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Sample records for rapidly evolving reaction

  1. Developing Collective Learning Extension for Rapidly Evolving Information System Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Ahmed, Faysal

    2017-01-01

    Due to rapidly evolving Information System (IS) technologies, instructors find themselves stuck in the constant game of catching up. On the same hand students find their skills obsolete almost as soon as they graduate. As part of IS curriculum and education, we need to emphasize more on teaching the students "how to learn" while keeping…

  2. A Rapidly Evolving Active Region NOAA 8032 observed on April ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1997-04-15

    The active region NOAA 8032 of April 15, 1997 was observed to evolve rapidly. The GOES X-ray data showed a number of sub-flares and two C-class flares during the 8-9 hours of its evolution. The magnetic evolution of this region is studied to ascertain its role in flare production. Large changes were observed in magnetic ...

  3. ON THE NATURE OF RAPIDLY ROTATING SINGLE EVOLVED STARS

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    Da Silva, R. Rodrigues; Canto Martins, B. L.; De Medeiros, J. R., E-mail: renan@dfte.ufrn.br [Departamento de Física Teórica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitário, Natal RN (Brazil)

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the nature of the rapidly rotating, apparently single giant based on rotational and radial velocity measurements carried out by the CORAVEL spectrometers. From the analyzed sample, composed of 2010 spectroscopic, apparently single, evolved stars of luminosity classes IV, III, II, and Ib with spectral types G and K, we classified 30 stars that presented unusual, moderate to rapid rotation. This work reports, for the first time, the presence of these abnormal rotators among subgiant, bright giant, and Ib supergiant stars. To date, this class of stars was reported only among giant stars of luminosity class III. Most of these abnormal rotators present an IRAS infrared excess, which, in principle, can be related to dust around these stars.

  4. Microsatellites evolve more rapidly in humans than in chimpanzees

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    Rubinsztein, D.C.; Leggo, J.; Amos, W. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-10

    Microsatellites are highly polymorphic markers consisting of varying numbers of tandem repeats. At different loci, these repeats can consist of one to five nucleotides. Microsatellites have been used in many fields of genetics, including genetic mapping, linkage disequilibrium analyses, forensic studies, and population genetics. It is important that we understand their mutational processes better so that they can be exploited optimally for studies of human diversity and evolutionary genetics. We have analyzed 24 microsatellite loci in chimpanzees, East Anglians, and Sub-Saharan Africans. The stepwise-weighted genetic distances between the humans and the chimpanzees and between the two human populations were calculated according to the method described by Deka et al. The ratio of the genetic distances between the chimpanzees and the humans relative to that between the Africans and the East Anglians was more than 10 times smaller than expected. This suggests that microsatellites have evolved more rapidly in humans than in chimpanzees. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Histone variant innovation in a rapidly evolving chordate lineage

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    Jansen Pascal WTC

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone variants alter the composition of nucleosomes and play crucial roles in transcription, chromosome segregation, DNA repair, and sperm compaction. Modification of metazoan histone variant lineages occurs on a background of genome architecture that shows global similarities from sponges to vertebrates, but the urochordate, Oikopleura dioica, a member of the sister group to vertebrates, exhibits profound modification of this ancestral architecture. Results We show that a histone complement of 47 gene loci encodes 31 histone variants, grouped in distinct sets of developmental expression profiles throughout the life cycle. A particularly diverse array of 15 male-specific histone variants was uncovered, including a testes-specific H4t, the first metazoan H4 sequence variant reported. Universal histone variants H3.3, CenH3, and H2A.Z are present but O. dioica lacks homologs of macroH2A and H2AX. The genome encodes many H2A and H2B variants and the repertoire of H2A.Z isoforms is expanded through alternative splicing, incrementally regulating the number of acetylatable lysine residues in the functionally important N-terminal "charge patch". Mass spectrometry identified 40 acetylation, methylation and ubiquitylation posttranslational modifications (PTMs and showed that hallmark PTMs of "active" and "repressive" chromatin were present in O. dioica. No obvious reduction in silent heterochromatic marks was observed despite high gene density in this extraordinarily compacted chordate genome. Conclusions These results show that histone gene complements and their organization differ considerably even over modest phylogenetic distances. Substantial innovation among all core and linker histone variants has evolved in concert with adaptation of specific life history traits in this rapidly evolving chordate lineage.

  6. Multivariate sexual selection in a rapidly evolving speciation phenotype.

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    Oh, Kevin P; Shaw, Kerry L

    2013-06-22

    Estimating the fitness surface of rapidly evolving secondary sexual traits can elucidate the origins of sexual isolation and thus speciation. Evidence suggests that sexual selection is highly complex in nature, often acting on multivariate sexual characters that sometimes include non-heritable components of variation, thus presenting a challenge for predicting patterns of sexual trait evolution. Laupala crickets have undergone an explosive species radiation marked by divergence in male courtship song and associated female preferences, yet patterns of sexual selection that might explain this diversification remain unknown. We used female phonotaxis trials to estimate the fitness surface for acoustic characters within one population of Laupala cerasina, a species with marked geographical variation in male song and female preferences. Results suggested significant directional sexual selection on three major song traits, while canonical rotation of the matrix of nonlinear selection coefficients (γ) revealed the presence of significant convex (stabilizing) sexual selection along combinations of characters. Analysis of song variation within and among males indicated significantly higher repeatability along the canonical axis of greatest stabilizing selection than along the axis of greatest linear selection. These results are largely consistent with patterns of song divergence that characterize speciation and suggest that different song characters have the potential to indicate distinct information to females during courtship.

  7. Reproductive behaviour evolves rapidly when intralocus sexual conflict is removed.

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    Stéphanie Bedhomme

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intralocus sexual conflict can inhibit the evolution of each sex towards its own fitness optimum. In a previous study, we confirmed this prediction through the experimental removal of female selection pressures in Drosophila melanogaster, achieved by limiting the expression of all major chromosomes to males. Compared to the control populations (C(1-4 where the genomes are exposed to selection in both sexes, the populations with male-limited genomes (ML(1-4 showed rapid increases in male fitness, whereas the fitness of females expressing ML-evolved chromosomes decreased. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we examine the behavioural phenotype underlying this sexual antagonism. We show that males expressing the ML genomes have a reduced courtship level but acquire the same number of matings. On the other hand, our data suggest that females expressing the ML genomes had reduced attractiveness, stimulating a lower rate of courtship from males. Moreover, females expressing ML genomes tend to display reduced yeast-feeding behaviour, which is probably linked to the reduction of their fecundity. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that reproductive behaviour is shaped by opposing selection on males and females, and that loci influencing attractiveness and foraging were polymorphic for alleles with sexually antagonistic expression patterns prior to ML selection. Hence, intralocus sexual conflict appears to play a role in the evolution of a wide range of fitness-related traits and may be a powerful mechanism for the maintenance of genetic variation in fitness.

  8. Rapid biocatalytic polytransesterification: reaction kinetics in an exothermic reaction

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    Chaudhary; Beckman; Russell

    1998-08-20

    Biocatalytic polytransesterification at high concentrations of monomers proceeds rapidly and is accompanied by an increase in the temperature of the reaction mixture due to liberation of heat of reaction during the initial phase. We have used principles of reaction calorimetry to monitor the kinetics of polymerization during this initial phase, thus relating the temperature to the extent of polymerization. Rate of polymerization increases with the concentration of monomers. This is also reflected by the increase in the temperature of the reaction mixture. Using time-temperature-conversion contours, a differential method of kinetic analysis was used to calculate the energy of activation ( approximately 15.1 Kcal/mol). Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. How rapidly does the human mitochondrial genome evolve?

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    Howell, N.; Kubacka, I. [Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Mackey, D.A. [Univ. of Melbourne (Australia)]|[Univ. of Tasmania, Launceston (Australia)

    1996-09-01

    The results of an empirical nucleotide-sequencing approach indicate that the evolution of the human mitochondrial noncoding D-loop is both more rapid and more complex than is revealed by standard phylogenetic approaches. The nucleotide sequence of the D-loop region of the mitochondrial genome was determined for 45 members of a large matrilineal Leber hereditary optic neuropathy pedigree. Two germ-line mutations have arisen in members of one branch of the family, thereby leading to triplasmic descendants with three mitochondrial genotypes. Segregation toward the homoplasmic state can occur within a single generation in some of these descendants, a result that suggests rapid fixation of mitochondrial mutations as a result of developmental bottlenecking. However, slow segregation was observed in other offspring, and therefore no single or simple pattern of segregation can be generalized from the available data. Evidence for rare mtDNA recombination within the D-loop was obtained for one family member. In addition to these germ-line mutations, a somatic mutation was found in the D-loop of one family member. When this genealogical approach was applied to the nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial coding regions, the results again indicated a very rapid rate of evolution. 44 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Genetic basis for rapidly evolved tolerance in the wild ...

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    Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) residing in some urban and industrialized estuaries of the US eastern seaboard demonstrate recently evolved and extreme tolerance to toxic aryl hydrocarbon pollutants, characterized as dioxin-like compounds (DLCs). Here we provide an unusually comprehensive accounting (69%) through Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) analysis of the genetic basis for DLC tolerance in killifish inhabiting an urban estuary contaminated with PCB congeners, the most toxic of which are DLCs. Consistent with mechanistic knowledge of DLC toxicity in fish and other vertebrates, the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (ahr2) region accounts for 17% of trait variation; however, QTLs on independent linkage groups and their interactions have even greater explanatory power (44%). QTLs interpreted within the context of recently available Fundulus genomic resources and shared synteny among fish species suggest adaptation via inter-acting components of a complex stress response network. Some QTLs were also enriched in other killifish populations characterized as DLC tolerant and residing in distant urban estuaries contaminated with unique mixtures of pollutants. Together, our results suggest that DLC tolerance in killifish represents an emerging example of parallel contemporary evolution that has been driven by intense human-mediated selection on natural populations. This manuscript describes experimental studies that contribute to our understanding of the ecological

  11. A rapidly evolving secretome builds and patterns a sea shell

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    Green Kathryn

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Instructions to fabricate mineralized structures with distinct nanoscale architectures, such as seashells and coral and vertebrate skeletons, are encoded in the genomes of a wide variety of animals. In mollusks, the mantle is responsible for the extracellular production of the shell, directing the ordered biomineralization of CaCO3 and the deposition of architectural and color patterns. The evolutionary origins of the ability to synthesize calcified structures across various metazoan taxa remain obscure, with only a small number of protein families identified from molluskan shells. The recent sequencing of a wide range of metazoan genomes coupled with the analysis of gene expression in non-model animals has allowed us to investigate the evolution and process of biomineralization in gastropod mollusks. Results Here we show that over 25% of the genes expressed in the mantle of the vetigastropod Haliotis asinina encode secreted proteins, indicating that hundreds of proteins are likely to be contributing to shell fabrication and patterning. Almost 85% of the secretome encodes novel proteins; remarkably, only 19% of these have identifiable homologues in the full genome of the patellogastropod Lottia scutum. The spatial expression profiles of mantle genes that belong to the secretome is restricted to discrete mantle zones, with each zone responsible for the fabrication of one of the structural layers of the shell. Patterned expression of a subset of genes along the length of the mantle is indicative of roles in shell ornamentation. For example, Has-sometsuke maps precisely to pigmentation patterns in the shell, providing the first case of a gene product to be involved in molluskan shell pigmentation. We also describe the expression of two novel genes involved in nacre (mother of pearl deposition. Conclusion The unexpected complexity and evolvability of this secretome and the modular design of the molluskan mantle enables

  12. EVOLVE

    CERN Document Server

    Deutz, André; Schütze, Oliver; Legrand, Pierrick; Tantar, Emilia; Tantar, Alexandru-Adrian

    2017-01-01

    This book comprises nine selected works on numerical and computational methods for solving multiobjective optimization, game theory, and machine learning problems. It provides extended versions of selected papers from various fields of science such as computer science, mathematics and engineering that were presented at EVOLVE 2013 held in July 2013 at Leiden University in the Netherlands. The internationally peer-reviewed papers include original work on important topics in both theory and applications, such as the role of diversity in optimization, statistical approaches to combinatorial optimization, computational game theory, and cell mapping techniques for numerical landscape exploration. Applications focus on aspects including robustness, handling multiple objectives, and complex search spaces in engineering design and computational biology.

  13. A fibre based triature interferometer for measuring rapidly evolving, ablatively driven plasma densities

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    Macdonald, J.; Bland, S. N.; Threadgold, J.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the first use of a fibre interferometer incorporating triature analysis for measuring rapidly evolving plasma densities of ne ˜ 1013/cm3 and above, such as those produced by simple coaxial plasma guns. The resultant system is extremely portable, easy to field in experiments, relatively cheap to produce, and—with the exception of a small open area in which the plasma is sampled—safe in operation as all laser light is enclosed.

  14. Protein coalitions in a core mammalian biochemical network linked by rapidly evolving proteins

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    Tsoka Sophia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular ATP levels are generated by glucose-stimulated mitochondrial metabolism and determine metabolic responses, such as glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS from the β-cells of pancreatic islets. We describe an analysis of the evolutionary processes affecting the core enzymes involved in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in mammals. The proteins involved in this system belong to ancient enzymatic pathways: glycolysis, the TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. Results We identify two sets of proteins, or protein coalitions, in this group of 77 enzymes with distinct evolutionary patterns. Members of the glycolysis, TCA cycle, metabolite transport, pyruvate and NADH shuttles have low rates of protein sequence evolution, as inferred from a human-mouse comparison, and relatively high rates of evolutionary gene duplication. Respiratory chain and glutathione pathway proteins evolve faster, exhibiting lower rates of gene duplication. A small number of proteins in the system evolve significantly faster than co-pathway members and may serve as rapidly evolving adapters, linking groups of co-evolving genes. Conclusions Our results provide insights into the evolution of the involved proteins. We find evidence for two coalitions of proteins and the role of co-adaptation in protein evolution is identified and could be used in future research within a functional context.

  15. Snake venoms are integrated systems, but abundant venom proteins evolve more rapidly.

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    Aird, Steven D; Aggarwal, Shikha; Villar-Briones, Alejandro; Tin, Mandy Man-Ying; Terada, Kouki; Mikheyev, Alexander S

    2015-08-28

    While many studies have shown that extracellular proteins evolve rapidly, how selection acts on them remains poorly understood. We used snake venoms to understand the interaction between ecology, expression level, and evolutionary rate in secreted protein systems. Venomous snakes employ well-integrated systems of proteins and organic constituents to immobilize prey. Venoms are generally optimized to subdue preferred prey more effectively than non-prey, and many venom protein families manifest positive selection and rapid gene family diversification. Although previous studies have illuminated how individual venom protein families evolve, how selection acts on venoms as integrated systems, is unknown. Using next-generation transcriptome sequencing and mass spectrometry, we examined microevolution in two pitvipers, allopatrically separated for at least 1.6 million years, and their hybrids. Transcriptomes of parental species had generally similar compositions in regard to protein families, but for a given protein family, the homologs present and concentrations thereof sometimes differed dramatically. For instance, a phospholipase A2 transcript comprising 73.4 % of the Protobothrops elegans transcriptome, was barely present in the P. flavoviridis transcriptome (venoms. Protein evolutionary rates were positively correlated with transcriptomic and proteomic abundances, and the most abundant proteins showed positive selection. This pattern holds with the addition of four other published crotaline transcriptomes, from two more genera, and also for the recently published king cobra genome, suggesting that rapid evolution of abundant proteins may be generally true for snake venoms. Looking more broadly at Protobothrops, we show that rapid evolution of the most abundant components is due to positive selection, suggesting an interplay between abundance and adaptation. Given log-scale differences in toxin abundance, which are likely correlated with biosynthetic costs, we

  16. Impact of the spatial distribution of morphological pattern on the efficiency of electrocatalytic gas evolving reactions

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    Žerađanin Aleksandar R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of electrocatalytic gas evolving reactions (hydrogen, chlorine and oxygen evolution is a key challenge for the important industrial processes, such as chlor-alkali electrolysis or water electrolysis. Central issue for the aforementioned electrocatalytic processes is huge power consumption. Experimental results accumulated in the past, as well as some predictive models ("volcano" plots indicate that altering the nature of the electrode material cannot significantly increase the activity of mentioned reactions. Consequently, it is necessary to find a qualitatively different strategy for improving the energy efficiency of electrocatalytic gas evolving reactions. Usually disregarded fact is that the gas evolution is an oscillatory phenomenon. Given the oscillatory behavior, a key parameter of macrokinetics of gas electrode is the frequency of gas-bubble detachment. Bearing in mind that the gas evolution greatly depends on the surface morphology, a methodology is proposed that establishes a rational link between the morphological pattern of electrode with electrode activity and stability. Characterization was performed using advanced analytical tools. Frequency of gas-bubble detachment is obtained in the configuration of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM while the corrosion stability is analyzed using miniaturized scanning flow electrochemical cell connected to the mass spectrometer (SFC-ICPMS.

  17. Rodent-specific alternative exons are more frequent in rapidly evolving genes and in paralogs

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    Mironov Andrey A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing is an important mechanism for generating functional and evolutionary diversity of proteins in eukaryotes. Here, we studied the frequency and functionality of recently gained, rodent-specific alternative exons. Results We projected the data about alternative splicing of mouse genes to the rat, human, and dog genomes, and identified exons conserved in the rat genome, but missing in more distant genomes. We estimated the frequency of rodent-specific exons while controlling for possible residual conservation of spurious exons. The frequency of rodent-specific exons is higher among predominantly skipped exons and exons disrupting the reading frame. Separation of all genes by the rate of sequence evolution and by gene families has demonstrated that rodent-specific cassette exons are more frequent in rapidly evolving genes and in rodent-specific paralogs. Conclusion Thus we demonstrated that recently gained exons tend to occur in fast-evolving genes, and their inclusion rate tends to be lower than that of older exons. This agrees with the theory that gain of alternative exons is one of the major mechanisms of gene evolution.

  18. Cancer immunotherapy: Opportunities and challenges in the rapidly evolving clinical landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emens, Leisha A; Ascierto, Paolo A; Darcy, Phillip K; Demaria, Sandra; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Redmond, William L; Seliger, Barbara; Marincola, Francesco M

    2017-08-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is now established as a powerful way to treat cancer. The recent clinical success of immune checkpoint blockade (antagonists of CTLA-4, PD-1 and PD-L1) highlights both the universal power of treating the immune system across tumour types and the unique features of cancer immunotherapy. Immune-related adverse events, atypical clinical response patterns, durable responses, and clear overall survival benefit distinguish cancer immunotherapy from cytotoxic cancer therapy. Combination immunotherapies that transform non-responders to responders are under rapid development. Current challenges facing the field include incorporating immunotherapy into adjuvant and neoadjuvant cancer therapy, refining dose, schedule and duration of treatment and developing novel surrogate endpoints that accurately capture overall survival benefit early in treatment. As the field rapidly evolves, we must prioritise the development of biomarkers to guide the use of immunotherapies in the most appropriate patients. Immunotherapy is already transforming cancer from a death sentence to a chronic disease for some patients. By making smart, evidence-based decisions in developing next generation immunotherapies, cancer should become an imminently treatable, curable and even preventable disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A robustness screen for the rapid assessment of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Karl D; Glorius, Frank

    2013-07-01

    In contrast to the rapidity with which scientific information is published, the application of new knowledge often remains slow, and we believe this to be particularly true of newly developed synthetic organic chemistry methodology. Consequently, methods to assess and identify robust chemical reactions are desirable, and would directly facilitate the application of newly reported synthetic methodology to complex synthetic problems. Here, we describe a simple process for assessing the likely scope and limitations of a chemical reaction beyond the idealized reaction conditions initially reported. Using simple methods and common analytical techniques we demonstrate a rapid assessment of an established chemical reaction, and also propose a simplified analysis that may be reported alongside new synthetic methodology.

  20. Rapid Topochemical Modification of Layered Perovskites via Microwave Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarian-Tefaghi, Sara; Teixeira Veiga, Elaine; Amand, Guillaume; Wiley, John B

    2016-02-15

    An effective microwave approach to the topochemical modification of different layered oxide perovskite hosts is presented where cation exchange, grafting, and intercalation reactions with acid, n-alkyl alcohols, and n-alkylamines, respectively, are successfully carried out. Microwave-assisted proton exchange reactions involving double- and triple-layered Dion-Jacobson and Ruddlesden-Popper perovskite family members, RbLnNb2O7 (Ln = La, Pr), KCa2Nb3O10, Li2CaTa2O7, and Na2La2Ti3O10, were found to be quite efficient, decreasing reaction times from several days to ≤3 h. Grafting and intercalation reactions involving double-layered perovskites were also quite rapid with full conversions occurring in as fast as an hour. Interestingly, triple-layered hosts were found to show different behavior; when complete intercalations were possible, grafting reactions were limited at best. Utilization of this rapid synthetic approach could help facilitate the fabrication of new organic-inorganic hybrids.

  1. Rapid electrochemiluminescence assays of polymerase chain reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenten, J H; Casadei, J; Link, J; Lupold, S; Willey, J; Powell, M; Rees, A; Massey, R

    1991-09-01

    We demonstrate the first use of an electrochemiluminescent (ECL) label, [4-(N-succimidyloxycarbonylpropyl)-4'-methyl-2,2'- bipyridine]ruthenium(II) dihexafluorophosphate (Origen label; IGEN Inc.), in DNA probe assays. This label allows rapid (less than 25 min) quantification and detection of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified products from oncogenes, viruses, and cloned genes. For the PCR, we used labeled oligonucleotide primers complementary to human papiloma virus and the Ha-ras oncogene. These samples were followed by ECL analysis or hybridization with specific, Origen-labeled oligonucleotide probes. These studies demonstrate the speed, specificity, and effectiveness of the new ECL labels, compared with 32P, for nucleic acid probe applications. We describe formats involving conventional methodologies and a new format that requires no wash step, allowing simple and rapid sample analysis. These rapid assays also reduce PCR contamination, by requiring less sample handling. Improvements in ECL detectability are currently under investigation for use in DNA probe assays without amplification.

  2. Ultrafast Primary Reactions in the Photosystems of Oxygen-Evolving Organisms

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    Holzwarth, A. R.

    In oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms (plants, green algae, cyanobacteria), the primary steps of photosynthesis occur in two membrane-bound protein supercomplexes, Photosystem I (PS I) and Photosystem II (PS II), located in the thylakoid membrane (c.f. Fig. 7.1) along with two other important protein complexes, the cytochrome b6/f complex and the ATP-synthase [1]. Each of the photosystems consists of a reaction center (RC) where the photoinduced early electron transfer processes occur, of a so-called core antenna consisting of chlorophyll (Chl) protein complexes responsible for light absorption and ultrafast energy transfer to the RC pigments, and additional peripheral antenna complexes of various kinds that increase the absorption cross-section. The peripheral complexes are Chl a/b-protein complexes in higher plants and green algae (LHC I or LHC II for PS I or PS II, respectively) and so-called phycobilisomes in cyanobacteria and red algae [2-4]. The structures and light-harvesting functions of these antenna systems have been extensively reviewed [2, 5-9]. Recently, X-ray structures of both PS I and PS II antenna/RC complexes have been determined, some to atomic resolution. Although many details of the pigment content and organization of the RCs and antenna systems of PS I and PS II have been known before, the high resolution structures of the integral complexes allow us for the first time to try to understand structure/function relationships in detail. This article covers our present understanding of the ultrafast energy transfer and early electron transfer processes occurring in the photosystems of oxygen-evolving organisms. The main emphasis will be on the electron transfer processes. However, in both photosystems the kinetics of the energy transfer processes in the core antennae is intimately interwoven with the kinetics of the electron transfer steps. Since both types of processes occur on a similar time scale, their kinetics cannot be considered

  3. Application of evolved gas analysis to cold-cap reactions of melter feeds for nuclear waste vitrification

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    Kruger, Albert A.; Chun, Jaehun; Hrma, Pavel R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2014-04-30

    In the vitrification of nuclear wastes, the melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming and modifying additives) experiences multiple gas-evolving reactions in an electrical glass-melting furnace. We employed the thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TGA-GC-MS) combination to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Apart from identifying the gases evolved, we performed quantitative analysis relating the weighed sum of intensities of individual gases linearly proportional with the differential themogravimetry. The proportionality coefficients were obtained by three methods based on the stoichiometry, least squares, and calibration. The linearity was shown to be a good first-order approximation, in spite of the complicated overlapping reactions.

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis in Three Fusarium Pathogens Identifies Rapidly Evolving Chromosomes and Genes Associated with Pathogenicity

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    Sperschneider, Jana; Gardiner, Donald M.; Thatcher, Louise F.; Lyons, Rebecca; Singh, Karam B.; Manners, John M.; Taylor, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens and hosts are in an ongoing arms race and genes involved in host–pathogen interactions are likely to undergo diversifying selection. Fusarium plant pathogens have evolved diverse infection strategies, but how they interact with their hosts in the biotrophic infection stage remains puzzling. To address this, we analyzed the genomes of three Fusarium plant pathogens for genes that are under diversifying selection. We found a two-speed genome structure both on the chromosome and gene group level. Diversifying selection acts strongly on the dispensable chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici and on distinct core chromosome regions in Fusarium graminearum, all of which have associations with virulence. Members of two gene groups evolve rapidly, namely those that encode proteins with an N-terminal [SG]-P-C-[KR]-P sequence motif and proteins that are conserved predominantly in pathogens. Specifically, 29 F. graminearum genes are rapidly evolving, in planta induced and encode secreted proteins, strongly pointing toward effector function. In summary, diversifying selection in Fusarium is strongly reflected as genomic footprints and can be used to predict a small gene set likely to be involved in host–pathogen interactions for experimental verification. PMID:25994930

  5. Sensationalistic journalism and tales of snakebite: are rattlesnakes rapidly evolving more toxic venom?

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    Hayes, William K; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2010-03-01

    Recent reports in the lay press have suggested that bites by rattlesnakes in the last several years have been more severe than those in the past. The explanation, often citing physicians, is that rattlesnakes are evolving more toxic venom, perhaps in response to anthropogenic causes. We suggest that other explanations are more parsimonious, including factors dependent on the snake and factors associated with the bite victim's response to envenomation. Although bites could become more severe from an increased proportion of bites from larger or more provoked snakes (ie, more venom injected), the venom itself evolves much too slowly to explain the severe symptoms occasionally seen. Increased snakebite severity could also result from a number of demographic changes in the victim profile, including age and body size, behavior toward the snake (provocation), anatomical site of bite, clothing, and general health including asthma prevalence and sensitivity to foreign antigens. Clinical management of bites also changes perpetually, rendering comparisons of snakebite severity over time tenuous. Clearly, careful study taking into consideration many factors will be essential to document temporal changes in snakebite severity or venom toxicity. Presently, no published evidence for these changes exists. The sensationalistic coverage of these atypical bites and accompanying speculation is highly misleading and can produce many detrimental results, such as inappropriate fear of the outdoors and snakes, and distraction from proven snakebite management needs, including a consistent supply of antivenom, adequate health care, and training. We urge healthcare providers to avoid propagating misinformation about snakes and snakebites. Copyright (c) 2010 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Navigating the Perfect Storm: Research Strategies for Socialecological Systems in a Rapidly Evolving World

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    Dearing, John A.; Bullock, Seth; Costanza, Robert; Dawson, Terry P.; Edwards, Mary E.; Poppy, Guy M.; Smith, Graham M.

    2012-04-01

    The `Perfect Storm' metaphor describes a combination of events that causes a surprising or dramatic impact. It lends an evolutionary perspective to how social-ecological interactions change. Thus, we argue that an improved understanding of how social-ecological systems have evolved up to the present is necessary for the modelling, understanding and anticipation of current and future social-ecological systems. Here we consider the implications of an evolutionary perspective for designing research approaches. One desirable approach is the creation of multi-decadal records produced by integrating palaeoenvironmental, instrument and documentary sources at multiple spatial scales. We also consider the potential for improved analytical and modelling approaches by developing system dynamical, cellular and agent-based models, observing complex behaviour in social-ecological systems against which to test systems dynamical theory, and drawing better lessons from history. Alongside these is the need to find more appropriate ways to communicate complex systems, risk and uncertainty to the public and to policy-makers.

  7. From Rapid to Delayed and Remote Postconditioning: the Evolving Concept of Ischemic Postconditioning in Brain Ischemia

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    Zhao, Heng; Ren, Chuancheng; Chen, Xingmiao; Shen, Jiangang

    2012-01-01

    Ischemic postconditioning is a concept originally defined to contrast with that of ischemic preconditioning. While both preconditioning and postconditioning confer a neuroprotective effect on brain ischemia, preconditioning is a sublethal insult performed in advance of brain ischemia, and postconditioning, which conventionally refers to a series of brief occlusions and reperfusions of the blood vessels, is conducted after ischemia/reperfusion. In this article, we first briefly review the history of preconditioning, including the experimentation that initially uncovered its neuroprotective effects and later revealed its underlying mechanisms-of-action. We then discuss how preconditioning research evolved into that of postconditioning – a concept that now represents a broad range of stimuli or triggers, including delayed postconditioning, pharmacological postconditioning, remote postconditioning – and its underlying protective mechanisms involving the Akt, MAPK, PKC and KATP channel cell-signaling pathways. Because the concept of postconditioning is so closely associated with that of preconditioning, and both share some common protective mechanisms, we also discuss whether a combination of preconditioning and postconditioning offers greater protection than preconditioning or postconditioning alone. PMID:22204317

  8. Cloning of novel rice blast resistance genes from two rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Changjiang; Sun, Xiaoguang; Chen, Xiao; Yang, Sihai; Li, Jing; Wang, Long; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Most rice blast resistance genes (R-genes) encode proteins with nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. Our previous study has shown that more rice blast R-genes can be cloned in rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families. In the present study, two rapidly evolving R-gene families in rice were selected for cloning a subset of genes from their paralogs in three resistant rice lines. A total of eight functional blast R-genes were identified among nine NBS-LRR genes, and some of these showed resistance to three or more blast strains. Evolutionary analysis indicated that high nucleotide diversity of coding regions served as important parameters in the determination of gene resistance. We also observed that amino-acid variants (nonsynonymous mutations, insertions, or deletions) in essential motifs of the NBS domain contribute to the blast resistance capacity of NBS-LRR genes. These results suggested that the NBS regions might also play an important role in resistance specificity determination. On the other hand, different splicing patterns of introns were commonly observed in R-genes. The results of the present study contribute to improving the effectiveness of R-gene identification by using evolutionary analysis method and acquisition of novel blast resistance genes.

  9. Consumer Health Informatics: Past, Present, and Future of a Rapidly Evolving Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiris, G

    2016-05-20

    Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) is a rapidly growing domain within the field of biomedical and health informatics. The objective of this paper is to reflect on the past twenty five years and showcase informatics concepts and applications that led to new models of care and patient empowerment, and to predict future trends and challenges for the next 25 years. We discuss concepts and systems based on a review and analysis of published literature in the consumer health informatics domain in the last 25 years. The field was introduced with the vision that one day patients will be in charge of their own health care using informatics tools and systems. Scientific literature in the field originally focused on ways to assess the quality and validity of available printed health information, only to grow significantly to cover diverse areas such as online communities, social media, and shared decision-making. Concepts such as home telehealth, mHealth, and the quantified-self movement, tools to address transparency of health care organizations, and personal health records and portals provided significant milestones in the field. Consumers are able to actively participate in the decision-making process and to engage in health care processes and decisions. However, challenges such as health literacy and the digital divide have hindered us from maximizing the potential of CHI tools with a significant portion of underserved populations unable to access and utilize them. At the same time, at a global scale consumer tools can increase access to care for underserved populations in developing countries. The field continues to grow and emerging movements such as precision medicine and the sharing economy will introduce new opportunities and challenges.

  10. Linking rapid magma reservoir assembly and eruption trigger mechanisms at evolved Yellowstone-type supervolcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotzlaw, J.F.; Bindeman, I.N.; Watts, Kathryn E.; Schmitt, A.K.; Caricchi, L.; Schaltegger, U.

    2014-01-01

    The geological record contains evidence of volcanic eruptions that were as much as two orders of magnitude larger than the most voluminous eruption experienced by modern civilizations, the A.D. 1815 Tambora (Indonesia) eruption. Perhaps nowhere on Earth are deposits of such supereruptions more prominent than in the Snake River Plain–Yellowstone Plateau (SRP-YP) volcanic province (northwest United States). While magmatic activity at Yellowstone is still ongoing, the Heise volcanic field in eastern Idaho represents the youngest complete caldera cycle in the SRP-YP, and thus is particularly instructive for current and future volcanic activity at Yellowstone. The Heise caldera cycle culminated 4.5 Ma ago in the eruption of the ∼1800 km3 Kilgore Tuff. Accessory zircons in the Kilgore Tuff display significant intercrystalline and intracrystalline oxygen isotopic heterogeneity, and the vast majority are 18O depleted. This suggests that zircons crystallized from isotopically distinct magma batches that were generated by remelting of subcaldera silicic rocks previously altered by low-δ18O meteoric-hydrothermal fluids. Prior to eruption these magma batches were assembled and homogenized into a single voluminous reservoir. U-Pb geochronology of isotopically diverse zircons using chemical abrasion–isotope dilution–thermal ionization mass spectrometry yielded indistinguishable crystallization ages with a weighted mean 206Pb/238U date of 4.4876 ± 0.0023 Ma (MSWD = 1.5; n = 24). These zircon crystallization ages are also indistinguishable from the sanidine 40Ar/39Ar dates, and thus zircons crystallized close to eruption. This requires that shallow crustal melting, assembly of isolated batches into a supervolcanic magma reservoir, homogenization, and eruption occurred extremely rapidly, within the resolution of our geochronology (103–104 yr). The crystal-scale image of the reservoir configuration, with several isolated magma batches, is very similar to the

  11. Rapidly evolving marmoset MSMB genes are differently expressed in the male genital tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceder Yvonne

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beta-microseminoprotein, an abundant component in prostatic fluid, is encoded by the potential tumor suppressor gene MSMB. Some New World monkeys carry several copies of this gene, in contrast to most mammals, including humans, which have one only. Here we have investigated the background for the species difference by analyzing the chromosomal organization and expression of MSMB in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus. Methods Genes were identified in the Callithrix jacchus genome database using bioinformatics and transcripts were analyzed by RT-PCR and quantified by real time PCR in the presence of SYBR green. Results The common marmoset has five MSMB: one processed pseudogene and four functional genes. The latter encompass homologous genomic regions of 32-35 kb, containing the genes of 12-14 kb and conserved upstream and downstream regions of 14-19 kb and 3-4 kb. One gene, MSMB1, occupies the same position on the chromosome as the single human gene. On the same chromosome, but several Mb away, is another MSMB locus situated with MSMB2, MSMB3 and MSMB4 arranged in tandem. Measurements of transcripts demonstrated that all functional genes are expressed in the male genital tract, generating very high transcript levels in the prostate. The transcript levels in seminal vesicles and testis are two and four orders of magnitude lower. A single gene, MSMB3, accounts for more than 90% of MSMB transcripts in both the prostate and the seminal vesicles, whereas in the testis around half of the transcripts originate from MSMB2. These genes display rapid evolution with a skewed distribution of mutated nucleotides; in MSMB2 they affect nucleotides encoding the N-terminal Greek key domain, whereas in MSMB3 it is the C-terminal MSMB-unique domain that is affected. Conclusion Callitrichide monkeys have four functional MSMB that are all expressed in the male genital tract, but the product from one gene, MSMB3, will predominate in seminal

  12. De novo ORFs in Drosophila are important to organismal fitness and evolved rapidly from previously non-coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine A Reinhardt

    Full Text Available How non-coding DNA gives rise to new protein-coding genes (de novo genes is not well understood. Recent work has revealed the origins and functions of a few de novo genes, but common principles governing the evolution or biological roles of these genes are unknown. To better define these principles, we performed a parallel analysis of the evolution and function of six putatively protein-coding de novo genes described in Drosophila melanogaster. Reconstruction of the transcriptional history of de novo genes shows that two de novo genes emerged from novel long non-coding RNAs that arose at least 5 MY prior to evolution of an open reading frame. In contrast, four other de novo genes evolved a translated open reading frame and transcription within the same evolutionary interval suggesting that nascent open reading frames (proto-ORFs, while not required, can contribute to the emergence of a new de novo gene. However, none of the genes arose from proto-ORFs that existed long before expression evolved. Sequence and structural evolution of de novo genes was rapid compared to nearby genes and the structural complexity of de novo genes steadily increases over evolutionary time. Despite the fact that these genes are transcribed at a higher level in males than females, and are most strongly expressed in testes, RNAi experiments show that most of these genes are essential in both sexes during metamorphosis. This lethality suggests that protein coding de novo genes in Drosophila quickly become functionally important.

  13. The Genomics, Epigenomics, and Transcriptomics of HPV-Associated Oropharyngeal Cancer--Understanding the Basis of a Rapidly Evolving Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, M; Fenton, T R

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been shown to represent a major independent risk factor for head and neck squamous cell cancer, in particular for oropharyngeal carcinoma. This type of cancer is rapidly evolving in the Western world, with rising trends particularly in the young, and represents a distinct epidemiological, clinical, and molecular entity. It is the aim of this review to give a detailed description of genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, and posttranscriptional changes that underlie the phenotype of this deadly disease. The review will also link these changes and examine what is known about the interactions between the host genome and viral genome, and investigate changes specific for the viral genome. These data are then integrated into an updated model of HPV-induced head and neck carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantitative comparison of catalytic mechanisms and overall reactions in convergently evolved enzymes: implications for classification of enzyme function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonacid, Daniel E; Yera, Emmanuel R; Mitchell, John B O; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2010-03-12

    Functionally analogous enzymes are those that catalyze similar reactions on similar substrates but do not share common ancestry, providing a window on the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve required catalysts. Identification and use of this information to improve reaction classification and computational annotation of enzymes newly discovered in the genome projects would benefit from systematic determination of reaction similarities. Here, we quantified similarity in bond changes for overall reactions and catalytic mechanisms for 95 pairs of functionally analogous enzymes (non-homologous enzymes with identical first three numbers of their EC codes) from the MACiE database. Similarity of overall reactions was computed by comparing the sets of bond changes in the transformations from substrates to products. For similarity of mechanisms, sets of bond changes occurring in each mechanistic step were compared; these similarities were then used to guide global and local alignments of mechanistic steps. Using this metric, only 44% of pairs of functionally analogous enzymes in the dataset had significantly similar overall reactions. For these enzymes, convergence to the same mechanism occurred in 33% of cases, with most pairs having at least one identical mechanistic step. Using our metric, overall reaction similarity serves as an upper bound for mechanistic similarity in functional analogs. For example, the four carbon-oxygen lyases acting on phosphates (EC 4.2.3) show neither significant overall reaction similarity nor significant mechanistic similarity. By contrast, the three carboxylic-ester hydrolases (EC 3.1.1) catalyze overall reactions with identical bond changes and have converged to almost identical mechanisms. The large proportion of enzyme pairs that do not show significant overall reaction similarity (56%) suggests that at least for the functionally analogous enzymes studied here, more stringent criteria could be used to refine

  15. Patient with rapidly evolving neurological disease with neuropathological lesions of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Lewy body dementia, chronic subcortical vascular encephalopathy and meningothelial meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Maria Gabriella; Tiple, Dorina; Bizzarro, Alessandra; Ladogana, Anna; Colaizzo, Elisa; Capellari, Sabina; Rossi, Marcello; Parchi, Piero; Masullo, Carlo; Pocchiari, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    We report a case of rapidly evolving neurological disease in a patient with neuropathological lesions of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Lewy body dementia (LBD), chronic subcortical vascular encephalopathy and meningothelial meningioma. The coexistence of severe multiple pathologies in a single patient strengthens the need to perform accurate clinical differential diagnoses in rapidly progressive dementias. © 2016 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  16. Facile Synthesis of Black Phosphorus: an Efficient Electrocatalyst for the Oxygen Evolving Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qianqian; Xu, Lei; Chen, Ning; Zhang, Han; Dai, Liming; Wang, Shuangyin

    2016-10-24

    Black phosphorus (BP) as a new 2D material has attracted extensive attention because of its unique electronic, optical, and structural properties. However, the difficulties associated with BP synthesis severely hinder the further development of BP for any potential applications. On the other hand, searching for other potential applications of BP is also a big challenge. A facile strategy was developed for preparation of BP supported on Ti foil (BP-Ti) in a thin-film form. Surprisingly, the as-prepared BP shows advanced electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). To improve the OER activity of the electrocatalyst, BP was grown on a carbon nanotube network (BP-CNT), showing even better activity. The results demonstrate that BP can be prepared by a facile method and may be applied as an electrocatalyst. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Rapid Hydrogen Shift Reactions in Acyl Peroxy Radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, Hasse Christian; Jørgensen, Solvejg

    2017-01-01

    We have used quantum mechanical chemical calculations (CCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVDZ-F12//M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ) to investigate the hydrogen shift (H-shift) reactions in acyl peroxy and hydroperoxy acyl peroxy radicals. We have focused on the H-shift reactions from a hydroperoxy group (OOH) (1,X-OOH H...

  18. Electrochemistry of single nanobubbles. Estimating the critical size of bubble-forming nuclei for gas-evolving electrode reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Sean R; Edwards, Martin A; Chen, Qianjin; Liu, Yuwen; Luo, Long; White, Henry S

    2016-12-12

    In this article, we address the fundamental question: "What is the critical size of a single cluster of gas molecules that grows and becomes a stable (or continuously growing) gas bubble during gas evolving reactions?" Electrochemical reactions that produce dissolved gas molecules are ubiquitous in electrochemical technologies, e.g., water electrolysis, photoelectrochemistry, chlorine production, corrosion, and often lead to the formation of gaseous bubbles. Herein, we demonstrate that electrochemical measurements of the dissolved gas concentration, at the instant prior to nucleation of an individual nanobubble of H2, N2, or O2 at a Pt nanodisk electrode, can be analyzed using classical thermodynamic relationships (Henry's law and the Young-Laplace equation - including non-ideal corrections) to provide an estimate of the size of the gas bubble nucleus that grows into a stable bubble. We further demonstrate that this critical nucleus size is independent of the radius of the Pt nanodisk employed (pressure of ∼350 atm, and contains ∼1700 H2 molecules. The data are consistent with stochastic fluctuations in the density of dissolved gas, at or near the Pt/solution interface, controlling the rate of bubble nucleation. We discuss the growth of the nucleus as a diffusion-limited process and how that process is affected by proximity to an electrode producing ∼1011 gas molecules per second. Our study demonstrates the advantages of studying a single-entity, i.e., an individual nanobubble, in understanding and quantifying complex physicochemical phenomena.

  19. Reactions Involving Calcium and Magnesium Sulfates as Potential Sources of Sulfur Dioxide During MSL SAM Evolved Gas Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, A. C.; Knudson, C. A.; Sutter, B.; Franz, H. B.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) have analyzed several subsamples of 860 C). Sulfides or Fe sulfates were detected by CheMin (e.g., CB, MJ, BK) and could contribute to the high temperature SO2 evolution, but in most cases they are not present in enough abundance to account for all of the SO2. This additional SO2 could be largely associated with x-ray amorphous material, which comprises a significant portion of all samples. It can also be attributed to trace S phases present below the CheMin detection limit, or to reactions which lower the temperatures of SO2 evolution from sulfates that are typically expected to thermally decompose at temperatures outside the SAM temperature range (e.g., Ca and Mg sulfates). Here we discuss the results of SAM-like laboratory analyses targeted at understanding this last possibility, focused on understanding if reactions of HCl or an HCl evolving phase (oxychlorine phases, chlorides, etc.) and Ca and Mg sulfates can result in SO2 evolution in the SAM temperature range.

  20. Phylogenetic utility of rapidly evolving DNA at high taxonomical levels: contrasting matK, trnT-F, and rbcL in basal angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Kai F; Borsch, Thomas; Hilu, Khidir W

    2006-10-01

    The prevailing view in molecular systematics is that relationships among distantly related taxa should be inferred using DNA segments with low rates of evolution. However, recent analyses of sequences from the rapidly evolving matK and trnT-trnF regions yielded well resolved and highly supported trees for early diverging angiosperms. We compare here the phylogenetic structure in matK, trnT-F, and rbcL datasets for the same 42, primarily basal angiosperm taxa. Phylogenetic trees based on matK or trnT-F are far more robust than those based on rbcL. Combined analysis of the rapidly evolving regions provides support for higher-level relationships stronger than that derived from analyses of multi-gene datasets of up to several fold the number of characters analyzed here. In addition to displaying a higher percentage of parsimony-informative characters, the average phylogenetic signal per informative character is significantly higher in the datasets from rapidly evolving DNA than in the more slowly evolving rbcL, as detected using resampling of identical numbers of parsimony-informative characters from the data matrices and subjecting different statistics for overall tree robustness and phylogenetic signal to significance tests. Automated via a set of scripts, the method used here should be easily extendable to comparisons of a broader range of genomic regions for varying taxon samplings. The relative performance of markers correlates not only with a lower mean homoplasy in matK and trnT-trnF compared to rbcL, but in particular correlates negatively with the percentage of sites exhibiting maximum or close to maximum homoplasy. A likelihood ratio test confirms that the rapidly evolving gene matK evolves significantly closer to neutrality, which may be one of the underlying factors for lower levels of overall homoplasy. Our results are in line with evidence from simulation studies suggesting that the deleterious effect of multiple hits in using rapidly evolving DNA at

  1. A history into genetic and epigenetic evolution of food tolerance: how humanity rapidly evolved by drinking milk and eating wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Carine

    2017-12-01

    Human exposure to wheat and milk is almost global worldwide. Yet the introduction of milk and wheat is very recent (5000-10 000 years) when compared to the human evolution. The last 4 decades have seen a rise in food allergy and food intolerance to milk and wheat. Often described as plurifactorial, the cause of allergic diseases is the result from an interplay between genetic predisposition and epigenetic in the context of environmental changes. Genetic and epigenetic understanding and their contribution to allergy or other antigen-driven diseases have considerably advanced in the last few years. Yet, environmental factors are also quite difficult to identify and associate with disease risk. Can we rethink our old findings and learn from human history and recent genetic studies? More than one million years separate Homo habilis to today's mankind, more than 1 million years to develop abilities to obtain food by foraging in diverse environments. One million year to adjust and fine-tune our genetic code and adapt; and only 1% of this time, 10 000 years, to face the three biggest revolutions of the human kind: the agricultural revolution, the industrial revolution and the postindustrial revolution. With big and rapid environmental changes come adaptation but with no time for fine-tuning. Today tolerance and adverse reactions to food may be a testimony of adaptation successes and mistakes.

  2. Probing fast ribozyme reactions under biological conditions with rapid quench-flow kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingaman, Jamie L; Messina, Kyle J; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2017-05-01

    Reaction kinetics on the millisecond timescale pervade the protein and RNA fields. To study such reactions, investigators often perturb the system with abiological solution conditions or substrates in order to slow the rate to timescales accessible by hand mixing; however, such perturbations can change the rate-limiting step and obscure key folding and chemical steps that are found under biological conditions. Mechanical methods for collecting data on the millisecond timescale, which allow these perturbations to be avoided, have been developed over the last few decades. These methods are relatively simple and can be conducted on affordable and commercially available instruments. Here, we focus on using the rapid quench-flow technique to study the fast reaction kinetics of RNA enzymes, or ribozymes, which often react on the millisecond timescale under biological conditions. Rapid quench of ribozymes is completely parallel to the familiar hand-mixing approach, including the use of radiolabeled RNAs and fractionation of reactions on polyacrylamide gels. We provide tips on addressing and preventing common problems that can arise with the rapid-quench technique. Guidance is also offered on ensuring the ribozyme is properly folded and fast-reacting. We hope that this article will facilitate the broader use of rapid-quench instrumentation to study fast-reacting ribozymes under biological reaction conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Rapid quantitative detection of glucose content in glucose injection by reaction headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei-Qi; Gong, Yi-Xian; Yu, Kong-Xian

    2017-10-20

    This work investigates an automated technique for rapid detecting the glucose content in glucose injection by reaction headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC). This method is based on the oxidation reaction of glucose in glucose injection with potassium dichromate. The carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) formed from the oxidation reaction can be quantitatively detected by GC. The results show that the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the present method was within 2.91%, and the measured glucose contents in glucose injection closely match those quantified by the reference method (relative differences glucose content in glucose injection related applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Rapid emergence and predominance of a broadly recognizing and fast-evolving norovirus GII.17 variant in late 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Martin C. W.; Lee, Nelson; Hung, Tin-Nok; Kwok, Kirsty; Cheung, Kelton; Tin, Edith K. Y.; Lai, Raymond W. M.; Nelson, E. Anthony S.; Leung, Ting F.; Chan, Paul K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) has been the predominant cause of viral gastroenteritis since 1996. Here we show that during the winter of 2014–2015, an emergent variant of a previously rare norovirus GII.17 genotype, Kawasaki 2014, predominated in Hong Kong and outcompeted contemporary GII.4 Sydney 2012 in hospitalized cases. GII.17 cases were significantly older than GII.4 cases. Root-to-tip and Bayesian BEAST analyses estimate GII.17 viral protein 1 (VP1) evolves one order of magnitude faster than GII.4 VP1. Residue substitutions and insertion occur in four of five inferred antigenic epitopes, suggesting immune evasion. Sequential GII.4-GII.17 infections are noted, implicating a lack of cross-protection. Virus bound to saliva of secretor histo-blood groups A, B and O, indicating broad susceptibility. This fast-evolving, broadly recognizing and probably immune-escaped emergent GII.17 variant causes severe gastroenteritis and hospitalization across all age groups, including populations who were previously less vulnerable to GII.4 variants; therefore, the global spread of GII.17 Kawasaki 2014 needs to be monitored. PMID:26625712

  5. Rapidly evolving genes in pathogens: methods for detecting positive selection and examples among fungi, bacteria, viruses and protists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguileta, Gabriela; Refrégier, Guislaine; Yockteng, Roxana; Fournier, Elisabeth; Giraud, Tatiana

    2009-07-01

    The ongoing coevolutionary struggle between hosts and pathogens, with hosts evolving to escape pathogen infection and pathogens evolving to escape host defences, can generate an 'arms race', i.e., the occurrence of recurrent selective sweeps that each favours a novel resistance or virulence allele that goes to fixation. Host-pathogen coevolution can alternatively lead to a 'trench warfare', i.e., balancing selection, maintaining certain alleles at loci involved in host-pathogen recognition over long time scales. Recently, technological and methodological progress has enabled detection of footprints of selection directly on genes, which can provide useful insights into the processes of coevolution. This knowledge can also have practical applications, for instance development of vaccines or drugs. Here we review the methods for detecting genes under positive selection using divergence data (i.e., the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates, d(N)/d(S)). We also review methods for detecting selection using polymorphisms, such as methods based on F(ST) measures, frequency spectrum, linkage disequilibrium and haplotype structure. In the second part, we review examples where targets of selection have been identified in pathogens using these tests. Genes under positive selection in pathogens have mostly been sought among viruses, bacteria and protists, because of their paramount importance for human health. Another focus is on fungal pathogens owing to their agronomic importance. We finally discuss promising directions in pathogen studies, such as detecting selection in non-coding regions.

  6. More rapid polar ozone depletion through the reaction of HOCl with HCl on polar stratospheric clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The direct reaction of HOCl with HCl is shown here to play a critical part in polar ozone loss. Observations of high levels of OClO and ClO in the springtime Antarctic stratosphere confirm that most of the available chlorine is in the form of ClO(x). But current photochemical models have difficulty converting HCl to ClO(x) rapidly enough in early spring to account fully for the observations. Here, a chemical model is used to show that the direct reaction of HOCl with HCl provides the missing mechanism. As alternative sources of nitrogen-containing oxidants have been converted in the late autumn to inactive HNO3 by known reactions on the sulfate layer aerosols, the reaction of HOCl with HCl on polar stratospheric clouds becomes the most important pathway for releasing that stratospheric chlorine which goes into polar night as HCl.

  7. Rapidly evolving asymptomatic eosinophilia in a patient with lung adenocarcinoma causes cognitive disturbance and respiratory insufficiency: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Jen, Yee-Min; Tsai, Wen-Chiuan; Chung, Ping-Ying; Kao, Woei-Yau

    2013-02-01

    Paraneoplastic eosinophilia is an unusual manifestation that usually remains asymptomatic. In this report, we presented the case of an 82-year-old patient with poorly differentiated lung adenocarcinoma and asymptomatic eosinophilia. The patient's condition worsened rapidly over a week, with episodes of cognitive disturbance, shortness of breath and acute kidney dysfunction. These symptoms were associated with a 4-fold increase in circulating eosinophil counts. The poor condition hindered further anticancer treatment. Treatment of the eosinophilia with corticosteroids and hydroxyurea significantly reduced circulating eosinophil counts to below the initial levels. Results of this case report suggested that lung cancer patients should be monitored closely for rapidly worsening symptoms of cognitive disturbance and respiratory insufficiency as signs of life-threatening asymptomatic eosinophilia, in order to initiate corticosteroid treatment.

  8. HPLC method for rapidly following biodiesel fuel transesterification reaction progress using a core-shell column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Samuel J.; Ott, Lisa S. [California State University, Chico, CA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    There are a wide and growing variety of feedstocks for biodiesel fuel. Most commonly, these feedstocks contain triglycerides which are transesterified into the fatty acid alkyl esters (FAAEs) which comprise biodiesel fuel. While the tranesterification reaction itself is simple, monitoring the reaction progress and reaction products is not. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is useful for assessing the FAAE products, but does not directly address either the tri-, di-, or monoglycerides present from incomplete transesterification or the free fatty acids which may also be present. Analysis of the biodiesel reaction mixture is complicated by the solubility and physical property differences among the components of the tranesterification reaction mixture. In this contribution, we present a simple, rapid HPLC method which allows for monitoring all of the main components in a biodiesel fuel transesterification reaction, with specific emphasis on the ability to monitor the reaction as a function of time. The utilization of a relatively new, core-shell stationary phase for the HPLC column allows for efficient separation of peaks with short elution times, saving both time and solvent. (orig.)

  9. Congenic strain analysis reveals genes that are rapidly evolving components of a prezygotic isolation mechanism mediating incipient reinforcement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Laukaitis

    Full Text Available Two decades ago, we developed a congenic strain of Mus musculus, called b-congenic, by replacing the androgen-binding protein Abpa27(a allele in the C3H/HeJ genome with the Abpa27(b allele from DBA/2J. We and other researchers used this b-congenic strain and its C3H counterpart, the a-congenic strain, to test the hypothesis that, given the choice between signals from two strains with different a27 alleles on the same genetic background, test subjects would prefer the homosubspecific one. It was our purpose in undertaking this study to characterize the segment transferred from DBA to the C3H background in producing the b-congenic strain on which a role for ABPA27 in behavior has been predicated. We determined the size of the chromosome 7 segment transferred from DBA and the genes it contains that might influence preference. We found that the "functional" DBA segment is about 1% the size of the mouse haploid genome and contains at least 29 genes expressed in salivary glands, however, only three of these encode proteins identified in the mouse salivary proteome. At least two of the three genes Abpa27, Abpbg26 and Abpbg27 encoding the subunits of androgen-binding protein ABP dimers evolved under positive selection and the third one may have also. In the sense that they are subunits of the same two functional entities, the ABP dimers, we propose that their evolutionary histories might not be independent of each other.

  10. Refolded scFv Antibody Fragment against Myoglobin Shows Rapid Reaction Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Nam Song

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Myoglobin is one of the early biomarkers for acute myocardial infarction. Recently, we have screened an antibody with unique rapid reaction kinetics toward human myoglobin antigen. Antibodies with rapid reaction kinetics are thought to be an early IgG form produced during early stage of in vivo immunization. We produced a recombinant scFv fragment for the premature antibody from Escherichia coli using refolding technology. The scFv gene was constructed by connection of the VH–VL sequence with a (Gly4Ser3 linker. The scFv fragment without the pelB leader sequence was expressed at a high level, but the solubility was extremely low. A high concentration of 8 M urea was used for denaturation. The dilution refolding process in the presence of arginine and the redox reagents GSH and GSSH successfully produced a soluble scFv protein. The resultant refolded scFv protein showed association and dissociation values of 9.32 × 10−4 M−1·s−1 and 6.29 × 10−3 s−1, respectively, with an affinity value exceeding 107 M−1 (kon/koff, maintaining the original rapid reaction kinetics of the premature antibody. The refolded scFv could provide a platform for protein engineering for the clinical application for diagnosis of heart disease and the development of a continuous biosensor.

  11. The exothermic reaction route of a self-heatable conductive ink for rapid processable printed electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Youn; Han, Jin Wook; Chun, Sangki

    2014-01-07

    We report the exothermic reaction route and new capability of a self-heatable conductive ink (Ag2O and silver 2,2-dimethyloctanoate) in order to achieve both a low sintering temperature and electrical resistivity within a short sintering time for flexible printed electronics and display appliances. Unlike conventional conductive ink, which requires a costly external heating instrument for rapid sintering, self-heatable conductive ink by itself is capable of generating heat as high as 312 °C when its exothermic reaction is triggered at a temperature of 180 °C. This intensive exothermic reaction is found to result from the recursive reaction of the 2,2-dimethyloctanoate anion, which is thermally dissociated from silver 2,2-dimethyloctanoate, with silver oxide microparticles. Through this recursive reaction, a massive number of silver atoms are supplied from silver oxide microparticles, and the nucleation of silver atoms and the fusion of silver nanoparticles become the major source of heat. This exothermic reaction eventually realizes the electrical resistivity of self-heatable conductive ink as low as 27.5 μΩ cm within just 40 s by combining chemical annealing, which makes it suitable for the roll-to-roll printable electronics such as a flexible touch screen panel.

  12. Immediate hypersensitivity reaction associated with the rapid infusion of Crotalidae polyvalent immune Fab (ovine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstege, Christopher P; Wu, Jeffrey; Baer, Alexander B

    2002-06-01

    A 16-year-old boy presented to the emergency department with rapidly progressing extremity pain, edema, and ecchymosis after envenomation by a copperhead. Crotalidae polyvalent immune Fab (ovine) (CroFab; FabAV) was infused. Six vials were placed in 250 mL of normal saline solution, and the infusion was gradually increased. Fifty minutes after beginning, the infusion was increased to 640 mL/h. Within minutes of the rate increase, the patient experienced full-body urticaria, facial edema, voice change, and tachycardia. The infusion was stopped. Hydroxyzine pamoate, famotidine, methylprednisolone, and a 1-L bolus of normal saline solution were administered intravenously. The symptoms abated, and the remaining FabAV was infused at a slower rate without return of this reaction. This immediate hypersensitivity reaction was most likely a rate-related anaphylactoid reaction that has not been previously reported with FabAV.[Holstege CP, Wu J, Baer AB. Immediate hypersensitivity reaction associated with the rapid infusion of Crotalidae polyvalent immune Fab (ovine). Ann Emerg Med. June 2002;39:677-679.

