on the short memory tasks. Chewing gum increased alertness at the end of the test session in both parts of the study. This effect was in the region of a 10% increase and was highly significant (P < 0.001). The results of this study showed that chewing gum increases alertness. In contrast, no significant effects of chewing gum were observed in the memory tasks. Intellectual performance was improved in the gum condition. Overall, the results suggest further research on the alerting effects of

  8. Application and Characterization of Gum from Bombax buonopozense Calyxes as an Excipient in Tablet Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyinye J. Uwaezuoke

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to explore gum from Bombax buonopozense calyxes as a binding agent in formulation of immediate release dosage forms using wet granulation method. The granules were characterized to assess the flow and compression properties and when compressed, non-compendial and compendial tests were undertaken to assess the tablet properties for tablets prepared with bombax gum in comparison with those prepared with tragacanth and acacia gums. Granules prepared with bombax exhibited good flow and compressible properties with angle of repose 28.60°, Carr’s compressibility of 21.30% and Hausner’s quotient of 1.27. The tablets were hard, but did not disintegrate after one hour. Furthermore, only 52.5% of paracetamol was released after one hour. The drug release profile followed zero order kinetics. Tablets prepared with bombax gum have the potential to deliver drugs in a controlled manner over a prolonged period at a constant rate.

  9. Karakterisasi dan Sifat Fisik Sistem Koaservasi Gelatin - Gum Akasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komari Komari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Complex coacervation system of gelatin solution of 1% and acacia gum of 1% could be developed for encapsulation of bio-active materials. The system had been developed to measured optimum pH of coacervate formation, coaservate recovery, viscosity and density of the solution sistem for predicting its membran thickness on covering the bio-active materials. Results showed that using turbidity measurement, pH of the system could recovery of the coacervate of the sistem was 3,5 and the dried coacervate recoveri was 81±4%. The mixture of gelatin solution of 1% and gum acacia solution of 1% were measured for density and viscosity and the results were 1,0876 ± 0,0045 g/ml and 0,986±0,025 mPa.s, respectively. This physical characteristics could be used for calculating membran thickness for certain bio-active material to be coated.

  10. Sulfomethylated graft copolymers of xanthan gum and polyacrylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, I.W.; Empey, R.A.; Racciato, J.S.

    1978-08-08

    A water-soluble anionic graft copolymer of xanthan gum and polyacrylamide is described in which at least part of the amide function of the acrylamide portion of the copolymer is sulfomethylated and the xanthan gum portion of the copolymer is unreacted with formaldehyde. The copolymer is sulfomethylated by reaction with formaldehyde and sodium metabisulfite. The formaldehyde does not cause any appreciable cross-linking between hydroxyl groups of the xanthan moieties. The sulfomethylation of the acrylamido group takes place at temperatures from 35 to 70 C. The pH is 10 or higher, typically from 12 to 13. The degree of anionic character may be varied by adjusting the molar ratio of formaldehyde and sodium metabisulfite with respect to the copolymer. 10 claims.

  11. Gum pigmentation: an unusual adverse effect of sublingual immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Anne; Chiang, Wen Chin; Kang, Liew Woei; Rao, Rajeshwar; Lim, Hwee Hoon; Chng, Chai Kiat

    2014-07-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy has gained acceptance amongst the paediatric community as it is very well tolerated and is safe. The adverse effects of this therapy is minimal consisting mainly of local side effects within the oral cavity such as itching of the mouth, swelling of the lips and less frequently abdominal pain, wheezing and urticaria has been described. This report is to highlight another local side effect of sublingual immunotherapy which has been observed in 3 of our patients. This is pigmentation of the gums which can occur anytime during the course of the immunotherapy. It resolves on stopping the immunotherapy and is likely due to a local inflammatory process occurring in the gums of these children. There is no associated pain or itching with the pigmentation. It can persist as long as the child is on the immunotherapy.

  12. Chemical and Functional Properties of Chia Seed (Salvia hispanica L.) Gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Campos, Maira Rubi; Ciau-Solís, Norma; Rosado-Rubio, Gabriel; Chel-Guerrero, Luis; Betancur-Ancona, David

    2014-01-01

    Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) constitutes a potential alternative raw material and ingredient in food industry applications due to its dietary fiber content. Gum can be extracted from its dietary fiber fractions for use as an additive to control viscosity, stability, texture, and consistency in food systems. The gum extracted from chia seeds was characterized to determine their quality and potential as functional food additives. The extracted chia gum contained 26.2% fat and a portion was submitted to fat extraction, producing two fractions: gum with fat (FCG) and gum partly defatted (PDCG). Proximal composition and physicochemical characterization showed these fractions to be different (P pseudoplastic type. PDCG had more viscosity than FCG. Chia seed is an excellent natural source of gum with good physicochemical and functional qualities, and is very promising for use in food industry. PMID:26904622

  13. Expression, purification and crystallization of the outer membrane lipoprotein GumB from Xanthomonas campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Melisa; Salinas, Silvina R; Bianco, María I; Ielpi, Luis

    2012-10-01

    GumB is a predicted outer membrane lipoprotein that is involved in the synthesis and/or secretion of xanthan gum. This exopolysaccharide, produced by Xanthomonas campestris, is valuable in industry because of its important rheological properties. Solution of the GumB structure will provide insight into the polymerization and/or secretion mechanisms of xanthan gum. GumB was overexpressed and purified and diffraction-quality crystals of native GumB were obtained. A complete data set was collected to 2.54 Å resolution with an R(p.i.m.) of 0.034. The crystals belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 84.4, b = 90.5, c = 120.7 Å.

  14. Antioxidant Effect of Xanthan Gum on Ram Sperm after Freezing and Thawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastal, G DA; Silva, E F; Mion, B; Varela Junior, A S; Rosa, C E; Corcini, C D; Mondadori, R G; Vieira, A D; Bianchi, I; Lucia, T

    Xanthan gum is used as thickener in media to preserve food products, having cryoprotectant and antioxidant properties that may be relevant for sperm cryopreservation. To evaluate the effects of adding xanthan gum to freezing extenders on post-thawing quality and oxidant activity of ram sperm. Ejaculates from seven rams extended TRIS-egg yolk-glycerol were split in three treatments including xanthan gum (0.15%; 0.20%; and 0.25%) and a control with no xanthan gum. After thawing, motility and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with 0.20% and 0.25% xanthan gum were lower than for the control (P membrane, acrosome and DNA did not differ (P > 0.05). Xanthan gum at 0.20% and 0.25% may be an efficient antioxidant for frozen-thawed ram sperm, due to the reduction in ROS production.

  15. Management of blue gum eucalyptus in California requires region-specific consideration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M. Wolf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Blue gum eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus is a large tree native to Australia that was widely planted throughout California for reforestation, building and timber, but in some areas has spread beyond its planted borders and substantially altered wildlands. Due to its fast growth, large size and reproductive potential, blue gum's impacts on native vegetation, wildlife and ecosystem processes are of concern, particularly in areas with reliable year-round rainfall or fog, where it is most likely to spread. Depending on levels of invasion and rate of spread, blue gum may have negative, positive or neutral impacts on fire regimes, water and nutrient availability, understory vegetation and higher trophic levels. Additional research on the abiotic and biotic impacts of blue gum, quantitative estimates of area covered by blue gum, and weed risk assessments that allow for region-specific climatic information and management goals to be incorporated are needed to guide management of blue gum populations.

  16. Influence of tragacanth gum in egg white based bioplastics: Thermomechanical and water uptake properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Castejón, María Luisa; Bengoechea, Carlos; García-Morales, Moisés; Martínez, Inmaculada

    2016-11-05

    This study aims to extend the range of applications of tragacanth gum by studying its incorporation into bioplastics formulation, exploring the influence that different gum contents (0-20wt.%) exert over the thermomechanical and water uptake properties of bioplastics based on egg white albumen protein (EW). The effect of plasticizer nature was also evaluated through the modification of the water/glycerol ratio within the plasticizer fraction (fixed at 40wt.%). The addition of tragacanth gum generally yielded an enhancement of the water uptake capacity, being doubled at the highest content. Conversely, presence of tragacanth gum resulted in a considerable decrease in the bioplastic mechanical properties: both tensile strength and maximum elongation were reduced up to 75% approximately when compared to the gum-free system. Ageing of selected samples was also studied, revealing an important effect of storage time when tragacanth gum is present, possibly due to its hydrophilic character. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Protein-free cress seed (Lepidium sativum) gum: Physicochemical characterization and rheological properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmkhah, Somayeh; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin

    2016-01-01

    Protein-free cress seed gum (PFCSG) was obtained by precipitation of crude cress seed gum (CSG) withethanol followed by treatment with protease. Molecular weight, moisture, ash and uronic acids contentdecreased after elimination of protein. Elimination of protein improved significantly rheological...... proper-ties and thermal stability of cress seed gum. Mechanical spectra of the CSG and PFCSG were classified asweak gels and PFCSG showed stronger and more elastic network structure. The gum dispersions exhib-ited strong shear-thinning behavior which was described satisfactory by the Herschel......-Bulkley and Mooremodels. Protein-free cress seed gum had higher apparent and intrinsic viscosities than the crude gum.CSG indicated lower hysteresis loop area, but degree of structural recovery of the samples showed no sig-nificant difference. The main decomposition of PFCSG started above 213◦C with two peaks (at 261...

  18. Efficacy of baking soda-containing chewing gum in removing natural tooth stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankodi, S M; Conforti, N; Berkowitz, H

    2001-07-01

    A 14-week, double-blind, randomized clinical trial was conducted with 126 healthy volunteers to compare the efficacy of twice-daily use of 3 baking soda-containing chewing gums in removing natural tooth stain when used in conjunction with a program of regular oral hygiene. All 3 chewing gums significantly reduced extrinsic stain (P Baking Soda Gum (AHDC) reduced dental stain by 70.8%, compared to reductions of 71.9% and 65.3%, after use of 2 experimental gum formulations. Whitened appearance improved by 1.73 shade tabs using AHDC gum, and up to 2.49 shade tabs with the experimental formulations. These results suggest that the use of baking soda-containing gum after meals, in conjunction with good oral hygiene, can improve both extrinsic dental staining and the whitened appearance of teeth.

  19. Design, formulation and evaluation of Aloe vera chewing gum

    OpenAIRE

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Ghannadi, Alireza; Raddanipour, Razieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aloe vera has antioxidant, antiinflammatory, healing, antiseptic, anticancer and antidiabetic effects. The aim of the present study was to design and evaluate the formulation of Aloe vera chewing gum with an appropriate taste and quality with the indications for healing oral wounds, such as lichen planus, mouth sores caused by cancer chemotherapy and mouth abscesses as well as reducing mouth dryness caused by chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: In Aloe vera powder, the carbohydra...

  20. Gellan gum microgel-reinforced cell-laden gelatin hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Hyeongho; Olsen, Bradley D.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The relatively weak mechanical properties of hydrogels remain a major drawback for their application as load-bearing tissue scaffolds. Previously, we developed cell-laden double-network (DN) hydrogels that were composed of photocrosslinkable gellan gum (GG) and gelatin. Further research into the materials as tissue scaffolds determined that the strength of the DN hydrogels decreased when they were prepared at cell-compatible conditions, and the encapsulated cells in the DN hydrogels did not f...

  1. Adult sudden death caused by aspiration of chewing gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njau, S N

    2004-01-28

    A case of a fatal foreign material aspiration is presented in the following text. A 24-year-old white male died suddenly. A piece of chewing gum lodged in a pool of frothy fluid was revealed at autopsy. Microscopic examinations revealed atelectasia emphysema, eosinophilic exudate and empty spaces. Blood and urine samples were analyzed, for alcohol and drug use by fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) on an Abbott AXSYM system. No alcohol or other drugs were detected in blood or urine.

  2. Effect of irradiation on functional properties of Gum Tragacanth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Mollakhalili meybodi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: irradiation is a physical treatment in which products are exposed to ionized radiation such as gamma and x rays to improve the security and quality. Hydrocolloids are components that are used in food science to improve texture properties. Exposing to irradiation treatment may change structural and functional properties. By regard to the importance of irradiation on decontaminating of hydrocolloids in food application, the aim of this study is studying the effect of irradiation at different doses on functional properties of Gum Tragacanth in food application. Material and methods: effect of irradiation treatment was studied on the rheological properties, zeta potential, particle size distribution and surface tension of dispersion systems contained 0/5% w/ w gum tragacanth that is irradiated at different doses (0, 0.75. 3, 5 kGy. The effect of irradiation on rheological properties was monitored by rheometer. In order to monitor the effect of irradiation treatment on particle size distribution, zeta potential and surface tension, particle sizer, Brookhaven zeta plus and tensiometer sere used respectively. All treatments were performed three times and the data were analyzed by one way ANOVA. Significant differences between means were identified (P values < 0.05 using Duncan test. Results: Irradiation, change rheologiacal properties and particle size distribution of dispersion contained gum tragacanth. Irradiation treatment up to 0.75 kGy increase zeta potential, but irradiating at higher doses decrease it again. Results of studying parameters showed that irradiation changes the functional properties by affecting on structure. These changes depend on irradiation dose Conclusion: Gum tragacanth irradiation may improve the functional properties by affecting on structure.

  3. Cryoextraction: A novel approach to remove aspirated chewing gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmundo Rubio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of aspirated foreign bodies can prove challenging at times, requiring even rigid bronchoscopy. Cryotherapy probes have been reported to help with extraction of foreign bodies. We present a case where successful "cryoextraction" was performed on an aspirated chewing gum. The case highlights the fact that this technique is useful to extract all materials that have water content. This technique can be performed through flexible bronchoscopy and can save patients from more aggressive approaches.

  4. Xanthan gum stabilized gold nanoparticles: characterization, biocompatibility, stability and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooja, Deep; Panyaram, Sravani; Kulhari, Hitesh; Rachamalla, Shyam S; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2014-09-22

    Xanthan gum (XG) has been widely used in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. In the present study, we explored the potential of XG in the synthesis of gold nanoparticle. XG was used as both reducing and stabilizing agent. The effect of various formulation and process variables such as temperature, reaction time, gum concentration, gum volume and gold concentration, in GNP preparation was determined. The XG stabilized, rubey-red XGNP were obtained with 5 ml of XG aqueous solution (1.5 mg/ml). The optimum temperature was 80°C whereas the reaction time was 3 h. The optimized nanoparticles were also investigated as drug delivery carrier for doxorubicin hydrochloride. DOX loaded gold nanoparticles (DXGP) were characterized by dynamic light scattering, TEM, FTIR, and DSC analysis. The synthesized nanoparticle showed mean particle size of 15-20 nm and zeta potential -29.1 mV. The colloidal stability of DXGP was studied under different conditions of pH, electrolytes and serum. Nanoparticles were found to be stable at pH range between pH 5-9 and NaCl concentration up to 0.5 M. In serum, nanoparticles showed significant stability up to 24h. During toxicity studies, nanoparticles were found biocompatible and non-toxic. Compared with free DOX, DXGP displayed 3 times more cytotoxicity in A549 cells. In conclusion, this study provided an insight to synthesize GNP without using harsh chemicals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. THE MORPHOLOGY OF THE GUM AND OF THE DESMODONTIUM

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    M. NICULESCU

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The gum and the desmodontium are constituent parts of the morpho-functional complex of the parodontium. Depending on its topographic situation, we can describe three portions of the gum: alveolar, marginal and interdental, each one having its features. Within the gum, the collagen fibres from the subepihtelial net are grouped in alveologingival, dentogingival, circular and interdental, the last ones being seen by us as a single group, called peridental fibres. The desmodontium or the alveolodental ligament or the parodontal ligament makes the relation between the alveolar bone and the radicular cement within the dentoalveolar articulation, articulation known under the name of gomphosis, a syndesmose that does not allow any movement to the tooth. Depending on their topographic situation, the collagen fibres in the constitution of the alveolodental ligament, also called cemento-alveolar fibres, can be divided in marginal, intermediary and apical. The alveolodental ligament has the important role in the transmission of the chewing forces to the resistance structures within the functional architectonics of the cranium.

  6. Effect of chewing gum on the bowel motility after cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadije Yazdi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative ileus is common after cholecystectomy, causes gas retension, distention, nausea, vomiting, and even pain. Chewing gum is a type of sham feeding that may reduce the duration of postoperative ileus. This study determines the effect of chewing gum in the immediate postoperative period to facilitate ileus recovery following cholecystectomy. Material & Methods: This is a randomized controlled trial in 2009. Twenty-four patients undergoing cholecystectomy and they divided in to two equal groups (n=12. Patients in group A chewed sugarless gum there time after surgery, each time 20 miniutes in 4, 10 and 18 hours after finishing sugery. Demographics, intraoperative, and postoperative care data did not reveal any significant difference between two groups. The data resending the first passage of flatus, defecation and bowel sound in every 2 hours for each patient completed in questioning. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version-13.5 and student t-test. Results: The first bowel sound heard 3 ±1.3 and 2.8 ±1.3 hours post-operatively in cases and controls, respectively. The above findings were not significant between two groups. Furthermore gas passing reported at 18.3±10.5 and 36.28±12.6 hours post-operation in case and control groups respectively. The first defecation was occured at 36.8 ±21.7 and 69.5 ±19.2 hours after operation in case and control groups, respectively

  7. Effects of Chewing Different Flavored Gums on Salivary Flow Rate and pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Karami Nogourani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chewing gum increases salivary flow rate (SFR and pH, but differences in preferences of gum flavor may influence SFR and pH. The aim of this paper was to assess the effect of five different flavors of sucrose-free chewing gum on the salivary flow rate and pH in healthy dental students in Isfahan, Iran. Fifteen (7 men and 8 women healthy dental student volunteers collected unstimulated saliva and then chewed one of five flavored gums for 6 min. The whole saliva was collected and assessed for 6 consecutive days. After unstimulated saliva was collected, stimulated saliva was collected at interval of 0-1, 1–3, and 3–6 minutes after the start of different flavored chewing gums. The SFR and salivary pH were measured. The SFR increased in all five flavored gums at 1, 3, and 6 minutes after start of chewing gums (<0.001. The flow rate of all products reached peak in the 1st minute of stimulation, except spearmint-flavored gums which reached peak in the 6th minute. In the 1st minute, the strawberry-flavored gums showed the highest SFR. During 1–3 minutes, strawberry- and apple-flavored gums showed higher SFR, respectively. Only the spearmint- and cinnamon-flavored gum significantly increased salivary pH. Gum flavored can affect the SFR and pH and special flavors can be advised for different individuals according to their oral conditions.

  8. Structure of xanthan gum and cell ultrastructure at different times of alkali stress

    OpenAIRE

    de Mello Luvielmo, Márcia; Borges,Caroline Dellinghausen; de Oliveira Toyama, Daniela; Vendruscolo, Claire Tondo; Scamparini,Adilma Regina Pippa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The effect of alkali stress on the yield, viscosity, gum structure, and cell ultrastructure of xanthan gum was evaluated at the end of fermentation process of xanthan production by Xanthomonas campestris pv. manihotis 280-95. Although greater xanthan production was observed after a 24 h-alkali stress process, a lower viscosity was observed when compared to the alkali stress-free gum, regardless of the alkali stress time. However, this outcome is not conclusive as further studies on g...

  9. Gum cordia as carrier of antioxidants: effects on lipid oxidation of peanuts

    OpenAIRE

    Haq, Muhammad Abdul; Azam, Mahmood; Hasnain, Abid

    2013-01-01

    Performance of antioxidants is improved by incorporating them into polymer matrix such as polysaccharides based edible coatings. Gum cordia, an anionic polysaccharide extracted from the fruits of Cordia.myxa could be used as carrier of antioxidants by virtue of its strong adhering and emulsifying properties. This study aimed to explore the potential of gum cordia as carrier of antioxidants when applied as edible coating on peanuts. Gum Cordia was compared with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) in...

  10. Chemical and Functional Properties of Chia Seed (Salvia hispanica L.) Gum

    OpenAIRE

    Maira Rubi Segura-Campos; Norma Ciau-Solís; Gabriel Rosado-Rubio; Luis Chel-Guerrero; David Betancur-Ancona

    2014-01-01

    Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) constitutes a potential alternative raw material and ingredient in food industry applications due to its dietary fiber content. Gum can be extracted from its dietary fiber fractions for use as an additive to control viscosity, stability, texture, and consistency in food systems. The gum extracted from chia seeds was characterized to determine their quality and potential as functional food additives. The extracted chia gum contained 26.2% fat and a portion was submit...

  11. Evaluation of Gum of Moringa oleifera as a Binder and Release Retardant in Tablet Formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Panda, D. S.; Choudhury, N. S. K.; Yedukondalu, M.; S Si; Gupta, R.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to find out the potential of gum from Moringa oleifera to act as a binder and release retardant in tablet formulations. The effect of calcium sulphate dihydrate (water insoluble) and lactose (water soluble) diluent on the release of propranolol hydrochloride was studied. The DSC thermograms of drug, gum and mixture of gum/drug indicated no chemical interaction. Tablets (F1, F2, F3, and F4) were prepared containing calcium sulphate dihydrate as diluent, propran...

  12. Effect of Chewing Bicarbonate-containing Sugar-free Gum on the Salivary pH: An in vivo Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ballal, Raksha K; Bhat, Sham S; Ramdas, Shenoy Shailesh; Ballal, Shrinidhi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of chewing gum on the salivary pH and to compare the effect of chewing bicarbonate-containing sugar-free gum on salivary pH against that of standard sugar-free gum. The experiment was carried out on 30 volunteers aged 20-22 years (mean age = 21 years) who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The test gum was sugar-free greenmint-flavored bicarbonate-containing gum and the standard control was sugar-free spearmint-flavored gum. The pH...

  13. Effects of Chewing Different Flavored Gums on Salivary Flow Rate and pH

    OpenAIRE

    Karami Nogourani, Maryam; Janghorbani, Mohsen; Kowsari Isfahan, Raha; Hosseini Beheshti, Mozhgan

    2012-01-01

    Chewing gum increases salivary flow rate (SFR) and pH, but differences in preferences of gum flavor may influence SFR and pH. The aim of this paper was to assess the effect of five different flavors of sucrose-free chewing gum on the salivary flow rate and pH in healthy dental students in Isfahan, Iran. Fifteen (7 men and 8 women) healthy dental student volunteers collected unstimulated saliva and then chewed one of five flavored gums for 6 min. The whole saliva was collected and assessed for...

  14. Whole and crushed nutlets of chia (Salvia hispanica from Mexico as a source of functional gums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Segura-Campos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to characterize the chemical and functional properties of Mexican chia (Salvia hispanica gums extracted from defatted whole and crushed nutlets using the Soxhlet and SFE-CO2 methods. Chia gums have interesting chemical and functional properties for the food industry. The oil and gum yields were in the range of 1.98-16.42% and 5.81-12.60%, respectively. The defatting procedure did not affect significantly the oil and gum extraction; the nutlet type (whole or crushed was the only parameter influencing the yield. The proximate composition and the protein and fiber contents of chia gum were evaluated. Low contents of protein and fiber and high NFE levels were found in whole nutlet gums. The functional properties of chia gum extracted from whole and crushed nutlets with the Soxhlet and SFE-COs methods showed the following ranges of water absorption capacity of 62.64 to 143.66 g/g, water adsorption capacity of 0.69 to 1.35 g/g, and water and oil holding capacity of 100 to 149.28 g/g and19.5 to 40.4 g/g, respectively. The rheological behavior exhibited by the gums was pseudoplastic or shear thinning. From a functional perspective, chia gum is an important food component due its emulsifier and stabilizer potentials.

  15. Application of cashew tree gum on the production and stability of spray-dried fish oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrel, Diego Alvarenga; Borges, Soraia Vilela; Fernandes, Regiane Victória de Barros; Antoniassi, Rosemar; de Faria-Machado, Adelia Ferreira; Feitosa, Judith Pessoa de Andrade; de Paula, Regina Celia Monteiro

    2017-04-15

    Evaluation of cashew gum compared to conventional materials was conducted regarding properties and oxidative stability of spray-dried fish oil. Emulsions produced with cashew gum showed lower viscosity when compared to Arabic gum. The particle size was larger (29.9μm) when cashew gum was used, and the encapsulation efficiency reached 76%, similar to that of modified starch but higher than that for Arabic gum (60%). The oxidation process for the surface oil was conducted and a relative lower formation of oxidation compounds was observed for the cashew gum treatment. GAB model was chosen to describe the moisture adsorption isotherm behaviours. Microparticles produced using Arabic and cashew gums showed greater water adsorption when exposed to higher relative humidities. Microparticles produced using cashew gum were more hygroscopic however encapsulation efficiency were higher and surface oil oxidation were less pronounced. Cashew gum can be further explored as an encapuslant material for spray drying processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. EVALUATION OF MORINGA OLEIFERA GUM AS A BINDER IN TABLET FORMULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Patil Basawaraj S.; Soodam Srinivas R; Kulkarni Upendra; Korwar Prakassh G.

    2010-01-01

    Various plant gums have been used as binders in tablet formulations. But still finding novel binder for the manufacture of tablets, in pharmaceutical industry. The Moringa oleifera gum was found its binding property. In the present study Moringa oleifera gum was employed as a binding agent in Chloroquine phosphate tablets at concentrations of 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0 % w/w, in comparison with potato starch. The properties of Moringa oleifera gum were evaluated for angle of repose, bulk density, tappe...

  17. Single-Dose and Multiple-Dose Pharmacokinetics of Nicotine 6 mg Gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Anna; Rasmussen, Thomas; Kraiczi, Holger

    2017-04-01

    Under-dosing is a recognized problem with current nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). Therefore, a new 6mg nicotine gum has been developed. To compare the nicotine uptake from the 6mg gum versus currently available NRT products, two pharmacokinetic studies were performed. In one randomized crossover study, 44 healthy adult smokers received single doses of 6, 4, and 2mg nicotine gum, and 4mg nicotine lozenge on separate occasions. In a separate randomized crossover multiple-dose study over 11 hours, 50 healthy adult smokers received one 6mg gum every hour and 90 minutes, respectively, one 4mg gum every hour, and one 4mg lozenge every hour. In both studies, blood samples were collected over 12 hours to determine single-dose and multiple-dose pharmacokinetic variables. In the single-dose study, the amount of nicotine released from the 2, 4, and 6mg gums (1.44, 3.36, and 4.94mg) as well as the resulting maximum concentration and area under the curve (5.9, 10.1, and 13.8ng/mL, and 17.1, 30.7, 46.2ng/mL × h, respectively) increased with dose. The maximum concentration and area under the curve of the 6mg gum were 44% and 30% greater, respectively, than those for 4mg lozenge. Upon hourly administration, the steady-state average plasma nicotine concentration with 6mg gum (37.4ng/mL) was significantly higher than those for 4mg lozenge (28.3ng/mL) and 4mg gum (27.1ng/mL). Nicotine delivery via the 6mg gum results in higher plasma nicotine concentrations after a single dose and at steady state than with currently available oral NRT. Under-dosing is a recognized problem with current NRT. Therefore, a new 6mg nicotine gum has been developed. Our studies show that upon single-dose and multiple-dose administration, the 6mg gum releases and delivers more nicotine to the systemic circulation than 2mg gum, 4mg gum, and 4mg lozenge. Thus, each 6mg nicotine gum provides a higher degree of nicotine substitution and/or lasts for a longer period of time than currently available nicotine

  18. Pharmacognostic studies of gums collected from aprocot trees growing in Armenia and perspectives of their use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichoyan, N

    2009-11-01

    Plant polysaccharides are widely used in the food and confectionary industries, as an emulsifier, flavour encapsulator, and thickening agent. The apricot tree has a gum that oozes out in the spring and it seems to be a lot like gum Arabic. Gums collected from apricot trees growing in Armenia (RA) are considered as exudates of ecological significance. Besides, in food industry it can entirely replace the more expensive gum Arabic as well as its synthetic derivatives. Periodically organized resource potential studies in the regions of RA gives the opportunity to have an exact notion of biological and utilized resources of gums as a natural exudates of cultivated apricot trees of the country. The study was conducted on gums collected from the apricot trees of Armavir region (Armavir, Edjmiatsin, Baghramyan) that were purified by general physical methods without any chemical or enzymatic influence. According to obtained results--from one apricot tree was collected 54.15+/- 4.41 g/m(2), the biological resource of apricot gum was 45 ton. We also determined the quantities of Mg, K and Ca in apricot gum by atomic--absorptive method (Mg - 18 mg/kg; Ca - 5.8 mg/kg; K - 15.7 mg/kg). The study results also revealed that addition of gummi armeniaca increases the yeast biomass up to 55%. According to above mentioned and the great resources of raw material of apricot tree gum it can be approved its usage in the food industry in Armenia.

