WorldWideScience

Sample records for rapidly fluctuation efc

  1. Chaotic Maps Dynamics, Fractals, and Rapid Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Goong

    2011-01-01

    This book consists of lecture notes for a semester-long introductory graduate course on dynamical systems and chaos taught by the authors at Texas A&M University and Zhongshan University, China. There are ten chapters in the main body of the book, covering an elementary theory of chaotic maps in finite-dimensional spaces. The topics include one-dimensional dynamical systems (interval maps), bifurcations, general topological, symbolic dynamical systems, fractals and a class of infinite-dimensional dynamical systems which are induced by interval maps, plus rapid fluctuations of chaotic maps as a

  2. Rapidity fluctuations in the initial state

    CERN Document Server

    Broniowski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    We analyze two-particle pseudorapidity correlations in a simple model, where strings of fluctuating length are attached to wounded nucleons.The obtained straightforward formulas allow us to understand the anatomy of the correlations, i.e., to identify the component due to the fluctuation of the number of wounded nucleons and the contribution from the string length fluctuations. Our results reproduce qualitatively and semiquantitatively the basic features of the recent correlation measurements at the LHC.

  3. Rapidly fluctuating anosmia: A clinical sign for unilateral smell impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negoias, Simona; Friedrich, Hergen; Caversaccio, Marco D; Landis, Basile N

    2016-02-01

    Reports about fluctuating olfactory deficits are rare, as are reports of unilateral olfactory loss. We present a case of unilateral anosmia with contralateral normosmia, presenting as rapidly fluctuating anosmia. The olfactory fluctuation occurred in sync with the average nasal cycle duration. Examination after nasal decongestion, formal smell testing, and imaging revealed unilateral, left-sided anosmia of sinonasal cause, with right-sided normosmia. We hypothesize that the nasal cycle induced transient anosmia when blocking the normosmic side. Fluctuating olfactory deficits might hide a unilateral olfactory loss and require additional unilateral testing and thorough workup. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Fuzzy Pattern Classification Based Detection of Faulty Electronic Fuel Control (EFC Valves Used in Diesel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Tugsal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop mathematical models of a rotary Electronic Fuel Control (EFC valve used in a Diesel engine based on dynamic performance test data and system identification methodology in order to detect the faulty EFC valves. The model takes into account the dynamics of the electrical and mechanical portions of the EFC valves. A recursive least squares (RLS type system identification methodology has been utilized to determine the transfer functions of the different types of EFC valves that were investigated in this study. Both in frequency domain and time domain methods have been utilized for this purpose. Based on the characteristic patterns exhibited by the EFC valves, a fuzzy logic based pattern classification method was utilized to evaluate the residuals and identify faulty EFC valves from good ones. The developed methodology has been shown to provide robust diagnostics for a wide range of EFC valves.

  5. Saturation scale fluctuations and multi-particle rapidity correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Bzdak, Adam

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of intrinsic fluctuations of the proton saturation momentum scale on event-by-event rapidity distributions. Saturation scale fluctuations generate an asymmetry in the single particle rapidity distribution in each event resulting in genuine n-particle correlations having a component linear in the rapidities of the produced particles, $y_1\\cdots y_n$. We introduce a color domain model that naturally explains the centrality dependence of the two-particle rapidity correlations recently measured by ATLAS while constraining the probability distribution of saturation scale fluctuations in the proton. Predictions for n = 4, 6 and 8 particle correlations find that the four and eight-particle cumulant change sign at an intermediate multiplicity, a signature which could be tested experimentally.

  6. Thermal blurring of event-by-event fluctuations provoked by rapidity conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Ohnishi, Yutaro; Asakawa, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of thermal blurring caused by the use of (momentum-space) rapidity as a proxy of coordinate-space rapidity in experimental measurements of conserved charge fluctuations in relativistic heavy ion collisions. In theoretical studies assuming statistical mechanics, calculated fluctuations are those in a spatial volume. Experiments, on the other hand, can measure fluctuations only in a momentum-space in the final state. In a standard argument to compare experimental results for a momentum space with theoretical studies for a coordinate space, rapidities of particles are implicitly regarded as equivalent to their coordinate-space rapidity. We show that the relation of two fluctuations is significantly altered by the existence of the thermal motion, i.e. thermal blurring. We discuss that the thermal blurring can be regarded as a part of the diffusion process, and the effect can be understood by studying the rapidity window dependences of fluctuations. Centrality dependence of the thermal blurring...

  7. Multi-particle long-range rapidity correlations from fluctuation of the fireball longitudinal shape

    CERN Document Server

    Bzdak, Adam

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the genuine long-range multi-particle rapidity correlation functions, $C_{n}(y_1,...,y_n)$ for $n=3,4,5,6$, originating from fluctuations of the fireball longitudinal shape. In these correlation functions any contribution from the short-range two-particle correlations, and in general up to $(n-1)$-particle in $C_n$, is suppressed. The information about the fluctuating fireball shape in rapidity is encoded in the cumulants of coefficients of the orthogonal polynomial expansion of particle distributions in rapidity.

  8. Thermal blurring of event-by-event fluctuations generated by rapidity conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Yutaro; Kitazawa, Masakiyo; Asakawa, Masayuki

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of thermal blurring caused by the use of (momentum-space) rapidity as a proxy of coordinate-space rapidity in experimental measurements of conserved-charge fluctuations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. In theoretical studies assuming statistical mechanics, calculated fluctuations are those in a spatial volume. Experiments, on the other hand, can measure fluctuations only in a momentum space in the final state. In a standard argument to compare experimental results for a momentum space with theoretical studies for a coordinate space, rapidities of particles are implicitly regarded as equivalent to their coordinate-space rapidity. We show that the relation of two fluctuations is significantly altered by the existence of the thermal motion, i.e., thermal blurring. We discuss that the thermal blurring can be regarded as a part of the diffusion process, and the effect can be understood by studying the rapidity window dependences of fluctuations. Centrality dependence of the thermal blurring effect is also discussed.

  9. On parton number fluctuations at various stages of the rapidity evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, A H

    2014-01-01

    Starting with the interpretation of parton evolution with rapidity as a branching-diffusion process, we describe the different kinds of fluctuations of the density of partons which affect the properties of QCD scattering amplitudes at moderately high energies. We then derive some of these properties as direct consequences of the stochastic picture. We get new results on the expression of the saturation scale of a large nucleus, and a modified geometric scaling valid at intermediate rapidities for dipole-dipole scattering.

  10. Rapidly fluctuating environments constrain coevolutionary arms races by impeding selective sweeps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Ellie; Laine, Anna-Liisa; Hietala, Mikael; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2013-08-07

    Although pervasive, the impact of temporal environmental heterogeneity on coevolutionary processes is poorly understood. Productivity is a key temporally heterogeneous variable, and increasing productivity has been shown to increase rates of antagonistic arms race coevolution, and lead to the evolution of more broadly resistant hosts and more broadly infectious parasites. We investigated the effects of the grain of environmental heterogeneity, in terms of fluctuations in productivity, on bacteria-phage coevolution. Our findings demonstrate that environmental heterogeneity could constrain antagonistic coevolution, but that its effect was dependent upon the grain of heterogeneity, such that both the rate and extent of coevolution were most strongly limited in fine-grained, rapidly fluctuating heterogeneous environments. We further demonstrate that rapid environmental fluctuations were likely to have impeded selective sweeps of resistance alleles, which occurred over longer durations than the fastest, but not the slowest, frequency of fluctuations used. Taken together our results suggest that fine-grained environmental heterogeneity constrained the coevolutionary arms race by impeding selective sweeps.

  11. The torque effect and fluctuations of entropy deposition in rapidity in ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Bożek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The decorrelation of the orientation of the event-plane angles in the initial state of relativistic Pb–Pb and p–Pb collisions, the “torque effect”, is studied in a model of entropy deposition in the longitudinal direction involving fluctuations of the longitudinal source profile on large scales. The radiation from a single wounded nucleon is asymmetric in space–time rapidity. It is assumed that the extent in rapidity of the region of deposited entropy is random. Fluctuations in the deposition of entropy from each source increase the event-plane decorrelation: for Pb–Pb collisions the change is moderate, while for p–Pb collisions the mechanism is absolutely essential to generate any sizable decorrelation. We also show that the experimental data for rank-four flow may be explained via folding of the elliptic flow. The results suggest the existence of long range fluctuations in the space–time distribution of entropy in the initial stages of relativistic nuclear collisions.

  12. Leaf thermal and hydraulic capacitances - structural safeguards for rapid ambient fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, S. J.; Or, D.; Zwieniecki, M.

    2011-12-01

    Leaves may be subjected to rapidly fluctuating irradiation or thermal conditions due to motion of sun flecks and clouds or passage of warm and dry wind gusts. Given a stomatal characteristic time scale (~5 min) for adjusting transpiration flux, fluctuations of environmental conditions at shorter time scales (~1 min) could push leaf hydraulic and thermal status beyond its operational limits resulting in xylem cavitation or overheating. As active stomatal protection may not be adequate, we propose that leaf thermal and hydraulic capacitances and hence leaf specific mass (hydrated thickness) provide passive protection and play a critical role for autonomous and intrinsic capacitive-based responses to rapid fluctuations. For example, a simple variable leaf mass per unit area can affect both thermal and hydraulic capacitances. Thus a thin leaf (0.2 mm) exposed to a sunfleck can experience an increase in leaf temperature by 20K in the order of 3 minutes, i.e. before stomata can activate evaporative cooling. Increasing leaf thickness can be an effective measure to increase the buffer for such environmental fluctuations, so that slower regulatory measures such as stomatal adjustments can take over before detrimental effects take place. Systematic measurements of thermal changes in response to step changes in radiation conditions were obtained using laser illumination and infra-red thermal imaging of leaf laser-illuminated area across a wide range of leaf morphologies from major plant divisions (ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms). Results confirm inverse relationships between leaf thickness and temperature rise (measured as steady state temperature increase). Hydraulic impacts of such structural capacitance on xylem function will be discussed.

  13. The generation of rapid solar flare hard X-ray and microwave fluctuations in current sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    The generation of rapid fluctuations, or spikes, in hard X-ray and microwave bursts via the disruption of electron heating and acceleration in current sheets is studied. It is found that 20 msec hard X-ray fluctuations can be thermally generated in a current sheet if the resistivity in the sheet is highly anomalous, the plasma density in the emitting region is relatively high, and the volume of the emitting region is greater than that of the current sheet. A specific mechanism for producing the fluctuations, involving heating in the presence of ion acoustic turbulence and a constant driving electric field, and interruption of the heating by a strong two-stream instability, is discussed. Variations upon this mechanism are also discussed. This mechanism also modulates electron acceleration, as required for the microwave spike emission. If the hard X-ray emission at energies less than approx. 1000 keV is nonthermal bremsstrahlung, the coherent modulation of electron acceleration in a large number of current sheets is required.

  14. Quantification of cell viability and rapid screening anti-cancer drug utilizing nanomechanical fluctuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shangquan; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Xiarong; Liang, Xin M; Gao, Dayong; Liu, Hong; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Qingchuan; Wu, Xiaoping

    2016-03-15

    Cancer is a serious threat to human health. Although numerous anti-cancer drugs are available clinically, many have shown toxic side effects due to poor tumor-selectivity, and reduced effectiveness due to cancers rapid development of resistance to treatment. The development of new highly efficient and practical methods to quantify cell viability and its change under drug treatment is thus of significant importance in both understanding of anti-cancer mechanism and anti-cancer drug screening. Here, we present an approach of utilizing a nanomechanical fluctuation based highly sensitive microcantilever sensor, which is capable of characterizing the viability of cells and quantitatively screening (within tens of minutes) their responses to a drug with the obvious advantages of a rapid, label-free, quantitative, noninvasive, real-time and in-situ assay. The microcantilever sensor operated in fluctuation mode was used in evaluating the paclitaxel effectiveness on breast cancer cell line MCF-7. This study demonstrated that the nanomechanical fluctuations of the microcantilever sensor are sensitive enough to detect the dynamic variation in cellular force which is provided by the cytoskeleton, using cell metabolism as its energy source, and the dynamic instability of microtubules plays an important role in the generation of the force. We propose that cell viability consists of two parts: biological viability and mechanical viability. Our experimental results suggest that paclitaxel has little effect on biological viability, but has a significant effect on mechanical viability. This new method provides a new concept and strategy for the evaluation of cell viability and the screening of anti-cancer drugs.

  15. Diffraction modeling of finite subband EFC probing on dark hole contrast with WFIRST-CGI shaped pupil coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hanying; Krist, John; Nemati, Bijan

    2016-08-01

    Current coronagraph instrument design (CGI), as a part of a proposed NASA WFIRST (Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope) mission, allocates two subband filters per full science band in order to contain system complexity and cost. We present our detailed investigation results on the adequacy of such limited number of finite subband filters in achieving full band dark hole contrast with shaped pupil coronagraph. The study is based on diffraction propagation modeling with realistic WFIRST optics, where each subband's complex field estimation is obtained, using Electric Field Conjugation (EFC) wavefront sensing / control algorithm, from pairwise pupil plane deformable mirror (DM) probing and image plane intensity averaging of the resulting fields of multiple (subband) wavelengths. Multiple subband choices and probing and control strategies are explored, including standard subband probing; mixed wavelength and/or weighted Jacobian matrix; subband probing with intensity subtraction; and extended subband probing with intensity subtraction. Overall, the investigation shows that the achievable contrast with limited number of finite subband EFC probing is about 2 2.5x worse than the designed post-EFC contrast for current SPC design. The result suggests that for future shaped pupil design, slightly larger over intended full bandwidth should be considered if it will be used with limited subbands for probing.

  16. Rapid fluctuations of the air and surface temperature in the city of Bucharest (Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheval, Sorin; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Hustiu, Mihaita-Cristinel

    2016-04-01

    Urban areas derive significant changes of the ambient temperature generating specific challenges for society and infrastructure. Extreme temperature events, heat and cold waves affect the human comfort, increase the health risk, and require specific building regulations and emergency preparedness, strongly related to the magnitude and frequency of the thermal hazards. Rapid changes of the temperature put a particular stress for the urban settlements, and the topic has been approached constantly in the scientific literature. Due to its geographical position in a plain area with a temperate climate and noticeable continental influence, the city of Bucharest (Romania) deals with high seasonal and daily temperature variations. However, rapid fluctuations also occur at sub-daily scale caused by cold or warm air advections or by very local effects (e.g. radiative heat exchange, local precipitation). For example, in the area of Bucharest, the cold fronts of the warm season may trigger temperature decreasing up to 10-15 centigrades / hour, while warm advections lead to increasing of 1-2 centigrades / hour. This study focuses on the hourly and sub-hourly temperature variations over the period November 2014 - February 2016, using air temperature data collected from urban sensors and meteorological stations of the national network, and land surface temperature data obtained from satellite remote sensing. The analysis returns different statistics, such as magnitude, intensity, frequency, simultaneous occurrence and areal coverage of the rapid temperature fluctuations. Furthermore, the generating factors for each case study are assessed, and the results are used to define some preliminary patterns and enhance the urban temperature forecast at fine scale. The study was funded by the Romanian Programme Partnership in Priority Domains, PN - II - PCCA - 2013 - 4 - 0509 - Reducing UHI effects to improve urban comfort and balance energy consumption in Bucharest (REDBHI).

  17. Survival of rapidly fluctuating natural low winter temperatures by High Arctic soil invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convey, Peter; Abbandonato, Holly; Bergan, Frode; Beumer, Larissa Teresa; Biersma, Elisabeth Machteld; Bråthen, Vegard Sandøy; D'Imperio, Ludovica; Jensen, Christina Kjellerup; Nilsen, Solveig; Paquin, Karolina; Stenkewitz, Ute; Svoen, Mildrid Elvik; Winkler, Judith; Müller, Eike; Coulson, Stephen James

    2015-12-01

    both direct exposure to at least -24 °C and the rapid and large temperature fluctuations. These results suggest that the studied polar soil invertebrate community may be robust to at least one important predicted consequence of projected climate change.

  18. In vivo and in vitro characterization of site-specific recombination of a novel serine integrase from the temperate phage EFC-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Bohyun; Kim, Inki; Nam, Ja-Ae [Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, 86 Asanbyeoungwon-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyo-Ihl [College of Life Sciences & Biotechnology, Korea University, 5-1 Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Chang Hoon, E-mail: chhoonha@amc.seoul.kr [Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, 86 Asanbyeoungwon-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-22

    EFC-1 integrase is a site-specific recombinase that belongs to the large family of serine recombinase. In previously study, we isolated the temperate phage EFC-1, and characterized its genomic sequence. Within its genome, Orf28 was predicted encode a 464 amino acid of a putative integrase gene. In this study, EFC-1 integrase was characterized in vitro and in vivo. In vitro assay was performed using purified His-tag fusion integrase. Also, to identify which serine is involved in the catalytic domain, we used site-directed mutagenesis and analyzed by a recombination assay in vitro. In vivo assay involved PCR and confocal microscopy in HEK293 cells, and determined the minimal lengths of attP and attB sites. According to our results, the EFC-1 integrase-mediated recombination was site-specific and unidirectional system in vitro and in vivo. Serine 21 of EFC-1 integrase plays a major role in the catalytic domain, and minimal sizes of attB and attP was defined 48 and 54 bp. Our finding may help develop a useful tool for gene therapy and gene delivery system. - Highlights: • EFC-1 integrase-mediated recombination was site-specific and unidirectional system. • Serine 21 of EFC-1 integrase plays a major role in the catalytic domain. • The functional minimal sizes of attB and attP was defined 48 and 54 bp.

  19. Characteristics of Turbulent Airflow Deduced from Rapid Surface Thermal Fluctuations: An Infrared Surface Anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh, Milad; Breitenstein, Daniel; Or, Dani

    2017-07-01

    The intermittent nature of turbulent airflow interacting with the surface is readily observable in fluctuations of the surface temperature resulting from the thermal imprints of eddies sweeping the surface. Rapid infrared thermography has recently been used to quantify characteristics of the near-surface turbulent airflow interacting with the evaporating surfaces. We aim to extend this technique by using single-point rapid infrared measurements to quantify properties of a turbulent flow, including surface exchange processes, with a view towards the development of an infrared surface anemometer. The parameters for the surface-eddy renewal (α and β ) are inferred from infrared measurements of a single-point on the surface of a heat plate placed in a wind tunnel with prescribed wind speeds and constant mean temperatures of the surface. Thermally-deduced parameters are in agreement with values obtained from standard three-dimensional ultrasonic anemometer measurements close to the plate surface (e.g., α = 3 and β = 1/26 (ms)^{-1} for the infrared, and α = 3 and β = 1/19 (ms)^{-1} for the sonic-anemometer measurements). The infrared-based turbulence parameters provide new insights into the role of surface temperature and buoyancy on the inherent characteristics of interacting eddies. The link between the eddy-spectrum shape parameter α and the infrared window size representing the infrared field of view is investigated. The results resemble the effect of the sampling height above the ground in sonic anemometer measurements, which enables the detection of larger eddies with higher values of α . The physical basis and tests of the proposed method support the potential for remote quantification of the near-surface momentum field, as well as scalar-flux measurements in the immediate vicinity of the surface.

  20. Rapid vegetation response to Lateglacial and early Holocene climatic fluctuation in the South Carpathian Mountains (Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyari, E. K.; Jakab, G.; Bálint, M.; Kern, Z.; Buczkó, K.; Braun, M.

    2012-03-01

    High-resolution pollen, conifer stomata and plant macrofossil analyses of two glacial lake sediments (1740 and 1990 m a.s.l.) are used to reconstruct Lateglacial (LG) and early Holocene (EH) vegetation and tree line changes in the Retezat Mountains. Our results show that during the LG, tree line was between 1750 and 1800 m a.s.l. formed by Larix decidua, Pinus mugo and Picea abies. Early LG spread to high altitudes suggests refugia of these tree species in the mountain. The Younger Dryas cooling resulted in regional steppe-tundra expansion, but tree line position and composition showed little change. The abundance of trees and shrubs decreased at 1740 m a.s.l., but species richness increased with the arrival of Pinus cembra. Our data support climate-model hindcasts for only modest decrease in accumulated growing season heat at mid-high altitudes. Regionally the pollen records suggest enhanced aridity and seasonality. In the EH, tree line reached 2000 m a.s.l. (higher than today) by ˜11,100 cal yr BP. P. mugo, P. cembra, P. abies established around the upper lake suggesting rapid increase in summer temperatures. The EH maximum of L. decidua between 11,200-10,600 cal yr BP was connected to high summer insolation. High altitude expansion of Abies alba between 10,600-10,300 cal yr BP suggested summer mean temperatures ˜2.8 °C higher then today. In comparison with other mountain sites in Europe, LG interstadial tree line was at similar altitude in the S Alps and ˜350 m higher in the Pirin Mountains. LG tree line fluctuation had similar low amplitude in the SE Alps, Retezat and Pirin Mts suggesting relatively weak influence of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation changes on growing season temperatures.

  1. The Warburg effect as an adaptation of cancer cells to rapid fluctuations in energy demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Tamir; Gatenby, Robert A.; Brown, Joel S.

    2017-01-01

    To maintain optimal fitness, a cell must balance the risk of inadequate energy reserve for response to a potentially fatal perturbation against the long-term cost of maintaining high concentrations of ATP to meet occasional spikes in demand. Here we apply a game theoretic approach to address the dynamics of energy production and expenditure in eukaryotic cells. Conventionally, glucose metabolism is viewed as a function of oxygen concentrations in which the more efficient oxidation of glucose to CO2 and H2O produces all or nearly all ATP except under hypoxic conditions when less efficient (2 ATP/ glucose vs. about 36ATP/glucose) anaerobic metabolism of glucose to lactic acid provides an emergency backup. We propose an alternative in which energy production is governed by the complex temporal and spatial dynamics of intracellular ATP demand. In the short term, a cell must provide energy for constant baseline needs but also maintain capacity to rapidly respond to fluxes in demand particularly due to external perturbations on the cell membrane. Similarly, longer-term dynamics require a trade-off between the cost of maintaining high metabolic capacity to meet uncommon spikes in demand versus the risk of unsuccessfully responding to threats or opportunities. Here we develop a model and computationally explore the cell’s optimal mix of glycolytic and oxidative capacity. We find the Warburg effect, high glycolytic metabolism even under normoxic conditions, is represents a metabolic strategy that allow cancer cells to optimally meet energy demands posed by stochastic or fluctuating tumor environments. PMID:28922380

  2. A stochastic mechanism for signal propagation in the brain: Force of rapid random fluctuations in membrane potentials of individual neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Dawei; Man, Shushuang; Martin, Joseph V

    2016-01-21

    There are two functionally important factors in signal propagation in a brain structural network: the very first synaptic delay-a time delay about 1ms-from the moment when signals originate to the moment when observation on the signal propagation can begin; and rapid random fluctuations in membrane potentials of every individual neuron in the network at a timescale of microseconds. We provide a stochastic analysis of signal propagation in a general setting. The analysis shows that the two factors together result in a stochastic mechanism for the signal propagation as described below. A brain structural network is not a rigid circuit rather a very flexible framework that guides signals to propagate but does not guarantee success of the signal propagation. In such a framework, with the very first synaptic delay, rapid random fluctuations in every individual neuron in the network cause an "alter-and-concentrate effect" that almost surely forces signals to successfully propagate. By the stochastic mechanism we provide analytic evidence for the existence of a force behind signal propagation in a brain structural network caused by rapid random fluctuations in every individual neuron in the network at a timescale of microseconds with a time delay of 1ms.

  3. Spatial distribution of diatom and cyanobacterial mats in the Dead Sea is determined by response to rapid salinity fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusler, Stefan; Weber, Miriam; de Beer, Dirk; Ionescu, Danny

    2014-11-01

    Cyanobacteria and diatom mats are ubiquitous in hypersaline environments but have never been observed in the Dead Sea, one of the most hypersaline lakes on Earth. Here we report the discovery of phototrophic microbial mats at underwater freshwater seeps in the Dead Sea. These mats are either dominated by diatoms or unicellular cyanobacteria and are spatially separated. Using in situ and ex situ O2 microsensor measurements we show that these organisms are photosynthetically active in their natural habitat. The diatoms, which are phylogenetically associated to the Navicula genus, grew in culture at salinities up to 40 % Dead Sea water (DSW) (14 % total dissolved salts, TDS). The unicellular cyanobacteria belong to the extremely halotolerant Euhalothece genus and grew at salinities up to 70 % DSW (24.5 % TDS). As suggested by a variable O2 penetration depth measured in situ, the organisms are exposed to drastic salinity fluctuations ranging from brackish to DSW salinity within minutes to hours. We could demonstrate that both phototrophs are able to withstand such extreme short-term fluctuations. Nevertheless, while the diatoms recover better from rapid fluctuations, the cyanobacteria cope better with long-term exposure to DSW. We conclude that the main reason for the development of these microbial mats is a local dilution of the hypersaline Dead Sea to levels allowing growth. Their spatial distribution in the seeping areas is a result of different recovery rates from short or long-term fluctuation in salinity.

  4. Rapidly fluctuating environments constrain co-evolutionary arms races by impeding selective sweeps

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Ellie; Laine, Anna-Liisa; Hietala, Mikael; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Although pervasive, the impact of temporal environmental heterogeneity on coevolutionary processes is poorly understood. Productivity is a key temporally heterogeneous variable, and increasing productivity has been shown to increase rates of antagonistic arms race coevolution, and lead to the evolution of more broadly resistant hosts and more broadly infectious parasites. We investigated the effects of the grain of environmental heterogeneity, in terms of fluctuations in productivity, on bact...

  5. Breathing FIRE: How Stellar Feedback Drives Radial Migration, Rapid Size Fluctuations, and Population Gradients in Low-Mass Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    El-Badry, Kareem; Geha, Marla; Hopkins, Philip F; Kereš, Dušan; Chan, T K; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2015-01-01

    We examine the effects of stellar feedback and bursty star formation on low-mass galaxies ($M_{\\rm star}=2\\times10^6-5\\times10^{10}{\\rm M_{\\odot}}$) using the FIRE (Feedback in Realistic Environments) simulations. While previous studies emphasized the impact of feedback on dark matter profiles, we investigate the impact on the stellar component: kinematics, radial migration, size evolution, and population gradients. Feedback-driven outflows/inflows drive significant radial stellar migration over both short and long timescales via two processes: (1) outflowing/infalling gas can remain star-forming, producing young stars that migrate $\\sim1{\\rm\\,kpc}$ within their first $100 {\\rm\\,Myr}$, and (2) gas outflows/inflows drive strong fluctuations in the global potential, transferring energy to all stars. These processes produce several dramatic effects. First, galaxies' effective radii can fluctuate by factors of $>2$ over $\\sim200 {\\rm\\,Myr}$, and these rapid size fluctuations can account for much of the observed s...

  6. BREATHING FIRE: HOW STELLAR FEEDBACK DRIVES RADIAL MIGRATION, RAPID SIZE FLUCTUATIONS, AND POPULATION GRADIENTS IN LOW-MASS GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Badry, Kareem; Geha, Marla [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Wetzel, Andrew; Hopkins, Philip F. [TAPIR, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA USA (United States); Kereš, Dusan; Chan, T. K. [Department of Physics, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André, E-mail: kareem.el-badry@yale.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and CIERA, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We examine the effects of stellar feedback and bursty star formation on low-mass galaxies (M{sub star} = 2 × 10{sup 6} − 5 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ⊙}) using the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulations. While previous studies emphasized the impact of feedback on dark matter profiles, we investigate the impact on the stellar component: kinematics, radial migration, size evolution, and population gradients. Feedback-driven outflows/inflows drive significant radial stellar migration over both short and long timescales via two processes: (1) outflowing/infalling gas can remain star-forming, producing young stars that migrate ∼1 kpc within their first 100 Myr, and (2) gas outflows/inflows drive strong fluctuations in the global potential, transferring energy to all stars. These processes produce several dramatic effects. First, galaxies’ effective radii can fluctuate by factors of >2 over ∼200 Myr, and these rapid size fluctuations can account for much of the observed scatter in the radius at fixed M{sub star}. Second, the cumulative effects of many outflow/infall episodes steadily heat stellar orbits, causing old stars to migrate outward most strongly. This age-dependent radial migration mixes—and even inverts—intrinsic age and metallicity gradients. Thus, the galactic-archaeology approach of calculating radial star formation histories from stellar populations at z = 0 can be severely biased. These effects are strongest at M{sub star} ≈ 10{sup 7–9.6} M{sub ⊙}, the same regime where feedback most efficiently cores galaxies. Thus, detailed measurements of stellar kinematics in low-mass galaxies can strongly constrain feedback models and test baryonic solutions to small-scale problems in ΛCDM.

  7. A hydraulic model is compatible with rapid changes in leaf elongation under fluctuating evaporative demand and soil water status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Cecilio F; Bosio, Mickael; Parent, Boris; Jeanguenin, Linda; Chaumont, François; Tardieu, François

    2014-04-01

    Plants are constantly facing rapid changes in evaporative demand and soil water content, which affect their water status and growth. In apparent contradiction to a hydraulic hypothesis, leaf elongation rate (LER) declined in the morning and recovered upon soil rehydration considerably quicker than transpiration rate and leaf water potential (typical half-times of 30 min versus 1-2 h). The morning decline of LER began at very low light and transpiration and closely followed the stomatal opening of leaves receiving direct light, which represent a small fraction of leaf area. A simulation model in maize (Zea mays) suggests that these findings are still compatible with a hydraulic hypothesis. The small water flux linked to stomatal aperture would be sufficient to decrease water potentials of the xylem and growing tissues, thereby causing a rapid decline of simulated LER, while the simulated water potential of mature tissues declines more slowly due to a high hydraulic capacitance. The model also captured growth patterns in the evening or upon soil rehydration. Changes in plant hydraulic conductance partly counteracted those of transpiration. Root hydraulic conductivity increased continuously in the morning, consistent with the transcript abundance of Zea maize Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Protein aquaporins. Transgenic lines underproducing abscisic acid, with lower hydraulic conductivity and higher stomatal conductance, had a LER declining more rapidly than wild-type plants. Whole-genome transcriptome and phosphoproteome analyses suggested that the hydraulic processes proposed here might be associated with other rapidly occurring mechanisms. Overall, the mechanisms and model presented here may be an essential component of drought tolerance in naturally fluctuating evaporative demand and soil moisture.

  8. Fluctuation-induced patterns and rapid evolution in predator-prey ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2014-03-01

    Predator-prey ecosystems exhibit noisy, persistent cycles that cannot be described by intuitive population-level differential equations such as the Lotka-Volterra equations. Traditionally this paradox has been met by including additional nonlinearities such as predator satiation to force limit cycle behavior. Over the last few years, it has been realized that individual-level descriptions, combined with systematic perturbation techniques can reproduce the key features of such systems in a minimal way, without requiring many additional assumptions or fine tunings. Here I review work in this area that uses these techniques to treat spatial patterns and the phenomenon of rapidly evolving prey sub-populations. In the latter case, I show how stochastic individual-level models reproduce the key features observed in chemostats and in the wild, including anomalous phase shifts between predator and prey species, evolutionary cycles and cryptic cycles. This work shows that stochastic individual-level models naturally describe systems where evolutionary time scales surprisingly match ecosystem time scales.

  9. Application of a new hydraulic conductivity model to simulate rapid groundwater fluctuations in the Eel River watershed in Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrettas, M. D.; Fung, I. Y.

    2015-12-01

    High-frequency multi-year observations of the water table at several wells in the Angelo Coast Range Reserve in the Eel River Watershed in northern California show rapid fluctuations, where the water table, some 10-15 meters below the surface, rises by as much as 1 meter in a day or two after the first storms of the rain season. The observations highlight preferential flow through weathered bedrock, which can store as much as 30% of the moisture in the column ("rock moisture"). This rapid transfer of moisture and storage at depth could have a significant impact on ecosystem dynamics and the water and energy budgets of the atmosphere on various time scales. Despite its high importance, preferential flow through weather bedrock is not routinely captured in most climate models. This work presents a new hydraulic conductivity parameterization that captures the preferential flow, with straightforward implementation into current global climate models. The hydraulic conductivity is represented as a product of the effective saturation (normalized water content) and a background hydraulic conductivity Kbkg, drawn from a depth dependent lognormal distribution. A unique feature of the parameterization is that the variance of hydraulic conductivity is large when there is little rock moisture, and decreases with increasing saturation, mimicking flow through fractures. The new method is applied to seven wells locations on a steep (35 degrees) hill-slope in the Eel River watershed in Northern California, for the duration of six years and estimates of the model parameters are provided by assimilating, into Richards' equation, measurements of precipitation [mm] and water table depths [m] at 30-minute time intervals. The simulation results show that the new approach yields a good agreement of the rapid rise of the observed water table at the tested well locations. Furthermore, the water stored in the weathered bedrock is estimated to be in the range between 32% and 41%, which could

  10. Rapid fluctuations in extracellular brain glucose levels induced by natural arousing stimuli and intravenous cocaine: fueling the brain during neural activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Magalie

    2012-01-01

    Glucose, a primary energetic substrate for neural activity, is continuously influenced by two opposing forces that tend to either decrease its extracellular levels due to enhanced utilization in neural cells or increase its levels due to entry from peripheral circulation via enhanced cerebral blood flow. How this balance is maintained under physiological conditions and changed during neural activation remains unclear. To clarify this issue, enzyme-based glucose sensors coupled with high-speed amperometry were used in freely moving rats to evaluate fluctuations in extracellular glucose levels induced by brief audio stimulus, tail pinch (TP), social interaction with another rat (SI), and intravenous cocaine (1 mg/kg). Measurements were performed in nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr), which drastically differ in neuronal activity. In NAcc, where most cells are powerfully excited after salient stimulation, glucose levels rapidly (latency 2–6 s) increased (30–70 μM or 6–14% over baseline) by all stimuli; the increase differed in magnitude and duration for each stimulus. In SNr, where most cells are transiently inhibited by salient stimuli, TP, SI, and cocaine induced a biphasic glucose response, with the initial decrease (−20–40 μM or 5–10% below baseline) followed by a reboundlike increase. The critical role of neuronal activity in mediating the initial glucose response was confirmed by monitoring glucose currents after local microinjections of glutamate (GLU) or procaine (PRO). While intra-NAcc injection of GLU transiently increased glucose levels in this structure, intra-SNr PRO injection resulted in rapid, transient decreases in SNr glucose. Therefore, extracellular glucose levels in the brain change very rapidly after physiological and pharmacological stimulation, the response is structure specific, and the pattern of neuronal activity appears to be a critical factor determining direction and magnitude of physiological

  11. Rapid Late Holocene glacier fluctuations reconstructed from South Georgia lake sediments using novel analytical and numerical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bilt, Willem; Bakke, Jostein; Werner, Johannes; Paasche, Øyvind; Rosqvist, Gunhild

    2016-04-01

    The collapse of ice shelves, rapidly retreating glaciers and a dramatic recent temperature increase show that Southern Ocean climate is rapidly shifting. Also, instrumental and modelling data demonstrate transient interactions between oceanic and atmospheric forcings as well as climatic teleconnections with lower-latitude regions. Yet beyond the instrumental period, a lack of proxy climate timeseries impedes our understanding of Southern Ocean climate. Also, available records often lack the resolution and chronological control required to resolve rapid climate shifts like those observed at present. Alpine glaciers are found on most Southern Ocean islands and quickly respond to shifts in climate through changes in mass balance. Attendant changes in glacier size drive variations in the production of rock flour, the suspended product of glacial erosion. This climate response may be captured by downstream distal glacier-fed lakes, continuously recording glacier history. Sediment records from such lakes are considered prime sources for paleoclimate reconstructions. Here, we present the first reconstruction of Late Holocene glacier variability from the island of South Georgia. Using a toolbox of advanced physical, geochemical (XRF) and magnetic proxies, in combination with state-of-the-art numerical techniques, we fingerprinted a glacier signal from glacier-fed lake sediments. This lacustrine sediment signal was subsequently calibrated against mapped glacier extent with the help of geomorphological moraine evidence and remote sensing techniques. The outlined approach enabled us to robustly resolve variations of a complex glacier at sub-centennial timescales, while constraining the sedimentological imprint of other geomorphic catchment processes. From a paleoclimate perspective, our reconstruction reveals a dynamic Late Holocene climate, modulated by long-term shifts in regional circulation patterns. We also find evidence for rapid medieval glacier retreat as well as a

  12. Rapid Fluctuations in Solar Flares. Proceedings of a Workshop Held in Lanham, Maryland on September 30-October 4, 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    Thompson RAPID CHANGES IN Ha-FLARES CORRELATED WITH MICROWAVES ......................... 301 J-P. Wilber and N. Klmpfer SECTION 4 PLASMA PHYSICS PLASMA...thermal response NASA/GSFC USA Peter Sturrock - review speaker Stanford U., CA. USA Ken Tapping - microwaves Herzberg Inst., Ottawa Canada Roger Thomas...The groups and their leaders were as follows: X-Rays (X) - Alan Kiplinger Radio and Microwaves (R) - Arnold Benz and Ken Tapping Thermal Response (T

  13. Fluctuation in seed abundance has contrasting effects on the fate of seeds from two rapidly germinating tree species in an Asian tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lin; Guo, Cong; Chen, Jin

    2017-01-01

    The seed predator satiation hypothesis states that high seed abundance can satiate seed predators or seed dispersers, thus promoting seed survival. However, for rapidly germinating seeds in tropical forests, high seed abundance may limit dispersal as the seeds usually remain under parent trees for long periods, which may lead to high mortality due to rodent predation or fungal infestations. By tracking 2 species of rapidly germinating seeds (Pittosporopsis kerrii, family Icacinaceae; Camellia kissi, family Theaceae), which depend on dispersal by scatter-hoarding rodents, we investigated the effects of seed abundance at the community level on predation and seed dispersal in the tropical forest of Xishuangbanna Prefecture, Southwest China. We found that high seed abundance at the community level was associated with delayed and reduced seed removal, decreased dispersal distance and increased pre-dispersal seed survival for both plant species. High seed abundance was also associated with reduced seed caching of C. kissi, but it showed little effect on seed caching of P. kerrii. However, post-dispersal seed survival for the 2 plant species followed the reverse pattern. High seed abundance in the community was associated with higher post-dispersal survival of P. kerrii seeds, but with lower post-dispersal survival of C. kissi seeds. Our results suggest that different plant species derive benefit from fluctuations in seed production in different ways.

  14. Diagenesis in limestone-dolostone successions after 1 million years of rapid sea-level fluctuations: A case study from Grand Cayman, British West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Min; Jones, Brian

    2016-08-01

    Meteoric diagenesis in young marine carbonate sediments has commonly been linked to fluctuations in Quaternary glacio-eustatic sea levels. The extent to which these sea-level changes are recorded in these carbonate successions, however, remains questionable. This is amply demonstrated by the diagenetic record found in the limestones and dolostones of the Cayman Formation (Miocene) on the Cayman Islands. On the eastern part of Grand Cayman, dolomitization that ceased by 1 million years ago created an architecture whereby the limestones in the central part of the island were surrounded by dolostones in coastal areas of the island. Since then, the upper 90 m of the Cayman Formation has been repeatedly cycled through many different marine and meteoric diagenetic zones as large, rapid eustatic oscillations in sea level affected the island. The records of these diagenetic cycles in the dolostones and limestones are, however, different and impossible to match to the cyclic changes in sea level. In the peripheral dolostones, post-dolomitization diagenetic features are sparse. In contrast, the limestones in the interior of the island exhibit a wider variety of meteoric diagenetic features, including extensive dissolution and calcite cementation. The dolostones have low porosity (limestones are characterized by high porosity (up to 50%), especially in the lower and middle parts of the studied limestone succession. The different phases of diagenesis found in the limestones, however, cannot be specifically matched to any sea-level fluctuations that have affected these successions. This issue is further exemplified by the fact that that the last marine transgression over the last ~ 16,000 years ago appears to have left no tangible record. The analysis of this succession clearly demonstrates that not all diagenetic regimes will be recorded in the fabrics of limestones or dolostones.

  15. Rapid fluctuations in flow and water-column properties in Asan Bay, Guam: implications for selective resilience of coral reefs in warming seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, C.D.; Field, M.E.; Cheriton, O.M.; Presto, M.K.; Logan, J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodynamics and water-column properties were investigated off west-central Guam from July 2007 through January 2008. Rapid fluctuations, on time scales of 10s of min, in currents, temperature, salinity, and acoustic backscatter were observed to occur on sub-diurnal frequencies along more than 2 km of the fore reef but not at the reef crest. During periods characterized by higher sea-surface temperatures (SSTs), weaker wind forcing, smaller ocean surface waves, and greater thermal stratification, rapid decreases in temperature and concurrent rapid increases in salinity and acoustic backscatter coincided with onshore-directed near-bed currents and offshore-directed near-surface currents. During the study, these cool-water events, on average, lasted 2.3 h and decreased the water temperature 0.57 °C, increased the salinity 0.25 PSU, and were two orders of magnitude more prevalent during the summer season than the winter. During the summer season when the average satellite-derived SST anomaly was +0.63 °C, these cooling events, on average, lowered the temperature 1.14 °C along the fore reef but only 0.11 °C along the reef crest. The rapid shifts appear to be the result of internal tidal bores pumping cooler, more saline, higher-backscatter oceanic water from depths >50 m over cross-shore distances of 100 s of m into the warmer, less saline waters at depths of 20 m and shallower. Such internal bores appear to have the potential to buffer shallow coral reefs from predicted increases in SSTs by bringing cool, offshore water to shallow coral environments. These cooling internal bores may also provide additional benefits to offset stress such as supplying food to thermally stressed corals, reducing stress due to ultraviolet radiation and/or low salinity, and delivering coral larvae from deeper reefs not impacted by surface thermal stress. Thus, the presence of internal bores might be an important factor locally in the resilience of select coral reefs facing increased

  16. Fluctuating Selection in the Moran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Antony M.; Lehman, Clarence; Yi, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Contrary to classical population genetics theory, experiments demonstrate that fluctuating selection can protect a haploid polymorphism in the absence of frequency dependent effects on fitness. Using forward simulations with the Moran model, we confirm our analytical results showing that a fluctuating selection regime, with a mean selection coefficient of zero, promotes polymorphism. We find that increases in heterozygosity over neutral expectations are especially pronounced when fluctuations are rapid, mutation is weak, the population size is large, and the variance in selection is big. Lowering the frequency of fluctuations makes selection more directional, and so heterozygosity declines. We also show that fluctuating selection raises dn/ds ratios for polymorphism, not only by sweeping selected alleles into the population, but also by purging the neutral variants of selected alleles as they undergo repeated bottlenecks. Our analysis shows that randomly fluctuating selection increases the rate of evolution by increasing the probability of fixation. The impact is especially noticeable when the selection is strong and mutation is weak. Simulations show the increase in the rate of evolution declines as the rate of new mutations entering the population increases, an effect attributable to clonal interference. Intriguingly, fluctuating selection increases the dn/ds ratios for divergence more than for polymorphism, a pattern commonly seen in comparative genomics. Our model, which extends the classical neutral model of molecular evolution by incorporating random fluctuations in selection, accommodates a wide variety of observations, both neutral and selected, with economy. PMID:28108586

  17. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10-23 Hz-1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  18. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10(-23) Hz(-1/2) above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  19. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Harms

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^–23 Hz^–1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our

  20. Fluctuations in classical sum rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elton, John R; Lakshminarayan, Arul; Tomsovic, Steven

    2010-10-01

    Classical sum rules arise in a wide variety of physical contexts. Asymptotic expressions have been derived for many of these sum rules in the limit of long orbital period (or large action). Although sum-rule convergence may well be exponentially rapid for chaotic systems in a global phase-space sense with time, individual contributions to the sums may fluctuate with a width which diverges in time. Our interest is in the global convergence of sum rules as well as their local fluctuations. It turns out that a simple version of a lazy baker map gives an ideal system in which classical sum rules, their corrections, and their fluctuations can be worked out analytically. This is worked out in detail for the Hannay-Ozorio sum rule. In this particular case the rate of convergence of the sum rule is found to be governed by the Pollicott-Ruelle resonances, and both local and global boundaries for which the sum rule may converge are given. In addition, the width of the fluctuations is considered and worked out analytically, and it is shown to have an interesting dependence on the location of the region over which the sum rule is applied. It is also found that as the region of application is decreased in size the fluctuations grow. This suggests a way of controlling the length scale of the fluctuations by considering a time dependent phase-space volume, which for the lazy baker map decreases exponentially rapidly with time.

  1. Turbulent fluctuations around Bjorken flow

    CERN Document Server

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    We study the evolution of local event-by-event deviations from smooth average fluid dynamic fields, as they can arise in heavy ion collisions from the propagation of fluctuating initial conditions. Local fluctuations around Bjorken flow are found to be governed by non-linear equations whose solutions can be characterized qualitatively in terms of Reynolds numbers. Perturbations at different rapidities decouple quickly, and satisfy (after suitable coordinate transformations) an effectively two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation of non-relativistic form. We discuss the conditions under which non-linearities in these equations cannot be neglected and turbulent behavior is expected to set in.

  2. Principle of minimal work fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Gaoyang; Gong, Jiangbin

    2015-08-01

    Understanding and manipulating work fluctuations in microscale and nanoscale systems are of both fundamental and practical interest. For example, in considering the Jarzynski equality 〈e-βW〉=e-βΔF, a change in the fluctuations of e-βW may impact how rapidly the statistical average of e-βW converges towards the theoretical value e-βΔF, where W is the work, β is the inverse temperature, and ΔF is the free energy difference between two equilibrium states. Motivated by our previous study aiming at the suppression of work fluctuations, here we obtain a principle of minimal work fluctuations. In brief, adiabatic processes as treated in quantum and classical adiabatic theorems yield the minimal fluctuations in e-βW. In the quantum domain, if a system initially prepared at thermal equilibrium is subjected to a work protocol but isolated from a bath during the time evolution, then a quantum adiabatic process without energy level crossing (or an assisted adiabatic process reaching the same final states as in a conventional adiabatic process) yields the minimal fluctuations in e-βW, where W is the quantum work defined by two energy measurements at the beginning and at the end of the process. In the classical domain where the classical work protocol is realizable by an adiabatic process, then the classical adiabatic process also yields the minimal fluctuations in e-βW. Numerical experiments based on a Landau-Zener process confirm our theory in the quantum domain, and our theory in the classical domain explains our previous numerical findings regarding the suppression of classical work fluctuations [G. Y. Xiao and J. B. Gong, Phys. Rev. E 90, 052132 (2014)].

  3. Local Multiplicity Fluctuations in Z decay

    OpenAIRE

    Chekanov, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    Local multiplicity fluctuations of hadrons produced in the decay of $Z^0$ were studied on the basis of L3 data. In addition to the normalized-factorial-moment method, the fluctuations were studied for the first time by the use of bunching parameters. A strong multifractal structure was observed inside jets. JETSET 7.4 PS describes the fluctuations in the azimuthal angle defined with respect to the beam axis reasonably well. For the fluctuations in rapidity, defined with respect to the thrust ...

  4. Behavior of Charge Fluctuations in Relativistic Nucleus-nucleus Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SA; Ben-hao; TAI; An

    2002-01-01

    Using a hadron and string cascade model JPCIAE, we have investigated the dependence ofevent-by-event charge fluctuations on (pseudo)rapidity window size, final state interaction, resonancedecay, centrality, and reaction energy for Pb + Pb collisions at SPS and LHC energies and for Au + Aucollisions at RHIC energies. The JPCIAE results of the charge fluctuations as a function of rapidity

  5. Local multiplicity fluctuations in hadronic Z decay

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Lacentre, P E; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lavorato, A; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Migani, D; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palit, S; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Rind, O; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1998-01-01

    Local multiplicity fluctuations in hadronic Z decays are studied using the L3 detector at LEP. Bunching parameters are used for the first time in addition to the normalised factorial moment method. The bunching parameters directly demonstrate that the fluctuations in rapidity are multifractal. Monte Carlo models show overall agreement with the data, reproducing the trend, although not always the magnitude, of the factorial moments and bunching parameters.

  6. Fluctuation relations for spintronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Rosa; Lim, Jong Soo; Sánchez, David

    2012-06-15

    Fluctuation relations are derived in systems where the spin degree of freedom and magnetic interactions play a crucial role. The form of the nonequilibrium fluctuation theorems relies on the assumption of a local balance condition. We demonstrate that in some cases the presence of magnetic interactions violates this condition. Nevertheless, fluctuation relations can be obtained from the microreversibility principle sustained only at equilibrium as a symmetry of the cumulant generating function for spin currents. We illustrate the spintronic fluctuation relations for a quantum dot coupled to partially polarized helical edge states.

  7. Longitudinal fluctuations and decorrelation of anisotropic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Long-Gang [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Petersen, Hannah [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Qin, Guang-You [Key Laboratory of Quark & Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Roy, Victor [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Wang, Xin-Nian [Key Laboratory of Quark & Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Nuclear Science Division MS70R0319, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    We investigate the decorrelation of 2nd and 3rd order anisotropic flow for charged particles in two different pseudo rapidity (η) windows by varying the pseudo rapidity gap, in an event-by-event (3+1)D ideal hydrodynamic model, with fluctuating initial conditions from A Multi-Phase Transport (AMPT) model. We visualize the parton distribution at initial state for Pb+Pb collisions at LHC and Au+Au collisions at RHIC, and demonstrate the longitudinal fluctuations originating from the asymmetry between forward and backward going participants, the fluctuations of the string length and the fluctuations due to finite number of partons at different beam energies. The decorrelation of anisotropic flow of final hadrons with large η gaps is found to originate from the spatial decorrelation along the longitudinal direction in the AMPT initial conditions through hydrodynamic evolution. The agreement between our results and recent CMS data in most centralities suggests that the string-like mechanism of initial parton production in AMPT model captures the initial longitudinal fluctuation that is responsible for the measured decorrelation of anisotropic flow in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC. Our predictions for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy show stronger longitudinal decorrelation than at LHC, indicating larger longitudinal fluctuations at lower beam energies.

  8. Longitudinal fluctuations and decorrelation of anisotropic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Long-Gang; Petersen, Hannah; Qin, Guang-You; Roy, Victor; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the decorrelation of 2nd and 3rd order anisotropic flow for charged particles in two different pseudo rapidity (η) windows by varying the pseudo rapidity gap, in an event-by-event (3+1)D ideal hydrodynamic model, with fluctuating initial conditions from A Multi-Phase Transport (AMPT) model. We visualize the parton distribution at initial state for Pb+Pb collisions at LHC and Au+Au collisions at RHIC, and demonstrate the longitudinal fluctuations originating from the asymmetry between forward and backward going participants, the fluctuations of the string length and the fluctuations due to finite number of partons at different beam energies. The decorrelation of anisotropic flow of final hadrons with large η gaps is found to originate from the spatial decorrelation along the longitudinal direction in the AMPT initial conditions through hydrodynamic evolution. The agreement between our results and recent CMS data in most centralities suggests that the string-like mechanism of initial parton production in AMPT model captures the initial longitudinal fluctuation that is responsible for the measured decorrelation of anisotropic flow in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC. Our predictions for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy show stronger longitudinal decorrelation than at LHC, indicating larger longitudinal fluctuations at lower beam energies.

  9. Hadronic Correlations and Fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Volker

    2008-10-09

    We will provide a review of some of the physics which can be addressed by studying fluctuations and correlations in heavy ion collisions. We will discuss Lattice QCD results on fluctuations and correlations and will put them into context with observables which have been measured in heavy-ion collisions. Special attention will be given to the QCD critical point and the first order co-existence region, and we will discuss how the measurement of fluctuations and correlations can help in an experimental search for non-trivial structures in the QCD phase diagram.

  10. Continuous information flow fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinberg, Martin Luc; Horowitz, Jordan M.

    2016-10-01

    Information plays a pivotal role in the thermodynamics of nonequilibrium processes with feedback. However, much remains to be learned about the nature of information fluctuations in small-scale devices and their relation with fluctuations in other thermodynamics quantities, like heat and work. Here we derive a series of fluctuation theorems for information flow and partial entropy production in a Brownian particle model of feedback cooling and extend them to arbitrary driven diffusion processes. We then analyze the long-time behavior of the feedback-cooling model in detail. Our results provide insights into the structure and origin of large deviations of information and thermodynamic quantities in autonomous Maxwell's demons.

  11. Quantum Fractal Fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benenti, Giuliano; Casati, Giulio; Guarneri, Italo; Terraneo, Marcello

    2001-07-02

    We numerically analyze quantum survival probability fluctuations in an open, classically chaotic system. In a quasiclassical regime and in the presence of classical mixed phase space, such fluctuations are believed to exhibit a fractal pattern, on the grounds of semiclassical arguments. In contrast, we work in a classical regime of complete chaoticity and in a deep quantum regime of strong localization. We provide evidence that fluctuations are still fractal, due to the slow, purely quantum algebraic decay in time produced by dynamical localization. Such findings considerably enlarge the scope of the existing theory.