  13. Diffusion of the Reaction Boundary of Rapidly Interacting Macromolecules in Sedimentation Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation combines relatively high hydrodynamic resolution of macromolecular species with the ability to study macromolecular interactions, which has great potential for studying dynamically assembled multiprotein complexes. Complicated sedimentation boundary shapes appear in multicomponent mixtures when the timescale of the chemical reaction is short relative to the timescale of sedimentation. Although the Lamm partial differential equation rigorously predicts the evolution of concentration profiles for given reaction schemes and parameter sets, this approach is often not directly applicable to data analysis due to experimental and sample imperfections, and/or due to unknown reaction pathways. Recently, we have introduced the effective particle theory, which explains quantitatively and in a simple physical picture the sedimentation boundary patterns arising in the sedimentation of rapidly interacting systems. However, it does not address the diffusional spread of the reaction boundary from the cosedimentation of interacting macromolecules, which also has been of long-standing interest in the theory of sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation. Here, effective particle theory is exploited to approximate the concentration gradients during the sedimentation process, and to predict the overall, gradient-average diffusion coefficient of the reaction boundary. The analysis of the heterogeneity of the sedimentation and diffusion coefficients across the reaction boundary shows that both are relatively uniform. These results support the application of diffusion-deconvoluting sedimentation coefficient distributions c(s) to the analysis of rapidly interacting systems, and provide a framework for the quantitative interpretation of the diffusional broadening and the apparent molar mass values of the effective sedimenting particle in dynamically associating systems. PMID:20513419

  14. Rapidly Evolving Genes Are Key Players in Host Specialization and Virulence of the Fungal Wheat Pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici (Mycosphaerella graminicola.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Poppe

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The speciation of pathogens can be driven by divergent host specialization. Specialization to a new host is possible via the acquisition of advantageous mutations fixed by positive selection. Comparative genome analyses of closely related species allows for the identification of such key substitutions via inference of genome-wide signatures of positive selection. We previously used a comparative genomics framework to identify genes that have evolved under positive selection during speciation of the prominent wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici (synonym Mycosphaerella graminicola. In this study, we conducted functional analyses of four genes exhibiting strong signatures of positive selection in Z. tritici. We deleted the four genes in Z. tritici and confirm a virulence-related role of three of the four genes ΔZt80707, ΔZt89160 and ΔZt103264. The two mutants ΔZt80707 and ΔZt103264 show a significant reduction in virulence during infection of wheat; the ΔZt89160 mutant causes a hypervirulent phenotype in wheat. Mutant phenotypes of ΔZt80707, ΔZt89160 and ΔZt103264 can be restored by insertion of the wild-type genes. However, the insertion of the Zt80707 and Zt89160 orthologs from Z. pseudotritici and Z. ardabiliae do not restore wild-type levels of virulence, suggesting that positively selected substitutions in Z. tritici may relate to divergent host specialization. Interestingly, the gene Zt80707 encodes also a secretion signal that targets the protein for cell secretion. This secretion signal is however only transcribed in Z. tritici, suggesting that Z. tritici-specific substitutions relate to a new function of the protein in the extracellular space of the wheat-Z. tritici interaction. Together, the results presented here highlight that Zt80707, Zt103264 and Zt89160 represent key genes involved in virulence and host-specific disease development of Z. tritici. Our findings illustrate that evolutionary predictions provide a powerful tool

  15. Contribution of Proton Capture Reactions to the Ascertained Abundance of Fluorine in the Evolved Stars of Globular Cluster M4, M22, 47 Tuc and NGC 6397

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanta, Upakul; Goswami, Aruna; Duorah, H. L.; Duorah, K.

    2017-12-01

    The origin of the abundance pattern and also the (anti)correlation present among the elements found in stars of globular clusters (GCs) remains unimproved until date. The proton-capture reactions are presently recognised in concert of the necessary candidates for that sort of observed behaviour in the second generation stars. We tend to propose a reaction network of a nuclear cycle namely carbon-nitrogen-oxygen-fluorine (CNOF) at evolved stellar condition since fluorine (^{19}F) is one such element which gets plagued by proton capture reactions. The stellar temperature thought about here ranges from 2× 107 to 10× 107 K and there has been an accretion occuring, with material density being 102 g/cm3 and 103 g/cm3. Such kind of temperature density conditions are probably going to be prevailing within the H-burning shell of evolved stars. The estimated abundances of ^{19}F are then matched with the info that has been determined for a few some metal-poor giants of GC M4, M22, 47 Tuc as well as NGC 6397. As far as the comparison between the observed and calculated abundances is concerned, it is found that the abundance of ^{19}F have shown an excellent agreement with the observed abundances with a correlation coefficent above 0.9, supporting the incidence of that nuclear cycle at the adopted temperature density conditions.

  16. The NLP toxin family in Phytophthora sojae includes rapidly evolving groups that lack necrosis-inducing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Suomeng; Kong, Guanghui; Qutob, Dinah; Yu, Xiaoli; Tang, Junli; Kang, Jixiong; Dai, Tingting; Wang, Hai; Gijzen, Mark; Wang, Yuanchao

    2012-07-01

    Necrosis- and ethylene-inducing-like proteins (NLP) are widely distributed in eukaryotic and prokaryotic plant pathogens and are considered to be important virulence factors. We identified, in total, 70 potential Phytophthora sojae NLP genes but 37 were designated as pseudogenes. Sequence alignment of the remaining 33 NLP delineated six groups. Three of these groups include proteins with an intact heptapeptide (Gly-His-Arg-His-Asp-Trp-Glu) motif, which is important for necrosis-inducing activity, whereas the motif is not conserved in the other groups. In total, 19 representative NLP genes were assessed for necrosis-inducing activity by heterologous expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Surprisingly, only eight genes triggered cell death. The expression of the NLP genes in P. sojae was examined, distinguishing 20 expressed and 13 nonexpressed NLP genes. Real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction results indicate that most NLP are highly expressed during cyst germination and infection stages. Amino acid substitution ratios (Ka/Ks) of 33 NLP sequences from four different P. sojae strains resulted in identification of positive selection sites in a distinct NLP group. Overall, our study indicates that expansion and pseudogenization of the P. sojae NLP family results from an ongoing birth-and-death process, and that varying patterns of expression, necrosis-inducing activity, and positive selection suggest that NLP have diversified in function.

  17. A rapid electrochemical biosensor based on an AC electrokinetics enhanced immuno-reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, I-Fang; Yang, Hsiao-Lan; Chung, Cheng-Che; Chang, Hsien-Chang

    2013-08-21

    Fluorescent labelling and chromogenic reactions that are commonly used in conventional immunoassays typically utilize diffusion dominated transport of analytes, which is limited by slow reaction rates and long detection times. By integrating alternating current (AC) electrokinetics and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), we construct an immunochip for rapid, sensitive, and label-free detection. AC electroosmosis (ACEO) and positive dielectrophoresis (DEP), induced by a biased AC electric field, can rapidly convect and trap the analyte onto an EIS working electrode within a few minutes. This allows the change of electron-transfer resistance (ΔRet) caused by the antibody-antigen (IgG-protein A) binding to be measured and quantified in real time. The measured impedance change achieves a plateau after electrokinetic concentration for only 90 s, and the detection limit is able to reach 200 pg ml⁻¹. Compared to the conventional incubation method, the electrokinetics-enhanced method is approximately 100 times faster in its reaction time, and the detection limit is reduced by 30 times. The ΔRet of the positive response is two orders of magnitude higher than the negative control, demonstrating excellent specificity for practical applications.

  18. Experimental phylogeny of neutrally evolving DNA sequences generated by a bifurcate series of nested polymerase chain reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanson, Gerdine F O; Kawashita, Silvia Y; Brunstein, Adriana; Briones, Marcelo R S

    2002-02-01

    A known phylogeny was generated using a four-step serial bifurcate PCR method. The ancestor sequence (SSU rDNA) evolved in vitro for 280 nested PCR cycles, and the resulting 15 ancestor and 16 terminal sequences (2,238 bp each) were determined. Parsimony, distance, and maximum likelihood analysis of the terminal sequences reconstructed the topology of the real phylogeny and branch lengths accurately. Divergence dates and ancestor sequences were estimated with very small error, particularly at the base of the phylogeny, mostly due to insertion and deletion changes. The substitution patterns along the known phylogeny are not described by reversible models, and accordingly, the probability substitution matrix, based on the observed substitutions from ancestor to terminal nodes along the known phylogeny, was calculated. This approach is an extension of previous studies using bacteriophage serial propagation, because here mutations were allowed to occur neutrally rather than by addition of a mutagenic agent, which produced biased mutational changes. These results provide for the first time biochemical experimental support for phylogenies, divergence date estimates, and an irreversible substitution model based on neutrally evolving DNA sequences. The substitution preferences observed here (A to G and T to C) are consistent with the high G+C content of the Thermus aquaticus genome. This suggests, at least in part, that the method here described, which explores the high Taq DNA polymerase error rate, simulates the evolution of a DNA segment in a thermophilic organism. These organisms include the bacterial rod T. aquaticus and several Archaea, and thus, the method and data set described here may well contribute new insights about the genome evolution of these organisms.

  19. Rapid Removal of Tetrabromobisphenol A by Ozonation in Water: Oxidation Products, Reaction Pathways and Toxicity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinghao; Huang, Qingguo; Lu, Junhe; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-01-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants and has attracted more and more attention. In this work, the parent TBBPA with an initial concentration of 100 mg/L was completely removed after 6 min of ozonation at pH 8.0, and alkaline conditions favored a more rapid removal than acidic and neutral conditions. The presence of typical anions and humic acid did not significantly affect the degradation of TBBPA. The quenching test using isopropanol indicated that direct ozone oxidation played a dominant role during this process. Seventeen reaction intermediates and products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Notably, the generation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol was first observed in the degradation process of TBBPA. The evolution of reaction products showed that ozonation is an efficient treatment for removal of both TBBPA and intermediates. Sequential transformation of organic bromine to bromide and bromate was confirmed by ion chromatography analysis. Two primary reaction pathways that involve cleavage of central carbon atom and benzene ring cleavage concomitant with debromination were thus proposed and further justified by calculations of frontier electron densities. Furthermore, the total organic carbon data suggested a low mineralization rate, even after the complete removal of TBBPA. Meanwhile, the acute aqueous toxicity of reaction solutions to Photobacterium Phosphoreum and Daphnia magna was rapidly decreased during ozonation. In addition, no obvious difference in the attenuation of TBBPA was found by ozone oxidation using different water matrices, and the effectiveness in natural waters further demonstrates that ozonation can be adopted as a promising technique to treat TBBPA-contaminated waters. PMID:26430733

  20. Rapid Removal of Tetrabromobisphenol A by Ozonation in Water: Oxidation Products, Reaction Pathways and Toxicity Assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijuan Qu

    Full Text Available Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants and has attracted more and more attention. In this work, the parent TBBPA with an initial concentration of 100 mg/L was completely removed after 6 min of ozonation at pH 8.0, and alkaline conditions favored a more rapid removal than acidic and neutral conditions. The presence of typical anions and humic acid did not significantly affect the degradation of TBBPA. The quenching test using isopropanol indicated that direct ozone oxidation played a dominant role during this process. Seventeen reaction intermediates and products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Notably, the generation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol was first observed in the degradation process of TBBPA. The evolution of reaction products showed that ozonation is an efficient treatment for removal of both TBBPA and intermediates. Sequential transformation of organic bromine to bromide and bromate was confirmed by ion chromatography analysis. Two primary reaction pathways that involve cleavage of central carbon atom and benzene ring cleavage concomitant with debromination were thus proposed and further justified by calculations of frontier electron densities. Furthermore, the total organic carbon data suggested a low mineralization rate, even after the complete removal of TBBPA. Meanwhile, the acute aqueous toxicity of reaction solutions to Photobacterium Phosphoreum and Daphnia magna was rapidly decreased during ozonation. In addition, no obvious difference in the attenuation of TBBPA was found by ozone oxidation using different water matrices, and the effectiveness in natural waters further demonstrates that ozonation can be adopted as a promising technique to treat TBBPA-contaminated waters.

  1. Kinetics of Cold-Cap Reactions for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste Glass Based on Simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry - Thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Pierce, David A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.; Chun, Jaehun; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-12-03

    For vitrifying nuclear waste glass, the feed, a mixture of waste with glass-forming and modifying additives, is charged onto the cold cap that covers 90-100% of the melt surface. The cold cap consists of a layer of reacting molten glass floating on the surface of the melt in an all-electric, continuous glass melter. As the feed moves through the cold cap, it undergoes chemical reactions and phase transitions through which it is converted to molten glass that moves from the cold cap into the melt pool. The process involves a series of reactions that generate multiple gases and subsequent mass loss and foaming significantly influence the mass and heat transfers. The rate of glass melting, which is greatly influenced by mass and heat transfers, affects the vitrification process and the efficiency of the immobilization of nuclear waste. We studied the cold-cap reactions of a representative waste glass feed using both the simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and the thermogravimetry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TGA-GC-MS) as complementary tools to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Analyses from DSC-TGA and EGA on the cold-cap reactions provide a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model. It also helps to formulate melter feeds for higher production rate.

  2. A temperature programmed reaction/single-photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry system for rapid investigation of gas-solid heterogeneous catalytic reactions under realistic reaction conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Songbo; Cui, Huapeng; Lai, Yulong; Sun, Chenglin; Luo, Sha; Li, Haiyang; Seshan, Kulathuiyer

    2015-01-01

    A Temperature-Programmed Reaction (TPRn)/Single-Photon Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (SPI-TOF-MS) system is described. The TPRn/SPI-TOF-MS system allows rapid characterization of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under realistic reaction conditions and at the same time allows for the

  3. Rapid detection of microbial DNA by a novel isothermal genome exponential amplification reaction (GEAR) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prithiviraj, Jothikumar; Hill, Vincent; Jothikumar, Narayanan

    2012-04-20

    In this study we report the development of a simple target-specific isothermal nucleic acid amplification technique, termed genome exponential amplification reaction (GEAR). Escherichia coli was selected as the microbial target to demonstrate the GEAR technique as a proof of concept. The GEAR technique uses a set of four primers; in the present study these primers targeted 5 regions on the 16S rRNA gene of E. coli. The outer forward and reverse Tab primer sequences are complementary to each other at their 5' end, whereas their 3' end sequences are complementary to their respective target nucleic acid sequences. The GEAR assay was performed at a constant temperature 60 °C and monitored continuously in a real-time PCR instrument in the presence of an intercalating dye (SYTO 9). The GEAR assay enabled amplification of as few as one colony forming units of E. coli per reaction within 30 min. We also evaluated the GEAR assay for rapid identification of bacterial colonies cultured on agar media directly in the reaction without DNA extraction. Cells from E. coli colonies were picked and added directly to GEAR assay mastermix without prior DNA extraction. DNA in the cells could be amplified, yielding positive results within 15 min. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Empathy, emotional contagion, and rapid facial reactions to angry and happy facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimberg, Ulf; Thunberg, Monika

    2012-12-01

    The aim was to explore whether emotional empathy is related to the capacity to react with rapid facial reactions to facial expressions of emotion, and if emotional empathy is related to the ability to experience a similar emotion as expressed by another person. People high or low in emotional empathy were exposed to pictures of happy and angry faces while their facial electromyography from the zygomaticus major and corrugator supercilii muscle regions was detected. High empathy participants rapidly reacted with larger zygomatic muscle activity to happy as compared with angry faces as early as after 500 ms after stimulus onset, and with larger corrugator muscle activity to angry than to happy faces after 500 ms. Accordingly, this group also reacted with a corresponding experience of emotion. The low empathy participants, in contrast, did not differentiate between the happy and angry stimuli with either facial muscles or in their self experience of emotion. The findings are related to the facial feedback hypothesis and the results are interpreted as support for the hypothesis that rapid and automatically evoked facial mimicry may be one important mechanism for emotional and empathic contagion to occur. © 2012 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Rapid disease progression in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected individuals with adverse reactions to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, J.; Veugelers, P. J.; Keet, I. P.; van der Ven, A. J. A. M.; Miedema, F.; Lange, J. M.; Coutinho, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the relation between the occurrence of adverse reactions to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) prophylaxis and the subsequent course of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in a cohort of homosexual men. Adverse reactions to TMP-SMZ were associated with a more rapid

  6. Targeted disruption in mice of a neural stem cell-maintaining, KRAB-Zn finger-encoding gene that has rapidly evolved in the human lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan-Chieh Chien

    Full Text Available Understanding the genetic basis of the physical and behavioral traits that separate humans from other primates is a challenging but intriguing topic. The adaptive functions of the expansion and/or reduction in human brain size have long been explored. From a brain transcriptome project we have identified a KRAB-Zn finger protein-encoding gene (M003-A06 that has rapidly evolved since the human-chimpanzee separation. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of different human tissues indicates that M003-A06 expression is enriched in the human fetal brain in addition to the fetal heart. Furthermore, analysis with use of immunofluorescence staining, neurosphere culturing and Western blotting indicates that the mouse ortholog of M003-A06, Zfp568, is expressed mainly in the embryonic stem (ES cells and fetal as well as adult neural stem cells (NSCs. Conditional gene knockout experiments in mice demonstrates that Zfp568 is both an NSC maintaining- and a brain size-regulating gene. Significantly, molecular genetic analyses show that human M003-A06 consists of 2 equilibrated allelic types, H and C, one of which (H is human-specific. Combined contemporary genotyping and database mining have revealed interesting genetic associations between the different genotypes of M003-A06 and the human head sizes. We propose that M003-A06 is likely one of the genes contributing to the uniqueness of the human brain in comparison to other higher primates.

  7. Fabrication of Polymerase Chain Reaction Plastic Lab-on-a-Chip Device for Rapid Molecular Diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Kieu The Loan; Zhang, Hainan; Kang, Dong-Jin; Kahng, Sung-Hyun; Tall, Ben D; Lee, Nae Yoon

    2016-05-01

    We aim to fabricate a thermoplastic poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) Lab-on-a-Chip device to perform continuous- flow polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) for rapid molecular detection of foodborne pathogen bacteria. A miniaturized plastic device was fabricated by utilizing PMMA substrates mediated by poly(dimethylsiloxane) interfacial coating, enabling bonding under mild conditions, and thus avoiding the deformation or collapse of microchannels. Surface characterizations were carried out and bond strength was measured. The feasibility of the Lab-on-a-Chip device for performing on-chip PCR utilizing a lab-made, portable dual heater was evaluated. The results were compared with those obtained using a commercially available thermal cycler. A PMMA Lab-on-a-Chip device was designed and fabricated for conducting PCR using foodborne pathogens as sample targets. A robust bond was established between the PMMA substrates, which is essential for performing miniaturized PCR on plastic. The feasibility of on-chip PCR was evaluated using Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Cronobacter condimenti, two worldwide foodborne pathogens, and the target amplicons were successfully amplified within 25 minutes. In this study, we present a novel design of a low-cost and high-throughput thermoplastic PMMA Lab-on-a-Chip device for conducting microscale PCR, and we enable rapid molecular diagnoses of two important foodborne pathogens in minute resolution using this device. In this regard, the introduced highly portable system design has the potential to enable PCR investigations of many diseases quickly and accurately.

  8. Quantitative methylene blue decolourisation assays as rapid screening tools for assessing the efficiency of catalytic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruid, Jan; Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice Leigh

    2017-05-01

    Identifying the most efficient oxidation process to achieve maximum removal of a target pollutant compound forms the subject of much research. There exists a need to develop rapid screening tools to support research in this area. In this work we report on the development of a quantitative assay as a means for identifying catalysts capable of decolourising methylene blue through the generation of oxidising species from hydrogen peroxide. Here, a previously described methylene blue test strip method was repurposed as a quantitative, aqueous-based spectrophotometric assay. From amongst a selection of metal salts and metallophthalocyanine complexes, monitoring of the decolourisation of the cationic dye methylene blue (via Fenton-like and non-Fenton oxidation reactions) by the assay identified the following to be suitable oxidation catalysts: CuSO 4 (a Fenton-like catalyst), iron(II)phthalocyanine (a non-Fenton oxidation catalyst), as well as manganese(II) phthalocyanine. The applicability of the method was examined for the removal of bisphenol A (BPA), as measured by HPLC, during parallel oxidation experiments. The order of catalytic activity was identified as FePc > MnPc > CuSO 4 for both BPA and MB. The quantitative MB decolourisation assay may offer a rapid method for screening a wide range of potential catalysts for oxidation processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reverse transcription genome exponential amplification reaction assay for rapid and universal detection of human rhinoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Li; Zhao, Lin-Qing; Zhou, Hang-Yu; Nie, Kai; Li, Xin-Na; Zhang, Dan; Song, Juan; Qian, Yuan; Ma, Xue-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) have long been recognized as the cause of more than one-half of acute viral upper respiratory illnesses, and they are associated with more-serious diseases in children, such as asthma, acute otitis media and pneumonia. A rapid and universal test for of HRV infection is in high demand. In this study, a reverse transcription genome exponential amplification reaction (RT-GEAR) assay targeting the HRV 5' untranslated region (UTR) was developed for pan-HRV detection. The reaction was performed in a single tube in one step at 65 °C for 60 min using a real-time fluorometer (Genie(®)II; Optigene). The RT-GEAR assay showed no cross-reactivity with common human enteroviruses, including HEV71, CVA16, CVA6, CVA10, CVA24, CVB5, Echo30, and PV1-3 or with other common respiratory viruses including FluA H3, FluB, PIV1-4, ADV3, RSVA, RSVB and HMPV. With in vitro-transcribed RNA containing the amplified regions of HRV-A60, HRV-B06 and HRV-C07 as templates, the sensitivity of the RT-GEAR assay was 5, 50 and 5 copies/reaction, respectively. Experiments to evaluate the clinical performance of the RT-GEAR assay were also carried out with a panel of 143 previously verified samples, and the results were compared with those obtained using a published semi-nested PCR assay followed by sequencing. The tested panel comprised 91 HRV-negative samples and 52 HRV-positive samples (18 HRV-A-positive samples, 3 HRV-B-positive samples and 31 HRV-C-positive samples). The sensitivity and specificity of the pan-HRVs RT-GEAR assay was 98.08 % and 100 %, respectively. The kappa correlation between the two methods was 0.985. The RT-GEAR assay based on a portable Genie(®)II fluorometer is a sensitive, specific and rapid assay for the universal detection of HRV infection.

  10. Fabrication of Polymerase Chain Reaction Plastic Lab-on-a-Chip Device for Rapid Molecular Diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We aim to fabricate a thermoplastic poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) Lab-on-a-Chip device to perform continuous- flow polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) for rapid molecular detection of foodborne pathogen bacteria. Methods: A miniaturized plastic device was fabricated by utilizing PMMA substrates mediated by poly(dimethylsiloxane) interfacial coating, enabling bonding under mild conditions, and thus avoiding the deformation or collapse of microchannels. Surface characterizations were carried out and bond strength was measured. The feasibility of the Lab-on-a-Chip device for performing on-chip PCR utilizing a lab-made, portable dual heater was evaluated. The results were compared with those obtained using a commercially available thermal cycler. Results: A PMMA Lab-on-a-Chip device was designed and fabricated for conducting PCR using foodborne pathogens as sample targets. A robust bond was established between the PMMA substrates, which is essential for performing miniaturized PCR on plastic. The feasibility of on-chip PCR was evaluated using Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Cronobacter condimenti, two worldwide foodborne pathogens, and the target amplicons were successfully amplified within 25 minutes. Conclusions: In this study, we present a novel design of a low-cost and high-throughput thermoplastic PMMA Lab-on-a-Chip device for conducting microscale PCR, and we enable rapid molecular diagnoses of two important foodborne pathogens in minute resolution using this device. In this regard, the introduced highly portable system design has the potential to enable PCR investigations of many diseases quickly and accurately. PMID:27230459

  11. Topical perfluorodecalin resolves immediate whitening reactions and allows rapid effective multiple pass treatment of tattoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Kavitha K; Brauer, Jeremy A; Anolik, Robert; Bernstein, Leonard; Brightman, Lori; Hale, Elizabeth; Karen, Julie; Weiss, Elliot; Geronemus, Roy G

    2013-02-01

    Laser tattoo removal using multiple passes per session, with each pass delivered after spontaneous resolution of whitening, improves tattoo fading in a 60-minute treatment time. Our objective was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of topical perfluorodecalin (PFD) in facilitating rapid effective multiple-pass tattoo removal. In a randomized, controlled study using Q-switched ruby or Nd:YAG laser, 22 previously treated tattoos were treated with 3 passes using PFD to resolve whitening after each pass ("R0 method"). In previously untreated symmetric tattoos, seven were treated over half of the tattoo with the R20 method, and the opposite half with 4 passes using PFD (R0 method); two were treated over half with a single pass and the opposite half with 4 passes using PFD (R0 method); and six treated over half with a single pass followed by PFD and the opposite half with a single pass alone. Blinded dermatologists rated tattoo fading at 1-3 months. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of whitening was performed in two tattoos. Topical PFD clinically resolved immediate whitening reactions within a mean 5 seconds (range 3-10 seconds). Tattoos treated with the R0 method demonstrated excellent fading in an average total treatment time of 5 minutes. Tattoo areas treated with the R0 method demonstrated equal fading compared to the R20 method, and improved fading compared to a single pass method. OCT imaging of whitening demonstrated epidermal and dermal hyper-reflective "bubbles" that dissipated until absent at 9-10 minutes after PFD application, and at 20 minutes without intervention. Multiple-pass tattoo removal using PFD to deliver rapid sequential passes (R0 method) appears equally effective as the R20 method, in a total treatment time averaging 5 minutes, and more effective than single pass treatment. OCT-visualized whitening-associated "bubbles," upon treatment with PFD, resolve twice as rapidly as spontaneous resolution. Copyright © 2012 Wiley

  12. Hedonic reactivity to visual and olfactory cues: rapid facial electromyographic reactions are altered in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soussignan, Robert; Schaal, Benoist; Rigaud, Daniel; Royet, Jean-Pierre; Jiang, Tao

    2011-03-01

    Though it has been suggested that hedonic processing is altered in anorexia nervosa (AN), few studies have used objective measures to assess affective processes in this eating disorder. Accordingly, we investigated facial electromyographic, autonomic and subjective reactivity to the smell and sight of food and non-food stimuli, and assessed more particularly rapid facial reactions reflecting automatic processing of pleasantness. AN and healthy control (HC) women were exposed, before and after a standardized lunch, to pictures and odorants of foods differing in energy density, as well as to non-food sensory cues. Whereas the temporal profile of zygomatic activity in AN patients was typified by a fast drop to sensory cues within the 1000 ms following stimulus onset, HC showed a larger EMG reactivity to pictures in a 800-1000 ms time window. In contrast, pleasantness ratings discriminated the two groups only for high energy density food cues suggesting a partial dissociation between objective and subjective measures of hedonic processes in AN patients. The findings suggest that the automatic processing of pleasantness might be altered in AN, with the sensitivity to reward being modulated by controlled processes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Detecting Malaria Hotspots: A Comparison of Rapid Diagnostic Test, Microscopy, and Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogeni, Polycarp; Williams, Thomas N; Omedo, Irene; Kimani, Domtila; Ngoi, Joyce M; Mwacharo, Jedida; Morter, Richard; Nyundo, Christopher; Wambua, Juliana; Nyangweso, George; Kapulu, Melissa; Fegan, Gregory; Bejon, Philip

    2017-11-27

    Malaria control strategies need to respond to geographical hotspots of transmission. Detection of hotspots depends on the sensitivity of the diagnostic tool used. We conducted cross-sectional surveys in 3 sites within Kilifi County, Kenya, that had variable transmission intensities. Rapid diagnostic test (RDT), microscopy, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used to detect asymptomatic parasitemia, and hotspots were detected using the spatial scan statistic. Eight thousand five hundred eighty-one study participants were surveyed in 3 sites. There were statistically significant malaria hotspots by RDT, microscopy, and PCR for all sites except by microscopy in 1 low transmission site. Pooled data analysis of hotspots by PCR overlapped with hotspots by microscopy at a moderate setting but not at 2 lower transmission settings. However, variations in degree of overlap were noted when data were analyzed by year. Hotspots by RDT were predictive of PCR/microscopy at the moderate setting, but not at the 2 low transmission settings. We observed long-term stability of hotspots by PCR and microscopy but not RDT. Malaria control programs may consider PCR testing to guide asymptomatic malaria hotspot detection once the prevalence of infection falls.

  14. Rapid detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food by polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennaji, H; Timinouni, M; Ennaji, M M; Ait m'hand, R; Hassar, M; Cohen, N

    2009-02-25

    The standard conventional methods for the detection of Listeria monocytogenes in foods require high time 7 to 10 days to give ready results. To dissolve this problem we have evaluate a short method using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) to analyze food samples. In parallel with this study, a comparison was made between PCR amplification from templates directly prepared from food and the official standard ISO procedure 11290-1. In this study we have used a Half Frazer broth as an enrichment medium; there were positive results of PCR detection of L. monocytogenes in different food sample analyzed (milk, cheese and meat) with approximately 1.5 10(1) Colony Forming Units /25 g in less than 36 h. This PCR procedure has proved to be rapid and sensitive method suitable for the routine analysis; firstly, because this assay required just a short pre-enrichment step before PCR. Secondly, this procedure is very simple and time-saving; it could take less than one working day to obtain results if initial microbiological load was very important.

  15. Improved Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction for Rapid Staphylococcus Aureus Detection in Meat and Milk Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šramková Zuzana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal food poisoning represents one of the most frequently occurring intoxications, caused by staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE-s and staphylococcal enterotoxin-like proteins (SEl-s. Therefore, there is a need for rapid, sensitive and specific detection method for this human pathogen and its toxin genes in food matrices. The present work is focused on Staphylococcus aureus detection by a nonaplex polymerase chain reaction, which targets the 23S rRNA gene for identification of S. aureus at the species level, genes for classical SE-s (SEA, SEC, SED, new SE-s (SEH, SEI, SEl-s (SEK, SEL and tsst-1 gene (toxic shock syndrome toxin. Primers were properly designed to avoid undesirable interactions and to create a reliably identifiable profile of amplicons when visualized in agarose gel. According to obtained results, this approach is able to reach the detection sensitivity of 12 colony forming units from milk and meat matrices without prior culturing and DNA extraction.

  16. Rapid Facial Reactions to Emotional Facial Expressions in Typically Developing Children and Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Paula M.; Moody, Eric J.; McIntosh, Daniel N.; Hepburn, Susan L.; Reed, Catherine L.

    2008-01-01

    Typical adults mimic facial expressions within 1000ms, but adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) do not. These rapid facial reactions (RFRs) are associated with the development of social-emotional abilities. Such interpersonal matching may be caused by motor mirroring or emotional responses. Using facial electromyography (EMG), this study…

  17. The Influence of Military Identity on Work Engagement and Burnout in the Norwegian Army Rapid Reaction Force

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, Rino Bandlitz; Martinussen, Monica; Kvilvang, Nils

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of military identity on work engagement and burnout among members in the Norwegian Army Rapid Reaction Forces (RRF). Hierarchical regression analyses found work engagement to be predicted by military identity (positively so by professionalism, and negatively by individualism), with individualism also predicting burnout. This is the first study to examine the unique influence of military identity on burnout and engagement among operational army personne...

  18. Rapid Detection/pathotyping of Newcastle disease virus isolates in clinical samples using real time polymerase chain reaction assay

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Abdul Wajid, Muhammad Wasim, Tahir Yaqub, Shafqat F Rehmani, Tasra Bibi, Nadia Mukhtar, Javed Muhammad, Umar Bacha, Suliman Qadir Afridi, Muhammad Nauman Zahid, Zia u ddin, Muhammad Zubair Shabbir, Kamran Abbas & Muneer Ahmad ### Abstract In the present protocol we describe the real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assay for the rapid detection/pathotyping of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isoaltes in clinical samples. Fusion gene and matrix gene...

  19. Interaction between the long-latency stretch reflex and voluntary electromyographic activity prior to a rapid voluntary motor reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, B L; Rothwell, J C; Marsden, C D

    1983-06-27

    The size of the long-latency component of the stretch reflex has been examined in the time interval between a signal to move and the required rapid voluntary contraction of triceps and flexor pollicis longus in 8 normal subjects. Bilateral movements of the elbow and thumb were made following an auditory signal. In 50% of the trials a torque pulse was applied unilaterally in order to elicit a stretch reflex response in one arm. The voluntary response in the contralateral arm was uncorrupted by a stretch reflex response, so was used as an indicator of voluntary reaction time. Control experiments, using an electrical stimulus to the fingers rather than muscle stretch, verified that both arms reacted almost simultaneously to the auditory cue, even when the reaction time was shortened by the presence of a unilateral electrical stimulus. Similarly, an interposed muscle stretch stimulus considerably reduced the reaction time to the audio signal. Because of this, the start of the voluntary EMG response frequently 'over-lapped' the end of the long-latency stretch reflex. Failure to take this shortening of voluntary reaction time into consideration can lead to the erroneous conclusion that reflex gain is increased prior to a rapid movement. If the 'overlap' of EMG responses is accounted for, very little change in the size of the long-latency stretch reflex is evident prior to activation of the muscles responsible for the movement of either the elbow or the thumb.

  20. Rapid trace detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) by complexation reactions during desorption electrospray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte-Rodríguez, Ismael; Chen, Hao; Cooks, R Graham

    2006-03-07

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry is used for rapid, specific and sensitive detection of trace amounts of the notorious explosive TATP present on ambient surfaces by alkali metal complexation in a simple spray technique.

  1. Maintaining evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, James F

    2008-12-01

    Although molecular methods, such as QTL mapping, have revealed a number of loci with large effects, it is still likely that the bulk of quantitative variability is due to multiple factors, each with small effect. Typically, these have a large additive component. Conventional wisdom argues that selection, natural or artificial, uses up additive variance and thus depletes its supply. Over time, the variance should be reduced, and at equilibrium be near zero. This is especially expected for fitness and traits highly correlated with it. Yet, populations typically have a great deal of additive variance, and do not seem to run out of genetic variability even after many generations of directional selection. Long-term selection experiments show that populations continue to retain seemingly undiminished additive variance despite large changes in the mean value. I propose that there are several reasons for this. (i) The environment is continually changing so that what was formerly most fit no longer is. (ii) There is an input of genetic variance from mutation, and sometimes from migration. (iii) As intermediate-frequency alleles increase in frequency towards one, producing less variance (as p --> 1, p(1 - p) --> 0), others that were originally near zero become more common and increase the variance. Thus, a roughly constant variance is maintained. (iv) There is always selection for fitness and for characters closely related to it. To the extent that the trait is heritable, later generations inherit a disproportionate number of genes acting additively on the trait, thus increasing genetic variance. For these reasons a selected population retains its ability to evolve. Of course, genes with large effect are also important. Conspicuous examples are the small number of loci that changed teosinte to maize, and major phylogenetic changes in the animal kingdom. The relative importance of these along with duplications, chromosome rearrangements, horizontal transmission and polyploidy

  2. Development of a rapid and sensitive one-step reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction in a single tube using the droplet-polymerase chain reaction machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Akemi; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Sueki, Akane; Taira, Chiaki; Uehara, Masayuki; Saito, Yasunori; Honda, Takayuki

    2015-08-25

    Reverse transcription (RT)-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a time-consuming procedure because it has several handling steps and is associated with the risk of cross-contamination during each step. Therefore, a rapid and sensitive one-step RT-nested PCR was developed that could be performed in a single tube using a droplet-PCR machine. The K562 BCR-ABL mRNA-positive cell line as well as bone marrow aspirates from 5 patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and 5 controls without CML were used. We evaluated one-step RT-nested PCR using the droplet-PCR machine. One-step RT-nested PCR performed in a single tube using the droplet-PCR machine enabled the detection of BCR-ABL mRNA within 40min, which was 10(3)-fold superior to conventional RT nested PCR using three steps in separate tubes. The sensitivity of the one-step RT-nested PCR was 0.001%, with sample reactivity comparable to that of the conventional assay. One-step RT-nested PCR was developed using the droplet-PCR machine, which enabled all reactions to be performed in a single tube accurately and rapidly and with high sensitivity. This one-step RT-nested PCR may be applicable to a wide spectrum of genetic tests in clinical laboratories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Rapid Selection Procedure for Simple Commercial Implementation of omega-Transaminase Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundersen Deslauriers, Maria; Tufvesson, Pär; Rackham, Emma J.

    2016-01-01

    A stepwise selection procedure is presented to quickly evaluate whether a given omega-transaminase reaction is suitable for a so-called "simple" scale-up for fast industrial implementation. Here "simple" is defined as a system without the need for extensive process development or specialized...

  4. Rapid and sensitive detection of Campylobacter spp. in chicken products by using the polymerase chain reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesendorf, B A; Quint, W G; Henkens, M H; Stegeman, H; Huf, F A; Niesters, H G

    1992-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) after a short enrichment culture was used to detect Campylobacter spp. in chicken products. After the 16S rRNA gene sequence of Campylobacter jejuni was determined and compared with known sequences from other enterobacteria, a primer and probe combination was

  5. Rapid Heartbeat, But Dry Palms: Reactions of Heart Rate and Skin Conductance Levels to Social Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eIffland

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Social rejection elicits negative mood, emotional distress and neural activity in networks that are associated with physical pain. However, studies assessing physiological reactions to social rejection are rare and results of these studies were found to be ambiguous. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine and specify physiological effects of social rejection.Methods: Participants (N = 50 were assigned to either a social exclusion or inclusion condition of a virtual ball-tossing game (Cyberball. Immediate and delayed physiological (skin conductance level and heart rate reactions were recorded. In addition, subjects reported levels of affect, emotional states and fundamental needs.Results: Subjects who were socially rejected showed increased heart rates. However, social rejection had no effect on subjects’ skin conductance levels. Both conditions showed heightened arousal on this measurement. Furthermore, psychological consequences of social rejection indicated the validity of the paradigm.Conclusions: Our results reveal that social rejection evokes an immediate physiological reaction. Accelerated heart rates indicate that behavior activation rather than inhibition is associated with socially threatening events. In addition, results revealed gender-specific response patterns suggesting that sample characteristics such as differences in gender may account for ambiguous findings of physiological reactions to social rejection.

  6. Rapid heartbeat, but dry palms: reactions of heart rate and skin conductance levels to social rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iffland, Benjamin; Sansen, Lisa M; Catani, Claudia; Neuner, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Social rejection elicits negative mood, emotional distress, and neural activity in networks that are associated with physical pain. However, studies assessing physiological reactions to social rejection are rare and results of these studies were found to be ambiguous. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine and specify physiological effects of social rejection. Participants (n = 50) were assigned to either a social exclusion or inclusion condition of a virtual ball-tossing game (Cyberball). Immediate and delayed physiological [skin conductance level (SCL) and heart rate] reactions were recorded. In addition, subjects reported levels of affect, emotional states, and fundamental needs. Subjects who were socially rejected showed increased heart rates. However, social rejection had no effect on subjects' SCLs. Both conditions showed heightened arousal on this measurement. Furthermore, psychological consequences of social rejection indicated the validity of the paradigm. Our results reveal that social rejection evokes an immediate physiological reaction. Accelerated heart rates indicate that behavior activation rather than inhibition is associated with socially threatening events. In addition, results revealed gender-specific response patterns suggesting that sample characteristics such as differences in gender may account for ambiguous findings of physiological reactions to social rejection.

  7. Rapid tomato volatile profiling by using proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTS-MS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farneti, B.; Cristescu, S.M.; Costa, G.; Harren, F.J.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    The availability of rapid and accurate methods to assess fruit flavor is of utmost importance to support quality control especially in the breeding phase. Breeders need more information and analytical tools to facilitate selection for complex multigenic traits such as flavor quality. In this study,

  8. Rapid Heartbeat, But Dry Palms: Reactions of Heart Rate and Skin Conductance Levels to Social Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin eIffland; Lisa Margareta Sansen; Claudia eCatani; Frank eNeuner

    2014-01-01

    Background: Social rejection elicits negative mood, emotional distress and neural activity in networks that are associated with physical pain. However, studies assessing physiological reactions to social rejection are rare and results of these studies were found to be ambiguous. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine and specify physiological effects of social rejection.Methods: Participants (N = 50) were assigned to either a social exclusion or inclusion condition of a virtual ball-to...

  9. Sinterable Ceramic Powders from Laser Heated Gas Phase Reactions and Rapidly Solidified Ceramic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    Gattuso, T. R., Meunier, M., Adler, D., and Haggerty, J. S., "IR Laser- Induced Deposition of Silicon Thin Films ", to be published in the Proceedings of...and Thin Films by Laser Induced Gas Phase Reactions", presented at the Nineteenth University Conference on Ceramic Science, Emergent Process Methods... Silicon Carbonitrides from Monomeric Organosilicon Precursors". To be presented at the 1983 Annual Meeting of the American Ceramic Society, April 1983

  10. Variability among the most rapidly evolving plastid genomic regions is lineage-specific: implications of pairwise genome comparisons in Pyrus (Rosaceae and other angiosperms for marker choice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Korotkova

    Full Text Available Plastid genomes exhibit different levels of variability in their sequences, depending on the respective kinds of genomic regions. Genes are usually more conserved while noncoding introns and spacers evolve at a faster pace. While a set of about thirty maximum variable noncoding genomic regions has been suggested to provide universally promising phylogenetic markers throughout angiosperms, applications often require several regions to be sequenced for many individuals. Our project aims to illuminate evolutionary relationships and species-limits in the genus Pyrus (Rosaceae-a typical case with very low genetic distances between taxa. In this study, we have sequenced the plastid genome of Pyrus spinosa and aligned it to the already available P. pyrifolia sequence. The overall p-distance of the two Pyrus genomes was 0.00145. The intergenic spacers between ndhC-trnV, trnR-atpA, ndhF-rpl32, psbM-trnD, and trnQ-rps16 were the most variable regions, also comprising the highest total numbers of substitutions, indels and inversions (potentially informative characters. Our comparative analysis of further plastid genome pairs with similar low p-distances from Oenothera (representing another rosid, Olea (asterids and Cymbidium (monocots showed in each case a different ranking of genomic regions in terms of variability and potentially informative characters. Only two intergenic spacers (ndhF-rpl32 and trnK-rps16 were consistently found among the 30 top-ranked regions. We have mapped the occurrence of substitutions and microstructural mutations in the four genome pairs. High AT content in specific sequence elements seems to foster frequent mutations. We conclude that the variability among the fastest evolving plastid genomic regions is lineage-specific and thus cannot be precisely predicted across angiosperms. The often lineage-specific occurrence of stem-loop elements in the sequences of introns and spacers also governs lineage-specific mutations. Sequencing

  11. Rapid detection of respiratory syncytial virus in nasopharyngeal aspirates by reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, A W; Paton, J C; Lawrence, A J; Goldwater, P N; Harris, R J

    1992-01-01

    A rapid method for detection of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in nasopharyngeal aspirates, involving a combination of reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction amplification (RT-PCR), has been developed. The RT-PCR assay employs oligonucleotide primers specific for the region of the RSV genome which encodes the F1 subunit of the fusion (F) glycoprotein. Other respiratory viruses do not give a positive reaction. The RT-PCR assay was tested on 202 nasopharyngeal aspirates collected from children with clinical signs of respiratory infection, and the results from RT-PCR were compared with those obtained from virus culture and direct detection by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). RT-PCR results were positive in 118 of 125 samples from which RSV was cultured, as well as in 4 of 7 samples which were culture negative but EIA positive. RT-PCR results were negative in 68 of 70 culture-negative, EIA-negative samples, which included 11 samples from which other respiratory viruses were isolated. The speed, sensitivity (94.6%), and specificity (greater than 97%) of the RT-PCR assay suggest that this technique could be useful for rapid detection of RSV in clinical samples. Images PMID:1374080

  12. Rapid and effective oxidative pretreatment of woody biomass at mild reaction conditions and low oxidant loadings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenglun; Chen, Charles H; Hegg, Eric L; Hodge, David B

    2013-08-26

    One route for producing cellulosic biofuels is by the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars generated from a pretreatment that can be effectively coupled with an enzymatic hydrolysis of the plant cell wall. While woody biomass exhibits a number of positive agronomic and logistical attributes, these feedstocks are significantly more recalcitrant to chemical pretreatments than herbaceous feedstocks, requiring higher chemical and energy inputs to achieve high sugar yields from enzymatic hydrolysis. We previously discovered that alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment catalyzed by copper(II) 2,2΄-bipyridine complexes significantly improves subsequent enzymatic glucose and xylose release from hybrid poplar heartwood and sapwood relative to uncatalyzed AHP pretreatment at modest reaction conditions (room temperature and atmospheric pressure). In the present work, the reaction conditions for this catalyzed AHP pretreatment were investigated in more detail with the aim of better characterizing the relationship between pretreatment conditions and subsequent enzymatic sugar release. We found that for a wide range of pretreatment conditions, the catalyzed pretreatment resulted in significantly higher glucose and xylose enzymatic hydrolysis yields (as high as 80% for both glucose and xylose) relative to uncatalyzed pretreatment (up to 40% for glucose and 50% for xylose). We identified that the extent of improvement in glucan and xylan yield using this catalyzed pretreatment approach was a function of pretreatment conditions that included H2O2 loading on biomass, catalyst concentration, solids concentration, and pretreatment duration. Based on these results, several important improvements in pretreatment and hydrolysis conditions were identified that may have a positive economic impact for a process employing a catalyzed oxidative pretreatment. These improvements include identifying that: (1) substantially lower H2O2 loadings can be used that may result in up to

  13. Economic analysis of rapid multiplex polymerase chain reaction testing for meningitis/encephalitis in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Steve; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Ginocchio, Christine C; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel; Zimmer, Louise; Bozzette, Samuel A

    2018-01-10

    We assessed the possible economic impact of a rapid test in pediatric patients with suspected community-acquired meningitis/encephalitis. Modeling simulated diagnosis, clinical decisions, resource use/costs of standard of care (SOC) and two cerebrospinal fluid testing strategies using FilmArray ® (FA), a US FDA-cleared system that provides results in approximately 1 h. Pathogens detected by FA caused approximately 75% of cases, 97% of which would be accurately diagnosed with FA.  Mean cost/case ranged from $17,599 to $22,025.  Syndromic testing is less expensive than SOC. Testing all suspected cases yielded greater savings ($3481/case) than testing only those with abnormal cerebrospinal fluid ($2157/case). Greater economic benefits are achievable with syndromic testing of all cases, rather than SOC or targeted syndromic testing.

  14. Numerical simulation of a plane turbulent mixing layer, with applications to isothermal, rapid reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, P.; Pratt, D. T.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for the numerical prediction of turbulent mixing in a spatially-developing, free shear layer. Most significantly, the computation incorporates the effects of large-scale structures, Schmidt number and Reynolds number on mixing, which have been overlooked in the past. In flow field prediction, large-eddy simulation was conducted by a modified 2-D vortex method with subgrid-scale modeling. The predicted mean velocities, shear layer growth rates, Reynolds stresses, and the RMS of longitudinal velocity fluctuations were found to be in good agreement with experiments, although the lateral velocity fluctuations were overpredicted. In scalar transport, the Monte Carlo method was extended to the simulation of the time-dependent pdf transport equation. For the first time, the mixing frequency in Curl's coalescence/dispersion model was estimated by using Broadwell and Breidenthal's theory of micromixing, which involves Schmidt number, Reynolds number and the local vorticity. Numerical tests were performed for a gaseous case and an aqueous case. Evidence that pure freestream fluids are entrained into the layer by large-scale motions was found in the predicted pdf. Mean concentration profiles were found to be insensitive to Schmidt number, while the unmixedness was higher for higher Schmidt number. Applications were made to mixing layers with isothermal, fast reactions. The predicted difference in product thickness of the two cases was in reasonable quantitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  15. Measurement of Quantum Yield, Quantum Requirement, and Energetic Efficiency of the O2-Evolving System of Photosynthesis by a Simple Dye Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros Barcelò, A.; Zapata, J. M.

    1996-11-01

    Photosynthesis is the conversion of absorbed radiant energy from sunlight into various forms of chemical energy by the chloroplasts of higher green plants. The overall process of photosynthesis consists of the oxidation of water (with the release of O2 as a product) and the reduction of CO2 to form carbohydrates. In the test tube electrons produced by the photolytic cleavage of H2) may be deviated from their true acceptor by inserting a suitable dye in the electron chain; i.e.; 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP) (E'o = + 0.217 V), which is blue in the oxidized quinone form and which becomes colorless when reduced to the phenolic form. This dye-electrom acceptor also has the advantage that it accepts electroms directly from the quinone (Qa) electron-acceptor of the photosystem IIreaction center associated with the O2-evolving (or water-slplitting) system. Based in the bleaching of DCPIP by illuminated spinach leaf chloroplasts, a classroom laboratory protocol has been developed to determine the quantum yield (QY = micromol O2 s-1 / micromol photons s-1, the quantum requirement (1/QY) and the energetic efficiency (f = chemical energy stored / light energy supplied) of the O2-evolving system of photosynthesis. Although values for the quantum yield, the quantum requirement and the energetic efficiency calculated in the classroom laboratory differ widely from those expected theoretically, these calculations are useful for illustrating the transformation of light energy into chemical energy by the chloroplasts of green plants.

  16. Orbital and physical parameters of eclipsing binaries from the All-Sky Automated Survey catalogue. III. Two new low-mass systems with rapidly evolving spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hełminiak, K. G.; Konacki, M.; Złoczewski, K.; Ratajczak, M.; Reichart, D. E.; Ivarsen, K. M.; Haislip, J. B.; Crain, J. A.; Foster, A. C.; Nysewander, M. C.; Lacluyze, A. P.

    2011-03-01

    Aims: We present the results of our spectroscopic and photometric analysis of two newly discovered low-mass detached eclipsing binaries found in the All-Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) catalogue: ASAS J093814-0104.4 and ASAS J212954-5620.1. Methods: Using the Grating Instrument for Radiation Analysis with a Fibre-Fed Echelle (GIRAFFE) on the 1.9-m Radcliffe telescope at the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) and the University College London Echelle Spectrograph (UCLES) on the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope, we obtained high-resolution spectra of both objects and derived their radial velocities (RVs) at various orbital phases. The RVs of both objects were measured with the two-dimensional cross-correlation technique (TODCOR) using synthetic template spectra as references. We also obtained V and I band photometry using the 1.0-m Elizabeth telescope at SAAO and the 0.4-m Panchromatic Robotic Optical Monitoring and Polarimetry Telescopes (PROMPT) located at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). The orbital and physical parameters of the systems were derived with PHOEBE and JKTEBOP codes. We compared our results with several sets of widely-used isochrones. Results: Our multi-epoch photometric observations demonstrate that both objects show significant out-of-eclipse modulations, which vary in time. We believe that this effect is caused by stellar spots, which evolve on time scales of tens of days. For this reason, we constructed our models on the basis of photometric observations spanning short time scales (less than a month). Our modeling indicates that (1) ASAS J093814-0104.04 is a main sequence active system with nearly-twin components with masses of M1 = 0.771 ± 0.033 M⊙, M2 = 0.768 ± 0.021 M⊙ and radii of R1 = 0.772 ± 0.012 R⊙ and R2 = 0.769 ± 0.013 R⊙. (2) ASAS J212954-5620.1 is a main sequence active binary with component masses of M1 = 0.833 ± 0.017 M⊙, M2 = 0.703 ± 0.013 M⊙ and radii of R1 = 0.845 ± 0.012 R⊙ and R2

  17. Utility of a rapid immunochromatographic strip test in detecting canine parvovirus infection compared with polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundaran S. Tinky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to detect the presence of canine parvovirus (CPV in fecal samples of diarrheic dogs by conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR and immunochromatographic (IC strip test and to compare the diagnostic potential of these tests. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 fecal samples collected from diarrheic dogs suspected for CPV infection were subjected to PCR using CPV-555 primer amplifying the gene coding for the VP1 protein. These samples were also tested by IC strip test using a commercial rapid Ag test kit. The results were statistically analyzed using McNemar test. Results: A total of 22 samples (44% were detected as positive by PCR, which yielded a specific amplicon of 583 bp. In IC strip test, 18 (36% samples were found to be positive. The sensitivity of the test as compared to PCR was found to be 72.22% and specificity was 92.86%. Positive predictive value and negative predictive value of IC strip test was found to be 88.89% and 81.25%, respectively. Statistical analysis of the results of PCR and IC assay using McNemar test revealed no significant difference (p>0.05. Conclusion: The IC strip test could be employed as a rapid field level diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of canine parvoviral diarrhea.

  18. Rapid genetically modified organism (GMO screening of various food products and animal feeds using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisha, V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available modified crops which brought up a controversy on the safety usage of genetically modified organisms (GMOs. It has been implemented globally that all GMO products and its derived ingredients should have regulations on the usage and labelling. Thus, it is necessary to develop methods that allow rapid screening of GMO products to comply with the regulations. This study employed a reliable and flexible multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR method for the rapid detection of transgenic elements in genetically modified soy and maize along with the soybean LECTIN gene and maize ZEIN gene respectively. The selected four common transgenic elements were 35S promoter (35S; Agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline synthase terminator (NOS; 5-enolypyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (epsps gene; and Cry1Ab delta-endotoxin (cry1Ab gene. Optimization of the multiplex PCR methods were carried out by using 1% Roundup ReadyTM Soybean (RRS as the certified reference material for soybean that produced fourplex PCR method detecting 35S promoter, NOS terminator, epsps gene and soybean LECTIN gene and by using 1% MON810 as the certified reference material for maize that produced triplex PCR method detecting 35S promoter, cry1Ab gene and maize ZEIN gene prior to screening of the GMO traits in various food products and animal feeds. 1/9 (11.1% of the animal feed contained maize and 1/15 (6.7% of the soybean food products showed positive results for the detection of GMO transgenic gene. None of the maize food products showed positive results for GMO transgenic gene. In total, approximately 4% of the food products and animal feed were positive as GMO. This indicated GMOs have not widely entered the food chain. However, it is necessary to have an appropriate screening method due to GMOs’ unknown potential risk to humans and to animals. This rapid screening method will provide leverage in terms of being economically wise, time saving and reliable.

  19. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Phytophthora sojae in Soil and Infected Soybeans by Species-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanchao; Zhang, Wenli; Wang, Ying; Zheng, Xiaobo

    2006-12-01

    ABSTRACT Root and stem rot caused by Phytophthora sojae is one of the most destructive diseases of soybean (Glycine max) worldwide. P. sojae can survive as oospores in soil for many years. In order to develop a rapid and accurate method for the specific detection of P. sojae in soil, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of eight P. sojae isolates were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the universal primers DC6 and ITS4. The sequences of PCR products were aligned with published sequences of 50 other Phytophthora species, and a region specific to P. sojae was used to design the specific PCR primers, PS1 and PS2. More than 245 isolates representing 25 species of Phytophthora and at least 35 other species of pathogens were used to test the specificity of the primers. PCR amplification with PS primers resulted in the amplification of a product of approximately 330 bp, exclusively from isolates of P. sojae. Tests with P. sojae genomic DNA determined that the sensitivity of the PS primer set is approximately 1 fg. This PCR assay, combined with a simple soil screening method developed in this work, allowed the detection of P. sojae from soil within 6 h, with a detection sensitivity of two oospores in 20 g of soil. PCR with the PS primers could also be used to detect P. sojae from diseased soybean tissue and residues. Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR assays were also developed to detect the pathogen directly in soil samples. The PS primer-based PCR assay provides a rapid and sensitive tool for the detection of P. sojae in soil and infected soybean tissue.

  20. Electrochemical Sensing for a Rapidly Evolving World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Max Robertson

    This dissertation focuses on three projects involving the development of harsh environment gas sensors. The first project discusses the development of a multipurpose oxygen sensor electrode for use in sealing with the common electrolyte yttria stabilized zirconia. The purpose of the sealing function is to produce an internal reference environment maintained by a metal/metal oxide mixture, a criteria for miniaturization of potentiometric oxygen sensing technology. This sensor measures a potential between the internal reference and a sensing environment. The second project discusses the miniaturization of an oxygen sensor and the fabrication of a more generalized electrochemical sensing platform. The third project discusses the discovery of a new mechanism in the electrochemical sensing of ammonia through molecular recognition and the utilization of a sensor taking advantage of the new mechanism. An initial study involving the development of a microwave synthesized La0.8Sr0.2Al0.9Mn0.1O3 sensor electrode material illustrates the ability of the material developed to meet ionic and electronic conducting requirements for effective and Nernstian oxygen sensing. In addition the material deforms plastically under hot isostatic pressing conditions in a similar temperature and pressure regime with yttria stabilized zirconia to produce a seal and survive temperatures up to 1350 °C. In the second project we show novel methods to seal an oxygen environment inside a device cavity to produce an electrochemical sensor body using room temperature plasma-activated bonding and low temperature and pressure assisted plasma-activated bonding with silicon bodies, both in a clean room environment. The evolution from isostatic hot pressing methods towards room temperature complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible technologies using single crystal silicon substrates in the clean room allows the sealing of devices on a much larger scale. Through this evolution in bonding technology we move from performing non-scalable experiments to produce one sensor at a time to scalable experiments producing six. The bonding methods we use are compatible with wafer scale processing. Practically speaking this means that the oxygen sensor design is scalable to produce thousands of sensors from one single bond. Using this bonding technology we develop a generalized sensing platform that could be used for a variety of sensing applications, including oxygen sensing, but also potentially involving CO2 or NOx as well. Future efforts will involve completing of O2 sensor construction and adaption of the design for CO2 and NOx sensing. The final project focuses on a novel ammonia sensor and sensing mechanism in Ag loaded zeolite Y. The sensor resistance changes upon exposure to ammonia due to the molecular recognition of Ag+ and ammonia, producing Ag(NH3)x+ species. The sensing mechanism is a Grothuss like mechanism based on the hoping of Ag+ centers. The hopping frequency of Ag+ changes upon introduction of ammonia due to the reduced electrostatic interactions between Ag+ and the negatively charged zeolite framework upon formation of Ag(NH3) x+. The change in hopping frequency results in a measurable change in impedance.

  1. Rapid determination of parabens in personal care products by stable isotope GC-MS/MS with dynamic selected reaction monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Perry G; Zhou, Wanlong

    2013-06-01

    In this study, a rapid and sensitive analytical method for the determination of methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, and butyl esters of para-hydroxy benzoic acid (parabens) in personal care products was developed and fully validated. Test portions were extracted with methanol followed by vortexing, sonication, centrifugation, and filtration without derivatization. The four parabens were quantified by GC-MS/MS in the electron ionization mode. Four corresponding isotopically labeled parabens were selected as internal standards, which were added at the beginning of the sample preparation and used to correct for recovery and matrix effects. Sensitivity, extraction efficiency, and recovery of the respective analytes were evaluated. The coefficients of determination (r(2)) were all greater than 0.995 for the four parabens investigated. The recoveries ranged from 97 to 107% at three spiked levels and a one-time (single) extraction efficiency greater than 97% was obtained. This method has been applied to screen 26 personal care products. This is the first time that a unique GC-MS/MS method with dynamic selected reaction monitoring and confirmation of analytes has been used to determine these parabens in cosmetic personal care products. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Detection of clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori by polymerase chain reaction using residual samples from rapid urease test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Sik Jeon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Approximately 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori, which corresponds to a high infection rate. Furthermore, the incidence of antibiotic-resistant H. pylori has increased with the recent rise in use of antibiotics for H. pylori elimination, suggesting growing treatment failures. Aim: The study was aimed to assess the use of residual samples from rapid urease test (RUT for biomolecular testing as an effective and accurate method to detect antibiotic-resistant H. pylori. Settings and Design: This study was a retrospective study performed using data obtained from medical records of previously isolated H. pylori strains. Materials and Methods: RUT was conducted for 5440 biopsy samples from individuals who underwent health examination in South Korea. Subsequently, 469 RUT residual samples were randomly selected and subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR to detect antibiotic-resistant H. pylori. Statistical Analysis Used: The Chi-square test was used to analyse categorical data. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The results showed a concordance between the results of PCR and conventional RUT in 450 of 469 samples, suggesting that the H. pylori PCR test is a time- and cost-effective detection method. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that PCR test can aid physicians to prescribe the appropriate antibiotics at the time of diagnosis, thus preventing the reduction in H. pylori eradication due to antibiotic resistance, averting progression to serious diseases and increasing the treatment success rate.