  19. Recently Investigated Natural Gums and Mucilages as Pharmaceutical Excipients: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Pritam Dinesh; Pawar, Harshal Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Due to advances in drug delivery technology, currently, excipients are included in novel dosage forms to fulfil specific functions and in some cases they directly or indirectly influence the extent and/or rate of drug release and drug absorption. Recent trends towards use of plant based and natural products demand the replacement of synthetic additives with natural ones. Today, the whole world is increasingly interested in natural drugs and excipients. These natural materials have many advantages over synthetic ones as they are chemically inert, nontoxic, less expensive, biodegradable, and widely available. This review discusses majority of the plant-derived polymeric compounds (gums and mucilage's), their sources, chemical constituents, uses, and some recent investigations as excipients in novel drug delivery systems.

  20. Alyssum homolocarpum seed gum-polyvinyl alcohol biodegradable composite film: Physicochemical, mechanical, thermal and barrier properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjazeb Marvdashti, Leila; Koocheki, Arash; Yavarmanesh, Masoud

    2017-01-02

    Films made from Alyssum homolocarpum seeds gum (AHSG) have poor mechanical and barrier (to oxygen) properties. In the present study poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) was used to improve the physicochemical properties of AHSG films. Results indicated that the addition of PVA significantly increased the moisture content, solubility, elongation at break (EB) and transparency while it decreased the density, oxygen permeability, chroma, water contact angle and Young modulus of AHSG based films. Films with higher AHSG to PVA ratios had lower water vapor permeability (WVP). The light barrier measurements presented low values of transparency at 600nm for PVA/AHSG films, indicating that films were very transparent while they had excellent barrier properties against UV light. Results for FTIR, DSC and SEM showed a clear interaction between PVA and AHSG, forming a new material. These results indicated that PVA/AHSG blend films had good compatibility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Study on plant Gums and their new development in application: with focus on tragacanth, guar and arabic Gum; a short review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hassanpour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gums refer to a type of polysaccharides which are used to increase viscosity and create some other functional properties such as thickening agent, emulsifying agent, stabilizer, crystal inhibitor and so forth. They are classifying based on their nature and originality including, microbial, plant, exudate and animal Gums. This article shortly reviews a group of plant Gums and recent findings in their application. Gums or Hydrocolloids are main compounds which create stability of emulsion via entering into water phase. The importance of these compounds is on viscosity and electrostatic reactions to stabilize nonalcoholic emulsion with below properties; 1 easily soluble in cold water, 2 the lowest amount of viscosity in water, 3 having maximum level of emulsifier amount, 4 no creation of gelling. Diversity and functionality of Gums and regarding their still novelty in food industries have made Gums one of the main additives in food formulations. Since sourced of Gums are different we must focus on using them together to improve their synergistic effect but interactions among them and combined matrixes produced by them also need to be studied in details.

  2. Directly compressible medicated chewing gum formulation for quick relief from common cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Shivang A; Shahiwala, Aliasgar F

    2012-07-01

    Common cold is the most frequently recurring disease in the world and is a leading cause of doctor visits and missed days from school and work. Cold reliever medicated chewing gum (MCG) will be a definitive patient acceptable solution for this condition. Anti-allergic, cetirizine (CTZ) is a BCS class-I (highly soluble and highly permeable) non-sedating antihistaminic drug and this study was based on the hypothesis that CTZ as a BCS class I drug will be easily released from chewing gum into the salivary fluid within few minutes of chewing and can be easily permeated from oral mucosa by the pressure created by the chewing action and absorbed to a larger extent into the systemic circulation. Therefore, ultimately patients will get quick relief from symptoms of common cold with greater compliance compared to other conventional dosage forms. This study mainly focuses on taste masking of CTZ by inclusion complexation method, its formulation development in the MCG form and its quality and performance evaluation with the study of potential factors affecting drug release by 3(2) full factorial experimental design. A "chew out" study is carried out to assess in vivo drug release from MCG, in which residual amount is extracted from the chewed sample. Formulation ingredients, such as elastomers, softeners, bulking agents, play an important role in the feel of the final product and its consistency; while sweeteners and flavors play a very essential character in its sensory properties. Interindividual variation in chewing frequency and chewing intensity is the main factor which affects release of active ingredient from MCG; while salivary dilution and involuntary swallowing are main reasons for variability in the absorption site, i.e., either from buccal mucosa or from gastrointestinal tract.

  3. 3D printing of layered brain-like structures using peptide modified gellan gum substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Rodrigo; Stevens, Leo; Thompson, Brianna C; Gilmore, Kerry J; Gorkin, Robert; Stewart, Elise M; in het Panhuis, Marc; Romero-Ortega, Mario; Wallace, Gordon G

    2015-10-01

    The brain is an enormously complex organ structured into various regions of layered tissue. Researchers have attempted to study the brain by modeling the architecture using two dimensional (2D) in vitro cell culturing methods. While those platforms attempt to mimic the in vivo environment, they do not truly resemble the three dimensional (3D) microstructure of neuronal tissues. Development of an accurate in vitro model of the brain remains a significant obstacle to our understanding of the functioning of the brain at the tissue or organ level. To address these obstacles, we demonstrate a new method to bioprint 3D brain-like structures consisting of discrete layers of primary neural cells encapsulated in hydrogels. Brain-like structures were constructed using a bio-ink consisting of a novel peptide-modified biopolymer, gellan gum-RGD (RGD-GG), combined with primary cortical neurons. The ink was optimized for a modified reactive printing process and developed for use in traditional cell culturing facilities without the need for extensive bioprinting equipment. Furthermore the peptide modification of the gellan gum hydrogel was found to have a profound positive effect on primary cell proliferation and network formation. The neural cell viability combined with the support of neural network formation demonstrated the cell supportive nature of the matrix. The facile ability to form discrete cell-containing layers validates the application of this novel printing technique to form complex, layered and viable 3D cell structures. These brain-like structures offer the opportunity to reproduce more accurate 3D in vitro microstructures with applications ranging from cell behavior studies to improving our understanding of brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In situ effect of CPP-ACP chewing gum upon erosive enamel loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Ribeiro Barros de ALENCAR

    Full Text Available Abstract Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP is able to increase salivary calcium and phosphate levels at an acidic pH. Previous studies demonstrated that a CPP-ACP chewing gum was able to enhance the re-hardening of erosion lesions, but could not diminish enamel hardness loss. Therefore, there is no consensus regarding the effectiveness of CPP-ACP on dental erosion. Objective This in situ study investigated the ability of a CPP-ACP chewing gum in preventing erosive enamel loss. Material and Methods: During three experimental crossover phases (one phase per group of seven days each, eight volunteers wore palatal devices with human enamel blocks. The groups were: GI – Sugar free chewing gum with CPP-ACP; GII – Conventional sugar free chewing gum; and GIII – No chewing gum (control. Erosive challenge was extraorally performed by immersion of the enamel blocks in cola drink (5 min, 4x/day. After each challenge, in groups CPP and No CPP, volunteers chewed one unit of the corresponding chewing gum for 30 minutes. Quantitative analysis of enamel loss was performed by profilometry (µm. Data were analyzed by Repeated-Measures ANOVA and Tukey’s test (p0.05. Conclusion The CPP-ACP chewing gum was not able to enhance the anti-erosive effect of conventional chewing gum against enamel loss.

  5. In vitro evaluation of Moringa oleifera gum for colon-specific drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Anil Kumar; Jarald, Edwin E; Showkat, Ahmad; Daud, Anwar

    2012-01-01

    Moringa gum obtained from stem of the plant Moringa oleifera Lam. belonging to family Moringaceae. Number of naturally occurring polysaccharides obtained from plant (guar gum, inulin), animal (chitosan, chondrotin sulphate), algal (alginates) or microbial (dextran) origin. The present study was evaluated Moringa oleifera gum as a carrier for colon specific drug delivery using in vitro drug release studies. Six formulations of curcumin were prepared using varying concentration of Moringa oleifera gum containing 50 mg curcumin by wet granulation method. Tablets were subjected for evaluation by studying the parameter like hardness, friability, drug content uniformity and in vitro drug release study. Hardness was found to be in the range of 5.5 to 7.3 kg/cm(2), the percentage friability was in the range of 0.60 to 0.89%, and tablet showed 98.99% to 99.89% of the labeled amount of curcumin indicating uniformity in drug content. In vitro drug release study was performed using simulated stomach, intestinal and colonic fluid. The susceptibility of Moringa gum to colonic bacteria was also assessed using drug release study with rat caecal contents. 30% Moringa gum containing formulation (F-3) was shown better drug released that is 90.46%, at the end of 24 h of dissolution study in the presence of rat caecal contents in comparison to 40% Moringa gum containing formulation (F-4) that was 78.03%. The results illustrate the usefulness of Moringa olefera gum as a potential carrier for colon-specific drug delivery.

  6. Optimizing the production of welan gum by Alcaligenes facalis NX-3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-02-15

    Feb 15, 2010 ... These predicted values were also verified by validation experiments. Key words: Alcaligenes facalis NX-3, Medium optimization, Plackett–Burman design, statistical experiment design, welan gum. ... However, it has not yet been reported as a means to study and optimize process parameters for welan gum ...

  7. Purification of cress seed (Lepidium sativum) gum: Physicochemical characterization and functional properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmkhah, Somayeh; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    emulsifying properties of cress seed gum and there was no significant difference among the purified samples. Crude gum showed the lowest foaming properties, while samples I and E (purified using ethanol) showed the highest foaming capacity and foam stability, respectively. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights...

  8. Evaluation of the suspening property of Grewia gum in zinc oxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The suspending property of grewia gum in zinc oxide suspension was evaluated. The gum was extracted by maceration, filtration, precipitation and drying techniques. It was used at 0.3 to 1% w/v as a suspending agent for zinc oxide. Sodiumcarboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) and tragacanth were used as basis for ...

  9. Effect of chewing gums containing the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri on oral malodour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Mette K; Bardow, Allan; Jensdottir, Thorbjörg

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of chewing gums containing probiotic bacteria on oral malodour. The null hypothesis was that no difference would be displayed compared with placebo gums. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-five healthy young adults with self-reported malodorous morning breath completed...

  10. Evaluation of the Binding Effect of Local Gum of Boswellia papyrifera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Boswellia papyrifera is one of the chief gum resin producing tree species in Ethiopia. Frankincense harvested from it is the most widely traded one. Frankincense is used for a variety of purposes from traditional medicine to industries such as pharmaceutical, perfume and food industries. In this work, B. papyrifera gum has ...

  11. Analysis of a gum from the exudates of Dichrostachys cinerea (L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The moisture content obtained was 15.8 ± 0.3%, which was rather too high and would only be suitable for formulations that need to remain moisturized. The gum from this plant had little ... In conclusion, this gum has potential as a product for the cosmetic, pharmaceutical and food industries. Further studies are needed to ...

  12. Unveiling the Sources of Chromium in Pictorialist Photographs: Gum-Dichromate Process or Paper Sizing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vila, Anna; Centeno, Silvia A; Kennedy, Nora W

    2015-01-01

    For this issue of Hand Papermaking devoted to paper sizing, we offer a review and extension of pertinent results obtained in our investigations of the gum-dichromate photographic process, commonly known as the gum-bichromate process.1 We have published three articles to date on our findings; this...

  13. 77 FR 65361 - Xanthan Gum From Austria and the People's Republic of China: Postponement of Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... International Trade Administration Xanthan Gum From Austria and the People's Republic of China: Postponement of...: Karine Gziryan (Austria) or Brandon Farlander (People's Republic of China), AD/CVD Operations, Office 4... xanthan gum from Austria and the People's Republic of China.\\1\\ The notice of initiation stated that the...

  14. 77 FR 34997 - Xanthan Gum From Austria and China; Institution of Antidumping Duty Investigations and Scheduling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Xanthan Gum From Austria and China; Institution of Antidumping Duty Investigations and Scheduling... from Austria and/or China of xanthan gum, provided for in subheading 3913.90.20 of the Harmonized...

  15. Effect of chewing gum use on oral hygiene and volatile sulphur ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chewing of gum has been favoured by many people because of its beneficial effects. The objective of this study was therefore to determine the difference between the oral hygiene status, organoleptic assessment, self perception of malodour as well as the mouth- air volatile sulphur compound concentration of chewing gum ...

  16. Intra-species variation of the properties of gum exudates from Acacia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gum exudates from Acacia senegal var. senegal and Acacia seyal var. fistula from Tanzania have been analyzed and their inter- and intra-species variation of their properties evaluated. The results show that significant inter-species variation of the properties of the gum exudates from the two species exist, whereas only ...

  17. An assessment of the soil-conditioning capacity of gums exuded by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assesses the soil conditioning capacity of tree gums based on the level of resistance to crumble posed by moulds of treated soils to the impacts of artificial raindrops. Gums exuded by trees viz., Acacia occidental and Parkia bicolor as well as a sample of poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVA) were used as soil conditioners.

  18. Investigation of the effect of zinc oxide-modified gum Arabic on polar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gum Arabic solution, a water-based adhesive, was modified with zinc oxide filler and the formulation was applied on wood, ceramic, glass and textile substrates. A strip of paper was used as a common adherent to all the substrates. Zinc oxide increased the viscosity of 30wt% gum Arabic solution and increased bond ...

  19. Compositional analysis and rheological characterization of gum tragacanth exudates from six species of Iranian Astragalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaghi, Sima; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Zargaraan, Azizollaah

    2011-01-01

    . In general, the results indicated that the six varieties of gum tragacanth studied exhibited significantly different rheological properties; therefore, these different gums may find use in a variety of applications as stabilisers, thickeners, emulsifiers and suspending agents depending on their rheological...

  20. Market-driven production with transaction costs outlook: Gum arabic collection systems in Senegal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mujawamariya, G.; Burger, C.P.J.; Haese, D' M.F.C.

    2015-01-01

    Low returns from marketing of non-timber forest products such as gum arabic restrict the collection of these products. A hypothesis is tested that access to good markets motivates collectors to harvest and market gum arabic. Analyses of the choice of participation in group marketing, sale price,

  1. Dilute solution, flow behavior, thixotropy and viscoelastic characterization of cress seed (Lepidium sativum) gum fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmkhah, Somayeh; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, rheological properties of cress seed gum (CSG) and its fractions (F1, F2, F3; fractionated using stepwise extraction with water) were investigated. Cress seed gum and its fractions revealed random coil conformation in dilute regimes; chain flexibility and intrinsic viscosity...... indicated that CSG and the fractions exhibited significantly different rheological properties....

  2. Evaluation of Native and Cross-Linked Acacia Senegal Gums as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) studies indicated the compatibility of the gums with the model drug, theophylline. Dissolution studies showed AS, Cross-linked var. karensis (CAS) and var. senegal (CAH) can sustain the release of the drug beyond 12 h at higher gum concentrations (p < 0.05) indicating the ...

  3. Reduction of lipid oxidation by formation of caseinate-oil-oat gum emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concentration of oat gum, though important for formation of stable emulsion, has no effect on oxidation of Omega 3 oil; this is most prominent in fish-oil based Omega 3 oil. The optimal concentration of oat gum is about 0.2% wt for emulsion stability and visual appearance. We found that concentr...

  4. Economic analysis of deforestation : the case of the gum Arabic belt in Sudan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahim, A.

    2006-01-01

    Keywords: Gum Arabic; Deforestation; Entry and Exit; Real options Drought; Socio-economic, Oligopoly; Interdependent markets; Stackelberg.The gum arabic belt inSudanoffered in the past an

  5. In situ effect of CPP-ACP chewing gum upon erosive enamel loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    de ALENCAR, Catarina Ribeiro Barros; de OLIVEIRA, Gabriela Cristina; MAGALHÃES, Ana Carolina; BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; MACHADO, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; RIOS, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) is able to increase salivary calcium and phosphate levels at an acidic pH. Previous studies demonstrated that a CPP-ACP chewing gum was able to enhance the re-hardening of erosion lesions, but could not diminish enamel hardness loss. Therefore, there is no consensus regarding the effectiveness of CPP-ACP on dental erosion. Objective This in situ study investigated the ability of a CPP-ACP chewing gum in preventing erosive enamel loss. Material and Methods: During three experimental crossover phases (one phase per group) of seven days each, eight volunteers wore palatal devices with human enamel blocks. The groups were: GI – Sugar free chewing gum with CPP-ACP; GII – Conventional sugar free chewing gum; and GIII – No chewing gum (control). Erosive challenge was extraorally performed by immersion of the enamel blocks in cola drink (5 min, 4x/day). After each challenge, in groups CPP and No CPP, volunteers chewed one unit of the corresponding chewing gum for 30 minutes. Quantitative analysis of enamel loss was performed by profilometry (µm). Data were analyzed by Repeated-Measures ANOVA and Tukey’s test (p0.05). Conclusion The CPP-ACP chewing gum was not able to enhance the anti-erosive effect of conventional chewing gum against enamel loss. PMID:28678944

  6. Acacia Senegal gum exudate offers protection against cyclophosphamide-induced urinary bladder cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Yahya, Abdulaziz A; Al-Majed, Abdulhakeem A; Gado, Ali M; Daba, Mohammad H; Al-Shabanah, Othman A; Abd-Allah, Adel R A

    2009-01-01

    Cylophosphamide (CYCL) is a strong anticancer and immunosuppressive agent but its urotoxicity presents one of the major toxic effects that limit its wide usage particularly in high dose regimens. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate Acacia Senegal gum exudate ,Gum Arabic (GA), for its possible role as a natural, nontoxic agent against CYCL-induced urotoxicity. Male Swiss albino rats were exposed to CYCL (150 mg/kg BW, once i.p) with or without GA oral supplementation (7.5 g/kg/day for 6 days) through drinking water. Glutathione (GSH), Malondialdehyde (MDA) and Nitric oxide (NO) bladder contents were assessed. Responsiveness of the bladder rings to acetylcholine (ACh) in vitro, microscopic and macroscopic features are also investigated. CYCL produced pronounced harmful effects on bladder urothelial lining with significant increases in (MDA) and NO levels in the tissue homogenates. Bladder-GSH content is dropped by over 60% following CYCL injection. Bladder contractility, as measured by its responsiveness to ACh, recorded a marked reduction. The isolated bladders exhibited such macroscopic changes as severe edema, inflammation and extravasation. The bladder weight increased as well. Histological changes were evident in the form of severe congestion, petechial hemorrhage and chronic inflammatory reaction in the lamina propria accompanied with desquamated epithelia. GA, a potential protective agent, produced an almost complete reversal of NO induction, lipid peroxidation or cellular GSH bladder contents in the GA+CYCL-treated group. Likewise, bladder inflammation and edema were reduced. Bladder rings showed a remarkable recovery in their responsiveness to ACh. Bladder histological examination showed a near normal configuration and structural integrity, with a significant reduction in inflammation and disappearance of focal erosions. These remarkable effects of GA may be attributed to its ability to neutralize acrolein, the reactive metabolite of CYCL and/or the

  7. Potential benefits of chewing gum for the delivery of oral therapeutics and its possible role in oral healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, Stefan W.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Maitra, Amarnath; Dodds, Michael W. J.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Over the years, chewing gum has developed from a candy towards an oral health-promoting nutraceutical. This review summarizes evidence for the oral health benefits of chewing gum, emphasizing identification of active ingredients in gum that facilitate prevention and removal of oral

  8. 78 FR 13379 - Xanthan Gum from Austria and China; Scheduling of the Final Phase of an Antidumping Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... COMMISSION Xanthan Gum from Austria and China; Scheduling of the Final Phase of an Antidumping Investigation... imports from Austria and/or China of xanthan gum, provided for in subheading 3913.90.20 of the Harmonized... preliminary determinations by the Department of Commerce that imports of xanthan gum from Austria and China...

  9. 78 FR 2251 - Xanthan Gum From Austria: Preliminary Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    ... International Trade Administration Xanthan Gum From Austria: Preliminary Determination of Sales at Less Than... determines that xanthan gum from Austria is being, or is likely to be, sold in the United States at less than... Investigation: Xanthan Gum from Austria,'' (``Preliminary Decision Memorandum'') from Christian Marsh, Deputy...

  10. Rapid Chondrocyte Isolation for Tissue Engineering Applications: The Effect of Enzyme Concentration and Temporal Exposure on the Matrix Forming Capacity of Nasal Derived Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedicherla, Srujana; Buckley, Conor Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory based processing and expansion to yield adequate cell numbers had been the standard in Autologous Disc Chondrocyte Transplantation (ADCT), Allogeneic Juvenile Chondrocyte Implantation (NuQu®), and Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (MACI). Optimizing cell isolation is a key challenge in terms of obtaining adequate cell numbers while maintaining a vibrant cell population capable of subsequent proliferation and matrix elaboration. However, typical cell yields from a cartilage digest are highly variable between donors and based on user competency. The overall objective of this study was to optimize chondrocyte isolation from cartilaginous nasal tissue through modulation of enzyme concentration exposure (750 and 3000 U/ml) and incubation time (1 and 12 h), combined with physical agitation cycles, and to assess subsequent cell viability and matrix forming capacity. Overall, increasing enzyme exposure time was found to be more detrimental than collagenase concentration for subsequent viability, proliferation, and matrix forming capacity (sGAG and collagen) of these cells resulting in nonuniform cartilaginous matrix deposition. Taken together, consolidating a 3000 U/ml collagenase digest of 1 h at a ratio of 10 ml/g of cartilage tissue with physical agitation cycles can improve efficiency of chondrocyte isolation, yielding robust, more uniform matrix formation.

  11. In vivo mucoadhesive strength appraisal of gum Manilkara zapota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Sudarshan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mucilage (MMZ extracted from the seeds of Manilkara zapota(Linn. P. Royen syn. using maceration techniques was evaluated for mucoadhesive strength by various in vitro and in vivo methods. The result showed that mucoadhesive strength of seeds mucilage have comparable property toward natural and synthetic polymers such as Guar Gum and hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC E5LV under the experimental conditions used in this study. Briefly, it could be concluded that the seed mucilage of Manilkara zapota can be used as a pharmaceutical excipient in oral mucoadhesive drug delivery systems. Further, it may be appropriate to study the changes in these properties after chemical modifications.

  12. Selective depression behavior of guar gum on talc-type scheelite flotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-zhong; Gu, Guo-hua; Wu, Xiang-bin; Zhao, Kai-le

    2017-08-01

    The depression behavior and mechanism of guar gum on talc-type scheelite flotation were systematically investigated by flotation experiments, adsorption tests, zeta-potential measurements, and infrared spectroscopic analyses. The flotation results for monominerals, mixed minerals, and actual mineral samples indicated that guar gum exhibited much higher selective depression for talc than for scheelite. Bench-scale closed-circuit tests showed that a tungsten concentrate with a WO3 grade of 51.43% and a WO3 recovery of 76.18% was obtained. Adsorption tests, zeta-potential measurements, and infrared spectral analyses confirmed that guar gum absorbed more strongly onto the talc surface than onto the scheelite surface because of chemisorption between guar gum and talc. This chemisorption is responsible for the guar gum's highly selective depression for talc and small depression for scheelite. The flotation results provide technical support for talc-type scheelite flotation.

  13. Tragacanth Gum: Structural Composition, Natural Functionality and Enxymatic Conversion as Source of Potential Prebiotic Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi Gavlighi, Hassan

    species of Iranian Astragalus for their emulsion stabilizing effects and their detailed chemical composition in order to examine any possible correlation between the make-up and the emulsion stabilizing properties of gum tragacanth. Also, enzymatic modification of highly fucose content of tragacanth gum...... of this gum with arabinogalactan and fucoxylogalacturonans in the structure of we decided to evaluate bioactivity of this gum. To date, different commercial of prebiotic compound available but still new compound is needed and interested. The main process for the production of prebiotic is enzymatic process...... that the structure of gum tragacanthfractions was different and included 1,4-bonded galacturonic acid backbone with terminally linked fucose and (1,),2-linked xylose, as well as terminally linked xylose called fucoxylogalacturonan. In addition, the presence of (1,),4-galactose linkages and 1,5 Ara linkage presumably...

  14. Purification of cress seed (Lepidium sativum) gum: A comprehensive rheological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmkhah, Somayeh; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin

    2016-01-01

    , the storage modulus (G′) was higher than the loss modulus (G″), and mechanical spectra of the crude and purified cress seed gums were classified as weak gels. The purified samples had stronger and more elastic network structure than the crude gum (CSG) and the gel network got stronger along the series of I......, EI and E. All the gum dispersions indicated shear-thinning behavior and the viscosity of the samples followed the order of E > EI > I > CSG. Herschel-Bulkley model was the best model to describe steady shear flow behavior and Arrhenius-type model was also applied to describe the effect of temperature....... Crude cress seed gum and EI showed the highest and the lowest activation energy, respectively. The crude and purified gums indicated thixotropic behavior and CSG exhibited the lowest hysteresis loop area and the highest structural recovery. All the samples revealed random coil conformation in dilute...

  15. KARAKTERISTIK EMULSI SANTAN DAN MINYAK KEDELAI YANG DITAMBAH GUM ARAB DAN SUKROSA ESTER [Emulsion Characteristics of Coconut Milk and Soybean Oil Added with Gum Arabic and Sucrose Ester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laksmi Hartayanie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available High saturated fatty acid content in coconut milk can be reduced by adding unsaturated fat. Pretreatment such as pasteurisation, homogenization or stabilizer and emulsifier addition are essential to prevent emulsion deterioration that could happen in few hours. This study aimed to determine the most appropriate combination of gum arabic and sucrose ester to produce good emulsion stability based on its physical and chemical characteristics. Furthermore this study also aimed to determine correlation between creaming index and other characteristics of coconut milk emulsion. Emulsion stability of mixed coconut milk in sterile glass bottles was observed for 7 days under 23-24°C. Stabilizer and emulsifier added were gum arabic and sucrose ester in five combinations, i.e. 6% gum arabic, 0.3% sucrose ester, 6% gum arabic + 0.3% sucrose ester, 3% gum arabic + 0.15% sucrose ester and 4.5% gum arabic + 0.225% sucrose ester. The physical characteristics evaluated were creaming index, total color change, viscosity and droplet distribution, while the chemical characteristics observed included pH, TBA value, and protein content. Data were analyzed by One Way Anova at 95% significant level to determine the differences among treatments. Bivariate Pearson Correlation was used in order to determine the interaction among sample characteristics. The data showed that, gum arabic and sucrose ester can maintain the emulsion stability. A combination of 4.5% gum arabic and 0.225% sucrose ester provided the best physicochemical characteristics with the lowest creaming index and decreased viscosit, and uniform droplet distribution.

