WorldWideScience

Sample records for rapidly enrolling millions

  1. The rapid enrollment design for Phase I clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Wang, Yunfei; Foster, Matthew C

    2016-07-10

    We propose a dose-finding design for Phase I oncology trials where each new patient is assigned to the dose most likely to be the target dose given observed data. The main model assumption is that the dose-toxicity curve is non-decreasing. This method is beneficial when it is desirable to assign a patient to a dose as soon as the patient is enrolled into a study. To prevent assignments to doses with limited toxicity information in fast accruing trials we propose a conservative rule that assigns temporary fractional toxicities to patients still in follow-up. We also recommend always using a safety rule in any fast accruing dose-finding trial. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. First solar system solids to proto-planets: A Rapid growth in a few million years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Jitendranath

    2016-07-01

    First solar system solids to proto-planets: A Rapid growth in a few million years J. N. Goswami Physical Research Laboratory Ahmedabad-380009, India Collapse of a dense molecular cloud led to the formation of the proto-Sun surrounded by a high temperature gaseous nebula. The nebula settled down to the mid-plane and formation of the first solar system solids, refractory oxides and silicates, such as Corundum, Perovskite, Melilite took place, that was followed by formation of more common silicate minerals. Laboratory studies of primitive meteorites support this scenario and also provide evidence for correlated presence of several now-extinct short-lived nuclides (e.g. 41Ca, 26Al, 60Fe) at the time of formation of the first solar system solids. Presence of 60Fe in early solar system solids suggests injection of freshly synthesized nuclides from a stellar source (a supernova) into the proto-solar cloud that also triggered its collapse and led to formation of our solar system. Presence of 41Ca (half-life: 0.1Ma) in early solar system solids suggest a time scale of less than a million years for the collapse of the proto-solar cloud and formation of proto-Sun and the first solar system solids. The gradual evolution of larger solar system objects, up to planetesimals (represented by the asteroids), took place at a rapid pace within a time scale of a few million years. Some of the asteroids retain their pristine nature (e.g. parent bodies of carbonaceous chondrite), while others, underwent melting and differentiation due to internal heating. Harold Urey proposed radioactive 26Al as a possible heat source that was confirmed by experiment only in 1999. Irons and stony iron meteorites are fragments from core regions of differentiated asteroids. Extensive computer simulation studies suggest that an explosive stellar event (e.g. supernova) can indeed trigger the collapse of the proto-solar cloud and also inject freshly synthesized short-lived nuclides into it within a relatively

  3. A galaxy rapidly forming stars 700 million years after the Big Bang at redshift 7.51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, S L; Papovich, C; Dickinson, M; Song, M; Tilvi, V; Koekemoer, A M; Finkelstein, K D; Mobasher, B; Ferguson, H C; Giavalisco, M; Reddy, N; Ashby, M L N; Dekel, A; Fazio, G G; Fontana, A; Grogin, N A; Huang, J-S; Kocevski, D; Rafelski, M; Weiner, B J; Willner, S P

    2013-10-24

    Of several dozen galaxies observed spectroscopically that are candidates for having a redshift (z) in excess of seven, only five have had their redshifts confirmed via Lyman α emission, at z = 7.008, 7.045, 7.109, 7.213 and 7.215 (refs 1-4). The small fraction of confirmed galaxies may indicate that the neutral fraction in the intergalactic medium rises quickly at z > 6.5, given that Lyman α is resonantly scattered by neutral gas. The small samples and limited depth of previous observations, however, makes these conclusions tentative. Here we report a deep near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 43 photometrically-selected galaxies with z > 6.5. We detect a near-infrared emission line from only a single galaxy, confirming that some process is making Lyman α difficult to detect. The detected emission line at a wavelength of 1.0343 micrometres is likely to be Lyman α emission, placing this galaxy at a redshift z = 7.51, an epoch 700 million years after the Big Bang. This galaxy's colours are consistent with significant metal content, implying that galaxies become enriched rapidly. We calculate a surprisingly high star-formation rate of about 330 solar masses per year, which is more than a factor of 100 greater than that seen in the Milky Way. Such a galaxy is unexpected in a survey of our size, suggesting that the early Universe may harbour a larger number of intense sites of star formation than expected.

  4. Method to Rapidly Collect Thousands of Velocity Observations to Validate Million-Element 2D Hydrodynamic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J. R.; Pasternack, G. B.; Bratovich, P.; Massa, D.; Reedy, G.; Johnson, T.

    2010-12-01

    Two-dimensional (depth-averaged) hydrodynamic models have existed for decades and are used to study a variety of hydrogeomorphic processes as well as to design river rehabilitation projects. Rapid computer and coding advances are revolutionizing the size and detail of 2D models. Meanwhile, advances in topo mapping and environmental informatics are providing the data inputs to drive large, detailed simulations. Million-element computational meshes are in hand. With simulations of this size and detail, the primary challenge has shifted to finding rapid and inexpensive means for testing model predictions against observations. Standard methods for collecting velocity data include boat-mounted ADCP and point-based sensors on boats or wading rods. These methods are labor intensive and often limited to a narrow flow range. Also, they generate small datasets at a few cross-sections, which is inadequate to characterize the statistical structure of the relation between predictions and observations. Drawing on the long-standing oceanographic method of using drogues to track water currents, previous studies have demonstrated the potential of small dGPS units to obtain surface velocity in rivers. However, dGPS is too inaccurate to test 2D models. Also, there is financial risk in losing drogues in rough currents. In this study, an RTK GPS unit was mounted onto a manned whitewater kayak. The boater positioned himself into the current and used floating debris to maintain a speed and heading consistent with the ambient surface flow field. RTK GPS measurements were taken ever 5 sec. From these positions, a 2D velocity vector was obtained. The method was tested over ~20 km of the lower Yuba River in California in flows ranging from 500-5000 cfs, yielding 5816 observations. To compare velocity magnitude against the 2D model-predicted depth-averaged value, kayak-based surface values were scaled down by an optimized constant (0.72), which had no negative effect on regression analysis

  5. Four-year treatment outcomes of adult patients enrolled in Mozambique's rapidly expanding antiretroviral therapy program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F Auld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Mozambique during 2004-2007 numbers of adult patients (≥15 years old enrolled on antiretroviral therapy (ART increased about 16-fold, from 60 kg, WHO stage IV (AHR 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3-2.4, reference group WHO stage I/II, lack of co-trimoxazole prescription (AHR 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.8, and later calendar year of ART initiation (AHR 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.8. Rates of immunologic treatment failure and regimen-switch were 14.0 and 0.6 events per 100-patient years, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: ART initiation at earlier disease stages and scale-up of co-trimoxazole among ART patients could improve outcomes. Research to determine reasons for low regimen-switch rates and increasing rates of attrition during program expansion is needed.

  6. Nearly 1.4 Million High School Physics Students - Enrollments in AP and second-year courses up 26% even though number of graduates down in 2012-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2014-05-01

    Since 1987, the Statistical Research Center at the American Institute of Physics has regularly conducted a nationwide survey of high school physics teachers to take a closer look at physics in U.S. high schools. We contact all of the teachers who teach at least one physics course at a nationally representative sample of all U.S. high schools—both public and private schools. Our most recent survey was conducted during the 2012-13 school year. While our questionnaire covers a number of areas of interest, in this article we examine the number of students enrolled in high school physics courses and the types of courses offered. We also take a closer look at the prior physics experience of students enrolled in Advanced Placement (AP) Physics classes.

  7. LSST survey: millions and millions of quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivezić, Željko

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), the next-generation optical imaging survey sited at Cerro Pachon in Chile, will provide hundreds of detections for a sample of more than ten million quasars with redshifts up to about seven. The LSST design, with an 8.4m (6.7m effective) primary mirror, a 9.6 sq. deg. field of view, and a 3.2 Gigapixel camera, will allow about 10,000 sq. deg. of sky to be covered twice per night, every three to four nights on average, with typical 5-sigma depth for point sources of r=24.5 (AB). With about 1000 observations in ugrizy bands over a 10-year period, these data will enable a deep stack reaching r=27.5 (about 5 magnitudes deeper than SDSS) and faint time-domain astronomy. The measured properties of newly discovered and known astrometric and photometric transients will be publicly reported within 60 sec after closing the shutter. In addition to a brief introduction to LSST, I review optical quasar selection techniques, with emphasis on methods based on colors, variability properties, and astrometric behavior.

  8. Drawing Millions of Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2017-01-01

    02.10.2017 Drawing Millions of Spaces Helle Brabrand, KADK, School of Architecture, Copenhagen My project Drawing Millions of Spaces takes up some recurring questions about drawing and perception, stating that kinesthetic perception alone is a decisive force in drawing architecture. The assertion...... is that awareness of produced sensuous effects is a core issue of drawing, framing the way we see and imagine. Affective tonality attaches to proprioceptive and kinesthetic experience, being the mode of experience that transverse the senses. Movement is always there; you have to make distinctions between kinds...... of movement and experimental dynamics, questioning what difference they may create. Drawing Millions of Spaces looks for ambiguous and resonant body-space articulations, preparing for a use of AR (augmented reality) as an additional creation approach. For instance, working with combined projections, using...

  9. Teaching Rapid and Slow Learners in High Schools: The Status of Adaptations in Junior, Senior, and Regular High Schools Enrolling More than 300 Pupils. Bulletin, 1954, No. 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Arno; Hull, J. Dan; Brown, Kenneth E.; Cummings, Howard H.; Johnson, Philip G.; Laxson, Mary; Ludington, John R.; Mallory, Berenice; Segel, David

    1954-01-01

    This bulletin represents a cooperative effort of nine secondary school specialists in the Office of Education to picture the provisions used in large high schools to adapt teaching methods in different subjects for pupils who are not average. It is recognized that a pupil may be a rapid learner in one subject and a slow learner in another. Each of…

  10. Million Solar Roofs Flyer (Revision)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2000-11-01

    The Million Solar Roofs Initiative, announced in June 1997, assists businesses and communities in installing solar energy systems on one million buildings across the United States by 2010. The US Department of Energy leads this trailblazing initiative by partnering with the building industry, local governments, state agencies, the solar industry, electric service providers, and non-governmental organizations to remove barriers and strengthen the demand for solar technologies.

  11. Mr Cameron's Three Million Apprenticeships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In the 2015 general election campaign David Cameron celebrated the success of apprenticeships during the Coalition and promised another 3 million. This article argues that the "reinvention" of apprenticeships has neither created real skills nor provided real alternatives for young people and that the UK schemes fall far short of those in…

  12. 26 CFR 300.7 - Enrollment of enrolled actuary fee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enrollment of enrolled actuary fee. 300.7... AND ADMINISTRATION USER FEES § 300.7 Enrollment of enrolled actuary fee. (a) Applicability. This section applies to the initial enrollment of enrolled actuaries with the Joint Board for the Enrollment of...

  13. EVE and School - Enrolments

    CERN Multimedia

    EVE et École

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANT DATES Enrolments 2017-2018 Enrolments for the school year 2017-2018 to the Nursery, the Kindergarten and the School will take place on 6, 7 and 8 March 2017 from 10 am to 1 pm at EVE and School. Registration forms will be available from Thursday 2nd March. More information on the website: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch/.

  14. 31 CFR 10.4 - Eligibility for enrollment as enrolled agent or enrolled retirement plan agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... enrolled agent or enrolled retirement plan agent. 10.4 Section 10.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of... to Practice § 10.4 Eligibility for enrollment as enrolled agent or enrolled retirement plan agent. (a) Enrollment as an enrolled agent upon examination. The Director of the Office of Professional Responsibility...

  15. 26 CFR 300.5 - Enrollment of enrolled agent fee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enrollment of enrolled agent fee. 300.5 Section... ADMINISTRATION USER FEES § 300.5 Enrollment of enrolled agent fee. (a) Applicability. This section applies to the initial enrollment of enrolled agents with the IRS Office of Professional Responsibility pursuant to 31...

  16. Medicare Enrollment Dashboard

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Office of Enterprise Data and Analytics has developed a new interactive Medicare Enrollment Dashboard, which provides current information on the number of...

  17. Marketplace Enrollment Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The maps show the distribution of consumers in a state who enrolled in marketplace plans through federally facilitated, partnership, and supported state-based...

  18. Anticipatory Enrollment Management: Another Level of Enrollment Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Marguerite J.

    2012-01-01

    Building on the principles of Enrollment Management (EM) and Strategic Enrollment Management (SEM), Anticipatory Enrollment Management (AEM) offers another level of managing enrollment: anticipating future enrollment. AEM is grounded in the basic principles of Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and includes strategic out-reach to parents and…

  19. An Elastic Architecture Adaptable to Millions of Application Scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yunji; Chen, Tianshi; Guo, Qi; Xu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Part 5: Performance Modeling, Prediction, and Tuning; International audience; With the rapid development of computer industry, the number of applications has been growing rapidly. Furthermore, even one application may correspond to different application scenarios which impose different requirements on performance or power. This trend raises the following question: how to design processors that best suit millions of application scenarios? It is impractical to design a dedicated processor for e...

  20. Growing Enrollment with Kindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Earl E.

    2015-01-01

    "While community college enrollment has generally declined by about 2 or 3 percent annually in recent years--due to some extent to the improving economy--some colleges have bucked the trend" (Ashford 2015). What made the difference? Like many community colleges, College of DuPage has been concerned with access and affordability. The…

  1. Certifying Enrollment Management Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Most current professionals who serve in an enrollment management leadership capacity likely were trained "on the job," or at professional development events, primarily because credit-bearing credentials, degrees, and other formal programs were nonexistent (Phair 2014). However, that landscape has since changed, and now there are multiple…

  2. Trends & Indicators: Enrollment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harney, John O.

    2011-01-01

    Since New England Board of Higher Education (NEBHE) began publishing tables and charts exploring "Trends & Indicators" in New England higher education more than a half-century ago, few figures have grabbed as much attention as college "enrollment" data. These local, state, regional and national data go beyond simple…

  3. Student Enrollment Patterns and Achievement in Ohio's Online Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, June; McEachin, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    We utilize state data of nearly 1.7 million students in Ohio to study a specific sector of online education: K-12 schools that deliver most, if not all, education online, lack a brick-and-mortar presence, and enroll students full-time. First, we explore e-school enrollment patterns and how these patterns vary by student subgroups and geography.…

  4. A Global Connection: Foreign Enrollment, International Education and World Trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, John C.

    1996-01-01

    New England is experiencing globalization at a rapid pace, including enrollment of foreign college and university students. If the area is to reap the economic and cultural advantages of foreign enrollment, it must maintain a hospitable climate for both foreign trade and foreign students. This process can be enhanced by the admissions and alumni…

  5. 31 CFR 10.5 - Application for enrollment as an enrolled agent or enrolled retirement plan agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... enrolled agent or enrolled retirement plan agent. 10.5 Section 10.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of... to Practice § 10.5 Application for enrollment as an enrolled agent or enrolled retirement plan agent. (a) Form; address. An applicant for enrollment as an enrolled agent or enrolled retirement plan agent...

  6. 16 million [pounds] investment for 'virtual supercomputer'

    CERN Multimedia

    Holland, C

    2003-01-01

    "The Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council is to spend 16million [pounds] to create a massive computing Grid, equivalent to the world's second largest supercomputer after Japan's Earth Simulator computer" (1/2 page)

  7. Million Solar Roofs: Partners Make Markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-06-01

    Million Solar Roofs (MSR) Partners Make Markets Executive Summary is a summary of the MSR Annual Partnership Update, a report from all the partners and partnerships who participate in the MSR Initiative.

  8. AREVA net income: 649 million euros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-03-15

    This document presents the financial statements for 2006 of Areva group: net income: 649 million euros; backlog up by 24.6% to 25.6 billion euros; steady growth of sales revenue: + 7.3%1 to 10.863 billion euros; operating income of 407 million euros: excellent divisional performance and constitution of a significant provision for the OL3 project in Finland; dividend proposed to Annual General Meeting of Shareholders: 8.46 euros per share.

  9. Back to School in Afghanistan: Determinants of School Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimbert, Stephane; Miwa, Keiko; Nguyen, Duc Thanh

    2008-01-01

    One of the first achievements of post-conflict Afghanistan was to bring almost 4 million children back to school. Issues remain daunting, however, with low primary enrollment especially for girls and in rural areas and very weak learning achievements. We review some key features of the education system in Afghanistan. By matching household and…

  10. EMBL pay settlement will cost millions

    CERN Multimedia

    Abott, A

    1999-01-01

    A labour dispute at EMBL, Heidelberg, was settled last week at a cost of at least DM4 million for the organisation's 16 member states. The lab has asked for clarification on whether the ruling from the IL0 refers simply to a salary adjustment from 1995 or also to a backdated implementation of higher salary scales. This second option would cost considerably more - 8 percent of the budget in back pay and DM3.5 million per annum (1/2 page).

  11. Enrollment Management in Academic Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBiaso, Nick

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an understanding of how administrative leaders make decisions regarding enrollment management within academic units at a major research university in the southwestern United States. Key enrollment management functions of recruiting, admissions, marketing, orientation, financial aid/scholarships, academic advising, student…

  12. A Transformational Enrollment Management Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Bob; Perez-Greene, Margot

    2001-01-01

    Describes Iowa Central Community College's approach to enrollment management, citing seven keys to its success: (1) the president's personal leadership; (2) a college-wide commitment to excellence; (3) strong administrative support; (4) high expectations for personnel; (5) well-defined enrollment management strategies; (6) participation by…

  13. Emulating a million machines to investigate botnets.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudish, Donald W.

    2010-06-01

    Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California are creating what is in effect a vast digital petridish able to hold one million operating systems at once in an effort to study the behavior of rogue programs known as botnets. Botnets are used extensively by malicious computer hackers to steal computing power fron Internet-connected computers. The hackers harness the stolen resources into a scattered but powerful computer that can be used to send spam, execute phishing, scams or steal digital information. These remote-controlled 'distributed computers' are difficult to observe and track. Botnets may take over parts of tens of thousands or in some cases even millions of computers, making them among the world's most powerful computers for some applications.

  14. MILLION BOOK UNIVERSAL DIGITAL LIBRARY PROJECTS: INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Waghmode, S. S.

    2009-01-01

    Digital Library of India is a digital library of books, which is free-to-read, searchable, predominantly in India languages, available to everyone over the Internet. Very soon it is expected that this portal would provide a gateway to Indian Digital Libraries in Science, Arts, Culture, Music, Movies, Traditional Medicine, Palm Leaves and many more. This project is collaboration between Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, Universities and Carnegie Mellon University under MILLION BOOK UNIVE...

  15. Medicaid Managed Care Enrollment Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This report is composed annually and profiles enrollment statistics on Medicaid managed care programs on a plan-specific level. This report also provides...

  16. A National Analysis of Noncredit Community College Education: Enrollment, Funding, Accountability, and Contextual Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Mark M.; Morgan, Grant B.; Katsinas, Stephen G.; Adair, J. Lucas; Miller, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    Noncredit community college enrollment accounts for approximately 40% of all enrollment in the two-year sector, or five million students (American Association of Community Colleges, 2016). Yet, this population is seldom discussed in the higher education literature due to inconsistent definitions, funding, and data reporting at the state level.…

  17. Annual Enrollment Report Number of Students Studying Journalism and Mass Communication at All-time High.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lee B.; Vlad, Tudor; Huh, Jisu; Prine, Joelle

    2001-01-01

    Finds that journalism and mass communication programs appear to be entering another period of rapid enrollment growth, swept up by overall increases in enrollments at United States universities. Finds that only about four in ten of the journalism and mass communication programs report enrollments by race, suggesting many administrators are not…

  18. Enrollment in Distance Education Courses, by State: Fall 2012. Web Tables. NCES 2014-023

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Postsecondary enrollment in distance education courses, particularly those offered online, has rapidly increased in recent years (Allen and Seaman 2013). Traditionally, distance education offerings and enrollment levels have varied across different types of institutions. For example, researchers have found that undergraduate enrollment in at least…

  19. Million Dollar Baby (2004 and Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Elías García Sánchez

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The worst misfortune that can befall an old, tormented and fearful boxing trainer is that the pupil he is training and of whom he is very fond should have a lesion as serious as a quadriplegia. This is the crux of the plot in Million Dollar Baby. A person who suffers a quadriplegia sees how most of her physical and sensorial abilities disappear and habitually suffers psychological disturbances requiring palliative medical care. Relatives are subjected to great stress and suffering. All these aspects are reflected, in general accurately, in the film.

  20. LHC collars - 12 million high technology gems

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Some 12 million steel collars will keep the LHC dipole magnet structures rigid. Their production has just begun. A huge job began last week: the high speed manufacturing of twelve million steel collars for the 1250 dipole magnets of the future Large Hadron Collider, LHC. The challenge is not only a matter of quantity: these collars are very high technology components because of the important role they play in the way the collider works. One of the main difficulties with the accelerator is that the magnetic field that keeps particles in orbit must have the same configuration and intensity in all the dipoles. But when the 8.33 tesla magnetic field is on -100.000 times the earth magnetic field - it produces a very strong force that can deform the 'soft' parts of the magnets, such as superconducting coils. The force loading one metre of dipole is almost comparable with the weight of a Boeing 747 - about 400 tonnes - so a huge deformation would occur without a mechanical component to keep the whole structure rigid...

  1. Interactive Graph Layout of a Million Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Mi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sensemaking of large graphs, specifically those with millions of nodes, is a crucial task in many fields. Automatic graph layout algorithms, augmented with real-time human-in-the-loop interaction, can potentially support sensemaking of large graphs. However, designing interactive algorithms to achieve this is challenging. In this paper, we tackle the scalability problem of interactive layout of large graphs, and contribute a new GPU-based force-directed layout algorithm that exploits graph topology. This algorithm can interactively layout graphs with millions of nodes, and support real-time interaction to explore alternative graph layouts. Users can directly manipulate the layout of vertices in a force-directed fashion. The complexity of traditional repulsive force computation is reduced by approximating calculations based on the hierarchical structure of multi-level clustered graphs. We evaluate the algorithm performance, and demonstrate human-in-the-loop layout in two sensemaking case studies. Moreover, we summarize lessons learned for designing interactive large graph layout algorithms on the GPU.

  2. Understanding and improving hospice enrollment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarett, David

    Hospice is considered the "gold standard" for end-of-life care, providing dying patients and their families access to a broad array of services across settings. Despite its comprehensive approach, hospice care remains underutilized; many patients who might benefit from hospice do not enroll, or enroll only in the last days of life. This Issue Brief summarizes a series of studies that shed light on the decision making process about hospice, and describes a simple, effective way to improve referrals to hospice among nursing home residents.

  3. 42 CFR 423.32 - Enrollment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Enrollment process. 423.32 Section 423.32 Public... Enrollment process. (a) General rule. A Part D eligible individual who wishes to enroll in a PDP may enroll... approved by CMS. (c) Timely process an individual's enrollment request. A PDP sponsor must timely process...

  4. A thirty million year-old inherited heteroplasmy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Doublet

    Full Text Available Due to essentially maternal inheritance and a bottleneck effect during early oogenesis, newly arising mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations segregate rapidly in metazoan female germlines. Consequently, heteroplasmy (i.e. the mixture of mtDNA genotypes within an organism is generally resolved to homoplasmy within a few generations. Here, we report an exceptional transpecific heteroplasmy (predicting an alanine/valine alloacceptor tRNA change that has been stably inherited in oniscid crustaceans for at least thirty million years. Our results suggest that this heteroplasmy is stably transmitted across generations because it occurs within mitochondria and therefore escapes the mtDNA bottleneck that usually erases heteroplasmy. Consistently, at least two oniscid species possess an atypical trimeric mitochondrial genome, which provides an adequate substrate for the emergence of a constitutive intra-mitochondrial heteroplasmy. Persistence of a mitochondrial polymorphism on such a deep evolutionary timescale suggests that balancing selection may be shaping mitochondrial sequence evolution in oniscid crustaceans.

  5. Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment and Data Driven Policy Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberger, Eric; Witt, M. Allison; Blankenberger, Bob; Franklin, Doug

    2014-01-01

    The use of dual credit has been expanding rapidly. Dual credit is a college course taken by a high school student for which both college and high school credit is given. Previous studies provided limited quantitative evidence that dual credit/dual enrollment is directly connected to positive student outcomes. In this study, predictive statistics…

  6. Tulelake, California: The last 3 million years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, D.P.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Rieck, H.J.; Bradbury, J.P.; Dean, W.E.; Forester, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    The Tulelake basin, formed by east-west extension and faulting during the past several million years, contains at least 550 m of lacustrine sediment. Interdisciplinary studies of a 334 m-long cored section from the town of Tulelake, California, near the center of the basin, document a 3-m.y. record of environmental changes. The core consists of a thick sequence of diatomaceous clayey, silty, and marly lacustrine sediments interbedded with numerous tephra layers. Paleomagnetic study puts the base of the core at about 3.0 Ma. Twelve widespread silicic tephra units provide correlations with other areas and complement age control provided by magnetostratigraphy; mafic and silicic tephra units erupted from local sources are also common in the core. Widespread tephra units include the Llao Rock pumice (=Tsoyawata, 7 ka), the Trego Hot Springs Bed (23 ka), and the Rockland (0.40 Ma), Lava Creek (0.62 Ma), and Rio Dell (1.5 Ma) ash beds, as well as several ash beds also found at Summer Lake, Oregon, and an ash bed originally recognized in DSDP hole 173 in the northeastern Pacific. Several tephra layers found in the core also occur in lacustrine beds exposed around the margins of the basin and elsewhere in the ancestral lacustrine system. Diatoms are present throughout the section. Pollen is present in most of the section, but some barren zones are found in the interval between 50 and 140 m; the greatest change in behavior of the pollen record takes place just above the top of the Olduvai Normal-Polarity Subchronozone. Ostracodes are present only in high-carbonate (>10% CaCO3) intervals. Evolutionary changes are found in the diatom and ostracode records. Bulk geochemical analyses show significant changes in elemental composition of the sediment through time. ?? 1989.

  7. 75 FR 76940 - User Fees Relating to Enrolled Agents and Enrolled Retirement Plan Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 300 RIN 1545-BJ65 User Fees Relating to Enrolled Agents and Enrolled... regulations relating to the imposition of user fees for enrolled agents and enrolled retirement plan agents. The proposed regulations separate the enrolled retirement plan agent user fees from the enrolled agent...

  8. 26 CFR 300.8 - Renewal of enrollment of enrolled actuary fee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Renewal of enrollment of enrolled actuary fee...) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION USER FEES § 300.8 Renewal of enrollment of enrolled actuary fee. (a) Applicability. This section applies to the renewal of enrollment of enrolled actuaries with the Joint Board for...

  9. 26 CFR 300.6 - Renewal of enrollment of enrolled agent fee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Renewal of enrollment of enrolled agent fee...) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION USER FEES § 300.6 Renewal of enrollment of enrolled agent fee. (a) Applicability. This section applies to the renewal of enrollment of enrolled agents with the IRS Office of...

  10. Enhancing the view of a million galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Composite image hi-res Size hi-res: 851 KB Credits: ESA/Univ. of Leicester/I. Stewart and M. Watson XMM-Newton X-ray spectral colour composite image XMM-Newton X-ray spectral colour composite image of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Field. The view gives an X-ray pseudo-colour representation of all the sources, coded according to their X-ray energy. More energetic sources are shown in blue and less energetic ones in red. This mosaic image, composed of 7 partially overlapping pointings, maps the full extent of the SXDF and corresponds to an exposure time exceeding one hundred hours. These data form the largest contiguous area over which deep X-ray observations have been performed. Composite image hi-res Size hi-res: 6215 KB Credits: NAOJ/Subaru Telescope XMM-Newton/Subaru colour composite image A colour composite image obtained by combining data taken with the Subaru Telescope in blue, red and near-infrared light. The image, worth over two hundred hours of exposure time, covers an area of sky seven times larger than the full moon. The images in blue light show details several hundred million times fainter than what can be seen with the naked eye. SXDS field hi-res Size hi-res: 448 KB Credits: NAOJ/Subaru Telescope SXDS field A particular of the SXDS field. The teardrop-shaped galaxy in the upper right portion of the frame is likely to have suffered from a collision with another galaxy. SXDS field hi-res Size hi-res: 358 KB Credits: NAOJ/Subaru Telescope SXDS field A particular of the SXDS field. The prominent spiral galaxy near the centre may be ineracting with a less-conspicuous dwarf galaxy to its lower right. One of the fundamental goals of modern astronomy is understanding the history of the Universe, and in particular learning about the processes that shape the formation and evolution of galaxies. To observe these processes as they unfold, astronomers must survey galaxies near and far, spanning a large enough volume of the Universe, so that local variations in the

  11. Current Term Enrollment Estimates: Spring 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Current Term Enrollment Estimates, published every December and May by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, include national enrollment estimates by institutional sector, state, enrollment intensity, age group, and gender. Enrollment estimates are adjusted for Clearinghouse data coverage rates by institutional sector, state, and…

  12. Kindergarden - Enrollments 2012-2013

    CERN Multimedia

    Kindergarden

    2012-01-01

      Enrollments 2012-2013   Monday 5, Tuesday 6, and Wednesday 7 March From 8.00 to 10.00 at the Nursery School   Registration forms will be available from 2nd March onwards: – At the Nursery School, from the Secretary, tel : 73604.    Catherine.Regelbrugge@cern.ch. – At the Nursery School, from the Headmistress, tel : 77925.    Brigitte.Pillionnel@cern.ch. – On the pages of the Nursery School website http://cern.ch/kindergarten/docs/cond%20gales%2012-2013%20EN.pdf. 

  13. 76 FR 21805 - User Fees Relating to Enrolled Agents and Enrolled Retirement Plan Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    ... Service 26 CFR Part 300 RIN 1545-BJ65 User Fees Relating to Enrolled Agents and Enrolled Retirement Plan... document contains amendments to the regulations relating to the imposition of user fees for enrolled agents and enrolled retirement plan agents. The final regulations lower the initial enrollment and renewal of...

  14. Preparing Students for Advanced Placement: An Evaluation of the Academic Contributions of Enrollment in Pre-AP Middle School Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuto, Charles M.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the College Board has expanded its Advanced Placement program to consist of over 30 courses offered to millions of students throughout the United States. While more students are enrolling in AP courses, the percentage of students passing the exams has declined. With students enrolling in the Advanced Placement courses as…

  15. Anthropogenic carbon release rate unprecedented during past 66 million years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeebe, R. E.; Ridgwell, A.; Zachos, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon release rates from anthropogenic sources have reached a record high of about 10 Pg C/y in 2013. However, due to uncertainties in the strength of climate system feedbacks, the full impact of the rapid carbon release on the Earth system is difficult to predict with confidence. Geologic analogues from past transient climate changes could provide invaluable constraints but only if the associated carbon release rates can be reliably reconstructed. We present a new technique - based on combined data-model analysis - to extract rates of change from the geological record, without the need for a stratigraphic age model. Given currently available records, we then show that the present anthropogenic carbon release rate is unprecedented during the Cenozoic (past 66 million years) by at least an order of magnitude. Our results have important implications for our ability to use past analogues to predict future changes, including constraints on climate sensitivity, ocean acidification, and impacts on marine and terrestrial ecosystems. For example, the fact that we have effectively entered an era of 'no analogue' state presents fundamental challenges to constraining forward modeling. Furthermore, future ecosystem disruptions will likely exceed the relatively limited extinctions observed during climate aberrations throughout the Cenozoic.

  16. Dual Enrollment Participation from the Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanny, M. Allison

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines the experiences of five high school students previously enrolled in dual enrollment courses, and discusses the perceived benefits and disadvantages of these experiences from the student perspective.

  17. 42 CFR 460.152 - Enrollment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Enrollment process. 460.152 Section 460.152 Public...) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.152 Enrollment process. (a) Intake process. Intake is an intensive process during which PACE staff members make one or more visits to a potential participant's place...

  18. 7 CFR 1467.7 - Enrollment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Enrollment process. 1467.7 Section 1467.7 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS WETLANDS RESERVE PROGRAM § 1467.7 Enrollment process. (a... of NRCS' intent to continue the enrollment process on their land unless otherwise notified by the...

  19. Dual Enrollment in Spanish: One Working Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Melanie; Chambers, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Dual enrollment is now a nation-wide phenomenon as all 50 states currently offer some form of dual-enrollment program to secondary-school students (Karp, Bailey, Hughes, and Fermin 2005). However, dual enrollment itself is often difficult to define as programs vary from school to school (Jordan, Cavalluzzo, and Corallo 2006). Therefore, language…

  20. A Comprehensive Analysis of Five Million UMLS Metathesaurus Terms Using Eighteen Million MEDLINE Citations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rong; Musen, Mark A; Shah, Nigam H

    2010-11-13

    The Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus is widely used for biomedical natural language processing (NLP) tasks. In this study, we systematically analyzed UMLS Metathesaurus terms by analyzing their occurrences in over 18 million MEDLINE abstracts. Our goals were: 1. analyze the frequency and syntactic distribution of Metathesaurus terms in MEDLINE; 2. create a filtered UMLS Metathesaurus based on the MEDLINE analysis; 3. augment the UMLS Metathesaurus where each term is associated with metadata on its MEDLINE frequency and syntactic distribution statistics. After MEDLINE frequency-based filtering, the augmented UMLS Metathesaurus contains 518,835 terms and is roughly 13% of its original size. We have shown that the syntactic and frequency information is useful to identify errors in the Metathesaurus. This filtered and augmented UMLS Metathesaurus can potentially be used to improve efficiency and precision of UMLS-based information retrieval and NLP tasks.

  1. 76 FR 2617 - User Fees Relating to Enrolled Agents and Enrolled Retirement Plan Agents; Hearing Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 300 RIN 1545-BJ65 User Fees Relating to Enrolled Agents and Enrolled... enrolled agents and enrolled retirement plan agents. DATES: The public hearing, originally scheduled for...

  2. Rural Enrollment in Health Insurance Marketplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Abigail R; McBride, Timothy D; Kemper, Leah M; Mueller, Keith J

    2015-07-01

    Our previous analysis of 2015 Health Insurance Marketplace (HIM) data on plan availability and premiums in comparison to 2014 showed only modest premium increases in many rural areas and increased firm participation in most areas. To determine whether HIM enrollment also shows a positive trend, we analyzed county-level HIM enrollment data for 2015 by geographic categories, population density, premium, and firm participation, comparing enrollment outcomes in rural places to those in urban places. Key Findings. (1) In the Northeast, Midwest, and West census regions, estimated enrollment rates in rural (micropolitan and noncore) counties were similar to estimated rates in urban counties, while in the South, rural rates lagged behind urban rates. (2) Estimated enrollment rates at the rating area level increased as the population density of the rating area increased. (3) Various measures of rurality and geography indicate that HIMs performed well in many rural areas; however, this analysis suggests that in some rural areas, enrollment outcomes may have been weak due to factors such as the geographic scope of the rating areas, plan availability in these rating areas, or potentially fewer resources devoted to outreach and enrollment efforts. (4) In general, county-level, enrollment-weighted average premiums differed more by census region than by metropolitan, micropolitan, and noncore status. (5) Low enrollment rates at the rating area level were associated with a lower numbers of firms participating in HIMs. When three or more firms participated, enrollment rates were close to or above average.

  3. Contributions to the Enrollment Process with Data Mining in Private Higher Education Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Isaac Estrada-Danell

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze how data mining (DM optimizes the enrollment process, with the intention of designing a predictive model to manage private enrollment for higher education institutions of Mexico. It analyzes the current status of the higher education institutions in relation to its enrollment process and the application of the DM. With a correlational method, a dataset (DS was used to model an entropy decision tree with the help of Rapid Miner software. The results show that it is possible to build and test a predictive model management of private enrollment for higher education institutions of Mexico as the ZAM&EST model proposed by the authors.

  4. L130-million cut to grants hits UK physical scientists

    CERN Multimedia

    Cressey, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    "UK physicists, still reeling from massive funding cuts announced earlier this year, have learnt of worse to come. Roughly L130 million (US$260 million)is being slashed from research grants awarded by the Engineering and Physical Scienes Research Council (EPSRC), it announced on 17 March." (2 pages)

  5. Enrollment Challenges in Critical Care Nursing Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, Mary Lou; Middleton, Aurea; Deaton, Lara; Bennett, Melody; Talbert, Steven; Penoyer, Daleen

    2017-09-01

    Enrollment challenges for critical care research are common. Contributing factors include short enrollment windows, the crisis nature of critical illness, lack of research staff, unavailable legal proxy, family dynamics, and language barriers. To describe enrollment statistics for an ongoing critical care nursing trial, barriers to recruitment, and strategies to enhance enrollment. Two years' worth of recruitment and enrollment data from an oral care intervention trial in critically ill adults receiving mechanical ventilation at 1 hospital were analyzed. Recruitment logs include number of patients screened, eligible, enrolled, and declined and patients' sex, race, and ethnicity. Target enrollment (15.5 patients per month) was based on experience and historical data. Strategies implemented to promote enrollment included providing study personnel at least 18 hours per day for 7 days per week, regular rounds, communication with direct care staff, and Spanish consent processes. In 2 years, 6963 patients were screened; 1551 (22%) were eligible. Consent was sought from 366 (24% of eligible patients). Enrollment averaged 13.3 patients per month (86% of projected target). The main factor impeding enrollment was unavailability of a legal proxy to provide consent (88%). The refusal rates of white (11%), black (13%), and Hispanic (16%) patients did not differ significantly. However, those classified as Asian or as more than 1 race declined significantly more often (35%) than did white or black patients (P = .02). Unavailability of a legal proxy within a short enrollment window was the major challenge to enrollment. Various factors influenced consent decisions. Clinical study design requires more conservative estimates. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  6. R316-million Richards Bay Coal Terminal expansions underway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-01

    Fabrication is underway on items critical to the R316-million expansion programme newly embarked upon by Richards Bay Coal Terminal (RBCT, South Africa), according to project manager SEMTEC. The expansion will increase the capacity of RBTC from 44 million tons of export quality coal a year to 53-million tons. The scope of work includes the design and fabrication of a tandem tippler, a stacker reclaimer, and new conveyors as well as upgrading the existing conveyor, terminal control and railway system and the supply of new locomotives.

  7. Urban versus Rural: Part-Time Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Michael; Tietjen-Smith, Tara; Waller, Lee Rusty; Waller, Sharon Kay

    2008-01-01

    The researchers examined part-time enrollment within public two-year, degree-granting community colleges by the degree of urbanization classifications of city, suburban, town, and rural for fall 2003 and 2005. Findings indicate no statistical differences in part-time enrollment between city and suburban institutions. No statistical differences…

  8. Gender Preference in Primary School Enrolment among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-01

    May 1, 2017 ... between boys and girls to enrol in school, especially among poor households. Even when the household has the ... The under-representation of girls in primary school system in many developing ... It is therefore obvious from the literature that the preference of parents in enrolment decision is influenced by ...

  9. Gender Preference in Primary School Enrolment among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The benefits of equal enrolment and retention in primary schools cannot be underestimated for developing countries in particular. This underscores the need for studies that shed light on enrolment inequalities. Applying binary probit model to cross-sectional data from 384 respondents randomly drawn from rural and urban ...

  10. Enrollment Management: A Market-Centered Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsbeek, David H.; Hossler, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Enrollment management, the authors suggested in earlier essays, is a deliberate process of achieving an institution's preferred enrollment profile, starting by identifying the strategic purposes and mission of the institution, and then orchestrating the marketing, recruitment, admissions, pricing and aid, retention programs, academic support…

  11. 5 CFR 890.1304 - Enrollment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS PROGRAM Department of Defense Federal Employees Health Benefits Program... 2001. Eligible beneficiaries will be able to enroll for coverage, change enrollment tiers (e.g., self...

  12. Enrolled Home Study Partners with Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lines, Patricia M.

    2004-01-01

    Home-based programs provide opportunities at a level far beyond what a traditional public school program can offer. To stem enrollment losses to homeschooling, or simply to help families interested in home-based option, public schools are enrolling children and sending them home, where they follow the school's curriculum under their parents'…

  13. Philanthro-metrics: Mining multi-million-dollar gifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The Million Dollar List (MDL, online at http://www.milliondollarlist.org) is a compilation of publicly announced charitable donations of $1 million or more from across the United States since 2000; as of December 2016, the database contains close to 80,000 gifts made by U.S. individuals, corporations, foundations, and other grant-making nonprofit organizations. This paper discusses the unique value of the Million Dollar List and provides unique insights to key questions such as: How does distance affect giving? How do networks impact million-dollar-plus gifts? Understanding the geospatial and temporal dimensions of philanthropy can assist researchers and policymakers to better understand the role of private funding in innovation and discovery. Moreover, the results from the paper emphasize the importance of philanthropy for fueling research and development in science, the arts, environment, and health. The paper also includes the limitations of the presented analyses and promising future work. PMID:28552937

  14. Philanthro-metrics: Mining multi-million-dollar gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osili, Una O; Ackerman, Jacqueline; Kong, Chin Hua; Light, Robert P; Börner, Katy

    2017-01-01

    The Million Dollar List (MDL, online at http://www.milliondollarlist.org) is a compilation of publicly announced charitable donations of $1 million or more from across the United States since 2000; as of December 2016, the database contains close to 80,000 gifts made by U.S. individuals, corporations, foundations, and other grant-making nonprofit organizations. This paper discusses the unique value of the Million Dollar List and provides unique insights to key questions such as: How does distance affect giving? How do networks impact million-dollar-plus gifts? Understanding the geospatial and temporal dimensions of philanthropy can assist researchers and policymakers to better understand the role of private funding in innovation and discovery. Moreover, the results from the paper emphasize the importance of philanthropy for fueling research and development in science, the arts, environment, and health. The paper also includes the limitations of the presented analyses and promising future work.

  15. Philanthro-metrics: Mining multi-million-dollar gifts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Una O Osili

    Full Text Available The Million Dollar List (MDL, online at http://www.milliondollarlist.org is a compilation of publicly announced charitable donations of $1 million or more from across the United States since 2000; as of December 2016, the database contains close to 80,000 gifts made by U.S. individuals, corporations, foundations, and other grant-making nonprofit organizations. This paper discusses the unique value of the Million Dollar List and provides unique insights to key questions such as: How does distance affect giving? How do networks impact million-dollar-plus gifts? Understanding the geospatial and temporal dimensions of philanthropy can assist researchers and policymakers to better understand the role of private funding in innovation and discovery. Moreover, the results from the paper emphasize the importance of philanthropy for fueling research and development in science, the arts, environment, and health. The paper also includes the limitations of the presented analyses and promising future work.

  16. Monsanto Gives Washington U. $23.5 Million.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culliton, Barbara J.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews various provisions of a five-year, $23.5-million research agreement between Washington University and the Monsanto Company. The scientific focus of this venture will be on proteins and peptides which modify cellular behavior. (SK)

  17. More than 500 million Chinese urban residents (14% of the global urban population) are imperiled by fine particulate hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunyang; Han, Lijian; Zhang, Robin Q

    2016-11-01

    China's urbanization and the subsequent public vulnerability to degenerated environment is important to global public health. Among the environmental problems, fine particulate (PM 2.5 ) pollution has become a serious hazard in rapidly urbanizing China. However, quantitative information remains inadequate. We thus collected PM 2.5 concentrations and population census records, to illustrate the spatial patterns and changes in the PM 2.5 hazard levels in China, and to quantify public vulnerability to the hazard during 2000-2010, following the air quality standards of World Health Organization. We found that 28% (2.72 million km 2 ) of China's territory, including 78% of cities (154 cities) with a population of >1 million, was exposed to PM 2.5 hazard in 2010; a 15% increase (1.47 million km 2 ) from 2000 to 2010. The hazards potentially impacted the health of 72% of the total population (942 million) in 2010, including 70% of the young (206 million) and 76% of the old (71 million). This was a significant increase from the 42% of total the population (279 million) exposed in 2000. Of the total urban residents, 76% (501 million) were affected in 2010. Along with PM 2.5 concentration increase, massive number of rural to urban migration also contributed greatly to China's urban public health vulnerability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 2013 Annual Survey of Journalism Mass Communication Enrollments: Enrollments Decline for Third Consecutive Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lee Bernard; Vlad, Tudor; Simpson, Holly Anne

    2014-01-01

    Enrollments in journalism and mass communication programs in the United States in the fall of 2013 were down from a year earlier for the third year in a row. Enrollments dropped at the bachelor's, master's, and doctoral levels, and the number of freshmen and sophomores were down dramatically from a year earlier. Enrollments in the…

  19. Pittsburgh American Community Survey 2015, School Enrollment

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — School enrollment data are used to assess the socioeconomic condition of school-age children. Government agencies also require these data for funding allocations...

  20. Manipulation in the enrollment of research participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandava, Amulya; Millum, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Researchers can design recruitment and consent processes so that potential participants are more likely to decide to enroll. These strategies work by subtly manipulating the participants. But how much manipulation is acceptable?

  1. Extreme ecosystem instability suppressed tropical dinosaur dominance for 30 million years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Jessica H; Lindström, Sofie; Irmis, Randall B; Glasspool, Ian J; Schaller, Morgan F; Dunlavey, Maria; Nesbitt, Sterling J; Smith, Nathan D; Turner, Alan H

    2015-06-30

    A major unresolved aspect of the rise of dinosaurs is why early dinosaurs and their relatives were rare and species-poor at low paleolatitudes throughout the Late Triassic Period, a pattern persisting 30 million years after their origin and 10-15 million years after they became abundant and speciose at higher latitudes. New palynological, wildfire, organic carbon isotope, and atmospheric pCO2 data from early dinosaur-bearing strata of low paleolatitudes in western North America show that large, high-frequency, tightly correlated variations in δ(13)Corg and palynomorph ecotypes occurred within a context of elevated and increasing pCO2 and pervasive wildfires. Whereas pseudosuchian archosaur-dominated communities were able to persist in these same regions under rapidly fluctuating extreme climatic conditions until the end-Triassic, large-bodied, fast-growing tachymetabolic dinosaurian herbivores requiring greater resources were unable to adapt to unstable high CO2 environmental conditions of the Late Triassic.

  2. Kaun Banega Crorepati–A Million Dollars for a Mathematician

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 8. Kaun Banega Crorepati – A Million Dollars for a Mathematician. M S Raghunathan. General Article Volume 7 Issue 8 August 2002 pp 40-50. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Origin, structure and function of millions of chromosomes present in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-06-04

    Jun 4, 2015 ... [Kumar S. and Kumari R. 2015 Origin, structure and function of millions of chromosomes present in the macronucleus of unicellular eukaryotic ciliate ... Two important characteristics of the species are presence of cilia on surface that aid in movement, attachment and feeding and nuclear dimorphism ...

  4. Millions Learning: Scaling up Quality Education in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jenny Perlman; Winthrop, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    "Millions Learning: Scaling up Quality Education in Developing Countries" tells the story of where and how quality education has scaled in low- and middle-income countries. The story emerges from wide-ranging research on scaling and learning, including 14 in-depth case studies from around the globe. Ultimately, "Millions…

  5. Origin, structure and function of millions of chromosomes present in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Origin, structure and function of millions of chromosomes present in the macronucleus of unicellular eukaryotic ciliate, Oxytricha trifallax: a model organism for transgenerationally programmed genome rearrangements. Sushil Kumar Renu Kumari. Research Commentary Volume 94 Issue 2 June 2015 pp 171-176 ...