  3. Direct polymerase chain reaction from blood and tissue samples for rapid diagnosis of bovine leukemia virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimori, Asami; Konnai, Satoru; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Nakahara, Ayako; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection induces bovine leukemia in cattle and causes significant financial harm to farmers and farm management. There is no effective therapy or vaccine; thus, the diagnosis and elimination of BLV-infected cattle are the most effective method to eradicate the infection. Clinical veterinarians need a simpler and more rapid method of diagnosing infection, because both nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR are labor intensive, time-consuming, and require specialized molecular biology techniques and expensive equipment. In this study, we describe a novel PCR method for amplifying the BLV provirus from whole blood, thus eliminating the need for DNA extraction. Although the sensitivity of PCR directly from whole blood (PCR-DB) samples as measured in bovine blood containing BLV-infected cell lines was lower than that of nested PCR, the PCR-DB technique showed high specificity and reproducibility. Among 225 clinical samples, 49 samples were positive by nested PCR, and 37 samples were positive by PCR-DB. There were no false positive samples; thus, PCR-DB sensitivity and specificity were 75.51% and 100%, respectively. However, the provirus loads of the samples detected by nested PCR and not PCR-DB were quite low. Moreover, PCR-DB also stably amplified the BLV provirus from tumor tissue samples. PCR-DB method exhibited good reproducibility and excellent specificity and is suitable for screening of thousands of cattle, thus serving as a viable alternative to nested PCR and real-time PCR.

  4. Rapid and sensitive method for the detection of Aeromonas caviae and Aeromonas trota by polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A A; Cerniglia, C E

    1997-04-01

    A 16S rDNA-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed for the detection of Aeromonas caviae and Aeromonas trota. These two species were identified from other Aeromonas spp. and closely related species by primers set (AER1 and AER2). The amplified product was 316 bp. The identity of the amplified product was confirmed by DNA-DNA hybridization. Two sets of primers (AER8 and AER9) were used for specific identification of Aer. caviae. Amplifying the 260 bp fragment of 16S rRNA gene region and digesting it with AluI restriction enzyme, yielded 180- and 80-bp fragments. For PCR assay, template DNA was released by mixing equal volumes of homogenized seeded crab meat with Aer. caviae and Chelex 100 (6%) incubated for 10 min at 56 degrees C followed by addition of an equal volume of 0.1% Triton-X-100 and boiled for 10 min. The detection limit was between 50 and 100 cells g-1 of crab meat. This method is very rapid and obviates the need for DNA isolation from complex food matrices and is specific for detecting two Aeromonas species.

  5. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  6. Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry detects rapid changes in volatile metabolite emission by Mycobacterium smegmatis after the addition of specific antimicrobial agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crespo, E.; Cristescu, S. M.; de Ronde, H.; Kuijper, S.; Kolk, A.H.J.; Anthony, R.M.; Harren, F. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The metabolic activity of plants, animals or microbes can be monitored by gas headspace analysis. This can be achieved using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS), a highly sensitive detection method for trace gas analysis. PTR-MS is rapid and can detect metabolic responses on-line as

  7. Preparation of a Rapidly Forming Poly(ferrocenylsilane)-Poly(ethylene glycol)-based Hydrogel by a Thiol–Michael Addition Click Reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sui, Xiaofeng; van Ingen, Lennard; Hempenius, Mark A.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis of a rapidly forming redox responsive poly(ferrocenylsilane)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PFS-PEG)-based hydrogel is described, achieved by a thiol-Michael addition click reaction. PFS bearing acrylate side groups (PFS-acryl) was synthesized by side group modification of

  8. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  9. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Graves

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish

  10. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP for rapid diagnosis of neonatal sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The difficulties in diagnosis of neonatal sepsis are due to varied clinical presentation, low sensitivity of blood culture which is considered the gold standard and empirical antibiotic usage affecting the outcome of results. Though polymerase chain reaction (PCR based detection of bacterial 16S rRNA gene has been reported earlier, this does not provide identification of the causative agent. In this study, we used restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP of amplified 16S rRNA gene to identify the organisms involved in neonatal sepsis and compared the findings with blood culture. Methods: Blood samples from 97 neonates were evaluated for diagnosis of neonatal sepsis using BacT/Alert (automated blood culture and PCR-RFLP. Results: Bacterial DNA was detected by 16S rRNA gene PCR in 55 cases, while BacT/Alert culture was positive in 34 cases. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common organism detected with both methods. Klebsiella spp. was isolated from four samples by culture but was detected by PCR-RFLP in five cases while Acinetobacter spp. was isolated from one case but detected in eight cases by PCR-RFLP. The sensitivity of PCR was found to be 82.3 per cent with a negative predictive value of 85.7 per cent. Eighty of the 97 neonates had prior exposure to antibiotics. Interpretation & conclusions:The results of our study demonstrate that PCR-RFLP having a rapid turnaround time may be useful for the early diagnosis of culture negative neonatal sepsis.

  11. Characterizing the Performance of a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer with a Rapid Cycling Tenax Preconcentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garland, S.P.; Alexander, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are species of interest for atmospheric modeling, worker chemical exposure and medical studies. Sometimes the required detection limits for these compounds is below the capability of existing real-time instrumentation. Preconcentrators have been implemented as an inexpensive way to amplify chemical signals and improve detection limits. Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been used as a tool for studying low concentrations of VOCs, but it lacks the capability to differentiate chemical signal contributions from isobaric compounds. In this work, behavior of a newly designed Tenax TA preconcentrator when coupled with a PTRMS is characterized. This novel preconcentrator design allows rapid temperature cycling, maintaining near real-time response. The preconcentrator was exposed to a sample gas of toluene in varying concentrations and loading times between and then thermally desorbed for analysis by PTR-MS. The effects of preconcentrating multiple analytes simultaneously were also investigated as well as the chromatographic effects of the preconcentrator. A linear behavior was observed when the integrated ion count rates (ICPS) from thermal desorption peaks were regressed against both varying loading times at a constant toluene concentration and varying concentrations with constant loading times. From these trends, it is possible to determine the concentration of a VOC by knowing its ICPS from thermal desorption peaks from a known preconcentration time. Peak height ion count rates representing ultimate detectability were amplified by factors up to 257 times the original signal, extending the range of the PTR-MS from 50pptv to nearly 250 parts per quadrillion. This corresponds to an ultimate sensitivity of 200 parts per quadrillion with 20 minute time resolution. Quantitative preconcentrator behavior was demonstrated using ICPS from these ion peaks and were amplified as much as 148 times their original signal. Results

  12. A temperature control method for shortening thermal cycling time to achieve rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bu, Minqiang; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R.; Sørensen, Karen Skotte

    2013-01-01

    We present a temperature control method capable of effectively shortening the thermal cycling time of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device with an external heater and a temperature sensor. The method employs optimized temperature overshooting and undershooting...... steps to achieve a rapid ramping between the temperature steps for DNA denaturation, annealing and extension. The temperature dynamics within the microfluidic PCR chamber was characterized and the overshooting and undershooting parameters were optimized using the temperature-dependent fluorescence...

  13. A novel temperature control method for shortening thermal cycling time to achieve rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bu, Minqiang; R. Perch-Nielsen, Ivan; Sørensen, Karen Skotte

    We present a new temperature control method capable of effectively shortening the thermal cycling time of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device with external heater and temperature sensor. The method employs optimized temperature overshooting and undershooting...... steps to achieve a rapid ramping between the temperature steps for DNA denaturation, annealing and extension. The temperature dynamics within the microfluidic PCR chamber was characterized and the overshooting and undershooting parameters were optimized using the temperature dependent fluorescence...

  14. Gender Differences among Sagittal Plane Knee Kinematic and Ground Reaction Force Characteristics during a Rapid Sprint and Cut Maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, C. Roger; Sizer, Phillip S.; Starch, David W.; Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Slauterbeck, James

    2004-01-01

    Women are more prone to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury during cutting sports than men. The purpose of this study was to examine knee kinematic and ground reaction forces (GRF) differences between genders during cutting. Male and female athletes performed cutting trials while force platform and video data were recorded (180 Hz).…

  15. Rapid decolorization of dye Orange G by microwave enhanced Fenton-like reaction with delafossite-type CuFeO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mei-Qiang; Zhu, Yi-Zu; Wei, Zong-Su; Hu, Jian-Qiang; Pan, Sheng-Dong; Xiao, Rui-Yang; Dong, Chun-Ying; Jin, Mi-Cong

    2017-02-15

    Bimetallic oxide CuFeO2 as a new heterogeneous catalyst has shown much higher catalytic ability for activating peroxide than single-metal oxides. The present work demonstrated a synergistic microwave (MW) enhanced Fenton-like process with CuFeO2 for rapid decolorization of azo dye Orange G (OG). The MW irradiation dramatically enhanced the OG degradation efficiency, achieving 99.9% decolorization within 15min at pH5. The XRD analysis of reused CuFeO2, together with metal leaching tests, indicated merits of recycling for CuFeO2. The subsequent surface element analysis by XPS for fresh and used CuFeO2 showed a complex network for reactions between copper-iron redox pairs and surface hydroxyl groups, leading to a synergistic Fenton-like system accelerated by MW irradiation. In the CuFeO2 initiated Fenton-like reactions, several oxidant species (i.e., OH, O2-, electron hole, and FeIVO) responsible to the OG oxidation were identified by quenching experiments, showing the MW generated high temperature and "hot spots" enhanced the yield of OH by generation of electron-hole pairs. Further, the 26 detected degradation products confirmed the OH dominant oxidation of OG. This study shows that the MW-enhanced Fenton-like reaction using CuFeO2 has potential applications for rapid decolorization of dye effluent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanical Reaction of Facial Skeleton to Rapid Palatal Expansion Devices using Laser Holography: An in vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revathi Peddu

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Hyrax appliance activation produced mechanical reactions on the teeth, alveolar bone, maxilla and the circum-maxillary bones and sutures. The displacement and fringes increased progressively with two, four and eight turns activation of hyrax. The pattern of the fringes was more circular around the nasomaxillary complex and zygomaticomaxillary sutures, suggesting rotational displacement of the maxilla. The number and pattern of fringes produced by the Spring jet appliances suggest that it produces only dentoalveolar changes and minimal orthopedic affects.

  17. Microwave-assisted multicomponent reactions for rapid synthesis of AIE-active fluorescent polymeric nanoparticles by post-polymerization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qian-Yong; Jiang, Ruming; Liu, Meiying; Wan, Qing; Xu, Dazhuang; Tian, Jianwen; Huang, Hongye; Wen, Yuanqing; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-11-01

    The development of simple and effective methods for synthesis of fluorescent polymeric nanoparticles (FPNs) with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) plays an important role for the biomedical applications of AIE-active FPNs. In present work, we developed a facile strategy for the fabrication of AIE-active FPNs by a post-polymerization method based on the microwave-assisted Kabachnik-Fields (KF) reaction, which can conjugate with poly(PEGMA-NH2), AIE-active dye (TPE-CHO) and diethyl phosphate (DP) under microwave irradiation within 5min. The characterization results confirm that PEGMA-TPE FPNs are successfully prepared through the microwave-assisted KF reaction. The resultant AIE-active FPNs show high water dispersity, intensive fluorescence and low cytotoxicity. These features make these AIE-active FPNs great potential for biomedical applications. Moreover, the microwave-assisted KF reaction is simple, fast, atom economy that should be a general strategy for the fabrication of various multifunctional AIE-active FPNs. We believe this work will open up a new avenue for the preparation of AIE-active functional materials with great potential for different applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Rapid optimization of the post-column fluorogenic ninhydrin reaction for the HPLC-based determination of bradykinin and related fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimalasena, R; Audus, K L; Stobaugh, J F

    2003-01-01

    A flow injection analysis scheme is demonstrated for the rapid optimization of reagent concentrations, flow rates, delay time and temperature using the guanidino moiety specific fluorogenic ninhydrin reaction. Using the amino acid arginine, non-arginine containing peptides, and the arginine-containing peptides, bradykinin and related fragments, specificity is demonstrated. These results serve to extend previous descriptions of the post-column reaction by offering a time efficient approach for the optimization of newly assembled post-column reactors using this chemistry. The reactor is subsequently added to a gradient elution HPLC system with the separation of bradykinin and bradykinin fragments demonstrated. Detection sensitivity in the high femtomole-low picomole mass range was achieved for these substances. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction combined with on-chip electrophoresis as a rapid screening tool for candidate gene sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittig, Rainer; Salowsky, Rüdiger; Blaich, Stephanie

    2005-01-01

    Combining multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR) with microfluidic amplicon analysis, we developed an assay for the rapid and reliable semiquantitative expression screening of 11 candidate genes for drug resistance in human malignant melanoma. The functionality...... of this approach was demonstrated by low interexperimental variations of amplicon quantities after endpoint analysis. When applied to RNA samples derived from drug-sensitive and -resistant melanoma cell lines, mRT-PCR delivered results qualitatively concordant with data obtained from Northern blot and array...... analyses. The screening of additional melanoma cell lines resulted in distinct expression patterns for ten candidate genes. Our approach reveals a rapid and easy-to-handle alternative for candidate gene set evaluation from limited amounts of RNA....

  20. A colorimetric assay of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) based on ninhydrin reaction for rapid screening of bacteria containing ACC deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Chang, S; Lin, L; Li, Y; An, Q

    2011-08-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity is an efficient marker for bacteria to promote plant growth by lowering ethylene levels in plants. We aim to develop a method for rapidly screening bacteria containing ACC deaminase, based on a colorimetric ninhydrin assay of ACC. A reliable colorimetric ninhydrin assay was developed to quantify ACC using heat-resistant polypropylene chimney-top 96-well PCR plates, having the wells evenly heated in boiling water, preventing accidental contamination from boiling water and limiting evaporation. With this method to measure bacterial consumption of ACC, 44 ACC-utilizing bacterial isolates were rapidly screened out from 311 bacterial isolates that were able to grow on minimal media containing ACC as the sole nitrogen source. The 44 ACC-utilizing bacterial isolates showed ACC deaminase activities and belonged to the genus Burkholderia, Pseudomonas or Herbaspirillum. Determination of bacterial ACC consumption by the PCR-plate ninhydrin-ACC assay is a rapid and efficient method for screening bacteria containing ACC deaminase from a large number of bacterial isolates. The PCR-plate ninhydrin-ACC assay extends the utility of the ninhydrin reaction and enables a rapid screening of bacteria containing ACC deaminase from large numbers of bacterial isolates. © 2011 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Rapid detection of active cytomegalovirus infection by in situ polymerase chain reaction on MRC5 cells inoculated with blood specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinger, D; Mougin, C; Lab, M

    1994-08-01

    An in situ polymerase chain reaction was developed to amplify immediate early genes of human cytomegalovirus in cells cultured in a 96 well plate and infected with leukocytes. The technical parameters enabling optimal detection of the DNA sequences were defined. The key to this method is the fixation of cells, which facilitates the access of the PCR mixture into the cell nuclei and preserves cell morphology. Such a technique could have wide application for the detection and identification of other infectious viruses in cultured cells very early after inoculation of clinical samples.

  2. Ranking in evolving complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hao; Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhou, Ming-Yang

    2017-05-01

    Complex networks have emerged as a simple yet powerful framework to represent and analyze a wide range of complex systems. The problem of ranking the nodes and the edges in complex networks is critical for a broad range of real-world problems because it affects how we access online information and products, how success and talent are evaluated in human activities, and how scarce resources are allocated by companies and policymakers, among others. This calls for a deep understanding of how existing ranking algorithms perform, and which are their possible biases that may impair their effectiveness. Many popular ranking algorithms (such as Google's PageRank) are static in nature and, as a consequence, they exhibit important shortcomings when applied to real networks that rapidly evolve in time. At the same time, recent advances in the understanding and modeling of evolving networks have enabled the development of a wide and diverse range of ranking algorithms that take the temporal dimension into account. The aim of this review is to survey the existing ranking algorithms, both static and time-aware, and their applications to evolving networks. We emphasize both the impact of network evolution on well-established static algorithms and the benefits from including the temporal dimension for tasks such as prediction of network traffic, prediction of future links, and identification of significant nodes.

  3. Evolving digital ecological networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A Fortuna

    Full Text Available "It is hard to realize that the living world as we know it is just one among many possibilities" [1]. Evolving digital ecological networks are webs of interacting, self-replicating, and evolving computer programs (i.e., digital organisms that experience the same major ecological interactions as biological organisms (e.g., competition, predation, parasitism, and mutualism. Despite being computational, these programs evolve quickly in an open-ended way, and starting from only one or two ancestral organisms, the formation of ecological networks can be observed in real-time by tracking interactions between the constantly evolving organism phenotypes. These phenotypes may be defined by combinations of logical computations (hereafter tasks that digital organisms perform and by expressed behaviors that have evolved. The types and outcomes of interactions between phenotypes are determined by task overlap for logic-defined phenotypes and by responses to encounters in the case of behavioral phenotypes. Biologists use these evolving networks to study active and fundamental topics within evolutionary ecology (e.g., the extent to which the architecture of multispecies networks shape coevolutionary outcomes, and the processes involved.

  4. Rapid identification of pathogens from positive blood cultures by multiplex polymerase chain reaction using the FilmArray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschke, Anne J; Heyrend, Caroline; Byington, Carrie L; Fisher, Mark A; Barker, Elizabeth; Garrone, Nicholas F; Thatcher, Stephanie A; Pavia, Andrew T; Barney, Trenda; Alger, Garrison D; Daly, Judy A; Ririe, Kirk M; Ota, Irene; Poritz, Mark A

    2012-12-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death. Rapid and accurate identification of pathogens and antimicrobial resistance directly from blood culture could improve patient outcomes. The FilmArray® (FA; Idaho Technology, Salt Lake City, UT, USA) Blood Culture (BC) panel can identify >25 pathogens and 4 antibiotic resistance genes from positive blood cultures in 1 h. We compared a development version of the panel to conventional culture and susceptibility testing on 102 archived blood cultures from adults and children with bacteremia. Of 109 pathogens identified by culture, 95% were identified by FA. Among 111 prospectively collected blood cultures, the FA identified 84 (91%) of 92 pathogens covered by the panel. Among 25 Staphylococcus aureus and 21 Enterococcus species detected, FA identified all culture-proven methicillin-resistant S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci. The FA BC panel is an accurate method for the rapid identification of pathogens and resistance genes from blood culture. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The catalase reaction of Shigella species and its use in rapid screening for epidemic Shigella dysenteriae type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karas, J A; Pillay, D G; Sturm, A W

    2007-01-01

    As epidemic dysentery caused by Shigella dysenteriae type 1 is associated with high mortality, early identification of outbreaks is important. Since S. dysenteriae type 1 differs from most of the Enterobacteriaceae in that it does not produce catalase, a test for catalase may provide a useful screening method. The ability of a catalase test to provide rapid identification of S. dysenteriae type 1 has now been assessed, using isolates of this pathogen from five continents, Shigella of other species, and entero-invasive (EIEC) and Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). All of the isolates of S. dysenteriae type 1, as well as S. dysenteriae of types 3, 4, 6, 9, 11 and 12 and S. boydii of type 12, were found catalase-negative. All the other bacteria tested were positive for catalase. In an epidemic setting in South Africa, 406 xylose-negative and lysine-decarboxylase-negative isolates, collected from xylose-lysine-deoxycholate (XLD) agar, were tested for catalase. All 356 of the catalase-negative isolates were confirmed to be of S. dysenteriae type 1. None of the catalase-positive isolates were of S. dysenteriae type 1. The catalase test is useful in the rapid, presumptive identification of S. dysenteriae type 1, from appropriate culture media, because of its high predictive value, simplicity and speed. It would be particularly useful during dysentery outbreaks, when other Shigella would be uncommon. There was no association between the absence of catalase activity and the production of Shiga toxin.

  6. Rapid determination of trace copper in animal feed based on micro-plate colorimetric reaction and statistical partitioning correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yiming; Wang, Jiayi; Zhang, Chi; Chen, Yiqiang

    2017-04-15

    The objective of this study was to develop a micro-plate based colorimetric assay for rapid and high-throughput detection of copper in animal feed. Copper ion in animal feed was extracted by trichloroacetic acid solution and reduced to cuprous ion by hydroxylamine. The cuprous ion can chelate with 2,2'-bicinchoninic acid to form a Cu-BCA complex which was detected with high sensitivity by micro-plate reader at 354nm. The whole assay procedure can be completed within 20min. To eliminate matrix interference, a statistical partitioning correction approach was proposed, which makes the detection of copper in complex samples possible. The limit of detection was 0.035μg/mL and the detection range was 0.1-10μg/mL of copper in buffer solution. Actual sample analysis indicated that this colorimetric assay produced results consistent with atomic absorption spectrometry analysis. These results demonstrated that the developed assay can be used for rapid determination of copper in animal feed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of the rapid thermal annealing on the interdiffusion and the reaction at the interface of the binary system Cr/Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merabet, A. [Laboratoire Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux Metalliques, Departement d' O.M.P., Faculte des Sciences de l' Ingenieur, Universite de Setif, Setif 19000 (Algeria)]. E-mail: merabet_abdelali@yahoo.fr

    2004-12-15

    In order to understand the growth mechanism of the silicides and the effect of the dopant on the electrical activity, a thin layer of chromium (100 nm) is deposited on the single crystal silicon (1 0 0) substrate implanted (10{sup 15} As{sup +} atoms/cm{sup 2}, 100 keV) and non implanted. Afterwards, we performed a rapid thermal annealing in the interval of temperature (450-600 deg. C) for a fixed duration of 45 s. The samples are analyzed by X ray-diffraction (XRD) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). The electrical activity has been investigated by the method of the four-point probes. The analysis of the samples by XRD and RBS showed that the rapid thermal annealing (RTA) leads to a reaction at the interface Cr/Si inducing the formation and the growth of the unique silicide CrSi{sub 2}. It is also established that the kinetics growth of CrSi{sub 2} presents a linear evolution with temperature. This fact shows that the growth is governed by a chemical reaction of the interface. Sheet resistance measurements have been performed to study the electrical behavior for these structures. It is worth to point out that the presence of the implanted arsenic in the single crystal silicon increased the resistance in a significant manner.

  8. The impact of rapid sediment accumulation on pore pressure development and dehydration reactions during shallow subduction in the Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meridth, Lanie N.; Screaton, Elizabeth J.; Jaeger, John M.; James, Stephanie R.; Villaseñor, Tania

    2017-01-01

    In the Gulf of Alaska region, sediment has rapidly accumulated (>1 km/my) in the trench sourced from intensified glaciation in the past ˜1.2 million years. This rapid sediment accumulation increases overburden and should accelerate dehydration of hydrous minerals by insulating the underlying sediment column. These processes have the potential to generate fluid overpressures in the low permeability sediments entering the subduction zone. A 1-D model was developed to simulate dehydration reaction progress and investigate excess pore pressures as sediments approach the trench and are subducted. At the deformation front, simulated temperatures increase by ˜30°C due to the insulating effect of trench sediments. As a result, opal-A begins to react to form quartz while smectite remains mostly unreacted. Loading due to the trench sediments elevates excess pore pressures to ˜30% of lithostatic pressure at the deformation front; however, deformation front excess pore pressures are sensitive to assumptions about the permeability of outer wedge sediments. If the outer wedge sediments are coarse-grained and high-permeability rather than mud-dominated, excess pore pressures are lower but still have an insulating effect. During early subduction, simulated pore pressures continue to rise and reach ˜70% of lithostatic by 60 km landward. The 1-D modeling results suggest that the elevated pore pressures are primarily due to loading and that dehydration reactions are not a significant component of excess pore pressure generation at this margin.

  9. Rapid in vitro splicing of coding sequences from genomic DNA by isothermal recombination reaction-based PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxuan Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloning of coding sequence (CDS is an important step for gene function research. Here, we reported a simple and efficient strategy for assembling multiple-exon into an intron-free CDS from genomic DNA (gDNA by an isothermal recombination reaction-based PCR (IRR-PCR method. As an example, a 2067-bp full-length CDS of the anther-specific expression gene OsABCG15, which is composed of seven exons and six introns, was generated by IRR-PCR using genomic DNA of rice leaf as the template. Actually, this approach can be wildly applied to any DNA sequences assembly to achieve CDS cloning, gene fusion and multiple site-directed mutagenesis in functional genomics studies in vitro.

  10. Development of a droplet digital polymerase chain reaction for rapid and simultaneous identification of common foodborne pathogens in soft cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Cremonesi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dairy products can harbor various microorganisms (e.g., Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli arising from animal reservoirs, and which can become important sources of foodborne illness. Therefore, early detection of food pathogens is crucial to prevent diseases. We wished to develop an accurate quantitative protocol based on a droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR involving eight individual TaqMan™ reactions to detect simultaneously, without selective enrichment, Listeria spp., L. monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., verocytotoxin-producing E. coli and Campylobacter spp. in cheese. ddPCR (a third-generation PCR provides absolute quantification of target DNAs without requirement of a standard curve, which simplifies experimentation and data comparability. The accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of the developed ddPCR system were assessed using purified DNA from 50 reference pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains from international or Italian collections and analyzing soft cheese samples artificially contaminated with serial dilutions (from 4×106 to 4×101 CFU/g of pure cultures from the American Type Culture Collection.Finally, the performance of our ddPCR system was compared by parallel testing with quantitative PCR: it gave higher sensitivity (102 CFU/g for the Listeria spp. assay without the necessity of a standard curve.In conclusion, this is the first ddPCR system developed for simultaneous detection of common foodborne pathogens in cheese using a single set of amplification conditions. As such, it could become a useful strategy for high-throughput screening of microorganisms to evaluate the quality and safety of food products.

  11. Development of a Droplet Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction for Rapid and Simultaneous Identification of Common Foodborne Pathogens in Soft Cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonesi, Paola; Cortimiglia, Claudia; Picozzi, Claudia; Minozzi, Giulietta; Malvisi, Michela; Luini, Mario; Castiglioni, Bianca

    2016-01-01

    Dairy products can harbor various microorganisms (e.g., Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli) arising from animal reservoirs, and which can become important sources of foodborne illness. Therefore, early detection of food pathogens is crucial to prevent diseases. We wished to develop an accurate quantitative protocol based on a droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) involving eight individual TaqMan™ reactions to detect simultaneously, without selective enrichment, Listeria spp., L. monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., verocytotoxin-producing E. coli and Campylobacter spp. in cheese. ddPCR (a "third-generation PCR") provides absolute quantification of target DNAs without requirement of a standard curve, which simplifies experimentation and data comparability. The accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of the developed ddPCR system were assessed using purified DNA from 50 reference pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains from international or Italian collections and analyzing soft cheese samples artificially contaminated with serial dilutions (from 4 × 106 to 4 × 101 CFU/g) of pure cultures from the American Type Culture Collection. Finally, the performance of our ddPCR system was compared by parallel testing with quantitative PCR: it gave higher sensitivity (102 CFU/g for the Listeria spp. assay) without the necessity of a standard curve. In conclusion, this is the first ddPCR system developed for simultaneous detection of common foodborne pathogens in cheese using a single set of amplification conditions. As such, it could become a useful strategy for high-throughput screening of microorganisms to evaluate the quality and safety of food products.

  12. Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains Resistant to Isoniazid and/or Rifampicin: Standardization of Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collantes, Jimena; Solari, Francesca Barletta; Rigouts, Leen

    2016-12-07

    Drug susceptibility testing using molecular techniques can enhance the identification of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Two multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were developed to detect the most common resistance-associated mutations to isoniazid (katGS315T, inhA-15C → T), and rifampicin (rpoBH526Y and rpoBS531L). To assess the species specificity of the qPCR, we selected 31 nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) reference strains belonging to 17 species from the public collection of mycobacterial cultures (BCCM/ITM). Additionally, we tested 17 isoniazid and/or rifampicin-resistant strains with other mutations in the target genes to assess mutation specificity. The limit of detection for all the targeted mutations was 20 bacilli/reaction. Multiplex 1 showed 90%, 95%, and 100% efficiency for wild type (WT), Mut katGS315T, and Mut rpoBS531L, respectively; whereas Multiplex 2 showed 97%, 94%, and 90% efficiency for WT, Mut inhA-15, and Mut rpoBH526Y, respectively. Three of 17 strains that presented other mutations in the target genes were identified as rifampicin resistant and only 3/31 NTM showed a similar melting temperature to rpoBL531 and/or katGT315 mutants. Thus, our proposed cascade of specific tuberculosis detection followed by drug resistance testing showed sensitivities for katGS315T, rpoBS531L, rpoBH526Y, and inhA-15 detection of 100%, 100%, 100%, and 96%, respectively; and specificities of 98%, 95%, 100%, and 100, respectively. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  13. Ultrasonic-assisted Kabachnik-Fields reaction for rapid fabrication of AIE-active fluorescent organic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Zi; Liu, Meiying; Jiang, Ruming; Zeng, Guangjiang; Wan, Qing; Huang, Hongye; Deng, Fengjie; Wan, Yiqun; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-03-01

    Aggregation-induced emission (AIE)-active fluorescent organic nanoparticles (FNPs) have been extensively explored for fluorescence "turn-on" bio-imaging applications with the unique advantages over conventional FNPs. Transformation of AIE-active molecules into FNPs can greatly expand their biomedical application potential. Here we reported a novel "one-pot" strategy for fabricating AIE-active FNPs through an ultrasonic-assisted, catalysts-free and solvent-free Kabachnik-Fields (KF) reaction for the first time. The KF reaction can be completed within 10min to generate AIE-active PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs through mixing polyethylenimine and aldehyde group containing AIE dyes and diethyl phosphate. These PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs were confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and fluorescence spectroscopy etc. The cell uptake behavior as well as cell viability of PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs was examined to evaluate their potential for biomedical application. We demonstrated that the amphiphilic α-aminophosphonate polymers could self-assemble into PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs in aqueous solution and showed excellent water dispersibility. TEM image shows the size of PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs is 100-200nm. More importantly, the PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs emit strong green fluorescence and desirable biocompatibility, making them very suitable for biomedical applications. Finally, thus smart FNPs design together with their excellent performance will open a new avenue in the development of FNPs for following biological processes such as carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Biomimetic molecular design tools that learn, evolve, and adapt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, David A

    2017-01-01

    A dominant hallmark of living systems is their ability to adapt to changes in the environment by learning and evolving. Nature does this so superbly that intensive research efforts are now attempting to mimic biological processes. Initially this biomimicry involved developing synthetic methods to generate complex bioactive natural products. Recent work is attempting to understand how molecular machines operate so their principles can be copied, and learning how to employ biomimetic evolution and learning methods to solve complex problems in science, medicine and engineering. Automation, robotics, artificial intelligence, and evolutionary algorithms are now converging to generate what might broadly be called in silico-based adaptive evolution of materials. These methods are being applied to organic chemistry to systematize reactions, create synthesis robots to carry out unit operations, and to devise closed loop flow self-optimizing chemical synthesis systems. Most scientific innovations and technologies pass through the well-known "S curve", with slow beginning, an almost exponential growth in capability, and a stable applications period. Adaptive, evolving, machine learning-based molecular design and optimization methods are approaching the period of very rapid growth and their impact is already being described as potentially disruptive. This paper describes new developments in biomimetic adaptive, evolving, learning computational molecular design methods and their potential impacts in chemistry, engineering, and medicine.

  15. Biomimetic molecular design tools that learn, evolve, and adapt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Winkler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A dominant hallmark of living systems is their ability to adapt to changes in the environment by learning and evolving. Nature does this so superbly that intensive research efforts are now attempting to mimic biological processes. Initially this biomimicry involved developing synthetic methods to generate complex bioactive natural products. Recent work is attempting to understand how molecular machines operate so their principles can be copied, and learning how to employ biomimetic evolution and learning methods to solve complex problems in science, medicine and engineering. Automation, robotics, artificial intelligence, and evolutionary algorithms are now converging to generate what might broadly be called in silico-based adaptive evolution of materials. These methods are being applied to organic chemistry to systematize reactions, create synthesis robots to carry out unit operations, and to devise closed loop flow self-optimizing chemical synthesis systems. Most scientific innovations and technologies pass through the well-known “S curve”, with slow beginning, an almost exponential growth in capability, and a stable applications period. Adaptive, evolving, machine learning-based molecular design and optimization methods are approaching the period of very rapid growth and their impact is already being described as potentially disruptive. This paper describes new developments in biomimetic adaptive, evolving, learning computational molecular design methods and their potential impacts in chemistry, engineering, and medicine.

  16. Biomimetic molecular design tools that learn, evolve, and adapt

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A dominant hallmark of living systems is their ability to adapt to changes in the environment by learning and evolving. Nature does this so superbly that intensive research efforts are now attempting to mimic biological processes. Initially this biomimicry involved developing synthetic methods to generate complex bioactive natural products. Recent work is attempting to understand how molecular machines operate so their principles can be copied, and learning how to employ biomimetic evolution and learning methods to solve complex problems in science, medicine and engineering. Automation, robotics, artificial intelligence, and evolutionary algorithms are now converging to generate what might broadly be called in silico-based adaptive evolution of materials. These methods are being applied to organic chemistry to systematize reactions, create synthesis robots to carry out unit operations, and to devise closed loop flow self-optimizing chemical synthesis systems. Most scientific innovations and technologies pass through the well-known “S curve”, with slow beginning, an almost exponential growth in capability, and a stable applications period. Adaptive, evolving, machine learning-based molecular design and optimization methods are approaching the period of very rapid growth and their impact is already being described as potentially disruptive. This paper describes new developments in biomimetic adaptive, evolving, learning computational molecular design methods and their potential impacts in chemistry, engineering, and medicine. PMID:28694872

  17. The Issue of Calculating the Final Temperature of the Products of Rapid Exothermic Chemical Reactions with Significant Energy Release in a Closed Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarev, V.; Geidmanis, D.

    2016-02-01

    The theoretical problem solved in this article is the calculation of thermodynamic parameters such as final temperature, distribution of the liquid and dry saturated vapour phases of the substance that are considered to be in thermodynamic equilibrium, and pressure of the system of several reaction products after adding to the system a certain amount of heat or the thermal effect released during rapid exothermic reaction in a closed volume that occurs so fast that it can be considered to be adiabatic, and when the volume of liquid reagents is several orders of magnitude less than the volume of the reactor. The general multi-substance problem is reduced to a theoretical problem for one substance of calculation thermodynamic parameters of system after adding a certain amount of heat that gives theoretically rigorous isochoric calculation. In this article, we substantiate our view that isochoric pass of calculation is more robust compared to seemingly more natural isobaric pass of calculation, if the later involves quite not trivial calculation of the adiabatic compression of a two-phase system (liquid - dry saturated vapour) that can pass itself into another kind of state (liquid - wet saturated vapour), which requires, apparently, more complex descriptions compared with isochoric calculation because the specific heat capacity of wet saturated vapour can be negative. The solved theoretical problem relates to a practical problem that has been a driver for our research as part of a design of the reactor of the titanium reduction from magnesium and titanium tetrachloride supplied into atmosphere of the reactor at high temperatures when both reagents are in gaseous state. The reaction is known to be exothermic with a high thermal effect, and estimate of the final temperature and pressure of the products of reaction, for instance, designing the reactor allows eliminating the possibility of the reaction products to penetrate backwards into supply tracts of the reagents

  18. A tool for rapid screening of direct DNA agents using reaction rates and relative interaction potency: towards screening environmental contaminants for hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavina, Jennilee M A; Rubab, Mamoona; Zhang, Huijuan; Zhu, Jiping; Nong, Andy; Feng, Yong-Lai

    2011-11-01

    DNA damage represents a potential biomarker for determining the exposure risk to chemicals and may provide early warning data for identifying chemical hazards to human health. Here, we have demonstrated a simple chromatography-based method that can be used to rapidly screen for the presence of chemical hazards as well as to determine parameters relevant to hazard assessment. In this proof-of-principle study, a simple in vitro system was used to determine the interaction of pollutants and probable carcinogens, phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE), tetrachlorohydroquinone (Cl(4)HQ), methylmethane sulfonate (MMS), styrene-7,8-oxide (SO), and benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), a metabolite of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), with single- and double-stranded DNA probes. Differences in potency and reaction kinetics were studied for chemical and DNA type. A relative interaction potency equivalency (PEQ) of a chemical was determined by ratio of interaction potency of a chemical to BPDE as the reference chemical in the reaction with single- and double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. PEQs were found to be BPDE > PGE > SO > MMS > Cl(4)HQ for single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides while they were found to be BPDE > PGE > Cl(4)HQ > MMS > SO for double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. Kinetics evaluation revealed that BPDE reacted with both DNA probes at a significantly faster rate, as compared to the remaining test chemicals. Equilibrium was reached within an hour for BPDE, but required a minimum of 48 h for the remaining chemicals. First-order rate constants were (1.61 ± 0.2) × 10(-3) s(-1) and (3.18 ± 0.4) × 10(-4) s(-1) for reaction of BPDE with double- and single-stranded DNA, respectively. The remaining chemicals possessed rate constants from 2 to 13 × 10(-6) s(-1) with a relative kinetic order for reaction with DNA of BPDE ≫ MMS > SO > PGE > Cl(4)HQ for ds-DNA and BPDE ≫ SO ≈ Cl(4)HQ ≈ MMS > PGE for ss-DNA. We further found that the reaction potency, defined by

  19. Limits of a rapid identification of common Mediterranean sandflies using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzedine Bounamous

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A total of 131 phlebotomine Algerian sandflies have been processed in the present study. They belong to the species Phlebotomus bergeroti, Phlebotomus alexandri, Phlebotomus sergenti, Phlebotomus chabaudi, Phlebotomus riouxi, Phlebotomus perniciosus, Phlebotomus longicuspis, Phlebotomus perfiliewi, Phlebotomus ariasi, Phlebotomus chadlii, Sergentomyia fallax, Sergentomyia minuta, Sergentomyia antennata, Sergentomyia schwetzi, Sergentomyia clydei, Sergentomyia christophersi and Grassomyia dreyfussi. They have been characterised by sequencing of a part of the cytochrome b (cyt b, t RNA serine and NADH1 on the one hand and of the cytochrome C oxidase I of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA on the other hand. Our study highlights two sympatric populations within P. sergenti in the area of its type-locality and new haplotypes of P. perniciosus and P. longicuspis without recording the specimens called lcx previously found in North Africa. We tried to use a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method based on a combined double digestion of each marker. These method is not interesting to identify sandflies all over the Mediterranean Basin.

  20. [The rapid specific characterization of clinical isolates of the genus Mycobacterium by the polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuende, J I; Jaime, M L; Gómez, M T; Del Campo, F; Alba, A; Pérez de Diego, I J

    1995-02-18

    Typing at species level of Mycobacterium is usually performed by microbiological and biochemical methods that require a long time and/or sufficient amount of bacteria. Molecular biology can avoid these problems using different techniques. A colony growth of the following mycobacteria has been analyzed: M. tuberculosis, M. kansasii, M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. gordonae, M. phlei, M. aurum, M. fortuitum, M. flavescens, M. marinum, M. xenopi, M. nonchromogenicum, M. terrae and M. chelonei. Strains were grown in Löwenstein-Jensen medium. DNA was obtained by proteolytic digestion and fenol extraction. The 16S rRNA gen was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the amplification was digested by HaeIII, HpaII, RsaI and AluI restriction enzymes. Restriction fragment patterns were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis and UV transillumination. The combination of the patterns obtained with HpaII and RsaI was sufficient to generate 13 different combined ones. The patterns of M. intracellulare and M. avium were the same. PCR and restriction enzyme analysis is an useful method for typing at species level of clinical isolates of mycobacteria.

  1. A new way to rapidly create functional, fluorescent fusion proteins: random insertion of GFP with an in vitro transposition reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakobsdottir Klara B

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP can be inserted into the middle of another protein to produce a functional, fluorescent fusion protein. Finding permissive sites for insertion, however, can be difficult. Here we describe a transposon-based approach for rapidly creating libraries of GFP fusion proteins. Results We tested our approach on the glutamate receptor subunit, GluR1, and the G protein subunit, αs. All of the in-frame GFP insertions produced a fluorescent protein, consistent with the idea that GFP will fold and form a fluorophore when inserted into virtually any domain of another protein. Some of the proteins retained their signaling function, and the random nature of the transposition process revealed permissive sites for insertion that would not have been predicted on the basis of structural or functional models of how that protein works. Conclusion This technique should greatly speed the discovery of functional fusion proteins, genetically encodable sensors, and optimized fluorescence resonance energy transfer pairs.

  2. Microfabricated Renewable Beads-Trapping/Releasing Flow Cell for Rapid Antigen-Antibody Reaction in Chemiluminescent Immunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Zhifeng; Shao, Guocheng; Wang, Jun; Lu, Donglai; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-04-01

    A filter pillar-array microstructure was coupled with a pneumatic micro-valve to fabricate a reusable miniaturized beads-trapping/releasing flow cell, in which trapping and releasing beads can be conveniently realized by switching the micro-valve. This miniaturized device was suitable to construct automatic fluidic system for “renewable surface analysis”. The renewable surface strategy based on pneumatic micro-valve enabled capture of beads in beads chamber prior to each assay, and release of the used beads after the assay. Chemiluminescent competitive immunoassay of 3,5,6-trichloropyridinol (TCP) was performed as a model to demonstrate the application potential of this reusable miniaturized flow cell. The whole fluidic assay process including beads trapping, immuno-binding, beads washing, beads releasing and signal collection could be completed in 10 min. Immunoassay of TCP using this miniaturized device showed a linear range of 0.20-70 ng/mL with a limit of detection of 0.080 ng/mL. The device had been successfully used for detection of TCP spiked in rat serum with average recovery of 97%. This investigation provides a rapid, sensitive, reusable, low-cost and automatic miniaturized device for solid-phase biochemical analysis for various purposes.

  3. Application of real time polymerase chain reaction targeting kex 1 gene & its comparison with the conventional methods for rapid detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii in clinical specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Revathy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: As there are no standard laboratory techniques for the rapid detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii in India, this study was undertaken to evaluate and establish an optimal and rapid technique for the detection of P. jirovecii by comparing three different techniques - staining technique, application of a real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR targeting kex 1 gene and application of nested PCR targeting mitochondrial large subunit (mtLSU gene for rapid detection of P. jirovecii in HIV positive patients. Methods: One hundred and fifty sputum specimens from HIV positive (n = 75 and HIV negative (n = 75 patients were subjected to three different techniques -KOH/Calcoflour and Grocott methanamine silver staining (GMS, RT-PCR targeting kex1 gene, PCR targeting mtLSU region followed by DNA sequencing and BLAST analysis. Results: Among the 75 HIV positive patients, P. jirovecii was detected in 19 (25.33% patients by the staining techniques, and in 23 (30.65% patients each by PCR targeting mtLSU region and by RT- PCR targeting kex1 gene of P. jirovecii. PCR based DNA sequencing targeting mtLSU region revealed 97-100 per cent sequence homology with P. jirovecii sequences in GenBank. Interpretation & conclusions: Of the three techniques for detection of P. jirovecii evaluated in this study, false negativity was found to be more in staining technique and it also required high technical expertise to interpret the result. Both nested PCR and RT-PCR were reliable and equally sensitive, in rapid detection of P. jirovecii, but RT-PCR technique also generated the copy numbers for knowing the severity of infection.

  4. Electrical characteristics and interfacial reactions of rapidly annealed Pt/Ru Schottky contacts on n-type GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, N.N.K.; Rajagopal Reddy, V. [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati (India); Choi, C.J. [School of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering, Semiconductor Physics Research Center (SPRC), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    The electrical properties and interfacial reactions of Pt/Ru Schottky contacts on n-type gallium nitride (GaN) have been investigated as a function of annealing temperature. The calculated Schottky barrier height (SBH) of the as-deposited Pt/Ru Schottky contact is found to be 0.69 eV current-voltage (I-V) and 0.76 eV capacitance-voltage (C-V). Experimental results showed that the SBHs are increased on increasing the annealing temperature. When the contact is annealed at 600 C, a maximum barrier height is obtained and the corresponding values are 0.87 eV (I-V) and 0.99 eV (C-V). The Norde method was also employed to extract the barrier height of Pt/Ru Schottky contacts and the values are 0.70 and 0.86 eV for the samples as-deposited and annealed at 600 C, which are in good agreement with those obtained from the I-V measurement. Shifts of the surface Fermi level are measured with the change in position of the Ga 2p core level peak. Based on the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies, the formation of gallide phases at the Ru/Pt/n-GaN interface could be the reason for the increase in SBH at elevated temperatures. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) results showed that the surface morphology of the Pt/Ru Schottky contact did not change significantly even after annealing at 600 C. These results point out that a Pt/Ru Schottky contact may be a suitable candidate for the fabrication of GaN-based high-temperature device applications. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Rapid "breath-print" of liver cirrhosis by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena Morisco

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: The aim of the present work was to test the potential of Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS in the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and the assessment of disease severity by direct analysis of exhaled breath. Twenty-six volunteers have been enrolled in this study: 12 patients (M/F 8/4, mean age 70.5 years, min-max 42-80 years with liver cirrhosis of different etiologies and at different severity of disease and 14 healthy subjects (M/F 5/9, mean age 52.3 years, min-max 35-77 years. Real time breath analysis was performed on fasting subjects using a buffered end-tidal on-line sampler directly coupled to a PTR-ToF-MS. Twelve volatile organic compounds (VOCs resulted significantly differently in cirrhotic patients (CP compared to healthy controls (CTRL: four ketones (2-butanone, 2- or 3- pentanone, C8-ketone, C9-ketone, two terpenes (monoterpene, monoterpene related, four sulphur or nitrogen compounds (sulfoxide-compound, S-compound, NS-compound, N-compound and two alcohols (heptadienol, methanol. Seven VOCs (2-butanone, C8-ketone, a monoterpene, 2,4-heptadienol and three compounds containing N, S or NS resulted significantly differently in compensate cirrhotic patients (Child-Pugh A; CP-A and decompensated cirrhotic subjects (Child-Pugh B+C; CP-B+C. ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic analysis was performed considering three contrast groups: CP vs CTRL, CP-A vs CTRL and CP-A vs CP-B+C. In these comparisons monoterpene and N-compound showed the best diagnostic performance. CONCLUSIONS: Breath analysis by PTR-ToF-MS was able to distinguish cirrhotic patients from healthy subjects and to discriminate those with well compensated liver disease from those at more advanced severity stage. A breath-print of liver cirrhosis was assessed for the first time.

  6. Mentoring: An Evolving Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michelle; Florczak, Kristine L

    2017-04-01

    The column concerns itself with mentoring as an evolving relationship between mentor and mentee. The collegiate mentoring model, the transformational transcendence model, and the humanbecoming mentoring model are considered in light of a dialogue with mentors at a Midwest university and conclusions are drawn.

  7. Measurably evolving populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drummond, Alexei James; Pybus, Oliver George; Rambaut, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    processes through time. Populations for which such studies are possible � measurably evolving populations (MEPs) � are characterized by sufficiently long or numerous sampled sequences and a fast mutation rate relative to the available range of sequence sampling times. The impact of sequences sampled through...... understanding of evolutionary processes in diverse organisms, from viruses to vertebrates....

  8. RADMAP: Simple probes for rapid assessment of complex reactivity: A method and case studies on the reaction of hydrogen atoms with unsaturated organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Andrew K; Fawcett, Jason A; Clyburne, Jason A C; Pye, Cory C

    2016-03-01

    RADMAP, an open source program, allows for rapid analysis and visualization of the earliest stages of reactions between any molecule and a monoatomic probe (i.e., H*, H(+), H(-), Br*, or any other monoatomic species) using ab initio methods. This program creates non-planar potential energy surfaces of the initial interaction between a molecule of interest and the monoatomic probe. These surfaces can be used to both predict the site of addition as well as provide a qualitative estimate for the relative proportion of the formation of adducts; therefore, it gives insight into both the reactivity and the kinetic stability of a molecule. The program presents a way to quickly predict the number of signals anticipated in transverse field muon spin resonance spectra as well as their relative intensities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid synthesis of graphitic carbon nitride powders by metathesis reaction between CaCN{sub 2} and C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang Linlin [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan, 250061 (China); Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center of Shandong Province, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Bi Jianqiang [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan, 250061 (China); Bai Yujun [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan, 250061 (China) and Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center of Shandong Province, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)], E-mail: byj97@126.com; Qi Yongxin [Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center of Shandong Province, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhu Huiling [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan, 250061 (China); Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center of Shandong Province, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Wang Chengguo; Wu Jiwei [Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center of Shandong Province, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Lu Chengwei [Department of Equipment, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Jinan 250031 (China)

    2008-12-20

    Carbon nitride powders were rapidly synthesized at low temperature via the chemical metathesis reaction between CaCN{sub 2} and C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6}. X-ray diffraction results confirm the formation of crystalline graphitic carbon nitride. Besides the dominant morphology of nanoparticles, flakes, nanorods, hollow and solid spheres can be observed by transmission electron microscopy. The absorption peaks of C-N, C=N and s-triazine rings, as well as the absence of C{identical_to}N peak in the infrared spectra, further verify the formation of graphite-like sp{sup 2}-bonded structure with planar networks. Elemental analysis gives an atomic ratio of N/C around 0.3. X-ray photoelectron spectra exhibit the existence of chemical bonding between C and N.

  10. Rapid detection and quantification of Ebola Zaire virus by one-step real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Young-Tae; Ticer, Anysha; Carrion, Ricardo; Patterson, Jean L

    2017-04-01

    Given that Ebola virus causes severe hemorrhagic fever in humans with mortality rates as high as 90%, rapid and accurate detection of this virus is essential both for controlling infection and preventing further transmission. Here, a one-step qRT-PCR assay for rapid and quantitative detection of an Ebola Zaire strain using GP, VP24 or VP40 genes as a target is introduced. Routine assay conditions for hydrolysis probe detection were established from the manufacturer's protocol used in the assays. The analytical specificity and sensitivity of each assay was evaluated using in vitro synthesized viral RNA transcripts. The assays were highly specific for the RNA transcripts, no cross-reactivity being observed among them. The limits of detection of the assays ranged from 102 to 103 copies per reaction. The assays were also evaluated using viral RNAs extracted from cell culture-propagated viruses (Ebola Zaire, Sudan and Reston strains), confirming that they are gene- and strain-specific. The RT-PCR assays detected viral RNAs in blood samples from virus-infected animal, suggesting that they can be also a useful method for identifying Ebola virus in clinical samples. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Rapid mitochondrial DNA typing using restriction enzyme digestion of polymerase chain reaction amplicons followed by capillary electrophoresis separation with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J M; Wilson, M R; Reeder, D J

    1998-01-01

    The polymorphic control region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is becoming more commonly used in forensic applications to differentiate among individuals in a population. Two hypervariable regions (HV1 and HV2) are often sequenced following amplification of the mtDNA via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). More rapid screening assays would reduce both the effort and the expense of comparing two samples. A methodology has been developed that first uses restriction endonuclease digestion of the PCR-amplified mtDNA using RsaI and MnlI and then capillary electrophoresis (CE) to separate and size the PCR-RFLP fragments. This rapid procedure offers an alternative method for screening of polymorphisms in amplified mtDNA samples. In addition, the presence of a T-->C transition at position 16189, which gives rise to the so-called "C-stretch" in HV1, may be predicted from the presence of nonspecific PCR products in the CE results.

  12. Rapid characterization of dry cured ham produced following different PDOs by proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pulgar, José Sánchez; Soukoulis, Christos; Biasioli, Franco; Cappellin, Luca; García, Carmen; Gasperi, Flavia; Granitto, Pablo; Märk, Tilmann D; Piasentier, Edi; Schuhfried, Erna

    2011-07-15

    In the present study, the recently developed proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) technique was used for the rapid characterization of dry cured hams produced according to 4 of the most important Protected Designations of Origin (PDOs): an Iberian one (Dehesa de Extremadura) and three Italian ones (Prosciutto di San Daniele, Prosciutto di Parma and Prosciutto Toscano). In total, the headspace composition and respective concentration for nine Spanish and 37 Italian dry cured ham samples were analyzed by direct injection without any pre-treatment or pre-concentration. Firstly, we show that the rapid PTR-ToF-MS fingerprinting in conjunction with chemometrics (Principal Components Analysis) indicates a good separation of the dry cured ham samples according to their production process and that it is possible to set up, using data mining methods, classification models with a high success rate in cross validation. Secondly, we exploited the higher mass resolution of the new PTR-ToF-MS, as compared with standard quadrupole based versions, for the identification of the exact sum formula of the mass spectrometric peaks providing analytical information on the observed differences. The work indicates that PTR-ToF-MS can be used as a rapid method for the identification of differences among dry cured hams produced following the indications of different PDOs and that it provides information on some of the major volatile compounds and their link with the implemented manufacturing practices such as rearing system, salting and curing process, manufacturing practices that seem to strongly affect the final volatile organic profile and thus the perceived quality of dry cured ham. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. EVOLVE 2014 International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Tantar, Emilia; Sun, Jian-Qiao; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Qian; Schütze, Oliver; Emmerich, Michael; Legrand, Pierrick; Moral, Pierre; Coello, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This volume encloses research articles that were presented at the EVOLVE 2014 International Conference in Beijing, China, July 1–4, 2014.The book gathers contributions that emerged from the conference tracks, ranging from probability to set oriented numerics and evolutionary computation; all complemented by the bridging purpose of the conference, e.g. Complex Networks and Landscape Analysis, or by the more application oriented perspective. The novelty of the volume, when considering the EVOLVE series, comes from targeting also the practitioner’s view. This is supported by the Machine Learning Applied to Networks and Practical Aspects of Evolutionary Algorithms tracks, providing surveys on new application areas, as in the networking area and useful insights in the development of evolutionary techniques, from a practitioner’s perspective. Complementary to these directions, the conference tracks supporting the volume, follow on the individual advancements of the subareas constituting the scope of the confe...

  14. Evolvable Neural Software System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  15. Primordial evolvability: Impasses and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasas, Vera; Fernando, Chrisantha; Szilágyi, András; Zachár, István; Santos, Mauro; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-09-21

    While it is generally agreed that some kind of replicating non-living compounds were the precursors of life, there is much debate over their possible chemical nature. Metabolism-first approaches propose that mutually catalytic sets of simple organic molecules could be capable of self-replication and rudimentary chemical evolution. In particular, the graded autocatalysis replication domain (GARD) model, depicting assemblies of amphiphilic molecules, has received considerable interest. The system propagates compositional information across generations and is suggested to be a target of natural selection. However, evolutionary simulations indicate that the system lacks selectability (i.e. selection has negligible effect on the equilibrium concentrations). We elaborate on the lessons learnt from the example of the GARD model and, more widely, on the issue of evolvability, and discuss the implications for similar metabolism-first scenarios. We found that simple incorporation-type chemistry based on non-covalent bonds, as assumed in GARD, is unlikely to result in alternative autocatalytic cycles when catalytic interactions are randomly distributed. An even more serious problem stems from the lognormal distribution of catalytic factors, causing inherent kinetic instability of such loops, due to the dominance of efficiently catalyzed components that fail to return catalytic aid. Accordingly, the dynamics of the GARD model is dominated by strongly catalytic, but not auto-catalytic, molecules. Without effective autocatalysis, stable hereditary propagation is not possible. Many repetitions and different scaling of the model come to no rescue. Despite all attempts to show the contrary, the GARD model is not evolvable, in contrast to reflexively autocatalytic networks, complemented by rare uncatalyzed reactions and compartmentation. The latter networks, resting on the creation and breakage of chemical bonds, can generate novel ('mutant') autocatalytic loops from a given set of

  16. A novel high performance stopped-flow apparatus equipped with a special constructed mixing chamber containing a plunger under inert condition with a very short dead-time to investigate very rapid reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayyed Mostafa Habibi Khorassani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present work set out to establish a novel stopped-flow instrument equipped with a special constructed mixing chamber containing a plunger to enable a kinetic study of the very rapid reactions under a dry inert atmosphere glove bag, in particular, for the reactions are sensitive to moisture or air. A stopped-flow spectrophotometer is essentially a conventional spectrophotometer with the addition of a system for rapid mixing of solutions. The purpose of this work is to describe the fabrication and evaluation of specially constructed and in-expensive stopped-flow system. The evaluation includes determination of the dead-time, relative mixing efficiency, and the measurement of known rate constants. Herein, a dead-time of about 3.4 ms was determined in the final modified construction of the stopped-flow apparatus in order to investigate the rapid initial during which some form of reaction intermediate is presented to be formed.

  17. Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, John H.; Hedgecock, Jud; Nienaber, Terry; Cooper, Bonnie; Allen, Carlton; Ming, Doug

    2000-01-01

    The Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer (REGA) is a high-temperature furnace and mass spectrometer instrument for determining the mineralogical composition and reactivity of soil samples. REGA provides key mineralogical and reactivity data that is needed to understand the soil chemistry of an asteroid, which then aids in determining in-situ which materials should be selected for return to earth. REGA is capable of conducting a number of direct soil measurements that are unique to this instrument. These experimental measurements include: (1) Mass spectrum analysis of evolved gases from soil samples as they are heated from ambient temperature to 900 C; and (2) Identification of liberated chemicals, e.g., water, oxygen, sulfur, chlorine, and fluorine. REGA would be placed on the surface of a near earth asteroid. It is an autonomous instrument that is controlled from earth but does the analysis of regolith materials automatically. The REGA instrument consists of four primary components: (1) a flight-proven mass spectrometer, (2) a high-temperature furnace, (3) a soil handling system, and (4) a microcontroller. An external arm containing a scoop or drill gathers regolith samples. A sample is placed in the inlet orifice where the finest-grained particles are sifted into a metering volume and subsequently moved into a crucible. A movable arm then places the crucible in the furnace. The furnace is closed, thereby sealing the inner volume to collect the evolved gases for analysis. Owing to the very low g forces on an asteroid compared to Mars or the moon, the sample must be moved from inlet to crucible by mechanical means rather than by gravity. As the soil sample is heated through a programmed pattern, the gases evolved at each temperature are passed through a transfer tube to the mass spectrometer for analysis and identification. Return data from the instrument will lead to new insights and discoveries including: (1) Identification of the molecular masses of all of the gases

  18. Rapid detection of periprosthetic joint infection using a combination of 16s rDNA polymerase chain reaction and lateral flow immunoassay: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, V; Schoon, J; Morgenstern, C; Preininger, B; Reinke, S; Duda, G; Breitbach, A; Perka, C F; Geissler, S

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a test for the rapid (within 25 minutes) intraoperative detection of bacteria from synovial fluid to diagnose periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). The 16s rDNA test combines a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for amplification of 16s rDNA with a lateral flow immunoassay in one fully automated system. The synovial fluid of 77 patients undergoing joint aspiration or primary or revision total hip or knee surgery was prospectively collected. The cohort was divided into a proof-of-principle cohort (n = 17) and a validation cohort (n = 60). Using the proof-of-principle cohort, an optimal cut-off for the discrimination between PJI and non-PJI samples was determined. PJI was defined as detection of the same bacterial species in a minimum of two microbiological samples, positive histology, and presence of a sinus tract or intra-articular pus. The 16s rDNA test proved to be very robust and was able to provide a result in 97% of all samples within 25 minutes. The 16s rDNA test was able to diagnose PJI with a sensitivity of 87.5% and 82%, and a specificity of 100% and 89%, in the proof-of-principle and validation cohorts, respectively. The microbiological culture of synovial fluid achieved a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 93% in the validation cohort. The 16s rDNA test offers reliable intraoperative detection of all bacterial species within 25 minutes with a sensitivity and specificity comparable with those of conventional microbiological culture of synovial fluid for the detection of PJI. The 16s rDNA test performance is independent of possible blood contamination, culture time and bacterial species. Cite this article : V. Janz, J. Schoon, C. Morgenstern, B. Preininger, S. Reinke, G. Duda, A. Breitbach, C. F. Perka, S. Geissler. Rapid detection of periprosthetic joint infection using a combination of 16s rDNA polymerase chain reaction and lateral flow immunoassay: A Pilot Study. Bone Joint Res 2018;7:12-19. DOI: 10

  19. A sensitive and a rapid multiplex polymerase chain reaction for the identification of Candida species in concentrated oral rinse specimens in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Asanga; Weerasekera, Manjula; Gunasekara, Chinthika; Dilhari, Ayomi; Bulugahapitiya, Uditha; Fernando, Neluka

    2017-03-01

    Oral candidiasis is being frequently recognized in patients with diabetes, and is associated with multiple pathogens including Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis. The aim of this study was to evaluate a usefulness of a Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction as a rapid diagnostic tool for identification of four oral Candida pathogens in patients with diabetes. A multiplex PCR was optimized to identify four Candida species in concentrated oral rinse samples. Common reverse primer, ITS4 and four species-specific forward primers targeting ITS1 and ITS2 regions of yeast genome were used. Species-specific single amplicon were detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Performance efficacy of multiplex PCR was compared with phenotypic identification. Out of 100 oral rinse samples, 72 were culture positive and of these 43 were at risk of oral Candida infection (>600cfu/ml). Multiple Candida species including C. albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis were identified in 22 samples which had risk of oral Candida infection. In total, 85 patients were positive for Candida by multiplex PCR and of them 49 had multiple Candida species. All 43 colonized specimens were also positive by multiplex PCR. C. albicans was the most predominant organism (75/85) followed by C. parapsilosis (47/85), C. tropicalis (17/85) and C. glabrata (6/85). In specimens with multiple species, the two most common organisms were C. albicans and C. parapsilosis. Multiplex PCR yielded a sensitivity of 10 Candida cells/ml of oral rinse sample. Multiplex PCR is found to be rapid, sensitive and specific than phenotypic identification methods in discriminating multiple Candida species in oral rinse specimens.