  12. Spatial fluctuation theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Espigares, Carlos; Redig, Frank; Giardinà, Cristian

    2015-08-01

    For non-equilibrium systems of interacting particles and for interacting diffusions in d-dimensions, a novel fluctuation relation is derived. The theorem establishes a quantitative relation between the probabilities of observing two current values in different spatial directions. The result is a consequence of spatial symmetries of the microscopic dynamics, generalizing in this way the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem related to the time-reversal symmetry. This new perspective opens up the possibility of direct experimental measurements of fluctuation relations of vectorial observables.

  13. Fluctuations of fragment observables

    CERN Document Server

    Gulminelli, F

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents a review of our present theoretical as well as experimental knowledge of different fluctuation observables relevant to nuclear multifragmentation. The possible connection between the presence of a fluctuation peak and the occurrence of a phase transition or a critical phenomenon is critically analyzed. Many different phenomena can lead both to the creation and to the suppression of a fluctuation peak. In particular, the role of constraints due to conservation laws and to data sorting is shown to be essential. From the experimental point of view, a comparison of the available fragmentation data reveals that there is a good agreement between different data sets of basic fluctuation observables, if the fragmenting source is of comparable size. This compatibility suggests that the fragmentation process is largely independent of the reaction mechanism (central versus peripheral collisions, symmetric versus asymmetric systems, light ions versus heavy ion induced reactions). Configurationa...

  14. Fluctuations near the deconfinement phase transition boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Mishustin, I N

    2005-01-01

    In this talk I discuss how a first order phase transition may proceed in rapidly expanding partonic matter produced in a relativistic heavy-ion collision. The resulting picture is that a strong collective flow of matter will lead to the fragmentation of a metastable phase into droplets. If the transition from quark-gluon plasma to hadron gas is of the first order, it will manifest itself by strong nonstatistical fluctuations in observable hadron distributions. I discuss shortly existing experimental data on the multiplicity fluctuations.

  15. Spin fluctuations and the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Loktev

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the spectral properties of a phenomenological model for a weakly doped two-dimensional antiferromagnet, in which the carriers move within one of the two sublattices where they were introduced. Such a constraint results in the free carrier spectra with the maxima at k=(± π/2 , ± π/2 observed in some cuprates. We consider the spectral properties of the model by taking into account fluctuations of the spins in the antiferromagnetic background. We show that such fluctuations lead to a non-pole-like structure of the single-hole Green's function and these fluctuations can be responsible for some anomalous "strange metal" properties of underdoped cuprates in the nonsuperconducting regime.

  16. Density fluctuations associated with the internal disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervais, F.; Gresillon, D.; Hennequin, P.; Quemeneur, A.; Truc, A. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises; Devynck, P.; Garbet, X.; Laviron, C.; Payan, J.; Pecquet, A.L. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1993-12-31

    Fluctuations specially related to the sawtooth relaxations have been recorded in TORE SUPRA ohmic plasmas with the CO{sub 2} scattering experiment ALTAIR. The temperature and density evolutions are simultaneously analysed to observe the sawtooth behaviour on a fast time scale. These observed fluctuations are perfectly connected with two characteristic phases of the sawtooth crash, lasting about 60 and 100 {mu}s respectively, as it can be seen on the soft X-ray signals or ECE temperature measurements. Frequency, wave number spectra and level of these fluctuations are analyzed for the two different sawtooth phases. Some specific turbulence correlated with the sawtooth crash has been previously reported. Theoretical models have suggested that enhanced turbulence could account for the rapid crash time and fast heat propagation observed on most tokamaks. The aim of this study is to check the validity of these models with a better knowledge of the characteristics of the observed turbulence. (author) 9 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Characterizing flow fluctuations with moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhalerao, Rajeev S. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Ollitrault, Jean-Yves, E-mail: jean-yves.ollitrault@cea.fr [CNRS, URA2306, IPhT, Institut de physique théorique de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Pal, Subrata [Department of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2015-03-06

    We present a complete set of multiparticle correlation observables for ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. These include moments of the distribution of the anisotropic flow in a single harmonic and also mixed moments, which contain the information on correlations between event planes of different harmonics. We explain how all these moments can be measured using just two symmetric subevents separated by a rapidity gap. This presents a multi-pronged probe of the physics of flow fluctuations. For instance, it allows to test the hypothesis that event-plane correlations are generated by non-linear hydrodynamic response. We illustrate the method with simulations of events in A MultiPhase Transport (AMPT) model.

  18. Characterizing flow fluctuations with moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev S. Bhalerao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a complete set of multiparticle correlation observables for ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. These include moments of the distribution of the anisotropic flow in a single harmonic and also mixed moments, which contain the information on correlations between event planes of different harmonics. We explain how all these moments can be measured using just two symmetric subevents separated by a rapidity gap. This presents a multi-pronged probe of the physics of flow fluctuations. For instance, it allows to test the hypothesis that event-plane correlations are generated by non-linear hydrodynamic response. We illustrate the method with simulations of events in A MultiPhase Transport (AMPT model.

  19. The fluctuating gap model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xiaobin

    2011-01-15

    The quasi-one-dimensional systems exhibit some unusual phenomenon, such as the Peierls instability, the pseudogap phenomena and the absence of a Fermi-Dirac distribution function line shape in the photoemission spectroscopy. Ever since the discovery of materials with highly anisotropic properties, it has been recognized that fluctuations play an important role above the three-dimensional phase transition. This regime where the precursor fluctuations are presented can be described by the so called fluctuating gap model (FGM) which was derived from the Froehlich Hamiltonian to study the low energy physics of the one-dimensional electron-phonon system. Not only is the FGM of great interest in the context of quasi-one-dimensional materials, liquid metal and spin waves above T{sub c} in ferromagnets, but also in the semiclassical approximation of superconductivity, it is possible to replace the original three-dimensional problem by a directional average over effectively one-dimensional problem which in the weak coupling limit is described by the FGM. In this work, we investigate the FGM in a wide temperature range with different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. We derive a formally exact solution to this problem and calculate the density of states, the spectral function and the optical conductivity. In our calculation, we show that a Dyson singularity appears in the low energy density of states for Gaussian fluctuations in the commensurate case. In the incommensurate case, there is no such kind of singularity, and the zero frequency density of states varies differently as a function of the correlation lengths for different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. Using the density of states we calculated with non-Gaussian order parameter fluctuations, we are able to calculate the static spin susceptibility which agrees with the experimental data very well. In the calculation of the spectral functions, we show that as the correlation increases, the

  20. Multi-mode fluctuating selection in host-parasite coevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Ben; Boots, Mike

    2017-03-01

    Understanding fluctuating selection is important for our understanding of patterns of spatial and temporal diversity in nature. Host-parasite theory has classically assumed fluctuations either occur between highly specific genotypes (matching allele: MA) or from specialism to generalism (gene-for-gene: GFG). However, while MA can only generate one mode of fluctuating selection, we show that GFG can in fact produce both rapid 'within-range' fluctuations (among genotypes with identical levels of investment but which specialise on different subsets of the population) and slower cycling 'between ranges' (different levels of investment), emphasising that MA is a subset of GFG. Our findings closely match empirical observations, although sampling rates need to be high to detect these novel dynamics empirically. Within-range cycling is an overlooked process by which fluctuating selection can occur in nature, suggesting that fluctuating selection may be a more common and important process than previously thought in generating and maintaining diversity.

  1. Event-by-Event Fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    In this review, we systematically examine the principles and the practices of fluctuations such as the momentum and the charge fluctuations as applied to the heavy ion collisions. Main emphases are: (i) Fluctuations as signals of phase transition (ii) Relationship between correlation functions and fluctuations (iii) Qualitative difference between fluctuations in small systems and large systems. Whenever available, theoretical results are compared with data from RHIC and SPS.

  2. Fluctuating Asymmetry and Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    The general factor of mental ability ("g") may reflect general biological fitness. If so, "g"-loaded measures such as Raven's progressive matrices should be related to morphological measures of fitness such as fluctuating asymmetry (FA: left-right asymmetry of a set of typically left-right symmetrical body traits such as finger…

  3. Diagnostics for fluctuation measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donne, A. J. H.

    2000-01-01

    Transport of particles and heat in magnetic confinement devices is largely attributed to the presence of microscopic instabilities. To better understand the physical mechanisms underlying plasma transport processes it is necessary to diagnose the fluctuations in the various quantities along with the

  4. Nonequilibrium mesoscopic conductance fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, T.; Blanter, Ya. M.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the amplitude of mesoscopic fluctuations of the differential conductance of a metallic wire at arbitrary bias voltage V . For noninteracting electrons, the variance ⟨δg2⟩ increases with V . The asymptotic large- V behavior is ⟨δg2⟩˜V/Vc (where eVc=D/L2 is the Thouless energy), in agreement with the earlier prediction by Larkin and Khmelnitskii. We find, however, that this asymptotics has a very small numerical prefactor and sets in at very large V/Vc only, which strongly complicates its experimental observation. This high-voltage behavior is preceded by a crossover regime, V/Vc≲30 , where the conductance variance increases by a factor ˜3 as compared to its value in the regime of universal conductance fluctuations (i.e., at V→0 ). We further analyze the effect of dephasing due to the electron-electron scattering on ⟨δg2⟩ at high voltages. With the Coulomb interaction taken into account, the amplitude of conductance fluctuations becomes a nonmonotonic function of V . Specifically, ⟨δg2⟩ drops as 1/V for voltages V≫gVc , where g is the dimensionless conductance. In this regime, the conductance fluctuations are dominated by quantum-coherent regions of the wire adjacent to the reservoirs.

  5. Measurements of charged hadron fluctuations in pseudo-rapidity bins in {sup 16}O-AgBr at 60 A GeV and {sup 32}S-AgBr at 200 A GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhoumik, Gopa; Deb, Argha; Ghosh, Dipak [Jadavpur University, Nuclear and Particle Physics Research Centre, Department of Physics, Kolkata (India); Bhattacharyya, Swarnapratim [New Alipore College, Department of Physics, New Alipore, Kolkata (India)

    2015-07-15

    We have measured the hadron-hadron correlation in the multiparticle production process of {sup 16}O-AgBr interactions at 60A GeV and {sup 32}S-AgBr interactions at 200A GeV in the forward and backward zone of the pseudo-rapidity space using the normalized factorial cumulant moment method. The experimental results have been compared with the Monte Carlo data generated according to the independent emission model. The results reveal that the observed correlation between the produced hadrons is purely dynamical. Correlation is found to be stronger in the backward zone than that in the forward zone of the pseudo-rapidity space for both interactions. Factorial cumulant moments for the experimental data show a power law rise with decreasing phase space bin size. The results obtained from the experimental data have also been compared with those obtained from analyzing FRITIOF data. Though FRITIOF data itself show the presence of a measured correlation among the hadrons, in most of the cases the values of the factorial cumulant moments are much less than the experimental values and they remain constant with phase space bin size. The study might hint towards the Bose-Einstein correlation as the origin of the observed behavior of the measured correlation. The failure of FRITIOF data to reproduce the exact experimental behavior in terms of factorial cumulant moment also supports this notion as the model does not take the BE correlation into account. (orig.)

  6. Fluctuations in quantum devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.Haken

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Logical gates can be formalized by Boolean algebra whose elementary operations can be realized by devices that employ the interactions of macroscopic numbers of elementary excitations such as electrons, holes, photons etc. With increasing miniaturization to the nano scale and below, quantum fluctuations become important and can no longer be ignored. Based on Heisenberg equations of motion for the creation and annihilation operators of elementary excitations, I determine the noise sources of composite quantum systems.

  7. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Harms, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of terrestrial gravity fluctuations will have great impact on the future development of GW detectors and high-precision gravimetry in general, and many open questions need to be answered still as emphasized in this article.

  8. A Model for Lightcone Fluctuations due to Stress Tensor Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Bessa, C H G; Ford, L H; Ribeiro, C C H

    2016-01-01

    We study a model for quantum lightcone fluctuations in which vacuum fluctuations of the electric field and of the squared electric field in a nonlinear dielectric material produce variations in the flight times of probe pulses. When this material has a non-zero third order polarizability, the flight time variations arise from squared electric field fluctuations, and are analogous to effects expected when the stress tensor of a quantized field drives passive spacetime geometry fluctuations. We also discuss the dependence of the squared electric field fluctuations upon the geometry of the material, which in turn determines a sampling function for averaging the squared electric field along the path of the pulse. This allows us to estimate the probability of especially large fluctuations, which is a measure of the probability distribution for quantum stress tensor fluctuations.

  9. Hydrodynamic Fluctuations in Laminar Fluid Flow. II. Fluctuating Squire Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz de Zárate, José M.; Sengers, Jan V.

    2013-02-01

    We use fluctuating hydrodynamics to evaluate the enhancement of thermally excited fluctuations in laminar fluid flow using plane Couette flow as a representative example. In a previous publication (J. Stat. Phys. 144:774, 2011) we derived the energy amplification arising from thermally excited wall-normal fluctuations by solving a fluctuating Orr-Sommerfeld equation. In the present paper we derive the energy amplification arising from wall-normal vorticity fluctuation by solving a fluctuating Squire equation. The thermally excited wall-normal vorticity fluctuations turn out to yield the dominant contribution to the energy amplification. In addition, we show that thermally excited streaks, even in the absence of any externally imposed perturbations, are present in laminar fluid flow.

  10. Rapid Environmental Fluctuations Recorded over the Last Glacial/Interglacial Cycle in the Sediments from Borehole PRGL1-4 (Gulf of Lions; Western Mediterranean) using Radiogenic Isotopes (Sr & Nd)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizou, J.

    2015-12-01

    The study of sediments deposited and preserved in oceanic basins unable us to examine how terrigenous sediment supply varied through time in relation to paleoenvironmental and climatic changes on land. The geochemical and isotopic compositions of marine sediment are used to unravel its provenance, and provide information about its formation. Providing that the paleoclimatic frame is known, such data give an insight into the rock-source location and allow us to decipher between genetic processes of mechanical erosion and chemical alteration. Borehole PRGL1-4 (European project PROMESS), located in the Gulf of Lions (W Mediterranean) at 300 mwd, was investigated geochemically at high-temporal resolution over the last glacial/interglacial cycle (i.e. 130 ka) to study sediment-source variations during rapid climate changes. Besides, sediments originating from the Rhône's and the Pyreneo-Languedocian's catchment areas have been analyzed to measure the isotopic composition of five source end-members that are the Alps, the Higher Rhône valley, the Lower Rhône valley, the Languedoc and the Pyrenees. Epsilon Nd and 87Sr/86Sr were measured on 60 samples encompassing 4 marine isotopic stages with an emphasis on Heinrich events. The epsilon Nd values of PRGL1-4 lean towards the Lower Rhône valley unradiogenic end-member during cold stadial intervals, and towards the Alpine radiogenic end-member during warm interstadials. The presence of an ice cap over the crystalline Alpine watershed during cold phases could prevent the sediments originating from this region from reaching the Gulf of Lions. The same pattern is observed during the time of Heinrich events. An influence of the sea level variations on the sedimentation at the borehole site during the Heinrich events is unlikely since they are only 10 to 15 m in amplitude. Furthermore, a major isotopic shift in epsilon Nd mean values is displayed around 40 ka that coincides with the connection of the Durance to the Rhône River

  11. Long-term modulation of the cosmic ray fluctuation spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starodubtsev, S.A.; Grigoryev, A.V. [Yu.G. Shafer Inst. of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, SB RAS, Yakutsk (Russian Federation); Usoskin, I.G. [Sodankylae Geophysical Observatory, Univ. of Oulu (Finland); Mursula, K. [Dept. of Physical Sciences, Univ of Oulu (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    Here we study the power level of rapid cosmic ray fluctuations in the frequency range of 10{sup -4}-1.67 . 10{sup -3} Hz (periods from 10 min to about 3h), using measurements by space-borne instruments for the period since 1974. We find that the power level of these fluctuations varies over the solar cycle, but the phase of this variation depends on the energy of cosmic ray particles. While the power level of these fluctuations in the higher energy channels (corresponding to galactic cosmic rays) changes in phase with the solar cycle, the fluctuation level for lower energy channels (predominantly of solar/interplanetary origin) is roughly in an opposite phase with the solar cycle. The results prove conclusively that these fluctuations originate in the near-Earth space, excluding their atmospheric or magnetospheric origin. We present these new results and discuss a possible scenario explaining the observed energy-dependence. (orig.)

  12. Long-term modulation of the cosmic ray fluctuation spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Starodubtsev

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we study the power level of rapid cosmic ray fluctuations in the frequency range of 10-4-1.67·10-3 Hz (periods from 10 min to about 3 h, using measurements by space-borne instruments for the period since 1974. We find that the power level of these fluctuations varies over the solar cycle, but the phase of this variation depends on the energy of cosmic ray particles. While the power level of these fluctuations in the higher energy channels (corresponding to galactic cosmic rays changes in phase with the solar cycle, the fluctuation level for lower energy channels (predominantly of solar/interplanetary origin is roughly in an opposite phase with the solar cycle. The results prove conclusively that these fluctuations originate in the near-Earth space, excluding their atmospheric or magnetospheric origin. We present these new results and discuss a possible scenario explaining the observed energy-dependence.

  13. Charge Transfer Fluctuations as a Signal for QGP

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Lijun; Jeon, Sangyong

    2005-01-01

    In this work, the charge transfer fluctuation which was previously used for $pp$ collisions is proposed for relativistic heavy-ion collisions as a QGP probe. We propose the appearance of a local minimum at midrapidity for the charge transfer fluctuation as a signal for a QGP. Within a two-component neutral cluster model, we demonstrate that the charge transfer fluctuation can detect the presence of a QGP as well as the size of the QGP in the rapidity space. We also show that the forward-backw...

  14. Hydrodynamics of charge fluctuations and balance functions

    CERN Document Server

    Ling, B; Stephanov, M

    2013-01-01

    We apply stochastic hydrodynamics to the study of charge density fluctuations in QCD matter undergoing Bjorken expansion. We find that the charge density correlations are given by a time integral over the history of the system, with the dominant contribution coming from the QCD crossover region where the change of susceptibility per entropy, chi T/s, is most significant. We study the rapidity and azimuthal angle dependence of the resulting charge balance function using a simple analytic model of heavy-ion collision evolution. Our results are in agreement with experimental measurements, indicating that hydrodynamic fluctuations contribute significantly to the measured charge correlations in high energy heavy-ion collisions. The sensitivity of the balance function to the value of the charge diffusion coefficient D allows us to estimate the typical value of this coefficient in the crossover region to be rather small, of the order of 1/(2pi T), characteristic of a strongly coupled plasma.

  15. Quantifying economic fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, H. Eugene; Nunes Amaral, Luis A.; Gabaix, Xavier; Gopikrishnan, Parameswaran; Plerou, Vasiliki

    2001-12-01

    This manuscript is a brief summary of a talk designed to address the question of whether two of the pillars of the field of phase transitions and critical phenomena-scale invariance and universality-can be useful in guiding research on interpreting empirical data on economic fluctuations. Using this conceptual framework as a guide, we empirically quantify the relation between trading activity-measured by the number of transactions N-and the price change G( t) for a given stock, over a time interval [ t, t+Δ t]. We relate the time-dependent standard deviation of price changes-volatility-to two microscopic quantities: the number of transactions N( t) in Δ t and the variance W2( t) of the price changes for all transactions in Δ t. We find that the long-ranged volatility correlations are largely due to those of N. We then argue that the tail-exponent of the distribution of N is insufficient to account for the tail-exponent of P{ G> x}. Since N and W display only weak inter-dependency, our results show that the fat tails of the distribution P{ G> x} arises from W. Finally, we review recent work on quantifying collective behavior among stocks by applying the conceptual framework of random matrix theory (RMT). RMT makes predictions for “universal” properties that do not depend on the interactions between the elements comprising the system, and deviations from RMT provide clues regarding system-specific properties. We compare the statistics of the cross-correlation matrix C-whose elements Cij are the correlation coefficients of price fluctuations of stock i and j-against a random matrix having the same symmetry properties. It is found that RMT methods can distinguish random and non-random parts of C. The non-random part of C which deviates from RMT results, provides information regarding genuine collective behavior among stocks. We also discuss results that are reminiscent of phase transitions in spin systems, where the divergent behavior of the response function at

  16. Primordial Fluctuations within Teleparallelism

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yi-Peng

    2011-01-01

    To study the primordial fluctuations for gravity within teleparallelism, we perform a 3+1 decomposition of the vierbein field which makes the metric tensor identical to the ADM formulation. The torsion scalar is differ by a total divergence from the Ricci scalar under this representation as a consistent result. Using the unitary gauge of the scalar field, we obtain the same quadratic actions for both scalar and tensor perturbations as the standard ones in the minimal torsion scalar coupling. When the same scenario is applied to the higher-order action, $f(T)$ gravity, we find that the scalar-tensor coupling in the Einstein frame becomes a total divergence. Consequently, the cosmological perturbations are the same for $f(T)$ and $f(R)$ gravity theories in the earlier universe although the behaviors of the late time cosmic acceleration are apparently different.

  17. Fluctuating multicomponent lattice Boltzmann model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardinelli, D; Sbragaglia, M; Biferale, L; Gross, M; Varnik, F

    2015-02-01

    Current implementations of fluctuating lattice Boltzmann equations (FLBEs) describe single component fluids. In this paper, a model based on the continuum kinetic Boltzmann equation for describing multicomponent fluids is extended to incorporate the effects of thermal fluctuations. The thus obtained fluctuating Boltzmann equation is first linearized to apply the theory of linear fluctuations, and expressions for the noise covariances are determined by invoking the fluctuation-dissipation theorem directly at the kinetic level. Crucial for our analysis is the projection of the Boltzmann equation onto the orthonormal Hermite basis. By integrating in space and time the fluctuating Boltzmann equation with a discrete number of velocities, the FLBE is obtained for both ideal and nonideal multicomponent fluids. Numerical simulations are specialized to the case where mean-field interactions are introduced on the lattice, indicating a proper thermalization of the system.

  18. Transport generated by dichotomous fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, J.; Czernik, T.; łuczka, J.

    1996-02-01

    Overdamped motion of Brownian particles in spatially periodic potentials and subjected to fluctuations modeled by asymmetric exponentially correlated two-state noise of zero mean value is considered. The probability current is presented in a closed form and analyzed in asymptotic regimes of very long and very short correlation times of the fluctuations. Explicit results are obtained for a piecewise linear potential. The role of correlations and temporal asymmetry of fluctuations is elucidated.

  19. Theory of slightly fluctuating ratchets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenbaum, V. M.; Shapochkina, I. V.; Lin, S. H.; Trakhtenberg, L. I.

    2017-04-01

    We consider a Brownian particle moving in a slightly fluctuating potential. Using the perturbation theory on small potential fluctuations, we derive a general analytical expression for the average particle velocity valid for both flashing and rocking ratchets with arbitrary, stochastic or deterministic, time dependence of potential energy fluctuations. The result is determined by the Green's function for diffusion in the time-independent part of the potential and by the features of correlations in the fluctuating part of the potential. The generality of the result allows describing complex ratchet systems with competing characteristic times; these systems are exemplified by the model of a Brownian photomotor with relaxation processes of finite duration.

  20. RAPID FLUCTUATIONS OF WATER MASER EMISSION IN VY CMa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhengXingwu; EugenioScaliseJr; HanFu

    1999-01-01

    The monitoring observations of the short- time variation of the water maser to-ward the supergiant star of VY CMa were carried out from August 26 through September 24 1993, using the 13.7 m telescope at the Qinghai station of the Purple

  1. Rapidity Correlation Structures from Causal Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gavin, Sean; Zin, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Viscous diffusion can broaden the rapidity dependence of two-particle transverse momentum fluctuations. Surprisingly, measurements at RHIC by the STAR collaboration demonstrate that this broadening is accompanied by the appearance of unanticipated structure in the rapidity distribution of these fluctuations in the most central collisions. Although a first order classical Navier-Stokes theory can roughly explain the rapidity broadening, it cannot explain the additional structure. We propose that the rapidity structure can be explained using the second order causal Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics with stochastic noise.

  2. Primordial fluctuations from nonlinear couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Calzetta, E A; Calzetta, Esteban A.; Gonorazky, Sonia

    1997-01-01

    We study the spectrum of primordial fluctuations in theories where the inflaton field is coupled to massless fields and/or to itself. Conformally invariant theories generically predict a scale invariant spectrum. Scales entering the theory through infrared divergences cause logarithmic corrections to the spectrum, tiltilng it towards the blue. We discuss in some detail wether these fluctuations are quantum or classical in nature.

  3. Fluctuation Relations for Molecular Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, David; Mallick, Kirone

    This review is focused on the application of specific fluctuation relations, such as the Gallavotti-Cohen relation, to ratchet models of a molecular motor. A special emphasis is placed on two-state models such as the flashing ratchet model. We derive the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation relation for these models and we discuss some of its implications.

  4. Fluctuations as stochastic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2008-04-01

    A notion of stochastic deformation is introduced and the corresponding algebraic deformation procedure is developed. This procedure is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables like deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). This method is demonstrated on diverse relativistic and nonrelativistic models with finite and infinite degrees of freedom. It is shown that under stochastic deformation the model of a nonrelativistic particle interacting with the electromagnetic field on a curved background passes into the stochastic model described by the Fokker-Planck equation with the diffusion tensor being the inverse metric tensor. The first stochastic correction to the Newton equations for this system is found. The Klein-Kramers equation is also derived as the stochastic deformation of a certain classical model. Relativistic generalizations of the Fokker-Planck and Klein-Kramers equations are obtained by applying the procedure of stochastic deformation to appropriate relativistic classical models. The analog of the Fokker-Planck equation associated with the stochastic Lorentz-Dirac equation is derived too. The stochastic deformation of the models of a free scalar field and an electromagnetic field is investigated. It turns out that in the latter case the obtained stochastic model describes a fluctuating electromagnetic field in a transparent medium.

  5. Memory and fitness optimization of bacteria under fluctuating environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Lambert

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria prudently regulate their metabolic phenotypes by sensing the availability of specific nutrients, expressing the required genes for their metabolism, and repressing them after specific metabolites are depleted. It is unclear, however, how genetic networks maintain and transmit phenotypic states between generations under rapidly fluctuating environments. By subjecting bacteria to fluctuating carbon sources (glucose and lactose using microfluidics, we discover two types of non-genetic memory in Escherichia coli and analyze their benefits. First, phenotypic memory conferred by transmission of stable intracellular lac proteins dramatically reduces lag phases under cyclical fluctuations with intermediate timescales (1-10 generations. Second, response memory, a hysteretic behavior in which gene expression persists after removal of its external inducer, enhances adaptation when environments fluctuate over short timescales (< 1 generation. Using a mathematical model we analyze the benefits of memory across environmental fluctuation timescales. We show that memory mechanisms provide an important class of survival strategies in biology that improve long-term fitness under fluctuating environments. These results can be used to understand how organisms adapt to fluctuating levels of nutrients, antibiotics, and other environmental stresses.

  6. Detection limit for rate fluctuations in inhomogeneous Poisson processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Toshiaki; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    Estimations of an underlying rate from data points are inevitably disturbed by the irregular occurrence of events. Proper estimation methods are designed to avoid overfitting by discounting the irregular occurrence of data, and to determine a constant rate from irregular data derived from a constant probability distribution. However, it can occur that rapid or small fluctuations in the underlying density are undetectable when the data are sparse. For an estimation method, the maximum degree of undetectable rate fluctuations is uniquely determined as a phase transition, when considering an infinitely long series of events drawn from a fluctuating density. In this study, we analytically examine an optimized histogram and a Bayesian rate estimator with respect to their detectability of rate fluctuation, and determine whether their detectable-undetectable phase transition points are given by an identical formula defining a degree of fluctuation in an underlying rate. In addition, we numerically examine the variational Bayes hidden Markov model in its detectability of rate fluctuation, and determine whether the numerically obtained transition point is comparable to those of the other two methods. Such consistency among these three principled methods suggests the presence of a theoretical limit for detecting rate fluctuations.

  7. Effects of phase transition induced density fluctuations on pulsar dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Bagchi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We show that density fluctuations during phase transitions in pulsar cores may have non-trivial effects on pulsar timings, and may also possibly account for glitches and anti-glitches. These density fluctuations invariably lead to non-zero off-diagonal components of the moment of inertia, leading to transient wobbling of star. Thus, accurate measurements of pulsar timing and intensity modulations (from wobbling may be used to identify the specific pattern of density fluctuations, hence the particular phase transition, occurring inside the pulsar core. Changes in quadrupole moment from rapidly evolving density fluctuations during the transition, with very short time scales, may provide a new source for gravitational waves.

  8. Nonequilibrium fluctuations in a resistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, N; Ciliberto, S

    2005-06-01

    In small systems where relevant energies are comparable to thermal agitation, fluctuations are of the order of average values. In systems in thermodynamical equilibrium, the variance of these fluctuations can be related to the dissipation constant in the system, exploiting the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. In nonequilibrium steady systems, fluctuations theorems (FT) additionally describe symmetry properties of the probability density functions (PDFs) of the fluctuations of injected and dissipated energies. We experimentally probe a model system: an electrical dipole driven out of equilibrium by a small constant current I, and show that FT are experimentally accessible and valid. Furthermore, we stress that FT can be used to measure the dissipated power P = R I2 in the system by just studying the PDFs' symmetries.

  9. Fluctuation of the Download Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Ding-Ding; LIV Jin-Gao; MA Yu-Gang

    2008-01-01

    The scaling behaviour of fluctuation for a download network we investigated a few years ago based upon Zhang's Econophysics web page is presented.A power law scaling,namely σ~α exists between the dispersion σ and average flux of the download rates.The fluctuation exponent α is neither 1/2 nor 1,which were claimed as two universal fluctuation classes in previous publication,while it varies from 1/2 to 1 with the time window in which the download data are accumulated.The crossover behaviour of fluctuation exponents can be qualitatively understood by the external driving fluctuation model for a small-size system or a network traffic model which suggests congestion as the origin.

  10. Quantum Fluctuations in Cosmology and How They Lead to a Multiverse

    CERN Document Server

    Guth, Alan H

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses density perturbations in inflationary models, offering a pedagogical description of how these perturbations are generated by quantum fluctuations in the early universe. A key feature of inflation is that that rapid expansion can stretch microscopic fluctuations to cosmological proportions. I discuss also another important conseqence of quantum fluctuations: the fact that almost all inflationary models become eternal, so that once inflation starts, it never stops.

  11. Density fluctuations in traffic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Yukawa, S

    1996-01-01

    Density fluctuations in traffic current are studied by computer simulations using the deterministic coupled map lattice model on a closed single-lane circuit. By calculating a power spectral density of temporal density fluctuations at a local section, we find a power-law behavior, \\sim 1/f^{1.8}, on the frequency f, in non-congested flow phase. The distribution of the headway distance h also shows the power law like \\sim 1/h^{3.0} at the same time. The power law fluctuations are destroyed by the occurence of the traffic jam.

  12. Mesoscopic Fluctuations in Stochastic Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Shiokawa, K

    2000-01-01

    Mesoscopic effects associated with wave propagation in spacetime with metric stochasticity are studied. We show that the scalar and spinor waves in a stochastic spacetime behave similarly to the electrons in a disordered system. Viewing this as the quantum transport problem, mesoscopic fluctuations in such a spacetime are discussed. The conductance and its fluctuations are expressed in terms of a nonlinear sigma model in the closed time path formalism. We show that the conductance fluctuations are universal, independent of the volume of the stochastic region and the amount of stochasticity.

  13. Understanding experimentally-observed fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2016-01-01

    We discuss two topics on the experimental measurements of fluctuation observables in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. First, we discuss the effects of the thermal blurring, i.e. the blurring effect arising from the experimental measurement of fluctuations in momentum space as a proxy of the thermal fluctuations defined in coordinate space, on higher order cumulants. Second, we discuss the effect of imperfect efficiency of detectors on the measurement of higher order cumulants. We derive effective formulas which can carry out the correction of this effect for higher order cumulants based on the binomial model.

  14. Fluctuation theorem: A critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek Mansour, M.; Baras, F.

    2017-10-01

    Fluctuation theorem for entropy production is revisited in the framework of stochastic processes. The applicability of the fluctuation theorem to physico-chemical systems and the resulting stochastic thermodynamics were analyzed. Some unexpected limitations are highlighted in the context of jump Markov processes. We have shown that these limitations handicap the ability of the resulting stochastic thermodynamics to correctly describe the state of non-equilibrium systems in terms of the thermodynamic properties of individual processes therein. Finally, we considered the case of diffusion processes and proved that the fluctuation theorem for entropy production becomes irrelevant at the stationary state in the case of one variable systems.

  15. How to observe fluctuating temperature?

    CERN Document Server

    Utyuzh, O V; Wlodarczyk, Z

    2001-01-01

    We provide arguments that event-by-event (EBE) analysis of multiparticle production data are ideal place to search for the possible fluctuation of temperature characterizing hadronizing source in thermodynamical approach.

  16. Local fluctuations in solution mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploetz, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    An extension of the traditional Kirkwood-Buff (KB) theory of solutions is outlined which provides additional fluctuating quantities that can be used to characterize and probe the behavior of solution mixtures. Particle-energy and energy-energy fluctuations for local regions of any multicomponent solution are expressed in terms of experimentally obtainable quantities, thereby supplementing the usual particle-particle fluctuations provided by the established KB inversion approach. The expressions are then used to analyze experimental data for pure water over a range of temperatures and pressures, a variety of pure liquids, and three binary solution mixtures – methanol and water, benzene and methanol, and aqueous sodium chloride. In addition to providing information on local properties of solutions it is argued that the particle-energy and energy-energy fluctuations can also be used to test and refine solute and solvent force fields for use in computer simulation studies. PMID:21806137

  17. Fluctuating attention in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrfelt, Randi; Aarsland, Dag; Janvin, Carmen

    2001-01-01

    great variability in performance in reactiontime tasks. Aiming to investigate fluctuation of attention in PD, we re- analysed data from a cue-target reactiontime task, specifically searching for differences in variability between patients and controls. The subjects included were a representative group...... a significant difference (pattention might be fluctuating on a moment to moment basis in PD. Some of the PD patients have also been tested with a choice reaction time...... task, shown by Walker et al. (2000) to be sensi- tive to fluctuation of cognition in DLB patients. Preliminary data-analysis indicate that PD patients also show considerable intra-individual variation in performance on this test. These findings suggest that fluctuating attention and cogni- tion...

  18. Decoherence induced by fluctuating boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    De Lorenci, V A

    2012-01-01

    The effects of fluctuating boundaries on a superposition state of a quantum particle in a box is studied. We consider a model in one space dimension in which the initial state is a coherent superposition of two energy eigenstates. The locations of the walls of the box are assumed to undergo small fluctuation with a Gaussian probability distribution. The spatial probability density of the particle contains an interference term, which is found to decay in time due to the boundary fluctuations. At late times, this term vanishes and the quantum coherence is lost. The system is now described by a density matrix rather than a pure quantum state.This model gives a simple illustration of how environment-induced decoherence can take place in quantum systems. It can also serve as an analog model for the effects of spacetime geometry fluctuations on quantum systems.

  19. Gaussian fluctuations in chaotic eigenstates

    CERN Document Server

    Srednicki, M A; Srednicki, Mark; Stiernelof, Frank

    1996-01-01

    We study the fluctuations that are predicted in the autocorrelation function of an energy eigenstate of a chaotic, two-dimensional billiard by the conjecture (due to Berry) that the eigenfunction is a gaussian random variable. We find an explicit formula for the root-mean-square amplitude of the expected fluctuations in the autocorrelation function. These fluctuations turn out to be O(\\hbar^{1/2}) in the small \\hbar (high energy) limit. For comparison, any corrections due to scars from isolated periodic orbits would also be O(\\hbar^{1/2}). The fluctuations take on a particularly simple form if the autocorrelation function is averaged over the direction of the separation vector. We compare our various predictions with recent numerical computations of Li and Robnik for the Robnik billiard, and find good agreement. We indicate how our results generalize to higher dimensions.

  20. Fluctuations and Instability in Sedimentation

    KAUST Repository

    Guazzelli, Élisabeth

    2011-01-21

    This review concentrates on the fluctuations of the velocities of sedimenting spheres, and on the structural instability of a suspension of settling fibers. For many years, theoretical estimates and numerical simulations predicted the fluctuations of the velocities of spheres to increase with the size of the container, whereas experiments found no such variation. Two ideas have increased our understanding. First, the correlation length of the velocity fluctuations was found experimentally to be 20 interparticle separations. Second, in dilute suspensions, a vertical variation in the concentration due to the spreading of the front with the clear fluid can inhibit the velocity fluctuations. In a very dilute regime, a homogeneous suspension of fibers suffers a spontaneous instability in which fast descending fiber-rich columns are separated by rising fiber-sparse columns. In a semidilute regime, the settling is hindered, more so than for spheres. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  1. Sectoral Shifts and Cyclical Fluctuations Sectoral Shifts and Cyclical Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Rogerson

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available Sectoral Shifts and Cyclical Fluctuations This paper studies a two sector real business cycle model in which the sectors experience different trend rates of growth and labor mobility is costly. Predictions are derived concerning the correlation between sectoral reallocation of workers and the cycle. This correlation may be positive or negative depending upon whether the growing sector displays larger or smaller fluctuations than the shrinking sector. The post- World War II period has witnessed two major patterns of sectoral change in industrialized countries: movement out of agriculture and movement out of the industrial sector. The model's basic prediction is shown to be consistent with the observed pattern of reallocation.

  2. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroney, O. J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  3. Kerr black hole thermodynamical fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavon, D.; Rubi, J. M.

    1985-04-01

    The near-equilibrium thermodynamical (TD) fluctuations of a massive rotating uncharged Kerr black hole immersed in a uniformly corotating radiation bath at its temperature are investigated theoretically, generalizing Schwarzschild-black-hole analysis of Pavon and Rubi(1983), based on Einstein fluctuation theory. The correlations for the energy and angular moment fluctuations and the second moments of the other TD parameters are obtained, and the generalized second law of black-hole TD and the Bekenstein (1975) interpretation of black-hole entropy are seen as functioning well in this case. A local-stability criterion and relation for TD equilibrium between the Kerr hole and its own radiation in the flat-space-time limit are derived, and a restriction between C and Lambda is deduced.

  4. Modeling fluctuations in scattered waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jakeman, E

    2006-01-01

    Fluctuations in scattered waves limit the performance of imaging and remote sensing systems that operate on all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. To better understand these fluctuations, Modeling Fluctuations in Scattered Waves provides a practical guide to the phenomenology, mathematics, and simulation of non-Gaussian noise models and discusses how they can be used to characterize the statistics of scattered waves.Through their discussion of mathematical models, the authors demonstrate the development of new sensing techniques as well as offer intelligent choices that can be made for system analysis. Using experimental results and numerical simulation, the book illustrates the properties and applications of these models. The first two chapters introduce statistical tools and the properties of Gaussian noise, including results on phase statistics. The following chapters describe Gaussian processes and the random walk model, address multiple scattering effects and propagation through an extended med...

  5. Fluctuation theorems for quantum processes

    CERN Document Server

    Albash, Tameem; Marvian, Milad; Zanardi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    We present fluctuation theorems and moment generating function equalities for generalized thermodynamic observables and quantum dynamics described by completely positive trace preserving (CPTP) maps, with and without feedback control. Our results include the quantum Jarzynski equality and Crooks fluctuation theorem, and clarify the special role played by the thermodynamic work and thermal equilibrium states in previous studies. We show that unitality replaces micro-reversibility as the condition for the physicality of the reverse process in our fluctuation theorems. We present an experimental application of our theory to the problem of extracting the system-bath coupling magnitude, which we do for a system of pairs of coupled superconducting flux qubits undergoing quantum annealing.

  6. Spectrum of Wind Power Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandi, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    Wind power fluctuations for an individual turbine and plant have been widely reported to follow the Kolmogorov spectrum of atmospheric turbulence; both vary with a fluctuation time scale τ as τ2 /3. Yet, this scaling has not been explained through turbulence theory. Using turbines as probes of turbulence, we show the τ2 /3 scaling results from a large scale influence of atmospheric turbulence. Owing to this long-range influence spanning 100s of kilometers, when power from geographically distributed wind plants is summed into aggregate power at the grid, fluctuations average (geographic smoothing) and their scaling steepens from τ2 /3→τ4 /3, beyond which further smoothing is not possible. Our analysis demonstrates grids have already reached this τ4 /3 spectral limit to geographic smoothing.

  7. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroney, O J E

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  8. Kaon fluctuations from lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn; Gunther, Jana; Parotto, Paolo; Pasztor, Attila; Vazquez, Israel Portillo; Ratti, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    We show that it is possible to isolate a set of kaon fluctuations in lattice QCD. By means of the Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) model, we calculate the actual kaon second-to-first fluctuation ratio, which receives contribution from primordial kaons and resonance decays, and show that it is very close to the one obtained for primordial kaons in the Boltzmann approximation. The latter only involves the strangeness and electric charge chemical potentials, which are functions of $T$ and $\\mu_B$ due to the experimental constraint on strangeness and electric charge, and can therefore be calculated on the lattice. This provides an unambiguous method to extract the kaon freeze-out temperature, by comparing the lattice results to the experimental values for the corresponding fluctuations.

  9. Fluctuations in Relativistic Causal Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Avdhesh; Mishra, Ananta P

    2013-01-01

    The formalism to calculate the hydrodynamics fluctuation using the quasi-stationary fluctuation theory of Onsager to the relativistic Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics is already known. In this work we calculate hydrodynamic fluctuations in relativistic causal theory of Muller, Israel and Stewart and other related causal hydrodynamic theories. We show that expressions for the Onsager coefficients and the correlation functions have form similar to the ones obtained by using Navier-Stokes equation. However, temporal evolution of the correlation functions obtained using MIS and the other causal theories can be significantly different than the correlation functions obtained using the Navier-Stokes equation. Finally, as an illustrative example, we explicitly plot the correlation functions obtained using the causal-hydrodynamics theories and compare them with correlation functions obtained by earlier authors using the expanding boost-invariant (Bjorken) flows.

  10. Quantum fluctuations in mesoscopic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, F.; Carollo, F.; Floreanini, R.; Narnhofer, H.

    2017-10-01

    Recent experimental results point to the existence of coherent quantum phenomena in systems made of a large number of particles, despite the fact that for many-body systems the presence of decoherence is hardly negligible and emerging classicality is expected. This behaviour hinges on collective observables, named quantum fluctuations, that retain a quantum character even in the thermodynamic limit: they provide useful tools for studying properties of many-body systems at the mesoscopic level, in-between the quantum microscopic scale and the classical macroscopic one. We herein present the general theory of quantum fluctuations in mesoscopic systems, and study their dynamics in a quantum open system setting, taking into account the unavoidable effects of dissipation and noise induced by the external environment. As in the case of microscopic systems, decoherence is not always the only dominating effect at the mesoscopic scale: certain types of environment can provide means for entangling collective fluctuations through a purely noisy mechanism.

  11. Fluctuation scaling in point processes

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, Shinsuke

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuation scaling has universally been observed in a wide variety of phenomena. For time series describing sequences of events, it can be expressed as power function relationship between the variance and the mean of either the inter-event interval or counting statistics, depending on the measurement variables. In this article, fluctuation scaling for series of events is formulated for the first time, in which the scaling exponents in the inter-event interval and counting statistics are related. It is also shown that a simple mechanism consisting of first-passage time to a threshold for Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes explains fluctuation scaling with various exponents depending on the subthreshold dynamics. A possible implication of the results is discussed in terms of characterizing `intrinsic' variability of neuronal discharges.

  12. Variable diffusion in stock market fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Jia-Chen; Chen, Lijian; Falcon, Liberty; McCauley, Joseph L.; Gunaratne, Gemunu H.

    2015-02-01

    We analyze intraday fluctuations in several stock indices to investigate the underlying stochastic processes using techniques appropriate for processes with nonstationary increments. The five most actively traded stocks each contains two time intervals during the day where the variance of increments can be fit by power law scaling in time. The fluctuations in return within these intervals follow asymptotic bi-exponential distributions. The autocorrelation function for increments vanishes rapidly, but decays slowly for absolute and squared increments. Based on these results, we propose an intraday stochastic model with linear variable diffusion coefficient as a lowest order approximation to the real dynamics of financial markets, and to test the effects of time averaging techniques typically used for financial time series analysis. We find that our model replicates major stylized facts associated with empirical financial time series. We also find that ensemble averaging techniques can be used to identify the underlying dynamics correctly, whereas time averages fail in this task. Our work indicates that ensemble average approaches will yield new insight into the study of financial markets' dynamics. Our proposed model also provides new insight into the modeling of financial markets dynamics in microscopic time scales.

  13. Merits and qualms of work fluctuations in classical fluctuation theorems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jiawen; Tan, Alvis Mazon; Hänggi, Peter; Gong, Jiangbin

    2017-01-01

    Work is one of the most basic notions in statistical mechanics, with work fluctuation theorems being one central topic in nanoscale thermodynamics. With Hamiltonian chaos commonly thought to provide a foundation for classical statistical mechanics, here we present general salient results regarding how (classical) Hamiltonian chaos generically impacts on nonequilibrium work fluctuations. For isolated chaotic systems prepared with a microcanonical distribution, work fluctuations are minimized and vanish altogether in adiabatic work protocols. For isolated chaotic systems prepared at an initial canonical distribution at inverse temperature β , work fluctuations depicted by the variance of e-β W are also minimized by adiabatic work protocols. This general result indicates that, if the variance of e-β W diverges for an adiabatic work protocol, it diverges for all nonadiabatic work protocols sharing the same initial and final Hamiltonians. Such divergence is hence not an isolated event and thus greatly impacts on the efficiency of using Jarzynski's equality to simulate free-energy differences. Theoretical results are illustrated in a Sinai model. Our general insights shall boost studies in nanoscale thermodynamics and are of fundamental importance in designing useful work protocols.

  14. Einstein equations with fluctuating volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Quevedo, Hernando

    2017-07-01

    We develop a simple model to study classical fields on the background of a fluctuating spacetime volume. It is applied to formulate the stochastic Einstein equations with a perfect-fluid source. We investigate the particular case of a stochastic Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker cosmology, and show that the resulting field equations can lead to solutions which avoid the initial big bang singularity. By interpreting the fluctuations as the result of the presence of a quantum spacetime, we conclude that classical singularities can be avoided even within a stochastic model that include quantum effects in a very simple manner.

  15. Neutron fluctuation measurements on TFTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidbrink, W. W.

    1986-08-01

    Measurements of fluctuations in the neutron yield are made on the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) with plastic scintillators. Light from the scintillators is coupled through acrylic rods or fiber-optic cables to photomultipliers operated in current mode. Discrimination against hard x rays is accomplished through comparison with the signal from a ZnS(6Li) scintillator. These measurements are useful in studies of deuterium pellet deposition, of the acceleration of beam ions during major radial compression, and of MHD instabilities. Techniques for measuring the neutral beam density profile and Qequivdt using neutron fluctuation measurements during pellet injection also have been proposed.

  16. Fluctuation Analysis of Human Electroencephalogram

    CERN Document Server

    Hwa, R C; Hwa, Rudolph C.; Ferree, Thomas C.

    2001-01-01

    The scaling behaviors of the human electroencephalogram (EEG) time series are studied using detrended fluctuation analysis. Two scaling regions are found in nearly every channel for all subjects examined. The scatter plot of the scaling exponents for all channels (up to 129) reveals the complicated structure of a subject's brain activity. Moment analyses are performed to extract the gross features of all the scaling exponents, and another universal scaling behavior is identified. A one-parameter description is found to characterize the fluctuation properties of the nonlinear behaviors of the brain dynamics.

  17. Consistency of detrended fluctuation analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Løvsletten, Ola

    2016-01-01

    The scaling function $F(s)$ in detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) scales as $F(s)\\sim s^{H}$ for stochastic processes with Hurst exponents $H$. We prove this scaling law for both stationary stochastic processes with $01$. As a final application of the new theory, we present an estimator $\\hat F(s)$ that can handle missing data in regularly sampled time series without the need for interpolation schemes. Under mild regularity conditions, $\\hat F(s)$ is equal in expectation to the fluctuation function $F(s)$ in the gap-free case.

  18. Testing the Propagating Fluctuations Model with a Long, Global Accretion Disk Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Hogg, J Drew

    2015-01-01

    The broad-band variability of many accreting systems displays characteristic structure; log-normal flux distributions, RMS-flux relations, and long inter-band lags. These characteristics are usually interpreted as inward propagating fluctuations in an accretion disk driven by stochasticity of the angular momentum transport mechanism. We present the first analysis of propagating fluctuations in a long-duration, high-resolution, global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of a geometrically-thin ($h/r\\approx0.1$) accretion disk around a black hole. While the dynamical-timescale turbulent fluctuations in the Maxwell stresses are too rapid to drive radially-coherent fluctuations in the accretion rate, we find that the low-frequency quasi-periodic dynamo action introduces low-frequency fluctuations in the Maxwell stresses which then drive the propagating fluctuations. Examining both the mass accretion rate and emission proxies, we recover log-normality, linear RMS-flux relations, and radial coher...

  19. Firm default and aggregate fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobson, Tor; Linde, Jesper; Roszbach, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the relationship between macroeconomic fluctuations and corporate defaults while conditioning on industry affiliation and an extensive set of firm-specific factors. By using a panel data set for virtually all incorporated Swedish businesses over 1990-2009, a period which includes

  20. Fluctuations in Overlapping Generations Economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede, Mich

    . The approach to existence of endogenous fluctuations is basic in the sense that the prime ingredients are the implicit function theorem and linear algebra. Moreover the approach is applied to show that for an open and dense set of utility functions there exist endowment vectors such that sunspot equilibria...

  1. Chaotic dynamics, fluctuations, nonequilibrium ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallavotti, Giovanni

    1998-06-01

    The ideas and the conceptual steps leading from the ergodic hypothesis for equilibrium statistical mechanics to the chaotic hypothesis for equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics are illustrated. The fluctuation theorem linear law and universal slope prediction for reversible systems is briefly derived. Applications to fluids are briefly alluded to. (c) 1998 American Institute of Physics.

  2. A Quasi-Periodic Solar Radio Fluctuation at Microwave Band

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Fu-Ying; HUANG Guang-Li; WU Hong-Ao

    2005-01-01

    @@ A rare but interesting solar radio fine structure, quasi-periodic fluctuations, on 25 August 1999 was observed at microwave band for the first time. They fluctuated initially at a nearly stable frequency level then at a reverse drift component up to 5.49 GHz. The individual fluctuation consists of a bi-directional drift component. The features are characterized by narrow bandwidth of △ f / f ≤ 3%, quasi-periodicity of~ 100 ms as well as a slowly reverse and a rapidly normal drift rates on the bi-directional drift component. The associated data of the Yohkoh soft and hard x-ray telescope and Nobeyama radio heliograph at 17 GHz showed that there are several bright spots (i.e. inhomogeneities) along the soft x-ray loop, and the locations of both radio and soft x-ray sources are closely consistent. Therefore, the fluctuations are most likely caused by the inhomogeneities within a flare loop.Based on the two-component atmospheric model, we suggest a three-component atmospheric model with large sc ale length λ and small scale lengths λ1 and λ2 to describe equilibrium atmosphere and inhomogeneity. With the beam model, the characters of fluctuations may be interpreted reasonably by the quasi-equidistant inhomogeneity along a flare loop.

  3. Universal Axial Fluctuations in Optical Tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, Marco; Ritort, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Optical tweezers allow the measurement of fluctuations at the nano-scale, in particular fluctuations in the end-to-end distance in single molecules. Fluctuation spectra can yield valuable information, but they can easily be contaminated by instrumental effects. We identify axial fluctuations, i.e. fluctuations of the trapped beads in the direction of light propagation, as one of these instrumental effects. Remarkably, axial fluctuations occur on a characteristic timescale similar to that of conformational (folding) transitions, which may lead to misinterpretation of the experimental results. We show that a precise measurement of the effect of force on both axial and conformational fluctuations is crucial to disentangle them. Our results on axial fluctuations are captured by a simple and general formula valid for all optical tweezers setups and provide experimentalists with a general strategy to distinguish axial fluctuations from conformational transitions.

  4. Dissipative Dynamics of Quantum Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Benatti, F; Floreanini, R

    2015-01-01

    One way to look for complex behaviours in many-body quantum systems is to let the number $N$ of degrees of freedom become large and focus upon collective observables. Mean-field quantities scaling as $1/N$ tend to commute, whence complexity at the quantum level can only be inherited from complexity at the classical level. Instead, fluctuations of microscopic observables scale as $1/\\sqrt{N}$ and exhibit collective Bosonic features, typical of a mesoscopic regime half-way between the quantum one at the microscopic level and the classical one at the level of macroscopic averages. Here, we consider the mesoscopic behaviour emerging from an infinite quantum spin chain undergoing a microscopic dissipative, irreversible dynamics and from global states without long-range correlations and invariant under lattice translations and dynamics. We show that, from the fluctuations of one site spin observables whose linear span is mapped into itself by the dynamics, there emerge bosonic operators obeying a mesoscopic dissipa...