  6. Universities' Royalty Income Increased 33% in 1997, Reaching $446-Million.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinger, Julianne

    1999-01-01

    According to an annual survey, 132 U.S. research universities earned over $446 million in royalties from inventions in fiscal 1997, and received 2,239 patents. The University of California was the top earner. Data provided on the top-earning institutions includes dollar amount of adjusted gross royalties received, number of licenses generating…

  7. Three Million Careers: Making the Apprenticeship Levy Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learning and Work Institute, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Government has a target of three million apprenticeship starts in England by 2020, and is introducing an Apprenticeship Levy on the payroll of large employers to fund this increase and to encourage greater employer engagement with apprenticeships. Concerns have been raised about whether there should be a delay to get the details right;…

  8. Kaun Banega Crorepati–A Million Dollars for a Mathematician ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 9. Kaun Banega Crorepati – A Million Dollars for a Mathematician - Poincaré Conjecture. M S Raghunathan. General Article Volume 7 Issue 9 September 2002 pp 56-68 ...

  9. Uncovered: Social Security, Retirement Uncertainty, and 1 Million Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Leslie; Aldeman, Chad

    2014-01-01

    Retirement savings are often described as a three-legged stool: Social Security, employer retirement plans, and personal savings. For many American workers, Social Security is the most consistent portion of the three-legged model, providing a solid plank of retirement savings. But nationwide, more than 1 million teachers--about 40 percent of all…

  10. Converting ppm to lb/million Btus; An easy method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapathy, V. (ABCO Industries, Inc. (US))

    1992-04-01

    Packaged steam generators firing gas or oil must limit emissions of pollutants in order to meet state and federal regulations. Criteria on emissions of common pollutants such as carbon monoxide (CO) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) are often specified in parts per million volume dry (ppmvd) at 3% oxygen. On the other hand, burner and boiler suppliers often cite or guarantee values in pounds per million Btu fired. This article demonstrates a simple method for calculating the conversion. It should be noted that excess air has little on the conversion factor. This paper shows the results of combustion calculations for natural gas and No. 2 oil at various excess air levels. The table shows the fuel gas analysis, molecular weight and amount of flue gas produced per million Btus fired on Higher Heating Value (HHV) basis. Using these, we will arrive at the relationship between ppmvd values of No{sub x} or CO to the corresponding values in pounds per million Btu fired.

  11. Million Hearts: Key to Collaboration to Reduce Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Extension has taught successful classes to address heart disease, yet heart disease remains the number one killer in the United States. The U.S. government's Million Hearts initiative seeks collaboration among colleges, local and state health departments, Extension and other organizations, and medical providers in imparting a consistent message…

  12. Russia to invest 200 million Swiss Francs in international accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Russia will invest 200 million CHF in the LHC project, according to first deputy industry, science and technologies minister. The results of scientific research in the center will be use in various industries, enabling new Russian technologies to enter the world market.

  13. The 13 million year Cenozoic pulse of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiasheng; Kravchinsky, Vadim A.; Liu, Xiuming

    2015-12-01

    The geomagnetic polarity reversal rate changes radically from very low to extremely high. Such process indicates fundamental changes in the Earth's core reorganization and core-mantle boundary heat flow fluctuations. However, we still do not know how critical such changes are to surface geology and climate processes. Our analysis of the geomagnetic reversal frequency, oxygen isotope record, and tectonic plate subduction rate, which are indicators of the changes in the heat flux at the core mantle boundary, climate and plate tectonic activity, shows that all these changes indicate similar rhythms on million years' timescale in the Cenozoic Era occurring with the common fundamental periodicity of ∼13 Myr during most of the time. The periodicity is disrupted only during the last 20 Myr. Such periodic behavior suggests that large scale climate and tectonic changes at the Earth's surface are closely connected with the million year timescale cyclical reorganization of the Earth's interior.

  14. Places: A 10 million Image Database for Scene Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bolei; Lapedriza, Agata; Khosla, Aditya; Oliva, Aude; Torralba, Antonio

    2017-07-04

    The rise of multi-million-item dataset initiatives has enabled data-hungry machine learning algorithms to reach near-human semantic classification performance at tasks such as visual object and scene recognition. Here we describe the Places Database, a repository of 10 million scene photographs, labeled with scene semantic categories, comprising a large and diverse list of the types of environments encountered in the world. Using the state-of-the-art Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), we provide scene classification CNNs (Places-CNNs) as baselines, that significantly outperform the previous approaches. Visualization of the CNNs trained on Places shows that object detectors emerge as an intermediate representation of scene classification. With its high-coverage and high-diversity of exemplars, the Places Database along with the Places-CNNs offer a novel resource to guide future progress on scene recognition problems.

  15. Million-degree plasma pervading the extended Orion Nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güdel, Manuel; Briggs, Kevin R; Montmerle, Thierry; Audard, Marc; Rebull, Luisa; Skinner, Stephen L

    2008-01-18

    Most stars form as members of large associations within dense, very cold (10 to 100 kelvin) molecular clouds. The nearby giant molecular cloud in Orion hosts several thousand stars of ages less than a few million years, many of which are located in or around the famous Orion Nebula, a prominent gas structure illuminated and ionized by a small group of massive stars (the Trapezium). We present x-ray observations obtained with the X-ray Multi-Mirror satellite XMM-Newton, revealing that a hot plasma with a temperature of 1.7 to 2.1 million kelvin pervades the southwest extension of the nebula. The plasma flows into the adjacent interstellar medium. This x-ray outflow phenomenon must be widespread throughout our Galaxy.

  16. Relative size predicts competitive outcome through 2 million years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liow, Lee Hsiang; Di Martino, Emanuela; Krzeminska, Malgorzata; Ramsfjell, Mali; Rust, Seabourne; Taylor, Paul D; Voje, Kjetil L

    2017-08-01

    Competition is an important biotic interaction that influences survival and reproduction. While competition on ecological timescales has received great attention, little is known about competition on evolutionary timescales. Do competitive abilities change over hundreds of thousands to millions of years? Can we predict competitive outcomes using phenotypic traits? How much do traits that confer competitive advantage and competitive outcomes change? Here we show, using communities of encrusting marine bryozoans spanning more than 2 million years, that size is a significant determinant of overgrowth outcomes: colonies with larger zooids tend to overgrow colonies with smaller zooids. We also detected temporally coordinated changes in average zooid sizes, suggesting that different species responded to a common external driver. Although species-specific average zooid sizes change over evolutionary timescales, species-specific competitive abilities seem relatively stable, suggesting that traits other than zooid size also control overgrowth outcomes and/or that evolutionary constraints are involved. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  17. Half a million hours of rugby football. The injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    In 30 seasons at Rugby School half a million hours of Rugby football have led to 9,885 injuries, an incidence of 197.7 injuries per 10.000 player hours. This incidence is compared with those from other school games, and with those of other series of Rugby football injuries. The injuries are compared regionally with those of other series, and the more important are listed. Images p30-a PMID:7248678

  18. Building the graph of medicine from millions of clinical narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, Samuel G; LePendu, Paea; Shah, Nigam H

    2014-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) represent a rich and relatively untapped resource for characterizing the true nature of clinical practice and for quantifying the degree of inter-relatedness of medical entities such as drugs, diseases, procedures and devices. We provide a unique set of co-occurrence matrices, quantifying the pairwise mentions of 3 million terms mapped onto 1 million clinical concepts, calculated from the raw text of 20 million clinical notes spanning 19 years of data. Co-frequencies were computed by means of a parallelized annotation, hashing, and counting pipeline that was applied over clinical notes from Stanford Hospitals and Clinics. The co-occurrence matrix quantifies the relatedness among medical concepts which can serve as the basis for many statistical tests, and can be used to directly compute Bayesian conditional probabilities, association rules, as well as a range of test statistics such as relative risks and odds ratios. This dataset can be leveraged to quantitatively assess comorbidity, drug-drug, and drug-disease patterns for a range of clinical, epidemiological, and financial applications.

  19. Astronomy Enrollments and Degrees: Results from the 2012 Survey of Astronomy Enrollments and Degrees. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Patrick; Nicholson, Starr

    2014-01-01

    Interest in astronomy degrees in the U.S. remains strong, with astronomy enrollments at or near all-time highs for the 2012-13 academic year. The total number of students taking an introductory astronomy course at a degree-granting physics or astronomy department is approaching 200,000. Enrollments in introductory astronomy courses have been…

  20. Enrollment Management Strategies at Four-Year Open Enrollment Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Dana S.

    2017-01-01

    Enrollment management plans have been researched and documented for the last fifty years and literature verifies that the use of these plans has only become more relevant in the 21st century. Strategies and activities for managing enrollment have been defined and shared for most types of institutions, however, there is limited research on the best…

  1. Managing Educational Facilities and Students' Enrolment in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR Nneka

    proper maintenance and use of the structural units and facilities are quite accurate and imperative. A well designed functional school building provides effective delivery of the school's curriculum and is positively related to enrolment of the students. (Ogbodo, 1995). Adesina (1981) stated that it is becoming increasingly ...

  2. Emphasizing Business Analysis to Increase IS Enrollments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizior, Ronald J.; Hidding, Gezinus J.

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes a proposal to increase enrollments in undergraduate Information Systems programs in Business Schools. In the face of Y2K overhang, the dot com bubble, and the popular press describing the off-shoring of Information Technology, this paper describes a proposal to stimulate interest in Information Systems as an undergraduate field…

  3. TRENDS IN ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN ENROLLMENTS AND GRADUATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALDEN, JOHN D.

    TECHNICIAN ENROLLMENTS AND GRADUATES WERE SURVEYED (1965-66) IN FIVE CLASSIFICATIONS WITH VARYING EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS--(1) ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN, (2) PHYSICIAL SCIENCE TECHNICIAN, (3) INDUSTRIAL TECHNICIAN, (4) PRE-ENGINEERING TRANSFER, AND (5) BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY. THE DATA WERE USED TO DETERMINE PRESENT TRENDS IN MANPOWER TRAINING AND…

  4. Engineering and Technician Enrollments--Fall 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineers Joint Council, New York, NY. Engineering Manpower Commission.

    Engineering and technician enrollments for Fall 1969 are reported for associate and bachelor's degree programs in engineering technology and industrial technology, and for engineering degrees at the bachelor's, master's, and doctor's levels. Statistical tables were produced by a computer analysis of data from 269 engineering schools and 558 other…

  5. National Comparison of Jointly Enrolled Students. Factsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This document contains data from the Community College Management Information System and other sources with summative data on topics of interest. Data gathered through the Division of Community College's Management Information System (MIS) indicates that in the 2013-14 academic year 42,996 students enrolled in almost 337,000 credit hours through…

  6. Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees, 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Deborah H.; And Others

    This report presents data on the number of students enrolled and the number of bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees awarded in academic year 1981-82 from 72 United States institutions offering degree programs in nuclear engineering or nuclear options within other engineering fields. Presented as well are historical data for the last decade…

  7. Enrollment Forecasting. Educational Facilities Digest 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piele, Philip; Wright, Darrell

    Enrollment forecasting is a subject for scholars of varied interests and concerns. The literature reflects several perspectives, including those of school administrators, facilities planners, mathematicians, statisticians, demographers, and computer programmers. This pamphlet contains an analysis and annotated bibliographies of 29 publications on…

  8. Crowdsourcing Precision Cerebrovascular Health: Imaging and Cloud Seeding A Million Brains Initiative™

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Liebeskind

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Crowdsourcing, an unorthodox approach in medicine, creates an unusual paradigm to study precision cerebrovascular health, eliminating the relative isolation and non-standardized nature of current imaging data infrastructure, while shifting emphasis to the astounding capacity of big data in the cloud. This perspective envisions the use of imaging data of the brain and vessels to orient and seed A Million Brains Initiative™ that may leapfrog incremental advances in stroke and rapidly provide useful data to the sizable population around the globe prone to the devastating effects of stroke and vascular substrates of dementia. Despite such variability in the type of data available and other limitations, the data hierarchy logically starts with imaging and can be enriched with almost endless types and amounts of other clinical and biological data. Crowdsourcing allows an individual to contribute to aggregated data on a population, while preserving their right to specific information about their own brain health. The cloud now offers endless storage, computing prowess and neuroimaging applications for post-processing that is searchable and scalable. Collective expertise is a windfall of the crowd in the cloud and particularly valuable in an area such as cerebrovascular health. The rise of precision medicine, rapidly evolving technological capabilities of cloud computing and the global imperative to limit the public health impact of cerebrovascular disease converge in the imaging of A Million Brains Initiative™. Crowdsourcing secure data on brain health may provide ultimate generalizability, enable focused analyses, facilitate clinical practice and accelerate research efforts.

  9. Whether and where to Enrol? Choosing a Primary School in the Slums of Urban Dhaka, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Slums account for around a third of the population of Dhaka, Bangladesh, and are thought to be growing rapidly. But there is little in the research literature about education of children who live in slums and it is doubtful whether they are covered in official statistics such as those on enrolment rates. This paper addresses this gap with…

  10. Over 30 million psychedelic users in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Teri S

    2013-01-01

    We estimated lifetime prevalence of psychedelic use (lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psilocybin (magic mushrooms), mescaline, and peyote) by age category using data from a 2010 US population survey of 57,873 individuals aged 12 years and older. There were approximately 32 million lifetime psychedelic users in the US in 2010; including 17% of people aged 21 to 64 years (22% of males and 12% of females). Rate of lifetime psychedelic use was greatest among people aged 30 to 34 (total 20%, including 26% of males and 15% of females). PMID:24627778

  11. [The Six Million Dollar Man: from fiction to reality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeveld, C H Kees

    2013-01-01

    The term 'bionic' has been in existence since 1958, but only gained general recognition from the television series 'The Six Million Dollar Man'. Following a crash, the central figure in this series - test pilot Steve Austin - has an eye, an arm and both legs replaced by prostheses which make him stronger and faster than a normal person. This story is based on the science fiction book 'Cyborg' by Martin Caidin. In the world of comic books and films there are a number of examples of people who are given superhuman powers by having technological gadgets built in. Although the latter is not yet possible, the bionic human has now become reality.

  12. 15 million preterm births annually: what has changed this year?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinney Mary V

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Each year, more than 1 in 10 of the world’s babies are born preterm, resulting in 15 million babies born too soon. World Prematurity Day, November 17, is a global effort to raise awareness about prematurity. This past year, there has been increased awareness of the problem, through new data and evidence, global partnership and country champions. Actions to improve care would save hundreds of thousands of babies born too soon from death and disability. Accelerated prevention requires urgent research breakthroughs.

  13. Osteopathology in Rhinocerotidae from 50 Million Years to the Present.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey T Stilson

    Full Text Available Individual elements of many extinct and extant North American rhinocerotids display osteopathologies, particularly exostoses, abnormal textures, and joint margin porosity, that are commonly associated with localized bone trauma. When we evaluated six extinct rhinocerotid species spanning 50 million years (Ma, we found the incidence of osteopathology increases from 28% of all elements of Eocene Hyrachyus eximius to 65-80% of all elements in more derived species. The only extant species in this study, Diceros bicornis, displayed less osteopathologies (50% than the more derived extinct taxa. To get a finer-grained picture, we scored each fossil for seven pathological indicators on a scale of 1-4. We estimated the average mass of each taxon using M1-3 length and compared mass to average pathological score for each category. We found that with increasing mass, osteopathology also significantly increases. We then ran a phylogenetically-controlled regression analysis using a time-calibrated phylogeny of our study taxa. Mass estimates were found to significantly covary with abnormal foramen shape and abnormal bone textures. This pattern in osteopathological expression may reflect a part of the complex system of adaptations in the Rhinocerotidae over millions of years, where increased mass, cursoriality, and/or increased life span are selected for, to the detriment of long-term bone health. This work has important implications for the future health of hoofed animals and humans alike.

  14. 8 CFR 287.11 - Pre-enrolled Access Lane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pre-enrolled Access Lane. 287.11 Section...; POWERS AND DUTIES § 287.11 Pre-enrolled Access Lane. (a) Pre-enrolled Access Lane (PAL). A PAL is a... enrolled participants and their passengers in vehicles authorized by the Service to pass through the...

  15. USHE End-of-Year Enrollment Report, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah System of Higher Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This end-of-year enrollment report is divided into three sections. Section A focuses on Utah System of Higher Education (USHE) 2015-16 enrollment. Section B provides statistical tables on USHE 2015-16 FTE enrollment by level of instruction. Finally, Section C provides data on USHE 2015-16 end-of-year FTE enrollment by level of instruction…

  16. Mobile Technology Bridges the 30 Million Word Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shing, Sophia; Yuan, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Education has been traditionally viewed as an equalizer for the poor to gain access to a better life. With the advent of the skills premium paired with rapid technological advances, the stratification and changing nature of education has ironically become one of the main causes of the income achievement gap. Research confirms that by the age of 3,…

  17. First Light with a 67-Million-Pixel WFI Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The newest astronomical instrument at the La Silla observatory is a super-camera with no less than sixty-seven million image elements. It represents the outcome of a joint project between the European Southern Observatory (ESO) , the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPI-A) in Heidelberg (Germany) and the Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte (OAC) near Naples (Italy), and was installed at the 2.2-m MPG/ESO telescope in December 1998. Following careful adjustment and testing, it has now produced the first spectacular test images. With a field size larger than the Full Moon, the new digital Wide Field Imager is able to obtain detailed views of extended celestial objects to very faint magnitudes. It is the first of a new generation of survey facilities at ESO with which a variety of large-scale searches will soon be made over extended regions of the southern sky. These programmes will lead to the discovery of particularly interesting and unusual (rare) celestial objects that may then be studied with large telescopes like the VLT at Paranal. This will in turn allow astronomers to penetrate deeper and deeper into the many secrets of the Universe. More light + larger fields = more information! The larger a telescope is, the more light - and hence information about the Universe and its constituents - it can collect. This simple truth represents the main reason for building ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory. However, the information-gathering power of astronomical equipment can also be increased by using a larger detector with more image elements (pixels) , thus permitting the simultaneous recording of images of larger sky fields (or more details in the same field). It is for similar reasons that many professional photographers prefer larger-format cameras and/or wide-angle lenses to the more conventional ones. The Wide Field Imager at the 2.2-m telescope Because of technological limitations, the sizes of detectors most commonly in use in

  18. The Relationships among Individual Characteristics, High School Characteristics, and College Enrollment: Using Enrollment Propensity as a Baseline for Evaluating Strategic Enrollment Management Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Gary R.; Robbins, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the relationships among student and high school characteristics and the decision to enroll in either a two- or four-year college or university. The purpose of the research was to assess the feasibility of using enrollment propensity (i.e., the likelihood of enrolling in college) as a baseline to evaluate the…

  19. The PMA Catalogue: 420 million positions and absolute proper motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetov, V. S.; Fedorov, P. N.; Velichko, A. B.; Shulga, V. M.

    2017-07-01

    We present a catalogue that contains about 420 million absolute proper motions of stars. It was derived from the combination of positions from Gaia DR1 and 2MASS, with a mean difference of epochs of about 15 yr. Most of the systematic zonal errors inherent in the 2MASS Catalogue were eliminated before deriving the absolute proper motions. The absolute calibration procedure (zero-pointing of the proper motions) was carried out using about 1.6 million positions of extragalactic sources. The mean formal error of the absolute calibration is less than 0.35 mas yr-1. The derived proper motions cover the whole celestial sphere without gaps for a range of stellar magnitudes from 8 to 21 mag. In the sky areas where the extragalactic sources are invisible (the avoidance zone), a dedicated procedure was used that transforms the relative proper motions into absolute ones. The rms error of proper motions depends on stellar magnitude and ranges from 2-5 mas yr-1 for stars with 10 mag < G < 17 mag to 5-10 mas yr-1 for faint ones. The present catalogue contains the Gaia DR1 positions of stars for the J2015 epoch. The system of the PMA proper motions does not depend on the systematic errors of the 2MASS positions, and in the range from 14 to 21 mag represents an independent realization of a quasi-inertial reference frame in the optical and near-infrared wavelength range. The Catalogue also contains stellar magnitudes taken from the Gaia DR1 and 2MASS catalogues. A comparison of the PMA proper motions of stars with similar data from certain recent catalogues has been undertaken.

  20. Radiation protection enrollments and degrees, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, J R; Shirley, D L; Blair, L M

    1982-05-01

    This report presents data on the number of students enrolled and the degrees awarded in academic year 1980-81 from 61 U.S. universities offering degree programs in radiation protection or related areas that would enable students to work in the health physics field. The report includes historical survey data for the last decade and provides information such as trends by degree level, foreign national student participation, female and minority student participation, and placement of graduates. Also included is a listing of the universities by type of program and number of students.

  1. [Profile of clinical trials enrolling Brazilian children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Jean Mendes de Lucena; Lima, Elisangela da Costa; Land, Marcelo Gerardin Poirot; Ventura, Miriam; Coelho, Helena Lutescia Luna

    2017-06-12

    This study aimed to characterize the clinical trials with medicines enrolling Brazilian children and adolescents, registered in the databases of Clinical Trials and the Brazilian Clinical Trials Network (ReBEC) from 1994 to 2014. Only 462 clinical trials enrolled Brazilian children and adolescents. There was an increase in registrations beginning in 2003, with an important drop in 2011. Among these trials, 35.5% were hosted in Brazil. The international clinical trials were mostly conducted by North American companies. In both cases, multinational industry was the principal source of funding. The clinical trials were predominantly phase III with injectable and solid oral pharmaceutical forms of antiviral drugs. Domestic clinical trials showed wider variation in the pharmaceutical forms and higher percentage of liquid formulations, when compared to the international trials. In addition to heavy external dependence for conducting clinical trials, the study emphasized the challenge for pediatric care in Brazil, which presents epidemiological peculiarities in an environment prone to the use of unlicensed medicines for children.

  2. K-12 Teaching and Physics Enrollment

    CERN Document Server

    Masood, Samina S

    2014-01-01

    We have collected and analyzed the relevant data from public schools in greater Houston area of Texas. Based and analyzed. Since the data is only limited to a few school, we are still working on getting more data so that we can compare and contrast the results adequately and understand the core of the enrollment issue at the national level. However, based on the raw data and partial analysis, we propose a few recommendations towards the improvement of science education in Texas Schools, in general, and greater Houston area schools in particular. Our results indicate that the quality of science education can be improved significantly if we focus on the improvement of high school education or even intermediate schools when students are first time exposed to science in a little technical way. Simply organizing teacher training programs at K-12 level as school education plays a pivotal role in the decrease in physics enrollment at the higher level. Similar analysis can actually be generalized to other states to f...

  3. Catching the missing million: experiences in enhancing TB & DR-TB detection by providing upfront Xpert MTB/RIF testing for people living with HIV in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizada, Neeraj; Sachdeva, Kuldeep Singh; Sreenivas, Achuthan; Kulsange, Shubhangi; Gupta, Radhey Shyam; Thakur, Rahul; Dewan, Puneet; Boehme, Catharina; Paramsivan, Chinnambedu Nainarappan

    2015-01-01

    A critical challenge in providing TB care to People Living with HIV (PLHIV) is establishing an accurate bacteriological diagnosis. Xpert MTB/RIF, a highly sensitive and specific rapid tool, offers a promising solution in addressing these challenges. This study presents results from PLHIV taking part in a large demonstration study across India wherein upfront Xpert MTB/RIF testing was offered to all presumptive PTB cases in public health facilities. The study covered a population of 8.8 million across 18 sub-district level tuberculosis units (TU), with one Xpert MTB/RIF platform established at each TU. All HIV-infected patients suspected of TB (both TB and Drug Resistant TB (DR-TB)) accessing public health facilities in study area were prospectively enrolled and provided upfront Xpert MTB/RIF testing. 2,787 HIV-infected presumptive pulmonary TB cases were enrolled and 867 (31.1%, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 29.4‒32.8) HIV-infected TB cases were diagnosed under the study. Overall 27.6% (CI 25.9-29.3) of HIV-infected presumptive PTB cases were positive by Xpert MTB/RIF, compared with 12.9% (CI 11.6-14.1) who had positive sputum smears. Upfront Xpert MTB/RIF testing of presumptive PTB and DR-TB cases resulted in diagnosis of 73 (9.5%, CI 7.6‒11.8) and 16 (11.2%, CI 6.7‒17.1) rifampicin resistance cases, respectively. Positive predictive value (PPV) for rifampicin resistance detection was high 97.7% (CI 89.3‒99.8), with no significant difference with or without prior history of TB treatment. The study results strongly demonstrate limitations of using smear microscopy for TB diagnosis in PLHIV, leading to low TB and DR-TB detection which can potentially lead to either delayed or sub-optimal TB treatment. Our findings demonstrate the usefulness and feasibility of addressing this diagnostic gap with upfront of Xpert MTB/RIF testing, leading to overall strengthening of care and support package for PLHIV.

  4. Banner hacked-3.7 million at risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A large-scale computer cyberattack at Banner Health compromised the records of up to 3.7 million patients, health-insurance-plan members, food and drink customers, and doctors according to the an Arizona Republic article by Ken Alltucker (1. Banner Health discovered unusual activity on its computer servers in late June and uncovered evidence of two attacks, with hackers accessing both patient records and payment-card records of food and beverage customers. The Phoenix-based health-care provider said it will mail letters to those affected notifying them about details of the cyberattack and steps they can take to protect themselves. Banner employees, many of whom are patients and covered by Banner Health insurance plans, also are believed to be victims of the attack. The Banner Health attack is the largest among 32 known data breaches involving Arizona-based health and medical providers since 2010 according to a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services list. The breech ...

  5. Implementing Municipal Tree Planting: Los Angeles Million-Tree Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincetl, Stephanie

    2010-02-01

    Urban forests are increasingly being seen as an important infrastructure that can help cities remediate their environmental impacts. This work reports on the first steps in implementing a million tree program in Los Angeles and the ways such a biogenic—living—infrastructure has been approached. Numbers of studies have been done to quantify the benefits of urban forests, but little has been written on the process of implementing urban tree planting programs. The investigative methods were primarily qualitative, involving interviews, attending meetings and conducting literature reviews. Results indicate that multiple nonprofit and city agency programs are involved in planting and maintaining trees and this has required coordination among groups that here-to-fore were unaccustomed to having to collaborate. The main finding that emerge from this research is that the implementation of such a program in Los Angeles is more complicated than it may seem due to several interacting factors: the need to rely on multiple public and private organizations to put trees into the ground and to maintain them; coordination of these multiple efforts must be centralized, but requires a great deal of time and effort and maybe resisted by some of the partners; funding for planting and long term maintenance must be pieced together from multiple sources; acceptance of trees by residents varies by neighborhood as does tree canopy cover; appropriate nursery supply can be limited; the location of the program within the city administration is determined by who initiates the program.

  6. How to review 4 million lines of ATLAS code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Graeme A.; Lampl, Walter; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    As the ATLAS Experiment prepares to move to a multi-threaded framework (AthenaMT) for Run3, we are faced with the problem of how to migrate 4 million lines of C++ source code. This code has been written over the past 15 years and has often been adapted, re-written or extended to the changing requirements and circumstances of LHC data taking. The code was developed by different authors, many of whom are no longer active, and under the deep assumption that processing ATLAS data would be done in a serial fashion. In order to understand the scale of the problem faced by the ATLAS software community, and to plan appropriately the significant efforts posed by the new AthenaMT framework, ATLAS embarked on a wide ranging review of our offline code, covering all areas of activity: event generation, simulation, trigger, reconstruction. We discuss the difficulties in even logistically organising such reviews in an already busy community, how to examine areas in sufficient depth to learn key areas in need of upgrade, yet also to finish the reviews in a timely fashion. We show how the reviews were organised and how the ouptuts were captured in a way that the sub-system communities could then tackle the problems uncovered on a realistic timeline. Further, we discuss how the review has inuenced the overall planning for the Run 3 ATLAS offline code.

  7. How to review 4 million lines of ATLAS code

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00226135; The ATLAS collaboration; Lampl, Walter

    2017-01-01

    As the ATLAS Experiment prepares to move to a multi-threaded framework (AthenaMT) for Run3, we are faced with the problem of how to migrate 4 million lines of C++ source code. This code has been written over the past 15 years and has often been adapted, re-written or extended to the changing requirements and circumstances of LHC data taking. The code was developed by different authors, many of whom are no longer active, and under the deep assumption that processing ATLAS data would be done in a serial fashion. In order to understand the scale of the problem faced by the ATLAS software community, and to plan appropriately the significant efforts posed by the new AthenaMT framework, ATLAS embarked on a wide ranging review of our offline code, covering all areas of activity: event generation, simulation, trigger, reconstruction. We discuss the difficulties in even logistically organising such reviews in an already busy community, how to examine areas in sufficient depth to learn key areas in need of upgrade, yet...

  8. How To Review 4 Million Lines of ATLAS Code

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Graeme; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    As the ATLAS Experiment prepares to move to a multi-threaded framework (AthenaMT) for Run3, we are faced with the problem of how to migrate 4 million lines of C++ source code. This code has been written over the past 15 years and has often been adapted, re-written or extended to the changing requirements and circumstances of LHC data taking. The code was developed by different authors, many of whom are no longer active, and under the deep assumption that processing ATLAS data would be done in a serial fashion. In order to understand the scale of the problem faced by the ATLAS software community, and to plan appropriately the significant efforts posed by the new AthenaMT framework, ATLAS embarked on a wide ranging review of our offline code, covering all areas of activity: event generation, simulation, trigger, reconstruction. We discuss the difficulties in even logistically organising such reviews in an already busy community, how to examine areas in sufficient depth to learn key areas in need of upgrade, yet...

  9. Over one million followers reached in CERN TweetUp

    CERN Document Server

    Katherine Chapman

    2012-01-01

    More than a million followers were reached on Twitter during CERN’s first ever “TweetUp”. On 25 July, 5 lucky Twitter followers, or "Tweeps" as they are known, visited CERN to take part in events held on the same day with the STS-134 astronauts. The Tweetup gave the online community a chance to ask questions and explore areas of CERN through the eyes of the tweeps, prompting over 1,000 tweets and re-tweets between them in 24 hours.   Loic Bommersbach, Lucy McKenna, Astrid Chantelauze (KIT), Nick Howes, Angeliki Kanellopoulou, Maud Ali-Cherif (ESA), Julien Harrod (ESA), Katherine Chapman (CERN), and Simon Bierwald outside the CERN Control Centre. Five winners of a competition announced on Twitter were invited to come to CERN and spend a day behind the scenes, taking part in events organised to celebrate the AMS experiment that was launched in May 2011. The aim was to give tweeps the opportunity to explore CERN and share their experiences, allowi...

  10. Association Between Race, Neighborhood, and Medicaid Enrollment and Outcomes in Medicare Home Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joynt Maddox, Karen E; Chen, Lena M; Zuckerman, Rachael; Epstein, Arnold M

    2018-02-01

    More than 3 million Medicare beneficiaries use home health care annually, yet little is known about how vulnerable beneficiaries fare in the home health setting. This is particularly important given the recent launch of Medicare's Home Health Value-Based Purchasing model. The objective of this study was to determine odds of adverse clinical outcomes associated with dual enrollment in Medicaid and Medicare as a marker of individual poverty, residence in a low-income ZIP code tabulation area (ZCTA), and black race. Retrospective observational study using individuals-level logistic regression. Home health care. Fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries from 2012 to 2014. Thirty- and 60-day clinical outcomes, including readmissions, admissions, and emergency department (ED) use. Home health agencies serving a high proportion of dually enrolled, low-income ZCTA, or black beneficiaries were less often high-quality. Dually-enrolled, low-income ZCTA, and Black beneficiaries receiving home health care after hospitalization had higher risk-adjusted odds of 30-day readmission (odds ratio [OR] = 1.08, P home health care without preceding hospitalization had higher 60-day admission (OR = 1.06, P home health services who are dually enrolled, live in a low-income neighborhood, or are black have higher rates of adverse clinical outcomes. These populations may be an important target for quality improvement under Home Health Value-Based Purchasing. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  11. Multi-million atom electronic structure calculations for quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Muhammad

    Quantum dots grown by self-assembly process are typically constructed by 50,000 to 5,000,000 structural atoms which confine a small, countable number of extra electrons or holes in a space that is comparable in size to the electron wavelength. Under such conditions quantum dots can be interpreted as artificial atoms with the potential to be custom tailored to new functionality. In the past decade or so, these nanostructures have attracted significant experimental and theoretical attention in the field of nanoscience. The new and tunable optical and electrical properties of these artificial atoms have been proposed in a variety of different fields, for example in communication and computing systems, medical and quantum computing applications. Predictive and quantitative modeling and simulation of these structures can help to narrow down the vast design space to a range that is experimentally affordable and move this part of nanoscience to nano-Technology. Modeling of such quantum dots pose a formidable challenge to theoretical physicists because: (1) Strain originating from the lattice mismatch of the materials penetrates deep inside the buffer surrounding the quantum dots and require large scale (multi-million atom) simulations to correctly capture its effect on the electronic structure, (2) The interface roughness, the alloy randomness, and the atomistic granularity require the calculation of electronic structure at the atomistic scale. Most of the current or past theoretical calculations are based on continuum approach such as effective mass approximation or k.p modeling capturing either no or one of the above mentioned effects, thus missing some of the essential physics. The Objectives of this thesis are: (1) to model and simulate the experimental quantum dot topologies at the atomistic scale; (2) to theoretically explore the essential physics i.e. long range strain, linear and quadratic piezoelectricity, interband optical transition strengths, quantum confined

  12. Radiation Protection Enrollments and Degrees. Enrollments--Fall 1973. Degrees Granted July 1965-June 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atomic Energy Commission, Washington, DC. Div. of Labor Relations.

    The demand for radiation protection personnel has increased during the past several years and can be expected to continue to increase for several years to come. This document gives the results of the latest survey of institutions offering degree programs in this field. Such a small segment of the total college enrollment is represented in health…

  13. STBase: one million species trees for comparative biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M McMahon

    Full Text Available Comprehensively sampled phylogenetic trees provide the most compelling foundations for strong inferences in comparative evolutionary biology. Mismatches are common, however, between the taxa for which comparative data are available and the taxa sampled by published phylogenetic analyses. Moreover, many published phylogenies are gene trees, which cannot always be adapted immediately for species level comparisons because of discordance, gene duplication, and other confounding biological processes. A new database, STBase, lets comparative biologists quickly retrieve species level phylogenetic hypotheses in response to a query list of species names. The database consists of 1 million single- and multi-locus data sets, each with a confidence set of 1000 putative species trees, computed from GenBank sequence data for 413,000 eukaryotic taxa. Two bodies of theoretical work are leveraged to aid in the assembly of multi-locus concatenated data sets for species tree construction. First, multiply labeled gene trees are pruned to conflict-free singly-labeled species-level trees that can be combined between loci. Second, impacts of missing data in multi-locus data sets are ameliorated by assembling only decisive data sets. Data sets overlapping with the user's query are ranked using a scheme that depends on user-provided weights for tree quality and for taxonomic overlap of the tree with the query. Retrieval times are independent of the size of the database, typically a few seconds. Tree quality is assessed by a real-time evaluation of bootstrap support on just the overlapping subtree. Associated sequence alignments, tree files and metadata can be downloaded for subsequent analysis. STBase provides a tool for comparative biologists interested in exploiting the most relevant sequence data available for the taxa of interest. It may also serve as a prototype for future species tree oriented databases and as a resource for assembly of larger species phylogenies

  14. STBase: one million species trees for comparative biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Michelle M; Deepak, Akshay; Fernández-Baca, David; Boss, Darren; Sanderson, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensively sampled phylogenetic trees provide the most compelling foundations for strong inferences in comparative evolutionary biology. Mismatches are common, however, between the taxa for which comparative data are available and the taxa sampled by published phylogenetic analyses. Moreover, many published phylogenies are gene trees, which cannot always be adapted immediately for species level comparisons because of discordance, gene duplication, and other confounding biological processes. A new database, STBase, lets comparative biologists quickly retrieve species level phylogenetic hypotheses in response to a query list of species names. The database consists of 1 million single- and multi-locus data sets, each with a confidence set of 1000 putative species trees, computed from GenBank sequence data for 413,000 eukaryotic taxa. Two bodies of theoretical work are leveraged to aid in the assembly of multi-locus concatenated data sets for species tree construction. First, multiply labeled gene trees are pruned to conflict-free singly-labeled species-level trees that can be combined between loci. Second, impacts of missing data in multi-locus data sets are ameliorated by assembling only decisive data sets. Data sets overlapping with the user's query are ranked using a scheme that depends on user-provided weights for tree quality and for taxonomic overlap of the tree with the query. Retrieval times are independent of the size of the database, typically a few seconds. Tree quality is assessed by a real-time evaluation of bootstrap support on just the overlapping subtree. Associated sequence alignments, tree files and metadata can be downloaded for subsequent analysis. STBase provides a tool for comparative biologists interested in exploiting the most relevant sequence data available for the taxa of interest. It may also serve as a prototype for future species tree oriented databases and as a resource for assembly of larger species phylogenies from precomputed

  15. Rapid Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  16. 42 CFR 417.538 - Enrollment and marketing costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Enrollment and marketing costs. 417.538 Section 417... PREPAYMENT PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.538 Enrollment and marketing costs. (a) Principle. Costs incurred by an HMO or CMP in performing the enrollment and marketing activities described in subpart k of...

  17. Bayesian Decision Theory in Enrollment Forecasting. AIR Forum 1979 Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Douglas A.

    The use of subjective probability as a theoretical model for enrollment forecasting is proposed, and the results of an application of subjective probability to enrollment forecasting at the University of Toledo are reported. Subjective probability can be used as an enrollment forecasting technique for both headcount and full-time equivalent using…

  18. 5 CFR 890.906 - Retired enrolled individuals coinsurance payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Retired enrolled individuals coinsurance... Charges, Physician Charges, and FEHB Benefit Payments § 890.906 Retired enrolled individuals coinsurance payments. (a) A retired enrolled individual's coinsurance responsibility for inpatient hospital services is...

  19. Concurrent Enrollment: Math. Issue Brief, No. 2017-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Joseph A.

    2017-01-01

    The question of course rigor is often raised in connection with Concurrent Enrollment courses when compared to their on-campus equivalents. Over one-third of all Utah high school juniors and seniors enroll in at least one concurrent enrollment course, courses in which students earn both high school credit for graduation and college credit…

  20. 42 CFR 438.810 - Expenditures for enrollment broker services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Expenditures for enrollment broker services. 438... Participation § 438.810 Expenditures for enrollment broker services. (a) Terminology. As used in this section... phone or in person; Enrollment broker means an individual or entity that performs choice counseling or...

  1. A comprehensive and quantitative comparison of text-mining in 15 million full-text articles versus their corresponding abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westergaard, David; Stærfeldt, Hans-Henrik; Tønsberg, Christian; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Brunak, Søren

    2018-02-01

    Across academia and industry, text mining has become a popular strategy for keeping up with the rapid growth of the scientific literature. Text mining of the scientific literature has mostly been carried out on collections of abstracts, due to their availability. Here we present an analysis of 15 million English scientific full-text articles published during the period 1823-2016. We describe the development in article length and publication sub-topics during these nearly 250 years. We showcase the potential of text mining by extracting published protein-protein, disease-gene, and protein subcellular associations using a named entity recognition system, and quantitatively report on their accuracy using gold standard benchmark data sets. We subsequently compare the findings to corresponding results obtained on 16.5 million abstracts included in MEDLINE and show that text mining of full-text articles consistently outperforms using abstracts only.

  2. Graduate education in Canada and China: What enrolment data tells us

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony DiPetta

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available China’s emergence as a global economic and political power is in part due to the country’s renewed involvement with, and commitment to, graduate higher education (Harris, 2005. Graduate education in China is viewed as the means of producing the essential scientists, engineers and skilled workforce needed to sustain the country’s rapid industrial growth and economic development. But how does China’s graduate education system compare with North American graduate higher education and what can each learn from the other? This paper examines the trends and patterns in Master’s level graduate education programs in China and Canada based on enrolment data gathered from 1999 to 2005. Initial comparisons of the data find that Master’s level enrolments in China are growing faster than in Canada; enrolment pattern distributions for both countries are unbalanced geographically and from a disciplinary perspective the highest number of Master’s level enrolments in Canada were in the business and management disciplines while in China the greatest Master’s level enrolments were in engineering. The comparisons provided by this study help identify some of the trends and challenges of graduate education at both the national and the regional levels of both countries.

  3. High School Physics Courses & Enrollments: Results from the 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2014-01-01

    This report examines enrollments in high school physics during the 2012-13 school year. Based on data from the most recent survey (which includes both public and private high schools in the U.S.), it is estimated that 39% of the class of 2013 took high school physics before graduating. During the 2012-13 school year, 1.38 million students were…

  4. 2012 Annual Survey of Journalism and Mass Communication Enrollments: Enrollments Decline for Second Year in a Row

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lee B.; Vlad, Tudor; Simpson, Holly Anne

    2013-01-01

    Enrollments in journalism and mass communication programs in the United States have declined over the last two years, reversing a pattern of growth that has sustained the field for twenty years. It is a decline at a time of continued growth in enrollments at universities generally. It is a decline at a time when enrollments have been growing in…

  5. The Chief Enrollment Officer Position: How the Hiring Process Illuminates the Competencies Required to Lead an Enrollment Management Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Stefanie D.

    2012-01-01

    As the field of enrollment management has developed and changed, so has the role of the chief enrollment officer. This position is often considered among the most critical in senior level university administration today. Thomas Huddleston stated that "an enrollment manager's efforts are intended to shape and influence particular units…

  6. Nuclear Engineering: Enrollments and Degrees. Enrollments-Fall 1973, Degrees Granted-July 1965-June 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atomic Energy Commission, Washington, DC. Office of Industrial Relations.

    This document presents statistical data concerning enrollments for fall 1973 and degrees granted 1965-June 1973 in nuclear engineering. Highlights of this survey of educational institutions indicated: (1) Ph.D.'s decreased to 126 from 149 in 1971-72 and from 181 in 1969-70. (2) MS's increased to 442 from 428 in 1971-72. (3) BS's increased to 551…

  7. To Enroll or Not to Enroll? Why Many Americans Have Gained Insurance Under the Affordable Care Act While Others Have Not. Findings from the Commonwealth Fund Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey, March-May 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sara R; Gunja, Munira; Doty, Michelle M; Beutel, Sophie

    2015-09-01

    According to the most recent Commonwealth Fund Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey, March-May 2015, an estimated 25 million adults remain uninsured. To achieve the Affordable Care Act's goal of near-universal coverage, policymakers must understand why some people are enrolling in the law's marketplace plans or in Medicaid coverage and why others are not. This analysis of the survey finds that affordability--whether real or perceived--is playing a significant role in adults' choice of marketplace plans and the decision whether to enroll at all. People who have gained coverage report significantly more positive experiences shopping for health plans than do those who did not enroll. Getting personal assistance--from telephone hotlines, navigators, and insurance brokers, among other sources--appears to make a critical difference in whether people gain health insurance

  8. Generic Eye Drops for Seniors Could Save Millions of Dollars a Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye Drops for Seniors Could Save Millions of Dollars a Year Medicare is billed more than $1 ... save the U.S. government hundreds of millions of dollars a year, a new study suggests. Conditions like ...

  9. MillionTreesNYC, Green infrastructure, and urban ecology: building a research agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacqueline W.T. Lu; Megan Shane; Erika Svendsen; Lindsay Campbell; Cristiana Fragola; Marianne Krasny; Gina Lovasl; David Maddox; Simon McDonnell; P. Timon McPhearson; Franco Montalto; Andrew Newman; Ellen Pehek; Ruth A. Rae; Richard Stedman; Keith G. Tidball; Lynne Westphal; Tom. Whitlow

    2009-01-01

    MillionTreesNYC is a citywide, public-private initiative with an ambitious goal: to plant and care for one million new trees across New York City's five boroughs by 2017. The Spring 2009 workshop MillionTreesNYC, Green Infrastructure, and Urban Ecology: Building a Research Agenda brought together more than 100 researchers, practitioners and New York City...

  10. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Levine, Mark

    2009-06-01

    China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it to the rank of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modelling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities. From this analysis, we can conclude that Chinese residential energy consumption will more than double by 2020, from 6.6 EJ in 2000 to 15.9 EJ in 2020. This increase will be driven primarily by urbanization, in combination with increases in living standards. In the urban and higher income Chinese households of the future, most major appliances will be common, and heated and cooled areas will grow on average. These shifts will offset the relatively modest efficiency gains expected according to current government plans and policies already in place. Therefore, levelling and reduction of growth in residential energy demand in China will require a new set of more aggressive efficiency policies.

  11. Does Enrollment in High-Deductible Health Plans Encourage Price Shopping?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinke; Haviland, Amelia; Mehrotra, Ateev; Huckfeldt, Peter; Wagner, Zachary; Sood, Neeraj

    2017-10-23

    To investigate whether enrollment in high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) led enrollees to choose lower-priced providers for office visits and laboratory tests. Claims data from more than 40 large employers. We compared the change in price for office visits and laboratory tests for enrollees who switched to HDHPs versus enrollees who remained in traditional plans. We estimated separate models for enrollees who changed providers versus those who remained with the same provider to disentangle the effects of HDHPs on provider choice and negotiated prices. Claims data from 2004 to 2010 on 1.8 million enrollees. After enrollment in HDHPs, 28 percent of enrollees changed physicians for office visits (compared to 19 percent in the Traditional Plan group, p price for office visits. About 25 percent of enrollees changed providers for laboratory tests (compared to 23 percent in the Traditional Plan group, p price per laboratory test. We found that HDHPs had lower negotiated prices for office visits but not for laboratory tests. High-deductible health plan enrollment may shift enrollees to lower cost providers, resulting in modest savings. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  12. "The Impact of Working while Enrolled in College on Wages"

    OpenAIRE

    Wade Nelson, Owen Wade Nelson Jr

    2013-01-01

    Those students who work while enrolled in college are investing in their human capital, and therefore, corporations looking to employ new workers entering the labor market may favor these types of students, and create incentives for non-working students to seek employment. Using NLSY97 data, this paper finds that working while enrolled in college decreases the wages one receives. Therefore, students who are not working while enrolled in school may have higher grades and graduate more freq...