  20. Impact of rapid methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus polymerase chain reaction testing on mortality and cost effectiveness in hospitalized patients with bacteraemia: a decision model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jack; Paladino, Joseph A

    2010-01-01

    Patients hospitalized with Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia have an unacceptably high mortality rate. Literature available to date has shown that timely selection of the most appropriate antibacterial may reduce mortality. One tool that may help with this selection is a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay that distinguishes methicillin (meticillin)-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) from methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) in less than 1 hour. To date, no information is available evaluating the impact of this PCR technique on clinical or economic outcomes. To evaluate the effect of a rapid PCR assay on mortality and economics compared with traditional empiric therapy, using a literature-derived model. A literature search for peer-reviewed European (EU) and US publications regarding treatment regimens, outcomes and costs was conducted. Information detailing the rates of infection, as well as the specificity and sensitivity of a rapid PCR assay (Xpert MRSA/SA Blood Culture PCR) were obtained from the peer-reviewed literature. Sensitivity analysis varied the prevalence rate of MRSA from 5% to 80%, while threshold analysis was applied to the cost of the PCR test. Hospital and testing resource consumption were valued with direct medical costs, adjusted to year 2009 values. Adjusted life-years were determined using US and WHO life tables. The cost-effectiveness ratio was defined as the cost per life-year saved. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated to determine the additional cost necessary to produce additional effectiveness. All analyses were performed using TreeAge Software (2008). The mean mortality rates were 23% for patients receiving empiric vancomycin subsequently switched to semi-synthetic penicillin (SSP) for MSSA, 36% for patients receiving empiric vancomycin treatment for MRSA, 59% for patients receiving empiric SSP subsequently switched to vancomycin for MRSA and 12% for patients receiving empiric SSP for MSSA. Furthermore, with an

  1. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction as an alternative rapid method for enumeration of colony count in liveBrucellavaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Waleed S; Sayed, Mahmoud L; Samy, A A; Al-Sadek, Ghada Mohamed; El-Hamid, Gina Mohamed Mohamed Abd; Ali, Abdel Hakam M

    2017-06-01

    Brucellosis is a major bacterial zoonosis of global importance affecting a range of animal species and man worldwide. It has economic, public health, and bio-risk importance. Control and prevention of animal brucellosis mainly depend on accurate diagnostic tools and implementation of effective and safe animal vaccination program. There are three types of animal Brucella live vaccines - Brucella melitensis Rev-1 vaccine, Brucella abortus S19, and B . abortus RB51. Evaluation of these vaccines depends mainly on enumeration of Brucella viable count. At present, used colony count method is time consuming, costly and requires especial skills. Hence, the aim of this study is to use and standardize real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) as an alternative, quantitative, sensitive, and rapid method to detect the colony count of Brucella in live Brucella vaccine. Four batches of different live Brucella vaccines were evaluated using of conventional bacterial count and RT-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) using BSCP31 gene specific primers and probe. Standard curve was generated from DNA template extracted from 10-fold serial dilution of living B. abortus RB51 vaccine to evaluate the sensitivity of RT-qPCR. Results revealed that three batches of living Brucella vaccines were acceptable for Brucella colony count when traditional bacterial enumeration method was used. Results of RT-qPCR were identical to that of conventional bacterial count. Results concluded that RT-qPCR was relatively sensitive compared to traditional bacterial colony count of these vaccines.

  2. Accuracy of a rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for diagnosis of group B Streptococcus colonization in a cohort of HIV-infected pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouvea, Maria Isabel S; Joao, Esau C; Teixeira, Maria de Lourdes B; Read, Jennifer S; Fracalanzza, Sergio E L; Souza, Claudia T V; Souza, Maria José de; Torres Filho, Helio M; Leite, Cassiana C F; do Brasil, Pedro E A A

    2017-05-01

    There are limited data regarding Xpert performance to detect Group B Streptococcus (GBS) in HIV-infected pregnant women. We evaluated the accuracy of a rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test in a cohort of HIV-infected women. At 35-37 weeks of pregnancy, a pair of combined rectovaginal swabs were collected for two GBS assays in a cohort of sequentially included HIV-infected women in Rio de Janeiro: (1) culture; and (2) real-time PCR assay [GeneXpert GBS (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA)]. Using culture as the reference, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative-likelihood ratios were estimated. From June 2012 to February 2015, 337 pregnant women met inclusion criteria. One woman was later excluded, due to failure to obtain a result in the index test; 336 were included in the analyses. The GBS colonization rate was 19.04%. Sensitivity and specificity of the GeneXpert GBS assay were 85.94% (95% CI: 75.38-92.42) and 94.85% (95% CI: 91.55-96.91), respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 79.71% (95% CI: 68.78-87.51) and 96.63% (95% CI: 93.72-98.22), respectively. GeneXpert GBS is an acceptable test for the identification of GBS colonization in HIV-infected pregnant women and represents a reasonable option to detect GBS colonization in settings where culture is not feasible.

  3. Detection of 2-deoxy-D-ribose radicals generated by the reaction with the hydroxyl radical using a rapid flow-ESR method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Yasunori; Yoshioka, Hisashi; Yoshioka, Hiroe

    2002-04-01

    ESR spectrum of the short-lived radicals derived from 2-deoxy-D-ribose by the reaction with the hydroxyl radical (HO*) was measured using a rapid flow method. A dielectric mixing resonator was used for the measurement, which made it possible to measure the highly sensitive ESR spectra of the radicals with a lifetime of the order of milliseconds. A complex spectrum was obtained and the spectral simulation was done to show that it was the superposition of the signals due to five radicals (I-V). Three of them were those formed by the dehydrogenation with the HO* at C-1 (I), C-3 (II), and C-4 (III) positions of the 2-deoxy-D-ribose molecule. The other two (IV and V) were carbonyl-conjugated radicals formed by the elimination of a water molecule from III and II. The results showed that dehydrogenation occurred randomly at the positions where hydroxyl groups are attached, but the most preferred position was C-3 and the radical position moved from C-3 to C-4 by the elimination of water molecule.

  4. Simultaneous and rapid differential diagnosis of Mycoplasma genitalium and Ureaplasma urealyticum based on a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Mirnejad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this investigation was to simultaneously detect and differentiate Mycoplasma genitalium and Ureaplasma urealyticum in female patients suffering from genital complications by polymerase chain reaction (PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP. Materials and Methods : Genital swabs were taken from 210 patients. They were transported to the laboratory in phosphate-buffered saline. For PCR, samples were analysed with genus-specific MyUu-R and MyUu-F primers. This primer set, which was originally designed in our laboratory, amplified a 465 bp fragment (M. genitalium and a 559 bp fragment (U. urealyticum. Samples containing a band of the expected sizes for the Mycoplasma strains were subjected to digestion with a restriction endonuclease enzyme of TaqI and Cac8I. Results: Of the 210 samples, a total of 100 (47.6% samples were found to be positive for Mycoplasmas (seven M. genitalium isolates, 3.3%; and 89 U. urealyticum isolates, 42.4%, and coinfections with both species were detected in four samples (1.9%. The PCR-RFLP results showed that M. genitalium and U. urealyticum are different by enzyme patterns. Conclusion: PCR-RFLP offers a rapid and easily applicable protocol to simultaneous detection and differentiation of M. genitalium and U. urealyticum from clinical samples when specific primers and restriction enzymes are used.

  5. Rapid and sensitive detection of Mycoplasma synoviae by an insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction-based assay on a field-deployable device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hung-Chih; Lo, Dan-Yuan; Chen, Chiou-Lin; Tsai, Yun-Long; Ping, Jia-Fong; Lee, Chien-Hsien; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae (MS), causing respiratory diseases, arthritis, and eggshell apex abnormalities in avian species, is an important pathogen in the poultry industry. Implementation of a biosecurity plan is important in MS infection management. Working on a field-deployable POCKIT™ device, an insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (iiPCR) assay has a potential for timely MS detection on the farm. The MS iiPCR assay had limit of detection 95% of about 9 genome equivalents by testing serial dilutions of a standard DNA. The detection endpoint of the assay for detection of MS genomic DNA was comparable to a reference real-time PCR. The assay did not crossreact with other important avian pathogens, including avian reovirus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pasteurella multocida, and Salmonella Pullorum. When 92 synovial fluid and respiratory tract swab samples collected from chickens, turkeys, and geese suspected of MS infection were tested, the clinical performance of the MS iiPCR had 97.8% agreement (Cohen's kappa value, 0.95) with that of the reference real-time PCR. In conclusion, the MS iiPCR/POCKIT™ system, working with field-deployable manual or automatic nucleic acid extraction methods, has potential to serve as a rapid and sensitive on-site tool to facilitate timely detection of MS. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association.

  6. Evolving haloalkane dehalogenases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, D.B.

    Mechanistic insight into the biochemistry of carbon–halogen bond cleavage is rapidly growing because of recent structural, biochemical and computational studies that have provided further insight into how haloalkane dehalogenases achieve their impressive catalytic activity. An occluded water-free

  7. Multiplex Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction untuk Deteksi Cepat Virus Flu Burung H5N1 (MULTIPLEX REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION-POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION FOR RAPID DETECTION OF H5N1 AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raden Wasito

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 (AIV H5N1 is highly pathogenic and fatal in poultry. The virusis still endemic with low virulence rate, although it may play a critical role in causing high morbidity andmortality rates in poultry in Indonesia. In general, diagnostic approach for AIV H5N1 is based onconventional serological and viral isolation methods that have the potential to produce consumings oftime and relatively expensive cost within the laboratory without compromising test utility. Thus, amolecular approach of multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR was developedand applied for the detection of matrix gene type A influenza viruses, AIV subtype subtype H5hemagglutinin gene with simultaneous detection of N1 nucleoprotein gene. Thirty sera specimens fromthe diseased commercial chickens that were specifically amplified positive-RT-PCR for AIV H5N1 wereselected for mRT-PCR. The mRT-PCR products were visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis and consistedof DNA fragments of AIV of 245 bp, 545 bp and 343 bp for M, H5 and N1 genes, respectively. Thus, themRT-PCR that can rapidly differentiate simultaneously between these genes is very important for thecontrol and even eradication of AIV transmission in poultry in Indonesia.

  8. A rapid method for the detection of foodborne pathogens by extraction of a trace amount of DNA from raw milk based on label-free amino-modified silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles and polymerase chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    A method based on amino-modified silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (ASMNPs) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed to rapidly and sensitively detect foodborne pathogens in raw milk. After optimizing parameters such as pH, temperature, and time, a trace amount of genomic DNA of pathogen...

  9. The nature of the intermediates in the reactions of Fe(III)- and Mn(III)-microperoxidase-8 with H(2)O(2): a rapid kinetics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primus, Jean-Louis; Grunenwald, Sylvie; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Albrecht-Gary, Anne-Marie; Mandon, Dominique; Veeger, Cees

    2002-02-20

    Kinetic studies were performed with microperoxidase-8 (Fe(III)MP-8), the proteolytic breakdown product of horse heart cytochrome c containing an octapeptide linked to an iron protoporphyrin IX. Mn(III) was substituted for Fe(III) in Mn(III)MP-8. The mechanism of formation of the reactive metal-oxo and metal-hydroperoxo intermediates of M(III)MP-8 upon reaction of H(2)O(2) with Fe(III)MP-8 and Mn(III)MP-8 was investigated by rapid-scan stopped-flow spectroscopy and transient EPR. Two steps (k(obs1) and k(obs2)) were observed and analyzed for the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with both catalysts. The plots of k(obs1) as function of [H(2)O(2)] at pH 8.0 and pH 9.1 for Fe(III)MP-8, and at pH 10.2 and pH 10.9 for Mn(III)MP-8, exhibit saturation kinetics, which reveal the accumulation of an intermediate. Double reciprocal plots of 1/k(obs1) as function of 1/[H(2)O(2)] at different pH values reveal a competitive effect of protons in the oxidation of M(III)MP-8. This effect of protons is confirmed by the linear dependence of 1/k(obs1) on [H(+)] showing that k(obs1) increases with the pH. The UV-visible spectra of the intermediates formed at the end of the first step (k(obs1)) exhibit a spectrum characteristic of a high-valent metal-oxo intermediate for both catalysts. Transient EPR of Mn(III)MP-8 incubated with an excess of H(2)O(2), at pH 11.5, shows the detection of a free radical signal at g approximately equal to 2 and of a resonance at g approximately equal to 4 characteristic of a Mn(IV) (S = 3/2) species. On the basis of these results, the following mechanism is proposed: (i) M(III)MP-8-OH(2) is deprotonated to M(III)MP-8-OH in a rapid preequilibrium step, with a pK(a) = 9.2 +/- 0.9 for Fe(III)MP-8 and a pK(a) = 11.2 +/- 0.3 for Mn(III)MP-8; (ii) M(III)MP-8-OH reacts with H(2)O(2) to form Compound 0, M(III)MP8-OOH, with a second-order rate constant k(1) = (1.3 +/- 0.6) x 10(6) M(-1) x s(-1) for Fe(III)MP-8 and k(1) = (1.6 +/- 0.9) x 10(5) M(-1) x s(-1) for Mn

  10. Fat: an evolving issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Speakman

    2012-09-01

    Work on obesity is evolving, and obesity is a consequence of our evolutionary history. In the space of 50 years, we have become an obese species. The reasons why can be addressed at a number of different levels. These include separating between whether the primary cause lies on the food intake or energy expenditure side of the energy balance equation, and determining how genetic and environmental effects contribute to weight variation between individuals. Opinion on whether increased food intake or decreased energy expenditure drives the obesity epidemic is still divided, but recent evidence favours the idea that food intake, rather than altered expenditure, is most important. There is more of a consensus that genetics explains most (probably around 65% of weight variation between individuals. Recent advances in genome-wide association studies have identified many polymorphisms that are linked to obesity, yet much of the genetic variance remains unexplained. Finding the causes of this unexplained variation will be an impetus of genetic and epigenetic research on obesity over the next decade. Many environmental factors – including gut microbiota, stress and endocrine disruptors – have been linked to the risk of developing obesity. A better understanding of gene-by-environment interactions will also be key to understanding obesity in the years to come.

  11. Evolving Concepts of Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anuradha; Wenzel, Sally E.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of asthma has evolved over time from a singular disease to a complex of various phenotypes, with varied natural histories, physiologies, and responses to treatment. Early therapies treated most patients with asthma similarly, with bronchodilators and corticosteroids, but these therapies had varying degrees of success. Similarly, despite initial studies that identified an underlying type 2 inflammation in the airways of patients with asthma, biologic therapies targeted toward these type 2 pathways were unsuccessful in all patients. These observations led to increased interest in phenotyping asthma. Clinical approaches, both biased and later unbiased/statistical approaches to large asthma patient cohorts, identified a variety of patient characteristics, but they also consistently identified the importance of age of onset of disease and the presence of eosinophils in determining clinically relevant phenotypes. These paralleled molecular approaches to phenotyping that developed an understanding that not all patients share a type 2 inflammatory pattern. Using biomarkers to select patients with type 2 inflammation, repeated trials of biologics directed toward type 2 cytokine pathways saw newfound success, confirming the importance of phenotyping in asthma. Further research is needed to clarify additional clinical and molecular phenotypes, validate predictive biomarkers, and identify new areas for possible interventions. PMID:26161792

  12. Evolving endoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Paulo; Faintuch, Joel

    2014-06-01

    Since the days of Albukasim in medieval Spain, natural orifices have been regarded not only as a rather repugnant source of bodily odors, fluids and excreta, but also as a convenient invitation to explore and treat the inner passages of the organism. However, surgical ingenuity needed to be matched by appropriate tools and devices. Lack of technologically advanced instrumentation was a strong deterrent during almost a millennium until recent decades when a quantum jump materialized. Endoscopic surgery is currently a vibrant and growing subspecialty, which successfully handles millions of patients every year. Additional opportunities lie ahead which might benefit millions more, however, requiring even more sophisticated apparatuses, particularly in the field of robotics, artificial intelligence, and tissue repair (surgical suturing). This is a particularly exciting and worthwhile challenge, namely of larger and safer endoscopic interventions, followed by seamless and scarless recovery. In synthesis, the future is widely open for those who use together intelligence and creativity to develop new prototypes, new accessories and new techniques. Yet there are many challenges in the path of endoscopic surgery. In this new era of robotic endoscopy, one will likely need a virtual simulator to train and assess the performance of younger doctors. More evidence will be essential in multiple evolving fields, particularly to elucidate whether more ambitious and complex pathways, such as intrathoracic and intraperitoneal surgery via natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), are superior or not to conventional techniques. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Asymmetric evolving random networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulomb, S.; Bauer, M.

    2003-10-01

    We generalize the Poissonian evolving random graph model of M. Bauer and D. Bernard (2003), to deal with arbitrary degree distributions. The motivation comes from biological networks, which are well-known to exhibit non Poissonian degree distributions. A node is added at each time step and is connected to the rest of the graph by oriented edges emerging from older nodes. This leads to a statistical asymmetry between incoming and outgoing edges. The law for the number of new edges at each time step is fixed but arbitrary. Thermodynamical behavior is expected when this law has a large time limit. Although (by construction) the incoming degree distributions depend on this law, this is not the case for most qualitative features concerning the size distribution of connected components, as long as the law has a finite variance. As the variance grows above 1/4, the average being < 1/2, a giant component emerges, which connects a finite fraction of the vertices. Below this threshold, the distribution of component sizes decreases algebraically with a continuously varying exponent. The transition is of infinite order, in sharp contrast with the case of static graphs. The local-in-time profiles for the components of finite size allow to give a refined description of the system.

  14. Evolving a photosynthetic organelle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakayama Takuro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria is believed to represent a singularity in the history of life. The enigmatic amoeba Paulinella and its 'recently' acquired photosynthetic inclusions provide a fascinating system through which to gain fresh insight into how endosymbionts become organelles. The plastids, or chloroplasts, of algae and plants evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. This landmark event conferred on eukaryotes the benefits of photosynthesis - the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy - and in so doing had a huge impact on the course of evolution and the climate of Earth 1. From the present state of plastids, however, it is difficult to trace the evolutionary steps involved in this momentous development, because all modern-day plastids have fully integrated into their hosts. Paulinella chromatophora is a unicellular eukaryote that bears photosynthetic entities called chromatophores that are derived from cyanobacteria and has thus received much attention as a possible example of an organism in the early stages of organellogenesis. Recent studies have unlocked the genomic secrets of its chromatophore 23 and provided concrete evidence that the Paulinella chromatophore is a bona fide photosynthetic organelle 4. The question is how Paulinella can help us to understand the process by which an endosymbiont is converted into an organelle.

  15. Assessing SfM-Photogrammetry potential at micro-scale on a rapidly evolving mud-bank: case study on a mesocosm study within pioneer mangroves in French Guiana (South America)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Jules; Brunier, Guillaume; Michaud, Emma; Anthony, Edward; Dussouillez, Philippe; Morvan, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    Mud banks are the loci of rich bio-geo-chemical processes occuring rapidly at infra-tide frequency. Their surface topography is commonly affected by many of these processes, including bioturbation, water drainage or dessication. Quantifying surface morphology and changes on a mud bank at the micro-scale is a challenging task due to a number of issues. First, the water-saturated nature of the soil makes it difficult to measure High Resolution Topography (HRT) with classical methods. Second, setting up an instrumented experiment without disrupting the signal being studied is hardly achieved at micro-scale. Finally, the highly mobile nature of this environment enhancing strong spatio-temporal heterogeneity is hard to capture. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) and SfM (Surface from Motion)-Photogrammetry are two techniques that enable mapping of micro-scale features, but the first technique is not suitable because of the poor quality of the backscattered laser signal on wet surfaces and the need to set up several measuring stations on a complex, unstable substrate. Thus, we set up an experiment to assess the feasibility and the accuracy of SfM in such a context. We took the opportunity of the installation of a pontoon dedicated to the study of bio-geochemical processes within benthic mesocosms installed on a mud bank inhabited by pioneer mangroves trees to develop an adapted photogrammetry protocol based on a full-frame remotely triggered camera sensor mounted on a pole. The incident light on the surface was also controlled with a light-diffusing device. We obtained sub-millimetric resolution 3D-topography and visible imagery. Surveys were carried out every 2 hours at low tide to detect surface changes due to water content variation as well as bioturbation mainly caused by crabs digging galleries and feeding on sediment surface. Both the qualitative and quantitative results seem very promising and lead us to expect new insights into heterogeneous surface processes on a

  16. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction as an alternative rapid method for enumeration of colony count in live Brucella vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed S. Shell

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Brucellosis is a major bacterial zoonosis of global importance affecting a range of animal species and man worldwide. It has economic, public health, and bio-risk importance. Control and prevention of animal brucellosis mainly depend on accurate diagnostic tools and implementation of effective and safe animal vaccination program. There are three types of animal Brucella live vaccines - Brucella melitensis Rev-1 vaccine, Brucella abortus S19, and B. abortus RB51. Evaluation of these vaccines depends mainly on enumeration of Brucella viable count. At present, used colony count method is time consuming, costly and requires especial skills. Hence, the aim of this study is to use and standardize real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR as an alternative, quantitative, sensitive, and rapid method to detect the colony count of Brucella in live Brucella vaccine. Materials and Methods: Four batches of different live Brucella vaccines were evaluated using of conventional bacterial count and RT-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR using BSCP31 gene specific primers and probe. Standard curve was generated from DNA template extracted from 10-fold serial dilution of living B. abortus RB51 vaccine to evaluate the sensitivity of RT-qPCR. Results: Results revealed that three batches of living Brucella vaccines were acceptable for Brucella colony count when traditional bacterial enumeration method was used. Results of RT-qPCR were identical to that of conventional bacterial count. Conclusion: Results concluded that RT-qPCR was relatively sensitive compared to traditional bacterial colony count of these vaccines.

  17. Nuclear transit study in children with chronic faecal soiling after Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) surgery has revealed a group with rapid proximal colonic treatment and possible adverse reactions to food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulos, Lefteris; King, Sebastian K; Southwell, Bridget R; Hutson, John M

    2016-08-01

    Long-term problems with faecal incontinence occur in up to 50 % of patients after pull-through for Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). The cause often remains unknown, leading to empirical treatments. Using nuclear transit study, we found some patients surprisingly had rapid proximal colonic transit, suspicious of occult diarrhoea. We aimed to assess whether these patients had unrecognized adverse reactions to food. Patients (n = 10, all males, 9.6 year; 4.25-15.5 years) with persistent faecal incontinence following pull-through for HSCR referred to the senior author and after exclusion of anatomical defects, underwent nuclear transit studies. Most (8) subsequently underwent breath hydrogen tests for sugar malabsorption and were tested for adverse reactions to food. Exclusion diets for protein allergens, lactose or fructose were then trialed. Of the 10 patients with rapid intestinal transit proven on nuclear transit study, breath hydrogen tests for fructose and/or lactose malabsorption were done in 8, and were positive in 7/8 patients. Exclusion diets contributed to either resolution or improvement in faecal incontinence in 9/10 patients. Rapid transit in the proximal, ganglionated colon may be present in children with faecal incontinence following pull-through for HSCR, possibly secondary to adverse reactions to food. This study suggests that children with post-operative soiling may benefit from a transit study and hydrogen breath tests to diagnose adverse reactions to food caused by sugar malabsorption.

  18. Evaluation of a rapid analyte measurement platform and real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay West Nile virus detection system in mosquito pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhalter, Kristen L; Horiuchi, Kalanthe; Biggerstaff, Brad J; Savage, Harry M; Nasci, Roger S

    2014-03-01

    We evaluated the commercially available Rapid Analyte Measurement Platform (RAMP) West Nile virus (WNV) antigen detection test for sensitivity and consistency with real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmation testing. Panels of samples consisting of WNV-spiked mosquito pools and negative control pools were sent to 20 mosquito abatement districts (MADs) that processed the pools using the RAMP assay. The samples were then sent to the reference laboratories used by the MADs for confirmation by real-time RT-PCR. Positive pools with virus titers of roughly 1-3 log10 PFU/ml had RAMP scores above the RAMP test positive cutoff score of 30 RAMP units, but these virus-positive samples could not be reliably confirmed by real-time RT-PCR testing. Pools with virus titers > or =4 log10 PFU/ml scored > or =50 RAMP units. Real-time RT-PCR results varied among the confirmation laboratories. With few exceptions, pools returning a RAMP score of > or =100 were confirmed with real-time RT-PCR, while pools returning a RAMP score of 50-99 appeared to be at the limit of real-time RT-PCR detection. Therefore, we recommend using a positive cutoff of 50 RAMP units with no real-time RT-PCR confirmation to maximize speed, efficiency, and economy of the RAMP assay. A more conservative approach would be to implement a "gray zone" range of 50-100 RAMP units. Pools scoring within the gray zone could be submitted for real-time RT-PCR confirmation with the understanding that positive pools may not confirm due to the inhibitory effect of the RAMP buffer on the real-time RT-PCR assay. We also conducted a series of experiments using laboratory-prepared mosquito pools spiked with WNV to compare mosquito homogenization buffers, pool sizes, and grinding methods in order to determine how these variables affect the RAMP and real-time RT-PCR assay results.

  19. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graves, C.J.; Ros, V.I.D.; Stevenson, B.; Sniegowski, P.D.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide

  20. Disgust: Evolved function and structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tybur, J.M.; Lieberman, D.; Kurzban, R.; DeScioli, P.

    2013-01-01

    Interest in and research on disgust has surged over the past few decades. The field, however, still lacks a coherent theoretical framework for understanding the evolved function or functions of disgust. Here we present such a framework, emphasizing 2 levels of analysis: that of evolved function and

  1. Evolving virtual creatures and catapults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaumont, Nicolas; Egli, Richard; Adami, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    We present a system that can evolve the morphology and the controller of virtual walking and block-throwing creatures (catapults) using a genetic algorithm. The system is based on Sims' work, implemented as a flexible platform with an off-the-shelf dynamics engine. Experiments aimed at evolving Sims-type walkers resulted in the emergence of various realistic gaits while using fairly simple objective functions. Due to the flexibility of the system, drastically different morphologies and functions evolved with only minor modifications to the system and objective function. For example, various throwing techniques evolved when selecting for catapults that propel a block as far as possible. Among the strategies and morphologies evolved, we find the drop-kick strategy, as well as the systematic invention of the principle behind the wheel, when allowing mutations to the projectile.

  2. Tissue Microarray: A rapidly evolving diagnostic and research tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawhar, Nazar M.T.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue microarray is a recent innovation in the field of pathology. A microarray contains many small representative tissue samples from hundreds of different cases assembled on a single histologic slide, and therefore allows high throughput analysis of multiple specimens at the same time. Tissue microarrays are paraffin blocks produced by extracting cylindrical tissue cores from different paraffin donor blocks and re-embedding these into a single recipient (microarray) block at defined array coordinates. Using this technique, up to 1000 or more tissue samples can be arrayed into a single paraffin block. It can permit simultaneous analysis of molecular targets at the DNA, mRNA, and protein levels under identical, standardized conditions on a single glass slide, and also provide maximal preservation and use of limited and irreplaceable archival tissue samples. This versatile technique, in which data analysis is automated facilitates retrospective and prospective human tissue studies. It is a practical and effective tool for high-throughput molecular analysis of tissues that is helping to identify new diagnostic and prognostic markers and targets in human cancers, and has a range of potential applications in basic research, prognostic oncology and drug discovery. This article summarizes the technical aspects of tissue microarray construction and sectioning, advantages, application, and limitations. PMID:19318744

  3. Emerging Zika Virus Infection: A Rapidly Evolving Situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordi, Licia; Avsic-Zupanc, Tatjana; Lalle, Eleonora; Vairo, Francesco; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; da Costa Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus, firstly identified in Uganda and responsible for sporadic human cases in Africa and Asia until recently, when large outbreak occurred in Pacific Ocean and the Americas. Since the main vectors during its spread outside of Africa have been Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti mosquitoes, which are widely distributed all over the world, there is urgent need for a coordinated response for prevention and spread of ZIKV epidemics.Despite clinical manifestation of Zika virus infection are usually mild and self limiting, there are reports suggesting, during the recent epidemic, an association of ZIKV infection with severe consequences, including fetal/newborn microcephaly, due to vertical in utero transmission, autoimmune-neurological presentations including cranial nerve dysfunction, and Guillain-Barré Syndrome in adults. The primary mode of transmission of Zika virus between humans is through the bite of an infected female mosquito of the Aedes genus, but also sexual and blood transfusion transmission may occur. Moreover, a case of non-sexual spread from one person to another has been described, indicating that we still have more to learn about Zika transmission.Biological basis for pathogenetic effects are under investigation. Laboratory diagnosis is challenging since, so far, there are no "gold standard" diagnostic tools, and the low and short viremia in the acute phase, and together with the high cross-reactivity among the members of flavivirus genus are the most challenging aspects to be overcome.

  4. A Rapidly Evolving Active Region NOAA 8032 observed on April ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    1997-04-15

    Apr 15, 1997 ... The GOES X-ray data showed a number of sub-flares and two C-class flares during the 8-9 hours of its evolution. ... (1991), where they observed X-class flares near the sites of. EFR. Wang & Shi (1993) suggested that ... region using the USΟ video magnetograph (Mathew et al. 1998). The active region. 233 ...

  5. The Rapidly Evolving Concept of Whole Heart Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Iop

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Whole heart engineering represents an incredible journey with as final destination the challenging aim to solve end-stage cardiac failure with a biocompatible and living organ equivalent. Its evolution started in 2008 with rodent organs and is nowadays moving closer to clinical application thanks to scaling-up strategies to human hearts. This review will offer a comprehensive examination on the important stages to be reached for the bioengineering of the whole heart, by describing the approaches of organ decellularization, repopulation, and maturation so far applied and the novel technologies of potential interest. In addition, it will carefully address important demands that still need to be satisfied in order to move to a real clinical translation of the whole bioengineering heart concept.

  6. "Reinventing Life": Introductory Biology for a Rapidly Evolving World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Jeffrey Scott

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary concepts are essential for a scientific understanding of most issues surrounding modern medicine, agriculture, biotechnology, and the environment. If the mantra for biology education in the 20th century was, "Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution," the mantra for the 21st century must be, "Nothing in biology…

  7. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng [Irvine, CA; Sui, Guodong [Los Angeles, CA; Elizarov, Arkadij [Valley Village, CA; Kolb, Hartmuth C [Playa del Rey, CA; Huang, Jiang [San Jose, CA; Heath, James R [South Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Michael E [Los Angeles, CA; Quake, Stephen R [Stanford, CA; Tseng, Hsian-rong [Los Angeles, CA; Wyatt, Paul [Tipperary, IE; Daridon, Antoine [Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  8. An enantioselective cascade reaction between α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and malonic half-thioesters: a rapid access to chiral δ-lactones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qiao; Sun, Shaofa; Huang, Jiayao; Li, Wenjun; Wu, Minghu; Guo, Haibing; Wang, Jian

    2014-06-11

    We disclose a novel efficient enantioselective organocatalytic cascade reaction for the preparation of δ-lactones in good to excellent yields (69-93%) and with high to excellent enantioselectivities (88-96% ee).

  9. When did oxygenic photosynthesis evolve?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roger Buick

    2008-01-01

    ...2.4 Ga ago, but when the photosynthetic oxygen production began is debatable. However, geological and geochemical evidence from older sedimentary rocks indicates that oxygenic photosynthesis evolved well before this oxygenation event...

  10. Marshal: Maintaining Evolving Models Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SIFT proposes to design and develop the Marshal system, a mixed-initiative tool for maintaining task models over the course of evolving missions. Marshal-enabled...

  11. A Study on the Physical Properties and Interfacial Reactions with Cu Substrate of Rapidly Solidified Sn-3.5Ag Lead-Free Solder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jie; Qu, Lin; Zhao, Ning; Kunwar, A.

    2013-08-01

    A rapidly solidified Sn-3.5Ag eutectic alloy produced by the melt-spinning technique was used as a sample in this research to investigate the microstructure, thermal properties, solder wettability, and inhibitory effect of Ag3Sn on Cu6Sn5 intermetallic compound (IMC). In addition, an as-cast Sn-3.5Ag solder was prepared as a reference. Rapidly solidified and as-cast Sn-3.5Ag alloys of the same size were soldered at 250°C for 1 s to observe their instant melting characteristics and for 3 s with different cooling methods to study the inhibitory effect of Ag3Sn on Cu6Sn5 IMC. Experimental techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and energy-dispersive spectrometry were used to observe and analyze the results of the study. It was found that rapidly solidified Sn-3.5Ag solder has more uniform microstructure, better wettability, and higher melting rate as compared with the as-cast material; Ag3Sn nanoparticles that formed in the rapidly solidified Sn-3.5Ag solder inhibited the growth of Cu6Sn5 IMC during aging significantly much strongly than in the as-cast material because their number in the rapidly solidified Sn-3.5Ag solder was greater than in the as-cast material with the same soldering process before aging. Among the various alternative lead-free solders, this study focused on comparison between rapidly solidified and as-cast solder alloys, with the former being observed to have better properties.

  12. Rapid detection of health-care-associated bloodstream infection in critical care using multipathogen real-time polymerase chain reaction technology: a diagnostic accuracy study and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warhurst, Geoffrey; Dunn, Graham; Chadwick, Paul; Blackwood, Bronagh; McAuley, Daniel; Perkins, Gavin D; McMullan, Ronan; Gates, Simon; Bentley, Andrew; Young, Duncan; Carlson, Gordon L; Dark, Paul

    2015-05-01

    There is growing interest in the potential utility of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in diagnosing bloodstream infection by detecting pathogen deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in blood samples within a few hours. SeptiFast (Roche Diagnostics GmBH, Mannheim, Germany) is a multipathogen probe-based system targeting ribosomal DNA sequences of bacteria and fungi. It detects and identifies the commonest pathogens causing bloodstream infection. As background to this study, we report a systematic review of Phase III diagnostic accuracy studies of SeptiFast, which reveals uncertainty about its likely clinical utility based on widespread evidence of deficiencies in study design and reporting with a high risk of bias. Determine the accuracy of SeptiFast real-time PCR for the detection of health-care-associated bloodstream infection, against standard microbiological culture. Prospective multicentre Phase III clinical diagnostic accuracy study using the standards for the reporting of diagnostic accuracy studies criteria. Critical care departments within NHS hospitals in the north-west of England. Adult patients requiring blood culture (BC) when developing new signs of systemic inflammation. SeptiFast real-time PCR results at species/genus level compared with microbiological culture in association with independent adjudication of infection. Metrics of diagnostic accuracy were derived including sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios and predictive values, with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Latent class analysis was used to explore the diagnostic performance of culture as a reference standard. Of 1006 new patient episodes of systemic inflammation in 853 patients, 922 (92%) met the inclusion criteria and provided sufficient information for analysis. Index test assay failure occurred on 69 (7%) occasions. Adult patients had been exposed to a median of 8 days (interquartile range 4-16 days) of hospital care, had high levels of organ support activities and recent

  13. An enzyme-activatable probe with a self-immolative linker for rapid and sensitive alkaline phosphatase detection and cell imaging through a cascade reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongmei; Xu, Chenglong; Liu, Jie; Li, Xiaohong; Guo, Lin; Li, Xinming

    2015-04-25

    We report the design and synthesis of a novel probe (1) for ALP assay by incorporating a self-immolative linker between a phosphate moiety and resorufin. Because of its good biocompatibility and rapid cell internalization, this probe also exhibited great potential for real-time monitoring of endogenous phosphatase activity in living cells.

  14. Rapid and sensitive detection of Mycoplasma synoviae by an insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction-based assay on a field-deployable device

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Hung-Chih; Lo, Dan-Yuan; Chen, Chiou-Lin; Tsai, Yun-Long; Ping, Jia-Fong; Lee, Chien-Hsien; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae (MS), causing respiratory diseases, arthritis, and eggshell apex abnormalities in avian species, is an important pathogen in the poultry industry. Implementation of a biosecurity plan is important in MS infection management. Working on a field-deployable POCKIT? device, an insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (iiPCR) assay has a potential for timely MS detection on the farm. The MS iiPCR assay had limit of detection 95% of about 9 genome equivalents by testing se...

  15. The Evolving Status of Photojournalism Education. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookman, Claude

    Noting that new technologies are resulting in extensive changes in the field of photojournalism, both as it is practiced and taught, this Digest reviews this rapidly evolving field of education and professional practice. It discusses what digital photography is; the history of digital photography; how digital photography has changed…

  16. Rapid analysis of rearranged kappa light chain genes of circulating polysaccharide-specific B lymphocytes by means of immunomagnetic beads and the polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougs, L; Barington, T; Madsen, HO

    1993-01-01

    -secreting cells. Examples of rearranged kappa genes used by HibCP-specific antibody-secreting cells from 4 adult vaccinees are given, representing the 3 largest of the 4 kappa variable region families. This method is a new tool for the investigation of vaccine-induced antibody responses with special reference...... of the B lymphocytes activated in vivo. Here, we present a method for rapid analysis of the rearranged kappa light chain genes used by human circulating antigen-specific B lymphocytes. After vaccination with Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (HibCP) conjugated with protein, the Hib...

  17. Rapid differentiation and identification of potential severe strains of Citrus tristeza virus by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokomi, R K; Saponari, M; Sieburth, P J

    2010-04-01

    A multiplex Taqman-based real-time reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to identify potential severe strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and separate genotypes that react with the monoclonal antibody MCA13. Three strain-specific probes were developed using intergene sequences between the major and minor coat protein genes (CPi) in a multiplex reaction. Probe CPi-VT3 was designed for VT and T3 genotypes; probe CPi-T36 for T36 genotypes; and probe CPi-T36-NS to identify isolates in an outgroup clade of T36-like genotypes mild in California. Total nucleic acids extracted by chromatography on silica particles, sodium dodecyl sulfate-potassium acetate, and CTV virion immunocapture all yielded high quality templates for real-time PCR detection of CTV. These assays successfully differentiated CTV isolates from California, Florida, and a large panel of CTV isolates from an international collection maintained in Beltsville, MD. The utility of the assay was validated using field isolates collected in California and Florida.

  18. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of grown blood cultures by combining culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction is rapid and effective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Beuving

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early administration of appropriate antibiotic therapy in bacteraemia patients dramatically reduces mortality. A new method for RApid Molecular Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing (RAMAST that can be applied directly to positive blood cultures was developed and evaluated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Growth curves and antibiotic susceptibility of blood culture isolates (Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci and (facultative aerobic gram-negative rods were determined by incubating diluted blood cultures with and without antibiotics, followed by a quantitative universal 16S PCR to detect the presence or absence of growth. Testing 114 positive blood cultures, RAMAST showed an agreement with microbroth dilution of 96.7% for gram-negative rods, with a minor error (false-susceptibility with a intermediate resistant strain rate of 1.9%, a major error (false resistance rate of 0.8% and a very major error (false susceptibility rate of 0.6%. Agreement for S. aureus was 97.9%, with a very major error rate of 2.1%. Enterococcus species showed 95.0% agreement, with a major error rate of 5.0%. These agreements are comparable with those of the Phoenix system. Starting from a positive blood culture, the test was completed within 9 hours. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This new rapid method for antibiotic susceptibility testing can potentially provide accurate results for most relevant bacteria commonly isolated from positive blood cultures in less time than routine methods.

  19. Visualization of enzyme-catalyzed reactions using pH indicators: rapid screening of hydrolase libraries and estimation of the enantioselectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morís-Varas, F; Shah, A; Aikens, J; Nadkarni, N P; Rozzell, J D; Demirjian, D C

    1999-10-01

    The use of pH indicators to monitor hydrolase-catalyzed reactions is described. The formation of acid following an enzyme-mediated hydrolysis causes a drop in the pH that can be visualized by a change in the color of the indicator-containing solution. The best indicators are those showing a color transition within the operational pH range of the hydrolases, like bromothymol blue and phenol red. The enantioselectivity of lipases and esterases can be estimated using single isomers under the same conditions and comparing the color turnover for each one. The method has been tested to quickly evaluate the enantioselectivity of a lipase towards a set of ester substrates and applied to the hierarchical screening of a library of thermophilic esterases.

  20. Rapid, high-throughput detection of azalea lace bug (Hemiptera: Tingidae) predation by Chrysoperla rufilabris (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), using fluorescent-polymerase chain reaction primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Timothy A; Boyd, David W

    2006-12-01

    Azalea lace bugs, Stephanitis pyrioides (Scott) (Hemiptera: Tingidae), are the most common pest of azaleas (Rhododendron spp.) in nursery production and the landscape. Although pesticides are commonly used to control lace bugs, natural enemies can be a significant source of lace bug mortality. Lacewings (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) are natural enemies of lace bugs and easily consume them in laboratory studies. Field studies on lacewing biocontrol of azalea lace bugs are underway; however, monitoring lacewing predation in a nursery environment by direct observation is impractical. Here, we describe a fluorescent-polymerase chain reaction method to estimate S. pyrioides consumption based on the gut contents of lacewing predators. Lace bug DNA was detected in fed lacewings up to 32 h after ingestion. More than 80% of the ingested lace bugs were detected using our method with only one false positive result. The assay is both high-throughput and relatively inexpensive, making it a practical approach to documenting lace bug predation in the field.

  1. A Rapid One-Pot Synthesis of Novel High-Purity Methacrylic Phosphonic Acid (PA-Based Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS Frameworks via Thiol-Ene Click Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Karuppasamy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we demonstrate a facile methodology to synthesis a novel methacrylic phosphonic acid (PA-functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSSs via thiol-ene click reaction using octamercapto thiol-POSS and ethylene glycol methacrylate phosphate (EGMP monomer. The presence of phosphonic acid moieties and POSS-cage structure in POSS-S-PA was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR and nuclear magnetic resonance (1H, 29Si and 31P-NMR analyses. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrum of POSS-S-PA acquired in a dithranol matrix, which has specifically designed for intractable polymeric materials. The observed characterization results signposted that novel organo-inorganic hybrid POSS-S-PA would be an efficacious material for fuel cells as a proton exchange membrane and high-temperature applications due to its thermal stability of 380 °C.

  2. A rapid method for the detection of representative coliforms in water samples: polymerase chain reaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Jong-Tar; Cheng, Chiu-Yu; Huang, Hsiao-Han; Tsao, Chia-Fen; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2010-03-01

    Methods to detect the presence of coliform bacteria in drinking water usually involve a series of complex cultivating steps that are time-consuming and subject to external influences. For this reason, the new 16S rRNA probe has been developed in this study as an alternative detector PCR-ELISA technique that does not involve the culture of bacteria and that is able to detect, identify, and quantify the representative coliform species present in water samples. Our results indicate that this technique is both rapid (detection time of 4 h) and accurate (1.4% error rate). The limit of detection (LOD) was 5 CFU/100 ml for total coliforms, which meets the standards set by most countries for drinking water. Our comparative study demonstrated that this PCR-ELISA method is superior to current conventional methods in terms of detection time, LOD, and accuracy.

  3. The Evolving Resource Metadata Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biemesderfer, Chris

    The search and discovery mechanisms that will facilitate and simplify systematic research on the Internet depend on systematic classifications of resources, as well as on standardized access to such metadata. The principles and technologies that will make this possible are evolving in the work of the Internet Engineering Task Force and the digital library initiatives, among others. The desired outcome is a set of standards, tools, and practices that permits both cataloging and retrieval to be comprehensive and efficient.

  4. An immunomagnetic separation-reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (IMS-RT-PCR) test for sensitive and rapid detection of viable waterborne Cryptosporidium parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallier-Soulier, Sylvie; Guillot, Emmanuelle

    2003-07-01

    The public health problem posed by the waterborne parasite Cryptosporidium parvum incited the water supply industry to develop very accurate analytical tools able to assess the presence of viable oocysts in drinking water. In this study, we report the development of a viability assay for C. parvum oocysts based on immunomagnetic separation and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (IMS-RT-PCR). The detection limit of the IMS-RT-PCR assay, which targets the hsp70 heat shock-induced mRNA, was in the range of ten viable oocysts per 100-l tap water samples. Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to heating, freezing and three chemical disinfection treatments namely, chlorination, chlorine dioxide treatment and ozonation under conventional doses used in water treatment plants, then detected by IMS-PCR and IMS-RT-PCR. The results obtained by IMS-PCR showed that none of the treatments had an effect on oocyst detection. The inactivation of oocysts by boiling resulted in no RT-PCR signal. Chlorine as well as chlorine dioxide did not influence oocyst viability as determined by IMS-RT-PCR. Ozone more effectively inactivated oocysts. The IMS-RT-PCR assay in conjunction with IMS-PCR marks the development of a combined detection and viability test which can be used for drinking water quality control as well as for reliable evaluation of treatment efficiency.

  5. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction based method for rapid identification of two species of the genus Scolytus Geoffroy (Col: Curculionidae: Scolytinae in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Amini

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular identification is going to be more widespread in taxonomic studies of insects when traditional tools are problematic and time consuming. Identification of bark beetles, as one of the most important pests of forests, based on morphological characteristics is difficult because of their small size and morphological similarities. In the current study, species-specific primers were desi gned to identify two most abundant and morphologically similar bark beetle species Scolytus ensifer Eichhoff 1881 and S. ecksteini Butovitsch 1929, both found on Ulmus minor Miller in north of Iran. These species-specific primers successfully produced a fragment size with 318 bp and 465 bp of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 (CO1 gene in S. ensifer and S. ecksteini respectively. The results revealed tha t the multiplex polymerase chain reaction using the species-specific primers could amplify a unique band to distinguish these two species so confirmed this method as a convenient and quick tool to identify those two bark beetle species.

  6. Rapid method for simultaneous determination of nitrite and nitrate in water samples using short-column ion-pair chromatographic separation, photochemical reaction, and chemiluminescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodamatani, Hitoshi; Yamazaki, Shigeo; Saito, Keiitsu; Komatsu, Yu; Tomiyasu, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A rapid method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of nitrite and nitrate. The separation of nitrite and nitrate was achieved using an octadecylsilane (ODS) short column (5 µm, 20 × 4.6 mm) with 10 mM of borate buffer-methanol (99.5:0.5, v/v; pH 10.0), containing 5 mM of lauryltrimethylammonium chloride and 50 mM of NaBr. These ions were detected by luminol chemiluminescence following online UV irradiation. The calibration curves of nitrite and nitrate were linear in the range of 1.0 × 10(-7) to 2.0 × 10(-5) M and 1.0 × 10(-6) to 2.0 × 10(-4) M, respectively. The detection limits for nitrite and nitrate were 0.05 and 0.4 µM, respectively (with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3). The precisions of peak heights for 7 identical injections of a standard mixture of 0.50 µM of nitrite and 5.0 µM of nitrate were 2.7 and 2.1%, respectively. Analysis time per sample was less than 2 min, and system pressure was low (2.1 MPa). The proposed method was successfully applied to water samples from various sources.

  7. Rapid and sensitive on-line monitoring 6 different kinds of volatile organic compounds in aqueous samples by spray inlet proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (SI-PTR-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xue; Kang, Meng; Wang, Hongmei; Huang, Chaoqun; Shen, Chengyin; Chu, Yannan

    2017-06-01

    Rapid and sensitive monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in aqueous samples is very important to human health and environmental protection. In this study, an on-line spray inlet proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (SI-PTR-MS) method was developed for the rapid and sensitive monitoring of 6 different kinds of VOCs, namely acetonitrile, acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetone, aether, and methylbenzene, in aqueous samples. The response time, limit of detection (LOD), and repeatability of the SI-PTR-MS system were evaluated. The response of the SI-PTR-MS was quite rapid with response times of 31-88 s. The LODs for all these VOCs were below 10 μg/L. The LOD of methylbenzene was 0.9 μg/L, much lower than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) in drinking water. The repeatability of this method was evaluated with 5 replicate determinations. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range of 0.8-3.1%, indicating good repeatability. To evaluate the matrix effects, the SI-PTR-MS system was employed for on-line monitoring of these 6 VOCs in different aqueous matrices, including lake water, tap water, and waste water. The relative recoveries were in the range of 94.6-106.0% for the lake water, 96.3-105.6% for the tap water, and 95.6-102.9% for the waste water. The results indicate that the SI-PTR-MS method has important application values in the rapid and sensitive monitoring of VOCs in these aqueous samples. In addition, the effect of salt concentration on the extracting efficiency was evaluated. The results showed that the LOD of the SI-PTR-MS could be further decreased by changing the salt concentration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Rapid Detection of Bloodstream Pathogens in Liver Transplantation Patients With FilmArray Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays: Comparison With Conventional Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlu, B; Bayindir, Y; Ozdemir, F; Ince, V; Cuglan, S; Hopoglu, M; Yakupogullari, Y; Kizilkaya, C; Kuzucu, C; Isık, B; Yilmaz, S

    2015-01-01

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) is an important concern in transplant patients. Early intervention with appropriate antimicrobial therapy is critical to better clinical outcome; however, there is significant delay when conventional identification methods are used. We aimed to determine the diagnostic performance of the FilmArray Blood Culture Identification Panel, a recently approved multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay detecting 24 BSI pathogens and 3 resistance genes, in comparison with the performances of conventional identification methods in liver transplant (LT) patients. A total of 52 defined sepsis episodes (signal-positive by blood culture systems) from 45 LT patients were prospectively studied. The FilmArray successfully identified 37 of 39 (94.8%) bacterial and 3 of 3 (100%) yeast pathogens in a total of 42 samples with microbial growth, failing to detect only 2 of 39 (5.1%) bacterial pathogens that were not covered by the test panel. The FilmArray could also detect additional pathogens in 3 samples that had been reported as having monomicrobial growth, and it could detect Acinetobacter baumannii in 2 samples suspected of skin flora contamination. The remaining 8 blood cultures showing a positive signal but yielding no growth were also negative by this assay. Results of MecA, KPC, and VanA/B gene detection were in high accordance. The FilmArray produced results with significantly shorter turnaround times (1.33 versus 36.2, 23.6, and 19.5 h; P FilmArray appeared as a reliable alternative diagnostic method with the potential to mitigate problems with protracted diagnosis of the BSI pathogens in LT patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Endonuclease Restriction-Mediated Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Novel Technique for Rapid, Sensitive and Quantitative Detection of Nucleic-Acid Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Li, Machao; Luo, Lijuan; Liu, Dongxin; Li, Hua; Cao, Xiaolong; Hu, Shoukui; Jin, Dong; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    The article reported a novel methodology for real-time PCR analysis of nucleic acids, termed endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time polymerase chain reaction (ET-PCR). Just like PCR, ET-PCR only required one pair of primers. A short sequence, which was recognized by restriction enzyme BstUI, was attached to the 5′ end of the forward (F) or reverse (R) PCR primer, and the new F or R primer was named EF or ER. EF/ER was labeled at the 5′ end with a reporter dye and in the middle with a quenching dye. BstUI cleaves the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5′ end recognition sequences and their complementary sequences) during the extension phase, which separates the reporter molecule from the quenching dye, leading to a gain of fluorescence signal. This process is repeated in each amplification cycle and unaffected the exponential synthesis of the PCR amplification. ET-PCR allowed real-time analysis of single or multiple targets in a single vessel, and provided the reproducible quantitation of nucleic acids. The analytical sensitivity and specificity of ET-PCR were successfully evaluated, detecting down to 250 fg of genomic DNA per tube of target pathogen DNA examined, and the positive results were generated in a relatively short period. Moreover, the practical application of ET-PCR for simultaneous detection of multiple target pathogens was also demonstrated in artificially contaminated blood samples. In conclusion, due to the technique’s simplicity of design, reproducible data and low contamination risk, ET-PCR assay is an appealing alternative to conventional approaches currently used for real-time nucleic acid analysis. PMID:27468284

  10. The evolvability of programmable hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Karthik; Wagner, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    In biological systems, individual phenotypes are typically adopted by multiple genotypes. Examples include protein structure phenotypes, where each structure can be adopted by a myriad individual amino acid sequence genotypes. These genotypes form vast connected ‘neutral networks’ in genotype space. The size of such neutral networks endows biological systems not only with robustness to genetic change, but also with the ability to evolve a vast number of novel phenotypes that occur near any one neutral network. Whether technological systems can be designed to have similar properties is poorly understood. Here we ask this question for a class of programmable electronic circuits that compute digital logic functions. The functional flexibility of such circuits is important in many applications, including applications of evolutionary principles to circuit design. The functions they compute are at the heart of all digital computation. We explore a vast space of 1045 logic circuits (‘genotypes’) and 1019 logic functions (‘phenotypes’). We demonstrate that circuits that compute the same logic function are connected in large neutral networks that span circuit space. Their robustness or fault-tolerance varies very widely. The vicinity of each neutral network contains circuits with a broad range of novel functions. Two circuits computing different functions can usually be converted into one another via few changes in their architecture. These observations show that properties important for the evolvability of biological systems exist in a commercially important class of electronic circuitry. They also point to generic ways to generate fault-tolerant, adaptable and evolvable electronic circuitry. PMID:20534598

  11. The 'E' factor -- evolving endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, M J

    2013-03-01

    Endodontics is a constantly developing field, with new instruments, preparation techniques and sealants competing with trusted and traditional approaches to tooth restoration. Thus general dental practitioners must question and understand the significance of these developments before adopting new practices. In view of this, the aim of this article, and the associated presentation at the 2013 British Dental Conference & Exhibition, is to provide an overview of endodontic methods and constantly evolving best practice. The presentation will review current preparation techniques, comparing rotary versus reciprocation, and question current trends in restoration of the endodontically treated tooth.

  12. Rapid and facile preparation of zinc ferrite (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) oxide by microwave-solvothermal technique and its catalytic activity in heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anchieta, Chayene G.; Severo, Eric C.; Rigo, Caroline; Mazutti, Marcio A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Federal University of Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria (Brazil); Kuhn, Raquel C., E-mail: raquelckuhn@yahoo.com.br [Department of Chemical Engineering, Federal University of Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria (Brazil); Muller, Edson I.; Flores, Erico M.M. [Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria (Brazil); Moreira, Regina F.P.M. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-970, Florianópolis (Brazil); Foletto, Edson L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Federal University of Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria (Brazil)

    2015-06-15

    In this work zinc ferrite (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) oxide was rapidly and easily prepared by microwave-solvothermal route and its catalytic property in photo-Fenton reaction was evaluated. The effects of microwave heating time and power on the properties of produced particles were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms were the techniques used for characterizing the solid products. The synthesized material was tested as a catalyst in the degradation of the textile dye molecule by the heterogeneous photo-Fenton process. Characterization results showed that the microwave heating time and power have significant influences on the formation of the phase spinel as well as on its physical properties. The reaction results showed that the ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} oxide has good photocatalytic activity, which can be attributed to high surface area and pore volume, and large pore size. The ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} oxide produced by the microwave irradiation exhibited promising photocatalytic activity for the removal of textile dye, reaching nearly 100% of decolorization at 40 min and 60% of mineralization at 240 min. Therefore, ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles rapidly prepared by the microwave route have the potential for use in treatment of textile wastewater by the heterogeneous photo-Fenton process. - Highlights: • ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized by microwave-solvothermal method. • ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was prepared by different microwave heating times and powers. • ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was used as heterogeneous photo-Fenton catalyst. • Degradation of Procion red dye using heterogeneous photo-Fenton process. • ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was highly efficient to degrade textile dye under visible light.

  13. A rapid and reliable species-specific identification of clinical and environmental isolates of Vibrio cholerae using a three-test procedure and recA polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A D Roozbehani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Vibrio cholerae, the cause of cholera, is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in many developing countries. Most laboratories initially rely on biochemical tests for a presumptive identification of these strains, followed by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based method to confirm their identification. The aim of this study is to establish a rapid and reliable identification scheme for V. cholerae using a minimal, but highly specific number of biochemical tests and a PCR assay. Materials and Methods: We developed a species-specific PCR to identify V. cholerae, using a housekeeping gene recA, and used that to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of 12 biochemical tests commonly used for screening and / or presumptive identification of V. cholerae in the clinical and environmental samples. Results: Here we introduced a combination of three biochemical tests, namely, sucrose fermentation, oxidase test, and growth in trypton broth containing 0% NaCl, as also the PCR of the recA gene, for rapid identification of V. cholerae isolates, with 100% sensitivity and specificity. The established method accurately identified a collection of 47 V. cholerae strains isolated from the clinical cases (n = 26 and surface waters (n = 21, while none of the 32 control strains belonging to different species were positive in this assay. Conclusion: The triple-test procedure introduced here is a simple and useful assay which can be adopted in cholera surveillance programs for efficient monitoring of V. cholerae in surface water and fecal samples.

  14. Peripartum hysterectomy: an evolving picture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Turner, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    Peripartum hysterectomy (PH) is one of the obstetric catastrophes. Evidence is emerging that the role of PH in modern obstetrics is evolving. Improving management of postpartum hemorrhage and newer surgical techniques should decrease PH for uterine atony. Rising levels of repeat elective cesarean deliveries should decrease PH following uterine scar rupture in labor. Increasing cesarean rates, however, have led to an increase in the number of PHs for morbidly adherent placenta. In the case of uterine atony or rupture where PH is required, a subtotal PH is often sufficient. In the case of pathological placental localization involving the cervix, however, a total hysterectomy is required. Furthermore, the involvement of other pelvic structures may prospectively make the diagnosis difficult and the surgery challenging. If resources permit, PH for pathological placental localization merits a multidisciplinary approach. Despite advances in clinical practice, it is likely that peripartum hysterectomy will be more challenging for obstetricians in the future.