  5. Thermal fluctuations in loop cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, J; Magueijo, Joao; Singh, Parampreet

    2007-01-01

    Quantum gravitational effects in loop quantum cosmology lead to a resolution of the initial singularity and have the potential to solve the horizon problem and generate a quasi scale-invariant spectrum of density fluctuations. We consider loop modifications to the behavior of the inverse scale factor below a critical scale in closed models and assume a purely thermal origin for the fluctuations. We show that the no-go results for scale invariance in classical thermal models can be evaded even if we just consider modifications to the background (zeroth order) gravitational dynamics. Since a complete and systematic treatment of the perturbed Einstein equations in loop cosmology is still lacking, we simply parameterize their expected modifications. These change quantitatively, but not qualitatively, our conclusions. We thus urge the community to more fully work out this complex aspect of loop cosmology, since the full picture would not only fix the free parameters of the theory, but also provide a model for a no...

  6. Algorithm refinement for fluctuating hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Sarah A.; Bell, John B.; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2007-07-03

    This paper introduces an adaptive mesh and algorithmrefinement method for fluctuating hydrodynamics. This particle-continuumhybrid simulates the dynamics of a compressible fluid with thermalfluctuations. The particle algorithm is direct simulation Monte Carlo(DSMC), a molecular-level scheme based on the Boltzmann equation. Thecontinuum algorithm is based on the Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes (LLNS)equations, which incorporate thermal fluctuations into macroscopichydrodynamics by using stochastic fluxes. It uses a recently-developedsolver for LLNS, based on third-order Runge-Kutta. We present numericaltests of systems in and out of equilibrium, including time-dependentsystems, and demonstrate dynamic adaptive refinement by the computationof a moving shock wave. Mean system behavior and second moment statisticsof our simulations match theoretical values and benchmarks well. We findthat particular attention should be paid to the spectrum of the flux atthe interface between the particle and continuum methods, specificallyfor the non-hydrodynamic (kinetic) time scales.

  7. Cyclical Fluctuations in Workplace Accidents

    OpenAIRE

    Boone, J.; J. C. VAN OURS

    2002-01-01

    This Paper presents a theory and an empirical investigation on cyclical fluctuations in workplace accidents. The theory is based on the idea that reporting an accident dents the reputation of a worker and raises the probability that he is fired. Therefore a country with a high or an increasing unemployment rate has a low (reported) workplace accident rate. The empirical investigation concerns workplace accidents in OECD countries. The analysis confirms that workplace accident rates are invers...

  8. Molecular fluctuation in living cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐孝威

    1997-01-01

    The concept of molecular fluctuation in living cells is introduced. Many apparently different experi-mental facts in living cells, including the velocity non-uniformity of organelle movement, the saltatory movement of transport vesicles in axoplasmic transport, the chromosome oscillation during metaphase in mitosis and the pauses in the chromosome movement during anaphase are explained using a unified viewpoint. A method of determination of average number of the attached motor protein molecules from the experimental data is also proposed.

  9. Random numbers from vacuum fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yicheng; Chng, Brenda; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2016-07-01

    We implement a quantum random number generator based on a balanced homodyne measurement of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The digitized signal is directly processed with a fast randomness extraction scheme based on a linear feedback shift register. The random bit stream is continuously read in a computer at a rate of about 480 Mbit/s and passes an extended test suite for random numbers.

  10. Chemical Measurement and Fluctuation Scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Quentin S

    2016-12-20

    Fluctuation scaling reports on all processes producing a data set. Some fluctuation scaling relationships, such as the Horwitz curve, follow exponential dispersion models which have useful properties. The mean-variance method applied to Poisson distributed data is a special case of these properties allowing the gain of a system to be measured. Here, a general method is described for investigating gain (G), dispersion (β), and process (α) in any system whose fluctuation scaling follows a simple exponential dispersion model, a segmented exponential dispersion model, or complex scaling following such a model locally. When gain and dispersion cannot be obtained directly, relative parameters, GR and βR, may be used. The method was demonstrated on data sets conforming to simple, segmented, and complex scaling. These included mass, fluorescence intensity, and absorbance measurements and specifications for classes of calibration weights. Changes in gain, dispersion, and process were observed in the scaling of these data sets in response to instrument parameters, photon fluxes, mathematical processing, and calibration weight class. The process parameter which limits the type of statistical process that can be invoked to explain a data set typically exhibited 0 4 possible. With two exceptions, calibration weight class definitions only affected β. Adjusting photomultiplier voltage while measuring fluorescence intensity changed all three parameters (0 < α < 0.8; 0 < βR < 3; 0 < GR < 4.1). The method provides a framework for calibrating and interpreting uncertainty in chemical measurement allowing robust comparison of specific instruments, conditions, and methods.

  11. Fluctuating hydrodynamics for ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Wickham, Logan; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos

    2017-04-01

    We present a mean-field fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) method for studying the structural and transport properties of ionic liquids in bulk and near electrified surfaces. The free energy of the system consists of two competing terms: (1) a Landau-Lifshitz functional that models the spontaneous separation of the ionic groups, and (2) the standard mean-field electrostatic interaction between the ions in the liquid. The numerical approach used to solve the resulting FHD-Poisson equations is very efficient and models thermal fluctuations with remarkable accuracy. Such density fluctuations are sufficiently strong to excite the experimentally observed spontaneous formation of liquid nano-domains. Statistical analysis of our simulations provides quantitative information about the properties of ionic liquids, such as the mixing quality, stability, and the size of the nano-domains. Our model, thus, can be adequately parameterized by directly comparing our prediction with experimental measurements and all-atom simulations. Conclusively, this work can serve as a practical mathematical tool for testing various theories and designing more efficient mixtures of ionic liquids.

  12. Consistency of detrended fluctuation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvsletten, O.

    2017-07-01

    The scaling function F (s ) in detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) scales as F (s ) ˜sH for stochastic processes with Hurst exponent H . This scaling law is proven for stationary stochastic processes with 0 law) autocorrelation function (ACF) scales as ˜s1 /2 . It is also demonstrated that the fluctuation function in DFA is equal in expectation to (i) a weighted sum of the ACF and (ii) a weighted sum of the second-order structure function. These results enable us to compute the exact finite-size bias for signals that are scaling and to employ DFA in a meaningful sense for signals that do not exhibit power-law statistics. The usefulness is illustrated by examples where it is demonstrated that a previous suggested modified DFA will increase the bias for signals with Hurst exponents 1 fluctuation function F (s ) in the gap-free case.

  13. Classical enhancement of quantum vacuum fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    De Lorenci, V A

    2016-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for the enhancement of vacuum fluctuations by means of a classical field. The basic idea is that if an observable quantity depends quadratically upon a quantum field, such as the electric field, then the application of a classical field produces a cross term between the classical and quantum fields. This cross term may be significantly larger than the purely quantum part, but also undergoes fluctuations driven by the quantum field. We illustrate this effect in a model for lightcone fluctuations involving pulses in a nonlinear dielectric. Vacuum electric field fluctuations produce fluctuations in the speed of a probe pulse, and form an analog model for quantum gravity effects. If the material has a nonzero third-order susceptibility, then the fractional light speed fluctuations are proportional to the square of the fluctuating electric field. Hence the application of a classical electric field can enhance the speed fluctuations. We give an example where this enhancement can be an increas...

  14. Correlated interaction fluctuations in photosynthetic complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Vlaming, Sebastiaan M

    2011-01-01

    The functioning and efficiency of natural photosynthetic complexes is strongly influenced by their embedding in a noisy protein environment, which can even serve to enhance the transport efficiency. Interactions with the environment induce fluctuations of the transition energies of and interactions between the chlorophyll molecules, and due to the fact that different fluctuations will partially be caused by the same environmental factors, correlations between the various fluctuations will occur. We argue that fluctuations of the interactions should in general not be neglected, as these have a considerable impact on population transfer rates, decoherence rates and the efficiency of photosynthetic complexes. Furthermore, while correlations between transition energy fluctuations have been studied, we provide the first quantitative study of the effect of correlations between interaction fluctuations and transition energy fluctuations, and of correlations between the various interaction fluctuations. It is shown t...

  15. Predicting growth fluctuation in network economy

    CERN Document Server

    Maeno, Yoshiharu

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a method to predict the growth fluctuation of firms interdependent in a network economy. The risk of downward growth fluctuation of firms is calculated from the statistics on Japanese industry.

  16. Fluctuation and dissipation in liquid crystal electroconvection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldburg, Walter I.; Goldschmidt, Yadin Y.; Kellay, Hamid

    2002-11-01

    The power dissipation P( t) was measured in a liquid crystal (MBBA) driven by an ac voltage into the chaotic electroconvective state. In that state, the power fluctuates about its mean value . The quantity measured, and compared with the fluctuation theorem of Gallavotti and Cohen, is the dimensionless standard deviation of the fluctuations, σP/.

  17. Fluctuations of the unruh temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Demers, J G

    1994-01-01

    Using the influence functional formalism, the problem of an accelerating detector in the presence of a scalar field in its ground state is considered in Minkowski space. As is known since the work of Unruh, to a quantum mechanical detector following a definite, classical acceleration, the field appears to be thermally excited. We relax the requirement of perfect classicality for the trajectory and substitute it with one of {\\it derived} classicality through the criteria of decoherence. The ensuing fluctuations in temperature are then related with the time and the amplitude of excitation in the detector's internal degree of freedom.

  18. Fluctuations in some climate parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Erlykin, A D; Wolfendale, A W; 10.1016/j.jastp.2011.01.021

    2011-01-01

    There is argument as to the extent to which there has been an increase over the past few decades in the frequency of the extremes of climatic parameters, such as temperature, storminess, precipitation, etc, an obvious point being that Global Warming might be responsible. Here we report results on those parameters of which we have had experience during the last few years: Global surface temperature, Cloud Cover and the MODIS Liquid Cloud Fraction. In no case we have found indications that fluctuations of these parameters have increased with time.

  19. Simulation of nanoscale density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Howard; Bowles, Richard K.

    2000-11-01

    Problems associated with the simulation of density fluctuations of limited breadth in a small cell are exposed and studied. The fluctuations are viewed as "physical clusters" of the type that might appear in nucleation processes and related phenomena. One of the most important features of the study stems from the fact that the simulation of a small heterogeneity in a macroscopic system presents problems that do not occur in the simulation of a bulk homogeneous property of the system. For example, once having simulated the probability of appearance of the fluctuation in a small cell, how is that result to be "mapped" onto the macrosystem in order to specify the equilibrium number of such fluctuations in that system? This problem is closely associated with the proper separation of the translational and internal degrees of freedom of the system, and has arisen in a number of fields, including the theory of nucleation. There are other problems associated with exponential dependence of cluster probability on the work of formation of the cluster, and also with rareness of some important clusters. In the latter case, simulative "umbrella sampling" does not always solve the entire problem. The present study is confined to clusters that appear in rarefied gases. Such systems are important in a number of scenarios, including nucleation processes. Several cluster models are considered including those consisting of molecules confined to a "container" of fixed volume and those constructed on the center of mass of the cluster. Connections between them are derived and rigorous solutions to the mapping problem are derived. Quantitative measures for the accuracy of approximate solutions, applied to cases in which the cluster is compact, are provided and exact solutions are provided even for the noncompact case. Some surprising results emerge from the study, among which is the fact that a cluster whose location is determined by one of its molecules, does not always have a

  20. Fluctuation modes of nanoconfined DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpusenko, Alena; Carpenter, Joshua H; Zhou, Chunda; Lim, Shuang Fang; Pan, Junhan; Riehn, Robert

    2012-01-15

    We report an experimental investigation of the magnitude of length and density fluctuations in DNA that has been stretched in nanofluidic channels. We find that the experimental data can be described using a one-dimensional overdamped oscillator chain with nonzero equilibrium spring length and that a chain of discrete oscillators yields a better description than a continuous chain. We speculate that the scale of these discrete oscillators coincides with the scale at which the finite extensibility of the polymer manifests itself. We discuss how the measurement process influences the apparent measured dynamic properties, and outline requirements for the recovery of true physical quantities.

  1. Critical swelling of fluctuating capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Haim; Haleva, Emir

    2009-03-01

    In many natural transport processes the solute molecules to be transported are encapsulated in semipermeable, flexible membrane vesicles of micron size. We study the swelling of such fluctuating capsules, as the number of encapsulated particles is increased, or the concentration of the outer solution is decreased. The approach to the maximum volume-to-area ratio and the associated buildup of membrane tension involve a continuous phase transition and follow universal scaling laws. The criticality and its features are model-independent, arising solely from the interplay between volume and surface degrees of freedom.ootnotetextE. Haleva and H. Diamant, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 078104 (2008).

  2. An objective fluctuation score for Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm K Horne

    Full Text Available Establishing the presence and severity of fluctuations is important in managing Parkinson's Disease yet there is no reliable, objective means of doing this. In this study we have evaluated a Fluctuation Score derived from variations in dyskinesia and bradykinesia scores produced by an accelerometry based system.The Fluctuation Score was produced by summing the interquartile range of bradykinesia scores and dyskinesia scores produced every 2 minutes between 0900-1800 for at least 6 days by the accelerometry based system and expressing it as an algorithm.This Score could distinguish between fluctuating and non-fluctuating patients with high sensitivity and selectivity and was significant lower following activation of deep brain stimulators. The scores following deep brain stimulation lay in a band just above the score separating fluctuators from non-fluctuators, suggesting a range representing adequate motor control. When compared with control subjects the score of newly diagnosed patients show a loss of fluctuation with onset of PD. The score was calculated in subjects whose duration of disease was known and this showed that newly diagnosed patients soon develop higher scores which either fall under or within the range representing adequate motor control or instead go on to develop more severe fluctuations.The Fluctuation Score described here promises to be a useful tool for identifying patients whose fluctuations are progressing and may require therapeutic changes. It also shows promise as a useful research tool. Further studies are required to more accurately identify therapeutic targets and ranges.

  3. Statistics of Multiscale Fluctuations in Macromolecular Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Yukalov, V I

    2012-01-01

    An approach is suggested for treating multiscale fluctuations in macromolecular systems. The emphasis is on the statistical properties of such fluctuations. The approach is illustrated by a macromolecular system with mesoscopic fluctuations between the states of atomic orbitals. Strong-orbital and weak-orbital couplings fluctuationally arise, being multiscale in space and time. Statistical properties of the system are obtained by averaging over the multiscale fluctuations. The existence of such multiscale fluctuations causes phase transitions between strong-coupling and weak-coupling states. These transitions are connected with structure and size transformations of macromolecules. An approach for treating density and size multiscale fluctuations by means of classical statistical mechanics is also advanced.

  4. Quantum Fluctuations Of The Stress Tensor

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, C

    2002-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations of the stress tensor are important in many branches of physics, including the study of the validity of semiclassical gravity and the backreaction problem in stochastic semiclassical gravity. The geometry fluctuations induced by stress tensor fluctuations are important to understand quantum gravity and the problem of lightcone fluctuations. Stress tensor fluctuations also hold the key to understand fundamental physical effects like quantum fluctuations of radiation pressure, and that is crucial to the sensitivity of interferometers and the limitations on the detection of gravitational waves. Even the wave-particle duality of light can be better understood by the study of quantum fluctuations of thermal radiation. It is well known in quantum field theory that the expectation value of the energy density, which contains quadratic field operators (e.g. E2 and B2 in the electromagnatic field case), is divergent and can be renormalized simply by normal ordering, which is subtracting out the vac...

  5. Transverse Momentum Fluctuations in Nuclear Collisions at 158 AGeV

    CERN Document Server

    Anticic, T.; Barna, D.; Bartke, J.; Behler, M.; Betev, L.; Bialkowska, H.; Billmeier, A.; Blume, C.; Boimska, B.; Botje, M.; Bracinik, J.; Bramm, R.; Brun, R.; Buncic, P.; Cerny, V.; Christakoglou, P.; Chvala, O.; Cramer, J.G.; Csato, P.; Darmenov, N.; Dimitrov, A.; Dinkelaker, P.; Eckardt, V.; Filip, P.; Flierl, D.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, P.; Freund, P.; Friese, V.; Gal, J.; Gazdzicki, M.; Georgopoulos, G.; Gladysz, E.; Hegyi, S.; Hohne, C.; Kadija, K.; Karev, A.; Kolesnikov, V.I.; Kollegger, T.; Korus, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kraus, I.; Kreps, M.; van Leeuwen, M.; Levai, P.; Litov, L.; Makariev, M.; Malakhov, A.I.; Markert, C.; Mateev, M.; Mayes, B.W.; Melkumov, G.L.; Meurer, C.; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M.; Molnar, J.; Mrowczynski, S.; Palla, G.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Panayotov, D.; Perl, K.; Petridis, A.; Pikna, M.; Pinsky, Lawrence S.; Puhlhofer, F.; Reid, J.G.; Renfordt, R.; Retyk, W.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rybczynski, M.; Rybicki, A.; Sandoval, A.; Sann, H.; Schmitz, N.; Seyboth, P.; Sikler, F.; Sitar, B.; Skrzypczak, E.; Stefanek, G.; Stock, R.; Strobele, H.; Susa, T.; Szentpetery, I.; Sziklai, J.; Trainor, T.A.; Varga, D.; Vassiliou, M.; Veres, G.I.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vranic, D.; Wetzler, A.; Wlodarczyk, Z.; Yoo, I.K.; Zaranek, J.; Zimanyi, J.

    2004-01-01

    Results are presented on event-by-event fluctuations in transverse momentum of charged particles, produced at forward rapidities in p+p, C+C, Si+Si and Pb+Pb collisions at 158 AGeV. Three different characteristics are discussed: the average transverse momentum of the event, the Phi_pT fluctuation measure and two-particle transverse momentum correlations. In the kinematic region explored, the dynamical fluctuations are found to be small. However, a significant system size dependence of Phi_pT is observed, with the largest value measured in peripheral Pb+Pb interactions. The data are compared with predictions of several models.

  6. Reversible Diffusion by Thermal Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donev, Aleksandar; Fai, Thomas G.; vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    A model for diffusion in liquids that couples the dynamics of tracer particles to a fluctuating Stokes equation for the fluid is investigated in the limit of large Schmidt number. In this limit, the concentration of tracers is shown to satisfy a closed-form stochastic advection-diffusion equation that is used to investigate the collective diffusion of hydrodynamically-correlated tracers through a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian numerical methods. This analysis indicates that transport in liquids is quite distinct from the traditional Fickian picture of diffusion. While the ensemble-averaged concentration follows Fick's law with a diffusion coefficient that obeys the Stokes-Einstein relation, each instance of the diffusive mixing process exhibits long-ranged giant fluctuations around its average behavior. We construct a class of mesoscopic models for diffusion in liquids at different observation scales in which the renormalized diffusion coefficient depends on this scale. This indicates that the Fickian diffusion coefficient in liquids is not a material constant, but rather, changes with the scale at which experimental measurements are performed.

  7. Currency speculation and dollar fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. SCHULMEISTER

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study the reasons behind the wide fluctuations of the dollar exchange rate following the breakdown of the Bretton Woods system, for the most part unexplained by the prevailing exchange rate theories, are explored. The author investigates the exchange rate between the two most traded currencies, the dollar and the deutschemark, from 1973 to 1988. In the first part, the pattern of the daily exchange rate movements is examined to show that a sequence of upward and downward trends interrupted by non-directional movements is typical of exchange rate dynamics in the short run. This pattern is systemically exploited through currency speculation, particularly through the use of “technical analysis”. In the second part, the author focuses on the medium-term, arguing that fluctuations can be explained as the result of interacting disequilibria in the goods and asset markets. Although currency speculation has been systemically profitable for most currencies, it should be considered to be destabilising since the sequence of price runs caused large and persistent deviations of exchange rates from their equilibrium values (purchasing power parity.  

  8. Currency speculation and dollar fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Schulmeister

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study the reasons behind the wide fluctuations of the dollar exchange rate following the breakdown of the Bretton Woods system, for the most part unexplained by the prevailing exchange rate theories, are explored. To do so, the author investigates the exchange rate between the two most traded currencies, the dollar and the deutschemark, from 1973 to 1988. In the first part, the pattern of the daily exchange rate movements is examined to show that a sequence of upward and downward trends interrupted by non-directional movements is typical of exchange rate dynamics in the short run. Moreover, this pattern is systemically exploited through currency speculation, particularly through the use of “technical analysis”. In the second part, the author focuses on the medium-term, arguing that fluctuations can be explained as the result of interacting disequilibria in the goods and asset markets. Although currency speculation has been systemically profitable for most currencies, it should be considered to be destabilizing since the sequence of price runs caused large and persistent deviations of exchange rates from their equilibrium values (purchasing power parity.

  9. Influence of Signal and Noise on Statistical Fluctuation of Single-Mode Laser System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Da-Hai; CHENG Qing-Hua; CAO Li; WU Da-Jin

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of calculating the steady-state mean normalized intensity fluctuation of a signal-mode laser system driven by both colored pump noise with signal modulation and the quantum noise with cross-correlation between its real and imaginary parts, we analyze the influence of modulation signal, noise, and its correlation form on the statistical fluctuation of the laser system. We have found that when the amplitude of modulation signal weakens and its frequency quickens, the statistical fluctuation will reduce rapidly. The statistical fluctuation of the laser system can be restrained by reducing the intensity of pump noise and quantum noise. Moreover, with prolonging of colored cross-correlation time, the statistical fluctuation of laser system experiences a repeated changing process, that is, from decreasing to augmenting,then to decreasing, and finally to augmenting again. With the decreasing of the value of cross-correlation coefficient, the statistical fluctuation will decrease too. When the cross-correlation form between the real part and imaginary part of quantum noise is zero correlation, the statistical fluctuation of laser system has a minimum. Compared with the influence of intensity of pump noise, the influence of intensity of quantum noise on the statistical fluctuation is smaller.

  10. Symmetries in fluctuations far from equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Pablo I; Pérez-Espigares, Carlos; del Pozo, Jesús J; Garrido, Pedro L

    2011-05-10

    Fluctuations arise universally in nature as a reflection of the discrete microscopic world at the macroscopic level. Despite their apparent noisy origin, fluctuations encode fundamental aspects of the physics of the system at hand, crucial to understand irreversibility and nonequilibrium behavior. To sustain a given fluctuation, a system traverses a precise optimal path in phase space. Here we show that by demanding invariance of optimal paths under symmetry transformations, new and general fluctuation relations valid arbitrarily far from equilibrium are unveiled. This opens an unexplored route toward a deeper understanding of nonequilibrium physics by bringing symmetry principles to the realm of fluctuations. We illustrate this concept studying symmetries of the current distribution out of equilibrium. In particular we derive an isometric fluctuation relation that links in a strikingly simple manner the probabilities of any pair of isometric current fluctuations. This relation, which results from the time-reversibility of the dynamics, includes as a particular instance the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem in this context but adds a completely new perspective on the high level of symmetry imposed by time-reversibility on the statistics of nonequilibrium fluctuations. The new symmetry implies remarkable hierarchies of equations for the current cumulants and the nonlinear response coefficients, going far beyond Onsager's reciprocity relations and Green-Kubo formulas. We confirm the validity of the new symmetry relation in extensive numerical simulations, and suggest that the idea of symmetry in fluctuations as invariance of optimal paths has far-reaching consequences in diverse fields.

  11. Bidirectionality From Cargo Thermal Fluctuations in Motor-Mediated Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Miles, Christopher E

    2016-01-01

    Molecular motor proteins serve as an essential component of intracellular transport by generating forces to haul cargoes along cytoskeletal filaments. In some circumstances, two species of motors that are directed oppositely (e.g. kinesin, dynein) can be attached to the same cargo. The resulting net motion is known to be bidirectional, but the mechanism of switching remains unclear. In this work, we propose a mean-field mathematical model of the mechanical interactions of two populations of molecular motors with diffusion of the cargo (thermal fluctuations) as the fundamental noise source. By studying a simplified model, the delayed response of motors to rapid fluctuations in the cargo is quantified, allowing for the reduction of the full model to two "characteristic positions" of each of the motor populations. The system is then found to be "metastable", switching between two distinct directional transport states, or bidirectional motion. The time to switch between these states is then investigated using WKB...

  12. Glacial greenhouse-gas fluctuations controlled by ocean circulation changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittner, Andreas; Galbraith, Eric D

    2008-11-20

    Earth's climate and the concentrations of the atmospheric greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) varied strongly on millennial timescales during past glacial periods. Large and rapid warming events in Greenland and the North Atlantic were followed by more gradual cooling, and are highly correlated with fluctuations of N(2)O as recorded in ice cores. Antarctic temperature variations, on the other hand, were smaller and more gradual, showed warming during the Greenland cold phase and cooling while the North Atlantic was warm, and were highly correlated with fluctuations in CO(2). Abrupt changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) have often been invoked to explain the physical characteristics of these Dansgaard-Oeschger climate oscillations, but the mechanisms for the greenhouse-gas variations and their linkage to the AMOC have remained unclear. Here we present simulations with a coupled model of glacial climate and biogeochemical cycles, forced only with changes in the AMOC. The model simultaneously reproduces characteristic features of the Dansgaard-Oeschger temperature, as well as CO(2) and N(2)O fluctuations. Despite significant changes in the land carbon inventory, CO(2) variations on millennial timescales are dominated by slow changes in the deep ocean inventory of biologically sequestered carbon and are correlated with Antarctic temperature and Southern Ocean stratification. In contrast, N(2)O co-varies more rapidly with Greenland temperatures owing to fast adjustments of the thermocline oxygen budget. These results suggest that ocean circulation changes were the primary mechanism that drove glacial CO(2) and N(2)O fluctuations on millennial timescales.

  13. Fluctuations and interactions in microemulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menes, R.; Safran, S.A. [Weizmann Institute, Rehovot (Israel); Strey, R. [Max Planck Institute, Gottingen (Germany)

    1995-12-01

    We review the properties of microemulsions as described by an interfacial model which focuses upon the deformations of the surfactant monolayer separating mesoscopic water and oil domains. In some cases, the interfacial shape is well defined, resulting in a globular phase, while in others, the interface is strongly affected by thermal fluctuations, resulting in a random, sponge-like structure. In the globular phase, interactions between globules can result in phase coexistence comparable to those observed in polymeric systems. Recent experiments indicate that these interactions can result in closed-loop coexistence regions in the isothermal, concentration phase diagram. We propose a mechanism for this reentrant phase separation based on the combined effects of a shape transition and attractive interactions. Long cylindrical globules can phase separate at relatively low interglobular attractions. A transformation from elongated globules to compact spherical drops alters the balance between the entropy and the effective interglobule interactions, leading to the remixing of the globular system.

  14. Characterizing price index behavior through fluctuation dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Panigrahi, Prasanta K; Banerjee, Arjun; Bahadur, Jainendra; Manimaran, P

    2012-01-01

    We study the nature of fluctuations in variety of price indices involving companies listed on the New York Stock Exchange. The fluctuations at multiple scales are extracted through the use of wavelets belonging to Daubechies basis. The fact that these basis sets satisfy vanishing moments conditions makes them ideal to extract local polynomial trends, through the low pass or `average coefficients'. Subtracting the trends from the original time series yields the fluctuations, at different scales, depending on the level of low-pass coefficients used for finding the `average behavior'. The fluctuations are then studied using wavelet based multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis to analyze their self-similar and non-statistical properties. Due to the multifractality of such time series, they deviate from Gaussian behavior in different frequency regimes. Their departure from random matrix theory predictions in such regimes is also analyzed. These deviations and non-statistical properties of the fluctuations can...

  15. Vacuum Lightcone Fluctuations in a Dielectric

    CERN Document Server

    Bessa, C H G; Ford, L H; Svaiter, N F

    2014-01-01

    A model for observable effects of electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations is presented. The model involves a probe pulse which traverses a slab of nonlinear optical material with a nonzero second order polarizability. We argue that the pulse interacts with the ambient vacuum fluctuations of other modes of the quantized electric field, and these vacuum fluctuations cause variations in the flight time of the pulse through the material. The geometry of the slab of material defines a sampling function for the quantized electric field, which in turn determines that vacuum modes whose wavelengths are of the order of the thickness of the slab give the dominant contribution. Some numerical estimates are made, which indicate that fractional fluctuations in flight time of the order of $10^{-9}$ are possible in realistic situations. The model presented here is both an illustration of a physical effect of vacuum fluctuations, and an analog model for the lightcone fluctuations predicted by quantum gravity.

  16. Nonlocally of plasma fluctuations and transport in magnetically confined plasmas theoretical background of nonlocality in fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    2002-09-01

    Nonlocal properties of fluctuations in confined plasmas are briefly surveyed. Contributions to understanding the bifurcation phenomena, improved confinement, and transient transport problem are explained. The theoretical progress in this aspect is addressed: Namely, the fluctuations are not excited by linear instabilities but are dressed with other turbulent fluctuations or fluctuations of meso-scale. Nonlinear interactions of fluctuations with different scale lengths are essential in dictating the dynamics of turbulence and turbulent transport. There are activators and suppressers in global inhomogeneities for evolution of turbulence. Turbulent fluctuations, on the other hand, induce or destroy these global inhomogeneities. Finally, statistical nature of turbulence is addressed. (author)

  17. Quantum fluctuations of geometry in hot Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo

    2015-01-01

    The fluctuations of spacetime geometries at finite temperature are evaluated within the linearized theory of gravity. These fluctuations are described by the probability distribution of various configurations of the gravitational field. The field configurations are described by the linearized Riemann-Weyl tensor. The probability distribution has a foam-like structure; prevailing configurations are those with the large changes of geometry at nearby points. Striking differences are found between the fluctuations of the electromagnetic field and the gravitational field.

  18. Fluctuations of a fluid inside a pore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zvelindovsky, AV; Zatovsky, AV

    The correlation theory of the thermal hydrodynamic fluctuations of compressible viscous fluids within a spherical pore has been developed. The fluctuation motions ape described by the linearized Navier-Stokes and heat transfer equations, containing spontaneous viscous stresses and heat fluxes. The

  19. Inverse scattering problem in turbulent magnetic fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Treumann, R A; Narita, Y

    2016-01-01

    We apply a particular form of the inverse scattering theory to turbulent magnetic fluctuations in a plasma. In the present note we develop the theory, formulate the magnetic fluctuation problem in terms of its electrodynamic turbulent response function, and reduce it to the solution of a special form of the famous Gel$'$fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation of quantum mechanical scattering theory.

  20. The Spectrum of Wind Power Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandi, Mahesh

    2016-11-01

    Wind is a variable energy source whose fluctuations threaten electrical grid stability and complicate dynamical load balancing. The power generated by a wind turbine fluctuates due to the variable wind speed that blows past the turbine. Indeed, the spectrum of wind power fluctuations is widely believed to reflect the Kolmogorov spectrum; both vary with frequency f as f - 5 / 3. This variability decreases when aggregate power fluctuations from geographically distributed wind farms are averaged at the grid via a mechanism known as geographic smoothing. Neither the f - 5 / 3 wind power fluctuation spectrum nor the mechanism of geographic smoothing are understood. In this work, we explain the wind power fluctuation spectrum from the turbine through grid scales. The f - 5 / 3 wind power fluctuation spectrum results from the largest length scales of atmospheric turbulence of order 200 km influencing the small scales where individual turbines operate. This long-range influence spatially couples geographically distributed wind farms and synchronizes farm outputs over a range of frequencies and decreases with increasing inter-farm distance. Consequently, aggregate grid-scale power fluctuations remain correlated, and are smoothed until they reach a limiting f - 7 / 3 spectrum. This work was funded by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University, Japan.

  1. Charge conservation effects for high order fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Begun, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    The exact charge conservation significantly impacts multiplicity fluctuations. The result depends strongly on the part of the system charge carried by the particles of interest. Along with the expected suppression of fluctuations for large systems, charge conservation may lead to negative skewness or kurtosis for small systems.

  2. Fluctuations of a fluid inside a pore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zvelindovsky, AV; Zatovsky, AV

    1997-01-01

    The correlation theory of the thermal hydrodynamic fluctuations of compressible viscous fluids within a spherical pore has been developed. The fluctuation motions ape described by the linearized Navier-Stokes and heat transfer equations, containing spontaneous viscous stresses and heat fluxes. The e

  3. Fluctuations of a fluid inside a pore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zvelindovsky, AV; Zatovsky, AV

    1997-01-01

    The correlation theory of the thermal hydrodynamic fluctuations of compressible viscous fluids within a spherical pore has been developed. The fluctuation motions ape described by the linearized Navier-Stokes and heat transfer equations, containing spontaneous viscous stresses and heat fluxes. The e

  4. Wave Beam Propagation Through Density Fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balakin, A. A.; Bertelli, N.; Westerhof, E.

    2011-01-01

    Perturbations induced by edge density fluctuations on electron cyclotron wave beams propagating in fusion plasmas are studied by means of a quasi-optical code. The effects of such fluctuations are illustrated here by showing the beam propagation in the case of single harmonic perturbations to the wa

  5. Computer simulations of phospholipid - membrane thermodynamic fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, U.R.; Peters, Günther H.j.; Schröder, T.B.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports all-atom computer simulations of five phospholipid membranes, DMPC, DPPC, DMPG, DMPS, and DMPSH, with a focus on the thermal equilibrium fluctuations of volume, energy, area, thickness, and order parameter. For the slow fluctuations at constant temperature and pressure (defined...

  6. Measuring shape fluctuations in biological membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzel, C.; Sengupta, K.

    2016-06-01

    Shape fluctuations of lipid membranes have intrigued cell biologists and physicists alike. In the cellular context, their origin—thermal or active—and their physiological significance are open questions. These small incessant displacements, also called membrane undulations, have mostly been studied in model membranes and membranes of simple cells like erythrocytes. Thermal fluctuations of such membranes have been very well described both theoretically and experimentally; active fluctuations are a topic of current interest. Experimentally, membrane fluctuations are not easy to measure, the main challenge being to develop techniques which are capable of measuring very small displacements at very high speed, and preferably over a large area and long time. Scattering techniques have given access to fluctuations in membrane stacks and a variety of optical microscopy based techniques have been devised to study membrane fluctuations of unilamellar vesicles, erythrocytes and other cells. Among them are flicker spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, diffraction phase microscopy and reflection interference contrast microscopy. Each of these techniques has its advantages and limitations. Here we review the basic principles of the major experimental techniques used to measure bending or shape fluctuations of biomembranes. We report seminal results obtained with each technique and highlight how these studies furthered our understanding of physical properties of membranes and their interactions. We also discuss suggested role of membrane fluctuations in different biological processes.

  7. Fluctuating brane in a dilatonic bulk

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, P; Rodríguez-Martinez, M; Brax, Philippe; Langlois, David; Rodriguez-Martinez, Maria

    2003-01-01

    We consider a cosmological brane moving in a static five-dimensional bulk spacetime endowed with a scalar field whose potential is exponential. After studying various cosmological behaviours for the homogeneous background, we investigate the fluctuations of the brane that leave spacetime unaffected. A single mode embodies these fluctuations and obeys a wave equation which we study for bouncing and ever-expanding branes.

  8. Cytoskeletal dynamics and supracellular organisation of cell shape fluctuations during dorsal closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Guy B; Murugesu, Sughashini; Adams, Richard J; Martinez-Arias, Alfonso; Gorfinkiel, Nicole

    2010-08-01

    Fluctuations in the shape of amnioserosa (AS) cells during Drosophila dorsal closure (DC) provide an ideal system with which to understand contractile epithelia, both in terms of the cellular mechanisms and how tissue behaviour emerges from the activity of individual cells. Using quantitative image analysis we show that apical shape fluctuations are driven by the medial cytoskeleton, with periodic foci of contractile myosin and actin travelling across cell apices. Shape changes were mostly anisotropic and neighbouring cells were often, but transiently, organised into strings with parallel deformations. During the early stages of DC, shape fluctuations with long cycle lengths produced no net tissue contraction. Cycle lengths shortened with the onset of net tissue contraction, followed by a damping of fluctuation amplitude. Eventually, fluctuations became undetectable as AS cells contracted rapidly. These transitions were accompanied by an increase in apical myosin, both at cell-cell junctions and medially, the latter ultimately forming a coherent, but still dynamic, sheet across cells. Mutants with increased myosin activity or actin polymerisation exhibited precocious cell contraction through changes in the subcellular localisation of myosin. thick veins mutant embryos, which exhibited defects in the actin cable at the leading edge, showed similar timings of fluctuation damping to the wild type, suggesting that damping is an autonomous property of the AS. Our results suggest that cell shape fluctuations are a property of cells with low and increasing levels of apical myosin, and that medial and junctional myosin populations combine to contract AS cell apices and drive DC.

  9. Testing the Propagating Fluctuations Model with a Long, Global Accretion Disk Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, J. Drew; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2016-07-01

    The broadband variability of many accreting systems displays characteristic structures; log-normal flux distributions, root-mean square (rms)-flux relations, and long inter-band lags. These characteristics are usually interpreted as inward propagating fluctuations of the mass accretion rate in an accretion disk driven by stochasticity of the angular momentum transport mechanism. We present the first analysis of propagating fluctuations in a long-duration, high-resolution, global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of a geometrically thin (h/r ≈ 0.1) accretion disk around a black hole. While the dynamical-timescale turbulent fluctuations in the Maxwell stresses are too rapid to drive radially coherent fluctuations in the accretion rate, we find that the low-frequency quasi-periodic dynamo action introduces low-frequency fluctuations in the Maxwell stresses, which then drive the propagating fluctuations. Examining both the mass accretion rate and emission proxies, we recover log-normality, linear rms-flux relations, and radial coherence that would produce inter-band lags. Hence, we successfully relate and connect the phenomenology of propagating fluctuations to modern MHD accretion disk theory.

  10. Time integration for particle Brownian motion determined through fluctuating hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Delmotte, Blaise

    2015-01-01

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics has been successfully combined with several computational methods to rapidly compute the correlated random velocities of Brownian particles. In the overdamped limit where both particle and fluid inertia are ignored, one must also account for a Brownian drift term in order to successfully update the particle positions. In this paper, we introduce and study a midpoint time integration scheme we refer to as the drifter-corrector (DC) that resolves the drift term for fluctuating hydrodynamics-based methods even when constraints are imposed on the fluid flow to obtain higher-order corrections to the particle hydrodynamic interactions. We explore this scheme in the context of the fluctuating force-coupling method (FCM) where the constraint is imposed on the rate-of-strain averaged over the volume occupied by the particle. For the DC, the constraint need only be imposed once per time step, leading to a significant reduction in computational cost with respect to other schemes. In fact, for f...

  11. Influence of temperature fluctuation on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of municipal organic solid waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory-scale experiment was carried out to assess the influence of temperature fluctuation on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of municipal organic solid waste (MOSW). Heating failure was simulated by decreasing temperature suddenly from 55 ℃ to 20 ℃ suddenly; 2 h time is needed for temperature decrease and recovery. Under the conditions ofS.0 g/(L·d) and 15 d respectively for MOSW load and retention time, following results were noted: (1) biogas production almost stopped and VFA (volatile fatty acid) accumulated rapidly, accompanied by pH decrease; (2) with low temperature (20 ℃) duration of 1, 5, 12 and 24 h, it took 3, 11, 56 and 72 h for the thermophilic anaerobic digestion system to reproduce methane after temperature fluctuation;(3) the longer the low temperature interval lasted, the more the methanogenic bacteria would decay; hydrolysis, acidification and methanogenesis were all influenced by temperature fluctuation; (4) the thermophilic microorganisms were highly resilient to temperature fluctuation.

  12. Cardiac-induced physiologic noise in tissue is a direct observation of cardiac-induced fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Pallab K; Lowe, Mark J

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that in certain cases, cardiac and respiratory rate fluctuations in BOLD-weighted MRI time courses may be an artifact unique to rapid sampled acquisitions and may not be present in longer repetition-time acquisitions. The implication of this is that, in these cases, cardiac and respiratory rate fluctuations are not aliased into data that undersample these effects and do not affect the resulting time course measurements. In this study, we show that these cases are specific to regions of large cerebrospinal fluid content and are not generally true for gray matter regions of the brain. We demonstrate that in many brain regions of interest, these fluctuations are directly observed as BOLD fluctuations and thus will affect measurements that undersample these effects.

  13. Solar wind thermally induced magnetic fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, R E; Moya, P S; Muñoz, V; Araneda, J A; F-Viñas, A; Valdivia, J A

    2014-06-20

    A kinetic description of Alfvén-cyclotron magnetic fluctuations for anisotropic electron-proton quasistable plasmas is studied. An analytical treatment, based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, consistently shows that spontaneous fluctuations in plasmas with stable distributions significantly contribute to the observed magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind, as seen, for example, in [S. D. Bale et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 211101 (2009)], even far below from the instability thresholds. Furthermore, these results, which do not require any adjustable parameters or wave excitations, are consistent with the results provided by hybrid simulations. It is expected that this analysis contributes to our understanding of the nature of magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind.

  14. Correlated fluctuations near the QCD critical point

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Lijia; Song, Huichao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a freeze-out scheme for the dynamical models near the QCD critical point through coupling the decoupled classical particles with the order parameter field. With a modified distribution function that satisfies specific static fluctuations, we calculate the correlated fluctuations of net protons on the hydrodynamic freeze-out surface. A comparison with recent STAR data shows that our model calculations could roughly reproduce energy dependent cumulant $C_4$ and $\\kappa \\sigma^2$ of net protons through tuning the related parameters. However, the calculated $C_2$ and $C_3$ with both Poisson and Binomial baselines are always above the experimental data due to the positive contributions from the static critical fluctuations. In order to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the experimental data, the dynamical critical fluctuations and more realistic non-critical fluctuation baselines should be investigated in the near future.

  15. Net Charge Fluctuation and String Fragmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SABen-Hao; CAIXu; TAIAn; ZHOUDai-Mei

    2004-01-01

    We present the simulation results of the net charge fluctuation in Au+Au collisions at √Snn=130 GeV from a dynamic model, JPCIAE, and its revisions. The simulations are done for the quark-gluon matter, the directly produced pions, the pion matter, and the hadron matter. The simulated net charge fluctuation of the quark-gluon matter is close to the thermal model prediction for the quark-gluon gas. However, the discrepancy exists comparing the simulated net charge fluctuation for directly produced pions and the pion matter with the thermal model prediction for pion gas and the resonance pion gas, respectively. The net charge fluctuation of hadron matter from default JPCIAE simulations is nearly 3.5 times larger than quark-gluon matter. A discussion is given for the net charge fluctuation as an evidence of QGP phase transition.

  16. Homeostatic fluctuations of a tissue surface

    CERN Document Server

    Risler, Thomas; Prost, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    We study the surface fluctuations of a tissue with a dynamics dictated by cell-rearrangement, cell-division and cell-death processes. Surface fluctuations are calculated in the homeostatic state, where cell division and cell death equilibrate on average. The obtained fluctuation spectrum can be mapped onto several other spectra such as those characterizing incompressible fluids, compressible Maxwell elastomers or permeable membranes in appropriate asymptotic regimes. Since cell division and cell death are out-of-equilibrium processes, detailed balance is broken, but a generalized fluctuation-response relation is satisfied in terms of appropriate observables. Our work is a first step toward the description of the out-of-equilibrium fluctuations of the surface of a thick epithelium and its dynamical response to external perturbations.

  17. Fluctuations in lipid bilayers: Are they understood?

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, Friederike

    2013-01-01

    We review recent computer simulation studies of undulating lipid bilayers. Theoretical interpretations of such fluctuating membranes are most commonly based on generalized Helfrich-type elastic models, with additional contributions of local "protrusions" and/or density fluctuations. Such models provide an excellent basis for describing the fluctuations of tensionless bilayers in the fluid phase at a quantitative level. However, this description is found to fail for membranes in the gel phase and for membranes subject to high tensions. The fluctuations of tilted gel membranes show a signature of the modulated ripple structure, which is a nearby phase observed in the pretransition regime between the fluid and tilted gel state. This complicates a quantitative analysis on mesoscopic length scales. In the case of fluid membranes under tension, the large-wavelength fluctuation modes are found to be significantly softer than predicted by theory. In the latter context, we also address the general problem of the relat...

  18. Spacetime Conformal Fluctuations and Quantum Dephasing

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifacio, Paolo M

    Any quantum system interacting with a complex environment undergoes decoherence. Empty space is filled with vacuum energy due to matter fields in their ground state and represents an underlying environment that any quantum particle has to cope with. In particular quantum gravity vacuum fluctuations should represent a universal source of decoherence. To study this problem we employ a stochastic approach that models spacetime fluctuations close to the Planck scale by means of a classical, randomly fluctuating metric (random gravity framework). We enrich the classical scheme for metric perturbations over a curved background by also including matter fields and metric conformal fluctuations. We show in general that a conformally modulated metric induces dephasing as a result of an effective nonlinear newtonian potential obtained in the appropriate nonrelativistic limit of a minimally coupled Klein-Gordon field. The special case of vacuum fluctuations is considered and a quantitative estimate of the expected effect...

  19. Coupled Quantum Fluctuations and Quantum Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormozi, Layla; Kerman, Jamie

    We study the relative effectiveness of coupled quantum fluctuations, compared to single spin fluctuations, in the performance of quantum annealing. We focus on problem Hamiltonians resembling the the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model of Ising spin glass and compare the effectiveness of different types of fluctuations by numerically calculating the relative success probabilities and residual energies in fully-connected spin systems. We find that for a small class of instances coupled fluctuations can provide improvement over single spin fluctuations and analyze the properties of the corresponding class. Disclaimer: This research was funded by ODNI, IARPA via MIT Lincoln Laboratory under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of ODNI, IARPA, or the US Government.

  20. Correlated fluctuations near the QCD critical point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lijia; Li, Pengfei; Song, Huichao

    2016-08-01

    In this article, we introduce a freeze-out scheme for the dynamical models near the QCD critical point through coupling the decoupled classical particles with the order parameter field. With a modified distribution function that satisfies specific static fluctuations, we calculate the correlated fluctuations of net protons on the hydrodynamic freeze-out surface. A comparison with recent STAR data shows that our model calculations could roughly reproduce energy-dependent cumulant C4 and κ σ2 of net protons through tuning the related parameters. However, the calculated C2 and C3 with both Poisson and binomial baselines are always above the experimental data due to the positive contributions from the static critical fluctuations. To qualitatively and quantitatively describe all the related experimental data, the dynamical critical fluctuations and more realistic noncritical fluctuation baselines should be investigated in the near future.

  1. Fluctuation theorem for constrained equilibrium systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Thomas; Dorfman, J. Robert

    2006-02-01

    We discuss the fluctuation properties of equilibrium chaotic systems with constraints such as isokinetic and Nosé-Hoover thermostats. Although the dynamics of these systems does not typically preserve phase-space volumes, the average phase-space contraction rate vanishes, so that the stationary states are smooth. Nevertheless, finite-time averages of the phase-space contraction rate have nontrivial fluctuations which we show satisfy a simple version of the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem, complementary to the usual fluctuation theorem for nonequilibrium stationary states and appropriate to constrained equilibrium states. Moreover, we show that these fluctuations are distributed according to a Gaussian curve for long enough times. Three different systems are considered here: namely, (i) a fluid composed of particles interacting with Lennard-Jones potentials, (ii) a harmonic oscillator with Nosé-Hoover thermostatting, and (iii) a simple hyperbolic two-dimensional map.

  2. Bridging the gap between event-by-event fluctuation measurements and theory predictions in relativistic nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun-Munzinger, P.; Rustamov, A.; Stachel, J.

    2017-04-01

    We develop methods to deal with non-dynamical contributions to event-by-event fluctuation measurements of net-particle numbers in relativistic nuclear collisions. These contributions arise from impact parameter fluctuations and from the requirement of overall net-baryon number or net-charge conservation and may mask the dynamical fluctuations of interest, such as those due to critical endpoints in the QCD phase diagram. Within a model of independent particle sources we derive formulae for net-particle fluctuations and develop a rigorous approach to take into account contributions from participant fluctuations in realistic experimental environments and at any cumulant order. Interestingly, contributions from participant fluctuations to the second and third cumulants of net-baryon distributions are found to vanish at mid-rapidity for LHC energies while higher cumulants of even order are non-zero even when the net-baryon number at mid-rapidity is zero. At lower beam energies the effect of participant fluctuations increases and induces spurious higher moments. The necessary corrections become large and need to be carefully taken into account before comparison to theory. We also provide a procedure for selecting the optimal phase-space coverage of particles for fluctuation analyses and discuss quantitatively the necessary correction due to global charge conservation.

  3. Bridging the gap between event-by-event fluctuation measurements and theory predictions in relativistic nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun-Munzinger, P., E-mail: p.braun-munzinger@gsi.de [Extreme Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Rustamov, A., E-mail: a.rustamov@cern.ch [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); National Nuclear Research Center, Baku (Azerbaijan); Stachel, J., E-mail: stachel@physi.uni-heidelberg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    We develop methods to deal with non-dynamical contributions to event-by-event fluctuation measurements of net-particle numbers in relativistic nuclear collisions. These contributions arise from impact parameter fluctuations and from the requirement of overall net-baryon number or net-charge conservation and may mask the dynamical fluctuations of interest, such as those due to critical endpoints in the QCD phase diagram. Within a model of independent particle sources we derive formulae for net-particle fluctuations and develop a rigorous approach to take into account contributions from participant fluctuations in realistic experimental environments and at any cumulant order. Interestingly, contributions from participant fluctuations to the second and third cumulants of net-baryon distributions are found to vanish at mid-rapidity for LHC energies while higher cumulants of even order are non-zero even when the net-baryon number at mid-rapidity is zero. At lower beam energies the effect of participant fluctuations increases and induces spurious higher moments. The necessary corrections become large and need to be carefully taken into account before comparison to theory. We also provide a procedure for selecting the optimal phase–space coverage of particles for fluctuation analyses and discuss quantitatively the necessary correction due to global charge conservation.

  4. Roughness-induced fluid interface fluctuations due to polar and apolar interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G; Backx, G

    1999-01-01

    We investigate substrate roughness-induced fluctuations on liquid films in the presence of polar (exponential) and apolar (van der Waals) interactions in the complete wetting regime. The liquid/vapor interface roughness amplitude sigma(w) increases rapidly with film thickness epsilon above a critica

  5. Fluctuating Asymmetry of Human Populations: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Graham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry, the random deviation from perfect symmetry, is a widely used population-level index of developmental instability, developmental noise, and robustness. It reflects a population’s state of adaptation and genomic coadaptation. Here, we review the literature on fluctuating asymmetry of human populations. The most widely used bilateral traits include skeletal, dental, and facial dimensions; dermatoglyphic patterns and ridge counts; and facial shape. Each trait has its advantages and disadvantages, but results are most robust when multiple traits are combined into a composite index of fluctuating asymmetry (CFA. Both environmental (diet, climate, toxins and genetic (aneuploidy, heterozygosity, inbreeding stressors have been linked to population-level variation in fluctuating asymmetry. In general, these stressors increase average fluctuating asymmetry. Nevertheless, there have been many conflicting results, in part because (1 fluctuating asymmetry is a weak signal in a sea of noise; and (2 studies of human fluctuating asymmetry have not always followed best practices. The most serious concerns are insensitive asymmetry indices (correlation coefficient and coefficient of indetermination, inappropriate size scaling, unrecognized mixture distributions, inappropriate corrections for directional asymmetry, failure to use composite indices, and inattention to measurement error. Consequently, it is often difficult (or impossible to compare results across traits, and across studies.

  6. Population Genetics with Fluctuating Population Sizes

    CERN Document Server

    Chotibut, Thiparat

    2016-01-01

    Standard neutral population genetics theory with a strictly fixed population size has important limitations. An alternative model that allows independently fluctuating population sizes and reproduces the standard neutral evolution is reviewed. We then study a situation such that the competing species are neutral at the equilibrium population size but population size fluctuations nevertheless favor fixation of one species over the other. In this case, a separation of timescales emerges naturally and allows adiabatic elimination of a fast population size variable to deduce the fluctuations-induced selection dynamics near the equilibrium population size. The results highlight the incompleteness of the standard population genetics with a strictly fixed population size.

  7. Elasticity and Fluctuations of Frustrated Nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Doron; Sharon, Eran; Diamant, Haim

    2016-06-01

    We derive a reduced quasi-one-dimensional theory of geometrically frustrated elastic ribbons. Expressed in terms of geometric properties alone, it applies to ribbons over a wide range of scales, allowing the study of their elastic equilibrium, as well as thermal fluctuations. We use the theory to account for the twisted-to-helical transition of ribbons with spontaneous negative curvature and the effect of fluctuations on the corresponding critical exponents. The persistence length of such ribbons changes nonmonotonically with the ribbon's width, dropping to zero at the transition. This and other statistical properties qualitatively differ from those of nonfrustrated fluctuating filaments.