  16. Quantitative HPLC analysis of active pharmaceutical ingredients in syrup vehicle using centrifugal filter devices and determination of xanthan gum in syrup vehicle using rheometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Tadey, Tanya; Hu, Mougang; Carr, Geoff; Guo, Junan

    2010-02-01

    Using rapid centrifugal filtration (membrane prevented compounds with molecular weight higher than the nominal molecular weight limit (NMWL) from transporting through the membrane, thus separating them from compounds with molecular weight smaller than NMWL, which would pass through the membrane. The purpose of this study aims to remove high molecular weight matrix (such as xanthan gum) interferences while achieving a quantitative analysis of the active pharmaceutical ingradients of interest. Two model active pharmaceutical ingredients, L-arginine and amphotericin B, were quantitatively recovered from the diluted syrup vehicle after centrifugation with the filter devices. The reproducibility [% relative standard deviation (RSD), peak area] of the filtered samples was less than 0.5%. For amphotericin B samples. The linear range was 0.28 microg/mL to 28.2 microg/mL. The limit of detection was 0.06 microg/mL. The limit of quantification was 0.28 microg/mL. The viscosity of a syrup vehicle changed linearly with the concentration of xanthan gum. A method was thus developed to determine xanthan gum in the syrup vehicle. The accuracy was within 95.0% to 105.0% at different concentration levels.

  17. Monitoring decay of black gum wood (Nyssa sylvatica) during growth of the shiitake mushroom (Lentinula edodes) using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vane, Christopher H

    2003-05-01

    Abstract diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT) and elemental analysis were employed to monitor biodegradation of black gum wood (Nyssa sylvatica) during growth of the shiitake mushroom (Lentinula edodes). Black gum was decayed for up to 4.3 years by L. edodes, during which time it was sampled at 19, 31, and 52 months. Biodegraded woods displayed increased % O (w/w) and decreased % C (w/w) relative to the undecayed control. The DRIFT spectra of decayed black gum showed a decrease in relative intensity of absorption bands at 1735 cm(-1) assigned to carboxyl functional groups from xylans and an increase in the absorption band at 1640 cm(-1) assigned to conjugated carbonyl groups originating from lignin. Xylan decay was rapid initially but slowed after 19 months; however, oxidative decay of the lignin side chains occurred throughout the 52-month decay period. Overall elemental and DRIFT data show that both polysaccharides and lignin were decayed during cultivation of the edible white-rot fungus.

  18. Feasibility and acceptability of point of care HIV testing in community outreach and GUM drop-in services in the North West of England: A programmatic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelliman Pauline

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Liverpool, injecting drug users (IDUs, men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM and UK Africans experience a disproportionate burden of HIV, yet services do not reach out to these groups and late presentations continue. We set out to: increase testing uptake in targeted marginalized groups through a community and genitourinary medicine (GUM-based point of care testing (POCT programme; and conduct a process evaluation to examine service provider inputs and document service user perceptions of the programme. Methods Mixed quantitative, qualitative and process evaluation methods were used. Service providers were trained to use fourth generation rapid antibody/antigen HIV tests. Existing outreach services incorporated POCT into routine practice. Clients completed a semi-structured questionnaire and focus group discussions (FGDs were held with service providers. Results Between September 2009 and June 2010, 953 individuals underwent POCT (GUM: 556 [59%]; community-based sites: 397 [42%]. Participants in the community were more likely to be male (p = 0.028, older (p Conclusions Community and GUM clinic-based POCT for HIV was feasible and acceptable to clients and service providers in a low prevalence setting. It successfully reached target groups, many of whom would not have otherwise tested. We recommend POCT be considered among strategies to increase the uptake of HIV testing among groups who are currently underserved.

  19. Bleeding from gums: Can it be a dengue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Bansal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bleeding from gums is a common feature in periodontitis patient. But abnormal bleeding from the gingiva or other areas of the oral mucosa that is difficult to control is an important clinical sign suggesting a hematological disorder. Case Report: A-40-year old male patient reported to our clinic with the chief complaint of acute gingival bleeding. There was continuous bleeding, fever since 3-4 days with weakness, retro orbital pain, and severe backache. Patient gave a history of bleeding from gums for last 24 hrs. His blood profile revealed; platelet count of 36,000, total wite blood cell (WBC count of 6000/cumm, differential leukocyte count (DLC (P45, L53, E2, and hemoglobin 12 g/dL. Patient sera was positive for dengue non-structural protein-1 antigen, anti-dengue immunoglobulin M (IgM, and anti-dengue immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies. Discussion: Here is a case report capable of changing our vision that acute gingival bleeding can also occur in dengue fever. Dengue fever can also be considered as one of the differential diagnosis for the acute gingival bleeding.

  20. Solubilisation of Persian gum: Chemical modification using acrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samari-Khalaj, Masumeh; Abbasi, Soleiman

    2017-08-01

    Persian gum (PG), mountain almond tree (Amygdalus scoparia) exudate, is a transparent and natural edible gum which consists of soluble (SFPG, 25-30wt%) and insoluble (IFPG, 70-75wt%) fractions. Therefore, in the present study, using response surface methodology (RSM), the influence of concentration (0.64-7.36wt%), acrylamide (0.070-0.120mol), temperature (19.77-70.23°C), and time (0.32-3.68h) on solubilizing and some other properties of IFPG were investigated. Based on our findings, the highest solubility (64wt%) was achieved at the presence of 6wt% IFPG, and 0.08mol acrylamide at 60°C after 3h. Intrinsic viscosity and molecular weight determination also confirmed modification reaction which led to reduction in molecular weight. In addition, the effect of pH and electrolytes on rheological properties showed that the soluble part of IFPG which modified at optimum conditions had an anionic structure similar to conventional SFPG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Methotrexate loaded gellan gum microparticles for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanka, Mukesh; Shetty, Chaitra; Srivastava, Rohit

    2017-12-06

    Recently, polysaccharides based microparticles have been found to offer an attractive potential as a carrier in drug delivery field. In this study, bare gellan gum microparticles (GG MPs) and methotrexate (MTX) loaded gellan gum microparticles (MTX-GG MPs) prepared by using simple water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion solvent diffusion method. The developed microparticles (MPs) were found discretely distributed in a spherical shape. MTX has been encapsulated in microparticles with 84.8 ± 1.68% encapsulation efficiency (%EE) and 6.45 ± 0.07% loading capacity (%LC). The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) characterization of the MPs clearly indicated the physical encapsulation of MTX into polymeric matrix of MPs. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) characterization showed slightly higher thermal stability of MTX-GG MPs in comparison to the GG MPs. In vitro release study of MTX-GG MPs showed 84% drug release within 24 h. The hemolysis study of GG MPs and MTX-GG MPs on human red blood cells (RBCs) showed <1.0% hemolysis. The cell viability studies on L929 showed GG MPs, and MTX-GG MPs are biocompatible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. MUSE: computational aspects of a GUM supplement 1 implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Martin; Wolf, Marco; Rösslein, Matthias

    2008-10-01

    The new guideline GUM Supplement 1—Propagation of Distributions Using a Monte Carlo Method (GS1) is currently published by JCGM/WG1. It describes an approximate method to calculate the measurement uncertainty in nearly all areas of metrology. In this way it overcomes the various limitations and drawbacks of the uncertainty propagation detailed in GUM. However, GS1 demands a software implementation in contrast to the uncertainty propagation. Therefore we have developed a software tool called MUSE (Measurement Uncertainty Simulation and Evaluation), which is a comprehensive implementation of GS1. In this paper we present the major computational aspects of the software which are the sampling from probability density functions (PDFs), an efficient way to propagate the PDFs with the help of a block design through the equation of the measurand and the calculation of the summarizing parameters based on these blocks. Also the different quality measures which are in place during the life cycle of the tool are elaborated.

  3. Short-term effects of a green coffee extract-, Garcinia c ambogia- and L-carnitine-containing chewing gum on snack intake and appetite regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobillo, Cecilia; Finlayson, Graham; Martínez, Ana; Fischman, Daniela; Beneitez, Analisa; Ferrero, Alejandro J; Fernández, Belisario E; Mayer, Marcos A

    2016-11-24

    Different studies have assessed the influence of chewing gum to aid control of appetite and reduce food intake. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the effects of chewing gum on satiety, food hedonics and snack intake and to explore the potential effects of the combination of Garcinia c ambogia, green coffee extract and L-carnitine on satiety, when administered in a gum format. This was a prospective study in which 57 subjects randomly received three kinds of treatments, in a crossover design: (1) active gum; (2) placebo gum; and (3) no gum. Food preferences and appetite sensations were evaluated by means of the Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire and visual analog scales. There was a significant reduction in low-fat sweet snack intake with placebo gum and the active gum compared to no gum and a reduction in high-fat sweet snack intake with the active gum compared to placebo gum and no gum. Total caloric intake was only reduced in the active gum condition. Both the active and placebo gum conditions significantly reduced hunger and prospective food consumption and increased fullness compared to no gum and were associated with a reduced wanting for sweet food in the LFPQ, consistent in a reduction in the relative preference for sweet snacks versus savoury snacks. This study supports the notion that chewing gum containing nutraceutical products might aid in the control over snack intake and reduce hunger sensations.

  4. Study of antimicrobial activity and atomic force microscopy imaging of the action mechanism of cashew tree gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Débora A; Ribeiro, Alexandra C; Costa, Eduardo M; Fernandes, João C; Tavaria, Freni K; Araruna, Felipe Bastos; Eiras, Carla; Eaton, Peter; Leite, José Roberto S A; Manuela Pintado, M

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the antimicrobial potential of two grades of cashew tree gum (crude and purified) against eight microorganisms and to analyze the mechanism of cashew tree gum antimicrobial action via atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging. The results indicated strong antimicrobial properties of pure cashew tree gum against all tested microorganisms, except for Candida albicans and Lactobacillus acidophilus. On the other hand crude cashew gum showed antimicrobial activity only against Gram-positive bacteria (MRSA, MSSA, Listeria innocua and Enterococcus faecium). Atomic force microscopy imaging showed that pure cashew tree gum lead to bacterial cell collapse. In conclusion cashew tree gum presented relevant antimicrobial activity against most of the studied bacteria, and the purification of the cashew gum affected its antimicrobial spectrum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. In Vivo Release Kinetics and Antibacterial Activity of Novel Polyphenols-Enriched Chewing Gums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianmaria Fabrizio Ferrazzano

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chewing gums may be particularly effective means for delivering and maintaining bioactive molecules, included in the gum formulation, able to have an anti-cariogenic effect. The purposes of this study were: to develop novel chewing gums containing quercetin (Qt; to evaluate their release using in vivo trial; finally, to test their in vivo antibacterial effect against oral Streptococcus mutans strains. A preliminary study was performed to produce new gums, enriched with the polyphenol quercetin. Then, a first in vivo experimental study was assessed to test the percentages of Qt released in the saliva of young volunteers. Moreover, a second clinical trial was performed to analyze the antibacterial capability of these enriched chewing gums against S. mutans strains after 14 days of daily consumption. The release analysis showed that a more effective release of Qt occurs in the first minutes of chewing, and it does not change saliva pH values. Moreover, Qt included in gums demonstrates an effective antibacterial activity, showing a reduction of the concentration of S. mutans strains in saliva samples, especially after 7 days. Qt included in experimental chewing gums could be efficiently released into the oral cavity and could promote an effective anti-caries concentration in volunteer’s saliva, without changing salivary pH values.

  6. Thiol derivatization of Xanthan gum and its evaluation as a mucoadhesive polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Meenakshi; Ahuja, Munish; Mehta, Heena

    2015-10-20

    Thiol-derivatization of xanthan gum polysaccharide was carried out by esterification with mercaptopropionic acid and thioglycolic acid. Thiol-derivatization was confirmed by Fourier-transformed infra-red spectroscopy. Xanthan-mercaptopropionic acid conjugate and xanthan-thioglycolic acid conjugate were found to possess 432.68mM and 465.02mM of thiol groups as determined by Ellman's method respectively. Comparative evaluation of mucoadhesive property of metronidazole loaded buccal pellets of xanthan and thiolated xanthan gum using chicken buccal pouch membrane revealed higher ex vivo bioadhesion time of thiolated xanthan gum as compared to xanthan gum. Improved mucoadhesive property of thiolated xanthan gum over the xanthan gum can be attributed to the formation of disulfide bond between mucus and thiolated xanthan gum. In vitro release study conducted using phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) revealed a sustained release profile of metronidazole from thiolated xanthan pellets as compared to xanthan pellets. In conclusion, thiolation of xanthan improves its mucoadhesive property and sustained the release of metronidazole over a prolonged period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Gum cordia as carrier of antioxidants: effects on lipid oxidation of peanuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Muhammad Abdul; Azam, Mahmood; Hasnain, Abid

    2015-04-01

    Performance of antioxidants is improved by incorporating them into polymer matrix such as polysaccharides based edible coatings. Gum cordia, an anionic polysaccharide extracted from the fruits of Cordia.myxa could be used as carrier of antioxidants by virtue of its strong adhering and emulsifying properties. This study aimed to explore the potential of gum cordia as carrier of antioxidants when applied as edible coating on peanuts. Gum Cordia was compared with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) in delivering of antioxidants: butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and ascorbic acid (AA). Coated and uncoated peanuts were stored at 35 °C for 126 days and coating carrier effectiveness was measured by following lipid oxidation using chemical parameters (peroxide value and thiobarbituric acid reactive species) and sensory evaluation (oxidized flavor). Significant differences (p cordia was found better than CMC to deliver the antioxidants. Gum cordia based coating in combination with BHA/BHT exhibited highest protection (290 % higher shelf life than control) based on peroxide value (40 meq.O2 kg(-1)) followed by gum codia plus BHT (244 %), gum cordia plus BHA (232 %), CMC plus BHA/BHT (184 %), CMC plus BHA (139 %), CMC plus BHT (119 %), gum cordia plus AA (96 %) and CMC plus AA (46 %).

  8. Chemical and Functional Properties of Chia Seed (Salvia hispanica L. Gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Rubi Segura-Campos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chia (Salvia hispanica L. constitutes a potential alternative raw material and ingredient in food industry applications due to its dietary fiber content. Gum can be extracted from its dietary fiber fractions for use as an additive to control viscosity, stability, texture, and consistency in food systems. The gum extracted from chia seeds was characterized to determine their quality and potential as functional food additives. The extracted chia gum contained 26.2% fat and a portion was submitted to fat extraction, producing two fractions: gum with fat (FCG and gum partly defatted (PDCG. Proximal composition and physicochemical characterization showed these fractions to be different (P<0.05. The PDCG had higher protein, ash, and carbohydrates content than the FCG, in addition to higher water-holding (110.5 g water/g fiber and water-binding capacities (0.84 g water/g fiber. The FCG had greater oil-holding capacity (25.7 g oil/g fiber and water absorption capacity (44 g water/g fiber. In dispersion trials, the gums exhibited a non-Newtonian fluid behavior, specifically shear thinning or pseudoplastic type. PDCG had more viscosity than FCG. Chia seed is an excellent natural source of gum with good physicochemical and functional qualities, and is very promising for use in food industry.

  9. Chemical and Functional Properties of Chia Seed (Salvia hispanica L.) Gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Campos, Maira Rubi; Ciau-Solís, Norma; Rosado-Rubio, Gabriel; Chel-Guerrero, Luis; Betancur-Ancona, David

    2014-01-01

    Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) constitutes a potential alternative raw material and ingredient in food industry applications due to its dietary fiber content. Gum can be extracted from its dietary fiber fractions for use as an additive to control viscosity, stability, texture, and consistency in food systems. The gum extracted from chia seeds was characterized to determine their quality and potential as functional food additives. The extracted chia gum contained 26.2% fat and a portion was submitted to fat extraction, producing two fractions: gum with fat (FCG) and gum partly defatted (PDCG). Proximal composition and physicochemical characterization showed these fractions to be different (P oil-holding capacity (25.7 g oil/g fiber) and water absorption capacity (44 g water/g fiber). In dispersion trials, the gums exhibited a non-Newtonian fluid behavior, specifically shear thinning or pseudoplastic type. PDCG had more viscosity than FCG. Chia seed is an excellent natural source of gum with good physicochemical and functional qualities, and is very promising for use in food industry.

  10. Chewing Gum: Cognitive Performance, Mood, Well-Being, and Associated Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Allen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has indicated that chewing gum can enhance attention, as well as promoting well-being and work performance. Four studies (two experiments and two intervention studies examined the robustness of and mechanisms for these effects. Study 1 investigated the acute effect of gum on mood in the absence of task performance. Study 2 examined the effect of rate and force of chewing on mood and attention performance. Study 3 assessed the effects of chewing gum during one working day on well-being and performance, as well as postwork mood and cognitive performance. In Study 4, performance and well-being were reported throughout the workday and at the end of the day, and heart rate and cortisol were measured. Under experimental conditions, gum was associated with higher alertness regardless of whether performance tasks were completed and altered sustained attention. Rate of chewing and subjective force of chewing did not alter mood but had some limited effects on attention. Chewing gum during the workday was associated with higher productivity and fewer cognitive problems, raised cortisol levels in the morning, and did not affect heart rate. The results emphasise that chewing gum can attenuate reductions in alertness, suggesting that chewing gum enhances worker performance.

  11. Effect of Guar Gum with Sorbitol Coating on the Properties and Oil Absorption of French Fries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Bo; Fan, Daming; Li, Jinwei; Duan, Zhenhua; Fan, Liuping

    2017-12-13

    This paper investigated the effects of guar gum with sorbitol coating on the oil absorption of French fries by combined dye oil methods, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that pretreatment of blanching with calcium ions and coating with guar gum and sorbitol could significantly reduce the structural oil (STO) and penetrated surface oil (PSO) of French fries and have no negative effects on its texture and also effectively control the final moisture content (p French fries with guar gum and sorbitol reduced by 50.8%, 33.1% and 30.6%, respectively. CLSM photographs confirmed that STO significantly reduced after coating with guar gum and sorbitol, followed by PSO. In the process of frying, the coatings of guar gum or guar gum with sorbitol could effectively prevent oil from infiltrating the potato tissue, which can be seen in the SEM photographs. The barrier properties of French fries were enhanced by coating guar gum, and sorbitol was added to avoid pores and cracks. Blanching with calcium ion can significantly reduce the final moisture content of coating French fries.

  12. [Effect of two kinds of chewing gums on dental plaque pH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Chen-bin; Tao, Dan-ying; Wang, Shun; Feng, Xi-ping

    2007-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the change of plaque pH after chewing 2 kinds of gums. The investigation consisted of 8 healthy subjects (aged 23-27 years, 4 males and 4 females) who refrained from toothbrushing for 24 hours before the test. The pH of dental plaque was measured using a Beetrode pH microelectrode before and after sucrose challenge with a 10% sucrose solutions at 5, 10, 15, 20 minutes as the baseline data. One week later the pH of dental plaque was measured again before the rinse and then the subjects rinsed with a 10% sucrose solutions. After 1 minute the sugar-free chewing gum was given and started to chew for 5, 10, 15, 20 minutes. The pH of dental plaque was measured at the same time on the non-chewing side. One week later the same test was carried out but the chewing gum was changed to tea polyphenol gum. Dental plaque pH value were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and SNK using SPSS 10.0 software package. Compared with the baseline chewed either tea polyphenol gum or sugar-free gum could increase the plaque pH recovery due to the sucrose rinsing challenge and it could maintain the dental plaque pH above the resting value. There was no statistically significant difference between tea polyphenol gum and sugar-free gum (P>0.05). Both gums can increase the plaque pH and decrease the risk of caries.

  13. Effects of chewing gum on cognitive function, mood and physiology in stressed and non-stressed volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    Recent research suggests that chewing gum may improve aspects of cognitive function and mood. There is also evidence suggesting that chewing gum reduces stress. It is important, therefore, to examine these two areas and to determine whether contextual factors (chewing habit, type of gum, and personality) modify such effects. The aims of the present study were: (i) to determine whether chewing gum improved mood and mental performance; (ii) to determine whether chewing gum had benefits in stressed individuals; and (iii) to determine whether chewing habit, type of gum and level of anxiety modified the effects of gum. A cross-over study involving 133 volunteers was carried out. Each volunteer carried out a test session when they were chewing gum and without gum, with order of gum conditions counterbalanced across subjects. Baseline sessions were conducted prior to each test session. Approximately half of the volunteers were tested in 75 dBA noise (the stress condition) and the rest in quiet. Volunteers were stratified on chewing habit and anxiety level. Approximately, half of the volunteers were given mint gum and half fruit gum. The volunteers rated their mood at the start and end of each session and had their heart rate monitored over the session. Saliva samples were taken to allow cortisol levels (good indicator of alertness and stress) to be assayed. During the session, volunteers carried out tasks measuring a range of cognitive functions (aspects of memory, selective and sustained attention, psychomotor speed and accuracy). Chewing gum was associated with greater alertness and a more positive mood. Reaction times were quicker in the gum condition, and this effect became bigger as the task became more difficult. Chewing gum also improved selective and sustained attention. Heart rate and cortisol levels were higher when chewing which confirms the alerting effect of chewing gum. Overall, the results suggest that chewing gum produces a number of benefits that are

  14. STABILITY OF KETOPROFEN COATED BY CHITOSAN-GUAR GUM GEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwantiningsih Sugita

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The coating stability of ketoprofen by chitosan-guar gum gel has been studied. Into 228.6 mL of 1.75% (w/v chitosan solution in 1% (v/v acetic acid, 38.1 mL of guar gum (gg solution was added with concentration variation of 0.35, 0.55, and 0.75% (w/v for ketoprofen microcapsules, and stirred with magnetic stirrer until homogenous. Afterwards, 7.62 mL of glutaraldehyde (glu was added slowly under stirring, with concentrations varied: 3, 3.5, and 4% (v/v. All mixtures were shaked for 20 min for homogenization. Into each microcapsule mixture for ketoprofen, a solution of 2 g of ketoprofen in 250 mL of 96% ethanol was added. Every mixture was then added with 5 mL of 2% Tween-80 and stirred with magnetic stirrer for an hour at room temperature. Conversion of suspension into fine powders/granules (microcapsules was done by using spray dryer. Every microcapsule formula was packed into capsules, as much as 100 g per capsule. The capsules were contained in 100-mL dark bottles and the bottles were kept in climatic chamber at (40 ± 2 °C and RH (75 ± 5 % for 3 months. The microcapsule stabilities were tested chemically and physically. The result showed that formulation of ketoprofen preparation composed of 1.75% (w/v chitosan, 0.35% (w/v gg, and 3.50% (v/v glu, was relatively the best, with ketoprofen percentage left in microcapsule after 3 months, degradation rate constant, and shelf life of 80.33%, 0.0351 % week-1, and 18.92 months, respectively. Reaction kinetic model for this formula followed Prout-Tompkins equation and the degradation of ketoprofen was seem to follow autocatalytic reaction mechanism controlled by the formation and growth of reaction core.   Keywords: Ketoprofen, chitosan-guar gum gel

  15. The effect of chewing gum's flavor on salivary flow rate and pH

    OpenAIRE

    Karami-Nogourani, Maryam; Kowsari-Isfahan, Raha; Hosseini-Beheshti, Mozhgan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chewing sugar-free gums is a convenient way to increase salivary flow. Salivary flow increases in response to both gustatory (taste) and mechanical (chewing) stimuli, and chewing gum can provide both of these stimuli. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of five different flavors of sugar-free chewing gum on the salivary flow rate (SFR) and pH. Materials and Methods: Fifteen dental students volunteered at the same time on six consecutive days, to collect one minute u...

  16. Natural gums of plant origin as edible coatings for food industry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Anuradha; Tyagi, Shvetambri; Gupta, Rajinder K; Tyagi, Yogesh K

    2017-12-01

    Natural plant-based gums and their derivatives are widely utilized in food industries, however, their applications as edible coatings to extend fresh fruits and vegetable shelf-life has been explored recently. These natural polymeric polysaccharides have many advantages as compared to synthetic polymers, because they are biodegradable, nontoxic, economical and easily available in the environment. Natural gums can also be semi synthetically modified to produce derivatives, which can easily compete with the synthetic preservatives available on the food market. In this review, the recent developments in the use of natural gums and their derivatives as edible coatings have been explored and discussed.

  17. Chewing gum does not induce context-dependent memory when flavor is held constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Amy A; Sun, Justin; Golding, Abbe C; Prevost, Darius

    2009-10-01

    This study examined the effect of chewing gum on memory when flavor is held constant. Four separate groups of participants (total n=101) completed a word recall task. At learning and recall, participants either chewed a piece of gum or sucked a sweet. Each participant completed the memory task twice, once with abstract words and once with concrete words. A significant effect of word type (concrete vs. abstract) was found, however recall performance was not improved by matched oral activity at learning and recall. The results cast further doubt on the ability of chewing gum to induce context-dependent memory effects.

  18. Relative bioavailability of methadone hydrochloride administered in chewing gum and tablets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christrup, Lona Louring; Angelo, H.R.; Bonde, J.

    1990-01-01

    Methadone administered in chewing gum in doses of 16.7-22.6 mg to seven patients in a study using an open balanced cross-over design, was compared with 20 mg of methadone given perorally as tablets. There was no significant difference in the AUC/D obtained after administration of chewing gum...... and tablets (p>0.05). It is concluded that the chewing gum formulation should be considered for further testing with respect to suppression of abstinence syndrome in narcotic addicts....

  19. Teaching Form as Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2012-01-01

    , this book offers both inspiration to teaching form and a systematic framework for pedagogical and didactical reflection on this topic. In this sense, it shapes and professionalizes design teaching, and contributes to the development of the double-professionalism, which is so essential for teachers in modern...... means that form serves both as the connective value and as the concept for reflection. In other words, form is observed as form, not anything else. The didactical challenge of teaching form as form is accentuated by students’ everyday-based pre-orientation towards function at the expense of form...... in this book that they are highly interested in both the declarative and formative dimension of making form. Methodologically, the courses described in the contributions have a strong focus on student-centered experiential activities, thereby implicitly claiming that students must learn to make form...