  15. Extreme evolved solar systems (EESS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaensicke, Boris

    2017-08-01

    In just 20 years, we went from not knowing if the solar system is a fluke of Nature to realising that it is totally normal for stars to have planets. More remarkably, it is now clear that planet formation is a robust process, as rich multi-planet systems are found around stars more massive and less massive than the Sun. More recently, planetary systems have been identified in increasingly complex architectures, including circumbinary planets, wide binaries with planets orbiting one or both stellar components, and planets in triple stellar systems.We have also learned that many planetary systems will survive the evolution of their host stars into the white dwarf phase. Small bodies are scattered by unseen planets into the gravitational field of the white dwarfs, tidally disrupt, form dust discs, and eventually accrete onto the white dwarf, where they can be spectroscopically detected. HST/COS has played a critical role in the study these evolved planetary systems, demonstrating that overall the bulk composition of the debris is rocky and resembles in composition the inner the solar system, including evidence for water-rich planetesimals. Past observations of planetary systems at white dwarfs have focused on single stars with main-sequence progenitors of 1.5 to 2.5Msun. Here we propose to take the study of evolved planetary systems into the extremes of parameter ranges to answer questions such as: * How efficient is planet formation around 4-10Msun stars? * What are the metallicities of the progenitors of debris-accreting white dwarfs?* What is the fate of circumbinary planets?* Can star-planet interactions generate magnetic fields in the white dwarf host?

  16. Orbital Decay in Binaries with Evolved Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng; Arras, Phil; Weinberg, Nevin N.; Troup, Nicholas; Majewski, Steven R.

    2018-01-01

    Two mechanisms are often invoked to explain tidal friction in binary systems. The ``dynamical tide” is the resonant excitation of internal gravity waves by the tide, and their subsequent damping by nonlinear fluid processes or thermal diffusion. The ``equilibrium tide” refers to non-resonant excitation of fluid motion in the star’s convection zone, with damping by interaction with the turbulent eddies. There have been numerous studies of these processes in main sequence stars, but less so on the subgiant and red giant branches. Motivated by the newly discovered close binary systems in the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-1), we have performed calculations of both the dynamical and equilibrium tide processes for stars over a range of mass as the star’s cease core hydrogen burning and evolve to shell burning. Even for stars which had a radiative core on the main sequence, the dynamical tide may have very large amplitude in the newly radiative core in post-main sequence, giving rise to wave breaking. The resulting large dynamical tide dissipation rate is compared to the equilibrium tide, and the range of secondary masses and orbital periods over which rapid orbital decay may occur will be discussed, as well as applications to close APOGEE binaries.

  17. CERN internal communication is evolving

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    CERN news will now be regularly updated on the CERN People page (see here).      Dear readers, All over the world, communication is becoming increasingly instantaneous, with news published in real time on websites and social networks. In order to keep pace with these changes, CERN's internal communication is evolving too. From now on, you will be informed of what’s happening at CERN more often via the “CERN people” page, which will frequently be updated with news. The Bulletin is following this trend too: twice a month, we will compile the most important articles published on the CERN site, with a brand-new layout. You will receive an e-mail every two weeks as soon as this new form of the Bulletin is available. If you have interesting news or stories to share, tell us about them through the form at: https://communications.web.cern.ch/got-story-cern-website​. You can also find out about news from CERN in real time...

  18. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma: Current and Evolving Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Adamska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC, which constitutes 90% of pancreatic cancers, is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. Due to the broad heterogeneity of genetic mutations and dense stromal environment, PDAC belongs to one of the most chemoresistant cancers. Most of the available treatments are palliative, with the objective of relieving disease-related symptoms and prolonging survival. Currently, available therapeutic options are surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and use of targeted drugs. However, thus far, therapies targeting cancer-associated molecular pathways have not given satisfactory results; this is due in part to the rapid upregulation of compensatory alternative pathways as well as dense desmoplastic reaction. In this review, we summarize currently available therapies and clinical trials, directed towards a plethora of pathways and components dysregulated during PDAC carcinogenesis. Emerging trends towards targeted therapies as the most promising approach will also be discussed.

  19. Evolving fuzzy rules for relaxed-criteria negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kwang Mong

    2008-12-01

    In the literature on automated negotiation, very few negotiation agents are designed with the flexibility to slightly relax their negotiation criteria to reach a consensus more rapidly and with more certainty. Furthermore, these relaxed-criteria negotiation agents were not equipped with the ability to enhance their performance by learning and evolving their relaxed-criteria negotiation rules. The impetus of this work is designing market-driven negotiation agents (MDAs) that not only have the flexibility of relaxing bargaining criteria using fuzzy rules, but can also evolve their structures by learning new relaxed-criteria fuzzy rules to improve their negotiation outcomes as they participate in negotiations in more e-markets. To this end, an evolutionary algorithm for adapting and evolving relaxed-criteria fuzzy rules was developed. Implementing the idea in a testbed, two kinds of experiments for evaluating and comparing EvEMDAs (MDAs with relaxed-criteria rules that are evolved using the evolutionary algorithm) and EMDAs (MDAs with relaxed-criteria rules that are manually constructed) were carried out through stochastic simulations. Empirical results show that: 1) EvEMDAs generally outperformed EMDAs in different types of e-markets and 2) the negotiation outcomes of EvEMDAs generally improved as they negotiated in more e-markets.

  20. Evolving Deep Networks Using HPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Steven R. [ORNL, Oak Ridge; Rose, Derek C. [ORNL, Oak Ridge; Johnston, Travis [ORNL, Oak Ridge; Heller, William T. [ORNL, Oak Ridge; Karnowski, thomas P. [ORNL, Oak Ridge; Potok, Thomas E. [ORNL, Oak Ridge; Patton, Robert M. [ORNL, Oak Ridge; Perdue, Gabriel [Fermilab; Miller, Jonathan [Santa Maria U., Valparaiso

    2017-01-01

    While a large number of deep learning networks have been studied and published that produce outstanding results on natural image datasets, these datasets only make up a fraction of those to which deep learning can be applied. These datasets include text data, audio data, and arrays of sensors that have very different characteristics than natural images. As these “best” networks for natural images have been largely discovered through experimentation and cannot be proven optimal on some theoretical basis, there is no reason to believe that they are the optimal network for these drastically different datasets. Hyperparameter search is thus often a very important process when applying deep learning to a new problem. In this work we present an evolutionary approach to searching the possible space of network hyperparameters and construction that can scale to 18, 000 nodes. This approach is applied to datasets of varying types and characteristics where we demonstrate the ability to rapidly find best hyperparameters in order to enable practitioners to quickly iterate between idea and result.

  1. NASA's Space Launch System: An Evolving Capability for Exploration An Evolving Capability for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, Stephen D.; Crumbly, Christopher M.; Robinson, Kimerly F.

    2016-01-01

    A foundational capability for international human deep-space exploration, NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle represents a new spaceflight infrastructure asset, creating opportunities for mission profiles and space systems that cannot currently be executed. While the primary purpose of SLS, which is making rapid progress towards initial launch readiness in two years, will be to support NASA's Journey to Mars, discussions are already well underway regarding other potential utilization of the vehicle's unique capabilities. In its initial Block 1 configuration, capable of launching 70 metric tons (t) to low Earth orbit (LEO), SLS is capable of propelling the Orion crew vehicle to cislunar space, while also delivering small CubeSat-class spacecraft to deep-space destinations. With the addition of a more powerful upper stage, the Block 1B configuration of SLS will be able to deliver 105 t to LEO and enable more ambitious human missions into the proving ground of space. This configuration offers opportunities for launching co-manifested payloads with the Orion crew vehicle, and a class of secondary payloads, larger than today's CubeSats. Further upgrades to the vehicle, including advanced boosters, will evolve its performance to 130 t in its Block 2 configuration. Both Block 1B and Block 2 also offer the capability to carry 8.4- or 10-m payload fairings, larger than any contemporary launch vehicle. With unmatched mass-lift capability, payload volume, and C3, SLS not only enables spacecraft or mission designs currently impossible with contemporary EELVs, it also offers enhancing benefits, such as reduced risk, operational costs and/or complexity, shorter transit time to destination or launching large systems either monolithically or in fewer components. This paper will discuss both the performance and capabilities of Space Launch System as it evolves, and the current state of SLS utilization planning.

  2. DNA evolved to minimize frameshift mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Agoni, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Point mutations can surely be dangerous but what is worst than to lose the reading frame?! Does DNA evolved a strategy to try to limit frameshift mutations?! Here we investigate if DNA sequences effectively evolved a system to minimize frameshift mutations analyzing the transcripts of proteins with high molecular weights.

  3. Reaction Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Okubo, Fumiya; Kobayashi, Satoshi; YOKOMORI, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Reaction systems are a formal model that has been introduced to investigate the interactive behaviors of biochemical reactions. Based on the formal framework of reaction systems, we propose new computing models called reaction automata that feature (string) language acceptors with multiset manipulation as a computing mechanism, and show that reaction automata are computationally Turing universal. Further, some subclasses of reaction automata with space complexity are investigated and their la...

  4. SkyNet: Modular nuclear reaction network library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.

    2017-10-01

    The general-purpose nuclear reaction network SkyNet evolves the abundances of nuclear species under the influence of nuclear reactions. SkyNet can be used to compute the nucleosynthesis evolution in all astrophysical scenarios where nucleosynthesis occurs. Any list of isotopes can be evolved and SkyNet supports various different types of nuclear reactions. SkyNet is modular, permitting new or existing physics, such as nuclear reactions or equations of state, to be easily added or modified.

  5. WSC-07: Evolving the Web Services Challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blake, M. Brian; Cheung, William K.W.; Jaeger, Michael C.; Wombacher, Andreas

    Service-oriented architecture (SOA) is an evolving architectural paradigm where businesses can expose their capabilities as modular, network-accessible software services. By decomposing capabilities into modular services, organizations can share their offerings at multiple levels of granularity

  6. Satcom access in the evolved packet core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cano, M.D.; Norp, A.H.J.; Popova, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    Satellite communications (Satcom) networks are increasingly integrating with terrestrial communications networks, namely Next Generation Networks (NGN). In the area of NGN the Evolved Packet Core (EPC) is a new network architecture that can support multiple access technologies. When Satcom is

  7. Acquisition: Acquisition of the Evolved SEASPARROW Missile

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... The Evolved SEASPARROW Missile, a Navy Acquisition Category II program, is an improved version of the RIM-7P SEASPARROW missile that will intercept high-speed maneuvering, anti-ship cruise missiles...

  8. Fuzzily Connected Multimodel Systems Evolving Autonomously From Data Streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelov, P

    2011-08-01

    A general framework and a holistic concept are proposed in this paper that combine computationally light machine learning from streaming data with the online identification and adaptation of dynamic systems in regard to their structure and parameters. According to this concept, the system is assumed to be decomposable into a set of fuzzily connected simple local models. The main thrust of this paper is in the development of an original approach for the self-design, self-monitoring, self-management, and self-learning of such systems in a dynamic manner from data streams which automatically detect and react to the shift in the data distribution by evolving the system structure. Novelties of this contribution lie in the following: 1) the computationally simple approach (simpl_e_Clustering-simplified evolving Clustering) to data space partitioning by recursive evolving clustering based on the relative position of the new data sample to the mean of the overall data, 2) the learning technique for online structure evolution as a reaction to the shift in the data distribution, 3) the method for online system structure simplification based on utility and inputs/feature selection, and 4) the novel graphical illustration of the spatiotemporal evolution of the data stream. The application domain for this computationally efficient technique ranges from clustering, modeling, prognostics, classification, and time-series prediction to pattern recognition, image segmentation, vector quantization, etc., to more general problems in various application areas, e.g., intelligent sensors, mobile robotics, advanced manufacturing processes, etc.

  9. The Pyrolysis Behavior of Evolved Species from Date Palm Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babiker Mohammed Elamen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The pyrolytic behavior of evolved gases from date palm seeds (DPSs were measured to gain insight into the mechanism of DPSs pyrolysis. Six different cultivars were used in this study, namely Deglet nour, Piarom, Suffry, Safawi, Mabroom and Aliya. A thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA and a real-time gas analyzer (GA were used to calculate the mass losses and the mole fraction of evolved gases, respectively. DPSs samples were pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere condition using argon with a purge rate of 100 mL/minute. The samples were subjected to non-isothermal operation. An independent single model and parallel reaction model were adopted to interpret the empirical data collected from TGA and GA, respectively. The results reveled that there are three types of pyrolysis zones depending on the main constituents of every cultivars. Moreover, the potentialty of the zones in controlling the pyrolysis behavior was noticeable. The dominant hydrocarbon species in DPSs were CO and CH4 (40 to 50% higher than the rest of species. The mole fraction of CO was 2 to 4 times higher than the mole fraction of CO2. The activation energy and frequency factor of DPSs evolved species showed that Mabroom has the highest activation energy regarding H2 (63.21kJ/mol and CO (74.32 kJ/mol.

  10. Higher rates of sex evolve in spatially heterogeneous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becks, Lutz; Agrawal, Aneil F

    2010-11-04

    The evolution and maintenance of sexual reproduction has puzzled biologists for decades. Although this field is rich in hypotheses, experimental evidence is scarce. Some important experiments have demonstrated differences in evolutionary rates between sexual and asexual populations; other experiments have documented evolutionary changes in phenomena related to genetic mixing, such as recombination and selfing. However, direct experiments of the evolution of sex within populations are extremely rare (but see ref. 12). Here we use the rotifer, Brachionus calyciflorus, which is capable of both sexual and asexual reproduction, to test recent theory predicting that there is more opportunity for sex to evolve in spatially heterogeneous environments. Replicated experimental populations of rotifers were maintained in homogeneous environments, composed of either high- or low-quality food habitats, or in heterogeneous environments that consisted of a mix of the two habitats. For populations maintained in either type of homogeneous environment, the rate of sex evolves rapidly towards zero. In contrast, higher rates of sex evolve in populations experiencing spatially heterogeneous environments. The data indicate that the higher level of sex observed under heterogeneity is not due to sex being less costly or selection against sex being less efficient; rather sex is sufficiently advantageous in heterogeneous environments to overwhelm its inherent costs. Counter to some alternative theories for the evolution of sex, there is no evidence that genetic drift plays any part in the evolution of sex in these populations.

  11. Cyberspace Operations: Influence Upon Evolving War Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    St ra te gy R es ea rc h Pr oj ec t CYBERSPACE OPERATIONS: INFLUENCE UPON EVOLVING WAR THEORY BY COLONEL KRISTIN BAKER United States...DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cyberspace Operations: Influence Upon Evolving War Theory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER... Leadership 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S

  12. Evolving effective incremental SAT solvers with GP

    OpenAIRE

    Bader, Mohamed; Poli, R.

    2008-01-01

    Hyper-Heuristics could simply be defined as heuristics to choose other heuristics, and it is a way of combining existing heuristics to generate new ones. In a Hyper-Heuristic framework, the framework is used for evolving effective incremental (Inc*) solvers for SAT. We test the evolved heuristics (IncHH) against other known local search heuristics on a variety of benchmark SAT problems.

  13. Evolving R Coronae Borealis Stars with MESA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Lauer, Amber; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Frank, Juhan

    2018-01-01

    R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars form a small class of cool, carbon-rich supergiants that have almost no hydrogen. They undergo extreme, irregular declines in brightness of up to 8 magnitudes due to the formation of thick clouds of carbon dust. Two scenarios have been proposed for the origin of an RCB star: the merger of a CO/He white dwarf (WD) binary and a final helium-shell flash. We are using a combination of 3D hydrodynamics codes and the 1D MESA (Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics) stellar evolution code including nucleosynthesis to construct post-merger spherical models based on realistic merger progenitor models and on our hydrodynamical simulations, and then following the evolution into the region of the HR diagram where RCB stars are located. We are investigating nucleosynthesis in the dynamically accreting material of CO/He WD mergers which may provide a suitable environment for significant production of 18O and the very low 16O/18O values observed.Our MESA modeling consists of two steps: first mimicking the WD merger event using two different techniques, (a) by choosing a very high mass accretion rate with appropriate abundances and (b) by applying "stellar engineering" to an initial CO WD model to account for the newly merged material by applying an entropy adjusting procedure. Second, we follow the post-merger evolution using a large nuclear reaction network including the effects of convective and rotational instabilities to the mixing of material in order to match the observed RCB abundances. MESA follows the evolution of the merger product as it expands and cools to become an RCB star. We then examine the surface abundances and compare them to the observed RCB abundances. We also investigate how long fusion continues in the He shell near the core and how this processed material is mixed up to the surface of the star. We then model the later evolution of RCB stars to determine their likely lifetimes and endpoints when they have returned to

  14. Modelling cell motility and chemotaxis with evolving surface finite elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Charles M; Stinner, Björn; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2012-11-07

    We present a mathematical and a computational framework for the modelling of cell motility. The cell membrane is represented by an evolving surface, with the movement of the cell determined by the interaction of various forces that act normal to the surface. We consider external forces such as those that may arise owing to inhomogeneities in the medium and a pressure that constrains the enclosed volume, as well as internal forces that arise from the reaction of the cells' surface to stretching and bending. We also consider a protrusive force associated with a reaction-diffusion system (RDS) posed on the cell membrane, with cell polarization modelled by this surface RDS. The computational method is based on an evolving surface finite-element method. The general method can account for the large deformations that arise in cell motility and allows the simulation of cell migration in three dimensions. We illustrate applications of the proposed modelling framework and numerical method by reporting on numerical simulations of a model for eukaryotic chemotaxis and a model for the persistent movement of keratocytes in two and three space dimensions. Movies of the simulated cells can be obtained from http://homepages.warwick.ac.uk/∼maskae/CV_Warwick/Chemotaxis.html.

  15. A one-step reaction for the rapid identification of Lactobacillus mindensis, Lactobacillus panis, Lactobacillus paralimentarius, Lactobacillus pontis and Lactobacillus frumenti using oligonucleotide primers designed from the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic sequences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferchichi, M; Valcheva, R; Prévost, H; Onno, B; Dousset, X

    2008-01-01

    ...) were designed to rapidly discriminate between Lactobacillus mindensis, Lactobacillus panis, Lactobacillus paralimentarius, Lactobacillus pontis and Lactobacillus frumenti species recently isolated from French sourdough...

  16. Partitioning the fitness components of RNA populations evolving in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Díaz Arenas

    Full Text Available All individuals in an evolving population compete for resources, and their performance is measured by a fitness metric. The performance of the individuals is relative to their abilities and to the biotic surroundings--the conditions under which they are competing--and involves many components. Molecules evolving in a test tube can also face complex environments and dynamics, and their fitness measurements should reflect the complexity of various contributing factors as well. Here, the fitnesses of a set of ligase ribozymes evolved by the continuous in vitro evolution system were measured. During these evolution cycles there are three different catalytic steps, ligation, reverse transcription, and forward transcription, each with a potential differential influence on the total fitness of each ligase. For six distinct ligase ribozyme genotypes that resulted from continuous evolution experiments, the rates of reaction were measured for each catalytic step by tracking the kinetics of enzymes reacting with their substrates. The reaction products were analyzed for the amount of product formed per time. Each catalytic step of the evolution cycle was found to have a differential incidence in the total fitness of the ligases, and therefore the total fitness of any ligase cannot be inferred from only one catalytic step of the evolution cycle. Generally, the ribozyme-directed ligation step tends to impart the largest effect on overall fitness. Yet it was found that the ligase genotypes have different absolute fitness values, and that they exploit different stages of the overall cycle to gain a net advantage. This is a new example of molecular niche partitioning that may allow for coexistence of more than one species in a population. The dissection of molecular events into multiple components of fitness provides new insights into molecular evolutionary studies in the laboratory, and has the potential to explain heretofore counterintuitive findings.

  17. Evolvability Search: Directly Selecting for Evolvability in order to Study and Produce It

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengistu, Henok; Lehman, Joel Anthony; Clune, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    One hallmark of natural organisms is their significant evolvability, i.e.,their increased potential for further evolution. However, reproducing such evolvability in artificial evolution remains a challenge, which both reduces the performance of evolutionary algorithms and inhibits the study...... of evolvable digital phenotypes. Although some types of selection in evolutionary computation indirectly encourage evolvability, one unexplored possibility is to directly select for evolvability. To do so, we estimate an individual's future potential for diversity by calculating the behavioral diversity of its...... immediate offspring, and select organisms with increased offspring variation. While the technique is computationally expensive, we hypothesized that direct selection would better encourage evolvability than indirect methods. Experiments in two evolutionary robotics domains confirm this hypothesis: in both...

  18. Evolved atmospheric entry corridor with safety factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zixuan; Ren, Zhang; Li, Qingdong

    2018-02-01

    Atmospheric entry corridors are established in previous research based on the equilibrium glide condition which assumes the flight-path angle to be zero. To get a better understanding of the highly constrained entry flight, an evolved entry corridor that considers the exact flight-path angle is developed in this study. Firstly, the conventional corridor in the altitude vs. velocity plane is extended into a three-dimensional one in the space of altitude, velocity, and flight-path angle. The three-dimensional corridor is generated by a series of constraint boxes. Then, based on a simple mapping method, an evolved two-dimensional entry corridor with safety factor is obtained. The safety factor is defined to describe the flexibility of the flight-path angle for a state within the corridor. Finally, the evolved entry corridor is simulated for the Space Shuttle and the Common Aero Vehicle (CAV) to demonstrate the effectiveness of the corridor generation approach. Compared with the conventional corridor, the evolved corridor is much wider and provides additional information. Therefore, the evolved corridor would benefit more to the entry trajectory design and analysis.

  19. Environmental noise, genetic diversity and the evolution of evolvability and robustness in model gene networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Steiner

    Full Text Available The ability of organisms to adapt and persist in the face of environmental change is accepted as a fundamental feature of natural systems. More contentious is whether the capacity of organisms to adapt (or "evolvability" can itself evolve and the mechanisms underlying such responses. Using model gene networks, I provide evidence that evolvability emerges more readily when populations experience positively autocorrelated environmental noise (red noise compared to populations in stable or randomly varying (white noise environments. Evolvability was correlated with increasing genetic robustness to effects on network viability and decreasing robustness to effects on phenotypic expression; populations whose networks displayed greater viability robustness and lower phenotypic robustness produced more additive genetic variation and adapted more rapidly in novel environments. Patterns of selection for robustness varied antagonistically with epistatic effects of mutations on viability and phenotypic expression, suggesting that trade-offs between these properties may constrain their evolutionary responses. Evolution of evolvability and robustness was stronger in sexual populations compared to asexual populations indicating that enhanced genetic variation under fluctuating selection combined with recombination load is a primary driver of the emergence of evolvability. These results provide insight into the mechanisms potentially underlying rapid adaptation as well as the environmental conditions that drive the evolution of genetic interactions.

  20. Interactively Evolving Compositional Sound Synthesis Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Björn Þór; Hoover, Amy K.; Risi, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    While the success of electronic music often relies on the uniqueness and quality of selected timbres, many musicians struggle with complicated and expensive equipment and techniques to create their desired sounds. Instead, this paper presents a technique for producing novel timbres that are evolved......, CPPNs can theoretically compute any function and can build on those present in traditional synthesizers (e.g. square, sawtooth, triangle, and sine waves functions) to produce completely novel timbres. Evolved with NeuroEvolution of Augmenting Topologies (NEAT), the aim of this paper is to explore...... the space of potential sounds that can be generated through such compositional sound synthesis networks (CSSNs). To study the effect of evolution on subjective appreciation, participants in a listener study ranked evolved timbres by personal preference, resulting in preferences skewed toward the first...

  1. Quantifying evolvability in small biological networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemenman, Ilya [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mugler, Andrew [COLUMBIA UNIV; Ziv, Etay [COLUMBIA UNIV; Wiggins, Chris H [COLUMBIA UNIV

    2008-01-01

    The authors introduce a quantitative measure of the capacity of a small biological network to evolve. The measure is applied to a stochastic description of the experimental setup of Guet et al. (Science 2002, 296, pp. 1466), treating chemical inducers as functional inputs to biochemical networks and the expression of a reporter gene as the functional output. The authors take an information-theoretic approach, allowing the system to set parameters that optimise signal processing ability, thus enumerating each network's highest-fidelity functions. All networks studied are highly evolvable by the measure, meaning that change in function has little dependence on change in parameters. Moreover, each network's functions are connected by paths in the parameter space along which information is not significantly lowered, meaning a network may continuously change its functionality without completely losing it along the way. This property further underscores the evolvability of the networks.

  2. Drug Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is interactions, which may occur between ... more serious. Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin ...

  3. Evolution of evolvability in gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Crombach

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory networks are perhaps the most important organizational level in the cell where signals from the cell state and the outside environment are integrated in terms of activation and inhibition of genes. For the last decade, the study of such networks has been fueled by large-scale experiments and renewed attention from the theoretical field. Different models have been proposed to, for instance, investigate expression dynamics, explain the network topology we observe in bacteria and yeast, and for the analysis of evolvability and robustness of such networks. Yet how these gene regulatory networks evolve and become evolvable remains an open question. An individual-oriented evolutionary model is used to shed light on this matter. Each individual has a genome from which its gene regulatory network is derived. Mutations, such as gene duplications and deletions, alter the genome, while the resulting network determines the gene expression pattern and hence fitness. With this protocol we let a population of individuals evolve under Darwinian selection in an environment that changes through time. Our work demonstrates that long-term evolution of complex gene regulatory networks in a changing environment can lead to a striking increase in the efficiency of generating beneficial mutations. We show that the population evolves towards genotype-phenotype mappings that allow for an orchestrated network-wide change in the gene expression pattern, requiring only a few specific gene indels. The genes involved are hubs of the networks, or directly influencing the hubs. Moreover, throughout the evolutionary trajectory the networks maintain their mutational robustness. In other words, evolution in an alternating environment leads to a network that is sensitive to a small class of beneficial mutations, while the majority of mutations remain neutral: an example of evolution of evolvability.

  4. How the first biopolymers could have evolved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkevich, V I; Gutin, A M; Shakhnovich, E I

    1996-01-01

    In this work, we discuss a possible origin of the first biopolymers with stable unique structures. We suggest that at the prebiotic stage of evolution, long organic polymers had to be compact to avoid hydrolysis and had to be soluble and thus must not be exceedingly hydrophobic. We present an algorithm that generates such sequences for model proteins. The evolved sequences turn out to have a stable unique structure, into which they quickly fold. This result illustrates the idea that the unique three-dimensional native structures of first biopolymers could have evolved as a side effect of nonspecific physicochemical factors acting at the prebiotic stage of evolution. PMID:8570645

  5. Evolving Intelligent Systems Methodology and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Angelov, Plamen; Kasabov, Nik

    2010-01-01

    From theory to techniques, the first all-in-one resource for EIS. There is a clear demand in advanced process industries, defense, and Internet and communication (VoIP) applications for intelligent yet adaptive/evolving systems. Evolving Intelligent Systems is the first self- contained volume that covers this newly established concept in its entirety, from a systematic methodology to case studies to industrial applications. Featuring chapters written by leading world experts, it addresses the progress, trends, and major achievements in this emerging research field, with a strong emphasis on th

  6. Preface: evolving rotifers, evolving science: Proceedings of the XIV International Rotifer Symposium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Devetter, Miloslav; Fontaneto, D.; Jersabek, Ch.D.; Welch, D.B.M.; May, L.; Walsh, E.J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 796, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-6 ISSN 0018-8158 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : evolving rotifers * 14th International Rotifer Symposium * evolving science Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 2.056, year: 2016

  7. Rapid mixing kinetic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephen R; Schilstra, Maria J

    2013-01-01

    Almost all of the elementary steps in a biochemical reaction scheme are either unimolecular or bimolecular processes that frequently occur on sub-second, often sub-millisecond, time scales. The traditional approach in kinetic studies is to mix two or more reagents and monitor the changes in concentrations with time. Conventional spectrophotometers cannot generally be used to study reactions that are complete within less than about 20 s, as it takes that amount of time to manually mix the reagents and activate the instrument. Rapid mixing techniques, which generally achieve mixing in less than 2 ms, overcome this limitation. This chapter is concerned with the use of these techniques in the study of reactions which reach equilibrium; the application of these methods to the study of enzyme kinetics is described in several excellent texts (Cornish-Bowden, Fundamentals of enzyme kinetics. Portland Press, 1995; Gutfreund, Kinetics for the life sciences. Receptors, transmitters and catalysis. Cambridge University Press, 1995).There are various ways to monitor changes in concentration of reactants, intermediates and products after mixing, but the most common way is to use changes in optical signals (absorbance or fluorescence) which often accompany reactions. Although absorbance can sometimes be used, fluorescence is often preferred because of its greater sensitivity, particularly in monitoring conformational changes. Such methods are continuous with good time resolution but they seldom permit the direct determination of the concentrations of individual species. Alternatively, samples may be taken from the reaction volume, mixed with a chemical quenching agent to stop the reaction, and their contents assessed by techniques such as HPLC. These methods can directly determine the concentrations of different species, but are discontinuous and have a limited time resolution.

  8. Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This is a computer-aided drawing of the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer, or TEGA, on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Apollo 16 Evolved Lithology Sodic Ferrogabbro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, Ryan; Jolliff, B. L.; Korotev, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Evolved lunar igneous lithologies, often referred to as the alkali suite, are a minor but important component of the lunar crust. These evolved samples are incompatible-element rich samples, and are, not surprisingly, most common in the Apollo sites in (or near) the incompatible-element rich region of the Moon known as the Procellarum KREEP Terrane (PKT). The most commonly occurring lithologies are granites (A12, A14, A15, A17), monzogabbro (A14, A15), alkali anorthosites (A12, A14), and KREEP basalts (A15, A17). The Feldspathic Highlands Terrane is not entirely devoid of evolved lithologies, and rare clasts of alkali gabbronorite and sodic ferrogabbro (SFG) have been identified in Apollo 16 station 11 breccias 67915 and 67016. Curiously, nearly all pristine evolved lithologies have been found as small clasts or soil particles, exceptions being KREEP basalts 15382/6 and granitic sample 12013 (which is itself a breccia). Here we reexamine the petrography and geochemistry of two SFG-like particles found in a survey of Apollo 16 2-4 mm particles from the Cayley Plains 62283,7-15 and 62243,10-3 (hereafter 7-15 and 10-3 respectively). We will compare these to previously reported SFG samples, including recent analyses on the type specimen of SFG from lunar breccia 67915.

  10. Rapid Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  11. Evolving Microbial Communities in Cellulose-Fed Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Toczyłowska-Mamińska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The abundance of cellulosic wastes make them attractive source of energy for producing electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs. However, electricity production from cellulose requires obligate anaerobes that can degrade cellulose and transfer electrons to the electrode (exoelectrogens, and thus most previous MFC studies have been conducted using two-chamber systems to avoid oxygen contamination of the anode. Single-chamber, air-cathode MFCs typically produce higher power densities than aqueous catholyte MFCs and avoid energy input for the cathodic reaction. To better understand the bacterial communities that evolve in single-chamber air-cathode MFCs fed cellulose, we examined the changes in the bacterial consortium in an MFC fed cellulose over time. The most predominant bacteria shown to be capable electron generation was Firmicutes, with the fermenters decomposing cellulose Bacteroidetes. The main genera developed after extended operation of the cellulose-fed MFC were cellulolytic strains, fermenters and electrogens that included: Parabacteroides, Proteiniphilum, Catonella and Clostridium. These results demonstrate that different communities evolve in air-cathode MFCs fed cellulose than the previous two-chamber reactors.

  12. Why, when, and how did yeast evolve alcoholic fermentation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashko, Sofia; Zhou, Nerve; Compagno, Concetta; Piškur, Jure

    2014-09-01

    The origin of modern fruits brought to microbial communities an abundant source of rich food based on simple sugars. Yeasts, especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae, usually become the predominant group in these niches. One of the most prominent and unique features and likely a winning trait of these yeasts is their ability to rapidly convert sugars to ethanol at both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Why, when, and how did yeasts remodel their carbon metabolism to be able to accumulate ethanol under aerobic conditions and at the expense of decreasing biomass production? We hereby review the recent data on the carbon metabolism in Saccharomycetaceae species and attempt to reconstruct the ancient environment, which could promote the evolution of alcoholic fermentation. We speculate that the first step toward the so-called fermentative lifestyle was the exploration of anaerobic niches resulting in an increased metabolic capacity to degrade sugar to ethanol. The strengthened glycolytic flow had in parallel a beneficial effect on the microbial competition outcome and later evolved as a "new" tool promoting the yeast competition ability under aerobic conditions. The basic aerobic alcoholic fermentation ability was subsequently "upgraded" in several lineages by evolving additional regulatory steps, such as glucose repression in the S. cerevisiae clade, to achieve a more precise metabolic control. © 2014 The Authors. FEMS Yeast Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  13. IR Spectroscopy of Gasses Evolved During Roasting Coffee Beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clain, Alexander; Capaldi, Xavier; Amanuel, Samuel

    2014-03-01

    We measured the IR spectra of the gasses that evolve during roasting of coffee beans. The spectra recorded at different temperature revealed that the intensity of certain IR bands increase as the temperature increases. For instance, the intensity of the CO2 band increased by a factor of four and reached a plateau as the roasting temperature approached 200°C. The intensity further increased as the temperature increased above 200°C, however, in two steps. Similarly the intensity of the OH bands monotonically increased until 200°C and then increased further in two rapid steps above 200°C. The temperature ranges where IR intensities change in two steps coincides with the temperature ranges where typically commercial roasting is done and where the first and second ``cracks'' are heard during roasting.

  14. A rapid and sensitive diagnosis of bovine leukaemia virus infection using the nested shuttle polymerase chain reaction Diagnóstico rápido e sensível da infecção com o vírus da Leucemia Bovina através de Shuttle Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester T. González

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Bovine leukaemia virus (BLV is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL. In Argentina, where a program to eradicate EBL has been introduced, sensitive and reliable diagnosis has attained high priority. Although the importance of the agar gel immunodiffusion test remains unchanged for routine work, an additional diagnostic technique is necessary to confirm cases of sera with equivocal results or of calves carrying maternal antibodies.Utilizing a nested shuttle polymerase chain reaction, the proviral DNA was detected from cows experimentally infected with as little as 5 ml of whole blood from BLV seropositive cows that were nonetheless normal in haematological terms. It proved to be a very sensitive technique, since it rapidly revealed the presence of the provirus, frequently at 2 weeks postinoculation and using a two-round procedure of nested PCR taking only 3 hours. Additionally, the primers used flanked a portion of the viral genome often employed to differentiate BLV type applying BamHI digestion. It is concluded that this method might offer a highly promising diagnostic tool for BLV infection.O Vírus da leucemia bovina (BLV é o agente causal da Leucose Enzoótica Bovina (EBL. Na Argentina, iniciou-se um programa de erradicação da EBL. Neste estágio, é prioritário possuir uma ferramenta de diagnóstico confiável. Embora seja indiscutível a importância do teste de agar gel imunodifusão, empregado rotineiramente no diagnóstico serológico da EBL, faz-se necessária uma técnica de diagnóstico adicional capaz de confirmar os resultados duvidosos. Foi possivel detectar ADN proviral aplicando Nested-PCR em novilhos experimentalmente infectados com pequenas doses de sangue total (5ml obtidas de um bovino BLV soropositivo. Esta técnica, cujo procedimento leva 3 horas, demonstrou ser muito sensível, uma vez que foi capaz de detectar a presença do provirus duas semanas após a inoculação. Os primers utilizados são os que

  15. Expression of human A53T alpha-synuclein in the rat substantia nigra using a novel AAV1/2 vector produces a rapidly evolving pathology with protein aggregation, dystrophic neurite architecture and nigrostriatal degeneration with potential to model the pathology of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xuan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD include the presence of alpha-synuclein (α-syn rich Lewy bodies and neurites and the loss of dopaminergic (DA neurons of the substantia nigra (SN. Animal models of PD based on viral vector-mediated over-expression of α-syn have been developed and show evidence of DA toxicity to varying degrees depending on the type of virus used, its concentration, and the serotype of vector employed. To date these models have been variable, difficult to reproduce, and slow in their evolution to achieve a desired phenotype, hindering their use as a model for testing novel therapeutics. To address these issues we have taken a novel vector in this context, that can be prepared in high titer and which possesses an ability to produce neuronally-directed expression, with expression dynamics optimised to provide a rapid rise in gene product expression. Thus, in the current study, we have used a high titer chimeric AAV1/2 vector, to express human A53T α-syn, an empty vector control (EV, or green fluorescent protein (GFP, the latter to control for the possibility that high levels of protein in themselves might contribute to damage. Results We show that following a single 2 μl injection into the rat SN there is near complete coverage of the structure and expression of A53T α-syn or GFP appears throughout the striatum. Within 3 weeks of SN delivery of their respective vectors, aggregations of insoluble α-syn were observed in SN DA neurons. The numbers of DA neurons in the SN were significantly reduced by expression of A53T α-syn (52%, and to a lesser extent by GFP (24%, compared to EV controls (both P P Conclusions In the current implementation of the model, we recapitulate the primary pathological hallmarks of PD, although a proportion of the SN damage may relate to general protein overload and may not be specific for A53T α-syn. Future studies will thus be required to optimise the dose of

  16. Expression of human A53T alpha-synuclein in the rat substantia nigra using a novel AAV1/2 vector produces a rapidly evolving pathology with protein aggregation, dystrophic neurite architecture and nigrostriatal degeneration with potential to model the pathology of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprich, James B; Johnston, Tom H; Reyes, M Gabriela; Sun, Xuan; Brotchie, Jonathan M

    2010-10-28

    The pathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD) include the presence of alpha-synuclein (α-syn) rich Lewy bodies and neurites and the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra (SN). Animal models of PD based on viral vector-mediated over-expression of α-syn have been developed and show evidence of DA toxicity to varying degrees depending on the type of virus used, its concentration, and the serotype of vector employed. To date these models have been variable, difficult to reproduce, and slow in their evolution to achieve a desired phenotype, hindering their use as a model for testing novel therapeutics. To address these issues we have taken a novel vector in this context, that can be prepared in high titer and which possesses an ability to produce neuronally-directed expression, with expression dynamics optimised to provide a rapid rise in gene product expression. Thus, in the current study, we have used a high titer chimeric AAV1/2 vector, to express human A53T α-syn, an empty vector control (EV), or green fluorescent protein (GFP), the latter to control for the possibility that high levels of protein in themselves might contribute to damage. We show that following a single 2 μl injection into the rat SN there is near complete coverage of the structure and expression of A53T α-syn or GFP appears throughout the striatum. Within 3 weeks of SN delivery of their respective vectors, aggregations of insoluble α-syn were observed in SN DA neurons. The numbers of DA neurons in the SN were significantly reduced by expression of A53T α-syn (52%), and to a lesser extent by GFP (24%), compared to EV controls (both P AAV1/2-A53T α-syn injection produced dystrophic neurites and a significant reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase levels (by 53%, P AAV1/2-GFP condition. In the current implementation of the model, we recapitulate the primary pathological hallmarks of PD, although a proportion of the SN damage may relate to general protein overload and

  17. Evolving wormhole geometries within nonlinear electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arellano, Aaron V B [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, El Cerrillo, Piedras Blancas, CP 50200, Toluca (Mexico); Lobo, Francisco S N [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofisica da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed C8 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2006-10-21

    In this work, we explore the possibility of evolving (2 + 1) and (3 + 1)-dimensional wormhole spacetimes, conformally related to the respective static geometries, within the context of nonlinear electrodynamics. For (3 + 1)-dimensional spacetime, it is found that the Einstein field equation imposes a contracting wormhole solution and the obedience of the weak energy condition. Nevertheless, in the presence of an electric field, the latter presents a singularity at the throat; however, for a pure magnetic field the solution is regular. For (2 + 1)-dimensional case, it is also found that the physical fields are singular at the throat. Thus, taking into account the principle of finiteness, which states that a satisfactory theory should avoid physical quantities becoming infinite, one may rule out evolving (3 + 1)-dimensional wormhole solutions, in the presence of an electric field, and (2 + 1)-dimensional case coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics.

  18. Continual Learning through Evolvable Neural Turing Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüders, Benno; Schläger, Mikkel; Risi, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Continual learning, i.e. the ability to sequentially learn tasks without catastrophic forgetting of previously learned ones, is an important open challenge in machine learning. In this paper we take a step in this direction by showing that the recently proposed Evolving Neural Turing Machine (ENT......) approach is able to perform one-shot learning in a reinforcement learning task without catastrophic forgetting of previously stored associations.......Continual learning, i.e. the ability to sequentially learn tasks without catastrophic forgetting of previously learned ones, is an important open challenge in machine learning. In this paper we take a step in this direction by showing that the recently proposed Evolving Neural Turing Machine (ENTM...

  19. Designing Garments to Evolve Over Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisberg, Vibeke; Grose, Lynda

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a REDO of the current fashion paradigm by investigating how garments might be designed to evolve over time. The purpose is to discuss ways of expanding the traditional role of the designer to include temporal dimensions of creating, producing and using clothes and to suggest a...... to a REDO of design education, to further research and the future fashion and textile industry.......This paper proposes a REDO of the current fashion paradigm by investigating how garments might be designed to evolve over time. The purpose is to discuss ways of expanding the traditional role of the designer to include temporal dimensions of creating, producing and using clothes and to suggest...... a range of potential fashion futures that decouple from declining resources. In the first part literature on 'Past and Present' historical and current aspects of sustainability in fashion and textiles are presented. In the second part, three exploratory case studies are described: Two projects by students...

  20. Antibody therapeutics - the evolving patent landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petering, Jenny; McManamny, Patrick; Honeyman, Jane

    2011-09-01

    The antibody patent landscape has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years, particularly in areas of technology relating to antibody modification to reduce immunogenicity in humans or improve antibody function. In some cases antibody techniques that were developed in the 1980s are still the subject of patent protection in the United States or Canada. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The evolving epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2009-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include assessments of disease burden and evolving patterns of disease presentation. Although it is hoped that sound epidemiologic studies provide aetiological clues, traditional risk factor-based epidemiology has provided limited insights into either Crohn\\'s disease or ulcerative colitis etiopathogenesis. In this update, we will summarize how the changing epidemiology of IBD associated with modernization can be reconciled with current concepts of disease mechanisms and will discuss studies of clinically significant comorbidity in IBD.

  2. Directional Communication in Evolved Multiagent Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    networks. Artificial Life, 15(2):185– 212, 2009. [23] K. O. Stanley and R. Miikkulainen. Evolving neural networks through augmenting topologies ...paper. 2.2 Neuroevolution of Augmenting Topologies The HyperNEAT approach is itself an extension of the original NEAT (Neu- roevolution of Augmenting ...Gauci and K. O. Stanley. Autonomous evolution of topographic regu- larities in artificial neural networks. Neural Computation, 22(7):1860–1898, 2010

  3. The Evolving Leadership Path of Visual Analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluse, Michael; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Gracio, Deborah K.

    2012-01-02

    This is a requested book chapter for an internationally authored book on visual analytics and related fields, coordianted by a UK university and to be published by Springer in 2012. This chapter is an overview of the leadship strategies that PNNL's Jim Thomas and other stakeholders used to establish visual analytics as a field, and how those strategies may evolve in the future.

  4. Raeder paratrigeminal neuralgia evolving to hemicrania continua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porzukowiak, Tina Renae

    2015-04-01

    Raeder paratrigeminal neuralgia is most commonly characterized as deep, boring, nonpulsatile, severe, unilateral facial and head pain in the distribution of the V1 area combined with ipsilateral oculosympathetic palsy and autonomic symptoms. Raeder paratrigeminal neuralgia evolving into hemicrania continua, a rare primary, chronic headache syndrome characterized by unilateral pain and response to indomethacin, has rarely been documented. The purpose of this case report is to contribute to the medical literature a single case of Raeder paratrigeminal neuralgia presenting as multiple cranial nerve palsies that evolved into hemicrania continua that was successfully treated with onabotulinumtoxinA. A 52-year-old white woman presented to the emergency department with the complaint of severe, aching, constant eye pain radiating to the V1 area for 1 week with associated ptosis and photophobia of the left eye. Ocular examination revealed involvement of cranial nerves II, III, V, and VI. Additional symptoms included ipsilateral lacrimation, eyelid edema, and rhinorrhea. Extensive medical work-up showed normal results. Raeder paratrigeminal neuralgia was diagnosed with multiple cranial nerve involvement; the headache component became chronic with periodic exacerbations of autonomic symptoms evolving to a diagnosis of hemicrania continua. The patient was intolerant to traditional indomethacin treatment, and the headache was successfully treated with onabotulinumtoxinA injections. Recognition of ipsilateral signs such as miosis, ptosis, hydrosis, eyelid edema, hyperemia, rhinorrhea, or nasal congestion is useful in the differential diagnosis of painful ophthalmoplegia, particularly in the diagnosis of Raeder paratrigeminal neuralgia and hemicrania continua. This case study illustrates a rare presentation of Raeder paratrigeminal neuralgia evolving into hemicrania continua presenting as a painful ophthalmoplegia with multiple cranial nerve involvement. The example supports the

  5. Evolvability of Amyloidogenic Proteins in Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Ho, Gilbert; Sugama, Shuei; Takamatsu, Yoshiki; Shimizu, Yuka; Takenouchi, Takato; Waragai, Masaaki; Masliah, Eliezer

    2018-01-01

     Currently, the physiological roles of amyloidogenic proteins (APs) in human brain, such as amyloid-β and α-synuclein, are elusive. Given that many APs arose by gene duplication and have been resistant against the pressures of natural selection, APs may be associated with some functions that are advantageous for survival of offspring. Nonetheless, evolvability is the sole physiological quality of APs that has been characterized in microorganisms such as yeast. Since yeast and human brain may share similar strategies in coping with diverse range of critical environmental stresses, the objective of this paper was to discuss the potential role of evolvability of APs in aging-associated neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Given the heterogeneity of APs in terms of structure and cytotoxicity, it is argued that APs might be involved in preconditioning against diverse stresses in human brain. It is further speculated that these stress-related APs, most likely protofibrillar forms, might be transmitted to offspring via the germline, conferring preconditioning against forthcoming stresses. Thus, APs might represent a vehicle for the inheritance of the acquired characteristics against environmental stresses. Curiously, such a characteristic of APs is reminiscent of Charles Darwin’s ‘gemmules’, imagined molecules of heritability described in his pangenesis theory. We propose that evolvability might be a physiological function of APs during the reproductive stage and neurodegenerative diseases could be a by-product effect manifested later in aging. Collectively, our evolvability hypothesis may play a complementary role in the pathophysiology of APs with the conventional amyloid cascade hypothesis. PMID:29439348

  6. Rapid detection of cytomegalovirus in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum samples by polymerase chain reaction: correlation of virus isolation and clinical outcome for patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K K; Vestbo, Jørgen; Benfield, T

    1997-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids and serum samples from 153 patients with pulmonary symptoms who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and underwent BAL were examined for the presence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) by conventional culture and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR...

  7. High-order evolving surface finite element method for parabolic problems on evolving surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kovács, Balázs

    2016-01-01

    High-order spatial discretisations and full discretisations of parabolic partial differential equations on evolving surfaces are studied. We prove convergence of the high-order evolving surface finite element method, by showing high-order versions of geometric approximation errors and perturbation error estimates and by the careful error analysis of a modified Ritz map. Furthermore, convergence of full discretisations using backward difference formulae and implicit Runge-Kutta methods are als...

  8. Evolvability Is an Evolved Ability: The Coding Concept as the Arch-Unit of Natural Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Srdja; Ćirković, Milan M

    2016-03-01

    Physical processes that characterize living matter are qualitatively distinct in that they involve encoding and transfer of specific types of information. Such information plays an active part in the control of events that are ultimately linked to the capacity of the system to persist and multiply. This algorithmicity of life is a key prerequisite for its Darwinian evolution, driven by natural selection acting upon stochastically arising variations of the encoded information. The concept of evolvability attempts to define the total capacity of a system to evolve new encoded traits under appropriate conditions, i.e., the accessible section of total morphological space. Since this is dependent on previously evolved regulatory networks that govern information flow in the system, evolvability itself may be regarded as an evolved ability. The way information is physically written, read and modified in living cells (the "coding concept") has not changed substantially during the whole history of the Earth's biosphere. This biosphere, be it alone or one of many, is, accordingly, itself a product of natural selection, since the overall evolvability conferred by its coding concept (nucleic acids as information carriers with the "rulebook of meanings" provided by codons, as well as all the subsystems that regulate various conditional information-reading modes) certainly played a key role in enabling this biosphere to survive up to the present, through alterations of planetary conditions, including at least five catastrophic events linked to major mass extinctions. We submit that, whatever the actual prebiotic physical and chemical processes may have been on our home planet, or may, in principle, occur at some time and place in the Universe, a particular coding concept, with its respective potential to give rise to a biosphere, or class of biospheres, of a certain evolvability, may itself be regarded as a unit (indeed the arch-unit) of natural selection.

  9. Understanding the physics and chemistry of reaction mechanisms from atomic contributions: a reaction force perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vöhringer-Martinez, Esteban; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2012-07-12

    Studying chemical reactions involves the knowledge of the reaction mechanism. Despite activation barriers describing the kinetics or reaction energies reflecting thermodynamic aspects, identifying the underlying physics and chemistry along the reaction path contributes essentially to the overall understanding of reaction mechanisms, especially for catalysis. In the past years the reaction force has evolved as a valuable tool to discern between structural changes and electrons' rearrangement in chemical reactions. It provides a framework to analyze chemical reactions and additionally a rational partition of activation and reaction energies. Here, we propose to separate these energies further in atomic contributions, which will shed new insights in the underlying reaction mechanism. As first case studies we analyze two intramolecular proton transfer reactions. Despite the atom based separation of activation barriers and reaction energies, we also assign the participation of each atom in structural changes or electrons' rearrangement along the intrinsic reaction coordinate. These participations allow us to identify the role of each atom in the two reactions and therfore the underlying chemistry. The knowledge of the reaction chemistry immediately leads us to suggest replacements with other atom types that would facilitate certain processes in the reaction. The characterization of the contribution of each atom to the reaction energetics, additionally, identifies the reactive center of a molecular system that unites the main atoms contributing to the potential energy change along the reaction path.

  10. Survivability is more fundamental than evolvability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Palmer

    Full Text Available For a lineage to survive over long time periods, it must sometimes change. This has given rise to the term evolvability, meaning the tendency to produce adaptive variation. One lineage may be superior to another in terms of its current standing variation, or it may tend to produce more adaptive variation. However, evolutionary outcomes depend on more than standing variation and produced adaptive variation: deleterious variation also matters. Evolvability, as most commonly interpreted, is not predictive of evolutionary outcomes. Here, we define a predictive measure of the evolutionary success of a lineage that we call the k-survivability, defined as the probability that the lineage avoids extinction for k generations. We estimate the k-survivability using multiple experimental replicates. Because we measure evolutionary outcomes, the initial standing variation, the full spectrum of generated variation, and the heritability of that variation are all incorporated. Survivability also accounts for the decreased joint likelihood of extinction of sub-lineages when they 1 disperse in space, or 2 diversify in lifestyle. We illustrate measurement of survivability with in silico models, and suggest that it may also be measured in vivo using multiple longitudinal replicates. The k-survivability is a metric that enables the quantitative study of, for example, the evolution of 1 mutation rates, 2 dispersal mechanisms, 3 the genotype-phenotype map, and 4 sexual reproduction, in temporally and spatially fluctuating environments. Although these disparate phenomena evolve by well-understood microevolutionary rules, they are also subject to the macroevolutionary constraint of long-term survivability.

  11. Present weather and climate: evolving conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerling, Martin P; Dettinger, Michael; Wolter, Klaus; Lukas, Jeff; Eischeid, Jon K.; Nemani, Rama; Liebmann, Brant; Kunkel, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter assesses weather and climate variability and trends in the Southwest, using observed climate and paleoclimate records. It analyzes the last 100 years of climate variability in comparison to the last 1,000 years, and links the important features of evolving climate conditions to river flow variability in four of the region’s major drainage basins. The chapter closes with an assessment of the monitoring and scientific research needed to increase confidence in understanding when climate episodes, events, and phenomena are attributable to human-caused climate change.

  12. f( R) gravity solutions for evolving wormholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Subhra; Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2017-08-01

    The scalar-tensor f( R) theory of gravity is considered in the framework of a simple inhomogeneous space-time model. In this research we use the reconstruction technique to look for possible evolving wormhole solutions within viable f( R) gravity formalism. These f( R) models are then constrained so that they are consistent with existing experimental data. Energy conditions related to the matter threading the wormhole are analyzed graphically and are in general found to obey the null energy conditions (NEC) in regions around the throat, while in the limit f(R)=R, NEC can be violated at large in regions around the throat.

  13. Information theory, evolutionary innovations and evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Andreas

    2017-12-05

    How difficult is it to 'discover' an evolutionary adaptation or innovation? I here suggest that information theory, in combination with high-throughput DNA sequencing, can help answer this question by quantifying a new phenotype's information content. I apply this framework to compute the phenotypic information associated with novel gene regulation and with the ability to use novel carbon sources. The framework can also help quantify how DNA duplications affect evolvability, estimate the complexity of phenotypes and clarify the meaning of 'progress' in Darwinian evolution.This article is part of the themed issue 'Process and pattern in innovations from cells to societies'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. Evolving Random Forest for Preference Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abou-Zleikha, Mohamed; Shaker, Noor

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach for pairwise preference learning through a combination of an evolutionary method and random forest. Grammatical evolution is used to describe the structure of the trees in the Random Forest (RF) and to handle the process of evolution. Evolved random forests ...... obtained for predicting pairwise self-reports of users for the three emotional states engagement, frustration and challenge show very promising results that are comparable and in some cases superior to those obtained from state-of-the-art methods....

  15. Boron-selective reactions as powerful tools for modular synthesis of diverse complex molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Pengfei

    2015-12-21

    In the context of modular and rapid construction of molecular diversity and complexity for applications in organic synthesis, biomedical and materials sciences, a generally useful strategy has emerged based on boron-selective chemical transformations. In the last decade, these types of reactions have evolved from proof-of-concept to some advanced applications in the efficient preparation of complex natural products and even automated precise manufacturing on the molecular level. These advances have shown the great potential of boron-selective reactions in simplifying synthetic design and experimental operations, and should inspire new developments in related chemical and technological areas. This tutorial review will highlight the original contributions and representative advances in this emerging field.

  16. Netgram: Visualizing Communities in Evolving Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghvendra Mall

    Full Text Available Real-world complex networks are dynamic in nature and change over time. The change is usually observed in the interactions within the network over time. Complex networks exhibit community like structures. A key feature of the dynamics of complex networks is the evolution of communities over time. Several methods have been proposed to detect and track the evolution of these groups over time. However, there is no generic tool which visualizes all the aspects of group evolution in dynamic networks including birth, death, splitting, merging, expansion, shrinkage and continuation of groups. In this paper, we propose Netgram: a tool for visualizing evolution of communities in time-evolving graphs. Netgram maintains evolution of communities over 2 consecutive time-stamps in tables which are used to create a query database using the sql outer-join operation. It uses a line-based visualization technique which adheres to certain design principles and aesthetic guidelines. Netgram uses a greedy solution to order the initial community information provided by the evolutionary clustering technique such that we have fewer line cross-overs in the visualization. This makes it easier to track the progress of individual communities in time evolving graphs. Netgram is a generic toolkit which can be used with any evolutionary community detection algorithm as illustrated in our experiments. We use Netgram for visualization of topic evolution in the NIPS conference over a period of 11 years and observe the emergence and merging of several disciplines in the field of information processing systems.

  17. Evolving MEMS Resonator Designs for Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornby, Gregory S.; Kraus, William F.; Lohn, Jason D.

    2008-01-01

    Because of their small size and high reliability, microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices have the potential to revolution many areas of engineering. As with conventionally-sized engineering design, there is likely to be a demand for the automated design of MEMS devices. This paper describes our current status as we progress toward our ultimate goal of using an evolutionary algorithm and a generative representation to produce designs of a MEMS device and successfully demonstrate its transfer to an actual chip. To produce designs that are likely to transfer to reality, we present two ways to modify evaluation of designs. The first is to add location noise, differences between the actual dimensions of the design and the design blueprint, which is a technique we have used for our work in evolving antennas and robots. The second method is to add prestress to model the warping that occurs during the extreme heat of fabrication. In future we expect to fabricate and test some MEMS resonators that are evolved in this way.

  18. Netgram: Visualizing Communities in Evolving Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Raghvendra; Langone, Rocco; Suykens, Johan A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Real-world complex networks are dynamic in nature and change over time. The change is usually observed in the interactions within the network over time. Complex networks exhibit community like structures. A key feature of the dynamics of complex networks is the evolution of communities over time. Several methods have been proposed to detect and track the evolution of these groups over time. However, there is no generic tool which visualizes all the aspects of group evolution in dynamic networks including birth, death, splitting, merging, expansion, shrinkage and continuation of groups. In this paper, we propose Netgram: a tool for visualizing evolution of communities in time-evolving graphs. Netgram maintains evolution of communities over 2 consecutive time-stamps in tables which are used to create a query database using the sql outer-join operation. It uses a line-based visualization technique which adheres to certain design principles and aesthetic guidelines. Netgram uses a greedy solution to order the initial community information provided by the evolutionary clustering technique such that we have fewer line cross-overs in the visualization. This makes it easier to track the progress of individual communities in time evolving graphs. Netgram is a generic toolkit which can be used with any evolutionary community detection algorithm as illustrated in our experiments. We use Netgram for visualization of topic evolution in the NIPS conference over a period of 11 years and observe the emergence and merging of several disciplines in the field of information processing systems. PMID:26356538

  19. BOOK REVIEW: OPENING SCIENCE, THE EVOLVING GUIDE ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The way we get our funding, collaborate, do our research, and get the word out has evolved over hundreds of years but we can imagine a more open science world, largely facilitated by the internet. The movement towards this more open way of doing and presenting science is coming, and it is not taking hundreds of years. If you are interested in these trends, and would like to find out more about where this is all headed and what it means to you, consider downloding Opening Science, edited by Sönke Bartling and Sascha Friesike, subtitled The Evolving Guide on How the Internet is Changing Research, Collaboration, and Scholarly Publishing. In 26 chapters by various authors from a range of disciplines the book explores the developing world of open science, starting from the first scientific revolution and bringing us to the next scientific revolution, sometimes referred to as “Science 2.0”. Some of the articles deal with the impact of the changing landscape of how science is done, looking at the impact of open science on Academia, or journal publishing, or medical research. Many of the articles look at the uses, pitfalls, and impact of specific tools, like microblogging (think Twitter), social networking, and reference management. There is lots of discussion and definition of terms you might use or misuse like “altmetrics” and “impact factor”. Science will probably never be completely open, and Twitter will probably never replace the journal article,

  20. NASA's Space Launch System: An Evolving Capability for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, Stephen D.; Robinson, Kimberly F.

    2016-01-01

    A foundational capability for international human deep-space exploration, NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle represents a new spaceflight infrastructure asset, creating opportunities for mission profiles and space systems that cannot currently be executed. While the primary purpose of SLS, which is making rapid progress towards initial launch readiness in two years, will be to support NASA's Journey to Mars, discussions are already well underway regarding other potential utilization of the vehicle's unique capabilities. In its initial Block 1 configuration, capable of launching 70 metric tons (t) to low Earth orbit (LEO), SLS will propel the Orion crew vehicle to cislunar space, while also delivering small CubeSat-class spacecraft to deep-space destinations. With the addition of a more powerful upper stage, the Block 1B configuration of SLS will be able to deliver 105 t to LEO and enable more ambitious human missions into the proving ground of space. This configuration offers opportunities for launching co-manifested payloads with the Orion crew vehicle, and a class of secondary payloads, larger than today's CubeSats. Further upgrades to the vehicle, including advanced boosters, will evolve its performance to 130 t in its Block 2 configuration. Both Block 1B and Block 2 also offer the capability to carry 8.4- or 10-m payload fairings, larger than any contemporary launch vehicle. With unmatched mass-lift capability, payload volume, and C3, SLS not only enables spacecraft or mission designs currently impossible with contemporary EELVs, it also offers enhancing benefits, such as reduced risk, operational costs and/or complexity, shorter transit time to destination or launching large systems either monolithically or in fewer components. This paper will discuss both the performance and capabilities of Space Launch System as it evolves, and the current state of SLS utilization planning.