  8. Classical and quantum temperature fluctuations via holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatsky, Alexander [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Institute for Materials Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory,Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Kedem, Yaron [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Krikun, Alexander [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics,B. Cheremushkinskaya 25, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Thorlacius, Lárus [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); University of Iceland, Science Institute,Dunhaga 3, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland); The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Department of Physics,Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Zarembo, Konstantin [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics,B. Cheremushkinskaya 25, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University,SE-751 08 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-01-07

    We study local temperature fluctuations in a 2+1 dimensional CFT on the sphere, dual to a black hole in asymptotically AdS spacetime. The fluctuation spectrum is governed by the lowest-lying hydrodynamic modes of the system whose frequency and damping rate determine whether temperature fluctuations are thermal or quantum. We calculate numerically the corresponding quasinormal frequencies and match the result with the hydrodynamics of the dual CFT at high temperature. As a by-product of our analysis we determine the appropriate boundary conditions for calculating low-lying quasinormal modes for a four-dimensional Reissner-Nordström black hole in global AdS.

  9. Population Genetics with Fluctuating Population Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David R.

    2017-05-01

    Standard neutral population genetics theory with a strictly fixed population size has important limitations. An alternative model that allows independently fluctuating population sizes and reproduces the standard neutral evolution is reviewed. We then study a situation such that the competing species are neutral at the equilibrium population size but population size fluctuations nevertheless favor fixation of one species over the other. In this case, a separation of timescales emerges naturally and allows adiabatic elimination of a fast population size variable to deduce the fluctuation-induced selection dynamics near the equilibrium population size. The results highlight the incompleteness of the standard population genetics with a strictly fixed population size.

  10. Fluctuation in nonextensive reaction-diffusion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Junlin; Chen Huaijun [Department of Physics, Shaanxi Normal University, Xian 710062 (China)

    2007-05-15

    The density fluctuation in a nonextensive reaction-diffusion system is investigated, where the nonequilibrium stationary-state distribution is described by the generalized Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the framework of Tsallis statistics (or nonextensive statistics). By using the density operator technique, the nonextensive pressure effect is introduced into the master equation and thus the generalized master equation is derived for the system. As an example, we take the{sup 3}He reaction-diffusion model inside stars to analyse the nonextensive effect on the density fluctuation and we find that the nonextensive parameter q different from one plays a very important role in determining the characteristics of the fluctuation waves.

  11. Diffusive transport by thermal velocity fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donev, Aleksandar; Bell, John B; de la Fuente, Anton; Garcia, Alejandro L

    2011-05-20

    We study the contribution of advection by thermal velocity fluctuations to the effective diffusion coefficient in a mixture of two identical fluids. We find good agreement between a simple fluctuating hydrodynamics theory and particle and finite-volume simulations. The enhancement of the diffusive transport depends on the system size L and grows as ln(L/L₀) in quasi-two-dimensional systems, while in three dimensions it scales as L₀⁻¹ - L⁻¹, where L₀ is a reference length. Our results demonstrate that fluctuations play an important role in the hydrodynamics of small-scale systems.

  12. Fractal fluctuations in gaze speed visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Damian G; Anastas, Jason

    2011-04-01

    Visual search involves a subtle coordination of visual memory and lower-order perceptual mechanisms. Specifically, the fluctuations in gaze may provide support for visual search above and beyond what may be attributed to memory. Prior research indicates that gaze during search exhibits fractal fluctuations, which allow for a wide sampling of the field of view. Fractal fluctuations constitute a case of fast diffusion that may provide an advantage in exploration. We present reanalyses of eye-tracking data collected by Stephen and Mirman (Cognition, 115, 154-165, 2010) for single-feature and conjunction search tasks. Fluctuations in gaze during these search tasks were indeed fractal. Furthermore, the degree of fractality predicted decreases in reaction time on a trial-by-trial basis. We propose that fractality may play a key role in explaining the efficacy of perceptual exploration.

  13. Metric fluctuations and its evolution during inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Anabitarte, M; Anabitarte, Mariano; Bellini, Mauricio

    2003-01-01

    W discuss the evolution of the fluctuations in a symmetric $\\phi_c$-exponential potential which provides a power-law expansion during inflation using both, the gauge invariant field $\\Phi$ and the Sasaki-Mukhanov field.

  14. Fluctuations of Intensive Quantities in Statistical Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur E. Ruuge

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In phenomenological thermodynamics, the canonical coordinates of a physical system split in pairs, with each pair consisting of an extensive quantity and an intensive one. In the present paper, the quasithermodynamic fluctuation theory of a model system of a large number of oscillators is extended to statistical thermodynamics based on the idea of perceiving the fluctuations of intensive variables as the fluctuations of specific extensive ones in a “thermodynamically dual” system. The extension is motivated by the symmetry of the problem in the context of an analogy with quantum mechanics, which is stated in terms of a generalized Pauli problem for the thermodynamic fluctuations. The doubled Boltzmann constant divided by the number of particles plays a similar role as the Planck constant.

  15. Synchronous imaging of coherent plasma fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskey, S. R.; Thapar, N.; Blackwell, B. D.; Howard, J.

    2014-03-01

    A new method for imaging high frequency plasma fluctuations is described. A phase locked loop and field programmable gate array are used to generate gating triggers for an intensified CCD camera. A reference signal from another diagnostic such as a magnetic probe ensures that the triggers are synchronous with the fluctuation being imaged. The synchronous imaging technique allows effective frame rates exceeding millions per second, good signal to noise through the accumulation of multiple exposures per frame, and produces high resolution images without generating excessive quantities of data. The technique can be used to image modes in the MHz range opening up the possibility of spectrally filtered high resolution imaging of MHD instabilities that produce sufficient light fluctuations. Some examples of projection images of plasma fluctuations on the H-1NF heliac obtained using this approach are presented here.

  16. Active membrane fluctuations with proton pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmelter, Adam; Chen, Kejia; Granick, Steve

    2014-03-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium membrane fluctuations in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) by reconstituting the light-activated proton pump, bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Once activated, BR is known to form oligomers in model membranes, with an unknown effect on fluctuation amplitude. By using the UV-crosslinkable lipid, 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, we localize BR and prevent light-induced oligomerization. This system allows us to selectively switch on and off active fluctuations and to turn off diffusion (oligomerization) using green and UV light, respectively. We compare active membrane fluctuations with trapped and freely diffusing BR using an interferometric technique with sub nanometer and microsecond resolution. Remarkable dependence is found on whether BR is localized or freely diffusing.

  17. Vacuum Radiation Pressure Fluctuations and Barrier Penetration

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    We apply recent results on the probability distribution for quantum stress tensor fluctuations to the problem of barrier penetration by quantum particles. The probability for large stress tensor fluctuations decreases relatively slowly with increasing magnitude of the fluctuation, especially when the quantum stress tensor operator has been averaged over a finite time interval. This can lead to large vacuum radiation pressure fluctuations on charged or polarizable particles, which can in turn push the particle over a potential barrier. The rate for this effect depends sensitively upon the details of the time averaging of the stress tensor operator, which might be determined by factors such as the shape of the potential. We make some estimates for the rate of barrier penetration by this mechanism and argue that in some cases this rate can exceed the rate for quantum tunneling through the barrier. The possibility of observation of this effect is discussed.

  18. Generalized fluctuation theorems for classical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, G S

    2015-01-01

    Fluctuation theorems have a very special place in the study of non equilibrium dynamics of physical systems. The form in which it is used most extensively is the Gallavoti-Cohen Fluctuation Theorem which is in terms of the distribution of the work $p(W)/p(-W)=\\exp(\\alpha W)$. We derive the general form of the fluctuation theorems for an arbitrary Gaussian Markov process and find conditions when the parameter $\\alpha$ becomes a universal parameter $1/kT$. As an application we consider fluctuation theorems for classical cyclotron motion of an electron in a parabolic potential. The motion of the electron is described by four coupled Langevin equations and thus is non-trivial. The generalized theorems are equally valid for non-equilibrium steady states.

  19. Resonances and fluctuations in the statistical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrieri Giorgio

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe how the study of resonances and fluctuations can help constrain the thermal and chemical freezeout properties of the fireball created in heavy ion collisions. This review is based on [1–5

  20. Scaling Properties of Fluctuations in Human Electroencephalogram

    CERN Document Server

    Hwa, R C; Hwa, Rudolph C.; Ferree, Thomas C.

    2002-01-01

    The fluctuation properties of the human electroencephalogram (EEG) time series are studied using detrended fluctuation analysis. For all 128 channels in each of 18 subjects studied, it is found that the standard deviation of the fluctuations exhibits scaling behaviors in two regions. Topographical plots of the scaling exponents reveal the spatial structure of the nonlinear electrical activities recorded on the scalp. Moment analyses are performed to extract the gross features of all the scaling exponents. The correlation between the two scaling exponents in each channel is also examined. It is found that two indices can characterize the overall properties of the fluctuation behaviors of the brain dynamics for every subject and that they vary widely across the subjects.

  1. Biopolymer elasticity: Mechanics and thermal fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Supurna; Samuel, Joseph

    2012-04-01

    We present an analytical study of the role of thermal fluctuations in shaping molecular elastic properties of semiflexible polymers. Our study interpolates between mechanics and statistical mechanics in a controlled way and shows how thermal fluctuations modify the elastic properties of biopolymers. We present a study of the minimum-energy configurations with explicit expressions for their energy and writhe and plots of the extension versus link for these configurations and a study of fluctuations around the local minima of energy and approximate analytical formulas for the free energy of stretched twisted polymers. The central result of our study is a closed-form expression for the leading thermal fluctuation correction to the free energy around the nonperturbative writhing family solution for the configuration of a biopolymer. From the derived formulas, the predictions of the wormlike chain model for molecular elasticity can be worked out for a comparison against numerical simulations and experiments.

  2. Riemannian geometry of fluctuation theory: An introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Luisberis

    2016-05-01

    Fluctuation geometry was recently proposed as a counterpart approach of Riemannian geometry of inference theory (information geometry), which describes the geometric features of the statistical manifold M of random events that are described by a family of continuous distributions dpξ(x|θ). This theory states a connection among geometry notions and statistical properties: separation distance as a measure of relative probabilities, curvature as a measure about the existence of irreducible statistical correlations, among others. In statistical mechanics, fluctuation geometry arises as the mathematical apparatus of a Riemannian extension of Einstein fluctuation theory, which is also closely related to Ruppeiner geometry of thermodynamics. Moreover, the curvature tensor allows to express some asymptotic formulae that account for the system fluctuating behavior beyond the gaussian approximation, while curvature scalar appears as a second-order correction of Legendre transformation between thermodynamic potentials.

  3. Effects of Longitudinal Fluctuations in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Raniwala, Rashmi; Loizides, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    In collisions of identical nuclei at a given impact parameter, the number of nucleons participating in the overlap region of each nucleus can be unequal due to nuclear density fluctuations. The asymmetry due to the unequal number of participating nucleons, which may be experimentally accessible by measuring either the energy in ZDC or the number of spectator nucleons, causes a shift of the center of mass rapidity of the participant zone. In a Monte Carlo Glauber model the average rapidity-shift is found to be almost linearly related to the asymmetry. Using Monte Carlo data for Pb-Pb collisions at 2.76 TeV generated with the HIJING model, we demonstrate that the rapidity distribution of produced particles is affected by the asymmetry, and that the effect can be quantitatively related to the average rapidity-shift via a third-order polynomial with a dominantly linear term. Experimental estimates of the spectator asymmetry may be used to further constrain the initial conditions in ultra-relativistic heavy ion co...

  4. Net-Charge Fluctuations in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 2.76$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Aguilar Salazar, Saul; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldit, Alain; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, F; Blanco, Francesco; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Nicolas; Boettger, Stefan; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bose, Suvendu Nath; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Boyer, Bruno Alexandre; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chawla, Isha; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chiavassa, Emilio; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Constantin, Paul; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Kushal; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; Demanov, Vyacheslav; Denes, Ervin; Deppman, Airton; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Dominguez, Isabel; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Dutta Majumdar, Mihir Ranjan

    2013-04-10

    We report the first measurement of the net-charge fluctuations in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV, measured with the ALICE detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The dynamical fluctuations per unit entropy are observed to decrease when going from peripheral to central collisions. An additional reduction in the amount of fluctuations is seen in comparison to the results from lower energies. We examine the dependence of fluctuations on the pseudo-rapidity interval, which may account for the dilution of fluctuations during the evolution of the system. We find that the ALICE data points are between the theoretically predicted values for a hadron gas and a Quark-Gluon Plasma.

  5. Scaling behaviour in daily air humidity fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Vattay, G; Vattay, Gabor; Harnos, Andrea

    1994-01-01

    We show that the daily average air humidity fluctuations exhibit non-trivial $1/f^{\\alpha}$ behaviour which different from the spectral properties of other meteorological quantities. This feature and the fractal spatial strucure found in clouds make it plausible to regard air humidity fluctuations as a manifestation of self-organized criticality. We give arguments why the dynamics in air humidity can be similar to those in sandpile models of SOC.

  6. Population Genetics with Fluctuating Population Sizes

    OpenAIRE

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Standard neutral population genetics theory with a strictly fixed population size has important limitations. An alternative model that allows independently fluctuating population sizes and reproduces the standard neutral evolution is reviewed. We then study a situation such that the competing species are neutral at the equilibrium population size but population size fluctuations nevertheless favor fixation of one species over the other. In this case, a separation of timescales emerges natural...

  7. Phase Fluctuations in the ABC Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodineau, T.; Derrida, B.

    2011-11-01

    We analyze the fluctuations of the steady state profiles in the modulated phase of the ABC model. For a system of L sites, the steady state profiles move on a microscopic time scale of order L 3. The variance of their displacement is computed in terms of the macroscopic steady state profiles by using fluctuating hydrodynamics and large deviations. Our analytical prediction for this variance is confirmed by the results of numerical simulations.

  8. Pressure fluctuations in gas fluidized beds

    OpenAIRE

    Leckner Bo.; Palchonok Genadij I.; Johnsson Filip

    2002-01-01

    The pressure fluctuations in a fluidized bed are a result of the actions of the bubbles. However, the bubbles may be influenced by the air supply system and by the pressure drop of the air distributor. These interactions are treated for low as well as for high velocity beds by means of a simple model of the principal frequency of the pressure fluctuations. The model includes the interaction with the air supply system and describes qualitatively two important bubbling regimes: the single bubbl...

  9. Transcription fluctuation effects on biochemical oscillations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota Nishino

    Full Text Available Some biochemical systems show oscillation. They often consist of feedback loops with repressive transcription regulation. Such biochemical systems have distinctive characteristics in comparison with ordinary chemical systems: i numbers of molecules involved are small, ii there are typically only a couple of genes in a cell with a finite regulation time. Due to the fluctuations caused by these features, the system behavior can be quite different from the one by deterministic rate equations, because the rate equations ignore molecular fluctuations and thus are exact only in the infinite molecular number limit. The molecular fluctuations on a free-running circadian system have been studied by Gonze et al. (2002 by introducing a scale parameter [Formula: see text] for the system size. They consider, however, only the first effect, assuming that the gene process is fast enough for the second effect to be ignored, but this has not been examined systematically yet. Here we study fluctuation effects due to the finite gene regulation time by introducing a new scale parameter [Formula: see text], which we take as the unbinding time of a nuclear protein from the gene. We focus on the case where the fluctuations due to small molecular numbers are negligible. In simulations on the same system studied by Gonze et al., we find the system is unexpectedly sensitive to the fluctuation in the transcription regulation; the period of oscillation fluctuates about 30 min even when the regulation time scale [Formula: see text] is around 30 s, that is even smaller than 1/1000 of its circadian period. We also demonstrate that the distribution width for the oscillation period and amplitude scales with [Formula: see text], and the correlation time scales with [Formula: see text] in the small [Formula: see text] regime. The relative fluctuations for the period are about half of that for the amplitude, namely, the periodicity is more stable than the amplitude.

  10. Spacetime Conformal Fluctuations and Quantum Dephasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacio, Paolo M.

    2009-06-01

    Any quantum system interacting with a complex environment undergoes decoherence. Empty space is filled with vacuum energy due to matter fields in their ground state and represents an underlying environment that any quantum particle has to cope with. In particular quantum gravity vacuum fluctuations should represent a universal source of decoherence. To study this problem we employ a stochastic approach that models spacetime fluctuations close to the Planck scale by means of a classical, randomly fluctuating metric (random gravity framework). We enrich the classical scheme for metric perturbations over a curved background by also including matter fields and metric conformal fluctuations. We show in general that a conformally modulated metric induces dephasing as a result of an effective nonlinear newtonian potential obtained in the appropriate nonrelativistic limit of a minimally coupled Klein-Gordon field. The special case of vacuum fluctuations is considered and a quantitative estimate of the expected effect deduced. Secondly we address the question of how conformal fluctuations could physically arise. By applying the random gravity framework we first show that standard GR seems to forbid spontaneous conformal metric modulations. Finally we argue that a different result follows within scalar-tensor theories of gravity such as e.g. Brans-Dicke theory. In this case a conformal modulation of the metric arises naturally as a result of the fluctuations in the Brans-Dicke field and quantum dephasing of a test particle is expected to occur. For large negative values of the coupling parameter the conformal fluctuations may also contribute to alleviate the well known problem of the large zero point energy due to quantum matter fields.

  11. Temperature fluctuations in an inhomogeneous diffusive fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, Z

    2014-01-01

    We discuss metric perturbations of the relativistic diffusion equation around the homogeneous Juttner equilibrium of massless particles in a homogeneous expanding universe. The metric perturbation describes matter distribution and the gravitational wave background in an inhomogeneous universe. We show that the lowest order perturbation can be treated as a variation of temperature. We derive a formula expressing temperature fluctuations in terms of the diffusion and tensor power spectrum. We discuss the multipole expansion of the fluctuations in the presence of diffusion.

  12. Fluctuation relations for a driven Brownian particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imparato, A.; Peliti, L.

    2006-08-01

    We consider a driven Brownian particle, subject to both conservative and nonconservative applied forces, whose probability evolves according to the Kramers equation. We derive a general fluctuation relation, expressing the ratio of the probability of a given Brownian path in phase space with that of the time-reversed path, in terms of the entropy flux to the heat reservoir. This fluctuation relation implies those of Seifert, Jarzynski, and Gallavotti-Cohen in different special cases.

  13. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), part A

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial by containing quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers Fluorescence Fluctuation SpectroscopyContains chapters on such topics as Time-integrated fluorescence cumulant analysis, Pulsed Interleaved Excitation, and raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the fieldCovers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopyContains chapte

  14. Charge fluctuation of the superconducting molecular crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, T., E-mail: yamataka@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.j [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Nakazawa, Y. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Kato, R. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Yakushi, K. [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8581 (Japan); Akutsu, H.; Akustu, A.S. [School of Science and Graduate School of Material Sciences, University of Hyogo, Kamigouri, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Yamamoto, H. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kawamoto, A. [Graduate School and Faculty of Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Turner, S.S. [Department of Chemistry, Warwick University, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Day, P. [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, concern has been raised about the charge fluctuation of the superconducting transition in the loosely dimerized molecular conductors. Not only the observation of the charge fluctuation is of considerably important but also the understanding of the mechanism of the fluctuation. We have observed degree of charge fluctuation of several {beta}''-type ET salts. The {beta}''-type ET salt is one of the best model compounds because the direction of the largest inter-site Coulomb interaction is perpendicular to that of the largest transfer integral. This structural property allows us to examine the role of inter-site Coulomb interaction from the viewpoint of the inter-molecular distance. The difference in the molecular charges between the charge rich site and the charge poor sites, {Delta}{rho}, is correlated with the conducting behavior; the superconducting materials have the small but finite {Delta}{rho}, whereas {Delta}{rho} of the insulating (metallic) materials is large (almost zero). After the analysis of the configuration in the inter-molecular distances, we have found that the degree of fluctuation, {Delta}{rho}, is attributed to the number of the most stable charge distribution(s), N{sub S}, and the number of the energy levels of the allowed charge distribution, N{sub A}. The superconducting materials belong to the condition of N{sub S{>=}}2 and N{sub A{>=}}2. Indeed, this condition contributes to the fluctuation of the molecular charges.

  15. Origin of density fluctuations in extended inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Salopek, David S.; Turner, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    The density fluctuations (both curvature and isocurvature) that arise due to quantum fluctuations in a simple model of extended inflation based upon the Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory are calculated. Curvature fluctuations arise due to quantum fluctuations in the Brans-Dicke field, in general have a nonscale-invariant spectrum, and can have an amplitude that is cosmologically acceptable and interesting without having to tune any coupling constant to a very small value. The density perturbations that arise due to the inflation field are subdominant. If there are other massless fields in the theory, e.g., an axion or an ilion, then isocurvature fluctuations arise in these fields too. Production of gravitational waves and the massless particles associated with excitations of the Brans-Dicke field are also discussed. Several attempts at more realistic models of extended inflation are also analyzed. The importance of the Einstein conformal frame in calculating curvature fluctuations is emphasized. When viewed in this frame, extended inflation closely resembles slow-rollover inflation with an exponential potential and the usual formula for the amplitude of curvature perturbations applies.

  16. Studies of Fluctuation Processes in Nuclear Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayik, Sakir [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-04-14

    The standard one-body transport approaches have been extensively applied to investigate heavy-ion collision dynamics at low and intermediate energies. At low energies the approach is the mean-field description of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory. At intermediate energies the approach is extended by including a collision term, and its application has been carried out mostly in the semi-classical framework of the Boltzmann-Uhling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) model. The standard transport models provide a good understanding of the average properties of the collision dynamics in terms of the effective interactions in both low and intermediate energies. However, the standard models are inadequate for describing the fluctuation dynamics of collective motion at low energies and disassembling of the nuclear system into fragments at intermediate energies resulting from the growth of density fluctuations in the spinodal region. Our tasks have been to improve the standard transport approaches by incorporating fluctuation mechanisms into the description. There are mainly two different mechanisms for fluctuations: (i) Collisional fluctuations generated by binary nucleon collisions, which provide the dominant mechanism at intermediate energies, and (ii) One-body mechanism or mean-field fluctuations, which is the dominant mechanism at low energies. In the first part of our project, the PI extended the standard transport model at intermediate energies by incorporating collisional mechanism according to the “Generalized Langevin Description” of Mori formalism. The PI and his collaborators carried out a number of applications for describing dynamical mechanism of nuclear multi fragmentations, and nuclear collective response in the semi-classical framework of the approach, which is known as the Boltzmann-Langevin model. In the second part of the project, we considered dynamical description at low energies. Because of the effective Pauli blocking, the collisional dissipation and

  17. Selection in a fluctuating environment leads to decreased genetic variation and facilitates the evolution of phenotypic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallsson, L R; Björklund, M

    2012-07-01

    Changes in the environment are expected to induce changes in the quantitative genetic variation, which influences the ability of a population to adapt to environmental change. Furthermore, environmental changes are not constant in time, but fluctuate. Here, we investigate the effect of rapid, continuous and/or fluctuating temperature changes in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, using an evolution experiment followed by a split-brood experiment. In line with expectations, individuals responded in a plastic way and had an overall higher potential to respond to selection after a rapid change in the environment. After selection in an environment with increasing temperature, plasticity remained unchanged (or decreased) and environmental variation decreased, especially when fluctuations were added; these results were unexpected. As expected, the genetic variation decreased after fluctuating selection. Our results suggest that fluctuations in the environment have major impact on the response of a population to environmental change; in a highly variable environment with low predictability, a plastic response might not be beneficial and the response is genetically and environmentally canalized resulting in a low potential to respond to selection and low environmental sensitivity. Interestingly, we found greater variation for phenotypic plasticity after selection, suggesting that the potential for plasticity to evolve is facilitated after exposure to environmental fluctuations. Our study highlights that environmental fluctuations should be considered when investigating the response of a population to environmental change.

  18. Continuous measurements of instantaneous heart rate and its fluctuations before and after hatching in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, K; Pearson, J T; Burggren, W W; Ar, A; Tazawa, H

    2000-03-01

    There has been considerable interest in heart rate (fh) fluctuations in relation to cardiovascular control systems and foetal conditions during pregnancy in mammals. Prominent fluctuations in fh also occur in avian embryos, which are an important experimental model for studying developmental physiology. The present study determined the instantaneous fh of seven chick embryos continuously from the last stage of prenatal development (day 18), throughout the pipping (perinatal) period (days 19-21) until hatching and, subsequently, of newly hatched chicks (up to day 2). The distinctive patterns of instantaneous fh fluctuations took the form of specific changes within a broad mean fh baseline. Cyclic oscillations (ultradian rhythm) occurred until an early stage of the perinatal period, when the fh baseline started rising. Subsequently, the baseline dropped and respiratory arrhythmia began to appear concomitant with external pipping. During the final stage of external pipping, when the fh baseline rose again prior to hatching, three unique patterns of instantaneous fh fluctuations were evident: relatively long-lasting cyclic small accelerations, irregular intermittent large accelerations and short-term repeated large accelerations. Furthermore, repeated alternate occurrences of the latter two types of acceleration formed an additional oscillating pattern with a period of 10-15 min. During the early period after hatching, when the fh baseline reached its maximum, instantaneous fh changed relatively slowly accompanied by transient rapid decelerations, probably due to augmented vagal tone. Subsequently, the mean fh baseline dropped to its minimum, and a circadian rhythm and three types of previously reported fh fluctuations (types I-III) appeared. Developmental patterns of mean fh and the appearance of distinctive patterns of instantaneous fluctuations in fh and circadian rhythms were not influenced by an ultimate failure of hatching after a normal development. The

  19. Study of event-by-event fluctuations in the charged particle ratio in high energy heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou Dai Mei; Liu Zhi Yi; Lu Zhong Dao; Sá Ben-Hao

    2002-01-01

    Using a hadron and string cascade model, JPCIAE, and the corresponding Monte Carlo event generator, the behavior of the charged particle ratio event-by-event fluctuations in subsystem depending on energy, centrality, resonance decay and rapidity interval was investigated for Pb+Pb collisions at SPS and ALICE energies, and for Au+Au collisions at RHIC energies. The model results of charged particle ratio event-by-event fluctuations as a function of the rapidity interval in Pb+Pb collisions at SPS energies were comparable with the preliminary NA49 data. It turned out that the charged particle ratio fluctuation has no strong energy, centrality, resonance decay and rapidity interval dependences. (13 refs).

  20. Scaling behavior in mitochondrial redox fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujan, V Krishnan; Biener, Gabriel; Herman, Brian A

    2006-05-15

    Scale-invariant long-range correlations have been reported in fluctuations of time-series signals originating from diverse processes such as heart beat dynamics, earthquakes, and stock market data. The common denominator of these apparently different processes is a highly nonlinear dynamics with competing forces and distinct feedback species. We report for the first time an experimental evidence for scaling behavior in NAD(P)H signal fluctuations in isolated mitochondria and intact cells isolated from the liver of a young (5-month-old) mouse. Time-series data were collected by two-photon imaging of mitochondrial NAD(P)H fluorescence and signal fluctuations were quantitatively analyzed for statistical correlations by detrended fluctuation analysis and spectral power analysis. Redox [NAD(P)H / NAD(P)(+)] fluctuations in isolated mitochondria and intact liver cells were found to display nonrandom, long-range correlations. These correlations are interpreted as arising due to the regulatory dynamics operative in Krebs' cycle enzyme network and electron transport chain in the mitochondria. This finding may provide a novel basis for understanding similar regulatory networks that govern the nonequilibrium properties of living cells.

  1. Electric probe for spin transition and fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhiyong; Li, Jia; Hou, Dazhi; Arenholz, Elke; N'diaye, Alpha T.; Tan, Ali; Uchida, Ken-Ichi; Sato, Koji; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslov; Qiu, Z. Q.; Saitoh, Eiji

    Spin fluctuation and transition have always been one of central topics of magnetism and condense matter science. To probe them, neutron scatterings have been used as powerful tools. A part of neutrons injected into a sample is scattered by spin fluctuation inside the sample. This process transcribes the spin fluctuation onto scattering intensity, which is commonly represented by dynamical magnetic susceptibility of the sample and is maximized at magnetic phase transitions. Importantly, a neutron carries spin without electric charge, and it thus can bring spin into a sample without being disturbed by electric energy: an advantage of neutrons, although large facilities such as a nuclear reactor is necessary. Here we show that spin pumping, frequently used in nanoscale spintronic devices, provides a desktop micro probe for spin fluctuation and transition; not only a neutron beam, spin current is also a flux of spin without an electric charge and its transport reflects spin fluctuation in a sample. We demonstrate detection of anti-ferromagnetic transition in ultra-thin CoO films via frequency dependent spin-current transmission measurements.

  2. Correlation length of magnetosheath fluctuations: Cluster statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Gutynska

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetosheath parameters are usually described by gasdynamic or magnetohydrodynamic (MHD models but these models cannot account for one of the most important sources of magnetosheath fluctuations – the foreshock. Earlier statistical processing of a large amount of magnetosheath observations has shown that the magnetosheath magnetic field and plasma flow fluctuations downstream of the quasiparallel shock are much larger than those at the opposite flank. These studies were based on the observations of a single spacecraft and thus they could not provide full information on propagation of the fluctuations through the magnetosheath.

    We present the results of a statistical survey of the magnetosheath magnetic field fluctuations using two years of Cluster observations. We discuss the dependence of the cross-correlation coefficients between different spacecraft pairs on the orientation of the separation vector with respect to the average magnetic field and plasma flow vectors and other parameters. We have found that the correlation length does not exceed ~1 RE in the analyzed frequency range (0.001–0.125 Hz and does not depend significantly on the magnetic field or plasma flow direction. A close connection of cross-correlation coefficients computed in the magnetosheath with the cross-correlation coefficients between a solar wind monitor and a magnetosheath spacecraft suggests that solar wind structures persist on the background of magnetosheath fluctuations.

  3. Fluctuation dynamics in reconnecting current sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Stechow, Adrian; Grulke, Olaf; Ji, Hantao; Yamada, Masaaki; Klinger, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    During magnetic reconnection, a highly localized current sheet forms at the boundary between opposed magnetic fields. Its steep perpendicular gradients and fast parallel drifts can give rise to a range of instabilities which can contribute to the overall reconnection dynamics. In two complementary laboratory reconnection experiments, MRX (PPPL, Princeton) and VINETA.II (IPP, Greifswald, Germany), magnetic fluctuations are observed within the current sheet. Despite the large differences in geometries (toroidal vs. linear), plasma parameters (high vs. low beta) and magnetic configuration (low vs. high magnetic guide field), similar broadband fluctuation characteristics are observed in both experiments. These are identified as Whistler-like fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range that propagate along the current sheet in the electron drift direction. They are intrinsic to the localized current sheet and largely independent of the slower reconnection dynamics. This contribution characterizes these magnetic fluctuations within the wide parameter range accessible by both experiments. Specifically, the fluctuation spectra and wave dispersion are characterized with respect to the magnetic topology and plasma parameters of the reconnecting current sheet.

  4. Thermal and Quantum Fluctuations around Domain Walls

    CERN Document Server

    Aragão de Carvalho, C

    2002-01-01

    We compute thermal and quantum fluctuations in the background of a domain wall in a scalar field theory at finite temperature using the exact scalar propagator in the subspace orthogonal to the wall's translational mode. The propagator makes it possible to calculate terms of any order in the semiclassical expansion of the partition function of the system. The leading term in the expansion corresponds to the fluctuation determinant, which we compute for arbitrary temperature in space dimensions 1,2, and 3. Our results may be applied to the description of thermal scalar propagation in the presence of soliton defects (in polymers, magnetic materials, etc.) and interfaces which are characterized by kinklike profiles. They lead to predictions as to how classical free energies, surface tensions, and interface profiles are modified by fluctuations, allowing for comparison with both numerical and experimental data. They can also be used to estimate transition temperatures. Furthermore, the simple analytic form of the...

  5. Mesoscale wind fluctuations over Danish waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, C.L.

    2010-12-15

    Mesoscale wind fluctuations affect the large scale integration of wind power because they undermine the day-ahead predictability of wind speed and power production, and because they can result in large fluctuations in power generation that must be balanced using reserve power. Large fluctuations in generated power are a particular problem for offshore wind farms because the typically high concentration of turbines within a limited geographical area means that fluctuations can be correlated across large numbers of turbines. Furthermore, organised mesoscale structures that often form over water, such as convective rolls and cellular convection, have length scales of tens of kilometers, and can cause large wind fluctuations on a time scale of around an hour. This thesis is an exploration of the predictability of mesoscale wind fluctuations using observations from the world's first two large offshore wind farms - Horns Rev I in the North Sea, and Nysted in the Baltic Sea. The thesis begins with a climatological analysis of wind fluctuations on time scales of 1-10 hours at the two sites. A novel method for calculating conditional climatologies of spectral information is proposed, based on binning and averaging the time axis of the Hilbert spectrum. Results reveal clear patterns between wind fluctuations and locally observed meteorological conditions. The analysis is expanded by classifying wind fluctuations on time scales of 1-3 hours according to synoptic patterns, satellite pictures and wind classes. Results indicate that cold air outbreaks and open cellular convection are a significant contributor to mesoscale wind variability at Horns Rev. The predictability of mesoscale wind fluctuations is tested by implementing standard statistical models that relate local wind variability to parameters based on a large scale weather analysis. The models show some skill, but only achieve a 15% improvement on a persistence forecast. The possibility of explicitly modelling

  6. The cause of universality in growth fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarzkopf, Yonathan; Farmer, J Doyne

    2010-01-01

    Phenomena as diverse as breeding bird populations, the size of U.S. firms, money invested in mutual funds, the GDP of individual countries and the scientific output of universities all show unusual but remarkably similar growth fluctuations. The fluctuations display characteristic features, including double exponential scaling in the body of the distribution and power law scaling of the standard deviation as a function of size. To explain this we propose a remarkably simple additive replication model: At each step each individual is replaced by a new number of individuals drawn from the same replication distribution. If the replication distribution is sufficiently heavy tailed then the growth fluctuations are Levy distributed. We analyze the data from bird populations, firms, and mutual funds and show that our predictions match the data well, in several respects: Our theory results in a much better collapse of the individual distributions onto a single curve and also correctly predicts the scaling of the stan...

  7. The power fluctuations of a wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, A; Sheinman, Y [Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)

    1996-01-01

    At the beginning of the paper the power fluctuations in the case of a sinusoidal gust are investigated. A quasi-steady model is derived. Then this model is corrected to account for the dynamic characteristics of the turbine. The correction is introduced using a special correction function which is obtained after running a complete dynamic model of the wind turbine. It is shown that for each value of average wind speed there is, for practical purposes, a linear relation between the intensity of power fluctuations and the product of the intensity of turbulence and the above-mentioned correction function. The derivation for a sinusoidal gust is the basis for the analysis of the power fluctuations in the case of a `real` wind. The model for `real` wind is validated by comparing its results with field measurements

  8. Density fluctuation spectrum in whistler turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikh, Dastgeer, E-mail: dastgeer.shaikh@uah.ed [Department of Physics and Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomy Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)

    2010-05-31

    We develop a nonlinear two-dimensional fluid model of whistler turbulence that includes effect of electron fluid density perturbations. The latter is coupled nonlinearly with wave magnetic field. This coupling leads essentially to finite compressibility effects in whistler turbulence model. We find from our simulations that despite strong compressibility effects, the density fluctuations follow the evolution of the wave magnetic field fluctuations. In a characteristic regime where large scale whistlers are predominant, the coupled density fluctuations are found to follow a Kolmogorov-like phenomenology in the inertial range turbulence. Consequently, the turbulent energy is dominated by the large scale (compared to electron inertial length) eddies and it follows a Kolmogorov-like k{sup -7/3} spectrum, where k is a characteristic wavenumber.

  9. Weight fluctuations of information storage media

    CERN Document Server

    Kish, Laszlo B

    2008-01-01

    In this essentially Unsolved Problems of Noise (UPoN) paper we further study the question recently posed in Fluctuation and Noise Letters (December 2007), if there is and interaction between bodies with correlated information content, and weather the observed weight transients during/after changing the information content in memory devices is due to a new type of interaction, a new type of "fifth force", or it is only a classical mechanism. We briefly discuss the issue of the great experimental uncertainty of the Newtonian gravitation constant. We also mention the peculiar experiments about sudden weight changes of humans and animals at the moment of death. The extended monitoring of four 4GB flash drives with no casing and various information content indicate a significant correlation between their weight variations and the fluctuations of ambient humidity. This is an evidence for the role of humidity and hygroscopic components, at least, for long-term weight fluctuations. A sequence of information changing ...

  10. Ultraviolet background fluctuations with clustered sources

    CERN Document Server

    Desjacques, Vincent; Biagetti, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    We develop a count-in-cells approach to the distribution of ultraviolet background fluctuations that includes source clustering. We demonstrate that an exact expression can be obtained if the clustering of ionizing sources follows the hierarchical ansatz. In this case, the intensity distribution depends solely on their 2-point correlation function. We show that the void scaling function of high redshift mock quasars is consistent with the Negative Binomial form, before applying our formalism to the description of HeII-ionizing fluctuations at the end of helium reionization. The model inputs are the observed quasar luminosity function and 2-point correlation at redshift $z\\sim 3$. We find that, for an (comoving) attenuation length $\\lesssim $ 55 Mpc, quasar clustering contributes less than 30% of the variance of intensity fluctuations so long as the quasar correlation length does not exceed 15 Mpc. We investigate also the dependence of the intensity distribution on the large-scale environment. Differences in t...

  11. Lensing Reconstruction using redshifted 21cm Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Zahn, O; Zahn, Oliver; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the potential of second generation measurements of redshifted 21 cm radiation from the epoch of reionization (EOR) to reconstruct the matter density fluctuations along the line of sight. To do so we generalize the quadratic methods developed for the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) to 21cm fluctuations. The three dimensional signal can be analyzed into a finite number of line of sight Fourier modes that contribute to the lensing reconstruction. In comparison with reconstruction using the CMB, 21cm fluctuations have a disadvantage of relative featurelessness, which can be compensated for by the fact that there are multiple uncorrelated backgrounds. The multiple redshift information allows to reconstruct relatively small scales even if one is limited by angular resolution. We estimate that a square kilometer of collecting area is needed with a maximal baseline of 3 km to achieve lensing reconstruction noise levels an order of magnitude below CMB quadratic estimator constraints at $l=1000$, and c...

  12. Fractal Fluctuations and Statistical Normal Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M

    2008-01-01

    Dynamical systems in nature exhibit selfsimilar fractal fluctuations and the corresponding power spectra follow inverse power law form signifying long-range space-time correlations identified as self-organized criticality. The physics of self-organized criticality is not yet identified. The Gaussian probability distribution used widely for analysis and description of large data sets underestimates the probabilities of occurrence of extreme events such as stock market crashes, earthquakes, heavy rainfall, etc. The assumptions underlying the normal distribution such as fixed mean and standard deviation, independence of data, are not valid for real world fractal data sets exhibiting a scale-free power law distribution with fat tails. A general systems theory for fractals visualizes the emergence of successively larger scale fluctuations to result from the space-time integration of enclosed smaller scale fluctuations. The model predicts a universal inverse power law incorporating the golden mean for fractal fluct...

  13. Torsional fluctuations in columnar DNA assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, D J

    2005-01-01

    In columnar assemblies of helical bio-molecules the azimuthal degrees of freedom, i.e. rotations about the long axes of molecules, may be important in determining the structure of the assemblies especially when the interaction energy between neighbouring molecules explicitly depends on their relative azimuthal orientations. For DNA this leads to a rich variety of mesophases for columnar assemblies, each categorized by a specific azimuthal ordering. In a preceding paper [A. Wynveen, D. J. Lee, and A. A. Kornyshev, Eur. Phys. J. E, 16, 303 (2005)] a statistical mechanical theory was developed for the assemblies of torsionally rigid molecues in order to determine how thermal fluctuations influence the structure of these mesophases. Here we extend this theory by including torsional fluctuations of the molecules, where a DNA molecule may twist about its long axis at the cost of torsional elastic energy. Comparing this with the previous study, we find that inclusion of torsional fluctuations further increases the d...

  14. Low Mach Number Fluctuating Hydrodynamics for Electrolytes

    CERN Document Server

    Péraud, Jean-Philippe; Chaudhri, Anuj; Bell, John B; Donev, Aleksandar; Garcia, Alejandro L

    2016-01-01

    We formulate and study computationally the low Mach number fluctuating hydrodynamic equations for electrolyte solutions. We are interested in studying transport in mixtures of charged species at the mesoscale, down to scales below the Debye length, where thermal fluctuations have a significant impact on the dynamics. Continuing our previous work on fluctuating hydrodynamics of multicomponent mixtures of incompressible isothermal miscible liquids (A. Donev, et al., Physics of Fluids, 27, 3, 2015), we now include the effect of charged species using a quasielectrostatic approximation. Localized charges create an electric field, which in turn provides additional forcing in the mass and momentum equations. Our low Mach number formulation eliminates sound waves from the fully compressible formulation and leads to a more computationally efficient quasi-incompressible formulation. We demonstrate our ability to model saltwater (NaCl) solutions in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium settings. We show that our algorithm...

  15. Fluctuation-Enhanced Sensing of Bacterium Odors

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Hung-Chih; King, Maria D; Kwan, Chiman

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the possibility to detect and identify bacteria by sensing their odor via fluctuation-enhanced sensing with commercial Taguchi sensors. The fluctuations of the electrical resistance during exposure to different bacterial odors, Escherichia coli and anthrax-surrogate Bacillus subtilis, have been measured and analyzed. In the present study, the simplest method, the measurement and analysis of power density spectra was used. The sensors were run in the normal heated and the sampling-and-hold working modes, respectively. The results indicate that Taguchi sensors used in these fluctuation-enhanced modes are effective tools of bacterium detection and identification even when they are utilizing only the power density spectrum of the stochastic sensor signal.

  16. Faraday polarization fluctuations of satellite beacon signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. C.; Klobuchar, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The anisotropic effects of random density irregularities in causing Faraday polarization fluctuations of VHF radio signals are examined, taking both rod-like and sheet-like irregularities into consideration. It is found that the variance of Faraday polarization fluctuations depends on the ratio of perpendicular to parallel correlation lengths. The anisotropic effect of rod-like ionospheric irregularities are shown to be most appreciable for longitudinal propagation. The anisotropic effect of sheet-like ionospheric irregularities, however, is not strongly dependent on the radio propagation angle. During transionospheric propagation at large angles with respect to the geomagnetic field, sheet-like irregularities may cause greater Faraday polarization fluctuations than rod-like irregularities.

  17. Classical and quantum temperature fluctuations via holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatsky, Alexander V. [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gudnason, Sven Bjarke [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Thorlacius, Larus [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Zarembo, Konstantin [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Uppsala Univ. (Sweden); Krikun, Alexander [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Kedem, Yaron [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-05-27

    We study local temperature fluctuations in a 2+1 dimensional CFT on the sphere, dual to a black hole in asymptotically AdS space-time. The fluctuation spectrum is governed by the lowest-lying hydrodynamic sound modes of the system whose frequency and damping rate determine whether temperature fluctuations are thermal or quantum. We calculate numerically the corresponding quasinormal frequencies and match the result with the hydrodynamics of the dual CFT at large temperature. As a by-product of our analysis we determine the appropriate boundary conditions for calculating low-lying quasinormal modes for a four-dimensional Reissner-Nordstrom black hole in global AdS.

  18. Self-organization of price fluctuation distribution in evolving markets

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, R K; Pan, Raj Kumar; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2006-01-01

    Financial markets can be seen as complex systems in non-equilibrium steady state, one of whose most important properties is the distribution of price fluctuations. Recently, there have been assertions that this distribution is qualitatively different in emerging markets as compared to developed markets. Here we analyse both high-frequency tick-by-tick as well as daily closing price data to show that the price fluctuations in the Indian stock market, one of the largest emerging markets, have a distribution that is identical to that observed for developed markets (e.g., NYSE). In particular, the cumulative distribution has a long tail described by a power law with an exponent $\\alpha \\approx 3$. Also, we study the historical evolution of this distribution over the period of existence of the National Stock Exchange (NSE) of India, which coincided with the rapid transformation of the Indian economy due to liberalization, and show that this power law tail has been present almost throughout. We conclude that the ``...

  19. Self-organization of price fluctuation distribution in evolving markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, R. K.; Sinha, S.

    2007-03-01

    Financial markets can be seen as complex systems in non-equilibrium steady state, one of whose most important properties is the distribution of price fluctuations. Recently, there have been assertions that this distribution is qualitatively different in emerging markets as compared to developed markets. Here we analyse both high-frequency tick-by-tick as well as daily closing price data to show that the price fluctuations in the Indian stock market, one of the largest emerging markets, have a distribution that is identical to that observed for developed markets (e.g., NYSE). In particular, the cumulative distribution has a long tail described by a power law with an exponent α ap 3. Also, we study the historical evolution of this distribution over the period of existence of the National Stock Exchange (NSE) of India, which coincided with the rapid transformation of the Indian economy due to liberalization, and show that this power law tail has been present almost throughout. We conclude that the "inverse cubic law" is a truly universal feature of a financial market, independent of its stage of development or the condition of the underlying economy.

  20. Scale invariance and universality of economic fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, H. E.; Amaral, L. A. N.; Gopikrishnan, P.; Plerou, V.

    2000-08-01

    In recent years, physicists have begun to apply concepts and methods of statistical physics to study economic problems, and the neologism “econophysics” is increasingly used to refer to this work. Much recent work is focused on understanding the statistical properties of time series. One reason for this interest is that economic systems are examples of complex interacting systems for which a huge amount of data exist, and it is possible that economic time series viewed from a different perspective might yield new results. This manuscript is a brief summary of a talk that was designed to address the question of whether two of the pillars of the field of phase transitions and critical phenomena - scale invariance and universality - can be useful in guiding research on economics. We shall see that while scale invariance has been tested for many years, universality is relatively less frequently discussed. This article reviews the results of two recent studies - (i) The probability distribution of stock price fluctuations: Stock price fluctuations occur in all magnitudes, in analogy to earthquakes - from tiny fluctuations to drastic events, such as market crashes. The distribution of price fluctuations decays with a power-law tail well outside the Lévy stable regime and describes fluctuations that differ in size by as much as eight orders of magnitude. (ii) Quantifying business firm fluctuations: We analyze the Computstat database comprising all publicly traded United States manufacturing companies within the years 1974-1993. We find that the distributions of growth rates is different for different bins of firm size, with a width that varies inversely with a power of firm size. Similar variation is found for other complex organizations, including country size, university research budget size, and size of species of bird populations.

  1. Rapid shallow breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachypnea; Breathing - rapid and shallow; Fast shallow breathing; Respiratory rate - rapid and shallow ... Shallow, rapid breathing has many possible medical causes, including: Asthma Blood clot in an artery in the lung Choking Chronic obstructive ...

  2. Characterization of initial fluctuations for the hydrodynamical description of heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floerchinger, Stefan; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2013-10-01

    Event-by-event fluctuations in the initial conditions for a hydrodynamical description of heavy ion collisions are characterized. We propose a Bessel-Fourier decomposition with respect to the azimuthal angle, the radius in the transverse plane, and rapidity. This allows for a complete characterization of fluctuations in all hydrodynamical fields including energy density, pressure, fluid velocity, shear stress, and bulk viscous pressure. It has the advantage that fluctuations can be ordered with respect to their wavelength and that they can be propagated mode by mode within the hydrodynamical formalism. Event ensembles can then be characterized in terms of a functional probability distribution. For the event ensemble of a Monte Carlo Glauber model, we provide evidence that the latter is close to Gaussian form, thus allowing for a particularly simple characterization of the event distribution.

  3. Characterization of initial fluctuations for the hydrodynamical description of heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Event-by-event fluctuations in the initial conditions for a hydrodynamical description of heavy-ion collisions are characterized. We propose a Bessel-Fourier decomposition with respect to the azimuthal angle, the radius in the transverse plane and rapidity. This allows for a complete characterization of fluctuations in all hydrodynamical fields including energy density, pressure, fluid velocity, shear stress and bulk viscous pressure. It has the advantage that fluctuations can be ordered with respect to their wave length and that they can be propagated mode-by-mode within the hydrodynamical formalism. Event ensembles can then be characterized in terms of a functional probability distribution. For the event ensemble of a Monte Carlo Glauber model, we provide evidence that the latter is close to Gaussian form, thus allowing for a particularly simple characterization of the event distribution.

  4. Some Thoughts on Effects of Fluctuation of Stock and Real Estate Prices on Consumer Expenditure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘琳

    2006-01-01

    @@ With the rapid development of China' s financial markets,stocks and real estate are becoming one of the assets that can exert remarkable influence on consumer behavior.Since the early 1990s, sharp rises in stock market value in some European and North American countries, along with violent swings of stock market in other countries (Japan, for instance), have asserted enormous influence upon their perspective level of consumer expenditure.In the meantime, influence of fluctuation of real estate prices has been growing consistently as well.Dr.Greenspan,Chairman of the Federal Reserve System, proclaimed in 2001 that fluctuation of U.S.real estate prices should have had a more significant impact on consumer expenditure than that from fluctuation of stock prices in that year, and this trend should continue to strengthen in U.S.

  5. Variable-Temperature Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Single-Molecule Fluctuations and Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Muller, Eric A; Kravtsov, Vasily; Sass, Paul M; Dreyer, Jens; Atkin, Joanna M; Raschke, Markus B

    2016-01-13

    Structure, dynamics, and coupling involving single-molecules determine function in catalytic, electronic or biological systems. While vibrational spectroscopy provides insight into molecular structure, rapid fluctuations blur the molecular trajectory even in single-molecule spectroscopy, analogous to spatial averaging in measuring large ensembles. To gain insight into intramolecular coupling, substrate coupling, and dynamic processes, we use tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) at variable and cryogenic temperatures, to slow and control the motion of a single molecule. We resolve intrinsic line widths of individual normal modes, allowing detailed and quantitative investigation of the vibrational modes. From temperature dependent line narrowing and splitting, we quantify ultrafast vibrational dephasing, intramolecular coupling, and conformational heterogeneity. Through statistical correlation analysis of fluctuations of individual modes, we observe rotational motion and spectral fluctuations of the molecule. This work demonstrates single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy beyond chemical identification, opening the possibility for a complete picture of molecular motion ranging from femtoseconds to minutes.

  6. Higher moments of multiplicity fluctuations in a hadron-resonance gas with exact conservation laws

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Jing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Higher moments of multiplicity fluctuations of hadrons produced in central nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied within the hadron-resonance gas model in the canonical ensemble. The conservation of three charges, baryon number, electric charge, and strangeness, is enforced in the large volume limit. Moments up to the forth order of various particles are calculated at SPS, RHIC and LHC energies. The asymptotic fluctuations within a simplified model with only one conserved charge in the canonical ensemble are discussed where simple analytical expressions for moments of multiplicity distribution can be obtained. Moments products of net-proton, net-kaon, and net-charge distributions in Au + Au collisions at RHIC energies are calculated and compared to the experimental measurements. The pseudo-rapidity coverage dependence of net-charge fluctuation is discussed.

  7. Magnetic Shift of the Chemical Freeze-out and Electric Charge Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kenji; Hidaka, Yoshimasa

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the effect of a strong magnetic field on the chemical freeze-out points in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. As a result of inverse magnetic catalysis or magnetic inhibition, the crossover onset to hot and dense matter out of quarks and gluons should be shifted to a lower temperature. To quantify this shift we employ the hadron resonance gas model and an empirical condition for the chemical freeze-out. We point out that the charged particle abundances are significantly affected by the magnetic field so that the electric charge fluctuation is largely enhanced, especially at high baryon density. The charge conservation partially cancels the enhancement, but our calculation shows that the electric charge fluctuation could serve as a magnetometer. We find that the fluctuation exhibits a crossover behavior rapidly increased for e B ≳(0.4 GeV )2, while the charge chemical potential has smoother behavior with an increasing magnetic field.

  8. Localization length fluctuation in randomly layered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Haiming; Huang, Feng; Jiang, Xiangqian; Sun, Xiudong

    2016-10-01

    Localization properties of the two-component randomly layered media (RLM) are studied in detail both analytically and numerically. The localization length is found fluctuating around the analytical result obtained under the high-frequency limit. The fluctuation amplitude approaches zero with the increasing of disorder, which is characterized by the distribution width of random thickness. It is also found that the localization length over the mean thickness periodically varies with the distribution center of random thickness. For the multi-component RLM structure, the arrangement of material must be considered.

  9. Fluctuations of offshore wind generation: Statistical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinson, Pierre; Christensen, Lasse E.A.; Madsen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    The magnitude of power fluctuations at large offshore wind farms has a significant impact on the control and management strategies of their power output. If focusing on the minute scale, one observes successive periods with smaller and larger power fluctuations. It seems that different regimes...... production averaged at a 1, 5, and 10-minute rate. The exercise consists in one-step ahead forecasting of these time-series with the various regime-switching models. It is shown that the MSAR model, for which the succession of regimes is represented by a hidden Markov chain, significantly outperforms...