  13. Remarkable morphological stasis in an extant vertebrate despite tens of millions of years of divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoué, Sébastien; Miya, Masaki; Arnegard, Matthew E.; McIntyre, Peter B.; Mamonekene, Victor; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between genotypic and phenotypic divergence over evolutionary time varies widely, and cases of rapid phenotypic differentiation despite genetic similarity have attracted much attention. Here, we report an extreme case of the reverse pattern—morphological stasis in a tropical fish despite massive genetic divergence. We studied the enigmatic African freshwater butterfly fish (Pantodon buchholzi), whose distinctive morphology earns it recognition as a monotypic family. We sequenced the mitochondrial genome of Pantodon from the Congo basin and nine other osteoglossomorph taxa for comparison with previous mitogenomic profiles of Pantodon from the Niger basin and other related taxa. Pantodon populations form a monophyletic group, yet their mitochondrial coding sequences differ by 15.2 per cent between the Niger and Congo basins. The mitogenomic divergence time between these populations is estimated to be greater than 50 Myr, and deep genetic divergence was confirmed by nuclear sequence data. Among six sister-group comparisons of osteoglossomorphs, Pantodon exhibits the slowest rate of morphological divergence despite a level of genetic differentiation comparable to both species-rich (e.g. Mormyridae) and species-poor (e.g. Osteoglossidae) families. Morphological stasis in these two allopatric lineages of Pantodon offers a living vertebrate model for investigating phenotypic stability over millions of generations in the face of profound fluctuations in environmental conditions. PMID:20880884

  14. Cross-amplification and validation of SNPs conserved over 44 million years between seals and dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph I Hoffman

    Full Text Available High-density SNP arrays developed for humans and their companion species provide a rapid and convenient tool for generating SNP data in closely-related non-model organisms, but have not yet been widely applied to phylogenetically divergent taxa. Consequently, we used the CanineHD BeadChip to genotype 24 Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella individuals. Despite seals and dogs having diverged around 44 million years ago, 33,324 out of 173,662 loci (19.2% could be genotyped, of which 173 were polymorphic and clearly interpretable. Two SNPs were validated using KASP genotyping assays, with the resulting genotypes being 100% concordant with those obtained from the high-density array. Two loci were also confirmed through in silico visualisation after mapping them to the fur seal transcriptome. Polymorphic SNPs were distributed broadly throughout the dog genome and did not differ significantly in proximity to genes from either monomorphic SNPs or those that failed to cross-amplify in seals. However, the nearest genes to polymorphic SNPs were significantly enriched for functional annotations relating to energy metabolism, suggesting a possible bias towards conserved regions of the genome.

  15. Dinosaurs in decline tens of millions of years before their final extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Manabu; Benton, Michael J.

    2016-05-01

    Whether dinosaurs were in a long-term decline or whether they were reigning strong right up to their final disappearance at the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) mass extinction event 66 Mya has been debated for decades with no clear resolution. The dispute has continued unresolved because of a lack of statistical rigor and appropriate evolutionary framework. Here, for the first time to our knowledge, we apply a Bayesian phylogenetic approach to model the evolutionary dynamics of speciation and extinction through time in Mesozoic dinosaurs, properly taking account of previously ignored statistical violations. We find overwhelming support for a long-term decline across all dinosaurs and within all three dinosaurian subclades (Ornithischia, Sauropodomorpha, and Theropoda), where speciation rate slowed down through time and was ultimately exceeded by extinction rate tens of millions of years before the K-Pg boundary. The only exceptions to this general pattern are the morphologically specialized herbivores, the Hadrosauriformes and Ceratopsidae, which show rapid species proliferations throughout the Late Cretaceous instead. Our results highlight that, despite some heterogeneity in speciation dynamics, dinosaurs showed a marked reduction in their ability to replace extinct species with new ones, making them vulnerable to extinction and unable to respond quickly to and recover from the final catastrophic event.

  16. Brief 70 Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees, 2011 Summary Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Don Johnson

    2012-10-31

    The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2010 and August 31, 2011. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2011. The enrollment and degree data include students majoring in nuclear engineering or in an option program equivalent to a major. Thirty-two academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during 2011, and data was received from all thirty-two programs. The data for two nuclear engineering programs include enrollments and degrees in health physics options that are also reported in the health physics enrollments and degrees data.

  17. Brief 74 Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2014 Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-03-15

    The 2014 survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2013 and August 31, 2014, and enrollments for fall 2014. There are three academic programs new to this year's survey. Thirty-five academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during 2014, and data were provided by all thirty-five. The enrollments and degrees data include students majoring in nuclear engineering or in an option program equivalent to a major. Two nuclear engineering programs have indicated that health physics option enrollments and degrees are also reported in the health physics enrollments and degrees survey.

  18. Brief 76 Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2015 Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-03-15

    The 2015 Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees Survey reports degrees granted between September 1, 2014 and August 31, 2015. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2015. The enrollments and degrees data comprises students majoring in nuclear engineering or in an option program equivalent to a major. Thirty-five academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during 2015, and data was received from all thirty-five programs. The report includes enrollment information on undergraduate students and graduate students and information by degree level for post-graduation plans.

  19. Brief 77 Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2015 Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-03-15

    The 2015 Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey reports degrees granted between September 1, 2014 and August 31, 2015. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2015. Twenty-two academic programs were included in the survey universe, with all 22 programs providing data. The enrollments and degrees information comprises students majoring in health physics or in an option program equivalent to a major. The report includes enrollment information on undergraduate students and graduate students and information by degree level for post-graduation plans.

  20. Rural Enrollment in Health Insurance Marketplaces, by State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Abigail R; McBride, Timothy D; Kemper, Leah M; Mueller, Keith J

    2015-10-01

    Since passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), much attention has been focused on the functioning of Health Insurance Marketplaces (HIMs). In this brief, cumulative county-level enrollment in HIMs through March 2015 is presented for state HIMs operated as Federally Facilitated Marketplaces (FFMs) and Federally Supported State-Based Marketplaces (FS-SBMs). We provide comparisons between enrollment in urban and rural areas of each state and corresponding percentages of "potential market" participants enrolled. Given differences in populations eligible for HIM enrollment, we analyzed Medicaid expansion states separately. This analysis provides a gauge of how well outreach and enrollment efforts are proceeding in the states. Key Findings. (1) Overall, people living in metropolitan areas were more likely to enroll in HIMs than were people in non-metropolitan areas, as 38.9 percent of potentially eligible metropolitan residents in Medicaid expansion states and 47.5 percent in non-expansion states were enrolled in HIMs, compared to 33.9 percent and 37.3 percent in nonmetropolitan areas, respectively. (2) Estimated enrollment rates varied considerably across the United States. In particular, estimated enrollment rates in non-metropolitan areas are higher than in metropolitan areas in Illinois, Maine, Michigan, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. (3) The states with the highest rural enrollment percentages were Maine, Michigan, Montana, North Carolina, New Hampshire, South Carolina, and Wisconsin. States with high absolute rural enrollment were about as likely to be Medicaid expansion states to be as non-expansion states, and they were slightly less likely to belong to the South census region.

  1. Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in China: data from 1·7 million adults in a population-based screening study (China PEACE Million Persons Project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiapeng; Lu, Yuan; Wang, Xiaochen; Li, Xinyue; Linderman, George C; Wu, Chaoqun; Cheng, Xiuyuan; Mu, Lin; Zhang, Haibo; Liu, Jiamin; Su, Meng; Zhao, Hongyu; Spatz, Erica S; Spertus, John A; Masoudi, Frederick A; Krumholz, Harlan M; Jiang, Lixin

    2017-12-09

    Hypertension is common in China and its prevalence is rising, yet it remains inadequately controlled. Few studies have the capacity to characterise the epidemiology and management of hypertension across many heterogeneous subgroups. We did a study of the prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in China and assessed their variations across many subpopulations. We made use of data generated in the China Patient-Centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events (PEACE) Million Persons Project from Sept 15, 2014, to June 20, 2017, a population-based screening project that enrolled around 1·7 million community-dwelling adults aged 35-75 years from all 31 provinces in mainland China. In this population, we defined hypertension as systolic blood pressure of at least 140 mm Hg, or diastolic blood pressure of at least 90 mm Hg, or self-reported antihypertensive medication use in the previous 2 weeks. Hypertension awareness, treatment, and control were defined, respectively, among hypertensive adults as a self-reported diagnosis of hypertension, current use of antihypertensive medication, and blood pressure of less than 140/90 mm Hg. We assessed awareness, treatment, and control in 264 475 population subgroups-defined a priori by all possible combinations of 11 demographic and clinical factors (age [35-44, 45-54, 55-64, and 65-75 years], sex [men and women], geographical region [western, central, and eastern China], urbanity [urban vs rural], ethnic origin [Han and non-Han], occupation [farmer and non-farmer], annual household income [< ¥10 000, ¥10 000-50 000, and ≥¥50 000], education [primary school and below, middle school, high school, and college and above], previous cardiovascular events [yes or no], current smoker [yes or no], and diabetes [yes or no]), and their associations with individual and primary health-care site characteristics, using mixed models. The sample contained 1 738 886 participants with a mean age of 55·6

  2. Five Ways to Economy-Proof Your Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassom, Julie

    2012-01-01

    When customers are facing job loss or tighter budgets, prospects are attempting to negotiate tuition fees, and subsidies are being cut, smart child care managers are studying the essential moves directors must take to increase and retain enrollment despite the volatile economy. Instead of using a tough economy as a reason enrollment drops, they…

  3. International Student Mobility: Trends in First-Time Graduate Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Carmen I.; Morales, Betsy; Sharma, Anand D.

    2012-01-01

    The academic programs at the graduate level are increasingly interested about the enrollment management challenges in terms of international student mobility. Understanding fundamental enrollment concepts to attract international students provides the essential key to consider the competitive environment concerning university resources, academic…

  4. Effects of the Subsidized Students' Loan on University Enrolment in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the effect of the subsidized students' loan on university enrolment in Ghana between 1988-2008 using the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) framework. It was discovered that the subsidized student loan had positive and significant impact on university enrolment. Per capita gross domestic product ...

  5. Cost, Quality, and the Community College Enrollment Decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiger, Caroline Martin

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies model whether students enroll in higher education, but few have investigated how students decide where to attend. Even fewer studies have considered how community college students make this nearly first noncompulsory human capital investment decision. This research focuses on the enrollment decisions of students whose first…

  6. The Financial Aid Office's Role in Enrollment Management: Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Student retention is an important part of a strategic enrollment management plan. Many scholars have written about the challenges of helping students not only enroll in college but also complete their degree programs. Among students pursuing a doctoral degree in higher education administration, student retention is a popular topic. Many doctoral…

  7. Factors Affecting Enrollment Trends in Pennsylvania Agricultural Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Saralyn S.

    Factors affecting enrollment in agricultural education at the secondary level were determined in a two-part study. One part focused on factors influencing students' decisions to enroll in agricultural education; the other examined 64 recruitment and retention practices teachers use. Purposive sampling ensured geographic and demographic…

  8. Effective Teaching Strategies for Open Enrollment Honors and AP Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebrenner, Susan

    2006-01-01

    A trend is emerging to open enrollment for honors and AP classes to all students who wish to take them. Teachers of these open enrollment classes may be facing several dilemmas. How can the high standards and academic rigor of the course be maintained? How can students who struggle to learn be supported in their endeavors to keep up with the…

  9. The Impact of Business Cycle Fluctuations on Graduate School Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper adds to the understanding of student decisions about graduate school attendance by studying the magnitude of the effect of business cycle fluctuations on enrollment. I use data on graduate school enrollment from the Current Population Survey and statewide variation in unemployment rates across time to proxy for changes in business cycle…

  10. Decision Making Process and Declining Enrollments in Northern New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Cyr, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This research was conducted as a qualitative comparative case study of two Northern New England school districts that were in the process of responding to declining enrollments. The purpose of the study was to explore decision-making through the lens of declining enrollments. An award winning rural school in an affluent town with high performing…

  11. Factors influencing the enrolment of students for science subjects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study aimed at identifying the factors that influence the enrolment of students for science subjects and strategies that can be used to improve the enrolment with the view of improving the population of science students in Oluyole Local Government Area, Ibadan. Descriptive survey research design was employed in the ...

  12. Community College Re-Enrollment after Hurricane Katrina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Sarah R.; Rhodes, Jean E.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we explored predictors of community college re-enrollment after Hurricane Katrina among a sample of low-income women (N = 221). It was predicted that participants' pre-hurricane educational optimism would predict community college re-enrollment a year after the hurricane. The influence of various demographic and additional resources…

  13. Roles and functions of Enrolled Nurses in Australia: Perspectives of Enrolled Nurses and Registered Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endacott, Ruth; O'Connor, Margaret; Williams, Allison; Wood, Pamela; McKenna, Lisa; Griffiths, Debra; Moss, Cheryle; Della, Phillip; Cross, Wendy

    2017-08-03

    The aims of the study were: To determine, from the perspectives of Enrolled Nurses (ENs) and Registered Nurses (RNs), the current scope of EN practice and To identify the activities that most ENs frequently performed in their workplace. Enrolled Nurse scope of practice in Australia has evolved and expanded over the past decade. However, the unclear role, function and competency differentiation between EN and RN leads to role confusion and ongoing professional debate. A cross-sectional online survey of ENs and RNs across Australia was conducted examining their levels of agreement on statements related to the scope of practice and the clinical and nonclinical activities that ENs were required to perform in their workplace. Valid responses were received from 892 ENs and 1198 RNs. ENs mostly agreed that they understood their scope of practice; did not undertake roles for which they were unprepared; sometimes undertook activities other than direct patient care and believed that they operated equally to many Registered Nurses (RNs). The majority of ENs reported that they performed tasks mostly related to basic patient care in their workplace. There were a number of significant differences between perspectives of RNs and ENs CONCLUSIONS: Clarifying the roles and scope of practice between the RN and the EN is important and explicit differences in responsibility and accountability between their roles must be clearly articulated in order to harmonise perceptions about role and capability. Health service providers, policy makers and education providers need to work collaboratively to ensure that facets of EN education and scope of practice in line with regulation are affirmed by all concerned. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Recent Enrollment Trends in American Soil Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Eric C.; Abit, Sergio; Brown, David; Dolliver, Holly; Hopkins, David; Lindbo, David; Manu, Andrew; Mbila, Monday; Parikh, Sanjai J.; Schulze, Darrell; Shaw, Joey; Weil, Ray; Weindorf, David

    2015-04-01

    Soil science student enrollment was on the decline in the United States from the early 1990s through the early 2000s. Overall undergraduate student enrollment in American colleges and universities rose by about 11% over the same time period. This fact created considerable consternation among the American soil science community. As we head into the International Year of Soil, it seemed to be a good time to revisit this issue and examine current enrollment trends. Fourteen universities that offer undergraduate and/or graduate programs in soil science were surveyed for their enrollments over the time period 2007-2014 (the last seven academic years). The 14 schools represent about 20% of the institutions that offer soil science degrees/programs in the United States. Thirteen institutions submitted undergraduate data and 10 submitted graduate data, which was analyzed by individual institution and in aggregate. Simple linear regression was used to find the slope of best-fit trend lines. For individual institutions, a slope of ≥ 0.5 (on average, the school gained 0.5 students per year or more) was considered to be growing enrollment, ≤ -0.5 was considered shrinking enrollment, and between -0.5 and 0.5 was considered to be stable enrollment. For aggregated data, the 0.5 slope standard was multiplied by the number of schools in the aggregated survey to determine whether enrollment was growing, shrinking, or stable. Over the period of the study, six of the 13 schools reporting undergraduate data showed enrollment gains, five of the 13 showed stable enrollments, one of the 13 showed declining enrollments, and one of the 13 discontinued their undergraduate degree program. The linear regression trend line for the undergraduate schools' composite data had a slope of 55.0 students/year (R2 = 0.96), indicating a strong overall trend of undergraduate enrollment growth at these schools. However, the largest school had also seen large growth in enrollment. To ensure that this one

  15. Developing the Learning Physical Science Curriculum: Adapting a Small Enrollment, Laboratory and Discussion Based Physical Science Course for Large Enrollments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Fred; Price, Edward; Robinson, Stephen; Boyd-Harlow, Danielle; McKean, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We report on the adaptation of the small enrollment, lab and discussion based physical science course, "Physical Science and Everyday Thinking" (PSET), for a large-enrollment, lecture-style setting. Like PSET, the new "Learning Physical Science" (LEPS) curriculum was designed around specific principles based on research on learning to meet the…

  16. Age-, sex-, and race-based differences among patients enrolled versus not enrolled in acute lung injury clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Colin R; Erickson, Sara E; Watkins, Timothy R; Matthay, Michael A; Hudson, Leonard D; Rubenfeld, Gordon D

    2010-06-01

    Little is known about the participation of racial/ethnic minorities, women, and the elderly into critical care clinical trials. We sought to characterize the representation of racial and ethnic minorities, women, and older patients in clinical trials of patients with acute lung injury and to determine the reasons for nonenrollment. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of pooled screening logs from 44 academic hospitals participating in three multicentered, randomized, controlled trials conducted by the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network from 1996 to 2005. None. We calculated odds ratios of enrollment for age, sex, racial groups, and the odds ratio for the presence of each exclusion criterion by age, sex, and race adjusted for demographics, acute lung injury risk factor, study, and study center. A total of 10.4% of 17,459 screened patients with acute lung injury were enrolled. The median (range) enrollment by center was 15% (2% to 88%). Older patients of both sexes were less likely to be enrolled, but older women were more likely to be enrolled than older men. The adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for enrollment among men > or =75 yrs of age was 0.59 (0.45 to 0.77) and for women > or =75 yrs of age was 0.45 (0.32 to 0.62) compared with men enrollment among all racial/ethnic groups. Older patients and men were less likely to be enrolled because of medical comorbidity. Among all patients who were not enrolled, black patients and their families refused participation more often than white patients. Older patients are less likely to be enrolled in acute lung injury clinical trials. There is no evidence that women or racial/ethnic minorities are underrepresented in acute lung injury clinical trials.

  17. Social Security Disability Insurance Enrollment and Health Care Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Lawrence C; Geissler, Kimberley H

    2017-09-21

    To examine the relationship between Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) enrollment and health care employment. State-year level data from government and other publicly available sources for all states (2000-2014). Population-weighted linear regression analyses model associations between each health care employment measure and each SSDI enrollment measure (i.e., SSDI overall, physical, or mental health enrollment rates), controlling for factors associated with health care employment, state fixed effects, and secular time trends. Data are gathered from publicly available sources. A one standard deviation increase in SSDI enrollment per 100,000 population is associated with a statistically significant 2.6 and 4.5 percent increase in the mean employment rate per 100,000 population for health care practitioner and technical occupations and health care support occupations, respectively. The size of this relationship varies by the type of disabling condition for SSDI enrollment (physical versus mental health). Social Security Disability Insurance enrollment is significantly associated with health care employment at the state level. Quantifying the magnitude of this relationship is important given high SSDI enrollment rates as well as evolving policy and demographic shifts related to the SSDI program. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  18. Baseline intrinsic flammability of Earth's ecosystems estimated from paleoatmospheric oxygen over the past 350 million years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, Claire M; Yearsley, Jonathan M; Hadden, Rory M; McElwain, Jennifer C; Rein, Guillermo

    2010-12-28

    Atmospheric oxygen (O(2)) is estimated to have varied greatly throughout Earth's history and has been capable of influencing wildfire activity wherever fuel and ignition sources were present. Fires consume huge quantities of biomass in all ecosystems and play an important role in biogeochemical cycles. This means that understanding the influence of O(2) on past fire activity has far-reaching consequences for the evolution of life and Earth's biodiversity over geological timescales. We have used a strong electrical ignition source to ignite smoldering fires, and we measured their self-sustaining propagation in atmospheres of different oxygen concentrations. These data have been used to build a model that we use to estimate the baseline intrinsic flammability of Earth's ecosystems according to variations in O(2) over the past 350 million years (Ma). Our aim is to highlight times in Earth's history when fire has been capable of influencing the Earth system. We reveal that fire activity would be greatly suppressed below 18.5% O(2), entirely switched off below 16% O(2), and rapidly enhanced between 19-22% O(2). We show that fire activity and, therefore, its influence on the Earth system would have been high during the Carboniferous (350-300 Ma) and Cretaceous (145-65 Ma) periods; intermediate in the Permian (299-251 Ma), Late Triassic (285-201 Ma), and Jurassic (201-145 Ma) periods; and surprisingly low to lacking in the Early-Middle Triassic period between 250-240 Ma. These baseline variations in Earth's flammability must be factored into our understanding of past vegetation, biodiversity, evolution, and biogeochemical cycles.

  19. International students' enrollment in IPTA by using multilevel analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Phoong Seuk; Ismail, Mohd Tahir; Karim, Samsul Ariffin Abdul

    2012-09-01

    The increases of demand on knowledge-based and production-based market force the growth of higher education. International students' enrollment contributes to economic growth and increase country's income, university reputation and name; promote the competitive of education and training markets. This paper used multilevel analysis to study the international students' enrollment in Malaysia public university. Student's background variables and institution background variables were study in this paper and the relationship among them also been investigated. Result shows that institution type is a significance factor on international students' enrollment in Malaysia public university.

  20. A life cycle carbon dioxide inventory of the Million Trees Los Angeles Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Gregory McPherson; Alissa Kendall

    2014-01-01

    PurposeThis study seeks to answer the question, “Will the Million Trees LA (Million Trees Los Angeles, MTLA) program be a carbon dioxide (CO2) sink or source?” Because there has never been a full accounting of CO2 emissions, it is unclear if urban tree planting initiatives (TPIs) are likely to be...

  1. How Much Is That Bachelor's Degree Really Worth? The Million Dollar Misunderstanding. Education Outlook. No. 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Many claim that a college degree is worth a million dollars, but like so many other "facts" about higher education in the United States, it is not quite right. Indeed, using a set of reasonable assumptions that factors in school selectivity, the cost of a college education, and foregone wages, I show that the million dollar figure is grossly…

  2. Rates of dinosaur body mass evolution indicate 170 million years of sustained ecological innovation on the avian stem lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Roger B J; Campione, Nicolás E; Carrano, Matthew T; Mannion, Philip D; Sullivan, Corwin; Upchurch, Paul; Evans, David C

    2014-05-01

    Large-scale adaptive radiations might explain the runaway success of a minority of extant vertebrate clades. This hypothesis predicts, among other things, rapid rates of morphological evolution during the early history of major groups, as lineages invade disparate ecological niches. However, few studies of adaptive radiation have included deep time data, so the links between extant diversity and major extinct radiations are unclear. The intensively studied Mesozoic dinosaur record provides a model system for such investigation, representing an ecologically diverse group that dominated terrestrial ecosystems for 170 million years. Furthermore, with 10,000 species, extant dinosaurs (birds) are the most speciose living tetrapod clade. We assembled composite trees of 614-622 Mesozoic dinosaurs/birds, and a comprehensive body mass dataset using the scaling relationship of limb bone robustness. Maximum-likelihood modelling and the node height test reveal rapid evolutionary rates and a predominance of rapid shifts among size classes in early (Triassic) dinosaurs. This indicates an early burst niche-filling pattern and contrasts with previous studies that favoured gradualistic rates. Subsequently, rates declined in most lineages, which rarely exploited new ecological niches. However, feathered maniraptoran dinosaurs (including Mesozoic birds) sustained rapid evolution from at least the Middle Jurassic, suggesting that these taxa evaded the effects of niche saturation. This indicates that a long evolutionary history of continuing ecological innovation paved the way for a second great radiation of dinosaurs, in birds. We therefore demonstrate links between the predominantly extinct deep time adaptive radiation of non-avian dinosaurs and the phenomenal diversification of birds, via continuing rapid rates of evolution along the phylogenetic stem lineage. This raises the possibility that the uneven distribution of biodiversity results not just from large-scale extrapolation of

  3. Rates of dinosaur body mass evolution indicate 170 million years of sustained ecological innovation on the avian stem lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger B J Benson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale adaptive radiations might explain the runaway success of a minority of extant vertebrate clades. This hypothesis predicts, among other things, rapid rates of morphological evolution during the early history of major groups, as lineages invade disparate ecological niches. However, few studies of adaptive radiation have included deep time data, so the links between extant diversity and major extinct radiations are unclear. The intensively studied Mesozoic dinosaur record provides a model system for such investigation, representing an ecologically diverse group that dominated terrestrial ecosystems for 170 million years. Furthermore, with 10,000 species, extant dinosaurs (birds are the most speciose living tetrapod clade. We assembled composite trees of 614-622 Mesozoic dinosaurs/birds, and a comprehensive body mass dataset using the scaling relationship of limb bone robustness. Maximum-likelihood modelling and the node height test reveal rapid evolutionary rates and a predominance of rapid shifts among size classes in early (Triassic dinosaurs. This indicates an early burst niche-filling pattern and contrasts with previous studies that favoured gradualistic rates. Subsequently, rates declined in most lineages, which rarely exploited new ecological niches. However, feathered maniraptoran dinosaurs (including Mesozoic birds sustained rapid evolution from at least the Middle Jurassic, suggesting that these taxa evaded the effects of niche saturation. This indicates that a long evolutionary history of continuing ecological innovation paved the way for a second great radiation of dinosaurs, in birds. We therefore demonstrate links between the predominantly extinct deep time adaptive radiation of non-avian dinosaurs and the phenomenal diversification of birds, via continuing rapid rates of evolution along the phylogenetic stem lineage. This raises the possibility that the uneven distribution of biodiversity results not just from large

  4. Rates of Dinosaur Body Mass Evolution Indicate 170 Million Years of Sustained Ecological Innovation on the Avian Stem Lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Roger B. J.; Campione, Nicolás E.; Carrano, Matthew T.; Mannion, Philip D.; Sullivan, Corwin; Upchurch, Paul; Evans, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale adaptive radiations might explain the runaway success of a minority of extant vertebrate clades. This hypothesis predicts, among other things, rapid rates of morphological evolution during the early history of major groups, as lineages invade disparate ecological niches. However, few studies of adaptive radiation have included deep time data, so the links between extant diversity and major extinct radiations are unclear. The intensively studied Mesozoic dinosaur record provides a model system for such investigation, representing an ecologically diverse group that dominated terrestrial ecosystems for 170 million years. Furthermore, with 10,000 species, extant dinosaurs (birds) are the most speciose living tetrapod clade. We assembled composite trees of 614–622 Mesozoic dinosaurs/birds, and a comprehensive body mass dataset using the scaling relationship of limb bone robustness. Maximum-likelihood modelling and the node height test reveal rapid evolutionary rates and a predominance of rapid shifts among size classes in early (Triassic) dinosaurs. This indicates an early burst niche-filling pattern and contrasts with previous studies that favoured gradualistic rates. Subsequently, rates declined in most lineages, which rarely exploited new ecological niches. However, feathered maniraptoran dinosaurs (including Mesozoic birds) sustained rapid evolution from at least the Middle Jurassic, suggesting that these taxa evaded the effects of niche saturation. This indicates that a long evolutionary history of continuing ecological innovation paved the way for a second great radiation of dinosaurs, in birds. We therefore demonstrate links between the predominantly extinct deep time adaptive radiation of non-avian dinosaurs and the phenomenal diversification of birds, via continuing rapid rates of evolution along the phylogenetic stem lineage. This raises the possibility that the uneven distribution of biodiversity results not just from large-scale extrapolation

  5. Medicare-Medicaid Ever-enrolled Trends Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This detailed Excel document accompanies the PDF report on national trends in Medicare-Medicaid dual enrollment from 2006 through the year prior to the current year....

  6. Ever Enrolled Medicare Population Estimates from the MCBS..

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Findings reported in Ever Enrolled Medicare Population Estimates from the MCBS Access to Care (ATC) Files, published in Volume 4, Issue 2 of the Medicare and...

  7. 1984 Survey: No Change in Mass Comm Enrollments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Paul V.

    1985-01-01

    Describes methodology and results of a survey of college and university students indicating that, overall, college and university enrollments in journalism and mass communications have reached a plateau. (HTH)

  8. Medicare Advantage-Part D Contract and Enrollment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicare Advantage (MA) - Part D Contract and Enrollment Data section serves as a centralized repository for publicly available data on contracts and plans,...

  9. Fertility postponement is largely due to rising educational enrolment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Bhrolcháin, Máire; Beaujouan, Eva

    2012-11-01

    The rise in educational enrolment is often cited as a possible cause of the trend to later childbearing in developed societies but direct evidence of its contribution to the aggregate change in fertility tempo is scarce. We show that rising enrolment, resulting in later ages at the end of education, accounts for a substantial part of the upward shift in the mean age at first birth in the 1980s and 1990s in Britain and in France. The postponement of first birth over that period has two components: a longer average period of enrolment and a post-enrolment component that is also related to educational level. The relationship between rising educational participation and the move to later fertility timing is almost certainly causal. Our findings therefore suggest that fertility tempo change is rooted in macro-economic and structural forces rather than in the cultural domain.

  10. Dual Enrollment, Structural Reform, and the Completion Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Melinda Mechur

    2015-01-01

    This chapter contextualizes and extends the previous chapters by addressing the intertwined issues of structural systems reform and college completion, as well as the role dual enrollment can play in ensuring equitable postsecondary outcomes for underrepresented students.

  11. Discontinuous college enrollment: associations with substance use and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arria, Amelia M; Caldeira, Kimberly M; Vincent, Kathryn B; Winick, Emily R; Baron, Rebecca A; O'Grady, Kevin E

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the prospective relationship of substance use and mental health problems with risk of discontinuous enrollment in college. Participants were 1,145 students at a large public university who were interviewed annually for four years beginning at college entry in 2004 (year 1). Discontinuous enrollment was defined as a gap in enrollment of one or more semesters during the first two years (early discontinuity) or the second two years (late discontinuity) versus continuous enrollment throughout all four years. Explanatory variables measured in year 1 were scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory, childhood conduct problems, cannabis use, number of illicit drugs used, and alcohol consumption. In years 3 and 4, participants reported lifetime history of clinically diagnosed attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression, and anxiety, including age at diagnosis. Multinomial logistic regression models were developed to evaluate the association between the independent variables and discontinuous enrollment while holding constant background characteristics. Higher BDI scores predicted early discontinuity but not late discontinuity, whereas cannabis and alcohol use predicted only late discontinuity. Receiving a depression diagnosis during college was associated with both early and late discontinuity. Self-reported precollege diagnoses were not related to discontinuous enrollment once background characteristics were taken into account. Students who experience depressive symptoms or seek treatment for depression during college might be at risk of interruptions in their college enrollment. Cannabis use and heavy drinking appear to add to this risk. Students entering college with preexisting psychiatric diagnoses are not necessarily at risk of enrollment interruptions.

  12. Brief 73 Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2013 Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-02-15

    The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2012 and August 31, 2013. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2013. Twenty-two academic programs were included in the survey universe, with all 22 programs providing data. Since 2009, data for two health physics programs located in engineering departments are also included in the nuclear engineering survey. The enrollments and degrees data includes students majoring in health physics or in an option program equivalent to a major.taoi_na

  13. Brief 75 Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2014 Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-03-05

    The 2014 survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2013 and August 31, 2014. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2014. Twenty-two academic programs were included in the survey universe, with all 22 programs providing data. Since 2009, data for two health physics programs located in engineering departments are also included in the nuclear engineering survey. The enrollments and degrees data includes students majoring in health physics or in an option program equivalent to a major.

  14. Enrolled nurse skill extension: metropolitan myth or rural reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blay, Nicole; Donoghue, Judith

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether the position of 'after hours clinical support enrolled nurse' is embracing clinical skill extension in the acute surgical area. Experienced enrolled nurses employed in a supernumerary capacity documented all activities with which they were engaged over a six-month period. Six surgical wards within a tertiary referral hospital, Sydney, Australia. Enrolled nurses working after hours in an extended support role in a supernumerary capacity. Data demonstrated that, in this study, the 'after hours clinical support enrolled nurse' was primarily performing routine nursing activities. Although the number of extended skills (n=13) performed could be considered diverse for an enrolled nurse, many were seldom performed. The most frequently performed extended skills were patient escorts and undertaking bladder ultrasounds with a mobile scanner. Medication administration was rarely performed. The role primarily incorporates basic nursing care with minimal scope for extended skills. The paper recommends that basic nursing practices be delegated to assistants in nursing to enable the 'after hours clinical support enrolled nurse' to effectively support registered nurses and extend their own practice.

  15. Access to Private Coverage for Children Enrolled in CHIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorrow, Stacey; Kenney, Genevieve M; Waidmann, Timothy; Anderson, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    To provide updated information on the potential substitution of public for private coverage among low-income children by examining the type of coverage held by children before they enrolled in Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and exploring the extent to which children covered by CHIP had access to private coverage while they were enrolled. We conducted a major household telephone survey in 2012 of enrollees and disenrollees in CHIP in 10 states. We used the survey responses and Medicaid/CHIP administrative data to estimate the coverage distribution of all new enrollees in the 12 months before CHIP enrollment and to identify children who may have had access to employer coverage through one of their parents while enrolled in CHIP. About 13% of new enrollees had any private coverage in the 12 months before enrolling in CHIP, and most were found to have lost that coverage as a result of parental job loss. About 40% of CHIP enrollees had a parent with an employer-sponsored insurance (ESI) policy, but only half reported that the policy could cover the child. Approximately 30% of new enrollees had public coverage during the year before but were uninsured just before enrolling. Access to private coverage among CHIP enrollees is relatively limited. Furthermore, even when there is potential access to ESI, affordability is a serious concern for parents, making it possible that many children with access to ESI would remain uninsured in the absence of CHIP. Copyright © 2015 Academic Pediatric Association. All rights reserved.

  16. Become One In A Million: Partnership Updates. Million Solar Roofs and Interstate Renewable Energy Council Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C., October 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tombari, C.

    2005-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Million Solar Roofs Initiative (MSR) is a unique public-private partnership aimed at overcoming market barriers for photovoltaics (PV), solar water heating, transpired solar collectors, solar space heating and cooling, and pool heating. This report contains annual progress reports from 866 partners across the United States.

  17. Student and faculty perceptions on the rapid scale-up of medical students in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengistu, Brittney S; Vins, Holly; Kelly, Caitrin M; McGee, Daphne R; Spicer, Jennifer O; Derbew, Miliard; Bekele, Abebe; Mariam, Damen Haile; Del Rio, Carlos; Blumberg, Henry M; Comeau, Dawn L

    2017-01-13

    Ethiopia is a country of over 94 million people that has a severe physician shortage with approximately only 2.5 physicians per 100,000 persons. Recently, the Ethiopian government implemented a "flood and retain" initiative to rapidly increase the quantity of physicians in Ethiopia. Consequently, medical student enrollment at Addis Ababa University (AAU) School of Medicine increased from 100 to approximately 300-400 students per class. This study evaluated the impact of the rapid scale-up in the number of medical students on the quality of medical education at AAU and the impact of the U.S. government-funded Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) grant awarded to AAU to provide resources to strengthen the quality of medical education at AAU. Qualitative, semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 22 key informants including faculty members, administrators and medical students at AAU. The audio recordings were transcribed verbatim and interview data were analyzed with thematic analysis. Four key themes emerged from the data. Overall, participants perceived a decrease in the quality of medical education at AAU due to challenges created by the rapid scale-up in the number of medical students. Positive learning environments were described as difficult to achieve due to overcrowding in classrooms and the limited numbers of textbooks. Overall, participants stated that infrastructure improvement is needed to provide adequate medical student training. The medical education initiatives implemented and funded by MEPI have provided significant resources to support the medical student curriculum but additional resources are required to accommodate a large student body. The unprecedented rapid scale-up of medical students has impacted multiple facets of medical education at AAU. It is important to consider the perspectives of students and faculty in order to focus future medical education policies, MEPI programming and the allocation of resources.

  18. Establishing State Health Insurance Exchanges: Implications for Health Insurance Enrollment, Spending, and Small Businesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibner, Christine; Girosi, Federico; Price, Carter C; Cordova, Amado; Hussey, Peter S; Beckman, Alice; McGlynn, Elizabeth A

    2011-01-01

    The RAND Corporation's Comprehensive Assessment of Reform Efforts microsimulation model was used to analyze the effects of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) on employers and enrollees in employer-sponsored health insurance, with a focus on small businesses and businesses offering coverage through health insurance exchanges. Outcomes assessed include the proportion of nonelderly Americans with insurance coverage, the number of employers offering health insurance, premium prices, total employer spending, and total government spending relative to what would have been observed without the policy change. The microsimulation predicts that PPACA will increase insurance offer rates among small businesses from 53 to 77 percent for firms with ten or fewer workers, from 71 to 90 percent for firms with 11 to 25 workers, and from 90 percent to nearly 100 percent for firms with 26 to 100 workers. Simultaneously, the uninsurance rate in the United States would fall from 19 to 6 percent of the nonelderly population. The increase in employer offer rates is driven by workers' demand for insurance, which increases due to an individual mandate requiring all people to obtain insurance policies. Employer penalties incentivizing businesses to offer coverage do not have a meaningful impact on outcomes. The model further predicts that approximately 60 percent of businesses will offer coverage through the health insurance exchanges after the reform. Under baseline assumptions, a total of 68 million people will enroll in the exchanges, of whom 35 million will receive exchange-based coverage from an employer.

  19. Classifying proteins into functional groups based on all-versus-all BLAST of 10 million proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, Natali; Higdon, Roger; Broomall, William; Stanberry, Larissa; Welch, Dean; Lu, Wei; Haynes, Winston; Barga, Roger; Kolker, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    To address the monumental challenge of assigning function to millions of sequenced proteins, we completed the first of a kind all-versus-all sequence alignments using BLAST for 9.9 million proteins in the UniRef100 database. Microsoft Windows Azure produced over 3 billion filtered records in 6 days using 475 eight-core virtual machines. Protein classification into functional groups was then performed using Hive and custom jars implemented on top of Apache Hadoop utilizing the MapReduce paradigm. First, using the Clusters of Orthologous Genes (COG) database, a length normalized bit score (LNBS) was determined to be the best similarity measure for classification of proteins. LNBS achieved sensitivity and specificity of 98% each. Second, out of 5.1 million bacterial proteins, about two-thirds were assigned to significantly extended COG groups, encompassing 30 times more assigned proteins. Third, the remaining proteins were classified into protein functional groups using an innovative implementation of a single-linkage algorithm on an in-house Hadoop compute cluster. This implementation significantly reduces the run time for nonindexed queries and optimizes efficient clustering on a large scale. The performance was also verified on Amazon Elastic MapReduce. This clustering assigned nearly 2 million proteins to approximately half a million different functional groups. A similar approach was applied to classify 2.8 million eukaryotic sequences resulting in over 1 million proteins being assign to existing KOG groups and the remainder clustered into 100,000 functional groups.

  20. Spotlight on Express Lane Eligibility (ELE): A Tool to Improve Enrollment and Renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoag, Sheila D

    2015-01-01

    We examine a new simplification policy, Express Lane Eligibility (ELE), introduced by the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA), to understand ELE's effects on enrollment, renewal, and administrative costs. Beginning in January 2012 and lasting through June 2013, we conducted 2 rounds of phone interviews with 38 state administrators and staff in 8 states that implemented ELE in Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), or both; we also conducted case studies in these same states, resulting in 136 in-person interviews. We collected administrative data on enrollments and renewals processed through ELE methods from the 8 states. ELE was adopted in different ways; the method of adoption influenced how many children were served and administrative savings. Automatic ELE processes, which enable states to use eligibility findings from partner agencies to automatically enroll or renew children, serve the most children and generate, on average, $1 million annually in administrative savings. Given the size of renewal caseloads and the recurring nature of renewal, using ELE for renewals holds substantial promise for administrative savings and keeping children covered. Automatic ELE processes are a best practice for using ELE. However, because Congress has not yet made ELE a permanent policy option, states are discouraged from adopting this more efficient method of eligibility determination and redeterminations. Making ELE permanent would support states that have already adopted the policy; in addition, ELE could support the transition of children to Medicaid or exchanges should CHIP not be funded after September 30, 2015. Copyright © 2015 Academic Pediatric Association. All rights reserved.

  1. Making Sense of 2.5 Million Surface Reflectance Spectra of Mercury from MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amore, M.; Helbert, J.; D'Incecco, P.; Domingue, D. L.; Izenberg, N. R.; McClintock, W. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface and Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has mapped the surface of Mercury on a global basis during its one-year primary orbital mission and the first third of its extended mission, producing ~2.5 million spectra from March 2011 to July 2012. The primary challenge to analyzing this dataset is to cope with its large size. In earlier studies of MASCS data, we combined several approaches, ranging from principal component analysis (PCA) to unsupervised cluster analysis and regridding to global and local fixed grids. Each of those techniques provided insight into spectral variations for different volumes of data, but each was quickly overcome by the growing dataset. The most recent version of our data analysis procedure uses PostgreSQL, a type of database management that controls the creation, integrity, maintenance, and use of a database. It embeds a high-level query language, which greatly simplifies database organization as well as retrieval and presentation of database information. We set up a data pipeline to update automatically the MASCS data, read them from the NASA Planetary Data System format, regrid the data to a common grid length, and store all information in the database. All data are then readily available to any authorized user in our network. We are working on a library to access the data directly from within our analysis software, and some preliminary functions have been implemented. As an example, the calculation of a parameter representing the database takes 2 s even for the full dataset of 2.5 million entries. It is thus straightforward to create and analyze rapidly the data, as for example the distribution of normalized radiance at a fixed wavelength. The new methodology provides facilities for controlling data access, enforcing data integrity, managing concurrency control, and recovering the database after a failure and

  2. Issues in health reform: how changes in eligibility may move millions back and forth between medicaid and insurance exchanges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Benjamin D; Rosenbaum, Sara

    2011-02-01

    The Affordable Care Act will extend health insurance coverage by both expanding Medicaid eligibility and offering premium subsidies for the purchase of private health insurance through state health insurance exchanges. But by definition, eligibility for these programs is sensitive to income and can change over time with fluctuating income and changes in family composition. The law specifies no minimum enrollment period, and subsidy levels will also change as income rises and falls. Using national survey data, we estimate that within six months, more than 35 percent of all adults with family incomes below 200 percent of the federal poverty level will experience a shift in eligibility from Medicaid to an insurance exchange, or the reverse; within a year, 50 percent, or 28 million, will. To minimize the effect on continuity and quality of care, states and the federal government should adopt strategies to reduce the frequency of coverage transitions and to mitigate the disruptions caused by those transitions. Options include establishing a minimum guaranteed eligibility period and "dually certifying" some plans to serve both Medicaid and exchange enrollees.

  3. Impact of Baseline Assessment Modality on Enrollment and Retention in a Facebook Smoking Cessation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanti, Andrea C; Jacobs, Megan A; Zawistowski, Grace; Brookover, Jody; Stanton, Cassandra A; Graham, Amanda L

    2015-07-16

    Few studies have addressed enrollment and retention methods in online smoking cessation interventions. Fully automated Web-based trials can yield large numbers of participants rapidly but suffer from high rates of attrition. Personal contact with participants can increase recruitment of smokers into cessation trials and improve participant retention. To compare the impact of Web-based (WEB) and phone (PH) baseline assessments on enrollment and retention metrics in the context of a Facebook smoking cessation study. Participants were recruited via Facebook and Google ads which were randomly displayed to adult smokers in the United States over 27 days from August to September 2013. On each platform, two identical ads were randomly displayed to users who fit the advertising parameters. Clicking on one of the ads resulted in randomization to WEB, and clicking on the other ad resulted in randomization to PH. Following online eligibility screening and informed consent, participants in the WEB arm completed the baseline survey online whereas PH participants completed the baseline survey by phone with a research assistant. All participants were contacted at 30 days to complete a follow-up survey that assessed use of the cessation intervention and smoking outcomes. Participants were paid $15 for follow-up survey completion. A total of 4445 people clicked on the WEB ad and 4001 clicked on the PH ad: 12.04% (n=535) of WEB participants and 8.30% (n=332) of PH participants accepted the online study invitation (PFacebook app (66/114, 57.9% WEB vs 17/35, 49% PH) or that completed the 30-day follow-up survey (49/114, 43.0% WEB vs 16/35, 46% PH). A total of $6074 was spent on ads, generating 3,834,289 impressions and resulting in 8446 clicks (average cost $0.72 per click). Per participant enrollment costs for advertising alone were $27 WEB and $87 PH. A more intensive phone baseline assessment protocol yielded a lower rate of enrollment, equivalent follow-up rates, and higher

  4. 76 FR 60841 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for “Million Hearts Challenge”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... pressure, cholesterol level, smoking status, pertinent medical ] history, aspirin and cholesterol-lowering... cardiovascular disease in their own care using the Million Hearts' ABCs framework (Aspirin for people at high...

  5. Monolithic distributed Bragg reflector cavities in Al2O3 with quality factors exceeding one million

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernhardi, Edward; van Wolferen, Hendricus A.G.M.; Worhoff, Kerstin; de Ridder, R.M.; Pollnau, Markus

    Monolithic distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) cavities with quality factors exceeding one million have been realized in aluminum oxide channel waveguides. This technology enabled the successful demonstration of the first DBR laser in this waveguide platform.

  6. Four-million-year-old hominids from East Lake Turkana, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffing, K; Feibel, C; Leakey, M; Walker, A

    1994-01-01

    A piece of mandible and several isolated teeth are reported from fluviatile sediments older than 4 million years at East Lake Turkana. They most closely resemble hominids from Laetoli, Tanzania and Hadar, Ethiopia which have been assigned to Australopithecus afarensis.

  7. EPA Awards 15 Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Grants Totaling Over $8 Million to Combat Invasive Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    15-OPA124 CHICAGO -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced the award of 15 Great Lakes Restoration Initiative grants totaling more than $8 million for projects to combat invasive species in the Great Lakes basin. These Great

  8. L'Europe prête 300 millions d'euros au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The BEI (Banque Européenne d'Investissement) will lent to CERN 300 millions of Euros, not only to build the new accelerator, but also to help to set up and european programm of research (1 paragraph)

  9. Poweo - 2007 revenue of 363 million euro, up 48%; Poweo - Chiffre d'affaires 2007 de 363 millions euro, en hausse de 48%

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-02-15

    Poweo, the leading independent energy operator in France, presents its key activity indicators for the 4. quarter 2007 and the overall 2007 year (non-audited data): electricity and gas sales, energy and service supplies, revenue, margin and income. The main results are summarized thereafter: 129.8 million euro revenue for the 4. quarter (67.1% of positive growth with respect to 2006); 363.1 million euro revenue for 2007 (48.5% increase with respect to 2006); 91431 active client sites on December 31, 2007 (80300 on December 31, 2006); 13000 new residential client sites registered since the beginning of 2008; more than 3800 MW of fossil fuel power plant projects and 1200 MW of renewable power plant projects (500 MW in offshore wind power) with 30 to 100% estimated rates of success; a 41 MW wind power capacity already in operation. (J.S.)

  10. Formation of the Grand Canyon 5 to 6 million years ago through integration of older palaeocanyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlstrom, Karl E.; Lee, John P.; Kelley, Shari A.; Crow, Ryan S.; Crossey, Laura J.; Young, Richard A.; Lazear, Greg; Beard, L. Sue; Ricketts, Jason W.; Fox, Matthew; Shuster, David L.

    2014-03-01

    The timing of formation of the Grand Canyon, USA, is vigorously debated. In one view, most of the canyon was carved by the Colorado River relatively recently, in the past 5-6 million years. Alternatively, the Grand Canyon could have been cut by precursor rivers in the same location and to within about 200 m of its modern depth as early as 70-55 million years ago. Here we investigate the time of formation of four out of five segments of the Grand Canyon, using apatite fission-track dating, track-length measurements and apatite helium dating: if any segment is young, the old canyon hypothesis is falsified. We reconstruct the thermal histories of samples taken from the modern canyon base and the adjacent canyon rim 1,500 m above, to constrain when the rocks cooled as a result of canyon incision. We find that two of the three middle segments, the Hurricane segment and the Eastern Grand Canyon, formed between 70 and 50 million years ago and between 25 and 15 million years ago, respectively. However, the two end segments, the Marble Canyon and the Westernmost Grand Canyon, are both young and were carved in the past 5-6 million years. Thus, although parts of the canyon are old, we conclude that the integration of the Colorado River through older palaeocanyons carved the Grand Canyon, beginning 5-6 million years ago.