  1. Rapid chemical separations

    CERN Document Server

    Trautmann, N

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given on the progress of fast chemical separation procedures during the last few years. Fast, discontinuous separation techniques are illustrated by a procedure for niobium. The use of such techniques for the chemical characterization of the heaviest known elements is described. Other rapid separation methods from aqueous solutions are summarized. The application of the high speed liquid chromatography to the separation of chemically similar elements is outlined. The use of the gas jet recoil transport method for nuclear reaction products and its combination with a continuous solvent extraction technique and with a thermochromatographic separation is presented. Different separation methods in the gas phase are briefly discussed and the attachment of a thermochromatographic technique to an on-line mass separator is shown. (45 refs).

  2. Counseling and Family Therapy in India: Evolving Professions in a Rapidly Developing Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, David K.; Jain, Sachin; Ramirez, Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    Outpatient counseling is a relatively new concept and form of clinical practice in India. This article provides an overview of the need for and current status of counseling and family therapy in India. Examples of training programs are presented, and future prospects for the counseling and family therapy professions are highlighted. The authors…

  3. Origin of a rapidly evolving homeostatic control system programming testis function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Pengli; Yagi, Shintaro; Shiota, Kunio; Alam, S M Khorshed; Vivian, Jay L; Wolfe, Michael W; Rumi, M A Karim; Chakraborty, Damayanti; Kubota, Kaiyu; Dhakal, Pramod; Soares, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    Mammals share common strategies for regulating reproduction, including a conserved hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis; yet, individual species exhibit differences in reproductive performance. In this report, we describe the discovery of a species-restricted homeostatic control system programming testis growth and function. Prl3c1 is a member of the prolactin gene family and its protein product (PLP-J) was discovered as a uterine cytokine contributing to the establishment of pregnancy. We utilized mouse mutagenesis of Prl3c1 and revealed its involvement in the regulation of the male reproductive axis. The Prl3c1-null male reproductive phenotype was characterized by testiculomegaly and hyperandrogenism. The larger testes in the Prl3c1-null mice were associated with an expansion of the Leydig cell compartment. Prl3c1 locus is a template for two transcripts (Prl3c1-v1 and Prl3c1-v2) expressed in a tissue-specific pattern. Prl3c1-v1 is expressed in uterine decidua, while Prl3c1-v2 is expressed in Leydig cells of the testis. 5'RACE, chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA methylation analyses were used to define cell-specific promoter usage and alternative transcript expression. We examined the Prl3c1 locus in five murid rodents and showed that the testicular transcript and encoded protein are the result of a recent retrotransposition event at the Mus musculus Prl3c1 locus. Prl3c1-v1 encodes PLP-J V1 and Prl3c1-v2 encodes PLP-J V2. Each protein exhibits distinct intracellular targeting and actions. PLP-J V2 possesses Leydig cell-static actions consistent with the Prl3c1-null testicular phenotype. Analysis of the biology of the Prl3c1 gene has provided insight into a previously unappreciated homeostatic setpoint control system programming testicular growth and function. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  4. The Information Technology Program Manager’s Dilemma: Rapidly Evolving Technology and Stagnant Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    information technology systems. The current DoDI 5000.02 leaves IT project and program managers wondering how the current process applies to them, as the guidance is fairly rigid and does not allow for the flexibility required to appropriately manage IT programs. Until very recently, in comparison to the development of a traditional weapons system, IT programs seemed to have been viewed as a utility or service instead of a critical component to national security. Perhaps that is because data passing through cables cannot be observed with the naked senses and therefore an

  5. INDIAN BUSINESSMEN IN FRANCE: AN INITIAL EXAMINATION OF THEIR ACTIVITIES IN A RAPIDLY-EVOLVING CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasoodeven Vuddamalay

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to understand the implications of the recent economic and political evolution of Indian immigration in Europe, and specifically in France, their businesses and entrepreneurial groups, as well as their links with the countries of origin/welcoming countries and their transnational networks, using an historical and geoanthropological approach. The analysis also covers the essential links that the transnational entrepreneurs establish between France/Europe and the rest of the world, particularly with the emerging cities of Asia, the Middle East and, possibly, certain parts of Africa, such as South Africa, the Mascarene Islands and East Africa. To that end, the author begins by contextualising Indian business projects in France, before going on to examine the current situation of ethnic shops, the transnational companies of traditional trading communities and, to some extent, their Institute of Information Technology networks. The author also carries out a study of the “Mittal Case” as a new paradigm of research within the changing world economy, as the traditional North-South separation is undermined and the complexities of fields in research on trading and business groups is renewed. Finally, the author situates these debates within the growing world knowledge of the communities of Indian immigrants in France and their small ethnic businessmen and traders.

  6. Development of rapidly evolving intron markers to estimate multilocus species trees of rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rodríguez-Prieto

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges in the analysis of closely related species, speciation and phylogeography is the identification of variable sequence markers that allow the determination of genealogical relationships in multiple genomic regions using coalescent and species tree approaches. Rodent species represent nearly half of the mammalian diversity, but so far no systematic study has been carried out to detect suitable informative markers for this group. Here, we used a bioinformatic pipeline to extract intron sequences from rodent genomes available in databases and applied a series of filters that allowed the identification of 208 introns that adequately fulfilled several criteria for these studies. The main required characteristics of the introns were that they had the maximum possible mutation rates, that they were part of single-copy genes, that they had an appropriate sequence length for amplification, and that they were flanked by exons with suitable regions for primer design. In addition, in order to determine the validity of this approach, we chose ten of these introns for primer design and tested them in a panel of eleven rodent species belonging to different representative families. We show that all these introns can be amplified in the majority of species and that, overall, 79% of the amplifications worked with minimum optimization of the annealing temperature. In addition, we confirmed for a pair of sister species the relatively high level of sequence divergence of these introns. Therefore, we provide here a set of adequate intron markers that can be applied to different species of Rodentia for their use in studies that require significant sequence variability.

  7. The rapidly evolving therapies for advanced melanoma--Towards immunotherapy, molecular targeted therapy, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ziqiang; Liu, Wei; Gotlieb, Vladimir

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of melanoma in both males and females continues to rise during the past 40 years despite the stable or declining trends for most cancer types. Due to the tremendous advance in immunobiology and molecular biology, breakthroughs in both immunotherapies and molecular targeted therapies have recently revolutionized the standard of care for patients with advanced melanoma. In 2011, US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved ipilimumab, an anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) antibody for metastatic melanoma therapy. Since then, novel drugs including antibodies to programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) such as pembrolizumab and nivolumab (both approved in 2014), selective BRAF inhibitors such as vemurafenib (approved in 2011), dabrafenib (approved in 2013); and MEK inhibitor trametinib (approved in 2013), have greatly extended the potential of immunotherapy and molecular targeted therapy for advanced melanoma. All of which have been demonstrated a significant increase in overall survival rate, and long-term benefits in multiple large clinical trials. Several new agents and novel therapies are currently under phase III clinical trials with the hope of being approved in the near future. We already entered a golden era in oncology that are providing significant survival improvement. In the meantime, new challenges for clinicians also started to emerge. In this review, we presented the existing evidence for the newest treatments for advanced melanoma, including CTLA-4, PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitors and BRAF, MEK inhibitors. We also discussed the strengths, limitations and challenges of using these novel therapies, and potential solutions as well as highlighted the areas requiring further research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Rapidly evolving circularly polarized emission during the 1994 outburst of GRO J1655-40

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macquart, JP; Wu, K; Sault, RJ; Hannikainen, DC

    2002-01-01

    We report the detection of circular polarization during the 1994 outburst of the Galactic microquasar GRO J1655-40. The circular polarization is clearly detected at 1.4 and 2.4 GHz, but not at 4.8 and 8.4 GHz, where its magnitude never exceeds 5 mJy. Both the sign and magnitude of the circular

  9. Evolving Technology, Shifting Expectations: Cultivating Pedagogy for a Rapidly Changing GIS Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, Britta; Thatcher, Jim

    2017-01-01

    As humans and natural processes continuously reshape the surface of the Earth, there is an unceasing need to document and analyze them through the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The public is gaining more access to spatial technologies that were once only available to highly trained professionals. With technological evolution comes a…

  10. Transforming Research in Oceanography through Education, Ethnography and Rapidly Evolving Technologies: An NSF-INSPIRE project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, C. R.; Croff Bell, K. L.; Pallant, A.; Mirmalek, Z.; Jasanoff, S.; Rajan, K.

    2014-12-01

    This paper will discuss a new NSF-INSPIRE project that brings together research conducted in the fields of Ocean Sciences, Education & Human Resources and Computer and Information Science & Engineering. Specifically, our objective is to investigate new methods by which telepresence can be used to conduct cutting edge research and provide authentic educational experiences to undergraduate students, remotely. We choose to conduct this research in an Oceanographic context for two reasons: first with the move toward smaller research ships in the national Oceanographic research fleet, we anticipate that access to berth space at sea will continue to be at a premium. Any component of traditional oceanographic research that can be ported to shore without loss of effectiveness would be of immediate benefit to the Ocean Sciences. Equally, however, we argue that any improvements to work place and/or education practices that we can identify while delivering research and education from the bottom of the deep ocean should be readily mappable to any other scientific or engineering activities that seek to make use of telepresence in less extreme remote environments. Work on our TREET project, to-date, has included recruitment of 6 early career scientists keen to take advantage of the research opportunity provided, together with two senior science mentors with experience using Telepresence and a cohort of undergraduate students at three of the ECS partner Universities, spanning 4 time zones across the continental US. Following a 12-week synchronous on-line seminar series taught in Spring-Summer 2014, the entire team joined together at the Inner Space Center in Sept-Oct 2014 to participate, virtually, in a cruise of research and exploration to the Kick'Em Jenny underwater volcano and adjacent cold seep sites, conducted by the Ocean Exploration Trust's ROV Hercules aboard the Exploration Vessel Nautilus. Our presentation will include preliminary results from that cruise.

  11. An RNA gene expressed during cortical development evolved rapidly in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pollard, Katherine S; Salama, Sofie R; Lambert, Nelle

    2006-01-01

    of the human brain. We devised a ranking of regions in the human genome that show significant evolutionary acceleration. Here we report that the most dramatic of these 'human accelerated regions', HAR1, is part of a novel RNA gene (HAR1F) that is expressed specifically in Cajal-Retzius neurons...

  12. Evolving Digital Publishing Opportunities across Composition Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawishler, Gail E.; Selfe, Cynthia L.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors report since the early 1980s, the profession has seen plenty of changes in the arena of digital scholarly publishing: during this time, while the specific challenges have seldom remained the same, the presence and the pressures of rapid technological change endure. In fact, as an editorial team that has, in part,…

  13. Evolving chromosomes and gene regulatory networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aswin

    Many processes change genomes. Koonin and Wolf. 2008. Page 5 .. including horizontal gene transfer. Koonin and Wolf. 2008. Page 6. Horizontal gene transfer. Drastic modification of genetic material. Rapid exploration of ne niches and phenot pes. Page 7. Horizontal gene transfer regulates. New selective forces for gene ...

  14. Duplicated genes evolve independently in allopolyploid cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard C. Cronn; Randall L. Small; Jonathan F. Wendel

    1999-01-01

    Of the many processes that generate gene duplications, polyploidy is unique in that entire genomes are duplicated. This process has been important in the evolution of many eukaryotic groups, and it occurs with high frequency in plants. Recent evidence suggests that polyploidization may be accompanied by rapid genomic changes, but the evolutionary fate of discrete loci...

  15. Evolving water science in the Anthropocene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savenije, H.H.G.; Hoekstra, A.Y.; Van der Zaag, P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the changing relation between man and water since the industrial revolution, the period that has been called the Anthropocene because of the unprecedented scale at which humans have altered the planet.We show how the rapidly changing reality urges us to continuously improve our

  16. Evolving water science in the Anthropocene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savenije, H.H.G.; Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert; van der Zaag, P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the changing relation between human beings and water since the Industrial Revolution, a period that has been called the Anthropocene because of the unprecedented scale at which humans have altered the planet during this time. We show how the rapidly changing world urges us to

  17. Reaction Time and Anticipation Time: Effects of Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jerry R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Results of a study indicated that, as age increased from seven to 20 years, reaction time decreased, with males having a more rapid reaction time than females. Beginning at age 10 or 11, subjects developed better motor plans and relied less on rapid reaction time to achieve good anticipation time. (FG)

  18. Evolvability as a Quality Attribute of Software Architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciraci, S.; van den Broek, P.M.; Duchien, Laurence; D'Hondt, Maja; Mens, Tom

    We review the definition of evolvability as it appears on the literature. In particular, the concept of software evolvability is compared with other system quality attributes, such as adaptability, maintainability and modifiability.

  19. The evolution of prompt reaction to adverse ties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Segbroeck, Sven; Santos, Francisco C; Nowé, Ann; Pacheco, Jorge M; Lenaerts, Tom

    2008-10-17

    In recent years it has been found that the combination of evolutionary game theory with population structures modelled in terms of dynamical graphs, in which individuals are allowed to sever unwanted social ties while keeping the good ones, provides a viable solution to the conundrum of cooperation. It is well known that in reality individuals respond differently to disadvantageous interactions. Yet, the evolutionary mechanism determining the individuals' willingness to sever unfavourable ties remains unclear. We introduce a novel way of thinking about the joint evolution of cooperation and social contacts. The struggle for survival between cooperators and defectors leads to an arms race for swiftness in adjusting social ties, based purely on a self-regarding, individual judgement. Since defectors are never able to establish social ties under mutual agreement, they break adverse ties more rapidly than cooperators, who tend to evolve stable and long-term relations. Ironically, defectors' constant search for partners to exploit leads to heterogeneous networks that improve the survivability of cooperators, compared to the traditional homogenous population assumption. When communities face the prisoner's dilemma, swift reaction to adverse ties evolves when competition is fierce between cooperators and defectors, providing an evolutionary basis for the necessity of individuals to adjust their social ties. Our results show how our innate resilience to change relates to mutual agreement between cooperators and how "loyalty" or persistent social ties bring along an evolutionary disadvantage, both from an individual and group perspective.

  20. Synthesis of renewable diesel through hydrodeoxygenation reaction from nyamplung oil (Calophyllum Inophyllum oil) using NiMo/Z and NiMo/C catalysts with rapid heating and cooling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanto, B. H.; Prakasa, M. B.; Shahab, M. H.

    2016-11-01

    The synthesis of metal nanocrystal was conducted by modification preparation from simple heating method which heating and cooling process run rapidly. The result of NiMo/Z 575 °C characterizations are 33.73 m2/gram surface area and 31.80 nm crystal size. By used NiMo/C 700 °C catalyst for 30 minutes which had surface area of 263.21 m2/gram, had 31.77 nm crystal size, and good morphology, obtained catalyst with high activity, selectivity, and stability. After catalyst activated, synthesis of renewable diesel performed in hydrogenation reactor at 375 °C, 12 bar, and 800 rpm. The result of conversion was 81.99%, yield was 68.08%, and selectivity was 84.54%.

  1. Tracking correlated, simultaneously evolving target populations, II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Ronald

    2017-05-01

    This paper is the sixth in a series aimed at weakening the independence assumptions that are typically presumed in multitarget tracking. Earlier papers investigated Bayes …lters that propagate the correlations between two evolving multitarget systems. Last year at this conference we attempted to derive PHD …lter-type approximations that account for both spatial correlation and cardinality correlation (i.e., correlation between the target numbers of the two systems). Unfortunately, this approach required heuristic models of both clutter and target appearance in order to incorporate both spatial and cardinality correlation. This paper describes a fully rigorous approach- provided, however, that spatial correlation between the two populations is ignored and only their cardinality correlations are taken into account. We derive the time-update and measurement-update equations for a CPHD …lter describing the evolution of such correlated multitarget populations.

  2. Resiliently evolving supply-demand networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubido, Nicolás; Grebogi, Celso; Baptista, Murilo S

    2014-01-01

    The ability to design a transport network such that commodities are brought from suppliers to consumers in a steady, optimal, and stable way is of great importance for distribution systems nowadays. In this work, by using the circuit laws of Kirchhoff and Ohm, we provide the exact capacities of the edges that an optimal supply-demand network should have to operate stably under perturbations, i.e., without overloading. The perturbations we consider are the evolution of the connecting topology, the decentralization of hub sources or sinks, and the intermittence of supplier and consumer characteristics. We analyze these conditions and the impact of our results, both on the current United Kingdom power-grid structure and on numerically generated evolving archetypal network topologies.

  3. A local-world evolving hypernetwork model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang-Yong; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2014-01-01

    Complex hypernetworks are ubiquitous in the real system. It is very important to investigate the evolution mechanisms. In this paper, we present a local-world evolving hypernetwork model by taking into account the hyperedge growth and local-world hyperedge preferential attachment mechanisms. At each time step, a newly added hyperedge encircles a new coming node and a number of nodes from a randomly selected local world. The number of the selected nodes from the local world obeys the uniform distribution and its mean value is m. The analytical and simulation results show that the hyperdegree approximately obeys the power-law form and the exponent of hyperdegree distribution is γ = 2 + 1/m. Furthermore, we numerically investigate the node degree, hyperedge degree, clustering coefficient, as well as the average distance, and find that the hypernetwork model shares the scale-free and small-world properties, which shed some light for deeply understanding the evolution mechanism of the real systems.

  4. The Evolving Theory of Evolutionary Radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, M; Breitkreuz, L; Alvarado, M; Baca, S; Cooper, J C; Heins, L; Herzog, K; Lieberman, B S

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary radiations have intrigued biologists for more than 100 years, and our understanding of the patterns and processes associated with these radiations continues to grow and evolve. Recently it has been recognized that there are many different types of evolutionary radiation beyond the well-studied adaptive radiations. We focus here on multifarious types of evolutionary radiations, paying special attention to the abiotic factors that might trigger diversification in clades. We integrate concepts such as exaptation, species selection, coevolution, and the turnover-pulse hypothesis (TPH) into the theoretical framework of evolutionary radiations. We also discuss other phenomena that are related to, but distinct from, evolutionary radiations that have relevance for evolutionary biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Epidemic spreading on evolving signed networks

    CERN Document Server

    Saeedian, M; Jafari, G R; Kertesz, J

    2016-01-01

    Most studies of disease spreading consider the underlying social network as obtained without the contagion, though epidemic influences peoples willingness to contact others: A friendly contact may be turned to unfriendly to avoid infection. We study the susceptible-infected (SI) disease spreading model on signed networks, in which each edge is associated with a positive or negative sign representing the friendly or unfriendly relation between its end nodes. In a signed network, according to Heiders theory, edge signs evolve such that finally a state of structural balance is achieved, corresponding to no frustration in physics terms. However, the danger of infection affects the evolution of its edge signs. To describe the coupled problem of the sign evolution and disease spreading, we generalize the notion of structural balance by taking into account the state of the nodes. We introduce an energy function and carry out Monte-Carlo simulations on complete networks to test the energy landscape, where we find loc...

  6. Finch: A System for Evolving Java (Bytecode)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Michael; Sipper, Moshe

    The established approach in genetic programming (GP) involves the definition of functions and terminals appropriate to the problem at hand, after which evolution of expressions using these definitions takes place. We have recently developed a system, dubbed FINCH (Fertile Darwinian Bytecode Harvester), to evolutionarily improve actual, extant software, which was not intentionally written for the purpose of serving as a GP representation in particular, nor for evolution in general. This is in contrast to existing work that uses restricted subsets of the Java bytecode instruction set as a representation language for individuals in genetic programming. The ability to evolve Java programs will hopefully lead to a valuable new tool in the software engineer's toolkit.

  7. Prospective evaluation of a high multiplexing real-time polymerase chain reaction array for the rapid identification and characterization of bacteria causative of nosocomial pneumonia from clinical specimens: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roisin, S; Huang, T-D; de Mendonça, R; Nonhoff, C; Bogaerts, P; Hites, M; Delaere, B; Hamels, S; de Longueville, F; Glupczynski, Y; Denis, O

    2017-09-27

    The purpose of this study was evaluation of the VAPChip assay based on the "Rapid-Array-PCR-technology" which targets 13 respiratory pathogens and 24 β-lactam resistance genes directly on respiratory clinical specimens. The first step included analysis of 45 respiratory specimens in order to calibrate and determine the threshold for target genes. The second prospective step involved 85 respiratory samples from patients suspected of nosocomial pneumonia collected in two academic hospitals over an 8-month period. Results of the VAPChip assay were compared to routine methods. The first step showed a large proportion of positive signals for H. influenzae and/or S. pneumoniae. For identification, discrepancies were observed in seven samples. Thresholds were adapted and two probes were re-designed to create a new version of the cartridge. In the second phase, sensitivity and specificity of the VAPchip for bacterial identification were 72.9% and 99.1%, respectively. Seventy (82%) pathogens were correctly identified by both methods. Nine pathogens detected by the VAPChip were culture negative and 26 pathogens identified by culture were VAPChip negative. For resistance mechanisms, 11 probes were positive without identification of pathogens with an antimicrobial-susceptibility testing compatible by culture. However, the patient's recent microbiological history was able to explain most of these positive signals. The VAPChip assay simultaneously detects different pathogens and resistance mechanisms directly from clinical samples. This system seems very promising but the extraction process needs to be automated for routine implementation. This kind of rapid point-of-care automated platform permitting a syndromic approach will be the future challenge in the management of infectious diseases.

  8. Rapid synthesis of beta zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Chang, Chun -Chih; Dornath, Paul; Wang, Zhuopeng

    2015-08-18

    The invention provides methods for rapidly synthesizing heteroatom containing zeolites including Sn-Beta, Si-Beta, Ti-Beta, Zr-Beta and Fe-Beta. The methods for synthesizing heteroatom zeolites include using well-crystalline zeolite crystals as seeds and using a fluoride-free, caustic medium in a seeded dry-gel conversion method. The Beta zeolite catalysts made by the methods of the invention catalyze both isomerization and dehydration reactions.

  9. cycloaddition reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    models of regioselectivity in pericyclic reactions. In addition, local hard and soft acid base (HSAB) princi- ples have been also employed to predict the observed regioselectivity.2 In recent years, the conceptual density functional theory has been remarkably successful in explaining the reactivity and site selectivity.3 The.

  10. Discrimination between mild and severe Citrus tristeza virus isolates with a rapid and highly specific real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method using TaqMan LNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Ruiz, S; Moreno, P; Guerri, J; Ambrós, S

    2009-03-01

    Severe isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) inducing seedling yellows (SY) and/or stem pitting (SP) in grapefruit or sweet orange are a major threat for the citrus industry worldwide. Identification of these CTV variants was achieved by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using a general primer set and three TaqMan locked nucleic acids (LNA) probes targeting sequences characteristic of severe, mild (non-SY, non-SP), and T36-like isolates. Successful amplification was achieved from fresh or silica-desiccated CTV-infected samples and all isolates but one reacted with one or more probes. Standard curves using RNA transcripts homologous to the three probes allowed a reproducible quantitative assay, with a wide dynamic range of detection starting with 10(2) copies. RT-PCR assays with homologous and heterologous transcript RNA mixes demonstrated that each probe reacted only with its cognate sequence which was detected even at ratios below 2.5%. Analysis of 56 pathogenically distinct CTV isolates from 20 countries showed that mild isolates reacted only with the mild probe, whereas severe SP and SY isolates reacted with the severe-SP or the T36-like probes, respectively, and often with a second probe. This procedure can be useful to identify and control potentially dangerous CTV isolates in areas affected only by mild isolates.

  11. Genetic structure and evolved malaria resistance in Hawaiian honeycreepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J.T.; Woodworth, B.L.; Eggert, L.E.; Hart, P.J.; Palmer, D.; Duffy, D.C.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2007-01-01

    Infectious diseases now threaten wildlife populations worldwide but population recovery following local extinction has rarely been observed. In such a case, do resistant individuals recolonize from a central remnant population, or do they spread from small, perhaps overlooked, populations of resistant individuals? Introduced avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) has devastated low-elevation populations of native birds in Hawaii, but at least one species (Hawaii amakihi, Hemignathus virens) that was greatly reduced at elevations below about 1000 m tolerates malaria and has initiated a remarkable and rapid recovery. We assessed mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers from amakihi and two other Hawaiian honeycreepers, apapane (Himatione sanguinea) and iiwi (Vestiaria coccinea), at nine primary study sites from 2001 to 2003 to determine the source of re-establishing birds. In addition, we obtained sequences from tissue from amakihi museum study skins (1898 and 1948-49) to assess temporal changes in allele distributions. We found that amakihi in lowland areas are, and have historically been, differentiated from birds at high elevations and had unique alleles retained through time; that is, their genetic signature was not a subset of the genetic variation at higher elevations. We suggest that high disease pressure rapidly selected for resistance to malaria at low elevation, leaving small pockets of resistant birds, and this resistance spread outward from the scattered remnant populations. Low-elevation amakihi are currently isolated from higher elevations (> 1000 m) where disease emergence and transmission rates appear to vary seasonally and annually. In contrast to results from amakihi, no genetic differentiation between elevations was found in apapane and iiwi, indicating that slight variation in genetic or life-history attributes can determine disease resistance and population recovery. Determining the conditions that allow for the development of resistance to disease is

  12. The evolving energy budget of accretionary wedges

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeck, Jessica; Cooke, Michele; Maillot, Bertrand; Souloumiac, Pauline

    2017-04-01

    The energy budget of evolving accretionary systems reveals how deformational processes partition energy as faults slip, topography uplifts, and layer-parallel shortening produces distributed off-fault deformation. The energy budget provides a quantitative framework for evaluating the energetic contribution or consumption of diverse deformation mechanisms. We investigate energy partitioning in evolving accretionary prisms by synthesizing data from physical sand accretion experiments and numerical accretion simulations. We incorporate incremental strain fields and cumulative force measurements from two suites of experiments to design numerical simulations that represent accretionary wedges with stronger and weaker detachment faults. One suite of the physical experiments includes a basal glass bead layer and the other does not. Two physical experiments within each suite implement different boundary conditions (stable base versus moving base configuration). Synthesizing observations from the differing base configurations reduces the influence of sidewall friction because the force vector produced by sidewall friction points in opposite directions depending on whether the base is fixed or moving. With the numerical simulations, we calculate the energy budget at two stages of accretion: at the maximum force preceding the development of the first thrust pair, and at the minimum force following the development of the pair. To identify the appropriate combination of material and fault properties to apply in the simulations, we systematically vary the Young's modulus and the fault static and dynamic friction coefficients in numerical accretion simulations, and identify the set of parameters that minimizes the misfit between the normal force measured on the physical backwall and the numerically simulated force. Following this derivation of the appropriate material and fault properties, we calculate the components of the work budget in the numerical simulations and in the

  13. The Evolving Diagnostic and Genetic Landscapes of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziats, Mark N; Rennert, Owen M

    2016-01-01

    The autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a heterogeneous set of neurodevelopmental syndromes defined by impairments in verbal and non-verbal communication, restricted social interaction, and the presence of stereotyped patterns of behavior. The prevalence of ASD is rising, and the diagnostic criteria and clinical perspectives on the disorder continue to evolve in parallel. Although the majority of individuals with ASD will not have an identifiable genetic cause, almost 25% of cases have identifiable causative DNA variants. The rapidly improving ability to identify genetic mutations because of advances in next generation sequencing, coupled with previous epidemiological studies demonstrating high heritability of ASD, have led to many recent attempts to identify causative genetic mutations underlying the ASD phenotype. However, although hundreds of mutations have been identified to date, they are either rare variants affecting only a handful of ASD patients, or are common variants in the general population conferring only a small risk for ASD. Furthermore, the genes implicated thus far are heterogeneous in their structure and function, hampering attempts to understand shared molecular mechanisms among all ASD patients; an understanding that is crucial for the development of targeted diagnostics and therapies. However, new work is beginning to suggest that the heterogeneous set of genes implicated in ASD may ultimately converge on a few common pathways. In this review, we discuss the parallel evolution of our diagnostic and genetic understanding of autism spectrum disorders, and highlight recent attempts to infer common biology underlying this complicated syndrome.

  14. The evolving diagnostic and genetic landscapes of autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Nicholas Ziats

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The autism spectrum disorders (ASD are a heterogeneous set of neurodevelopmental syndromes defined by impairments in verbal and non-verbal communication, restricted social interaction, and the presence of stereotyped patterns of behavior. The prevalence of ASD is rising, and the diagnostic criteria and clinical perspectives on the disorder continue to evolve in parallel. Although the majority of individuals with ASD will not have an identifiable genetic cause, almost 25% of cases have identifiable causative DNA variants. The rapidly improving ability to identify genetic mutations because of advances in next generation sequencing, coupled with previous epidemiological studies demonstrating high heritability of ASD, have led to many recent attempts to identify causative genetic mutations underlying the ASD phenotype. However, although hundreds of mutations have been identified to date, they are either rare variants affecting only a handful of ASD patients, or are common variants in the general population conferring only a small risk for ASD. Furthermore, the genes implicated thus far are heterogeneous in their structure and function, hampering attempts to understand shared molecular mechanisms among all ASD patients; an understanding that is crucial for the development of targeted diagnostics and therapies. However, new work is beginning to suggest that the heterogeneous set of genes implicated in ASD may ultimately converge on a few common pathways. In this review, we discuss the parallel evolution of our diagnostic and genetic understanding of autism spectrum disorders, and highlight recent attempts to infer common biology underlying this complicated syndrome.

  15. Evolving Nonthermal Electron Distributions in Simulations of Sgr A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chael, Andrew; Narayan, Ramesh

    2018-01-01

    The accretion flow around Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the black hole at the Galactic Center, produces strong variability from the radio to X-rays on timescales of minutes to hours. This rapid, powerful variability is thought to be powered by energetic particle acceleration by plasma processes like magnetic reconnection and shocks. These processes can accelerate particles into non-thermal distributions which do not quickly isothermal in the low densities found around hot accretion flows. Current state-of-the-art simulations of accretion flows around black holes assume either a single-temperature gas or, at best, a two-temperature gas with thermal ions and electrons. We present results from incorporating the self-consistent evolution of a non-thermal electron population in a GRRMHD simulation of Sgr A*. The electron distribution is evolved across space, time, and Lorentz factor in parallel with background thermal ion, electron, and radiation fluids. Energy injection into the non-thermal distribution is modeled with a sub-grid prescription based on results from particle-in-cell simulations of magnetic reconnection. The energy distribution of the non-thermal electrons shows strong variability, and the spectral shape traces the complex interplay between the local viscous heating rate, magnetic field strength, and fluid velocity. Results from these simulations will be used in interpreting forthcoming data from the Event Horizon Telescope that resolves Sgr A*'s sub-mm variability in both time and space.

  16. Meiosis evolves: adaptation to external and internal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomblies, Kirsten; Higgins, James D; Yant, Levi

    2015-10-01

    306 I. 306 II. 307 III. 312 IV. 317 V. 318 319 References 319 SUMMARY: Meiosis is essential for the fertility of most eukaryotes and its structures and progression are conserved across kingdoms. Yet many of its core proteins show evidence of rapid or adaptive evolution. What drives the evolution of meiosis proteins? How can constrained meiotic processes be modified in response to challenges without compromising their essential functions? In surveying the literature, we found evidence of two especially potent challenges to meiotic chromosome segregation that probably necessitate adaptive evolutionary responses: whole-genome duplication and abiotic environment, especially temperature. Evolutionary solutions to both kinds of challenge are likely to involve modification of homologous recombination and synapsis, probably via adjustments of core structural components important in meiosis I. Synthesizing these findings with broader patterns of meiosis gene evolution suggests that the structural components of meiosis coevolve as adaptive modules that may change in primary sequence and function while maintaining three-dimensional structures and protein interactions. The often sharp divergence of these genes among species probably reflects periodic modification of entire multiprotein complexes driven by genomic or environmental changes. We suggest that the pressures that cause meiosis to evolve to maintain fertility may cause pleiotropic alterations of global crossover rates. We highlight several important areas for future research. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. No surviving evolved companions of the progenitor of SN 1006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Hernández, Jonay I; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Tabernero, Hugo M; Montes, David; Canal, Ramon; Méndez, Javier; Bedin, Luigi R

    2012-09-27

    Type Ia supernovae are thought to occur when a white dwarf made of carbon and oxygen accretes sufficient mass to trigger a thermonuclear explosion. The accretion could be slow, from an unevolved (main-sequence) or evolved (subgiant or giant) star (the single-degenerate channel), or rapid, as the primary star breaks up a smaller orbiting white dwarf (the double-degenerate channel). A companion star will survive the explosion only in the single-degenerate channel. Both channels might contribute to the production of type Ia supernovae, but the relative proportions of their contributions remain a fundamental puzzle in astronomy. Previous searches for remnant companions have revealed one possible case for SN 1572 (refs 8, 9), although that has been questioned. More recently, observations have restricted surviving companions to be small, main-sequence stars, ruling out giant companions but still allowing the single-degenerate channel. Here we report the results of a search for surviving companions of the progenitor of SN 1006 (ref. 14). None of the stars within 4 arc minutes of the apparent site of the explosion is associated with the supernova remnant, and we can firmly exclude all giant and subgiant stars from being companions of the progenitor. In combination with previous results, our findings indicate that fewer than 20 per cent of type Ia supernovae occur through the single-degenerate channel.

  18. On the Critical Role of Divergent Selection in Evolvability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Lehman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An ambitious goal in evolutionary robotics is to evolve increasingly complex robotic behaviors with minimal human design effort. Reaching this goal requires evolutionary algorithms that can unlock from genetic encodings their latent potential for evolvability. One issue clouding this goal is conceptual confusion about evolvability, which often obscures the aspects of evolvability that are important or desirable. The danger from such confusion is that it may establish unrealistic goals for evolvability that prove unproductive in practice. An important issue separate from conceptual confusion is the common misalignment between selection and evolvability in evolutionary robotics. While more expressive encodings can represent higher-level adaptations (e.g. sexual reproduction or developmental systems that increase long-term evolutionary potential (i.e. evolvability, realizing such potential requires gradients of fitness and evolvability to align. In other words, selection is often a critical factor limiting increasing evolvability. Thus, drawing from a series of recent papers, this article seeks to both (1 clarify and focus the ways in which the term evolvability is used within artificial evolution, and (2 argue for the importance of one type of selection, i.e. divergent selection, for enabling evolvability. The main argument is that there is a fundamental connection between divergent selection and evolvability (on both the individual and population level that does not hold for typical goal-oriented selection. The conclusion is that selection pressure plays a critical role in realizing the potential for evolvability, and that divergent selection in particular provides a principled mechanism for encouraging evolvability in artificial evolution.

  19. How does cognition evolve? Phylogenetic comparative psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Luke J.; Hare, Brian A.; Nunn, Charles L.; Anderson, Rindy C.; Aureli, Filippo; Brannon, Elizabeth M.; Call, Josep; Drea, Christine M.; Emery, Nathan J.; Haun, Daniel B. M.; Herrmann, Esther; Jacobs, Lucia F.; Platt, Michael L.; Rosati, Alexandra G.; Sandel, Aaron A.; Schroepfer, Kara K.; Seed, Amanda M.; Tan, Jingzhi; van Schaik, Carel P.; Wobber, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Now more than ever animal studies have the potential to test hypotheses regarding how cognition evolves. Comparative psychologists have developed new techniques to probe the cognitive mechanisms underlying animal behavior, and they have become increasingly skillful at adapting methodologies to test multiple species. Meanwhile, evolutionary biologists have generated quantitative approaches to investigate the phylogenetic distribution and function of phenotypic traits, including cognition. In particular, phylogenetic methods can quantitatively (1) test whether specific cognitive abilities are correlated with life history (e.g., lifespan), morphology (e.g., brain size), or socio-ecological variables (e.g., social system), (2) measure how strongly phylogenetic relatedness predicts the distribution of cognitive skills across species, and (3) estimate the ancestral state of a given cognitive trait using measures of cognitive performance from extant species. Phylogenetic methods can also be used to guide the selection of species comparisons that offer the strongest tests of a priori predictions of cognitive evolutionary hypotheses (i.e., phylogenetic targeting). Here, we explain how an integration of comparative psychology and evolutionary biology will answer a host of questions regarding the phylogenetic distribution and history of cognitive traits, as well as the evolutionary processes that drove their evolution. PMID:21927850

  20. Approximating centrality in evolving graphs: toward sublinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Benjamin W.; Cybenko, George

    2017-05-01

    The identification of important nodes is a ubiquitous problem in the analysis of social networks. Centrality indices (such as degree centrality, closeness centrality, betweenness centrality, PageRank, and others) are used across many domains to accomplish this task. However, the computation of such indices is expensive on large graphs. Moreover, evolving graphs are becoming increasingly important in many applications. It is therefore desirable to develop on-line algorithms that can approximate centrality measures using memory sublinear in the size of the graph. We discuss the challenges facing the semi-streaming computation of many centrality indices. In particular, we apply recent advances in the streaming and sketching literature to provide a preliminary streaming approximation algorithm for degree centrality utilizing CountSketch and a multi-pass semi-streaming approximation algorithm for closeness centrality leveraging a spanner obtained through iteratively sketching the vertex-edge adjacency matrix. We also discuss possible ways forward for approximating betweenness centrality, as well as spectral measures of centrality. We provide a preliminary result using sketched low-rank approximations to approximate the output of the HITS algorithm.

  1. How does cognition evolve? Phylogenetic comparative psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Evan L; Matthews, Luke J; Hare, Brian A; Nunn, Charles L; Anderson, Rindy C; Aureli, Filippo; Brannon, Elizabeth M; Call, Josep; Drea, Christine M; Emery, Nathan J; Haun, Daniel B M; Herrmann, Esther; Jacobs, Lucia F; Platt, Michael L; Rosati, Alexandra G; Sandel, Aaron A; Schroepfer, Kara K; Seed, Amanda M; Tan, Jingzhi; van Schaik, Carel P; Wobber, Victoria

    2012-03-01

    Now more than ever animal studies have the potential to test hypotheses regarding how cognition evolves. Comparative psychologists have developed new techniques to probe the cognitive mechanisms underlying animal behavior, and they have become increasingly skillful at adapting methodologies to test multiple species. Meanwhile, evolutionary biologists have generated quantitative approaches to investigate the phylogenetic distribution and function of phenotypic traits, including cognition. In particular, phylogenetic methods can quantitatively (1) test whether specific cognitive abilities are correlated with life history (e.g., lifespan), morphology (e.g., brain size), or socio-ecological variables (e.g., social system), (2) measure how strongly phylogenetic relatedness predicts the distribution of cognitive skills across species, and (3) estimate the ancestral state of a given cognitive trait using measures of cognitive performance from extant species. Phylogenetic methods can also be used to guide the selection of species comparisons that offer the strongest tests of a priori predictions of cognitive evolutionary hypotheses (i.e., phylogenetic targeting). Here, we explain how an integration of comparative psychology and evolutionary biology will answer a host of questions regarding the phylogenetic distribution and history of cognitive traits, as well as the evolutionary processes that drove their evolution.

  2. On the Discovery of Evolving Truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaliang; Li, Qi; Gao, Jing; Su, Lu; Zhao, Bo; Fan, Wei; Han, Jiawei

    2015-08-01

    In the era of big data, information regarding the same objects can be collected from increasingly more sources. Unfortunately, there usually exist conflicts among the information coming from different sources. To tackle this challenge, truth discovery, i.e., to integrate multi-source noisy information by estimating the reliability of each source, has emerged as a hot topic. In many real world applications, however, the information may come sequentially, and as a consequence, the truth of objects as well as the reliability of sources may be dynamically evolving. Existing truth discovery methods, unfortunately, cannot handle such scenarios. To address this problem, we investigate the temporal relations among both object truths and source reliability, and propose an incremental truth discovery framework that can dynamically update object truths and source weights upon the arrival of new data. Theoretical analysis is provided to show that the proposed method is guaranteed to converge at a fast rate. The experiments on three real world applications and a set of synthetic data demonstrate the advantages of the proposed method over state-of-the-art truth discovery methods.

  3. Sexual regret: evidence for evolved sex differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galperin, Andrew; Haselton, Martie G; Frederick, David A; Poore, Joshua; von Hippel, William; Buss, David M; Gonzaga, Gian C

    2013-10-01

    Regret and anticipated regret enhance decision quality by helping people avoid making and repeating mistakes. Some of people's most intense regrets concern sexual decisions. We hypothesized evolved sex differences in women's and men's experiences of sexual regret. Because of women's higher obligatory costs of reproduction throughout evolutionary history, we hypothesized that sexual actions, particularly those involving casual sex, would be regretted more intensely by women than by men. In contrast, because missed sexual opportunities historically carried higher reproductive fitness costs for men than for women, we hypothesized that poorly chosen sexual inactions would be regretted more by men than by women. Across three studies (Ns = 200, 395, and 24,230), we tested these hypotheses using free responses, written scenarios, detailed checklists, and Internet sampling to achieve participant diversity, including diversity in sexual orientation. Across all data sources, results supported predicted psychological sex differences and these differences were localized in casual sex contexts. These findings are consistent with the notion that the psychology of sexual regret was shaped by recurrent sex differences in selection pressures operating over deep time.

  4. Extracting evolving pathologies via spectral clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardis, Elena; Pohl, Kilian M; Davatzikos, Christos

    2013-01-01

    A bottleneck in the analysis of longitudinal MR scans with white matter brain lesions is the temporally consistent segmentation of the pathology. We identify pathologies in 3D+t(ime) within a spectral graph clustering framework. Our clustering approach simultaneously segments and tracks the evolving lesions by identifying characteristic image patterns at each time-point and voxel correspondences across time-points. For each 3D image, our method constructs a graph where weights between nodes capture the likeliness of two voxels belonging to the same region. Based on these weights, we then establish rough correspondences between graph nodes at different time-points along estimated pathology evolution directions. We combine the graphs by aligning the weights to a reference time-point, thus integrating temporal information across the 3D images, and formulate the 3D+t segmentation problem as a binary partitioning of this graph. The resulting segmentation is very robust to local intensity fluctuations and yields better results than segmentations generated for each time-point.

  5. Functional Topology of Evolving Urban Drainage Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Soohyun; Paik, Kyungrock; McGrath, Gavan S.; Urich, Christian; Krueger, Elisabeth; Kumar, Praveen; Rao, P. Suresh C.

    2017-11-01

    We investigated the scaling and topology of engineered urban drainage networks (UDNs) in two cities, and further examined UDN evolution over decades. UDN scaling was analyzed using two power law scaling characteristics widely employed for river networks: (1) Hack's law of length (L)-area (A) [L∝Ah] and (2) exceedance probability distribution of upstream contributing area (δ) [P>(A≥δ>)˜aδ-ɛ]. For the smallest UDNs ((A≥δ>) plots for river networks are abruptly truncated, those for UDNs display exponential tempering [P>(A≥δ>)=aδ-ɛexp⁡>(-cδ>)]. The tempering parameter c decreases as the UDNs grow, implying that the distribution evolves in time to resemble those for river networks. However, the power law exponent ɛ for large UDNs tends to be greater than the range reported for river networks. Differences in generative processes and engineering design constraints contribute to observed differences in the evolution of UDNs and river networks, including subnet heterogeneity and nonrandom branching.

  6. The Evolving Classification of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foshat, Michelle; Boroumand, Nahal

    2017-05-01

    - An explosion of information on pulmonary hypertension has occurred during the past few decades. The perception of this disease has shifted from purely clinical to incorporate new knowledge of the underlying pathology. This transfer has occurred in light of advancements in pathophysiology, histology, and molecular medical diagnostics. - To update readers about the evolving understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension and to demonstrate how pathology has shaped the current classification. - Information presented at the 5 World Symposia on pulmonary hypertension held since 1973, with the last meeting occurring in 2013, was used in this review. - Pulmonary hypertension represents a heterogeneous group of disorders that are differentiated based on differences in clinical, hemodynamic, and histopathologic features. Early concepts of pulmonary hypertension were largely influenced by pharmacotherapy, hemodynamic function, and clinical presentation of the disease. The initial nomenclature for pulmonary hypertension segregated the clinical classifications from pathologic subtypes. Major restructuring of this disease classification occurred between the first and second symposia, which was the first to unite clinical and pathologic information in the categorization scheme. Additional changes were introduced in subsequent meetings, particularly between the third and fourth World Symposia meetings, when additional pathophysiologic information was gained. Discoveries in molecular diagnostics significantly progressed the understanding of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Continued advancements in imaging modalities, mechanistic pathogenicity, and molecular biomarkers will enable physicians to define pulmonary hypertension phenotypes based on the pathobiology and allow for treatment customization.

  7. Evolving application of biomimetic nanostructured hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norberto Roveri

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Norberto Roveri, Michele IafiscoLaboratory of Environmental and Biological Structural Chemistry (LEBSC, Dipartimento di Chimica ‘G. Ciamician’, Alma Mater Studiorum, Università di Bologna, Bologna, ItalyAbstract: By mimicking Nature, we can design and synthesize inorganic smart materials that are reactive to biological tissues. These smart materials can be utilized to design innovative third-generation biomaterials, which are able to not only optimize their interaction with biological tissues and environment, but also mimic biogenic materials in their functionalities. The biomedical applications involve increasing the biomimetic levels from chemical composition, structural organization, morphology, mechanical behavior, nanostructure, and bulk and surface chemical–physical properties until the surface becomes bioreactive and stimulates cellular materials. The chemical–physical characteristics of biogenic hydroxyapatites from bone and tooth have been described, in order to point out the elective sides, which are important to reproduce the design of a new biomimetic synthetic hydroxyapatite. This review outlines the evolving applications of biomimetic synthetic calcium phosphates, details the main characteristics of bone and tooth, where the calcium phosphates are present, and discusses the chemical–physical characteristics of biomimetic calcium phosphates, methods of synthesizing them, and some of their biomedical applications.Keywords: hydroxyapatite, nanocrystals, biomimetism, biomaterials, drug delivery, remineralization

  8. Evolving application of biomimetic nanostructured hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roveri, Norberto; Iafisco, Michele

    2010-11-09

    By mimicking Nature, we can design and synthesize inorganic smart materials that are reactive to biological tissues. These smart materials can be utilized to design innovative third-generation biomaterials, which are able to not only optimize their interaction with biological tissues and environment, but also mimic biogenic materials in their functionalities. The biomedical applications involve increasing the biomimetic levels from chemical composition, structural organization, morphology, mechanical behavior, nanostructure, and bulk and surface chemical-physical properties until the surface becomes bioreactive and stimulates cellular materials. The chemical-physical characteristics of biogenic hydroxyapatites from bone and tooth have been described, in order to point out the elective sides, which are important to reproduce the design of a new biomimetic synthetic hydroxyapatite. This review outlines the evolving applications of biomimetic synthetic calcium phosphates, details the main characteristics of bone and tooth, where the calcium phosphates are present, and discusses the chemical-physical characteristics of biomimetic calcium phosphates, methods of synthesizing them, and some of their biomedical applications.

  9. Epidemic spreading on evolving signed networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedian, M.; Azimi-Tafreshi, N.; Jafari, G. R.; Kertesz, J.

    2017-02-01

    Most studies of disease spreading consider the underlying social network as obtained without the contagion, though epidemic influences people's willingness to contact others: A "friendly" contact may be turned to "unfriendly" to avoid infection. We study the susceptible-infected disease-spreading model on signed networks, in which each edge is associated with a positive or negative sign representing the friendly or unfriendly relation between its end nodes. In a signed network, according to Heider's theory, edge signs evolve such that finally a state of structural balance is achieved, corresponding to no frustration in physics terms. However, the danger of infection affects the evolution of its edge signs. To describe the coupled problem of the sign evolution and disease spreading, we generalize the notion of structural balance by taking into account the state of the nodes. We introduce an energy function and carry out Monte Carlo simulations on complete networks to test the energy landscape, where we find local minima corresponding to the so-called jammed states. We study the effect of the ratio of initial friendly to unfriendly connections on the propagation of disease. The steady state can be balanced or a jammed state such that a coexistence occurs between susceptible and infected nodes in the system.

  10. UKAEA'S evolving contract philosophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, R. D. [UK Atomic Energy Authority, UKAEA, Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) has gone through fundamental change over the last ten years. At the heart of this change has been UKAEA's relationship with the contracting and supply market. This paper describes the way in which UKAEA actively developed the market to support the decommissioning programme, and how the approach to contracting has evolved as external pressures and demands have changed. UKAEA's pro-active approach to industry has greatly assisted the development of a healthy, competitive market for services supporting decommissioning in the UK. There have been difficult changes and many challenges along the way, and some retrenchment was necessary to meet regulatory requirements. Nevertheless, UKAEA has sustained a high level of competition - now measured in terms of competed spend as a proportion of competable spend - with annual out-turns consistently over 80%. The prime responsibility for market development will pass to the new Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) in 2005, as the owner, on behalf of the Government, of the UK's civil nuclear liabilities. The preparatory work for the NDA indicates that the principles established by UKAEA will be carried forward. (author)

  11. An evolving model of online bipartite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chu-Xu; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Liu, Chuang

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the structure and evolution of online bipartite networks is a significant task since they play a crucial role in various e-commerce services nowadays. Recently, various attempts have been tried to propose different models, resulting in either power-law or exponential degree distributions. However, many empirical results show that the user degree distribution actually follows a shifted power-law distribution, the so-called Mandelbrot’s law, which cannot be fully described by previous models. In this paper, we propose an evolving model, considering two different user behaviors: random and preferential attachment. Extensive empirical results on two real bipartite networks, Delicious and CiteULike, show that the theoretical model can well characterize the structure of real networks for both user and object degree distributions. In addition, we introduce a structural parameter p, to demonstrate that the hybrid user behavior leads to the shifted power-law degree distribution, and the region of power-law tail will increase with the increment of p. The proposed model might shed some lights in understanding the underlying laws governing the structure of real online bipartite networks.

  12. Immunopharmacology and adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, M J

    1993-04-01

    Adverse drug reactions are common and troublesome complications of contemporary pharmacotherapy. Adverse drug reactions are frequently, and often incorrectly, referred to as "allergy". Although there are multiple mechanisms for adverse drug reactions, adverse drug reactions mediated by the immune system account for a disproportionate number of fatal and serious adverse reactions, and constitute a major clinical problem for patients and physicians. The immune system has evolved in multicellular organisms as a defence against infection. Interactions between drugs and the immune system occur as inadvertent consequences of the protective function of the immune system, with drug molecules or drug-carrier haptens being recognized as "non-self" by the immune system. The classical mechanisms for drug hypersensitivity described by Gell and Coombs (Types 1 to 4) include IgE-mediated, cytotoxic, immune complex-mediated and delayed mechanism. These mechanisms provide elegant models for drug-immune interactions that can provide mechanistic explanations for events such as urticaria associated with penicillins. However, these mechanisms do not account for many of the immunologically mediated adverse reactions commonly encountered in clinical practice. Over the last two decades, there has been an increasing awareness of the importance of reactive drug metabolites and drug-protein interactions in the initiation of immunologic events mediating adverse drug reactions. Reactive drug metabolites may produce direct and profound effects on various functions of the immune system. Although some adverse reactions mediated by the immune system occur with equal frequency among adults and children, some of these reactions appear to be markedly more common among children than adults.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate the innovative Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC) to provide rapid and reliable in-space impulse...

  14. Rapid serial visual presentation design for cognition

    CERN Document Server

    Spence, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A powerful new image presentation technique has evolved over the last twenty years, and its value demonstrated through its support of many and varied common tasks. Conceptually, Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP) is basically simple, exemplified in the physical world by the rapid riffling of the pages of a book in order to locate a known image. Advances in computation and graphics processing allow RSVP to be applied flexibly and effectively to a huge variety of common tasks such as window shopping, video fast-forward and rewind, TV channel selection and product browsing. At its heart is a

  15. Implementation of rapid diagnostics with antimicrobial stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minejima, Emi; Wong-Beringer, Annie

    2016-11-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship (ASP) is an intervention-based program to improve patient outcomes to infection while limiting spread of resistance and unintended consequences. Many rapid diagnostic tools are now FDA cleared for clinical use, with three evaluated across multiple settings: Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry, Verigene, and FilmArray. Areas covered: This review will focus on studies published that evaluated ASP intervention with rapid diagnostic implementation on outcomes of infection. A description of the key ASP personnel, rapid diagnostic notification methods, hours of notification, and scope of ASP intervention is summarized. Expert commentary: It is critical that ASPs continually re-evaluate and evolve with technological advances. Rapid diagnostic tools are powerful in their ability to identify organisms quickly. A trained clinician is needed to evaluate the results and interact with the providers to educate them on result interpretation and optimal antimicrobial selection to maximize treatment success.

  16. Quantum mechanics in an evolving Hilbert space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artacho, Emilio; O'Regan, David D.

    2017-03-01

    Many basis sets for electronic structure calculations evolve with varying external parameters, such as moving atoms in dynamic simulations, giving rise to extra derivative terms in the dynamical equations. Here we revisit these derivatives in the context of differential geometry, thereby obtaining a more transparent formalization, and a geometrical perspective for better understanding the resulting equations. The effect of the evolution of the basis set within the spanned Hilbert space separates explicitly from the effect of the turning of the space itself when moving in parameter space, as the tangent space turns when moving in a curved space. New insights are obtained using familiar concepts in that context such as the Riemann curvature. The differential geometry is not strictly that for curved spaces as in general relativity, a more adequate mathematical framework being provided by fiber bundles. The language used here, however, will be restricted to tensors and basic quantum mechanics. The local gauge implied by a smoothly varying basis set readily connects with Berry's formalism for geometric phases. Generalized expressions for the Berry connection and curvature are obtained for a parameter-dependent occupied Hilbert space spanned by nonorthogonal Wannier functions. The formalism is applicable to basis sets made of atomic-like orbitals and also more adaptative moving basis functions (such as in methods using Wannier functions as intermediate or support bases), but should also apply to other situations in which nonorthogonal functions or related projectors should arise. The formalism is applied to the time-dependent quantum evolution of electrons for moving atoms. The geometric insights provided here allow us to propose new finite-difference time integrators, and also better understand those already proposed.

  17. The evolving role of tiotropium in asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McIvor ER

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Emma R McIvor,1 R Andrew McIvor2 1Queen’s University, Belfast, UK; 2Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Abstract: Tiotropium is a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA that exerts its bronchodilatory effect by blocking endogenous acetylcholine receptors in the airways. Its safety and efficacy are well established for the treatment of COPD, and it is now being recognized for its role in improving lung function and control in asthma. This review discusses the evolving role of tiotropium delivered by the Respimat® in patients across the range of asthma severities and ages, and provides an overview of safety and efficacy data. Tiotropium is the only LAMA currently approved for the treatment of asthma, and evidence from a large-scale clinical trial program, including several Phase III studies in adults, has demonstrated that tiotropium improves lung function and asthma control, with a safety profile comparable with that of placebo. Clinical trials in adolescent patients (aged 12–17 years have also shown improvements in lung function and trends toward improved asthma control. Of note, the efficacy and safety profiles are consistent regardless of baseline characteristics and phenotype. Given the large and growing body of evidence, it is likely that as clinical experience with tiotropium increases, this treatment may possibly emerge as the key choice for add-on therapy to inhaled corticosteroids/long-acting β2-agonists, and in patients who do not tolerate long-acting bronchodilators or other medications, in the future. Keywords: tiotropium, anticholinergics, asthma, efficacy

  18. Emergent spacetime in stochastically evolving dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshordi, Niayesh [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. N., Waterloo, ON, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); HEPCOS, Department of Physics, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260-1500 (United States); Stojkovic, Dejan, E-mail: ds77@buffalo.edu [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. N., Waterloo, ON, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); HEPCOS, Department of Physics, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260-1500 (United States)

    2014-12-12

    Changing the dimensionality of the space–time at the smallest and largest distances has manifold theoretical advantages. If the space is lower dimensional in the high energy regime, then there are no ultraviolet divergencies in field theories, it is possible to quantize gravity, and the theory of matter plus gravity is free of divergencies or renormalizable. If the space is higher dimensional at cosmological scales, then some cosmological problems (including the cosmological constant problem) can be attacked from a completely new perspective. In this paper, we construct an explicit model of “evolving dimensions” in which the dimensions open up as the temperature of the universe drops. We adopt the string theory framework in which the dimensions are fields that live on the string worldsheet, and add temperature dependent mass terms for them. At the Big Bang, all the dimensions are very heavy and are not excited. As the universe cools down, dimensions open up one by one. Thus, the dimensionality of the space we live in depends on the energy or temperature that we are probing. In particular, we provide a kinematic Brandenberger–Vafa argument for how a discrete causal set, and eventually a continuum (3+1)-dim spacetime along with Einstein gravity emerges in the Infrared from the worldsheet action. The (3+1)-dim Planck mass and the string scale become directly related, without any compactification. Amongst other predictions, we argue that LHC might be blind to new physics even if it comes at the TeV scale. In contrast, cosmic ray experiments, especially those that can register the very beginning of the shower, and collisions with high multiplicity and density of particles, might be sensitive to the dimensional cross-over.

  19. Emergent spacetime in stochastically evolving dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshordi, Niayesh; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2014-12-01

    Changing the dimensionality of the space-time at the smallest and largest distances has manifold theoretical advantages. If the space is lower dimensional in the high energy regime, then there are no ultraviolet divergencies in field theories, it is possible to quantize gravity, and the theory of matter plus gravity is free of divergencies or renormalizable. If the space is higher dimensional at cosmological scales, then some cosmological problems (including the cosmological constant problem) can be attacked from a completely new perspective. In this paper, we construct an explicit model of ;evolving dimensions; in which the dimensions open up as the temperature of the universe drops. We adopt the string theory framework in which the dimensions are fields that live on the string worldsheet, and add temperature dependent mass terms for them. At the Big Bang, all the dimensions are very heavy and are not excited. As the universe cools down, dimensions open up one by one. Thus, the dimensionality of the space we live in depends on the energy or temperature that we are probing. In particular, we provide a kinematic Brandenberger-Vafa argument for how a discrete causal set, and eventually a continuum (3 + 1)-dim spacetime along with Einstein gravity emerges in the Infrared from the worldsheet action. The (3 + 1)-dim Planck mass and the string scale become directly related, without any compactification. Amongst other predictions, we argue that LHC might be blind to new physics even if it comes at the TeV scale. In contrast, cosmic ray experiments, especially those that can register the very beginning of the shower, and collisions with high multiplicity and density of particles, might be sensitive to the dimensional cross-over.

  20. Emergent spacetime in stochastically evolving dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niayesh Afshordi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Changing the dimensionality of the space–time at the smallest and largest distances has manifold theoretical advantages. If the space is lower dimensional in the high energy regime, then there are no ultraviolet divergencies in field theories, it is possible to quantize gravity, and the theory of matter plus gravity is free of divergencies or renormalizable. If the space is higher dimensional at cosmological scales, then some cosmological problems (including the cosmological constant problem can be attacked from a completely new perspective. In this paper, we construct an explicit model of “evolving dimensions” in which the dimensions open up as the temperature of the universe drops. We adopt the string theory framework in which the dimensions are fields that live on the string worldsheet, and add temperature dependent mass terms for them. At the Big Bang, all the dimensions are very heavy and are not excited. As the universe cools down, dimensions open up one by one. Thus, the dimensionality of the space we live in depends on the energy or temperature that we are probing. In particular, we provide a kinematic Brandenberger–Vafa argument for how a discrete causal set, and eventually a continuum (3+1-dim spacetime along with Einstein gravity emerges in the Infrared from the worldsheet action. The (3+1-dim Planck mass and the string scale become directly related, without any compactification. Amongst other predictions, we argue that LHC might be blind to new physics even if it comes at the TeV scale. In contrast, cosmic ray experiments, especially those that can register the very beginning of the shower, and collisions with high multiplicity and density of particles, might be sensitive to the dimensional cross-over.