  10. Anisotropic spin fluctuations in metallic erbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waeppling, R.; Hartmann, O.; Harris, S.; Karlsson, E. (Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Physics (Sweden)); Kalvius, G.M.; Asch, L.; Kratzer, A. (Physik Dept., Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany)); Dalmas de Reotier, P.; Yaouanc, A. (CENG/DRFMC/LIH, 38 - Grenoble (France))

    1993-02-01

    From a [mu]SR study of metallic erbium single crystals, the presence of anisotropic spin correlations in the paramagnetic state at temperatures well above T[sub N] has been detected. The temperature dependence of the depolarization rate of the muon precession signal gives a dynamical critical exponent of 0.15(3) for the fluctuations of the magnetic field component at the muon site that is parallel with the c-axis. For magnetic field components perpendicular to the c-axis there are no indications of slowing down of fluctuations due to the onset of spin correlations on approaching T[sub N]. (orig.).

  11. Observation of reflectance fluctuations in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Takahisa; Aoki, Kenichiro

    2017-04-01

    Through the study of the power spectra of a monochromatic light beam reflected by metallic mirrors, fluctuations in their reflectance are observed. The power spectra were obtained down to a factor 10-6 below the standard quantum limit, with a dynamic range of 105 in frequency and power, using methods we developed. The properties of the spectra are investigated, and their dependence on the material is analyzed. The physics underlying the phenomenon is also discussed. These fluctuations provide a window into the degrees of freedom responsible for the reflection process in metals.

  12. Stochastic Einstein equations with fluctuating volume

    CERN Document Server

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    We develop a simple model to study classical fields on the background of a fluctuating spacetime volume. It is applied to formulate the stochastic Einstein equations with a perfect-fluid source. We investigate the particular case of a stochastic Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker cosmology, and show that the resulting field equations can lead to solutions which avoid the initial big bang singularity. By interpreting the fluctuations as the result of the presence of a quantum spacetime, we conclude that classical singularities can be avoided even within a stochastic model that include quantum effects in a very simple manner.

  13. Disorder-induced dynamic fluctuations in KTN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, L. L.; Sokoloff, J.; Boatner, L. A.

    1985-08-01

    Quasielastic light scattering arising from fluctuations and Raman scattering from soft phonons have been observed in the cubic paraelectric phase and in the tetragonal and orthorhombic ferroelectric phases of KTa 1- xNb xO 3 with x=0.10 and 0.28. An unpolarized, critically narrowing central component is observed in the cubic phase. In the tetragonal phase, this component, which results from E symmetry fluctuations, has a slowly varying width. These results are consistent with an eight-site, order- disorder model for the successive phase transitions.

  14. User fluctuation in communities: a forum case

    CERN Document Server

    Petrushyna, Zinayida

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fluctuation of users help stakeholders to provide a better support to communities. Below we present an experiment where we detect communities, their evolution and based on the data characterize users that stay, leave or join a community. Using a resulted feature set and logistic regression we operate with models of users that are joining and users that are staying in a community. In the related work we emphasize a number of features we will include in our future experiments to enhance train accuracy. This work represents a ?first from a series of experiments devoted to user fluctuation in communities.

  15. Spin fluctuation theory of itinerant electron magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    This volume shows how collective magnetic excitations determine most of  the magnetic properties of itinerant electron magnets. Previous theories were mainly restricted to the Curie-Weiss law temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibilities. Based on the spin amplitude conservation idea including the zero-point fluctuation amplitude, this book shows that the entire temperature and magnetic field dependence of magnetization curves, even in the ground state, is determined by the effect of spin fluctuations. It also shows that the theoretical consequences are largely in agreement with many experimental observations. The readers will therefore gain a new comprehensive perspective of their unified understanding of itinerant electron magnetism.

  16. Fluctuations and localization in mesoscopic electron

    CERN Document Server

    Janssen, Martin

    2001-01-01

    The quantum phenomena of tunneling and interference show up not only in the microscopic world of atoms and molecules, but also in cold materials of the real world, such as metals and semiconductors. Though not fully macroscopic, such mesoscopic systems contain a huge number of particles, and the holistic nature of quantum mechanics becomes evident already in simple electronic measurements. The measured quantity fluctuates as a function of applied fields in an unpredictable, yet reproducible way. Despite this fingerprint character of fluctuations, their statistical properties are universal, i.e

  17. Granular Impact Dynamics: Acoustics and Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Abram H

    2012-01-01

    In the corresponding fluid dynamics video, created for the APS DFD 2012 Gallery of Fluid Motion, we show high-speed videos of 2D granular impact experiments, where an intruder strikes a collection of bidisperse photoelastic disks from above. We discuss the force beneath the intruder, which is strongly fluctuating in space and time. These fluctuations correspond to acoustic pulses which propagate into the medium. Analysis shows that this process, in our experiments, is dominated by collisions with grain clusters. The energy from these collisions is carried into the granular medium along networks of grains, where is it dissipated.

  18. Transition to turbulence, intermittence, and vortex fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bershadskii, A.G.

    1985-09-01

    A model is developed which describes the fluctuation coalescence of vortices at moderately high Reynolds numbers. The model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data on (1) flow intermittence in a boundary layer, a round jet, and a plane wake; (2) the effect of a magnetic field on the formation of a turbulent energy spectrum behind a grid and on turbulent fluctuations and friction in ducts; (3) formation of a turbulent energy spectrum in a boundary layer and in ducts. 12 references.

  19. Inverse scattering problem in turbulent magnetic fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treumann, Rudolf A.; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-08-01

    We apply a particular form of the inverse scattering theory to turbulent magnetic fluctuations in a plasma. In the present note we develop the theory, formulate the magnetic fluctuation problem in terms of its electrodynamic turbulent response function, and reduce it to the solution of a special form of the famous Gelfand-Levitan-Marchenko equation of quantum mechanical scattering theory. The last of these applies to transmission and reflection in an active medium. The theory of turbulent magnetic fluctuations does not refer to such quantities. It requires a somewhat different formulation. We reduce the theory to the measurement of the low-frequency electromagnetic fluctuation spectrum, which is not the turbulent spectral energy density. The inverse theory in this form enables obtaining information about the turbulent response function of the medium. The dynamic causes of the electromagnetic fluctuations are implicit to it. Thus, it is of vital interest in low-frequency magnetic turbulence. The theory is developed until presentation of the equations in applicable form to observations of turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations as input from measurements. Solution of the final integral equation should be done by standard numerical methods based on iteration. We point to the possibility of treating power law fluctuation spectra as an example. Formulation of the problem to include observations of spectral power densities in turbulence is not attempted. This leads to severe mathematical problems and requires a reformulation of inverse scattering theory. One particular aspect of the present inverse theory of turbulent fluctuations is that its structure naturally leads to spatial information which is obtained from the temporal information that is inherent to the observation of time series. The Taylor assumption is not needed here. This is a consequence of Maxwell's equations, which couple space and time evolution. The inversion procedure takes advantage of a particular

  20. Energy dependence of transverse momentum fluctuations in Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at 20A to 158A GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA49 Collaboration; Anticic, T.

    2009-04-15

    Results are presented on event-by-event fluctuations of transverse momenta p{sub T} in central Pb+Pb interactions at 20A, 30A, 40A, 80A, and 158A GeV. The analysis was performed for charged particles at forward center-of-mass rapidity (1.1 < y*{sub {pi}} < 2.6). Three fluctuation measures were studied: the distribution of average transverse momentum M(p{sub T}) in the event, the {phi}{sub p{sub T}} fluctuation measure, and two-particle transverse momentum correlations. Fluctuations of p{sub T} are small and show no significant energy dependence in the energy range of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. Results are compared with QCD-inspired predictions for the critical point, and with the UrQMD model. Transverse momentum fluctuations, similar to multiplicity fluctuations, do not show the increase expected for freeze-out near the critical point of QCD.

  1. Hybrid Computation Model for Intelligent System Design by Synergism of Modified EFC with Neural Network

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In recent past, it has been seen in many applications that synergism of computational intelligence techniques outperforms over an individual technique. This paper proposes a new hybrid computation model which is a novel synergism of modified evolutionary fuzzy clustering with associated neural networks. It consists of two modules: fuzzy distribution and neural classifier. In first module, mean patterns are distributed into the number of clusters based on the modified evolutionary fuzzy cluste...

  2. Mechanical energy fluctuations in granular chains: the possibility of rogue fluctuations or waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ding; Westley, Matthew; Sen, Surajit

    2014-09-01

    The existence of rogue or freak waves in the ocean has been known for some time. They have been reported in the context of optical lattices and the financial market. We ask whether such waves are generic to late time behavior in nonlinear systems. In that vein, we examine the dynamics of an alignment of spherical elastic beads held within fixed, rigid walls at zero precompression when they are subjected to sufficiently rich initial conditions. Here we define such waves generically as unusually large energy fluctuations that sustain for short periods of time. Our simulations suggest that such unusually large fluctuations ("hot spots") and occasional series of such fluctuations through space and time ("rogue fluctuations") are likely to exist in the late time dynamics of the granular chain system at zero dissipation. We show that while hot spots are common in late time evolution, rogue fluctuations are seen in purely nonlinear systems (i.e., no precompression) at late enough times. We next show that the number of such fluctuations grows exponentially with increasing nonlinearity whereas rogue fluctuations decrease superexponentially with increasing precompression. Dissipation-free granular alignment systems may be possible to realize as integrated circuits and hence our observations may potentially be testable in the laboratory.

  3. Fluctuations and structure of amphiphilic films; Fluctuations et structure de films d`amphiphiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourier, CH

    1996-07-01

    This thesis is divided in three parts.The first part exposes in a theoretical point of view, how the fluctuations spectrum of an amphiphilic film is governed by its properties and its bidimensional characteristics.The measurements of fluctuations spectra of an interface are accessible with the measurement of intensity that interface diffuses out of the specular angle, we present in the second chapter the principles of the X rays diffusion by a real interface and see how the diffuse diffusion experiments allow to determine the fluctuations spectrum of an amphiphilic film. The second part is devoted to the different experimental techniques that have allowed to realize the study of fluctuation as well as the structural study.The third part is devoted to experimental results concerning the measurements of fluctuations spectra and to the study of the structure of amphiphilic films. We show that it is possible by using an intense source of X rays (ESRF: European Synchrotron Radiation Facility) to measure the water and amphiphilic films fluctuations spectra until molecular scales. The last chapter is devoted to the structural study and film fluctuations made of di-acetylenic molecules. (N.C.)

  4. Correlations and Fluctuations: Status and Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Volker; Koch, Volker

    2008-04-15

    We will provide an overview of the physics which can be addressed by studying fluctuations and correlations in heavy ion collisions. Observables, which have been discussed in the literature will be briefly reviewed and put in context with experiment and information from Lattice QCD. Special attention will be given to the QCD critical point and the first order co-existence region.

  5. Turbulent pressure fluctuations measured during CHATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven P. Oncley; William J. Massman; Edward G. Patton

    2008-01-01

    Fast-response pressure fluctuations were included in the Canopy Horizontal Array of Turbulence Study (CHATS) at several heights within and just above the canopy in a walnut orchard. Two independent systems were intercompared and then separated. We present an evaluation of turbulence statistics - including the pressure transport term in the turbulence kinetic energy...

  6. Wind fluctuations over the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Claire Louise; Pinson, Pierre; Giebel, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    a certain class of conditions can be found. Here, the HHT is applied to create conditional spectra which demonstrate patterns in the occurrence of severe wind variability. It is shown that wind fluctuations over the North Sea are more severe for westerly flow than for easterly flow, and that severe...

  7. Isocurvature fluctuations induce early star formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sugiyama, N; Zaroubi, S; Silk, J

    2004-01-01

    The early reionization of the Universe inferred from the WMAP polarization results, if confirmed, poses a problem for the hypothesis that scale-invariant adiabatic density fluctuations account for large-scale structure and galaxy formation. One can only generate the required amount of early star for

  8. Density fluctuations and correlations of confined fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varea, C.; Robledo, A.

    The density fluctuations about the equilibrium structure of fluids confined by parallel planar walls are analyzed for the cases of identical and symmetrically opposed fields at the walls. We determine the stability matrix (of the second derivatives of the free energy functional with respect to the density) for conditions both above and below the wetting transition temperature Tw of the semi-infinite system and corroborate in all cases that the equilibrium configurations are stable. We identify the fluctuations close to the walls and in the middle of the slab and discuss their effect when the wall separation L diverges. For competing walls above Tw the localized fluctuation with lowest eigenvalue describes the displacements of the incipient wetting films that become unimpeded interfacial translations for L→∞. Below Tw the fluctuations with lowest eigenvalue correspond to stiffer deformations extended across the slab. For identical walls above Tw coexisting states display incipient prewetting films and the lowest eigenvalue describes the nature of their growth as L increases. We also calculate the pair correlation function for the inhomogeneous states and, for symmetrically opposed walls, we obtain standard Ornstein-Zernike (OZ) behavior at the walls, but find significant deviations from this law at the interface-like region in the middle of the slab. To model fluids with short-ranged forces we use a ferromagnetic Ising-type Hamiltonian in mean-field approximation.

  9. Fluctuation scaling, Taylor's law, and crime.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin S Hanley

    Full Text Available Fluctuation scaling relationships have been observed in a wide range of processes ranging from internet router traffic to measles cases. Taylor's law is one such scaling relationship and has been widely applied in ecology to understand communities including trees, birds, human populations, and insects. We show that monthly crime reports in the UK show complex fluctuation scaling which can be approximated by Taylor's law relationships corresponding to local policing neighborhoods and larger regional and countrywide scales. Regression models applied to local scale data from Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire found that different categories of crime exhibited different scaling exponents with no significant difference between the two regions. On this scale, violence reports were close to a Poisson distribution (α = 1.057 ± 0.026 while burglary exhibited a greater exponent (α = 1.292 ± 0.029 indicative of temporal clustering. These two regions exhibited significantly different pre-exponential factors for the categories of anti-social behavior and burglary indicating that local variations in crime reports can be assessed using fluctuation scaling methods. At regional and countrywide scales, all categories exhibited scaling behavior indicative of temporal clustering evidenced by Taylor's law exponents from 1.43 ± 0.12 (Drugs to 2.094 ± 0081 (Other Crimes. Investigating crime behavior via fluctuation scaling gives insight beyond that of raw numbers and is unique in reporting on all processes contributing to the observed variance and is either robust to or exhibits signs of many types of data manipulation.

  10. Energy density fluctuations in inflationary cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, H F; Muller, Harald F; Schmid, Christoph

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the energy density fluctuations contributed by scalar fields \\Phi with vanishing expectation values, \\langle\\Phi\\rangle=0, which are present in addition to the inflaton field. For simplicity we take \\Phi to be non--interacting and minimally coupled to gravity. We use normal ordering to define the renormalized energy density operator \\rho, and we show that any normal ordering gives the same result for correlation functions of \\rho. We first consider massless fields and derive the energy fluctuations in a single mode \\vk, the two--point correlation function of the energy density, the power spectrum, and the variance of the smeared energy density, \\ddR. Mass effects are investigated for energy fluctuations in single modes. All quantities considered are scale invariant at the second horizon crossing (Harrison--Zel'dovich type) for massless and for unstable massive fields. The magnitude of the relative fluctuations \\de\\rho/\\rt is of order (\\Hi/\\Mp)^2 in the massless case, where \\Hi is the Hubble constan...

  11. A theory of fluctuations in plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felderhof, B.U.

    1964-01-01

    A theory of thermal fluctuations in plasmas is developed based on a probability ensemble for one-particle distribution functions ƒ(r, ν). The probability for a specific ƒ(r, ν) is obtained from the canonical ensemble with the aid of the continuum approximation. Subsequently the probability distribut

  12. Magnetic fluctuations in heavy-fermion metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mason, T.E.; Petersen, T.; Aeppli, G.

    1995-01-01

    , the nature of the antiferromagnetic order and magnetic fluctuations is qualitatively quite different. UPd2Al3 resembles a rare earth magnetic system with coupling of the 4f electrons to the conduction electrons manifested in a broadening of otherwise conventional spin wave excitations. This is in marked...

  13. Generalized fluctuation theorems for classical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, G. S.; Dattagupta, Sushanta

    2015-11-01

    The fluctuation theorem has a very special place in the study of nonequilibrium dynamics of physical systems. The form in which it is used most extensively is the Gallavoti-Cohen fluctuation theorem which is in terms of the distribution of the work p (W )/p (-W )=exp(α W ) . We derive the general form of the fluctuation theorems for an arbitrary multidimensional Gaussian Markov process. Interestingly, the parameter α is by no means universal, hitherto taken for granted in the case of linear Gaussian processes. As a matter of fact, conditions under which α does become a universal parameter 1 /K T are found to be rather restrictive. As an application we consider fluctuation theorems for classical cyclotron motion of an electron in a parabolic potential. The motion of the electron is described by four coupled Langevin equations and thus is nontrivial. The generalized theorems are equally valid for nonequilibrium steady states and could be especially important in the presence of anisotropic diffusion.

  14. Fluctuations in overlapping generations economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede, Mich

    2009-01-01

    and L less than or equal to M. The approach to existence of endogenous fluctuations is basic in the sense that the prime ingredients are the implicit function theorem and linear algebra. Moreover it is sketched how the approach can be applied to show that for an open and dense set of utility functions...

  15. Holocene Glacier Fluctuations In The Swiss Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzhauser, H.

    The reconstruction of preindustrial glacier fluctuations in the Swiss Alps reveals the natural range of Holocene climate variability against which the present-day climatic situation can be judged. The results of very recent research on the Great Aletsch and Gorner Glaciers (Valaisian Alps), the Lower Grindelwald Glacier (Bernese Alps) shed light on the glacier fluctuations during the last 3200 years. These glaciers have, at max- imum extensions, penetrated below the timberline and have even reached inhabited areas resulting in sometimes massive destruction. Losses of buildings, woods and pas- tures are the conditions governing the methods used for the reconstruction of glacier length fluctuation through time. The main methods are: historical - the interpretation of pictorial and written historical records, glazio-archaeology - the search for anthro- pogenic traces that are directly related to changes in glacier size/length and scientific - the radiocarbon dating of fossil soils (palaeosols) and wood found in glacier fore- fields. Numerous samples of palaeosols and fossil wood (tree trunks, roots and macro- remains) found in the glacier forefield were radiocarbon dated. Owing to the good condition of several fossil tree trunks, dendrochronological analyses were also con- ducted. The dendrochronological analysis of fossil trees has supplied much reliable evidence of glacier fluctuations through its proven exactness (a single year resolution) which is impossible to obtain with the radiocarbon method alone.

  16. Fluctuation charge effects in ionization fronts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrayas, Manuel; Trueba, Jose L [Area de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Camino del Molino s/n, 28943 Fuenlabrada, Madrid (Spain); Baltanas, J P [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes 2, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)

    2008-05-21

    In this paper, we study the effects of charge fluctuations on the propagation of both negative and positive ionization fronts in streamer discharges. We show that fronts accelerate when random charge creation events are present. This effect might play a similar role to photoionization in order to make the front move faster.

  17. Magnetic fluctuations in UNi4B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mentink, S.A.M.; Mason, T.E.; Buyers, W.J.L.;

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic fluctuation spectrum of the geometrically frustrated antiferromagnetic compound UNi4B, which partially orders below T-N = 20 K. An overdamped spin excitation is observed at the AF wave vector around 2.4 meV. Low-frequency, weakly Q-dependent inelastic scattering...

  18. Critical point fluctuations in supported lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Simon D; Heath, George; Olmsted, Peter D; Kisil, Anastasia

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that it is possible to observe many aspects of critical phenomena in supported lipid bilayers using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with the aid of stable and precise temperature control. The regions of criticality were determined by accurately measuring and calculating phase diagrams for the 2 phase L(d)-L(o) region, and tracking how it moves with temperature, then increasing the sampling density around the estimated critical regions. Compositional fluctuations were observed above the critical temperature (T(c)) and characterised using a spatial correlation function. From this analysis, the phase transition was found to be most closely described by the 2D Ising model, showing it is a critical transition. Below T(c) roughening of the domain boundaries occurred due to the reduction in line tension close to the critical point. Smaller scale density fluctuations were also detected just below T(c). At T(c), we believe we have observed fluctuations on length scales greater than 10 microm. The region of critically fluctuating 10-100 nm nanodomains has been found to extend a considerable distance above T(c) to temperatures within the biological range, and seem to be an ideal candidate for the actual structure of lipid rafts in cell membranes. Although evidence for this idea has recently emerged, this is the first direct evidence for nanoscale domains in the critical region.

  19. State space modeling of groundwater fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendrecht, W.L.

    2004-01-01

    Groundwater plays an important role in both urban and rural areas. It is therefore essential to monitor groundwater fluctuations. However, data that becomes available need to be analyzed further in order to extract specific information on the groundwater system. Until recently, simple linear time se

  20. Isocurvature fluctuations induce early star formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sugiyama, N; Zaroubi, S; Silk, J

    2004-01-01

    The early reionization of the Universe inferred from the WMAP polarization results, if confirmed, poses a problem for the hypothesis that scale-invariant adiabatic density fluctuations account for large-scale structure and galaxy formation. One can only generate the required amount of early star

  1. Low Mach number fluctuating hydrodynamics for electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péraud, Jean-Philippe; Nonaka, Andy; Chaudhri, Anuj; Bell, John B.; Donev, Aleksandar; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2016-11-01

    We formulate and study computationally the low Mach number fluctuating hydrodynamic equations for electrolyte solutions. We are interested in studying transport in mixtures of charged species at the mesoscale, down to scales below the Debye length, where thermal fluctuations have a significant impact on the dynamics. Continuing our previous work on fluctuating hydrodynamics of multicomponent mixtures of incompressible isothermal miscible liquids [A. Donev et al., Phys. Fluids 27, 037103 (2015), 10.1063/1.4913571], we now include the effect of charged species using a quasielectrostatic approximation. Localized charges create an electric field, which in turn provides additional forcing in the mass and momentum equations. Our low Mach number formulation eliminates sound waves from the fully compressible formulation and leads to a more computationally efficient quasi-incompressible formulation. We demonstrate our ability to model saltwater (NaCl) solutions in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium settings. We show that our algorithm is second order in the deterministic setting and for length scales much greater than the Debye length gives results consistent with an electroneutral approximation. In the stochastic setting, our model captures the predicted dynamics of equilibrium and nonequilibrium fluctuations. We also identify and model an instability that appears when diffusive mixing occurs in the presence of an applied electric field.

  2. Fluctuation Solution Theory Properties from Molecular Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildskov, Jens; Wedberg, R.; O’Connell, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties obtained in the Fluctuation Solution Theory are based on spatial integrals of molecular TCFs between component pairs in the mixture. Molecular simulation, via either MD or MC calculations, can yield these correlation functions for model inter- and intramolecular...... thermodynamic properties of solutions...

  3. Coefficient of variation of underwater irradiance fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, V. L.

    2010-06-01

    We consider underwater sunlight fluctuations in the case of a one-dimensional irregular sea surface. Several rigorous and approximate models are proposed, which make it possible to analytically treat and physically explain the dependence of the coefficient of variation of the underwater irradiance on the depth, the wind velocity, and optical parameters of the sea water.

  4. Local fluctuation control of papain by changing a highly fluctuating residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    To control the local fluctuation of the amino acid residues of papain, ARG59, a highly fluctuating residue in papain, has been changed to GLY. We investigated the binding properties of 2-10GLY (peptides with between 2 and 10 glycine residues) to the modified papain structure via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. The change of the ARG59 residue to GLY alters the binding sites for some peptides, and changed its substrate specificity. Furthermore, the modification alters the binding stability of some peptides. Thus, control of the local fluctuations of residues in proteins has the potential to alter the protein's function.

  5. Fluctuating ideal-gas lattice Boltzmann method with fluctuation dissipation theorem for nonvanishing velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaehler, G; Wagner, A J

    2013-06-01

    Current implementations of fluctuating ideal-gas descriptions with the lattice Boltzmann methods are based on a fluctuation dissipation theorem, which, while greatly simplifying the implementation, strictly holds only for zero mean velocity and small fluctuations. We show how to derive the fluctuation dissipation theorem for all k, which was done only for k=0 in previous derivations. The consistent derivation requires, in principle, locally velocity-dependent multirelaxation time transforms. Such an implementation is computationally prohibitively expensive but, with a small computational trick, it is feasible to reproduce the correct FDT without overhead in computation time. It is then shown that the previous standard implementations perform poorly for non vanishing mean velocity as indicated by violations of Galilean invariance of measured structure factors. Results obtained with the method introduced here show a significant reduction of the Galilean invariance violations.

  6. Effects of thermal shape fluctuations and pairing fluctuations on the giant dipole resonance in warm nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, A K Rhine; Dang, N Dinh

    2015-01-01

    Apart from the higher limits of isospin and temperature, the properties of atomic nuclei are intriguing and less explored at the limits of lowest but finite temperatures. At very low temperatures there is a strong interplay between the shell (quantal fluctuations), statistical (thermal fluctuations), and residual pairing effects as evidenced from the studies on giant dipole resonance (GDR). In our recent work [Phys. Rev. C \\textbf{90}, 044308 (2014)], we have outlined some of our results from a theoretical approach for such warm nuclei where all these effects are incorporated along within the thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) extended to include the fluctuations in the pairing field. In this article, we present the complete formalism based on the microscopic-macroscopic approach for determining the deformation energies and a macroscopic approach which links the deformation to GDR observables. We discuss our results for the nuclei $^{97}$Tc, $^{120}$Sn, $^{179}$Au, and $^{208}$Pb, and corroborate with the...

  7. Effect of thermal fluctuations on a charged dilatonic black Saturn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourhassan, Behnam, E-mail: b.pourhassan@du.ac.ir [School of Physics, Damghan University, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faizal, Mir, E-mail: f2mir@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4 (Canada)

    2016-04-10

    In this paper, we will analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a charged dilatonic black Saturn. These thermal fluctuations will correct the thermodynamics of the charged dilatonic black Saturn. We will analyze the corrections to the thermodynamics of this system by first relating the fluctuations in the entropy to the fluctuations in the energy. Then, we will use the relation between entropy and a conformal field theory to analyze the fluctuations in the entropy. We will demonstrate that similar physical results are obtained from both these approaches. We will also study the effect of thermal fluctuations on the phase transition in this charged dilatonic black Saturn.

  8. Effect of thermal fluctuations on a charged dilatonic black Saturn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Pourhassan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a charged dilatonic black Saturn. These thermal fluctuations will correct the thermodynamics of the charged dilatonic black Saturn. We will analyze the corrections to the thermodynamics of this system by first relating the fluctuations in the entropy to the fluctuations in the energy. Then, we will use the relation between entropy and a conformal field theory to analyze the fluctuations in the entropy. We will demonstrate that similar physical results are obtained from both these approaches. We will also study the effect of thermal fluctuations on the phase transition in this charged dilatonic black Saturn.

  9. Theory of electromagnetic fluctuations for magnetized multi-species plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Roberto E., E-mail: roberto.navarro@ug.uchile.cl; Muñoz, Víctor [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Araneda, Jaime [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción 4070386 (Chile); Moya, Pablo S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, D. C. 20064 (United States); Viñas, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Valdivia, Juan A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Estudios Interdisciplinarios Básicos y Aplicados en Complejidad, CEIBA complejidad, Bogotá (Colombia)

    2014-09-15

    Analysis of electromagnetic fluctuations in plasma provides relevant information about the plasma state and its macroscopic properties. In particular, the solar wind persistently sustains a small but detectable level of magnetic fluctuation power even near thermal equilibrium. These fluctuations may be related to spontaneous electromagnetic fluctuations arising from the discreteness of charged particles. Here, we derive general expressions for the plasma fluctuations in a multi-species plasma following arbitrary distribution functions. This formalism, which generalizes and includes previous works on the subject, is then applied to the generation of electromagnetic fluctuations propagating along a background magnetic field in a plasma of two proton populations described by drifting bi-Maxwellians.

  10. Effect of Thermal Fluctuations on a Charged Dilatonic Black Saturn

    CERN Document Server

    Pourhassan, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we will analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a charged dilatonic black Saturn. These thermal fluctuations will correct the thermodynamics of the charged dilatonic black Saturn. We will analyze the corrections to the thermodynamics of this system by first relating the fluctuations in the entropy to the fluctuations in the energy. Then, we will use the relation between entropy and a conformal field theory to analyze the fluctuations in the entropy. We will demonstrate that similar physical results are obtained from both these approaches. We will also study the effect of thermal fluctuations on the phase transition in this charged dilatonic black Saturn.

  11. Statistical physics approaches to understanding physiological fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kun

    This dissertation investigates the influences of the circadian pacemaker on the temporal structures of fluctuations in the human heartbeat and other related physiological signals. The scale-invariant properties of these physiological fluctuations are demonstrated to possess significant circadian rhythms. These findings are relevant in understanding the daily patterns of adverse cardiac events reported by epidemiological studies. Part I of this dissertation introduces the daily pattern in the onset of adverse cardiac events, the circadian pacemaker, and experimental methods of assessing the circadian influences. This part also reviews scale-invariant properties of physiological fluctuations, and scaling analyses that are used to access long-range correlations (an important scale-invariant property). Part II focuses on the effects of trends and nonstationarities---the mean value, standard deviation, and correlation function of signals are not invariant over time. In the case that trends and nonstationarities are unrelated to the underlying mechanism of a signal, simulations and analytic derivations are conducted to explore how to quantify accurately the correlations embedded in the noisy signals that have trends and nonstationarities. Part III investigates dynamics of human motor activity---a physiological function highly correlated with cardiac dynamics. Results demonstrate that apparently random forearm motion possesses previously unrecognized dynamic patterns. These are characterized by similar distribution forms, long-range correlations, and nonlinear Fourier phase interactions across separate individuals and measurements. Part IV reports circadian influences on the dynamic properties of heartbeat fluctuations and activity signals. Correlation properties of heartbeat fluctuations are found to exhibit a significant circadian rhythm that is independent of behavior-related factors including sleep/wake cycles, and random or scheduled events. This circadian rhythm is

  12. Turbulent magnetic fluctuations in laboratory reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Stechow, Adrian; Grulke, Olaf; Klinger, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The role of fluctuations and turbulence is an important question in astrophysics. While direct observations in space are rare and difficult dedicated laboratory experiments provide a versatile environment for the investigation of magnetic reconnection due to their good diagnostic access and wide range of accessible plasma parameters. As such, they also provide an ideal chance for the validation of space plasma reconnection theories and numerical simulation results. In particular, we studied magnetic fluctuations within reconnecting current sheets for various reconnection parameters such as the reconnection rate, guide field, as well as plasma density and temperature. These fluctuations have been previously interpreted as signatures of current sheet plasma instabilities in space and laboratory systems. Especially in low collisionality plasmas these may provide a source of anomalous resistivity and thereby contribute a significant fraction of the reconnection rate. We present fluctuation measurements from two complementary reconnection experiments and compare them to numerical simulation results. VINETA.II (Greifswald, Germany) is a cylindrical, high guide field reconnection experiment with an open field line geometry. The reconnecting current sheet has a three-dimensional structure that is predominantly set by the magnetic pitch angle which results from the superposition of the guide field and the in-plane reconnecting field. Within this current sheet, high frequency magnetic fluctuations are observed that correlate well with the local current density and show a power law spectrum with a spectral break at the lower hybrid frequency. Their correlation lengths are found to be extremely short, but propagation is nonetheless observed with high phase velocities that match the Whistler dispersion. To date, the experiment has been run with an external driving field at frequencies higher than the ion cyclotron frequency f_{ci}, which implies that the EMHD framework applies

  13. Large Fluctuations in the High-Redshift Metagalactic Ionizing Background

    CERN Document Server

    D'Aloisio, Anson; Davies, Frederick B; Furlanetto, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations have shown that the scatter in opacities among coeval segments of the Lyman-alpha forest increases rapidly at z > 5. In this paper, we assess whether the large scatter can be explained by fluctuations in the ionizing background in the post-reionization intergalactic medium. We find that matching the observed scatter at z ~ 5.5 requires a short spatially averaged mean free path of 3 shorter than direct measurements at z ~ 5.2. We argue that such rapid evolution in the mean free path is difficult to reconcile with our measurements of the global H I photoionization rate, which stay approximately constant over the interval z ~ 4.8 - 5.5. However, we also show that measurements of the mean free path at z > 5 are likely biased towards higher values by the quasar proximity effect. This bias can reconcile the short values of the mean free path that are required to explain the large scatter in opacities. We discuss the implications of this scenario for cosmological reionization. Finally, we invest...

  14. Fluctuation effects in bidirectional cargo transport

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Sarah; Santen, Ludger

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a theoretical model for bidirectional cargo transport in biological cells, which is driven by teams of molecular motors and subject to thermal fluctuations. The model describes explicitly the directed motion of the molecular motors on the filament. The motor-cargo coupling is implemented via linear springs. By means of extensive Monte Carlo simulations we show that the model describes the experimentally observed regimes of anomalous diffusion, i.e. subdiffusive behavior at short times followed by superdiffusion at intermediate times. The model results indicate that subdiffuse regime is induced by thermal fluctuations while the superdiffusive motion is generated by correlations of the motors' activity. We also tested the efficiency of bidirectional cargo transport in crowded areas by measuring its ability to pass barriers with increased viscosity. Our results show a remarkable gain of efficiency for high viscosities.

  15. Growth fluctuation in preferential attachment dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    In the Yule-Simon process, creation and selection of words follows the preferential attachment mechanism, resulting in a power-law growth in the cumulative number of individual word occurrences as well as the power-law population distribution of the vocabulary. This is derived using mean-field approximation, assuming a continuum limit of both the time and number of word occurrences. However, time and word occurrences are inherently discrete in the process, and it is natural to assume that the cumulative number of word occurrences has a certain fluctuation around the average behavior predicted by the mean-field approximation. We derive the exact and approximate forms of the probability distribution of such fluctuation analytically, and confirm that those probability distributions are well supported by the numerical experiments.

  16. Dynamical Fluctuations in Baryon--Meson Ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, A

    2010-01-01

    The event-by-event dynamical fluctuations in kaon-to-proton and proton-to-pion ratios have been studied in dependence on center--of--mass energies of nucleon--nucleon collisions $\\sqrt{s}$. Based on changing phase space volume which apparently is the consequence of phase transition from hadrons to quark--gluon plasma at large $\\sqrt{s}$, the single--particle distribution function $f$ is assumed to be rather modified. Varying $f$ and phase space volume are implemented in the grand--canonical partition function, especially at $\\sqrt{s}>17$ GeV, so that hadron resonance gas model, when taking into account the experimental acceptance ${\\cal A}$ and quark phase space occupation factor $\\gamma$, turns to be able to reproduce the dynamical fluctuations in $(K^++K^-)/(p+\\overline{p})$ and $(p+\\overline{p})/(\\pi^++\\pi^-)$ ratios over the entire range of $\\sqrt{s}$.

  17. Fractality feature in oil price fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Momeni, M; Talebi, K

    2008-01-01

    The scaling properties of oil price fluctuations are described as a non-stationary stochastic process realized by a time series of finite length. An original model is used to extract the scaling exponent of the fluctuation functions within a non-stationary process formulation. It is shown that, when returns are measured over intervals less than 10 days, the Probability Density Functions (PDFs) exhibit self-similarity and monoscaling, in contrast to the multifractal behavior of the PDFs at macro-scales (typically larger than one month). We find that the time evolution of the distributions are well fitted by a Levy distribution law at micro-scales. The relevance of a Levy distribution is made plausible by a simple model of nonlinear transfer

  18. Thermal Fluctuation and Meson Melting: Holographic Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ali-Akbari, M; Vahedi, A

    2014-01-01

    We use gauge/gravity duality to investigate the effect of thermal fluctuations on the dissociation of the quarkonium meson in strongly coupled $(3+1)$-dimensional gauge theories. This is done by studying the instability and probable first order phase transition of a probe D7-brane in the dual gravity theory. We explicitly show that for the Minkowski embeddings with their tips close to the horizon in the background, the long wavelength thermal fluctuations lead to an imaginary term in their action signaling an instability in the system. Due to this instability, a phase transition is expected. On the gauge theory side, it indicates that the quarkonium mesons are not stable and dissociate in the plasma. Identifying the imaginary part of the probe barne action with the thermal width of the mesons, we observe that the thermal width increases as one decreases the mass of the quarks. Also keeping the mass fixed, thermal width increases by temperature as expected.

  19. Quantum Fluctuations of a Superconductor Order Parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunov, K Yu; Lehtinen, J S

    2016-12-01

    Tunneling I-V characteristics between very narrow titanium nanowires and "massive" superconducting aluminum were measured. The clear trend was observed: the thinner the titanium electrode, the broader the singularity at eV = Δ1(Al) + Δ2(Ti). The phenomenon can be explained by broadening of the gap edge of the quasi-one-dimensional titanium channels due to quantum fluctuations of the order parameter modulus |Δ2|. The range of the nanowire diameters, where the effect is pronounced, correlates with dimensions where the phase fluctuations of the complex superconducting order parameter Δ = |Δ|e(iφ), the quantum phase slips, broadening the R(T) dependencies, have been observed.

  20. Vorticity Fluctuations in Plane Couette Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz de Zarate, Jose; Sengers, Jan V.

    2010-11-01

    In this presentation we evaluate the flow-induced amplification of the thermal noise in plane Couette configuration. The physical origin of the noise is the random nature of molecular collisions, that contribute with a stochastic component to the stress tensor (Landau's fluctuating hydrodynamics). This intrinsic stochastic forcing is then amplified by the mode- coupling mechanisms associated to shear flow. In a linear approximation, noise amplification can be studied by solving stochastic Orr-Sommerfeld and Squire equations. We compare the efficiency of the different mechanisms, being the most important the direct coupling between Squire and Orr-Sommerfed equations. The main effect is to amplify wall-normal vorticity fluctuations with an spanwise modulation at wave number around 1.5, a configuration that resembles the streaks that have been proposed as precursors of the flow instability.

  1. Maximally Symmetric Spacetimes emerging from thermodynamic fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Bravetti, A; Quevedo, H

    2015-01-01

    In this work we prove that the maximally symmetric vacuum solutions of General Relativity emerge from the geometric structure of statistical mechanics and thermodynamic fluctuation theory. To present our argument, we begin by showing that the pseudo-Riemannian structure of the Thermodynamic Phase Space is a solution to the vacuum Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory of gravity with a cosmological constant. Then, we use the geometry of equilibrium thermodynamics to demonstrate that the maximally symmetric vacuum solutions of Einstein's Field Equations -- Minkowski, de-Sitter and Anti-de-Sitter spacetimes -- correspond to thermodynamic fluctuations. Moreover, we argue that these might be the only possible solutions that can be derived in this manner. Thus, the results presented here are the first concrete examples of spacetimes effectively emerging from the thermodynamic limit over an unspecified microscopic theory without any further assumptions.

  2. Could thermal fluctuations seed cosmic structure?

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, J; Magueijo, Joao; Pogosian, Levon

    2003-01-01

    We examine the possibility that thermal, rather than quantum, fluctuations are responsible for seeding the structure of our universe. We find that while the thermalization condition leads to nearly Gaussian statistics, a Harrisson-Zeldovich spectrum for the primordial fluctuations can only be achieved in very special circumstances. These depend on whether the universe gets hotter or colder in time, while the modes are leaving the horizon. In the latter case we find a no-go theorem which can only be avoided if the fundamental degrees of freedom are not particle-like, such as in string gases near the Hagedorn phase transition. The former case is less forbidding, and we suggest two potentially successful ``warming universe'' scenarios. One makes use of the Phoenix universe, the other of ``phantom'' matter.

  3. Chiral vacuum fluctuations in quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, Joao

    2010-01-01

    We examine tensor perturbations around a deSitter background within the framework of Ashtekar's variables and cousins parameterized by the Immirzi parameter $\\gamma$. At the classical level we recover standard cosmological perturbation theory, with illuminating insights. Quantization leads to real novelties. In the low energy limit we find a second quantized theory of gravitons which displays different vacuum fluctuations for right and left gravitons. Nonetheless right and left gravitons have the same (positive) energies, resolving a number of paradoxes suggested in the literature. The right-left asymmetry of the vacuum fluctuations depends on $\\gamma$ and the ordering of the Hamiltonian constraint, and it would leave a distinctive imprint in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background, thus opening quantum gravity to observational test.

  4. Rainbow gravity and scale-invariant fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Gubitosi, Giulia; Magueijo, Joao

    2013-01-01

    We re-examine a recently proposed scenario where the deformed dispersion relations associated with a flow of the spectral dimension to a UV value of 2 leads to a scale-invariant spectrum of cosmological fluctuations, without the need for inflation. In that scenario Einstein gravity was assumed. The theory displays a wavelength-dependent speed of light but by transforming to a suitable "rainbow frame" this feature can be removed, at the expense of modifying gravity. We find that the ensuing rainbow gravity theory is such that gravity switches off at high energy (or at least leads to a universal conformal coupling). This explains why the fluctuations are scale-invariant on all scales: there is no horizon scale as such. For dispersion relations that do not lead to exact scale invariance we find instead esoteric inflation in the rainbow frame. We argue that these results shed light on the behaviour of gravity under the phenomenon of dimensional reduction.

  5. Dark energy from primordial inflationary quantum fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringeval, Christophe; Suyama, Teruaki; Takahashi, Tomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yokoyama, Shuichiro

    2010-09-17

    We show that current cosmic acceleration can be explained by an almost massless scalar field experiencing quantum fluctuations during primordial inflation. Provided its mass does not exceed the Hubble parameter today, this field has been frozen during the cosmological ages to start dominating the Universe only recently. By using supernovae data, completed with baryonic acoustic oscillations from galaxy surveys and cosmic microwave background anisotropies, we infer the energy scale of primordial inflation to be around a few TeV, which implies a negligible tensor-to-scalar ratio of the primordial fluctuations. Moreover, our model suggests that inflation lasted for an extremely long period. Dark energy could therefore be a natural consequence of cosmic inflation close to the electroweak energy scale.

  6. Memory versus fluctuations in heavy ion fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chushnyakova, M. V.; Gontchar, I. I.

    2013-09-01

    We model collisions of complex nuclei leading to capture using the Langevin equations, with white and colored noises and with instant and retarding friction, respectively. The friction force is supposed to be proportional to the squared derivative of the strong nucleus-nucleus interaction potential (SnnP). The SnnP is calculated within the framework of the double folding model with the density-dependent M3Y NN-forces possessing the finite range exchange term. Comparing results obtained in the presence and in the absence of fluctuations, we found that the fluctuations influence the capture cross sections weakly, typically within 5%. In contradistinction, the influence of the memory effects is found to be about 20%.

  7. Molecular thermodynamics using fluctuation solution theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Martin Dela

    Properties of chemicals and their mutual phase equilibria are critical variables in process design. Reliable estimates of relevant equilibrium properties, from thermodynamic models, can form the basis of good decision making in the development phase of a process design, especially when access...... to relevant experimental data is limited. This thesis addresses the issue of generating and using simple thermodynamic models within a rigorous statistical mechanical framework, the so-called fluctuation solution theory, from which relations connecting properties and phase equilibria can be obtained....... The framework relates thermodynamic variables to molecular pair correlation functions of liquid mixtures. In this thesis, application of the framework is illustrated using two approaches: 1. Solubilities of solid solutes in mixed solvent systems are determined from fluctuation solution theory application...

  8. Molecular thermodynamics using fluctuation solution theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Martin Dela

    Properties of chemicals and their mutual phase equilibria are critical variables in process design. Reliable estimates of relevant equilibrium properties, from thermodynamic models, can form the basis of good decision making in the development phase of a process design, especially when access...... to relevant experimental data is limited. This thesis addresses the issue of generating and using simple thermodynamic models within a rigorous statistical mechanical framework, the so-called fluctuation solution theory, from which relations connecting properties and phase equilibria can be obtained....... The framework relates thermodynamic variables to molecular pair correlation functions of liquid mixtures. In this thesis, application of the framework is illustrated using two approaches: 1. Solubilities of solid solutes in mixed solvent systems are determined from fluctuation solution theory application...

  9. Oil Price Fluctuation Reflects International Power Balance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宇燕; 管清友

    2008-01-01

    Due to the uncertainty of the oil economy,economists have yet to build a perfect analytical framework for the oil market.Over a period of time,oil price fluctuates according to the supply and demand of the international market.In the long run,however,given the political nature of oil,oil price fluctuation is also dependent on the power balance between oil consumer and producer countries.History has proven that the world energy landscape is constantly in a process of change and evolution,which underlies the increasing oil price uncertainty in the long run.From the perspective of the world energy landscape and its evolution,this article applies international political-economic methodology in addressing the energy security issues facing China,with the purpose of offering recommendations for further areas of energy research.

  10. Trapped Electron Precession Shear Induced Fluctuation Decorrelation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.S. Hahm; P.H. Diamond; E.-J. Kim

    2002-07-29

    We consider the effects of trapped electron precession shear on the microturbulence. In a similar way the strong E x B shear reduces the radial correlation length of ambient fluctuations, the radial variation of the trapped electron precession frequency can reduce the radial correlation length of fluctuations associated with trapped electrons. In reversed shear plasmas, with the explicit dependence of the trapped electron precession shearing rate on B(subscript)theta, the sharp radial gradient of T(subscript)e due to local electron heating inside qmin can make the precession shearing mechanism more effective, and reduce the electron thermal transport constructing a positive feedback loop for the T(subscript)e barrier formation.

  11. Charge fluctuations in nano-scale capacitors

    CERN Document Server

    Limmer, David T; Salanne, Mathieu; Chandler, David; Madden, Paul A; van Roij, René; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The fluctuations of the charge on an electrode contain information on the microscopic correlations within the adjacent fluid and their effect on the electronic properties of the interface. We investigate these fluctuations using molecular dynamics simulations in a constant-potential ensemble with histogram reweighting techniques. This approach offers an efficient and accurate route to the differential capacitance and is broadly applicable. We demonstrate these methods with three different capacitors: pure water between platinum electrodes, and a pure as well as a solvent-based organic electrolyte each between graphite electrodes. The total charge distributions with the pure solvent and solvent-based electrolytes are remarkably Gaussian, while in the pure ionic liquid the total charge distribution displays distinct non-Gaussian features, suggesting significant potential-driven changes in the organization of the interfacial fluid.

  12. Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations and Zodiacal Light

    CERN Document Server

    Arendt, Richard G; Moseley, S H; Mather, J

    2016-01-01

    We have performed a specific observational test to measure the effect that the zodiacal light can have on measurements of the spatial fluctuations of the near-IR background. Previous estimates of possible fluctuations caused by zodiacal light have often been extrapolated from observations of the thermal emission at longer wavelengths and low angular resolution, or from IRAC observations of high latitude fields where zodiacal light is faint and not strongly varying with time. The new observations analyzed here target the COSMOS field, at low ecliptic latitude where the zodiacal light intensity varies by factors of $\\sim2$ over the range of solar elongations at which the field can be observed. We find that the white noise component of the spatial power spectrum of the background is correlated with the modeled zodiacal light intensity. Roughly half of the measured white noise is correlated with the zodiacal light, but a more detailed interpretation of the white noise is hampered by systematic uncertainties that ...

  13. Quantifying Fluctuations/Correlations in Polymer Brushes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Xinghua; Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Baohui

    2011-03-01

    Fast lattice Monte Carlo (FLMC) simulations with multiple occupancy of lattice sites and Kronecker δ -function interactions give orders of magnitude faster/better sampling of the configurational space of multi-chain systems than conventional lattice MC simulations with self- and mutual- avoiding walks and nearest-neighbor interactions. Using FLMC simulations with Wang-Landau -- Transition-Matrix sampling, we have studied polymer brushes in both an implicit and explicit solvent. The various quantities obtained from simulations (including the internal energy, Helmholtz free energy, constant-volume heat capacity, segmental distribution, and chain sizes) are compared with predictions from the corresponding lattice self-consistent field theory and Gaussian fluctuation theory that are based on the same Hamiltonian as in FLMC simulations (thus without any parameter-fitting) to unambiguously and quantitatively reveal the effects of system fluctuations and correlations neglected or treated only approximately in the theories. Q. Wang, Soft Matter, 5, 4564 (2009).

  14. Load fluctuations drive actin network growth

    CERN Document Server

    Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2007-01-01

    The growth of actin filament networks is a fundamental biological process that drives a variety of cellular and intracellular motions. During motility, eukaryotic cells and intracellular pathogens are propelled by actin networks organized by nucleation-promoting factors, which trigger the formation of nascent filaments off the side of existing filaments in the network. A Brownian ratchet (BR) mechanism has been proposed to couple actin polymerization to cellular movements, whereby thermal motions are rectified by the addition of actin monomers at the end of growing filaments. Here, by following actin--propelled microspheres using three--dimensional laser tracking, we find that beads adhered to the growing network move via an object--fluctuating BR. Velocity varies with the amplitude of thermal fluctuation and inversely with viscosity as predicted for a BR. In addition, motion is saltatory with a broad distribution of step sizes that is correlated in time. These data point to a model in which thermal fluctuati...

  15. Chiral Vacuum Fluctuations in Quantum Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magueijo, João; Benincasa, Dionigi M. T.

    2011-03-01

    We examine tensor perturbations around a de Sitter background within the framework of Ashtekar’s variables and its cousins parameterized by the Immirzi parameter γ. At the classical level we recover standard cosmological perturbation theory, with illuminating insights. Quantization leads to real novelties. In the low energy limit we find a second quantized theory of gravitons which displays different vacuum fluctuations for right and left gravitons. Nonetheless right and left gravitons have the same (positive) energies, resolving a number of paradoxes suggested in the literature. The right-left asymmetry of the vacuum fluctuations depends on γ and the ordering of the Hamiltonian constraint, and it would leave a distinctive imprint in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background, thus opening quantum gravity to observational test.

  16. Giant natural fluctuation models and anthropogenic warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, S.; Rio Amador, L.; Hébert, R.; Lima, I.

    2016-08-01

    Explanations for the industrial epoch warming are polarized around the hypotheses of anthropogenic warming (AW) and giant natural fluctuations (GNFs). While climate sceptics have systematically attacked AW, up until now they have only invoked GNFs. This has now changed with the publication by D. Keenan of a sample of 1000 series from stochastic processes purporting to emulate the global annual temperature since 1880. While Keenan's objective was to criticize the International Panel on Climate Change's trend uncertainty analysis (their assumption that residuals are only weakly correlated), for the first time it is possible to compare a stochastic GNF model with real data. Using Haar fluctuations, probability distributions, and other techniques of time series analysis, we show that his model has unrealistically strong low-frequency variability so that even mild extrapolations imply ice ages every ≈1000 years. Helped by statistics, the GNF model can easily be scientifically rejected.

  17. Fluctuations When Driving Between Nonequilibrium Steady States

    CERN Document Server

    Riechers, P M

    2016-01-01

    Maintained by environmental fluxes, biological systems are thermodynamic processes that operate far from equilibrium without detailed-balance dynamics. Yet, they often exhibit well defined nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs). More importantly, critical thermodynamic functionality arises directly from transitions among their NESSs, driven by environmental switching. Here, we identify constraints on excess thermodynamic quantities that ride above the NESS housekeeping background. We do this by extending the Crooks fluctuation theorem to transitions among NESSs, without invoking an unphysical dual dynamics. This and corresponding integral fluctuation theorems determine how much work must be expended when controlling systems maintained far from equilibrium. This generalizes feedback control theory, showing that Maxwellian Demons can leverage mesoscopic-state information to take advantage of the excess energetics in NESS transitions. Altogether, these point to universal thermodynamic laws that are immediately app...

  18. Generalised Complex Geometry in Thermodynamical Fluctuation Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fernández de Córdoba

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a brief overview of some key concepts in the theory of generalized complex manifolds. This new geometry interpolates, so to speak, between symplectic geometry and complex geometry. As such it provides an ideal framework to analyze thermodynamical fluctuation theory in the presence of gravitational fields. To illustrate the usefulness of generalized complex geometry, we examine a simplified version of the Unruh effect: the thermalising effect of gravitational fields on the Schroedinger wavefunction.

  19. Thermodynamics and fluctuations far from equilibrium

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, John

    2008-01-01

    This book deals with the formulation of the thermodynamics of chemical and other systems far from equilibrium, including connections to fluctuations. It contains applications to non-equilibrium stationary states and approaches to such states, systems with multiple stationary states, stability and equi-stability conditions, reaction diffusion systems, transport properties, and electrochemical systems. The theoretical treatment is complemented by experimental results to substantiate the formulation. Dissipation and efficiency are analyzed in autonomous and externally forced reactions, including several biochemical systems.

  20. Equilibrium fluctuation energy of gyrokinetic plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krommes, J.A.; Lee, W.W.; Oberman, C.