  11. Determinants of School Enrolment of Children in Slums of Varanasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Nayak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Education plays a vital role to developing a nation. In India, urban slums constituting about 22.6% of the urban population are the poor and socially disadvantaged. This slum community is least concerned for school enrolment of their children inspite of the fact that primary education is compulsory and is free in public schools. In urban areas schools available are mostly of private sector that are not free and beyond affordability to slums; government and corporation schools are few, but beyond reach. Motive of the parents is to involve children in income generating activities and the girls are more deprived of school enrolment in poorer society. Objectives: 1 assess the enrolment status of slum children and 2 determine the factors influencing school enrolment.Methodology: The data was collected during 2011-12 from 15 randomly selected slums out of 227 in which a total of 893 families were contacted and mothers with children aged 5-15 years interrogated. In addition to child history on age, sex and school enrolment, the family background characteristics were e.g. religion, caste, and family size as well as age, education and occupation of both mother & father were recorded.Results: Out of 1145 children, male and female equal represented; mostly (90.9% were Hindus and half were SC/ST class. About 30% father and 57.2% mothers were illiterate; about half fathers were unskilled-worker and 96.0% mother’s house wife. Overall 31.3% children were not enrolled and were decreasing from 49.2% to 24.3% to 21.4% in the age groups 5-6, 7-9 and 10-15 years respectively. Enrolment was poor in Muslims (50.0% compared to Hindus (29.4%; enrolment was similar irrespective of child sex among Hindus, but in Muslims 62.5% male and 35.4% female children were only enrolled. Similar was the situation as one move from SC/ST (67.6% to OBC (73.4% and general caste (77.9%. Education of father and mother had significant role to enrolment but not the age and

  12. Timing of College Enrollment and Family Formation Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jannie H. Grøne; Humlum, Maria Knoth; Vejlin, Rune Majlund

    It is likely that the extent of progression in the educational system affects whether or not one decides to start a family at a given point in time. We estimate the effect of enrolling in college in the year of application on later family formation decisions such as the probability of being...... family formation decisions. For example, we find that the effect of enrolling in college on the probability of being a parent at age 27 is about 9 percentage points, corresponding to an increase of about 70 percent....

  13. Optimizing Enrollment of Patients into Nephrology Research Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selewski, David T; Herreshoff, Emily G; Gipson, Debbie S

    2016-03-07

    Advances in medical care and biomedical research depend on the participation of human subjects. Poor patient enrollment in research has limited past clinical and translational research endeavors in nephrology. Simultaneously, patients and their caregivers are seeking better diagnostic, monitoring, and therapeutic approaches to improve or restore kidney and overall health. This manuscript will discuss a framework and strategies to optimize patient enrollment within nephrology research and provide examples of success from existing nephrology research programs. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  14. Comparison of ESL Achivement Scores Between Japanese College Students Enrolled in a Study Abroad Program and Students not Enrolled

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Curtis

    2011-01-01

    This study examines that motivational effect of enrollment in a study abroad program on English achievement. Three months after signing up, Michigan English Placement Test scores of Japanese college students about to go abroad were compared to those of a stratified random sample of students not enrolled. An independent one-tailed t-test with a 0.05 region of rejection was conducted on the means with the results being p=.27. Since the resulting probability was greater than 0.05. the null hypot...

  15. Educational futures and increase in female enrolment in private ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the growing trend of demographic changes in the admission process in the educational sector in Nigeria. It is an analysis of the admission trend in privately owned Universities, using Fountain University, Osogbo as a case study. It was discovered that the number of female enrolment is on the rise.

  16. Why Does Private School Enrollment Grow? Evidence from Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narodowski, Mariano; Moschetti, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    During the second half of the twentieth century, a process of privatization took place in the Argentine education system. This paper seeks to explain the growth of private enrollments in Argentina over the last years. Drawing on the concept of quasi-monopoly, we run a random-effects estimation on panel data to analyze the determinants of the…

  17. Assessment of the Attitude of Prospective Teachers Enrolled in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of the Attitude of Prospective Teachers Enrolled in Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching: The Case of Wollega University. ... Moreover, an attempt was made to explore prospective teachers' attitude towards teaching in terms of some variables: gender, family income, parents' level of education, reasons for ...

  18. An interactive flow model for projecting school enrolments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Edward

    1993-07-01

    Successful planning in educational administration is highly dependent on accurate student numbers. An interactive enrolment projection model is described which begins with pre-school age children to project the expected number of first grade entrants. These cohorts are then progressed through the school system. The model described can be implemented on a microcomputer and uses an interactive technique which enables human intervention in order to take full account of local knowledge in predicting the numbers in each year group. Control is maintained by allowing groups of schools to be amalgamated and then by applying to these larger groups the same techniques used to obtain the initial individual school enrolments. Adjustments to individual school enrolments are then possible following the reconciliation of larger group figures with known demographic statistics. This counteracts the effects of student mobility across wider areas and overcomes many of the problems associated with simple aggregation of individual school projections. The model provides a valuable planning tool when enrolment figures are needed for decision making.

  19. Track Placement and the Motivational Predictors of Math Course Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Marcela; Domina, Thurston

    2017-01-01

    Background: Virtually all high schools offer a range of courses to allow students to enroll in four years of high school mathematics. However, only two thirds of U.S. high school graduates took mathematics courses each school year. Purpose/Research Question: This study addresses three research questions: First, how do students' math course…

  20. Enrollment Management's Sleeping Giant: The Net Price Calculator Mandate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Mary A. C.

    2011-01-01

    Enrollment managers will be watching to see how recruitment strategies change when higher education's sleeping giant--net price calculators (NPCs)--wakes in the fall of 2011. Some predict yield projections may be more difficult and reputations will be challenged as prospective students, their families, high school counselors, and independent…

  1. What Board Members Need to Know About: Enrollment Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundrieser, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary strategic enrollment management entails planning, implementing, and developing administrative structures to develop and support strategies and tactics to regulate patterns of students entering the institution and through to graduation. It must do so in a way that is both predictable and consistent with the institution's mission and…

  2. 38 CFR 21.7673 - Measurement of concurrent enrollments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Measurement of concurrent... Reserve Course Assessment § 21.7673 Measurement of concurrent enrollments. (a) Conversion of units of... reservist's training time. (Authority: 10 U.S.C. 16136(b); 38 U.S.C. 3688) (b) Conversion of clock hours to...

  3. 38 CFR 21.7172 - Measurement of concurrent enrollments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Measurement of concurrent... (Montgomery GI Bill-Active Duty) Course Assessment § 21.7172 Measurement of concurrent enrollments. (a..., VA will convert the credit hours to clock hours to determine the veteran's training time. (Authority...

  4. Improving Retention and Enrollment Forecasting in Part-Time Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Joel; Bray, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a model that can be used to analyze student enrollment data and can give insights for improving retention of part-time students and refining institutional budgeting and planning efforts. Adult higher-education programs are often challenged in that part-time students take courses less reliably than full-time students. For…

  5. Retention, Persistence, and Enrollment Management: An Exploration of Organizational Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Stacy A.

    2013-01-01

    Low student retention and persistence continues to be a major problem within American higher education (Elkins, Braxton, & James, 2000; Kalsbeek & Hossler, 2010; Kezar, 2004; Tinto, 2006-2007). Less is known about the institutional organizational behavior influence on student persistence (Berger, 2001-2002); and while enrollment management…

  6. Defensive enrolment in mantis shrimp larvae (Malacostraca: Stomatopoda)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haug, C.; Haug, J.T.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a possible new defensive behaviour of larval stages of mantis shrimps (Stomatopoda). Mantis shrimp larvae are rarely observed in nature, thus the study is based on postures of museum material and functional morphological aspects. Specimens described here are tightly enrolled, their pleon

  7. Student Assessment in Large-Enrollment Biology Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Manuel; Stella, Carlos; Galagovsky, Lydia

    2008-01-01

    Enrollments into first-year university biology courses may be very large, and therefore evaluating student learning can represent quite a challenge. In this article, we present our experience in assessing students by means of an assessment instrument called "Understand Before Choosing" (UBC). It has been used for six semesters, and its performance…

  8. Will Medicare Advantage payment reforms impact plan rebates and enrollment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Lauren Hersch

    2014-01-01

    To assess the relationship between Medicare Advantage (MA) plan rebates and enrollment and simulate the effects of Affordable Care Act (ACA) payment reforms. First difference regressions of county-level MA payment and enrollment data from CMS from 2006 to 2010. A $10 decrease in the per member/per month rebate to MA plans was associated with a 0.20 percentage point (0.9%) decrease in MA penetration (P penetration and a 10% decrease in risk score. ACA reforms are predicted to reduce the level of rebates in lower-spending counties, leading to enrollment decreases of 1.7 to 1.9 percentage points in the lowest-spending counties. The simulation predicts that the disenrollment would come from MA enrollees with higher risk scores. MA enrollment responds to availability of supplemental benefits supported by rebates. ACA provisions designed to lower MA spending will predominantly affect Medicare beneficiaries living in counties where MA plans may be unable to offer a comparable product at a price similar to that of traditional Medicare.

  9. Factors Affecting the Enrolment of Students in Geography in Public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objective of the study was to determine the relationship between availability and use of teaching/learning resources and enrolment in the subject. The study adopted a survey design. The target population consisted of Form III students, geography teachers and the head teachers of the thirty-one public secondary ...

  10. New World School of the Arts: Beyond Dual Enrollment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Katharine

    1988-01-01

    Traces the development of the New World School of the Arts in Florida from a cooperative dual-enrollment visual and performing arts program involving Dade County Public Schools and Miami-Dade Community College to an independent institution. Discusses curriculum development, auditions, faculty, credits, costs, funding, scheduling, student success,…

  11. Why mothers choose to enrol their children in malaria clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed at researching the reasons why mothers enrol their children in malaria clinical research and how family members or relatives are involved in the decision-making process. Issues related to informed consent were also a particular focus of this study. A total of 81 participants took part in 8 focus group ...

  12. Distance Learning Enrollments in Independent Institutions. Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington State Higher Education Coordinating Board, Olympia.

    This study investigated the feasibility of collecting enrollment data on distance learning programs sponsored by private institutions within and outside of Washington State. E-commerce developments have allowed in-state independent providers and out-of-state public institutions to serve residents of Washington State, and many nontraditional…

  13. Factors influencing students' physical science enrolment decision at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Students who chose physical science explained the source of their motivation in terms of high self-concept and perception of selfefficacy especially in ... Students also reported building enough self-confidence to enrol in physical science by the encouragement they received through informal contact with physics lecturers.

  14. Interviews with Students Enrolled in Academic CPR Workshops, Summer 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maple, Chelley

    This study focuses on students enrolled in academic CPR workshops in the summer of 2002. The goal of the study is to examine changes in the population of students with academic problems. The CPR workshops are a requirement for students that are subject to dismissal. The study was conducted in the summer of 2003 on the telephone with a random…

  15. 7 CFR 1469.6 - Enrollment criteria and selection process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Enrollment criteria and selection process. 1469.6 Section 1469.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT... areas for nutrient or pest management; (iv) Targeting program participation for locally important...

  16. Enrollment Pathways to Financial Sustainability: Choosing the Road Less Traveled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supplee, Janice L.

    2014-01-01

    Rising costs, burgeoning debt, and falling credit ratings are among the financial challenges faced by small, tuition-dependent private colleges, including many members of the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities (CCCU). In their efforts to generate more revenue, most of these institutions have focused on enrollment strategies as the…

  17. Returns to Education: Accounting for Enrolment and Completion Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hérault, Nicolas; Zakirova, Rezida

    2015-01-01

    This paper contributes to the literature by separately analysing the course enrolment and completion effects of vocational education and training (VET) as well as higher education. Moreover, we investigate the persistence of these wage effects over time while controlling for two potential selection biases. We take advantage of the Longitudinal…

  18. Minimum Wage Effects on Educational Enrollments in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Gail A.; Cruickshank, Amy A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper empirically examines the impact of minimum wages on educational enrollments in New Zealand. A significant reform to the youth minimum wage since 2000 has resulted in some age groups undergoing a 91% rise in their real minimum wage over the last 10 years. Three panel least squares multivariate models are estimated from a national sample…

  19. Employment Status among Parenting Teenage Mothers Enrolled in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Wilson, Kelly L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many programs emphasize subsequent pregnancy prevention and high school graduation among teenage mothers; however, less is known about their ability to increase financial earnings from employment opportunities while concurrently enrolled in school. This study evaluates factors influencing employment status among teenage mothers after…

  20. Transactional and Transformational Leader Behaviors and Christian School Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaught, James Ward, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    School enrollment trends and how leaders respond are critical to the sustainability of Christian schools. This study applied quantitative and qualitative approaches to address the question, are there significant differences in the mean scores for behavioral factors or in the mean scores for transactional and transformational leadership styles for…

  1. Enrolment on Health Insurance Scheme in Ghana: Evidence from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multistage sampling procedure was used to select the respondents. Binary logit model was used to estimate the determinants of enrolment to the scheme. The findings show that factors such as age, occupation, place of residence, income and wealth, play an important role in shaping individuals' and households' decision ...

  2. ENGINEERING AND TECHNICIAN ENROLLMENTS FALL 1967. SUMMARY REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALDEN, JOHN D.

    THIS REPORT SUMMARIZES IMPORTANT DATA OF THE ENROLLMENT SURVEY CONDUCTED BY THE ENGINEERING MANPOWER COMMISSION OF ENGINEERS JOINT COUNCIL IN THE FALL OF 1967. QUESTIONNAIRES WERE SENT TO ALL KNOWN UNITED STATES TECHNICAL INSTITUTES, JUNIOR COLLEGES, AND OTHER INSTITUTIONS OFFERING ENGINEERING OR INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY. MORE THAN 97…

  3. 78 FR 48035 - Conservation Reserve Program, Re-Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ... Bill (Pub. L. 110-246, the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008), which allows that the... requirements, Soil conservation, Technical assistance, Water resources, Wildlife. For the reasons explained... Part 1410 RIN 0560-AH80 Conservation Reserve Program, Re-Enrollment AGENCY: Commodity Credit...

  4. Telemarketing as a Vital Part of Enrollment Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lee D.

    1991-01-01

    Describes how telemarketing can be vital part of college's or university's enrollment management campaign if it is done wisely and nonintrusively. Shares author's experience as coordinator of telemarketing activity at one university. Concludes that development of effective telemarketing program can enhance the institution's ability to achieve its…

  5. application of markovian model to .school enrolment projection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-09-12

    Sep 12, 2005 ... NPWAWN OF MARK~OV~AN MODELTO SCHOOL ENROLMENT PROJECTION &E&. , 11 and. Similarly, and. 3.0. Application. To estimate the parameters of this inodel, data for B.Sc Statistics with Computer Science Part - Time programme in the ljniversity of Benin, Nigeria, for the period between ...

  6. Gender differences in the number of students' enrolled into the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    And that Governments at all levels, National University Commission (NUC), Non Governmental Organizations (NGOs) and University administrators should institute endowments and scholarship awards to encourage more female enrolment into science-based courses. Gender and Behaviour Vol. 4(1) 2006: 493-507 ...

  7. Perceived indicators in enrolment of students into physical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the perceived indictors influencing enrolment of students in Physical Education subject in Secondary Schools in Obudu LGA of Cross River State, Nigeria. To achieve this objective, two null hypotheses were formulated and tested in the study. A Sample of 100(6.2%) of the population was randomly ...

  8. Managing Large-Enrollment Courses in Hybrid Instruction Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    This essay addresses the hitches and glitches in the hybrid instruction system of teaching and learning for large-enrollment courses. This new instructional methodology asks facilitators to redesign their entire traditional teaching and learning practices. The nature of subject to be taught via the hybrid mode further affects the success rate of…

  9. Disclosure of HIV status: experiences of patients enrolled in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The convergence between the tuberculosis (TB) and HIV epidemics has led to studies investigating strategies for integrated HIV and TB care. We present the experiences of a cohort of 17 patients enrolled in the first integrated TB and HIV treatment pilot programme, conducted in Durban, South Africa, as a precursor to a ...

  10. Utilization of dental services among Medicaid-enrolled children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchery, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    To assess what characteristics of children and their communities are associated with lower dental service use rates, to support development of strategies to target subgroups of children with lower utilization. The Medicaid Analytic Extract (MAX) 5-percent sample file, known as Mini- MAX 2008. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the association between enrollee and county characteristics and dental preventive and treatment service utilization. There is substantial variation in service use by age. Relative to a 9-year-old, a 2-year-old is 28 percentage points less likely, and a 15-year-old is 15 percentage points less likely, to receive a preventive dental service. Children enrolled in Medicaid for only part of the year were significantly less likely to receive a preventive or a treatment service relative to children covered by Medicaid for the full year. For preventive care, children enrolled for nine months were 15 percentage points less likely to have a service. Those enrolled for six months were 30 points less likely; those enrolled for three months were 41 points less likely. Children eligible for Medicaid based on disability were 9 and 6 percentage points less likely to receive a preventive or treatment service, respectively, than their counterparts who were eligible based on income alone. This study identifies some subgroups of children who are particularly underserved and for whom states may need to devote more attention.

  11. Enrolment regimes and gender differences in university of mines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore affirmative action plan is recommended at all levels of mine work planning that will ensure inclusion of such feminine virtues to impact profitably and propel growth of the mining industry in Ghana. Keywords: Enrolment Regimes, Gender Differences, Gender-Equity Discourse, University of Mines and Technology, ...

  12. Factors associated with enrolment of HIV infected pregnant women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Tanzania, enrolment into care and treatment centers (CTC) for those in need of anti-retroviral therapy is estimated to be 22.2%, indicating that the gateway to accessing CTC services is being underutilized. It is well-known that barriers to accessing these services affect women disproportionately, particularly ...

  13. Managing Enrollment Decline: Current Knowledge and Future Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Michael A.

    Although educational leaders have been coping with declining enrollment for almost a decade, educational researchers have begun to focus on the topic only recently. The first part of this introduction to a special issue of the Peabody Journal of Education briefly summarizes the contents of the subsequent essays, which are intended to bridge the…

  14. Pediatric Orthopedic Hoverboard Injuries: A Prospectively Enrolled Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Andrew D; Reid, Daniel B; Blood, Travis D; Daniels, Alan H; Cruz, Aristides I

    2017-11-01

    Hoverboards pose a significant risk of musculoskeletal injury to pediatric riders. A prospectively enrolled cohort yielded 9 pediatric patients injured while riding hoverboards in 2016. Eight of the injuries involved the upper extremity, and one involved the lower extremity. No riders wore any safety equipment and injury patterns modeled those seen in skateboard riders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Student Enrollment in Geoscience Departments. 1982-1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Geological Inst., Washington, DC.

    Presented in table format are student enrollment data for geoscience disciplines at colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. Subfields for both countries include: geology; geophysics; oceanography; marine science; geological engineering; geophysical engineering; geochemistry; hydrology; mineralogy; paleontology; soil science;…

  16. Enrollment of SME Managers to Growth-oriented Training Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Torben; Jensen, Kent Wickstrøm; Schou Nielsen, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Entrepreneurial learning through formal growth-oriented training programs for SME managers promises to enhance the growth competences and growth intentions of the enrolled managers. The impact of such programs, however, depends on who enrolls since initial competence and growth-intention......Purpose: Entrepreneurial learning through formal growth-oriented training programs for SME managers promises to enhance the growth competences and growth intentions of the enrolled managers. The impact of such programs, however, depends on who enrolls since initial competence and growth......-intention levels vary significantly. Potential participants may suffer from limited ability to transform new knowledge into practice, absence of growth intention and too high or too low a prior competence level to be able to benefit substantially. Selection and self-selection processes therefore have a bearing...... on the extent to which such programs result in additionality, i.e. improved growth performance compared to non-intervention. Design/methodology Selection and self-selection processes are explored through a study of a large-scale training program for growth oriented managers of small Danish firms. This program...

  17. Ethical considerations in implementing a biometric co-enrolment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Participants who screened at the clinical research sites (CRSs) had their names, SA identity or passport number and fingerprints captured onto BCEPS after comprehensive education and discussion. This information was verified at all study visits. If a participant attempted to screen or co-enrol at multiple CRSs, the system ...

  18. Annual Enrollment Report: Growth in Number of Students Studying Journalism and Mass Communication Slows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lee B.; Vlad, Tudor; Huh, Jisu; Daniels, George L.

    2002-01-01

    Provides the key findings of the 2001 Annual Survey of Journalism and Mass Communication Enrollments. Shows that undergraduate enrollments continued to grow while graduate enrollments declined. Discusses degrees granted and race, ethnicity, and gender factors. (PM)

  19. A dynamic marine calcium cycle during the past 28 million years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, E.M.; Paytan, A.; Caldeira, K.; Bullen, T.D.; Thomas, E.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence have shown that the isotopic composition and concentration of calcium in seawater have changed over the past 28 million years. A high-resolution, continuous seawater calcium isotope ratio curve from marine (pelagic) barite reveals distinct features in the evolution of the seawater calcium isotopic ratio suggesting changes in seawater calcium concentrations. The most pronounced increase in the ??44/40Ca value of seawater (of 0.3 per mil) occurred over roughly 4 million years following a period of low values around 13 million years ago. The major change in marine calcium corresponds to a climatic transition and global change in the carbon cycle and suggests a reorganization of the global biogeochemical system.

  20. Roster of Astronomy Departments with Enrollment and Degree Data, 2016: Results from the 2016 Survey of Enrollments and Degrees. Roster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Starr; Mulvey, Patrick J.

    2017-01-01

    The number of both astronomy bachelor's degrees and PhDs awarded in the class of 2016 represent all-time highs. Astronomy bachelors have been increasing steadily for the last 15 years, with 469 degrees awarded in the class of 2016. With undergraduate astronomy enrollments continuing to grow, the trend is expected to continue for at least the next…

  1. [The future population of Mexico. 123 million by the year 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal Hinojosa, R

    1988-01-01

    Recent data on fertility in Mexico have allowed identification of the most likely of 2 alternative population projections through the year 2010. The projection assumes an increase in life expectancy for men and women respectively from 64.08 and 70.47 in 1980-85 and 77.00 in 2005-10. The migration assumption is that there will be a net loss of 529,274 Mexicans every 5 years. The total fertility rate is expected to decline from to 2.7. The total population was projected at 82.8 million in 1988, 104.0 million at the end of the century, and 123.2 million in 2010. The 0-14 age group will decline from 44.23% of the population in 1980 and 40.33% in 1985 to 31.41% in 2000 and 29.50% in 2010. The proportion aged 15-64 will increase from 52.45% in 1980 and 56.22% in 1985 to 63.96% in 2000 and 64 75% in 2010. The proportion of the population in localities with under 2500 inhabitants is expected to remain stable at about 24.3 million persons. Mexico City, Guadalajara, Monterrey, and Puebla will have a combined population of 35 million by the year 2000. In 2010, the Federal District and the State of Mexico which includes Mexico City are expected to contain 29.3% of the total population. The projected population increase over the next 22 years is 40.4 million, 16% greater than the national population in 1960. The implications for providing food and consumer goods, and especially for improving the quality of life are serious. The relative demand for primary and secondary education and for maternal-child health care will decline, but the demand for jobs and for family planning services will increase as the proportion of the population in the economically active age groups increases.

  2. World ethylene capacity jumped 5 million mt/y or 6.5% in past year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1997-05-19

    Global ethylene capacity has increased more than 5 million metric tons/year (mt/y) to about 85 million mt/y since the Journal`s last survey. This increase amounts to a 6.5% boost in only 1 year`s time. Responsible for this increase was: construction of several new plants in China, and expansions of existing ones; major expansions at a number of US plants; and capacity additions in Saudi Arabia, the U.K. and India. The paper describes the survey, then discusses the global ethylene outlook, the situation in Asia/Pacific, North America, Western Europe, Latin America, the Middle East and Africa, and feedstocks.

  3. Poweo 2006 consolidated revenue at euro 244 million, up 121%; Poweo chiffre d'affaires 2006 de 244 millions euro, en hausse de 121%

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-01-15

    POWEO, the leading independent energy operator in France, presents in this document its key business indicators for the 4. quarter of 2006 and the full year: POWEO records again a strong rise of its annual revenue, exceeding its euro 220 million target. This progression relates to all the business components. The particularly soft climatic conditions recorded in France at the end of the year did not result in a significant fall of revenue compared to initial forecasts. The number of customer sites amounts to 80.300 at December 31, 2006, in progression of 23% compared to the end of 2005. The customer base remained overall stable during the second half of 2006, POWEO limiting voluntarily the acquisition of customers in electricity during the preparation of the opening to competition of the residential market due to take place on July 1, 2007. The gas customer base for its part more than doubled compared to end June 2006, with more than 5.000 customer sites transferred as at December 31, 2006. The Energy Management net margin, realised or un-realised, amounted to euro 49.7 million in 2006, recognised as revenue under IFRS standards. This includes the euro 22 million exceptional capital gain mentioned in previous financial releases in 2006, as well as a euro 7.9 million un-realised capital gain resulting from the transfer of some contracts into the Energy Management portfolio further to the capacity swap agreement with EDF announced publicly on January 3, 2007. The services provided by POWEO to its customers enjoy a high level of acceptance and represented revenue of euro 2.9 million in 2006. As from 2007, the revenue realised through these services will be presented separately from other components of revenue in order to better reflect its expected growth. The services offering will be indeed a key element of the marketing strategy of POWEO in the years to come, with a potentially significant impact on the results taking into account their level of gross margin which

  4. Timing of College Enrollment and Family Formation Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humlum, Maria; Kristoffersen, Jannie H. G.; Vejlin, Rune Majlund

    The level of progression of an individual’s educational or labor market career is a potentially important factor for family formation decisions. We address this issue by considering the effects of a particular college admission system on family formation. We show that the admission system affects...... mainly the timing of college enrollment and not the college - going decision. As such, we consider a specific type of career interruption and its consequences for relationship formation and fertility decisions. Specifically, we employ a regression discontinuity design based on the college admission...... system to estimate the effect of being above the admission requirement in the year of application on later family formation decisions. We find that the admission system has substantial effects on the timing of family formation and, specifically, that the timing of college enrollment is an important...

  5. Health status, risk factors, and medical conditions among persons enrolled in Medicaid vs uninsured low-income adults potentially eligible for Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Sandra L; Kostova, Deliana; Kenney, Genevieve M; Long, Sharon K

    2013-06-26

    of many chronic conditions. A substantial proportion of currently uninsured adults with chronic conditions did not have good disease control; projections based on sample weighting suggest this may represent 3.5 million persons (95% CI, 2.9 million-4.2 million). These adults may need initial intensive medical care following Medicaid enrollment.

  6. More on enrolling female students in science and engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Cynthia

    2010-06-01

    This paper investigates reasons for practices and policies that are designed to promote higher levels of enrollment by women in scientific disciplines. It challenges the assumptions and problematic arguments of a recent article questioning their legitimacy. Considering the motivations for and merits of such programs suggests a practical response to the question of whether there should be programs to attract female science and engineering students.

  7. Enrollment and degree completion in higher education without admission standards

    OpenAIRE

    Declercq, Koen; Verboven, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Many countries organize their higher education system with limited or no ex ante admission standards. They instead rely more heavily on an ex post selection mechanism, based on the students' performance during higher education. We analyze how a system with ex post selection affects initial enrollment and final degree completion, using a rich dataset for Belgium (region of Flanders). We develop a dynamic discrete choice model of college/university and major choice, where the outcome of the enr...

  8. Timing of College Enrollment and Family Formation Decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Humlum, Maria Knoth; Kristoffersen, Jannie H. G.; Vejlin, Rune Majlund

    2014-01-01

    The level of progression of an individual’s educational or labor market career is a potentially important factor for family formation decisions. We address this issue by considering the effects of a particular college admission system on family formation. We show that the admission system affects mainly the timing of college enrollment and not the college-going decision. As such, we consider a specific type of career interruption and its consequences for relationship formation ...

  9. College Enrollment, Dropouts and Option Value of Education

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas Trachter; Ali Ozdagli

    2008-01-01

    Psychic costs are the most important component of the papers that are trying to match empirical facts related with college enrollment and dropout decisions of high school graduates. The absense of psychic cost requires very high levels of risk aversion to duplicate the same facts. However, psychic costs lack any economic meaning and treated as an obscure idiosyncratic component of utility function in influential papers such as Keane and Wolpin (1997) and Carneiro, Hansen, Heckman (2003). In t...

  10. Queen's researchers make the grade: University boasts two of three finalists for million-dollar grant

    CERN Multimedia

    Armstrong, F E

    2003-01-01

    Two Queen's University researchers are among three Canadian finalists in a contest to win $1 million. Art McDonald, director of the Queen's-run Sudbury Neutrino Observatory Institute, and John Smol, Canada Research Chair in Environmental Change, have been nominated for the Gerhard Herzberg Canada Gold Medal for Science and Engineering (1 page).

  11. MillionTreesNYC, green infrastructure and urban ecology symposium March 5-6, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erika S. Svendsen; Jacqueline W.T. Lu

    2010-01-01

    On March 5-6, 2010, over two hundred researchers and practitioners came together at The New School to showcase scientific innovation in the field of urban forestry and greening. The MillionTreesNYC, Green Infrastructure and Urban Ecology Research Symposium engaged professionals from a broad range of disciplines including sociology, planning,...

  12. Rheumatic fever prophylaxis in South Africa - is bicillin 1,2 million ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rheumatic fever is a major health problem in South Africa. Although intramuscular benzathine penicillin (bicillin) 1,2 million units (MU) every 4 weeks is widely used for secondary prophylaxis, studies in other countries have shown a recurrence rate of 3 - 8% over 5 - 6 years in patients on this regimen. It has been ...

  13. NBODY6++GPU: ready for the gravitational million-body problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long; Spurzem, Rainer; Aarseth, Sverre; Nitadori, Keigo; Berczik, Peter; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Naab, Thorsten

    2015-07-01

    Accurate direct N-body simulations help to obtain detailed information about the dynamical evolution of star clusters. They also enable comparisons with analytical models and Fokker-Planck or Monte Carlo methods. NBODY6 is a well-known direct N-body code for star clusters, and NBODY6++ is the extended version designed for large particle number simulations by supercomputers. We present NBODY6++GPU, an optimized version of NBODY6++ with hybrid parallelization methods (MPI, GPU, OpenMP, and AVX/SSE) to accelerate large direct N-body simulations, and in particular to solve the million-body problem. We discuss the new features of the NBODY6++GPU code, benchmarks, as well as the first results from a simulation of a realistic globular cluster initially containing a million particles. For million-body simulations, NBODY6++GPU is 400-2000 times faster than NBODY6 with 320 CPU cores and 32 NVIDIA K20X GPUs. With this computing cluster specification, the simulations of million-body globular clusters including 5 per cent primordial binaries require about an hour per half-mass crossing time.

  14. Rheumatic fever prophylaxis in South Africa - is bicillin 1,2 million ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1993-09-30

    Sep 30, 1993 ... years of sentinel surveillance of acute respiratory infections (1985 - 1990): the benefits of an influenza early warning ... acquired cardiac disease in children worldwide. The prevalence of rheumatic fever and ... (approximately R40 million annually) for valve replacement surgery at six major South African ...

  15. One Million Bones: Measuring the Effect of Human Rights Participation in the Social Work Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Jane; Cheatham, Leah P.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the integration of human rights content and a national arts-activism initiative--One Million Bones--into a bachelor's-level macro practice class as a human rights teaching strategy. Two previously validated scales, the Human Rights Exposure (HRX) in Social Work and the Human Rights Engagement (HRE) in Social Work (McPherson…

  16. Modeling a Million-Node Slim Fly Network Using Parallel Discrete-Event Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, Noah; Carothers, Christopher; Mubarak, Misbah; Ross, Robert; Carns, Philip

    2016-05-15

    As supercomputers close in on exascale performance, the increased number of processors and processing power translates to an increased demand on the underlying network interconnect. The Slim Fly network topology, a new lowdiameter and low-latency interconnection network, is gaining interest as one possible solution for next-generation supercomputing interconnect systems. In this paper, we present a high-fidelity Slim Fly it-level model leveraging the Rensselaer Optimistic Simulation System (ROSS) and Co-Design of Exascale Storage (CODES) frameworks. We validate our Slim Fly model with the Kathareios et al. Slim Fly model results provided at moderately sized network scales. We further scale the model size up to n unprecedented 1 million compute nodes; and through visualization of network simulation metrics such as link bandwidth, packet latency, and port occupancy, we get an insight into the network behavior at the million-node scale. We also show linear strong scaling of the Slim Fly model on an Intel cluster achieving a peak event rate of 36 million events per second using 128 MPI tasks to process 7 billion events. Detailed analysis of the underlying discrete-event simulation performance shows that a million-node Slim Fly model simulation can execute in 198 seconds on the Intel cluster.

  17. Kavli Foundation donate $7.5 million to University of Chicago for cosmological physics institute

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "The University of Chicago will devote $7.5 million in donations from Fred Kavli and the Kavli Foundation of Oxnard, Calif., to studying some of the most puzzling scientific questions about the origin and evolution of the universe and the laws that govern it" (1 page)

  18. Pork-Barrel Spending on Academe Reaches a Record $797-Million.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Jeffrey; Cordes, Colleen

    1999-01-01

    For the 1999 fiscal year, Congress earmarked specific spending measures that included at least $797 million for projects involving colleges and universities, a 51% increase over 1998. Earmarks are seen by some as inequitable because they are not subject to competitive, merit-based reviews typically used by federal agencies to distribute money for…

  19. Biggest Pork Barrel Ever: $225-Million for Projects That Bypassed Merit Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Colleen

    1988-01-01

    Congress has quietly approved millions of dollars for campus research projects not subjected to traditional merit reviews. The wisdom of allowing legislators to direct federal money to specific campuses is questioned less and less, and the practice is more prevalent than ever. (MSE)

  20. Monitoring Million Trees LA: Tree performance during the early years and future benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Gregory. McPherson

    2014-01-01

    Million Trees LA (MTLA) is one of several large-scale mayoral tree planting initiatives striving to create more livable cities through urban forestry. This study combined field sampling of tree survival and growth with numerical modeling of future benefits to assess performance of MTLA plantings. From 2006 to 2010 MTLA planted a diverse mix of 91,786 trees....

  1. 25+ Years of the Hubble Space Telescope and a Simple Error That Cost Millions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerin, Said

    2016-01-01

    A simple mistake in properly setting up a measuring device caused millions of dollars to be spent in correcting the initial optical failure of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This short article is intended as a lesson for a physics laboratory and discussion of errors in measurement.

  2. A progressively wetter climate in southern East Africa over the past 1.3 million years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, T.C.; Werne, J.P.; Brown, E.T.; Abbott, A.; Berke, M.; Steinman, B.E.; Halbur, J.; Contreras, S.; Grosshuesch, S.; Deino, A.; Lyons, R.P.; Scholz, C.A.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    African climate is generally considered to have evolved towardsprogressively drier conditions over the past few million years,with increased variability as glacial–interglacial change intensifiedworldwide1–3. Palaeoclimate records derived mainly from northernAfrica exhibit a 100,000-year

  3. A progressively wetter climate in Southern East Africa over the past 1.3 million years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, T.C.; Werne, J.P.; Brown, E.T.; Abbott, A; Berke, M.; Steinman, B.A.; Halbur, J.; Contreras, S.; Grosshuesch, S.; Deino, C.A.; Scholz, C.A.; Lyons, R.P.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    African climate is generally considered to have evolved towards progressively drier conditions over the past few million years, with increased variability as glacial–interglacial change intensified worldwide1, 2, 3. Palaeoclimate records derived mainly from northern Africa exhibit a 100,000-year

  4. Virginia Tech research funded by Recovery Act exceeds $20 million, and growing

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2009-01-01

    As of Monday, Aug. 24, Virginia Tech researchers had received 45 grants through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), totaling $20.3 million, for projects ranging from determining the cause of cell defects to planning for a program that will facilitate graduate study by veterans.

  5. Sufficient oxygen for animal respiration 1,400 million years ago

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuichang; Wang, Xiaomei; Wang, Huajian

    2016-01-01

    The Mesoproterozoic Eon [1,600-1,000 million years ago (Ma)] is emerging as a key interval in Earth history, with a unique geochemical history that might have influenced the course of biological evolution on Earth. Indeed, although this time interval is rather poorly understood, recent chromium i...

  6. Global chronostratigraphical correlation table for the last 2.7 million years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, K.M.; Gibbard, P.L.

    2010-01-01

    The table provides a correlation of chronostratigraphical subdivisions of late Cenozoic geological time, spanning the last 2.7 million years. The formal division of the Quaternary is the responsibility of the IUGS International Commission on Stratigraphy’s (ICS) Subcommission on Quaternary

  7. Temporal disease trajectories condensed from population-wide registry data covering 6.2 million patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Boeck; Moseley, Pope; Oprea, Tudor

    2014-01-01

    . We use the entire spectrum of diseases and convert 14.9 years of registry data on 6.2 million patients into 1,171 significant trajectories. We group these into patterns centred on a small number of key diagnoses such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and gout, which are central...

  8. Unemployment, earnings and enrollment among post 9/11 veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleykamp, Meredith

    2013-05-01

    This paper examines three outcomes characterizing different aspects of post 9/11 veterans' economic reintegration to civilian life: unemployment, earnings and college enrollment, using Current Population Survey data from 2005 to 2011. Analyses include interactions of veteran status with sex, race/ethnicity and educational attainment to evaluate whether diverse veterans experience diverse consequences of service. In brief, I find that the basic unemployment differences between veterans and non-veterans often reported in the media understate the effect of military service on unemployment for men, since veterans have other characteristics that are associated with higher employment rates. Female veterans appear to suffer a steeper employment penalty than male veterans, but black veterans appear to suffer less of a penalty than white veterans. But on two other measures, earnings and college enrollment, veterans appear to be doing better than their civilian peers. Veterans with a high school education or less outearn their civilian peers, but veterans with at least some college education appear to lose some or all of the veteran earnings advantage compared to veterans with a high school degree, suggesting the greatest wage returns to military service accrue among the least educated. Veterans with at least a high school education are more likely to be enrolled in college than their civilian peers. Treating veterans as a monolithic block obscures differences in the consequences of military service across diverse groups. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Factors influencing decisions to enroll in the health informatics educational programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshammari, Fares

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the most important factors associated with undergraduate students' decisions to enroll in the health informatics program at Hail University in Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among the population of 73 students (second to fourth year; 52 females, 21 males; age range 19-25 years). A hierarchy of perceived sources of influence was identified. Counselors, teachers and other professionals, and promotional materials, including information in the media, as well as the high quality characteristics of the institution, had the strongest influence. Other students, friends and family, the academic reputation of the University and the health informatics department faculty, together with interactions in the academic environment (e.g. segregation by gender) and financial, job, career, and postgraduate opportunities, were perceived to be weaker sources of influence. The strengths of the sources of influence varied significantly with respect to the socio-demographic characteristics of the students, as well as the categories associated with the decision-making process. Strong sources of influence were particularly important for the increasing number of female students who often made the final decision to enroll. These findings will support policy and decision makers to make better plans for health informatics education by understanding the influential sources that attract students into the health informatics profession, and will also assist the health care sector's attempts to avoid a deficiency in this rapidly expanding professional field.

  10. Management and treatment outcomes of patients enrolled in MDR-TB treatment in Viet Nam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhung, N. V.; Hoa, N. B.; Thuy, H. T.; Takarinda, K. C.; Tayler-Smith, K.; Harries, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: The programmatic management of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Viet Nam has been rapidly scaled up since 2009. Objectives: To document the annual numbers of patients enrolled for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) treatment during 2010–2014 and to determine characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients initiating treatment during 2010–2012. Design: A retrospective cohort study using national reports and data from the national electronic data system for drug-resistant TB. Results: The number of patients enrolled annually for MDR-TB treatment increased from 97 in 2010 to 1522 in 2014. The majority of patients were middle-aged men who had pulmonary disease and had failed a retreatment regimen; 77% had received ⩾2 courses of TB treatment. Favourable outcomes (cured and treatment completed) were attained in 73% of patients. Unfavourable outcomes included loss to follow-up (12.5%), death (8%) and failure (6.3%). Having had ⩾2 previous treatment courses and being human immunodeficiency virus-positive were associated with unfavourable outcomes. Conclusion: Increasing numbers of patients are being treated for MDR-TB each year with good treatment outcomes under national programme management in Viet Nam. However, there is a need to increase case detection—currently at 30% of the estimated 5100 MDR-TB cases per year, reduce adverse outcomes and improve monitoring and evaluation. PMID:27051608

  11. Management and treatment outcomes of patients enrolled in MDR-TB treatment in Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong, N T M; Nhung, N V; Hoa, N B; Thuy, H T; Takarinda, K C; Tayler-Smith, K; Harries, A D

    2016-03-21

    The programmatic management of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Viet Nam has been rapidly scaled up since 2009. To document the annual numbers of patients enrolled for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) treatment during 2010-2014 and to determine characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients initiating treatment during 2010-2012. A retrospective cohort study using national reports and data from the national electronic data system for drug-resistant TB. The number of patients enrolled annually for MDR-TB treatment increased from 97 in 2010 to 1522 in 2014. The majority of patients were middle-aged men who had pulmonary disease and had failed a retreatment regimen; 77% had received ⩾2 courses of TB treatment. Favourable outcomes (cured and treatment completed) were attained in 73% of patients. Unfavourable outcomes included loss to follow-up (12.5%), death (8%) and failure (6.3%). Having had ⩾2 previous treatment courses and being human immunodeficiency virus-positive were associated with unfavourable outcomes. Increasing numbers of patients are being treated for MDR-TB each year with good treatment outcomes under national programme management in Viet Nam. However, there is a need to increase case detection-currently at 30% of the estimated 5100 MDR-TB cases per year, reduce adverse outcomes and improve monitoring and evaluation.

  12. Agricultural Knowledge and Perceptions Among Students Enrolled in Agriscience Programs in Texas Counties Bordering Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel M. Whitehead

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hispanics are rapidly becoming the predominant ethnic group in Texas. While many secondary agriculture programs have seen increased participation by Hispanic students, in comparison to the demographics of Texas secondary school enrollment, Hispanics are underrepresented in agricultural education. As a result, agricultural education programs should continue to become more diverse and provide curriculum engaging to a wide variety of students. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to determine the agricultural literacy rates and perceptions of agriculture among Hispanic and non-Hispanic high school agriculture students enrolled in agriculture programs in Texas counties bordering Mexico. Results showed both groups have agricultural literacy rates congruent with previous studies; however, Hispanic students tended to have lower knowledge scores in all areas except agricultural career knowledge, as well as lower perceptions of agriculture. Agricultural career knowledge scores were the lowest area for all respondents. Recommendations include: 1 more research should be conducted to better determine levels of agricultural literacy in minority agricultural education students in Texas and other areas, and 2 more emphasis on agricultural career knowledge should be incorporated into agriscience courses to better inform students about postsecondary education and career options within the agricultural industry.

  13. Prospective study of one million deaths in India: rationale, design, and validation results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat Jha

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Over 75% of the annual estimated 9.5 million deaths in India occur in the home, and the large majority of these do not have a certified cause. India and other developing countries urgently need reliable quantification of the causes of death. They also need better epidemiological evidence about the relevance of physical (such as blood pressure and obesity, behavioral (such as smoking, alcohol, HIV-1 risk taking, and immunization history, and biological (such as blood lipids and gene polymorphisms measurements to the development of disease in individuals or disease rates in populations. We report here on the rationale, design, and implementation of the world's largest prospective study of the causes and correlates of mortality.We will monitor nearly 14 million people in 2.4 million nationally representative Indian households (6.3 million people in 1.1 million households in the 1998-2003 sample frame and 7.6 million people in 1.3 million households in the 2004-2014 sample frame for vital status and, if dead, the causes of death through a well-validated verbal autopsy (VA instrument. About 300,000 deaths from 1998-2003 and some 700,000 deaths from 2004-2014 are expected; of these about 850,000 will be coded by two physicians to provide causes of death by gender, age, socioeconomic status, and geographical region. Pilot studies will evaluate the addition of physical and biological measurements, specifically dried blood spots. Preliminary results from over 35,000 deaths suggest that VA can ascertain the leading causes of death, reduce the misclassification of causes, and derive the probable underlying cause of death when it has not been reported. VA yields broad classification of the underlying causes in about 90% of deaths before age 70. In old age, however, the proportion of classifiable deaths is lower. By tracking underlying demographic denominators, the study permits quantification of absolute mortality rates. Household case-control, proportional

  14. Prospective Study of One Million Deaths in India: Rationale, Design, and Validation Results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over 75% of the annual estimated 9.5 million deaths in India occur in the home, and the large majority of these do not have a certified cause. India and other developing countries urgently need reliable quantification of the causes of death. They also need better epidemiological evidence about the relevance of physical (such as blood pressure and obesity, behavioral (such as smoking, alcohol, HIV-1 risk taking, and immunization history, and biological (such as blood lipids and gene polymorphisms measurements to the development of disease in individuals or disease rates in populations. We report here on the rationale, design, and implementation of the world's largest prospective study of the causes and correlates of mortality. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We will monitor nearly 14 million people in 2.4 million nationally representative Indian households (6.3 million people in 1.1 million households in the 1998-2003 sample frame and 7.6 million people in 1.3 million households in the 2004-2014 sample frame for vital status and, if dead, the causes of death through a well-validated verbal autopsy (VA instrument. About 300,000 deaths from 1998-2003 and some 700,000 deaths from 2004-2014 are expected; of these about 850,000 will be coded by two physicians to provide causes of death by gender, age, socioeconomic status, and geographical region. Pilot studies will evaluate the addition of physical and biological measurements, specifically dried blood spots. Preliminary results from over 35,000 deaths suggest that VA can ascertain the leading causes of death, reduce the misclassification of causes, and derive the probable underlying cause of death when it has not been reported. VA yields broad classification of the underlying causes in about 90% of deaths before age 70. In old age, however, the proportion of classifiable deaths is lower. By tracking underlying demographic denominators, the study permits quantification of absolute mortality rates

  15. Variations in vascular mortality trends, 2001?2010, among 1.3 million women with different lifestyle risk factors for the disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cairns, Benjamin J; Balkwill, Angela; Canoy, Dexter; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian K; Beral, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Aims Vascular disease mortality has declined rapidly in most Western countries, against a background of improved treatments and falling prevalence of smoking, but rising obesity. We examined whether this decline differed by lifestyle risk factors for vascular disease. Methods and Results During 2001?2010, there were 9241 vascular disease deaths in a prospective study of 1.3 million women in middle age, about one-quarter of all UK women in the eligible age range (50?64 years in 1996?2001). We ...