  1. Evolvable Cryogenics (ECRYO) Pressure Transducer Calibration Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Carlos E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the findings of recent activities conducted by Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) In-Space Propulsion Branch and MSFC's Metrology and Calibration Lab to assess the performance of current "state of the art" pressure transducers for use in long duration storage and transfer of cryogenic propellants. A brief historical narrative in this paper describes the Evolvable Cryogenics program and the relevance of these activities to the program. This paper also provides a review of three separate test activities performed throughout this effort, including: (1) the calibration of several pressure transducer designs in a liquid nitrogen cryogenic environmental chamber, (2) the calibration of a pressure transducer in a liquid helium Dewar, and (3) the calibration of several pressure transducers at temperatures ranging from 20 to 70 degrees Kelvin (K) using a "cryostat" environmental chamber. These three separate test activities allowed for study of the sensors along a temperature range from 4 to 300 K. The combined data shows that both the slope and intercept of the sensor's calibration curve vary as a function of temperature. This homogeneous function is contrary to the linearly decreasing relationship assumed at the start of this investigation. Consequently, the data demonstrates the need for lookup tables to change the slope and intercept used by any data acquisition system. This ultimately would allow for more accurate pressure measurements at the desired temperature range. This paper concludes with a review of a request for information (RFI) survey conducted amongst different suppliers to determine the availability of current "state of the art" flight-qualified pressure transducers. The survey identifies requirements that are most difficult for the suppliers to meet, most notably the capability to validate the sensor's performance at temperatures below 70 K.

  2. Speed ot travelling waves in reaction-diffusion equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benguria, R.D.; Depassier, M.C. [Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Avda. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Santiago (Chile); Mendez, V. [Facultat de Ciencies de la Salut, Universidad Internacional de Catalunya, Gomera s/n 08190 Sant Cugat del Valles, Barcelona (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Reaction diffusion equations arise in several problems of population dynamics, flame propagation and others. In one dimensional cases the systems may evolve into travelling fronts. Here we concentrate on a reaction diffusion equation which arises as a simple model for chemotaxis and present results for the speed of the travelling fronts. (Author)

  3. Orthogonally Evolved AI to Improve Difficulty Adjustment in Video Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hintze, Arend; Olson, Randal; Lehman, Joel Anthony

    2016-01-01

    (i.e. agents subject to fewer generations of evolution) make for easier opponents, while highly-evolved agents are more challenging to overcome. In this publication we test a new approach for difficulty adjustment in games: orthogonally evolved AI, where the player receives support from collaborating...... opponents. Furthermore, human interaction can modulate (and be informed by) the performance and behavior of collaborating agents. In this way, orthogonally evolved AI both facilitates smoother difficulty adjustment and enables new game experiences....

  4. Intramolecular and Transannular Diels-Alder Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, David Ackland; Ascic, Erhad

    2014-01-01

    Few reactions can compete with the Diels-Alder (DA) [4+2] cycloaddition for the rapid and efficient generation of molecular complexity. The DA reaction is atom-economic and stereospecific, as well as diastereo- and regioselective. The intramolecular version (IMDA) of the DA cycloaddition and its...

  5. Spallation reactions; Reactions de spallation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cugon, J.

    1996-12-31

    Spallation reactions dominate the interactions of hadrons with nuclei in the GeV range (from {approx} 0.1 to {approx} 10 GeV). They correspond to a sometimes important ejection of light particles leaving most of the time a residue of mass commensurate with the target mass. The main features of the experimental data are briefly reviewed. The most successful theoretical model, namely the intranuclear cascade + evaporation model, is presented. Its physical content, results and possible improvements are critically discussed. Alternative approaches are shortly reviewed. (author). 84 refs.

  6. Evolving water science in the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savenije, H. H. G.; Hoekstra, A. Y.; van der Zaag, P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the changing relation between human beings and water since the Industrial Revolution, a period that has been called the Anthropocene because of the unprecedented scale at which humans have altered the planet during this time. We show how the rapidly changing world urges us to continuously improve our understanding of the complex interactions between humans and the water system. The paper starts by demonstrating that hydrology and the science of managing water resources have played key roles in human and economic development throughout history; yet these roles have often been marginalised or obscured. Knowledge of hydrology and water resources engineering and management helped to transform the landscape, and thus also the very hydrology within catchments itself. It is only fairly recent that water experts have become conscious of such mechanisms, exemplified by several concepts that try to incorporate them - integrated water resources management, eco-hydrology, socio-hydrology. We have reached a stage at which a more systemic understanding of scale interdependencies can inform the sustainable governance of water systems, using new concepts like precipitation sheds, virtual water transfers, water footprints, and water value flow.

  7. Evolving Perspectives on Lyme Borreliosis in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, JLH; Middelveen, MJ; Klein, D; Sperling, FAH

    2012-01-01

    With cases now documented in every province, Lyme borreliosis (LB) is emerging as a serious public health risk in Canada. Controversy over the contribution of LB to the burden of chronic disease is maintained by difficulty in capturing accurate Canadian statistics, especially early clinical cases of LB. The use of dogs as sentinel species demon-strates that potential contact with Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes, as detected by C6 peptide, extends across the country. Dissemination of infected ticks by migratory birds and rapid establishment of significant levels of infection have been well described. Canadian public health response has focused on identification of established populations of the tick vectors, Ixodes scapularis and I. pacificus, on the assumption that these are the only important vectors of the disease across Canada. Strains of B. burgdorferi circulating in Canada and the full range of their reservoir species and coinfections remain to be explored. Ongoing surveys and historical records demonstrate that Borrelia-positive Ixodes species are regu-larly present in regions of Canada that have previously been considered to be outside of the ranges of these species in re-cent modeling efforts. We present data demonstrating that human cases of LB are found across the nation. Consequently, physician education and better early diagnoses are needed to prevent long term sequelae. An international perspective will be paramount for developing improved Canadian guidelines that recognize the complexity and diversity of Lyme borreliosis. PMID:23091570

  8. Evolving Techniques for Surgical Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Tubaro

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The management of lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH is one of the most topical areas in urology. Although most patients are adequately managed conservatively, many still require surgery to reduce bladder outlet obstruction or relieve symptoms by removing the inflamed adenomatous tissue. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP remains the gold standard treatment in all national and international guidelines, with open prostatectomy and laser enucleation reserved for patients with a prostate >80 ml. The current trend in the surgical management of BPH is threefold: replacing open prostatectomy with transurethral enucleation of the adenoma, managing high-risk patients by photoselective vaporisation of the prostate thus minimising blood loss, and moving BPH surgery to ambulatory day surgery and one-day surgery units in selected patients. Laser enucleation has been pioneered using the Holmium laser, although the GreenLightTM laser has been recently proposed as an alternative approach. The absence of any bleeding in photovaporisation of the prostate allows surgery to be performed in a growing population of patients on anti-aggregant and anticoagulant medications. Randomised trials of the GreenLight XPSTM laser with the MoXy™ fibre versus TURP proved the effectiveness of photovaporisation in the surgical management of BPH and suggested that 50% of patients could be discharged within 24 hours. The demand for BPH surgery remains high and urologists have rapidly adapted to the increasing demand for minimally invasive surgery. Prostate surgery evolved from a heroic procedure that remained in the memories of the entire patient family for life into a day-case procedure, and the future hopefully holds ejaculation-sparing surgery.

  9. Adoption of Geospatial Systems towards evolving Sustainable Himalayan Mountain Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, M. S. R.; Bajracharya, B.; Pradhan, S.; Shestra, B.; Bajracharya, R.; Shakya, K.; Wesselmann, S.; Ali, M.; Bajracharya, S.; Pradhan, S.

    2014-11-01

    Natural resources dependence of mountain communities, rapid social and developmental changes, disaster proneness and climate change are conceived as the critical factors regulating sustainable Himalayan mountain development. The Himalayan region posed by typical geographic settings, diverse physical and cultural diversity present a formidable challenge to collect and manage data, information and understands varied socio-ecological settings. Recent advances in earth observation, near real-time data, in-situ measurements and in combination of information and communication technology have transformed the way we collect, process, and generate information and how we use such information for societal benefits. Glacier dynamics, land cover changes, disaster risk reduction systems, food security and ecosystem conservation are a few thematic areas where geospatial information and knowledge have significantly contributed to informed decision making systems over the region. The emergence and adoption of near-real time systems, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), board-scale citizen science (crowd-sourcing), mobile services and mapping, and cloud computing have paved the way towards developing automated environmental monitoring systems, enhanced scientific understanding of geophysical and biophysical processes, coupled management of socio-ecological systems and community based adaptation models tailored to mountain specific environment. There are differentiated capacities among the ICIMOD regional member countries with regard to utilization of earth observation and geospatial technologies. The region can greatly benefit from a coordinated and collaborative approach to capture the opportunities offered by earth observation and geospatial technologies. The regional level data sharing, knowledge exchange, and Himalayan GEO supporting geospatial platforms, spatial data infrastructure, unique region specific satellite systems to address trans-boundary challenges would go a long way in

  10. Novel Drugs of Abuse: A Snapshot of an Evolving Marketplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandrey, Ryan; Johnson, Matthew W.; Johnson, Patrick S.; Khalil, Miral A.

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives Over the past decade, non-medical use of novel drugs has proliferated worldwide. In most cases these are synthetic drugs first synthesized in academic or pharmaceutical laboratories for research or drug development purposes, but also include naturally occurring substances that do not fit the typical pharmacological or behavioral profile of traditional illicit substances. Perhaps most unique to this generation of new drugs is that they are being sold over the counter and on the Internet as “legal highs” or substitutes for traditional illicit drugs such as cannabis, cocaine, amphetamines, MDMA, and LSD. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of novel drugs in current use, including the epidemiology of use and toxicologic and pharmacological properties, and to offer some guidelines to clinicians who see patients experiencing adverse effects from these drugs. Method We review the known scientific literature on recently introduced synthetic drug types, synthetic cannabinoids and synthetic cathinones, and the hallucinogen Salvia divinorum. Results These substances comprise part of a rapidly evolving and controversial drug market that has challenged definitions of what is legal and illegal, has benefitted from open commercial sales without regulatory oversight, and is noteworthy for the pace at which new substances are introduced. Conclusions This emerging trend in substance use presents significant and unique public health and criminal justice challenges. At this time, these substances are not detected in routine drug screens and substance-specific treatment for cases of use-related toxicity are not available. Clinicians are encouraged to learn characteristic signs associated with misuse of novel drugs to recognize cases in their practice, and are recommended to use a symptom-specific approach for treatment in each case. PMID:24921061

  11. Loops and autonomy promote evolvability of ecosystem networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianxi

    2014-09-29

    The structure of ecological networks, in particular food webs, determines their ability to evolve further, i.e. evolvability. The knowledge about how food web evolvability is determined by the structures of diverse ecological networks can guide human interventions purposefully to either promote or limit evolvability of ecosystems. However, the focus of prior food web studies was on stability and robustness; little is known regarding the impact of ecological network structures on their evolvability. To correlate ecosystem structure and evolvability, we adopt the NK model originally from evolutionary biology to generate and assess the ruggedness of fitness landscapes of a wide spectrum of model food webs with gradual variation in the amount of feeding loops and link density. The variation in network structures is controlled by linkage rewiring. Our results show that more feeding loops and lower trophic link density, i.e. higher autonomy of species, of food webs increase the potential for the ecosystem to generate heritable variations with improved fitness. Our findings allow the prediction of the evolvability of actual food webs according to their network structures, and provide guidance to enhancing or controlling the evolvability of specific ecosystems.

  12. Protein structural modularity and robustness are associated with evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rorick, Mary M; Wagner, Günter P

    2011-01-01

    Theory suggests that biological modularity and robustness allow for maintenance of fitness under mutational change, and when this change is adaptive, for evolvability. Empirical demonstrations that these traits promote evolvability in nature remain scant however. This is in part because modularity, robustness, and evolvability are difficult to define and measure in real biological systems. Here, we address whether structural modularity and/or robustness confer evolvability at the level of proteins by looking for associations between indices of protein structural modularity, structural robustness, and evolvability. We propose a novel index for protein structural modularity: the number of regular secondary structure elements (helices and strands) divided by the number of residues in the structure. We index protein evolvability as the proportion of sites with evidence of being under positive selection multiplied by the average rate of adaptive evolution at these sites, and we measure this as an average over a phylogeny of 25 mammalian species. We use contact density as an index of protein designability, and thus, structural robustness. We find that protein evolvability is positively associated with structural modularity as well as structural robustness and that the effect of structural modularity on evolvability is independent of the structural robustness index. We interpret these associations to be the result of reduced constraints on amino acid substitutions in highly modular and robust protein structures, which results in faster adaptation through natural selection.

  13. Adaptation of Escherichia coli to glucose promotes evolvability in lactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kelly N; Castillo, Gerardo; Wünsche, Andrea; Cooper, Tim F

    2016-02-01

    The selective history of a population can influence its subsequent evolution, an effect known as historical contingency. We previously observed that five of six replicate populations that were evolved in a glucose-limited environment for 2000 generations, then switched to lactose for 1000 generations, had higher fitness increases in lactose than populations started directly from the ancestor. To test if selection in glucose systematically increased lactose evolvability, we started 12 replay populations--six from a population subsample and six from a single randomly selected clone--from each of the six glucose-evolved founder populations. These replay populations and 18 ancestral populations were evolved for 1000 generations in a lactose-limited environment. We found that replay populations were initially slightly less fit in lactose than the ancestor, but were more evolvable, in that they increased in fitness at a faster rate and to higher levels. This result indicates that evolution in the glucose environment resulted in genetic changes that increased the potential of genotypes to adapt to lactose. Genome sequencing identified four genes--iclR, nadR, spoT, and rbs--that were mutated in most glucose-evolved clones and are candidates for mediating increased evolvability. Our results demonstrate that short-term selective costs during selection in one environment can lead to changes in evolvability that confer longer term benefits. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  14. Could life have evolved in cometary nuclei?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Nun, A.; Lazcano-Araujo, A.; Oró, J.

    1981-12-01

    Hoyle and Wickramasinghe have recently suggested that life may have originated in cometary nuclei rather than directly on Earth. Even though comets are known to contain substantial amounts of organic compounds which may have contributed to the formation of biochemical molecules on the primitive Earth, it is doubtful that the process of chemical evolution has proceeded in comets beyond the stage that has occurred in carbonaceous chondrites. Some of the arguments which do not favor the occurrence of biopoesis in comets are: 1. A large layer of cometary ices is ablated from the nucleus' surface each time the comet passes through perihelion, so that essentially most of the organic products on the surface would be sublimed, blown off or polymerized. 2. Because of the low temperatures of the cometary ices, polymers formed on one perihelion passage would not migrate deep enough into the nucleus to be preserved before they would be ablated away by the next perihelion passage. 3. In the absence of atmosphere, and discrete liquid and solid surfaces, it is difficult to visualize the synthesis of key life molecules, such as oligopeptides, oligonucleotides and phospholipids by condensation and dehydration reactions as is presumed to have occurred in the evaporating ponds of the primitive Earth. 4. Observations suggest that cometary nuclei have a rather weak structure. Hence, the low central pressures in comets combined with the high vapor pressures of cometary ices at the melting point of water ice, suggest that a liquid core is not a tenable structure. Yet, even if a cometary nucleus is compact enough to hold a liquid core and a transient liquid water environment was provided by the decay of26Al, the continuous irradiation in water of most of the biologically relevant polymers would have hydrolyzed and degraded them. 5. Needless to say that the effects of radiation on self-replicating systems would also have caused the demise of any life forms which may have appeared under any

  15. The Simplest Chronoscope V: A Theory of Dual Primary and Secondary Reaction Time Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montare, Alberto

    2016-12-01

    Extending work by Montare, visual simple reaction time, choice reaction time, discriminative reaction time, and overall reaction time scores obtained from college students by the simplest chronoscope (a falling meterstick) method were significantly faster as well as significantly less variable than scores of the same individuals from electromechanical reaction timers (machine method). Results supported the existence of dual reaction time systems: an ancient primary reaction time system theoretically activating the V5 parietal area of the dorsal visual stream that evolved to process significantly faster sensory-motor reactions to sudden stimulations arising from environmental objects in motion, and a secondary reaction time system theoretically activating the V4 temporal area of the ventral visual stream that subsequently evolved to process significantly slower sensory-perceptual-motor reactions to sudden stimulations arising from motionless colored objects. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Rapid establishment of polymerase chain reaction-restriction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seven sets of chloroplast primers could produce one or more distinct bands. After the amplified products were digested by 10 restriction enzymes, a total of 135 bands were detected, among which 98 bands (72.59%) were polymorphic. The cpDNA PCR-RFLP based genetic distance (GD) among 30 tea accessions ranged ...

  17. Influence of reactions heats on variation of radius, temperature, pressure and chemical species amounts within a single acoustic cavitation bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerboua, Kaouther; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2018-03-01

    The scientific interest toward the study of acoustic bubble is mainly explained by its practical benefit in providing a reactional media favorable to the rapid evolution of chemical mechanism. The evolution of this mechanism is related to the simultaneous and dependent variation of the volume, temperature and pressure within the bubble, retrieved by the resolution of a differential equations system, including among others the thermal balance. This last one is subject to different assumptions, some authors deem simply that the temperature varies adiabatically during the collapsing phase, without considering the reactions heat of the studied mechanism. This paper aims to evaluate the pertinence of neglecting reactions heats in the thermal balance, by analyzing their effect on the variation of radius, temperature, pressure and chemical species amounts. The results show that the introduction of reactions heats conducts to a decrease of the temperature, an increase of the pressure and a reduction of the bubble volume. As a consequence, this leads to a drop of the quantities of free radicals produced by the chemical mechanism evolving within the bubble. This paper also proved that the impact of the consideration of reactions heats is dependent of the frequency and the acoustic amplitude of the ultrasonic wave. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Self-Evolvable Systems Machine Learning in Social Media

    CERN Document Server

    Iordache, Octavian

    2012-01-01

    This monograph presents key method to successfully manage the growing  complexity of systems  where conventional engineering and scientific methodologies and technologies based on learning and adaptability come to their limits and new ways are nowadays required. The transition from adaptable to evolvable and finally to self-evolvable systems is highlighted, self-properties such as self-organization, self-configuration, and self-repairing are introduced and challenges and limitations of the self-evolvable engineering systems are evaluated.

  19. In Situ Measurement of Local Hydrogen Production Rate by Bubble-Evolved Recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen visibly bubbles during photocatalytic water splitting under illumination with above-bandgap radiation, which provides a direct measurement of local gas-evolving reaction rate. In this paper, optical microscopy of superfield depth was used for recording the hydrogen bubble growth on Cd0.5Zn0.5S photocatalyst in reaction liquid and illuminated with purple light. By analyzing change of hydrogen bubble size as a function of time, we understood that hydrogen bubble growth experienced two periods, which were inertia effect dominated period and diffusion effect dominated period, respectively. The tendency of hydrogen bubble growth was similar to that of the gas bubble in boiling, while the difference in bubble diameter and growth time magnitude was great. Meanwhile, we obtained the local hydrogen production rate on photocatalyst active site by measuring hydrogen bubble growth variation characteristics. This method makes it possible to confirm local actual hydrogen evolution rate quantitatively during photocatalytic water splitting.

  20. Evolving food retail environments in Thailand and implications for the health and nutrition transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banwell, Cathy; Dixon, Jane; Seubsman, Sam-Ang; Pangsap, S; Kelly, Matthew; Sleigh, Adrian

    2013-04-01

    To investigate evolving food retail systems in Thailand. Rapid assessment procedures based on qualitative research methods including interviews, focus groups discussions and site visits. Seven fresh markets located in the four main regions of Thailand. Managers, food specialists, vendors and shoppers from seven fresh markets who participated in interviews and focus group discussions. Fresh markets are under economic pressure and are declining in number. They are attempting to resist the competition from supermarkets by improving convenience, food diversity, quality and safety. Obesity has increased in Thailand at the same time as rapid growth of modern food retail formats has occurred. As fresh markets are overtaken by supermarkets there is a likely loss of fresh, healthy, affordable food for poorer Thais, and a diminution of regional culinary culture, women's jobs and social capital, with implications for the health and nutrition transition in Thailand.

  1. In situ regeneration of bioactive coatings enabled by an evolved Staphylococcus aureus sortase A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Hyun Ok; Qu, Zheng; Haller, Carolyn A.; Dorr, Brent M.; Dai, Erbin; Kim, Wookhyun; Liu, David R.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2016-04-01

    Surface immobilization of bioactive molecules is a central paradigm in the design of implantable devices and biosensors with improved clinical performance capabilities. However, in vivo degradation or denaturation of surface constituents often limits the long-term performance of bioactive films. Here we demonstrate the capacity to repeatedly regenerate a covalently immobilized monomolecular thin film of bioactive molecules through a two-step stripping and recharging cycle. Reversible transpeptidation by a laboratory evolved Staphylococcus aureus sortase A (eSrtA) enabled the rapid immobilization of an anti-thrombogenic film in the presence of whole blood and permitted multiple cycles of film regeneration in vitro that preserved its biological activity. Moreover, eSrtA transpeptidation facilitated surface re-engineering of medical devices in situ after in vivo implantation through removal and restoration film constituents. These studies establish a rapid, orthogonal and reversible biochemical scheme to regenerate selective molecular constituents with the potential to extend the lifetime of bioactive films.

  2. Adapting Morphology to Multiple Tasks in Evolved Virtual Creatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lessin, Dan; Fussell, Don; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2014-01-01

    The ESP method for evolving virtual creatures (Lessin et al., 2013) consisted of an encapsulation mechanism to preserve learned skills, a human-designed syllabus to build higherlevel skills by combining lower-level skills systematically, and a pandemonium mechanism to resolve conflicts between...... encapsulated skills in a single creature’s brain. Previous work with ESP showed that it is possible to evolve much more complex behavior than before, even when fundamental morphology (i.e., skeletal segments and joints) was evolved only for the first skill. This paper introduces a more general form of ESP...... in which full morphological development can continue beyond the first skill, allowing creatures to adapt their morphology to multiple tasks. This extension increases the variety and quality of evolved creature results significantly, while maintaining the original ESP system’s ability to incrementally...

  3. Orthogonally Evolved AI to Improve Difficulty Adjustment in Video Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hintze, Arend; Olson, Randal; Lehman, Joel Anthony

    2016-01-01

    (i.e. agents subject to fewer generations of evolution) make for easier opponents, while highly-evolved agents are more challenging to overcome. In this publication we test a new approach for difficulty adjustment in games: orthogonally evolved AI, where the player receives support from collaborating...... agents that are co-evolved with opponent agents (where collaborators and opponents have orthogonal incentives). The advantage is that game difficulty can be adjusted more granularly by manipulating two independent axes: by having more or less adept collaborators, and by having more or less adept...... opponents. Furthermore, human interaction can modulate (and be informed by) the performance and behavior of collaborating agents. In this way, orthogonally evolved AI both facilitates smoother difficulty adjustment and enables new game experiences....

  4. Transhydrogenase promotes the robustness and evolvability of E. coli deficient in NADPH production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hung Chou

    Full Text Available Metabolic networks revolve around few metabolites recognized by diverse enzymes and involved in myriad reactions. Though hub metabolites are considered as stepping stones to facilitate the evolutionary expansion of biochemical pathways, changes in their production or consumption often impair cellular physiology through their system-wide connections. How does metabolism endure perturbations brought immediately by pathway modification and restore hub homeostasis in the long run? To address this question we studied laboratory evolution of pathway-engineered Escherichia coli that underproduces the redox cofactor NADPH on glucose. Literature suggests multiple possibilities to restore NADPH homeostasis. Surprisingly, genetic dissection of isolates from our twelve evolved populations revealed merely two solutions: (1 modulating the expression of membrane-bound transhydrogenase (mTH in every population; (2 simultaneously consuming glucose with acetate, an unfavored byproduct normally excreted during glucose catabolism, in two subpopulations. Notably, mTH displays broad phylogenetic distribution and has also played a predominant role in laboratory evolution of Methylobacterium extorquens deficient in NADPH production. Convergent evolution of two phylogenetically and metabolically distinct species suggests mTH as a conserved buffering mechanism that promotes the robustness and evolvability of metabolism. Moreover, adaptive diversification via evolving dual substrate consumption highlights the flexibility of physiological systems to exploit ecological opportunities.

  5. Evolving the Evolving: Territory, Place and Rewilding in the California Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Milligan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Current planning and legislation in California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta call for the large-scale ecological restoration of aquatic and terrestrial habitats. These ecological mandates have emerged in response to the region’s infrastructural transformation and the Delta’s predominant use as the central logistical hub in the state’s vast water conveyance network. Restoration is an attempt to recover what was externalized by the logic and abstractions of this logistical infrastructure. However, based on findings from our research, which examined how people are using restored and naturalized landscapes in the Delta and how these landscapes are currently planned for, we argue that as mitigatory response, restoration planning continues some of the same spatial abstractions and inequities by failing to account for the Delta as an urbanized, cultural and unique place. In interpreting how these conditions have come to be, we give attention to a pluralistic landscape approach and a coevolutionary reading of planning, policy, science and landscapes to discuss the conservation challenges presented by “Delta as an Evolving Place”. We suggest that for rewilding efforts to be successful in the Delta, a range of proactive, opportunistic, grounded and participatory tactics will be required to shift towards a more socio-ecological approach.

  6. (N+1)-dimensional Lorentzian evolving wormholes supported by polytropic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldo, Mauricio [Universidad del Bio-Bio, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Concepcion (Chile); Arostica, Fernanda; Bahamonde, Sebastian [Universidad de Concepcion, Departamento de Fisica, Concepcion (Chile)

    2013-08-15

    In this paper we study (N+1)-dimensional evolving wormholes supported by energy satisfying a polytropic equation of state. The considered evolving wormhole models are described by a constant redshift function and generalizes the standard flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime. The polytropic equation of state allows us to consider in (3+1)-dimensions generalizations of the phantom energy and the generalized Chaplygin gas sources. (orig.)

  7. Modular Orbital Demonstration of an Evolvable Space Telescope (MODEST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldauf, Brian; Conti, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The "Search for Life" via imaging of exoplanets is a mission that requires extremely stable telescopes with apertures in the 10 m to 20 m range. The High Definition Space Telescope (HDST) envisioned for this mission would have an aperture >10 m, which is a larger payload than what can be delivered to space using a single launch vehicle. Building and assembling the mirror segments enabling large telescopes will likely require multiple launches and assembly in space. Space-based telescopes with large apertures will require major changes to system architectures.The Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA) for HDST is a primary mission cost driver. Enabling and affordable solutions for this next generation of large aperture space-based telescope are needed.This paper reports on the concept for the Modular Orbital Demonstration of an Evolvable Space Telescope (MODEST), which demonstrates on-orbit robotic and/or astronaut assembly of a precision optical telescope in space. It will also facilitate demonstration of active correction of phase and mirror shape. MODEST is proposed to be delivered to the ISS using standard Express Logistics Carriers (ELCs) and can mounted to one of a variety of ISS pallets. Post-assembly value includes space, ground, and environmental studies, and a testbed for new instruments. This demonstration program for next generation mirror technology provides significant risk reduction and demonstrates the technology in a six-mirror phased telescope. Other key features of the demonstration include the use of an active primary optical surface with wavefront feedback control that allows on-orbit optimization and demonstration of precise surface control to meet optical system wavefront and stability requirements.MODEST will also be used to evaluate advances in lightweight mirror and metering structure materials such as SiC or Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer that have excellent mechanical and thermal properties, e.g. high stiffness, high modulus, high thermal

  8. A Modular Orbital Demonstration of an Evolvable Space Telescope (MODEST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Alberto; Arenberg, Jonathan; Baldauf, Brian

    2017-01-01

    The “Search for Life” (direct imaging of earth-like planets) will require extremely stable telescopes with apertures in the 10 m to 20 m range. Such apertures are larger than what can be delivered to space using current or planned future launch vehicles. Building and assembling large telescopes in space is therefore likely to require not only multiple launches but importantly assembly in spce. As a result, space-based telescopes with large apertures will require major changes to our conventional telescope design and architecture.Here we report on the concept for the Modular Orbital Demonstration of an Evolvable Space Telescope (MODEST) to demonstrates the on-orbit robotic and/or astronaut assembly of an optical telescope in space. MODEST is a proposed International Space Station (ISS demonstration that will make use of the standard Express Logistics Carriers (ELCs) and can mounted to one of a variety of ISS pallets.MODEST will provides significant risk reduction for the next generation of space observatories, and demonstrates the technology needed to assemble a six-mirror phased telescope. Key modest features include the use of an active primary optical surface with wavefront feedback control to allow on-orbit optimization, and the precise surface control to meet optical system wavefront and stability requirements.MODEST will also be used to evaluate advances in lightweight mirror and metering structure materials such as SiC or Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) that have excellent mechanical and thermal properties, e.g. high stiffness, high modulus, high thermal conductivity, and low thermal expansion. Mirrors built from these materials can be rapidly replicated in a highly cost effective manner, making them an excellent candidate for a low cost, high performance Optical Telescope Assembly paving the way for enabling affordable solutions for the next generation of large aperture space-based telescope.MODEST post-assembly value includes space, ground, and

  9. Evolving treatment strategies for management of cardiorenal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandamudi, Sanjay; Chen, Horng H

    2011-12-01

    aspects about our evolving understanding of the cardiorenal system are the innovative treatments that have emerged as a result. The creation of chimeric natriuretic peptides, targeted intra-renal pharmacotherapy, the novel use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors, and combination treatment strategies demonstrate that despite our varied success in treating cardiorenal syndrome in the past, there are highly encouraging translational therapies rapidly developing in the pipeline.

  10. Climate in Context - How partnerships evolve in regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parris, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    In 2015, NOAA's RISA program will celebrate its 20th year of exploration in the development of usable climate information. In the mid-1990s, a vision emerged to develop interdisciplinary research efforts at the regional scale for several important reasons. Recognizable climate patterns, such as the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), emerge at the regional level where our understanding of observations and models coalesce. Critical resources for society are managed in a context of regional systems, such as water supply and human populations. Multiple scales of governance (local, state, and federal) with complex institutional relationships can be examined across a region. Climate information (i.e. data, science, research etc) developed within these contexts has greater potential for use. All of this work rests on a foundation of iterative engagement between scientists and decision makers. Throughout these interactions, RISAs have navigated diverse politics, extreme events and disasters, socio-economic and ecological disruptions, and advances in both science and technology. Our understanding of information needs is evolving into a richer understanding of complex institutional, legal, political, and cultural contexts within which people can use science to make informed decisions. The outcome of RISA work includes both cases where climate information was used in decisions and cases where capacity for using climate information and making climate resilient decisions has increased over time. In addition to balancing supply and demand of scientific information, RISAs are engaged in a social process of reconciling climate information use with important drivers of society. Because partnerships are critical for sustained engagement, and because engagement is critically important to the use of science, the rapid development of new capacity in regionally-based science programs focused on providing climate decision support is both needed and challenging. New actors can bolster

  11. Agile Science Planning: Rapid Response Re-planning Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop autonomous rapid response to science observations in missions targeting small bodies in fly-by mode where observing and reaction time is precious.

  12. Identification of liquid-phase decomposition species and reactions for guanidinium azotetrazolate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumbhakarna, Neeraj R.; Shah, Kaushal J.; Chowdhury, Arindrajit; Thynell, Stefan T., E-mail: thynell@psu.edu

    2014-08-20

    Highlights: • Guanidinium azotetrazolate (GzT) is a high-nitrogen energetic material. • FTIR spectroscopy and ToFMS spectrometry were used for species identification. • Quantum mechanics was used to identify transition states and decomposition pathways. • Important reactions in the GzT liquid-phase decomposition process were identified. • Initiation of decomposition occurs via ring opening, releasing N{sub 2}. - Abstract: The objective of this work is to analyze the decomposition of guanidinium azotetrazolate (GzT) in the liquid phase by using a combined experimental and computational approach. The experimental part involves the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to acquire the spectral transmittance of the evolved gas-phase species from rapid thermolysis, as well as to acquire spectral transmittance of the condensate and residue formed from the decomposition. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS) is also used to acquire mass spectra of the evolved gas-phase species. Sub-milligram samples of GzT were heated at rates of about 2000 K/s to a set temperature (553–573 K) where decomposition occurred under isothermal conditions. N{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, HCN, guanidine and melamine were identified as products of decomposition. The computational approach is based on using quantum mechanics for confirming the identity of the species observed in experiments and for identifying elementary chemical reactions that formed these species. In these ab initio techniques, various levels of theory and basis sets were used. Based on the calculated enthalpy and free energy values of various molecular structures, important reaction pathways were identified. Initiation of decomposition of GzT occurs via ring opening to release N{sub 2}.

  13. A novel reverse flow reactor coupling endothermic and exothermic reactions. Part II: sequential reactor configuration for reversible endothermic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sint Annaland, M.; Scholts, H.A.R.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2002-01-01

    The new reactor concept for highly endothermic reactions at elevated temperatures with possible rapid catalyst deactivation based on the indirect coupling of endothermic and exothermic reactions in reverse flow, developed for irreversible reactions in Part I, has been extended to reversible

  14. Effective but costly, evolved mechanisms of defense against a virulent opportunistic pathogen in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin H Ye

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila harbor substantial genetic variation for antibacterial defense, and investment in immunity is thought to involve a costly trade-off with life history traits, including development, life span, and reproduction. To understand the way in which insects invest in fighting bacterial infection, we selected for survival following systemic infection with the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in wild-caught Drosophila melanogaster over 10 generations. We then examined genome-wide changes in expression in the selected flies relative to unselected controls, both of which had been infected with the pathogen. This powerful combination of techniques allowed us to specifically identify the genetic basis of the evolved immune response. In response to selection, population-level survivorship to infection increased from 15% to 70%. The evolved capacity for defense was costly, however, as evidenced by reduced longevity and larval viability and a rapid loss of the trait once selection pressure was removed. Counter to expectation, we observed more rapid developmental rates in the selected flies. Selection-associated changes in expression of genes with dual involvement in developmental and immune pathways suggest pleiotropy as a possible mechanism for the positive correlation. We also found that both the Toll and the Imd pathways work synergistically to limit infectivity and that cellular immunity plays a more critical role in overcoming P. aeruginosa infection than previously reported. This work reveals novel pathways by which Drosophila can survive infection with a virulent pathogen that may be rare in wild populations, however, due to their cost.

  15. Whole-genome sequencing of a laboratory-evolved yeast strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunham Maitreya J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental evolution of microbial populations provides a unique opportunity to study evolutionary adaptation in response to controlled selective pressures. However, until recently it has been difficult to identify the precise genetic changes underlying adaptation at a genome-wide scale. New DNA sequencing technologies now allow the genome of parental and evolved strains of microorganisms to be rapidly determined. Results We sequenced >93.5% of the genome of a laboratory-evolved strain of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its ancestor at >28× depth. Both single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number amplifications were found, with specific gains over array-based methodologies previously used to analyze these genomes. Applying a segmentation algorithm to quantify structural changes, we determined the approximate genomic boundaries of a 5× gene amplification. These boundaries guided the recovery of breakpoint sequences, which provide insights into the nature of a complex genomic rearrangement. Conclusions This study suggests that whole-genome sequencing can provide a rapid approach to uncover the genetic basis of evolutionary adaptations, with further applications in the study of laboratory selections and mutagenesis screens. In addition, we show how single-end, short read sequencing data can provide detailed information about structural rearrangements, and generate predictions about the genomic features and processes that underlie genome plasticity.

  16. Rapid prototyping of composite aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George; Rais-Rohani, Masoud; Hall, Kenneth; Holifield, Walt; Sullivan, Rani; Brown, Scott

    The faculty, staff and students of the Raspet Flight Research Laboratory (RFRL) have developed a rapid prototyping capability in a series of research aircraft and unmanned aircraft development projects. There has been a steady change in the technologies used to accomplish these tasks at the RFRL. The most recent development has been the utilization of computer graphics and a 5-axis gantry robot router to accelerate the design, moldmaking and parts trimming tasks. The composite structure fabrication processes at the RFRL have evolved from wet-lay-up to autoclave curve. Currently, the feasibility of the stitched composite material preform and resin transfer molding process is being explored.

  17. Páramo is the world’s fastest evolving and coolest biodiversity hotspot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago eMadriñán

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the processes that cause speciation is a key aim of evolutionary biology. Lineages or biomes that exhibit recent and rapid diversification are ideal model systems for determining these processes. Species rich biomes reported to be of relatively recent origin, i.e., since the beginning of the Miocene, include Mediterranean ecosystems such as the California Floristic Province, oceanic islands such as the Hawaiian archipelago and the Neotropical high elevation ecosystem of the Páramos. Páramos constitute grasslands above the forest tree-line (at elevations of c. 2800–4700 m with high species endemism. Organisms that occupy this ecosystem are a likely product of unique adaptations to an extreme environment that evolved during the last three to five million years when the Andes reached an altitude that was capable of sustaining this type of vegetation. We compared net diversification rates of lineages in fast evolving biomes using 73 dated molecular phylogenies. Based on our sample, we demonstrate that average net diversification rates of Páramo plant lineages are faster than those of other reportedly fast evolving hotspots and that the faster evolving lineages are more likely to be found in Páramos than the other hotspots. Páramos therefore represent the ideal model system for studying diversification processes. Most of the speciation events that we observed in the Páramos (144 out of 177 occurred during the Pleistocene possibly due to the effects of species range contraction and expansion that may have resulted from the well-documented climatic changes during that period. Understanding these effects will assist with efforts to determine how future climatic changes will impact plant populations.

  18. Rapid Development: A Content Analysis Comparison of Literature and Purposive Sampling of AFRL Rapid Reaction Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    warning for incoming German bombers (Brown, 1999). The Culin Hedgerow Cutter was adapted from steel obstacles (originally emplaced by the German army...and attached to the front of Sherman tanks allowing the breaching of hedgerows to counter German emplacements in confined fields in the taking of the...Government Accounting Office. DoD Acquisitions: Assessments of Selected Weapons Programs. Washington: GPO, 30 March 2010 Guttman, Jon, “French Hedgerows

  19. Origin and evolution of photosynthetic reaction centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, John M.; Pierson, Beverly K.

    1987-09-01

    The prototype reaction center may have used protoporphyrin-IX associated with small peptides to transfer electrons or protons across the primitive cell membrane. The precursor of all contemporary reaction centers contained chlorophylla molecules as both primary electron donor and initial electron acceptor and an Fe-S center as secondary acceptor (RC-1 type). The biosynthetic pathway for chlorophylla evolved along with the evolution of a better organized reaction center associated with cytochromes and quinones in a primitive cyclic electron transport system. This reaction center probably functioned initially in photoassimilation, but was easily adapted to CO2 fixation using H2 and H2S as reductants. During this phase bacteriochlorophyllg may have evolved from chlorophylla in response to competition for light, and thereby initiated the gram-positive line of eubacteria. A second reaction center (RC-2) evolved from RC-1 between 3.5 and 2.5 Ga ago in response to the competition for reductants for CO2 fixation. The new organism containing RC-2 in series with RC-1 would have been able to use poor reducing agents such as the abundant aqueous ferrous ion in place of H2 and H2S. This new organism is proposed to be the common ancestor of all phototrophic eubacteria except those related to the gram-positive bacteria. All organisms containing bacteriochlorophylla lost either RC-1 or RC-2, while those organisms containing chlorophylla (ancestors of cyanobacteria) added a water-splitting enzyme to RC-2 between 3.0 and 2.5 Ga ago in order to use H2O in place of hydrated ferrous ion as electron donor for autotrophic photosynthesis.

  20. Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Evolving From Radiologically Isolated Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarci, Orhun H; Lebrun, Christine; Siva, Aksel; Keegan, Mark B; Azevedo, Christina J; Inglese, Matilde; Tintoré, Mar; Newton, Braeden D; Durand-Dubief, Francoise; Amato, Maria Pia; De Stefano, Nicola; Sormani, Maria Pia; Pelletier, Daniel; Okuda, Darin T

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the preprogressive phase in subjects with radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS) who evolve to primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). A multicenter RIS cohort was previously established. Demographic, clinical, and radiological characteristics of subjects with RIS that evolved directly to PPMS were compared to those that developed a relapsing disease course from onset (clinically isolated syndrome [CIS] or relapsing-remitting MS) and were also compared to two other population- and clinic-based PPMS cohorts. Of the 453 subjects with RIS, 128 evolved to symptomatic MS during the follow-up (113 developed a first acute clinical event consistent with CIS/MS, 15 evolved to PPMS). PPMS prevalence (11.7%) and onset age (mean ± standard deviation; 49.1 ± 12.1) in the RIS group were comparable to other PPMS populations (p > 0.05). Median time to PPMS was 3.5 years (range, 1.6-5.4). RIS evolved to PPMS more commonly in men (p = 0.005) and at an older age (p < 0.001) when compared to CIS/MS, independent of follow-up duration. Subjects who evolved to PPMS had more spinal cord lesions (100%) before symptomatic evolution than those that developed CIS/MS (64%) and those that remained asymptomatic (23%) within the follow-up period (P = 0.005). Other MRI characteristics in the preprogressive phase of PPMS were indistinguishable from CIS/MS. Subjects with RIS evolve to PPMS at the same frequency as expected from general MS populations in an age-dependent manner. Besides age, unequivocal presence of spinal cord lesions and being male predicted evolution to PPMS. Our findings further suggest that RIS is biologically part of the MS spectrum. © 2015 American Neurological Association.

  1. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  2. Multistage reaction pathways in detonating high explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Computer Science, and Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242 (United States); Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Vashishta, Priya [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Computer Science, and Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242 (United States)

    2014-11-17

    Atomistic mechanisms underlying the reaction time and intermediate reaction products of detonating high explosives far from equilibrium have been elusive. This is because detonation is one of the hardest multiscale physics problems, in which diverse length and time scales play important roles. Here, large spatiotemporal-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations validated by quantum molecular dynamics simulations reveal a two-stage reaction mechanism during the detonation of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine crystal. Rapid production of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O within ∼10 ps is followed by delayed production of CO molecules beyond ns. We found that further decomposition towards the final products is inhibited by the formation of large metastable carbon- and oxygen-rich clusters with fractal geometry. In addition, we found distinct unimolecular and intermolecular reaction pathways, respectively, for the rapid N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O productions.

  3. Rebinding in biochemical reactions on membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, Sean D.; Keener, James P.

    2017-10-01

    The behavior of many biochemical processes depends crucially on molecules rapidly rebinding after dissociating. In the case of multisite protein modification, the importance of rebinding has been demonstrated both experimentally and through several recent computational studies involving stochastic spatial simulations. As rebinding stems from spatio-temporal correlations, theorists have resorted to models that explicitly include space to properly account for the effects of rebinding. However, for reactions in three space dimensions it was recently shown that well-mixed ordinary differential equation (ODE) models can incorporate rebinding by adding connections to the reaction network. The rate constants for these new connections involve the probability that a pair of molecules rapidly rebinds after dissociation. In order to study biochemical reactions on membranes, in this paper we derive an explicit formula for this rebinding probability for reactions in two space dimensions. We show that ODE models can use the formula to replicate detailed stochastic spatial simulations, and that the formula can predict ultrasensitivity for reactions involving multisite modification of membrane-bound proteins. Further, we compute a new concentration-dependent rebinding probability for reactions in three space dimensions. Our analysis predicts that rebinding plays a much larger role in reactions on membranes compared to reactions in cytoplasm.

  4. Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Conditions Anaphylaxis Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions Anaphylaxis-Like Reactions Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... exposed to a foreign substance, some people suffer reactions identical to anaphylaxis, but no allergy (IgE antibody) ...

  5. Catalysis of Photochemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albini, A.

    1986-01-01

    Offers a classification system of catalytic effects in photochemical reactions, contrasting characteristic properties of photochemical and thermal reactions. Discusses catalysis and sensitization, examples of catalyzed reactions of excepted states, complexing ground state substrates, and catalysis of primary photoproducts. (JM)

  6. Rapid heating of matter using high power lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Woosuk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-08

    This slide presentation describes motivation (uniform and rapid heating of a target, opportunity to study warm dense matter, study of nuclear fusion reactions), rapid heating of matter with intense laser-driven ion beams, visualization of the expanding warm dense gold and diamond, and nuclear fusion experiments using high power lasers (direct heating of deuterium spheres (radius ~ 10nm) with an intense laser pulse.

  7. Modeling and clustering users with evolving profiles in usage streams

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chongsheng

    2012-09-01

    Today, there is an increasing need of data stream mining technology to discover important patterns on the fly. Existing data stream models and algorithms commonly assume that users\\' records or profiles in data streams will not be updated or revised once they arrive. Nevertheless, in various applications such asWeb usage, the records/profiles of the users can evolve along time. This kind of streaming data evolves in two forms, the streaming of tuples or transactions as in the case of traditional data streams, and more importantly, the evolving of user records/profiles inside the streams. Such data streams bring difficulties on modeling and clustering for exploring users\\' behaviors. In this paper, we propose three models to summarize this kind of data streams, which are the batch model, the Evolving Objects (EO) model and the Dynamic Data Stream (DDS) model. Through creating, updating and deleting user profiles, these models summarize the behaviors of each user as a profile object. Based upon these models, clustering algorithms are employed to discover interesting user groups from the profile objects. We have evaluated all the proposed models on a large real-world data set, showing that the DDS model summarizes the data streams with evolving tuples more efficiently and effectively, and provides better basis for clustering users than the other two models. © 2012 IEEE.

  8. Catalytic Friedel-Crafts reaction of aminocyclopropanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Nanteuil, Florian; Loup, Joachim; Waser, Jérôme

    2013-07-19

    A Lewis acid catalyzed Friedel-Crafts reaction between donor-acceptor aminocyclopropanes and indoles and other electron-rich aromatic compounds is reported. Indole alkylation at the C3 position was generally obtained for a broad range of functional groups and substitution patterns. In the case of C3-substituted indoles, C2 alkylation was observed. The reaction gives a rapid access to gamma amino acid derivatives present in numerous bioactive molecules.

  9. Development of a fluorescence-based sensor for rapid diagnosis of cyanide exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Randy; Oda, Robert P; Bhandari, Raj K; Mahon, Sari B; Brenner, Matthew; Rockwood, Gary A; Logue, Brian A

    2014-02-04

    Although commonly known as a highly toxic chemical, cyanide is also an essential reagent for many industrial processes in areas such as mining, electroplating, and synthetic fiber production. The "heavy" use of cyanide in these industries, along with its necessary transportation, increases the possibility of human exposure. Because the onset of cyanide toxicity is fast, a rapid, sensitive, and accurate method for the diagnosis of cyanide exposure is necessary. Therefore, a field sensor for the diagnosis of cyanide exposure was developed based on the reaction of naphthalene dialdehyde, taurine, and cyanide, yielding a fluorescent β-isoindole. An integrated cyanide capture "apparatus", consisting of sample and cyanide capture chambers, allowed rapid separation of cyanide from blood samples. Rabbit whole blood was added to the sample chamber, acidified, and the HCN gas evolved was actively transferred through a stainless steel channel to the capture chamber containing a basic solution of naphthalene dialdehyde (NDA) and taurine. The overall analysis time (including the addition of the sample) was cyanide exposure. Most importantly, the sensor was 100% accurate in diagnosing cyanide poisoning for acutely exposed rabbits.

  10. On Thermonuclear Reaction Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Haubold, H. J.; Mathai, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear reactions govern major aspects of the chemical evolution of galaxies and stars. Analytic study of the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals is attempted here. Exact expressions for the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals for nuclear reactions in the cases of nonresonant, modified nonresonant, screened nonresonant and resonant cases are given. These are expressed in terms of H-functions, G-functions and in computable series forms. Computational aspects are als...

  11. A rapid two step protocol of in vitro propagation of an important ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present investigation aimed at developing rapid micro propagation protocol, which can be used for conservation of Centella asiatica and mass multiplication of a valuable medicinal plant to meet out the pharmaceutical demand and its conservation. Attempts were made to evolve a rapid in vitro technology to conserve, ...

  12. A rapid two step protocol of in vitro propagation of an important ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chandrakant tiwari

    2013-03-06

    Mar 6, 2013 ... The present investigation aimed at developing rapid micro propagation protocol, which can be used for conservation of Centella asiatica and mass multiplication of a valuable medicinal plant to meet out the pharmaceutical demand and its conservation. Attempts were made to evolve a rapid in vitro ...

  13. Atmospheric gas phase reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Ulrich

    This chapter introduces the underlying physicochemical principles and the relevance of atmospheric gas phase reactions. In particular, reaction orders, the concept of elementary reactions, definition of and factors determining reaction rates (kinetic theory of chemical reactions), and photochemical reactions are discussed. Sample applications of the pertinent reaction pathways in tropospheric chemistry are presented, particularly reactions involving free radicals (OH, NO3, halogen oxides) and their roles in the self-cleaning of the troposphere. The cycles of nitrogen and sulfur species as well as the principles of tropospheric ozone formation are introduced. Finally, the processes governing the stratospheric ozone layer (Chapman Cycle and extensions) are discussed.

  14. Synthesis of Evolving Cells for Reconfigurable Manufacturing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padayachee, J.; Bright, G.

    2014-07-01

    The concept of Reconfigurable Manufacturing Systems (RMSs) was formulated due to the global necessity for production systems that are able to economically evolve according to changes in markets and products. Technologies and design methods are under development to enable RMSs to exhibit transformable system layouts, reconfigurable processes, cells and machines. Existing factory design methods and software have not yet advanced to include reconfigurable manufacturing concepts. This paper presents the underlying group technology framework for the design of manufacturing cells that are able to evolve according to a changing product mix by mechanisms of reconfiguration. The framework is based on a Norton- Bass forecast and time variant BOM models. An adaptation of legacy group technology methods is presented for the synthesis of evolving cells and two optimization problems are presented within this context.

  15. Evolving Systems: An Outcome of Fondest Hopes and Wildest Dreams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan A.; Balas, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    New theory is presented for evolving systems, which are autonomously controlled subsystems that self-assemble into a new evolved system with a higher purpose. Evolving systems of aerospace structures often require additional control when assembling to maintain stability during the entire evolution process. This is the concept of Adaptive Key Component Control that operates through one specific component to maintain stability during the evolution. In addition, this control must often overcome persistent disturbances that occur while the evolution is in progress. Theoretical results will be presented for Adaptive Key Component control for persistent disturbance rejection. An illustrative example will demonstrate the Adaptive Key Component controller on a system composed of rigid body and flexible body modes.

  16. Computational Genetic Regulatory Networks Evolvable, Self-organizing Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Knabe, Johannes F

    2013-01-01

    Genetic Regulatory Networks (GRNs) in biological organisms are primary engines for cells to enact their engagements with environments, via incessant, continually active coupling. In differentiated multicellular organisms, tremendous complexity has arisen in the course of evolution of life on earth. Engineering and science have so far achieved no working system that can compare with this complexity, depth and scope of organization. Abstracting the dynamics of genetic regulatory control to a computational framework in which artificial GRNs in artificial simulated cells differentiate while connected in a changing topology, it is possible to apply Darwinian evolution in silico to study the capacity of such developmental/differentiated GRNs to evolve. In this volume an evolutionary GRN paradigm is investigated for its evolvability and robustness in models of biological clocks, in simple differentiated multicellularity, and in evolving artificial developing 'organisms' which grow and express an ontogeny starting fr...

  17. Study on evolving phases of accelerating generalized polygon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuntian; Dong, Fengliang; Qian, Kemao; Zhang, Qingchuan; Chu, Weiguo; Ma, Xuan; Wu, Xiaoping

    2016-03-07

    Recently, accelerating beam is becoming a hotspot in optics research. In this paper, we studied the evolving phases of accelerating generalized polygon beams (AGPBs) and proposed a novel method to generate this beam family. An important discovery has been made about reconstructing AGPBs only by evolving low-frequency phases in high power region, which confirms the dominant role of phase terms in the AGPBs' evolution. We also succeeded controlling the size and quantity of AGPB's intensity peaks in an easy and direct manner by manipulating the evolving phases in low frequency. This result not only explains the self-healing property of AGPBs but also confirms that AGPBs can be a great candidate to function as an optical tweezer to trap and free microparticles and microcreatures for certain purpose.

  18. Cosmic Biology How Life Could Evolve on Other Worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Louis Neil

    2011-01-01

    It is very unlikely that little green humanoids are living on Mars. But what are the possible life forms that might exist in our Solar System and how might they have evolved? This uniquely authoritative and imaginative book on the possibilties for alien life addresses the intrinsic interest that we have about life on other worlds - reinforcing some of our assumptions and reshaping others. It introduces new possibilties that will enlarge our understanding of the issue overall, in particular the enormous range of environments and planetary conditions within which life might evolve. Cosmic Biology -discusses a broad range of possible environments where alien life might have evolved; -explains why carbon-based, water-borne life is more likely that its alternatives, but is not the only possiblity; -applies the principles of planetary science and modern biology to evolutionary scenarios on other worlds; -looks at the future fates of living systems, including those on Earth.

  19. Qualitative Functional Decomposition Analysis of Evolved Neuromorphic Flight Controllers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay K. Boddhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the previous work, it was demonstrated that one can effectively employ CTRNN-EH (a neuromorphic variant of EH method methodology to evolve neuromorphic flight controllers for a flapping wing robot. This paper describes a novel frequency grouping-based analysis technique, developed to qualitatively decompose the evolved controllers into explainable functional control blocks. A summary of the previous work related to evolving flight controllers for two categories of the controller types, called autonomous and nonautonomous controllers, is provided, and the applicability of the newly developed decomposition analysis for both controller categories is demonstrated. Further, the paper concludes with appropriate discussion of ongoing work and implications for possible future work related to employing the CTRNN-EH methodology and the decomposition analysis techniques presented in this paper.

  20. RAPID BIOCATALYTIC POLYTRANSESTERIFICATION: REACTION KINETICS IN AN EXOTHERMIC REACTION. (R825338)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  1. The cartography of pain: the evolving contribution of pain maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Geoffrey D

    2010-09-01

    Pain maps are nowadays widely used in clinical practice. This article aims to critically review the fundamental principles that underlie the mapping of pain, to analyse the evolving iconography of pain maps and their sometimes straightforward and sometimes contentious nature when used in the clinic, and to draw attention to some more recent developments in mapping pain. It is concluded that these maps are intriguing and evolving cartographic tools which can be used for depicting not only the spatial features but also the interpretative or perceptual components and accompaniments of pain. Copyright 2009 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. 1. History, evolution, and evolving standards of contact lens care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczotka-Flynn, Loretta; Ahearn, Donald G; Barr, Joseph; Benjamin, William Joe; Kiang, Tina; Nichols, Jason J; Schein, Oliver D; Stone, Ralph P; Winterton, Lynn

    2013-01-15

    Contact lenses and lens care regimens are an important part of eyecare practices and vital to lens-wearing patients. New contact lens materials and cleaning options continue to come to market and affect how patients wear and care for their lenses. In this section we look at how the contact lens and lens solution revolution started, how it has evolved over the last 40 years, and how standards have evolved and impacted these new offerings. Copyright © 2013 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Active Printed Materials for Complex Self-Evolving Deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raviv, Dan; Zhao, Wei; McKnelly, Carrie; Papadopoulou, Athina; Kadambi, Achuta; Shi, Boxin; Hirsch, Shai; Dikovsky, Daniel; Zyracki, Michael; Olguin, Carlos; Raskar, Ramesh; Tibbits, Skylar

    2014-12-01

    We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated models are designed and printed as static objects. Here, we introduce a novel approach for simulating and fabricating self-evolving structures that transform into a predetermined shape, changing property and function after fabrication. The new locally coordinated bending primitives combine into a single system, allowing for a global deformation which can stretch, fold and bend given environmental stimulus.

  4. RAPID: Collaborative Commanding and Monitoring of Lunar Assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Recaredo J.; Mittman, David S.; Powell, Mark W.; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Abramyan, Lucy; Shams, Khawaja S.; Wallick, Michael; Allan, Mark; hide

    2011-01-01

    RAPID (Robot Application Programming Interface Delegate) software utilizes highly robust technology to facilitate commanding and monitoring of lunar assets. RAPID provides the ability for intercenter communication, since these assets are developed in multiple NASA centers. RAPID is targeted at the task of lunar operations; specifically, operations that deal with robotic assets, cranes, and astronaut spacesuits, often developed at different NASA centers. RAPID allows for a uniform way to command and monitor these assets. Commands can be issued to take images, and monitoring is done via telemetry data from the asset. There are two unique features to RAPID: First, it allows any operator from any NASA center to control any NASA lunar asset, regardless of location. Second, by abstracting the native language for specific assets to a common set of messages, an operator may control and monitor any NASA lunar asset by being trained only on the use of RAPID, rather than the specific asset. RAPID is easier to use and more powerful than its predecessor, the Astronaut Interface Device (AID). Utilizing the new robust middleware, DDS (Data Distribution System), developing in RAPID has increased significantly over the old middleware. The API is built upon the Java Eclipse Platform, which combined with DDS, provides platform-independent software architecture, simplifying development of RAPID components. As RAPID continues to evolve and new messages are being designed and implemented, operators for future lunar missions will have a rich environment for commanding and monitoring assets.

  5. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design (RAPID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    RAPID is a methodology and software system to define a class of airplane configurations and directly evaluate surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity on and about the configurations. A distinguishing characteristic which separates RAPID from other airplane surface modellers is that the output grids and grid sensitivity are directly applicable in CFD analysis. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process which is incorporated into interactive software for 'real time' visual analysis and into batch software for the application of optimization technology. The computed surface grids and volume grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, and vertical tail components. The double-delta wing and tail components are manifested by solving a fourth order partial differential equation (PDE) subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design parameters are incorporated into the boundary conditions and therefore govern the shapes of the surfaces. The PDE solution yields a smooth transition between boundaries. Surface grids suitable for CFD calculation are created by establishing an H-type topology about the configuration and incorporating grid spacing functions in the PDE equation for the lifting components and the fuselage definition equations. User specified grid parameters govern the location and degree of grid concentration. A two-block volume grid about a configuration is calculated using the Control Point Form (CPF) technique. The interactive software, which runs on Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations, allows design parameters to be continuously varied and the resulting surface grid to be observed in real time. The batch software computes both the surface and volume grids and also computes the sensitivity of the output grid with respect to the input design parameters by applying the precompiler tool

  6. Rapidly Developing Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Oline Barrios Poulsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe cutaneous reactions with potentially fatal outcomes can have many different causes. The Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN are rare. They are characterized by a low incidence but high mortality, and drugs are most commonly implicated. Urgent active therapy is required. Prompt recognition and withdrawal of suspect drug and rapid intervention can result in favourable outcome. No further international guidelines for treatment exist, and much of the treatment relies on old or experimental concepts with no scientific evidence. We report on a 54-year-old man experiencing rapidly developing drug-induced severe TEN and presented multiorgan failure involving the respiratory and circulatory system, coagulopathy, and renal insufficiency. Detachment counted 30% of total body surface area (TBSA. SCORTEN = 5, indicating a mortality rate >90%. The patient was sedated and mechanically ventilated, supported with fluids and inotropes to maintain a stable circulation. Component therapy was guided by thromboelastography (TEG. The patient received plasmapheresis, and shock reversal treatment was initiated. He was transferred to a specialized intensive care burn unit within 24 hours from admittance. The initial care was continued, and hemodialysis was started. Pulmonary, circulatory, and renal sequelae resolved with intensive care, and re-epithelialization progressed slowly. The patient was discharged home on hospital day 19.