    1985-11-01

    The thermal equilibrium electric field fluctuation energy of the gyrokinetic model of magnetized plasma is computed, and found to be smaller than the well-known result (k)/8..pi.. = 1/2T/(1 + (klambda/sub D/)/sup 2/) valid for arbitrarily magnetized plasmas. It is shown that, in a certain sense, the equilibrium electric field energy is minimum in the gyrokinetic regime. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Velocity Fluctuations in Electrostatically Driven Granular Media

    OpenAIRE

    Aranson, I. S.; Olafsen, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    We study experimentally the particle velocity fluctuations in an electrostatically driven dilute granular gas. The experimentally obtained velocity distribution functions have strong deviations from Maxwellian form in a wide range of parameters. We have found that the tails of the distribution functions are consistent with a stretched exponential law with typical exponents of the order 3/2. Molecular dynamic simulations shows qualitative agreement with experimental data. Our results suggest t...

  2. Fluctuation sensitivity of a transcriptional signaling cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkiewicz, Kevin R.; Mayo, Michael L.

    2016-09-01

    The internal biochemical state of a cell is regulated by a vast transcriptional network that kinetically correlates the concentrations of numerous proteins. Fluctuations in protein concentration that encode crucial information about this changing state must compete with fluctuations caused by the noisy cellular environment in order to successfully transmit information across the network. Oftentimes, one protein must regulate another through a sequence of intermediaries, and conventional wisdom, derived from the data processing inequality of information theory, leads us to expect that longer sequences should lose more information to noise. Using the metric of mutual information to characterize the fluctuation sensitivity of transcriptional signaling cascades, we find, counter to this expectation, that longer chains of regulatory interactions can instead lead to enhanced informational efficiency. We derive an analytic expression for the mutual information from a generalized chemical kinetics model that we reduce to simple, mass-action kinetics by linearizing for small fluctuations about the basal biological steady state, and we find that at long times this expression depends only on a simple ratio of protein production to destruction rates and the length of the cascade. We place bounds on the values of these parameters by requiring that the mutual information be at least one bit—otherwise, any received signal would be indistinguishable from noise—and we find not only that nature has devised a way to circumvent the data processing inequality, but that it must be circumvented to attain this one-bit threshold. We demonstrate how this result places informational and biochemical efficiency at odds with one another by correlating high transcription factor binding affinities with low informational output, and we conclude with an analysis of the validity of our assumptions and propose how they might be tested experimentally.

  3. An Analytical Approach to Fluctuations in Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Vázquez, R A

    1996-01-01

    We review the problem of fluctuations in particle shower theory. By using a generalization of Furry equation, we find relations between the $n$--particle correlation function and the number of particles average or 1--particle correlation function. Such relations show that the average is the only independent dynamical variable. We also develop a numerical code to solve the equation for the correlation functions and compare the results with those from a Montecarlo simulation which show a perfect agreement between both methods.

  4. Fluctuations and correlations introduction and overview

    CERN Document Server

    Kittel, E W

    2005-01-01

    Higher-order correlations have been observed as particle-density fluctuations. Approximate scaling with improving resolution provides evidence for a self-similar correlation effect. Quantum- Chromodynamics branching is a good candidate for a dynamical explanation of these correlations in e **+e**- collisions at CERN/LEP and, as expected, also of those in pp collisions at future CERN/LHC energies. However, also other sources such as identical-particle Bose-Einstein interference effects contribute.

  5. Primordial black hole formation from cosmological fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Harada, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    Primordial black holes (PBHs) are those which may have formed in the early Universe and affected the subsequent evolution of the Universe through their Hawking radiation and gravitational field. To constrain the early Universe from the observational constraint on the abundance of PBHs, it is essential to determine the formation threshold for primordial cosmological fluctuations, which are naturally described by cosmological long-wavelength solutions. I will briefly review our recent analytical and numerical results on the PBH formation.

  6. Fluctuation sound absorption in quark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kerbikov, B O

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the sound absorption in quark matter due to the interaction of the sound wave with the precritical fluctuations of the diquark-pair field above $T_c$. The soft collective mode of the pair field is derived using the time dependent Ginzburg-Landau functional with random Langevin forces. The strong absorption near the phase transition line may be viewed as a manifestation of the Mandelshtam-Leontovich slow relaxation time theory.

  7. Oil Price Fluctuations and Industry Stock Return

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Tahmoorespour; Marjan Rezvani; Meysam Safari; Elias Randjbarand

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of oil price variation on 14 industries in six markets, including Canada, China, France, India, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Panel weekly data were collected from June 1998 to December 2011. The results indicate that price fluctuations primarily affect the Oil and Gas as well as the Mining industries and have the least influence on the Food and Beverage industry. Furthermore, in three out of six of these countries (Canada, France, and the U.K.)...

  8. Holocene glacial fluctuations in southern South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynhout, S.; Sagredo, E. A.; Kaplan, M. R.; Aravena, J. C.; Martini, M. A.; Strelin, J. A.; Schaefer, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the timing and magnitude of former glacier fluctuations is critical to decipher long-term climatic trends and to unravel both natural cycles and human impact on the current glacial behavior. Despite more than seven decades of research efforts, a unifying model of Holocene glacial fluctuations in Southern South America remains elusive. Here, we present the state-of-the-art regarding the timing of Holocene glacial fluctuation in southern Patagonia-Tierra del Fuego, with a focus on a new generation of high-resolution radiocarbon and 10Be surface exposure dating chronologies. Recently acquired evidence suggest that after receding from advanced Late Glacial positions, Patagonian glaciers were for the most part close to, or even behind, present ice margins during the Early Holocene. On the other hand, emerging chronologies indicate that in some areas there were extensive expansions (century scale?) that punctuated the warm interval. Subsequently, we have evidence of multiple millennial timescale glacial advances starting in the middle Holocene. Several glacial maxima are defined by moraines and other landforms from 7000 years ago to the 19th century, with a gap sometime between 4,500 and 2,500 years ago. The last set of advances began around 800-600 years ago. Although glacial activity is documented in Patagonia at the same time as the European Little Ice Age, the extent of these glacial events are less prominent than those of the mid-Holocene. The causes that may explain these glacial fluctuations remain elusive. Finally, we discuss ongoing efforts to better define the timing and extent of Holocene glaciations in southern South America, and to establish the basis to test competing hypothesis of regional Holocene climate variability.

  9. Fluctuations and the QCD Phase Diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Volker

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution we will discuss how the study of various fluctuation observables may be used to explore the phase diagram of the strong interaction. We will briefly summarize the present study of experimental and theoretical research in this area. We will then discuss various corrections and issues which need to be understood and applied for a meaningful comparison of experimental measurements with theoretical predictions. This contribution is dedicated to Andrzej Bialas on the occasion of his $80^{\\mathrm{th}}$ birthday.

  10. Conserved charge fluctuations with HISQ fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We calculate cumulants of fluctuations of net-baryon number, net-electric charge and net-strangeness, in the framework of lattice regularized QCD. We use a highly improved staggered quark (HISQ) action on lattices with temporal extent of N_tau=6,8 and 12 and almost physical quark masses. By means of a Taylor expansion in various chemical potentials and under demanding both strangeness neutrality as well as the correct isospin asymmetry, we evaluate these fluctuations at conditions met in heavy ion collisions. Cumulants of net-electric charge fluctuations can, in principle, also be measured in heavy ion experiments. We therefore propose a method to extract freeze-out parameters, such as the freeze-out temperature and baryon chemical potential, based on a comparison of lattice results and experimental measurements of two different ratios of net-electric charge cumulants. As this method involves only (lattice) QCD results and experimental measurements it is model independent and, for the purpose of extracting fr...

  11. Controlling charge quantization with quantum fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezouin, S.; Iftikhar, Z.; Anthore, A.; Parmentier, F. D.; Gennser, U.; Cavanna, A.; Ouerghi, A.; Levkivskyi, I. P.; Idrisov, E.; Sukhorukov, E. V.; Glazman, L. I.; Pierre, F.

    2016-08-01

    In 1909, Millikan showed that the charge of electrically isolated systems is quantized in units of the elementary electron charge e. Today, the persistence of charge quantization in small, weakly connected conductors allows for circuits in which single electrons are manipulated, with applications in, for example, metrology, detectors and thermometry. However, as the connection strength is increased, the discreteness of charge is progressively reduced by quantum fluctuations. Here we report the full quantum control and characterization of charge quantization. By using semiconductor-based tunable elemental conduction channels to connect a micrometre-scale metallic island to a circuit, we explore the complete evolution of charge quantization while scanning the entire range of connection strengths, from a very weak (tunnel) to a perfect (ballistic) contact. We observe, when approaching the ballistic limit, that charge quantization is destroyed by quantum fluctuations, and scales as the square root of the residual probability for an electron to be reflected across the quantum channel; this scaling also applies beyond the different regimes of connection strength currently accessible to theory. At increased temperatures, the thermal fluctuations result in an exponential suppression of charge quantization and in a universal square-root scaling, valid for all connection strengths, in agreement with expectations. Besides being pertinent for the improvement of single-electron circuits and their applications, and for the metal-semiconductor hybrids relevant to topological quantum computing, knowledge of the quantum laws of electricity will be essential for the quantum engineering of future nanoelectronic devices.

  12. Strongly intensive measures for multiplicity fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begun, V. V.; Konchakovski, V. P.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.

    2013-04-01

    The two recently proposed families of strongly intensive measures of fluctuations and correlations are studied within the hadron-string-dynamics (HSD) transport approach to nucleus-nucleus collisions. We consider the measures ΔKπ and ΣKπ for kaon and pion multiplicities in Au+Au collisions in a wide range of collision energies and centralities. These strongly intensive measures appear to cancel the participant number fluctuations. This allows to enlarge the centrality window in the analysis of event-by-event fluctuations for up to at least 10% of the most central collisions. We also present a comparison of the HSD results with the data of the NA49 and STAR Collaborations. HSD describes ΣKπ reasonably well. However, the HSD results depend monotonously on collision energy and do not reproduce the bump-dip structure of ΔKπ observed from the NA49 data in the region of the center of mass energy of the nucleon pair \\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 8{--}12 GeV. This observation deserves further study. The origin of this ‘structure’ is not connected with simple geometrical or limited acceptance effects, as these effects are taken into account in HSD simulations.

  13. Fluctuation Measurements at New Spatial Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Ryan; Mattingly, Sean; Berumen, Jorge; Drake, Dereth; Skiff, Fred

    2013-10-01

    We present preliminary measurements from a laser induced fluorescence detection system used to resolve ion density fluctuations on spatial scales approaching the ion Debye length ~0.5 mm. The detection system consists of a pair of moveable periscopes which collimate light collected from a small measurement region (~0.1 cm3) along the axis of a magnetized singly ionized Argon plasma column. The light is imaged onto a pair of 16-channel linear photomultiplier arrays with digitized photon counting on all 32 channels at 1 MHz or on 8 channels at 4 MHz. The viewing regions may be resolved spatially either along or radial to the magnetic field axis depending on the orientation of the entrance slit. Plasma fluctuations resolved in ion velocity have never been observed at this scale. Measurements may provide insight into transport phenomena, which are fundamentally linked to plasma fluctuations. This work is supported by U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-99ER54543.

  14. Photothermal fluctuation spectroscopy on gold nanoparticle dimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waehnert, Miriam; Neubauer, Nils; Raduenz, Romy; Cichos, Frank [Molecular Nanophotonics Group, University of Leipzig, Linnestrasse 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    To measure distance changes on the nanoscale, FRET (Fluorescence resonance energy transfer) is a heavily applied technique in biophysical studies. The upper limit of distance fluctuations being measured with this method is about 10 nm. Furthermore it suffers from photochemical degradation mechanisms like blinking and bleaching of the energy transferring dye molecules. We report on recent experiments using pairs of gold nanoparticles as absorbing markers replacing dye molecules. Gold particles are strongly interacting with light, if they are excited near the plasmon resonance. The resulting dipoles of two closely spaced gold nanoparticles can couple to form a new resonance, which appears in the absorption as a distinct feature. The strength of this absorption depends on the distance of the two particles and is visible up to a few 10 nm, which clearly exceeds the lengthscale of FRET. The gold nanoparticles are detected by photothermal heterodyne detection, using the release of heat from the absorbing particles to create a local refractive index change around them, which can be probed with a confocal laser scanning setup. Due to the plasmon coupling a fluctuating distance will result in a fluctuating photothermal signal. Numerical analyses of the spectra together with first experimental results will be presented.

  15. Fermionic influence (action) on inflationary fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Boyanovsky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by apparent persistent large scale anomalies in the CMB we study the influence of fermionic degrees of freedom on the dynamics of inflaton fluctuations as a possible source of violations of (nearly) scale invariance on cosmological scales. We obtain the non-equilibrium effective action of an inflaton-like scalar field with Yukawa interactions ($Y_{D,M}$) to light \\emph{fermionic} degrees of freedom both for Dirac and Majorana fields in de Sitter space-time. The effective action leads to Langevin equations of motion for the fluctuations of the inflaton-like field, with self-energy corrections and a stochastic gaussian noise. We solve the Langevin equation in the super-Hubble limit implementing a dynamical renormalization group resummation. For a nearly massless inflaton its power spectrum of super Hubble fluctuations is \\emph{enhanced}, $\\mathcal{P}(k;\\eta) = (\\frac{H}{2\\pi})^2\\,e^{\\gamma_t[-k\\eta] }$ with $\\gamma_t[-k\\eta] = \\frac{1}{6\\pi^2} \\Big[\\sum_{i=1}^{N_D}{Y^2_{i,D}}+2\\sum_{j=1}^{N_M}{Y^2_{j,...

  16. On the composition fluctuations of reverse micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovstun, Sergey A; Razumov, Vladimir F

    2010-11-15

    The polydispersity of the reverse micelles is determined mainly by the fluctuations of their composition. The composition of the reverse micelle is a two-dimensional random variable whose components are the numbers of water (i) and surfactant (j) molecules. In this study the fluctuations of the composition of the reverse micelles are considered in the Gaussian approximation. It is shown that the standard deviation of the quantity w=i/j may be calculated from the dependence of the water vapor pressure above the microemulsion on the molar ratio W=[water]/[surfactant]. The estimation based on the literature data for microemulsion system sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate/water/isooctane at 37°C in the range W=0-18 has shown that the relative standard deviation of the quantity w is about 10%. It is shown that the value of the composition fluctuations is related to the dependence of average composition on the concentration of reverse micelles at constant parameter W.

  17. Water-level fluctuations influence sediment porewater ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reservoirs typically have elevated fish mercury (Hg) levels compared to natural lakes and rivers. A unique feature of reservoirs is water-level management which can result in sediment exposure to the air. The objective of this study is to identify how reservoir water-level fluctuations impact Hg cycling, particularly the formation of the more toxic and bioaccumulative methylmercury (MeHg). Total-Hg (THg), MeHg, stable isotope methylation rates and several ancillary parameters were measured in reservoir sediments (including some in porewater and overlying water) that are seasonally and permanently inundated. The results showed that sediment and porewater MeHg concentrations were over 3-times higher in areas experiencing water-level fluctuations compared to permanently inundated sediments. Analysis of the data suggest that the enhanced breakdown of organic matter in sediments experiencing water-level fluctuations has a two-fold effect on stimulating Hg methylation: 1) it increases the partitioning of inorganic Hg from the solid phase into the porewater phase (lower log Kd values) where it is more bioavailable for methylation; and 2) it increases dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the porewater which can stimulate the microbial community that can methylate Hg. Sulfate concentrations and cycling were enhanced in the seasonally inundated sediments and may have also contributed to increased MeHg production. Overall, our results suggest that reservoir management a

  18. Entropic fluctuations in thermally driven harmonic networks

    CERN Document Server

    Jaksic, Vojkan; Shirikyan, Armen

    2016-01-01

    We consider a general network of harmonic oscillators driven out of thermal equilibrium by coupling to several heat reservoirs at different temperatures. The action of the reservoirs is implemented by Langevin forces. Assuming the existence and uniqueness of the steady state of the resulting process, we construct a canonical entropy production functional which satisfies the Gallavotti--Cohen fluctuation theorem, i.e., a global large deviation principle with a rate function I(s) obeying the Gallavotti--Cohen fluctuation relation I(-s)-I(s)=s for all s. We also consider perturbations of our functional by quadratic boundary terms and prove that they satisfy extended fluctuation relations, i.e., a global large deviation principle with a rate function that typically differs from I(s) outside a finite interval. This applies to various physically relevant functionals and, in particular, to the heat dissipation rate of the network. Our approach relies on the properties of the maximal solution of a one-parameter famil...

  19. Stochastic isocurvature baryon fluctuations, baryon diffusion, and primordial nucleosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Kurki-Suonio, H; Mathews, G J; Kurki-Suonio, Hannu; Jedamzik, Karsten; Mathews, Grant J

    1996-01-01

    We examine effects on primordial nucleosynthesis from a truly random spatial distribution in the baryon-to-photon ratio (\\eta). We generate stochastic fluctuation spectra characterized by different spectral indices and root-mean-square fluctuation amplitudes. For the first time we explicitly calculate the effects of baryon diffusion on the nucleosynthesis yields of such stochastic fluctuations. We also consider the collapse instability of large-mass-scale inhomogeneities. Our results are generally applicable to any primordial mechanism producing fluctuations in \\eta which can be characterized by a spectral index. In particular, these results apply to primordial isocurvature baryon fluctuation (PIB) models. The amplitudes of scale-invariant baryon fluctuations are found to be severely constrained by primordial nucleosynthesis. However, when the \\eta distribution is characterized by decreasing fluctuation amplitudes with increasing length scale, surprisingly large fluctuation amplitudes on the baryon diffusion ...

  20. Rapid response systems update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterbottom, Fiona; Castex, Julie; Campbell, Anita

    2013-06-01

    Rapid response is a mature concept that is undergoing metamorphosis. The ideal structure and function of these safety teams has not yet been realized but new developments in the field of rapid response systems are evolving.

  1. Participant number fluctuations for higher moments of a multiplicity distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Begun, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    The independent participant model is generalized for skewness and kurtosis. The obtained relations allow to calculate the fluctuations of an arbitrarily high order. From the comparison with the SPS and the LHC data it is found that the participants are not protons. The contribution of the participant fluctuations increases with the order of fluctuations. The method to quantify the value of participant number fluctuations experimentally is proposed.

  2. A study of particle number fluctuation under BCS theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Particle number fluctuations in BCS theory are studied with the relativistic mean-field theory and the shell effects of particle number fluctuations are first discovered. By analyzing the relative errors of the particle number fluctuations, we find that the particle number fluctuations are relevant with the odd-even character. We later apply this method to the examination of the new shell structure, showing that N = 184 for the neutron is indeed a new closed shell.

  3. Experimental results on charge fluctuations in heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, D K; Netrakanti, P K; Pant, L M; Mohanty, A K

    2016-01-01

    We present a subset of experimental results on charge fluctuation from the heavy-ion collisions to search for phase transition and location of critical point in the QCD phase diagram. Measurements from the heavy-ion experiments at the SPS and RHIC energies observe that total charge fluctuations increase from central to peripheral collisions. The net-charge fluctuations in terms of dynamical fluctuation measure $\

  4. Exact fluctuation-entanglement relation for bipartite pure states

    CERN Document Server

    Villaruel, Aura Mae B

    2015-01-01

    We identify a subsystem fluctuation (variance) that measures entanglement in an arbitrary bipartite pure state. This fluctuation is of an observable that generalizes the notion of polarization to an arbitrary N-level subsystem. We express this polarization fluctuation in terms of the order-2 Renyi entanglement entropy and a generalized concurrence. The fluctuation-entanglement relation presented here establishes a framework for experimentally measuring entanglement using Stern-Gerlach-type state selectors.

  5. Retinal ganglion cell adaptation to small luminance fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel K; Graña, Gilberto; Passaglia, Christopher L

    2010-08-01

    To accommodate the wide input range over which the visual system operates within the narrow output range of spiking neurons, the retina adjusts its sensitivity to the mean light level so that retinal ganglion cells can faithfully signal contrast, or relative deviations from the mean luminance. Given the large operating range of the visual system, the majority of work on luminance adaptation has involved logarithmic changes in light level. We report that luminance gain controls are recruited for remarkably small fluctuations in luminance as well. Using spike recordings from the rat optic tract, we show that ganglion cell responses to a brief flash of light are modulated in amplitude by local background fluctuations as little as 15% contrast. The time scale of the gain control is rapid (retinal locus of adaptation precedes the ganglion cell spike generator because response gain changes of on cells were uncorrelated with firing rate. The mechanism seems to reside within the inner retinal network and not in the photoreceptors, because the adaptation profiles of on and off cells differed markedly. The response gain changes follow Weber's law, suggesting that network mechanisms of luminance adaptation described in previous work modulates retinal ganglion cell sensitivity, not just when we move between different lighting environments, but also as our eyes scan a visual scene. Finally, we show that response amplitude is uniformly reduced for flashes on a modulated background that has spatial contrast, indicating that another gain control that integrates luminance signals nonlinearly over space operates within the receptive field center of rat ganglion cells.

  6. The new IGS ionospheric product - TEC fluctuation maps and their scientific application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krankowski, Andrzej; Cherniak, Iurii; Zakharenkova, Irina

    2017-04-01

    The GPS signals fading due to presence of the plasma irregularities in the ionosphere can decrease an operational availability of navigation systems. This effect can be estimated by measuring its impact on phase of the received GPS signal. The new IGS ionospheric fluctuation maps product is based on estimates of the TEC rapid changes. For an overall representation of the spatial evolution of the ionospheric irregularities, which caused the GPS signal fluctuations over the Northern Hemisphere in middle and high latitudes, a daily map of the ROTI index is produced basing on data derived from a representative set of 700 permanent GPS stations. We use the corrected geomagnetic (CGM) coordinates with DGRF/IGRF models. For daily ROTI maps, we averaged and binned all ROTI values collected during 00-24 UT period of a considered day. The grid size is 8 min MLT by 2° MLAT, with the latter covering 50° - 90°. The averaged ROTI value in each MLAT-MLT bin corresponds to probability of the GPS signals phase fluctuations caused by passing of radio signals through the ionospheric irregularities. The resulted ionospheric fluctuation product is represented in the ASCII IONEX-like data format and can be visualized. This data format is described in details. We demonstrate the IGS ionospheric fluctuation map product performance for scientific research application on set of test-cases (geomagnetic storms occurred in the years 2013-2015) for comparative analysis of the resulted daily ROTI maps for quiet and geomagnetically disturbed periods. The intense phase scintillations depicted in the diurnal ROTI maps can provide an important information about development of the severe storm-induced gradients in the ionospheric plasma density, both caused by auroral particle precipitation and plasma flows. It is possible to conclude that IGS ionospheric fluctuation maps product can be effectively used for monitoring of the plasma irregularities with different origin. The independent ground

  7. Ion-dispersion and rapid electron fluctuations in the cusp: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lunde

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We present results from co-ordinated measurements with the low altitude REIMEI satellite and the ESR (EISCAT Svalbard Radar, together with other ground-based instruments carried out in February 2006. The results mainly relate to the dayside cusp where clear signatures of so-called ion-dispersion are seen in the satellite data. The cusp ion-dispersion is important for helping to understand the temporal and spatial structure of magnetopause reconnection. Whenever a satellite crosses boundaries of flux tubes or convection cells, cusp structures such as ion-dispersion will always be encountered. In our case we observed 3 distinct steps in the ion energy, but it includes at least 2 more steps as well, which we interpret as temporal features in relation to pulsed reconnection at the magnetopause. In addition, fast variations of the electron flux and energy occurring during these events have been studied in detail. The variations of the electron population, if interpreted as structures crossed by the REIMEI satellite, would map near the magnetopause to similar features as observed previously with the Cluster satellites. These were explained as Alfvén waves originating from an X-line of magnetic reconnection.

  8. Survival of rapidly fluctuating natural low winter temperatures by High Arctic soil invertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Convey, Peter; Abbandonato, Holly; Bergan, Frode;

    2015-01-01

    experienced at microhabitat level, few studies have explicitly set out to link field conditions experienced by natural multispecies communities with the more detailed laboratory ecophysiological studies of a small number of 'representative' species. This is particularly the case during winter, when snow cover...... microhabitats. To assess survival of natural High Arctic soil invertebrate communities contained in soil and vegetation cores to natural winter temperature variations, the overwintering temperatures they experienced were manipulated by deploying cores in locations with varying snow accumulation: No Snow...

  9. Rapid Reading, Yes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommer, Harvey

    1971-01-01

    Recommends instruction in rapid reading fo high school and college students and asserts that flexibility of speed and reasoning provide the foundation for effective rapid reading. Describes the components of rapid reading as orientation, selection, clarification, arrangement, review, and study. (RW)

  10. Fluctuating lattice Boltzmann method for the diffusion equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Alexander J; Strand, Kyle

    2016-09-01

    We derive a fluctuating lattice Boltzmann method for the diffusion equation. The derivation removes several shortcomings of previous derivations for fluctuating lattice Boltzmann methods for hydrodynamic systems. The comparative simplicity of this diffusive system highlights the basic features of this first exact derivation of a fluctuating lattice Boltzmann method.

  11. A Fluctuating Lattice Boltzmann Method for the Diffusion Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Alexander J

    2016-01-01

    We derive a fluctuating lattice Boltzmann method for the diffusion equation. The derivation removes several shortcomings of previous derivations for fluctuating lattice Boltzmann methods for hydrodynamic systems. The comparative simplicity of this diffusive system highlights the basic features of this first exact derivation of a fluctuating lattice Boltzmann method.

  12. Charged-to-neutral correlation at forward rapidity in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abdelwahab, N M; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Page, B S; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandacz, A; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-01-01

    Event-by-event fluctuations of the ratio of inclusive charged to photon multiplicities at forward rapidity in Au+Au collision at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV have been studied. Dominant contribution to such fluctuations is expected to come from correlated production of charged and neutral pions. We search for evidences of dynamical fluctuations of different physical origins. Observables constructed out of moments of multiplicities are used as measures of fluctuations. Mixed events and model calculations are used as baselines. Results are compared to the dynamical net-charge fluctuations measured in the same acceptance. A non-zero statistically significant signal of dynamical fluctuations is observed in excess to the model prediction when charged particles and photons are measured in the same acceptance. We find that, unlike dynamical net-charge fluctuation, charge-neutral fluctuation is not dominated by correlation due to particle decay. Results are compared to the expectations based on the generic production mech...

  13. Nonthermal Fluctuations and Mechanics of the Active Cell Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, K; Byrd, H; MacKintosh, F C; Kilfoil, M L

    2013-01-01

    We present direct measurements of fluctuations in the nucleus of yeast cells. While prior work has shown these fluctuations to be active and non-thermal in character, their origin and time dependence are not understood. We show that nuclear fluctuations can be quantitatively understood by uncorrelated, active force fluctuations driving a nuclear medium that is dominated by an uncondensed DNA solution, for which we perform rheological measurements on an in vitro model system under similar conditions to what is expected in the nucleus. We conclude that the eukaryotic nucleus of living cells is a nonequilibrium soft material whose fluctuations are actively driven, and are far from thermal in their time dependence.

  14. Runaway electrons as a diagnostic of plasma internal magnetic fluctuations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Yong-Zhen; Ding Xuan-Tong; Li Wen-Zhong

    2006-01-01

    The transport of runaway electrons in a high-temperature plasma is relatively easy to measure in a steady state experiment and a perturbation experiment, which provides runaway electron diffusion coefficient Dr. This diffusion coefficient is determined by internal magnetic fluctuations, so it can be interpreted in terms of a magnetic fluctuation level. The internal magnetic fluctuation level (br/BT) is estimated to be about (2-4)×-4 in the HL-1M plasma. The results presented here demonstrate the effectiveness of using runaway electron transport techniques to determine internal magnetic fluctuations. A profile of magnetic fluctuation level in the HL-1M plasma can be estimated from Dr.

  15. Fluctuations in diffusion processes in microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, Stefano; Cerbino, Roberto; Vailati, Alberto; Giglio, Marzio

    2006-09-01

    It has been shown recently that diffusion processes exhibit giant nonequilibrium fluctuations (NEFs). That is, the diffusing fronts display corrugations whose length scale ranges from the molecular to the macroscopic one. The amplitude of the NEF diverges following a power law behavior proportional to q(-4) (where q is the wave vector). However, fluctuations of wave number smaller than a critical "rolloff" wave vector are quenched by the presence of gravity. It is therefore expected that in microgravity conditions, the amplitude of the NEF should be boosted by the absence of the buoyancy-driven restoring force. This may affect any diffusion process performed in microgravity, such as the crystallization of a protein solution induced by the diffusion of a salt buffer. The aim of GRADFLEX (GRAdient-Driven FLuctuation EXperiment), a joint project of ESA and NASA, is to investigate the presence of NEFs arising in a diffusion process under microgravity conditions. The project consists of two experiments. One is carried out by UNIMI (University of Milan) and INFM (Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia) and is focused on NEF in a concentration diffusion process. The other experiment is performed by UCSB (University of California at Santa Barbara) concerning temperature NEF in a simple fluid. In the UNIMI part of the GRADFLEX experimental setup, NEFs are induced in a binary mixture by means of the Soret effect. The diagnostic method is an all-optical quantitative shadowgraph technique. The power spectrum of the induced NEFs is obtained by the processing of the shadowgraph images. A detailed description of the experimental apparatus as well as the ground-based experimental results is presented here for the UNIMI-INFM experiment. The GRADFLEX payload is scheduled to fly on the FOTON M3 capsule in April 2007.

  16. Stochastic thermodynamics, fluctuation theorems and molecular machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Udo

    2012-12-01

    Stochastic thermodynamics as reviewed here systematically provides a framework for extending the notions of classical thermodynamics such as work, heat and entropy production to the level of individual trajectories of well-defined non-equilibrium ensembles. It applies whenever a non-equilibrium process is still coupled to one (or several) heat bath(s) of constant temperature. Paradigmatic systems are single colloidal particles in time-dependent laser traps, polymers in external flow, enzymes and molecular motors in single molecule assays, small biochemical networks and thermoelectric devices involving single electron transport. For such systems, a first-law like energy balance can be identified along fluctuating trajectories. For a basic Markovian dynamics implemented either on the continuum level with Langevin equations or on a discrete set of states as a master equation, thermodynamic consistency imposes a local-detailed balance constraint on noise and rates, respectively. Various integral and detailed fluctuation theorems, which are derived here in a unifying approach from one master theorem, constrain the probability distributions for work, heat and entropy production depending on the nature of the system and the choice of non-equilibrium conditions. For non-equilibrium steady states, particularly strong results hold like a generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorem involving entropy production. Ramifications and applications of these concepts include optimal driving between specified states in finite time, the role of measurement-based feedback processes and the relation between dissipation and irreversibility. Efficiency and, in particular, efficiency at maximum power can be discussed systematically beyond the linear response regime for two classes of molecular machines, isothermal ones such as molecular motors, and heat engines such as thermoelectric devices, using a common framework based on a cycle decomposition of entropy production.

  17. Energy dependence of multiplicity fluctuations in heavy ion collisions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Lungwitz, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    In this work data of the NA49 experiment at CERN SPS on the energy dependence of multiplicity fluctuations in central Pb+Pb collisions at 20A, 30A, 40A, 80A and 158A GeV, as well as the system size dependence at 158A GeV, is analysed for positively, negatively and all charged hadrons. Furthermore the rapidity and transverse momentum dependence of multiplicity fluctuations are studied. The experimental results are compared to predictions of statistical hadron-gas and string-hadronic models. It is expected that multiplicity fluctuations are sensitive to the phase transition to quark-gluon-plasma (QGP) and to the critical point of strongly interacting matter. It is predicted that both the onset of deconfinement, the lowest energy where QGP is created, and the critical point are located in the SPS energy range. Furthermore, the predictions for the multiplicity fluctuations of statistical and string-hadronic models are different, the experimental data might allow to distinguish between them. The used measure of mu...

  18. Environmental fluctuations restrict eco-evolutionary dynamics in predator-prey system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltunen, Teppo; Ayan, Gökçe B; Becks, Lutz

    2015-06-01

    Environmental fluctuations, species interactions and rapid evolution are all predicted to affect community structure and their temporal dynamics. Although the effects of the abiotic environment and prey evolution on ecological community dynamics have been studied separately, these factors can also have interactive effects. Here we used bacteria-ciliate microcosm experiments to test for eco-evolutionary dynamics in fluctuating environments. Specifically, we followed population dynamics and a prey defence trait over time when populations were exposed to regular changes of bottom-up or top-down stressors, or combinations of these. We found that the rate of evolution of a defence trait was significantly lower in fluctuating compared with stable environments, and that the defence trait evolved to lower levels when two environmental stressors changed recurrently. The latter suggests that top-down and bottom-up changes can have additive effects constraining evolutionary response within populations. The differences in evolutionary trajectories are explained by fluctuations in population sizes of the prey and the predator, which continuously alter the supply of mutations in the prey and strength of selection through predation. Thus, it may be necessary to adopt an eco-evolutionary perspective on studies concerning the evolution of traits mediating species interactions.

  19. Universal fluctuations the phenomenology of hadronic matter

    CERN Document Server

    Botet, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this book is to present, in a comprehensive and progressive way, the appearance of universal limit probability laws in physics, and their connection with the recently developed scaling theory of fluctuations. Arising from the probability theory and renormalization group methods, this novel approach has been proved recently to provide efficient investigative tools for the collective features that occur in any finite system. The mathematical background is self-contained and is formulated in terms which are easy to apply to the physical context. After illustrating the problem

  20. Global Warming and Caspian Sea Level Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Ardakanian, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Coastal regions have a high social, economical and environmental importance. Due to this importance the sea level fluctuations can have many bad consequences. In this research the correlation between the increasing trend of temperature in coastal stations due to Global Warming and the Caspian Sea level has been established. The Caspian Sea level data has been received from the Jason-1 satellite. It was resulted that the monthly correlation between the temperature and sea level is high and also positive and almost the same for all the stations. But the yearly correlation was negative. It means that the sea level has decreased by the increase in temperature.

  1. Voltage fluctuations in neurons: signal or noise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yarom, Yosef; Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2011-01-01

    , we discuss noise-free neuronal signaling and detrimental and beneficial forms of noise in large-scale functional neural networks. Evidence that noise and variability in some cases go hand in hand with behavioral variability and increase behavioral choice, richness, and adaptability opens new avenues...... that allows and facilitates complex adaptive behavior in an unpredictable world. Here we review the growing experimental evidence that functional network activity is associated with intense fluctuations in membrane potential and spike timing. We trace origins and consequences of noise and variability. Finally...

  2. Fluctuating Elasticity Mode in Transient Molecular Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Giovanni; Rossi, Marina; Biffi, Silvia; Sciortino, Francesco; Bellini, Tommaso

    2017-08-01

    Transient molecular networks, a class of adaptive soft materials with remarkable application potential, display complex, and intriguing dynamic behavior. By performing dynamic light scattering on a wide angular range, we study the relaxation dynamics of a reversible network formed by DNA tetravalent nanoparticles, finding a slow relaxation mode that is wave vector independent at large q and crosses over to a standard q-2 viscoelastic relaxation at low q . Exploiting the controlled properties of our DNA network, we attribute this mode to fluctuations in local elasticity induced by connectivity rearrangement. We propose a simple beads and springs model that captures the basic features of this q0 behavior.

  3. Gluon Green functions free of Quantum fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Athenodorou, A; De Soto, F; Rodríguez-Quintero, J; Zafeiropoulos, S

    2016-01-01

    This letter reports on how the Wilson flow technique can efficaciously kill the short-distance quantum fluctuations of 2- and 3-gluon Green functions, removes the $\\Lambda_{\\rm QCD}$ scale and destroys the transition from the confining non-perturbative to the asymptotically-free perturbative sector. After the Wilson flow, the behavior of the Green functions with momenta can be described in terms of the quasi-classical instanton background. The same behavior also occurs, before the Wilson flow, at low-momenta. This last result permits applications as, for instance, the detection of instanton phenomenological properties or a cheap lattice calibration.

  4. Sources of Economic Fluctuations in Central America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfredo Toledo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using panel data from Central America, this paper studies the determining factors of inflation and aggregate output fluctuations by estimating two Structural Vector Autoregressive (SVAR models. Price and output variables are included in one of the models, whereas M2 and the price of oil are additional variables in the other one. Findings of this study suggest that price is determined by the demand, while output seems to be influenced mainly by the supply shocks in that area. It was also evidenced that the price of oil does not have a significant impact on the general price level in that region.

  5. Fluctuation dynamo based on magnetic reconnections

    OpenAIRE

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow which models turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnections of flux ropes. The model is particularly suitable for rarefied plasma, such as the Solar corona or galactic halos. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find tha...

  6. Order parameter fluctuations in the holographic superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Plantz, N W M; Vandoren, S

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of order parameter fluctuations in the holographic superconductor. In particular, the fully backreacted spectral functions of the order parameter in both the normal and the superconducting phase are computed. We also present a vector-like large-$N$ version of the Ginzburg-Landau model that accurately describes our long-wavelength results in both phases. The large-$N$ limit of the latter model explains why the Higgs mode and the second-sound mode are not present in the spectral functions. Our results indicate that the holographic superconductor describes a relativistic multi-component superfluid in the universal regime of the BEC-BCS crossover.

  7. Detrended fluctuation analysis of multivariate time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hui; Shang, P.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we generalize the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to the multivariate case, named multivariate DFA (MVDFA). The validity of the proposed MVDFA is illustrated by numerical simulations on synthetic multivariate processes, where the cases that initial data are generated independently from the same system and from different systems as well as the correlated variate from one system are considered. Moreover, the proposed MVDFA works well when applied to the multi-scale analysis of the returns of stock indices in Chinese and US stock markets. Generally, connections between the multivariate system and the individual variate are uncovered, showing the solid performances of MVDFA and the multi-scale MVDFA.

  8. Fluctuations of wavefunctions about their classical average

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benet, L [Centro Internacional de Ciencias, Ciudad Universitaria, Chamilpa, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Flores, J [Centro Internacional de Ciencias, Ciudad Universitaria, Chamilpa, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Hernandez-Saldana, H [Centro Internacional de Ciencias, Ciudad Universitaria, Chamilpa, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Izrailev, F M [Centro Internacional de Ciencias, Ciudad Universitaria, Chamilpa, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Leyvraz, F [Centro Internacional de Ciencias, Ciudad Universitaria, Chamilpa, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Seligman, T H [Centro Internacional de Ciencias, Ciudad Universitaria, Chamilpa, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    2003-02-07

    Quantum-classical correspondence for the average shape of eigenfunctions and the local spectral density of states are well-known facts. In this paper, the fluctuations of the quantum wavefunctions around the classical value are discussed. A simple random matrix model leads to a Gaussian distribution of the amplitudes whose width is determined by the classical shape of the eigenfunction. To compare this prediction with numerical calculations in chaotic models of coupled quartic oscillators, we develop a rescaling method for the components. The expectations are broadly confirmed, but deviations due to scars are observed. This effect is much reduced when both Hamiltonians have chaotic dynamics.

  9. Boundary Fluctuations and A Reduction Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Herzog, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The boundary Weyl anomalies live on a codimension-1 boundary, $\\partial {\\cal M}$. The entanglement entropy originates from infinite correlations on both sides of a codimension-2 surface, $\\Sigma$. Motivated to have a further understanding of the boundary effects, we introduce a notion of reduction entropy, which, guided by thermodynamics, is a combination of the boundary effective action and the boundary stress tensor defined by allowing the metric on $\\partial {\\cal M}$ to fluctuate. We discuss how a reduction might be performed so that the reduction entropy reproduces the entanglement structure.

  10. Macroscopic fluctuations theory of aerogel dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lefevere, Raphael; Zambotti, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    We consider extensive deterministic dynamics made of $N$ particles modeling aerogels under a macroscopic fluctuation theory description. By using a stochastic model describing those dynamics after a diffusive rescaling, we show that the functional giving the exponential decay in $N$ of the probability of observing a given energy and current profile is not strictly convex as a function of the current. This behaviour is caused by the fact that the energy current is carried by particles which may have arbitrary low speed with sufficiently large probability.

  11. Fluctuations of wavefunctions about their classical average

    CERN Document Server

    Bénet, L; Hernandez-Saldana, H; Izrailev, F M; Leyvraz, F; Seligman, T H

    2003-01-01

    Quantum-classical correspondence for the average shape of eigenfunctions and the local spectral density of states are well-known facts. In this paper, the fluctuations of the quantum wavefunctions around the classical value are discussed. A simple random matrix model leads to a Gaussian distribution of the amplitudes whose width is determined by the classical shape of the eigenfunction. To compare this prediction with numerical calculations in chaotic models of coupled quartic oscillators, we develop a rescaling method for the components. The expectations are broadly confirmed, but deviations due to scars are observed. This effect is much reduced when both Hamiltonians have chaotic dynamics.

  12. Order parameter fluctuations in the holographic superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantz, N. W. M.; Stoof, H. T. C.; Vandoren, S.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the effect of order parameter fluctuations in the holographic superconductor. In particular, following an introduction to the concept of intrinsic dynamics and its implementation within holographic models, we compute the intrinsic spectral functions of the order parameter in both the normal and the superconducting phase, using a fully backreacted bulk geometry. We also present a vector-like large-N version of the Ginzburg–Landau model that accurately describes our long-wavelength results in both phases. Our results indicate that the holographic superconductor describes a relativistic multi-component superfluid in the universal regime of the BEC–BCS crossover.

  13. Entropy production fluctuations of finite Markov chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Da-Quan; Qian, Min; Zhang, Fu-Xi

    2003-09-01

    For almost every trajectory segment over a finite time span of a finite Markov chain with any given initial distribution, the logarithm of the ratio of its probability to that of its time-reversal converges exponentially to the entropy production rate of the Markov chain. The large deviation rate function has a symmetry of Gallavotti-Cohen type, which is called the fluctuation theorem. Moreover, similar symmetries also hold for the rate functions of the joint distributions of general observables and the logarithmic probability ratio.

  14. Universal impedance fluctuations in wave chaotic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmady, Sameer; Zheng, Xing; Ott, Edward; Antonsen, Thomas M; Anlage, Steven M

    2005-01-14

    We experimentally investigate theoretical predictions of universal impedance fluctuations in wave chaotic systems using a microwave analog of a quantum chaotic infinite square well potential. We emphasize the use of the radiation impedance to remove the nonuniversal effects of the particular coupling between the outside world and the scatterer. Specific predictions that we test include the probability density functions (PDFs) of the real and imaginary parts of the universal impedance, the equality of the variances of these PDFs, and the dependence of these PDFs on a single loss parameter.

  15. Primordial fluctuations in extended Liouville theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Wynton E.

    2015-03-01

    Liouville gravity can be used to precisely model features of 3+1 dimensional cosmology in a simplified 1+1d setting. We study primordial fluctuations in a generally covariant extension of Liouville theory, in the context of single field inflation. The scale invariant spectrum of scalar curvature perturbations is exhibited, and their three-point correlation function is computed in the slow roll approximation. We recover Maldacena's consistency relation for the three-point function, which in this context depends on a global shift symmetry of extended Liouville theory.

  16. Primordial fluctuations in extended Liouville theory

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Wynton E

    2014-01-01

    Liouville gravity can be used to precisely model features of 3+1 dimensional cosmology in a simplified 1+1d setting. We study primordial fluctuations in a generally covariant extension of Liouville theory, in the context of single field inflation. The scale invariant spectrum of scalar curvature perturbations is exhibited, and their three-point correlation function is computed in the slow roll approximation. We recover Maldacena's consistency relation for the three-point function, which in this context depends on a global shift symmetry of extended Liouville theory.

  17. Work extraction from quantum systems with bounded fluctuations in work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richens, Jonathan G.; Masanes, Lluis

    2016-11-01

    In the standard framework of thermodynamics, work is a random variable whose average is bounded by the change in free energy of the system. This average work is calculated without regard for the size of its fluctuations. Here we show that for some processes, such as reversible cooling, the fluctuations in work diverge. Realistic thermal machines may be unable to cope with arbitrarily large fluctuations. Hence, it is important to understand how thermodynamic efficiency rates are modified by bounding fluctuations. We quantify the work content and work of formation of arbitrary finite dimensional quantum states when the fluctuations in work are bounded by a given amount c. By varying c we interpolate between the standard and minimum free energies. We derive fundamental trade-offs between the magnitude of work and its fluctuations. As one application of these results, we derive the corrected Carnot efficiency of a qubit heat engine with bounded fluctuations.

  18. Current fluctuations in a two dimensional model of heat conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Espigares, Carlos; Garrido, Pedro L.; Hurtado, Pablo I.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we study numerically and analytically current fluctuations in the two-dimensional Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti (KMP) model of heat conduction. For that purpose, we use a recently introduced algorithm which allows the direct evaluation of large deviations functions. We compare our results with predictions based on the Hydrodynamic Fluctuation Theory (HFT) of Bertini and coworkers, finding very good agreement in a wide interval of current fluctuations. We also verify the existence of a well-defined temperature profile associated to a given current fluctuation which depends exclusively on the magnitude of the current vector, not on its orientation. This confirms the recently introduced Isometric Fluctuation Relation (IFR), which results from the time-reversibility of the dynamics, and includes as a particular instance the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem in this context but adds a completely new perspective on the high level of symmetry imposed by timereversibility on the statistics of nonequilibrium fluctuations.

  19. Effects of plasma collisionality on power balance and magnetic fluctuations in the T1 reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, G.; Brzozowski, J. H.; Hörling, P.; Mazur, S.; Nordlund, P.; Drake, J. R.

    1996-05-01

    The effects of plasma collisionality on power balance and magnetic fluctuations have been studied on the Extrap T1 reversed-field pinch. A characteristic minimum in loop voltage is observed as the plasma collisionality decreases. The minimum is caused by an increase in the anomalous input power and coincides with a change of scaling of the magnetic fluctuations and a rapid increase of the electron mean free path. However, the increase of anomalous input power in the low collisional regime appears to have little influence on the total amount of energy stored in the plasma.

  20. Does urban poverty increase body fluctuating asymmetry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozener, Bariş

    2011-12-01

    Perturbations during development leave enduring signs on the adult body. Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) is a good bio-indicator of stress during ontogeny. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of urban poverty on the fluctuating asymmetry of young Turkish males. Young males from a lower socioeconomic group (N = 140, Mean age = 18.17 +/- 0.61) were selected from slum areas of Ankara, the capital of Turkey, where urban poverty is intense. An upper socioeconomic group, on the other hand, consisted of students from two private colleges and included children from some of the richest families in Turkey (N = 120, Mean age = 18.08 +/- 0.54). Eight anthropometric traits of all subjects were measured. Considering the seven measurements demonstrate ideal FA, the individuals living in poor areas of the city displayed higher FA. The discrepancy between the two groups was even greater for a measure of composite FA. In conclusion, poor living conditions in Ankara, where urban poverty is intense, adversely impact the developmental stability of young Turkish males.

  1. Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations and Zodiacal Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Kashlinsky, A.; Moseley, S. H.; Mather, J.

    2017-01-01

    We performed a specific observational test to measure the effect that the zodiacal light can have on measurements of the spatial fluctuations of the near-IR (near-infrared)background. Previous estimates of possible fluctuations caused by zodiacal light have often been extrapolated from observations of the thermal emission at longer wavelengths and low angular resolution or from IRAC (Infrared Array Camera) observations of high-latitude fields where zodiacal light is faint and not strongly varying with time. The new observations analyzed here target the COSMOS (Cosmic Evolution Survey) field at low ecliptic latitude where the zodiacal light intensity varies by factors of approximately 2 over the range of solar elongations at which the field can be observed. We find that the white-noise component of the spatial power spectrum of the background is correlated with the modeled zodiacal light intensity. Roughly half of the measured white noise is correlated with the zodiacal light, but a more detailed interpretation of the white noise is hampered by systematic uncertainties that are evident in the zodiacal light model. At large angular scales (greater than or approximately equal to 100 arcseconds) where excess power above the white noise is observed, we find no correlation of the power with the modeled intensity of the zodiacal light. This test clearly indicates that the large-scale power in the infrared background is not being caused by the zodiacal light.

  2. Direct measurement of antiferromagnetic domain fluctuations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpyrko, O. G.; Isaacs, E. D.; Logan, J. M.; Feng, Y.; Aeppli, G.; Jaramillo, R.; Kim, H. C.; Rosenbaum, T. F.; Zschack, P.; Sprung, M.; Narayanan, S.; Sandy, A.; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. College London

    2007-05-03

    Measurements of magnetic noise emanating from ferromagnets owing to domain motion were first carried out nearly 100 years ago1, and have underpinned much science and technology2, 3. Antiferromagnets, which carry no net external magnetic dipole moment, yet have a periodic arrangement of the electron spins extending over macroscopic distances, should also display magnetic noise. However, this must be sampled at spatial wavelengths of the order of several interatomic spacings, rather than the macroscopic scales characteristic of ferromagnets. Here we present a direct measurement of the fluctuations in the nanometer-scale superstructure of spin- and charge-density waves associated with antiferromagnetism in elemental chromium. The technique used is X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, where coherent X-ray diffraction produces a speckle pattern that serves as a 'fingerprint' of a particular magnetic domain configuration. The temporal evolution of the patterns corresponds to domain walls advancing and retreating over micrometer distances. This work demonstrates a useful measurement tool for antiferromagnetic domain wall engineering, but also reveals a fundamental finding about spin dynamics in the simplest antiferromagnet: although the domain wall motion is thermally activated at temperatures above 100 K, it is not so at lower temperatures, and indeed has a rate that saturates at a finite value--consistent with quantum fluctuations--on cooling below 40 K.

  3. Mean, fluctuations and predictability in biological dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giometto, A.; Altermatt, F.; Carrara, F.; Rinaldo, A.

    2013-12-01

    Dispersal is a key ecological phenomenon, fundamental to the understanding of the dynamics of invasive species, spread of epidemics and range shifts due to climate or environmental change. Additionally, organisms' spread drives species distribution and affects their coexistence. Despite its relevance, replicated experimentation on biological dispersal is inconclusive to date and current assessments point at inherent limitations to predictability owing to large fluctuations even in the simplest ecological settings. In contrast, we show by replicated experimentation on the spread of the ciliate Tetrahymena sp. in linear landscapes, that information on local unconstrained movement and reproduction of individuals allows to predict reliably the existence and speed of traveling waves of invasion at the macroscopic scale. Furthermore, a theoretical approach introducing demographic stochasticity in the Fisher-Kolmogorov framework of reaction-diffusion processes is shown to capture both the mean and the observed fluctuations in range expansions between replicated invasions. Thus, the predictability of the phenomenon overcomes the inherent stochasticity. Notably, predictions on the spread of organisms are based on local, short-time and independent observations of the two processes affecting dispersal, namely individuals' movement and reproduction. Our results establish a causal link from the short-term individual level to the long-term, broad-scale population patterns and may be generalized to sort whether the variability observed in nature or in experimental ensembles might be accounted for by systematic differences between landscapes or by stochasticity affecting basic vital rates of the organisms involved.

  4. Fluctuation dynamo based on magnetic reconnections

    CERN Document Server

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow which models turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnections of flux ropes. The model is particularly suitable for rarefied plasma, such as the Solar corona or galactic halos. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that the flux rope dynamo is more than an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy released during reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3, consistent with the Solar corona heating by nanoflares. We also present a nonlinear extension of the model. This shows that a plausible saturation mechanism of the fluctuation dynamo is the suppression of turbulent magnetic diffusivity, due to suppression of random stretching at the location o...

  5. Fluctuation dynamo based on magnetic reconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, A. W.; Shukurov, A.; Barenghi, C. F.; Subramanian, K.

    2010-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow which models turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnections of flux ropes. The model is particularly suitable for rarefied plasma, such as the solar corona or galactic halos. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that the flux rope dynamo is more than an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy released during reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3, consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares. We also present a nonlinear extension of the model. This shows that a plausible saturation mechanism of the fluctuation dynamo is the suppression of turbulent magnetic diffusivity, due to suppression of random stretching at the location of the flux ropes. We confirm that the probability distribution function of the magnetic line curvature has a power-law form suggested by \\citet{Sheck:2002b}. We argue, however, using our results that this does not imply a persistent folded structure of magnetic field, at least in the nonlinear stage.