  16. Roster of Astronomy Departments with Enrollment and Degree Data, 2014: Results from the 2014 Survey of Enrollments and Degrees. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Starr; Mulvey, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate astronomy enrollments in the US continue to rise with junior and senior level enrollments exceeding the previous year's all-time high. The increasing undergraduate enrollments have produced 428 bachelor's in the 2013-14 academic year, also an all-time high. Undergraduate astronomy degree production will continue to rise given the…

  17. A Comparison of Academic Administrators and Enrollment Managers' Perceptions of Undergraduate Enrollment Management Functions at a Subset of Four-Year Public Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesarini, Lisa McHugh

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine perceptions of various enrollment management functions at a subset of four-year public institutions. Specifically, this study compared perceptions of academic administrators with enrollment managers as they related to the availability, need, and effectiveness of certain enrollment management functions. In…

  18. 2011 Annual Survey of Journalism and Mass Communication Enrollments: Enrollments Decline, Reversing the Increase of a Year Earlier, and Suggesting Slow Growth for Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lee B.; Vlad, Tudor; Kalpen, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    Enrollments in journalism and mass communication programs declined in the autumn of 2011, compared to a year earlier. Enrollments were down slightly at the senior and junior levels and substantially at the freshman level. Enrollment increased at the sophomore level. The majority of administrators say they have made curricular changes in the past…

  19. Course Placement Series: Spotlight on High School Math Course Enrollment. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessee Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Tennessee Department of Education explored course enrollment patterns in an effort to better understand in which courses students are enrolling and whether course enrollment policies and procedures are promoting students' interests. This report focuses on math course enrollment patterns throughout high school by following the 2013-14 twelfth…

  20. Strategic Enrollment Management (SEM) Decisions and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldin, Antoinette M.

    2013-01-01

    With the changing landscape in enrollment options for potential community college students, community college administrators are looking for ways to forecast enrollment by using strategic enrollment management models. Today, community colleges' administration is challenged to develop, use, and implement enrollment models that support their…

  1. 20 CFR 901.32 - Receipt of information concerning enrolled actuaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Receipt of information concerning enrolled... Suspension or Termination of Enrollment § 901.32 Receipt of information concerning enrolled actuaries. If an... Guaranty Corporation, or a member of the Joint Board has reason to believe that an enrolled actuary has...

  2. 20 CFR 670.490 - How long may a student be enrolled in Job Corps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How long may a student be enrolled in Job..., Selection and Assignment, and Enrollment § 670.490 How long may a student be enrolled in Job Corps? (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a student may remain enrolled in Job Corps for no...

  3. 34 CFR 76.655 - Level of expenditures for students enrolled in private schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Level of expenditures for students enrolled in private... Enrolled in Private Schools § 76.655 Level of expenditures for students enrolled in private schools. (a... funds on: (1) A student enrolled in a private school who receives benefits under the program; and (2) A...

  4. 1974-75 Fall Enrollment Analysis. Research Report No. 74-08.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alworth, Robert M.; Freed, Judee

    Fall 1974 enrollment in the Los Angeles Community Colleges reached an historical high of 124,839--a 14.6% increase over the previous fall. Enrollment increases were greater among day students (17.6 percent) than evening students (10.9 percent), reversing the pattern of last year. Female enrollment increased more sharply than male enrollment and…

  5. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  6. Infusing photonics to increase enrollment in electronics engineering technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayiotou, Chrys A.; Seeber, Fred P.

    2007-06-01

    During the last 15 years most of the electronics engineering technology programs across the nation have experienced a constant decline in enrollment. Today's high school students do not seem to consider a career in electronics engineering appealing enough to commit to a field of study in desperate need of new students. They still associate electronics programs with the electronics section of a department store; televisions, stereo systems, DVD and VCR players, and other disposable electronics. While the downward trend continues across the nation, Indian River Community College (IRCC) has been able not only to stop it but to reverse it by attracting a new generation of students. By introducing high school students to new and emerging technologies, their perception of established degrees has changed and their interest has been stimulated. Photonics is one of those technologies capturing students' attention. IRCC, a partner college in the National Center for Optics and Photonics Education (OP-TEC), with the assistance of other colleges like Camden County College which already offers an Associate in Applied Science degree in Photonics, has created a Photonics specialization under the Electronics Engineering Technology program. The targeted marketing of this new specialization has led to an increase in enrollment of 50% in 2005, 80% in 2006, and for 2007 it is projected it to be over 100%. An interesting comparison can be made concerning enrollment at colleges with a full AAS program in photonics like Camden County College and IRCC which uses photonics as an enabling technology. This analysis could lead to a new approach in restructuring engineering technology degrees with the infusion of photonics throughout many technology fields. This presentation will discuss the plan of action that made possible this initiative at Indian River Community College and new program directions at Camden County College, Blackwood, New Jersey.

  7. Mental health among currently enrolled medical students in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wege, N; Muth, T; Li, J; Angerer, P

    2016-03-01

    The study identifies the prevalence of common mental disorders according to the patient health questionnaire (PHQ) and the use of psychotropic substances in a sample of currently enrolled medical students. A cross-sectional survey with a self-administrated questionnaire. All newly enrolled medical students at the University of Dusseldorf, with study beginning either in 2012 or 2013, respectively, were invited to participate. The evaluation was based on 590 completed questionnaires. Mental health outcomes were measured by the PHQ, including major depression, other depressive symptoms (subthreshold depression), anxiety, panic disorders and psychosomatic complaints. Moreover, information about psychotropic substances use (including medication) was obtained. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to estimate associations between sociodemographic and socio-economic factors and mental health outcomes. The prevalence rates, measured by the PHQ, were 4.7% for major depression, 5.8% for other depressive symptoms, 4.4% for anxiety, 1.9% for panic disorders, and 15.7% for psychosomatic complaints. These prevalence rates were higher than those reported in the general population, but lower than in medical students in the course of medical training. In all, 10.7% of the students reported regular psychotropic substance use: 5.1% of students used medication 'to calm down,' 4.6% 'to improve their sleep,' 4.4% 'to elevate mood,' and 3.1% 'to improve cognitive performance.' In the fully adjusted model, expected financial difficulties were significantly associated with poor mental health (odds ratio [OR]: 2.14; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.31-3.48), psychosomatic symptoms (OR:1.85; 95% CI: 1.11-3.09) and psychotropic substances use (OR: 2.68; 95% CI: 1.51-4.75). The high rates of mental disorders among currently enrolled medical students call for the promotion of mental health, with a special emphasis on vulnerable groups. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public

  8. (Updated) NCI Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget Proposes $25 Million for Frederick National Lab | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer; image by Richard Frederickson, Staff Photographer The additional funding requested for Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) in the Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget was $25 million, or approximately 3.5 percent of the total additional funding request of $715 million. Officially called the Professional Judgment Budget, the Bypass Budget is a result of the National Cancer Act of 1971, which authorizes NCI to submit a budget directly to the president, to send to Congress. With a focus on NCI’s research priorities and areas of cancer research with potential for investment, the Bypass Budget specifies additional funding, over and above the current budget, that is needed to advance

  9. luxS in bacteria isolated from 25 to 40 million year-old amber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Patrício, Ana R.; Rivera, Jessica I.; Coradin, Mariel; Gonzalez, Alfredo; Tirado, Gabriela; Cano, Raúl J.; Toranzos, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    Interspecies bacterial communication is mediated by autoinducer-2, whose synthesis depends on luxS. Due to the apparent universality of luxS (present in over 40 bacterial species), it may have an ancient origin; however, no direct evidence is currently available. We amplified luxS in bacteria isolated from 25 to 40 million year-old amber. Phylogenies and Principal Component Analyses (PCA) of luxS and the 16S rRNA gene from ancient and extant bacteria were constructed. Amber isolates exhibited unique 16S rRNA gene phylogenies, while the luxS phylogeny was very similar to that of extant Bacillus spp. This suggests that luxS may have been acquired by horizontal transfer millions of years ago. Molecular clocks of luxS suggest slow evolutionary rates, similar to those of the 16S rRNA gene and consistent with a conserved gene. PMID:24102660

  10. Epidemiologic Study of One Million American Workers and Military Veterans Exposed to Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boice, John D. [International Epidemiology Inst. Ltd., Rockville, MD (United States)

    2015-02-27

    A pilot study was completed demonstrating the feasibility of conducting an epidemiologic study assessing cancer and other disease mortality among nearly one million US veterans and workers exposed to ionizing radiation, a population 10 times larger than atomic bomb survivor study with high statistical power to evaluate low dose rate effects. Among the groups enumerated and/or studied were: (1) 194,000 Department of Energy Uranium Workers; (2) 6,700 Rocketdyne Radiation Workers; (3) 7,000 Mound Radiation Workers; (4) 156,000 DOE Plutonium Workers; (5) 212,000 Nuclear Power Plant Workers; (6) 130,000 Industrial Radiography Workers; (7) 1.7 million Medical Workers and (8) 135,000 Atomic Veterans.

  11. Quesnoin, a novel pentacyclic ent-diterpene from 55 million years Old Oise Amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jossang, Jean; Bel-Kassaoui, Hakima; Jossang, Akino; Seuleiman, Mannan; Nel, André

    2008-01-18

    Amber, fossilized tree resin, found at the Oise River area of the Paris basin (France) was dated as being 55 million years old. Quesnoin, a novel unique pure organic compound, was isolated from Oise amber. 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated an unknown diterpene skeleton, quesnane. The absolute configurations of the eight chiral centers of quesnoin were determined to be 4S, 5S, 8R, 9S, 10S, 13S, 14R, and 16S by chiral auxiliary (R)- and (S)-phenylglycine methyl ester derivatization. Quesnoin allowed us to disclose the tree producer, corresponding to modern Hymenaea oblongifolia, Fabaceae, a subfamily of Caesalpiniaceae, one of the oldest angiosperm. The presence of the Amazon rainforest tree, H. oblongifolia, indicated that the climate of the Paris basin might have been tropical in the early Eocene period, 55 million years ago.

  12. Genome size in conodonts (chordata): inferred variations during 270 million years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, S C; Harper, E

    1988-09-02

    DNA is too unstable to be preserved during fossilization, but it still seems possible to infer the genome content of fossils because in every group of organisms investigated cell size is proportional to quantity of DNA. Accordingly, information on macroevolutionary trends in genome size through millions of years is potentially available. This survey of inferred variation in genome content in fossils is based on measurements of epithelial cells in extinct conodonts over a period of 270 million years. Why genome size varies so widely amongst living organisms is a subject of continuing debate. Paleontology offers a distinct temporal perspective, but lack of data on conodont paleoecology make the proposed adaptive explanations for genome variation difficult to test.

  13. Radiation protection enrollments and degrees, 1979 and 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gove, R.M.; Little, J.R.; Shirley, D.L.

    1981-07-01

    Public concern over the effects of low-level radiation and other aspects of the use of nuclear energy has grown in recent years, and the demand for radiation protection has continued to increase. Radiation Protection Enrollments and Degrees presents the results of the latest survey of institutions offering degree programs in this field. Students obtaining such degrees are vital to the development of industry, medicine, research, power production, construction, and agriculture. These surveys assist state and federal governments in their search for such personnel.

  14. Rapid-Cycling Bubble-Chamber, details

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Parts of the hydraulic expansion system of the Rapid-Cycling Bubble-Chamber (RCBC). RCBC was the largest of 3 rapid-cycling bubble-chambers (the others were LEBC and HOLEBC), used as target- and vertex-detectors within the European Hybrid Spectrometer (EHS) in the SPS North Area (EHN1). RCBC contained 250 l of liquid hydrogen and was located inside a 3 T superconducting magnet. It was designed for 30 expansions/s (100 times faster than BEBC), the system shown here allowed 50 expansions/s. RCBC operated from 1981 to 1983 for experiments NA21, NA22 and NA23 at a rate of 15 expansions/s, clocking up a total of over 4 million. In the rear, at left, is bearded Lucien Veillet; Augustin Didona is at the right. See also 8001009. The installation of the piston assembly in the RCBC chamber body is shown in the Annual Report 1980, p.65.

  15. Trade partners UK in Europe Leaf lands 2.5 million pound CERN deal

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Leaf Technologies of Newtownabbey, County Antrim, has won a 2.5 million pound contract to supply electronic modules to CERN (the European Laboratory for Particle Physics) in Geneva, one of the world's most advanced scientific research projects, which is funded by the UK and 19 other European governments. Leaf will develop sophisticated circuit boards for the high precision controls of the Large Hadron Collider" (1 page)

  16. Laying the Foundation for a Solar America: The Million Solar Roofs Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strahs, G.; Tombari, C.

    2006-10-01

    As the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technology Program embarks on the next phase of its technology acceptance efforts under the Solar America Initiative, there is merit to examining the program's previous market transformation effort, the Million Solar Roofs Initiative. Its goal was to transform markets for distributed solar technologies by facilitating the installation of solar systems.

  17. A magnified young galaxy from about 500 million years after the Big Bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Postman, Marc; Zitrin, Adi; Moustakas, John; Shu, Xinwen; Jouvel, Stephanie; Høst, Ole; Molino, Alberto; Bradley, Larry; Coe, Dan; Moustakas, Leonidas A; Carrasco, Mauricio; Ford, Holland; Benítez, Narciso; Lauer, Tod R; Seitz, Stella; Bouwens, Rychard; Koekemoer, Anton; Medezinski, Elinor; Bartelmann, Matthias; Broadhurst, Tom; Donahue, Megan; Grillo, Claudio; Infante, Leopoldo; Jha, Saurabh W; Kelson, Daniel D; Lahav, Ofer; Lemze, Doron; Melchior, Peter; Meneghetti, Massimo; Merten, Julian; Nonino, Mario; Ogaz, Sara; Rosati, Piero; Umetsu, Keiichi; van der Wel, Arjen

    2012-09-20

    Re-ionization of the intergalactic medium occurred in the early Universe at redshift z ≈ 6-11, following the formation of the first generation of stars. Those young galaxies (where the bulk of stars formed) at a cosmic age of less than about 500 million years (z ≲ 10) remain largely unexplored because they are at or beyond the sensitivity limits of existing large telescopes. Understanding the properties of these galaxies is critical to identifying the source of the radiation that re-ionized the intergalactic medium. Gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters allows the detection of high-redshift galaxies fainter than what otherwise could be found in the deepest images of the sky. Here we report multiband observations of the cluster MACS J1149+2223 that have revealed (with high probability) a gravitationally magnified galaxy from the early Universe, at a redshift of z = 9.6 ± 0.2 (that is, a cosmic age of 490 ± 15 million years, or 3.6 per cent of the age of the Universe). We estimate that it formed less than 200 million years after the Big Bang (at the 95 per cent confidence level), implying a formation redshift of ≲14. Given the small sky area that our observations cover, faint galaxies seem to be abundant at such a young cosmic age, suggesting that they may be the dominant source for the early re-ionization of the intergalactic medium.

  18. Safety of gadopentetate dimeglumine after 120 million administrations over 25 years of clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Toru; Hayakawa, Masakane; Shimada, Fumiki; Yabuki, Masahisa; Dohanish, Susan; Palkowitsch, Petra; Yoshikawa, Kohki

    2013-12-25

    We evaluated the safety of gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA), the first contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging, using pharmacovigilance data for spontaneously reported adverse events (AEs) after 120 million cumulative administrations worldwide. We analyzed spontaneously reported AEs for Gd-DTPA for pre-specified time periods between 1988 and 2011. Since the market introduction of Gd-DTPA in 1988, its global utilization reached 120 million cumulative administrations in 2011, more than 80% of which was by the USA, countries in the European Union (EU), and Japan. The global AE reporting rate was 21.2 in 100,000 administrations in 1988 and 14.4 in 100,000 administrations by 2011. Regional differences included higher reporting rates in the USA and Japan, and reporting rates lower than global rates in the EU. The reported rate of global serious AEs changed from 1.4 in 100,000 administrations in 1988 to 4.0 in 100,000 administrations in 2011. The highest number of reports of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) was received from 2006 to 2008. Since 2009, no report of a current onset of NSF has been received. The reduced report rate of NSF may be due to increased awareness about the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). After more than 120 million cumulative administrations, Gd-DTPA is a widely used GBCA that shows a consistently low and stable incidence of AEs.

  19. Political action committees: how much influence will $7.7 million buy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brightbill, T

    1991-01-01

    The influence of health-related political action committees (PACs) continued to grow during the 1990 election campaign. During the first 18 months of the election cycle, contributions from medical and health care PACs to congressional candidates reached a total of $7.7 million. Among the leading PACs were the American Medical Association, American Dental Association, and American Hospital Association, which contributed a total of $3.3 million to congressional races through September 1990. For its study, HealthWeek monitored the contributions and Federal Election Commission reports of 52 leading health care PACs, including professional and trade associations, drug companies, insurers, and other groups. Trade groups made up about two-thirds of all PAC dollars spent, and several of these groups increased their spending significantly in the 1990 election cycle. Key lawmakers on health-related congressional committees received nearly $1.5 million from health care PACs, the study found. In all, 16 senators and representatives received more than $30,000 each from health care PACs. Senator John D. Rockefeller IV (Democrat, West Virginia) and Representative Thomas Tauke (Republican, Iowa) led the Senate and House, respectively, in total PAC receipts.

  20. On enrolling more female students in science and engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouville, Mathieu

    2008-06-01

    Many people hold this truth to be self-evident that universities should enroll more female students in science and engineering; the main question then being how. Typical arguments include possible benefits to women, possible benefits to the economy, and the unfairness of the current female under-representation. However, when clearly stated and scrutinized these arguments in fact lead to the conclusion that there should be more women in scientific disciplines in higher education in the sense that we should expect more women (which various kinds of discrimination may prevent), not that we should actively enroll more women. Outreach programs towards high school students may therefore be logically incompatible with the arguments supposed to justify them. They should purport to allow women to graduate in a field congruent with her abilities and desires, rather than try to draw as many of them to scientific disciplines as possible: one cannot try to 'recruit' as many female students as possible while claiming to help them choose more freely.

  1. Understanding women's choices to enroll in engineering: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eileen

    The underrepresentation of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) college programs is a troublesome local, national and global phenomenon. The topic of this doctoral thesis specifically focused on the underrepresentation of women in the field of engineering and more specifically on the factors that women may perceive as chiefly motivating them to choose engineering as a college major. By not choosing to major in engineering, women forego intellectual opportunities and the financial rewards that engineering careers can provide. Their absence means that the field of engineering also suffers from the lack of contributions from a diverse workforce. Women who graduated from a specific community college's engineering program in the United States were the focus of this qualitative study. Grounded in achievement motivation theory, and in particular expectancy-value theory of academic and career choice, this research was guided by two questions: How do women perceive their academic self-efficacies and expectations for success as influencing their decisions to enroll in engineering? How do women perceive their subjective task values as influencing their decisions to enroll in engineering? This single, holistic case study with one main unit of analysis incorporated a written questionnaire, individual interviews and a focus group meeting as the three instruments used to collect data. The qualitative data, cyclically coded, shed light on the complex mechanisms of academic and career choice.

  2. A Modest POPSCI Proposal: Turn The ISS Into A $2 Million-A-Night Space Hotel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dawn Stover

    2004-01-01

    If the International Space Station (ISS) is completed in 2010 and then becomes obsolete due to rapidly advancing space exploration capabilities, NASA should turn the ISS into the world's most exclusive hotel...

  3. 100 Million Views of Electronic Cigarette YouTube Videos and Counting: Quantification, Content Evaluation, and Engagement Levels of Videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jidong; Kornfield, Rachel; Emery, Sherry L

    2016-03-18

    The video-sharing website, YouTube, has become an important avenue for product marketing, including tobacco products. It may also serve as an important medium for promoting electronic cigarettes, which have rapidly increased in popularity and are heavily marketed online. While a few studies have examined a limited subset of tobacco-related videos on YouTube, none has explored e-cigarette videos' overall presence on the platform. To quantify e-cigarette-related videos on YouTube, assess their content, and characterize levels of engagement with those videos. Understanding promotion and discussion of e-cigarettes on YouTube may help clarify the platform's impact on consumer attitudes and behaviors and inform regulations. Using an automated crawling procedure and keyword rules, e-cigarette-related videos posted on YouTube and their associated metadata were collected between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2013. Metadata were analyzed to describe posting and viewing time trends, number of views, comments, and ratings. Metadata were content coded for mentions of health, safety, smoking cessation, promotional offers, Web addresses, product types, top-selling brands, or names of celebrity endorsers. As of June 30, 2013, approximately 28,000 videos related to e-cigarettes were captured. Videos were posted by approximately 10,000 unique YouTube accounts, viewed more than 100 million times, rated over 380,000 times, and commented on more than 280,000 times. More than 2200 new videos were being uploaded every month by June 2013. The top 1% of most-viewed videos accounted for 44% of total views. Text fields for the majority of videos mentioned websites (70.11%); many referenced health (13.63%), safety (10.12%), smoking cessation (9.22%), or top e-cigarette brands (33.39%). The number of e-cigarette-related YouTube videos was projected to exceed 65,000 by the end of 2014, with approximately 190 million views. YouTube is a major information-sharing platform for electronic cigarettes

  4. A Globally Self-Consistent Model of Plate Motions Relative to the Hotspots for the Past 48 Million Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, E.; Gordon, R. G.

    2012-04-01

    Hotspots are volcanic anomalies, either in an intraplate setting or in the form of excessive volcanism along the plate boundaries, not explained by classic plate tectonics. In the early 70's, along with a deep mantle origin, hotspots were proposed to move so slowly relative to one another such that they could be used as a reference frame fixed in the deep mantle for describing plate motions in an "absolute" sense. Ever since the idea was first introduced, however, the rates of relative hotspot motion, and thus the limits of the hotspot frame of reference, have remained a source of heated debate with suggestions ranging from apparent fixity to rapid motion between the hotspots. The question of inter-hotspot motion is closely related to the estimation of true polar wander—rotation of the whole solid earth relative to the spin axis. A fundamental problem of global tectonics and paleomagnetism is determining which part of apparent polar wander—the apparent movement of age-progressive paleomagnetic poles relative to the continent in question—is due to plate motion, and which part is due to true polar wander. One approach for separating these is available if the hotspots are indeed tracking the motion of the mantle beneath the asthenosphere and are moving slowly relative to one another. In this case, a model of plate motion relative to the hotspots can be used to predict the positions of past paleomagnetic poles relative to the spin axis and thus estimate the amount of true polar wander. Cumulative improvements in the age progression along the hotspot tracks, the geomagnetic reversal time scale, and relative plate reconstructions lead to significant changes in earlier results. In this study, we build on a new method for objectively estimating plate-hotspot rotations and their uncertainties, and on our recent results that have demonstrated no significant motion between the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hotspots since 48 Ma, and present a globally self-consistent model

  5. 100 Million Views of Electronic Cigarette YouTube Videos and Counting: Quantification, Content Evaluation, and Engagement Levels of Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background The video-sharing website, YouTube, has become an important avenue for product marketing, including tobacco products. It may also serve as an important medium for promoting electronic cigarettes, which have rapidly increased in popularity and are heavily marketed online. While a few studies have examined a limited subset of tobacco-related videos on YouTube, none has explored e-cigarette videos’ overall presence on the platform. Objective To quantify e-cigarette-related videos on YouTube, assess their content, and characterize levels of engagement with those videos. Understanding promotion and discussion of e-cigarettes on YouTube may help clarify the platform’s impact on consumer attitudes and behaviors and inform regulations. Methods Using an automated crawling procedure and keyword rules, e-cigarette-related videos posted on YouTube and their associated metadata were collected between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2013. Metadata were analyzed to describe posting and viewing time trends, number of views, comments, and ratings. Metadata were content coded for mentions of health, safety, smoking cessation, promotional offers, Web addresses, product types, top-selling brands, or names of celebrity endorsers. Results As of June 30, 2013, approximately 28,000 videos related to e-cigarettes were captured. Videos were posted by approximately 10,000 unique YouTube accounts, viewed more than 100 million times, rated over 380,000 times, and commented on more than 280,000 times. More than 2200 new videos were being uploaded every month by June 2013. The top 1% of most-viewed videos accounted for 44% of total views. Text fields for the majority of videos mentioned websites (70.11%); many referenced health (13.63%), safety (10.12%), smoking cessation (9.22%), or top e-cigarette brands (33.39%). The number of e-cigarette-related YouTube videos was projected to exceed 65,000 by the end of 2014, with approximately 190 million views. Conclusions YouTube is a major

  6. Nearly 1.4 Million High School Physics Students--Enrollments in AP and Second-Year Courses up 26% Even though Number of Graduates down in 2012-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2014-01-01

    Since 1987, the Statistical Research Center at the American Institute of Physics has regularly conducted a nationwide survey of high school physics teachers to take a closer look at physics in U.S. high schools. We contact all of the teachers who teach at least one physics course at a nationally representative sample of all U.S. high schools-both…

  7. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design (RAPID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    RAPID is a methodology and software system to define a class of airplane configurations and directly evaluate surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity on and about the configurations. A distinguishing characteristic which separates RAPID from other airplane surface modellers is that the output grids and grid sensitivity are directly applicable in CFD analysis. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process which is incorporated into interactive software for 'real time' visual analysis and into batch software for the application of optimization technology. The computed surface grids and volume grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, and vertical tail components. The double-delta wing and tail components are manifested by solving a fourth order partial differential equation (PDE) subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design parameters are incorporated into the boundary conditions and therefore govern the shapes of the surfaces. The PDE solution yields a smooth transition between boundaries. Surface grids suitable for CFD calculation are created by establishing an H-type topology about the configuration and incorporating grid spacing functions in the PDE equation for the lifting components and the fuselage definition equations. User specified grid parameters govern the location and degree of grid concentration. A two-block volume grid about a configuration is calculated using the Control Point Form (CPF) technique. The interactive software, which runs on Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations, allows design parameters to be continuously varied and the resulting surface grid to be observed in real time. The batch software computes both the surface and volume grids and also computes the sensitivity of the output grid with respect to the input design parameters by applying the precompiler tool

  8. Developing the learning physical science curriculum: Adapting a small enrollment, laboratory and discussion based physical science course for large enrollments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Goldberg

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on the adaptation of the small enrollment, lab and discussion based physical science course, Physical Science and Everyday Thinking (PSET, for a large-enrollment, lecture-style setting. Like PSET, the new Learning Physical Science (LEPS curriculum was designed around specific principles based on research on learning to meet the needs of nonscience students, especially prospective and practicing elementary and middle school teachers. We describe the structure of the two curricula and the adaptation process, including a detailed comparison of similar activities from the two curricula and a case study of a LEPS classroom implementation. In LEPS, short instructor-guided lessons replace lengthier small group activities, and movies, rather than hands-on investigations, provide the evidence used to support and test ideas. LEPS promotes student peer interaction as an important part of sense making via “clicker” questions, rather than small group and whole class discussions typical of PSET. Examples of student dialog indicate that this format is capable of generating substantive student discussion and successfully enacting the design principles. Field-test data show similar student content learning gains with the two curricula. Nevertheless, because of classroom constraints, some important practices of science that were an integral part of PSET were not included in LEPS.

  9. Schooling and Industrialization in China: Gender Differences in School Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    The rapid decrease in gender inequality in education over the past several decades in China has drawn significant attention in the existing literature. Several factors have been proposed or examined to explain this decrease. However, few studies have examined this topic from the perspective of the changing job structure and skill requirements in…

  10. Rapid shallow breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the smallest air passages of the lungs in children ( bronchiolitis ) Pneumonia or other lung infection Transient tachypnea of the newborn Anxiety and panic Other serious lung disease Home Care Rapid, shallow breathing should not be treated at home. It is ...

  11. Rapid Strep Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worse than normal. Your first thoughts turn to strep throat. A rapid strep test in your doctor’s office ... your suspicions.Viruses cause most sore throats. However, strep throat is an infection caused by the Group A ...

  12. 3D Discrete Element Model with 1 Million Particles: an Example of Hydro-fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Pollard, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Discrete Element Method (DEM) permits large relative motion and breakage of elements, and does not require re-meshing, for example as would the Finite Element Method. DEM has a wide range of applications in the fields of solid-earth geophysics, geomechanics, mining engineering, and structural geology. However, due to the computational cost, particle numbers of discrete element models are generally less than a few tens of thousands, which limits the applications. A new 3D DEM system 'MatDEM' can complete dynamic simulations of one million particles. The conversion formulas between particle parameters and model mechanical properties were derived, and the conversion of energy in DEM can be simulated. In a recent paper (Liu et al., 2013, JGR), the analytical solutions of elastic properties and failure modes of a 2D close-packed discrete element model were proposed. Based on these theoretical results, it is easy to create materials using DEM, which have similar mechanical properties to rock. Given the mechanical properties and state of stress, geologists and engineers can investigate the characteristics of rock deformation and failure under different conditions. MatDEM provides an alternative way to study the micro-macro relationships of rock and soil, and the evolution of geologic structures. As an example, MatDEM was used to investigate the generation and development of fluid driven fractures around a micro pore. The simulation result of fractures of an anisotropic 3D model, which includes 1 million particles, is demonstrated. Via parallel computing technology, MatDEM may handle tens of millions of particles in near future. Left: Fluid pressure is applied in the pore to generate fractures. Right: Simulation results (black segments represent fractures).

  13. Onset of Antarctic Circumpolar Current 30 million years ago as Tasmanian Gateway aligned with westerlies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Howie D; Whittaker, Joanne M; Williams, Simon E; Latimer, Jennifer C; Kordesch, Wendy E C; Delaney, Margaret L

    2015-07-30

    Earth's mightiest ocean current, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), regulates the exchange of heat and carbon between the ocean and the atmosphere, and influences vertical ocean structure, deep-water production and the global distribution of nutrients and chemical tracers. The eastward-flowing ACC occupies a unique circumglobal pathway in the Southern Ocean that was enabled by the tectonic opening of key oceanic gateways during the break-up of Gondwana (for example, by the opening of the Tasmanian Gateway, which connects the Indian and Pacific oceans). Although the ACC is a key component of Earth's present and past climate system, the timing of the appearance of diagnostic features of the ACC (for example, low zonal gradients in water-mass tracer fields) is poorly known and represents a fundamental gap in our understanding of Earth history. Here we show, using geophysically determined positions of continent-ocean boundaries, that the deep Tasmanian Gateway opened 33.5 ± 1.5 million years ago (the errors indicate uncertainty in the boundary positions). Following this opening, sediments from Indian and Pacific cores recorded Pacific-type neodymium isotope ratios, revealing deep westward flow equivalent to the present-day Antarctic Slope Current. We observe onset of the ACC at around 30 million years ago, when Southern Ocean neodymium isotopes record a permanent shift to modern Indian-Atlantic ratios. Our reconstructions of ocean circulation show that massive reorganization and homogenization of Southern Ocean water masses coincided with migration of the northern margin of the Tasmanian Gateway into the mid-latitude westerly wind band, which we reconstruct at 64° S, near to the northern margin. Onset of the ACC about 30 million years ago coincided with major changes in global ocean circulation and probably contributed to the lower atmospheric carbon dioxide levels that appear after this time.

  14. Innovation for the 'bottom 100 million': eliminating neglected tropical diseases in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotez, Peter J; Dumonteil, Eric; Heffernan, Michael J; Bottazzi, Maria E

    2013-01-01

    An estimated 100 million people in the Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) region live on less than US$2 per day, while another 46 million people in the US live below that nation's poverty line. Almost all of the 'bottom 100 million' people suffer from at least one neglected tropical disease (NTD), including one-half of the poorest people in the region infected with hookworms, 10% with Chagas disease, and up to 1-2% with dengue, schistosomiasis, and/or leishmaniasis. In the US, NTDs such as Chagas disease, cysticercosis, toxocariasis, and trichomoniasis are also common among poor populations. These NTDs trap the poorest people in the region in poverty, because of their impact on maternal and child health, and occupational productivity. Through mass drug administration (MDA), several NTDs are on the verge of elimination in the Americas, including lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, trachoma, and possibly leprosy. In addition, schistosomiasis may soon be eliminated in the Caribbean. However, for other NTDs including hookworm infection, Chagas disease, dengue, schistosomiasis, and leishmaniasis, a new generation of 'anti-poverty vaccines' will be required. Several vaccines for dengue are under development by multinational pharmaceutical companies, whereas others are being pursued through non-profit product development partnerships (PDPs), in collaboration with developing country manufacturers in Brazil and Mexico. The Sabin Vaccine Institute PDP is developing a primarily preventive bivalent recombinant human hookworm vaccine, which is about to enter phase 1 clinical testing in Brazil, as well as a new therapeutic Chagas disease vaccine in collaboration with several Mexican institutions. The Chagas disease vaccine would be administered to seropositive patients to delay or prevent the onset of Chagasic cardiomyopathy (secondary prevention). Together, MDA and the development of new anti-poverty vaccines afford an opportunity to implement effective control and

  15. Onset of Antarctic Circumpolar Current 30 million years ago as Tasmanian Gateway aligned with westerlies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Howie D.; Whittaker, Joanne M.; Williams, Simon E.; Latimer, Jennifer C.; Kordesch, Wendy E. C.; Delaney, Margaret L.

    2015-07-01

    Earth's mightiest ocean current, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), regulates the exchange of heat and carbon between the ocean and the atmosphere, and influences vertical ocean structure, deep-water production and the global distribution of nutrients and chemical tracers. The eastward-flowing ACC occupies a unique circumglobal pathway in the Southern Ocean that was enabled by the tectonic opening of key oceanic gateways during the break-up of Gondwana (for example, by the opening of the Tasmanian Gateway, which connects the Indian and Pacific oceans). Although the ACC is a key component of Earth's present and past climate system, the timing of the appearance of diagnostic features of the ACC (for example, low zonal gradients in water-mass tracer fields) is poorly known and represents a fundamental gap in our understanding of Earth history. Here we show, using geophysically determined positions of continent-ocean boundaries, that the deep Tasmanian Gateway opened 33.5 +/- 1.5 million years ago (the errors indicate uncertainty in the boundary positions). Following this opening, sediments from Indian and Pacific cores recorded Pacific-type neodymium isotope ratios, revealing deep westward flow equivalent to the present-day Antarctic Slope Current. We observe onset of the ACC at around 30 million years ago, when Southern Ocean neodymium isotopes record a permanent shift to modern Indian-Atlantic ratios. Our reconstructions of ocean circulation show that massive reorganization and homogenization of Southern Ocean water masses coincided with migration of the northern margin of the Tasmanian Gateway into the mid-latitude westerly wind band, which we reconstruct at 64° S, near to the northern margin. Onset of the ACC about 30 million years ago coincided with major changes in global ocean circulation and probably contributed to the lower atmospheric carbon dioxide levels that appear after this time.

  16. RAPID3? Aptly named!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, J-M

    2014-01-01

    The RAPID3 score is the sum of three 0-10 patient self-report scores: pain, functional impairment on MDHAQ, and patient global estimate. It requires 5 seconds for scoring and can be used in all rheumatologic conditions, although it has mostly been used in rheumatoid arthritis where cutoffs for low disease activity (12/30) have been set. A RAPID3 score of ≤ 3/30 with 1 or 0 swollen joints (RAPID3 ≤ 3 + ≤ SJ1) provides remission criteria comparable to Boolean, SDAI, CDAI, and DAS28 remission criteria, in far less time than a formal joint count. RAPID3 performs as well as the DAS28 in separating active drugs from placebos in clinical trials. RAPID3 also predicts subsequent structural disease progression. RAPID3 can be determined at short intervals at home, allowing the determination of the area under the curve of disease activity between two visits and flare detection. However, RAPID3 should not be seen as a substitute for DAS28 and face to face visits in routine care. Monitoring patient status with only self-report information without a rheumatologist's advice (including joints and physical examination, and consideration of imaging and laboratory tests) may indeed be as undesirable for most patients than joint examination without a patient questionnaire. Conversely, combining the RAPID3 and the DAS28 may consist in faster or more sensitive confirmation that a medication is effective. Similarly, better enquiring of most important concerns of patients (pain, functional status and overall opinion on their disorder) should reinforces patients' confidence in their rheumatologist and treatments.

  17. Students' Attitudes and Enrollment Trends in Physics and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjong, Delphine

    Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields are critical for meeting ever-increasing demands in the U.S. for STEM and related skills, and for ensuring the global competitiveness of the United States in technological advancement and scientific innovation. Nonetheless, few U.S. students consider a STEM degree after high school and fewer STEM students end up graduating with a STEM degree. In 2012, the United States ranked 35th in math and 27th in science out of 64 participating countries in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), sponsored by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Considering the significant role physics and engineering play in technological advancement, this work investigates the attitudes of students and recent enrollment trends in these important subject areas.

  18. An automatically configured modular algorithm for post enrollment course timetabling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fawcett, Chris; Hoos, Holger; Chiarandini, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Timetabling tasks form a widely studied type of resource scheduling problem, with important real-world applications in schools, universities and other educational settings. In this work, we focus on postenrollment course timetabling, the problem that was covered by Track 2 of the recent 2nd...... International Timetabling Competition (ITC2007). Following an approach that makes strong use of automated exploration of a large design space of modular and highly parameterised stochastic local search algorithms for this problem, we have obtained a solver that achieves consistently better performance than...... the top-ranked solver from the competition. This represents a substantial improvement in the state of the art for post-enrollment course timetabling....

  19. One million years of glaciation and denudation history in west Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strunk, Astrid; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; Egholm, David Lundbek

    2017-01-01

    The influence of major Quaternary climatic changes on growth and decay of the Greenland Ice Sheet, and associated erosional impact on the landscapes, is virtually unknown beyond the last deglaciation. Here we quantify exposure and denudation histories in west Greenland by applying a novel Markov...... different glacial landforms caused by variations in ice thickness across the landscape. We furthermore show that the present day ice-free areas only were ice covered ca. 45% of the past 1 million years, and even less at high-elevation sites, implying that the Greenland Ice Sheet for much of the time...

  20. Geo-targeted Weather Alerts Coming to Millions of Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Personal Localized Alert Network (PLAN), aka Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS), is readying for roll out and will be broadcasting emergency public alerts to millions of cell phones by the middle of 2012. Learn how the National Weather Serivce (NWS) is supplying PLAN with geo-referenced weather alert information in the industry standard Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) format and how you can access this same information for integration with mobile devices, other consumer electronics, and decision support systems. Information will also be provided on the NWS' new collaborative venue that encourages wide participation in the evolution and use of NWS CAP alerts in a variety of applications.

  1. A new ascarid species in cynodont coprolite dated of 240 million years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRISCILLA A. DA SILVA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cynodonts represent the transition from reptiles to mammals. They are classified as synapsids, or tetrapod animals with mammalian characteristics. We present here the finding of helminth eggs in a coprolite identified as of cynodont origin dated of nearly 240 million years. Microscopy revealed the presence of very well preserved intestinal parasite eggs. Up to now we identified an ascarid egg by morphological characteristics. Based on a previous description of the new genus Ascarites Poinar Jr and Boucot 2006 in coprolites of iguanodons from Belgium, we propose a new species, Ascarites rufferi n.sp. in cynodonts, a host that inhabited the Southern Region of Brazil in the Triassic period.

  2. Revival and Identification of Bacterial Spores in 25- to 40-Million-Year-Old Dominican Amber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Raul J.; Borucki, Monica K.

    1995-05-01

    A bacterial spore was revived, cultured, and identified from the abdominal contents of extinct bees preserved for 25 to 40 million years in buried Dominican amber. Rigorous surface decontamination of the amber and aseptic procedures were used during the recovery of the bacterium. Several lines of evidence indicated that the isolated bacterium was of ancient origin and not an extant contaminant. The characteristic enzymatic, biochemical, and 16S ribosomal DNA profiles indicated that the ancient bacterium is most closely related to extant Bacillus sphaericus.

  3. The Surface Age of Sputnik Planum, Pluto, Must Be Less than 10 Million Years

    OpenAIRE

    Trilling, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Data from the New Horizons mission to Pluto show no craters on Sputnik Planum down to the detection limit (2 km for low resolution data, 625 m for high resolution data). The number of small Kuiper Belt Objects that should be impacting Pluto is known to some degree from various astronomical surveys. We combine these geological and telescopic observations to make an order of magnitude estimate that the surface age of Sputnik Planum must be less than 10 million years. This maximum surface age is...

  4. Weekday variation in triglyceride concentrations in 1.8 million blood samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaskolowski, Jörn; Ritz, Christian; Sjödin, Anders Mikael

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Triglyceride (TG) concentration is used as a marker of cardio-metabolic risk. However, diurnal and possibly weekday variation exists in TG concentrations. OBJECTIVE: To investigate weekday variation in TG concentrations among 1.8 million blood samples drawn between 2008 and 2015 from...... variations in TG concentrations were recorded for out-patients between the age of 9 to 26 years, with up to 20% higher values on Mondays compared to Fridays (all PTriglyceride concentrations were highest after the weekend and gradually declined during the week. We suggest that unhealthy...

  5. Automatically Augmenting Lifelog Events Using Pervasively Generated Content from Millions of People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan F. Smeaton

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In sensor research we take advantage of additional contextual sensor information to disambiguate potentially erroneous sensor readings or to make better informed decisions on a single sensor’s output. This use of additional information reinforces, validates, semantically enriches, and augments sensed data. Lifelog data is challenging to augment, as it tracks one’s life with many images including the places they go, making it non-trivial to find associated sources of information. We investigate realising the goal of pervasive user-generated content based on sensors, by augmenting passive visual lifelogs with “Web 2.0” content collected by millions of other individuals.

  6. Automatically augmenting lifelog events using pervasively generated content from millions of people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Aiden R; Smeaton, Alan F

    2010-01-01

    In sensor research we take advantage of additional contextual sensor information to disambiguate potentially erroneous sensor readings or to make better informed decisions on a single sensor's output. This use of additional information reinforces, validates, semantically enriches, and augments sensed data. Lifelog data is challenging to augment, as it tracks one's life with many images including the places they go, making it non-trivial to find associated sources of information. We investigate realising the goal of pervasive user-generated content based on sensors, by augmenting passive visual lifelogs with "Web 2.0" content collected by millions of other individuals.

  7. Comparison of survival among eligible patients not enrolled versus enrolled in the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) randomized trial of pre-enucleation radiation of large choroidal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Marta M; Diener-West, Marie; Hawkins, Barbara S

    2007-01-01

    To compare survival between patients enrolled in the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) randomized trial of pre-enucleation radiation therapy (PERT) for large choroidal melanoma and eligible patients who did not enroll. COMS clinical center personnel prospectively reported to the COMS Coordinating Center all patients with choroidal melanoma examined between November 1986 and December 1994. Deaths of enrolled patients were reported prospectively by clinical center personnel. In a COMS ancillary study, we retrospectively searched medical records of participating clinical centers, the Social Security Death Index, and the National Death Index to determine vital status of eligible patients not enrolled. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to compare survival within 10 years of baseline reporting and before July 31, 2000, of enrolled patients versus eligible patients not enrolled. Clinical centers that received local institutional review board approval to participate in this ancillary study prospectively reported on 129 of 299 eligible patients not enrolled in the COMS PERT trial. The baseline characteristics of the 129 patients included in this ancillary study were similar to those of the 170 patients not included; 73 patients were reported as deceased. Previously identified prognostic covariates, i.e., age and longest tumor diameter, were confirmed to predict survival in both enrolled patients and eligible patients not enrolled; trial enrollment was not predictive. After adjusting for prognostic covariates and stratifying by clinical center, the estimated hazard ratio (enrolled vs. not-enrolled) was 1.12 (95% confidence interval: 0.83 to 1.51). The results of the COMS PERT trial should be generalizable to all patients with choroidal melanoma meeting the eligibility criteria for that trial. While the methods we used may not be generalizable to all clinical trials because of unique features of the COMS, other researchers may be able to use similar methods

  8. The Resilience of Women in Higher Education in Afghanistan. Study No 1: Obstacles and Opportunities in Women's Enrollment and Graduation; Study No. 2: The Human, Social and Institutional Resilience of Female Doctors and Postgraduate Residency Programs. Resilience in Education Settings (RES)-Research Studies Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosha, Afifa; Oriya, Spozhmay; Nabi, Tahira; Halim, Sabera; Hofyani, Sohaila; Liwal, Abida; Safi, Najibullah; Sahak, Mohamad Nadir; Noormal, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    Female access to higher education in Afghanistan has been and continues to be limited. At the basic education level, the country has made great advances since 2000; it increased access from 900,000 students in 2000, almost all boys, to 6.7 million students in 2009, and girl's enrollment increased from 5,000 under the Taliban to 2.4 million in the…

  9. Twenty-million-year relationship between mammalian diversity and primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Susanne A.; Eronen, Jussi T.; Schnitzler, Jan; Hof, Christian; Janis, Christine M.; Mulch, Andreas; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Graham, Catherine H.

    2016-01-01

    At global and regional scales, primary productivity strongly correlates with richness patterns of extant animals across space, suggesting that resource availability and climatic conditions drive patterns of diversity. However, the existence and consistency of such diversity–productivity relationships through geological history is unclear. Here we provide a comprehensive quantitative test of the diversity–productivity relationship for terrestrial large mammals through time across broad temporal and spatial scales. We combine >14,000 occurrences for 690 fossil genera through the Neogene (23–1.8 Mya) with regional estimates of primary productivity from fossil plant communities in North America and Europe. We show a significant positive diversity–productivity relationship through the 20-million-year record, providing evidence on unprecedented spatial and temporal scales that this relationship is a general pattern in the ecology and paleo-ecology of our planet. Further, we discover that genus richness today does not match the fossil relationship, suggesting that a combination of human impacts and Pleistocene climate variability has modified the 20-million-year ecological relationship by strongly reducing primary productivity and driving many mammalian species into decline or to extinction. PMID:27621451

  10. A 3D photograph with 92 million pixels for tagging particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    Where was a given particle born? How can we tag it precisely enough to be able to then follow it along its track and through its decays? This is the job of the pixel detector installed at the heart of the ATLAS detector, only centimeters away from the LHC collisions. In order to improve its identification and tagging capabilities, the ATLAS collaboration has recently taken a big step towards the completion of the upgrade of its Pixel detector, which will include the insertion of a brand-new layer of 12 million pixels.   The 7 metre long beryllium beam pipe inserted in the carbon-fibre positioning tool is being prepared ready for the new innermost layer of the Pixel detector to be mounted. Photo: ATLAS Collaboration. With its three layers and 80 million channels concentrated in 2.2 square metres, the ATLAS pixel detector was already the world’s largest pixel-based system used in particle physics. Its excellent performance was instrumental in the discovery of the Higgs boson in July ...

  11. Herbivores increase the global availability of nutrients over millions of years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Christopher E

    2017-12-01

    Can the presence of herbivores increase global nutrient availability? Animals disperse vital nutrients through ecosystems, increasing the spatial availability of these nutrients. Large herbivores are especially important for the dispersal of vital nutrients due to their long food passage times and day ranges, and large herbivores from past periods (the Pleistocene) may have increased nutrient concentrations on the continental scale. However, such results have been demonstrated theoretically but not yet empirically. Models suggest that the Pennsylvanian subperiod (323-299 million years ago), with no tetrapod terrestrial herbivores, would have had fewer, less-well-distributed nutrients than the Cretaceous period (145-66 million years ago), with the largest terrestrial herbivores ever-the sauropods. Here, I show that these models are supported empirically by remnant plant material (coal deposits) from the Cretaceous (N = 680), which had significantly (P < 0.00001) increased concentrations (136%) and decreased spatial heterogeneity (22%) of plant-important rock-derived nutrients compared with the Pennsylvanian subperiod (N = 4,996). Non-biotic physical processes, such as weathering rates, cannot account for such differences, because aluminium-a nutrient not important for plants and animals, but weathered in a similar manner to the above elements-showed no significant difference between the two periods, suggesting that these large changes were driven by plant-herbivore interactions. Populations of large wild herbivores are currently at historical lows; therefore, we are potentially losing a key ecosystem service.