  20. Stability assessment of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) oil-in-water beverage emulsion formulated with acacia and xanthan gums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Maryam; Goli, Sayed Amir Hossein; Nasirpour, Ali

    2016-05-15

    The development of a conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) oil-in-water beverage emulsion containing acacia gum (AG) and xanthan gum (XG) was investigated. D-optimal design and response surface method was used and 10% w/w AG, 3.5% w/w CLA and 0.3% w/w XG was introduced as the optimum formula. Afterward the effect of storage time on the physicochemical properties of selected formulation including specific gravity, turbidity, viscosity, average droplet size, span, size index, creaming index, oxidation measurements and stability in its diluted form, were determined. Findings revealed that the size of oil droplets increased after six weeks and resulted in instability of the emulsion concentrate. Peroxide value increased until 21 days and then decreased dramatically, whereas TBA and Totox values began to increase after this time. Turbidity loss rate was low demonstrating the good stability of the diluted emulsion. The results revealed that it is possible to produce a stable CLA oil-in-water emulsion for using in beverages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Preparation and characterization of a chemically sulfated cashew gum polysaccharide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura Neto, Erico de; Maciel, Jeanny da S.; Cunha, Pablyana L. R.; Paula, Regina Celia M. de; Feitosa, Judith P.A., E-mail: judith@dqoi.ufc.br [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Fortaleza (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Cashew gum (CG) was sulfated in pyridine:formamide using chlorosulfonic acid as the reagent. Confirmation of sulfation was obtained by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy through the presence of an asymmetrical S=O stretching vibration at 1259 cm{sup -1}. The degrees of substitution were 0.02, 0.24 and 0.88 determined from the sulfur percentage. 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data showed that the sulfation occurred at primary carbons. An increase of at least 4% of the solution viscosity was observed due to sulfation. The thermal gravimetric curves (TGA) indicate that the derivatives are stable up to ca. 200 deg C. The sulfated CG is compared to carboxymethylated CG in order to verify the possibility of the use of the former in the preparation of polyelectrolyte complexes; the latter is already being used for this application. (author)

  2. An outflow linked to a YSO in Gum 31?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazzano, M. M.; Cappa, C. E.; Bosch, G.; Vásquez, J.

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the distribution of the molecular gas associated with 10349-5824, a young stellar object located on the edge of the H ii region Gum31, with the aim of investigating the existence of bipolar outflows. We use CO(2-1) line observations obtained with the APEX telescope, H line observations on the K band taken with Flamingos 2 in Gemini South and additional data from at 4.5, 8 and 24 m. J103648.97-584010.7 (1), classified as class II, coincides with extended emission in 4.5 m, suggesting the presence of bipolar flows, and with H emission at 2.12 m. Three extended sources detected in H at 0.5 and 1.5 of 1 could also suggest the presence of shocked gas. Additional evidence of bipolar outflows comes from CO(2-1) spectra.

  3. Alginate/cashew gum nanoparticles for essential oil encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Erick F; Paula, Haroldo C B; de Paula, Regina C M

    2014-01-01

    Alginate/cashew gum nanoparticles were prepared via spray-drying, aiming at the development of a biopolymer blend for encapsulation of an essential oil. Nanoparticles were characterized regarding to their hydrodynamic volume, surface charge, Lippia sidoides essential oil content and release profile, in addition to being analyzed by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal analysis (TGA/DSC) and X-ray diffractometry. Nanoparticles in solution were found to have averaged sizes in the range 223-399 nm, and zeta potential values ranging from -30 to -36 mV. Encapsulated oil levels varied from 1.9 to 4.4% with an encapsulation efficiency of up to 55%. The in vitro release profile showed that between 45 and 95% of oil was released within 30-50h. Kinetic studies revealed that release pattern follow a Korsmeyer-Peppas mechanism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of smart hydrogels of etherified gum ghatti for sustained oral delivery of ropinirole hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Somasree; Roy, Goutam; Maiti, Sabyasachi; Bhattacharyya, Uttam Kumar; Sil, Ayantika; Mitra, Ritwika

    2017-10-01

    Gum Ghatti (GG) is a water soluble complex polysaccharide obtained from Anogeissus latifolia. Due to its non toxic and excellent emulsifying characteristics, it was widely used in different pharmaceutical preparations. Currently another facet was explored for its utility as release retardant polymer in oral controlled drug delivery system. As GG solely was incapable of forming microspheres therefore modification of GG to Sodium carboxymethyl (NaCMGG) derivative was done by carboxymethylation process and its gel forming capacity was explored by the use of trivalent cation (Aluminium chloride) which results into complete microbead system in a complete aqueous environment for controlled delivery of Ropinirole Hydrochloride (RHCl). Rheological property of NaCMGG showed pseudoplastic shear thinning behavior. Spherical shape of bead was observed under scanning electron microscope. Depending upon the formulation variables, Drug entrapment efficiency (DEE) varies from 47.66±3.51 % to 71.4±2.65%., and 80 to 90% drug was released in 6h in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer. Drug release was governed by both fickian diffusion and polymer relaxation simultaneously. Compatible environment for drug entrapment was established by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Thus the modified derivative NaCMGG could be a promising polymer in biomedical application. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Formulation and evaluation of xanthan gum based aceclofenac tablets for colon targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiruganesh Ramasamy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study is to develop a colon targeted drug delivery systems for Aceclofenac using xanthan gum as a carrier. In this study, multilayer coated system that is resistant to gastric and small intestinal conditions but can be easily degraded by colonic bacterial enzymes was designed to achieve effective colon delivery of Aceclofenac. The xanthan gum, the drug and the physical mixture were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. All the formulations were evaluated for hardness, drug content uniformity and other physical properties. Release aspects of Aceclofenac in simulated gastrointestinal fluid and colonic fluid with enzymes were investigated. From these results, Eudragit coated system exhibited gastric and small intestinal resistance to the release of Aceclofenac. The rapid increase in release of Aceclofenac in SCF was revealed as due to the degradation of the xanthan gum membrane by bacterial enzymes. The designed system could be used potentially as a carrier for colon delivery of Aceclofenac by regulating drug release in stomach and the small intestine.O presente estudo teve como objetivo o desenvolvimento de sistema de liberação cólon-alvo de aceclofenaco empregando goma xantana. Nesse trabalho, o revestimento de múltiplas camadas com característica de resistência às condições do intestino delgado além de gastrorresistência oferece como vantagem a rápida degradação desse sistema por enzimas bacterianas colônicas. Dessa forma, o planejamento de tal sistema possibilitou a liberação específica do aceclofenaco no cólon. A goma xantana e o fármaco, além da mistura física desses dois componentes, foram caracterizados por espectroscopia no infravermelho com transformada de Fourier (FTIR e calorimetria diferencial exploratória (DSC. Todas as formulações foram avaliadas no que se refere à dureza, à uniformidade de conteúdo do f

  6. A novel emulsion-forming arabinogalactan gum from the stems of Frost grape (Vitis riparia Michx.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel arabinogalactan polysaccharide (FGP) is described that is produced in large quantities from the cut stems of Frost grape (Vitis riparia Michx.). The sugar composition consists of L-arabinofuranose (L-Araf, 55.2 %) and D-galactopyranose (D-Galp 30.1%), with smaller components of D-xylose (11....

  7. Hygroscopic growth and cloud droplet activation of xanthan gum as a proxy for marine hydrogels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dawson, K. W; Petters, M. D; Meskhidze, N; Petters, S. Suda; Kreidenweis, S. M

    2016-01-01

    .... Here we use xanthan gum (XG)—a bacterial biopolymer—as a proxy for marine hydrogels. Measurements were performed for pure XG particles and mixtures of XG with sodium chloride, calcium nitrate, and calcium carbonate...

  8. Cell free xanthan gum production using continuous recycled packed fibrous-bed bioreactor-membrane

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosalam, S; Krishnaiah, D; Bono, A

    2008-01-01

    .... This study revealed the xanthan gum production by fermentation of Xanthomonas campestris DSMZ using glucose as a carbon source in an immobilised batch and a continuous recycled packed fibrous-bed bioreactor-membrane (CRPBFBM...

  9. Use of co-precipitates of Brachystegia Eurycoma gum and egg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    precipitates of Brachystegia gum and egg albumin as binder, and testing the stability of the metronidazole tablets with regard to moisture uptake and also the effect of moisture sorption on disintegration and dissolution profiles of the tablets.

  10. Nicotine-substitute gum-induced milk alkali syndrome: a look at unexpected sources of calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Christine M; Mackey, Patricia A; Westphal, Sydney A; Argueta, Rodolfo

    2013-01-01

    This report describes a 64-year-old woman with recurrent hypercalcemia. Her laboratory evaluation was consistent with milk-alkali syndrome. It was eventually discovered that the source of the excessive calcium consumption was nicotine-replacement chewing gum and carbonated water. An extensive literature search was performed to see if milk-alkali syndrome due to nicotine-replacement gum and carbonated water has been previously reported. No prior report describing the association of milk alkali syndrome with nicotine-replacement gum and carbonated water was found. We present a unique case of milk-alkali syndrome due to nicotine-replacement gum and carbonated water. It serves as a lesson to evaluate other sources besides calcium supplements as the cause of excessive calcium intake.

  11. Preparation of Acetylated Guar Gum – Unsaturated Polyester Composites & Effect of Water on Their Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David D’Melo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Guar gum has seen extensive use in blends, however, its application as a filler in thermoset composites has as yet not been investigated. The effect of the addition of guar gum and its acetyl derivatives on the kinetics of water diffusion in unsaturated polyester composites was studied. The effect of water on the mechanical properties of the composites was studied with respect to the nature of filler, filler concentration and time of immersion. All the mechanical properties were observed to decrease on exposure to water. Further, it was observed that acetylated guar gum, with a degree of substitution of 0.21, showed the best mechanical properties, surpassing the other filled composites and that of the pure unsaturated polyester. Thus, acetylated guar gum showed promise as eco-friendly filler in composite formulation.

  12. Formulation and Evaluation of Chlorhexidine Medicated Chewing Gums by Different Methods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koppula Rajitha

    2016-01-01

      Aim: The aim of this work is development and evaluation of chlorhexidine medicated chewing gums by different methods and to study the influence of different plasticizers and methods on physicochemical...

  13. The Quantitative Determination of Butylated Hydroxytoluene in Chewing Gum Using GC--MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, A. E.

    2005-01-01

    The experiment to measure concentration of Photophysical Characterization(BHT) and determine percent recovery in chewing gum is described. The results demonstrated that over time, the concentration of BHT in the extract decreased owing to aerial oxidation.

  14. Controlled dual release study of curcumin and a 4-aminoquinoline analog from gum acacia containing hydrogels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Aderibigbe, BA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The potential of gum acacia containing hydrogels as controlled dual-drug delivery systems for antiprotozoal agents was investigated. 4-Aminoquinoline analog and curcumin were selected as model drugs because they exhibit antiprotozoal activity...

  15. Gum karaya based hydrogel nanocomposites for the effective removal of cationic dyes from aqueous solutions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mittala, H

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable hydrogel nanocomposites (HNC) of gum karaya (GK) grafted with poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) incorporated silicon carbide nanoparticles (SiC NPs) were synthesized using the in situ graft copolymerization method and tested for the adsorption...

  16. The Xanthomonas campestris gumD gene required for synthesis of xanthan gum is involved in normal pigmentation and virulence in causing black rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, F L; Chou, H C; Lin, Y S; Yang, B Y; Lin, N T; Weng, S F; Tseng, Y H

    1997-04-07

    A cloned 4.1-kb EcoRI fragment from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris was previously shown to complement the non-mucoid mutant P22 and increase xanthan gum production after being transformed into the wild-type strain Xc17. The gene responsible for these effects was identified, sequenced, and shown to be the gumD gene which has previously been proposed to encode glucose transferase activity, an enzyme required for adding the first glucose residue to the isoprenoid glycosyl carrier lipid during xanthan synthesis. A gumD mutant, isolated from Xc17 by gene replacement, was shown to possess altered pigment xanthomonadin profiles and exhibit reduced virulence in causing black rot in broccoli. This study appears to be the first to demonstrate that interruption of a gene required for xanthan synthesis can lead to reduced virulence of X. campestris.

  17. Want to block earworms from conscious awareness?B(u)y gum!

    OpenAIRE

    Beaman, C. Philip; Powell, Kitty; Rapley, Ellie

    2015-01-01

    Three experiments examine the role of articulatory motor planning in experiencing an involuntary musical recollection (an “earworm”). Experiment 1 shows that interfering with articulatory motor programming by chewing gum reduces both the number of voluntary and the number of involuntary—unwanted—musical thoughts. This is consistent with other findings that chewing gum interferes with voluntary processes such as recollections from verbal memory, the interpretation of ambiguous auditory images,...

  18. Cell Free Xanthan Gum Production Using Continuous Recycled Packed Fibrous-bed Bioreactor-membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Rosalam, S.; Krishnaiah, D.; Bono, A.

    2008-01-01

    Although the xanthan gum has been produced as a commercial commodity, the biomass isolation and its recovery are still challenging. This study revealed the xanthan gum production by fermentation of Xanthomonas campestris DSMZ using glucose as a carbon source in an immobilised batch and a continuous recycled packed fibrous-bed bioreactor-membrane (CRPBFBM). The pure cotton fibre was used to immobilise the microbial cell biomass and to isolate from the liquid phase containing medium and xantha...

  19. Structure and Mechanism of GumK, a Membrane-associated Glucuronosyltransferase*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Barreras, Máximo; Salinas, Silvina R.; Patricia L. Abdian; Kampel, Matías A.; Ielpi, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris GumK (β-1,2-glucuronosyltransferase) is a 44-kDa membrane-associated protein that is involved in the biosynthesis of xanthan, an exopolysaccharide crucial for this bacterium's phytopathogenicity. Xanthan also has many important industrial applications. The GumK enzyme is the founding member of the glycosyltransferase family 70 of carbohydrate-active enzymes, which is composed of bacterial glycosyltransferases involved in exopolysaccharide synthes...

  20. Formulation and evaluation of xanthan gum based aceclofenac tablets for colon targeted drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Thiruganesh Ramasamy; Uma Devi Subbaih Kandhasami; Himabindhu Ruttala; Suresh Shanmugam

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to develop a colon targeted drug delivery systems for Aceclofenac using xanthan gum as a carrier. In this study, multilayer coated system that is resistant to gastric and small intestinal conditions but can be easily degraded by colonic bacterial enzymes was designed to achieve effective colon delivery of Aceclofenac. The xanthan gum, the drug and the physical mixture were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential sc...

  1. Management of blue gum eucalyptus in California requires region-specific consideration

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Kristina M; DiTomaso, Joseph M

    2016-01-01

    Blue gum eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) is a large tree native to Australia that was widely planted throughout California for reforestation, building and timber, but in some areas has spread beyond its planted borders and substantially altered wildlands. Due to its fast growth, large size and reproductive potential, blue gum's impacts on native vegetation, wildlife and ecosystem processes are of concern, particularly in areas with reliable year-round rainfall or fog, where it is most likely...

  2. Salivary flow rate and pH during prolonged gum chewing in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polland, K E; Higgins, F; Orchardson, R

    2003-09-01

    Gum chewing for 20 min causes an increase in salivary flow rate and salivary pH. Most people chew gum for longer than 20 min, and our aim was to determine how whole mouth salivary flow rate and pH might adapt during prolonged gum chewing. Resting saliva was collected over 5 min; gum-stimulated saliva was collected at intervals during 90 min, chewing a single pellet (1.5 g) of mint-flavoured, sugar-free gum (n = 19). Subjects chewed at their own preferred rate and style. Both salivary flow rate and pH were increased above resting levels for the entire 90 min. The salivary flow was significantly greater (anovaP chewing. The saliva pH remained significantly higher (P pH even after 90-min chewing. When the experiment was repeated with the gum pellets replaced at 30 and 60 min (n = 9), similar increases in salivary flow rate and pH were found. In the latter experiment, there was no evidence of any cumulative effects on flow or pH. The persistent increase in salivary pH in particular could be beneficial to oral and dental health.

  3. Role of glucose in chewing gum-related facilitation of cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Richard; Tunney, Richard J

    2004-10-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that chewing gum leads to cognitive benefits through improved delivery of glucose to the brain, by comparing the cognitive performance effects of gum and glucose administered separately and together. Participants completed a battery of cognitive tests in a fully related 2 x 2 design, where one factor was Chewing Gum (gum vs. mint sweet) and the other factor was Glucose Co-administration (consuming a 25 g glucose drink vs. consuming water). For four tests (AVLT Immediate Recall, Digit Span, Spatial Span and Grammatical Transformation), beneficial effects of chewing and glucose were found, supporting the study hypothesis. However, on AVLT Delayed Recall, enhancement due to chewing gum was not paralleled by glucose enhancement, suggesting an alternative mechanism. The glucose delivery model is supported with respect to the cognitive domains: working memory, immediate episodic long-term memory and language-based attention and processing speed. However, some other mechanism is more likely to underlie the facilitatory effect of chewing gum on delayed episodic long-term memory.

  4. Simultaneous degumming and production of a natural gum from Crotalaria juncea seeds: Physicochemical and rheological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Suvra; Bhattacharjee, Annesha; Sarkar, Ujjaini; Baidya, Pabitra Kumar; Baksi, Sibashish

    2018-01-12

    The oil extracted from Crotalaria juncea (Sunn-hemp) contains 70% of gum. Several methods of degumming are attempted in order to maximize the yield of gum. During appropriate water induced degumming, about 95-98% of phosphatides are separated. The maximum oil yield for two types of degummimg processes are 0.59% and 0.69% corresponding to hot water and pure O-phosphoric acid (19.88 N) treatment respectively. The % oil yield obtained for TOP degumming is about 0.78%. Physico-chemical characteristics of the isolated gum such as moisture, ash, protein, fat and aqueous solubility along with FTIR and TGA analysis are studied in order to evaluate the effect of extraction process. The behaviour of gum on the molecular scale is evaluated through alcohol treatment. Chromatographic analysis determines the monosaccharide content of the gum with glucose: xylose: arabinose::54: 34:1. Rheological characterization shows that the juncea gum solutions are shear rate dependent and the behaviour is shear-thinning (or pseudoplastic). Results show that the temperature dependent viscosity decreases with increasing shear rate. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cell Free Xanthan Gum Production Using Continuous Recycled Packed Fibrous-bed Bioreactor-membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalam, S.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the xanthan gum has been produced as a commercial commodity, the biomass isolation and its recovery are still challenging. This study revealed the xanthan gum production by fermentation of Xanthomonas campestris DSMZ using glucose as a carbon source in an immobilised batch and a continuous recycled packed fibrous-bed bioreactor-membrane (CRPBFBM. The pure cotton fibre was used to immobilise the microbial cell biomass and to isolate from the liquid phase containing medium and xanthan gum. The cellulose acetate membrane with 0.45 µm was used to recover the xanthan gum. The batch fermentation showed that the immobilisation technique gave higher xanthan gum concentration at 20g/L than the free moving cell without immobilisation at 18g/L. The CRPBBM produced the highest xanthan gum concentration at 18.7 g/L at the dilution rate of 1.44 d-1. The highest production rate of CRPBFBM was 0.475 g/L-h. Further research needs to be conducted to ascertain the stability of the Xanthomonas Campestris DSMZ during a long period of continuous fermentation as well as up scaling the CRPBFBM.

  6. Modified gum arabic cross-linked gelatin scaffold for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarika, P.R. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 547 (India); Cinthya, Kuriakose [Tissue Culture Laboratory, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojappura, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 012 (India); Jayakrishnan, A. [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Anilkumar, P.R., E-mail: anilkumarpr@sctimst.ac.in [Tissue Culture Laboratory, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojappura, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 012 (India); James, Nirmala Rachel, E-mail: nirmala@iist.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 547 (India)

    2014-10-01

    The present work deals with development of modified gum arabic cross-linked gelatin scaffold for cell culture. A new biocompatible scaffold was developed by cross-linking gelatin (Gel) with gum arabic, a polysaccharide. Gum arabic was subjected to periodate oxidation to obtain gum arabic aldehyde (GAA). GAA was reacted with gelatin under appropriate pH to prepare the cross-linked hydrogel. Cross-linking occurred due to Schiff's base reaction between aldehyde groups of oxidized gum arabic and amino groups of gelatin. The scaffold prepared from the hydrogel was characterized by swelling properties, degree of cross-linking, in vitro degradation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cytocompatibility evaluation using L-929 and HepG2 cells confirmed non-cytotoxic and non-adherent nature of the scaffold. These properties are essential for generating multicellular spheroids and hence the scaffold is proposed to be a suitable candidate for spheroid cell culture. - Highlights: • Gum arabic cross-linked gelatin scaffold was developed for tissue engineering. • Cross-linking was achieved by Schiff's base reaction. • The scaffold is non-cytotoxic and non adherent to fibroblast and hepatocytes. • The scaffolds are potential candidates for spheroid cell culture.

  7. Gum arabic/starch/maltodextrin/inulin as wall materials on the microencapsulation of rosemary essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Regiane Victória de Barros; Borges, Soraia Vilela; Botrel, Diego Alvarenga

    2014-01-30

    The effects of the partial or total replacement of gum arabic by modified starch, maltodextrin and inulin on the characteristics of rosemary essential oil microencapsulated by spray drying were evaluated in this study. The lowest level of water absorption under conditions of high relative humidity was observed in treatments containing inulin. The wettability property of the powders was improved by the addition of inulin. The total replacement of gum arabic by modified starch or a mixture of modified starch and maltodextrin (1:1, m/m) did not significantly affect the efficiency of encapsulation, although higher Tg values were exhibited by microcapsules prepared using pure gum arabic or gum arabic and inulin. 1,8-cineol, camphor and α-pinene were the main components identified by gas chromatography in the oils extracted from the microcapsules. The particles had smoother surfaces and more folds when gum arabic or inulin was present. Larger particles were observed in the powders prepared with pure gum arabic or modified starch. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. QbD based synthesis and characterization of polyacrylamide grafted corn fibre gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Akashdeep; Mangla, Bhumika; Sethi, Sheshank; Kamboj, Sunil; Sharma, Radhika; Rana, Vikas

    2017-01-20

    The aim of present investigation was to utilize quality by design approach for the synthesis of polyacrylamide corn fibre gum (PAAm-g-CFG) from corn fibre gum (CFG) by varying concentration of acrylamide and initiator. The spectral analysis (ATR-FTIR, 1H NMR, DSC, X-ray and Mass spectroscopy) was conducted to assure grafting copolymerization of CFG with acrylamide. The powder flow properties confirm the porous nature of PAAm-g-CFG. The grafted copolymer dispersion showed shear thinning behaviour that follows Herschel Bulkley model. The viscoelastic analysis suggested viscous liquid like nature of PAAm-g-CFG and its viscosity increases with increase in concentration of PAAm-g-CFG. The mucoadhesive strength of synthesized PAAm-g-CFG was found to be higher than moringa oleifera gum, karaya gum, guar gum, xanthan gum, chitosan and gelatin. Further, the results pointed toward enhanced thermal stability of PAAm-g-CFG. Thus, PAAm-g-CFG has a great potential to be used in food and pharmaceutical industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The feasibility of Cassia fistula gum with polyaluminium chloride for the decolorization of reactive dyeing wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perng Yuan Shing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to find a new environmental-friendly coagulant that can partially replace conventional polyaluminium chloride (PAC which was shown to be toxic to aquatic environment, gum extracted from seeds of Cassia fistula Linn. (CF was investigated in decolorization of reactive dyes Blue 19 (RB19 and Black 5 (RB5 using jar-test experiments. The optimal results showed that crude CF gum (at pH 10, initial dye concentrations (IDC of 100 and 50 mg L-1, gum dosages 200 and 300 mg L-1, reaction time 30 and 45 min, and agitation speed 60 rpm did not achieve high degrees of decolorization in RB5 and RB19 (55.7 and 62.0 %, respectively as compared with PAC coagulant (97.2 and 94.4 %, respectively at the same IDC and reaction time. Whereas when CF gum was used in combination with PAC, decolorization efficiencies of both dyes reached over 92 % at 40 % volume fraction of gum. These results indicated the potential of using CF gum as a “green” coagulant or as a contributing factor to color removal of textile wastewater.

  10. Binding effectiveness of Colocassia esculenta gum in poorly compressible drugs-paracetamol and metronidazole tablet formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwu, K I; Udeala, O K

    2000-01-01

    The effectiveness of a polysaccharide gum obtained from the cormels of Colocassia esculenta was evaluated comparatively with acacia and methylcellulose as binders in the formulation of poorly compressible drugs. The granules of these drugs produced by wet massing method using colocassia and acacia gums as binders have high compressibility index indicating poor flow. Based on this parameter, the granules produced with methylcellulose as binder seem to flow better. The properties of tablets evaluated include breaking strength, friability, disintegration time and dissolution rate. The new polysaccharide gum showed better concentration-strength profile than acacia while methylcellulose yielded mechanically more stable tablets than the two binders. The resistance of tablets to abrasion was poor in metronidazole tablets formulated with colocassia gum. The in vitro availability characteristics showed that tablets produced with the new gum show acceptable disintegration time and release profile within a certain range of its concentration in tablets. At 4% w/w nominal concentration of colocassia gum in metronidazole tablets and 6% w/w in paracetamol, tablets show very long disintegration time and prolonged release profile. The binders used for comparison yielded tablets that show better in vitro release characteristics.

  11. Acacia Senegal Gum Exudate Offers Protection Against Cyclophosphamide-Induced Urinary Bladder Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz A. Al-Yahya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylophosphamide (CYCL is a strong anticancer and immunosuppressive agent but its urotoxicity presents one of the major toxic effects that limit its wide usage particularly in high dose regimens. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate Acacia Senegal gum exudate, Gum Arabic (GA, for its possible role as a natural, nontoxic agent against CYCL-induced urotoxicity. Male Swiss albino rats were exposed to CYCL (150 mg/kg BW, once i.p with or without GA oral supplementation (7.5 g/kg/day for 6 days through drinking water. Glutathione (GSH, Malondialdehyde (MDA and Nitric oxide (NO bladder contents were assessed. Responsiveness of the bladder rings to acetylcholine (ACh in vitro, microscopic and macroscopic features are also investigated. CYCL produced pronounced harmful effects on bladder urothelial lining with significant increases in (MDA and NO levels in the tissue homogenates. Bladder-GSH content is dropped by over 60% following CYCL injection. Bladder contractility, as measured by its responsiveness to ACh, recorded a marked reduction. The isolated bladders exhibited such macroscopic changes as severe edema, inflammation and extravasation. The bladder weight increased as well. Histological changes were evident in the form of severe congestion, petechial hemorrhage and chronic inflammatory reaction in the lamina propria accompanied with desquamated epithelia. GA, a potential protective agent, produced an almost complete reversal of NO induction, lipid peroxidation or cellular GSH bladder contents in the GA + CYCL-treated group. Likewise, bladder inflammation and edema were reduced. Bladder rings showed a remarkable recovery in their responsiveness to ACh. Bladder histological examination showed a near normal configuration and structural integrity, with a significant reduction in inflammation and disappearance of focal erosions. These remarkable effects of GA may be attributed to its ability to neutralize acrolein, the reactive metabolite of CYCL

  12. Effects of a Baking Soda Gum on extrinsic dental stain: results of a longitudinal 4-week assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soparkar, P; Newman, M B

    2001-07-01

    An evaluation of the effects of ARM & HAMMER DENTAL CARE The Baking Soda Gum (AHDC) on extrinsic dental stain was made in 48 subjects presenting with measurable extrinsic stain. The subjects were randomized to use either the baking soda gum or a non-baking soda placebo gum for 20 minutes twice daily after lunch and dinner while brushing once daily. The procedure of limited brushing was chosen to simulate the level of hygiene normally practiced by participants entering a clinical study. After 4 weeks, the reduction in measurable extrinsic stain in the baking soda gum group was statistically significant (P = .0044) relative to baseline. Statistical analysis of the placebo gum group revealed no significant change in extrinsic stain from baseline. The magnitude of the unadjusted longitudinal reduction in extrinsic stain in the baking soda gum group was 29.7% at 4 weeks.