  6. Spin fluctuations in 3d paramagnetic metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Aleksander; Kutepov, Andrey; Antropov, Vladimir

    Spin fluctuations (SFs) in 3d paramagnetic metals were investigated using the linear response formalism within the time dependent density functional theory. An efficient scheme of frequency integration using the Matsubara technique has been implemented and tested. The SFs spectrum in 3d paramagnets is analyzed in real and reciprocal spaces as a function of frequency and temperature. For all materials the SFs are characterized by the coexistence of low and high energy branches which originate from different regions of the Brillouin zone. The low-energy ones can be measured by neutron scattering experiments while the high-energy SFs appear to be more localized. Further, we studied the nature of square of fluctuating magnetic moment in these materials. This work was supported, in part, by the Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and by the Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Materials Science and Engineering. The research was performed at Ames Laboratory, which is operated for the U.S. DOE by Iowa State University under contract # DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  7. Fluctuating structure of aqueous organic nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrahsheh, Fawaz; Wilemski, Gerald

    2013-05-01

    Supercooled and nano-confined water occurs frequently as nanometer-sized aqueousorganic aerosol droplets that are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and in many industrial processes. Nanodroplet structure is important because it influences droplet growth and evaporation rates, heterogeneous reaction rates, and radiative properties. We used classical molecular dynamic simulations to study the structure of binary water-nonane and ternary water-butanol-nonane nanodroplets for several temperatures and droplet sizes. We found that nonspherical, phase-separated Russian Doll (RD) structures occur for water/nonane nanodroplets at all temperatures studied, 220K-300K. The RD structure consists of a nearly spherical water droplet partially wetted by a convex lens of nonane. We then studied the effects of butanol on the wetting of the water/butanol core-shell droplet by the nonane lens. At low concentrations, butanol acts as a surfactant to significantly enhance the wetability of the water droplet by nonane. At 250 K, with sufficient butanol and nonane, perfect wetting (thin film formation by nonane) occurs. Perfect wetting also occurs at higher temperatures, 270 K to 300 K, but this wetting state is progressively destabilized at higher temperature. All of the nanodroplets studied undergo distinct transitions between partial dewetting and perfect wetting states due to isothermal fluctuations in the local distribution of butanol on the surface of the water core. These fluctuations favor the wetted state at lower temperatures and the dewetted state at higher temperatures.

  8. SOL width and intermittent fluctuations in KSTAR

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, O E; Theodorsen, A; Bak, J -G; Hong, S -H; Kim, H -S; Pitts, R A

    2016-01-01

    Radial profiles of the ion saturation current and its fluctuation statistics are presented from probe measurements in L-mode, neutral beam heated plasmas at the outboard mid-plane region of KSTAR. The familiar two-layer structure, seen elsewhere in tokamak L-mode discharges, with a steep near-SOL profile and a broad far-SOL profile, is observed. The profile scale length in the far-SOL increases drastically with line-averaged density, thereby enhancing plasma interactions with the main chamber walls. Time series from the far-SOL region are characterised by large-amplitude bursts attributed to the radial motion of blob-like plasma filaments. Analysis of a data time series of several seconds duration under stationary plasma conditions reveals the statistical properties of these fluctuations, including the rate of level crossings and the average duration of periods spent above a given threshold level. This is shown to be in excellent agreement with predictions of a stochastic model, giving novel predictions of pl...

  9. Zero-point quantum fluctuations in cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Hollenstein, Lukas; Maggiore, Michele; Mitsou, Ermis

    2011-01-01

    We re-examine the classic problem of the renormalization of zero-point quantum fluctuations in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background. We discuss a number of issues that arise when regularizing the theory with a momentum-space cutoff, and show explicitly how introducing non-covariant counter-terms allows to obtain covariant results for the renormalized vacuum energy-momentum tensor. We clarify some confusion in the literature concerning the equation of state of vacuum fluctuations. Further, we point out that the general structure of the effective action becomes richer if the theory contains a scalar field phi with mass m smaller than the Hubble parameter H(t). Such an ultra-light particle cannot be integrated out completely to get the effective action. Apart from the volume term and the Einstein-Hilbert term, that are reabsorbed into renormalizations of the cosmological constant and Newton's constant, the effective action in general also has a term proportional to F(phi)R, for some function F(phi). As a resu...

  10. Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations and Zodiacal Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Kashlinsky, A.; Moseley, S. H.; Mather, J.

    2017-01-01

    We performed a specific observational test to measure the effect that the zodiacal light can have on measurements of the spatial fluctuations of the near-IR (near-infrared)background. Previous estimates of possible fluctuations caused by zodiacal light have often been extrapolated from observations of the thermal emission at longer wavelengths and low angular resolution or from IRAC (Infrared Array Camera) observations of high-latitude fields where zodiacal light is faint and not strongly varying with time. The new observations analyzed here target the COSMOS (Cosmic Evolution Survey) field at low ecliptic latitude where the zodiacal light intensity varies by factors of approximately 2 over the range of solar elongations at which the field can be observed. We find that the white-noise component of the spatial power spectrum of the background is correlated with the modeled zodiacal light intensity. Roughly half of the measured white noise is correlated with the zodiacal light, but a more detailed interpretation of the white noise is hampered by systematic uncertainties that are evident in the zodiacal light model. At large angular scales (greater than or approximately equal to 100 arcseconds) where excess power above the white noise is observed, we find no correlation of the power with the modeled intensity of the zodiacal light. This test clearly indicates that the large-scale power in the infrared background is not being caused by the zodiacal light.

  11. Local average height distribution of fluctuating interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Naftali R.; Meerson, Baruch; Sasorov, Pavel V.

    2017-01-01

    Height fluctuations of growing surfaces can be characterized by the probability distribution of height in a spatial point at a finite time. Recently there has been spectacular progress in the studies of this quantity for the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) equation in 1 +1 dimensions. Here we notice that, at or above a critical dimension, the finite-time one-point height distribution is ill defined in a broad class of linear surface growth models unless the model is regularized at small scales. The regularization via a system-dependent small-scale cutoff leads to a partial loss of universality. As a possible alternative, we introduce a local average height. For the linear models, the probability density of this quantity is well defined in any dimension. The weak-noise theory for these models yields the "optimal path" of the interface conditioned on a nonequilibrium fluctuation of the local average height. As an illustration, we consider the conserved Edwards-Wilkinson (EW) equation, where, without regularization, the finite-time one-point height distribution is ill defined in all physical dimensions. We also determine the optimal path of the interface in a closely related problem of the finite-time height-difference distribution for the nonconserved EW equation in 1 +1 dimension. Finally, we discuss a UV catastrophe in the finite-time one-point distribution of height in the (nonregularized) KPZ equation in 2 +1 dimensions.

  12. 5th International Conference on Valence Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Malik, S

    1987-01-01

    During the Koln meeting (August 28-31, 1984), Irdia was chosen as the venue for the next International Conference on Valence Fluctuations. lhis was in recognition ard appreciation of the work done, both experimental ard theoretical, by the Irdian scientists in this area during the last decade. We decided to hold this Conference in the month of January, 1987 at Bangalore. lhe subject of Valence Fluctuations has kept itself alive ard active as it has provided many shocks ard suprises particularly among the Ce- ard U-based intermetallies. lhe richness of many interesting physical phenomena occurring in mixed valent materials, the flexibility of modifying their physical properties (by alloying, for example) ard the possibility of synthesizing a wide variety of new such materials seem to be the key factors in this regard. Barely six months before this Conference, an International Conference on Anomalous Rare Earths and Actinides (ICAREA) had been held at Grenoble (July, 1986) which also focussed on mixed valence a...

  13. Fluctuation dynamos and their Faraday rotation signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, Pallavi

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in many astrophysical systems like galaxies, galaxy clusters and possibly even the IGM filaments. We study fluctuation dynamo action in turbulent systems focusing on one observational signature; the Faraday rotation measure (RM) from background radio sources seen through the magnetic field generated by such a dynamo. We simulate the fluctuation dynamo (FD) in periodic boxes up to resolutions of 512^3, with varying fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, and measure the resulting random RMs. We show that the resulting rms value of RM is quite significant, given that the FD produces intermittent fields. When the dynamo saturates, it is of order 40%-50% of the value expected in a model where fields of strength B_rms uniformly fill cells of the largest turbulent eddy but are randomly oriented from one cell to another. This level of RM dispersion obtains across different values of magnetic Reynolds number and Prandtl number explored. We also use the random RMs to probe the structure of the ge...

  14. Turbulent Spot Pressure Fluctuation Wave Packet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Wave packet analysis provides a connection between linear small disturbance theory and subsequent nonlinear turbulent spot flow behavior. The traditional association between linear stability analysis and nonlinear wave form is developed via the method of stationary phase whereby asymptotic (simplified) mean flow solutions are used to estimate dispersion behavior and stationary phase approximation are used to invert the associated Fourier transform. The resulting process typically requires nonlinear algebraic equations inversions that can be best performed numerically, which partially mitigates the value of the approximation as compared to a more complete, e.g. DNS or linear/nonlinear adjoint methods. To obtain a simpler, closed-form analytical result, the complete packet solution is modeled via approximate amplitude (linear convected kinematic wave initial value problem) and local sinusoidal (wave equation) expressions. Significantly, the initial value for the kinematic wave transport expression follows from a separable variable coefficient approximation to the linearized pressure fluctuation Poisson expression. The resulting amplitude solution, while approximate in nature, nonetheless, appears to mimic many of the global features, e.g. transitional flow intermittency and pressure fluctuation magnitude behavior. A low wave number wave packet models also recover meaningful auto-correlation and low frequency spectral behaviors.

  15. Cryogenic Liquid Fluctuations in a Motionless Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Vin Ai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers approximate numerical methods to determine own frequencies of cryogenic liquid fluctuations stratification of which changes under any law. The increasing use of cryogenic liquids, liquefied gas, superfluid solutions, and slush liquids in modern mechanical engineering define relevance of a perspective. Interest in the considered problem is also caused by the fact that in cryogenic liquid along with superficial waves there can be internal wave movements penetrating all thickness of liquid in a tank and therefore playing important role in many hydro-dynamic processes.This article considers problems of determining the own frequencies of cryogenic liquid fluctuations, partially filling cylindrical tank of any cross section. It is supposed that the change of the liquid particles density due to thermal stratification of entire liquid mass can proceed continuously under any law. To solve numerically a similar problem, a method of trigonometric series (MTS and a method of final elements (MFE were used. When using the MTS method the unknown solution and variable coefficients of the equation were presented in the form of trigonometric series. Further, after multiplication of series and the subsequent mathematical operations the frequency equation was obtained. Bubnov-Galyorkin's approach was used to obtain solutions by the MFE method. Reliability of received numerical results is confirmed by coincidence with frequency results calculated by analytical formulas of solutions of differential equations with constant frequency of buoyancy.

  16. Fluctuations When Driving Between Nonequilibrium Steady States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechers, Paul M.; Crutchfield, James P.

    2017-08-01

    Maintained by environmental fluxes, biological systems are thermodynamic processes that operate far from equilibrium without detailed-balanced dynamics. Yet, they often exhibit well defined nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs). More importantly, critical thermodynamic functionality arises directly from transitions among their NESSs, driven by environmental switching. Here, we identify the constraints on excess heat and dissipated work necessary to control a system that is kept far from equilibrium by background, uncontrolled "housekeeping" forces. We do this by extending the Crooks fluctuation theorem to transitions among NESSs, without invoking an unphysical dual dynamics. This and corresponding integral fluctuation theorems determine how much work must be expended when controlling systems maintained far from equilibrium. This generalizes thermodynamic feedback control theory, showing that Maxwellian Demons can leverage mesoscopic-state information to take advantage of the excess energetics in NESS transitions. We also generalize an approach recently used to determine the work dissipated when driving between functionally relevant configurations of an active energy-consuming complex system. Altogether, these results highlight universal thermodynamic laws that apply to the accessible degrees of freedom within the effective dynamic at any emergent level of hierarchical organization. By way of illustration, we analyze a voltage-gated sodium ion channel whose molecular conformational dynamics play a critical functional role in propagating action potentials in mammalian neuronal membranes.

  17. Attribution of glacier fluctuations to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerlemans, J.

    2012-04-01

    Glacier retreat is a worlwide phenomenon, which started around the middle of the 19th century. During the period 1800-1850 the number of retreating and advancing glaciers was roughly equal (based on 42 records from different continents). During the period 1850-1900 about 92% of all mountain glaciers became shorter (based on 65 records). After this, the percentage of shrinking glaciers has been around 90% until the present time. The glacier signal is rather coherent over the globe, especially when surging and calving glaciers are not considered (for such glaciers the response to climate change is often masked by length changes related to internal dynamics). From theoretical studies as well as extensive meteorological work on glaciers, the processes that control the response of glaciers to climate change are now basically understood. It is useful to make a difference between geometric factors (e.g. slope, altitudinal range, hypsometry) and climatic setting (e.g. seasonal cycle, precipitation). The most sensitive glaciers appear to be flat glaciers in a maritime climate. Characterizing the dynamic properties of a glacier requires at least two quantities: the climate sensitivity, expressing how the equilibrium glacier state depends on the climatic conditions, and the response time, indicating how fast a glacier approaches a new equilibrium state after a stepwise change in the climatic forcing. These quantities can be estimated from relatively simple theory, showing that differences among glaciers are substantial. For larger glaciers, climate sensitivities (in terms of glacier length) vary from 1 to 8 km per 100 m change in the equilibrium-line altitude. Response times are mainly in the range of 20 to 200 years, with most values between 30 and 80 years. Changes in the equilibrium-line altitude or net mass balance of a glacier are mainly driven by fluctuations in air temperature, precipitation, and global radiation. Energy-balance modelling for many glaciers shows that

  18. CHARACTERISTICS OF CORRELATION AND SPECTRUM BETWEEN WALL FLUCTUATING PRESSURE AND FLUCTUATING VELOCITY OF IMPING-ING JET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The correlation, the spectrum and the turbu-lent scale between wall fluctuating pressure and fluctuating ve-locity, on the bed of plunging pool under the action of single and twin impinging jet, are investigated in the paper by using 2-D LDA and the dynamic pressure scanning system of multi-ple points. It is found that the cross correlation between the horizontal fluctuating velocity and the fluctuating pressure of twin jet is bigger than that of sinlge jet, and the spectrum be-tween horizontal fluctuating velocity and fluctuating pressure obviously has approximately dominant frequency. The rela-tionship between the fluctuation pressure coefficient on wall and the turbulent intensity near the wall can be described with logarithmic curve.

  19. Doubling Fluctuation-Enhanced Sensing Information by Separating Adsorption-Desorption and Difussive Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Schmera, Gabor

    2008-01-01

    We analyze a (symmetrical) two-sensor arrangement with a joint boundary line between the sensors for fluctuation-enhanced sensing. We show a way to separate the adsorption-desorption signal components from the diffusive signal component. Thus the method generates two independent output spectra which doubles the sensor information for pattern recognition.

  20. Fluctuation relation, fluctuation theorem, thermostats and entropy creation in nonequilibrium statistical physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallavotti, Giovanni

    2007-06-01

    A unified viewpoint is presented in the margin to the Conference "Work, dissipation and fluctuations in nonequilibrium physics" Bruxelles 22-25 March, 2006, where the topics were discussed by various authors and it became clear the need that the very different viewpoints be consistently presented by their proponents. To cite this article: G. Gallavotti, C. R. Physique 8 (2007).

  1. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  2. Measurement of Turbulent Pressure and Temperature Fluctuations in a Gas Turbine Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis (Technical Monitor); LaGraff, John E.; Bramanti, Cristina; Pldfield, Martin; Passaro, Andrea; Biagioni, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    The report summarizes the results of the redesign efforts directed towards the gas-turbine combustor rapid-injector flow diagnostic probe developed under sponsorship of NASA-GRC and earlier reported in NASA-CR-2003-212540. Lessons learned during the theoretical development, developmental testing and field-testing in the previous phase of this research were applied to redesign of both the probe sensing elements and of the rapid injection device. This redesigned probe (referred to herein as Turboprobe) has been fabricated and is ready, along with the new rapid injector, for field-testing. The probe is now designed to capture both time-resolved and mean total temperatures, total pressures and, indirectly, one component of turbulent fluctuations.

  3. Fluctuations-induced coexistence in public goods dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, H.; Brenner, N.; Ariel, G.; Louzoun, Y.

    2016-10-01

    Cooperative interactions between individuals in a population and their stability properties are central to population dynamics and evolution. We introduce a generic class of nonlinear dynamical systems describing such interactions between producers and non-producers of a rapidly equilibrating common resource extracted from a finite environment. In the deterministic mean field approximation, fast-growing non-producers drive the entire population to extinction. However, the presence of arbitrarily small perturbations destabilizes this fixed point into a stochastic attractor where both phenotypes can survive. Phase space arguments and moment closure are used to characterize the attractor and show that its properties are not determined by the noise amplitude or boundary conditions, but rather it is stabilized by the stochastic nonlinear dynamics. Spatial Monte Carlo simulations with demographic fluctuations and diffusion illustrate a similar effect, supporting the validity of the two-dimensional stochastic differential equation as an approximation. The functional distribution of the noise emerges as the main factor determining the dynamical outcome. Noise resulting from diffusion between different regions, or additive noise, induce coexistence while multiplicative or local demographic noise do not alter the outcome of deterministic dynamics. The results are discussed in a general context of the effect of noise on phase space structure.

  4. Cross-section fluctuations in chaotic scattering systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, Torleif E. O.; Dietz, Barbara; Richter, Achim

    2016-10-01

    Exact analytical expressions for the cross-section correlation functions of chaotic scattering systems have hitherto been derived only under special conditions. The objective of the present article is to provide expressions that are applicable beyond these restrictions. The derivation is based on a statistical model of Breit-Wigner type for chaotic scattering amplitudes which has been shown to describe the exact analytical results for the scattering (S )-matrix correlation functions accurately. Our results are given in the energy and in the time representations and apply in the whole range from isolated to overlapping resonances. The S -matrix contributions to the cross-section correlations are obtained in terms of explicit irreducible and reducible correlation functions. Consequently, the model can be used for a detailed exploration of the key features of the cross-section correlations and the underlying physical mechanisms. In the region of isolated resonances, the cross-section correlations contain a dominant contribution from the self-correlation term. For narrow states the self-correlations originate predominantly from widely spaced states with exceptionally large partial width. In the asymptotic region of well-overlapping resonances, the cross-section autocorrelation functions are given in terms of the S -matrix autocorrelation functions. For inelastic correlations, in particular, the Ericson fluctuations rapidly dominate in that region. Agreement with known analytical and experimental results is excellent.

  5. On the torque on birefringent plates induced by quantum fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Iannuzzi, D; Barash, Y; Capasso, F; Iannuzzi, Davide; Munday, Jeremy N.; Barash, Yuri; Capasso, Federico

    2004-01-01

    We present detailed numerical calculations of the mechanical torque induced by quantum fluctuations on two parallel birefringent plates with in plane optical anisotropy, separated by either vacuum or a liquid (ethanol). The torque is found to vary as $\\sin(2\\theta)$, where $\\theta$ represents the angle between the two optical axes, and its magnitude rapidly increases with decreasing plate separation $d$. For a 40 $\\mu$m diameter disk, made out of either quartz or calcite, kept parallel to a Barium Titanate plate at $d\\simeq 100$ nm, the maximum torque (at $\\theta={\\pi\\over 4}$) is of the order of $\\simeq 10^{-19}$ N$\\cdot$m. We propose an experiment to observe this torque when the Barium Titanate plate is immersed in ethanol and the other birefringent disk is placed on top of it. In this case the retarded van der Waals (or Casimir-Lifshitz) force between the two birefringent slabs is repulsive. The disk would float parallel to the plate at a distance where its net weight is counterbalanced by the retarded van...

  6. Conserved Charge Fluctuations from Lattice QCD and the Beam Energy Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsch, F.; Bazavov, A.; Ding, H.-T.; Hegde, P.; Kaczmarek, O.; Laermann, E.; Mukherjee, Swagato; Ohno, H.; Petreczky, P.; Schmidt, C.; Sharma, S.; Soeldner, W.; Steinbrecher, P.; Wagner, M.

    2016-12-01

    We discuss the next-to-leading order Taylor expansion of ratios of cumulants of net-baryon number fluctuations. We focus on the relation between the skewness ratio, SBσB ≡ χ3B/χ1B, and the kurtosis ratio, κB σB2 ≡ χ4B/χ2B. We show that differences in these two cumulant ratios are small for small values of the baryon chemical potential. The next-to-leading order correction to κB σB2 however is approximately three times larger than that for SBσB. The former thus drops much more rapidly with increasing beam energy, √{sNN}. We argue that these generic patterns are consistent with current data on cumulants of net-proton number fluctuations measured by the STAR Collaboration at √{sNN} ≥ 19.6 GeV.

  7. Conserved Charge Fluctuations from Lattice QCD and the Beam Energy Scan

    CERN Document Server

    Karsch, F; Ding, H -T; Hegde, P; Kaczmarek, O; Laermann, E; Mukherjee, Swagato; Ohno, H; Petreczky, P; Schmidt, C; Sharma, S; Soeldner, W; Steinbrecher, P; Wagner, M

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the next-to-leading order Taylor expansion of ratios of cumulants of net-baryon number fluctuations. We focus on the relation between the skewness ratio, $S_B\\sigma_B = \\chi_3^B/\\chi_1^B$, and the kurtosis ratio, $\\kappa_B\\sigma_B^2 =\\chi_4^B/\\chi_2^B$. We show that differences in these two cumulant ratios are small for small values of the baryon chemical potential. The next-to-leading order correction to $\\kappa_B\\sigma_B^2$ however is approximately three times larger than that for $S_B\\sigma_B$. The former thus drops much more rapidly with increasing beam energy, $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$. We argue that these generic patterns are consistent with current data on cumulants of net-proton number fluctuations measured by the STAR Collaboration at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}\\ge 19.6$~GeV.

  8. Fast Evaluation of Fluctuations in Biochemical Networks With the Linear Noise Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elf, Johan; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2003-01-01

    Biochemical networks in single cells can display large fluctuations in molecule numbers, making mesoscopic approaches necessary for correct system descriptions. We present a general method that allows rapid characterization of the stochastic properties of intracellular networks. The starting point is a macroscopic description that identifies the system's elementary reactions in terms of rate laws and stoichiometries. From this formulation follows directly the stationary solution of the linear noise approximation (LNA) of the Master equation for all the components in the network. The method complements bifurcation studies of the system's parameter dependence by providing estimates of sizes, correlations, and time scales of stochastic fluctuations. We describe how the LNA can give precise system descriptions also near macroscopic instabilities by suitable variable changes and elimination of fast variables. PMID:14597656

  9. Analysis of single events in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions: A new method to search for critical fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, R. [Univ. of Frankfurt (Germany)

    1995-07-15

    The upcoming generation of experiments with ultrarelativistic heavy nuclear projectiles, at the CERN SPS and at RHIC and LHC, will confront researchers with several thousand identified hadrons per event, suitable detectors provided. An analysis of individual events becomes meaningful concerning a multitude of hadronic signals thought to reveal a transient deconfinement phase transition, or the related critical precursor fluctuations. Transverse momentum spectra, the kaon to pion ratio, and pionic Bose-Einstein correlation are examined, showing how to separate the extreme, probably rare candidate events from the bulk of average events. This type of observables can already be investigated with the Pb beam of the SPS. The author then discusses single event signals that add to the above at RHIC and LHC energies, kaon interferometry, rapidity fluctuation, jet and {gamma} production.

  10. Detrended fluctuation analysis made flexible to detect range of cross-correlated fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwapień, Jarosław; Oświecimka, Paweł; DroŻdŻ, Stanisław

    2015-11-01

    The detrended cross-correlation coefficient ρDCCA has recently been proposed to quantify the strength of cross-correlations on different temporal scales in bivariate, nonstationary time series. It is based on the detrended cross-correlation and detrended fluctuation analyses (DCCA and DFA, respectively) and can be viewed as an analog of the Pearson coefficient in the case of the fluctuation analysis. The coefficient ρDCCA works well in many practical situations but by construction its applicability is limited to detection of whether two signals are generally cross-correlated, without the possibility to obtain information on the amplitude of fluctuations that are responsible for those cross-correlations. In order to introduce some related flexibility, here we propose an extension of ρDCCA that exploits the multifractal versions of DFA and DCCA: multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis and multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis, respectively. The resulting new coefficient ρq not only is able to quantify the strength of correlations but also allows one to identify the range of detrended fluctuation amplitudes that are correlated in two signals under study. We show how the coefficient ρq works in practical situations by applying it to stochastic time series representing processes with long memory: autoregressive and multiplicative ones. Such processes are often used to model signals recorded from complex systems and complex physical phenomena like turbulence, so we are convinced that this new measure can successfully be applied in time-series analysis. In particular, we present an example of such application to highly complex empirical data from financial markets. The present formulation can straightforwardly be extended to multivariate data in terms of the q -dependent counterpart of the correlation matrices and then to the network representation.

  11. Entropic Fluctuations in Thermally Driven Harmonic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakšić, V.; Pillet, C.-A.; Shirikyan, A.

    2017-02-01

    We consider a general network of harmonic oscillators driven out of thermal equilibrium by coupling to several heat reservoirs at different temperatures. The action of the reservoirs is implemented by Langevin forces. Assuming the existence and uniqueness of the steady state of the resulting process, we construct a canonical entropy production functional S^t which satisfies the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem. More precisely, we prove that there exists κ _c>1/2 such that the cumulant generating function of S^t has a large-time limit e(α ) which is finite on a closed interval [1/2-κ _c,1/2+κ _c], infinite on its complement and satisfies the Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry e(1-α )=e(α ) for all α in R. Moreover, we show that e(α ) is essentially smooth, i.e., that e'(α )→ ∓ ∞ as α → 1/2 ∓ κ _c. It follows from the Gärtner-Ellis theorem that S^t satisfies a global large deviation principle with a rate function I( s) obeying the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation relation I(-s)-I(s)=s for all sin R. We also consider perturbations of S^t by quadratic boundary terms and prove that they satisfy extended fluctuation relations, i.e., a global large deviation principle with a rate function that typically differs from I( s) outside a finite interval. This applies to various physically relevant functionals and, in particular, to the heat dissipation rate of the network. Our approach relies on the properties of the maximal solution of a one-parameter family of algebraic matrix Riccati equations. It turns out that the limiting cumulant generating functions of S^t and its perturbations can be computed in terms of spectral data of a Hamiltonian matrix depending on the harmonic potential of the network and the parameters of the Langevin reservoirs. This approach is well adapted to both analytical and numerical investigations.

  12. Glacier fluctuations during the past 2000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomina, Olga N.; Bradley, Raymond S.; Jomelli, Vincent; Geirsdottir, Aslaug; Kaufman, Darrell S.; Koch, Johannes; McKay, Nicholas P.; Masiokas, Mariano; Miller, Gifford; Nesje, Atle; Nicolussi, Kurt; Owen, Lewis A.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Wanner, Heinz; Wiles, Gregory; Yang, Bao

    2016-10-01

    A global compilation of glacier advances and retreats for the past two millennia grouped by 17 regions (excluding Antarctica) highlights the nature of glacier fluctuations during the late Holocene. The dataset includes 275 time series of glacier fluctuations based on historical, tree ring, lake sediment, radiocarbon and terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide data. The most detailed and reliable series for individual glaciers and regional compilations are compared with summer temperature and, when available, winter precipitation reconstructions, the most important parameters for glacier mass balance. In many cases major glacier advances correlate with multi-decadal periods of decreased summer temperature. In a few cases, such as in Arctic Alaska and western Canada, some glacier advances occurred during relatively warm wet times. The timing and scale of glacier fluctuations over the past two millennia varies greatly from region to region. However, the number of glacier advances shows a clear pattern for the high, mid and low latitudes and, hence, points to common forcing factors acting at the global scale. Globally, during the first millennium CE glaciers were smaller than between the advances in 13th to early 20th centuries CE. The precise extent of glacier retreat in the first millennium is not well defined; however, the most conservative estimates indicate that during the 1st and 2nd centuries in some regions glaciers were smaller than at the end of 20th/early 21st centuries. Other periods of glacier retreat are identified regionally during the 5th and 8th centuries in the European Alps, in the 3rd-6th and 9th centuries in Norway, during the 10th-13th centuries in southern Alaska, and in the 18th century in Spitsbergen. However, no single period of common global glacier retreat of centennial duration, except for the past century, has yet been identified. In contrast, the view that the Little Ice Age was a period of global glacier expansion beginning in the 13th century

  13. Entropic Fluctuations in Thermally Driven Harmonic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakšić, V.; Pillet, C.-A.; Shirikyan, A.

    2016-10-01

    We consider a general network of harmonic oscillators driven out of thermal equilibrium by coupling to several heat reservoirs at different temperatures. The action of the reservoirs is implemented by Langevin forces. Assuming the existence and uniqueness of the steady state of the resulting process, we construct a canonical entropy production functional S^t which satisfies the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem. More precisely, we prove that there exists κ_c>1/2 such that the cumulant generating function of S^t has a large-time limit e(&alpha) which is finite on a closed interval [1/2-κ_c,1/2+κ_c] , infinite on its complement and satisfies the Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry e(1-&alpha)=e(&alpha) for all α in R. Moreover, we show that e(&alpha) is essentially smooth, i.e., that e'(&alpha)→ ∓ ∞ as α → {1}/{2}∓ κ_c . It follows from the Gärtner-Ellis theorem that S^t satisfies a global large deviation principle with a rate function I(s) obeying the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation relation I(-s)-I(s)=s for all sin R. We also consider perturbations of S^t by quadratic boundary terms and prove that they satisfy extended fluctuation relations, i.e., a global large deviation principle with a rate function that typically differs from I(s) outside a finite interval. This applies to various physically relevant functionals and, in particular, to the heat dissipation rate of the network. Our approach relies on the properties of the maximal solution of a one-parameter family of algebraic matrix Riccati equations. It turns out that the limiting cumulant generating functions of S^t and its perturbations can be computed in terms of spectral data of a Hamiltonian matrix depending on the harmonic potential of the network and the parameters of the Langevin reservoirs. This approach is well adapted to both analytical and numerical investigations.

  14. Precipitation as the main driver of Neoglacial fluctuations of Gualas glacier, Northern Patagonian Icefield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bertrand

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Glaciers are frequently used as indicators of climate change. However, the link between past glacier fluctuations and climate variability is still highly debated. Here, we investigate the mid- to late-Holocene fluctuations of Gualas Glacier, one of the northernmost outlet glaciers of the Northern Patagonian Icefield, using a multi-proxy sedimentological and geochemical analysis of a 15 m long fjord sediment core from Golfo Elefantes, Chile, and historical documents from early Spanish explorers. Our results show that the core can be sub-divided into three main lithological units that were deposited under very different hydrodynamic conditions. Between 5400 and 4180 cal yr BP and after 750 cal yr BP, sedimentation in Golfo Elefantes was characterized by the rapid deposition of fine silt, most likely transported by fluvio-glacial processes. By contrast, the sediment deposited between 4130 and 850 cal yr BP is composed of poorly sorted sand that is free of shells. This interval is particularly marked by high magnetic susceptibility values and Zr concentrations, and likely reflects a major advance of Gualas glacier towards Golfo Elefantes during the Neoglaciation. Several thin silt layers observed in the upper part of the core are interpreted as secondary fluctuations of Gualas glacier during the Little Ice Age, in agreement with historical and dendrochronological data. Our interpretation of the Golfo Elefantes glaciomarine sediment record in terms of fluctuations of Gualas glacier is in excellent agreement with the glacier chronology proposed for the Southern Patagonian Icefield, which is based on terrestrial (moraine deposits. By comparing our results with independent proxy records of precipitation and sea surface temperature, we suggest that the fluctuations of Gualas glacier during the last 5400 yr were mainly driven by changes in precipitation in the North Patagonian Andes.

  15. Precipitation as the main driver of Neoglacial fluctuations of Gualas glacier, Northern Patagonian Icefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, S.; Hughen, K. A.; Lamy, F.; Stuut, J.-B. W.; Torrejón, F.; Lange, C. B.

    2012-03-01

    Glaciers are frequently used as indicators of climate change. However, the link between past glacier fluctuations and climate variability is still highly debated. Here, we investigate the mid- to late-Holocene fluctuations of Gualas Glacier, one of the northernmost outlet glaciers of the Northern Patagonian Icefield, using a multi-proxy sedimentological and geochemical analysis of a 15 m long fjord sediment core from Golfo Elefantes, Chile, and historical documents from early Spanish explorers. Our results show that the core can be sub-divided into three main lithological units that were deposited under very different hydrodynamic conditions. Between 5400 and 4180 cal yr BP and after 750 cal yr BP, sedimentation in Golfo Elefantes was characterized by the rapid deposition of fine silt, most likely transported by fluvio-glacial processes. By contrast, the sediment deposited between 4130 and 850 cal yr BP is composed of poorly sorted sand that is free of shells. This interval is particularly marked by high magnetic susceptibility values and Zr concentrations, and likely reflects a major advance of Gualas glacier towards Golfo Elefantes during the Neoglaciation. Several thin silt layers observed in the upper part of the core are interpreted as secondary fluctuations of Gualas glacier during the Little Ice Age, in agreement with historical and dendrochronological data. Our interpretation of the Golfo Elefantes glaciomarine sediment record in terms of fluctuations of Gualas glacier is in excellent agreement with the glacier chronology proposed for the Southern Patagonian Icefield, which is based on terrestrial (moraine) deposits. By comparing our results with independent proxy records of precipitation and sea surface temperature, we suggest that the fluctuations of Gualas glacier during the last 5400 yr were mainly driven by changes in precipitation in the North Patagonian Andes.

  16. Precipitation as the main driver of Neoglacial fluctuations of Gualas glacier, Northern Patagonian Icefield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bertrand

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Glaciers are frequently used as indicators of climate change. However, the link between past glacier fluctuations and climate variability is still highly debated. Here, we investigate the mid- to late-Holocene fluctuations of Gualas Glacier, one of the northernmost outlet glaciers of the Northern Patagonian Icefield, using a multi-proxy sedimentological and geochemical analysis of a 15 m long fjord sediment core from Golfo Elefantes, Chile, and historical documents from early Spanish explorers. Our results show that the core can be sub-divided in three main lithological units that were deposited under very different hydrodynamic conditions. Between 5400 and 4180 cal yr BP and after 750 cal yr BP, sedimentation in Golfo Elefantes was characterized by the rapid deposition of fine silt, most likely transported by fluvio-glacial processes. By contrast, the sediment deposited between 4130 and 850 cal yr BP is composed of poorly sorted sand that is free of shells. This interval is particularly marked by high magnetic susceptibility values and Zr concentrations, and likely reflects a major advance of Gualas glacier towards Golfo Elefantes during the Neoglaciation. Several thin silt layers observed in the upper part of the core are interpreted as secondary fluctuations of Gualas glacier during the Little Ice Age, in agreement with historical and dendrochronological data. Our interpretation of the Golfo Elefantes glaciomarine sediment record in terms of fluctuations of Gualas glacier is in excellent agreement with the glacier chronology proposed for the Southern Patagonian Icefield, which is based on terrestrial (moraine deposits. By comparing our results with independent proxy records of precipitation and sea surface temperature, we demonstrate that the fluctuations of Gualas glacier during the last 5400 yr were mainly driven by changes in precipitation in the Andes.

  17. Thioredoxins Play a Crucial Role in Dynamic Acclimation of Photosynthesis in Fluctuating Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormählen, Ina; Zupok, Arkadiusz; Rescher, Josephin; Leger, Jochen; Weissenberger, Stefan; Groysman, Julia; Orwat, Anne; Chatel-Innocenti, Gilles; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Armbruster, Ute; Geigenberger, Peter

    2017-01-09

    Sunlight represents the energy source for photosynthesis and plant growth. When growing in the field, plant photosynthesis has to manage strong fluctuations in light intensities. Regulation based on the thioredoxin (Trx) system is believed to ensure light-responsive control of photosynthetic reactions in the chloroplast. However, direct evidence for a role of this system in regulating dynamic acclimation of photosynthesis in fluctuating conditions is largely lacking. In this report we show that the ferredoxin-dependent Trxs m1 and m2 as well as the NADPH-dependent NTRC are both indispensable for photosynthetic acclimation in fluctuating light intensities. Arabidopsis mutants with combined deficiency in Trxs m1 and m2 show wild-type growth and photosynthesis under constant light condition, while photosynthetic parameters are strongly modified in rapidly alternating high and low light. Two independent trxm1m2 mutants show lower photosynthetic efficiency in high light, but surprisingly significantly higher photosynthetic efficiency in low light. Our data suggest that a main target of Trx m1 and m2 is the NADP-malate dehydrogenase involved in export of excess reductive power from the chloroplast. The decreased photosynthetic efficiency in the high-light peaks may thus be explained by a reduced capacity of the trxm1m2 mutants in the rapid light activation of this enzyme. In the ntrc mutant, dynamic responses of non-photochemical quenching of excitation energy and plastoquinone reduction state both were strongly attenuated in fluctuating light intensities, leading to a massive decrease in PSII quantum efficiency and a specific decrease in plant growth under these conditions. This is likely due to the decreased ability of the ntrc mutant to control the stromal NADP(H) redox poise. Taken together, our results indicate that NTRC is indispensable in ensuring the full range of dynamic responses of photosynthesis to optimize photosynthesis and maintain growth in fluctuating

  18. Fluctuation and dissipation in de Sitter space

    CERN Document Server

    Fischler, Willy; Pedraza, Juan F; Tangarife, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study some thermal properties of quantum field theories in de Sitter space by means of holographic techniques. We focus on the static patch of de Sitter and assume that the quantum fields are in the standard Bunch-Davies vacuum. More specifically, we follow the stochastic motion of a massive charged particle due to its interaction with Hawking radiation. The process is described in terms of the theory of Brownian motion in inhomogeneous media and its associated Langevin dynamics. At late times, we find that the particle undergoes a regime of slow diffusion and never reaches the horizon, in stark contrast to the usual random walk behavior at finite temperature. Nevertheless, the fluctuation-dissipation theorem is found to hold at all times.

  19. Radial Velocity Fluctuations of RZ Psc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potravnov, I. S.; Gorynya, N. A.; Grinin, V. P.; Minikulov, N. Kh.

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of the radial velocity of the UX Ori type star RZ Psc is studied. The existence of an inner cavity with a radius of about 0.7 a.u. in the circumstellar disk of this star allows to suggest the presence of a companion. A study of the radial velocity of RZ Psc based on our own measurements and published data yields no periodic component in its variability. The two most accurate measurements of V r , based on high resolution spectra obtained over a period of three months, show that the radial velocity is constant over this time interval to within 0.5 km/s. This imposes a limit of M p ≤10 M Jup on the mass of the hypothetical companion. Possible reasons for the observed strong fluctuations in the radial velocity of this star are discussed.

  20. Queues and Lévy fluctuation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Dębicki, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    The book provides an extensive introduction to queueing models driven by Lévy-processes as well as a systematic account of the literature on Lévy-driven queues. The objective is to make the reader familiar with the wide set of probabilistic techniques that have been developed over the past decades, including transform-based techniques, martingales, rate-conservation arguments, change-of-measure, importance sampling, and large deviations. On the application side, it demonstrates how Lévy traffic models arise when modelling current queueing-type systems (as communication networks) and includes applications to finance. Queues and Lévy Fluctuation Theory will appeal to graduate/postgraduate students and researchers in mathematics, computer science, and electrical engineering. Basic prerequisites are probability theory and stochastic processes.

  1. Gluon Green functions free of quantum fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Athenodorou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This letter reports on how the Wilson flow technique can efficaciously kill the short-distance quantum fluctuations of 2- and 3-gluon Green functions, remove the ΛQCD scale and destroy the transition from the confining non-perturbative to the asymptotically-free perturbative sector. After the Wilson flow, the behavior of the Green functions with momenta can be described in terms of the quasi-classical instanton background. The same behavior also occurs, before the Wilson flow, at low-momenta. This last result permits applications as, for instance, the detection of instanton phenomenological properties or a determination of the lattice spacing only from the gauge sector of the theory.

  2. Multiplane 3D superresolution optical fluctuation imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Geissbuehler, Stefan; Godinat, Aurélien; Bocchio, Noelia L; Dubikovskaya, Elena A; Lasser, Theo; Leutenegger, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    By switching fluorophores on and off in either a deterministic or a stochastic manner, superresolution microscopy has enabled the imaging of biological structures at resolutions well beyond the diffraction limit. Superresolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) provides an elegant way of overcoming the diffraction limit in all three spatial dimensions by computing higher-order cumulants of image sequences of blinking fluorophores acquired with a conventional widefield microscope. So far, three-dimensional (3D) SOFI has only been demonstrated by sequential imaging of multiple depth positions. Here we introduce a versatile imaging scheme which allows for the simultaneous acquisition of multiple focal planes. Using 3D cross-cumulants, we show that the depth sampling can be increased. Consequently, the simultaneous acquisition of multiple focal planes reduces the acquisition time and hence the photo-bleaching of fluorescent markers. We demonstrate multiplane 3D SOFI by imaging the mitochondria network in fixed ...

  3. Recent fluctuations of the Argentinian glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, Juan Carlos

    1999-10-01

    Some of the results obtained in the glaciological research carried out since 1979 at the Argentinian Andes are shown in this paper. The research covers a wide latitudinal gap extending from the Agua Negra glacier in the province of San Juan to the Frı´as glacier situated at Mount Tronador. Agua Negra and Piloto glaciers show a very similar behavior of almost continuous retreat since 1965 while at the Plomo region a small advance period, starting in 1982, is observed in five of the 10 glaciers studied. Finally, the Frı´as glacier fluctuations record shows a very strong recession since 1850 only interrupted by the 1976 advance that continued in 1977.

  4. Relaxation and resonances in fluctuating dielectric systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Colin, L. S.; del Castillo, L. F.

    1989-09-01

    In this paper we show how the ideas behind extended irreversible thermodynamics are used to generate a systematic treatment of the relaxation and resonance phenomena in the propagation and absorption of electromagnetic energy in dielectric materials in a nonequilibrium state. Two cases are discussed: the first, in which the forced oscillations arising from the correlation between the fluctuations of the polarization vector and the electric field are neglected, and the second, in which this term is taken into account. In both cases we show how the main equations serve to make a connection between the macroscopic approach followed here and a number of results obtained for both, gases and polar liquids using molecular models. The results obtained here are compared with previous work on this problem, and new effects arising from the second case are pointed out.

  5. Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of Autoregressive Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Morariu, V V; Vamos, C; Soltuz, S

    2007-01-01

    Autoregressive processes (AR) have typical short-range memory. Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) was basically designed to reveal long range correlation in non stationary processes. However DFA can also be regarded as a suitable method to investigate both long-range and short range correlation in non-stationary and stationary systems. Applying DFA to AR processes can help understanding the non uniform correlation structure of such processes. We systematically investigated a first order autoregressive model AR(1) by DFA and established the relationship between the interaction constant of AR(1) and the DFA correlation exponent. The higher the interaction constant the higher is the short range correlation exponent. They are exponentially related. The investigation was extended to AR(2) processes. The presence of a distant positive interaction in addition to a near by interaction will increase the correlation exponent and the range of correlation while the effect of a distant negative interaction will decrease...

  6. Capital Gains Taxation and House Price Fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuest, Clemens; Nielsen, Søren Bo

    2004-01-01

    Recent years have seen large swings in house prices in many countries. Motivated by housing price variations, proposals for taxing capital gains on housing have repeatedly been put forth. The idea seems to be that such taxes would curb the redistribution occurring between those owning houses...... and those trying to get into the market for owner-occupied housing. Our paper shows that at least in simple settings, a tax on real capital gains on housing will only lead to even bigger price swings and will not be able to redistribute between people appearing on either side of the housing market.......Keywords: capital gains tax, housing market, price fluctuationsJEL-Classification: H23, H24, R 31.Addresses:...

  7. Topology of microwave background fluctuations - Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, J. Richard, III; Park, Changbom; Bies, William E.; Bennett, David P.; Juszkiewicz, Roman

    1990-01-01

    Topological measures are used to characterize the microwave background temperature fluctuations produced by 'standard' scenarios (Gaussian) and by cosmic strings (non-Gaussian). Three topological quantities: total area of the excursion regions, total length, and total curvature (genus) of the isotemperature contours, are studied for simulated Gaussian microwave background anisotropy maps and then compared with those of the non-Gaussian anisotropy pattern produced by cosmic strings. In general, the temperature gradient field shows the non-Gaussian behavior of the string map more distinctively than the temperature field for all topology measures. The total contour length and the genus are found to be more sensitive to the existence of a stringy pattern than the usual temperature histogram. Situations when instrumental noise is superposed on the map, are considered to find the critical signal-to-noise ratio for which strings can be detected.

  8. Internal pressure fluctuations in coacervates and syneresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, B.; Bohidar, H. B.

    2006-12-01

    Syneresis exhibited by a heterogeneous polyampholyte coacervate (polymer-rich phase) is discussed through non-equilibrium statistical thermodynamics. It has been shown that the coacervate phase is associated with fluctuating excess internal pressure that gives rise to syneresis. It is proposed that energy is dissipated to the environment only by the surface of coacervate, whereas in the bulk, gelatin chains only exchange energy with each other with negligible or no dissipation. Consequently, the internal pressure inside the coacervate follows a damped oscillatory behaviour that relaxes slowly with time, independently of amplitude. We connect the volume of the supernatant released with time (exponential relaxation behavior) with the presence of long-lived nonlinear localized modes (the existence of breathers).

  9. Solidity of viscous liquids. IV. Density fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is the fourth in a series exploring the physical consequences of the solidity of highly viscous liquids. It is argued that the two basic characteristics of a flow event (a jump between two energy minima in configuration space) are the local density change and the sum of all particle...... displacements. Based on this it is proposed that density fluctuations are described by a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation with rates in k space of the form C+Dk^2 with D>>C a^2 where a is the average intermolecular distance. The inequality expresses a long-wavelength dominance of the dynamics which...... with Debye behavior at low frequencies and an omega^{−1/2} decay of the loss at high frequencies. Finally, a general formalism for the description of viscous liquid dynamics, which supplements the density dynamics by including stress fields, a potential energy field, and molecular orientational fields...

  10. Binary Fingerprints at Fluctuation-Enhanced Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Hung-Chih; King, Maria D; Kwan, Chiman

    2009-01-01

    We developed a simple way to generate binary patterns based on spectral slopes in different frequency ranges at fluctuation-enhanced sensing. Such patterns can be considered as binary "fingerprints" of odors. The method has experimentally been demonstrated with a commercial semiconducting metal oxide (Taguchi) sensor exposed to bacterial odors (Escherichia coli and Anthrax-surrogate Bacillus subtilis) and processing their stochastic signals. With a single Taguchi sensor, the situations of empty chamber, tryptic soy agar (TSA) medium, or TSA with bacteria could be distinguished with 100% reproducibility. The bacterium numbers were in the range of 25 thousands to 1 million. To illustrate the relevance for ultra-low power consumption, we show that this new type of signal processing and pattern recognition task can be implemented by a simple analog circuitry and a few logic gates with total power consumption in the microWatts range.

  11. Fluctuations in type IV pilus retraction

    CERN Document Server

    Linden, M; Jonsson, A B; Wallin, M; Linden, Martin; Johansson, Emil; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Wallin, Mats

    2005-01-01

    The type IV pilus retraction motor is found in many important bacterial pathogens. It is the strongest known linear motor protein and is required for bacterial infectivity. We characterize the dynamics of type IV pilus retraction in terms of a stochastic chemical reaction model. We find that a two state model can describe the experimental force velocity relation and qualitative dependence of ATP concentration. The results indicate that the dynamics is limited by an ATP-dependent step at low load and a force-dependent step at high load, and that at least one step is effectively irreversible in the measured range of forces. The irreversible nature of the sub-step(s) lead to interesting predictions for future experiments: We find different parameterizations with mathematically identical force velocity relations but different fluctuations (diffusion constant). We also find a longer elementary step compared to an earlier analysis, which agrees better with known facts about the structure of the pilus filament and e...

  12. Anisotropic magnetic fluctuations in 3-k antiferromagnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caciuffo, R. [European Commission, Joint Research Center, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, Karlsruhe D-76125 (Germany)]. E-mail: roberto.caciuffo@ec.europa.eu; Magnani, N. [European Commission, Joint Research Center, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, Karlsruhe D-76125 (Germany); Istituto dei Materiali per l' Elettronica ed il Magnetismo, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, I-43010 Fontanini (PR) (Italy); Santini, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Parma, Viale G. P. Usberti 7/A, I-43100 Parma (Italy); Carretta, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Parma, Viale G. P. Usberti 7/A, I-43100 Parma (Italy); Amoretti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Parma, Viale G. P. Usberti 7/A, I-43100 Parma (Italy); Blackburn, E. [European Commission, Joint Research Center, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, Karlsruhe D-76125 (Germany); Institute Laue-Langevin, Boite Postal 156-X, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Enderle, M. [Institute Laue-Langevin, Boite Postal 156-X, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Brown, P.J. [Institute Laue-Langevin, Boite Postal 156-X, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Lander, G.H. [European Commission, Joint Research Center, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, Karlsruhe D-76125 (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    The anisotropy of magnetic fluctuations propagating along the high-symmetry directions in cubic systems with 3-k magnetic order is analyzed within the random-phase approximation assuming anisotropic exchange interactions. Both transverse and longitudinal structures are considered, with reference to the UO{sub 2} and USb compounds, respectively. In the case of UO{sub 2}, the spin-waves polarizations calculated for acoustic and optical branches are favorably compared with three-dimensional polarization analysis experiments carried out on a triple axis spectrometer. The overall spin-waves polarization behavior emerges as a consequence of the 3-k nature of the magnetic order, whatever the strength of the exchange coupling assumed.

  13. Fluctuation behaviors of financial return volatility duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hongli; Wang, Jun; Lu, Yunfan

    2016-04-01

    It is of significantly crucial to understand the return volatility of financial markets because it helps to quantify the investment risk, optimize the portfolio, and provide a key input of option pricing models. The characteristics of isolated high volatility events above certain threshold in price fluctuations and the distributions of return intervals between these events arouse great interest in financial research. In the present work, we introduce a new concept of daily return volatility duration, which is defined as the shortest passage time when the future volatility intensity is above or below the current volatility intensity (without predefining a threshold). The statistical properties of the daily return volatility durations for seven representative stock indices from the world financial markets are investigated. Some useful and interesting empirical results of these volatility duration series about the probability distributions, memory effects and multifractal properties are obtained. These results also show that the proposed stock volatility series analysis is a meaningful and beneficial trial.

  14. Fractal fluctuations in cardiac time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, B. J.; Zhang, R.; Sanders, A. W.; Miniyar, S.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Human heart rate, controlled by complex feedback mechanisms, is a vital index of systematic circulation. However, it has been shown that beat-to-beat values of heart rate fluctuate continually over a wide range of time scales. Herein we use the relative dispersion, the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean, to show, by systematically aggregating the data, that the correlation in the beat-to-beat cardiac time series is a modulated inverse power law. This scaling property indicates the existence of long-time memory in the underlying cardiac control process and supports the conclusion that heart rate variability is a temporal fractal. We argue that the cardiac control system has allometric properties that enable it to respond to a dynamical environment through scaling.

  15. Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of Traffic Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xiao-Yan; LIU Zong-Hua; TANG Ming

    2007-01-01

    Different routing strategies may result in different behaviour of traffic on internet. We analyse the correlation of traffic data for three typical routing strategies by the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and find that the degree of correlation of the data can be divided into three regions, i.e. weak, medium, and strong correlation. The DFA scalings are constants in both the regions of weak and strong correlations but monotonically increase in the region of medium correlation. We suggest that it is better to consider the traffic on complex network as three phases, i.e. the free, buffer, and congestion phase, than just as two phases believed before, i.e. the free and congestion phase.

  16. Entangled scalar and tensor fluctuations during inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Hael; Vardanyan, Tereza [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University,5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-11-29

    We show how the choice of an inflationary state that entangles scalar and tensor fluctuations affects the angular two-point correlation functions of the T, E, and B modes of the cosmic microwave background. The propagators for a state starting with some general quadratic entanglement are solved exactly, leading to predictions for the primordial scalar-scalar, tensor-tensor, and scalar-tensor power spectra. These power spectra are expressed in terms of general functions that describe the entangling structure of the initial state relative to the standard Bunch-Davies vacuum. We illustrate how such a state would modify the angular correlations in the CMB with a simple example where the initial state is a small perturbation away from the Bunch-Davies state. Because the state breaks some of the rotational symmetries, the angular power spectra no longer need be strictly diagonal.

  17. Fluctuations and correlations in modulation instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solli, D. R.; Herink, G.; Jalali, B.; Ropers, C.

    2012-07-01

    Stochastically driven nonlinear processes are responsible for spontaneous pattern formation and instabilities in numerous natural and artificial systems, including well-known examples such as sand ripples, cloud formations, water waves, animal pigmentation and heart rhythms. Technologically, a type of such self-amplification drives free-electron lasers and optical supercontinuum sources whose radiation qualities, however, suffer from the stochastic origins. Through time-resolved observations, we identify intrinsic properties of these fluctuations that are hidden in ensemble measurements. We acquire single-shot spectra of modulation instability produced by laser pulses in glass fibre at megahertz real-time capture rates. The temporally confined nature of the gain physically limits the number of amplified modes, which form an antibunched arrangement as identified from a statistical analysis of the data. These dynamics provide an example of pattern competition and interaction in confined nonlinear systems.

  18. Fluctuations and Linear Response in Supercooled Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Johannes K.

    Fluctuation dissipation theorems are derived for thermodynamic properties like frequency dependent specific heat and compressibility. First the case where a systems dynamics are restricted by constant volume and energy is considered. The dynamic linear response to a heat pulse and a volume change...... at time zero is calculated, under assumption of energy conservation. Then the case of isothermal isobaric conditions are treated by a slight modification of ordinary linear response theory. In both cases the perturbation cannot be stated through the Hamiltonian, but has to be imposed by variation...... of the external thermodynamic system parameters. In thermodynamic response theory equivalence between ensembles is broken, but time correlation functions sampled in different ensembles are connected through the Maxwell relations of thermodynamics generalized to the frequency domain. Different applications...