  12. luxS in bacteria isolated from 25- to 40-million-year-old amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Patrício, Ana R; Rivera, Jessica I; Coradin, Mariel; Gonzalez, Alfredo; Tirado, Gabriela; Cano, Raúl J; Toranzos, Gary A

    2014-01-01

    Interspecies bacterial communication is mediated by autoinducer-2, whose synthesis depends on luxS. Due to the apparent universality of luxS (present in more than 40 bacterial species), it may have an ancient origin; however, no direct evidence is currently available. We amplified luxS in bacteria isolated from 25- to 40-million-year-old amber. The phylogenies and molecular clocks of luxS and the 16S rRNA gene from ancient and extant bacteria were determined as well. Luminescence assays using Vibrio harveyi BB170 aimed to determine the activity of luxS. While the phylogeny of luxS was very similar to that of extant Bacillus spp., amber isolates exhibited unique 16S rRNA gene phylogenies. This suggests that luxS may have been acquired by horizontal transfer millions of years ago. Molecular clocks of luxS suggest slow evolutionary rates, similar to those of the 16S rRNA gene and consistent with a conserved gene. Dendograms of the 16S rRNA gene and luxS show two separate clusters for the extant and ancient bacteria, confirming the uniqueness of the latter group. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A 61-million-person experiment in social influence and political mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Robert M.; Fariss, Christopher J.; Jones, Jason J.; Kramer, Adam D. I.; Marlow, Cameron; Settle, Jaime E.; Fowler, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Human behaviour is thought to spread through face-to-face social networks, but it is difficult to identify social influence effects in observational studies9–13, and it is unknown whether online social networks operate in the same way14–19. Here we report results from a randomized controlled trial of political mobilization messages delivered to 61 million Facebook users during the 2010 US congressional elections. The results show that the messages directly influenced political self-expression, information seeking and real-world voting behaviour of millions of people. Furthermore, the messages not only influenced the users who received them but also the users’ friends, and friends of friends. The effect of social transmission on real-world voting was greater than the direct effect of the messages themselves, and nearly all the transmission occurred between ‘close friends’ who were more likely to have a face-to-face relationship. These results suggest that strong ties are instrumental for spreading both online and real-world behaviour in human social networks. PMID:22972300

  14. Fortifying baladi bread in Egypt: reaching more than 50 million people through the subsidy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhakim, Nadine; Laillou, Arnaud; El Nakeeb, Anwar; Yacoub, Rukia; Shehata, Magdy

    2012-12-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies, especially iron-deficiency anemia, are a public health problem in Egypt, where anemia rates almost doubled in the years from 2000 to 2005. In 2008, the Government of Egypt began implementation of a 5-year national program to fortify with iron and folic acid the wheat flour used in baking subsidized baladi bread, the staple food consumed by a majority of low- income groups. To project the achievements of this national Wheat Flour Fortification Program. This paper describes the program, estimates the production of fortified flour and consumption of fortified bread, and identifies program challenges and sustainability issues. Through the national Wheat Flour Fortification Program, ferrous sulfate and folic acid are now added to all wheat flour produced under the national Food Subsidy Program. Up to 50 million Egyptians nationwide are now consuming quality-assured fortified baladi bread on a daily basis. In 2011, 6.5 million MT of fortified wheat flour was produced by 143 participating public- and private-sector mills. Political changes in Egypt in 2011 did not seem to affect the program; the new leadership in the Ministry of Supply and Internal Trade remains committed to fortification of wheat flour. The daily intake of approximately 12 mg of iron and 600 microg of folic acid through the consumption of baladi bread suggests that the impact of the program on the prevention and reduction of iron and folate deficiencies among the Egyptian population could be significant; the results of an end-line survey are pending.

  15. Born too soon: accelerating actions for prevention and care of 15 million newborns born too soon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Joy E; Kinney, Mary V; Belizan, José M; Mason, Elizabeth Mary; McDougall, Lori; Larson, Jim; Lackritz, Eve; Friberg, Ingrid K; Howson, Christopher P

    2013-01-01

    Preterm birth complication is the leading cause of neonatal death resulting in over one million deaths each year of the 15 million babies born preterm. To accelerate change, we provide an overview of the comprehensive strategy required, the tools available for context-specifi c health system implementation now, and the priorities for research and innovation. There is an urgent need for action on a dual track: (1) through strategic research to advance the prevention of preterm birth and (2) improved implementation and innovation for care of the premature neonate. We highlight evidence-based interventions along the continuum of care, noting gaps in coverage, quality, equity and implications for integration and scale up. Improved metrics are critical for both burden and tracking programmatic change. Linked to the United Nation’s Every Women Every Child strategy, a target was set for 50% reduction in preterm deaths by 2025. Three analyses informed this target: historical change in high income countries, recent progress in best performing countries, and modelling of mortality reduction with high coverage of existing interventions. If universal coverage of selected interventions were to be achieved, then 84% or more than 921,000 preterm neonatal deaths could be prevented annually, with antenatal corticosteroids and Kangaroo Mother Care having the highest impact. Everyone has a role to play in reaching this target including government leaders, professionals, private sector, and of course families who are aff ected the most and whose voices have been critical for change in many of the countries with the most progress.

  16. A progressively wetter climate in southern East Africa over the past 1.3 million years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. C.; Werne, J. P.; Brown, E. T.; Abbott, A.; Berke, M.; Steinman, B. A.; Halbur, J.; Contreras, S.; Grosshuesch, S.; Deino, A.; Scholz, C. A.; Lyons, R. P.; Schouten, S.; Damsté, J. S. Sinninghe

    2016-09-01

    African climate is generally considered to have evolved towards progressively drier conditions over the past few million years, with increased variability as glacial-interglacial change intensified worldwide. Palaeoclimate records derived mainly from northern Africa exhibit a 100,000-year (eccentricity) cycle overprinted on a pronounced 20,000-year (precession) beat, driven by orbital forcing of summer insolation, global ice volume and long-lived atmospheric greenhouse gases. Here we present a 1.3-million-year-long climate history from the Lake Malawi basin (10°-14° S in eastern Africa), which displays strong 100,000-year (eccentricity) cycles of temperature and rainfall following the Mid-Pleistocene Transition around 900,000 years ago. Interglacial periods were relatively warm and moist, while ice ages were cool and dry. The Malawi record shows limited evidence for precessional variability, which we attribute to the opposing effects of austral summer insolation and the temporal/spatial pattern of sea surface temperature in the Indian Ocean. The temperature history of the Malawi basin, at least for the past 500,000 years, strongly resembles past changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide and terrigenous dust flux in the tropical Pacific Ocean, but not in global ice volume. Climate in this sector of eastern Africa (unlike northern Africa) evolved from a predominantly arid environment with high-frequency variability to generally wetter conditions with more prolonged wet and dry intervals.

  17. Twenty-million-year relationship between mammalian diversity and primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Susanne A.; Eronen, Jussi T.; Schnitzler, Jan; Hof, Christian; Janis, Christine M.; Mulch, Andreas; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Graham, Catherine H.

    2016-09-01

    At global and regional scales, primary productivity strongly correlates with richness patterns of extant animals across space, suggesting that resource availability and climatic conditions drive patterns of diversity. However, the existence and consistency of such diversity-productivity relationships through geological history is unclear. Here we provide a comprehensive quantitative test of the diversity-productivity relationship for terrestrial large mammals through time across broad temporal and spatial scales. We combine >14,000 occurrences for 690 fossil genera through the Neogene (23-1.8 Mya) with regional estimates of primary productivity from fossil plant communities in North America and Europe. We show a significant positive diversity-productivity relationship through the 20-million-year record, providing evidence on unprecedented spatial and temporal scales that this relationship is a general pattern in the ecology and paleo-ecology of our planet. Further, we discover that genus richness today does not match the fossil relationship, suggesting that a combination of human impacts and Pleistocene climate variability has modified the 20-million-year ecological relationship by strongly reducing primary productivity and driving many mammalian species into decline or to extinction.

  18. Aerodynamic journal bearing with a flexible, damped support operating at 7.2 million DN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waumans, Tobias; Peirs, Jan; Al-Bender, Farid; Reynaerts, Dominiek

    2011-10-01

    This paper reports on the design, development and experimental validation of an aerodynamic journal bearing with a flexible, damped support operating at speeds up to 1.2 million rpm (= 7.2 million DN). In terms of the DN-number, this achievement represents to our knowledge a record for an air bearing of the self-acting type. Stabilization by means of a flexible, damped support therefore proves to be a promising solution to the dynamic stability problem of high-speed gas bearings. In order to select the support parameters in an optimal way, a stability study is performed leading to the formulation of a series of dimensionless design guidelines. The proposed implementation, which makes use of elastomeric O-rings in combination with a tunable squeeze-film damper, is discussed in detail. A method for the manufacturing of miniature bearing bushes with a wave-shaped film height profile is outlined. Experiments up to 683 280 rpm are performed with an air-driven turbine and up to 1203 000 rpm with a helium-driven turbine. Deceleration experiments are conducted in order to obtain an estimation of the frictional losses of the system.

  19. Future climate forcing potentially without precedent in the last 420 million years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Gavin L.; Royer, Dana L.; Lunt, Daniel J.

    2017-04-01

    The evolution of Earth's climate on geological timescales is largely driven by variations in the magnitude of total solar irradiance (TSI) and changes in the greenhouse gas content of the atmosphere. Here we show that the slow ~50 Wm-2 increase in TSI over the last ~420 million years (an increase of ~9 Wm-2 of radiative forcing) was almost completely negated by a long-term decline in atmospheric CO2. This was likely due to the silicate weathering-negative feedback and the expansion of land plants that together ensured Earth's long-term habitability. Humanity's fossil-fuel use, if unabated, risks taking us, by the middle of the twenty-first century, to values of CO2 not seen since the early Eocene (50 million years ago). If CO2 continues to rise further into the twenty-third century, then the associated large increase in radiative forcing, and how the Earth system would respond, would likely be without geological precedent in the last half a billion years.

  20. Isolation of a 250 million-year-old halotolerant bacterium from a primary salt crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreeland, Russell H.; Rosenzweig, William D.; Powers, Dennis W.

    2000-10-01

    Bacteria have been found associated with a variety of ancient samples, however few studies are generally accepted due to questions about sample quality and contamination. When Cano and Borucki isolated a strain of Bacillus sphaericus from an extinct bee trapped in 25-30 million-year-old amber, careful sample selection and stringent sterilization techniques were the keys to acceptance. Here we report the isolation and growth of a previously unrecognized spore-forming bacterium (Bacillus species, designated 2-9-3) from a brine inclusion within a 250million-year-old salt crystal from the Permian Salado Formation. Complete gene sequences of the 16S ribosomal DNA show that the organism is part of the lineage of Bacillus marismortui and Virgibacillus pantothenticus. Delicate crystal structures and sedimentary features indicate the salt has not recrystallized since formation. Samples were rejected if brine inclusions showed physical signs of possible contamination. Surfaces of salt crystal samples were sterilized with strong alkali and acid before extracting brines from inclusions. Sterilization procedures reduce the probability of contamination to less than 1 in 10 9.

  1. The first fossil leaf insect: 47 million years of specialized cryptic morphology and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedmann, Sonja; Bradler, Sven; Rust, Jes

    2007-01-09

    Stick and leaf insects (insect order Phasmatodea) are represented primarily by twig-imitating slender forms. Only a small percentage ( approximately 1%) of extant phasmids belong to the leaf insects (Phylliinae), which exhibit an extreme form of morphological and behavioral leaf mimicry. Fossils of phasmid insects are extremely rare worldwide. Here we report the first fossil leaf insect, Eophyllium messelensis gen. et sp. nov., from 47-million-year-old deposits at Messel in Germany. The new specimen, a male, is exquisitely preserved and displays the same foliaceous appearance as extant male leaf insects. Clearly, an advanced form of extant angiosperm leaf mimicry had already evolved early in the Eocene. We infer that this trait was combined with a special behavior, catalepsy or "adaptive stillness," enabling Eophyllium to deceive visually oriented predators. Potential predators reported from the Eocene are birds, early primates, and bats. The combination of primitive and derived characters revealed by Eophyllium allows the determination of its exact phylogenetic position and illuminates the evolution of leaf mimicry for this insect group. It provides direct evidence that Phylliinae originated at least 47 Mya. Eophyllium enlarges the known geographical range of Phylliinae, currently restricted to southeast Asia, which is apparently a relict distribution. This fossil leaf insect bears considerable resemblance to extant individuals in size and cryptic morphology, indicating minimal change in 47 million years. This absence of evolutionary change is an outstanding example of morphological and, probably, behavioral stasis.

  2. Lifestyle factors and primary glioma and meningioma tumours in the Million Women Study cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, V S; Pirie, K; Green, J; Casabonne, D; Beral, V

    2008-07-08

    Previous studies have reported inconsistent results on the effect of anthropometric and lifestyle factors on the risk of developing glioma or meningioma tumours. A prospective cohort of 1.3 million middle-aged women was used to examine these relationships. During 7.7 million women-years of follow-up, a total of 1563 women were diagnosed with a primary incident central nervous system tumour: 646 tumours were classified as glioma and 390 as meningioma. Our results show that height is related to the incidence of all central nervous system tumours with a risk of about 20% per 10 cm increase in height (relative risk=1.19, 95% CI=1.10-1.30 per 10 cm increase in height, P<0.001): the risks did not differ significantly between specified glioma and meningioma. Body mass index (BMI) was also related to central nervous system tumour incidence, with a risk of about 20% per 10 kg m(-2) increase in BMI (relative risk=1.17, 95% CI=1.03-1.34 per 10 kg m(-2) increase in BMI, P=0.02). Smoking status, alcohol intake, socioeconomic level, parity, age at first birth, and oral contraceptive use were not associated with the risk of glioma or meningioma tumours. In conclusion, for women in the United Kingdom, the incidence of glioma or meningioma tumours increases with increasing height and increasing BMI.

  3. The economic consequences of malnutrition in Cambodia, more than 400 million US dollar lost annually.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagriansky, Jack; Champa, Ngy; Pak, Kimchoeun; Whitney, Sophie; Laillou, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Cambodia is among the 28 worst countries globally with the highest rates of childhood malnutrition. The aim of the assessment was to apply published evidence associating malnutrition and a variety of functional consequences to project economic implications of this high rate of childhood malnutrition. Such information is vital to advocate for appropriate programs and action plan to reduce malnutrition (from severe stunting to micronutrient deficiencies). This exercise used a "consequence model" to apply these "coefficients of loss" established in the global scientific literature to Cambodia health, demographic and economic data to develop a national estimation of the economic losses link to malnutrition. The impact of the indicators of malnutrition analysed represent a burden to the national economy of Cambodia estimated at more than $400 million annually -2.5% of GDP. Micronutrient deficiencies suggest deficits in the quality of the diet - representing a national burden of more than $200 million annually while breastfeeding behaviours account for 6% of the burden. 57% of the losses emerge from indicators measured in children, while 43% of losses are from indicators independent of childhood measurements - indicators of maternal behaviour along with maternal and adult nutrition. Given the low cost of interventions and the high baseline losses, investment in nutrition programs in Cambodia is likely to offer high returns and attractive benefit cost ratios. Since nearly half the losses are determined prior to the birth of the child, this has implications for targeting and timing of programs.

  4. Toward Millions of File System IOPS on Low-Cost, Commodity Hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Da; Burns, Randal; Szalay, Alexander S

    2013-01-01

    We describe a storage system that removes I/O bottlenecks to achieve more than one million IOPS based on a user-space file abstraction for arrays of commodity SSDs. The file abstraction refactors I/O scheduling and placement for extreme parallelism and non-uniform memory and I/O. The system includes a set-associative, parallel page cache in the user space. We redesign page caching to eliminate CPU overhead and lock-contention in non-uniform memory architecture machines. We evaluate our design on a 32 core NUMA machine with four, eight-core processors. Experiments show that our design delivers 1.23 million 512-byte read IOPS. The page cache realizes the scalable IOPS of Linux asynchronous I/O (AIO) and increases user-perceived I/O performance linearly with cache hit rates. The parallel, set-associative cache matches the cache hit rates of the global Linux page cache under real workloads.

  5. Baseline intrinsic flammability of Earth’s ecosystems estimated from paleoatmospheric oxygen over the past 350 million years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, Claire M.; Yearsley, Jonathan M.; Hadden, Rory M.; McElwain, Jennifer C.; Rein, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric oxygen (O2) is estimated to have varied greatly throughout Earth’s history and has been capable of influencing wildfire activity wherever fuel and ignition sources were present. Fires consume huge quantities of biomass in all ecosystems and play an important role in biogeochemical cycles. This means that understanding the influence of O2 on past fire activity has far-reaching consequences for the evolution of life and Earth’s biodiversity over geological timescales. We have used a strong electrical ignition source to ignite smoldering fires, and we measured their self-sustaining propagation in atmospheres of different oxygen concentrations. These data have been used to build a model that we use to estimate the baseline intrinsic flammability of Earth’s ecosystems according to variations in O2 over the past 350 million years (Ma). Our aim is to highlight times in Earth’s history when fire has been capable of influencing the Earth system. We reveal that fire activity would be greatly suppressed below 18.5% O2, entirely switched off below 16% O2, and rapidly enhanced between 19–22% O2. We show that fire activity and, therefore, its influence on the Earth system would have been high during the Carboniferous (350–300 Ma) and Cretaceous (145–65 Ma) periods; intermediate in the Permian (299–251 Ma), Late Triassic (285–201 Ma), and Jurassic (201–145 Ma) periods; and surprisingly low to lacking in the Early–Middle Triassic period between 250–240 Ma. These baseline variations in Earth’s flammability must be factored into our understanding of past vegetation, biodiversity, evolution, and biogeochemical cycles. PMID:21149686

  6. 76 FR 67743 - Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Provider Enrollment Application Fee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... Medicare or Medicaid programs or Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); revalidating their Medicare... Health Insurance Programs; Additional Screening Requirements, Application Fees, Temporary Enrollment..., Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) provider enrollment processes. Specifically, and...

  7. 76 FR 16422 - Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Provider Enrollment Application Fee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... Health Insurance Programs; Provider Enrollment Application Fee Amount for 2011 AGENCY: Centers for... with comment period entitled: ``Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs... Health Insurance Program (CHIP) provider enrollment processes. Specifically, and as stated in 42 CFR 424...

  8. 78 FR 12829 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for EFTPS Individual Enrollment with Third Party...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... Party Authorization Form AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request... comments concerning EFTPS Individual Enrollment with Third Party Authorization Form. DATES: [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: EFTPS Individual Enrollment with Third Party...

  9. Intergenerational enrollment and expenditure changes in Medicaid: trends from 1991 to 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Stephen W

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From its inception, Medicaid was aimed at providing insurance coverage for low income children, elderly, and disabled. Since this time, children have become a smaller proportion of the US population and Medicaid has expanded to additional eligibility groups. We sought to evaluate relative growth in spending in the Medicaid program between children and adults from 1991-2005. We hypothesize that this shifting demographic will result in fewer resources being allocated to children in the Medicaid program. Methods We utilized retrospective enrollment and expenditure data for children, adults and the elderly from 1991 to 2005 for both Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program Medicaid expansion programs. Data were obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services using their Medicaid Statistical Information System. Results From 1991 to 2005, the number of enrollees increased by 83% to 58.7 million. This includes increases of 33% for children, 100% for adults and 50% for the elderly. Concurrently, total expenditures nationwide rose 150% to $273 billion. Expenditures for children increased from $23.4 to $65.7 billion, adults from $46.2 to $123.6 billion, and elderly from $39.2 to $71.3 billion. From 1999 to 2005, Medicaid spending on long-term care increased by 31% to $84.3 billion. Expenditures on the disabled grew by 61% to $119 billion. In total, the disabled account for 43% and long-term care 31%, of the total Medicaid budget. Conclusion Our study did not find an absolute decrease in the overall resources being directed toward children. However, increased spending on adults on a per-capita and absolute basis, particularly disabled adults, is responsible for much of the growth in spending over the past 15 years. Medicaid expenditures have grown faster than inflation and overall national health expenditures. A national strategy is needed to ensure adequate coverage for Medicaid recipients while dealing with the

  10. Intergenerational enrollment and expenditure changes in Medicaid: trends from 1991 to 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Stephen W; Freed, Gary L

    2012-09-20

    From its inception, Medicaid was aimed at providing insurance coverage for low income children, elderly, and disabled. Since this time, children have become a smaller proportion of the US population and Medicaid has expanded to additional eligibility groups. We sought to evaluate relative growth in spending in the Medicaid program between children and adults from 1991-2005. We hypothesize that this shifting demographic will result in fewer resources being allocated to children in the Medicaid program. We utilized retrospective enrollment and expenditure data for children, adults and the elderly from 1991 to 2005 for both Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Program Medicaid expansion programs. Data were obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services using their Medicaid Statistical Information System. From 1991 to 2005, the number of enrollees increased by 83% to 58.7 million. This includes increases of 33% for children, 100% for adults and 50% for the elderly. Concurrently, total expenditures nationwide rose 150% to $273 billion. Expenditures for children increased from $23.4 to $65.7 billion, adults from $46.2 to $123.6 billion, and elderly from $39.2 to $71.3 billion. From 1999 to 2005, Medicaid spending on long-term care increased by 31% to $84.3 billion. Expenditures on the disabled grew by 61% to $119 billion. In total, the disabled account for 43% and long-term care 31%, of the total Medicaid budget. Our study did not find an absolute decrease in the overall resources being directed toward children. However, increased spending on adults on a per-capita and absolute basis, particularly disabled adults, is responsible for much of the growth in spending over the past 15 years. Medicaid expenditures have grown faster than inflation and overall national health expenditures. A national strategy is needed to ensure adequate coverage for Medicaid recipients while dealing with the ongoing constraints of state and federal budgets.

  11. An Expectancy-Value Model for Sustained Enrolment Intentions of Senior Secondary Physics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Jessy; Barker, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the predictive influences of achievement motivational variables that may sustain students' engagement in physics and influence their future enrolment plans in the subject. Unlike most studies attempting to address the decline of physics enrolments through capturing students' intention to enrol in physics before ever…

  12. Community Colleges and Labor Market Conditions: How Does Enrollment Demand Change Relative to Local Unemployment Rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Nicholas W.; Orians, Erica Lee

    2013-01-01

    This study uses fixed-effects panel data techniques to estimate the elasticity of community college enrollment demand relative to local unemployment rates. The findings suggest that community college enrollment demand is counter-cyclical to changes in the labor market, as enrollments rise during periods of weak economic conditions. Using national…

  13. The Role of Academic Motivation and Engagement on the Relationship between Dual Enrollment and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    I examine whether academic motivation and engagement--conditions that advocates consider mechanisms for the effect of dual enrollment--account for the relationship between dual enrollment and academic performance. Few studies examine the claimed mechanisms that account for the impact of dual enrollment, which leaves the processes through which…

  14. Strategic Enrolment Management (SEM) in Self-Financed Higher Education of Hong Kong: Evaluation and Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Peggy; Galbraith, Craig

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine how the dimensions of strategic enrolment management (SEM) tie to the success metrics in the area of enrolment, retention and graduation from senior and programme management perspectives of a self-financed institution in Hong Kong. The literature on SEM has demonstrated that managing enrolment is a global…

  15. The Effects of Head Start Enrollment Duration on Migrant Children's Dental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyunghee

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors affecting Migrant Head Start (MHS) children's dental health. Enrollment duration (number of years and weeks enrolled) and individual and family factors were considered. Children (N = 931) who enrolled in Michigan Migrant Head Start during 2012-2013 were selected for the study sample and classified…

  16. 42 CFR 422.314 - Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in MA MSA plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in MA MSA... Advantage Organizations § 422.314 Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in MA MSA plans. (a... the beneficiary is enrolled in the MSA plan. (2) CMS deposits the full amount to which a beneficiary...

  17. 34 CFR 75.650 - Participation of students enrolled in private schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Participation of students enrolled in private schools... Participation of students enrolled in private schools. If the authorizing statute for a program requires a grantee to provide for participation by students enrolled in private schools, the grantee shall provide a...

  18. 28 CFR 29.11 - Sale or other transfer of an enrolled vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sale or other transfer of an enrolled... ACT REGULATIONS § 29.11 Sale or other transfer of an enrolled vehicle. Upon the transferral of ownership of an enrolled vehicle, the transferring owner must completely remove the program decals, change...

  19. WCET Distance Education Enrollment Report 2016: Utilizing U.S. Department of Education Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Russ; Straut, Terri Taylor

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, Distance Education enrollments grew each year, even as overall higher education enrollments have declined. Even so, the overall Distance Education enrollment numbers do not tell the whole story. Based on data accumulated by the U.S. Department of Education's Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) surveys…

  20. 34 CFR 668.38 - Enrollment in telecommunications and correspondence courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Enrollment in telecommunications and correspondence... Student Eligibility § 668.38 Enrollment in telecommunications and correspondence courses. (a) If a student..., or graduate degree. (b)(1) For purposes of this section, a student enrolled in a telecommunications...

  1. 5 CFR 894.510 - When may I decrease my type of enrollment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Enrollment and... your type of enrollment, (b) Decreasing your type of enrollment means going from: (1) Self and family to self plus one; (2) Self and family to self only; or (3) Self plus one to self only. (c) You may...

  2. 5 CFR 894.508 - When may I increase my type of enrollment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Enrollment and... your type of enrollment. (b) Increasing your type of enrollment means going from: (1) Self only to self plus one; (2) Self only to self and family; or (3) Self plus one to self and family. (c) You may...

  3. 5 CFR 894.201 - What types of enrollments are available under FEDVIP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Coverage and... types of enrollment: (a) Self only, which covers only the enrolled employee or annuitant; (b) Self plus one, which covers the enrolled employee or annuitant plus one eligible family member; and (c) Self and...

  4. Rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis. Detection of drug resistance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñuelas-Bayón, Jesús; Vitoria, María Asunción; Samper, Sofía

    2017-10-01

    Tuberculosis is still a serious public health problem, with 10.8 million new cases and 1.8 million deaths worldwide in 2015. The diversity among members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, the causal agent of tuberculosis, is conducive to the design of different methods for rapid diagnosis. Mutations in the genes involved in resistance mechanisms enable the bacteria to elude the treatment. We have reviewed the methods for the rapid diagnosis of M. tuberculosis complex and the detection of susceptibility to drugs, both of which are necessary to prevent the onset of new resistance and to establish early, appropriate treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. From the million dollar's web, to ‘seriespepito’ Is it a Bubble 2.0?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José García-Ull

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2005, a 21 years old English student created The Million Dollar Homepage. The idea was simple: he divided the site into 100 blocks of 10x10 pixels each with the aim to sell these spaces to the brands interested in advertising on the website. Each pixel would cost 1 dollar. That apparently naive idea ended reaching notoriety in the newly named Web 2.0 (O'Reilly, 2005. Worldwide online media, many of whom just began their journey through the Web, covered the curious initiative. The online media coverage also jumped to traditional media (crossmedia narrative, Jenkins, 2006 and this issue had a direct influence on the increase of visitors and number of page views in the site. It was, in fact, one of the first examples of a viral message in the Web. Advertising brands were attracted by the media impact of the website, which became a showcase. Companies such as The Times or Yahoo were attracted by the web influence. In a few months, the business student Alex Tew sold every single pixel of his website to advertising brands, amountig to a million dollars. In 2015, according to Alexa Rank, onclickads.net, publited.com, adcash.com, popads.net or adf.ly are among the 150 most visited websites in Spain, competing with companies like facebook.com, wordpress.es, marca.com, rtve.es or bbva.es, to name a few. We present in the following article the reasons why these affiliate advertising networks occupy key positions in the rankings of most visited websites and to this end, we will focus on studying the business model of some of the main links pages, which offer access to download or online viewing of media formats, including series, documentaries and film content. We will focus in particular on the business models like seriespepito.com, closed due to alleged intellectual property crime in 2014. They generated within months, about a million dollars profit. We studied, with this purpose, the role of the affiliate networks, the use of tracking tools such as

  6. Rapid small lot manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrigan, R.W.

    1998-05-09

    The direct connection of information, captured in forms such as CAD databases, to the factory floor is enabling a revolution in manufacturing. Rapid response to very dynamic market conditions is becoming the norm rather than the exception. In order to provide economical rapid fabrication of small numbers of variable products, one must design with manufacturing constraints in mind. In addition, flexible manufacturing systems must be programmed automatically to reduce the time for product change over in the factory and eliminate human errors. Sensor based machine control is needed to adapt idealized, model based machine programs to uncontrolled variables such as the condition of raw materials and fabrication tolerances.

  7. The numbers, educational status and health of enrolled and non-enrolled school-age children in the Allai Valley, Northwest Frontier Province, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Andrew; Kirby, Helen

    2010-04-01

    A cluster survey of the age, sex and enrolment status of all school-age children 5-14 years old was undertaken in 2006 in a remote rural sub-district of the Northwest Frontier Province, Pakistan about a year after a devastating earthquake. Information was collected on the characteristics of children, their households and parents, and on reasons for non-enrolment. The health and nutritional status of a randomly selected child in each household was assessed and enrolled and non-enrolled children were compared by sex. A total of 2032 children were recorded in 925 households, 845 girls and 1187 boys, a sex ratio of 71 girls/100 boys. Half of all girls were not enrolled in school compared with a fifth of all boys. There was no common reason for non-enrolment and they differed between the sexes. The randomly selected children (n = 897) were moderately malnourished: 43% were stunted, 12% were thin and 46% were anaemic. 66% of a sub-sample of children (n = 269) had a low urinary iodine concentration, which could contribute to a low IQ and impaired hearing. There were no statistically significant differences in the nutritional status or health of non-enrolled and enrolled girls. These data contribute towards an understanding of how to improve the education and health of school-age children in a conservative, rural province of Pakistan. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Twenty-five million liters of blood into the sewer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, M

    2014-10-01

    Laboratory medicine has evolved tremendously but not so much to the individual patient's benefit as far as the volume of blood samples is concerned. It can be calculated that with the current collection methods and the small amounts of blood or serum required by modern laboratory analyzers in the Western world alone each 25 million liter of patients' blood is thrown into waste containers. That is four times more than the total volume of blood that is transfused each year. And this is not a trivial issue, as studies show that many patients develop 'hospital acquired anemia' due to blood collection and this is associated with an adverse outcome. It is time that collection methods for blood samples are adapted to the much smaller volumes that are required by new generation laboratory analyzers, in particular for vulnerable groups, such as hematology or oncology patients, critically ill patients, or children. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  9. 3.3-million-year-old stone tools from Lomekwi 3, West Turkana, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmand, Sonia; Lewis, Jason E; Feibel, Craig S; Lepre, Christopher J; Prat, Sandrine; Lenoble, Arnaud; Boës, Xavier; Quinn, Rhonda L; Brenet, Michel; Arroyo, Adrian; Taylor, Nicholas; Clément, Sophie; Daver, Guillaume; Brugal, Jean-Philip; Leakey, Louise; Mortlock, Richard A; Wright, James D; Lokorodi, Sammy; Kirwa, Christopher; Kent, Dennis V; Roche, Hélène

    2015-05-21

    Human evolutionary scholars have long supposed that the earliest stone tools were made by the genus Homo and that this technological development was directly linked to climate change and the spread of savannah grasslands. New fieldwork in West Turkana, Kenya, has identified evidence of much earlier hominin technological behaviour. We report the discovery of Lomekwi 3, a 3.3-million-year-old archaeological site where in situ stone artefacts occur in spatiotemporal association with Pliocene hominin fossils in a wooded palaeoenvironment. The Lomekwi 3 knappers, with a developing understanding of stone's fracture properties, combined core reduction with battering activities. Given the implications of the Lomekwi 3 assemblage for models aiming to converge environmental change, hominin evolution and technological origins, we propose for it the name 'Lomekwian', which predates the Oldowan by 700,000 years and marks a new beginning to the known archaeological record.

  10. Paleopathology in Australopithecus africanus: a suggested case of a 3-million-year-old prepubertal periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, U

    1988-06-01

    The fossil remains of a juvenile Australopithecus africanus specimen from Sterkfontein Member 4 temporally confined on faunal grounds to 2.5-3.0 million years before the present (Myr B.P.) show pathological alterations of the periodontal alveolar process consistent with a case of prepubertal periodontitis. This diagnosis is based on macroscopic features of alveolar bone loss distribution, pattern of periodontal bone destruction, migration of the affected deciduous molars, and on stereomicroscopic and scanning electron microscopic evidence of alveolar bone destruction. Differential diagnoses and pathological exclusions are discussed in terms of localized patterns of periodontal bone destruction and presumptive survival rate. The reported case appears to be the first detailed description of a recognized disease in early hominid evolution.

  11. The United States Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program - Over 151 Million Miles Safely Steamed on Nuclear Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-03-01

    NNSA’s third mission pillar is supporting the U.S. Navy’s ability to protect and defend American interests across the globe. The Naval Reactors Program remains at the forefront of technological developments in naval nuclear propulsion and ensures a commanding edge in warfighting capabilities by advancing new technologies and improvements in naval reactor performance and reliability. In 2015, the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program pioneered advances in nuclear reactor and warship design – such as increasing reactor lifetimes, improving submarine operational effectiveness, and reducing propulsion plant crewing. The Naval Reactors Program continued its record of operational excellence by providing the technical expertise required to resolve emergent issues in the Nation’s nuclear-powered fleet, enabling the Fleet to safely steam more than two million miles. Naval Reactors safely maintains, operates, and oversees the reactors on the Navy’s 82 nuclear-powered warships, constituting more than 45 percent of the Navy’s major combatants.

  12. A virtual observatory for photoionized nebulae: the Mexican Million Models database (3MdB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisset, C.; Delgado-Inglada, G.; Flores-Fajardo, N.

    2015-04-01

    Photoionization models obtained with numerical codes are widely used to study the physics of the interstellar medium (planetary nebulae, HII regions, etc). Grids of models are performed to understand the effects of the different parameters used to describe the regions on the observables (mainly emission line intensities). Most of the time, only a small part of the computed results of such grids are published, and they are sometimes hard to obtain in a user-friendly format. We present here the Mexican Million Models dataBase (3MdB), an effort to resolve both of these issues in the form of a database of photoionization models, easily accessible through the MySQL protocol, and containing a lot of useful outputs from the models, such as the intensities of 178 emission lines, the ionic fractions of all the ions, etc. Some examples of the use of the 3MdB are also presented.

  13. 15 million degrees a journey to the centre of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    Light takes eight minutes to reach Earth from the surface of the Sun. But its journey within the Sun takes hundreds of thousands of years. What is going on in there? What are light and heat? How does the Sun produce them and how on earth did scientists discover this? In this astonishing and enlightening adventure, you'll travel millions of miles from inside the Sun to its surface and to Earth, where the light at the end of its journey is allowing you to read right now. You'll discover how the Sun works (including what it sounds like), the latest research in solar physics and how a solar storm could threaten everything we know. And you'll meet the groundbreaking scientists, including the author, who pieced this extraordinary story together.

  14. How the Sun Knocks Out My Cell Phone from 150 Million Kilometers Away

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladbury, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Large solar particle events (SPE) threaten many elements of critical infrastructure. A 2013 study by Lloyds of London and Atmospheric and Environmental Research recently found that if a worst-case solar event like the 1859 Carrington Event struck our planet now, it could result on $0.6-$2.36 trillion in damages to the economy. In March 2014, researchers Y. D. Liu et al. revealed that just such an event had narrowly missed Earth in July 2012. The event was observed by the STEREO A spacecraft. In this presentation, we examine how the sun can pack such a punch from 150 million km away, the threats such solar particle events pose, their mechanisms and the efforts NASA and other space agencies are carrying out to understand and mitigate such risks.

  15. 1.2 million kids and counting-Mobile science laboratories drive student interest in STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Amanda L; Stapleton, Mary K

    2017-05-01

    In today's increasingly technological society, a workforce proficient in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) skills is essential. Research has shown that active engagement by K-12 students in hands-on science activities that use authentic science tools promotes student learning and retention. Mobile laboratory programs provide this type of learning in schools and communities across the United States and internationally. Many programs are members of the Mobile Lab Coalition (MLC), a nonprofit organization of mobile and other laboratory-based education programs built on scientist and educator collaborations. A recent survey of the member programs revealed that they provide an impressive variety of programming and have collectively served over 1.2 million students across the US.

  16. A genetic variation map for chicken with 2.8 million single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, G K; Hillier, L; Brandstrom, M; Croojmans, R; Ovcharenko, I; Gordon, L; Stubbs, L; Lucas, S; Glavina, T; Kaiser, P; Gunnarsson, U; Webber, C; Overton, I

    2005-02-20

    We describe a genetic variation map for the chicken genome containing 2.8 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), based on a comparison of the sequences of 3 domestic chickens (broiler, layer, Silkie) to their wild ancestor Red Jungle Fowl (RJF). Subsequent experiments indicate that at least 90% are true SNPs, and at least 70% are common SNPs that segregate in many domestic breeds. Mean nucleotide diversity is about 5 SNP/kb for almost every possible comparison between RJF and domestic lines, between two different domestic lines, and within domestic lines--contrary to the idea that domestic animals are highly inbred relative to their wild ancestors. In fact, most of the SNPs originated prior to domestication, and there is little to no evidence of selective sweeps for adaptive alleles on length scales of greater than 100 kb.

  17. The Surface Age of Sputnik Planum, Pluto, Must Be Less than 10 Million Years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Trilling

    Full Text Available Data from the New Horizons mission to Pluto show no craters on Sputnik Planum down to the detection limit (2 km for low resolution data, 625 m for high resolution data. The number of small Kuiper Belt Objects that should be impacting Pluto is known to some degree from various astronomical surveys. We combine these geological and telescopic observations to make an order of magnitude estimate that the surface age of Sputnik Planum must be less than 10 million years. This maximum surface age is surprisingly young and implies that this area of Pluto must be undergoing active resurfacing, presumably through some cryo-geophysical process. We discuss three possible resurfacing mechanisms and the implications of each one for Pluto's physical properties.

  18. Natural hybridization between genera that diverged from each other approximately 60 million years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothfels, Carl J; Johnson, Anne K; Hovenkamp, Peter H; Swofford, David L; Roskam, Harry C; Fraser-Jenkins, Christopher R; Windham, Michael D; Pryer, Kathleen M

    2015-03-01

    A fern from the French Pyrenees-×Cystocarpium roskamianum-is a recently formed intergeneric hybrid between parental lineages that diverged from each other approximately 60 million years ago (mya; 95% highest posterior density: 40.2-76.2 mya). This is an extraordinarily deep hybridization event, roughly akin to an elephant hybridizing with a manatee or a human with a lemur. In the context of other reported deep hybrids, this finding suggests that populations of ferns, and other plants with abiotically mediated fertilization, may evolve reproductive incompatibilities more slowly, perhaps because they lack many of the premating isolation mechanisms that characterize most other groups of organisms. This conclusion implies that major features of Earth's biodiversity-such as the relatively small number of species of ferns compared to those of angiosperms-may be, in part, an indirect by-product of this slower "speciation clock" rather than a direct consequence of adaptive innovations by the more diverse lineages.

  19. Continuously Growing Rodent Molars Result from a Predictable Quantitative Evolutionary Change over 50 Million Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagan Tapaltsyan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The fossil record is widely informative about evolution, but fossils are not systematically used to study the evolution of stem-cell-driven renewal. Here, we examined evolution of the continuous growth (hypselodonty of rodent molar teeth, which is fuelled by the presence of dental stem cells. We studied occurrences of 3,500 North American rodent fossils, ranging from 50 million years ago (mya to 2 mya. We examined changes in molar height to determine whether evolution of hypselodonty shows distinct patterns in the fossil record, and we found that hypselodont taxa emerged through intermediate forms of increasing crown height. Next, we designed a Markov simulation model, which replicated molar height increases throughout the Cenozoic and, moreover, evolution of hypselodonty. Thus, by extension, the retention of the adult stem cell niche appears to be a predictable quantitative rather than a stochastic qualitative process. Our analyses predict that hypselodonty will eventually become the dominant phenotype.

  20. Surface-enhanced gallium arsenide photonic resonator with a quality factor of six million

    CERN Document Server

    Guha, Biswarup; Cadiz, Fabian; Morgenroth, Laurence; Ulin, Vladimir; Berkovitz, Vladimir; Lemaître, Aristide; Gomez, Carmen; Amo, Alberto; Combrié, Sylvian; Gérard, Bruno; Leo, Giuseppe; Favero, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Gallium Arsenide and related compound semiconductors lie at the heart of optoelectronics and integrated laser technologies. Shaped at the micro and nano-scale, they allow strong interaction with quantum dots and quantum wells, and promise to result in stunning devices. However gallium arsenide optical structures presently exhibit lower performances than their silicon-based counterparts, notably in nanophotonics where the surface plays a chief role. Here we report on advanced surface control of miniature gallium arsenide optical resonators, using two distinct techniques that produce permanent results. One leads to extend the lifetime of free-carriers and enhance luminescence, while the other strongly reduces surface absorption originating from mid-gap states and enables ultra-low optical dissipation devices. With such surface control, the quality factor of wavelength-sized optical disk resonators is observed to rise up to six million at telecom wavelength, greatly surpassing previous realizations and opening n...

  1. Spitzer Photometry of Approximately 1 Million Stars in M31 and 15 Other Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rubab

    2017-01-01

    We present Spitzer IRAC 3.6-8 micrometer and Multiband Imaging Photometer 24 micrometer point-source catalogs for M31 and 15 other mostly large, star-forming galaxies at distances approximately 3.5-14 Mpc, including M51, M83, M101, and NGC 6946. These catalogs contain approximately 1 million sources including approximately 859,000 in M31 and approximately 116,000 in the other galaxies. They were created following the procedures described in Khan et al. through a combination of pointspread function (PSF) fitting and aperture photometry. These data products constitute a resource to improve our understanding of the IR-bright (3.6-24 micrometer) point-source populations in crowded extragalactic stellar fields and to plan observations with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  2. Hong Kong enrolled nurses' perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, K F; Lee, L Y K; Lee, J K L

    2008-09-01

    To explore Hong Kong nurses' perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care, and to investigate the relationship between their perceptions and their demographic characteristics. Many studies suggest that spirituality is the essence of human being and plays an important role in people's lives. Although studies have documented the positive relationship between spiritual care and patients' health outcomes, it has also been shown that the implementation of spiritual care is uncommon in nursing practice. Furthermore, there is little discussion on practising nurses' perception of spirituality and spiritual care in Hong Kong. This study adopted a cross-sectional descriptive design to investigate nurses' perception of spirituality and spiritual care in Hong Kong. A convenience sample of 429 practising enrolled nurses were invited to complete the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale (SSCRS) (response rate 91%). Subjects showed satisfactory understanding of spirituality and appreciated providing spiritual care to patients. The mean scores for the SSCRS and its four subscales were greater than half of the maximum score. There were significant differences in the perceptions of spirituality between subjects with different education levels and religious affiliations. The findings suggest increasing the emphasis of spirituality both in undergraduate education and in continuing-development levels. Recommendations are also made regarding the implementation of spiritual care in nursing practice. Despite having a convenience sample, the present study has contributed to stimulating awareness and discussion among nurses on spirituality and spiritual care.

  3. Mentoring program for students newly enrolled in an Engineering Degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pedro Peña-Martín

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a mentoring program for first year engineering students in the Telecommunications Engineering College (ETSIT at the University of Malaga (UMA. Actors involved in the program are professors from staff, veterans mentoring students and, of course, freshmen. All of them has been organized trough the Moodle based Virtual Learning Environment Platform of the UMA. The program has gone through several phases over three years. This paper shows the main objectives of this mentoring program, the initial design to get them where professors played mentor role, and successive changes made to try to improve the results, including the assumption of the mentor role by senior students (peer mentoring. The tools used for program evaluation are shown too. Despite the low participation, it has been a framework for the development of various educational and socializing activities (for mentors and mentees focused on developing generic competences. Furthermore, it has been a research tool to get a better understanding of problems affecting students newly enrolled.

  4. Staff policy regarding mitigation of school enrollment impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Testimony in recent geothermal power plant siting cases in the Geysers-Calistoga KGRA has established that nine local school districts have reached or exceeded the design which induces immigration into these impacted districts will aggravate the situation. Several power plant applicants have agreed to provide annual mitigation payments to local school districts which can document adverse student enrollment impacts. The Lake County agreements with Occidental Geothermal, Inc. and the California Department of Water Resources require mitigation fees for students having at least one parent who either works directly with the power plant or works indirectly with the geothermal-service industry. An adjustment is made each year so that the applicant only pays a one-time fee for each student. An annual student survey is used to help identify students qualifying for mitigation payments. This paper presents an algorithms which CEC staff will propose to be used in the event that a power plant applicant and an impacted school district are unable to negotiate a mitigation agreement. The algorithm provides a basis for calculating an annual mitigation payment which would be used to help construct new permanent facilities and to purchase additional school buses.

  5. Rapid Cycling and Its Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Rapid Cycling and its Treatment What is bipolar disorder? Bipolar ... to Depression and Manic Depression . What is rapid cycling? Rapid cycling is defined as four or more ...

  6. Rapid manufacturing for microfluidics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Land, K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available . Microfluidics is at the forefront of developing solutions for drug discovery, diagnostics (from glucose tests to malaria and TB testing) and environmental diagnostics (E-coli monitoring of drinking water). In order to quickly implement new designs, a rapid...

  7. Rapid Prototyping in PVS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Cesar A.; Butler, Ricky (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    PVSio is a conservative extension to the PVS prelude library that provides basic input/output capabilities to the PVS ground evaluator. It supports rapid prototyping in PVS by enhancing the specification language with built-in constructs for string manipulation, floating point arithmetic, and input/output operations.