  13. Green synthesis of copper oxide nanoparticles using gum karaya as a biotemplate and their antibacterial application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padil, Vinod Vellora Thekkae; Černík, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Background Copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles have attracted huge attention due to catalytic, electric, optical, photonic, textile, nanofluid, and antibacterial activity depending on the size, shape, and neighboring medium. In the present paper, we synthesized CuO nanoparticles using gum karaya, a natural nontoxic hydrocolloid, by green technology and explored its potential antibacterial application. Methods The CuO nanoparticles were synthesized by a colloid-thermal synthesis process. The mixture contained various concentrations of CuCl2 • 2H2O (1 mM, 2 mM, and 3 mM) and gum karaya (10 mg/mL) and was kept at 75°C at 250 rpm for 1 hour in an orbital shaker. The synthesized CuO was purified and dried to obtain different sizes of the CuO nanoparticles. The well diffusion method was used to study the antibacterial activity of the synthesized CuO nanoparticles. The zone of inhibition, minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum bactericidal concentration were determined by the broth microdilution method recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Results Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed CuO nanoparticles evenly distributed on the surface of the gum matrix. X-ray diffraction of the synthesized nanoparticles indicates the formation of single-phase CuO with a monoclinic structure. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy peak at 525 cm−1 should be a stretching of CuO, which matches up to the B2u mode. The peaks at 525 cm−1 and 580 cm−1 indicated the formation of CuO nanostructure. Transmission electron microscope analyses revealed CuO nanoparticles of 4.8 ± 1.6 nm, 5.5 ± 2.5 nm, and 7.8 ± 2.3 nm sizes were synthesized with various concentrations of CuCl2 • 2H2O (1 mM, 2 mM, and 3 mM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy profiles indicated that the O 1s and Cu 2p peak corresponding to the CuO nanoparticles were observed. The antibacterial activity of the synthesized nanoparticles was tested against Gram-negative and positive

  14. Chitosan-gum arabic polyelectrolyte complex films: physicochemical, mechanical and mucoadhesive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakloetsakun, Duangkamon; Preechagoon, Detpon; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas; Pongjanyakul, Thaned

    2016-08-01

    By blending chitosan (CS) and gum arabic (GA), a powerful biomaterial complex might be obtained due to the unique properties of CS and the low viscosity and good emulsifying properties of GA. The objectives of this study were to prepare and examine the properties of dispersions and films of CS and GA as a function of the mixing weight ratio, pH value and molecular weight of CS. The dispersions were characterized by turbidity, zeta potential and cytotoxicity and then the dispersions were cast into films. Physicochemical properties of the film were performed. CS-GA dispersions exhibited higher turbidity and a lower zeta potential with an increase in the GA ratio. Continuous films of the CS-GA could be formed at all ratios. CS and GA could molecularly interact via electrostatic forces and intermolecular hydrogen bonding. The CS-GA (1:0.5) films exhibited relatively low water uptake, erosion, water vapor permeability and puncture strength compared to the CS films. Furthermore, the CS-GA films demonstrated good mucoadhesive properties, allowing for adhesion to the mucosal membrane. Based on these results, it could be advantageous to use CS-GA films as film formers for the formulation of coatings and drug delivery systems.

  15. Effect of Gum arabic on distribution behavior of nanocellulose fillers in starch film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneshwaran, Nadanathangam; Ammayappan, L.; Huang, Qingrong

    2011-09-01

    Uniform distribution of nanofillers in polymer matrix is posing a major challenge in exploiting the full potential of nanomaterials. Various fillers are being evaluated to improve the performance of biopolymer films like starch. In this work, nanocellulose is used as fillers to increase the performance characteristics of starch film. Due to high surface energy and hydrophilic nature of nanocellulose, they tend to aggregate during the film forming process. To circumvent this problem, Gum arabic (GA) was added to distribute the nanocellulose uniformly. GA helps in reduction of surface energy (as analyzed by contact angle) and thus facilitates the uniform distribution of nanocellulose (as demonstrated through polarized light microscopy). Nanocellulose as filler improved the tensile strength of starch film by 2.5 times while that of uniformly distributed nanocellulose by 3.5 times. Moreover, while nanocellulose as such could reduce the water vapor permeability of starch film by 1.4 times, uniformly distributed nanocellulose reduced it by 2 times proving the importance of GA. Starch film filled with nanocellulose and GA will be a 100% biopolymer-based system having potential demand in eco-friendly applications.

  16. Multiple functionalities of Ni nanoparticles embedded in carboxymethyl guar gum polymer: catalytic activity and superparamagnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardar, Debasmita [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Sengupta, Manideepa; Bordoloi, Ankur [Nano Catalysis, Catalytic Conversion and Process Division, CSIR—Indian Institute of Petroleum (IIP), Mohkampur, Dehradun 248005 (India); Ahmed, Md. A.; Neogi, S.K.; Bandyopadhyay, Sudipta [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Jain, Ruchi; Gopinath, Chinnakonda S. [Catalysis Division and Center of Excellence on Surface Science, CSIR—National Chemical Laboratory, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pune 411 008 (India); Bala, Tanushree, E-mail: tanushreebala@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Ni nanoparticles were synthesized in polymer to form Ni-Polymer composite. • Ni nanoparticles retain their superparamagnetism in the composite. • Ni-Polymer composites showed catalytic activity. - Abstract: Composites comprising of metallic nanoparticles in polymer matrices have allured significant importance due to multifunctionalities. Here a simple protocol has been described to embed Ni nanoparticles in carboxymethyl guar gum (CMGG) polymer. The composite formation helps in the stabilization of Ni nanoparticles which are otherwise prone towards aerial oxidation. Further the nanoparticles retain their superparamagnetic nature and catalytic capacity. Ni-Polymer composite catalyses the reduction of 4-Nitrophenol to 4-Aminophenol very efficiently in presence of NaBH{sub 4}, attaining a complete conversion under some experimental conditions. Ni-Polymer composite is well characterized using UV–vis spectroscopy, FTIR, XPS, powder XRD, TGA, SEM and TEM. A detailed magnetic measurement using superconducting quantum interference device-vibrating sample magnetometer (SQUID-VSM) reveals superparamagnetic behaviour of the composite.

  17. Evaluation of gum of Moringa oleifera as a binder and release retardant in tablet formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Panda D; Choudhury N.S.K; Yedukondalu M; Si S; Gupta R

    2008-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to find out the potential of gum from Moringa oleifera to act as a binder and release retardant in tablet formulations. The effect of calcium sulphate dihydrate (water insoluble) and lactose (water soluble) diluent on the release of propranolol hydrochloride was studied. The DSC thermograms of drug, gum and mixture of gum/drug indicated no chemical interaction. Tablets (F1, F2, F3, and F4) were prepared containing calcium sulphate dihydrate as diluent, propr...

  18. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Fingerprinting for Identification of Acacia Gum in Microsamples from Works of Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granzotto, Clara; Sutherland, Ken

    2017-01-01

    to the analysis of naturally aged (∼80 year) gum arabic samples, pure and mixed with lead white pigment, and allowed the detection of gum arabic in samples from a late painting (1949/1954) by Georges Braque in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. This first application of the technique to characterize...... to the reproducibility of the gum MS profile, even in the presence of other organic and inorganic components, together with the minimal sample size required, demonstrate the value of this new MALDI-TOF MS method as an analytical tool for the identification of gum arabic in microsamples from museum artifacts....

  19. [done no pages] An overview on applications of guar gum in food systems to modify structural properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana B. Popova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharides define as complex polymers composed of units interlinked with glycosidic bonds originated naturally. Polysaccharides are categorizing in several groups and among them, Gums are those with critical roles in food systems. Guar Gum is imparting softness, emulsification, stabilizing via its addition to formulas. This Gum is a fast soluble in cold water and can be active in a wide range of pH. The aim of this overview is giving an initial concept about guar gum and then convey to an introduction of its applications in food industries.

  20. Gellan gum based physical hydrogels incorporating highly valuable endogen molecules and associating BMP-2 as bone formation platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cebral, Rita; Civantos, Ana; Ramos, Viviana; Seijo, Begoña; López-Lacomba, José Luis; Sanz-Casado, José Vicente; Sanchez, Alejandro

    2017-07-01

    Physical hydrogels have been designed for a double purpose: as growth factor delivery systems and as scaffolds to support cell colonization and formation of new bone. Specifically, the polysaccharide gellan gum and the ubiquitous endogenous molecules chondroitin, albumin and spermidine have been used as exclusive components of these hydrogels. The mild ionotropic gelation technique was used to preserve the bioactivity of the selected growth factor, rhBMP-2. In vitro tests demonstrated the effective delivery of rhBMP-2 in its bioactive form. In vivo experiments performed in the muscle tissue of Wistar rats provided a proof of concept of the ability of the developed platforms to elicit new bone formation. Furthermore, this biological effect was better than that of a commercial formulation currently used for regenerative purposes, confirming the potential of these hydrogels as new and innovative growth factor delivery platforms and scaffolds for regenerative medicine applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of tragacanth gum based hydrogels by radiation method for use in wound dressing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Baljit; Varshney, Lalit; Francis, Sanju; Rajneesh

    2017-06-01

    Keeping in view the inherent wound healing ability of tragacanth gum (TG), mucoadhesive and gel forming nature of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), in the present work, an attempt has been made to prepare the antibiotic drug 'gentamicin' and analgesic drug 'lidocaine' loaded sterile TG-PVA-PVP hydrogel dressings for care of wound infection and wound pain together. These polymers were characterized by cryo-SEM, AFM, FTIR, XRD, 13C NMR, TGA, DSC and swelling studies. Drug release mechanism and kinetic models, network parameters and other properties like haemolysis, mucoadhesion, water vapor permeability, microbial penetration, antioxidant activities and oxygen permeability were also determined. The results showed wound fluid absorption and slow drug release ability of hydrogel films. These polymer films were found to be blood compatible, permeable to water vapor and O2, and impermeable to microorganism. Further, the synergic effects of mucoadhesive, antimicrobial and antioxidant nature of hydrogel dressings will make them suitable candidate for wound management.

  2. Dependence levels in users of electronic cigarettes, nicotine gums and tobacco cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etter, Jean-François; Eissenberg, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    To assess dependence levels in users of e-cigarettes, and compare them with dependence levels in users of nicotine gums and tobacco cigarettes. Self-reports from cross-sectional Internet and mail surveys. Comparisons of: (a) 766 daily users of nicotine-containing e-cigarettes with 30 daily users of nicotine-free e-cigarettes; (b) 911 former smokers who used the e-cigarette daily with 451 former smokers who used the nicotine gum daily (but no e-cigarette); (c) 125 daily e-cigarette users who smoked daily (dual users) with two samples of daily smokers who did not use e-cigarettes (2206 enrolled on the Internet and 292 enrolled by mail from the general population of Geneva). We used the Fagerström test for nicotine dependence, the nicotine dependence syndrome scale, the cigarette dependence scale and versions of these scales adapted for e-cigarettes and nicotine gums. Dependence ratings were slightly higher in users of nicotine-containing e-cigarettes than in users of nicotine-free e-cigarettes. In former smokers, long-term (>3 months) users of e-cigarettes were less dependent on e-cigarettes than long-term users of the nicotine gum were dependent on the gum. There were few differences in dependence ratings between short-term (≤3 months) users of gums or e-cigarettes. Dependence on e-cigarettes was generally lower in dual users than dependence on tobacco cigarettes in the two other samples of daily smokers. Some e-cigarette users were dependent on nicotine-containing e-cigarettes, but these products were less addictive than tobacco cigarettes. E-cigarettes may be as or less addictive than nicotine gums, which themselves are not very addictive. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chewing gum decreases energy intake at lunch following a controlled breakfast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Kathleen J; Kresge, Daniel L

    2017-11-01

    The impact of chewing gum on fasting appetite or meal intake has not been studied. We tested the hypothesis that chewing gum would decrease lunch intake after a controlled breakfast, and reduce hunger in fasting and fed states. Seventeen males and sixteen females (21.4 ± 6.3y, BMI 23.8 ± 2.7 kg/m(2)) participated in a randomized crossover study in which subjects chewed sugar-free gum a total of 1 h on the test day (GC), and did not chew gum on a control day (NG). The 1 h of gum chewing included 20 min while fasting, and two 20-min sessions between breakfast and lunch. Subjects rated their appetite and mood on visual analog scales. After completing the fasting measures, subjects consumed a breakfast shake containing 30% of their measured resting energy expenditure. Three hours later they consumed an ad libitum lunch with water. Fasting ratings of hunger were lower in GC than NG (t = 2.66, p = 0.01). Subjects consumed significantly less pasta (41 g, 68 kcals, t = 2.32, p = 0.03) during GC than NG. In conclusion, gum chewing decreased fasting hunger ratings and lunch energy consumed. Chewing gum may be a useful tool impacting energy balance in this population. Longer studies, especially in other populations, will be required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Alyssum homolocarpum seed gum: Dilute solution and some physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesarinejad, M A; Razavi, Seyed M A; Koocheki, A

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of various temperatures (25-65°C) on some dilute solution properties of Alyssum homolocarpum seed gum (AHSG) as a novel potential source of hydrocolloid. Monosaccharide composition, FTIR analysis and molecular parameters were determined to provide more structural information. The results indicated that AHSG had a low molecular weight (3.66×10(5)Da), medium intrinsic viscosity (18.34dl/g) at 25°C, relatively flexible chain with a chain flexibility parameter of 618.54, and activation energy of 0.51×10(7)J/kgmol. With rise in temperature from 25 to 55°C, the intrinsic viscosity decreased as well as coil radius and volume of AHSG. The shape factor of AHSG macromolecule was spherical at all temperatures. The electrostatic interaction and particle size of AHSG solution were -25.81mV (at neutral pH) and 225.36nm, respectively. The results revealed that AHSG had high total sugar content (85.33%), small amount of uronic acids (5.63%) and it is likely a galactan-type polysaccharide. The FTIR spectra showed that AHSG behaved like a typical polyelectrolyte because of the presence of carboxyl and hydroxyl groups. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Synthesis of novel biodegradable antibacterial grafted xanthan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elella, Mahmoud H Abu; Mohamed, Riham R; ElHafeez, Eman Abd; Sabaa, Magdy W

    2017-10-01

    Xanthan gum (XG) is natural polysaccharides used in food industries as stabilizers and thickener agents. The problem is that some food products are found to be contaminated by pathogenic bacteria such as Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphyloccus aureus (S. aureus) that reduce their shelf life. This research aims to synthesize biodegradable antibacterial XG-grafted-poly(N-vinyl imidazole) PVI and the effect of reaction parameters were studied on grafting yield (G), grafting efficiency (GE), total conversion (TC) and homopolymer (H) %. XG-g-PVI was characterized via various analysis tools. Thermal analysis showed that grafted XG was more thermally stable than unmodified XG and their stability increased with increasing PVI%. XG-g-PVI was acting as antibacterial agent against (E. coli and S. aureus) bacteria that cause food borne diseases. Their activity increases with increasing grafting yield%. Surface morphology showed change from irregular lobules shape in XG to smooth surface in its graft with PVI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhalable Antitubercular Therapy Mediated by Locust Bean Gum Microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana D. Alves

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains a major global health problem and alternative therapeutic approaches are needed. Considering the high prevalence of lung tuberculosis (80% of cases, the pulmonary delivery of antitubercular drugs in a carrier system capable of reaching the alveoli, being recognised and phagocytosed by alveolar macrophages (mycobacterium hosts, would be a significant improvement to current oral drug regimens. Locust bean gum (LBG is a polysaccharide composed of galactose and mannose residues, which may favour specific recognition by macrophages and potentiate phagocytosis. LBG microparticles produced by spray-drying are reported herein for the first time, incorporating either isoniazid or rifabutin, first-line antitubercular drugs (association efficiencies >82%. Microparticles have adequate theoretical properties for deep lung delivery (aerodynamic diameters between 1.15 and 1.67 μm. The cytotoxic evaluation in lung epithelial cells (A549 cells and macrophages (THP-1 cells revealed a toxic effect from rifabutin-loaded microparticles at the highest concentrations, but we may consider that these were very high comparing with in vivo conditions. LBG microparticles further evidenced strong ability to be captured by macrophages (percentage of phagocytosis >94%. Overall, the obtained data indicated the potential of the proposed system for tuberculosis therapy.

  7. An evaluation of sodium bicarbonate chewing gum as a supplement to toothbrushing for removal of dental plaque from children's teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleber, C J; Davidson, K R; Rhoades, M L

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this human clinical study was to determine whether a commercial chewing gum containing 5% sodium bicarbonate (ARM & HAMMER DENTAL CARE The Baking Soda Gum [AHDC]) was effective in removing dental plaque when used as a supplement to regular toothbrushing by children. Healthy children (N = 28, average age = 11 years) were randomly distributed into 2 groups. One group was instructed to chew 2 tablets of AHDC chewing gum for 20 minutes 2 times each day (after lunch and dinner) in addition to their normal toothbrushing regimen. The other group used a sugarless mint tablet twice daily during the same period in addition to toothbrushing. After 1 week of using their assigned product, all participants were again examined for oral health and plaque. After a 1-week washout period, subjects were crossed over to the opposite group. Among the 21 participants completing the study, the AHDC chewing gum significantly (P plaque by 15% after 1 week compared to the mint tablet control, as measured by the Modified Quigley-Hein Plaque Index. When longitudinally compared to the baseline plaque scores, the gum resulted in a significant (P plaque on the teeth. Subanalysis of the data showed that the AHDC chewing gum was particularly effective on the lingual surfaces and the posterior teeth and least effective on the facial surfaces of the anterior teeth, which do not readily come into direct contact with the gum during mastication. The bicarbonate gum demonstrated significant plaque reduction in all other areas of the mouth, even on tooth surfaces not directly contacted during chewing. Compliance with the chewing gum regimen was excellent, and oral health exams did not indicate any adverse events among children using either the chewing gum or mint tablets. In this study, regular use of AHDC chewing gum was safe and effective in removing dental plaque and served as a significant complement to the daily toothbrushing regimen of children.

  8. Microwave-assisted acid extraction methodology for trace elements determination in mastic gum of Pistacia lentiscus using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariadis, George A; Spanou, Eleni A

    2011-01-01

    To ensure food safety, accurate knowledge of the levels of several trace elements is necessary. This is also true for natural products of plants and resins used for human consumption or therapeutic treatment, like the mastic gum of Pistacia lentiscus. The rapid analysis of gum and resin matrices is a challenge because there are problems with the decomposition of such complicated matrices. To develop an efficient multielemental analytical method for the determination of trace elements and to compare different procedures for analyte extraction when microwave-assisted digestion is applied. The inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric (ICP-AES) technique was applied and the optimum ICP conditions like radiofrequency power, argon flow rate and nebuliser sample uptake flowrate were found. The microwave-assisted procedure was compared with that with conventional heating. Since mastic and resinous materials are difficult for dissolution and extraction of trace element, influential acid mixtures containing hydrofluoric acid proved to be capable of quantitative extraction of the analytes. The digestion of mastic resin or similar matrices is significantly facilitated by using microwave radiation instead of conventional heating since the obtained recovery for several analytes is much higher. It was proved that the acid mixture of HCl-HNO(3)-HF was the most efficient for complete sample digestion and recovery of the analytes. The performance characteristics of the developed method were evaluated against certified reference material and the method was proved reliable and applicable to the analysis of mastic gum and possibly to similar resinous matrices. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Hormonal regulation of gummosis and composition of gums from bulbs of hyacinth (Hyacinthus orientalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Kensuke; Kotake, Toshihisa; Boncela, Anna Jarecka; Saniewski, Marian; Ueda, Junichi

    2015-02-01

    Hyacinth (Hyacinthus orientalis) bulbs infected by Fusarium oxysporum showed the symptoms of gummosis. The purpose of this study was to clarify the hormonal regulation of gummosis and composition of gums from hyacinth bulbs. The application of ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid), an ethylene-releasing compound, at 2% (w/w, in lanolin) induced gummosis in hyacinth bulbs. Methyl jasmonate (JA-Me) at 1.5% (w/w, in lanolin) induced gummosis as well. Simultaneous application of JA-Me and ethephon further enhanced gummosis. Molecular mass distribution of hyacinth gums analyzed by gel permeation chromatography indicated that the gums were mainly homogenous polysaccharides with an average molecular weight of ca. 30kDa. Analysis of the sugar composition of the gums after hydrolysis revealed that the majority were arabinose (ca. 35%) and galactose (ca. 40%) together with small amounts of fucose, rhamnose and uronic acids (ca. 5%, respectively), suggesting that the gums are pectic arabinogalactans. These results indicate that jasmonates (JAs) interact with ethylene to stimulate sugar metabolism, producing pectic arabinogalactans, and vice versa, leading to gummosis. These findings, together with those from our previous studies in tulips (Tulipa gesneriana) and grape hyacinth (Muscari armeniacum), revealed that sugar metabolism and hormonal regulation relating to gummosis are different among species of bulbous plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Surface analysis characterisation of gum binders used in modern watercolour paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Naoko; Cumpson, Peter J.

    2016-02-01

    Conducting this study has demonstrated that not only SEM-EDX but also XPS can be an efficient tool for characterising watercolour paint surfaces. We find that surface effects are mediated by water. Once the powdered components in the watercolour come into contact with water they dramatically transform their chemical structures at the surface and show the presence of pigment components with a random dispersion within the gum layer. Hence the topmost surface of the paint is confirmed as being composed of the gum binder components. This result is difficult to confirm using just one analytical technique (either XPS or SEM-EDX). In addition, peak fitting of C1s XPS spectra suggests that the gum binder in the commercial watercolour paints is probably gum arabic (by comparison with the reference materials). This identification is not conclusive, but the combination techniques of XPS and SEM shows the surface structure with material distribution of the gum binder and the other ingredients of the watercolour paints. Therefore as a unique technique, XPS combined with SEM-EDX may prove a useful method in the study of surface structure for not only watercolour objects but also other art objects; which may in future help in the conservation for art.

  11. Gum in apricot (Prunus armeniaca L. shoots induced by methyl jasmonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Saniewski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been well known that some fungal pathogens (Monilia laxa, M. fructigena, Cytospora cincta, larvae of Grapholita molesta and plant hormone - ethylene, induce gummosis in apricot shoots. Methyl jasmonate (JA-Me was also found to induce gummosis in apricot shoots as well as biotic and abiotic factors mentioned above. In order to know the mode of action of JA-Me on gum induction and/or formation, chemical composition of polysaccharides (after hydrolysis in gums of apricot shoots induced by JA-Me compared with those by ethephon and their mixture, and naturally occurring ones was studied, resulted in the succesful identification of monosaccharides, and the similarity of a composition consisting of xylose, arabinose and galactose at molar ratio 1:10:14, respectively. These results suggest that beside different inducers of gum in apricot the mechanism of polysaccharides biosynthesis of gums is the same or similar. The physiological role for JA-Me on gum induction and/or formation in apricot shoots, and other species are also discussed.

  12. Mechanical and barrier properties of guar gum based nano-composite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Chaturbhuj K; Gupta, Sumit; Bahadur, Jitendra; Mazumder, S; Variyar, Prasad S; Sharma, Arun

    2015-06-25

    Guar gum based nano-composite films were prepared using organically modified (cloisite 20A) and unmodified (nanofil 116) nanoclays. Effect of nanoclay incorporation on mechanical strength, water vapor barrier property, chromatic characteristics and opacity of films was evaluated. Nano-composites were characterized using X-ray scattering, FTIR and scanning electron microscopy. A nanoclay concentration dependent increase in mechanical strength and reduction in water vapor transmission rate was observed. Films containing nanofil 116 (2.5% w/w guar gum) and closite 20A (10% w/w guar gum) demonstrated a 102% and 41% higher tensile strength, respectively, as compared to the control. Lower tensile strength of cloisite 20A films as compared to nanofil 116 films was due to its incompatibility with guar gum. X-ray scattering analysis revealed that interstitial spacing between nanofil 116 and cloisite 20A sheets increased due to intercalation by guar gum polymer. This resulted in improved mechanical and barrier properties of nano-composites compared to control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis of oxidized guar gum by dry method and its application in reactive dye printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Honghong; Liu, Mingzhu; Zhang, Bing; Cui, Dapeng; Gao, Chunmei; Ni, Boli; Chen, Jiucun

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare oxidized guar gum with a simple dry method, basing on guar gum, hydrogen peroxide and a small amount of solvent. To obtain a product with suitable viscosity for reactive dye printing, the effects of various factors such as the amount of oxidant and solvent, reaction temperature and time were studied with respect to the viscosity of reaction products. The product was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography, scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The hydrated rate of guar gum and oxidized guar gum was estimated through measuring the required time when their solutions (1%, w/v) reached the maximum viscosity. The effects of the salt concentration and pH on viscosity of the resultant product were studied. The mixed paste containing oxidized guar gum and carboxymethyl starch was prepared and its viscosity was determined by the viscometer. The rheological property of the mixed paste was appraised by the printing viscosity index. In addition, the applied effect of mixed paste in reactive dye printing was examined by assessing the fabric stiffness, color yield and sharp edge to the printed image in comparison with sodium alginate. And the results indicated that the mixed paste could partially replace sodium alginate as thickener in reactive dye printing. The study also showed that the method was low cost and eco-friendly and the product would have an extensive application in reactive dye printing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Modified gum arabic cross-linked gelatin scaffold for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarika, P R; Cinthya, Kuriakose; Jayakrishnan, A; Anilkumar, P R; James, Nirmala Rachel

    2014-10-01

    The present work deals with development of modified gum arabic cross-linked gelatin scaffold for cell culture. A new biocompatible scaffold was developed by cross-linking gelatin (Gel) with gum arabic, a polysaccharide. Gum arabic was subjected to periodate oxidation to obtain gum arabic aldehyde (GAA). GAA was reacted with gelatin under appropriate pH to prepare the cross-linked hydrogel. Cross-linking occurred due to Schiff's base reaction between aldehyde groups of oxidized gum arabic and amino groups of gelatin. The scaffold prepared from the hydrogel was characterized by swelling properties, degree of cross-linking, in vitro degradation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cytocompatibility evaluation using L-929 and HepG2 cells confirmed non-cytotoxic and non-adherent nature of the scaffold. These properties are essential for generating multicellular spheroids and hence the scaffold is proposed to be a suitable candidate for spheroid cell culture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of physicochemical characteristics and antioxidant property of Prunus avium gum exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Hossein; Askari, Gholamreza; Jahanbin, Kambiz; Khodaeian, Faramarz

    2016-12-01

    In this study some physicochemical properties and elemental analysis of Prunus avium gum exudates were investigated. The gum studied had, on average, 75.14% carbohydrate, 11.3% uronic acids, 1.11% protein, 7.53% moisture content (w.b.) and 3.12% ash. Measured values for the angle of repose, Carr's index and Hausner ratio showed the good flow ability for the gum powder. The viscosity of 1% aqueous solution of the gum exhibited a Newtonian type of flow and with pH reduction the swelling index was increased. The average molecular weight of the main polysaccharide fraction was about 1.46×10(5)Da (146kDa). GC analysis showed that the main polysaccharide was composed of four kinds of neutral monosaccharides, namely mannose (Man), arabinose (Ara), galactose (Gal) and xylose (Xyl) with a relative molar ratio of 1.0:14.7:7.1:2.4. FTIR analysis showed the presence of carboxyl and hydroxyl groups and glycosidic linkage. The antioxidant activity of the gum was evaluated by determining DPPH scavenging and total phenolic contents which showed poor antioxidant property. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Development of eco-friendly submicron emulsions stabilized by a bio-derived gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Mosqueda, Luis María; Ramírez, Pablo; Trujillo-Cayado, Luis Alfonso; Santos, Jenifer; Muñoz, José

    2014-11-01

    Many traditional organic solvents are being gradually replaced by ecofriendly alternatives. D-Limonene is a terpenic (bio)-solvent that fulfils the requirements to be considered a green solvent. D-Limonene sub-micron emulsions suffer from Ostwald ripening destabilization. In this study, we examined the influence of the addition of a natural gum (rosin gum) to D-limonene in order to prevent Ostwald ripening. This contribution deals with the study of emulsions formulated with a mixture of D-limonene and rosin gum as dispersed phase and Pluronic PE9400 as emulsifier. The procedure followed for the development of these formulations was based on the application of product design principles. This led to the optimum ratio rosin gum/D-limonene and subsequently to the optimum surfactant concentration. The combination of different techniques (rheology, laser diffraction and multiple light scattering) was demonstrated to be a powerful tool to assist in the prediction of the emulsions destabilization process. Not only did the addition of rosin gum highly increase the stability of these emulsions by inhibiting the Ostwald ripening, but it also reduced the emulsions droplet size. Thus, we found that stable sub-micron D-limonene-in-water emulsions have been obtained in the range 3-6 wt% Pluronic PE-9400 by means of a single-step rotor/stator homogenizing process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of the effects of khaya gum on the mechanical and release properties of paracetamol tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeku, O A; Itiola, O A

    2003-03-01

    A study of the comparative effects of khaya gum and two standard binding agents-polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and gelatin--on crushing strength and friability, and the disintegration and dissolution characteristics of paracetamol tablets was made. The crushing strength-friability ratio (CSFR), the disintegration times, D, and the dissolution times t50, t90, and t1 (derived from the equation of Noyes and Whitney), all increased with an increase in binder concentration; however, the dissolution rate constants, k1 and k2, decreased. The ranking for the values of CSFR for tablets containing the different binders was PVP > gelatin > khaya gum. The ranking for D and the dissolution times was gelatin > khaya gum > PVP, whereas the ranking for the dissolution rate constants was PVP > khaya gum > gelatin. There were significant linear correlations between CSFR, D, t50, t90, and t1 for the tablets. There were also significant correlations between k1 and D, t50, t90, and t1, and between k2 and t90. The results suggest that khaya gum could be useful as an alternative binding agent to produce tablets with particular mechanical strength and drug release profiles.