  19. Cirrus feedback on interannual climate fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C; Dessler, A E; Zelinka, M D; Yang, P; Wang, T

    2014-12-28

    Cirrus clouds are not only important in determining the current climate, but also play an important role in climate change and variability. Analysis of satellite observations shows that the amount and altitude of cirrus clouds (optical depth <3.6, cloud top pressure <440 hPa) increase in response to inter-annual surface warming. Thus, cirrus clouds are likely to act as a positive feedback on short-term climate fluctuations, by reducing the planet’s ability to radiate longwave radiation to space in response to planetary surface warming. Using cirrus cloud radiative kernels, the magnitude of cirrus feedback is estimated to be 0.20±0.21W/m2/°C, which is comparable to the surface albedo feedback. Most of the cirrus feedback comes from increasing cloud amount in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and subtropical upper troposphere.

  20. Electron temperature fluctuations in NGC 346

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, V A; Krabbe, A C

    2008-01-01

    The existence and origin of large spatial temperature fluctuations in HII regions and planetary nebulae are assumed to explain the differences between the heavy element abundances inferred from collisionally excited and recombination lines, although this interpretation remains significantly controversial. We investigate the spatial variation in electron temperature inside NGC 346, the brightest HII region in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Long slit spectrophotometric data of high signal-to-noise were employed to derive the electron temperature from measurements derived from localized observations of the [OIII]($\\lambda4959 + \\lambda5007)/\\lambda4363$ ratio in three directions across the nebula. The electron temperature was estimated in 179 areas of 5$^{\\prime\\prime}\\times1.5^{\\prime\\prime}$ of size distributed along three different declinations. A largely homogeneous temperature distribution was found with a mean temperature of 12 269 K and a dispersion of 6.1%. After correcting for pure measurements errors, a t...

  1. Response of Brownian Fluctuations to External Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laub, Jeffrey William

    Millikan's law of particle fall is an empirical result which shows the dependence of particle fall rate in a gas on particle radius and host gas density. The size of submicron particles in gases has long been determined by Millikan's law. The dominant factor is Stokes' law with a correction added to account for the physics of slip. However, it was recently shown by Kim and Fedele that Brownian fluctuations affect the fall rate while showing no anomalies in the density dependence of the rms displacement. The effect was an enhancement of the fall rate of small particles as the density of the host gas is increased. This enhancement showed a size dependence in the form of a smooth transition from the one of decreasing fall rate with increasing density for large particles (~0.4 μm radius) to another of increasing fall rate with increasing gas density for small particles ( ~0.15mum radius). The magnitude of the anomaly is determined by how the rms Brownian velocity compares with its fall rate. In an effort to understand the effect of Brownian fluctuations coupling with gravity, a new experiment has been carried out where an AC field was applied to force particles to fluctuate more in the vertical direction on one hand and where a constant DC field was applied to change the effective force of gravity on the other. These fields were applied to a charged oil drop in the 0.2 to 0.3 μm radius range falling in a nitrogen environment. Displacements over a 4 second time interval were repeatedly measured in both the vertical and horizontal directions. The original experimental apparatus was used with some modifications. The modifications included computer automation of particle control and data taking to allow for longer use of the same particle, up to 120 hours, and to facilitate application of the additional fields. The objective was to make large particles appear to be smaller via forced oscillations and make them fall faster or slower via the DC bias to effect the change in

  2. Enhanced droplet spreading due to thermal fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, A M; Freund, J B, E-mail: jbfreund@illinois.ed [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2009-11-18

    The lubrication equation that governs the dynamics of thin liquid films can be augmented to account for stochastic stresses associated with the thermal fluctuations of the fluid. It has been suggested that under certain conditions the spreading rate of a liquid drop on a surface will be increased by these stochastic stresses. Here, an atomistic simulation of a spreading drop is designed to examine such a regime and provide a quantitative assessment of the stochastic lubrication equation for spreading. It is found that the atomistic drop does indeed spread faster than the standard lubrication equations would suggest and that the stochastic lubrication equation of Gruen et al (2006 J. Stat. Phys. 122 1261-91) predicts the spread rate.

  3. Attentiveness cycles: synchronized behavior and aggregate fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Gomes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A sticky-information macroeconomic model is developed in order to analyze the behavior of the time trajectories of the inflation rate and of the output gap, when disturbed by eventual monetary policy shocks. In opposition to what is typical in the literature on this subject, different paces on information updating explicitly lead to a setting with interaction among heterogeneous agents. Specifically, we consider firms with different information updating frequencies whose behavior implies the emergence of attentiveness cycles of possibly large lengths; within these cycles we deduct a differently shaped Phillips curve for each time period. Systematic changes on the form of the aggregate supply relation will be the engine that triggers a sluggish response to shocks and the eventual persistence of business fluctuations.

  4. Convergence and fluctuations of Regularized Tyler estimators

    KAUST Repository

    Kammoun, Abla

    2015-10-26

    This article studies the behavior of regularized Tyler estimators (RTEs) of scatter matrices. The key advantages of these estimators are twofold. First, they guarantee by construction a good conditioning of the estimate and second, being a derivative of robust Tyler estimators, they inherit their robustness properties, notably their resilience to the presence of outliers. Nevertheless, one major problem that poses the use of RTEs in practice is represented by the question of setting the regularization parameter p. While a high value of p is likely to push all the eigenvalues away from zero, it comes at the cost of a larger bias with respect to the population covariance matrix. A deep understanding of the statistics of RTEs is essential to come up with appropriate choices for the regularization parameter. This is not an easy task and might be out of reach, unless one considers asymptotic regimes wherein the number of observations n and/or their size N increase together. First asymptotic results have recently been obtained under the assumption that N and n are large and commensurable. Interestingly, no results concerning the regime of n going to infinity with N fixed exist, even though the investigation of this assumption has usually predated the analysis of the most difficult N and n large case. This motivates our work. In particular, we prove in the present paper that the RTEs converge to a deterministic matrix when n → ∞ with N fixed, which is expressed as a function of the theoretical covariance matrix. We also derive the fluctuations of the RTEs around this deterministic matrix and establish that these fluctuations converge in distribution to a multivariate Gaussian distribution with zero mean and a covariance depending on the population covariance and the parameter.

  5. Holocene glacier fluctuations in the American Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, P. Thompson

    In many areas of the American Rocky Mountains (Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Idaho, Montana), Cascade Range (Washington, Oregon), and the Sierra Nevada (California), radiocarbon ages suggest that ice receded to near present limits before 10 ka BP. A pre-Altithermal readvance or stillstand left moraines ca. 1-3 km beyond and ca. 50-300 m below present glacier margins. At one locality on Glacier Peak in Washington, these deposits are perhaps dated to the early Holocene, but in general these deposits are probably at least 10 ka old. Glacial advances during the Altithermal (ca. 8 to 5 ka BP) elsewhere are rare; radiocarbon evidence for Altithermal glacial advances in the Colorado Front Range is questionable. The earliest radiocarbon-dated Neoglacial advances occurred about 5 ka BP in the Washington Cascades; moraines and related deposits believed to be of early Neoglacial age (i.e. 5 to 3 ka BP) elsewhere are poorly dated. For example, moraines believed to date to the early Neoglacial in Colorado (Triple Lakes) and Wyoming (Temple Lake) are actually late Pleistocene age, based on radiocarbon ages derived from lake sediments at the type localities. Although relative-age data (i.e. lichens, rock weathering, soils) from many areas suggest a three-fold Neoglacial sequence, little supporting radiocarbon evidence is available. However, tephrochronology distinguishes three Neoglacial advances near Mount Rainier in Washington. In most mountain ranges of the western United States, fresh, unweathered, sharp-crested moraines usually adjacent to present ice margins, or near headwalls in empty cirques, date to the Little Ice Age of the last several centuries. However, detailed photographic or other historical records of glacial fluctuations during the last century are rare, and detailed mass balance studies rarer still. Whether or not pre-Little Ice Age glacial fluctuations in the American Cordillera are synchronous must await better radiometric dating of local moraine sequences.

  6. Fluctuation traits of Litchi wholesale price in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, F. F.; Qi, W. E.; Ouyang, X.

    2017-07-01

    This paper chose the wholesale price of litchi as research object based on the daily data of 11 main sales markets in China -- Beijing, Chengdu, Guangzhou, Hefei, Jiaxing, Nanjing, Shanghai, Shenyang, Changsha, Zhengzhou and Chongqing from April 1, 2012 to September 30, 2016. After analyzing the fluctuation characteristics with BP filter method and H-P filter method, and the fluctuation trends of litchi wholesale price in China obtained by BP filter are roughly consistent with the trends obtained by H-P filter. The main conclusions are as follows: there is strong cyclicality in the fluctuation of litchi wholesale price; the period of fluctuations of litchi wholesale prices are not repeatable; litchi wholesale price fluctuates asymmetrically in one fluctuation cycle.

  7. Gluon number fluctuations with heavy quarks at HERA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xiang-Rong; ZHOU Dai-Cui

    2011-01-01

    We study the effect of gluon number fluctuations (Pomeron loops) on the proton structure function at HERA.It is shown that the description of charm and bottom quarks and longitudinal structure functions are improved,with x2/d.o.f=0.803 (fluctuations) as compared with x2/d.o.f=0.908 (without fluctuations),once the gluon number fluctuations are included.We find that in the gluon number fluctuation case the heavy quarks do not play an important role in the proton structure function as the saturation model.The successful description of the HERA data indicates that the gluon number fluctuation could be one of the key mechanisms to describe the proton structure function at HERA energies.

  8. Amplitude fluctuations in the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase

    CERN Document Server

    Jakubczyk, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the interplay of thermal amplitude and phase fluctuations in a $U(1)$ symmetric two-dimensional $\\phi^4$-theory. To this end, we derive coupled renormalization group equations for both types of fluctuations. Discarding the amplitude fluctuations, the expected Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase characterized by a finite phase stiffness and an algebraic decay of order parameter correlations is recovered at low temperatures. However, in contrast to the widespread expectation, amplitude fluctuations are not innocuous, since their mass vanishes due to a strong renormalization by phase fluctuations. Even at low temperatures the amplitude fluctuations lead to a logarithmic renormalization group flow of the phase stiffness, which ultimately vanishes. Hence, the BKT phase is strictly speaking replaced by a symmetric phase with a finite correlation length, which is however exponentially large at low temperatures. The vortex-driven BKT transition is then rounded to a crossover, which may be practical...

  9. Venus Express observations of magnetic field fluctuations in the magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, J.; Wang, C.; Zhang, T. L.; Volwerk, M.; Delva, M.; Baumjohann, W.

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic field fluctuations within a planetary magnetosheath play an important role in the solar wind interaction with the planet, since they can reconfigure the plasma flow and the magnetic field and transfer energy from the bow shock to the lower boundary. Many studies have been presented on the fluctuations in the terrestrial magnetosheath; however, hardly any studies have so far been carried out for Venusian magnetosheath fluctuations, except for Luhmann et al. [1983] and Vörös et al. [2008] who performed some case studies on the magnetosheath fluctuations at Venus. It was shown that the fluctuations are probably convected from the vicinity of the quasi-parallel bow shock along the streamlines. Based on the Venus Express observations in 2006 and 2007, we investigate the spatial distributions of magnetic field fluctuations in the Venus magnetosheath statistically.

  10. Fluctuation patterns and conditional reversibility in nonequilibrium systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gallavotti, G

    1997-01-01

    Fluctuations of observables as functions of time, or "fluctuation patterns", are studied in a chaotic microscopically reversible system that has irreversibly reached a nonequilibrium stationary state. Supposing that during a certain, long enough, time interval the average entropy creation rate has a value $s$ and that during another time interval of the same length it has value $-s$ then we show that the relative probabilities of fluctuation patterns in the first time interval are the same as those of the reversed patterns in the second time interval. The system is ``conditionally reversible'' or irreversibility in a reversible system is "driven" by the entropy creation: while a very rare fluctuation happens to change the sign of the entropy creation rate it also happens that the time reversed fluctuations of all other observables acquire the same relative probability of the corresponding fluctuations in presence of normal entropy creation. A mathematical proof is sketched.

  11. Fluctuations and correlations in nucleus-nucleus collisions within transport approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konchakovski, Volodymyr P.

    2009-10-01

    optimal choice of collision systems and collision energies for the experimental search of the QCD critical point. Other observables are fluctuations of ratios of hadrons (e.g. pions, kaons, protons, etc.) which are not so much affected by volume fluctuations. In particular HSD results for the kaon-to-pion ratio fluctuations, which has been regarded as promising observable for a long time, are presented from low SPS energies up to high energies at RHIC. In addition to the HSD calculations statistical model is also used in terms of microcanonical, canonical and grand canonical ensembles. Further a study of the system size event-by-event fluctuations causing rapidity forward-backward correlations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is presented. The HSD simulations reveal strong forward-backward correlations and reproduce the main qualitative features of the STAR data in A+A collisions at RHIC energies. It has been shown that strong forward-backward correlations arise due to an averaging over many different events that belong to one centrality bin. An optimization of the experimental selection of centrality classes is presented, which is relevant for the program of the NA61 collaboration at CERN, the low-energy program at RHIC, as well as future experiments at FAIR. (orig.)

  12. Stress-induced electric current fluctuations in rocks: a superstatistical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright-Taylor, Alexis; Vallianatos, Filippos; Sammonds, Peter

    2017-04-01

    equilibrium processes whose variance fluctuates over time. The appearance of q-Gaussian statistics are caused by the fluctuating β parameter, which effectively models the fluctuating energy dissipation rate in the system. This concept is known as superstatistics and is physically relevant for modelling driven non-equilibrium systems where the environmental conditions fluctuate on a large scale. The idea is that the environmental variable, such as temperature or pressure, changes so slowly that a rapidly fluctuating variable within that environment has time to relax back to equilibrium between each change in the environment. The application of superstatistical techniques to our experimental electric current fluctuations show that they can indeed be described, to good approximation, by the superposition of local Gaussian processes with fluctuating variance. We conclude, then, that the measured electric current fluctuates in response to intermittent energy dissipation and is driven to varying temporary local equilibria during deformation by the variations in stress intensity. The advantage of this technique is that, once the model has been established to be a good description of the system in question, the average β parameter (a measure of the average energy dissipation rate) for the system can be obtained simply from the macroscopic q-Gaussian distribution parameters.

  13. Evidence of strong proton shape fluctuations from incoherent diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Mäntysaari, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    We show within the saturation framework that measurements of exclusive vector meson production at high energy provide evidence for strong geometric fluctuations of the proton. In comparison, the effect of saturation scale and color charge fluctuations is weak. This knowledge will allow detailed future measurements of the incoherent cross section to tightly constrain the fluctuating geometry of the proton as a function of the parton momentum fraction $x$.

  14. A note on the Weibel instability and thermal fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Treumann, R A

    2012-01-01

    The thermal fluctuation level of the Weibel instability is recalculated. It is shown that the divergence of the fluctuations at long wavelengths, i.e. the Weibel infrared catastrophe, never occurs. At large wavelengths the thermal fluctuation level is terminated by the presence of even the smallest available stable thermal anisotropy. Weibel fields penetrate only one skin depth into the plasma. When excited inside, they cause layers of antiparallel fields of skin depth width and vortices which may be subject to reconnection.

  15. Simulation analysis of within-day flow fluctuation effects on trout below flaming Gorge Dam.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Railsback, S. F.; Hayse, J. W.; LaGory, K. E.; Environmental Science Division; EPRI

    2006-01-01

    In addition to being renewable, hydropower has the advantage of allowing rapid load-following, in that the generation rate can easily be varied within a day to match the demand for power. However, the flow fluctuations that result from load-following can be controversial, in part because they may affect downstream fish populations. At Flaming Gorge Dam, located on the Green River in northeastern Utah, concern has been raised about whether flow fluctuations caused by the dam disrupt feeding at a tailwater trout fishery, as fish move in response to flow changes and as the flow changes alter the amount or timing of the invertebrate drift that trout feed on. Western Area Power Administration (Western), which controls power production on submonthly time scales, has made several operational changes to address concerns about flow fluctuation effects on fisheries. These changes include reducing the number of daily flow peaks from two to one and operating within a restricted range of flows. These changes significantly reduce the value of the power produced at Flaming Gorge Dam and put higher load-following pressure on other power plants. Consequently, Western has great interest in understanding what benefits these restrictions provide to the fishery and whether adjusting the restrictions could provide a better tradeoff between power and non-power concerns. Directly evaluating the effects of flow fluctuations on fish populations is unfortunately difficult. Effects are expected to be relatively small, so tightly controlled experiments with large sample sizes and long study durations would be needed to evaluate them. Such experiments would be extremely expensive and would be subject to the confounding effects of uncontrollable variations in factors such as runoff and weather. Computer simulation using individual-based models (IBMs) is an alternative study approach for ecological problems that are not amenable to analysis using field studies alone. An IBM simulates how a

  16. Entanglement-fluctuation relation for bipartite pure states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaruel, Aura Mae B.; Paraan, Francis N. C.

    2016-08-01

    We identify subsystem fluctuations (variances) that measure entanglement in an arbitrary bipartite pure state. These fluctuations are of observables that generalize the notion of polarization to an arbitrary N -level subsystem. We express this polarization fluctuation in terms of subsystem purity and other entanglement measures. The derived entanglement-fluctuation relation is evaluated for the ground states of a one-dimensional free-fermion gas and the Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki spin chain. Our results provide a framework for experimentally measuring entanglement using Stern-Gerlach-type state selectors.

  17. Spontaneous emission of Alfvénic fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, P. H.; López, R. A.; Vafin, S.; Kim, S.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2017-09-01

    Low-frequency fluctuations are pervasively observed in the solar wind. The present paper theoretically calculates the steady state spectra of low-frequency electromagnetic (EM) fluctuations of the Alfvénic type for thermal equilibrium plasma. The analysis is based upon a recently formulated theory of spontaneously emitted EM fluctuations in magnetized thermal plasmas. It is found that the fluctuations in the magnetosonic mode branch is constant, while the kinetic Alfvénic mode spectrum is dependent on a form factor that is a function of perpendicular wave number. Potential applicability of the present work in the wider context of heliospheric research is also discussed.

  18. Fluctuation, time-correlation function and geometric Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Pati, A K

    1999-01-01

    We establish a fluctuation-correlation theorem by relating the quantum fluctuations in the generator of the parameter change to the time integral of the quantum correlation function between the projection operator and force operator of the ``fast'' system. By taking a cue from linear response theory we relate the quantum fluctuation in the generator to the generalised susceptibility. Relation between the open-path geometric phase, diagonal elements of the quantum metric tensor and the force-force correlation function is provided and the classical limit of the fluctuation-correlation theorem is also discussed.

  19. Fluctuational shift of nematic-isotropic phase transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kats, E. I.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we discuss a macroscopic counterpart to the microscopic mechanism of the straightening dimer mesogens conformations, proposed recently by S.M. Saliti, M.G.Tamba, S.N. Sprunt, C.Welch, G.H.Mehl, A. Jakli, J.T. Gleeson (Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 217801 (2016)) to explain their experimental observation of the unprecedentedly large shift of the nematic-isotropic transition temperature. Our interpretation is based on singular longitudinal fluctuations of the nematic order parameter. Since these fluctuations are governed by the Goldstone director fluctuations they exist only in the nematic state. External magnetic field suppresses the singular longitudinal fluctuations of the order parameter (similarly as it is the case for the transverse director fluctuations, although with a different scaling over the magnetic field). The reduction of the fluctuations changes the equilibrium value of the modulus of the order parameter in the nematic state. Therefore it leads to additional (with respect to the mean field contribution) fluctuational shift of the nematic-isotropic transition temperature. Our mechanism works for any nematic liquid crystals, however the magnitude of the fluctuational shift increases with decrease of the Frank elastic moduli. Since some of these moduli supposed to be anomalously small for so-called bent-core or dimer nematic liquid crystals, just these liquid crystals are promising candidates for the observation of the predicted fluctuational shift of the phase transition temperature.

  20. Cosmological fluctuations of a random field and radiation fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastero-Gil, Mar [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Campus de Fuentenueva, Universidad de Granada, Granada, 18071 (Spain); Berera, Arjun [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Moss, Ian G. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Newcastlle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Ramos, Rudnei O., E-mail: mbg@ugr.es, E-mail: ab@ph.ed.ac.uk, E-mail: ian.moss@ncl.ac.uk, E-mail: rudnei@uerj.br [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 20550-013 Brazil (Brazil)

    2014-05-01

    A generalization of the random fluid hydrodynamic fluctuation theory due to Landau and Lifshitz is applied to describe cosmological fluctuations in systems with radiation and scalar fields. The viscous pressures, parametrized in terms of the bulk and shear viscosity coefficients, and the respective random fluctuations in the radiation fluid are combined with the stochastic and dissipative scalar evolution equation. This results in a complete set of equations describing the perturbations in both scalar and radiation fluids. These derived equations are then studied, as an example, in the context of warm inflation. Similar treatments can be done for other cosmological early universe scenarios involving thermal or statistical fluctuations.

  1. Adiabatic fluctuations from cosmic strings in a contracting universe

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenberger, Robert H; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2008-01-01

    We show that adiabatic, super-Hubble, and almost scale invariant density fluctuations are produced by cosmic strings in a contracting universe. An essential point is that isocurvature perturbations produced by topological defects such as cosmic strings on super-Hubble scales lead to a source term which seeds the growth of curvature fluctuations on these scales. Once the symmetry has been restored at high temperatures, the isocurvature seeds disappear, and the fluctuations evolve as adiabatic ones in the expanding phase. Thus, cosmic strings may be resurrected as a mechanism for generating the primordial density fluctuations observed today.

  2. Mapping current fluctuations of stochastic pumps to nonequilibrium steady states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotskoff, Grant M.

    2017-03-01

    We show that current fluctuations in a stochastic pump can be robustly mapped to fluctuations in a corresponding time-independent nonequilibrium steady state. We thus refine a recently proposed mapping so that it ensures equivalence of not only the averages, but also optimal representation of fluctuations in currents and density. Our mapping leads to a natural decomposition of the entropy production in stochastic pumps similar to the "housekeeping" heat. As a consequence of the decomposition of entropy production, the current fluctuations in weakly perturbed stochastic pumps are shown to satisfy a universal bound determined by the steady state entropy production.

  3. Fluctuation theorem in dynamical systems with quenched disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drocco, Jeffrey; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia; Reichhardt, Charles

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate that the fluctuation theorem of Gallavotti and Cohen can be used to characterize far from equilibrium dynamical nonthermal systems in the presence of quenched disorder where strong fluctuations or crackling noise occur. By observing the frequency of entropy-destroying trajectories, we show that the theorem holds in specific dynamical regimes near the threshold for motion, indicating that these systems might be ideal candidates for understanding what types of nonthermal fluctuations could be used in constructing generalized fluctuation theorems. We also discuss how the theorem could be tested with global or local probes in systems such as superconducting vortices, magnetic domain walls, stripe phases, Coulomb glasses and earthquake models.

  4. Fluidized Granular Medium as an Instance of the Fluctuation Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitosa, Klebert; Menon, Narayanan

    2004-04-01

    We study the statistics of the power flux into a collection of inelastic beads maintained in a fluidized steady state by external mechanical driving. The power shows large fluctuations, including frequent large negative fluctuations, about its average value. The relative probabilities of positive and negative fluctuations in the power flux are in close accord with the fluctuation theorem of Gallavotti and Cohen, even at time scales shorter than those required by the theorem. We also compare an effective temperature that emerges from this analysis to the kinetic granular temperature.

  5. Global analysis of fluorescence fluctuation data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skakun, V.V.; Hink, M.A.; Digris, A.V.; Engel, R.; Novikov, E.G.; Apanasovich, V.V.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2005-01-01

    Over the last decade the number of applications of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) has grown rapidly. Here we describe the development and application of a software package, FCS Data Processor, to analyse the acquired correlation curves. The algorithms combine strong analytical power

  6. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design (RAPID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    RAPID is a methodology and software system to define a class of airplane configurations and directly evaluate surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity on and about the configurations. A distinguishing characteristic which separates RAPID from other airplane surface modellers is that the output grids and grid sensitivity are directly applicable in CFD analysis. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process which is incorporated into interactive software for 'real time' visual analysis and into batch software for the application of optimization technology. The computed surface grids and volume grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, and vertical tail components. The double-delta wing and tail components are manifested by solving a fourth order partial differential equation (PDE) subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design parameters are incorporated into the boundary conditions and therefore govern the shapes of the surfaces. The PDE solution yields a smooth transition between boundaries. Surface grids suitable for CFD calculation are created by establishing an H-type topology about the configuration and incorporating grid spacing functions in the PDE equation for the lifting components and the fuselage definition equations. User specified grid parameters govern the location and degree of grid concentration. A two-block volume grid about a configuration is calculated using the Control Point Form (CPF) technique. The interactive software, which runs on Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations, allows design parameters to be continuously varied and the resulting surface grid to be observed in real time. The batch software computes both the surface and volume grids and also computes the sensitivity of the output grid with respect to the input design parameters by applying the precompiler tool

  7. Rapidly progressive Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christian; Wolff, Martin; Weitz, Michael; Bartlau, Thomas; Korth, Carsten; Zerr, Inga

    2011-09-01

    Different rates of progression have been observed among patients with Alzheimer disease. Risk factors that accelerate deterioration have been identified and some are being discussed, such as genetics, comorbidity, and the early appearance of Alzheimer disease motor signs. Progressive forms of Alzheimer disease have been reported with rapid cognitive decline and disease duration of only a few years. This short review aims to provide an overview of the current knowledge of rapidly progressive Alzheimer disease. Furthermore, we suggest that rapid, in this context, should be defined as a Mini-Mental State Examination score decrease of 6 points per year.

  8. Detrended fluctuation analysis made flexible to detect range of cross-correlated fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Kwapien, Jaroslaw; Drozdz, Stanislaw

    2015-01-01

    The detrended cross-correlation coefficient $\\rho_{\\rm DCCA}$ has recently been proposed to quantify the strength of cross-correlations on different temporal scales in bivariate, non-stationary time series. It is based on the detrended cross-correlation and detrended fluctuation analyses (DCCA and DFA, respectively) and can be viewed as an analogue of the Pearson coefficient in the case of the fluctuation analysis. The coefficient $\\rho_{\\rm DCCA}$ works well in many practical situations but by construction its applicability is limited to detection of whether two signals are generally cross-correlated, without possibility to obtain information on the amplitude of fluctuations that are responsible for those cross-correlations. In order to introduce some related flexibility, here we propose an extension of $\\rho_{\\rm DCCA}$ that exploits the multifractal versions of DFA and DCCA: MFDFA and MFCCA, respectively. The resulting new coefficient $\\rho_q$ not only is able to quantify the strength of correlations, but ...

  9. Correlated and Uncorrelated Regions in Heart-Rate Fluctuations during Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunde, Armin; Havlin, Shlomo; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Penzel, Thomas; Peter, Jörg-Hermann; Voigt, Karlheinz

    2000-10-01

    Healthy sleep consists of several stages: deep sleep, light sleep, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Here we show that these sleep stages can be characterized and distinguished by correlations of heart rates separated by n beats. Using the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) up to fourth order we find that long-range correlations reminiscent to the wake phase are present only in the REM phase. In the non-REM phases, the heart rates are uncorrelated above the typical breathing cycle time, pointing to a random regulation of the heartbeat during non-REM sleep.

  10. Intensity fluctuations of reflected wave from a diffuse target with a hard edge in atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liguo; Gao, Ming; Li, Yaqing; Gong, Lei

    2017-07-01

    The intensity fluctuation of the reflected field from a diffuse circular plate with a hard edge in turbulence is investigated by combining the Rytov theory and the Extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. The normalized covariance and variance of the reflected intensity are formulated and calculated. The enhancement effect on the normalized variance is discussed around the backscattering direction, which disappears rapidly as the receiving point moves away from the transmitting center. The ;averaging effect; of the target aperture is also discussed, and the results show that the normalized variance and the backscattering enhancement effect decreases with increasing target size.

  11. Equilibrium & Nonequilibrium Fluctuation Effects in Biopolymer Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachan, Devin Michael

    Fluctuation-induced interactions are an important organizing principle in a variety of soft matter systems. In this dissertation, I explore the role of both thermal and active fluctuations within cross-linked polymer networks. The systems I study are in large part inspired by the amazing physics found within the cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells. I first predict and verify the existence of a thermal Casimir force between cross-linkers bound to a semi-flexible polymer. The calculation is complicated by the appearance of second order derivatives in the bending Hamiltonian for such polymers, which requires a careful evaluation of the the path integral formulation of the partition function in order to arrive at the physically correct continuum limit and properly address ultraviolet divergences. I find that cross linkers interact along a filament with an attractive logarithmic potential proportional to thermal energy. The proportionality constant depends on whether and how the cross linkers constrain the relative angle between the two filaments to which they are bound. The interaction has important implications for the synthesis of biopolymer bundles within cells. I model the cross-linkers as existing in two phases: bound to the bundle and free in solution. When the cross-linkers are bound, they behave as a one-dimensional gas of particles interacting with the Casimir force, while the free phase is a simple ideal gas. Demanding equilibrium between the two phases, I find a discontinuous transition between a sparsely and a densely bound bundle. This discontinuous condensation transition induced by the long-ranged nature of the Casimir interaction allows for a similarly abrupt structural transition in semiflexible filament networks between a low cross linker density isotropic phase and a higher cross link density bundle network. This work is supported by the results of finite element Brownian dynamics simulations of semiflexible filaments and transient cross-linkers. I

  12. Time fluctuation analysis of forest fire sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Orozco, Carmen D.; Kanevski, Mikhaïl; Tonini, Marj; Golay, Jean; Pereira, Mário J. G.

    2013-04-01

    Forest fires are complex events involving both space and time fluctuations. Understanding of their dynamics and pattern distribution is of great importance in order to improve the resource allocation and support fire management actions at local and global levels. This study aims at characterizing the temporal fluctuations of forest fire sequences observed in Portugal, which is the country that holds the largest wildfire land dataset in Europe. This research applies several exploratory data analysis measures to 302,000 forest fires occurred from 1980 to 2007. The applied clustering measures are: Morisita clustering index, fractal and multifractal dimensions (box-counting), Ripley's K-function, Allan Factor, and variography. These algorithms enable a global time structural analysis describing the degree of clustering of a point pattern and defining whether the observed events occur randomly, in clusters or in a regular pattern. The considered methods are of general importance and can be used for other spatio-temporal events (i.e. crime, epidemiology, biodiversity, geomarketing, etc.). An important contribution of this research deals with the analysis and estimation of local measures of clustering that helps understanding their temporal structure. Each measure is described and executed for the raw data (forest fires geo-database) and results are compared to reference patterns generated under the null hypothesis of randomness (Poisson processes) embedded in the same time period of the raw data. This comparison enables estimating the degree of the deviation of the real data from a Poisson process. Generalizations to functional measures of these clustering methods, taking into account the phenomena, were also applied and adapted to detect time dependences in a measured variable (i.e. burned area). The time clustering of the raw data is compared several times with the Poisson processes at different thresholds of the measured function. Then, the clustering measure value

  13. Noise, fluctuation, and HADAMARD-transform spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzsche, Guenter; Riesenberg, Rainer

    2003-05-01

    The HADAMARD principle is known in optics as a multiplex technique. It describes the mode with the most advantageous increase of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in terms of scanning (Fellget advantage). The maximum increase of SNR, we call it gain, is (n+1)/(2On), where n is the number of multiplexing. It is valid in the case of pure detector noise. The multiplex encoding Hadamard pattern in case of n = 7 is 1110100, whereby 1 stands for a switched on channel performed by a field selector. The signals of all (switched on) channels are detected by a single detector. n measurement steps with a cyclic change of the pattern is necessary to perform the Hadamard transformation and to get the result of each individual channel. In case of n = 7 the theoretical gain is 1.51. For all possible multiplex pattern (1100000, 1110000 and so on) the gain is theoretically investigated. A multiplexing advantage (gain > 1) is reached only by the Hadamard pattern, the inverse Hadamard pattern and for (0111111)-pattern (gain=1.08). Most of the multiplex pattern are disadvantageous. The reason for maximum gain of the HADAMARD transformation is analysed theoretically. Signal fluctuations during the measurement caused by fluctuations of the illumination or by the object under test, reduce the multiplex gain, too. So the limits for realizing a gain are estimated theoretically. Essential is the transformation procedure and its influence on the error propagation. The results could be verified by experiments with array spectrometeres. Requirements are derived by numerical simulation concerning the stability of the signals to be multiplexed. It is simulated the needed stability of the signals with increasing order of multiplexing. So the increase of the multiplex gain is limited by signal fluctuations. A realized 96 channel spectral reader is presented as a modern application of an optical multiplexing arrangement. ! M. Harvid, N. J. A. Sloane, Hadamard Transform Optics, Academic Press, 1979

  14. Hydropower RAPID Toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-12-01

    This fact sheet provides a brief overview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydropower Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop (RAPID) Toolkit including its capabilities, features, and benefits.

  15. SAP Sector Develops Rapidly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Chengwang

    2007-01-01

    @@ Stable demand growth internationally Super absorbent polymers (SAP) feature high water absorption, high water retention, rapid water absorption, great expanding power,strong thickening, strong anchoring and excellent elasticity.

  16. Rapid Lead Screening Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vitro Diagnostics Tests Used In Clinical Care Rapid Lead Screening Test Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... reducing the need for a follow-up visit. Lead Risk Links Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ( ...

  17. Fluctuation of Mesoscopic RLC Circuit at Finite Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-Yan; WANG Ji-Suo; FAN Hong-Yi

    2008-01-01

    We consider the fluctuation of mesoscopic RLC circuit at finite temperature since a resistance always produces Joule heat when the circuit is working. By virtue of the thermo field dynamics and the coherent thermo state representation we show that the quantum mechanical zero-point fluctuations of both charge and current increase with the rising temperature and the resistance value.

  18. House price fluctuations and the business cycle dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abate, Girum Dagnachew; Anselin, Luc

    areas in the US from 2001 to 2013, it is shown that house price fluctuations have detrimental effect on output growth and spillover from one location to another. The loss of output due to house price fluctuations is more pronounced during the recent financial crisis. The time varying recursive...

  19. Critical fluctuations for quantum mean-field models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fannes, M.; Kossakowski, A.; Verbeure, A. (Univ. Louvain (Belgium))

    1991-11-01

    A Ginzburg-Landau-type approximation is proposed for the local Gibbs states for quantum mean-field models that leads to the exact thermodynamics. Using this approach, the spin fluctuations are computed for some spin-1/2 models. At the critical temperature, the distribution function showing abnormal fluctuations is found explicitly.

  20. Dynamical net-proton fluctuations near a QCD critical point

    CERN Document Server

    Herold, Christoph; Yan, Yupeng; Kobdaj, Chinorat

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of the net-proton kurtosis and the kurtosis of the chiral order parameter near the critical point in the model of nonequilibrium chiral fluid dynamics. The order parameter is propagated explicitly and coupled to an expanding fluid of quarks and gluons in order to describe the dynamical situation in a heavy-ion collision. We study the critical region near the critical point on the crossover side. There are two sources of fluctuations: non-critical initial event-by-event fluctuations and critical fluctuations. These fluctuations can be distinguished by comparing a mean-field evolution of averaged thermodynamic quantities with the inclusion of fluctuations at the phase transition. We find that while the initial state fluctuations give rise to flat deviations from statistical fluctuations, critical fluctuations reveal a clear structure of the phase transition. The signals of the critical point in the net-proton and sigma field kurtosis are affected by the nonequilibrium dynamics and t...

  1. Fluctuation of the electric field in a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee J.

    2015-04-01

    The theory of electric field fluctuations in a plasma is reviewed. The fluctuations of an electric field can be assumed to be due to the Cerenkov radiation, which is emitted by single particles that satisfy the Landau wave-particle resonance conditions. This view naturally agrees with the picture that a plasma can be considered to be an aggregate of non-interacting dressed particles. A simple classical derivation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem is presented to show that the fluctuations of the Cerenkov electric field agree with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. A quasilinear-like solution of the Liouville equation is shown to derive an electric field fluctuation with the same form as that obtained by using the dressed particle approach. We suggest that the fluctuation can be traced to the causality that gives rise to collisionless dissipation (imaginary part of the dielectric function). Therefore, the fluctuation in a plasma has a philosophical implication in that its existence is fundamentally due to the causal principle that the effect cannot be precedent to the cause, thus defining the direction of time.

  2. Source of electrostatic fluctuations in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemons, D.S.; Asbridge, J.R.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Peter Gray, S.; Gosling, J.T.

    1979-05-01

    Solar wind electron and ion distribution functions measured simultaneously with or close to times of intense electrostatic fluctuations are subjected to a linear Vlasov stability analysis. Although all distributions tested were found to be stable, the analysis suggests that the ion beam instability is the most likely source of the fluctuations.

  3. Fluctuating Potential Barrier System with Correlated Spatial Noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing-Hui

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we study a fluctuating potential barrier system with correlated spatial noises. Study shows that for this system, there is the resonant activation over the fluctuating potential barrier, and that the correlation between the different spatial noises can enhance (or weaken) the resonant activation.

  4. Longitudinal fluctuations in the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubczyk, Pawel; Metzner, Walter

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the interplay of longitudinal and transverse thermal fluctuations in a U(1 ) symmetric two-dimensional ϕ4 theory. Toward this end, we derive coupled renormalization-group equations for both types of fluctuations obtained from a linear (Cartesian) decomposition of the order-parameter field. Discarding the longitudinal fluctuations, the expected Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase characterized by a finite stiffness and an algebraic decay of order-parameter correlations is recovered. Renormalized by transverse fluctuations, the longitudinal mass scales to zero so that longitudinal fluctuations become increasingly important for small momenta. Within our expansion of the effective action, they generate a logarithmic decrease of the stiffness, in agreement with previous functional renormalization-group calculations. The logarithmic terms imply a deviation from the vanishing β function for the stiffness in the nonlinear σ model describing the phase fluctuations at three-loop order. To gain further insight, we also compute the flow of the parameters characterizing longitudinal and transverse fluctuations from a density-phase representation of the order-parameter field, with a cutoff on phase fluctuations. The power-law flow of the longitudinal mass and other quantities is thereby confirmed, but the stiffness remains finite in this approach. We conclude that the marginal flow of the stiffness obtained in the Cartesian representation is an artifact of the truncated expansion of momentum dependences.

  5. Squeezing of thermal and quantum fluctuations: Universal features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik; Flensberg, Karsten

    1993-01-01

    We study the classical and quantum fluctuations of a general damped forced oscillator close to a bifurcation instability. Near the instability point, the fluctuations are strongly phase correlated and are squeezed. In the limit of low damping, it is shown that the system has universal features wh...

  6. Fluctuations of MS births and UV-light exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, F.; Smolders, J.; Trojano, M.; Lepore, V.; Zwanikken, C.; Amato, M. P.; Grand'Maison, F.; Butzkueven, H.; Marrosu, M.; Duquette, P.; Comi, G.; Izquierdo, G.; Grammond, P.; Lus, G.; Petersen, T.; Bergamaschi, R.; Giuliani, G.; Boz, C.; Coniglio, G.; Van Pesch, V.; Lechner-Scott, J.; Cavalla, P.; Granella, F.; Avolio, C.; Fiol, M.; Poehlau, D.; Saladino, M. L.; Gallo, P.; Deri, N.; Oleschko Arruda, W.; Paine, M.; Ferro, M.; Barnett, M.; Cabrera-Gomez, J. A.; Slee, M.; Moore, F.; Shaw, C.; Petkovska-Boskova, T.; Rutherford, M.; Engelsen, O.; Damoiseaux, J.; Hupperts, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) are more frequently born in spring when compared to autumn. Fluctuation of UV-light has been hypothesized to drive this phenomenon. Aim To assess the correlation between fluctuation of sunlight and birth season in persons with MS. Methods For this rec

  7. Temperature Fluctuation Characteristics Analysis for Steam Generator of Fast Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Li-na; WU; Zhi-guang

    2015-01-01

    In the case of boiling heat transfer deterioration,temperature fluctuating may accelerate the corrosion of heat transfer tubes and can also lead to thermal stress on the tubes.In this paper,dryout-induced temperature fluctuation for the fast reactor steam generator is investigated.The impacts of water flow rate,sodium inlet temperature and the outlet steam

  8. On Clustering Impurities by Liquid Density Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Shimkevich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in liquid technology have created a new class of fluids called “nanofluids” which are two-phase mixtures of a non-metal-liquid matrix and addon particles usually less than 100 nm in size. It is reputed that such liquids have a great potential for application. Indeed, many tests have shown that their thermal conductivity can be increased by almost 20% compared to that of the base fluids for a relatively low particle loading (of 1 up to 5% in volume. It is confirmed by experimental data and simulation results. In this study, the author considers an effect of impurity clustering by liquid density fluctuations as a natural mechanism for stabilizing microstructure of the colloidal solution and estimates the effect of fractal structure of colloidal particles on thermal conductivity of water. The results of this study may be useful for motivating choosing the composition of heat-transfer suspension and developing technology for making the appropriate nanofluid.

  9. Temperature fluctuations of interstellar dust grains

    CERN Document Server

    Horn, Kobi; Biham, Ofer

    2007-01-01

    The temperatures of interstellar dust grains are analyzed using stochastic simulations, taking into account the grain composition and size and the discreteness of the photon flux. [...] The distribution of grain temperatures is calculated for a broad range of grain sizes and for different intensities of the interstellar radiation field, relevant to diffuse clouds and to PDRs. The dependence of the average grain temperature on its size is shown for different irradiation intensities. It is found that the average temperatures of grains with radii smaller than about 0.02 $\\mu$m are reduced due to the fluctuations. The average temperatures of grains of radii larger than about 0.35 $\\mu$m are also slightly reduced due to their more efficient emission of infrared radiation, particularly when exposed to high irradiation intensities. The average temperatures of silicate and carbonaceous grains are found to depend on the radiation field intensity X_MMP according to ~X_MMP^gamma, where the exponent gamma depends on the...

  10. Effects of quantization on detrended fluctuation analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Song-Sheng; Xu Ze-Xi; Yin Kui-Xi; Xu Yin-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) is a method foro estimating the long-range power-law correlation exponent in noisy signals. It has been used successfully in many different fields, especially in the research of physiological signals.As an inherent part of these studies, quantization of continuous signals is inevitable. In addition, coarse-graining, to transfer original signals into symbol series in symbolic dynamic analysis, can also be considered as a quantization-like operation. Therefore, it is worth considering whether the quantization of signal has any effect on the result of DFA and if so, how large the effect will be. In this paper we study how the quantized degrees for three types of noise series (anti-correlated, uncorrelated and long-range power-law correlated signals) affect the results of DFA and find that their effects are completely different. The conclusion has an essential value in choosing the resolution of data acquisition instrument and in the processing of coarse-graining of signals.

  11. Fluctuations in the Dynamics of Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Horacio E. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States). Department of Physics and Astronomy

    2015-05-06

    This research program addressed the question of the presence of dynamical heterogeneities – strong spatial fluctuations in the dynamics – in glass forming liquids and jamming systems near dynamical arrest, with particular emphasis on aging systems, i.e. systems that are in the (non-equilibrium) glass regime. The main goals proposed for this research were: to perform numerical simulations of atomistic structural glass models to characterize dynamical heterogeneities in out of equilibrium (aging) glassy systems; to test the hypothesis that a certain symmetry (“time reparametrization symmetry”) is present in microscopic models of glassy systems and that this symmetry can explain the main features of dynamical heterogeneities; and to test to what extent these phenomena are universal across different glassy/jamming systems. It was found that: most of the important features of dynamical heterogeneities in the aging regime could be described in terms of simple scaling behaviors; that some of the most basic theoretical models of glassy systems indeed have time reparametrization symmetry; that all tests performed in numerical simulation data were consistent with the predictions from time reparametrization symmetry; and that to a large degree, the main features of dynamical heterogeneities were universal across different glassy systems. Most of the findings that came out of this research have been reported in detail in eight papers in high quality journals, two unpublished but publicly accessible manuscripts, and 27 invited and contributed talks.

  12. Primordial fluctuations from deformed quantum algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, Andrew C. [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario London, ON, Canada N6A 5B7 (Canada); Brown, Iain A. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Seahra, Sanjeev S., E-mail: aday46@uwo.ca, E-mail: ibrown@astro.uio.no, E-mail: sseahra@unb.ca [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of New Brunswick Fredericton, NB, Canada E3B 5A3 (Canada)

    2014-03-01

    We study the implications of deformed quantum algebras for the generation of primordial perturbations from slow-roll inflation. Specifically, we assume that the quantum commutator of the inflaton's amplitude and momentum in Fourier space gets modified at energies above some threshold M{sub *}. We show that when the commutator is modified to be a function of the momentum only, the problem of solving for the post-inflationary spectrum of fluctuations is formally equivalent to solving a one-dimensional Schr and quot;odinger equation with a time dependent potential. Depending on the class of modification, we find results either close to or significantly different from nearly scale invariant spectra. For the former case, the power spectrum is characterized by step-like behaviour at some pivot scale, where the magnitude of the jump is O(H{sup 2}/M{sub *}{sup 2}). (H is the inflationary Hubble parameter.) We use our calculated power spectra to generate predictions for the cosmic microwave background and baryon acoustic oscillations, hence demonstrating that certain types of deformations are incompatible with current observations.

  13. From Brownian motion to power of fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Berche

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The year 2012 marks the 140th birth anniversary of Marian Smoluchowski (28.05.1872-5.09.1917, a man who "made ground-breaking contribution to the theory of Brownian motion, the theory of sedimentation, the statistical nature of the Second Law, the theory and practice of density fluctuations (critical opalescence. During his final years of scientific creativity his pioneering theory of coagulation and diffusion-limited reaction rate appeared. These outstanding achievements present true gems which dominate the description of soft matter physics and chemical physics as well as the related areas up till now!" This quotation was taken from the lecture by Peter Hanggi given at international conference Statistical Physics: Modern Trends and Applications that took place in Lviv, Ukraine on July 3-6, 2012 (see conference web-page for more details and was dedicated to the commemoration of Smoluchowski's work. This and forthcoming issues of the Condensed Matter Physics contain papers presented at this conference.

  14. Love triangles, quantum fluctuations and spin jam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hun

    When magnetic moments are interacting with each other in a situation resembling that of complex love triangles, called frustration, a large set of states that are energetically equivalent emerge. This leads to exotic spin states such as spin liquid and spin ice. Recently, we presented evidence for the existence of a topological glassy state, that we call spin jam, induced by quantum fluctuations. The case in point is SrCr9pGa12-9pO19 (SCGO(p)), a highly frustrated magnet, in which the magnetic Cr ions form a quasi-two-dimensional triangular system of bi-pyramids. This system has been an archetype in search for exotic spin states. Understanding the nature of the state has been a great intellectual challenge. Our new experimental data and theoretical spin jam model provide for the first time a coherent understanding of the phenomenon. Furthermore, the findings strongly support the possible existence of purely topological glassy states. Reference:

  15. Maximum entropy production and the fluctuation theorem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewar, R C [Unite EPHYSE, INRA Centre de Bordeaux-Aquitaine, BP 81, 33883 Villenave d' Ornon Cedex (France)

    2005-05-27

    Recently the author used an information theoretical formulation of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics (MaxEnt) to derive the fluctuation theorem (FT) concerning the probability of second law violating phase-space paths. A less rigorous argument leading to the variational principle of maximum entropy production (MEP) was also given. Here a more rigorous and general mathematical derivation of MEP from MaxEnt is presented, and the relationship between MEP and the FT is thereby clarified. Specifically, it is shown that the FT allows a general orthogonality property of maximum information entropy to be extended to entropy production itself, from which MEP then follows. The new derivation highlights MEP and the FT as generic properties of MaxEnt probability distributions involving anti-symmetric constraints, independently of any physical interpretation. Physically, MEP applies to the entropy production of those macroscopic fluxes that are free to vary under the imposed constraints, and corresponds to selection of the most probable macroscopic flux configuration. In special cases MaxEnt also leads to various upper bound transport principles. The relationship between MaxEnt and previous theories of irreversible processes due to Onsager, Prigogine and Ziegler is also clarified in the light of these results. (letter to the editor)

  16. Fluctuating hyperfine interactions: an updated computational implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacate, M. O.; Evenson, W. E.

    2015-04-01

    The stochastic hyperfine interactions modeling library (SHIML) is a set of routines written in the C programming language designed to assist in the analysis of stochastic models of hyperfine interactions. The routines read a text-file description of the model, set up the Blume matrix, upon which the evolution operator of the quantum mechanical system depends, and calculate the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Blume matrix, from which theoretical spectra of experimental techniques can be calculated. The original version of SHIML constructs Blume matrices applicable for methods that measure hyperfine interactions with only a single nuclear spin state. In this paper, we report an extension of the library to provide support for methods such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation, which are sensitive to interactions with two nuclear spin states. Examples will be presented that illustrate the use of this extension of SHIML to generate Mössbauer spectra for polycrystalline samples under a number of fluctuating hyperfine field models.

  17. Fluctuating hyperfine interactions: an updated computational implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacate, M. O., E-mail: zacatem1@nku.edu [Northern Kentucky University, Department of Physics and Geology (United States); Evenson, W. E. [Utah Valley University, Department of Physics (United States)

    2015-04-15

    The stochastic hyperfine interactions modeling library (SHIML) is a set of routines written in the C programming language designed to assist in the analysis of stochastic models of hyperfine interactions. The routines read a text-file description of the model, set up the Blume matrix, upon which the evolution operator of the quantum mechanical system depends, and calculate the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Blume matrix, from which theoretical spectra of experimental techniques can be calculated. The original version of SHIML constructs Blume matrices applicable for methods that measure hyperfine interactions with only a single nuclear spin state. In this paper, we report an extension of the library to provide support for methods such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation, which are sensitive to interactions with two nuclear spin states. Examples will be presented that illustrate the use of this extension of SHIML to generate Mössbauer spectra for polycrystalline samples under a number of fluctuating hyperfine field models.

  18. Potential Fluctuation Equality for Free Energy Evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Ngo, Van

    2011-01-01

    Jarzynski's equality [1] allows us to investigate free energy landscapes (FELs) by constructing distributions of work performed on a system from an initial ensemble of states to final states. This work is experimentally measured by extension-versus-force (EVF) curves. We proposed a new approach that enables us to reconstruct such FELs without necessity of measuring EVF curves. We proved that any free energy changes could be computed by measuring the fluctuations of a harmonic external potential in final states. The main assumption of our proof is that one should probably treat a potential's minimum {\\lambda} (thought to be control parameter) and time in separate and independent manners. We recovered Jarzynski's equality from the introduction of a double Heaviside function. We then applied the approach in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to compute the free energy barrier of breaking DNA base pairs (bps). The free energy barrier for breaking a CG bp in our simulations is identified as 1.7 +/- 0.2 kcal/mol t...

  19. Nonlinear filtering properties of detrended fluctuation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyono, Ken; Tsujimoto, Yutaka

    2016-11-01

    Detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) has been widely used for quantifying long-range correlation and fractal scaling behavior. In DFA, to avoid spurious detection of scaling behavior caused by a nonstationary trend embedded in the analyzed time series, a detrending procedure using piecewise least-squares fitting has been applied. However, it has been pointed out that the nonlinear filtering properties involved with detrending may induce instabilities in the scaling exponent estimation. To understand this issue, we investigate the adverse effects of the DFA detrending procedure on the statistical estimation. We show that the detrending procedure using piecewise least-squares fitting results in the nonuniformly weighted estimation of the root-mean-square deviation and that this property could induce an increase in the estimation error. In addition, for comparison purposes, we investigate the performance of a centered detrending moving average analysis with a linear detrending filter and sliding window DFA and show that these methods have better performance than the standard DFA.

  20. Primordial fluctuations from deformed quantum algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Day, Andrew C; Seahra, Sanjeev S

    2013-01-01

    We study the implications of deformed quantum algebras for the generation of primordial perturbations from slow-roll inflation. Specifically, we assume that the quantum commutator of the inflaton's amplitude and momentum in Fourier space gets modified at energies above some threshold $M_{\\star}$. We show that when the commutator is modified to be a function of the momentum only, the problem of solving for the post-inflationary spectrum of fluctuations is formally equivalent to solving a one-dimensional Schr\\"odinger equation with a time dependent potential. Depending on the class of modification, we find results either close to or significantly different from nearly scale invariant spectra. For the former case, the power spectrum is characterized by step-like behaviour at some pivot scale, where the magnitude of the jump is $\\mathcal{O}(H^{2}/M_{\\star}^{2})$. ($H$ is the inflationary Hubble parameter.) We use our calculated power spectra to generate predictions for the cosmic microwave background and baryon a...