  8. Rapid Prototyping Reconsidered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosier, James

    2011-01-01

    Continuing educators need additional strategies for developing new programming that can both reduce the time to market and lower the cost of development. Rapid prototyping, a time-compression technique adapted from the high technology industry, represents one such strategy that merits renewed evaluation. Although in higher education rapid…

  9. Association of clinical trial enrollment and survival using contemporary therapy for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moke, Diana J; Oberley, Matthew J; Bhojwani, Deepa; Parekh, Chintan; Orgel, Etan

    2018-02-01

    While early studies reported superior survival for cancer patients enrolled on clinical trials, recent findings are inconclusive. We investigated the association between enrollment on contemporary trials and event-free survival (EFS) in pediatric B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). In a retrospective cohort of 274 children (1-21 years) treated for B-ALL from 2008 to 2015, 55.5% enrolled with no disparity in enrollment by age, sex, or ethnicity. Three-year EFS was similar for enrolled and not enrolled patients (90.1% [95% CI, 82.5-94.5] versus 86.5% [95% CI, 77.7-92.0]). Clinical trial enrollment did not affect pediatric B-ALL survival, albeit in a limited-size cohort treated at a single academic institution. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The Role of Continuing Medical Education in Increasing Enrollment in Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnell, John T; Twillman, Robert K; Breslan, Stephanie A; Schultz, Jan; Miller, Lyerka

    2017-09-01

    Opioid diversion, misuse, and abuse are rapidly growing problems in the United States; >60% of all drug overdose deaths involve an opioid. At least 49 states now have fully operational prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) to support legitimate medical use of controlled substances; however, there is considerable underutilization of such programs. To increase awareness of PDMPs and their use, a continuing medical education program including 2 webcasts and a series of newsletters was offered to health care providers. Four hundred and sixty-five clinicians participated in 1 of 2 webcasts. Of those, 207 clinicians responded to a pre-survey and 64 responded to a post-survey. Slightly more than half of clinicians were registered for their state's PDMP program before the educational intervention, and although significantly more clinicians reported increased likelihood to access their state PDMP after participation, the number that actually registered only trended toward a statistically significant increase to 74% after the education (P = 0.06). Immediate post-activity evaluation also indicated that the education significantly improved clinician knowledge of the characteristics of addiction, findings in a PDMP that would suggest diversion or abuse, and strategies to complement the use of a PDMP (P education is effective for improving clinician knowledge and confidence related to opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion and effective use of a PDMP; however, the education did not result in a significant increase in enrollment in state PDMPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Survival after dialysis discontinuation and hospice enrollment for ESRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Nina R; Dougherty, Meredith; Harris, Pamela S; Casarett, David J

    2013-12-01

    Textbooks report that patients with ESRD survive for 7-10 days after discontinuation of dialysis. Studies describing actual survival are limited, however, and research has not defined patient characteristics that may be associated with longer or shorter survival times. The goals of this study were to determine the mean life expectancy of patients admitted to hospice after discontinuation of dialysis, and to identify independent predictors of survival time. Data for demographics, clinical characteristics, and survival were obtained from 10 hospices for patients with ESRD who discontinued dialysis before hospice admission. Data were collected for patients admitted between January 1, 2008 and May 15, 2012. All hospices were members of the Coalition of Hospices Organized to Investigate Comparative Effectiveness network, which obtains de-identified data from an electronic medical record. Of 1947 patients who discontinued dialysis, the mean survival after hospice enrollment was 7.4 days (range, 0-40 days). Patients who discontinued dialysis had significantly shorter survival compared with other patients (n=124,673) with nonrenal hospice diagnoses (mean survival 54.4 days; hazard ratio, 2.96; 95% confidence interval, 2.82 to 3.09; P<0.001). A Cox proportional hazards model identified seven independent predictors of earlier mortality after dialysis discontinuation, including male sex, referral from a hospital, lower functional status (Palliative Performance Scale score), and the presence of peripheral edema. Patients who discontinue dialysis have significantly shorter survival than other hospice patients. Individual survival time varies greatly, but several variables can be used to predict survival and tailor a patient's care plan based on estimated prognosis.

  12. Enrollment in clinical cancer trials: how are we doing and what are the obstacles to improving enrollment rates? A 2-year retrospective review of pediatric cancer trial enrollment in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodgshun, Andrew J; De Silva, Mandy P; Bradbeer, Peter; Cross, Siobhan

    2014-11-01

    Clinical trials contribute to the establishment of the best therapy for children with cancer. This study looks at rates of enrollment in therapeutic clinical trials over a 2-year period in New Zealand and examines the reasons for nonenrollment. All new diagnoses of cancer in children aged 16 or younger over the period of 1 January, 2009 to 31 December, 2010 were identified through the New Zealand Child Cancer Registry. Clinical trial enrollment status was identified from the medical records. For those not enrolled, the reason for nonenrollment was ascertained. A total of 28% of children diagnosed with cancer who received chemotherapy with curative intent in this time period were enrolled on clinical trials. The 2 most common reasons for nonenrollment in this study were that no study was open locally in which to enroll children (27%) or that previously open-clinical trials were closed to accrual at the time of the child's diagnosis (20%). In New Zealand, enrollment rates on clinical trials for children with cancer are lower than expected.

  13. Facing Two Rapidly Spreading Internet Worms

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    The Internet is currently facing a growing number of computer infections due to two rapidly spreading worms. The "Conficker" and "Downadup" worms have infected an estimated 1.1 million PCs in a 24-hour period, bringing the total number of infected computers to 3.5 million [1]. Via a single USB stick, these worms were also responsible for the infection of about 40 laptops at the last EGEE conference in Istanbul. In order to reduce the impact of these worms on CERN Windows computers, the Computer Security Team has suggested several preventive measures described here. Disabling the Windows AutoRun and AutoPlay Features The Computer Security Team and the IT/IS group have decided to disable the "AutoRun" and "AutoPlay" functionality on all centrally-managed Windows computers at CERN. When inserting CDs, DVDs or USB sticks into a PC, "AutoRun" and "AutoPlay" are responsible for automatically playing music or films stored on these media, or ...

  14. Rapid surface sampling and archival record system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barren, E.; Penney, C.M.; Sheldon, R.B. [GE Corporate Research and Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    A number of contamination sites exist in this country where the area and volume of material to be remediated is very large, approaching or exceeding 10{sup 6} m{sup 2} and 10{sup 6} m{sup 3}. Typically, only a small fraction of this material is actually contaminated. In such cases there is a strong economic motivation to test the material with a sufficient density of measurements to identify which portions are uncontaminated, so extensively they be left in place or be disposed of as uncontaminated waste. Unfortunately, since contamination often varies rapidly from position to position, this procedure can involve upwards of one million measurements per site. The situation is complicated further in many cases by the difficulties of sampling porous surfaces, such as concrete. This report describes a method for sampling concretes in which an immediate distinction can be made between contaminated and uncontaminated surfaces. Sample acquisition and analysis will be automated.

  15. Characteristics and Risk Factors for Negative Academic Events: A 27-Year Serial Prevalence Study of 9.7 Million Japanese College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Chiyoko; Uchida, Mai

    2017-08-10

    To examine the prevalence of and the factors contributing to leaves of absence and school discontinuation in Japanese college students over a 27-year period. Trends in these academic events over time were assessed, and students at elevated risk and psychosocial difficulties in need of supportive intervention were identified. Surveys were collected from the majority of Japanese national universities between 1985 and 2012, yielding data on a total of 9.7 million Japanese university students. Each year, data collected included the number of students enrolled at a university and the number of students who discontinued school and took leaves of absence. The reasons for these academic events were also collected in the surveys. We found that instances of these academic events have become prevalent over the past decades among Japanese university students. The rates of leaves of absence and school discontinuation for men were consistently higher than that for women throughout the study. Negative reasons such as apathetic state were the dominant reason for these academic events. Males, especially in 4-year programs (liberal arts and sciences), were more likely to have negative events due to negative reasons such as apathetic state. These students were not diagnosed psychiatrically. The population of students at elevated risk should receive psychosocial interventions and be provided mental health support.

  16. The Relationship between Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentration and Global Temperature for the Last 425 Million Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jackson Davis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Assessing human impacts on climate and biodiversity requires an understanding of the relationship between the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2 in the Earth’s atmosphere and global temperature (T. Here I explore this relationship empirically using comprehensive, recently-compiled databases of stable-isotope proxies from the Phanerozoic Eon (~540 to 0 years before the present and through complementary modeling using the atmospheric absorption/transmittance code MODTRAN. Atmospheric CO2 concentration is correlated weakly but negatively with linearly-detrended T proxies over the last 425 million years. Of 68 correlation coefficients (half non-parametric between CO2 and T proxies encompassing all known major Phanerozoic climate transitions, 77.9% are non-discernible (p > 0.05 and 60.0% of discernible correlations are negative. Marginal radiative forcing (ΔRFCO2, the change in forcing at the top of the troposphere associated with a unit increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration, was computed using MODTRAN. The correlation between ΔRFCO2 and linearly-detrended T across the Phanerozoic Eon is positive and discernible, but only 2.6% of variance in T is attributable to variance in ΔRFCO2. Of 68 correlation coefficients (half non-parametric between ΔRFCO2 and T proxies encompassing all known major Phanerozoic climate transitions, 75.0% are non-discernible and 41.2% of discernible correlations are negative. Spectral analysis, auto- and cross-correlation show that proxies for T, atmospheric CO2 concentration and ΔRFCO2 oscillate across the Phanerozoic, and cycles of CO2 and ΔRFCO2 are antiphasic. A prominent 15 million-year CO2 cycle coincides closely with identified mass extinctions of the past, suggesting a pressing need for research on the relationship between CO2, biodiversity extinction, and related carbon policies. This study demonstrates that changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration did not cause temperature change in the ancient climate.

  17. Life habits, hox genes, and affinities of a 311 million-year-old holometabolan larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Joachim T; Labandeira, Conrad C; Santiago-Blay, Jorge A; Haug, Carolin; Brown, Susan

    2015-09-29

    Holometabolous insects are the most diverse, speciose and ubiquitous group of multicellular organisms in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. The enormous evolutionary and ecological success of Holometabola has been attributed to their unique postembryonic life phases in which nonreproductive and wingless larvae differ significantly in morphology and life habits from their reproductive and mostly winged adults, separated by a resting stage, the pupa. Little is known of the evolutionary developmental mechanisms that produced the holometabolous larval condition and their Paleozoic origin based on fossils and phylogeny. We provide a detailed anatomic description of a 311 million-year-old specimen, the oldest known holometabolous larva, from the Mazon Creek deposits of Illinois, U.S.A. The head is ovoidal, downwardly oriented, broadly attached to the anterior thorax, and bears possible simple eyes and antennae with insertions encircled by molting sutures; other sutures are present but often indistinct. Mouthparts are generalized, consisting of five recognizable segments: a clypeo-labral complex, mandibles, possible hypopharynx, a maxilla bearing indistinct palp-like appendages, and labium. Distinctive mandibles are robust, triangular, and dicondylic. The thorax is delineated into three, nonoverlapping regions of distinctive surface texture, each with legs of seven elements, the terminal-most bearing paired claws. The abdomen has ten segments deployed in register with overlapping tergites; the penultimate segment bears a paired, cercus-like structure. The anterior eight segments bear clawless leglets more diminutive than the thoracic legs in length and cross-sectional diameter, and inserted more ventrolaterally than ventrally on the abdominal sidewall. Srokalarva berthei occurred in an evolutionary developmental context likely responsible for the early macroevolutionary success of holometabolous insects. Srokalarva berthei bore head and prothoracic structures, leglet

  18. Rapid manufacturing facilitated customisation

    OpenAIRE

    Tuck, Christopher John; Hague, Richard; Ruffo, Massimiliano; Ransley, Michelle; Adams, Paul Russell

    2008-01-01

    Abstract This paper describes the production of body-fitting customised seat profiles utilising the following digital methods: three dimensional laser scanning, reverse engineering and Rapid Manufacturing (RM). The seat profiles have been manufactured in order to influence the comfort characteristics of an existing ejector seat manufactured by Martin Baker Aircraft Ltd. The seat, known as Navy Aircrew Common Ejection Seat (NACES), was originally designed with a generic profile. ...

  19. Rapid Detection of Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Perlin

    2005-08-14

    Pathogen identification is a crucial first defense against bioterrorism. A major emphasis of our national biodefense strategy is to establish fast, accurate and sensitive assays for diagnosis of infectious diseases agents. Such assays will ensure early and appropriate treatment of infected patients. Rapid diagnostics can also support infection control measures, which monitor and limit the spread of infectious diseases agents. Many select agents are highly transmissible in the early stages of disease, and it is critical to identify infected patients and limit the risk to the remainder of the population and to stem potential panic in the general population. Nucleic acid-based molecular approaches for identification overcome many of the deficiencies associated with conventional culture methods by exploiting both large- and small-scale genomic differences between organisms. PCR-based amplification of highly conserved ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, intergenic sequences, and specific toxin genes is currently the most reliable approach for bacterial, fungal and many viral pathogenic agents. When combined with fluorescence-based oligonucleotide detection systems, this approach provides real-time, quantitative, high fidelity analysis capable of single nucleotide allelic discrimination (4). These probe systems offer rapid turn around time (<2 h) and are suitable for high throughput, automated multiplex operations that are critical for clinical diagnostic laboratories. In this pilot program, we have used molecular beacon technology invented at the Public health Research Institute to develop a new generation of molecular probes to rapidly detect important agents of infectious diseases. We have also developed protocols to rapidly extract nucleic acids from a variety of clinical specimen including and blood and tissue to for detection in the molecular assays. This work represented a cooperative research development program between the Kramer-Tyagi/Perlin labs on probe development

  20. Tiber Personal Rapid Transit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Carlo D'agostino

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The project “Tiber Personal Rapid Transit” have been presented by the author at the Rome City Vision Competition1 2010, an ideas competition, which challenges architects, engineers, designers, students and creatives individuals to develop visionary urban proposals with the intention of stimulating and supporting the contemporary city, in this case Rome. The Tiber PRT proposal tries to answer the competition questions with the definition of a provocative idea: a Personal Rapid transit System on the Tiber river banks. The project is located in the central section of the Tiber river and aims at the renewal of the river banks with the insertion of a Personal Rapid Transit infrastructure. The project area include the riverbank of Tiber from Rome Transtevere RFI station to Piazza del Popolo, an area where main touristic and leisure attractions are located. The intervention area is actually no used by the city users and residents and constitute itself a strong barrier in the heart of the historic city.

  1. Enrollment and attendance in a parent training prevention program for conduct problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Courtney N; Arnold, David H; Meagher, Susan

    2011-06-01

    Low levels of enrollment and attendance in parent training programs present major problems for researchers and clinicians. The literature on enrollment and attendance in prevention programs is especially limited, and these constructs may be particularly difficult to address in this context. Further, most previous research has not made the distinction between enrollment and attendance. This study describes predictors of enrollment and attendance in a behavioral parent training program intended to prevent conduct problems in preschoolers. Information was gathered from 106 preschoolers, their parents, and their teachers. Parent socioeconomic status (SES), single parent status, ethnicity, child externalizing behavior, parent depressive symptoms, and parent social support were investigated as possible predictors of families' enrollment and attendance. Only 48% of the families that had already provided informed consent and completed demographic questionnaires actually enrolled in the parent training program; parents with lower incomes and lower levels of social support were less likely to enroll. In addition, African-American and Puerto Rican families were less likely to enroll than Caucasian families. The average attendance rate for enrolled parents was 61%; dual parents and parents with children evidencing externalizing behavior problems attended more parent training sessions. Parent depression was not associated with enrollment or attendance. Significant relationships were maintained when controlling for other predictors including SES and when accounting for center-level variance. In addition, three distinct patterns of attendance were observed, which may have practical implications related to retention strategies.

  2. Why do families enrol in paediatric weight management? A parental perspective of reasons and facilitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, A J; Avis, J L S; Holt, N L; Gokiert, R; Chanoine, J-P; Legault, L; Morrison, K M; Sharma, A M; Ball, G D C

    2016-03-01

    Few children with obesity who are referred for weight management end up enroled in treatment. Factors enabling enrolment are poorly understood. Our purpose was to explore reasons for and facilitators of enrolment in paediatric weight management from the parental perspective. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents of 10- to 17-year-olds who were referred to one of four Canadian weight management clinics and enroled in treatment. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Manifest/inductive content analysis was used to analyse the data, which included the frequency with which parents referred to reasons for and facilitators of enrolment. In total, 65 parents were interviewed. Most had a child with a BMI ≥95th percentile (n = 59; 91%), were mothers (n = 55; 85%) and had completed some post-secondary education (n = 43; 66%). Reasons for enrolment were related to concerns about the child, recommended care and expected benefits. Most common reasons included weight concern, weight loss expectation, lifestyle improvement, health concern and need for external support. Facilitators concerned the referral initiator, treatment motivation and barrier control. Most common facilitators included the absence of major barriers, parental control over the decision to enrol, referring physicians stressing the need for specialized care and parents' ability to overcome enrolment challenges. Healthcare providers might optimize enrolment in paediatric weight management by being proactive in referring families, discussing the advantages of the recommended care to meet treatment expectations and providing support to overcome enrolment barriers. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. $32 Million in EPA funds help Northwest and Alaska tribes protect communities' health, water, air and natural resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $32 million in funding for the Indian Environmental General Assistance Program (GAP) capacity building grants to tribes and tribal consortia in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington.

  4. Clemson University Awarded $1 Million Grant from EPA for Research to Respond to Water Scarcity, Drought and Extreme Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATLANTA - Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a $1 million award to Clemson University for research addressing extreme weather events and climate change which impact the frequency and severity of droughts, subsequent wildf

  5. Greensboro Small Business Among Recipients of $1.9 Million from EPA to Support the Nations Green Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATLANTA - Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced almost $2 million to 19 small businesses nationwide to develop and commercialize technologies that tackle critical environmental problems. Bio-Adhesive Alliance, Inc. based in

  6. Childhood family correlates of heterosexual and homosexual marriages: a national cohort study of two million Danes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Morten; Hviid, Anders

    2006-10-01

    Children who experience parental divorce are less likely to marry heterosexually than those growing up in intact families; however, little is known about other childhood factors affecting marital choices. We studied childhood correlates of first marriages (heterosexual since 1970, homosexual since 1989) in a national cohort of 2 million 18-49 year-old Danes. In multivariate analyses, persons born in the capital area were significantly less likely to marry heterosexually, but more likely to marry homosexually, than their rural-born peers. Heterosexual marriage was significantly linked to having young parents, small age differences between parents, stable parental relationships, large sibships, and late birth order. For men, homosexual marriage was associated with having older mothers, divorced parents, absent fathers, and being the youngest child. For women, maternal death during adolescence and being the only or youngest child or the only girl in the family increased the likelihood of homosexual marriage. Our study provides population-based, prospective evidence that childhood family experiences are important determinants of heterosexual and homosexual marriage decisions in adulthood.

  7. Burrowing hard corals occurring on the sea floor since 80 million years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentoku, Asuka; Tokuda, Yuki; Ezaki, Yoichi

    2016-04-14

    We describe a previously unknown niche for hard corals in the small, bowl-shaped, solitary scleractinian, Deltocyathoides orientalis (Family Turbinoliidae), on soft-bottom substrates. Observational experiments were used to clarify how the sea floor niche is exploited by turbinoliids. Deltocyathoides orientalis is adapted to an infaunal mode of life and exhibits behaviours associated with automobility that include burrowing into sediments, vertical movement through sediments to escape burial, and recovery of an upright position after being overturned. These behaviours were achieved through repeated expansion and contraction of their peripheral soft tissues, which constitute a unique muscle-membrane system. Histological analysis showed that these muscle arrangements were associated with deeply incised inter-costal spaces characteristic of turbinoliid corals. The oldest known turbinoliid, Bothrophoria ornata, which occurred in the Cretaceous (Campanian), also possessed a small, conical skeleton with highly developed costae. An infaunal mode of life became available to turbinoliids due to the acquisition of automobility through the muscle-membrane system at least 80 million years ago. The newly discovered active burrowing strategies described herein provide new insights into the use of an unattached mode of life by corals inhabiting soft-bottom substrates throughout the Phanerozoic.

  8. Oceanic crustal carbon cycle drives 26-million-year atmospheric carbon dioxide periodicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, R Dietmar; Dutkiewicz, Adriana

    2018-02-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) data for the last 420 million years (My) show long-term fluctuations related to supercontinent cycles as well as shorter cycles at 26 to 32 My whose origin is unknown. Periodicities of 26 to 30 My occur in diverse geological phenomena including mass extinctions, flood basalt volcanism, ocean anoxic events, deposition of massive evaporites, sequence boundaries, and orogenic events and have previously been linked to an extraterrestrial mechanism. The vast oceanic crustal carbon reservoir is an alternative potential driving force of climate fluctuations at these time scales, with hydrothermal crustal carbon uptake occurring mostly in young crust with a strong dependence on ocean bottom water temperature. We combine a global plate model and oceanic paleo-age grids with estimates of paleo-ocean bottom water temperatures to track the evolution of the oceanic crustal carbon reservoir over the past 230 My. We show that seafloor spreading rates as well as the storage, subduction, and emission of oceanic crustal and mantle CO 2 fluctuate with a period of 26 My. A connection with seafloor spreading rates and equivalent cycles in subduction zone rollback suggests that these periodicities are driven by the dynamics of subduction zone migration. The oceanic crust-mantle carbon cycle is thus a previously overlooked mechanism that connects plate tectonic pulsing with fluctuations in atmospheric carbon and surface environments.

  9. Predicting the Electronic Properties of 3D, Million-atom Semiconductor nanostructure Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack Dongarra; Stanimire Tomov

    2012-03-15

    This final report describes the work done by Jack Dongarra (University Distinguished Professor) and Stanimire Tomov (Research Scientist) related to the DOE project entitled Predicting the Electronic Properties of 3D, Million-Atom Semiconductor Nanostructure Architectures. In this project we addressed the mathematical methodology required to calculate the electronic and transport properties of large nanostructures with comparable accuracy and reliability to that of current ab initio methods. This capability is critical for further developing the field, yet it is missing in all the existing computational methods. Additionally, quantitative comparisons with experiments are often needed for a qualitative understanding of the physics, and for guiding the design of new nanostructures. We focused on the mathematical challenges of the project, in particular on solvers and preconditioners for large scale eigenvalue problems that occur in the computation of electronic states of large nanosystems. Usually, the states of interest lie in the interior of the spectrum and their computation poses great difficulties for existing algorithms. The electronic properties of a semiconductor nanostructure architecture can be predicted/determined by computing its band structure. Of particular importance are the 'band edge states' (electronic states near the energy gap) which can be computed from a properly defined interior eigenvalue problem. Our primary mathematics and computational challenge here has been to develop an efficient solution methodology for finding these interior states for very large systems. Our work has produced excellent results in terms of developing both new and extending current state-of-the-art techniques.

  10. Venipuncture Nerve Injuries in the Upper Extremity From More Than 1 Million Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukuda, Yukinori; Funakoshi, Tadanao; Nasuhara, Yasuyuki; Nagano, Yusuke; Shimizu, Chikara; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2016-06-16

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the nerve injury rate for 1 million venipunctures and the efficacy of attempts to avoid severe nerve injury. We collected data for outpatients from whom a venipuncture blood sample was obtained in our hospital from 2005 to 2014. Every venipuncture procedure for outpatients was performed by a trained nurse or clinical technologist at the center for blood sampling in our hospital. In addition, a series of lectures by a specialist is held in our hospital at various times. All complaints related to venipuncture blood sampling were reported to our division of hospital safety management and were followed up using the guidelines for injuries related to the venipuncture. The number of venipuncture-related complications was 293 (0.027%, 1/3700) of 1,082,053 during the 10 years. A total of 40 of the 1,082,053 venipunctures were referred to the department of orthopedic surgery, and 16 (0.0015%, 1/67,000) were diagnosed with obvious nerve injuries. The average duration of the treatment was 46.4 days (range, 1-126 days); 69% of the patients recovered within 5 weeks, and all patients recovered within 18 weeks. Although it is impossible to completely prevent venipuncture-related complications, appropriate venipuncture skills and risk management decrease the incidence of chronic or permanent nerve injury risk after venipuncture.

  11. Millions of Boreal Shield Lakes can be used to Probe Archaean Ocean Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, S. L.; Tsuji, J. M.; Wu, L.; Venkiteswaran, J. J.; Molot, L. A.; Elgood, R. J.; Paterson, M. J.; Neufeld, J. D.

    2017-04-01

    Life originated in Archaean oceans, almost 4 billion years ago, in the absence of oxygen and the presence of high dissolved iron concentrations. Early Earth oxidation is marked globally by extensive banded iron formations but the contributing processes and timing remain controversial. Very few aquatic habitats have been discovered that match key physico-chemical parameters of the early Archaean Ocean. All previous whole ecosystem Archaean analogue studies have been confined to rare, low sulfur, and permanently stratified lakes. Here we provide first evidence that millions of Boreal Shield lakes with natural anoxia offer the opportunity to constrain biogeochemical and microbiological aspects of early Archaean life. Specifically, we combined novel isotopic signatures and nucleic acid sequence data to examine processes in the anoxic zone of stratified boreal lakes that are naturally low in sulfur and rich in ferrous iron, hallmark characteristics predicted for the Archaean Ocean. Anoxygenic photosynthesis was prominent in total water column biogeochemistry, marked by distinctive patterns in natural abundance isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and iron. These processes are robust, returning reproducibly after water column re-oxygenation following lake turnover. Evidence of coupled iron oxidation, iron reduction, and methane oxidation affect current paradigms of both early Earth and modern aquatic ecosystems.

  12. What Four Million Mappings Can Tell You about Two Hundred Ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazvinian, Amir; Noy, Natalya F.; Jonquet, Clement; Shah, Nigam; Musen, Mark A.

    The field of biomedicine has embraced the Semantic Web probably more than any other field. As a result, there is a large number of biomedical ontologies covering overlapping areas of the field. We have developed BioPortal—an open community-based repository of biomedical ontologies. We analyzed ontologies and terminologies in BioPortal and the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), creating more than 4 million mappings between concepts in these ontologies and terminologies based on the lexical similarity of concept names and synonyms. We then analyzed the mappings and what they tell us about the ontologies themselves, the structure of the ontology repository, and the ways in which the mappings can help in the process of ontology design and evaluation. For example, we can use the mappings to guide users who are new to a field to the most pertinent ontologies in that field, to identify areas of the domain that are not covered sufficiently by the ontologies in the repository, and to identify which ontologies will serve well as background knowledge in domain-specific tools. While we used a specific (but large) ontology repository for the study, we believe that the lessons we learned about the value of a large-scale set of mappings to ontology users and developers are general and apply in many other domains.

  13. Finding a million-star hotel an astro-tourist’s guide to dark sky places

    CERN Document Server

    Mizon, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Finding a Million-Star Hotel explores the modern phenomenon of astro-tourism, the efforts by increasing numbers of people to find nearby and distant locations where they can see the real night sky so often hidden by light pollution. Astronomer Bob Mizon directs readers to dark sky sites in the United Kingdom, the United States, and a few further afield. This is more than just a hotel guide with links for accommodation at or near the locations. There are chapters on choosing telescopes and binoculars, on celestial objects astro-tourists can look for in the night sky, and an investigation into the causes of the skyglow that veils our view of the stars. Most of those who go seeking the stars are not professional astronomers. This book is aimed at those observers with limited knowledge of the night sky who are eager to explore and enjoy it. Even those contemplating setting up astro-themed hotels, campsites, or astronomy events can benefit from reading this book and from the advice included on how to equip such pl...

  14. Is there 1.5-million-year-old ice near Dome C, Antarctica?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrenin, Frédéric; Cavitte, Marie G. P.; Blankenship, Donald D.; Chappellaz, Jérôme; Fischer, Hubertus; Gagliardini, Olivier; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Passalacqua, Olivier; Ritz, Catherine; Roberts, Jason; Siegert, Martin J.; Young, Duncan A.

    2017-11-01

    Ice sheets provide exceptional archives of past changes in polar climate, regional environment and global atmospheric composition. The oldest dated deep ice core drilled in Antarctica has been retrieved at EPICA Dome C (EDC), reaching ˜ 800 000 years. Obtaining an older paleoclimatic record from Antarctica is one of the greatest challenges of the ice core community. Here, we use internal isochrones, identified from airborne radar coupled to ice-flow modelling to estimate the age of basal ice along transects in the Dome C area. Three glaciological properties are inferred from isochrones: surface accumulation rate, geothermal flux and the exponent of the Lliboutry velocity profile. We find that old ice (> 1.5 Myr, 1.5 million years) likely exists in two regions: one ˜ 40 km south-west of Dome C along the ice divide to Vostok, close to a secondary dome that we name Little Dome C (LDC), and a second region named North Patch (NP) located 10-30 km north-east of Dome C, in a region where the geothermal flux is apparently relatively low. Our work demonstrates the value of combining radar observations with ice flow modelling to accurately represent the true nature of ice flow, and understand the formation of ice-sheet architecture, in the centre of large ice sheets.

  15. Continuously growing rodent molars result from a predictable quantitative evolutionary change over 50 million years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapaltsyan, Vagan; Eronen, Jussi T; Lawing, A Michelle; Sharir, Amnon; Janis, Christine; Jernvall, Jukka; Klein, Ophir D

    2015-05-05

    The fossil record is widely informative about evolution, but fossils are not systematically used to study the evolution of stem-cell-driven renewal. Here, we examined evolution of the continuous growth (hypselodonty) of rodent molar teeth, which is fuelled by the presence of dental stem cells. We studied occurrences of 3,500 North American rodent fossils, ranging from 50 million years ago (mya) to 2 mya. We examined changes in molar height to determine whether evolution of hypselodonty shows distinct patterns in the fossil record, and we found that hypselodont taxa emerged through intermediate forms of increasing crown height. Next, we designed a Markov simulation model, which replicated molar height increases throughout the Cenozoic and, moreover, evolution of hypselodonty. Thus, by extension, the retention of the adult stem cell niche appears to be a predictable quantitative rather than a stochastic qualitative process. Our analyses predict that hypselodonty will eventually become the dominant phenotype. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Terrestrial climate evolution in the Southwest Pacific over the past 30 million years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prebble, Joseph G.; Reichgelt, Tammo; Mildenhall, Dallas C.; Greenwood, David R.; Raine, J. Ian; Kennedy, Elizabeth M.; Seebeck, Hannu C.

    2017-02-01

    A reconstruction of terrestrial temperature and precipitation for the New Zealand landmass over the past ∼30 million years is produced using pollen data from >2000 samples lodged in the New Zealand Fossil Record Electronic Database and modern climate data of nearest living relatives. The reconstruction reveals a warming trend through the late Oligocene to early Miocene, peak warmth in the middle Miocene, and stepwise cooling through the late Neogene. Whereas the regional signal in our reconstruction includes a ∼5-10° northward tectonic drift, as well as an increase in high altitude biomes due to late Neogene and Pliocene uplift of the Southern Alps, the pattern mimics inferred changes in global ice extent, which suggests that global drivers played a major role in shaping local vegetation. Importantly, seasonal temperature estimates indicate low seasonality during the middle Miocene, and that subsequent Neogene cooling was largely due to cooler winters. We suggest that this may reflect increased Subantarctic influence on New Zealand vegetation as the climate cooled.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Million Quasars (Milliquas) catalog (Flesch, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, E. W.

    2017-04-01

    This is a compendium of 452,794 type-I QSOs and AGN, largely complete from the literature to 21 June 2016. Also included are ~900K high-confidence quasar candidates from SDSS-based photometric quasar catalogs (of 90%+ likelihood) and from all-sky radio/X-ray associated objects (of 80%+ likelihood). Type-II and Bl Lac objects are also included, bringing the total count to 1,422,219. This version is the same as v4.8 but with these changes: (1) The 3XMM-DR6 X-ray source catalog (www.cosmos.esa.int/web/xmm-newton/xsa) has been added and new X-ray associations calculated. (2) Radio/X-ray data have been reprocessed in line with that of the new Million Optical Radio/X-ray (MORX) associations catalogue, in preparation. The catalog format is simple, each object is shown as one line bearing the J2000 coordinates, its original name, object class, red and blue optical magnitudes, PSF class, redshift, the citations for the name and redshift, plus up to four radio/X-ray identifiers where applicable. Questions/comments/praise/complaints may be directed to Eric Flesch at eric(at)flesch.org. (1 data file).

  18. Iterative evolution of sympatric seacow (Dugongidae, Sirenia assemblages during the past ~26 million years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Velez-Juarbe

    Full Text Available Extant sirenians show allopatric distributions throughout most of their range. However, their fossil record shows evidence of multispecies communities throughout most of the past ∼26 million years, in different oceanic basins. Morphological differences among co-occurring sirenian taxa suggest that resource partitioning played a role in structuring these communities. We examined body size and ecomorphological differences (e.g., rostral deflection and tusk morphology among sirenian assemblages from the late Oligocene of Florida, early Miocene of India and early Pliocene of Mexico; each with three species of the family Dugongidae. Although overlapping in several ecomorphological traits, each assemblage showed at least one dominant trait in which coexisting species differed. Fossil sirenian occurrences occasionally are monotypic, but the assemblages analyzed herein show iterative evolution of multispecies communities, a phenomenon unparalleled in extant sirenian ecology. As primary consumers of seagrasses, these communities likely had a strong impact on past seagrass ecology and diversity, although the sparse fossil record of seagrasses limits direct comparisons. Nonetheless, our results provide robust support for previous suggestions that some sirenians in these extinct assemblages served as keystone species, controlling the dominance of climax seagrass species, permitting more taxonomically diverse seagrass beds (and sirenian communities than many of those observed today.

  19. Violent crime runs in families: a total population study of 12.5 million individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisell, T; Lichtenstein, P; Långström, N

    2011-01-01

    Etiological theory and prior research with small or selected samples suggest that interpersonal violence clusters in families. However, the strength and pattern of this aggregation remains mostly unknown. We investigated all convictions for violent crime in Sweden 1973-2004 among more than 12.5 million individuals in the nationwide Multi-Generation Register, and compared rates of violent convictions among relatives of violent individuals with relatives of matched, non-violent controls, using a nested case-control design. We found strong familial aggregation of interpersonal violence among first-degree relatives [e.g. odds ratio (OR)sibling 4.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.2-4.3], lower for more distant relatives (e.g. OR cousin 1.9, 95% CI 1.9-1.9). Risk patterns across biological and adoptive relations provided evidence for both genetic and environmental influences on the development of violent behavior. Familial risks were stronger among women, in higher socio-economic strata, and for early onset interpersonal violence. There were crime-specific effects (e.g. OR sibling for arson 22.4, 95% CI 12.2-41.2), suggesting both general and subtype-specific familial risk factors for violent behavior. The observed familiality should be accounted for in criminological research, applied violence risk assessment, and prevention efforts.

  20. It is worth 10 million working hours a year to have your toilet paper folded?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Rickard; Ljung, Hedvig; Ljung, Harald

    2016-01-01

    From our experience the toilet paper is folded in the bathrooms in rooms in branded hotels. We aimed to study the total time yearly spent in the world on folding hotel toilet paper. Three investigators clocked 60 folding toilet paper events and calculated the mean time. The mean folding time was 5.73 s (interquartile range 4.50-6.56). Using the calculated extra time it takes to fold the toilet paper and the number of hotel nights spent we estimated the total time spent in the world each year to fold the toilet paper. For sensitivity analyses we used different assumptions on number of hotel beds, occupancy rate and folding time. Assuming an extra 10 s spent on folding toilet paper, approximately 10 million hours are globally spent on folding toilet paper every year. This corresponds to more than 5000 man-years of work. In a hotel with yearly full coverage of 200 beds skipping folding the toilet paper corresponds to around 200 h of time that could be spent elsewhere. To take away unnecessary duties from hotel room cleaners would increase their health and well-being and save time that could be better spent. Is it really defendable and appropriate that someone else has spent time on folding the toilet paper you are just about to use?

  1. Mason Tenders agrees to pay $1 million to end ADA litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-12-29

    The [name removed] District Council Welfare Fund has agreed to pay $1 million to construction workers who have been denied medical coverage for AIDS-related care. The decision establishes self-insured health care benefits programs as covered entities under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The settlement ends a three-year battle which began in 1992 between [name removed] and fourteen HIV-positive construction workers who were refused medical coverage. The first suit was filed by [name removed]., a construction worker who lost coverage for his HIV-related care in July 1991. At that time, the union fund decided to exclude care for HIV on the grounds that it was too expensive. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) filed an ADA lawsuit that challenged disability-based distinctions in health insurance. The U.S. Attorney's Office filed a complaint against the union under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) statute to end organized crime associated with the union. In late 1994, the government announced a consent decree, settling its racketeering suit against the union. Under the terms of the settlement, [name removed] was awarded $16,000 in damages. In the EEOC case, damages for plan members ranged as high as $50,000.

  2. A new glimpse on Mesozoic zooplankton-150 million-year-old lobster larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Joachim T; Haug, Carolin

    2017-01-01

    Larvae of malacostracan crustaceans represent a large fraction of modern day zooplankton. Plankton is not only a major part of the modern marine ecosystem, but must have played an important role in the ecosystems of the past as well. Unfortunately, our knowledge about plankton composition of the past is still quite limited. As an important part of today's zooplankton, malacostracan larvae are still a rarity in the fossil record; many types of malacostracan larvae dominating the modern plankton have so far not been found as fossils. Here we report a new type of fossil malacostracan larva, found in the 150 million years old lithographic limestones of southern Germany (Solnhofen Lithographic Limestones). The three rather incomplete specimens mainly preserve the telson. A pronounced middle spine on the posterior edge of these specimens indicates that they are either larval forms of a clawed lobster or of an axiidean lobster, or of a closer relative to one of the two groups. The tergo-pleura are drawn out into distinct spines in one specimen, further supporting the interpretation as a larva of a clawed lobster or an early relative. The telson morphology also shows adaptations to a prolonged planktic life style, the latero-posterior edges are drawn out into distinct spines. Similar adaptations are known in larvae of the modern homarid lobster Nephrops norvegicus, not necessarily indicating a closer relationship, but convergent life styles. The new finds provide an important new insight into the composition of Mesozoic zooplankton and demonstrate the preservation potential of lithographic limestones.

  3. A seven-million-year hornblende mineral record from the central Chinese Loess Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tong; Liu, Lianwen; Chen, Yang; Sheng, Xuefen; Ji, Junfeng

    2017-05-24

    Previous studies of the late Cenozoic erosion rate have yielded different views-long-term stable rates or a significant increase at climate transitions-leading to uncertainty concerning the hypothesized global erosion rate controlled by either tectonic uplift or climatic changes. Here, we present a seven-million-year hornblende mineral record along the Lingtai section of the Chinese Loess Plateau. By examining the spatial distribution of hornblende minerals in seven desert basins, which are potential loess source areas, we constructed a ratio of hornblende versus total heavy minerals to reflect past changes in physical/chemical weathering strength. Our results demonstrate that the ratio has generally increased since 7 Ma, with three significant shifts recorded at 2.6 Ma, 1.4 Ma and 0.5 Ma linked to the onset, continuation and expansion of the Northern Hemisphere glaciation, respectively. Given that chemical weathering during the diagenetic history produces a trend of smoothly increasing hornblende migrating upwards, the three shifts at these boundaries can be interpreted as changes in the bedrock erosion rate on the northern Tibetan Plateau, which may be related to tectonic uplift events and incision of the Yellow River. Evidence presented here supports the idea of coupling between climate change, tectonic uplift and regional erosion.

  4. Evolution of morphogenesis in 360-million-year-old conodont chordates calibrated in days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzik, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    Highly rhythmic increments of crown tissue are identifiable in conodont oral apparatus elements from the Late Devonian of the Holy Cross Mountains, Poland; individual laminae being of thickness comparable with daily increments of vertebrate tooth enamel and fish otoliths. Abundant occurrence of such specimens enables bed-by-bed (stratophenetic) studies of the process of evolution at the population level and quantitative presentation of the evolution of ontogeny in the sampled geological section covering several million years. The morphologic transformation is expressed as expansion of a juvenile asymmetry to later stages of the ontogeny and in decrease of the mature element width, which was due to a change of the mineral tissue secretion rate. It was not just a simple extension of a juvenile character into the later stage of the ontogeny (heterochrony) but rather a true developmental novelty. The evolution was gradual and very slow. The proposed quantitative approach to growth increments in the mineral skeleton of ancient chordates introduces real-time units to evolutionary developmental studies connected with direct paleontological evidence on the course of evolution.

  5. Is there 1.5-million-year-old ice near Dome C, Antarctica?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Parrenin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ice sheets provide exceptional archives of past changes in polar climate, regional environment and global atmospheric composition. The oldest dated deep ice core drilled in Antarctica has been retrieved at EPICA Dome C (EDC, reaching ∼ 800 000 years. Obtaining an older paleoclimatic record from Antarctica is one of the greatest challenges of the ice core community. Here, we use internal isochrones, identified from airborne radar coupled to ice-flow modelling to estimate the age of basal ice along transects in the Dome C area. Three glaciological properties are inferred from isochrones: surface accumulation rate, geothermal flux and the exponent of the Lliboutry velocity profile. We find that old ice (> 1.5 Myr, 1.5 million years likely exists in two regions: one ∼ 40 km south-west of Dome C along the ice divide to Vostok, close to a secondary dome that we name Little Dome C (LDC, and a second region named North Patch (NP located 10–30 km north-east of Dome C, in a region where the geothermal flux is apparently relatively low. Our work demonstrates the value of combining radar observations with ice flow modelling to accurately represent the true nature of ice flow, and understand the formation of ice-sheet architecture, in the centre of large ice sheets.

  6. Earliest hominin cancer: 1.7-million-year-old osteosarcoma from Swartkrans Cave, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Odes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The reported incidence of neoplasia in the extinct human lineage is rare, with only a few confirmed cases of Middle or Later Pleistocene dates reported. It has generally been assumed that pre-modern incidence of neoplastic disease of any kind is rare and limited to benign conditions, but new fossil evidence suggests otherwise. We here present the earliest identifiable case of malignant neoplastic disease from an early human ancestor dated to 1.8-1.6 million years old. The diagnosis has been made possible only by advances in 3D imaging methods as diagnostic aids. We present a case report based on re-analysis of a hominin metatarsal specimen (SK 7923 from the cave site of Swartkrans in the Cradle of Humankind, South Africa. The expression of malignant osteosarcoma in the Swartkrans specimen indicates that whilst the upsurge in malignancy incidence is correlated with modern lifestyles, there is no reason to suspect that primary bone tumours would have been any less frequent in ancient specimens. Such tumours are not related to lifestyle and often occur in younger individuals. As such, malignancy has a considerable antiquity in the fossil record, as evidenced by this specimen.

  7. The SCOPSCO Deep Drilling Project: a 1.3 million-year palaeoenvironmental reconstruction from Lake Ohrid using stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Jack; Leng, Melanie; Francke, Alexander; Vogel, Hendrik; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Wagner, Bernd

    2017-04-01

    Lake Ohrid is a large, ancient lake situated on the Balkan Peninsula in the central northern Mediterranean region. The lake hosts a world-class degree of endemic biodiversity and an extensive sedimentary archive. In 2013, an extremely successful International Continental scientific Drilling Program deep drilling campaign was conducted as part of the transdisciplinary Scientific Collaboration on Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid (SCOPSCO) project and recovered over 2100 m of sediment from the lake. The main target site in the central basin provided a 584-m composite record covering at least 1.3 million years. Here, we present new oxygen and carbon isotope data (δ18O and δ13C) from carbonate for the entire lacustrine sequence (upper 430 m) of the SCOPSCO cores spanning Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 41-1, based on chronological information derived from tephrostratigraphy, palaeomagnetic analyses, and orbital tuning of biogeochemical proxies. Contemporary monitoring data suggest variations in δ18O are primarily a function of changes in regional water balance. This is confirmed through the Holocene where the isotope dataset shows a stable transition from wetter conditions in the Early Holocene to a drier climate in the Late Holocene, which is consistent with a regional pattern of aridification. At the onset of deep-water lacustrine conditions around 1.3 Ma, very low δ18O are comparable to measured values for surface inflow today and infer that Lake Ohrid had a greatly reduced residence time and volume. Multiple rapid shifts to higher values in long-term average δ18O are observed in the early lake history, most likely associated with lake ontogeny and the progressive deepening of Lake Ohrid. After MIS 10, the observed variability between glacial and interglacial δ18O increases dramatically concomitant with a lower reconstructed lake level, suggesting a more pronounced sensitivity to hydroclimate change. A trend to higher interglacial δ18O through this time

  8. DoD’s Compressed Natural Gas Filling Station in Afghanistan: An Ill-conceived $43 Million Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    on its own. As of March 2015, no construction had begun and AGE had no plans to install the TFBSO-procured pipe . 17 Advanced Engineering Associates...Ill-Conceived $43 Million Project," pursuant to an email from Jack Mitchell, Director, Special Projects, dated September 24. 2015. The Department...personnel, construction on a planned new pipeline has not started and approximately $6.5 million worth of new pipe is apparently sitting in storage in

  9. Improved identification and enrolment into care of HIV-exposed and -infected infants and children following a community health worker intervention in Lilongwe, Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early identification and entry into care is critical to reducing morbidity and mortality in children with HIV. The objective of this report is to describe the impact of the Tingathe programme, which utilizes community health workers (CHWs to improve identification and enrolment into care of HIV-exposed and -infected infants and children. Methods: Three programme phases are described. During the first phase, Mentorship Only (MO (March 2007–February 2008 on-site clinical mentorship on paediatric HIV care was provided. In the second phase, Tingathe-Basic (March 2008–February 2009, CHWs provided HIV testing and counselling to improve case finding of HIV-exposed and -infected children. In the final phase, Tingathe-PMTCT (prevention of mother-to-child transmission (March 2009–February 2011, CHWs were also assigned to HIV-positive pregnant women to improve mother-infant retention in care. We reviewed routinely collected programme data from HIV testing registers, patient mastercards and clinic attendance registers from March 2005 to March 2011. Results: During MO, 42 children (38 HIV-infected and 4 HIV-exposed were active in care. During Tingathe-Basic, 238 HIV-infected children (HIC were newly enrolled, a six-fold increase in rate of enrolment from 3.2 to 19.8 per month. The number of HIV-exposed infants (HEI increased from 4 to 118. During Tingathe-PMTCT, 526 HIC were newly enrolled over 24 months, at a rate of 21.9 patients per month. There was also a seven-fold increase in the average number of exposed infants enrolled per month (9.5–70 patients per month, resulting in 1667 enrolled with a younger median age at enrolment (5.2 vs. 2.5 months; p<0.001.During the Tingathe-Basic and Tingathe-PMTCT periods, CHWs conducted 44,388 rapid HIV tests, 7658 (17.3% in children aged 18 months to 15 years; 351 (4.6% tested HIV-positive. Over this time, 1781 HEI were enrolled, with 102 (5.7% found HIV-infected by positive PCR. Additional HIC

  10. China urges rapid growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendry, S.

    1993-02-03

    This time last year China's paramount leader, Deng Xiaoping, launched the country on another bout of fast-paced economic growth and restructuring. After three years of riding out political and economic clampdown, foreign chemical companies were jerked awake by major changes in China's chemical industry. As the state becomes less involved with managing the economy, unleashing 12% gross national product growth, closer involvement with domestic factories has become attractive and essential. MCI officials say government funds will now be channeled toward clearing energy and transport bottlenecks, and chemical enterprises will be given more chance to turn a profit. They will be allowed to issue shares, seek foreign investment partners themselves, and bypass trading companies like China National Import-Export Corp. (Sinochem), the former state monopoly. Foreign analysts question whether China's finances and oil resources can support expansion. Even if they can, Cai estimates that ethylene imports will remain around the present level of 1 million tons. To further guarantee chemical supplies, China has invested in urea and polypropylene plants in the US and polystyrene plant in Hong Kong.

  11. 42 CFR 417.422 - Eligibility to enroll in an HMO or CMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility to enroll in an HMO or CMP. 417.422... Eligibility to enroll in an HMO or CMP. Except as specified in §§ 417.423 and 417.424, an HMO or CMP must... the geographic area served by the HMO or CMP; (c) Is not enrolled in any other HMO or CMP that has...