  18. Matrix properties of a new plant gum in controlled drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalu, V D; Odeniyi, M A; Jaiyeoba, K T

    2007-07-01

    A new plant gum, Okra (extracted from the pods of Hibiscus esculentus), has been evaluated as a controlled-release agent in modified release matrices, in comparison with sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (NaCMC) and hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC), using Paracetamol as a model drug. Tablets were produced by direct compression and the in-vitro drug release was assessed in conditions mimicking the gastro intestinal system, for 6 h. Okra gum matrices provided a controlled-release of Paracetamol for more than 6 h and the release rates followed time-independent kinetics. The release rates were dependent on the concentration of the drug present in the matrix. The addition of tablet excipients, lactose and Avicel, altered the dissolution profile and the release kinetics. Okra gum compared favourably with NaCMC, and a combination of Okra gum and NaCMC, or on further addition of HPMC resulted in near zeroorder release of paracetamol from the matrix tablet. The results indicate that Okra gum matrices could be useful in the formulation of sustained-release tablets for up to 6 h.

  19. Bayesian uncertainty analysis compared with the application of the GUM and its supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elster, Clemens

    2014-08-01

    The Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) has proven to be a major step towards the harmonization of uncertainty evaluation in metrology. Its procedures contain elements from both classical and Bayesian statistics. The recent supplements 1 and 2 to the GUM appear to move the guidelines towards the Bayesian point of view, and they produce a probability distribution that shall encode one's state of knowledge about the measurand. In contrast to a Bayesian uncertainty analysis, however, Bayes' theorem is not applied explicitly. Instead, a distribution is assigned for the input quantities which is then ‘propagated’ through a model that relates the input quantities to the measurand. The resulting distribution for the measurand may coincide with a distribution obtained by the application of Bayes' theorem, but this is not true in general. The relation between a Bayesian uncertainty analysis and the application of the GUM and its supplements is investigated. In terms of a simple example, similarities and differences in the approaches are illustrated. Then a general class of models is considered and conditions are specified for which the distribution obtained by supplement 1 to the GUM is equivalent to a posterior distribution resulting from the application of Bayes' theorem. The corresponding prior distribution is identified and assessed. Finally, we briefly compare the GUM approach with a Bayesian uncertainty analysis in the context of regression problems.

  20. Development of a new hybrid gel phantom using carrageenan and gellan gum for visualizing three-dimensional temperature distribution during hyperthermia and radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Masahiro; Kato, Hirokazu; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Shimamura, Kaoru; Uchida, Tetsuya; Wang, Yadi; Akaki, Shiro; Asaumi, Jun-Ichi; Himei, Kengo; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Kanazawa, Susumu; Shibuya, Koichi; Kawasaki, Shoji; Hiraki, Yoshio

    2005-07-01

    We developed a new hybrid gel phantom using carrageenan and gellan gum for the purpose of visualizing three-dimensional temperature distribution. The phantom, which contains carrageenan, gellan gum, non-ionic surface active agent, potassium chloride, n-butanol, sodium azide, and water, shows good transparency at room temperature, and has the advantage that the heated region becomes white and opaque due to segregation of the surface active agent. Carrageenan and gellan gum were added to improve the transparency and fragility of the hybrid gel. Potassium chloride was used to adjust the electrical conductivity of the gel to a range of 5-130 MHz, so that it would be equivalent to that of muscle tissue for each frequency used by electromagnetic heating devices. N-butanol was used to adjust the clouding temperature to a range between 45 and 55 degrees C. In the present study we clarified the important properties of the new phantom, and developed formulae for easy determination of the amounts of ingredients necessary for the desired clouding temperature and electric conductivity. The characteristics of this phantom are: a) a solid form to avoid convection by heat conduction; b) sufficient strength without fragility to form a torso without the use of a reinforcing agent; c) high transparency at room temperature and visualization of the heating area as a white turbidity; d) time-lapse and accurate visualization of the changing temperature area without thermal hysteresis; e) electrical properties similar to those of human tissues; f) ease of production; and g) low cost and good safety. This phantom might assist oncologists in their routine checking and study of the performance of electromagnetic heating devices for hyperthermia and radiofrequency ablation.

  1. Effects of oriental sweet gum storax on porcine wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocsel, Hakan; Teke, Zafer; Sacar, Mustafa; Kabay, Burhan; Duzcan, S Ender; Kara, Inci Gokalan

    2012-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the effects of oriental sweet gum (Liquidambar orientalis Mill.) storax on partial-thickness and full-thickness wounds compared to conventional wound dressings in a porcine model. Six young Yorkshire pigs were used. Sixteen square excisional wounds measuring 3 × 3 cm were performed per animal. The wounds were allocated to one of the four treatment modalities: storax, hydrocolloid dressing, silver sulfadiazine, and control groups. Partial-thickness wounds were created in two pigs, and tissue samples were harvested on days 4 and 8, respectively. Full-thickness wounds were created in four pigs, and tissue samples were taken on days 4, 8, 14, and 21, respectively. Histologically, all wounds were examined for re-epithelialization and granulation tissue formation. Tissue hydroxyproline content and wound contraction areas were measured. In storax-applied group, there was a greater depth of granulation tissue at 4 and 8 days compared to all other groups (p < .0125), and there was a faster re-epithelialization at 21 days compared to both hydrocolloid dressing and control groups in full-thickness wounds (p < .0125). Tissue hydroxyproline content and wound contraction did not differ significantly between the groups. The results of this study indicate that topical application of storax enhanced both re-epithelialization and granulation tissue formation in full-thickness wounds. Further studies are indicated in this important area of wound healing research to evaluate the clinical efficacy of this storax and search for the mechanisms that explain its effects.

  2. Self-perceived mouthfeel and physico-chemical surface effects after chewing gums containing sorbitol and Magnolia bark extract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, Stefan W.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Slomp, Anje M.; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Dodds, Michael W. J.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2017-01-01

    The European Food Safety Authority recognizes the contribution of sugar-free chewing gum to oral health through increased salivation, clearance of food debris, and neutralization of biofilm pH. Magnolia bark extract is a gum additive shown to reduce the prevalence of bad-breath bacteria but its

  3. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Fingerprinting for Identification of Acacia Gum in Microsamples from Works of Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granzotto, Clara; Sutherland, Ken

    2017-03-07

    This paper reports an improved method for the identification of Acacia gum in cultural heritage samples using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) after enzymatic digestion of the polysaccharide component. The analytical strategy was optimized using a reference Acacia gum (gum arabic, sp. A. senegal) and provided an unambiguous MS profile of the gum, characterized by specific and recognized oligosaccharides, from as little as 0.1 μg of material. The enhanced experimental approach with reduced detection limit was successfully applied to the analysis of naturally aged (∼80 year) gum arabic samples, pure and mixed with lead white pigment, and allowed the detection of gum arabic in samples from a late painting (1949/1954) by Georges Braque in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. This first application of the technique to characterize microsamples from a painting, in conjunction with analyses by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), provided important insights into Braque's unusual mixed paint media that are also helpful to inform appropriate conservation treatments for his works. The robustness of the analytical strategy due to the reproducibility of the gum MS profile, even in the presence of other organic and inorganic components, together with the minimal sample size required, demonstrate the value of this new MALDI-TOF MS method as an analytical tool for the identification of gum arabic in microsamples from museum artifacts.

  4. Comparative viscoelasticity studies: Corn fiber gum versus commercial polysaccharide emulsifiers in bulk and at air/liquid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comparative study of both the bulk and air/liquid interfacial rheological responses was carried out by using four kinds of high molecular weight and highly branched polysaccharide emulsifiers, (a) corn fiber gum (CFG), (b) octenyl succinate anhydride-modified starch (OSA-s), (c) gum arabic (GA) an...

  5. Dryland resources, livelihoods and institutions : diversity and dynamics in use and management of gum and resin trees in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teshale Woldeamanuel Habebo, Teshale

    2011-01-01

    Dry woodlands comprise the largest forest resources in Ethiopia. An important feature of these forests is their richness in Acacia, Boswellia and Commiphora (ABC) species that produce gum and resin. Gums/resins significantly contribute to rural livelihoods, the national economy, and ecosystem

  6. Examples of measurement uncertainty evaluations in accordance with the revised GUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runje, B.; Horvatic, A.; Alar, V.; Medic, S.; Bosnjakovic, A.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents examples of the evaluation of uncertainty components in accordance with the current and revised Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM). In accordance with the proposed revision of the GUM a Bayesian approach was conducted for both type A and type B evaluations.The law of propagation of uncertainty (LPU) and the law of propagation of distribution applied through the Monte Carlo method, (MCM) were used to evaluate associated standard uncertainties, expanded uncertainties and coverage intervals. Furthermore, the influence of the non-Gaussian dominant input quantity and asymmetric distribution of the output quantity y on the evaluation of measurement uncertainty was analyzed. In the case when the probabilistically coverage interval is not symmetric, the coverage interval for the probability P is estimated from the experimental probability density function using the Monte Carlo method. Key highlights of the proposed revision of the GUM were analyzed through a set of examples.

  7. Structural and physicochemical changes in guar gum by alcohol-acid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dandan; Yang, Na; Zhang, Yao; Guo, Lunan; Sang, Shangyuan; Jin, Zhengyu; Xu, Xueming

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of alcohol-acid degradation on the structural and physicochemical characteristics of guar gum. Guar gum (50wt.%) was treated with methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, or 1-butanol containing 1 or 2mL 36% hydrochloric acid at 75°C for 30-240min. The linear relationship between 1/Mw and time suggested that alcohol-acid degradation followed first-order kinetics with rate constants varying directly with the number of alcohol carbon atoms and acid concentration. Alcohol-acid treatment exerted no effect on the chemical and crystal structure of guar but significantly decreased shear viscosity, slightly increased solubility, mildly reduced thermostability, and dramatically darkened colour. This study extended the knowledge of the effect of alcohol on the acid hydrolysis of guar and will contribute to the development of a large-scale procedure for guar gum degradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigation on Tensile Fatigue Characteristics of Meshed GUM Metal Plates for Bone Graft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Koki; He, Jianmei

    2017-11-01

    GUM Metal has characteristics of lower elasticity rigidity, large elastic deformation, higher strength and biocompatibility etc. When it is used for implant applications, there is still problem like overloading on the natural-bone because of its high rigidity compared with the human bones. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to create more flexible meshed plates for implant applications from the viewpoints of elastic rigidity and volume density. Basic mesh shapes are designed, devised and applied for meshed GUM Metal plates using three dimensional (3D) CAD tools. Experimental evaluation on tensile fatigue characteristics of meshed GUM Metal plate specimens are carried out. Analytical approaches on stress evaluation are also executed through finite element method to obtain the S-N curve for fatigue characteristic evaluation.

  9. Evaluating the masticatory function after mandibulectomy with colour-changing chewing gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Y; Ishida, S; Hasegawa, T; Kobayashi, M; Nibu, K; Komori, T

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the usefulness of colour-changing gum in evaluating masticatory performance after mandibulectomy. Thirty-nine patients who underwent mandibulectomy between 1982 and 2010 at Kobe University Hospital were recruited in this study. There were 21 male and 18 female subjects with a mean age of 64·7 years (range: 12-89 years) at the time of surgery. The participants included six patients who underwent marginal mandibulectomy, 21 patients who underwent segmental mandibulectomy and 12 patients who underwent hemimandibulectomy. The masticatory function was evaluated using colour-changing chewing gum, gummy jelly and a modified Sato's questionnaire. In all cases, the data were obtained more than 3 months after completing the patient's final prosthesis. The colour-changing gum scores correlated with both the gummy jelly scores (r = 0·634, P masticatory performance after mandibulectomy. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Physical Stability of Oil in Water Emulsions in the Presence of Gamma Irradiated Gum Tragacanth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meybodi, Neda Mollakhalili; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Farhoodi, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Gum tragacanth (GT) exuded from an Iranian Astragalus species was γ-irradiated at 0, 0.75, 1.5, 3, 5, 7, 10 kGy and used to stabilize a model oil in water emulsion system. Stability and physicochemical properties of emulsion samples were investigated with respect to the effect of irradiation...... treatment on functional properties of gum tragacanth. Particle size distribution, interfacial tension, zeta potential, steady shear and oscillatory rheological measurements were used to characterize and evaluate the emulsion samples and obtain more information about the possible stability mechanism....... Emulsions were prepared by homogenizing 10% w/w sun flower oil with 90% w/w aqueous gum dispersions and stored quiescently at 25°C for 120 days. Results indicated that using 1.5 kGy irradiated GT was more effective in providing optimum values of apparent viscosity, number mean diameter, electrosteric...

  11. SPATIALLY RESOLVED H{alpha} MAPS AND SIZES OF 57 STRONGLY STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1 FROM 3D-HST: EVIDENCE FOR RAPID INSIDE-OUT ASSEMBLY OF DISK GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Erica June; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Bezanson, Rachel; Lundgren, Britt [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Brammer, Gabriel [European Southern Observatory, Alonson de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Foerster Schreiber, Natascha [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon; Labbe, Ivo [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Leiden (Netherlands); Rix, Hans-Walter; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Schmidt, Kasper B. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kriek, Mariska [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Quadri, Ryan [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    We investigate the buildup of galaxies at z {approx} 1 using maps of H{alpha} and stellar continuum emission for a sample of 57 galaxies with rest-frame H{alpha} equivalent widths >100 A in the 3D-HST grism survey. We find that the H{alpha} emission broadly follows the rest-frame R-band light but that it is typically somewhat more extended and clumpy. We quantify the spatial distribution with the half-light radius. The median H{alpha} effective radius r{sub e} (H{alpha}) is 4.2 {+-} 0.1 kpc but the sizes span a large range, from compact objects with r{sub e} (H{alpha}) {approx} 1.0 kpc to extended disks with r{sub e} (H{alpha}) {approx} 15 kpc. Comparing H{alpha} sizes to continuum sizes, we find =1.3 {+-} 0.1 for the full sample. That is, star formation, as traced by H{alpha}, typically occurs out to larger radii than the rest-frame R-band stellar continuum; galaxies are growing their radii and building up from the inside out. This effect appears to be somewhat more pronounced for the largest galaxies. Using the measured H{alpha} sizes, we derive star formation rate surface densities, {Sigma}{sub SFR}. We find that {Sigma}{sub SFR} ranges from {approx}0.05 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2} for the largest galaxies to {approx}5 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2} for the smallest galaxies, implying a large range in physical conditions in rapidly star-forming z {approx} 1 galaxies. Finally, we infer that all galaxies in the sample have very high gas mass fractions and stellar mass doubling times <500 Myr. Although other explanations are also possible, a straightforward interpretation is that we are simultaneously witnessing the rapid formation of compact bulges and large disks at z {approx} 1.

  12. Effects of sugar-free chewing gum sweetened with xylitol or maltitol on the development of gingivitis and plaque: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keukenmeester, R.S.; Slot, D.E.; Rosema, N.A.M.; van Loveren, C.; van der Weijden, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to test the effect of sugar-free chewing gum sweetened with xylitol or maltitol compared to the use of a gum base or no gum on gingivitis and plaque scores under both brushing and non-brushing circumstances. Methods The design of the study was a four-group,

  13. Temperature dependency of the interaction between xanthan gum and sage seed gum: An interpretation of dynamic rheology and thixotropy based on creep test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Seyed M A; Behrouzian, Fataneh; Alghooneh, Ali

    2017-10-01

    The viscoelastic (transient and dynamic) and time-dependent rheological behaviors of XG (xanthan gum), SSG (sage seed gum) and their blends at various ratios (1-3, 1-1, and 3-1 SSG-XG) and temperatures (10, 30, and 50C) were investigated using creep and recovery analyses. The creep compliance was converted to stress relaxation data; then, the structural kinetic model satisfactorily fitted the time-dependent relaxation modulus. Furthermore, dynamic rheology of mixtures was investigated using creep analyses. The most important contribution of the Maxwell spring to deformation (53.51%), was that corresponding to the SSG at 50C and the most important contribution of the Maxwell dashpot to the maximum deformation, were those corresponding to the XG (61.44%) and 1-3 SSG-XG (58.91%) samples both at 50C. The breakdown rate constant ( α) of the crosslinked gum structure in SSG and 3-1 SSG-XG under the application of external shear stress increases with temperature from 10 to 50C in the range of 0.14-0.32 (1/s) and 0.14-0.24 (1/s), respectively, whereas other dispersions showed the reverse trend. Among all dispersions, only XG and 1-3 SSG-XG demonstrated crossover frequency at 9.95 and 31.47 rad/s, respectively, at 50C, indicative of the lowest entanglement density for 1-3 SSG-XG. The greatest interaction between SSG and XG occurred for 3-1 ratio at 50C, which was confirmed by the Han curves. Hydrocolloid blends, particularly those consisting of xanthan gum and a galactomannan from new source can provide a range of attractive textural properties. Rheological studies contribute to the description of the molecular structure and prediction of the structural changes during their manufacturing processes. Sage seed gum (SSG), as a polyelectrolyte galactomannan, has a great potential to exert stabilizing, thickening, gelling and binding properties in food, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical systems. Therefore, we elaborate the interactions between SSG and xanthan gum and also the

  14. NaCl and sugar release, salivation and taste during mastication of salted chewing gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyraud, Eric; Prinz, Jon; Dransfield, Eric

    2003-09-01

    Salt perception impacts on food acceptability and nutrition and depends upon salt release from foods that was determined in situ during mastication of chewing gum with up to 10% (1800 mmol/kg) added NaCl. The mechanical action of chewing increased salivation, which was further increased by the presence of salt, particularly above 180 mmol NaCl/kg gum or above 100 mM NaCl in saliva. The average resting salivary flow rate was 1 ml/min, increasing to 4 and 6 ml/min with gums containing low and high salt, respectively. Thus, stimulation of salivation by salt occurred at a concentration well above the taste threshold of 20 mM NaCl. NaCl concentration in nonstimulated saliva was about 10 mM and increased to 500 mM after 30 s chewing of the 10% NaCl gum and returned to near nonstimulated levels after 4 min chewing. Changes in pH of saliva were more gradual, increasing to a maximum at about 2 min and remaining elevated after 4 min. Salty taste was related to the free chloride ion concentration in saliva irrespective of the initial salt concentration in the gum with an indication of adaptation after 3 min chewing. During chewing, salty taste increased ahead of the increase in salivary conductivity and the salt concentration in the sublingual saliva varied in a cyclic fashion about every 20 s. This is consistent with a cyclic swallowing of saliva and replacement with newly secreted saliva of low salt content and mastication releasing further salt from the gum.

  15. Dependence levels in users of electronic cigarettes, nicotine gums and tobacco cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ETTER, Jean-François; EISSENBERG, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess dependence levels in users of e-cigarettes, and compare them with dependence levels in users of nicotine gums and tobacco cigarettes. Design Self-reports from cross-sectional Internet and mail surveys. Comparisons of: a) 766 daily users of nicotine-containing e-cigarettes with 30 daily users of nicotine-free e-cigarettes; b) 911 former smokers who used the e-cigarette daily with 451 former smokers who used the nicotine gum daily (but no e-cigarette); c) 125 daily e-cigarette users who smoked daily (dual users) with two samples of daily smokers who did not use e-cigarettes (2206 enrolled on the Internet and 292 enrolled by mail from the general population of Geneva). We used the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence, the Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale, the Cigarette Dependence Scale and versions of these scales adapted for e-cigarettes and nicotine gums. Results Dependence ratings were slightly higher in users of nicotine-containing e-cigarettes than in users of nicotine-free e-cigarettes. In former smokers, long-term (>3 months) users of e-cigarettes were less dependent on e-cigarettes than long-term users of the nicotine gum were dependent on the gum. There were few differences in dependence ratings between short-term (e-cigarettes. Dependence on e-cigarettes was generally lower in dual users than dependence on tobacco cigarettes in the two other samples of daily smokers. Conclusions Some e-cigarette users were dependent on nicotine-containing e-cigarettes, but these products were less addictive than tobacco cigarettes. E-cigarettes may be as or less addictive than nicotine gums, which themselves are not very addictive. PMID:25561385

  16. Xanthan gum and Scleroglucan - how both differ at elevated temperatures. Industrial biopolymers for oilwell drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, P.; Keilhofer, G. [Degussa Construction Polymers GmbH, Trostberg (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    Industrial biopolymers produced by microorganisms have become very popular in the oilfield over the last years. Especially Xanthan Gum and Scleroglucan are used extensively as viscosifiers for various drilling fluid applications due to its unique rheological properties. Scleroglucan is known to be more temperature stable than Xanthan Gum. It is distinguished by a better stability against molecular decomposition. Moreover, Scleroglucan offers a better thickening performance at elevated temperatures. This latter aspect is often neglected when temperature stability is discussed. Although the viscosity-behaviour at increased temperature is of decisive importance with regard to downhole conditions. Rheology measurements indicate that Scleroglucan becomes superior to Xanthan Gum even at moderate temperatures of 60 to 80 C (140 to 175 F). At these temperatures and above, Xanthan Gum fluid viscosity drops significantly. Whereas Scleroglucan shows a flat and stable performance profile. This advantage of Scleroglucan first became obvious from a solids settling experiment at 80 C (175 F). It was only the Scleroglucan solution that retained the sized sand particles in suspension. While in the Xanthan Gum solution the solids settled down completely. Surprisingly, from the oilfield-standard FANN 35 SA viscometer this result was not evident. The instrument does not reach the ultra-low-shear range which is most relevant for particle settling. Advanced special instruments are available to cover this. However, it turned out, that also a common Brookfield HAT viscometer is very well suited for this purpose. Equipped with a heating cup and rotating at its lowest speed of 0.5 rpm, the instrument provides a simple and reliable approach to trace suspension capacity with increasing temperature. For example, with 2 ppb of Scleroglucan in a CaCl{sub 2} brine the biopolymer provides a stable Brookfield viscosity of about 20.000 mPas. Whereas with 2 ppb Xanthan Gum it drops down to 5.200 m

  17. Natural gums as sustained release carriers: development of gastroretentive drug delivery system of ziprasidone HCl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJ Rajamma

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Objective of this study is to show the potential use of natural gums in the development of drug delivery systems. Therefore in this work gastro retentive tablet formulations of ziprasidone HCl were developed using simplex lattice design considering concentration of okra gum, locust bean gum and HPMC K4M as independent variables. A response surface plot and multiple regression equations were used to evaluate the effect of independent variables on hardness, flag time, floating time and drug release for 1 h, 2 h, and 8 h and for 24 h. A checkpoint batch was also prepared by considering the constraints and desirability of optimized formulation to improve its in vitro performance. Significance of result was analyzed using ANOVA and p was considered statistically significant. Results Formulation chiefly contains locust bean gum found to be favorable for hardness and floatability but combined effect of three variables was responsible for the sustained release of drug. The in vitro drug release data of check point batch (F8 was found to be sustained well compared to the most satisfactory formulation (F7 of 7 runs. The ‘n’ value was found to be between 0.5 and 1 suggesting that release of drug follows anomalous (non-fickian diffusion mechanism indicating both diffusion and erosion mechanism from these natural gums. Predicted results were almost similar to the observed experimental values indicating the accuracy of the design. In vivo floatability test indicated non adherence to the gastric mucosa and tablets remain buoyant for more than 24 h. Conclusions Study showed these eco-friendly natural gums can be considered as promising SR polymers.

  18. The Association of Gum Bleeding with Respiratory Health in a Population Based Study from Northern Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Gómez Real

    Full Text Available There is little knowledge about how oral and respiratory health is interrelated even though the mucosa of the oral cavity and airways constitutes a continuum and the exposures to these are partly similar.To investigate whether gum bleeding is related to asthma, respiratory symptoms and self-reported COPD.A postal questionnaire including questions about respiratory and oral health was sent to general population samples in seven Northern European centres. In 13,409 responders, gum bleeding when brushing teeth was reported always/often by 4% and sometimes by 20%. Logistic regressions accounted for age, smoking, educational level, centre and gender. Effects of BMI, cardio-metabolic diseases, early life factors, gastro-oesophageal reflux, dental hygiene, nasal congestion, and asthma medication were addressed.Gum bleeding always/often was significantly associated with ≥ 3 asthma symptoms (OR 2.58, 95% CI 2.10-3.18, asthma (1.62 [1.23-2.14] and self-reported COPD (2.02 [1.28-3.18]. There was a dose-response relationship between respiratory outcomes and gum bleeding frequency (≥ 3 symptoms: gum bleeding sometimes 1.42 [1.25-1.60], often/always 2.58 [2.10-3.18], and there was no heterogeneity between centres (p(heterogeneity = 0.49. None of the investigated risk factors explained the associations. The observed associations were significantly stronger among current smokers (p(interaction = 0.004.A consistent link between gum bleeding and obstructive airways disease was observed, not explained by common risk factors or metabolic factors. We speculate that oral pathogens might have unfavourable impact on the airways, and that the direct continuity of the mucosa of the oral cavity and the airways reflects a pathway that might provide novel opportunities for interventions.