  7. Evolving matched filter transform pairs for satellite image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Michael R.; Horner, Toby; Moore, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Wavelets provide an attractive method for efficient image compression. For transmission across noisy or bandwidth limited channels, a signal may be subjected to quantization in which the signal is transcribed onto a reduced alphabet in order to save bandwidth. Unfortunately, the performance of the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) degrades at increasing levels of quantization. In recent years, evolutionary algorithms (EAs) have been employed to optimize wavelet-inspired transform filters to improve compression performance in the presence of quantization. Wavelet filters consist of a pair of real-valued coefficient sets; one set represents the compression filter while the other set defines the image reconstruction filter. The reconstruction filter is defined as the biorthogonal inverse of the compression filter. Previous research focused upon two approaches to filter optimization. In one approach, the original wavelet filter is used for image compression while the reconstruction filter is evolved by an EA. In the second approach, both the compression and reconstruction filters are evolved. In both cases, the filters are not biorthogonally related to one another. We propose a novel approach to filter evolution. The EA optimizes a compression filter. Rather than using a wavelet filter or evolving a second filter for reconstruction, the reconstruction filter is computed as the biorthogonal inverse of the evolved compression filter. The resulting filter pair retains some of the mathematical properties of wavelets. This paper compares this new approach to existing filter optimization approaches to determine its suitability for the optimization of image filters appropriate for defense applications of image processing.

  8. Functional properties of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van P.H.

    1996-01-01


    This Thesis presents the results of a study by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and measurements of oxygen evolution of the Oxygen Evolving Complex of Photosystem 11 (PS-II) in PS-II enriched membranes from spinach.

    The experimental part of this Thesis is preceded by a

  9. On the Benefits of Divergent Search for Evolved Representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehman, Joel; Risi, Sebastian; Stanley, Kenneth O

    2012-01-01

    explicit objectives that are consequently divergent may implicitly reward lineages that continually diverge, thereby indirectly selecting for evolvable representations that are better able to diverge further. This paper reviews a range of past results that support such a hypothesis from a method called...

  10. Fast, comfortable or economical: Evolving platooning strategies with many objectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willigen, W. van; Haasdijk, E.; Kester, L.J.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    The research in this paper is inspired by a vision of intelligent vehicles that autonomously move along motorways: they join and leave trains of vehicles (platoons), overtake other vehicles, etc. We propose a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm that evolves high-level controllers for such

  11. Evolving Robot Controllers for Structured Environments Through Environment Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreno, Rodrigo; Faiña, Andres; Støy, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    into four different sub-environments and evolve controllers that generalize to traverse two larger environments composed of the sub-environments. We also study two strategies for presenting the sub-environments to the evolutionary algorithm: all sub-environments at the same time and in sequence. Results...

  12. The urban watershed continuum: evolving spatial and temporal dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujay S. Kaushal; Kenneth T. Belt

    2012-01-01

    Urban ecosystems are constantly evolving, and they are expected to change in both space and time with active management or degradation. An urban watershed continuum framework recognizes a continuum of engineered and natural hydrologic flowpaths that expands hydrologic networks in ways that are seldom considered. It recognizes that the nature of hydrologic connectivity...

  13. Optimization as side-effect of evolving allelopathic diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pagie, L.; Hogeweg, P.

    2001-01-01

    Many bacteria carry gene complexes that code for a toxin-antidote pair, e.g. colicin systems. Such gene complexes can be advantageous for its host by killing competitor bacteria while the antidote protects the host. However, in order to evolve a novel and useful toxin first a proper antidote must

  14. Did language evolve like the vertebrate eye? | Botha | Stellenbosch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Did language evolve like the vertebrate eye? R P Botha. Abstract. No abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.5774/34-0-33 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  15. A Review of Microbiology: An Evolving Science, Second Edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara May

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Microbiology: An Evolving Science, 2nd ed.; Joan L Slonczweski and John W. Foster; (2011. W.W. Norton & Company, New York NY. 1096 pages. ISBN: 978-0-393-93447-2. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  16. The Evolving Military Learner Population: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kate; Vignare, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This literature review examines the evolving online military learner population with emphasis on current generation military learners, who are most frequently Post-9/11 veterans. The review synthesizes recent scholarly and grey literature on military learner demographics and attributes, college experiences, and academic outcomes against a backdrop…

  17. Evolving Nature of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourian, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the historical and evolving terminology, constructs, and ideologies that inform the language used by those who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and same-gender loving, who may identify as queer, as well as those who are members of trans* communities from multiple and intersectional perspectives.

  18. Optimists' Creed: Brave New Cyberlearning, Evolving Utopias (Circa 2041)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleson, Winslow; Lewis, Armanda

    2016-01-01

    This essay imagines the role that artificial intelligence innovations play in the integrated living, learning and research environments of 2041. Here, in 2041, in the context of increasingly complex wicked challenges, whose solutions by their very nature continue to evade even the most capable experts, society and technology have co-evolved to…

  19. A Conceptual Framework for Evolving, Recommender Online Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, K. Dharini Amitha; Gallupe, R. Brent

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive conceptual framework is developed and described for evolving recommender-driven online learning systems (ROLS). This framework describes how such systems can support students, course authors, course instructors, systems administrators, and policy makers in developing and using these ROLS. The design science information systems…

  20. Disaggregating soil erosion processes within an evolving experimental landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil-mantled landscapes subjected to rainfall, runoff events, and downstream base level adjustments will erode and evolve in time and space. Yet the precise mechanisms for soil erosion also will vary, and such variations may not be adequately captured by soil erosion prediction technology. This st...

  1. Thermogravimetry-evolved gas analysis–mass spectrometry system ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This system which gives complete information on weight change, heat change, nature and content of evolved gases is being used for. temperature programmed decomposition (TPD),; synthesis of nanocrystalline materials,; gas–solid interactions and; analysis of gas mixtures. The TPD of various inorganic oxyanion solids ...

  2. Generic, Property Based Queries for Evolvable Weaving Specifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagy, I.; Bergmans, Lodewijk; Gülesir, G.; Durr, P.E.A.; Aksit, Mehmet

    2005-01-01

    In the current aspect-oriented languages, advices and pointcuts are explicitly associated in general. This results in weaving specifications that are less evolvable and need more maintenance during the development of a system. To address this issue, we propose associative access to advices and

  3. Exploring, exploiting and evolving diversity of aquatic ecosystem models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.B.G.; Arhonditsis, G.B.; Beusen, Arthur; Bolding, Karsten; Bruce, Louise; Bruggeman, Jorn; Couture, Raoul Marie; Downing, Andrea S.; Alex Elliott, J.; Frassl, M.A.; Gal, Gideon; Gerla, Daan J.; Hipsey, M.R.; Hu, Fenjuan; Ives, S.C.; Janse, J.H.; Jeppesen, Erik; Jöhnk, K.D.; Kneis, David; Kong, Xiangzhen; Kuiper, J.J.; Lehmann, M.K.; Lemmen, Carsten; Özkundakci, Deniz; Petzoldt, Thomas; Rinke, Karsten; Robson, B.J.; Sachse, René; Schep, S.A.; Schmid, Martin; Scholten, Huub; Teurlincx, Sven; Trolle, Dennis; Troost, T.A.; Dam, Van A.A.; Gerven, Van L.P.A.; Weijerman, Mariska; Wells, S.A.; Mooij, W.M.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a community perspective on how to explore, exploit and evolve the diversity in aquatic ecosystem models. These models play an important role in understanding the functioning of aquatic ecosystems, filling in observation gaps and developing effective strategies for water quality

  4. Intelligent reservoir operation system based on evolving artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Paulo; Chang, Fi-John

    2008-06-01

    We propose a novel intelligent reservoir operation system based on an evolving artificial neural network (ANN). Evolving means the parameters of the ANN model are identified by the GA evolutionary optimization technique. Accordingly, the ANN model should represent the operational strategies of reservoir operation. The main advantages of the Evolving ANN Intelligent System (ENNIS) are as follows: (i) only a small number of parameters to be optimized even for long optimization horizons, (ii) easy to handle multiple decision variables, and (iii) the straightforward combination of the operation model with other prediction models. The developed intelligent system was applied to the operation of the Shihmen Reservoir in North Taiwan, to investigate its applicability and practicability. The proposed method is first built to a simple formulation for the operation of the Shihmen Reservoir, with single objective and single decision. Its results were compared to those obtained by dynamic programming. The constructed network proved to be a good operational strategy. The method was then built and applied to the reservoir with multiple (five) decision variables. The results demonstrated that the developed evolving neural networks improved the operation performance of the reservoir when compared to its current operational strategy. The system was capable of successfully simultaneously handling various decision variables and provided reasonable and suitable decisions.

  5. Sextant: Visualizing time-evolving linked geospatial data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Nikolaou (Charalampos); K. Dogani (Kallirroi); K. Bereta (Konstantina); G. Garbis (George); M. Karpathiotakis (Manos); K. Kyzirakos (Konstantinos); M. Koubarakis (Manolis)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe linked open data cloud is constantly evolving as datasets get continuously updated with newer versions. As a result, representing, querying, and visualizing the temporal dimension of linked data is crucial. This is especially important for geospatial datasets that form the backbone

  6. SexTant: Visualizing Time-Evolving Linked Geospatial Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Bereta (Konstantina); C. Nikolaou (Charalampos); M. Karpathiotakis (Manos); K. Kyzirakos (Konstantinos); M. Koubarakis (Manolis); E. Blomqvist; T. Groza

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractWe present SexTant, a Web-based system for the visualization and exploration of time-evolving linked geospatial data and the creation, sharing, and collaborative editing of "temporally-enriched" thematic maps which are produced by combining dierent sources of such data.

  7. Evolving user needs and late-mover advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Querbes, Adrien; Frenken, Koen

    2017-01-01

    We propose a generalized NK-model of late-mover advantage where late-mover firms leapfrog first-mover firms as user needs evolve over time. First movers face severe trade-offs between the provision of functionalities in which their products already excel and the additional functionalities requested

  8. Water Footprint Assessment : Evolvement of a New Research Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Arjen Y.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the evolvement of water footprint assessment (WFA) as a new research field over the past fifteen years. The research is rooted in four basic thoughts: (1) there is a global dimension to water management because water-intensive commodities are internationally traded, so we must

  9. Evolving information systems: meeting the ever-changing environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, J.L.H.; Proper, H.A.; Falkenberg, E.D.

    1994-01-01

    To meet the demands of organizations and their ever-changing environment, information systems are required which are able to evolve to the same extent as organizations do. Such a system has to support changes in all time-and application-dependent aspects. In this paper, requirements and a conceptual

  10. Heritage – A Conceptually Evolving and Dissonant Phenomenon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I therefore, drawing from literature and experiences gained during field observations and focus group interviews, came up with the idea of working with three viewpoints of heritage. Drawing on real life cases I argue that current heritage management and education practices' failure to recognise and respect the evolving, ...

  11. Evolving strategies for cancer and autoimmunity: back to the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter John Lane

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although current thinking has focused on genetic variation between individuals and environmental influences as underpinning susceptibility to both autoimmunity and cancer, an alternative view is that human susceptibility to these diseases is a consequence of the way the immune system evolved. It is important to remember that the immunological genes that we inherit and the systems that they control were shaped by the drive for reproductive success rather than for individual survival. It is our view that human susceptibility to autoimmunity and cancer are the evolutionarily acceptable side effects of the immune adaptations that evolved in early placental mammals to accommodate a fundamental change in reproductive strategy. Studies of immune function in mammals shows that high affinity antibodies and CD4 memory, along with its regulation, co-evolved with placentation. By dissection of the immunologically active genes and proteins that evolved to regulate this step change in the mammalian immune system, clues have emerged that may reveal ways of detuning both effector and regulatory arms of the immune system to abrogate autoimmune responses whilst preserving protection against infection. Paradoxically, it appears that such a detuned and deregulated immune system is much better equipped to mount anti-tumor immune responses against cancers.

  12. Baby dumping and evolving baby factories in Nigeria: their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Baby dumping and evolving baby factories in Nigeria: their implication for child right and social protection. ... Journal of Religion and Human Relations ... a society-based approach which involves a thorough overhaul of our rigid social orientation which will create room for a conducive environment for child rights and social ...

  13. Evolving Concepts of Development through the Experience of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... facing developing countries; how thinking has evolved on particular aspects of development; and how different organizations espouse and use ideas to influence development. The edited volume will be submitted to an academic press for publication, along with a companion volume appropriate for university teaching.

  14. Cyperus difformis evolves resistance to propanil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valverde Mena, Bernal Eduardo; Boddy, Louis G.; Pedroso, Rafael M.

    2014-01-01

    Cyperus difformis L. is one of the worst weeds of rice world-wide and has evolved resistance to acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicides in rice fields of California. Propanil use was intensified to control the widespread resistant biotypes. Rice growers have recently experienced poor co...

  15. Evolutionary genetics: you are what you evolve to eat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Ian; Jones, Corbin D

    2015-04-20

    The evolution of host specialization can potentially limit future evolutionary opportunities. A new study now shows how Drosophila sechellia, specialized on the toxic Morinda fruit, has evolved new nutritional needs influencing its reproduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid shallow breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the smallest air passages of the lungs in children ( bronchiolitis ) Pneumonia or other lung infection Transient tachypnea of the newborn Anxiety and panic Other serious lung disease Home Care Rapid, shallow breathing should not be treated at home. It is ...

  17. Rapid Strep Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worse than normal. Your first thoughts turn to strep throat. A rapid strep test in your doctor’s office ... your suspicions.Viruses cause most sore throats. However, strep throat is an infection caused by the Group A ...

  18. RAPID3? Aptly named!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, J-M

    2014-01-01

    The RAPID3 score is the sum of three 0-10 patient self-report scores: pain, functional impairment on MDHAQ, and patient global estimate. It requires 5 seconds for scoring and can be used in all rheumatologic conditions, although it has mostly been used in rheumatoid arthritis where cutoffs for low disease activity (12/30) have been set. A RAPID3 score of ≤ 3/30 with 1 or 0 swollen joints (RAPID3 ≤ 3 + ≤ SJ1) provides remission criteria comparable to Boolean, SDAI, CDAI, and DAS28 remission criteria, in far less time than a formal joint count. RAPID3 performs as well as the DAS28 in separating active drugs from placebos in clinical trials. RAPID3 also predicts subsequent structural disease progression. RAPID3 can be determined at short intervals at home, allowing the determination of the area under the curve of disease activity between two visits and flare detection. However, RAPID3 should not be seen as a substitute for DAS28 and face to face visits in routine care. Monitoring patient status with only self-report information without a rheumatologist's advice (including joints and physical examination, and consideration of imaging and laboratory tests) may indeed be as undesirable for most patients than joint examination without a patient questionnaire. Conversely, combining the RAPID3 and the DAS28 may consist in faster or more sensitive confirmation that a medication is effective. Similarly, better enquiring of most important concerns of patients (pain, functional status and overall opinion on their disorder) should reinforces patients' confidence in their rheumatologist and treatments.

  19. Evolvable mathematical models: A new artificial Intelligence paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grouchy, Paul

    We develop a novel Artificial Intelligence paradigm to generate autonomously artificial agents as mathematical models of behaviour. Agent/environment inputs are mapped to agent outputs via equation trees which are evolved in a manner similar to Symbolic Regression in Genetic Programming. Equations are comprised of only the four basic mathematical operators, addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, as well as input and output variables and constants. From these operations, equations can be constructed that approximate any analytic function. These Evolvable Mathematical Models (EMMs) are tested and compared to their Artificial Neural Network (ANN) counterparts on two benchmarking tasks: the double-pole balancing without velocity information benchmark and the challenging discrete Double-T Maze experiments with homing. The results from these experiments show that EMMs are capable of solving tasks typically solved by ANNs, and that they have the ability to produce agents that demonstrate learning behaviours. To further explore the capabilities of EMMs, as well as to investigate the evolutionary origins of communication, we develop NoiseWorld, an Artificial Life simulation in which interagent communication emerges and evolves from initially noncommunicating EMM-based agents. Agents develop the capability to transmit their x and y position information over a one-dimensional channel via a complex, dialogue-based communication scheme. These evolved communication schemes are analyzed and their evolutionary trajectories examined, yielding significant insight into the emergence and subsequent evolution of cooperative communication. Evolved agents from NoiseWorld are successfully transferred onto physical robots, demonstrating the transferability of EMM-based AIs from simulation into physical reality.

  20. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 10. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms Distinguishing between Single Minima and Rapidly Equilibrating Structures. Uday Maitra J Chandrasekhar. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 10 October 1997 pp 29-37 ...

  1. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms - Distinguishing between Single Mimima and Rapidly Equilibrating Structures. Uday Maitra J Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1315-1323 ...

  2. Emergence of a Norovirus GII.4 Strain Correlates with Changes in Evolving Blockade Epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindesmith, Lisa C.; Costantini, Verónica; Swanstrom, Jesica; Debbink, Kari; Donaldson, Eric F.; Vinjé, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The major capsid protein of norovirus GII.4 strains is evolving rapidly, resulting in epidemic strains with altered antigenicity. GII.4.2006 Minerva strains circulated at pandemic levels in 2006 and persisted at lower levels until 2009. In 2009, a new GII.4 variant, GII.4.2009 New Orleans, emerged and since then has become the predominant strain circulating in human populations. To determine whether changes in evolving blockade epitopes correlate with the emergence of the GII.4.2009 New Orleans strains, we compared the antibody reactivity of a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against GII.4.2006 and GII.4.2009 virus-like particles (VLPs). Both anti-GII.4.2006 and GII.4.2009 MAbs effectively differentiated the two strains by VLP-carbohydrate ligand blockade assay. Most of the GII.4.2006 MAbs preferentially blocked GII.4.2006, while all of the GII.4.2009 MAbs preferentially blocked GII.4.2009, although 8 of 12 tested blockade MAbs blocked both VLPs. Using mutant VLPs designed to alter predicted antigenic epitopes, binding of seven of the blockade MAbs was impacted by alterations in epitope A, identifying residues 294, 296, 297, 298, 368, and 372 as important antigenic sites in these strains. Convalescent-phase serum collected from a GII.4.2009 outbreak confirmed the immunodominance of epitope A, since alterations of epitope A affected serum reactivity by 40%. These data indicate that the GII.4.2009 New Orleans variant has evolved a key blockade epitope, possibly allowing for at least partial escape from protective herd immunity and provide epidemiological support for the utility of monitoring changes in epitope A in emergent strain surveillance. PMID:23269783

  3. Polyjet technology applications for rapid tooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udroiu Razvan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer Jetting (PolyJet has proved to be one of the most accurate additive manufacturing technologies, in order to manufacture rapid tools. Rapid Tooling (RT is different from conventional tooling as follow: manufacturing time is shorter, the cost is much less, but the tool life is shorter and tolerances are wider. The purpose of this paper is to make a comparative study between the soft tools (silicon moulds and hard tools (acrylic thermoplastic moulds based on the Polymer Jetting technology. Thus, two types of moulds have been made in order to manufacture a test part. Reaction injection moulding (RIM and casting techniques were used to fill these moulds with resins that simulate the plastic injection materials. Rapid tooling applications, such as indirect tooling and direct tooling, based on PolyJet technology were experimentally investigated.

  4. An Evolving Identity: How Chronic Care Is Transforming What it Means to Be a Physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogetz, Alyssa L; Bogetz, Jori F

    2015-12-01

    Physician identity and the professional role physicians play in health care is rapidly evolving. Over 130 million adults and children in the USA have complex and chronic diseases, each of which is shaped by aspects of the patient's social, psychological, and economic status. These patients have lifelong health care needs that require the ongoing care of multiple health care providers, access to community services, and the involvement of patients' family support networks. To date, physician professional identity formation has centered on autonomy, authority, and the ability to "heal." These notions of identity may be counterproductive in chronic disease care, which demands interdependency between physicians, their patients, and teams of multidisciplinary health care providers. Medical educators can prepare trainees for practice in the current health care environment by providing training that legitimizes and reinforces a professional identity that emphasizes this interdependency. This commentary outlines the important challenges related to this change and suggests potential strategies to reframe professional identity to better match the evolving role of physicians today.

  5. The Evolving Role of the Program Coordinator: Five Essential Skills for the Coordinator Toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckelman, Joseph; Zavatchen, Sylvia E; Jones, Sally A

    2017-06-01

    As ACGME (Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education) requirements have expanded and become increasingly more complex, so has the role of the program coordinator. Over the last decade, the knowledge and skills required to capably administer residency and fellowship training programs have increased in both volume and complexity. Today's coordinators are responsible for more than clerical tasks. They also function as managers and have greater roles in the development and implementation of program initiatives, policies, and outcomes. As a result, coordinators' roles and responsibilities have evolved to include management skills. To keep pace with the rapid and continuing change, it is imperative that coordinators continue to develop these skill sets to add value to their programs, institutions, and careers. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Dynamical Classification of Centaurs which Evolve into Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jeremy R.; Horner, Jonathan; Hinse, Tobias; Marsden, Stephen; Swinburne University of Technology

    2016-10-01

    Centaurs are small Solar system bodies with semi-major axes between Jupiter and Neptune and perihelia beyond Jupiter. Centaurs can be further subclassified into two dynamical categories - random walk and resonance hopping. Random walk Centaurs have mean square semi-major axes () which vary in time according to a generalized diffusion equation where ~t2H. H is the Hurst exponent with 0 for resonance hopping Centaurs is not well described by generalized diffusion.The aim of this study is to determine which dynamical type of Centaur is most likely to evolve into each class of comet. 31,722 fictional massless test particles were integrated for 3 Myr in the 6-body problem (Sun, Jovian planets, test particle). Initially each test particle was a member of one of four groups. The semi-major axes of all test particles in a group were clustered within 0.27 au from a first order, interior Mean Motion resonance of Neptune. The resonances were centered at 18.94 au, 22.95 au, 24.82 au and 28.37 au.If the perihelion of a test particle reached particle was considered to be a comet and classified as either a random walk or resonance hopping Centaur. The results showed that over 4,000 test particles evolved into comets within 3 Myr. 59% of these test particles were random walk and 41% were resonance hopping. The behavior of the semi-major axis in time was usually well described by generalized diffusion for random walk Centaurs (ravg = 0.98) and poorly described for resonance hopping Centaurs (ravg = 0.52). The average Hurst exponent was 0.48 for random walk Centaurs and 0.20 for resonance hopping Centaurs. Random walk Centaurs were more likely to evolve into short period comets while resonance hopping Centaurs were more likely to evolve into long period comets. For each initial cluster, resonance hopping Centaurs took longer to evolve into comets than random walk Centaurs. Overall the population of random walk Centaurs averaged 143 kyr to evolve into comets, and the population of

  7. Collateral damage: rapid exposure-induced evolution of pesticide resistance leads to increased susceptibility to parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Mieke; Stoks, Robby; Coors, Anja; van Doorslaer, Wendy; de Meester, Luc

    2011-09-01

    Although natural populations may evolve resistance to anthropogenic stressors such as pollutants, this evolved resistance may carry costs. Using an experimental evolution approach, we exposed different Daphnia magna populations in outdoor containers to the carbamate pesticide carbaryl and control conditions, and assessed the resulting populations for both their resistance to carbaryl as well as their susceptibility to infection by the widespread bacterial microparasite Pasteuria ramosa. Our results show that carbaryl selection led to rapid evolution of carbaryl resistance with seemingly no cost when assessed in a benign environment. However, carbaryl-resistant populations were more susceptible to parasite infection than control populations. Exposure to both stressors reveals a synergistic effect on sterilization rate by P. ramosa, but this synergism did not evolve under pesticide selection. Assessing costs of rapid adaptive evolution to anthropogenic stress in a semi-natural context may be crucial to avoid too optimistic predictions for the fitness of the evolving populations. © 2011 The Author(s).

  8. [Adverse reactions to insulin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liñana, J J; Montoro, F J; Hernández, M D; Basomba, A

    1997-07-01

    The prevalence of allergic reactions to insuline has decreased during the last few years. Probably this is due to the use of the newly-developed recombinant human insuline. At present, adverse reactions to insuline occur in 5-10% of patients on therapy with insuline. Adverse reactions may be local (more frequent) or systemic (rare). Insuline resistance consists in a different type of immunological reaction. Diagnosis of allergy to insuline is based on clinical history and cutaneous and serological tests. Treatment depends upon the severity of the reaction. When insuline is indispensable despite a previous allergic reaction, a desensitization protocol may be implemented.

  9. The Evolving Role of Emergency Departments in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganti, Kristy Gonzalez; Bauhoff, Sebastian; Blanchard, Janice C; Abir, Mahshid; Iyer, Neema; Smith, Alexandria; Vesely, Joseph V; Okeke, Edward N; Kellermann, Arthur L

    2013-01-01

    The research described in this article was performed to develop a more complete picture of how hospital emergency departments (EDs) contribute to the U.S. health care system, which is currently evolving in response to economic, clinical, and political pressures. Using a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods, it explores the evolving role that EDs and the personnel who staff them play in evaluating and managing complex and high-acuity patients, serving as the key decisionmaker for roughly half of all inpatient hospital admissions, and serving as "the safety net of the safety net" for patients who cannot get care elsewhere. The report also examines the role that EDs may soon play in either contributing to or helping to control the rising costs of health care.

  10. AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS OF EVOLVING TAKAGI-SUGENO-KANG FUZZY MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu-Emil Precup

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents theoretical and application results concerning the development of evolving Takagi-Sugeno-Kang fuzzy models for two dynamic systems, which will be viewed as controlled processes, in the field of automotive applications. The two dynamic systems models are nonlinear dynamics of the longitudinal slip in the Anti-lock Braking Systems (ABS and the vehicle speed in vehicles with the Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT systems. The evolving Takagi-Sugeno-Kang fuzzy models are obtained as discrete-time fuzzy models by incremental online identification algorithms. The fuzzy models are validated against experimental results in the case of the ABS and the first principles simulation results in the case of the vehicle with the CVT.

  11. Duplication Detection When Evolving Feature Models of Software Product Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Khtira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available After the derivation of specific applications from a software product line, the applications keep evolving with respect to new customer’s requirements. In general, evolutions in most industrial projects are expressed using natural language, because it is the easiest and the most flexible way for customers to express their needs. However, the use of this means of communication has shown its limits in detecting defects, such as inconsistency and duplication, when evolving the existing models of the software product line. The aim of this paper is to transform the natural language specifications of new evolutions into a more formal representation using natural language processing. Then, an algorithm is proposed to automatically detect duplication between these specifications and the existing product line feature models. In order to instantiate the proposed solution, a tool is developed to automatize the two operations.

  12. Real-time evolvable pulse shaper for radiation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanchares, Juan, E-mail: julandan@dacya.ucm.es [Facultad de Informática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), C/Prof. José García Santesmases s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garnica, Oscar, E-mail: ogarnica@dacya.ucm.es [Facultad de Informática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), C/Prof. José García Santesmases s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Risco-Martín, José L., E-mail: jlrisco@dacya.ucm.es [Facultad de Informática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), C/Prof. José García Santesmases s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ignacio Hidalgo, J., E-mail: hidalgo@dacya.ucm.es [Facultad de Informática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), C/Prof. José García Santesmases s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Regadío, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.regadio@insa.es [Área de Tecnologías Electrónicas, Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA), 28850 Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-11-01

    In the last two decades, recursive algorithms for real-time digital pulse shaping in pulse height measurements have been developed and published in number of articles and textbooks. All these algorithms try to synthesize in real time optimum or near optimum shapes in the presence of noise. Even though some of these shapers can be considered effective designs, some side effects like aging cannot be ignored. We may observe that after sensors degradation, the signal obtained is not valid. In this regard, we present in this paper a novel technique that, based on evolvable hardware concepts, is able to evolve the degenerated shaper into a new design with better performance than the original one under the new sensor features.

  13. Exploring, exploiting and evolving diversity of aquatic ecosystem models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssen, Annette B. G.; Arhonditsis, George B.; Beusen, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a community perspective on how to explore, exploit and evolve the diversity in aquatic ecosystem models. These models play an important role in understanding the functioning of aquatic ecosystems, filling in observation gaps and developing effective strategies for water quality...... management. In this spirit, numerous models have been developed since the 1970s. We set off to explore model diversity by making an inventory among 42 aquatic ecosystem modellers, by categorizing the resulting set of models and by analysing them for diversity. We then focus on how to exploit model diversity...... by comparing and combining different aspects of existing models. Finally, we discuss how model diversity came about in the past and could evolve in the future. Throughout our study, we use analogies from biodiversity research to analyse and interpret model diversity. We recommend to make models publicly...

  14. The Use of Genetic Programming to Evolve Passive Filter Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Ogri J. Ushie; Abbod, Maysam F.; Julie C. Ogbulezie

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces the use of Genetic Programming (GP), Genetic Folding and symbolic circuit analysis in Matlab for the evolution of passive filter circuits. Instead of combining MATLAB and PSPICE in electronic circuit simulation, in this work, only MATLAB is used. It helps to reduce elapsed time for transferring the simulation between the two software packages. The circuit evolved from GP using the Matlab program and is automatically converted into a symbolic netlist also by using a Matla...

  15. Evolving Pacing Strategies for Team Pursuit Track Cycling

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Markus; Day, Jareth; Jordan, Diora; Kroeger, Trent; Neumann, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Team pursuit track cycling is a bicycle racing sport held on velodromes and is part of the Summer Olympics. It involves the use of strategies to minimize the overall time that a team of cyclists needs to complete a race. We present an optimisation framework for team pursuit track cycling and show how to evolve strategies using metaheuristics for this interesting real-world problem. Our experimental results show that these heuristics lead to significantly better strategies than state-of-art st...

  16. ONMCGP: Orthogonal Neighbourhood Mutation Cartesian Genetic Programming for Evolvable Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    I, Fuchuan N.; I, Yuanxiang L.; E, Peng K.

    2014-03-01

    Evolvable Hardware is facing the problems of scalability and stalling effect. This paper proposed a novel Orthogonal Neighbourhood Mutation (ONM) operator in Cartesian genetic programming (CGP), to reduce the stalling effect in CGP and improve the efficiency of the algorithms.The method incorporates with Differential Evolution strategy. Demonstrated by experiments on benchmark, the proposed Orthogonal Neighbourhood Search can jump out of Local optima, reduce the stalling effect in CGP and the algorithm convergence faster.

  17. Engineering Therapies that Evolve to Autonomously Control Epidemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Grant No. D15AP00024 “ Engineering Therapies that Evolve to Autonomously Control Epidemics” PI: Leor Weinberger...viruses could be engineered into therapeutics, known as Therapeutic Interfering Particles (’TIPs’), using the virus HIV as a model system. By engineering ... engineered TIPs could have indefinite, population-scale impact. To achieve this aim, we developed novel multi-scale models that connected the measured

  18. india's northward drift and collision with asia: evolving faunal response

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    INDIA'S NORTHWARD DRIFT AND COLLISION WITH ASIA: EVOLVING FAUNAL RESPONSE · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19 · Slide 20 · Slide 21 · Slide 22 · Slide 23 · Slide 24.

  19. New nuclear build and evolving radiation protection challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Radiological protection has continued to evolve in order to meet emerging challenges and will continue to do so. This paper will discuss the scientific and social challenges that will or may be faced by the radiological protection community in the coming 10 to 20 y and how these may affect what is expected to be a renewed interest in building and operating nuclear power plants for electricity generation. Copyright © 2010 Health Physics Society

  20. TRICARE Policy and Operations: Evolving to Support the Quadruple Aim

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    Examples of Evolution – TRICARE in Alaska – Autism Services Demonstration 2011 MHS Conference 3 Track L  Evolving to achieve the Quadruple Aim...Heidelberg MEDDAC Lessons Learned 1, 2, 3, 4 1, 2, 3, 4 2 a. TRICARE in Alaska b. Autism Services Demonstration c. A Regional View 3 1 1, 2...3, 4 3 TRICARE Pharmacy Programs 3, 4 4 TRICARE for Reserves and National Guard 1, 2, 3 5 TRICARE Dental Programs 1, 2, 4 6 a

  1. Establishing credibility: Evolving perceptions of the European Central Bank

    OpenAIRE

    Linda S. Goldberg; Klein, Michael W

    2005-01-01

    The credibility of a central bank’s anti-inflation stance, a key determinant of its success, may reflect institutional structure or, more dynamically, the history of policy decisions. The first years of the European Central Bank (ECB) provide a natural experiment for considering whether, and how, central bank credibility evolves. In this paper, we present a model demonstrating how the high-frequency response of asset prices to news reflects market perceptions of the anti-inflation stance of a...

  2. Hemicrania continua evolving from cluster headache responsive to valproic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambru, Giorgio; Castellini, Paola; Bini, Annamaria; Evangelista, Andrea; Manzoni, Gian Camillo; Torelli, Paola

    2008-10-01

    Hemicrania continua (HC) is a rare type of primary headache characterized by a prompt and enduring response to indomethacin. We describe a patient who suffered from cluster headache evolving into ipsilateral HC, who does not tolerate a long-term indomethacin therapy. The case was complex in terms of diagnosis, associated comorbidity, and choice of treatment; after several trials with different therapeutic regimens, we started the patient on a therapy with valproic acid and obtained an improvement of her HC.

  3. Rapid evolutionary adaptation to elevated salt concentrations in pathogenic freshwater bacteria Serratia marcescens

    OpenAIRE

    Ketola, Tarmo; Hiltunen, Teppo

    2014-01-01

    Rapid evolutionary adaptions to new and previously detrimental environmental conditions can increase the risk of invasion by novel pathogens. We tested this hypothesis with a 133-day-long evolutionary experiment studying the evolution of the pathogenic Serratia marcescens bacterium at salinity niche boundary and in fluctuating conditions. We found that S. marcescens evolved at harsh (80 g/L) and extreme (100 g/L) salt conditions had clearly improved salt tolerance than those evolved in the ot...

  4. Rapid small lot manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrigan, R.W.

    1998-05-09

    The direct connection of information, captured in forms such as CAD databases, to the factory floor is enabling a revolution in manufacturing. Rapid response to very dynamic market conditions is becoming the norm rather than the exception. In order to provide economical rapid fabrication of small numbers of variable products, one must design with manufacturing constraints in mind. In addition, flexible manufacturing systems must be programmed automatically to reduce the time for product change over in the factory and eliminate human errors. Sensor based machine control is needed to adapt idealized, model based machine programs to uncontrolled variables such as the condition of raw materials and fabrication tolerances.

  5. A weighted network evolving model with capacity constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, XiaoHuan; Zhu, JinFu; Wu, WeiWei; Ge, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Most of existing works on complex network assumed that the nodes and edges were uncapacitated during the evolving process, and displayed "rich club" phenomenon. Here we will show that the "rich club" could be changed to "common rich" if we consider the node capacity. In this paper, we define the node and edge attractive index with node capacity, and propose a new evolving model on the base of BBV model, with evolving simulations of the networks. In the new model, an entering node is linked with an existing node according to the preferential attachment mechanism defined with the attractive index of the existing node. We give the theoretical approximation and simulation solutions. If node capacity is finite, the rich node may not be richer further when the node strength approaches or gets to the node capacity. This is confirmed by analyzing the passenger traffic and routes of Chinese main airports. Due to node strength being function of time t, we can use the theoretical approximation solution to forecast how node strength changes and the time when node strength reaches its maximum value.

  6. Social networks: Evolving graphs with memory dependent edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindrod, Peter; Parsons, Mark

    2011-10-01

    The plethora of digital communication technologies, and their mass take up, has resulted in a wealth of interest in social network data collection and analysis in recent years. Within many such networks the interactions are transient: thus those networks evolve over time. In this paper we introduce a class of models for such networks using evolving graphs with memory dependent edges, which may appear and disappear according to their recent history. We consider time discrete and time continuous variants of the model. We consider the long term asymptotic behaviour as a function of parameters controlling the memory dependence. In particular we show that such networks may continue evolving forever, or else may quench and become static (containing immortal and/or extinct edges). This depends on the existence or otherwise of certain infinite products and series involving age dependent model parameters. We show how to differentiate between the alternatives based on a finite set of observations. To test these ideas we show how model parameters may be calibrated based on limited samples of time dependent data, and we apply these concepts to three real networks: summary data on mobile phone use from a developing region; online social-business network data from China; and disaggregated mobile phone communications data from a reality mining experiment in the US. In each case we show that there is evidence for memory dependent dynamics, such as that embodied within the class of models proposed here.

  7. Evolving Human Alteration of the Carbon Cycle: the Watershed Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, S.; Delaney Newcomb, K.; Newcomer Johnson, T.; Pennino, M. J.; Smith, R. M.; Beaulieu, J. J.; Belt, K.; Grese, M.; Blomquist, J.; Duan, S.; Findlay, S.; Likens, G.; Mayer, P. M.; Murthy, S.; Utz, R.; Yepsen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Watersheds experiencing land development are constantly evolving, and their biogeochemical signatures are expected to evolve across both space and time in drainage waters. We investigate how land development influences spatial and temporal evolution of the carbon cycle from small streams to major rivers in the Eastern U.S. Along the watershed continuum, we show that there is spatial evolution in: (1) the amount, chemical form, and bioavailability of carbon; (2) carbon retention/release at the reach scale; and (3) ecosystem metabolism of carbon from headwaters to coastal waters. Over shorter time scales, the interaction between land use and climate variability alters magnitude and frequency of carbon "pulses" in watersheds. Amounts and forms of carbon pulses in agricultural and urban watersheds respond similarly to climate variability due to headwater alteration and loss of ecosystem services to buffer runoff and temperature changes. Over longer time scales, land use change has altered organic carbon concentrations in tidal waters of Chesapeake Bay, and there have been increased bicarbonate alkalinity concentrations in rivers throughout the Eastern U.S. due to human activities. In summary, our analyses indicates that the form and reactivity of carbon have evolved over space and time along the watershed continuum with major implications for downstream ecosystem metabolism, biological oxygen demand, carbon dioxide production, and river alkalinization.

  8. Allergic reactions (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allergic reaction can be provoked by skin contact with poison plants, chemicals and animal scratches, as well as ... mildew, dust, nuts and shellfish, may also cause allergic reaction. Medications such as penicillin and other antibiotics are ...

  9. Cosmetic tattoo pigment reaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greywal, Tanya; Cohen, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundCutaneous reactions to tattoos are most commonly granulomatous or lichenoid.PurposeWe describe a woman who developed a lymphocytic reaction following a cosmetic tattoo procedure with black dye...

  10. Iowa Lakes Community College: Partnerships for Academic and Economic Success in a Rapidly Evolving Wind-Energy Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohni, Mary; Rogers, Jolene; Zeitz, Al

    2007-01-01

    Iowa Lakes Community College responded to a national need for wind-energy technicians. The Wind-Energy and Turbine Program aligned industry and academic competencies with experiential learning components to foster exploration of additional renewable energy applications. Completers understand both the physical and academic rigor a career in wind…

  11. Big Data, IPRs & Competition Law in the Pharma & Life Sciences- future issues in a rapidly evolving field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo

    While there are numerous particular IPR and regulatory issues to be resolved across the intersection between Big Data and the life sciences there is a growing awareness of the importance of data and specifically Big Data by market authorities. Antitrust enforcement agencies, those in the United...... the merger on the condition that the merged firm would make copies of its database available for purchase by existing and new potential competitors. The previous decision of the European Court of Justice in the IMS Health case has already set out that there are limitations to the extent IPRs can be used......, regulatory or de facto is not a concern and the technology or data owner is in general obliged to license on fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory terms. These are issues that remain unanswered in the antitrust narrative but all indications are that the future holds more application of the antitrust rules...

  12. Rapid Cycling and Its Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Rapid Cycling and its Treatment What is bipolar disorder? Bipolar ... to Depression and Manic Depression . What is rapid cycling? Rapid cycling is defined as four or more ...

  13. Chemical transport reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Schäfer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Transport Reactions focuses on the processes and reactions involved in the transport of solid or liquid substances to form vapor phase reaction products. The publication first offers information on experimental and theoretical principles and the transport of solid substances and its special applications. Discussions focus on calculation of the transport effect of heterogeneous equilibria for a gas motion between equilibrium spaces; transport effect and the thermodynamic quantities of the transport reaction; separation and purification of substances by means of material transport; and

  14. The genomic landscape of rapid repeated evolutionary ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlantic killifish populations have rapidly adapted to normally lethal levels of pollution in four urban estuaries. Through analysis of 384 whole killifish genome sequences and comparative transcriptomics in four pairs of sensitive and tolerant populations, we identify the aryl hydrocarbon receptor–based signaling pathway as a shared target of selection. This suggests evolutionary constraint on adaptive solutions to complex toxicant mixtures at each site. However, distinct molecular variants apparently contribute to adaptive pathway modification among tolerant populations. Selection also targets other toxicity-mediatinggenes and genes of connected signaling pathways; this indicates complex tolerance phenotypes and potentially compensatory adaptations. Molecular changes are consistent with selection on standing genetic variation. In killifish, high nucleotide diversityhas likely been a crucial substrate for selective sweeps to propel rapid adaptation. This manuscript describes genomic evaluations that contribute to our understanding of the ecological and evolutionary risks associated with chronic contaminant exposures to wildlife populations. Here, we assessed genetic patterns associated with long-term response to an important class of highly toxic environmental pollutants. Specifically, chemical-specific tolerance has rapidly and repeatedly evolved in an estuarine fish species resident to estuaries of the Atlantic U.S. coast. We used laboratory studies to ch

  15. Reaction Time (Polish language)

    OpenAIRE

    Iermakov, Sergii

    2014-01-01

    Reaction time is the interval time between the presentation of a stimulus and the initiation of the muscular response to that stimulus.If there is only one possible response (simple reaction time) it will only take a short time to react. If there are several possible responses (choice reaction time) then it will take longer to determine which response to carry out.

  16. Laser enhanced chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Included is the discussion of infrared diode lasers used to study time dependent dynamic events. Also, hot atom excitation of vibrational states of polyatomic molecules, bimolecular quenching and reactions of O(sup 1)D, bimolecular reaction studies of the OH + CO yields H + CO2 system, and the chemical dynamics of the reaction between chlorine atoms and deuterated cyclohexane are covered briefly.

  17. (MIRC) reaction w

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudesh Kumari

    as eco-friendly reaction media in catalyst free organic synthesis.7 Ethylene glycol has promising physical ... these properties it is used as a promising green media in many catalysed/ uncatalysed organic reactions ..... Ruijter E, Scheffelaar R and Orru R V A 2011 Multi- component Reaction Design in the Quest for Molecular ...

  18. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION RAPID COMMUNICATION ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sulfated polyborate: A mild, efficient catalyst for synthesis of N-tert- butyl/N-trityl protected amides via Ritter reaction. KRISHNA S INDALKAR, CHETAN K KHATRI and GANESH U CHATURBHUJ*. Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400 019 ...

  19. Rapid manufacturing for microfluidics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Land, K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available . Microfluidics is at the forefront of developing solutions for drug discovery, diagnostics (from glucose tests to malaria and TB testing) and environmental diagnostics (E-coli monitoring of drinking water). In order to quickly implement new designs, a rapid...

  20. Rapid Prototyping in PVS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Cesar A.; Butler, Ricky (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    PVSio is a conservative extension to the PVS prelude library that provides basic input/output capabilities to the PVS ground evaluator. It supports rapid prototyping in PVS by enhancing the specification language with built-in constructs for string manipulation, floating point arithmetic, and input/output operations.

  1. Rapid Prototyping Reconsidered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosier, James

    2011-01-01

    Continuing educators need additional strategies for developing new programming that can both reduce the time to market and lower the cost of development. Rapid prototyping, a time-compression technique adapted from the high technology industry, represents one such strategy that merits renewed evaluation. Although in higher education rapid…

  2. Shadow banking in China: expanding scale, evolving structure

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Cindy

    2013-01-01

    This Asia Focus provides an overview of shadow banking activities in China, their close ties with banks, reasons behind their rapid rise, the range of participants and products, and regulatory issues.

  3. A novel reverse flow reactor coupling endothermic and exothermic reactions. Part I: comparison of reactor configurations for irreversible endothermic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sint Annaland, M.; Scholts, H.A.R.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2002-01-01

    A new reactor concept is studied for highly endothermic heterogeneously catalysed gas phase reactions at high temperatures with rapid but reversible catalyst deactivation. The reactor concept aims to achieve an indirect coupling of energy necessary for endothermic reactions and energy released by

  4. Non-isothermal pyrolysis of de-oiled microalgal biomass: Kinetics and evolved gas analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Rahulkumar; Ghosh, Tonmoy; Saravaia, Hitesh; Paliwal, Chetan; Ghosh, Arup; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-12-01

    Non-isothermal (β=5, 10, 20, 35°C/min) pyrolysis of de-oiled microalgal biomass (DMB) of Chlorella variabilis was investigated by TGA-MS (30-900°C, Argon atmosphere) to understand thermal decomposition and evolved gas analysis (EGA). The results showed that three-stage thermal decomposition and three volatilization zone (100-400°C, 400-550°C and 600-750°C) of organic matters during pyrolysis. The highest rate of weight-loss is 8.91%/min at 302°C for 35°C/min heating-rate. Kinetics of pyrolysis were investigated by iso-conversional (KAS, FWO) and model-fitting (Coats-Redfern) method. For Zone-1and3, similar activation energy (Ea) is found in between KAS (α=0.4), FWO (α=0.4) and Avrami-Erofe'ev (n=4) model. Using the best-fitted kinetic model Avrami-Erofe'ev (n=4), Ea values (R(2)=>0.96) are 171.12 (Zone-1), 404.65 (Zone-2) and 691.42kJ/mol (Zone-3). EGA indicate the abundance of most gases observed consequently between 200-300°C and 400-500°C. The pyrolysis of DMB involved multi-step reaction mechanisms for solid-state reactions having different Ea values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Vibrationally excited water emission at 658 GHz from evolved stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudry, A.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Herpin, F.; Torstensson, K.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Richards, A. M. S.; Gray, M. D.; De Breuck, C.; Olberg, M.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Several rotational transitions of ortho- and para-water have been identified toward evolved stars in the ground vibrational state as well as in the first excited state of the bending mode (v2 = 1 in (0, 1, 0) state). In the latter vibrational state of water, the 658 GHz J = 11,0-10,1 rotational transition is often strong and seems to be widespread in late-type stars. Aims: Our main goals are to better characterize the nature of the 658 GHz emission, compare the velocity extent of the 658 GHz emission with SiO maser emission to help locate the water layers and, more generally, investigate the physical conditions prevailing in the excited water layers of evolved stars. Another goal is to identify new 658 GHz emission sources and contribute in showing that this emission is widespread in evolved stars. Methods: We have used the J = 11,0-10,1 rotational transition of water in the (0, 1, 0) vibrational state nearly 2400 K above the ground-state to trace some of the physical conditions of evolved stars. Eleven evolved stars were extracted from our mini-catalog of existing and potential 658 GHz sources for observations with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope equipped with the SEPIA Band 9 receiver. The 13CO J = 6-5 line at 661 GHz was placed in the same receiver sideband for simultaneous observation with the 658 GHz line of water. We have compared the ratio of these two lines to the same ratio derived from HIFI earlier observations to check for potential time variability in the 658 GHz line. We have compared the 658 GHz line properties with our H2O radiative transfer models in stars and we have compared the velocity ranges of the 658 GHz and SiO J = 2-1, v = 1 maser lines. Results: Eleven stars have been extracted from our catalog of known or potential 658 GHz evolved stars. All of them show 658 GHz emission with a peak flux density in the range ≈50-70 Jy (RU Hya and RT Eri) to ≈2000-3000 Jy (VY CMa and W Hya). Five Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB

  6. Why, when and where did honey bee dance communication evolve?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbie eI'Anson Price

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Honey bees (Apis sp. are the only known bee genus that uses nest-based communication to provide nest-mates with information about the location of resources, the so-called dance language. Successful foragers perform waggle dances for high quality food sources and suitable nest-sites during swarming. However, since many species of social insects do not communicate the location of resources to their nest-mates, the question of why the dance language evolved is of ongoing interest. We review recent theoretical and empirical research into the ecological circumstances that make dance communication beneficial in present day environments. This research suggests that the dance language is most beneficial when food sources differ greatly in quality and are hard to find. The dances of extant honey bee species differ in important ways, and phylogenetic studies suggest an increase in dance complexity over time: species with the least complex dance were the first to appear and species with the most complex dance are the most derived. We review the fossil record of honey bees and speculate about the time and context (foraging vs. swarming in which spatially referential dance communication might have evolved. We conclude that there are few certainties about when the dance language first appeared; dance communication could be older than 40 million years and, thus, predate the genus Apis, or it could be as recent as 20 million years when extant honey bee species diverged during the early Miocene. The most parsimonious scenario assumes it evolved in a sub-tropical to temperate climate, with patchy vegetation somewhere in Eurasia.

  7. Evolving networks-Using past structure to predict the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Ke-ke; Yan, Wei-sheng; Small, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Many previous studies on link prediction have focused on using common neighbors to predict the existence of links between pairs of nodes. More broadly, research into the structural properties of evolving temporal networks and temporal link prediction methods have recently attracted increasing attention. In this study, for the first time, we examine the use of links between a pair of nodes to predict their common neighbors and analyze the relationship between the weight and the structure in static networks, evolving networks, and in the corresponding randomized networks. We propose both new unweighted and weighted prediction methods and use six kinds of real networks to test our algorithms. In unweighted networks, we find that if a pair of nodes connect to each other in the current network, they will have a higher probability to connect common nodes both in the current and the future networks-and the probability will decrease with the increase of the number of neighbors. Furthermore, we find that the original networks have their particular structure and statistical characteristics which benefit link prediction. In weighted networks, the prediction algorithm performance of networks which are dominated by human factors decrease with the decrease of weight and are in general better in static networks. Furthermore, we find that geographical position and link weight both have significant influence on the transport network. Moreover, the evolving financial network has the lowest predictability. In addition, we find that the structure of non-social networks has more robustness than social networks. The structure of engineering networks has both best predictability and also robustness.

  8. Simulating DNA coding sequence evolution with EvolveAGene 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Barry G

    2008-04-01

    Phylogenetic reconstruction based upon multiple alignments of molecular sequences is important to most branches of modern biology and is central to molecular evolution. Understanding the historical relationships among macromolecules depends upon computer programs that implement a variety of analytical methods. Because it is impossible to know those historical relationships with certainty, assessment of the accuracy of methods and the programs that implement them requires the use of programs that realistically simulate the evolution of DNA sequences. EvolveAGene 3 is a realistic coding sequence simulation program that separates mutation from selection and allows the user to set selection conditions, including variable regions of selection intensity within the sequence and variation in intensity of selection over branches. Variation includes base substitutions, insertions, and deletions. To the best of my knowledge, it is the only program available that simulates the evolution of intact coding sequences. Output includes the true tree and true alignments of the resulting coding sequence and corresponding protein sequences. A log file reports the frequencies of each kind of base substitution, the ratio of transition to transversion substitutions, the ratio of indel to base substitution mutations, and the numbers of silent and amino acid replacement mutations. The realism of the data sets has been assessed by comparing the d(N)/d(S) ratio, the ratio of transition to transversion substitutions, and the ratio of indel to base substitution mutations of the simulated data sets with those parameters of real data sets from the "gold standard" BaliBase collection of structural alignments. Results show that the data sets produced by EvolveAGene 3 are very similar to real data sets, and EvolveAGene 3 is therefore a realistic simulation program that can be used to evaluate a variety of programs and methods in molecular evolution.

  9. Breast cancer treatment: evolving approaches but stable results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chism, S E; Brown, B S; Hoyle, B A

    1986-12-01

    This report describes the outcome of 530 women with breast cancer diagnosed from 1968 through 1983 and represents a demographic population rather than a referred selected one. The data represents the results of evolving breast cancer treatment approaches during the past 2 decades and is particularly useful as a measure of the total population denominator, free of selection factors that confound reports detailing a surgical, radiation, or chemotherapy experience. During the time interval reviewed, the standard treatment approach of the primary changed from radical mastectomy to biopsy and radiation therapy. Chemotherapy policy evolved from single agent treatment for relapse to multiple drug programs as adjuvant or for relapse. The major findings were: The 5-, 10-, and 15-year survival rates for the intervals 1972-75, 1976-79, and 1980-83 were slightly better than the earliest interval 1968-71, but with no statistically significant improvement. The frequency of favorable disease (Stages Tis, 1) increased from 16 to 31 percent during the interval but the mean age remained the same suggesting that patient education programs, availability of health insurance, or mammography may have lead to identifying patients with more favorable disease. Mastectomy has been replaced by breast conserving surgery and radiation as the most common treatment of the primary. Patients treated by surgery and biopsy/radiation had identical survival outcomes. It was not possible to detect improved survival that could be ascribed to the adoption of multiple agent chemotherapy but the magnitude of the effect is calculated to be on the order of 2% of the total patient population diagnosed. Death due to breast cancer decreases with time after diagnosis but is still 4% per year, 10 years after treatment. The findings suggest that progress has been made in detection, breast conservation, and palliation of symptoms in many subpopulations, but the end results for the total breast cancer population have

  10. Open-Ended Behavioral Complexity for Evolved Virtual Creatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lessin, Dan; Fussell, Don; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2013-01-01

    use of high-level human input in the form of a syllabus of intermediate learning tasks--along with mechanisms for preservation, reuse, and combination of previously learned tasks. This method (named ESP for its three components: encapsulation, syllabus, and pandemonium) is employed to evolve a virtual...... creature with behavioral complexity that clearly exceeds previously achieved levels. ESP thus demonstrates that EVCs may indeed have the potential to one day rival the behavioral complexity--and therefore the entertainment value--of their non-virtual counterparts....

  11. Regenerative technologies to bed side: Evolving the regulatory framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Sakai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available There are high expectations for the clinical application of regenerative medicine technologies to treat musculoskeletal disorders. However, there are still big hurdles in bringing cell-based products to the market, mainly due to strict regulatory frameworks to approve these. Recently, the Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency adopted new regulations under legislature. The translational potential of this article is to inform on the regulations to bring experimental phase regenerative concepts to market approval in the United States and Europe, and highlight the opportunities granted by Japanese regulatory framework. Furthermore, we discuss the perspectives on the quickly evolving regulatory environment.

  12. Evolving Four Part Harmony Using a Multiple Worlds Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scirea, Marco; Brown, Joseph Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This application of the Multiple Worlds Model examines a collaborative fitness model for generating four part harmonies. In this model we have multiple populations and the fitness of the individuals is based on the ability of a member from each population to work with the members of other...... populations. We present the result of two experiments: the generation of compositions, given a static voice line, both in a constrained and unconstrained harmonic framework. The remaining three voices are evolved using this collaborative fitness function, which looks for a number of classical composition...

  13. Simulations of embodied evolving semiosis: Emergent semantics in artificial environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, L.M.; Joslyn, C.

    1998-02-01

    As we enter this amazing new world of artificial and virtual systems and environments in the context of human communities, we are interested in the development of systems and environments which have the capacity to grow and evolve their own meanings in the context of this community of interaction. In this paper the authors analyze the necessary conditions to achieve systems and environments with these properties: (1) a coupled interaction between a system and its environment; (2) an environment with sufficient initial richness and structure to allow for; (3) embodied emergent classification of that environment system coupling; and (4) which is subject to pragmatic selection.

  14. Modeling the Chinese language as an evolving network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei; Shi, Yuming; Huang, Qiuling

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of Chinese language has three main features: the total number of characters is gradually increasing, new words are generated in the existing characters, and some old words are no longer used in daily-life language. Based on the features, we propose an evolving language network model. Finally, we use this model to simulate the character co-occurrence networks (nodes are characters, and two characters are connected by an edge if they are adjacent to each other) constructed from essays in 11 different periods of China, and find that characters that appear with high frequency in old words are likely to be reused when new words are formed.

  15. Gravity Effects on Information Filtering and Network Evolving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Hu; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Chen, Lingjiao; Liu, Chuang; Yang, Chengcheng; Wang, Xueqi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, based on the gravity principle of classical physics, we propose a tunable gravity-based model, which considers tag usage pattern to weigh both the mass and distance of network nodes. We then apply this model in solving the problems of information filtering and network evolving. Experimental results on two real-world data sets, Del.icio.us and MovieLens, show that it can not only enhance the algorithmic performance, but can also better characterize the properties of real networks. This work may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of the effect of gravity model. PMID:24622162

  16. Modes of competition and the fitness of evolved populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Tim; McKane, Alan J

    2015-09-01

    Competition between individuals drives the evolution of whole species. Although the fittest individuals survive the longest and produce the most offspring, in some circumstances the resulting species may not be optimally fit. Here, using theoretical analysis and stochastic simulations of a simple model ecology, we show how the mode of competition can profoundly affect the fitness of evolved species. When individuals compete directly with one another, the adaptive dynamics framework provides accurate predictions for the number and distribution of species, which occupy positions of maximal fitness. By contrast, if competition is mediated by the consumption of a common resource, then demographic noise leads to the stabilization of species with near minimal fitness.

  17. f(R) gravity solutions for evolving wormholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Subhra [Presidency University, Department of Mathematics, Kolkata (India); Chakraborty, Subenoy [Jadavpur University, Department of Mathematics, Kolkata (India)

    2017-08-15

    The scalar-tensor f(R) theory of gravity is considered in the framework of a simple inhomogeneous space-time model. In this research we use the reconstruction technique to look for possible evolving wormhole solutions within viable f(R) gravity formalism. These f(R) models are then constrained so that they are consistent with existing experimental data. Energy conditions related to the matter threading the wormhole are analyzed graphically and are in general found to obey the null energy conditions (NEC) in regions around the throat, while in the limit f(R) = R, NEC can be violated at large in regions around the throat. (orig.)

  18. Evolving fuzzy systems from data streams in real-time

    OpenAIRE

    Angelov, Plamen; Zhou, Xiaowei

    2006-01-01

    An approach to real-time generation of fuzzy rule-base systems of extended Takagi-Sugeno (xTS) type from data streams is proposed in the paper. The xTS fuzzy system combines both zero and first order Takagi-Sugeno (TS) type systems. The fuzzy rule-base (system structure) evolves starting 'from scratch' based on the data distribution in the joint input/output data space. An incremental clustering procedure that takes into account the non-stationary nature of the data pattern and generates clus...

  19. Forces shaping the fastest evolving regions in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pollard, Katherine S; Salama, Sofie R; King, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    are dramatically changed in human but not in other primates, with seven times more substitutions in human than in chimp. The accelerated elements, and in particular the top five, show a strong bias for adenine and thymine to guanine and cytosine nucleotide changes and are disproportionately located in high...... contributed to accelerated evolution of the fastest evolving elements in the human genome.......Comparative genomics allow us to search the human genome for segments that were extensively changed in the last approximately 5 million years since divergence from our common ancestor with chimpanzee, but are highly conserved in other species and thus are likely to be functional. We found 202...

  20. Reforming marketing for sustainability: towards a framework for evolved marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Hurth, V; Peck, J.; Jackman, E; Wensing, E

    2015-01-01

    This paper seeks to provide guidance to the question ‘how can we evolve marketing so that it becomes a force for sustainability?’. Much useful advice has been produced on the how existing norms of marketing can be applied to the topic of sustainability – for example, taking the marketing ‘Ps’ and integrating a sustainability approach into each. Many people on the ground trying to implement ‘Sustainable Marketing’ find that there is much high-level enthusiasm for this kind of change, at a mana...