  12. Changing Preschool Enrolments in Post-Socialist Central Asia: Causes and Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Giddings; Mieke Meurs; Tilahun Temesgen

    2007-01-01

    Preschool can contribute importantly to human capital development, especially among poor children. In socialist countries, preschool enrolment rates have declined since transition. We examine changed preschool enrolment in Kyrgyzstan. We evaluate demand- and supply-side explanations for changing enrolments, and use household survey data to develop a simple, logit model of preschool attendance. We find that access plays the most important role in attendance, despite an apparent excess capacity...

  13. Epidemiologic Study of One Million U.S. Radiation Workers and Veterans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boice, John [National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2017-12-14

    The single most important question in radiation epidemiology is determining the level of health risks associated with radiation exposures that occur gradually over time. The study of one million early U.S. radiation workers and veterans has been designed to provide information on risk following chronic exposures by focusing on occupational groups with differing radiation exposure patterns, including intakes of radionuclides. The cost-efficient study builds on the investments made and foundations laid by investigators and government agencies over the past 30-40 years, which have established early worker cohorts that can now provide answers to questions on the lifetime human health risks associated with low-level radiation exposures. Within the overall goal of the epidemiologic study of one million U.S. radiation workers and veterans, this project had a total of nine specific aims which included studies of six populations for multiple endpoints including cancer overall mortality, leukemia and non-cancer mortality. The six populations included: Mound, Ohio, workers exposed to polonium, tritium and plutonium; nuclear power plant workers within the Landauer dosimetry and Nuclear Regulatory Commission data files; industrial radiographers; Mallinckrodt uranium workers; uranium workers who linked with the US Renal Data System; and nuclear weapons test participants. Over 400,000 workers and atomic veterans are included in these populations, with vital status being determined and analyses of all causes of death undertaken. A critical, integral component of the studies has been comprehensive evaluations of dosimetry involving, in many cases, complex dose reconstructions, and assessments of uncertainties. The work has also involved development of state-of-the art statistical approaches and modeling. All nine aims were accomplished successfully, resulting in publication of two NCRP documents, 13 literature papers, numerous Boice Reports in Health Physics News and many

  14. Big History or the 13800 million years from the Big Bang to the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gústafsson, Ludvik E.

    2017-04-01

    Big History is the integrated history of the Cosmos, Earth, Life, and Humanity. It is an attempt to understand our existence as a continuous unfolding of processes leading to ever more complex structures. Three major steps in the development of the Universe can be distinguished, the first being the creation of matter/energy and forces in the context of an expanding universe, while the second and third steps were reached when completely new qualities of matter came into existence. 1. Matter comes out of nothing Quantum fluctuations and the inflation event are thought to be responsible for the creation of stable matter particles in what is called the Big Bang. Along with simple particles the universe is formed. Later larger particles like atoms and the most simple chemical elements hydrogen and helium evolved. Gravitational contraction of hydrogen and helium formed the first stars und later on the first galaxies. Massive stars ended their lives in violent explosions releasing heavier elements like carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur and iron into the universe. Subsequent star formation led to star systems with bodies containing these heavier elements. 2. Matter starts to live About 9200 million years after the Big Bang a rather inconspicous star of middle size formed in one of a billion galaxies. The leftovers of the star formation clumped into bodies rotating around the central star. In some of them elements like silicon, oxygen, iron and many other became the dominant matter. On the third of these bodies from the central star much of the surface was covered with an already very common chemical compound in the universe, water. Fluid water and plenty of various elements, especially carbon, were the ingredients of very complex chemical compounds that made up even more complex structures. These were able to replicate themselves. Life had appeared, the only occasion that we human beings know of. Life evolved subsequently leading eventually to the formation of multicellular

  15. Stature, body mass, and brain size: a two-million-year odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Andrew

    2013-12-01

    Physical size has been critical in the evolutionary success of the genus Homo over the past 2.4 million-years. An acceleration in the expansion of savannah grasslands in Africa from 1.6Ma to 1.2Ma witnessed concomitant increases in physical stature (150-170cm), weight (50-70kg), and brain size (750-900cm(3)). With the onset of 100,000year Middle Pleistocene glacial cycles ("ice ages") some 780,000years ago, large-bodied Homo groups had reached modern size and had successfully dispersed from equatorial Africa, Central, and Southeast Asia to high-latitude localities in Atlantic Europe and North East Asia. While there is support for incursions of multiple Homo lineages to West Asia and Continental Europe at this time, data does not favour a persistence of Homo erectus beyond ∼400,000years ago in Africa, west and Central Asia, and Europe. Novel Middle Pleistocene Homo forms (780,000-400,000years) may not have been substantially taller (150-170cm) than earlier Homo (1.6Ma-800,000years), yet brain size exceeded 1000cm(3) and body mass approached 80kg in some males. Later Pleistocene Homo (400,000-138,000years) were 'massive' in their height (160-190cm) and mass (70-90kg) and consistently exceed recent humans. Relative brain size exceeds earlier Homo, yet is substantially lower than in final glacial H. sapiens and Homo neanderthalensis. A final leap in absolute and relative brain size in Homo (300,000-138,000years) occurred independent of any observed increase in body mass and implies a different selective mediator to that operating on brain size increases observed in earlier Homo. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Diversity as Opportunity: Insights from 600 Million Years of AHR Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Mark E; Karchner, Sibel I; Merson, Rebeka R

    2017-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) was for many years of interest only to pharmacologists and toxicologists. However, this protein has fundamental roles in biology that are being revealed through studies in diverse animal species. The AHR is an ancient protein. AHR homologs exist in most major groups of modern bilaterian animals, including deuterostomes (chordates, hemichordates, echinoderms) and the two major clades of protostome invertebrates [ecdysozoans (e.g. arthropods and nematodes) and lophotrochozoans (e.g. molluscs and annelids)]. AHR homologs also have been identified in cnidarians such as the sea anemone Nematostella and in the genome of Trichoplax, a placozoan. Bilaterians, cnidarians, and placozoans form the clade Eumetazoa, whose last common ancestor lived approximately 600 million years ago (MYA). The presence of AHR homologs in modern representatives of all these groups indicates that the original eumetazoan animal possessed an AHR homolog. Studies in invertebrates and vertebrates reveal parallel functions of AHR in the development and function of sensory neural systems, suggesting that these may be ancestral roles. Vertebrate animals are characterized by the expansion and diversification of AHRs, via gene and genome duplications, from the ancestral protoAHR into at least five classes of AHR-like proteins: AHR, AHR1, AHR2, AHR3, and AHRR. The evolution of multiple AHRs in vertebrates coincided with the acquisition of high-affinity binding of halogenated and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and the emergence of adaptive functions involving regulation of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes and roles in adaptive immunity. The existence of multiple AHRs may have facilitated subfunction partitioning and specialization of specific AHR types in some taxa. Additional research in diverse model and non-model species will continue to enrich our understanding of AHR and its pleiotropic roles in biology and toxicology.

  17. Conserved form and function of the germinal epithelium through 500 million years of vertebrate evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Harry J; Uribe, Mari Carmen; Lo Nostro, Fabiana L; Mims, Steven D; Parenti, Lynne R

    2016-08-01

    The germinal epithelium, i.e., the site of germ cell production in males and females, has maintained a constant form and function throughout 500 million years of vertebrate evolution. The distinguishing characteristic of germinal epithelia among all vertebrates, males, and females, is the presence of germ cells among somatic epithelial cells. The somatic epithelial cells, Sertoli cells in males or follicle (granulosa) cells in females, encompass and isolate germ cells. Morphology of all vertebrate germinal epithelia conforms to the standard definition of an epithelium: epithelial cells are interconnected, border a body surface or lumen, are avascular and are supported by a basement membrane. Variation in morphology of gonads, which develop from the germinal epithelium, is correlated with the evolution of reproductive modes. In hagfishes, lampreys, and elasmobranchs, the germinal epithelia of males produce spermatocysts. A major rearrangement of testis morphology diagnoses osteichthyans: the spermatocysts are arranged in tubules or lobules. In protogynous (female to male) sex reversal in teleost fishes, female germinal epithelial cells (prefollicle cells) and oogonia transform into the first male somatic cells (Sertoli cells) and spermatogonia in the developing testis lobules. This common origin of cell types from the germinal epithelium in fishes with protogynous sex reversal supports the homology of Sertoli cells and follicle cells. Spermatogenesis in amphibians develops within spermatocysts in testis lobules. In amniotes vertebrates, the testis is composed of seminiferous tubules wherein spermatogenesis occurs radially. Emerging research indicates that some mammals do not have lifetime determinate fecundity. The fact emerged that germinal epithelia occur in the gonads of all vertebrates examined herein of both sexes and has the same form and function across all vertebrate taxa. Continued study of the form and function of the germinal epithelium in vertebrates

  18. Predicting the electronic properties of 3D, million-atom semiconductor nanostructure architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zunger, A [Materials Science Center, NREL (United States); Franceschetti, A [Materials Science Center, NREL (United States); Bester, G [Materials Science Center, NREL (United States); Jones, W B [Scientific Computing Center, NREL (United States); Kim, Kwiseon [Scientific Computing Center, NREL (United States); Graf, P A [Scientific Computing Center, NREL (United States); Wang, L-W [Computational Research Division, LBNL (United States); Canning, A [Computational Research Division, LBNL (United States); Marques, O [Computational Research Division, LBNL (United States); Voemel, C [Computational Research Division, LBNL (United States); Dongarra, J [Department of Computer Science, University of Tennessee (United States); Langou, J [Department of Computer Science, University of Tennessee (United States); Tomov, S [Department of Computer Science, University of Tennessee (United States)

    2006-09-15

    The past {approx}10 years have witnessed revolutionary breakthroughs both in synthesis of quantum dots (leading to nearly monodispersed, defect-free nanostructures) and in characterization of such systems, revealing ultra narrow spectroscopic lines of <1 meV width, exposing new intriguing effects, such as multiple exciton generation, fine-structure splitting, quantum entanglement, multiexciton recombination and more. These discoveries have led to new technological applications including quantum computing and ultra-high efficiency solar cells. Our work in this project is based on two realizations/observations: First, that the dots exhibiting clean and rich spectroscopic and transport characteristics are rather big. Indeed, the phenomenology indicated above is exhibited only by the well-passivated defect-free quantum dots containing at least a few thousand atoms (colloidal) and even a few hundred thousand atoms (self assembled). Understanding the behavior of nanotechnology devices requires the study of even larger, million-atom systems composed of multiple components such as wires+dots+films. Second, first-principles many-body computational techniques based on current approaches (Quantum Monte-Carlo, GW, Bethe-Salpeter) are unlikely to be adaptable to such large structures and, at the same time, the effective mass-based techniques are too crude to provide insights on the many-body/atomistic phenomenology revealed by experiment. Thus, we have developed a set of methods that use an atomistic approach (unlike effective-mass based techniques) and utilize single-particle + many body techniques that are readily scalable to {approx}10{sup 3}-10{sup 6} atom nanostructures. New mathematical and computational techniques have also been developed to accelerate our calculations and go beyond simple conjugate gradient based methods allowing us to study larger systems. In this short paper based on a poster presented at the DOE SciDAC06 conference we will present the overall

  19. Bed net ownership in Kenya: the impact of 3.4 million free bed nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulule John

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In July and September 2006, 3.4 million long-lasting insecticide-treated bed nets (LLINs were distributed free in a campaign targeting children 0-59 months old (CU5s in the 46 districts with malaria in Kenya. A survey was conducted one month after the distribution to evaluate who received campaign LLINs, who owned insecticide-treated bed nets and other bed nets received through other channels, and how these nets were being used. The feasibility of a distribution strategy aimed at a high-risk target group to meet bed net ownership and usage targets is evaluated. Methods A stratified, two-stage cluster survey sampled districts and enumeration areas with probability proportional to size. Handheld computers (PDAs with attached global positioning systems (GPS were used to develop the sampling frame, guide interviewers back to chosen households, and collect survey data. Results In targeted areas, 67.5% (95% CI: 64.6, 70.3% of all households with CU5s received campaign LLINs. Including previously owned nets, 74.4% (95% CI: 71.8, 77.0% of all households with CU5s had an ITN. Over half of CU5s (51.7%, 95% CI: 48.8, 54.7% slept under an ITN during the previous evening. Nearly forty percent (39.1% of all households received a campaign net, elevating overall household ownership of ITNs to 50.7% (95% CI: 48.4, 52.9%. Conclusions The campaign was successful in reaching the target population, families with CU5s, the risk group most vulnerable to malaria. Targeted distribution strategies will help Kenya approach indicator targets, but will need to be combined with other strategies to achieve desired population coverage levels.

  20. Stacking a million seismograms and other data products at the IRIS DMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutko, A. R.; Bahavar, M.; Trabant, C.; Karstens, R.

    2012-12-01

    The IRIS DMC is in its third year of developing data products. Here, we highlight a new product based on stacking roughly one million seismograms to generate composite record sections that illuminate the global telseseismic wavefield. These are made using all available broadband data at the DMC for all shallow M5.7+ earthquakes from 1990-present. Within multiple narrow frequency bands ranging from 0.01 to 4.0 Hz, traces are culled based on multiple quality control metrics in order to maximize the number of clean traces and then stacked within narrow distance bins. We show record sections of nonlinearly stacked short-term/long-term average ratios (STA/LTA) in order to highlight detections of weak phases (e.g. PKPPKPPKP), as well as linear stacks of envelope functions in order to highlight coda decay rates at different frequencies. Stacks are generated for vertical, radial and tangential component data. Comparison with equivalent stacks using axi-symmetric 2D spectral-element method (SEM) synthetic seismograms will also be shown. Another new data product that will be featured is short arc Rayleigh wave source-time functions for M7+ events. We will also describe other new data products developed by external groups and recently made available from the DMC including a) a western ambient noise US cross-correlation database and b) SeisSound, an audio/video seismic waveform visualization. Finally we will report the status of data products currently in development such as animations of aftershock sequences for large earthquakes. These data products are all part of a growing collection of products produced and managed at the IRIS DMC, for the complete list please visit http://www.iris.edu/dms/products.

  1. How to record a million synaptic weights in a hippocampal slice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upinder S Bhalla

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A key step toward understanding the function of a brain circuit is to find its wiring diagram. New methods for optical stimulation and optical recording of neurons make it possible to map circuit connectivity on a very large scale. However, single synapses produce small responses that are difficult to measure on a large scale. Here I analyze how single synaptic responses may be detectable using relatively coarse readouts such as optical recording of somatic calcium. I model a network consisting of 10,000 input axons and 100 CA1 pyramidal neurons, each represented using 19 compartments with voltage-gated channels and calcium dynamics. As single synaptic inputs cannot produce a measurable somatic calcium response, I stimulate many inputs as a baseline to elicit somatic action potentials leading to a strong calcium signal. I compare statistics of responses with or without a single axonal input riding on this baseline. Through simulations I show that a single additional input shifts the distribution of the number of output action potentials. Stochastic resonance due to probabilistic synaptic release makes this shift easier to detect. With approximately 80 stimulus repetitions this approach can resolve up to 35% of individual activated synapses even in the presence of 20% recording noise. While the technique is applicable using conventional electrical stimulation and extracellular recording, optical methods promise much greater scaling, since the number of synapses scales as the product of the number of inputs and outputs. I extrapolate from current high-speed optical stimulation and recording methods, and show that this approach may scale up to the order of a million synapses in a single two-hour slice-recording experiment.

  2. A hot Jupiter orbiting a 2-million-year-old solar-mass T Tauri star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, J F; Moutou, C; Malo, L; Baruteau, C; Yu, L; Hébrard, E; Hussain, G; Alencar, S; Ménard, F; Bouvier, J; Petit, P; Takami, M; Doyon, R; Collier Cameron, A

    2016-06-30

    Hot Jupiters are giant Jupiter-like exoplanets that orbit their host stars 100 times more closely than Jupiter orbits the Sun. These planets presumably form in the outer part of the primordial disk from which both the central star and surrounding planets are born, then migrate inwards and yet avoid falling into their host star. It is, however, unclear whether this occurs early in the lives of hot Jupiters, when they are still embedded within protoplanetary disks, or later, once multiple planets are formed and interact. Although numerous hot Jupiters have been detected around mature Sun-like stars, their existence has not yet been firmly demonstrated for young stars, whose magnetic activity is so intense that it overshadows the radial velocity signal that close-in giant planets can induce. Here we report that the radial velocities of the young star V830 Tau exhibit a sine wave of period 4.93 days and semi-amplitude 75 metres per second, detected with a false-alarm probability of less than 0.03 per cent, after filtering out the magnetic activity plaguing the spectra. We find that this signal is unrelated to the 2.741-day rotation period of V830 Tau and we attribute it to the presence of a planet of mass 0.77 times that of Jupiter, orbiting at a distance of 0.057 astronomical units from the host star. Our result demonstrates that hot Jupiters can migrate inwards in less than two million years, probably as a result of planet–disk interactions.

  3. Increasing negativity of age stereotypes across 200 years: evidence from a database of 400 million words.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben Ng

    Full Text Available Scholars argue about whether age stereotypes (beliefs about old people are becoming more negative or positive over time. No previous study has systematically tested the trend of age stereotypes over more than 20 years, due to lack of suitable data. Our aim was to fill this gap by investigating whether age stereotypes have changed over the last two centuries and, if so, what may be associated with this change. We hypothesized that age stereotypes have increased in negativity due, in part, to the increasing medicalization of aging. This study applied computational linguistics to the recently compiled Corpus of Historical American English (COHA, a database of 400 million words that includes a range of printed sources from 1810 to 2009. After generating a comprehensive list of synonyms for the term elderly for these years from two historical thesauri, we identified 100 collocates (words that co-occurred most frequently with these synonyms for each of the 20 decades. Inclusion criteria for the collocates were: (1 appeared within four words of the elderly synonym, (2 referred to an old person, and (3 had a stronger association with the elderly synonym than other words appearing in the database for that decade. This yielded 13,100 collocates that were rated for negativity and medicalization. We found that age stereotypes have become more negative in a linear way over 200 years. In 1880, age stereotypes switched from being positive to being negative. In addition, support was found for two potential explanations. Medicalization of aging and the growing proportion of the population over the age of 65 were both significantly associated with the increase in negative age stereotypes. The upward trajectory of age-stereotype negativity makes a case for remedial action on a societal level.

  4. Reconstruction of a continuous high-resolution CO2 record over the past 20 million years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Köhler

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The gradual cooling of the climate during the Cenozoic has generally been attributed to a decrease in CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. The lack of transient climate models and, in particular, the lack of high-resolution proxy records of CO2, beyond the ice-core record prohibit, however, a full understanding of, for example, the inception of the Northern Hemisphere glaciation and mid-Pleistocene transition. Here we elaborate on an inverse modelling technique to reconstruct a continuous CO2 series over the past 20 million year (Myr, by decomposing the global deep-sea benthic δ18O record into a mutually consistent temperature and sea level record, using a set of 1-D models of the major Northern and Southern Hemisphere ice sheets. We subsequently compared the modelled temperature record with ice core and proxy-derived CO2 data to create a continuous CO2 reconstruction over the past 20 Myr. Results show a gradual decline from 450 ppmv around 15 Myr ago to 225 ppmv for mean conditions of the glacial-interglacial cycles of the last 1 Myr, coinciding with a gradual cooling of the global surface temperature of 10 K. Between 13 to 3 Myr ago there is no long-term sea level variation caused by ice-volume changes. We find no evidence of change in the long-term relation between temperature change and CO2, other than the effect following the saturation of the absorption bands for CO2. The reconstructed CO2 record shows that the Northern Hemisphere glaciation starts once the long-term average CO2 concentration drops below 265 ppmv after a period of strong decrease in CO2. Finally, only a small long-term decline of 23 ppmv is found during the mid-Pleistocene transition, constraining theories on this major transition in the climate system. The approach is not accurate enough to revise current ideas about climate sensitivity.

  5. The evolutionary and genetic origins of consciousness in the Cambrian Period over 500 million years ago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd E Feinberg

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrates evolved in the Cambrian Period before 520 million years ago, but we do not know when or how consciousness arose in the history of the vertebrate brain. Here we propose multiple levels of isomorphic or somatotopic neural representations as an objective marker for sensory consciousness. All extant vertebrates have these, so we deduce that consciousness extends back to the group’s origin. The first conscious sense may have been vision. Then vision, coupled with additional sensory systems derived from ectodermal placodes and neural crest, transformed primitive reflexive systems into image forming brains that map and perceive the external world and the body’s interior. We posit that the minimum requirement for sensory consciousness and qualia is a brain including a forebrain (but not necessarily a developed cerebral cortex/pallium, midbrain and hindbrain. This brain must also have 1 hierarchical systems of intercommunicating, isomorphically organized, processing nuclei that extensively integrate the different senses into representations that emerge in upper levels of the neural hierarchy; and 2 a widespread reticular formation that integrates the sensory inputs and contributes to attention, awareness, and neural synchronization. We propose a two-step evolutionary history, in which the optic tectum was the original center of multi-sensory conscious perception (as in fish and amphibians: step 1, followed by a gradual shift of this center to the dorsal pallium or its cerebral cortex (in mammals, reptiles, birds: step 2. We address objections to the hypothesis and call for more studies of fish and amphibians. In our view, the lamprey has all the neural requisites and is likely the simplest extant vertebrate with sensory consciousness and qualia. Genes that pattern the proposed elements of consciousness (isomorphism, neural crest, placodes have been identified in all vertebrates. Thus, consciousness is in the genes, some of which are

  6. Rapidly variable relatvistic absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, M.; Pinto, C.; Fabian, A.; Lohfink, A.; Buisson, D.; Alston, W.; Jiang, J.

    2017-10-01

    I will present results from the 1.5Ms XMM-Newton observing campaign on the most X-ray variable AGN, IRAS 13224-3809. We find a series of nine absorption lines with a velocity of 0.24c from an ultra-fast outflow. For the first time, we are able to see extremely rapid variability of the UFO features, and can link this to the X-ray variability from the inner accretion disk. We find a clear flux dependence of the outflow features, suggesting that the wind is ionized by increasing X-ray emission.

  7. Rapid prototype and test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, D.L.; Hansche, B.D.

    1996-06-01

    In order to support advanced manufacturing, Sandia has acquired the capability to produce plastic prototypes using stereolithography. Currently, these prototypes are used mainly to verify part geometry and ``fit and form`` checks. This project investigates methods for rapidly testing these plastic prototypes, and inferring from prototype test data actual metal part performance and behavior. Performances examined include static load/stress response, and structural dynamic (modal) and vibration behavior. The integration of advanced non-contacting measurement techniques including scanning laser velocimetry, laser holography, and thermoelasticity into testing of these prototypes is described. Photoelastic properties of the epoxy prototypes to reveal full field stress/strain fields are also explored.

  8. Right-Rapid-Rough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Craig

    2003-01-01

    IDEO (pronounced 'eye-dee-oh') is an international design, engineering, and innovation firm that has developed thousands of products and services for clients across a wide range of industries. Its process and culture attracted the attention of academics, businesses, and journalists around the world, and are the subject of a bestselling book, The Art of Innovation by Tom Kelley. One of the keys to IDEO's success is its use of prototyping as a tool for rapid innovation. This story covers some of IDEO's projects, and gives reasons for why they were successful.

  9. Brief 72 Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2013 Data (2-14)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-02-15

    The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2012 and August 31, 2013. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2013. The enrollments and degrees data include students majoring in nuclear engineering or in an option program equivalent to a major. Thirty-two academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during 2013, and data was received from all thirty-two programs. The data for two nuclear engineering programs include enrollments and degrees in health physics options that are also reported in the health physics enrollments and degrees data.

  10. A nudge toward participation: Improving clinical trial enrollment with behavioral economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanEpps, Eric M; Volpp, Kevin G; Halpern, Scott D

    2016-07-20

    Interventions informed by behavioral economics can address barriers to patient enrollment in clinical trials and improve recruitment efforts. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Latino Male Ethnic Subgroups: Patterns in College Enrollment and Degree Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponjuan, Luis; Palomin, Leticia; Calise, Angela

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines Latino male ethnic subgroups and their college enrollment and degree completion patterns. The chapter also offers recommendations to improve Latino male ethnic subgroups' educational achievement.

  12. Perceived knowledge and clinical comfort with genetics among Taiwanese nurses enrolled in a RN-to-BSN program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh; Lee, Shu-Hsin; Chen, Suh-Jen; Lin, Shu-Chin

    2013-08-01

    Advances in genetics have had a profound impact on health care. Yet, many nurses, as well as other health care providers, have limited genetic knowledge and feel uncomfortable integrating genetics into their practice. Very little is known about perceived genetic knowledge and clinical comfort among Taiwanese nurses enrolled in a Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing program. To examine perceived knowledge and clinical comfort with genetics among Taiwanese nurses enrolled in a Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing program and to assess how genetics has been integrated into their past and current nursing programs. The study also sought to examine correlations among perceived knowledge, integration of genetics into the nursing curriculum, and clinical comfort with genetics. A descriptive, cross-sectional study. Taiwanese nurses enrolled in a Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing program were recruited. A total of 190 of 220 nurses returned the completed survey (86.36% response rate). Descriptive statistics and the Pearson product-moment correlation were used for data analysis. Most nurses indicated limited perceived knowledge and clinical comfort with genetics. Curricular hours focused on genetics in a current nursing program were greater than those in past nursing programs. The use of genetic materials, attendance at genetic workshops and conferences, and clinically relevant genetics in nursing practice significantly related with perceived knowledge and clinical comfort with genetics. However, there were no correlations between prior genetic-based health care, perceived knowledge, and clinical comfort with genetics. This study demonstrated the need for emphasizing genetic education and practice to ensure health-related professionals become knowledgeable about genetic information. Given the rapidly developing genetic revolution, nurses and other health care providers need to utilize genetic discoveries to optimize health outcomes

  13. Rapid mineralocorticoid receptor trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekle, M; Bretschneider, M; Meinel, S; Ruhs, S; Grossmann, C

    2014-03-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that physiologically regulates water-electrolyte homeostasis and controls blood pressure. The MR can also elicit inflammatory and remodeling processes in the cardiovascular system and the kidneys, which require the presence of additional pathological factors like for example nitrosative stress. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) for pathophysiological MR effects remain(s) elusive. The inactive MR is located in the cytosol associated with chaperone molecules including HSP90. After ligand binding, the MR monomer rapidly translocates into the nucleus while still being associated to HSP90 and after dissociation from HSP90 binds to hormone-response-elements called glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) as a dimer. There are indications that rapid MR trafficking is modulated in the presence of high salt, oxidative or nitrosative stress, hypothetically by induction or posttranslational modifications. Additionally, glucocorticoids and the enzyme 11beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase may also influence MR activation. Because MR trafficking and its modulation by micro-milieu factors influence MR cellular localization, it is not only relevant for genomic but also for nongenomic MR effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid response manufacturing (RRM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, W.D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Waddell, W.L. [National Centers for Manufacturing Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1997-02-18

    US industry is fighting to maintain its competitive edge in the global market place. Today markets fluctuate rapidly. Companies, to survive, have to be able to respond with quick-to-market, improved, high quality, cost efficient products. The way products are developed and brought to market can be improved and made more efficient through the proper incorporation of emerging technologies. The RRM project was established to leverage the expertise and resources of US private industries and federal agencies to develop, integrate, and deploy new technologies that meet critical needs for effective product realization. The RRM program addressed a needed change in the US Manufacturing infrastructure that will ensure US competitiveness in world market typified by mass customization. This project provided the effort needed to define, develop and establish a customizable infrastructure for rapid response product development design and manufacturing. A major project achievement was the development of a broad-based framework for automating and integrating the product and process design and manufacturing activities involved with machined parts. This was accomplished by coordinating and extending the application of feature-based product modeling, knowledge-based systems, integrated data management, and direct manufacturing technologies in a cooperative integrated computing environment. Key technological advancements include a product model that integrates product and process data in a consistent, minimally redundant manner, an advanced computer-aided engineering environment, knowledge-based software aids for design and process planning, and new production technologies to make products directly from design application software.

  15. Safety of intracoronary infusion of 20 million C-kit positive human cardiac stem cells in pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C L Keith

    Full Text Available There is mounting interest in using c-kit positive human cardiac stem cells (c-kit(pos hCSCs to repair infarcted myocardium in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. A recent phase I clinical trial (SCIPIO has shown that intracoronary infusion of 1 million hCSCs is safe. Higher doses of CSCs may provide superior reparative ability; however, it is unknown if doses >1 million cells are safe. To address this issue, we examined the effects of 20 million hCSCs in pigs.Right atrial appendage samples were obtained from patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The tissue was processed by an established protocol with eventual immunomagnetic sorting to obtain in vitro expanded hCSCs. A cumulative dose of 20 million cells was given intracoronarily to pigs without stop flow. Safety was assessed by measurement of serial biomarkers (cardiac: troponin I and CK-MB, renal: creatinine and BUN, and hepatic: AST, ALT, and alkaline phosphatase and echocardiography pre- and post-infusion. hCSC retention 30 days after infusion was quantified by PCR for human genomic DNA. All personnel were blinded as to group assignment.Compared with vehicle-treated controls (n=5, pigs that received 20 million hCSCs (n=9 showed no significant change in cardiac function or end organ damage (assessed by organ specific biomarkers that could be attributed to hCSCs (P>0.05 in all cases. No hCSCs could be detected in left ventricular samples 30 days after infusion.Intracoronary infusion of 20 million c-kit positive hCSCs in pigs (equivalent to ~40 million hCSCs in humans does not cause acute cardiac injury, impairment of cardiac function, or liver and renal injury. These results have immediate translational value and lay the groundwork for using doses of CSCs >1 million in future clinical trials. Further studies are needed to ascertain whether administration of >1 million hCSCs is associated with greater efficacy in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy.

  16. Hospice Enrollment in Patients With Advanced Heart Failure Decreases Acute Medical Service Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Cindi K; Barrón, Yolanda; Moore, Stanley; Murtaugh, Chris; Lala, Anuradha; Aldridge, Melissa; Goldstein, Nathan; Gelfman, Laura P

    2017-03-01

    Patients with advanced heart failure (HF) enroll in hospice at low rates, and data on their acute medical service utilization after hospice enrollment is limited. We performed a descriptive analysis of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries, with at least one home health claim between July 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, and at least 2 HF hospitalizations between July 1, 2009, and December 31, 2009, who subsequently enrolled in hospice between July 1, 2009, and December 31, 2009. We estimated panel-negative binomial models on a subset of beneficiaries to compare their acute medical service utilization before and after enrollment. Our sample size included 5073 beneficiaries: 55% were female, 45% were ≥85 years of age, 13% were non-white, and the mean comorbidity count was 2.38 (standard deviation 1.22). The median number of days between the second HF hospital discharge and hospice enrollment was 45. The median number of days enrolled in hospice was 15, and 39% of the beneficiaries died within 7 days of enrollment. During the study period, 11% of the beneficiaries disenrolled from hospice at least once. The adjusted mean number of hospital, intensive care unit, and emergency room admissions decreased from 2.56, 0.87, and 1.17 before hospice enrollment to 0.53, 0.19, and 0.76 after hospice enrollment. Home health care Medicare beneficiaries with advanced HF who enrolled in hospice had lower acute medical service utilization after their enrollment. Their pattern of hospice use suggests that earlier referral and improved retention may benefit this population. Further research is necessary to understand hospice referral and palliative care needs of advanced HF patients. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Reconstructing the tectonic history of Fennoscandia from its margins: The past 100 million years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muir Wood, R. [EQE International Ltd (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-01

    In the absence of onland late Mesozoic and Cenozoic geological formations the tectonic history of the Baltic Shield over the past 100 million years can be reconstructed from the thick sedimentary basins that surround Fennoscandia on three sides. Tectonic activity around Fennoscandia through this period has been diverse but can be divided into four main periods: a. pre North Atlantic spreading ridge (100-60 Ma) when transpressional deformation on the southern margins of Fennoscandia and transtensional activity to the west was associated with a NNE-SSW maximum compressive stress direction; b. the creation of the spreading ridge (60-45 Ma) when there was rifting along the western margin; c. the re-arrangement of spreading axes (45-25 Ma) when there was a radial compression around Fennoscandia, and d. the re-emergence of the Iceland hot-spot (25-0 Ma) when the stress-field has come to accord with ridge or plume `push`. Since 60 Ma the Alpine plate boundary has had little influence on Fennoscandia. The highest levels of deformation on the margins of Fennoscandia were achieved around 85 Ma, 60-55 Ma, with strain-rates around 10{sup -9}/year. Within the Baltic Shield long term strain rates have been around 10{sup -1}1/year, with little evidence for significant deformations passing into the shield from the margins. Fennoscandian Border Zone activity, which was prominent from 90-60 Ma, was largely abandoned following the creation of the Norwegian Sea spreading ridge, and with the exception of the Lofoten margin, there is subsequently little evidence for deformation passing into Fennoscandia. Renewal of modest compressional deformation in the Voering Basin suggest that the `Current Tectonic Regime` is of Quaternary age although the orientation of the major stress axis has remained consistent since around 10 Ma. The past pattern of changes suggest that in the geological near-future variations are to be anticipated in the magnitude rather than the orientation of stresses.

  18. On the state dependency of the equilibrium climate sensitivity during the last 5 million years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Köhler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is still an open question how equilibrium warming in response to increasing radiative forcing – the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S – depends on background climate. We here present palaeodata-based evidence on the state dependency of S, by using CO2 proxy data together with a 3-D ice-sheet-model-based reconstruction of land ice albedo over the last 5 million years (Myr. We find that the land ice albedo forcing depends non-linearly on the background climate, while any non-linearity of CO2 radiative forcing depends on the CO2 data set used. This non-linearity has not, so far, been accounted for in similar approaches due to previously more simplistic approximations, in which land ice albedo radiative forcing was a linear function of sea level change. The latitudinal dependency of ice-sheet area changes is important for the non-linearity between land ice albedo and sea level. In our set-up, in which the radiative forcing of CO2 and of the land ice albedo (LI is combined, we find a state dependence in the calculated specific equilibrium climate sensitivity, S[CO2,LI], for most of the Pleistocene (last 2.1 Myr. During Pleistocene intermediate glaciated climates and interglacial periods, S[CO2,LI] is on average ~ 45 % larger than during Pleistocene full glacial conditions. In the Pliocene part of our analysis (2.6–5 Myr BP the CO2 data uncertainties prevent a well-supported calculation for S[CO2,LI], but our analysis suggests that during times without a large land ice area in the Northern Hemisphere (e.g. before 2.82 Myr BP, the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity, S[CO2,LI], was smaller than during interglacials of the Pleistocene. We thus find support for a previously proposed state change in the climate system with the widespread appearance of northern hemispheric ice sheets. This study points for the first time to a so far overlooked non-linearity in the land ice albedo radiative forcing, which is important for similar

  19. On the state dependency of the equilibrium climate sensitivity during the last 5 million years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, P.; de Boer, B.; von der Heydt, A. S.; Stap, L. B.; van de Wal, R. S. W.

    2015-12-01

    It is still an open question how equilibrium warming in response to increasing radiative forcing - the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S - depends on background climate. We here present palaeodata-based evidence on the state dependency of S, by using CO2 proxy data together with a 3-D ice-sheet-model-based reconstruction of land ice albedo over the last 5 million years (Myr). We find that the land ice albedo forcing depends non-linearly on the background climate, while any non-linearity of CO2 radiative forcing depends on the CO2 data set used. This non-linearity has not, so far, been accounted for in similar approaches due to previously more simplistic approximations, in which land ice albedo radiative forcing was a linear function of sea level change. The latitudinal dependency of ice-sheet area changes is important for the non-linearity between land ice albedo and sea level. In our set-up, in which the radiative forcing of CO2 and of the land ice albedo (LI) is combined, we find a state dependence in the calculated specific equilibrium climate sensitivity, S[CO2,LI], for most of the Pleistocene (last 2.1 Myr). During Pleistocene intermediate glaciated climates and interglacial periods, S[CO2,LI] is on average ~ 45 % larger than during Pleistocene full glacial conditions. In the Pliocene part of our analysis (2.6-5 Myr BP) the CO2 data uncertainties prevent a well-supported calculation for S[CO2,LI], but our analysis suggests that during times without a large land ice area in the Northern Hemisphere (e.g. before 2.82 Myr BP), the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity, S[CO2,LI], was smaller than during interglacials of the Pleistocene. We thus find support for a previously proposed state change in the climate system with the widespread appearance of northern hemispheric ice sheets. This study points for the first time to a so far overlooked non-linearity in the land ice albedo radiative forcing, which is important for similar palaeodata

  20. Partitioned Waveform Inversion, From Tens to Millions of Seismograms: A Journey of Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, S.; Schaeffer, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    In a landmark paper a quarter of a century ago, Nolet (1990) applied his newly developed method, Partitioned Waveform Inversion (PWI), to data from a new broadband array in Europe, the Network of Autonomously Recording Seismographs (NARS). The deployment of NARS was followed by deployments of numerous other arrays, resulting in an explosive growth in the amount of broadband data worldwide. The PWI method, in turn, has proven to be extremely effective in utilizing the growing data volumes. Over the last 20+ years, it has yielded a steady stream of discoveries on the Earth's structure and dynamics. PWI extracts information on Earth structure from both surface and body waves within full seismic waveforms, putting this information in the form of linear equations with uncorrelated uncertainties. Early on, PWI has been applied successfully at the continental scale for upper-mantle tomography, at the regional scale for Moho-depth mapping, and even at the local scale for imaging shallow marine sediments. Automated multimode inversion developed on the basis of PWI has taken the method to global applications, and today it has been applied to millions of seismograms (all broadband data available from international data centers). Waveform tomography stemming from the work of Nolet (1990) now reveals the global structure and anisotropy of the upper mantle in great detail. It provides regional resolution (at the scale of tectonic units) in many regions that are well-sampled by the data. Beneath Tibet, for example, complex subduction of the cold, high-velocity Indian lithosphere is imaged in detail in the upper mantle, while azimuthal anisotropy resolved within the crust shows the flow that accommodates the India-Asia lithospheric convergence. At greater depths, in the mantle transition zone, a belt of high-velocity anomalies reveals subducted lithospheric fragments along the entire Tethys convergence zone. Globally, waveform tomography enables us to examine the heterogeneity of

  1. Marco Polo, Nicknamed the Million, and His “Book on the Diversity of the World”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Garkavets

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To highlight the most urgent problems related to the person of Marco Polo and his works, written in collaboration with Rustichano (commonly known as Rustichello of Pisa. Research materials: the work of Marco Polo, with attention drawn to its general characteristics and scientific value. Materials are used which describe the history of the Polo family and the biography of Marco Polo the traveler. This work explores the routes of Polo’s travels, his career success in China and his documentary information about the country in the era of the Mongol Yuan Dynasty. We explore his language proficiency, in particular regard to the “Tatar” language in light of the source for the “Tatar” Lord Prayer in edition of Marco Polo in a German translation of Jerome Megizer; the return-route from China to Ilkhanate of the Hulaguides; the introduction of paper money in Mongol Iran at that time; Marco’s return to Venice and his acquaintance with the novelist, Rustichano of Pisa, while in Genoese captivity; versions of their joint writing on the East; Rustichano and scribes’ additions to the memoirs of Marco; the debated date of the will of Marco Polo and the mystery of two gold items listed in the inventory of his property, which are identified as two of Gaykhatu’s golden paizas; Marco Polo’s connections to the discovery of America by Christopher Columbus and Amerigo Vespucci; fake maps of China, Japan, Sakhalin, the Aleutian Islands, Chukotka, Alaska and much of the North American West, attributed to Marco Polo. Results and novelty of the research: We have confirmed the hypothesis about the origin of the generic nickname Million, received by Polos, and its connection to the estate of the Venetian family, Vilione / Milione. We have identified the source of the “Tatar” Lord Prayer in the German edition of Marco Polo. We have raised the question of the participation of Polo in the printing of paper money by Gaykhatu. We have proved the

  2. Rapid Refresh (RAP) [13 km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Rapid Refresh (RAP) numerical weather model took the place of the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) on May 1, 2012. Run by the National Centers for Environmental...

  3. Rapid Refresh (RAP) [20 km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Rapid Refresh (RAP) numerical weather model took the place of the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) on May 1, 2012. Run by the National Centers for Environmental...

  4. Rapid chemical separations

    CERN Document Server

    Trautmann, N

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given on the progress of fast chemical separation procedures during the last few years. Fast, discontinuous separation techniques are illustrated by a procedure for niobium. The use of such techniques for the chemical characterization of the heaviest known elements is described. Other rapid separation methods from aqueous solutions are summarized. The application of the high speed liquid chromatography to the separation of chemically similar elements is outlined. The use of the gas jet recoil transport method for nuclear reaction products and its combination with a continuous solvent extraction technique and with a thermochromatographic separation is presented. Different separation methods in the gas phase are briefly discussed and the attachment of a thermochromatographic technique to an on-line mass separator is shown. (45 refs).

  5. Increasing Enrollment by Better Serving Your Institution's Target Audiences through Benefit Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnow, Betsy

    The marketing technique of benefit segmentation may be effective in increasing enrollment in adult educational programs, according to a study at College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, Illinois. The study was conducted to test applicability of benefit segmentation to enrollment generation. The measuring instrument used in this study--the course improvement…

  6. The Implementation of Enrollment Management at Two Public Universities Experiencing Demographic and Funding Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the implementation of enrollment management at two public universities. The theoretical framework was conceptual and centered on the effectiveness of the implementation process as a pivotal factor in the development of a comprehensive enrollment management operation. This multi-site case study included 14…

  7. Gender and area of specialization vis-à-vis students' enrolments in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender and area of specialization vis-à-vis students' enrolments in undergraduate degree programmes by platform in Public Universities in Kenya. ... The analysis undertook majorly the quantitative pathway using percentages and Chi Square. The overall findings have shown a discrepancy in students' enrolment per ...

  8. 78 FR 6852 - Agency Information Collection (Student Verification of Enrollment) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Student Verification of Enrollment) Activity Under OMB Review....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Student Verification of Enrollment, VA Form 22-8979. OMB Control Number: 2900... of information abstracted below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and comment...

  9. Recruitment methods in a clinical trial of provoked vulvodynia: Predictors of enrollment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachour, Candi C; Bachmann, Gloria A; Foster, David C; Wan, Jim Y; Rawlinson, Leslie A; Brown, Candace S

    2017-02-01

    Successful recruitment in clinical trials for chronic pain conditions is challenging, especially in women with provoked vulvodynia due to reluctance in discussing pain associated with sexual intercourse. The most successful recruitment methods and the characteristics of women reached with these methods are unknown. To compare the effectiveness and efficiency of four recruitment methods and to determine socioeconomic predictors for successful enrollment in a National Institutes of Health-sponsored multicenter clinical trial evaluating a gabapentin intervention in women with provoked vulvodynia. Recruitment methods utilized mass mailing, media, clinician referrals and community outreach. Effectiveness (number of participants enrolled) and efficiency (proportion screened who enrolled) were determined. Socioeconomic variables including race, educational level, annual household income, relationship status, age, menopausal status and employment status were also evaluated regarding which recruitment strategies were best at targeting specific cohorts. Of 868 potential study participants, 219 were enrolled. The most effective recruitment method in enrolling participants was mass mailing ( p recruitment methods ( p = 0.11). Relative to clinician referral, black women were 13 times as likely to be enrolled through mass mailing (adjusted odds ratio 12.5, 95% confidence interval, 3.6-43.1) as white women. There were no differences in enrollment according to educational level, annual income, relationship status, age, menopausal status, or employment status and recruitment method. In this clinical trial, mass mailing was the most effective recruitment method. Race of participants enrolled in a provoked vulvodynia trial was related to the recruitment method.

  10. Decisions and Barriers to First-in-Family College Student Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonk, Garrett B.

    2013-01-01

    United States Government scrutiny of enrollment practices at for-profit colleges has caused significant decreases in profitability at career colleges. The phenomenological problem explored in this study was the declining enrollment at career colleges. Systems theory and Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory formed the conceptual framework for this…

  11. Evaluating the Effect of No Child Left Behind on U.S. Music Course Enrollments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elpus, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate nationwide enrollment in high school music courses from 1982 until 2009 to determine what trends in music enrollment existed and whether these trends were affected by the passage and implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). With data from 10 separate nationally representative high…

  12. Funding Higher Education in the 1980s: Responses to Enrollment Shift and Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, David S.; Joyner, L. Felix

    Funding and enrollment issues facing higher education are considered in two articles. In "Funding for Higher Education Enrollment Shifts in the 80s," David S. Spence outlines the decline in number of traditional college-age students; the trend to older, part-time, place-bound students; the increasing demands for remedial, continuing, and…

  13. The Assumed Benefits and Hidden Costs of Adult Learners' College Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Nyun; Baker, Rose M.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of adults' enrollment in and graduation from a two-year college on their hourly wages and occupational status in U.S. by employing a growth curve model and a piecewise model. College enrollment reduced hourly wages and occupational status by 13.8% and 2.74 points, respectively. Less-educated workers whose wages…

  14. Dual Credit Enrollment and GPA by Ethnicity and Gender at Texas 2-Year Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert D., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the extent to which differences were present in dual credit course enrollment. Specifically examined were whether differences were present in the first semester GPA and at the end of the first two semesters for students who enrolled in dual credit courses while in high school from…

  15. 25 CFR 111.2 - Enrolling non-full-blood children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enrolling non-full-blood children. 111.2 Section 111.2... CAPITA PAYMENTS § 111.2 Enrolling non-full-blood children. Where an Indian woman was married to a white... though she left it after marriage and lived away from the reservation, the children of such a marriage...

  16. Enrollment and Completions at Private Career Schools. A Factual Look at Private Career Institutions in Nebraska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebraska Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education, Lincoln.

    A survey of 53 private career institutions in Nebraska (56 percent located in the Omaha area) revealed the following statistics for the period July 1, 1990 to June 30, 1991: (1) 9,275 students were enrolled; (2) business programs enrolled the largest percentage (35 percent) of the total student population, with business, trade, and technical…

  17. An Evaluation of Enrollment Management Models of the 28 Florida Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoBasso, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which enrollment management models have been successfully implemented within the 28 Florida community colleges. The study also sought to determine when enrollment management structures began and whether expected benefits were achieved. Analysis of the data collected in this study indicated…

  18. 42 CFR 417.572 - Budget and enrollment forecast and interim reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Budget and enrollment forecast and interim reports... forecast and interim reports. (a) Annual submittal. The HMO or CMP must submit an annual operating budget and enrollment forecast, in the form and detail required by CMS, at least 90 days before the beginning...

  19. The Relationship of Institutional Tuition Discounts with Enrollment at Private, Not-for-Profit Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, Nathan E.

    2010-01-01

    Empirical studies exploring the impact of student aid on postsecondary enrollment often stop short of the specific examination of institutional tuition discounting. This research uses separate empirical ordinary least squares (OLS) regression models to examine three questions using public choice theory, positing that enrollment decisions may be…

  20. Congruence between National Policy for Science and Humanities Enrolment Ratio and Labour Market Demand in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabi, Goski; Alabi, Joshua; Mohammed, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    The paper undertook a snapshot of the demand for various academic programmes on the labour market and compared this with national policy norms for enrolment in public universities in Ghana. The objective was to ascertain whether national higher education enrolments are responsive to the national policy target of 60:40 (Sciences : Humanities) or…