  19. Collaborative form(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunn, Wendy

    Gunn asks us to consider beauty as collaborative forms of action generated by moving between design by means of anthropology and anthropology by means of design. Specifically, she gives focus to play-like reflexions on practices of designing energy products, systems and infrastructure. Design...... anthropology engages groups of people within collaborative, interdisciplinary, inter-organizational design processes and co-analytic activities vs. the individual anthropologist conducting studies of people. In doing anthropology by means of design as Gatt and Ingold (2013) have shown, design is considered...

  20. In situ effect of CPP-ACP chewing gum upon erosive enamel loss

    OpenAIRE

    de ALENCAR, Catarina Ribeiro Barros; de OLIVEIRA, Gabriela Cristina; MAGALH?ES, Ana Carolina; BUZALAF, Mar?lia Afonso Rabelo; MACHADO, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; HON?RIO, Heitor Marques; RIOS, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) is able to increase salivary calcium and phosphate levels at an acidic pH. Previous studies demonstrated that a CPP-ACP chewing gum was able to enhance the re-hardening of erosion lesions, but could not diminish enamel hardness loss. Therefore, there is no consensus regarding the effectiveness of CPP-ACP on dental erosion. Objective This in situ study investigated the ability of a CPP-ACP chewing gum in preventing erosive e...

  1. Physico-chemical characterization of the temperature dependent hydration kinetics of Gleditsia sinensis gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Hong-Lei; Lin, Xue-Jiao; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Sun, Da-Feng; Jiang, Jian-Xin

    2013-11-01

    The physico-chemical properties and hydration kinetics of Gleditsia sinensis gum were investigated to evaluate its temperature dependence. The increase of temperature resulted in improved solubility of G. sinensis gum, and the dissolved galactomannan showed decreased degree of galactose substitution (DSGal) and increased molecular weight (p0.96), and the hydration index t0.8 at different temperatures varied in the range of 51-302 min. It was found that galactomannan with low DSGal and high molecular weight exhibited slow hydration rate and poor solubility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhancement of anti-inflammatory activity of bromelain by its encapsulation in katira gum nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernela, Manju; Ahuja, Munish; Thakur, Rajesh

    2016-06-05

    Bromelain-loaded katira gum nanoparticles were synthesized using 3 level optimization process and desirability approach. Nanoparticles of the optimized batch were characterized using particle size analysis, zeta potential, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Investigation of their in vivo anti-inflammatory activity by employing carrageenan induced rat-paw oedema method showed that encapsulation of bromelain in katira gum nanoparticles substantially enhanced its anti-inflammatory potential. This may be attributed to enhanced absorption owing to reduced particle size or to protection of bromelain from acid proteases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development and Antibacterial Activity of Cashew Gum-Based Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José dos S. Soares

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the development of a green synthesis of silver nanoparticles reduced and stabilized by exuded gum from Anacardium occidentale L. and evaluates in vitro their antibacterial and cytotoxic activities. Characterization of cashew gum-based silver nanoparticles (AgNPs was carried out based on UV–Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis which revealed that the synthesized silver nanoparticles were spherical in shape, measuring about 4 nm in size with a uniform dispersal. AgNPs presented antibacterial activity, especially against Gram-negative bacteria, in concentrations where no significant cytotoxicity was observed.

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity of Chios mastic gum is associated with inhibition of TNF-alpha induced oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerakis Stamatios

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gum of Chios mastic (Pistacia lentiscus var. chia is a natural antimicrobial agent that has found extensive use in pharmaceutical products and as a nutritional supplement. The molecular mechanisms of its anti-inflammatory activity, however, are not clear. In this work, the potential role of antioxidant activity of Chios mastic gum has been evaluated. Methods Scavenging of superoxide radical was investigated by electron spin resonance and spin trapping technique using EMPO spin trap in xanthine oxidase system. Superoxide production in endothelial and smooth muscle cells stimulated with TNF-α or angiotensin II and treated with vehicle (DMSO or mastic gum (0.1-10 μg/ml was measured by DHE and HPLC. Cellular H2O2 was measured by Amplex Red. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC with mastic gum was determined by the decrease of purified PKC activity, by inhibition of PKC activity in cellular homogenate and by attenuation of superoxide production in cells treated with PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA. Results Spin trapping study did not show significant scavenging of superoxide by mastic gum itself. However, mastic gum inhibited cellular production of superoxide and H2O2 in dose dependent manner in TNF-α treated rat aortic smooth muscle cells but did not affect unstimulated cells. TNF-α significantly increased the cellular superoxide production by NADPH oxidase, while mastic gum completely abolished this stimulation. Mastic gum inhibited the activity of purified PKC, decreased PKC activity in cell homogenate, and attenuated superoxide production in cells stimulated with PKC activator PMA and PKC-dependent angiotensin II in endothelial cells. Conclusion We suggest that mastic gum inhibits PKC which attenuates production of superoxide and H2O2 by NADPH oxidases. This antioxidant property may have direct implication to the anti-inflammatory activity of the Chios mastic gum.

  5. Anti-inflammatory activity of Chios mastic gum is associated with inhibition of TNF-alpha induced oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Gum of Chios mastic (Pistacia lentiscus var. chia) is a natural antimicrobial agent that has found extensive use in pharmaceutical products and as a nutritional supplement. The molecular mechanisms of its anti-inflammatory activity, however, are not clear. In this work, the potential role of antioxidant activity of Chios mastic gum has been evaluated. Methods Scavenging of superoxide radical was investigated by electron spin resonance and spin trapping technique using EMPO spin trap in xanthine oxidase system. Superoxide production in endothelial and smooth muscle cells stimulated with TNF-α or angiotensin II and treated with vehicle (DMSO) or mastic gum (0.1-10 μg/ml) was measured by DHE and HPLC. Cellular H2O2 was measured by Amplex Red. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) with mastic gum was determined by the decrease of purified PKC activity, by inhibition of PKC activity in cellular homogenate and by attenuation of superoxide production in cells treated with PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Results Spin trapping study did not show significant scavenging of superoxide by mastic gum itself. However, mastic gum inhibited cellular production of superoxide and H2O2 in dose dependent manner in TNF-α treated rat aortic smooth muscle cells but did not affect unstimulated cells. TNF-α significantly increased the cellular superoxide production by NADPH oxidase, while mastic gum completely abolished this stimulation. Mastic gum inhibited the activity of purified PKC, decreased PKC activity in cell homogenate, and attenuated superoxide production in cells stimulated with PKC activator PMA and PKC-dependent angiotensin II in endothelial cells. Conclusion We suggest that mastic gum inhibits PKC which attenuates production of superoxide and H2O2 by NADPH oxidases. This antioxidant property may have direct implication to the anti-inflammatory activity of the Chios mastic gum. PMID:21645369

  6. Volcanoes drive climate variability by emitting ozone weeks before eruptions, by forming lower stratospheric aerosols, by causing sustained ozone depletion, and by causing rapid changes in regional ozone concentrations affecting temperature and pressure differences driving atmospheric oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P. L.

    2016-12-01

    Total column ozone observed by satellite on February 19, 2010, increased 75% in a plume from Eyjafjallajökull volcano in southern Iceland eastward past Novaya Zemlya, extending laterally from northern Greenland to southern Norway (http://youtu.be/wJFZcPEfoR4). Contemporaneous ground deformation and rapidly increasing numbers of earthquakes imply magma began rising from a sill 4-6 km below the volcano, erupting a month later. Whether the ozone formed from the magma or from very hot gases rising through cracks in the ground is unclear. On February 20-22, 1991, similar increases in ozone were observed north of Pinatubo volcano before its initial eruption on April 2 (http://youtu.be/5y1PU2Qu3ag). Annual average total column ozone during the year of most moderate to large explosive volcanic eruptions since routine observations of ozone began in 1927 has been substantially higher than normal. Increased total column ozone absorbs more solar ultraviolet-B radiation, warming the ozone layer and cooling Earth. Most major volcanic eruptions form sulfuric-acid aerosols in the lower part of the ozone layer providing aqueous surfaces on which heterogeneous chemical reactions enhance ozone depletion. Within a year, aerosol droplets grew large enough to reflect and scatter high-frequency solar radiation, cooling Earth 0.5oC for 2-3 years. Temperature anomalies in the northern hemisphere rose 0.7oC in 28 years from 1970 to 1998 (HadCRUT4), while annual average ozone at Arosa dropped 27 DU because of manufactured CFC gases. Beginning in August 2014, temperature anomalies in the northern hemisphere rose another 0.6oC in less than two years apparently because of the 6-month eruption of Bárðarbunga volcano in central Iceland, the highest rate of basaltic lava extrusion since 1783. Large extrusions of basaltic lava are typically contemporaneous with the greatest periods of warming throughout Earth history. Ozone concentrations at Arosa change by season typically from 370 DU during

  7. Gum arabic modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles cross linked with collagen for isolation of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chittor Raghuraman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles are important class of materials in the field of nanobiotechnology, as it is an emerging area of research for material science and molecular biology researchers. One of the various methods to obtain multifunctional nanomaterials, molecular functionalization by attaching organic functional groups to nanomagnetic materials is an important technique. Recently, functionalized magnetic nanoparticles have been demonstrated to be useful in isolation/detection of dangerous pathogens (bacteria/viruses for human life. Iron (Fe based material especially FePt is used in the isolation of ultralow concentrations (2 cfu/ml of bacteria in less time and it has been demonstrated that van-FePt may be used as an alternative fast detection technique with respect to conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR method. However, still further improved demonstrations are necessary with interest to biocompatibility and green chemistry. Herein, we report the synthesis of Fe3O4 nanoparticles by template medication and its application for the detection/isolation of S. aureus bacteria. Results The reduction of anhydrous Iron chloride (FeCl3 in presence of sodium borohydride and water soluble polyelectrolyte (polydiallyldimethyl ammonium chloride, PDADMAC produces black precipitates. The X-ray diffraction (XRD, XPS and TEM analysis of the precipitates dried at 373 K demonstrated the formation of nanocrystalline Fe3O4. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed isolated staphylococcous aureus (S. aureus bacteria at ultralow concentrations using collagen coated gum arabic modified iron oxide nanoparticles (CCGAMION. Conclusion We are able to synthesize nanocrystalline Fe3O4 and CCGAMION was able to isolate S. aureus bacteria at 8-10 cfu (colony forming units/ml within ~3 minutes.

  8. Chronotherapeutic drug delivery of Tamarind gum, Chitosan and Okra gum controlled release colon targeted directly compressed Propranolol HCl matrix tablets and in-vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, A M J; Indana, V L; Kumar, Jatinder

    2015-08-01

    The main objective of this investigation is to develop a chronotherapeutic drug delivery of various natural polymers based colon targeted drug delivery systems to treat early morning sign in BP. The polymers such as Tamarind gum, Okra gum and Chitosan were used in the formulation design. A model drug Propranolol HCl was incorporated in the formulation in order to assess the controlled release and time dependent release potential of various natural polymers. A novel polymer Tamarind gum was extracted and used as a prime polymer in this study to prove the superiority of this polymer over other leading natural polymer. Propranolol HCl was used as a model drug which undergoes hepatic metabolism and witnesses the poor bioavailability. The matrix tablets of Propranolol HCl were prepared by direct compression. The tablets were evaluated for various quality control parameters and found to be within the limits. Carbopol 940 was used as an auxiliary polymer to modify the drug release and physicochemical characteristics of the tablets. The in vitro release studies were performed in 0.1N HCl for 1.5h, followed by pH 6.8 phosphate buffer for 2h and pH 7.4 phosphate buffer till maximum amount of drug release. The in vitro release profile of the formulations were fitted with various pharmacokinetic mathematical models and analyzed for release profile. The formulations prepared with Tamarind gum prolonged the release for an extended period of time compared to other polymer based formulation and showed an excellent compression characteristic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Antiplaque Efficacy of Tooth and Gums Tonic, Hiora-GA Gel, and Spirogyl Gum Paint in Comparison with Chlorhexidine M Gel: A Double-blind Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhabogi, Jagadeeswara Rao; Shekar, B R Chandra; Ramana, I Venkata; Yadav, Sarjeev Singh; Kumar, G Satish; Harita, N

    2017-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of three different herbal products (Tooth and Gums Tonic, Hiora-GA gel, and Spirogyl Gum paint) in reducing plaque, gingival inflammation and bacterial count in comparison with chlorhexidine M gel among participants with moderate to severe periodontitis. A total of eighty participants with moderate to severe periodontitis were initially recruited after obtaining their informed consent. All participants were offered scaling and polishing on the first visit to remove visible calculus. Then, these participants were randomly divided into four groups of twenty participants each using block randomization method. Participants in Group 1, 2, 3, and 4 were given chlorhexidine M gel, Hiora-GA gel, Spirogyl Gum paint, and Tooth and Gums Tonic, respectively. All participants were instructed to brush their teeth twice day with a soft bristled toothbrush and their regular fluoridated toothpaste. They were instructed to apply the respective gels twice a day according to the manufacturer's guidelines. The posttreatment follow-up examinations for gingival and plaque changes were assessed after 30, 60, and 90 days by three trained and calibrated investigators using gingival and plaque index. The investigators and statistician were blind about group allocation. The supragingival plaque samples were collected before and 90 days after treatment from the buccal surfaces of maxillary right first permanent molar of each participant for microbial analysis. The mean plaque, gingival scores significantly decreased at different intervals following intervention in all groups. The bacterial counts also significantly reduced postintervention with no significant difference in the efficacy of these products compared to chlorhexidine. All three herbal products were found to be effective when used along with oral prophylaxis. Hence, they can all be used as alternates to chlorhexidine in the management of periodontal diseases.

  10. Antiplaque efficacy of tooth and gums tonic, Hiora-GA gel, and Spirogyl Gum Paint in comparison with chlorhexidine M gel: A double-blind randomized control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeeswara Rao Sukhabogi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the efficacy of three different herbal products (Tooth and Gums Tonic, Hiora-GA gel, and Spirogyl Gum paint in reducing plaque, gingival inflammation and bacterial count in comparison with chlorhexidine M gel among participants with moderate to severe periodontitis. Materials and Methods: A total of eighty participants with moderate to severe periodontitis were initially recruited after obtaining their informed consent. All participants were offered scaling and polishing on the first visit to remove visible calculus. Then, these participants were randomly divided into four groups of twenty participants each using block randomization method. Participants in Group 1, 2, 3, and 4 were given chlorhexidine M gel, Hiora-GA gel, Spirogyl Gum paint, and Tooth and Gums Tonic, respectively. All participants were instructed to brush their teeth twice day with a soft bristled toothbrush and their regular fluoridated toothpaste. They were instructed to apply the respective gels twice a day according to the manufacturer's guidelines. The posttreatment follow-up examinations for gingival and plaque changes were assessed after 30, 60, and 90 days by three trained and calibrated investigators using gingival and plaque index. The investigators and statistician were blind about group allocation. The supragingival plaque samples were collected before and 90 days after treatment from the buccal surfaces of maxillary right first permanent molar of each participant for microbial analysis. Results: The mean plaque, gingival scores significantly decreased at different intervals following intervention in all groups. The bacterial counts also significantly reduced postintervention with no significant difference in the efficacy of these products compared to chlorhexidine. Conclusion: All three herbal products were found to be effective when used along with oral prophylaxis. Hence, they can all be used as alternates to chlorhexidine in the management

  11. Want to block earworms from conscious awareness? B(u)y gum!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaman, C Philip; Powell, Kitty; Rapley, Ellie

    2015-01-01

    Three experiments examine the role of articulatory motor planning in experiencing an involuntary musical recollection (an "earworm"). Experiment 1 shows that interfering with articulatory motor programming by chewing gum reduces both the number of voluntary and the number of involuntary-unwanted-musical thoughts. This is consistent with other findings that chewing gum interferes with voluntary processes such as recollections from verbal memory, the interpretation of ambiguous auditory images, and the scanning of familiar melodies, but is not predicted by theories of thought suppression, which assume that suppression is made more difficult by concurrent tasks or cognitive loads. Experiment 2 shows that chewing the gum affects the experience of "hearing" the music and cannot be ascribed to a general effect on thinking about a tune only in abstract terms. Experiment 3 confirms that the reduction of musical recollections by chewing gum is not the consequence of a general attentional or dual-task demand. The data support a link between articulatory motor programming and the appearance in consciousness of both voluntary and unwanted musical recollections.

  12. Stepwise extraction of Lepidium sativum seed gum: Physicochemical characterization and functional properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmkhah, Somayeh; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin

    2016-01-01

    stability was F3 > F2 > F1. Cress seed gum and its fractions exhibited non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior which the Herschel-Bulkley model was successfully described the steady shear flow behavior of samples, and apparent viscosity followed the order of F3 > F2 > F1. F3 exhibited the best surface tension...

  13. Rifabutin-loaded Floating Gellan Gum Beads: Effect of Calcium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    dissolution apparatus type II in 0.01M HCl (ph 2.0) as the dissolution medium. The shape, surface morphology and ... Keywords: Floating beads, Gellan gum, Incorporation efficiency, Rifabutin, Stomach-specific release. Received: 18 August 2010 ... induced by cations and is temperature- dependent. In aqueous solution, the ...

  14. Xylitol carryover effects on salivary mutans streptococci after 13 months of chewing xylitol gum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shinga-Ishihara, C; Nakai, Y; Milgrom, P; Söderling, E; Tolvanen, M; Murakami, K

    2012-01-01

    To assess mutans streptococci (MS) during xylitol gum chewing (mean 3.8 g/day, 2.9 times/day) for 13 months and then for 15 months after the intervention, Japanese mothers with high salivary MS were randomized into two groups...

  15. Deformation response of gellan gum based bone scaffold subjected to uniaxial quasi-static loading

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kytýř, Daniel; Krčmářová, Nela; Šleichrt, Jan; Fíla, Tomáš; Koudelka_ml., Petr; Gantar, A.; Novak, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 1 (2017), s. 14-21 ISSN 1210-2709 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) ATCZ38 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : gellan gum scaffold * reinforcement * uni-axial loading Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials https://ojs.cvut.cz/ojs/index.php/ap/article/view/3885

  16. Gummosis in grape hyacinth (Muscari armeniacum) bulbs: hormonal regulation and chemical composition of gums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Kensuke; Kotake, Toshihisa; Sasamoto, Makiko; Saniewski, Marian; Ueda, Junichi

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hormonal regulation of gummosis in grape hyacinth (Muscari armeniacum) bulbs, focusing especially on the chemical composition of the gums. The application of ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid), an ethylene-releasing compound, at 1% and 2% (w/w) in lanolin as well as ethylene induced gummosis in the bulbs within several days. Methyl jasmonate (JA-Me, 0.1-2% in lanolin) alone had no effect on gummosis. However, simultaneous application of JA-Me and ethephon led to extreme stimulation of ethephon-induced gummosis. Ethephon-induced gummosis in the bulbs depended on the maturation stage of the bulbs, increasing from April to July, but decreasing from August to September. Regardless of the presence of JA-Me, the application of ethephon to the inflorescence axis of grape hyacinths did not induce gummosis. Gel permeation chromatography analysis revealed that gums were homogenous polysaccharides with an average molecular mass of ca. 8.3 kDa. Analysis of the sugar composition of the gums after hydrolysis revealed that the molar ratio of Rha:Ara:Gal:GalA:GlcA was 25:10:40:7:15. These results suggest that principal factors of gummosis as well as the chemical composition of gums differ between species of bulbous plants.

  17. Effect of weeding status and tapping date on the yield of gum Arabic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of weeding status and tapping date on the yield of gum Arabic (Acacia Senegal) in Jigawa state, Nigeria. K.J. Ilu, I.A. Yau, M.S. Babura, Bashir B. H. Zahran, Sid Ahmed, O Abdulsalam, H. Ahmed ...

  18. Plants as a Source of Green Corrosion Inhibitors: The Case of Gum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The inhibitive performance of gum exudates from Acacia drepanolobium and Acacia senegal from Tanzania, towards the corrosion of mild steel in fresh water has been investigated. The experimental methods include potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies. The results ...

  19. Starch-guar gum extrudates: microstructure, physicochemical properties and in-vitro digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Borries-Medrano, Erich; Jaime-Fonseca, Mónica R; Aguilar-Méndez, Miguel A

    2016-03-01

    Starch-guar gum mixtures were obtained by extrusion using a three-variable Box-Behnken statistic design. Morphology, expansion index, viscosity, crystallinity and digestion in vitro of the extruded samples were analyzed through response surface methodology (RSM). The extrusion temperature and the moisture content were the factors that significantly affected the physicochemical properties of the samples. Starch-guar gum samples showed expansion index and viscosity up to 1.55 and 1400mPas, respectively. The crystallinity of the samples was modified by adding guar gum to the extrudates, showing correlation between long-range order (X-ray diffraction) and short-range order (FTIR spectroscopy). Guar induced microstructural changes and its role in gelatinization-melting processes was significant. The rate of glucose release decreased from 0.47 to 0.43mM/min when the extrusion temperature decreased. However, adding guar gum to starch had no significant effect on glucose release. Overall, the extrusion temperature and the moisture content were the factors that significantly affected the physicochemical properties of the extruded samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Helicobacter pylori in ice cream and its control using mastic gum essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagah Mohamed Saad

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: All isolates recovered from small scale ice cream samples reflexing the hygienic conditions under which samples were produced. Mastic gum essential oil exhibited a powerful anti-H. pylori effect recommending its addition to food matrix for therapeutic purposes or as a functional food. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2017; 4(2.000: 132-139

  1. Evaluation Of Snail Mucin Dispersed In Brachystegia Gum Gel As A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Snail mucin was obtained from the mucilage of Archachatina marginata (Family Arionidae). The wound healing effect of the snail mucin was evaluated wth special attention to the effect when combined with honey in Brachystegia eurychoma gel preparation. Brachystegia eurycoma gum, snail mucin and honey were ...

  2. Fomation of corn fiber gum-milk protein conjugates and their molecular characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn fiber arabinoxylan is hemicellulose B isolated from the fibrous portions (pericarp, tip cap, and endosperm cell wall fractions) of corn kernels and is commonly referred to as corn fiber gum (CFG). Our previous studies showed that CFG isolated from corn bran (a byproduct of corn dry milling) co...

  3. The development of a new corn fiber gum isolation process that preserves its functional components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn fiber gum (CFG) is a hemicellulose (arabinoxylan)-enriched fraction obtained by the extraction of corn bran/fiber using a mild alkaline hydrogen peroxide process. The unique polysaccharide, CFG, with its low solution viscosity has been proposed as a stabilizer for oil-in-water emulsions. We ha...

  4. Production of corn fiber gum under conditions that retain its functional components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn fiber gum (CFG) is a hemicellulose (arabinoxylan)-enriched fraction obtained by the extraction of corn bran/fiber using a mild alkaline hydrogen peroxide process. The unique polysaccharide, CFG, with its low solution viscosity has been proposed as a stabilizer for oil-in-water emulsions. We ha...

  5. Corn fiber gum and milk protein conjugates with improved emulsion stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn fiber gum (CFG), an alkaline hydrogen peroxide extract of the corn kernel milling by-product “corn fiber” was covalently conjugated with Beta-lactoglobulin (Beta-LG) and whey protein isolate (WPI). Covalent coupling of CFG to protein was achieved by dry heating reaction (Maillard-type) of CFG ...

  6. Importance of protein rich components in the emulsifying properties of corn fiber gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purified corn fiber gum (CFG-F) isolated from "fine" (kernel endosperm-derived) corn fiber that contained about 2% residual protein was extracted with 70% aqueous ethanol. The aqueous ethanol extract (AEE), which contained 19.5% of the total CFG, contained a high percentage of the proteinaceous ma...

  7. Peroxidase mediated conjugation of corn fibeer gum and bovine serum albumin to improve emulsifying properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emulsifying properties of corn fiber gum (CFG), a naturally-occurring polysaccharide protein complex, were improved by kinetically controlled formation of hetero-covalent linkages with bovine serum albumin (BSA), using horseradish peroxidase. The formation of hetero-crosslinked CFG-BSA conjugate...

  8. Rifabutin-loaded Floating Gellan Gum Beads: Effect of Calcium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To formulate rifabutin-loaded floating gel beads for stomach-specific release. Methods: Rifabutin-loaded floating gellan gum beads were prepared by ionotropic calcium-induced gelation in acidic medium. In-vitro buoyancy and drug release studies were performed using a USP dissolution apparatus type II in ...

  9. The Effects of Chewing Cinnamon Flavored Gum on Mood, Feeling and Spelling Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew; Kim, Wonsun; Raudenbush, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate if the effects of chewing cinnamon flavored gum can increase mood, feeling and spelling acquisition. 5th grade students (n = 22) at Ilshin elementary school in South Korea served as participants. The same students were required to take 4 spelling tests with 1 given every day over the course of 4 days. For…

  10. Boswellia gum resin/chitosan polymer composites: Controlled delivery vehicles for aceclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Sougata; Laha, Bibek; Maiti, Sabyasachi

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of Boswellia gum resin on the properties of glutaraldehyde (GA) crosslinked chitosan polymer composites and their potential as oral delivery vehicles for a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, aceclofenac. The incorporation of resinous material caused a significant improvement in drug entrapment efficiency (∼40%) of the polymer composites. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis confirmed the formation of chitosan-gum resin composites and did not show any evidence of drug-polymer chemical interaction. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) suggested the formation of particulate polymer composites up to chitosan:gum resin mass ratio of 1:3. Only 8-17% drug was released into HCl solution (pH 1.2) in 2h. The drug release rate of polymer composites was faster in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.8). The composites released ∼60-68% drug load in 7h. In same duration, the drug release rate suddenly boosted up to 92% as the concentration of gum resin in the composites was raised to 80%. The drug release mechanism deviated from non-Fickian to case-II type with increasing resin concentration in the composites. Hence, GA-treated Boswellia resin-chitosan composites could be considered as alternative vehicles for oral delivery of aceclofenac. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Vegetation status and socio-economic importance of gum and resin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study on population status, socio-economic importance and threats of gum- and resin-producing plant species was made in Borena, South Wollo, (Ethiopia). After reconnaissance survey of the area, three kebeles were selected and studied. For each site, transect lines were systematically laid down in North-South compass ...

  12. Kinetic release studies of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate from gum acacia crosslinked hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderibigbe, B A; Varaprasad, K; Sadiku, E R; Ray, S S; Mbianda, X Y; Fotsing, M C; Owonubi, S J; Agwuncha, S C

    2015-02-01

    Natural polymer hydrogels are useful for controlling release of drugs. In this study, hydrogels containing gum acacia were synthesized by free-radical polymerization of acrylamide with gum acacia. The effect of gum acacia in the hydrogels on the release mechanism of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate (BP) was studied at pH 1.2 and 7.4. The hydrogels exhibited high swelling ratios at pH 7.4 and low swelling ratios at pH 1.2. The release study was performed using UV-Visible spectroscopy via complex formation with Fe(III) ions. At pH 1.2, the release profile was found to be anomalous while at pH 7.4, the release kinetic of BP was a perfect zero-order release mechanism. The hydrogels were found to be pH-sensitive and the release profiles of the BP were found to be influenced by the degree of crosslinking of the hydrogel network with gum acacia. The preliminary results suggest that these hydrogels are promising devices for controlled delivery of bisphosphonate to the gastrointestinal region. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The management of xerostomia in patients on haemodialysis : Comparison of artificial saliva and chewing gum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bots, CP; Brand, HS; Veerman, ECI; Valentijn-Benz, M; Van Amerongen, BM; Amerongen, AVN; Valentijn, RM; Vos, PI; Bijlsma, JA; ter Wee, PM

    2005-01-01

    Many patients on haemodialysis (HD) therapy suffer from a dry mouth and xerostomia. This can be relieved by mechanical and gustatory stimulation or palliative care. The aim of this crossover study was to investigate the effect and preferences of a sugar-free chewing gum (Freedent White(TM)) and a

  14. The management of xerostomia in patients on haemodialysis: comparison of artificial saliva and chewing gum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bots, Casper P.; Brand, Henk S.; Veerman, Enno C. I.; Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van Amerongen, Barbara M.; Nieuw Amerongen, Arie V.; Valentijn, Robert M.; Vos, Pieter F.; Bijlsma, Joost A.; Bezemer, Pieter D.; ter Wee, Piet M.

    2005-01-01

    Many patients on haemodialysis (HD) therapy suffer from a dry mouth and xerostomia. This can be relieved by mechanical and gustatory stimulation or palliative care. The aim of this crossover study was to investigate the effect and preferences of a sugar-free chewing gum (Freedent White) and a

  15. Effect of partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG) on the bioaccessibility of fat and cholesterol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minekus, M.; Jelier, M.; Xiao, J.-Z.; Kondo, S.; Iwatsuki, K.; Kokubo, S.; Bos, M.; Dunnewind, B.; Havenaar, R.

    2005-01-01

    The Addition of a compound that lowers the intestinal uptake of fat and cholesterol might be an interesting strategy to reduce the risk of vascular disease. Partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG) has been shown to have this effect in healthy volunteers after intake of a yogurt drink with 3 to 6% PHGG.

  16. Chewing gum and cognitive performance: a case of a functional food with function but no food?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholey, Andrew

    2004-10-01

    Recent reports suggest that enhancement of memory performance while chewing gum is a fairly robust phenomenon. The processes underlying the effect are not known, but may involve glucose delivery, context-dependent effects and arousal mechanisms amongst others. This brief commentary outlines the main findings from these studies and raises some issues regarding interpretation, methodology and future research directions.

  17. Highly Concentrated Alginate-Gellan Gum Composites for 3D Plotting of Complex Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Rahul Akkineni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In tissue engineering, additive manufacturing (AM technologies have brought considerable progress as they allow the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D structures with defined architecture. 3D plotting is a versatile, extrusion-based AM technology suitable for processing a wide range of biomaterials including hydrogels. In this study, composites of highly concentrated alginate and gellan gum were prepared in order to combine the excellent printing properties of alginate with the favorable gelling characteristics of gellan gum. Mixtures of 16.7 wt % alginate and 2 or 3 wt % gellan gum were found applicable for 3D plotting. Characterization of the resulting composite scaffolds revealed an increased stiffness in the wet state (15%–20% higher Young’s modulus and significantly lower volume swelling in cell culture medium compared to pure alginate scaffolds (~10% vs. ~23%. Cytocompatibility experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC revealed that cell attachment was improved—the seeding efficiency was ~2.5–3.5 times higher on the composites than on pure alginate. Additionally, the composites were shown to support hMSC proliferation and early osteogenic differentiation. In conclusion, print fidelity of highly concentrated alginate-gellan gum composites was comparable to those of pure alginate; after plotting and crosslinking, the scaffolds possessed improved qualities regarding shape fidelity, mechanical strength, and initial cell attachment making them attractive for tissue engineering applications.

  18. KINEMATICS OF THE IONIZED-GAS IN PUPPIS-VELA INCLUDING THE GUM NEBULA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SAHU, MS; SAHU, KC

    1993-01-01

    We present a high resolution spectroscopic study of the ionised gas in Puppis-Vela, which includes the Gum Nebula and the IRAS Vela Shell, in the emission lines of Halpha lambda6563 angstrom, [NII] lambdalambda6548, 6584 angstrom and the [OIII] lambda5007 angstrom. Line profiles were obtained at 18

  19. Efek Penambahan -Galaktosidase Famili 27 Glikosida Hidrolase Bacillus Halodurans terhadap Kekentalan Guar Gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andian Ari Anggraeni

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mempelajari aktivitas protein hasil translasi gen a-galaktosidase dari Bacillus halodurans famili 27 glikosida hidrolase dengan cara mengamati pengaruh penambahan protein terhadap kekentalan larutan guar gum. Penelitian ini dilakukan dengan menggunakan metode eksperimen. a-Galaktosidase adalah enzim yang mengkatalisasi hidrolisis ikatan a-1,6-galaktosida dari terminal non-reducing pada oligosakarida, liposakarida dan/atau polisakarida yang mengandung galaktosa. Protein rekombinan yang diekspresikan oleh gen  agalaktosidase BH1870 Bacillus halodurans dipurifikasi menggunakan His-binding metal affinity chromatography. Uji aktivitas dilakukan dengan menggunakan substrat guar gum pada beberapa interval suhu, yaitu 37, 45, 55 dan 65o C. Enzim ini mampu menghidrolisa guar gum pada suhu 37 oC, yang ditunjukkan dengan penurunan kekentalan larutan guar gum.  Namun, enzim ini tidak stabil pada suhu yang lebih besar dari 37 oC. Beberapa residu asam amino yang dianggap penting bagi aktivitas hidrolisis enzim famili 27 ternyata tidak terdapat pada B. halodurans a-galaktosidase. Ketiadaan residu ini mungkin dapat mempengaruhi kestabilan enzim pada suhu tinggi. Untuk membuktikan asumsi ini, diperlukan studi lanjut tentang site-directed mutagenesis pada residu-residu ini.

  20. Two-colour chewing gum mixing ability: digitalisation and spatial heterogeneity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenberg, R.A.F.; Scherder, E.J.A.; Visscher, C.M.; Gorissen, T.; Yoshida, E.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2013-01-01

    Many techniques are available to assess masticatory performance, but not all are appropriate for every population. A proxy suitable for elderly persons suffering from dementia was lacking, and a two-colour chewing gum mixing ability test was investigated for this purpose. A fully automated digital

  1. Two-colour chewing gum mixing ability: digitalisation and spatial heterogeneity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijenberg, R A F; Scherder, E J A; Visscher, C M; Gorissen, T; Yoshida, E; Lobbezoo, F

    2013-10-01

    Many techniques are available to assess masticatory performance, but not all are appropriate for every population. A proxy suitable for elderly persons suffering from dementia was lacking, and a two-colour chewing gum mixing ability test was investigated for this purpose. A fully automated digital analysis algorithm was applied to a mixing ability test using two-coloured gum samples in a stepwise increased number of chewing cycles protocol (Experiment 1: n = 14; seven men, 19-63 years), a test-retest assessment (Experiment 2: n = 10; four men, 20-49 years) and compared to an established wax cubes mixing ability test (Experiment 3: n = 13; 0 men, 21-31 years). Data were analysed with repeated measures anova (Experiment 1), the calculation of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC; Experiment 2) and Spearman's rho correlation coefficient (Experiment 3). The method was sensitive to increasing numbers of chewing cycles (F5,65 = 57·270, P = 0·000) and reliable in the test-retest (ICC value of 0·714, P = 0·004). There was no significant correlation between the two-coloured gum test and the wax cubes test. The two-coloured gum mixing ability test was able to adequately assess masticatory function and is recommended for use in a population of elderly persons with dementia. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Structural characterization and thermal behavior of a gum extracted from Ferula assa foetida L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidy, Sima; Nasirpour, Ali; Keramat, Javad; Desbrières, Jacques; Cerf, Didier Le; Pierre, Guillaume; Delattre, Cedric; Laroche, Céline; Baynast, Hélène De; Ursu, Alina-Violeta; Marcati, Alain; Djelveh, Gholamreza; Michaud, Philippe

    2018-02-01

    The gum asafoetida, an oleo-gum-resin from root of Ferula assa foetida, was extracted through alcoholic procedure followed by water extraction and then biochemically characterized using colorimetric assays, Fourier infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance. The gum was mainly composed of carbohydrates (67.39% w/w) with a monosaccharide distribution of 11.5: 5.9: 2.3: 1 between Gal, Ara, Rha and GlcA (molar ratio) and proteins (arabinogalactan protein). The polysaccharide consisted of a (1→3)-β-d-galactan backbone ramified predominantly from O-6 but also from O-4 and O-4,6. Side chains included terminal-α-l-Araf, terminal-α-l-Rhap, (1→3)-α-l-Araf, (1→5)-α-l-Araf, terminal-β-d-Galp, β-d-GlcA and traces of (1→4)-β-d-GlcA. X-ray diffraction pattern showed a semi crystalline microstructure. Thermal behavior of the gum was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) revealed temperatures below and upper 200°C as dominant regions of weight loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Association between masticatory performance using a colour-changeable chewing gum and jaw movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komagamine, Y; Kanazawa, M; Minakuchi, S; Uchida, T; Sasaki, Y

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between masticatory performance as determined using a colour-changeable chewing gum and mandibular movements. Subjects comprised 45 fully dentate adults (23 men, 22 women; mean age, 28·1 years). The gum was chewed for a specified number of chewing strokes (20, 40, 60, 80, 120 or 160 strokes) without any instructions as to chewing side. A colourimeter was used to measure L*, a* and b* values (CIE-L*a*b* colour system) for the chewed gum, then the difference between two colours in the CIE-L*a*b* colour space (ΔE) for each number of chewing strokes was calculated according to a formula. Index of masticatory performance (ΔE60) for each subject was obtained using ΔE for 20, 40, 60, 80, 120 and 160 strokes. Mandibular movements were recorded using an opto-electric system with six degrees of freedom. Twelve parameters of mandibular movements relating to amplitude, duration, velocity and angle were computed for each cycle, and mean values for 10 cycles (from cycle 11 to 20) were calculated separately. Stepwise multiple regression analysis identified maximum closing velocity and closing angle as predictors accounting for 18% of the variation in ΔE60. These results suggest that lower angles of approach to intercuspation and faster speed during closing duration are associated with colour changes in the colour-changeable chewing gum. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Chitosan/pectin/gum Arabic polyelectrolyte complex: process-dependent appearance, microstructure analysis and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ruei-Yi; Chen, Pin-Wen; Kuo, Ting-Yun; Lin, Che-Min; Wang, Da-Ming; Hsien, Tzu-Yang; Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen

    2014-01-30

    Novel chitosan/pectin/gum Arabic polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) solutions and membranes with various compositions were prepared for biomedical applications. The appearance of the PEC solutions, either clear or turbid, was process-dependent and depended on how the three components were dissolved and mixed. The addition of gum Arabic to the chitosan and pectin significantly decreased the viscosities of the resultant PEC solutions due to the formation of globe-like microstructures that was accompanied by network-like microstructures and other molecular entanglements. The mechanical strength and hydrophilicity of the PEC membranes manufactured from the PEC solutions, especially for a weight ratio of 84/8/8 (chitosan/pectin/gum Arabic), were enhanced compared to pure chitosan membranes. Moreover, the use of the 84/8/8 PEC membranes as a drug carrier exhibited steady and fairly complete release of a drug (insulin) for 6h. Based on these promising results, the chitosan/pectin/gum Arabic PEC membranes have great potential in controlled drug release applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of the socio-economic factors associated with gum Arabic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study is an analysis of the socio-economic factors associated with gum arabic collectors in Northern Guinea Savanna Zone of Adamawa State, Nigeria through a questionnaire survey on a sample of 100 respondents obtained through a multi stage sampling technique. Data collected were analyzed using descriptive ...

  6. Evaluation of masticatory function after maxillectomy using a colour-changing chewing gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Y; Ishida, S; Kobayashi, M; Hasegawa, T; Nibu, K; Komori, T

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with the masticatory dysfunction after maxillectomy using a colour-changing chewing gum. Thirty-nine patients who underwent maxillectomy between January 2002 and May 2010 in the Department of Kobe University Hospital were recruited for this study. There were 20 male and 19 female subjects, with a median age of 73·3 years (range of 44-90) at the time of surgery. The intra-oral conditions after maxillectomy were classified by HS classification, and the masticatory function was evaluated by a colour-changing chewing gum and the results of a modified Sato's questionnaire. The scores of the colour-changing gum were closely correlated with the scores of the modified Sato's questionnaire (r = 0·661, P masticatory dysfunction were the number of anchor teeth ≤2 and a soft palate defect. A colour-changing gum was found to be useful for evaluating the post-operative masticatory function, and it was important to conserve the anchor teeth and the soft palate to avoid masticatory dysfunction. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Improvement of rheological, thermal and functional properties of tapioca starch using gum arabic

    Science.gov (United States)

    The addition of gum arabic (GA) to native tapioca starch (TS) to modify the functionality of TS was investigated. GA is well known for its stabilizing, emulsifying, and thickening properties. The effects of adding GA (0.1-1.0%) on pasting, rheological and solubility properties of TS (5%) were analy...

  8. Characterization of gums from local acacia species for the food and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gums are widely used to support the pharmaceutical, brewery, food, cosmetics and adhesive industries. Their uses are mainly based on their physicochemical properties and their mucilage. These properties make them act as emulsifiers, suspenders, thickeners, stabilizers, binders, and lubricants. In spite of the tremendous ...

  9. "JCE" Classroom Activity #105. A Sticky Situation: Chewing Gum and Solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Gonzalez, Ingrid; Cintron-Maldonado, Jose A.; Perez-Medina, Ilia E.; Montes-Berrios, Veronica; Roman-Lopez, Saurie N.

    2010-01-01

    In this Activity, students perform several solubility tests using common food items such as chocolate, chewing gum, water, sugar, and oil. From their observations during the Activity, students will initially classify the substances tested as soluble or insoluble. They will then use their understanding of the chemistry of solubility to classify the…

  10. Micronised bran-enriched fresh egg tagliatelle: Significance of gums addition on pasta technological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Esparza, M E; Raga, A; González-Martínez, C; Albors, A

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the work was to produce fibre-enriched fresh pasta based on micronised wheat bran and durum wheat semolina with appropriate techno-functional properties. Wheat semolina was replaced with fine particle size (50% below 75 µm) wheat bran - up to 11.54% (w/w). A Box-Behnken design with randomised response surface methodology was used to determine a suitable combination of carboxymethylcellulose, xanthan gum and locust bean gum to improve pasta attributes: minimum cooking loss, maximum values for water gain and swelling index, as well as better colour and texture characteristics before and after cooking. The proximate chemical composition of wheat semolina and bran was determined and the microstructure of uncooked pasta was observed as well. From the response surface methodology analysis, it is recommended to use: (i) xanthan gum over 0.6% w/w as it led to bran-enriched pasta with a better developed structure and superior cooking behaviour, (ii) a combination of xanthan gum (0.8% w/w) and carboxymethylcellulose (over 0.6% w/w) to enhance uncooked pasta yellowness.

  11. Preparation and characterization of gum karaya hydrogel nanocomposite flocculant for metal ions removal from mine effluents

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fosso-Kankeu, E

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This research paper reports the removal of heavy metal ions from mine effluents using the gum karaya (GK)-grafted poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) incorporated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4 MNPs) hydrogel nanocomposite [i.e., GK...

  12. The efficacy of two prototype chewing gums for the removal of extrinsic tooth stain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Kulak, Y; Kazazoglu, E

    Aim: To compare the potential efficacy of two prototype chewing gums in extrinsic stain removal on natural teeth. Setting: Dental school clinics. Design: Double-blind, two groups, parallel design. Participants: 76 adult volunteers (32m, 44f, mean age: 20.6 years old). Methods: Oral hard and soft

  13. Compressional, mechanical and release properties of a novel gum in paracetamol tablet formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adedokun Musiliu O.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The binding properties of Eucalyptus gum obtained from the incised trunk of Eucalyptus tereticornis, were evaluated in paracetamol tablet formulations, in comparison with that of Gelatin B.P. In so doing, the compression properties were analyzed using density measurements and the compression equations of Heckel, Kawakita and Gurham. In our work, the mechanical properties of the tablets were assessed using the crushing strength and friability of the tablets, while the drug release properties of the tablets were assessed using disintegration and dissolution times. The results of the study reveal that tablet formulations incorporating Eucalyptus gum as binder, exhibited faster onset and higher amount of plastic deformation during compression than those containing gelatin. What is more, the Gurnham equation could be used as a substitute for the Kawakita equation in describing the compression properties of pharmaceutical tablets. Furthermore, the crushing strength, disintegration and dissolution times of the tablets increased with binder concentration, while friability values decreased. We noted that no significant differences in properties exist between formulations derived from the two binders (p > 0.05 exist. While tablets incorporating gelatin exhibited higher values for mechanical properties, Eucalyptus gum tablets had better balance between mechanical and release properties - as seen from the CSFR/Dt values. Tablets of good mechanical and release properties were prepared using Eucalyptus gum as a binder, and, therefore, it could serve as an alternative binder in producing tablets with good mechanical strength and fast drug release.

  14. Effect of guar gum conjugation on functional, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of egg white lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdani, Afshan Mumtaz; Wani, Idrees Ahmed; Bhat, Naseer Ahmad; Siddiqi, Raushid Ahmad

    2018-02-01

    This study was undertaken to analyze the effect of conjugation of egg-white lysozyme with guar gum. Lysozyme is an antimicrobial polypeptide that can be used for food preservation. Its antibacterial activity is limited to gram positive bacteria. Conjugation with polysaccharides like guar gum may broaden its activity against gram negatives. Conjugate was developed through Maillard reaction. Assays carried out included sugar estimation, SDS-PAGE, GPC, color, FT-IR, DSC, thermal stability, solubility, emulsifying, foaming and antioxidant activity. In addition, antimicrobial activity of the conjugate was determined against two gram positive (Staphyllococcus aureus and Enterococcus) and two gram negative pathogens (E. coli and Salmonella). Results showed higher functional properties of lysozyme-guar gum conjugate. The antioxidant properties increased from 2.02-35.80% (Inhibition of DPPH) and 1.65-4.93AAE/g (reducing power) upon guar gum conjugation. Conjugate significantly inhibited gram negative bacteria and the antibacterial activity also increased significantly against gram positive pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Qualidade de balas de gelatina fortificadas com vitaminas A, C e E Quality of gelatine gums fortified with vitamins A, C and E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Garcia

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O estudo teve como objetivo verificar a estabilidade das vitaminas A, C e E, na forma de acetato de vitamina A, ácido ascórbico e acetato de vitamina E, sobredosadas em 80%, 80% e 50% respectivamente na fortificação de confeitos do tipo balas de gelatina, fornecendo 30% da IDR destas vitaminas em 100 g de produto. As vitaminas adicionadas não afetaram a qualidade das gomas de gelatina em relação à textura e claridade, parâmetros estes avaliados após processamento. Houve uma perda média no processamento de vitamina A de 25% em relação ao adicionado, seguida da vitamina E com 12% e vitamina C com 1%. Aumentando-se a temperatura de depósito da calda das gomas, de 70ºC para 80ºC encontrou-se uma diminuição na concentração da vitamina A de aproximadamente 37% e de 9% para a vitamina C. A eliminação do ácido cítrico da formulação das gomas com o propósito de minimizar perdas no processo não foi benéfica para as vitaminas C e E. Na estocagem de 6 meses obteve-se uma queda média de 93% da vitamina A, 57% para a vitamina C e 24% da vitamina E. Verificou-se, portanto que as vitaminas A e C irão ditar a vida de prateleira das gomas de gelatina e não foram sobredosadas em concentrações suficientes para garantir o declarado no rótulo até 6 meses numa estocagem controlada a 20ºC.This study had as objective to verify the stability of vitamins A, C and E, in the form of vitamin A acetate, ascorbic acid and vitamin E acetate, with overages at 80%, 80% and 50% respectively in gelatine gums confectionery type, supplying 30% of RDI of these vitamins in 100 g product. The added vitamins did not affect the quality of gelatine gums in relation to the texture and clarity, which were analyzed after processing; however, the gums with vitamins became brown with shelf life, being vitamin C the responsible for the presented defect. There were an average loss of vitamin A of 25% in relation to the initially added, followed by vitamin E

  16. Characterization of some psorosis and concave gum isolates from northwestern Argentina Caracterización de aislamientos de psorosis y concave gum del noroeste argentino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Figueroa

    Full Text Available The Citrus Sanitation Center of the Estación Experimental Agroindustrial Obispo Colombres in Tucumán, Argentina, has developed a virus bank of various graft-transmissible citrus pathogens found in northwestern Argentina. In this bank, several psorosis and concave gum isolates are maintained in Pineapple sweet orange seedlings. In order to characterize these pathogens, 11 isolates were indexed to seedlings of Pineapple sweet orange, Dweet tangor, Eureka lemon plus Etrog citron budded on rough lemon seedlings. Cross protection was applied for identifying psorosis-A. Symptoms obtained were variable and ranged from mild to very severe. A clear effect of temperature on symptom expression, and distinct differences in the reactions between psorosis-A and concave gum viruses were detected.El Centro de Saneamiento de Citrus de la Estación Experimental Agroindustrial Obispo Colombres, de Tucumán, Argentina, ha constituido un banco de virus de cítricos con material recolectado en la región noroeste del país. El mismo cuenta con varios aislamientos de psorosis y concave gum que se mantienen en plantas de naranjo dulce Pineapple. Con el objetivo de caracterizar biológicamente 11 de estos aislamientos, se inocularon plantines de naranjo dulce Pineapple, Dweet tangor, limonero Eureka y plantas injertadas de cidro Etrog en limoneros rugoso. Las pruebas con Pineapple se realizaron por duplicado bajo dos condiciones de temperatura: frías y calientes. La confirmación de psorosis A se realizó mediante prueba de protección cruzada con un aislamiento de psorosis B. Los resultados obtenidos muestran una amplia diversidad biológica entre los aislamientos, con expresión de síntomas que variaron desde suaves a muy severos. Se confirmó la presencia de psorosis A y se encontró que los aislamientos de "concave gum" del banco de virus no estaban en mezcla con psorosis. El efecto de la temperatura en la manifestación de los síntomas fue significativo y se

  17. The Effect of Persian Gums and Tragacanth on Texture and Sensory Characteristics of Non-Gluten ‎Cakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrooz Ghasemi

    2017-08-01

    Methods: The effect of addition of Persian gums, Tragacanth, and a combination of both of these compounds at levels of 0.5, 1, and 1.5% on texture, color, and sensory characteristics of these cakes was evaluated in this study. Results: The results showed that solidity and viscosity factors were elevated by addition of gum to cake. Using of gums in cakes leads to moisture maintenance inside the cake texture and thus improves mastication property. Furthermore, the results of porosity evaluation showed that addition of Persian gums and Tragacanth decreases the size and increases the number of gas cells inside the cake texture and improves porosity. The best porosity was related to the sample containing 1.5% Persian gum and Tragacanth. The treatment that contained 0.75% Persian gum and 0.75% Tragacanth had the highest acceptability among consumers. Conclusions: Results showed that Persian and Tragacanth gums, whether used independently or in combination, can improve the quality and organoleptic characteristics of gluten-free cakes.

  18. An Evaluation of the Binding Strength of Okra Gum and the Drug Release Characteristics of Tablets Prepared from It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Amjad; Qureshi, Farah; Abbas, Nasir; Arshad, Muhammad Sohail; Ali, Ejaz

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the adhesion ability of okra gum, which is gaining popularity as a tablet binder. For this purpose, gum was extracted from okra pods, and the binding strength of different concentrations (1%, 3%, and 5%) was determined quantitatively. Additionally, naproxen sodium tablets were prepared by using okra gum as a binder and were evaluated for their properties including hardness, friability, disintegration time, and dissolution rate. The binding strength values were compared with that of pre-gelatinized starch, a commonly used tablet binder. The results from universal testing machine indicate that the binding strengths of all dispersions of okra increase as the concentration increases from 1% to 5% and ranges from 2.5 to 4.5 N, which are almost twice a high as those of pre-gelatinized starch. The tablets prepared with okra gum have shown good mechanical strength with hardness values of 7–8.5 kg/cm2 and a friability okra gum and 5.05 min with starch paste), and the drug release from these tablets was slower than the formulations with starch. The higher binding ability of okra gum probably linked with its chemical composition as it mainly contains galactose, rhamnose, and galacturonic acid. This study concludes that okra gum is a better binder than pre-gelatinized starch, it might be explored in future for introduction as a cost-effective binder in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:28574438

  19. Effects of high-hydrostatic pressure and pH treatments on the emulsification properties of gum arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fanyi; Bell, Alan E; Davis, Fred J

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the emulsification properties of the native gums and those treated at high pressure (800 MPa) both at their "natural" pH (4.49 and 4.58, respectively) and under "acidic and basic" pH (2.8 and 8.0) conditions. The emulsification behaviour of KLTA gum was found to be superior to that of the GCA gum. High pressure and pH treatment changed the emulsification properties of both gums. The acidic amino acids in gum arabic were shown to play an important role in their emulsification behaviour, and mechanisms of emulsification for the two gums were suggested to be different. The highly "branched" nature of the carbohydrate in GCA gum was also thought to be responsible for the "spreading" of droplet size distributions observed. Coomassie brilliant blue binding was used to indicate conformational changes in protein structure and Ellman's assay was used to estimate any changes in levels of free thiols present. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Design and evaluation of fast dissolving tablets containing diclofenac sodium using fenugreek gum as a natural superdisintegrant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M Uday; Babu, M Kishore

    2014-05-01

    To formulate diclofenac sodium as fast dissolving tablets (FDTs) using fenugreek gum as a natural superdisintegrant which also possess anti-inflammatory activity. An attempt was made to extract the fenugreek gum and evaluated it for various physicochemical characterizations. The swelling index and viscosity of fenugreek gum was 221% and 293.4 mpa.s respectively. FDTs of diclofenac sodium was formulated by direct compression technique using different concentrations (1%-6%, w/w) of fenugreek gum as a natural superdisintegrant and compared with renowned synthetic superdisintegrants like sodium starch glycolate and croscarmellose sodium. The anti-inflammatory activity of a formulation was evaluated with carrageenan induced experimental rats. The formulated tablets were evaluated for various physical tests like weight variation, friability, hardness and results complied with the limits. The drug release from all the formulations ascertained first order kinetics. Among all the formulations F3 containing fenugreek gum with the concentration of 6% produced least disintegrating time 21 seconds resulting in higher drug release rate 93.74% at the end of 25 min. Hence, it was considered as optimized formulation. The present study revealed that the fenugreek gum as a natural superdisintegrant showed better disintegrating property than the most widely used synthetic superdisintegrants like sodium starch glycolate and croscarmellose sodium in the formulations of FDTs. The results suggested that the fenugreek gum act as a good super disintegrating agent and it showed promising additive anti-inflammatory activity with diclofenac sodium.